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Sample records for bio stimulatory response

  1. Immune-Stimulatory Dinucleotide at the 5′-End of Oligodeoxynucleotides Is Critical for TLR9-Mediated Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) containing a CpG or certain synthetic dinucleotides, referred to as immune-stimulatory dinucleotides, induce Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9)-mediated immune responses. Chemical modifications such as 2′-O-methylribonucleotides incorporated adjacent to the immune-stimulatory dinucleotide on the 5′-side abrogate TLR9-mediated immune responses. In this study, we evaluated the effect of the location of immune-stimulatory dinucleotides in ODNs on TLR9-mediated immune responses. We designed and synthesized ODNs with two immune-stimulatory dinucleotides, one placed toward the 5′-end region and the other toward the 3′-end region, incorporated 2′-O-methylribonucleotides selectively preceding the 5′- or 3′-immune-stimulatory dinucleotide or both, and studied TLR9-mediated immune responses of these compounds in cell-based assays and in vivo in mice. These studies showed that an immune-stimulatory dinucleotide located closer to the 5′-end is critical for and dictates TLR9-mediated immune responses. These studies provide insights for the use of ODNs when employed as TLR9 agonists and antagonists or antisense agents. PMID:24900663

  2. Validation of an interferon stimulatory response element reporter gene assay for quantifying type I interferons.

    PubMed

    McCoski, S R; Xie, M; Hall, E B; Mercadante, P M; Spencer, T E; Lonergan, P; Ealy, A D

    2014-04-01

    The goal of this work was to develop a virus-free, cell-based interferon (IFN) bioassay and determine the utility of this assay on biological samples that contained IFN-τ, the trophoblast-secreted maternal recognition of pregnancy factor in ruminants. Madin-Darby bovine kidney cells were transduced with lentiviral particles that contained a firefly luciferase reporter construct driven by an IFN stimulatory response element (ISRE). Stably transduced cells were selected with the use of puromycin resistance. A linear, dose-responsive response was detected with human IFN-α and ovine IFN-τ. Interferon activity was detected in conditioned media from bovine trophoblast cells and uterine flushes collected from sheep and cattle. Activity also was detected in media collected after individual or small group culture of in vitro-produced bovine blastocysts at day 8 to 10 after fertilization. In summary, this IFN stimulatory response element-reporter assay may be used as an alternative to virus-dependent, cytopathic assays. It contains a similar sensitivity to IFNs and can be completed in a shorter time than cytopathic assays and does not require heightened biosafety conditions after cell transduction.

  3. Non-responsiveness of antigen-experienced CD4 T cells reflects more stringent co-stimulatory requirements.

    PubMed Central

    Hamel, M E; Noteboom, E; Kruisbeek, A M

    1998-01-01

    We recently reported that previously activated T cells, irrespective of the nature of the first stimulus they encountered, are unable to respond to Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), nor to soluble anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (mAb) presented by splenic antigen-presenting cells (APC). Such previously activated T cells are, however, fully capable of responding to plate-bound anti-CD3 plus splenic APC. These data suggest differential integration of the T-cell receptor (TCR) and co-stimulatory signalling pathways in naive versus antigen-experienced T cells. Consistent with this hypothesis, anti-CD28 mAb restores the proliferative capacity of resting ex vivo CD45RBlo CD4+ T cells (representing previously activated T cells) to both soluble anti-CD3 mAb and SEB. Interestingly, mAb-mediated engagement of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) completely negates the rescue effects mediated by anti-CD28 mAb in CD45RBlo cells. Nevertheless, the non-responsiveness of CD45RBlo CD4+ T cells cannot be reversed by anti-CTLA-4 Fab fragments, indicating that it is not related to negative regulatory effects of CTLA-4 engagement itself. Interestingly, the addition of interleukin-2 (IL-2) restores the proliferative capacity of CD45RBlo CD4+ T cells to SEB and soluble anti-CD3 mAb. Moreover, when rescued by IL-2, the cells are less susceptible to the negative regulatory effects of CTLA-4 engagement. Together, these findings suggest that the non-responsiveness of CD45RBlo CD4+ T cells to certain stimuli may be related to inadequate TCR signalling, primarily affecting IL-2 production. Images Figure 1 PMID:9640247

  4. Self-stimulatory behavior and perceptual reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Lovaas, I; Newsom, C; Hickman, C

    1987-01-01

    Self-stimulatory behavior is repetitive, stereotyped, functionally autonomous behavior seen in both normal and developmentally disabled populations, yet no satisfactory theory of its development and major characteristics has previously been offered. We present here a detailed hypothesis of the acquisition and maintenance of self-stimulatory behavior, proposing that the behaviors are operant responses whose reinforcers are automatically produced interoceptive and exteroceptive perceptual consequences. The concept of perceptual stimuli and reinforcers, the durability of self-stimulatory behaviors, the sensory extinction effect, the inverse relationship between self-stimulatory and other behaviors, the blocking effect of self-stimulatory behavior on new learning, and response substitution effects are discussed in terms of the hypothesis. Support for the hypothesis from the areas of sensory reinforcement and sensory deprivation is also reviewed. Limitations of major alternative theories are discussed, along with implications of the perceptual reinforcement hypothesis for the treatment of excessive self-stimulatory behavior and for theoretical conceptualizations of functionally related normal and pathological behaviors.

  5. Self-stimulatory behavior and perceptual reinforcement.

    PubMed Central

    Lovaas, I; Newsom, C; Hickman, C

    1987-01-01

    Self-stimulatory behavior is repetitive, stereotyped, functionally autonomous behavior seen in both normal and developmentally disabled populations, yet no satisfactory theory of its development and major characteristics has previously been offered. We present here a detailed hypothesis of the acquisition and maintenance of self-stimulatory behavior, proposing that the behaviors are operant responses whose reinforcers are automatically produced interoceptive and exteroceptive perceptual consequences. The concept of perceptual stimuli and reinforcers, the durability of self-stimulatory behaviors, the sensory extinction effect, the inverse relationship between self-stimulatory and other behaviors, the blocking effect of self-stimulatory behavior on new learning, and response substitution effects are discussed in terms of the hypothesis. Support for the hypothesis from the areas of sensory reinforcement and sensory deprivation is also reviewed. Limitations of major alternative theories are discussed, along with implications of the perceptual reinforcement hypothesis for the treatment of excessive self-stimulatory behavior and for theoretical conceptualizations of functionally related normal and pathological behaviors. PMID:3583964

  6. Comparative Analysis of Cellular Immune Responses in Treated Leishmania Patients and Hamsters against Recombinant Th1 Stimulatory Proteins of Leishmania donovani

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Sumit; Yadav, Narendra K.; Rawat, Keerti; Tripathi, Chandra Dev P.; Jaiswal, Anil K.; Khare, Prashant; Tandon, Rati; Baharia, Rajendra K.; Das, Sanchita; Gupta, Reema; Kushawaha, Pramod K.; Sundar, Shyam; Sahasrabuddhe, Amogh A.; Dube, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    Our prior studies demonstrated that cellular response of T helper 1 (Th1) type was generated by a soluble antigenic fraction (ranging from 89.9 to 97.1 kDa) of Leishmania donovani promastigote, in treated Leishmania patients as well as hamsters and showed significant prophylactic potential against experimental visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Eighteen Th1 stimulatory proteins were identified through proteomic analysis of this subfraction, out of which 15 were developed as recombinant proteins. In the present work, we have evaluated these 15 recombinant proteins simultaneously for their comparative cellular responses in treated Leishmania patients and hamsters. Six proteins viz. elongation factor-2, enolase, aldolase, triose phosphate isomerase, protein disulfide isomerase, and p45 emerged as most immunogenic as they produced a significant lymphoproliferative response, nitric oxide generation and Th1 cytokine response in PBMCs and lymphocytes of treated Leishmania patients and hamsters respectively. The results suggested that these proteins may be exploited for developing a successful poly-protein and/or poly-epitope vaccine against VL. PMID:27047452

  7. Self-Stimulatory Behavior and Perceptual Reinforcement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovaas, Ivar; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A detailed hypothesis of the acquisition and maintenance of self-stimulatory behavior is offered, proposing that such behaviors are operant responses whose reinforcers are automatically produced perceptual consequences. Related concepts are discussed, and support for the hypothesis from the areas of sensory reinforcement and sensory deprivation is…

  8. Bio-responsive polymer hydrogels homeostatically regulate blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Maitz, Manfred F; Freudenberg, Uwe; Tsurkan, Mikhail V; Fischer, Marion; Beyrich, Theresa; Werner, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Bio-responsive polymer architectures can empower medical therapies by engaging molecular feedback-response mechanisms resembling the homeostatic adaptation of living tissues to varying environmental constraints. Here we show that a blood coagulation-responsive hydrogel system can deliver heparin in amounts triggered by the environmental levels of thrombin, the key enzyme of the coagulation cascade, which--in turn--becomes inactivated due to released heparin. The bio-responsive hydrogel quantitatively quenches blood coagulation over several hours in the presence of pro-coagulant stimuli and during repeated incubation with fresh, non-anticoagulated blood. These features enable the introduced material to provide sustainable, autoregulated anticoagulation, addressing a key challenge of many medical therapies. Beyond that, the explored concept may facilitate the development of materials that allow the effective and controlled application of drugs and biomolecules.

  9. Th1 Stimulatory Proteins of Leishmania donovani: Comparative Cellular and Protective Responses of rTriose Phosphate Isomerase, rProtein Disulfide Isomerase and rElongation Factor-2 in Combination with rHSP70 against Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Anil Kumar; Khare, Prashant; Joshi, Sumit; Kushawaha, Pramod Kumar; Sundar, Shyam; Dube, Anuradha

    2014-01-01

    In visceral leishmaniasis, the recovery from the disease is always associated with the generation of Th1-type of cellular responses. Based on this, we have previously identified several Th1-stimulatory proteins of Leishmania donovani -triose phosphate isomerase (TPI), protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and elongation factor-2 (EL-2) etc. including heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) which induced Th1-type of cellular responses in both cured Leishmania patients/hamsters. Since, HSPs, being the logical targets for vaccines aimed at augmenting cellular immunity and can be early targets in the immune response against intracellular pathogens; they could be exploited as vaccine/adjuvant to induce long-term immunity more effectively. Therefore, in this study, we checked whether HSP70 can further enhance the immunogenicity and protective responses of the above said Th1-stimulatory proteins. Since, in most of the studies, immunogenicity of HSP70 of L. donovani was assessed in native condition, herein we generated recombinant HSP70 and tested its potential to stimulate immune responses in lymphocytes of cured Leishmania infected hamsters as well as in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of cured patients of VL either individually or in combination with above mentioned recombinant proteins. rLdHSP70 alone elicited strong cellular responses along with remarkable up-regulation of IFN-γ and IL-12 cytokines and extremely lower level of IL-4 and IL-10. Among the various combinations, rLdHSP70 + rLdPDI emerged as superior one augmenting improved cellular responses followed by rLdHSP70 + rLdEL-2. These combinations were further evaluated for its protective potential wherein rLdHSP70 + rLdPDI again conferred utmost protection (∼80%) followed by rLdHSP70 + rLdEL-2 (∼75%) and generated a strong cellular immune response with significant increase in the levels of iNOS transcript as well as IFN-γ and IL-12 cytokines which was further supported by the high level of IgG2 antibody

  10. Th1 stimulatory proteins of Leishmania donovani: comparative cellular and protective responses of rTriose phosphate isomerase, rProtein disulfide isomerase and rElongation factor-2 in combination with rHSP70 against visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Anil Kumar; Khare, Prashant; Joshi, Sumit; Kushawaha, Pramod Kumar; Sundar, Shyam; Dube, Anuradha

    2014-01-01

    In visceral leishmaniasis, the recovery from the disease is always associated with the generation of Th1-type of cellular responses. Based on this, we have previously identified several Th1-stimulatory proteins of Leishmania donovani -triose phosphate isomerase (TPI), protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and elongation factor-2 (EL-2) etc. including heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) which induced Th1-type of cellular responses in both cured Leishmania patients/hamsters. Since, HSPs, being the logical targets for vaccines aimed at augmenting cellular immunity and can be early targets in the immune response against intracellular pathogens; they could be exploited as vaccine/adjuvant to induce long-term immunity more effectively. Therefore, in this study, we checked whether HSP70 can further enhance the immunogenicity and protective responses of the above said Th1-stimulatory proteins. Since, in most of the studies, immunogenicity of HSP70 of L. donovani was assessed in native condition, herein we generated recombinant HSP70 and tested its potential to stimulate immune responses in lymphocytes of cured Leishmania infected hamsters as well as in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of cured patients of VL either individually or in combination with above mentioned recombinant proteins. rLdHSP70 alone elicited strong cellular responses along with remarkable up-regulation of IFN-γ and IL-12 cytokines and extremely lower level of IL-4 and IL-10. Among the various combinations, rLdHSP70 + rLdPDI emerged as superior one augmenting improved cellular responses followed by rLdHSP70 + rLdEL-2. These combinations were further evaluated for its protective potential wherein rLdHSP70 + rLdPDI again conferred utmost protection (∼80%) followed by rLdHSP70 + rLdEL-2 (∼75%) and generated a strong cellular immune response with significant increase in the levels of iNOS transcript as well as IFN-γ and IL-12 cytokines which was further supported by the high level of IgG2 antibody

  11. Bio-inspired Nanomaterials for Biosensing and Cell Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Molly

    2012-02-01

    This talk will provide an overview of our recent developments in bio-inspired nanomaterials for tissue regeneration and sensing. Bio-responsive nanomaterials are of growing importance with potential applications including drug delivery, diagnostics and tissue engineering [1]. DNA-, protein- or peptide-functionalised nanoparticle (NP) aggregates are particularly useful systems since triggered changes in their aggregation states may be readily monitored. Our recent simple conceptually novel approaches to real-time monitoring of protease, lipase and kinase enzyme action using modular peptide functionalized NPs will be presented [2,3,4]. The highly interdisciplinary field of Tissue Engineering (TE) can also benefit from advances in the design of bio-responsive nanomaterials. TE involves the development of artificial scaffold structures on which new cells are encouraged to grow. The ability to control topography and chemistry at the nanoscale offers exciting possibilities for stimulating growth of new tissue through the development of novel nanostructured scaffolds that mimic the nanostructure of the tissues in the body [1,5,6]. Recent developments in this context will be discussed as well as novel approaches to in vivo tissue regeneration of large volumes of highly vascularised and hierarchically organized tissue [7,8,9]. [4pt] [1] MM Stevens, J George. Science 310:1135-1138 (2005)[0pt] [2] A Laromaine, L Koh, M Murugesan, RV Ulijn, MM Stevens. Journal of the American Chemical Society 129:4156-4157 (2007)[0pt] [3] J Ghadiali, MM Stevens. Advanced Materials 20: 4359-4363 (2008); J Ghadiali et al, ACS Nano 4:4915-4919 (2010)[0pt] [4] D Aili, M Mager, D Roche, MM Stevens. Nano Letters 11:1401-1405 (2011) [0pt] [5] E Place, ND Evans, MM Stevens. Nature Materials 8:457-470 (2009)[0pt] [6] MD Mager, V LaPointe, MM Stevens. Nature Chemistry 3:582-589 (2011)[0pt] [7] MM Stevens et. al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 102:11450-11455 (2005)[0pt] [8] E Gentleman et al. Nature

  12. Flow cytometric analysis of the stimulatory response of T cell subsets from normal and HIV-1+ individuals to various mitogenic stimuli in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Medina, E; Borthwick, N; Johnson, M A; Miller, S; Bofill, M

    1994-01-01

    A novel technique is described which allows the study of the responses of T cell subpopulations stimulated in bulk cultures without interfering with cell-cell interactions. The number and phenotype of lymphoblasts developing following stimulation with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), anti-CD3, staphylococcal protein A (SPA) and pokeweed mitogen (PWM) was determined in HIV-1- and HIV-1+ patients using a new five-parameter flow cytometric method. We found that normal T cells responded faster to PHA than to any of the other mitogens tested. The peak of the PHA response occurred on day 3, followed by anti-CD3 and SPA on day 4 and PWM mitogen on day 5. Although PHA and anti-CD3 stimulated up to 95% and 80% of lymphocytes, respectively, SPA and PWM stimulated only 40% and 30% of cells, respectively. A defective T cell response was observed in lymphocytes cultured from asymptomatic HIV-1+ patients compared with negative controls. This loss of response was related to a selective mortality of T cells following mitogenic stimulation, referred to as activation-associated lymphocyte death (AALD). The results showed that stronger mitogens (PHA and anti-CD3) induced AALD in a larger proportion (50-60%) of T cells than weaker mitogens such as SPA and PWM (30-40%), and that AALD affected different lymphocyte subsets to different extents. AALD occurred more frequently in total CD8+ and CD45RO+ T cells compared with CD4+ and CD45RA+ T cells, but memory CD4+ T cells were the population most severely affected in samples from HIV-1+ donors. PMID:7914156

  13. A novel recombinant Leishmania donovani p45, a partial coding region of methionine aminopeptidase, generates protective immunity by inducing a Th1 stimulatory response against experimental visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Reema; Kushawaha, Pramod K; Tripathi, Chandra Dev Pati; Sundar, Shyam; Dube, Anuradha

    2012-05-01

    The development of a vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis (VL) conferring long-lasting immunity remains a challenge. Identification and proteomic characterization of parasite proteins led to the detection of p45, a member of the methionine aminopeptidase family. To our knowledge the present study is the first known report that describes the molecular and immunological characterization of p45. Recombinant Leishmania donovani p45 (rLdp45) induced cellular responses in cured hamsters and generated Th1-type cytokines from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of cured/endemic VL patients. Immunization with rLdp45 exerted considerable prophylactic efficacy (∼85%) supported by an increase in mRNA expression of iNOS, IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-12 and decrease in TGF-β and IL-4, indicating its potential as a vaccine candidate against VL.

  14. A Comprehensive Evaluation System for Military Hospitals' Response Capability to Bio-terrorism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Jiang, Nan; Shao, Sicong; Zheng, Tao; Sun, Jianzhong

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study is to establish a comprehensive evaluation system for military hospitals' response capacity to bio-terrorism. Literature research and Delphi method were utilized to establish the comprehensive evaluation system for military hospitals' response capacity to bio-terrorism. Questionnaires were designed and used to survey the status quo of 134 military hospitals' response capability to bio-terrorism. Survey indicated that factor analysis method was suitable to for analyzing the comprehensive evaluation system for military hospitals' response capacity to bio-terrorism. The constructed evaluation system was consisted of five first-class and 16 second-class indexes. Among them, medical response factor was considered as the most important factor with weight coefficient of 0.660, followed in turn by the emergency management factor with weight coefficient of 0.109, emergency management consciousness factor with weight coefficient of 0.093, hardware support factor with weight coefficient of 0.078, and improvement factor with weight coefficient of 0.059. The constructed comprehensive assessment model and system are scientific and practical.

  15. T Helper Cells Fate Mapping by Co-stimulatory Molecules and its Functions in Allograft Rejection and Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Abdoli, R; Najafian, N

    2014-01-01

    T cell differentiation is dictated by a combination of T cell receptor (TCR) interaction with an antigen-bound major histocompatibility complex (MHC), and co-stimulatory molecules signal. The co-stimulatory signal can be positive or negative, and amplifying or diminishing the initial signal. However, the secondary co-stimulatory signal is not obligatory and its necessity is dictated, in part, by the stage of T cell development. In the field of transplantation, directing the T cell differentiation process can lead to therapeutic possibilities that promote allograft tolerance, and hinder unfavorable alloimmune responses. Therefore, understanding the details of T cell differentiation process, including the influence of co-stimulatory signals, is of paramount importance. It is important to note there is functional overlap between co-stimulatory molecules. It has been observed that some co-stimulatory signals have different effects on different T cell subsets. Hence, blockade of a co-stimulatory signal pathway, as part of a therapeutic regimen in transplantation, may have far reaching effects beyond the initial therapeutic intent and inhibit co-stimulatory signals necessary for desirable regulatory responses. In this review, co-stimulatory molecules involved in the differentiation of naïve T cells into T helper 1 (Th1), T helper 2 (Th2), T helper 17 (Th17), inducible regulatory T cells (iTregs), and T helper 9 (Th9) cells and their overlap are discussed.

  16. T Helper Cells Fate Mapping by Co-stimulatory Molecules and its Functions in Allograft Rejection and Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Abdoli, R.; Najafian, N.

    2014-01-01

    T cell differentiation is dictated by a combination of T cell receptor (TCR) interaction with an antigen-bound major histocompatibility complex (MHC), and co-stimulatory molecules signal. The co-stimulatory signal can be positive or negative, and amplifying or diminishing the initial signal. However, the secondary co-stimulatory signal is not obligatory and its necessity is dictated, in part, by the stage of T cell development. In the field of transplantation, directing the T cell differentiation process can lead to therapeutic possibilities that promote allograft tolerance, and hinder unfavorable alloimmune responses. Therefore, understanding the details of T cell differentiation process, including the influence of co-stimulatory signals, is of paramount importance. It is important to note there is functional overlap between co-stimulatory molecules. It has been observed that some co-stimulatory signals have different effects on different T cell subsets. Hence, blockade of a co-stimulatory signal pathway, as part of a therapeutic regimen in transplantation, may have far reaching effects beyond the initial therapeutic intent and inhibit co-stimulatory signals necessary for desirable regulatory responses. In this review, co-stimulatory molecules involved in the differentiation of naïve T cells into T helper 1 (Th1), T helper 2 (Th2), T helper 17 (Th17), inducible regulatory T cells (iTregs), and T helper 9 (Th9) cells and their overlap are discussed. PMID:25184030

  17. Designing a bio-responsive robot from DNA origami.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ishay, Eldad; Abu-Horowitz, Almogit; Bachelet, Ido

    2013-01-01

    Nucleic acids are astonishingly versatile. In addition to their natural role as storage medium for biological information(1), they can be utilized in parallel computing(2,3) , recognize and bind molecular or cellular targets(4,5) , catalyze chemical reactions(6,7) , and generate calculated responses in a biological system(8,9). Importantly, nucleic acids can be programmed to self-assemble into 2D and 3D structures(10-12), enabling the integration of all these remarkable features in a single robot linking the sensing of biological cues to a preset response in order to exert a desired effect. Creating shapes from nucleic acids was first proposed by Seeman(13), and several variations on this theme have since been realized using various techniques(11,12,14,15) . However, the most significant is perhaps the one proposed by Rothemund, termed scaffolded DNA origami(16). In this technique, the folding of a long (>7,000 bases) single-stranded DNA 'scaffold' is directed to a desired shape by hundreds of short complementary strands termed 'staples'. Folding is carried out by temperature annealing ramp. This technique was successfully demonstrated in the creation of a diverse array of 2D shapes with remarkable precision and robustness. DNA origami was later extended to 3D as well(17,18) . The current paper will focus on the caDNAno 2.0 software(19) developed by Douglas and colleagues. caDNAno is a robust, user-friendly CAD tool enabling the design of 2D and 3D DNA origami shapes with versatile features. The design process relies on a systematic and accurate abstraction scheme for DNA structures, making it relatively straightforward and efficient. In this paper we demonstrate the design of a DNA origami nanorobot that has been recently described(20). This robot is 'robotic' in the sense that it links sensing to actuation, in order to perform a task. We explain how various sensing schemes can be integrated into the structure, and how this can be relayed to a desired effect

  18. Designing a Bio-responsive Robot from DNA Origami

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Ishay, Eldad; Abu-Horowitz, Almogit; Bachelet, Ido

    2013-01-01

    Nucleic acids are astonishingly versatile. In addition to their natural role as storage medium for biological information1, they can be utilized in parallel computing2,3 , recognize and bind molecular or cellular targets4,5 , catalyze chemical reactions6,7 , and generate calculated responses in a biological system8,9. Importantly, nucleic acids can be programmed to self-assemble into 2D and 3D structures10-12, enabling the integration of all these remarkable features in a single robot linking the sensing of biological cues to a preset response in order to exert a desired effect. Creating shapes from nucleic acids was first proposed by Seeman13, and several variations on this theme have since been realized using various techniques11,12,14,15 . However, the most significant is perhaps the one proposed by Rothemund, termed scaffolded DNA origami16. In this technique, the folding of a long (>7,000 bases) single-stranded DNA 'scaffold' is directed to a desired shape by hundreds of short complementary strands termed 'staples'. Folding is carried out by temperature annealing ramp. This technique was successfully demonstrated in the creation of a diverse array of 2D shapes with remarkable precision and robustness. DNA origami was later extended to 3D as well17,18 . The current paper will focus on the caDNAno 2.0 software19 developed by Douglas and colleagues. caDNAno is a robust, user-friendly CAD tool enabling the design of 2D and 3D DNA origami shapes with versatile features. The design process relies on a systematic and accurate abstraction scheme for DNA structures, making it relatively straightforward and efficient. In this paper we demonstrate the design of a DNA origami nanorobot that has been recently described20. This robot is 'robotic' in the sense that it links sensing to actuation, in order to perform a task. We explain how various sensing schemes can be integrated into the structure, and how this can be relayed to a desired effect. Finally we use Cando21 to

  19. Co-stimulatory and Co-inhibitory Pathways in Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qianxia; Vignali, Dario A A

    2016-05-17

    The immune system is guided by a series of checks and balances, a major component of which is a large array of co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory pathways that modulate the host response. Although co-stimulation is essential for boosting and shaping the initial response following signaling through the antigen receptor, inhibitory pathways are also critical for modulating the immune response. Excessive co-stimulation and/or insufficient co-inhibition can lead to a breakdown of self-tolerance and thus to autoimmunity. In this review, we will focus on the role of co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory pathways in two systemic (systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis) and two organ-specific (multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes) emblematic autoimmune diseases. We will also discuss how mechanistic analysis of these pathways has led to the identification of potential therapeutic targets and initiation of clinical trials for autoimmune diseases, as well as outline some of the challenges that lie ahead. PMID:27192568

  20. Governing at a distance: social marketing and the (bio) politics of responsibility.

    PubMed

    Crawshaw, Paul

    2012-07-01

    In the recently published lectures from the College de France series, The Birth of Bio-Politics, Foucault (2009) offers his most explicit analysis of neo-liberal governmentality and its impact upon states and societies in the late twentieth century. Framed in terms of the bio-political as a mode of governance of populations and its relationship to neo-liberalism, these lectures offer a rich seam of theoretical resources with which to interrogate contemporary forms of governmentality. This paper seeks to apply these and some recent critical analysis by Foucauldian scholars, to the study of health governance, with particular reference to the use of social marketing as a strategy to improve the health of populations 'at a distance'. Reflecting a broader decollectivisation of welfare, such strategies are identified as exemplars of neo-liberal methods of governance through inculcating self management and individualisation of responsibility for health and wellbeing. Drawing on original empirical data collected with a sample of fifty long term unemployed men in 2009, this paper critically examines social marketing as a newer feature of health governance and reflects upon participants' responses to it as a strategy in the context of their wider understandings of health, choice and responsibility.

  1. Governing at a distance: social marketing and the (bio) politics of responsibility.

    PubMed

    Crawshaw, Paul

    2012-07-01

    In the recently published lectures from the College de France series, The Birth of Bio-Politics, Foucault (2009) offers his most explicit analysis of neo-liberal governmentality and its impact upon states and societies in the late twentieth century. Framed in terms of the bio-political as a mode of governance of populations and its relationship to neo-liberalism, these lectures offer a rich seam of theoretical resources with which to interrogate contemporary forms of governmentality. This paper seeks to apply these and some recent critical analysis by Foucauldian scholars, to the study of health governance, with particular reference to the use of social marketing as a strategy to improve the health of populations 'at a distance'. Reflecting a broader decollectivisation of welfare, such strategies are identified as exemplars of neo-liberal methods of governance through inculcating self management and individualisation of responsibility for health and wellbeing. Drawing on original empirical data collected with a sample of fifty long term unemployed men in 2009, this paper critically examines social marketing as a newer feature of health governance and reflects upon participants' responses to it as a strategy in the context of their wider understandings of health, choice and responsibility. PMID:22541800

  2. A Quick-responsive DNA Nanotechnology Device for Bio-molecular Homeostasis Regulation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Songlin; Wang, Pei; Xiao, Chen; Li, Zheng; Yang, Bing; Fu, Jieyang; Chen, Jing; Wan, Neng; Ma, Cong; Li, Maoteng; Yang, Xiangliang; Zhan, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Physiological processes such as metabolism, cell apoptosis and immune responses, must be strictly regulated to maintain their homeostasis and achieve their normal physiological functions. The speed with which bio-molecular homeostatic regulation occurs directly determines the ability of an organism to adapt to conditional changes. To produce a quick-responsive regulatory system that can be easily utilized for various types of homeostasis, a device called nano-fingers that facilitates the regulation of physiological processes was constructed using DNA origami nanotechnology. This nano-fingers device functioned in linked open and closed phases using two types of DNA tweezers, which were covalently coupled with aptamers that captured specific molecules when the tweezer arms were sufficiently close. Via this specific interaction mechanism, certain physiological processes could be simultaneously regulated from two directions by capturing one biofactor and releasing the other to enhance the regulatory capacity of the device. To validate the universal application of this device, regulation of the homeostasis of the blood coagulant thrombin was attempted using the nano-fingers device. It was successfully demonstrated that this nano-fingers device achieved coagulation buffering upon the input of fuel DNA. This nano-device could also be utilized to regulate the homeostasis of other types of bio-molecules. PMID:27506964

  3. A Quick-responsive DNA Nanotechnology Device for Bio-molecular Homeostasis Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Songlin; Wang, Pei; Xiao, Chen; Li, Zheng; Yang, Bing; Fu, Jieyang; Chen, Jing; Wan, Neng; Ma, Cong; Li, Maoteng; Yang, Xiangliang; Zhan, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Physiological processes such as metabolism, cell apoptosis and immune responses, must be strictly regulated to maintain their homeostasis and achieve their normal physiological functions. The speed with which bio-molecular homeostatic regulation occurs directly determines the ability of an organism to adapt to conditional changes. To produce a quick-responsive regulatory system that can be easily utilized for various types of homeostasis, a device called nano-fingers that facilitates the regulation of physiological processes was constructed using DNA origami nanotechnology. This nano-fingers device functioned in linked open and closed phases using two types of DNA tweezers, which were covalently coupled with aptamers that captured specific molecules when the tweezer arms were sufficiently close. Via this specific interaction mechanism, certain physiological processes could be simultaneously regulated from two directions by capturing one biofactor and releasing the other to enhance the regulatory capacity of the device. To validate the universal application of this device, regulation of the homeostasis of the blood coagulant thrombin was attempted using the nano-fingers device. It was successfully demonstrated that this nano-fingers device achieved coagulation buffering upon the input of fuel DNA. This nano-device could also be utilized to regulate the homeostasis of other types of bio-molecules. PMID:27506964

  4. Targeting the finite-deformation response of wavy biological tissues with bio-inspired material architectures.

    PubMed

    Tu, Wenqiong; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy

    2013-12-01

    The Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm driven by a homogenized-based model is employed to target the response of three types of heart-valve chordae tendineae with different stiffening characteristics due to different degrees of waviness of collagen fibril/fiber bundles. First, geometric and material parameters are identified through an extensive parametric study that produce excellent agreement of the simulated response based on simplified unit cell architectures with the actual response of the complex biological tissue. These include amplitude and wavelength of the crimped chordae microstructure, elastic moduli of the constituent phases, and degree of microstructural refinement of the stiff phase at fixed volume fraction whose role in the stiffening response is elucidated. The study also reveals potential non-uniqueness of bio-inspired wavy microstructures in attaining the targeted response of certain chordae tendineae crimp configurations. The homogenization-based Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm, whose predictions are validated through the parametric study, is then shown to be an excellent tool in identifying optimal unit cell architectures in the design space that exhibits very steep gradients. Finally, defect criticality of optimal unit cell architectures is investigated in order to assess their feasibility in replacing actual biological tendons with stiffening characteristics. PMID:24018396

  5. Forensic DNA Barcoding and Bio-Response Studies of Animal Horn Products Used in Traditional Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yu M.; Peng, Cheng; Dong, Xiao P.; Chen, Shi L.; Sun, Li G.; Xiao, Xiao H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Animal horns (AHs) have been applied to traditional medicine for more than thousands of years, of which clinical effects have been confirmed by the history. But now parts of AHs have been listed in the items of wildlife conservation, which limits the use for traditional medicine. The contradiction between the development of traditional medicine and the protection of wild resources has already become the common concern of zoophilists, traditional medical professionals, economists, sociologists. We believe that to strengthen the identification for threatened animals, to prevent the circulation of them, and to seek fertile animals of corresponding bioactivities as substitutes are effective strategies to solve this problem. Methodology/Principal Findings A powerful technique of DNA barcoding based on the mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) was used to identify threatened animals of Bovidae and Cervidae, as well as their illegal adulterants (including 10 species and 47 specimens). Meanwhile, the microcalorimetric technique was used to characterize the differences of bio-responses when those animal specimens acted on model organism (Escherichia coli). We found that the COI gene could be used as a universal primer to identify threatened animals and illegal adulterants mentioned above. By analyzing 223 mitochondrial COI sequences, a 100% identification success rate was achieved. We further found that the horns of Mongolian Gazelle and Red Deer could be exploited as a substitute for some functions of endangered Saiga Antelope and Sika Deer in traditional medicine, respectively. Conclusion/Significance Although it needs a more comprehensive evaluation of bioequivalence in order to completely solve the problem of substitutes for threatened animals, we believe that the identification (DNA barcoding) of threatened animals combined with seeking substitutions (bio-response) can yet be regarded as a valid strategy for establishing a balance between the

  6. Reverse engineering biological networks :applications in immune responses to bio-toxins.

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, Anthony A.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Davidson, George S.; Haaland, David Michael; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Thomas, Edward Victor; Slepoy, Alexander; Zhang, Zhaoduo; May, Elebeoba Eni; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel

    2005-12-01

    Our aim is to determine the network of events, or the regulatory network, that defines an immune response to a bio-toxin. As a model system, we are studying T cell regulatory network triggered through tyrosine kinase receptor activation using a combination of pathway stimulation and time-series microarray experiments. Our approach is composed of five steps (1) microarray experiments and data error analysis, (2) data clustering, (3) data smoothing and discretization, (4) network reverse engineering, and (5) network dynamics analysis and fingerprint identification. The technological outcome of this study is a suite of experimental protocols and computational tools that reverse engineer regulatory networks provided gene expression data. The practical biological outcome of this work is an immune response fingerprint in terms of gene expression levels. Inferring regulatory networks from microarray data is a new field of investigation that is no more than five years old. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first attempt that integrates experiments, error analyses, data clustering, inference, and network analysis to solve a practical problem. Our systematic approach of counting, enumeration, and sampling networks matching experimental data is new to the field of network reverse engineering. The resulting mathematical analyses and computational tools lead to new results on their own and should be useful to others who analyze and infer networks.

  7. Response of Surface Soil Hydrology to the Micro-Pattern of Bio-Crust in a Dry-Land Loess Environment, China.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Yu, Yun; Chen, Liding

    2015-01-01

    The specific bio-species and their spatial patterns play crucial roles in regulating eco-hydrologic process, which is significant for large-scale habitat promotion and vegetation restoration in many dry-land ecosystems. Such effects, however, are not yet fully studied. In this study, 12 micro-plots, each with size of 0.5 m in depth and 1 m in length, were constructed on a gentle grassy hill-slope with a mean gradient of 8° in a semiarid loess hilly area of China. Two major bio-crusts, including mosses and lichens, had been cultivated for two years prior to the field simulation experiments, while physical crusts and non-crusted bare soils were used for comparison. By using rainfall simulation method, four designed micro-patterns (i.e., upper bio-crust and lower bare soil, scattered bio-crust, upper bare soil and lower bio-crust, fully-covered bio-crust) to the soil hydrological response were analyzed. We found that soil surface bio-crusts were more efficient in improving soil structure, water holding capacity and runoff retention particularly at surface 10 cm layers, compared with physical soil crusts and non-crusted bare soils. We re-confirmed that mosses functioned better than lichens, partly due to their higher successional stage and deeper biomass accumulation. Physical crusts were least efficient in water conservation and erosion control, followed by non-crusted bare soils. More importantly, there were marked differences in the efficiency of the different spatial arrangements of bio-crusts in controlling runoff and sediment generation. Fully-covered bio-crust pattern provides the best option for soil loss reduction and runoff retention, while a combination of upper bio-crust and lower bare soil pattern is the least one. These findings are suggested to be significant for surface-cover protection, rainwater infiltration, runoff retention, and erosion control in water-restricted and degraded natural slopes.

  8. Marked enhancement of the immune response to BioThrax® (Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed) by the TLR9 agonist CPG 7909 in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Rynkiewicz, Dianna; Rathkopf, Melinda; Sim, Iain; Waytes, A Thomas; Hopkins, Robert J; Giri, Lallan; DeMuria, Deborah; Ransom, Janet; Quinn, James; Nabors, Gary S; Nielsen, Carl J

    2011-08-26

    Immunization with BioThrax(®) (Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed) is a safe and effective means of preventing anthrax. Animal studies have demonstrated that the addition of CpG DNA adjuvants to BioThrax can markedly increase the immunogenicity of the vaccine, increasing both serum anti-protective antigen (PA) antibody and anthrax toxin-neutralizing antibody (TNA) concentrations. The immune response to CpG-adjuvanted BioThrax in animals was not only stronger, but was also more rapid and led to higher levels of protection in spore challenge models. The B-class CpG DNA adjuvant CPG 7909, a 24-base synthetic, single-strand oligodeoxynucleotide, was evaluated for its safety profile and adjuvant properties in a Phase 1 clinical trial. A double-blind study was performed in which 69 healthy subjects, age 18-45 years, were randomized to receive three doses of either: (1) BioThrax alone, (2) 1 mg of CPG 7909 alone or (3) BioThrax plus 1 mg of CPG 7909, all given intramuscularly on study days 0, 14 and 28. Subjects were monitored for IgG to PA by ELISA and for TNA titers through study day 56 and for safety through month 6. CPG 7909 increased the antibody response by 6-8-fold at peak, and accelerated the response by 3 weeks compared to the response seen in subjects vaccinated with BioThrax alone. No serious adverse events related to study agents were reported, and the combination was considered to be reasonably well tolerated. The marked acceleration and enhancement of the immune response seen by combining BioThrax and CPG 7909 offers the potential to shorten the course of immunization and reduce the time to protection, and may be particularly useful in the setting of post-exposure prophylaxis. PMID:21624418

  9. Metaproteogenomic insights beyond bacterial response to naphthalene exposure and bio-stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Guazzaroni, María-Eugenia; Herbst, Florian-Alexander; Lores, Iván; Tamames, Javier; Peláez, Ana Isabel; López-Cortés, Nieves; Alcaide, María; Del Pozo, Mercedes V; Vieites, José María; von Bergen, Martin; Gallego, José Luis R; Bargiela, Rafael; López-López, Arantxa; Pieper, Dietmar H; Rosselló-Móra, Ramón; Sánchez, Jesús; Seifert, Jana; Ferrer, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Microbial metabolism in aromatic-contaminated environments has important ecological implications, and obtaining a complete understanding of this process remains a relevant goal. To understand the roles of biodiversity and aromatic-mediated genetic and metabolic rearrangements, we conducted ‘OMIC' investigations in an anthropogenically influenced and polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soil with (Nbs) or without (N) bio-stimulation with calcium ammonia nitrate, NH4NO3 and KH2PO4 and the commercial surfactant Iveysol, plus two naphthalene-enriched communities derived from both soils (CN2 and CN1, respectively). Using a metagenomic approach, a total of 52, 53, 14 and 12 distinct species (according to operational phylogenetic units (OPU) in our work equivalent to taxonomic species) were identified in the N, Nbs, CN1 and CN2 communities, respectively. Approximately 10 out of 95 distinct species and 238 out of 3293 clusters of orthologous groups (COGs) protein families identified were clearly stimulated under the assayed conditions, whereas only two species and 1465 COGs conformed to the common set in all of the mesocosms. Results indicated distinct biodegradation capabilities for the utilisation of potential growth-supporting aromatics, which results in bio-stimulated communities being extremely fit to naphthalene utilisation and non-stimulated communities exhibiting a greater metabolic window than previously predicted. On the basis of comparing protein expression profiles and metagenome data sets, inter-alia interactions among members were hypothesised. The utilisation of curated databases is discussed and used for first time to reconstruct ‘presumptive' degradation networks for complex microbial communities. PMID:22832345

  10. Response of Surface Soil Hydrology to the Micro-Pattern of Bio-Crust in a Dry-Land Loess Environment, China

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Yu, Yun; Chen, Liding

    2015-01-01

    The specific bio-species and their spatial patterns play crucial roles in regulating eco-hydrologic process, which is significant for large-scale habitat promotion and vegetation restoration in many dry-land ecosystems. Such effects, however, are not yet fully studied. In this study, 12 micro-plots, each with size of 0.5 m in depth and 1 m in length, were constructed on a gentle grassy hill-slope with a mean gradient of 8° in a semiarid loess hilly area of China. Two major bio-crusts, including mosses and lichens, had been cultivated for two years prior to the field simulation experiments, while physical crusts and non-crusted bare soils were used for comparison. By using rainfall simulation method, four designed micro-patterns (i.e., upper bio-crust and lower bare soil, scattered bio-crust, upper bare soil and lower bio-crust, fully-covered bio-crust) to the soil hydrological response were analyzed. We found that soil surface bio-crusts were more efficient in improving soil structure, water holding capacity and runoff retention particularly at surface 10 cm layers, compared with physical soil crusts and non-crusted bare soils. We re-confirmed that mosses functioned better than lichens, partly due to their higher successional stage and deeper biomass accumulation. Physical crusts were least efficient in water conservation and erosion control, followed by non-crusted bare soils. More importantly, there were marked differences in the efficiency of the different spatial arrangements of bio-crusts in controlling runoff and sediment generation. Fully-covered bio-crust pattern provides the best option for soil loss reduction and runoff retention, while a combination of upper bio-crust and lower bare soil pattern is the least one. These findings are suggested to be significant for surface-cover protection, rainwater infiltration, runoff retention, and erosion control in water-restricted and degraded natural slopes. PMID:26207757

  11. Bio-inspired vapor-responsive colloidal photonic crystal patterns by inkjet printing.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ling; Xie, Zhuoying; Wang, Wei; Yuan, Chunwei; Zhao, Yuanjin; Mu, Zhongde; Zhong, Qifeng; Gu, Zhongze

    2014-11-25

    Facile, fast, and cost-effective technology for patterning of responsive colloidal photonic crystals (CPCs) is of great importance for their practical applications. In this report, we develop a kind of responsive CPC patterns with multicolor shifting properties by inkjet printing mesoporous colloidal nanoparticle ink on both rigid and soft substrates. By adjusting the size and mesopores' proportion of nanoparticles, we can precisely control the original color and vapor-responsive color shift extent of mesoporous CPC. As a consequence, multicolor mesoporous CPCs patterns with complex vapor responsive color shifts or vapor-revealed implicit images are subsequently achieved. The complicated and reversible multicolor shifts of mesoporous CPC patterns are favorable for immediate recognition by naked eyes but hard to copy. This approach is favorable for integration of responsive CPCs with controllable responsive optical properties. Therefore, it is of great promise for developing advanced responsive CPC devices such as anticounterfeiting devices, multifunctional microchips, sensor arrays, or dynamic displays.

  12. Bio-inspired vapor-responsive colloidal photonic crystal patterns by inkjet printing.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ling; Xie, Zhuoying; Wang, Wei; Yuan, Chunwei; Zhao, Yuanjin; Mu, Zhongde; Zhong, Qifeng; Gu, Zhongze

    2014-11-25

    Facile, fast, and cost-effective technology for patterning of responsive colloidal photonic crystals (CPCs) is of great importance for their practical applications. In this report, we develop a kind of responsive CPC patterns with multicolor shifting properties by inkjet printing mesoporous colloidal nanoparticle ink on both rigid and soft substrates. By adjusting the size and mesopores' proportion of nanoparticles, we can precisely control the original color and vapor-responsive color shift extent of mesoporous CPC. As a consequence, multicolor mesoporous CPCs patterns with complex vapor responsive color shifts or vapor-revealed implicit images are subsequently achieved. The complicated and reversible multicolor shifts of mesoporous CPC patterns are favorable for immediate recognition by naked eyes but hard to copy. This approach is favorable for integration of responsive CPCs with controllable responsive optical properties. Therefore, it is of great promise for developing advanced responsive CPC devices such as anticounterfeiting devices, multifunctional microchips, sensor arrays, or dynamic displays. PMID:25300045

  13. Reliability and Validity of the Zephyr[TM] BioHarness[TM] to Measure Respiratory Responses to Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hailstone, Jono; Kilding, Andrew E.

    2011-01-01

    The Zephyr[TM] BioHarness[TM] (Zephyr Technology, Auckland, New Zealand) is a wireless physiological monitoring system that has the ability to measure respiratory rate unobtrusively. However, the ability of the BioHarness[TM] to accurately and reproducibly determine respiratory rate across a range of intensities is currently unknown. The aim of…

  14. Bio-inspired fabrication of stimuli-responsive photonic crystals with hierarchical structures and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tao; Peng, Wenhong; Zhu, Shenmin; Zhang, Di

    2016-03-01

    When the constitutive materials of photonic crystals (PCs) are stimuli-responsive, the resultant PCs exhibit optical properties that can be tuned by the stimuli. This can be exploited for promising applications in colour displays, biological and chemical sensors, inks and paints, and many optically active components. However, the preparation of the required photonic structures is the first issue to be solved. In the past two decades, approaches such as microfabrication and self-assembly have been developed to incorporate stimuli-responsive materials into existing periodic structures for the fabrication of PCs, either as the initial building blocks or as the surrounding matrix. Generally, the materials that respond to thermal, pH, chemical, optical, electrical, or magnetic stimuli are either soft or aggregate, which is why the manufacture of three-dimensional hierarchical photonic structures with responsive properties is a great challenge. Recently, inspired by biological PCs in nature which exhibit both flexible and responsive properties, researchers have developed various methods to synthesize metals and metal oxides with hierarchical structures by using a biological PC as the template. This review will focus on the recent developments in this field. In particular, PCs with biological hierarchical structures that can be tuned by external stimuli have recently been successfully fabricated. These findings offer innovative insights into the design of responsive PCs and should be of great importance for future applications of these materials.

  15. Co-stimulatory molecules as targets for treatment of lupus.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Joan T

    2013-09-01

    Co-stimulatory molecules help to regulate interactions between T cells and antigen-presenting cells and may play an important role in the pathogenesis of lupus. Both work in murine models and some early studies in human lupus support further examination of these molecules as therapeutic targets. Complexities of lupus clinical trial variables may have hampered progress in this area but recent developments in the field may make interventional trials more feasible in the near future. To date biologics which provide direct blockade of interactions between CD40 and CD154, B7RP-1 and ICOS, and CD80 or CD86 with CD28 have been assessed in multicenter clinical trials. These data will be reviewed and critiqued.

  16. Growth-stimulatory effect of resveratrol in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Masayuki; Yamabe, Noriko; Kang, Ki Sung; Zhu, Bao Ting

    2010-08-01

    Earlier studies have shown that resveratrol could induce death in several human cancer cell lines in culture. Here we report our observation that resveratrol can also promote the growth of certain human cancer cells when they are grown either in culture or in athymic nude mice as xenografts. At relatively low concentrations (stimulatory effect in the MDA-MB-435s human cancer cells, but this effect was not observed in several other human cell lines tested. Analysis of cell signaling molecules showed that resveratrol induced the activation of JNK, p38, Akt, and NF-kappaB signaling pathways in these cells. Further analysis using pharmacological inhibitors showed that only the NF-kappaB inhibitor (BAY11-7082) abrogated the growth-stimulatory effect of resveratrol in cultured cells. In athymic nude mice, resveratrol at 16.5 mg/kg body weight enhanced the growth of MDA-MB-435s xenografts compared to the control group, while resveratrol at the 33 mg/kg body weight dose did not have a similar effect. Additional analyses confirmed that resveratrol stimulated cancer cell growth in vivo through activation of the NF-kappaB signaling pathway. Taken together, these observations suggest that resveratrol at low concentrations could stimulate the growth of certain types of human cancer cells in vivo. This cell type-specific mitogenic effect of resveratrol may also partly contribute to the procarcinogenic effect of alcohol consumption (rich in resveratrol) in the development of certain human cancers.

  17. Bio-Inspired Synthetic Nanovesicles for Glucose-Responsive Release of Insulin

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A new glucose-responsive formulation for self-regulated insulin delivery was constructed by packing insulin, glucose-specific enzymes into pH-sensitive polymersome-based nanovesicles assembled by a diblock copolymer. Glucose can passively transport across the bilayer membrane of the nanovesicle and be oxidized into gluconic acid by glucose oxidase, thereby causing a decrease in local pH. The acidic microenvironment causes the hydrolysis of the pH sensitive nanovesicle that in turn triggers the release of insulin in a glucose responsive fashion. In vitro studies validated that the release of insulin from nanovesicle was effectively correlated with the external glucose concentration. In vivo experiments, in which diabetic mice were subcutaneously administered with the nanovesicles, demonstrate that a single injection of the developed nanovesicle facilitated stabilization of the blood glucose levels in the normoglycemic state (<200 mg/dL) for up to 5 days. PMID:25268758

  18. History of river regulation of the Noce River (NE Italy) and related bio-morphodynamic responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serlet, Alyssa; Scorpio, Vittoria; Mastronunzio, Marco; Proto, Matteo; Zen, Simone; Zolezzi, Guido; Bertoldi, Walter; Comiti, Francesco; Prà, Elena Dai; Surian, Nicola; Gurnell, Angela

    2016-04-01

    The Noce River is a hydropower-regulated Alpine stream in Northern-East Italy and a major tributary of the Adige River, the second longest Italian river. The objective of the research is to investigate the response of the lower course of the Noce to two main stages of hydromorphological regulation; channelization/ diversion and, one century later, hydropower regulation. This research uses a historical reconstruction to link the geomorphic response with natural and human-induced factors by identifying morphological and vegetation features from historical maps and airborne photogrammetry and implementing a quantitative analysis of the river response to channelization and flow / sediment supply regulation related to hydropower development. A descriptive overview is presented. The concept of evolutionary trajectory is integrated with predictions from morphodynamic theories for river bars that allow increased insight to investigate the river response to a complex sequence of regulatory events such as development of bars, islands and riparian vegetation. Until the mid-19th century the river had a multi-thread channel pattern. Thereafter (1852) the river was straightened and diverted. Upstream of Mezzolombardo village the river was constrained between embankments of approximately 100 m width while downstream they are of approximately 50 m width. Since channelization some interesting geomorphic changes have appeared in the river e.g. the appearance of alternate bars in the channel. In 1926 there was a breach in the right bank of the downstream part that resulted in a multi-thread river reach which can be viewed as a recovery to the earlier multi-thread pattern. After the 1950's the flow and sediment supply became strongly regulated by hydropower development. The analysis of aerial images reveals that the multi-thread reach became progressively stabilized by vegetation development over the bars, though signs of some dynamics can still be recognizable today, despite the

  19. A method for bio-electrical impedance analysis based on a step-voltage response.

    PubMed

    Neves, C E; Souza, M N

    2000-08-01

    Bioimpedance analysis (BIA) has been researched broadly, since it is simple, it presents good results and the analysers are portable, allowing it to be used in field studies. This paper presents a new technique of BIA based on a step-voltage current response and bipolar electrode array. A prototype of this new kind of analyser was developed and constructed to test the technique. Bench tests were performed to calibrate the prototype and the obtained results were comparable to those of commercial analysers. Body composition tests were conducted on 67 subjects of both sexes. Besides the bioimpedance analysis, anthropometric measures, consisting of weight, height, circumference and skinfold thickness, were also obtained from the subjects to allow an estimation of the body composition from anthropometric equations established in the literature. The results point to a good correlation (Pearson coefficient, r = 0.9645) between the anthropometric estimated fat-free mass (FFM) and its analogue estimated by the new bioimpedance technique. PMID:10984207

  20. Nonintrusive 3D reconstruction of human bone models to simulate their bio-mechanical response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Tsouknidas; Antonis, Lontos; Savvas, Savvakis; Nikolaos, Michailidis

    2012-06-01

    3D finite element models representing functional parts of the human skeletal system, have been repeatedly introduced over the last years, to simulate biomechanical response of anatomical characteristics or investigate surgical treatment. The reconstruction of geometrically accurate FEM models, poses a significant challenge for engineers and physicians, as recent advances in tissue engineering dictate highly customized implants, while facilitating the production of alloplast materials that are employed to restore, replace or supplement the function of human tissue. The premises of every accurate reconstruction method, is to encapture the precise geometrical characteristics of the examined tissue and thus the selection of a sufficient imaging technique is of the up-most importance. This paper reviews existing and potential applications related to the current state-of-the-art of medical imaging and simulation techniques. The procedures are examined by introducing their concepts; strengths and limitations, while the authors also present part of their recent activities in these areas. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Spectroscopic studies on chemical- and photo-responsive molecular machines and their bio-applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Yuen Agnes

    2011-07-01

    The four chapters presented in this dissertation describe how various spectroscopic techniques are used: 1) to study the operation of molecular machines in solution, 2) to track the operation of molecular machines inside a single cell, and 3) to investigate the photo-decomposition pathway of a biological chromophore. Recent advances in nanotechnology have enriched the development of nano-scale molecular assemblies to be used as delivery platforms for biologically relevant molecules. Among all the molecular assemblies, molecular machines that are incorporated onto various domains of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) hold considerable potential as a reliable delivery system. Because the ease of functionalization enables chemical or photo-responsive molecular moieties to be covalently attached to the silica framework, these molecular assemblies, with defined mechanized properties, can perform specific functions under external stimuli (pH, redox, or light). While the primary function of these molecular machines is to deliver stored cargo molecules, the means of activation and the motif in which they operate are different. In the first and second chapters of this dissertation, two types of molecular machines, nanovalves and nanoimpellers, and their operations are studied. The ability to continuously monitor and image progression of molecular-based biological events in real-time can enhance our understanding of intracellular processes upon drug, protein and nucleic acid delivery. Using the photo-activated nanoimpeller described in the second chapter, the third chapter explores how it can be used to transport a nuclear staining agent, PI, inside a single cell. Nanoimpellers are made by functionalizing azobenzene molecules to the internal pore surface of MSN. The continuous cis/trans isomerizations are set in motion upon laser illumination at optimal wavelength(s), which facilitate cargo molecules to be expelled from the pores to the surrounding medium. By refining a

  2. Anabaena sp. mediated bio-oxidation of arsenite to arsenate in synthetic arsenic (III) solution: Process optimization by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Jana, Animesh; Bhattacharya, Priyankari; Swarnakar, Snehasikta; Majumdar, Swachchha; Ghosh, Sourja

    2015-11-01

    Blue green algae Anabaena sp. was cultivated in synthetic arsenite solution to investigate its bio-oxidation potential for arsenic species. Response surface methodology (RSM) was employed based on a 3-level full factorial design considering four factors, viz. initial arsenic (III) concentration, algal dose, temperature and time. Bio-oxidation (%) of arsenic (III) was considered as response for the design. The study revealed that about 100% conversion of As (III) to As (V) was obtained for initial As (III) concentration of 2.5-7.5 mg/L at 30 °C for 72 h of exposure using 3 g/L of algal dose signifying a unique bio-oxidation potential of Anabaena sp. The dissolved CO2 (DCO2) and oxygen (DO) concentration in solution was monitored during the process and based on the data, a probable mechanism was proposed wherein algal cell acts like a catalytic membrane surface and expedites the bio-oxidation process. Bioaccumulation of arsenic, as well as, surface adsorption on algal cell was found considerably low. Lipid content of algal biomass grown in arsenite solution was found slightly lower than that of algae grown in synthetic media. Toxicity effects on algal cells due to arsenic exposure were evaluated in terms of comet assay and chlorophyll a content which indicated DNA damage to some extent along with very little decrease in chlorophyll a content. In summary, the present study explored the potential application of Anabaena sp. as an ecofriendly and sustainable option for detoxification of arsenic contaminated natural water with value-added product generation.

  3. Anabaena sp. mediated bio-oxidation of arsenite to arsenate in synthetic arsenic (III) solution: Process optimization by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Jana, Animesh; Bhattacharya, Priyankari; Swarnakar, Snehasikta; Majumdar, Swachchha; Ghosh, Sourja

    2015-11-01

    Blue green algae Anabaena sp. was cultivated in synthetic arsenite solution to investigate its bio-oxidation potential for arsenic species. Response surface methodology (RSM) was employed based on a 3-level full factorial design considering four factors, viz. initial arsenic (III) concentration, algal dose, temperature and time. Bio-oxidation (%) of arsenic (III) was considered as response for the design. The study revealed that about 100% conversion of As (III) to As (V) was obtained for initial As (III) concentration of 2.5-7.5 mg/L at 30 °C for 72 h of exposure using 3 g/L of algal dose signifying a unique bio-oxidation potential of Anabaena sp. The dissolved CO2 (DCO2) and oxygen (DO) concentration in solution was monitored during the process and based on the data, a probable mechanism was proposed wherein algal cell acts like a catalytic membrane surface and expedites the bio-oxidation process. Bioaccumulation of arsenic, as well as, surface adsorption on algal cell was found considerably low. Lipid content of algal biomass grown in arsenite solution was found slightly lower than that of algae grown in synthetic media. Toxicity effects on algal cells due to arsenic exposure were evaluated in terms of comet assay and chlorophyll a content which indicated DNA damage to some extent along with very little decrease in chlorophyll a content. In summary, the present study explored the potential application of Anabaena sp. as an ecofriendly and sustainable option for detoxification of arsenic contaminated natural water with value-added product generation. PMID:26247411

  4. Response of Human Osteoblast to n-HA/PEEK—Quantitative Proteomic Study of Bio-effects of Nano-Hydroxyapatite Composite

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Minzhi; Li, Haiyun; Liu, Xiaochen; Wei, Jie; Ji, Jianguo; Yang, Shu; Hu, Zhiyuan; Wei, Shicheng

    2016-01-01

    Nano-sized hydroxyapatite (n-HA) is considered as a bio-active material, which is often mixed into bone implant material, polyetheretherketone (PEEK). To reveal the global protein expression modulations of osteoblast in response to direct contact with the PEEK composite containing high level (40%) nano-sized hydroxyapatite (n-HA/PEEK) and explain its comprehensive bio-effects, quantitative proteomic analysis was conducted on human osteoblast-like cells MG-63 cultured on n-HA/PEEK in comparison with pure PEEK. Results from quantitative proteomic analysis showed that the most enriched categories in the up-regulated proteins were related to calcium ion processes and associated functions while the most enriched categories in the down-regulated proteins were related to RNA process. This enhanced our understanding to the molecular mechanism of the promotion of the cell adhesion and differentiation with the inhibition of the cell proliferation on n-HA/PEEK composite. It also exhibited that although the calcium ion level of incubate environment hadn’t increased, merely the calcium fixed on the surface of material had influence to intracellular calcium related processes, which was also reflect by the higher intracellular Ca2+ concentration of n-HA/PEEK. This study could lead to more comprehensive cognition to the versatile biocompatibility of composite materials. It further proves that proteomics is useful in new bio-effect discovery. PMID:26956660

  5. Response of Human Osteoblast to n-HA/PEEK--Quantitative Proteomic Study of Bio-effects of Nano-Hydroxyapatite Composite.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Minzhi; Li, Haiyun; Liu, Xiaochen; Wei, Jie; Ji, Jianguo; Yang, Shu; Hu, Zhiyuan; Wei, Shicheng

    2016-01-01

    Nano-sized hydroxyapatite (n-HA) is considered as a bio-active material, which is often mixed into bone implant material, polyetheretherketone (PEEK). To reveal the global protein expression modulations of osteoblast in response to direct contact with the PEEK composite containing high level (40%) nano-sized hydroxyapatite (n-HA/PEEK) and explain its comprehensive bio-effects, quantitative proteomic analysis was conducted on human osteoblast-like cells MG-63 cultured on n-HA/PEEK in comparison with pure PEEK. Results from quantitative proteomic analysis showed that the most enriched categories in the up-regulated proteins were related to calcium ion processes and associated functions while the most enriched categories in the down-regulated proteins were related to RNA process. This enhanced our understanding to the molecular mechanism of the promotion of the cell adhesion and differentiation with the inhibition of the cell proliferation on n-HA/PEEK composite. It also exhibited that although the calcium ion level of incubate environment hadn't increased, merely the calcium fixed on the surface of material had influence to intracellular calcium related processes, which was also reflect by the higher intracellular Ca(2+) concentration of n-HA/PEEK. This study could lead to more comprehensive cognition to the versatile biocompatibility of composite materials. It further proves that proteomics is useful in new bio-effect discovery. PMID:26956660

  6. Response of Human Osteoblast to n-HA/PEEK—Quantitative Proteomic Study of Bio-effects of Nano-Hydroxyapatite Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Minzhi; Li, Haiyun; Liu, Xiaochen; Wei, Jie; Ji, Jianguo; Yang, Shu; Hu, Zhiyuan; Wei, Shicheng

    2016-03-01

    Nano-sized hydroxyapatite (n-HA) is considered as a bio-active material, which is often mixed into bone implant material, polyetheretherketone (PEEK). To reveal the global protein expression modulations of osteoblast in response to direct contact with the PEEK composite containing high level (40%) nano-sized hydroxyapatite (n-HA/PEEK) and explain its comprehensive bio-effects, quantitative proteomic analysis was conducted on human osteoblast-like cells MG-63 cultured on n-HA/PEEK in comparison with pure PEEK. Results from quantitative proteomic analysis showed that the most enriched categories in the up-regulated proteins were related to calcium ion processes and associated functions while the most enriched categories in the down-regulated proteins were related to RNA process. This enhanced our understanding to the molecular mechanism of the promotion of the cell adhesion and differentiation with the inhibition of the cell proliferation on n-HA/PEEK composite. It also exhibited that although the calcium ion level of incubate environment hadn’t increased, merely the calcium fixed on the surface of material had influence to intracellular calcium related processes, which was also reflect by the higher intracellular Ca2+ concentration of n-HA/PEEK. This study could lead to more comprehensive cognition to the versatile biocompatibility of composite materials. It further proves that proteomics is useful in new bio-effect discovery.

  7. Optimization of factors with C/N ratio and flocs biomass concentration in simulated aquaculture bio-flocs systems by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Yun-Jie; Zhu, Liang; Xu, Xiang-Yang

    2012-01-01

    The TAN (total ammonia nitrogen) removal efficiency was investigated in simulated aquaculture bio-flocs technology systems. The response surface methodology that was applied with a central composite rotational design and two key operational parameters, flocs biomass concentration and C/N ratio was varied in order to evaluate the system performance and achieve the optimal operational conditions in this study. A polynomial linear regression model was found to quantitatively describe the relationship between the two variables and response values with adequate fitness in the simulate aquaculture bio-flocs systems. The results showed that flocs biomass concentration and operational C/N ratio both had significant impacts on the response objectives, as well as the interactions between them. The optimal results attained from the model indicated that more than 90% TAN removal efficiency was achieved when the flocs biomass concentration and C/N ratio were around 2.0-2.5 (volatile suspended solids, g/l) and 13-16, respectively.

  8. Phytotoxicity and stimulatory impacts of nanosized and bulk titanium dioxide on fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill).

    PubMed

    Feizi, Hassan; Kamali, Maryam; Jafari, Leila; Rezvani Moghaddam, Parviz

    2013-04-01

    The objective of the this study was to compare concentrations of nanosized TiO2 at 0, 5, 20, 40, 60 and 80 mg L(-1) with bulk TiO2 for phytotoxic and stimulatory effects on fennel seed germination and early growth stage. After 14 d of seed incubation, germination percentage highly improved following exposure to 60 ppm nanosized TiO2. Similar positive effects occurred in terms of shoot dry weight and germination rate. Application of bulk TiO2 particles in 40 ppm concentration greatly decreased shoot biomass up to 50% compared to the control. Application of 40 ppm nanosized TiO2 treatment improved mean germination time by 31.8% in comparison to the untreated control. In addition, low and intermediate concentrations of nanosized TiO2 enhanced indices such as germination value, vigor index and mean daily germination. In general, there was a considerable response by fennel seed to nanosized TiO2 presenting the possibility of a new approach to overcome problems with seed germination in some plant species, particularly medicinal plants.

  9. Delayed stimulatory effect of low-intensity shockwaves on human periosteal cells.

    PubMed

    Tam, Kam-Fai; Cheung, Wing-Hoi; Lee, Kwong-Man; Qin, Ling; Leung, Kwok-Sui

    2005-09-01

    We investigated the effect of shockwaves on cells explanted from normal human periosteum to study the potential mechanisms of their responses and to determine suitable treatment settings. The cells were subjected to one shockwave treatment with systematic combinations of energy intensities (range, 0.05-0.5 mJ/mm) and number of shocks (range, 500-2000) whereas control cells received no treatment. The immediate effect on cell viability and the long-lasting effect on proliferation, viable cell number at Day 18, and mineralization at Day 35 were assessed. We observed an immediate dose-dependent destructive effect of shockwaves. Energy intensity and number of shocks contributed equally to viability. Total energy dose (intensity x number of shocks) was a better reference for determining the shockwave effect. We also found a long-term stimulatory effect on proliferation, viable cell number, and calcium deposition of human periosteal cells. At the same total energy dose, low-intensity shockwaves with more shocks (0.12 mJ/mm at 1250 shocks) were more favorable for enhancing cellular activities than high-intensity waves with fewer shocks (0.5 mJ/mm at 300 shocks). These findings document some of the biochemical changes of periosteal cells during shockwave treatments.

  10. Stimulatory versus suppressive effects of GM-CSF on tumor progression in multiple cancer types

    PubMed Central

    Hong, In-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, also called CSF-2) is best known for its critical role in immune modulation and hematopoiesis. A large body of experimental evidence indicates that GM-CSF, which is frequently upregulated in multiple types of human cancers, effectively marks cancer cells with a ‘danger flag' for the immune system. In this context, most studies have focused on its function as an immunomodulator, namely its ability to stimulate dendritic cell (DC) maturation and monocyte/macrophage activity. However, recent studies have suggested that GM-CSF also promotes immune-independent tumor progression by supporting tumor microenvironments and stimulating tumor growth and metastasis. Although some studies have suggested that GM-CSF has inhibitory effects on tumor growth and metastasis, an even greater number of studies show that GM-CSF exerts stimulatory effects on tumor progression. In this review, we summarize a number of findings to provide the currently available information regarding the anticancer immune response of GM-CSG. We then discuss the potential roles of GM-CSF in the progression of multiple types of cancer to provide insights into some of the complexities of its clinical applications. PMID:27364892

  11. Stimulatory effects of neuronally released norepinephrine on renin release in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Yasuo; Kawazoe, Shinka; Ichihara, Toshio; Shinyama, Hiroshi; Kageyama, Masaaki; Morimoto, Shiro )

    1988-10-01

    Extracellular high potassium inhibits renin release in vitro by increasing calcium concentrations in the juxtaglomerular cells. The authors found that the decreased response of renin release from rat kidney cortical slices in high potassium solution changed to a strikingly increased one in the presence of nifedipine at doses over 10{sup {minus}6} M. They then examined the stimulatory effect of extracellular high potassium in the presence of nifedipine on renin release. The enhancement of release was significantly suppressed either by propranolol or by metoprolol but not by prazosin. High potassium plus nifedipine-induced increase in renin release was markedly attenuated by renal denervation. The enhancing effect was not observed when the slices were incubated in calcium-free medium. Divalent cations such as Cd{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, and Mn{sup 2+} blocked this enhancement in a concentration-dependent manner. High potassium elicited an increase in {sup 3}H efflux from the slices preloaded with ({sup 3}H)-norepinephrine. The increasing effect was not influenced by nifedipine but was abolished by the removal of extracellular calcium or by the addition of divalent cations. These observations suggest to us that the high potassium plus nifedipine-induced increase in renin release from the slices is mediated by norepinephrine derived from renal sympathetic nerves and that this neuronally released norepinephrine stimulates renin release via activation of {beta}-adrenoceptors.

  12. Suppressive effects of co-stimulatory molecule expressions on mouse splenocytes by anti-allergic agents in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, J; Asano, K; Tryka, E; Kanai, K; Yamamoto, S; Hisamitsu, T; Suzaki, H

    2000-01-01

    The influence of anti-allergic drugs, epinastine hydrochloride (EP) and disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), on the co-stimulatory molecule expression was examined using in vitro cell culture technique. Spleen cells obtained from BALB/c mice 10 days after immunization with haemocyanin absorbed to aluminium hydroxide were cultured in the presence of 100.0 microg/ml haemocyanin and various concentrations of the agents. Low concentrations (<1.5 x 10(-4)M) of EP and DSCG did not influence spleen cell blastic activity induced by antigenic stimulation, whereas these agents caused significant inhibition of spleen cell activation when 2 x 10(-4) M of the agents were added to cell cultures. EP and DSCG also did not affect blastic activity of sensitized splenic T cells by anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody stimulation even when these cells were cultured in the presence of 2 x 10(-4) M of the agents. We next examined the influence of EP and DSCG on the expression of co-stimulatory molecules on spleen cells in response to antigenic stimulation. Sensitized spleen cells were cultured in the presence of 2 x 10(-4)M of the agents and the expression of molecules were examined by flow cytometer 24h later. EP and DSCG suppressed the expression of costimulatory molecules, CD40 and CD80, but not CD86, on splenic B cells which were enhanced by antigenic stimulation in vitro. PMID:10958379

  13. A Response to "BIO 2010: Transforming Undergraduate Education for Future Research Biologists," from the Perspective of the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Major Program at Kenyon College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slonczewski, Joan L.; Marusak, Rosemary

    2004-01-01

    The National Research Council completed a major study of undergraduate biology education, "BIO 2010-Transforming Undergraduate Education For Future Research Biologists (BIO 2010)," funded by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the National Institutes of Health. The "BIO 2010" report recommends that biology pedagogy should use an…

  14. Gold ions bio-released from metallic gold particles reduce inflammation and apoptosis and increase the regenerative responses in focal brain injury.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Agnete; Kolind, Kristian; Pedersen, Dan Sonne; Doering, Peter; Pedersen, Mie Ostergaard; Danscher, Gorm; Penkowa, Milena; Stoltenberg, Meredin

    2008-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury results in loss of neurons caused as much by the resulting neuroinflammation as by the injury. Gold salts are known to be immunosuppressive, but their use are limited by nephrotoxicity. However, as we have proven that implants of pure metallic gold release gold ions which do not spread in the body, but are taken up by cells near the implant, we hypothesize that metallic gold could reduce local neuroinflammation in a safe way. Bio-liberation, or dissolucytosis, of gold ions from metallic gold surfaces requires the presence of disolycytes i.e. macrophages and the process is limited by their number and activity. We injected 20-45 mum gold particles into the neocortex of mice before generating a cryo-injury. Comparing gold-treated and untreated cryolesions, the release of gold reduced microgliosis and neuronal apoptosis accompanied by a transient astrogliosis and an increased neural stem cell response. We conclude that bio-liberated gold ions possess pronounced anti-inflammatory and neuron-protective capacities in the brain and suggest that metallic gold has clinical potentials. Intra-cerebral application of metallic gold as a pharmaceutical source of gold ions represents a completely new medical concept that bypasses the blood-brain-barrier and allows direct drug delivery to inflamed brain tissue.

  15. Hypertensive factor: calcium stimulatory activity obtained from different tissues and animal species.

    PubMed

    Wright, G L; Huang, B S; Johnson, P J; McCumbee, W D

    1988-10-01

    It was recently shown that a peptide (hypertensive factor, HF) isolated from erythrocyte hemolysates from spontaneously hypertensive rats induced a prolonged elevation of blood pressure in normotensive rats. In addition, the peptide produced a marked stimulation of the in vitro uptake of lanthanum-resistant calcium by the aortae and enhanced the contractile response of aortic rings to constrictor agents. The present report describes findings of calcium stimulatory activity, enhancement of contractile function, or pressor activity in extracts of homogenates from several tissues of the rat and from erythrocyte hemolysates of several mammalian species. Significant stimulation of calcium uptake in aortic rings was obtained with preparations from rat brain, liver, and kidney. The activity per weight of tissue was similar for brain and kidney (approximately 2 units/g), while liver exhibited somewhat higher concentrations (4 units/g). The diffusate of cardiac tissue did not significantly alter in vitro calcium uptake by aortae. The injection of the cardiac and liver diffusates into normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats produced slight (10 Torr) (1 Torr = 133.3Pa) and moderate (25 Torr) elevations of blood pressure, respectively. Finally, a peptide purified from homogenates of rat brain by the protocol developed for the purification of HF from erythrocytes was shown to significantly enhance the contractile response of aortic rings to K+ and norepinephrine. Diffusates of erythrocytes from the rat, rabbit, dog, and guinea pig each caused a significant stimulation of calcium uptake and contained approximately the same level of activity (500 units/L of whole blood). Diffusates prepared from outdated human erythrocytes had no significant effect on calcium uptake, whereas those of freshly drawn samples exhibited high levels of activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Temporal dissociation between sodium depletion and sodium appetite appearance: Involvement of inhibitory and stimulatory signals.

    PubMed

    Margatho, L O; Porcari, C Y; Macchione, A F; da Silva Souza, G D; Caeiro, X E; Antunes-Rodrigues, J; Vivas, L; Godino, A

    2015-06-25

    Our aim was to analyze the participation of inhibitory and stimulatory signals in the temporal dissociation between sodium depletion (SD) induced by peritoneal dialysis (PD) and the appearance of sodium appetite (SA), particularly 2h after PD, when the rats are hypovolemic/natremic but SA is not evident. We investigated the effects of bilateral injections of the serotonin (5-HT) receptor antagonist, methysergide, into the lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPBN) on hypertonic NaCl and water intake 2h vs. 24h after PD. We also studied plasma renin activity (PRA) and aldosterone (ALDO) concentration 2h vs. 24h after PD. Additionally, we combined the analysis of brain Fos immunoreactivity (Fos-ir) with the detection of double immunoreactivity in 5HT and oxytocinergic (OT) cells 2h after PD. Bilateral LPBN injections of methysergide (4μg/200nl at each site) increased NaCl intake when tested 2h after PD compared to controls. We found a significant increase in PRA and ALDO concentration after PD but no differences between 2 and 24h after PD. We also found for the first time a significant increase 2h after PD in the number of Fos-ir neurons in the brainstem nuclei that have been shown to be involved in the inhibition of SA. In summary, the results show that 5HT-mechanisms in the LPBN modulate sodium intake during the delay of SA when the renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) is increased. In addition, the activation of brainstem areas previously associated with the satiety phase of SA is in part responsible for the temporal dissociation between SD and behavioral arousal. PMID:25841323

  17. Effects of Punishment Procedures on the Self-Stimulatory Behavior of an Autistic Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friman, Patrick C.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Three punishment procedures--contingent applications of water mist, lemon juice, and vinegar--were evaluated as aversive treatment methods for a self-stimulatory behavior exhibited by a severely retarded 11-year-old male. The water mist procedure was as effective as lemon juice or vinegar, presented less physical threat to the client, and was…

  18. Stimulatory effect of thymic factor(s) on steroidogenesis in cultured rat granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Uzumcu, M; Akira, S; Lin, Y C

    1992-01-01

    Thymic cells from immature female rats were isolated and used for production of thymic cell culture conditioned medium (TCM). Granulosa cells were obtained from immature diethylstilbestrol (DES)-treated rats. TCM stimulated basal progesterone and estradiol secretion from the granulosa cells in a dose and time dependent manner. Maximal stimulation of progesterone production occurred at 48 hours of incubation, during which period TCM caused approximately 5 times more progesterone secretion than heart cell conditioned medium (HCM) or mock extract (ME). The maximum progesterone secretion by granulosa cells occurred when they were exposed to 48% TCM causing 7 times more progesterone secretion than controls. Under the same maximum stimulatory conditions, however, TCM only approximately doubled estradiol secretion compared to concentrations secreted in the presence of HCM or ME. Thus, the effect of TCM on progesterone secretion was more prominent than its effect on estradiol secretion. The stimulatory action of TCM was not mimicked by HCM, thymosin-alpha 1 or thymulin. Furthermore, the stimulatory action of TCM on steroidogenesis did not appear to be mediated by the cAMP system. The stimulatory factor(s) in TCM were heat, acid and acetone labile, but could not be sedimented by activated charcoal. Thus, the present study demonstrates that the secretory product(s) of thymic epithelial cells can stimulate steroidogenesis in cultured rat granulosa cells. Our data imply that thymic factor(s) may have a direct effect on ovarian function.

  19. Brief Report: The Effects of Exercise on the Self-Stimulatory Behaviors and Positive Responding of Adolescents with Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal-Malek, Andrea; Mitchell, Stella

    1997-01-01

    A study investigated the effects of aerobic exercise on the self-stimulatory behaviors and academic performance of five adolescent males with autism. Results found there was a significant decrease in self-stimulatory behavior following the physical exercise. Academic performance increased after the aerobic exercise as compared to classroom…

  20. The soil-water balance simulations of a grassland in response to CO2, rainfall, and biodiversity manipulations at BioCON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flinker, R. H.; Cardenas, M.; Caldwell, T. G.; Rich, R.; Reich, P.

    2013-12-01

    The BioCON (Biodiversity, CO2 and N) experiment has been continuously running since 1997. Operated by the University of Minnesota and located within the Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve in Minnesota, USA, BioCON is a Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiment that investigates plant community response to three key environmental variables: nitrogen, atmospheric CO2 and biodiversity. More recently rainfall exclusion and temperature manipulation were added to the experiment which amounts to 371 plots. The site attempts to replicate predicted average temperature increases and a northern shift of plant species and any associated consequences. FACE experiments have been conducted for a number of years in different countries, but the focus has generally been on how plant communities, soil respiration and microbes respond. Minimal work has been focused on the hydrologic aspects of these experiments which are potentially valuable for investigating global warming effects on local and plot-scale ecohydrology. Thus, the objective of this work is to characterize and model unsaturated flow for different CO2 and rainfall treatments in order to see how they affect soil moisture dynamics and groundwater recharge on grasslands of central Minnesota. Our study focuses on simulating soil moisture dynamics in eighteen of the BioCON plots: six bare plots with regular rainfall regimes (zero plant species, three plots with elevated atmospheric CO2 levels), six regular rainfall regimes (nine plant species, three plots with elevated atmospheric CO2 levels) and six reduced rainfall regimes (nine plant species, three plots with elevated atmospheric CO2 levels). The Simultaneous Heat and Water (SHAW) model, which solves the Richards equation for unsaturated zone water flow coupled to a comprehensive energy balance model, was parameterized with a combination of field and lab estimates of soil properties. Field estimates of saturated hydraulic conductivity using tension infiltrometers ranged

  1. Loss of plant biodiversity eliminates stimulatory effect of elevated CO2 on earthworm activity in grasslands.

    PubMed

    Arnone, John A; Zaller, Johann G; Hofer, Gabriela; Schmid, Bernhard; Körner, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Earthworms are among the world's most important ecosystem engineers because of their effects on soil fertility and plant productivity. Their dependence on plants for carbon, however, means that any changes in plant community structure or function caused by rising atmospheric CO2 or loss of plant species diversity could affect earthworm activity, which may feed back on plant communities. Production of surface casts measured during three consecutive years in field experimental plots (n = 24, 1.2 m(2)) planted with local calcareous grassland species that varied in plant species richness (diversity levels: high, 31 species; medium, 12; low, 5) and were exposed to ambient (356 μl CO2 l(-1)) or elevated (600 μl CO2 l(-1)) CO2 was only consistently stimulated in high diversity plots exposed to elevated CO2 (+120 %, 31 spp: 603 ± 52 under ambient CO2 vs. 1,325 ± 204 g cast dwt. m(-2) year(-1) under elevated CO2 in 1996; +77 %, 940 ± 44 vs. 1,663 ± 204 g cast dwt. m(-2) year(-1) in 1998). Reductions in plant diversity had little effect on cast production in ecosystems maintained at ambient CO2, but the stimulatory effect of elevated CO2 on cast production disappeared when plant species diversity was decreased to 12 and 5 species. High diversity plots were also the only communities that included plant species that an earlier field study showed to be among the most responsive to elevated CO2 and to be most preferred by earthworms to deposit casts near. Further, the +87 % CO2-induced increase in cast production measured over the 3 years corresponded to a parallel increase in cumulative total nitrogen of 5.7 g N m(-2) and would help explain the large stimulation of aboveground plant biomass production observed in high-diversity communities under elevated CO2. The results of this study demonstrate how the loss of plant species from communities can alter responses of major soil heterotrophs and consequently ecosystem biogeochemistry.

  2. Co-Stimulatory Blockade of the CD28/CD80-86/CTLA-4 Balance in Transplantation: Impact on Memory T Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Ville, Simon; Poirier, Nicolas; Blancho, Gilles; Vanhove, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    CD28 and CTLA-4 are prototypal co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory cell surface signaling molecules interacting with CD80/86, known to be critical for immune response initiation and regulation, respectively. Initial “bench-to-beside” translation, two decades ago, resulted in the development of CTLA4-Ig, a biologic that targets CD80/86 and prevents T-cell costimulation. In spite of its proven effectiveness in inhibiting allo-immune responses, particularly in murine models, clinical experience in kidney transplantation with belatacept (high-affinity CTLA4-Ig molecule) reveals a high incidence of acute, cell-mediated rejection. Originally, the etiology of belatacept-resistant graft rejection was thought to be heterologous immunity, i.e., the cross-reactivity of the pool of memory T cells from pathogen-specific immune responses with alloantigens. Recently, the standard view that memory T cells arise from effector cells after clonal contraction has been challenged by a “developmental” model, in which less differentiated memory T cells generate effector cells. This review delineates how this shift in paradigm, given the differences in co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory signal depending on the maturation stage, could profoundly affect our understanding of the CD28/CD80-86/CTLA-4 blockade and highlights the potential advantages of selectively targeting CD28, instead of CD80/86, to control post-transplant immune responses. PMID:26322044

  3. RNA-Seq analysis of urea nutrition responsive transcriptome of Oryza sativa elite indica cultivar RP Bio 226

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Mettu Madhavi; Ulaganathan, Kandasamy

    2015-01-01

    Rice yield is greatly influenced by the nitrogen and rice varieties show variation in yield. For understanding the role of urea nutrition in the yield of elite indica rice cultivar RPBio-226, the urea responsive transcriptome was sequenced and analyzed. The raw reads and the Transcriptome Shotgun Assembly project has been deposited at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession GDKM00000000. The version described in this paper is the first version, GDKM01000000. PMID:26697348

  4. The importance of being coupled: Stable states, transitions and responses to changing forcings in tidal bio-morphodynamics (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marani, M.; D'Alpaos, A.; da Lio, C.; Carniello, L.; Lanzoni, S.; Rinaldo, A.

    2009-12-01

    Changes in relative sea level, nutrient and sediment loading, and ecological characteristics expose tidal landforms and ecosystems to responses which may or may not be reversible. Predicting such responses is important in view of the ecological, cultural and socio-economic importance of endangered tidal environments worldwide. Here we develop a point model of the joint evolution of tidal landforms and biota including the dynamics of intertidal vegetation, benthic microbial assemblages, erosional and depositional processes, local and general hydrodynamics, and relative sea-level change. Alternative stable states and punctuated equilibrium dynamics emerge, characterized by possible sudden transitions of the system, governed by vegetation type, disturbances of the benthic biofilm, sediment availability and marine transgressions or regressions. Multiple equilibria are the result of the interplay of erosion, deposition and biostabilization. They highlight the importance of the coupling between biological and sediment transport processes in determining the evolution of a tidal system as a whole. Hysteretic switches between stable states may arise because of differences in the threshold values of relative sea level rise inducing transitions from vegetated to unvegetated equilibria and viceversa.

  5. Smart surface coating of drug nanoparticles with cross-linkable polyethylene glycol for bio-responsive and highly efficient drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Weijia; Zhang, Xiujuan; Chen, Xianfeng; Zhou, Mengjiao; Xu, Ruirui; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2016-04-01

    Many drug molecules can be directly used as nanomedicine without the requirement of any inorganic or organic carriers such as silica and liposome nanostructures. This new type of carrier-free drug nanoparticles (NPs) has great potential in clinical treatment because of its ultra-high drug loading capacity and biodegradability. For practical applications, it is essential for such nanomedicine to possess robust stability and minimal premature release of therapeutic molecules during circulation in the blood stream. To meet this requirement, herein, we develop GSH-responsive and crosslinkable amphiphilic polyethylene glycol (PEG) molecules to modify carrier-free drug NPs. These PEG molecules can be cross-linked on the surface of the NPs to endow them with greater stability and the cross-link is sensitive to intracellular environment for bio-responsive drug release. With this elegant design, our experimental results show that the liberation of DOX from DOX-cross-linked PEG NPs is dramatically slower than that from DOX-non-cross-linked PEG NPs, and the DOX release profile can be controlled by tuning the concentration of the reducing agent to break the cross-link between PEG molecules. More importantly, in vivo studies reveal that the DOX-cross-linked PEG NPs exhibit favorable blood circulation half-life (>4 h) and intense accumulation in tumor areas, enabling effective anti-cancer therapy. We expect this work will provide a powerful strategy for stabilizing carrier-free nanomedicines and pave the way to their successful clinical applications in the future.Many drug molecules can be directly used as nanomedicine without the requirement of any inorganic or organic carriers such as silica and liposome nanostructures. This new type of carrier-free drug nanoparticles (NPs) has great potential in clinical treatment because of its ultra-high drug loading capacity and biodegradability. For practical applications, it is essential for such nanomedicine to possess robust stability

  6. Targeting the T-cell co-stimulatory CD27/CD70 pathway in cancer immunotherapy: rationale and potential.

    PubMed

    van de Ven, Koen; Borst, Jannie

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, cancer immunotherapy was named 'breakthrough of the year' based on the outcome of clinical trials with blocking antibodies to the T-cell co-inhibitory receptors CTLA-4 and PD-1. This success has emphasized that cytotoxic T-cell responses to cancer can occur, but are limited by peripheral tolerance and by immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment. Targeting of CTLA-4, PD-1 or its ligands partly overcomes these limitations and can now be applied in multiple immunogenic cancer types. Furthermore, an increased success rate is expected from combining CTLA-4 and/or PD-1 blocking with deliberate engagement of T-cell co-stimulatory receptors, particularly TNF receptor (R) family members. The TNFR family includes CD27 (Tnfrsf7), for which an agonistic antibody has recently entered clinical trials. In this review, we describe how CD27 co-stimulation impacts the T-cell response, with the purpose to illuminate how CD27 agonism can be exploited in cancer immunotherapy.

  7. Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Secreted Sphingosine 1-Phosphate (S1P) Exerts a Stimulatory Effect on Skeletal Myoblast Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Alessia; Anderloni, Giulia; Pierucci, Federica; Matteini, Francesca; Chellini, Flaminia; Zecchi Orlandini, Sandra; Meacci, Elisabetta

    2014-01-01

    Bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have the potential to significantly contribute to skeletal muscle healing through the secretion of paracrine factors that support proliferation and enhance participation of the endogenous muscle stem cells in the process of repair/regeneration. However, MSC-derived trophic molecules have been poorly characterized. The aim of this study was to investigate paracrine signaling effects of MSCs on skeletal myoblasts. It was found, using a biochemical and morphological approach that sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), a natural bioactive lipid exerting a broad range of muscle cell responses, is secreted by MSCs and represents an important factor by which these cells exert their stimulatory effects on C2C12 myoblast and satellite cell proliferation. Indeed, exposure to conditioned medium obtained from MSCs cultured in the presence of the selective sphingosine kinase inhibitor (iSK), blocked increased cell proliferation caused by the conditioned medium from untreated MSCs, and the addition of exogenous S1P in the conditioned medium from MSCs pre-treated with iSK further increased myoblast proliferation. Finally, we also demonstrated that the myoblast response to MSC-secreted vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) involves the release of S1P from C2C12 cells. Our data may have important implications in the optimization of cell-based strategies to promote skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:25264785

  8. The Brain Activity in Brodmann Area 17: A Potential Bio-Marker to Predict Patient Responses to Antiepileptic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xin; Fang, Weidong; Zeng, Kebin; Yang, Mingming; Li, Chenyu; Wang, Shasha; Li, Minghui; Wang, Xuefeng

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to predict newly diagnosed patient responses to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging tools to explore changes in spontaneous brain activity. We recruited 21 newly diagnosed epileptic patients, 8 drug-resistant (DR) patients, 11 well-healed (WH) patients, and 13 healthy controls. After a 12-month follow-up, 11 newly diagnosed epileptic patients who showed a poor response to AEDs were placed into the seizures uncontrolled (SUC) group, while 10 patients were enrolled in the seizure-controlled (SC) group. By calculating the amplitude of fractional low-frequency fluctuations (fALFF) of blood oxygen level-dependent signals to measure brain activity during rest, we found that the SUC patients showed increased activity in the bilateral occipital lobe, particularly in the cuneus and lingual gyrus compared with the SC group and healthy controls. Interestingly, DR patients also showed increased activity in the identical cuneus and lingual gyrus regions, which comprise Brodmann’s area 17 (BA17), compared with the SUC patients; however, these abnormalities were not observed in SC and WH patients. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves indicated that the fALFF value of BA17 could differentiate SUC patients from SC patients and healthy controls with sufficient sensitivity and specificity prior to the administration of medication. Functional connectivity analysis was subsequently performed to evaluate the difference in connectivity between BA17 and other brain regions in the SUC, SC and control groups. Regions nearby the cuneus and lingual gyrus were found positive connectivity increased changes or positive connectivity changes with BA17 in the SUC patients, while remarkably negative connectivity increased changes or positive connectivity decreased changes were found in the SC patients. Additionally, default mode network (DMN) regions showed negative connectivity increased changes or negative

  9. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 curtails the inflammatory and T cell stimulatory capacity of macrophages through an IL-10-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Korf, Hannelie; Wenes, Mathias; Stijlemans, Benoit; Takiishi, Tatiana; Robert, Sofie; Miani, Michela; Eizirik, Decio L; Gysemans, Conny; Mathieu, Chantal

    2012-12-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is a hormone nuclear receptor regulating bone and calcium homeostasis. Studies revealing the expression of VDR on immune cells point toward a role for VDR-dependent signaling pathways in immunity. Here we verified the ability of the natural VDR ligand, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (1,25(OH)(2)D(3)) to interfere in inflammatory and T cell stimulatory capacity of macrophages, in particular within a chronic inflammatory disease features of experimental type 1 diabetes (T1D). We demonstrated that VDR is constitutively expressed in macrophages and both the levels of VDR and its downstream targets, are clearly induced by 1,25(OH)(2)D(3). In control mice, macrophage programming with 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) partially abrogated the activation-provoked expression of IL-12p40, TNFα and iNOS as well as the effector T cell-recruiting chemokines, CXCL9, CXCL10 and CXCL11. Targeting VDR signaling in macrophages counteracted their T-cell stimulatory ability despite essentially unaltered expression of antigen-presenting and costimulatory molecules. Furthermore, even in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, where macrophages/monocytes featured a heightened responsiveness toward danger signals and a superior T cell stimulatory capacity, 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) successfully curtailed these basic macrophage-mediated functions. Interestingly, the inhibitory action of the active compound was associated with an IL-10-dependent mechanism since 1,25(OH)(2)D(3)-treatment of IL-10-deficient macrophages failed to reproduce the characteristic repression on inflammatory mediators or T cell proliferation. Combined, these results highlight the possible therapeutic applicability of this natural immunomodulator, due to its ability to counteract macrophage inflammatory and T cell-activating pathways. PMID:22944250

  10. Structural ensembles reveal intrinsic disorder for the multi-stimuli responsive bio-mimetic protein Rec1-resilin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balu, Rajkamal; Knott, Robert; Cowieson, Nathan P.; Elvin, Christopher M.; Hill, Anita J.; Choudhury, Namita R.; Dutta, Naba K.

    2015-06-01

    Rec1-resilin is the first recombinant resilin-mimetic protein polymer, synthesized from exon-1 of the Drosophila melanogaster gene CG15920 that has demonstrated unusual multi-stimuli responsiveness in aqueous solution. Crosslinked hydrogels of Rec1-resilin have also displayed remarkable mechanical properties including near-perfect rubber-like elasticity. The structural basis of these extraordinary properties is not clearly understood. Here we combine a computational and experimental investigation to examine structural ensembles of Rec1-resilin in aqueous solution. The structure of Rec1-resilin in aqueous solutions is investigated experimentally using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Both bench-top and synchrotron SAXS are employed to extract structural data sets of Rec1-resilin and to confirm their validity. Computational approaches have been applied to these experimental data sets in order to extract quantitative information about structural ensembles including radius of gyration, pair-distance distribution function, and the fractal dimension. The present work confirms that Rec1-resilin is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) that displays equilibrium structural qualities between those of a structured globular protein and a denatured protein. The ensemble optimization method (EOM) analysis reveals a single conformational population with partial compactness. This work provides new insight into the structural ensembles of Rec1-resilin in solution.

  11. Structural ensembles reveal intrinsic disorder for the multi-stimuli responsive bio-mimetic protein Rec1-resilin

    PubMed Central

    Balu, Rajkamal; Knott, Robert; Cowieson, Nathan P.; Elvin, Christopher M.; Hill, Anita J.; Choudhury, Namita R.; Dutta, Naba K.

    2015-01-01

    Rec1-resilin is the first recombinant resilin-mimetic protein polymer, synthesized from exon-1 of the Drosophila melanogaster gene CG15920 that has demonstrated unusual multi-stimuli responsiveness in aqueous solution. Crosslinked hydrogels of Rec1-resilin have also displayed remarkable mechanical properties including near-perfect rubber-like elasticity. The structural basis of these extraordinary properties is not clearly understood. Here we combine a computational and experimental investigation to examine structural ensembles of Rec1-resilin in aqueous solution. The structure of Rec1-resilin in aqueous solutions is investigated experimentally using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Both bench-top and synchrotron SAXS are employed to extract structural data sets of Rec1-resilin and to confirm their validity. Computational approaches have been applied to these experimental data sets in order to extract quantitative information about structural ensembles including radius of gyration, pair-distance distribution function, and the fractal dimension. The present work confirms that Rec1-resilin is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) that displays equilibrium structural qualities between those of a structured globular protein and a denatured protein. The ensemble optimization method (EOM) analysis reveals a single conformational population with partial compactness. This work provides new insight into the structural ensembles of Rec1-resilin in solution. PMID:26042819

  12. Immune checkpoint blockade reveals the stimulatory capacity of tumor-associated CD103(+) dendritic cells in late-stage ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Flies, Dallas B; Higuchi, Tomoe; Harris, Jaryse C; Jha, Vibha; Gimotty, Phyllis A; Adams, Sarah F

    2016-08-01

    Although immune infiltrates in ovarian cancer are associated with improved survival, the ovarian tumor environment has been characterized as immunosuppressive, due in part to functional shifts among dendritic cells with disease progression. We hypothesized that flux in dendritic cell subpopulations with cancer progression were responsible for observed differences in antitumor immune responses in early and late-stage disease. Here we identify three dendritic cell subsets with disparate functions in the ovarian tumor environment. CD11c+CD11b(-)CD103(+) dendritic cells are absent in the peritoneal cavity of healthy mice but comprise up to 40% of dendritic cells in tumor-bearing mice and retain T cell stimulatory capacity in advanced disease. Among CD11c+CD11b+ cells, Lair-1 expression distinguishes stimulatory and immunoregulatory DC subsets, which are also enriched in the tumor environment. Notably, PD-L1 is expressed by Lair-1(hi) immunoregulatory dendritic cells, and may contribute to local tumor antigen-specific T cell dysfunction. Using an adoptive transfer model, we find that PD-1 blockade enables tumor-associated CD103(+) dendritic cells to promote disease clearance. These data demonstrate that antitumor immune capacity is maintained among local dendritic cell subpopulations in the tumor environment with cancer progression. Similar dendritic cell subsets are present in malignant ascites from women with ovarian cancer, supporting the translational relevance of these results. PMID:27622059

  13. FS laser processing of bio-polymer thin films for studying cell-to-substrate specific response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daskalova, A.; Nathala, Chandra S. R.; Kavatzikidou, P.; Ranella, A.; Szoszkiewicz, R.; Husinsky, W.; Fotakis, C.

    2016-09-01

    The use of ultra-short pulses for nanoengineering of biomaterials opens up possibilities for biological, medical and tissue engineering applications. Structuring the surface of a biomaterial into arrays with micro- and nanoscale features and architectures, defines new roadmaps to innovative engineering of materials. Thin films of novel collagen/elastin composite and gelatin were irradiated by Ti:sapphire fs laser in air at central wavelength 800 nm, with pulse durations in the range of 30 fs. The size and shape as well as morphological forms occurring in the resulted areas of interaction were analyzed as a function of irradiation fluence and number of pulses by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The fs interaction regime allows generation of well defined micro porous surface arrays. In this study we examined a novel composite consisting of collagen and elastin in order to create a biodegradable matrix to serve as a biomimetic surface for cell attachment. Confocal microscopy images of modified zones reveal formation of surface fringe patterns with orientation direction alongside the area of interaction. Outside the crater rim a wave-like topography pattern is observed. Structured, on a nanometer scale, surface array is employed for cell-culture experiments for testing cell's responses to substrate morphology. Mice fibroblasts migration was monitored after 3 days cultivation period using FESEM. We found that fibroblasts cells tend to migrate and adhere along the laser modified zones. The performed study proved that the immobilized collagen based biofilms suite as a template for successful fibroblasts cell guidance and orientation. Fs laser induced morphological modification of biomimetic materials exhibit direct control over fibroblasts behaviour due to induced change in their wettability state.

  14. New Chemical, Bio-Optical and Physical Observations of Upper Ocean Response to the Passage of a Mesoscale Eddy Off Bermuda

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNeil, J. D.; Jannasch, H. W.; Dickey, T.; McGillicuddy, Dennis J., Jr.; Brzezinski, M.; Sakamoto, C. M.

    1999-01-01

    A mesoscale eddy advected across the Bermuda Testbed Mooring site over a 30-day period centered on July 14, 1995. Temperature and current measurements along with biogeochemical measurements were used to characterize the biological response of the upper ocean associated with the introduction of nitrate into the euphotic layer due to the doming of isotherms associated with the eddy. Complementary shipboard data showed an anomalous water mass, which extended from a depth of approximately 50 to 1000 m, manifesting as a cold surface expression and warm anomaly at depth. Although mesoscale eddies are frequently observed in the Sargasso Sea, the present observations are particularly unique because of the high-temporal-resolution measurements of the new instrumentation deployed on the mooring. Analyzers that measure nitrate plus nitrite were placed at depths of 80 and 200 m and bio-optical sensors were located at depths of 20, 35, 45, 71, and 86 m. Peak nitrate values of nearly 3.0 micro-M at 80 m and chlorophyll a values of 1.4 mg/cubic m at 71 m were observed, a well as a 25- to 30-meter shoaling of the 1% light level depth. A Doppler shift from the inertial period (22.8 hours) to 25.2 hours was observed in several time series records due to the movement of the eddy across the mooring. Inertial pumping brought cold, nutrient-rich waters farther into the euphotic zone than would occur solely by isothermal lifting. Silicic acid was depleted to undetectable levels owing to the growth of diatoms within the eddy. The chlorophyll a values associated with the eddy appear to be the largest recorded during the eight years of the ongoing US JGOFS Bermuda Atlantic Time Series Study program.

  15. New Chemical, Bio-Optical and Physical Observations of Upper Ocean Response to the Passage of a Mesoscale Eddy off Bermuda

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNeil, J. D.; Jannasch, H. W.; Dickey, T.; McGillicuddy, D.; Brzekinski, M.; Sakamoto, C. M.

    1999-01-01

    A mesoscale eddy advected across the Bermuda Testbed Mooring site over a 30-day period centered on July 14, 1995. Temperature and current measurements along with biogeochemical measurements were used to characterize the biological response of the upper ocean associated with the introduction of nitrate into the euphoric layer due to the doming of isotherms associated with the eddy. Complementary shipboard data showed an anomalous water mass, which extended from a depth of approximately 50 to 1000 m, manifesting as a cold surface expression and warm anomaly at depth. Although mesoscale eddies are frequently observed in the Sargasso Sea, the present observations are particularly unique because of the high-temporal-resolution measurements of the new instrumentation deployed on the mooring. Analyzers that measure nitrate plus nitrite were placed at depths of 80 and 200 m and bio-optical sensors were located at depths of 20, 35, 45, 71, and 86 m. Peak nitrate values of nearly 3.0 microns at 80 m and chlorophyll alpha values of 1.4 mg/cu m at 71 m were observed, as well as a 25- to 30-meter shoaling of the 1% light level depth. A Doppler shift from the inertial period (22.8 hours) to 25.2 hours was observed in several time series records due to the movement of the eddy across the mooring. Inertial pumping brought cold, nutrient-rich waters farther into the euphotic zone than would occur solely by isothermal lifting. Silicic acid was depleted to undetectable levels owing to the growth of diatoms within the eddy. The chlorophyll alpha values associated with the eddy appear to be the largest recorded during the 8 years of the ongoing U.S. JGOFS Bermuda Atlantic Time Series Study (BATS) program.

  16. Climatic response variability and machine learning: development of a modular technology framework for predicting bio-climatic change in pacific northwest ecosystems"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seamon, E.; Gessler, P. E.; Flathers, E.

    2015-12-01

    The creation and use of large amounts of data in scientific investigations has become common practice. Data collection and analysis for large scientific computing efforts are not only increasing in volume as well as number, the methods and analysis procedures are evolving toward greater complexity (Bell, 2009, Clarke, 2009, Maimon, 2010). In addition, the growth of diverse data-intensive scientific computing efforts (Soni, 2011, Turner, 2014, Wu, 2008) has demonstrated the value of supporting scientific data integration. Efforts to bridge this gap between the above perspectives have been attempted, in varying degrees, with modular scientific computing analysis regimes implemented with a modest amount of success (Perez, 2009). This constellation of effects - 1) an increasing growth in the volume and amount of data, 2) a growing data-intensive science base that has challenging needs, and 3) disparate data organization and integration efforts - has created a critical gap. Namely, systems of scientific data organization and management typically do not effectively enable integrated data collaboration or data-intensive science-based communications. Our research efforts attempt to address this gap by developing a modular technology framework for data science integration efforts - with climate variation as the focus. The intention is that this model, if successful, could be generalized to other application areas. Our research aim focused on the design and implementation of a modular, deployable technology architecture for data integration. Developed using aspects of R, interactive python, SciDB, THREDDS, Javascript, and varied data mining and machine learning techniques, the Modular Data Response Framework (MDRF) was implemented to explore case scenarios for bio-climatic variation as they relate to pacific northwest ecosystem regions. Our preliminary results, using historical NETCDF climate data for calibration purposes across the inland pacific northwest region

  17. The Association Between Viral Infections and Co-stimulatory Gene Polymorphisms in Kidney Transplant Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Niknam, Ahmad; Karimi, Mohammad Hossein; Yaghobi, Ramin; Geramizadeh, Bita; Roozbeh, Jamshid; Salehipour, Mehdi; Iravani, Mahdiyar

    2016-01-01

    Background The surveillance of kidney transplant patients depends on function of different immunologic markers like co-stimulatory molecules. These molecules may also be associated with post kidney transplant viral related outcomes. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the possible associations between co-stimulatory molecule gene polymorphisms and viral infections in kidney transplant patients. Patients and Methods In total, 172 kidney transplant patients were included in this study. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in loci of co-stimulatory molecules including: PDCD.1, CD28, CTLA4 and ICOS, were analyzed in the studied patients by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) methods. Active Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and history of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection were analyzed in each kidney transplant patient using the CMV antigenemia kit and HCV antibody assay, according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Results CMV active infection was found in 31 of 172 (18.02%) kidney transplant patients. HCV infection was only found in two of the 172 (1.16%) studied patients. Significant associations were found between TT and TC genotypes of CTLA4 -1722T/C and T allele with acute rejection in CMV infected kidney transplant patients. A significant association was also found between the T allele of CD28 + 17 C/T genetic polymorphism and acute rejection in CMV infected kidney transplant patients. Significantly higher frequency of AA genotype and A allele of CTLA4 + 49AG polymorphism were found in CMV infected female patients. Also a significantly higher frequency of GG genotype and G allele of PDCD-1.3A/G polymorphisms were found in CMV infected female patients. Conclusions Based on these results, CTLA4 and CD28 genetic polymorphisms, which regulate T-cell activation, can influence active CMV infection in kidney transplant patients. These results should be confirmed by further investigations. PMID:27800130

  18. Stimulatory actions of bioflavenoids on tyrosine uptake into cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, K.; Hamano, S.; Oka, M.; Teraoka, K. )

    1990-09-28

    The effects of flavenoids on L-({sup 14}C)tyrosine uptake into cultured adrenal chromaffin cells were examined. Flavone markedly stimulated tyrosine uptake into these cells in a manner dependent on its concentration. Apigenin also caused a moderate stimulatory action, but quercetin had no significant effect on the uptake. Flavone also stimulated the uptake of histidine, but did not affect the uptake of serine, lysine, or glutamic acid. These results are considered to propose the possibility that flavonoids may be able to stimulate the precursor uptake into the cells, resulting in an enhancement of the biogenic amine production.

  19. Evaluation of co-stimulatory effects of Tamarindus indica L. on MNU-induced colonic cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Shivshankar, Pooja; Shyamala Devi, Chennam Srinivasulu

    2004-08-01

    Colonic cell proliferation is the prerequisite for the genesis of cancer. Experimental and epidemiologic evidence indicate dietary factors to be one of the commonest predisposing factors in the development of several types of cancers including large intestine. Here we have investigated the role of the fruit pulp of Tamarindus indica L. (TI), a tropical plant-derived food material, on the proliferating colonic mucosa using Swiss albino mice. Crypt cell proliferation rate (CCPR), on histological basis and [3H]-thymidine incorporation assay were chosen to evaluate the modulating potential of TI per se and in response to a subacute dose of N-nitroso N'-methyl urea (MNU). Descending colonic segment showed greater rate of cell proliferation than the ascending colon and cecum tissues isolated from the group 2 (TI-per se) when compared with group 1 (negative controls). It also revealed a positive correlation with the incorporation studies. Significant increase in the CCPR and radiolabeled precursor incorporation (p <0.001) was observed in MNU-induced+TI fed group of animals (group 4) in all the three segments when compared with control diet fed normal (group 1) as well as MNU-induced (group 3) animals. This study therefore indicates a co-stimulatory effect of TI on MNU-induced colonic cell kinetics.

  20. Upstream stimulatory factor-2 mediates quercetin-induced suppression of PAI-1 gene expression in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Olave, Nélida C; Grenett, Maximiliano H; Cadeiras, Martin; Grenett, Hernan E; Higgins, Paul J

    2010-10-15

    The polyphenol quercetin (Quer) represses expression of the cardiovascular disease risk factor plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in cultured endothelial cells (ECs). Transfection of PAI-1 promoter-luciferase reporter deletion constructs identified a 251-bp fragment (nucleotides -800 to -549) responsive to Quer. Two E-box motifs (CACGTG), at map positions -691 (E-box1) and -575 (E-box2), are platforms for occupancy by several members of the c-MYC family of basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper (bHLH-LZ) proteins. Promoter truncation and electrophoretic mobility shift/supershift analyses identified upstream stimulatory factor (USF)-1 and USF-2 as E-box1/E-box2 binding factors. ECs co-transfected with a 251 bp PAI-1 promoter fragment containing the two E-box motifs (p251/luc) and a USF-2 expression vector (pUSF-2/pcDNA) exhibited reduced luciferase activity versus p251/luc alone. Overexpression of USF-2 decreased, while transfection of a dominant-negative USF construct increased, EC growth consistent with the known anti-proliferative properties of USF proteins. Quer-induced decreases in PAI-1 expression and reduced cell proliferation may contribute, at least in part, to the cardioprotective benefit associated with daily intake of polyphenols.

  1. Stimulatory effect of cytokinins and interaction with IAA on the release of lateral buds of pea plants from apical dominance.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunjian; Bangerth, Fritz

    2003-09-01

    Lateral buds of pea plants can be released from apical dominance and even be transformed into dominant shoots when repeatedly treated with synthetic exogenous cytokinins (CKs). The mechanism of the effect of CKs, however, is not clear. The results in this work showed that the stimulatory effects of CKs on the growth of lateral buds and the increase in their fresh weights in pea plants depended on the structure and concentration of the CKs used. The effect of N-(2-chloro-4-pyridyl)-N'-phenylurea (CPPU) was stronger than that of 6-benzylaminopurine (6-BA). Indoleacetic acid (IAA) concentration in shoot, IAA export out of the treated apex and basipetal transport in stems were markedly increased after the application of CPPU or 6-BA to the apex or the second node of pea plant. This increase was positively correlated with the increased concentration of the applied CKs. These results suggest that the increased IAA synthesis and export induced by CKs application might be responsible for the growth of lateral shoots in intact pea plants. PMID:14593807

  2. Sensory extinction: a procedure form eliminating self-stimulatory behavior in developmentally disabled children.

    PubMed

    Rincover, A

    1978-09-01

    This study was designed to investigate the role of sensory reinforcement in the motivation of self-stimulation. If self-stimulatory behavior is maintained by its sensory consequences, such as the proprioceptive, auditory, or visual stimulation it produces, then such behavior should extinguish when those sensory consequences are not permitted. The present study introduces a new procedure, Sensory Extinction, in which certain sensory consequences are masked or removed, to examine whether self-stimulation is operant behavior maintained by sensory reinforcement. The effectiveness of Sensory Extinction was assessed by a reversal design for each of three autistic children, and the results showed the following. First, self-stimulation reliably extinguished when a certain sensory consequence was removed, then increased when that consequence was permitted. This was replicable within and across children. Second, different Sensory Extinction procedures were required for different self-stimulatory behaviors, since the sensory reinforcers supporting them were idiosyncratic across children. Finally, regarding clinical gains, the data suggest that Sensory Extinction may be a relatively convenient and rapid alternative for the treatment of self-stimulation. The present findings extend the efficacy of extinction as a behavior-modification technique to instances in which the reinforcer is purely sensory. The implications of these results for the treatment of other forms of deviant behavior are discussed.

  3. Identification of T-cell stimulatory antigens of Chlamydia trachomatis using synovial fluid-derived T-cell clones.

    PubMed Central

    Hassell, A B; Reynolds, D J; Deacon, M; Gaston, J S; Pearce, J H

    1993-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is a major cause of sexually transmitted disease, infertility and reactive arthritis in the Western world, and of trachoma in the developing world. There is evidence that the chronic inflammatory reaction seen in diseases associated with chlamydiae represents a delayed-type hypersensitivity response to chlamydial antigens. Little is known about which chlamydial antigens elicit T-cell responses yet such information could have important implications in terms of both immunopathological understanding of these diseases and immunoprophylaxis design. In this study, 61 chlamydia-specific T-cell clones have been produced from the synovial fluid of an individual with sexually acquired reactive arthritis (SARA). Ten clones have been characterized in detail and used to identify T-cell stimulatory antigens of chlamydiae by means of T-cell immunoblotting. Two distinct antigenic fractions have been identified, one recognized by three of the clones (molecular weight 18,000), the other recognized by six of the clones (molecular weight 30,000). The fractions are distinct from the major outer membrane protein, the 57,000 MW stress protein and the 60,000 MW cysteine-rich membrane protein of chlamydiae. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) restriction of the response to these antigens differed: clones recognizing the 18,000 MW antigen required antigen-presenting cells expressing DR1 subtype DRB1*0101 or DRB1*0102 which only differ at amino acids 85 and 86 on the DR beta-chain; by contrast clones recognizing the 30,000 MW antigen were presented to only by antigen-presenting cells from DRB1*0101 individuals, reflecting extreme sensitivity of these clones to the polymorphism at positions 85 and 86 on the DR beta-chain. Images Figure 4 PMID:7691730

  4. The prolonged stimulatory effect of ACTH on 11 beta-hydroxylation, and its contribution to the steroidogenic potency of adrenocortical cells.

    PubMed

    Lambert, F; Lammerant, J; Kolanowski, J

    1984-04-01

    The mechanism of the prolonged stimulatory influence of corticotropin (ACTH) on the capacity of adrenocortical cells to produce cortisol in response to ACTH and more specifically the role of 11 beta-hydroxylation, was studied on guinea-pig adrenocortical cells dispersed from control and ACTH-treated animals. As a result of the previous in vivo exposure to ACTH, the net maximal production of glucocorticoids in response to ACTH (by 10(5) cells and 2 h incubation) increased from 660 +/- 33.9 ng (control group) to 1105 +/- 117.9 ng for cells from ACTH-treated animals (P less than 0.001), whereas the apparent affinity of the steroidogenic response remained unchanged. In addition there occurred an increased conversion of exogenous pregnenolone into cortisol by cells from ACTH-treated animals, indicating a prolonged stimulatory influence of ACTH on the post-pregnenolone pathway of cortisol biosynthesis. The activity of 11 beta-hydroxylation step was therefore examined by incubating the adrenocortical cells from control and ACTH-treated animals in the presence of increasing amounts of 11-deoxycortisol. The maximal capacity of 11-deoxycortisol conversion into cortisol was increased as a result of the in vivo exposure to ACTH, averaging 3423 +/- 211 ng cortisol formed from 5 micrograms 11-deoxycortisol by 10(5) cells from ACTH-treated animals vs 2074 +/- 185 ng for cells from control guinea-pigs (P less than 0.001). However, the conversion of lower amounts of 11-deoxycortisol into cortisol, reproducing quantitatively the maximal effect of ACTH on cortisol biosynthesis, was only barely increased in cells from ACTH-treated animals (P greater than 0.05). Therefore it was concluded that ACTH increases in a lasting way not only the overall steroidogenic capacity of adrenocortical cells but also the maximal efficiency of 11 beta-hydroxylation. Since the latter effect cannot account quantitatively for the magnitude of the lasting effect of ACTH on the maximal capacity of

  5. Stimulatory effects of the putative metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist L-AP3 on phosphoinositide turnover in neonatal rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, R.; Prabhu, G.; Godwin, M.; Challiss, R. A.

    1996-01-01

    1. The effects of the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) antagonist, L-2-amino-3-phosphonopropionate (L-AP3) on phosphoinositide turnover in neonatal rat cerebral cortex slices has been investigated. 2. At concentrations of < or = 300 microM, L-AP3 inhibited total [3H]-inositol phosphate ([3H]-InsPx) and Ins(1,4,5)P3 mass responses stimulated by the selective mGluR agonist, 1-amino-cyclopentane-1S, 3R-dicarboxylic acid (1S, 3R-ACPD). Comparison with the competitive mGluR antagonist (+/-)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine ((+/-)-MCPG) clearly demonstrated that L-AP3 caused inhibition by a mechanism that was not competitive, as L-AP3 decreased the maximal response to 1S, 3R-ACPD (by approximately 40% at 300 microM L-AP3) without significantly affecting the concentration of 1S, 3R-ACPD required to cause half-maximal stimulation of the [3H]-InsPx response. 3. In contrast, at a higher concentration L-AP3 (1 mM) caused a large increase in [3H]-InsPx accumulation which was similar in magnitude in both the absence and presence of 1S, 3R-ACPD (300 microM). D-AP3 (1 mM) had no stimulatory effect alone and did not affect the response evoked by 1S, 3R-ACPD. L-AP3 (1 mM) also caused a large increase in Ins(1,4,5)P3 accumulation. The magnitude of the response (4-5 fold increase over basal) approached that evoked by a maximally effective concentration of 1S, 3R-ACPD, but differed substantially in the time-course of the response. The stimulatory effects of 1S, 3R-ACPD and L-AP3 on Ins(1,4,5)P3 accumulation were also similarly affected by decreases in extracellular calcium concentration. 4. Detailed analysis of the inositol phospholipid labelling pattern and the inositol (poly)phosphate isomeric species generated following addition of L-AP3 was also performed. In the continued presence of myo-[3H]-inositol, L-AP3 (1 mM) stimulated a significant increase in phosphatidylinositol labelling, but not that of the polyphosphoinositides, and the inositol (poly)phosphate profile

  6. Stimulatory effect of interleukin-1 beta on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis of the rat: influence of age, gender and circulating sex steroids.

    PubMed

    Rivier, C

    1994-03-01

    The bilateral communication between the immune and neuroendocrine systems plays an essential role in modulating the adequate response of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis to the stimulatory influence of interleukins (ILs). It is thus reasonable to assume that inappropriate responses of the HPA axis to ILs might play a role in modulating the onset of pathological conditions such as infections. As part of our programme aimed at investigating the ability of ILs to release pro-opiomelanocortin-like peptides and corticosterone in rats exposed to alcohol, we observed that this stimulatory action appeared to be influenced by the gender of the animals. We therefore examined the ability of IL-1 beta, injected peripherally, to stimulate the HPA axis as a function of stage of sexual maturation and the presence or absence of circulating sex steroids. In immature (21 to 22-day-old) rats, both males and females responded to the i.p. administration of 0.5 or 2.0 micrograms IL-1 beta/kg with statistically comparable increases in plasma ACTH levels. In contrast, females released significantly (P < 0.01) more corticosterone in response to the lower dose of cytokine. Forty-day-old intact animals showed no sexual dimorphism in ACTH secretion, but the females again secreted significantly (P < 0.05-0.01) more corticosterone. Gonadectomy, performed 7-8 days prior to the assay, increased the absolute amount of corticosterone released over a 60-min period. A noticeable dimorphism of the ACTH response to IL-1 beta became apparent in 70-day-old intact rats, with females secreting more ACTH than males.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Identification of stimulatory and inhibitory inputs to the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis during hypoglycaemia or transport in ewes.

    PubMed

    Smith, R F; French, N P; Saphier, P W; Lowry, P J; Veldhuis, J D; Dobson, H

    2003-06-01

    This study used the novel approach of statistical modelling to investigate the control of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and quantify temporal relationships between hormones. Two experimental paradigms were chosen, insulin-induced hypoglycaemia and 2 h transport, to assess differences in control between noncognitive and cognitive stimuli. Vasopressin and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) were measured in hypophysial portal plasma, and adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) and cortisol in jugular plasma of conscious sheep, and deconvolution analysis was used to calculate secretory rates, before modelling. During hypoglycaemia, the relationship between plasma glucose and vasopressin or CRH was best described by log10 transforming variables (i.e. a positive power-curve relationship). A negative-feedback relationship with log10 cortisol concentration 2 h previously was detected. Analysis of the "transport" stimulus suggested that the strength of the perceived stimulus decreased over time after accounting for cortisol facilitation and negative-feedback. The time course of vasopressin and CRH responses to each stimulus were different However, at the pituitary level, the data suggested that log10 ACTH secretion rate was related to log10 vasopressin and CRH concentrations with very similar regression coefficients and an identical ratio of actions (2.3 : 1) for both stimuli. Similar magnitude negative-feedback effects of log10 cortisol at -110 min (hypoglycaemia) or -40 min (transport) were detected, and both models contained a stimulatory relationship with cortisol at 0 min (facilitation). At adrenal gland level, cortisol secretory rates were related to simultaneously measured untransformed ACTH concentration but the regression coefficient for the hypoglycaemia model was 2.5-fold greater than for transport. No individual sustained maximum cortisol secretion for longer than 20 min during hypoglycaemia and 40 min during transport. These unique models demonstrate

  8. Effect of multiple endogenous biological factors on the response of the tephritids Anastrepha ludens and Anastrepha obliqua (Diptera: Tephritidae) to multilure traps baited with BioLure or NuLure in mango orchards.

    PubMed

    Arredondo, José; Flores, Salvador; Montoya, Pablo; Díaz-Fleischer, Francisco

    2014-06-01

    The physiological state of an insect is likely the most important endogenous factor influencing resource-oriented behavior, and it varies considerably among individuals. Trials were conducted in mango orchards to study the effect of multiple endogenous biological factors on the response of two fly species, Anastrepha ludens (Loew) and Anastrepha obliqua Maquart (Diptera: Tephritidae), to BioLure and NuLure baits. The biological factors of the two fly species that were tested were the following: 1) fertility status-sterile (irradiated) and fertile flies; 2) two types of diets (only sugar and a 3:1 mixture of sugar and hydrolyzed yeast protein; 3) sex, and 4) two sexual maturity conditions (2-4- and 15-18-d-old flies, representing immature and sexually mature flies, respectively, and 2-4-d-old flies treated with methoprene as an artificially induced sexually state male condition). The laboratory-treated flies were released into three different mango orchards. The trials were conducted in four blocks per orchard using eight traps in each block (50:50 BioLure: NuLure). The traps were replaced every 2 d during the 12-d period and the flies per trap per day values were calculated. More protein-fed, fertile, female, immature, and A. obliqua flies were caught compared with the other flies tested. In addition, the traps baited with NuLure attracted more flies than those baited with BioLure. Interaction analyses indicated that the type of bait and the sexual maturity status were the most important factors affecting the responses of the flies. Our study demonstrated that lures attract only a small segment of the fly population, those that have a specific hunger for amino acids-immature flies-and those that were protein-starved. The implications for improved trapping system designs are discussed.

  9. The Differential and Temporal Effects of Antecedent Exercise on the Self-Stimulatory Behavior of a Child with Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celiberti, David A.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    The effects of two levels of exercise (walking versus jogging) in suppressing the self-stimulatory behavior during academic programming of a 5-year-old boy with autism were examined. Decreased physical self-stimulation and "out of seat" behavior were found only for the jogging condition. Sharp reductions in these behaviors did not return to…

  10. Forensic Analysis of BIOS Chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershteyn, Pavel; Davis, Mark; Shenoi, Sujeet

    Data can be hidden in BIOS chips without hindering computer performance. This feature has been exploited by virus writers and computer game enthusiasts. Unused BIOS storage can also be used by criminals, terrorists and intelligence agents to conceal secrets. However, BIOS chips are largely ignored in digital forensic investigations. Few techniques exist for imaging BIOS chips and no tools are available specifically for analyzing BIOS data.

  11. Gamma-amino butyric acid inhibits the nicotine-imposed stimulatory challenge in xenograft models of non-small cell lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Al-Wadei, H A N; Al-Wadei, M H; Ullah, M F; Schuller, H M

    2012-02-01

    Non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is the leading type of lung cancer; smoking is a documented risk factor. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-mediated intracellular signaling in response to nicotine has recently been implicated in the growth regulation of NSCLC. In the current study nude mice carrying xenografts of the human lung NSCLC cell lines NCI-H322 or NCI-H441 were used as animal models. Nicotine administration and gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) treatment lasted for 30 days. Catecholamines, cortisol, GABA, and cAMP were analyzed in blood and tumor tissues by immunoassays. Expression of nicotinic receptors and effector proteins in the xenografts was assessed by Western blotting. Our data indicate that nicotine stimulated the growth of NSCLC xenografts via modulation of nAChR upregulation and activation of cAMP signaling. The nicotine-treated group showed an enhanced level of stress neurotransmitters and second messenger cAMP in serum, blood cellular fraction, and xenograft tissues. Activation of critical proteins in the oncogenic pathway, including CREB, ERK, Akt, and Src, and upregulation of α-4 and α-7 subunits of nAChR provided mechanistic insight for the observed stimulatory effect of nicotine. Interestingly, GABA, being an antagonist to cAMP signaling, showed a promising intervention by reversing the stimulatory effect of nicotine on cancer growth and all signaling pathways. GABA has potential to lower the risk of NSCLC among smokers and could be used to enhance the clinical outcome of standard cancer intervention strategies.

  12. Stimulatory action of protein kinase Cɛ isoform on the slow component of delayed rectifier K+ current in guinea-pig atrial myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Toda, H; Ding, W-G; Yasuda, Y; Toyoda, F; Ito, M; Matsuura, H; Horie, M

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Protein kinase C (PKC) comprises at least twelve isoforms and has an isoform-specific action on cardiac electrical activity. The slow component of delayed rectifier K+ current (I Ks) is one of the major repolarizing currents in the hearts of many species and is also potentiated by PKC activation. Little is known, however, about PKC isoform(s) functionally involved in the potentiation of I Ks in native cardiac myocytes. Experimental approach: I Ks was recorded from guinea-pig atrial myocytes, using the whole-cell configuration of patch-clamp method. Key results: Bath application of phenylephrine enhanced I Ks concentration-dependently with EC50 of 5.4 μM and the maximal response (97.1±11.9% increase, n=16) was obtained at 30 μM. Prazosin (1 μM) almost totally abolished the potentiation of I Ks by phenylephrine, supporting the involvement of α1-adrenoceptors. The stimulatory action of phenylephrine was significantly, if not entirely, inhibited by the general PKC inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide I but was little affected by Gö-6976, Gö-6983 and rottlerin. Furthermore, this stimulatory effect was significantly reduced by dialyzing atrial myocytes with PKCɛ-selective inhibitory peptide ɛV1-2 but was not significantly affected by conventional PKC isoform-selective inhibitory peptide βC2-4. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) at 100 nM substantially increased I Ks by 64.2±1.3% (n=6), which was also significantly attenuated by an internal dialysis with ɛV1-2 but not with βC2-4. Conclusions and implications: The present study provides experimental evidence to suggest that, in native guinea-pig cardiac myocytes, activation of PKC contributes to α1-adrenoceptor-mediated potentiation of I Ks and that ɛ is the isoform predominantly involved in this PKC action. PMID:17339832

  13. TCR stimulation without co-stimulatory signals induces expression of "tolerogenic" genes in memory CD4 T cells but does not compromise cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Aini; Zheng, Xiong; Khattar, Mithun; Schroder, Paul; Stepkowski, Stanislaw; Xia, Jiahong; Chen, Wenhao

    2015-02-01

    Memory T cells resist co-stimulatory blockade and present a unique therapeutic challenge in transplantation and autoimmune diseases. Herein, we determined whether memory T cells express less "tolerogenic" genes than naïve T cells to reinforce a proliferative response under the deprivation of co-stimulatory signals. The expression of ∼40 tolerogenic genes in memory and naïve CD4(+) T cells was thus assessed during an in vitro TCR stimulation without co-stimulation. Briefly, upon TCR stimulation with an anti-CD3 mAb alone, memory CD4(+) T cells exhibited more proliferation than naïve CD4(+) T cells. To our surprise, at 24h upon anti-CD3 mAb stimulation, memory CD4(+) T cells expressed more than a 5-fold higher level of the transcription factor Egr2 and a 20-fold higher level of the transmembrane E3 ubiquitin ligase GRAIL than those in naïve T cells. Hence, the high-level expression of tolerogenic genes, Egr2 and GRAIL, in memory CD4(+) T cells does not prevent cell proliferation. Importantly, anti-CD3 mAb-stimulated memory CD4(+) T cells expressed high protein/gene levels of phosphorylated STAT5, Nedd4, Bcl-2, and Bcl-XL. Therefore, co-stimulation-independent proliferation of memory CD4(+) T cells may be due to elevated expression of molecules that support cell proliferation and survival, but not lack of tolerogenic molecules.

  14. Interaction between Angiotensin II and Insulin/IGF-1 Exerted a Synergistic Stimulatory Effect on ERK1/2 Activation in Adrenocortical Carcinoma H295R Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tong, An-li; Wang, Fen; Cui, Yun-ying; Li, Chun-yan; Li, Yu-xiu

    2016-01-01

    The cross talk between angiotensin II (Ang II) and insulin has been described mainly in cardiovascular cells, hepatocytes, adipocytes, and so forth, and to date no such cross talk was reported in adrenal. In this study, we examined the interaction between Ang II and insulin/IGF-1 in ERK and AKT signaling pathways and expression of steroidogenic enzymes in H295R cells. Compared to the control, 100 nM Ang II increased phospho-ERK1/2 approximately 3-fold. Insulin (100 nM) or IGF-1 (10 nM) alone raised phospho-ERK1/2 1.8- and 1.5-fold, respectively, while, after pretreatment with 100 nM Ang II for 30 min, insulin (100 nM) or IGF-1 (10 nM) elevated phospho-ERK1/2 level 8- and 7-fold, respectively. The synergistic effect of Ang II and insulin/IGF-1 on ERK1/2 activation was inhibited by selective AT1 receptor blocker, PKC inhibitor, and MEK1/2 inhibitor. Ang II marginally suppressed AKT activation under the basal condition, while it had no effect on phospho-AKT induced by insulin/IGF-1. Ang II significantly stimulated mRNA expression of CYP11B1 and CYP11B2, and such stimulatory effects were enhanced when cells were cotreated with insulin/IGF-1. We are led to conclude that Ang II in combination with insulin/IGF-1 had an evident synergistic stimulatory effect on ERK1/2 activation in H295R cells and the effect may be responsible for the enhanced steroid hormone production induced by Ang II plus insulin/IGF-1. PMID:27293433

  15. Stimulatory Effects of Arsenic-Tolerant Soil Fungi on Plant Growth Promotion and Soil Properties

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Pankaj Kumar; Shenoy, Belle Damodara; Gupta, Manjul; Vaish, Aradhana; Mannan, Shivee; Singh, Nandita; Tewari, Shri Krishna; Tripathi, Rudra Deo

    2012-01-01

    Fifteen fungi were obtained from arsenic-contaminated agricultural fields in West Bengal, India and examined for their arsenic tolerance and removal ability in our previous study. Of these, the four best arsenic-remediating isolates were tested for plant growth promotion effects on rice and pea in the present study. A greenhouse-based pot experiment was conducted using soil inocula of individual fungi. The results indicated a significant (P<0.05) increase in plant growth and improvement of soil properties in inoculated soils compared to the control. A significant increase in plant growth was recorded in treated soils and varied from 16–293%. Soil chemical and enzymatic properties varied from 20–222% and 34–760%, respectively, in inoculated soil. Plants inoculated with inocula of Westerdykella and Trichoderma showed better stimulatory effects on plant growth and soil nutrient availability than Rhizopus and Lasiodiplodia. These fungi improved soil nutrient content and enhanced plant growth. These fungi may be used as bioinoculants for plant growth promotion and improved soil properties in arsenic-contaminated agricultural soils. PMID:23047145

  16. Stimulatory activities of a T cell proteoglycan fraction (T-PGF)

    SciTech Connect

    Levitt, D.; Olmstead, L.

    1986-03-01

    The authors had demonstrated previously that T lymphocytes synthesize and secrete chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (PG). To analyze whether this PG possessed immunoregulatory activity, mouse T cell hybridomas were created and screened for secretion of /sup 35/S-PG. The PG secreted by high producer lines was purified primarily by anion exchange chromatography. Analysis of isolated material indicated the presence of uronic acid, a major sugar in glycosaminoglycans. SDS-PAGE of radio-iodinated T-PGF revealed two bands at 70 kd and 50 kd, which was confirmed by silver staining. The T-PGF stimulated mouse splenic B cell fractions to proliferate and differentiate into plaque-forming cells; no induction or costimulation (with Con A) of T cells fraction or thymocyte proliferation was detected. The T-PGF stimulated activated (Percoll low density, increased forward light scattering) B cells better than resting populations; induction of resting cells could be enhanced by simultaneous addition of low concentrations of a protein mitogen, STM. Biochemically and functionally, T-PGF co-migrates with PG in the void volume of Sephacryl S-200 columns. The precise nature of the relationship between B cell stimulatory activity and PG is unknown; however, the recent production of monoclonal antibodies against T-PGF should help clarify these questions.

  17. Stimulatory effect of apigenin-6-C-beta-L-fucopyranoside on insulin secretion and glycogen synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cazarolli, Luisa Helena; Folador, Poliane; Moresco, Henrique Hunger; Brighente, Inês Maria Costa; Pizzolatti, Moacir Geraldo; Silva, Fátima Regina M Barreto

    2009-11-01

    In vivo and in vitro treatments were carried out to investigate the effects of apigenin-6-C-beta-L-fucopyranoside (1), isolated from Averrhoa carambola L. (Oxalidaceae), on serum glucose and insulin levels in hyperglycemic rats as well as its effect on glycogen synthesis in normal rat soleus muscle. Apigenin-6-C-beta-L-fucopyranoside showed an acute effect on blood glucose lowering in hyperglycemic rats and stimulated glucose-induced insulin secretion. A stimulatory effect of 1 on glycogen synthesis was observed when muscles were incubated with this flavonoid and also its effect was completely nullified by pre-treatment with insulin signal transduction inhibitors. Taking this into account, the MAPK-PP1 and PI3K-GSK3 pathways are involved in the apigenin-6-C-beta-L-fucopyranoside-induced increase in glycogen synthesis in muscle. This study provides evidence for dual effects of apigenin-6-C-beta-L-fucopyranoside as an antihyperglycemic (insulin secretion) as well as an insulinomimetic (glycogen synthesis) agent.

  18. Engineering artificial antigen-presenting cells to express a diverse array of co-stimulatory molecules.

    PubMed

    Suhoski, Megan M; Golovina, Tatiana N; Aqui, Nicole A; Tai, Victoria C; Varela-Rohena, Angel; Milone, Michael C; Carroll, Richard G; Riley, James L; June, Carl H

    2007-05-01

    To facilitate the therapeutic application of antigen-presenting cells (APCs), we have developed a cell-based artificial APC (aAPC) system by engineering K562 cells with lentiviruses to direct the stable expression and secretion of a variety of co-stimulatory molecules and cytokines. Here we report the use of a combinatorial lentiviral gene transfer approach to achieve long-term stable expression of at least seven genes in the K562 parental cell line. Expression of various combinations of genes on the aAPC enables the precise determination of human T-cell activation requirements, such that aAPCs can be tailored for the optimal propagation of T-cell subsets with specific growth requirements and distinct functions. The aAPCs support ex vivo growth and long-term expansion of functional human CD8 T cells without requiring the addition of exogenous cytokines, in contrast to the use of natural APCs. Distinct populations of T cells can be expanded with aAPCs expressing CD137L (4-1BBL) and/or CD80. Finally, the aAPCs provide an efficient platform to expand genetically modified T cells and to maintain CD28 expression on CD8 T cells. Therefore, K562-based aAPCs have therapeutic potential for adoptive immunotherapies and vaccinations. PMID:17375070

  19. Stimulatory effects of arsenic-tolerant soil fungi on plant growth promotion and soil properties.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Pankaj Kumar; Shenoy, Belle Damodara; Gupta, Manjul; Vaish, Aradhana; Mannan, Shivee; Singh, Nandita; Tewari, Shri Krishna; Tripathi, Rudra Deo

    2012-01-01

    Fifteen fungi were obtained from arsenic-contaminated agricultural fields in West Bengal, India and examined for their arsenic tolerance and removal ability in our previous study. Of these, the four best arsenic-remediating isolates were tested for plant growth promotion effects on rice and pea in the present study. A greenhouse-based pot experiment was conducted using soil inocula of individual fungi. The results indicated a significant (P<0.05) increase in plant growth and improvement of soil properties in inoculated soils compared to the control. A significant increase in plant growth was recorded in treated soils and varied from 16-293%. Soil chemical and enzymatic properties varied from 20-222% and 34-760%, respectively, in inoculated soil. Plants inoculated with inocula of Westerdykella and Trichoderma showed better stimulatory effects on plant growth and soil nutrient availability than Rhizopus and Lasiodiplodia. These fungi improved soil nutrient content and enhanced plant growth. These fungi may be used as bioinoculants for plant growth promotion and improved soil properties in arsenic-contaminated agricultural soils.

  20. Retractile processes in T lymphocyte orientation on a stimulatory substrate: morphology and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipov, Sergey N.; Maly, Ivan V.

    2008-03-01

    T cells of the immune system target infected and tumor cells in crowded tissues with high precision by coming into direct contact with the intended target and orienting the intracellular Golgi apparatus and the associated organelles to the area of the cell-cell contact. The mechanism of this orientation remains largely unknown. To further elucidate it we used three-dimensional microscopy of living T cells presented with an artificial substrate mimicking the target cell surface. The data indicate that long, finger-like processes emanate from the T cell surface next to the intracellular Golgi apparatus. These processes come in contact with the substrate and retract. The retraction accompanies the reorientation of the T cell body which brings the Golgi apparatus closer to the stimulatory substrate. Numerical modeling indicates that considering the forces involved the retraction of a process attached with one end to the cell body near the Golgi apparatus and with the other end to the substrate can bring the Golgi apparatus to the substrate by moving the entire cell body. The dynamic scenarios that are predicted by the quantitative model explain features of the reorientation movements that we measured but could not explain previously. We propose that retraction of the surface processes is a force-generating mechanism contributing to the functional orientation of T lymphocytes.

  1. AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma: evidence for direct stimulatory effect of glucocorticoid on cell proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Guo, W. X.; Antakly, T.

    1995-01-01

    Glucocorticoid therapy has been linked to increased risk of development of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), which has become epidemic among HIV-infected individuals. However, no experimental evidence is available to explain the role of glucocorticoid in KS biopathology. We investigated the direct effect of dexamethasone (Dex) on the growth of cultured KS cells derived from acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients (AIDS-KS). Dex significantly stimulated the proliferation of AIDS-KS cells. Moreover, simultaneous exposure to Dex and oncostatin M, a KS major cytokine, produced a dramatic synergistic effect on proliferation of AIDS-KS cell. This suggests an interaction between glucocorticoid and growth factor intracellular pathways in KS cells. The expression of glucocorticoid receptor protein and mRNA in AIDS-KS cell cultures was examined by radioimmunoassay and in situ hybridization, respectively. Compared with other well studied cell lines, AIDS-KS cells contain an unusually high level of glucocorticoid receptor protein, which is further upregulated by glucocorticoid treatment. RU-486, a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, completely abolished the stimulatory effect of Dex and reduced the synergistic effect of Dex and oncostatin M on proliferation of AIDS-KS. These findings demonstrate that glucocorticoid stimulates directly the proliferation of AIDS-KS cells via the modulation of glucocorticoid receptor expression. Images Figure 3 PMID:7887453

  2. Stimulatory effects of neuropeptide Y on the growth of orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides).

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuge; Li, Bo; Lin, Haoran; Li, Wensheng

    2012-11-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a member of the pancreatic polypeptide family which is a potent orexigenic peptide known to date in mammals and teleost. This study was carried out to investigate the effects of NPY on food intake and growth of orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides). Synthetic grouper NPY (gNPY) was given orally at the dose of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 μg/g feed for 50 days, results showed that NPY treatment (1.0 and 2.0 μg/g feed) significantly increased growth rate, weight gain, feed conversion efficiency (FCE) and pituitary growth hormone (GH) mRNA level than the control group (p<0.05). Furthermore, high level secretion of gNPY was expressed and purified in the Pichia pastoris expression system. The bioactivity of recombinant gNPY was confirmed by its ability to up-regulate GH mRNA expression in vivo and in vitro and down-regulate preprosomatostatin I (PSSI) mRNA expression in vivo. These results demonstrate that NPY has stimulatory effects on food intake as well as growth of grouper as in other teleost fish, also indicate that recombinant gNPY from P. pastoris has the same bioactivity as synthetic gNPY and has the potential to be used as a feed additive for both research and aquatic application.

  3. Stimulatory effects of arsenic-tolerant soil fungi on plant growth promotion and soil properties.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Pankaj Kumar; Shenoy, Belle Damodara; Gupta, Manjul; Vaish, Aradhana; Mannan, Shivee; Singh, Nandita; Tewari, Shri Krishna; Tripathi, Rudra Deo

    2012-01-01

    Fifteen fungi were obtained from arsenic-contaminated agricultural fields in West Bengal, India and examined for their arsenic tolerance and removal ability in our previous study. Of these, the four best arsenic-remediating isolates were tested for plant growth promotion effects on rice and pea in the present study. A greenhouse-based pot experiment was conducted using soil inocula of individual fungi. The results indicated a significant (P<0.05) increase in plant growth and improvement of soil properties in inoculated soils compared to the control. A significant increase in plant growth was recorded in treated soils and varied from 16-293%. Soil chemical and enzymatic properties varied from 20-222% and 34-760%, respectively, in inoculated soil. Plants inoculated with inocula of Westerdykella and Trichoderma showed better stimulatory effects on plant growth and soil nutrient availability than Rhizopus and Lasiodiplodia. These fungi improved soil nutrient content and enhanced plant growth. These fungi may be used as bioinoculants for plant growth promotion and improved soil properties in arsenic-contaminated agricultural soils. PMID:23047145

  4. BioWatch in a Box

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, M T; Dzentis, J M; Meyer, R M

    2006-02-01

    BioWatch, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) environmental monitoring program, has been successfully operating in many of the nation's urban centers since early 2003. This early warning environmental monitoring system can detect trace amounts of biological materials in the air, and has been used to provide information to assist public health experts determine whether detected materials are due to an intentional release (bioterrorism incident) or due to minute quantities that occur naturally in the environment. BioWatch information enables federal, state, and local officials to more quickly determine appropriate emergency response, medical care and consequence management.

  5. BioMEMs.

    PubMed

    Gross, Brooks A

    2004-01-01

    This session is intended to provide insight into the development of BioMEMS in the academic and industrial settings and address the current challenges facing R&D. Each speaker will address the field of bioMEMS and collaborations between academia and industry from his point-of-view and provide examples of developmental successes and failures in his setting. The speakers will also submit potential solutions to the organizational problems they presently face and foresee in the future. As a panel, the speakers will exchange ideas with the attendees with the hope of collectively introducing solutions to the problems submitted during the talks and general guidelines for successful R&D of BioMEMS through productive collaboration among engineers and scientists of different disciplines and between academia and industry. Speakers: Professor Kensall D. Wise (Professor of EECS and Director of WIMS, U of Michigan), Dr. Michael A. Huff (Director of the MEMS Exchange), Colin Brenan (CTO, Biotrove).

  6. Stimulatory Effects of Balanced Deep Sea Water on Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Function

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Byung Geun; Park, Jung-Eun; Cho, Hyun-Jung; Shon, Yun Hee

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide prevalence of metabolic diseases, including obesity and diabetes, is increasing. Mitochondrial dysfunction is recognized as a core feature of these diseases. Emerging evidence also suggests that defects in mitochondrial biogenesis, number, morphology, fusion, and fission, contribute to the development and progression of metabolic diseases. Our previous studies revealed that balanced deep-sea water (BDSW) has potential as a treatment for diabetes and obesity. In this study, we aimed to investigate the mechanism by which BDSW regulates diabetes and obesity by studying its effects on mitochondrial metabolism. To determine whether BDSW regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and function, we investigated its effects on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content, mitochondrial enzyme activity, and the expression of transcription factors and mitochondria specific genes, as well as on the phosphorylation of signaling molecules associated with mitochondria biogenesis and its function in C2C12 myotubes. BDSW increased mitochondrial biogenesis in a time and dose-dependent manner. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that BDSW enhances gene expression of PGC-1α, NRF1, and TFAM for mitochondrial transcription; MFN1/2 and DRP1 for mitochondrial fusion; OPA1 for mitochondrial fission; TOMM40 and TIMM44 for mitochondrial protein import; CPT-1α and MCAD for fatty acid oxidation; CYTC for oxidative phosphorylation. Upregulation of these genes was validated by increased mitochondria staining, CS activity, CytC oxidase activity, NAD+ to NADH ratio, and the phosphorylation of signaling molecules such as AMPK and SIRT1. Moreover, drinking BDSW remarkably improved mtDNA content in the muscles of HFD-induced obese mice. Taken together, these results suggest that the stimulatory effect of BDSW on mitochondrial biogenesis and function may provide further insights into the regulatory mechanism of BDSW-induced anti-diabetic and anti-obesity action. PMID:26068191

  7. Stimulatory Effects of Balanced Deep Sea Water on Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Function.

    PubMed

    Ha, Byung Geun; Park, Jung-Eun; Cho, Hyun-Jung; Shon, Yun Hee

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide prevalence of metabolic diseases, including obesity and diabetes, is increasing. Mitochondrial dysfunction is recognized as a core feature of these diseases. Emerging evidence also suggests that defects in mitochondrial biogenesis, number, morphology, fusion, and fission, contribute to the development and progression of metabolic diseases. Our previous studies revealed that balanced deep-sea water (BDSW) has potential as a treatment for diabetes and obesity. In this study, we aimed to investigate the mechanism by which BDSW regulates diabetes and obesity by studying its effects on mitochondrial metabolism. To determine whether BDSW regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and function, we investigated its effects on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content, mitochondrial enzyme activity, and the expression of transcription factors and mitochondria specific genes, as well as on the phosphorylation of signaling molecules associated with mitochondria biogenesis and its function in C2C12 myotubes. BDSW increased mitochondrial biogenesis in a time and dose-dependent manner. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that BDSW enhances gene expression of PGC-1α, NRF1, and TFAM for mitochondrial transcription; MFN1/2 and DRP1 for mitochondrial fusion; OPA1 for mitochondrial fission; TOMM40 and TIMM44 for mitochondrial protein import; CPT-1α and MCAD for fatty acid oxidation; CYTC for oxidative phosphorylation. Upregulation of these genes was validated by increased mitochondria staining, CS activity, CytC oxidase activity, NAD+ to NADH ratio, and the phosphorylation of signaling molecules such as AMPK and SIRT1. Moreover, drinking BDSW remarkably improved mtDNA content in the muscles of HFD-induced obese mice. Taken together, these results suggest that the stimulatory effect of BDSW on mitochondrial biogenesis and function may provide further insights into the regulatory mechanism of BDSW-induced anti-diabetic and anti-obesity action. PMID:26068191

  8. Stimulatory effect of topical application of caffeine on UVB-induced apoptosis in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yao-Ping; Lou, You-Rong; Li, Xiang-Hong; Xie, Jian-Guo; Lin, Yong; Shih, Weichung Joe; Conney, Allan H

    2002-01-01

    In an earlier study, we showed that oral administration of green tea or caffeine to SKH-1 mice for 2 weeks prior to a single application of UVB enhanced UVB-induced increases in the number of p53-positive cells, p21(WAF1/CIP1)-positive cells, and apoptotic sunburn cells in the epidermis. In the present study, we found that topical application of caffeine, a major chemopreventive agent in tea, to the dorsal skin of SKH-1 mice immediately after irradiation with UVB (30 mJ/cm2) enhanced UVB-induced apoptosis as measured by the number of morphologically distinct epidermal apoptotic sunburn cells and the number of caspase 3-positive cells. Time course studies indicated that UVB-induced increases in apoptotic sunburn cells were correlated with elevated levels of caspase 3, a key protease that becomes activated during an early stage of apoptosis. Topical application of caffeine immediately after UVB enhanced UVB-induced increases in caspase 3 (active form)-immunoreactive-positive cells and in caspase 3 enzyme activity in the epidermis. Topical application of caffeine had only a small stimulatory effect on UVB-induced increases in the level of wild-type p53 protein and these changes were not related temporally to caffeine-induced increases in apoptotic cells. There was little or no effect of topical applications of caffeine on epidermal cell proliferation as determined by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation into DNA. Topical application of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) to the dorsal skin of mice immediately after irradiation with UVB had a small inhibitory effect on UVB-induced increases in BrdU-positive cells in the basal layer of the epidermis, but this treatment had no effect on UVB-induced increases in apoptotic sunburn cells. The results of this study indicate a proapoptotic effect of topical application of caffeine on UVB-irradiated mouse skin.

  9. Selaginellin and biflavonoids as protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors from Selaginella tamariscina and their glucose uptake stimulatory effects.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phi-Hung; Ji, Da-Jung; Han, Yu-Ran; Choi, Jae-Sue; Rhyu, Dong-Young; Min, Byung-Sun; Woo, Mi-Hee

    2015-07-01

    As part of an ongoing search for new antidiabetic agents from medicinal plants, the methanol extract of the aerial parts of Selaginella tamariscina was found to possess stimulatory effect on glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocyte cells. Thus, bioassay-guided isolation of this active extract yielded two new compounds (1 and 2) along with five known biflavonoids (3-7). Their structures were elucidated by extensive analysis of spectroscopic and physicochemical data. The absolute configuration of compound 2 was determined by specific rotation and CD data analysis. All isolates exhibited potent inhibitory effects on PTP1B enzyme with IC50 values ranging from 4.5±0.1 to 13.2±0.8μM. Furthermore, the isolates (1-7) showed significant stimulatory effects on 2-NBDG uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocyte cells. Of these, compounds (1, 6, and 7) which exhibited mixed-competitive inhibition modes against PTP1B, showed potent stimulatory effects on 2-NBDG uptake. This result indicated the potential of these biflavonoids as lead molecules for development of antidiabetic agents and the beneficial use of S. tamariscina against hyperglycemia.

  10. Selaginellin and biflavonoids as protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors from Selaginella tamariscina and their glucose uptake stimulatory effects.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phi-Hung; Ji, Da-Jung; Han, Yu-Ran; Choi, Jae-Sue; Rhyu, Dong-Young; Min, Byung-Sun; Woo, Mi-Hee

    2015-07-01

    As part of an ongoing search for new antidiabetic agents from medicinal plants, the methanol extract of the aerial parts of Selaginella tamariscina was found to possess stimulatory effect on glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocyte cells. Thus, bioassay-guided isolation of this active extract yielded two new compounds (1 and 2) along with five known biflavonoids (3-7). Their structures were elucidated by extensive analysis of spectroscopic and physicochemical data. The absolute configuration of compound 2 was determined by specific rotation and CD data analysis. All isolates exhibited potent inhibitory effects on PTP1B enzyme with IC50 values ranging from 4.5±0.1 to 13.2±0.8μM. Furthermore, the isolates (1-7) showed significant stimulatory effects on 2-NBDG uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocyte cells. Of these, compounds (1, 6, and 7) which exhibited mixed-competitive inhibition modes against PTP1B, showed potent stimulatory effects on 2-NBDG uptake. This result indicated the potential of these biflavonoids as lead molecules for development of antidiabetic agents and the beneficial use of S. tamariscina against hyperglycemia. PMID:25907369

  11. Evaluation of the skin sensitization potential of chemicals using expression of co-stimulatory molecules, CD54 and CD86, on the naive THP-1 cell line.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Y; Sakaguchi, H; Ito, Y; Okuda, M; Suzuki, H

    2003-04-01

    It has been known that dendritic cells (DCs) including Langerhans cells (LCs) play a critical role in the skin sensitization process. Many attempts have been made to develop in vitro sensitization tests that employ DCs derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC-DC) or CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (CD34+ HPC) purified from cord blood or bone marrow. However, the use of the DCs in in vitro methods has been difficult due to the nature of these cells such as low levels in the source and/or donor-to-donor variability. In our studies, we employed the human monocytic leukemia cell line, THP-1, in order to avoid some of these difficulties. At the start, we examined whether treatment of the cells with various cytokines could produce DCs from THP-1. Treatment of THP-1 cells with cytokines such as GM-CSF, IL-4, TNF-alpha, and/or PMA did induce some phenotypic changes in THP-1 cells that were characteristic of DCs. Subsequently, responses to a known sensitizer, dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB), and a non-sensitizer, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) or sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), on the expression of co-stimulatory molecules, CD54 and CD86, were examined between the naive cells and the cytokine-treated cells. Interestingly, the naive THP-1 cells responded only to DNCB and the response to the sensitizer was more distinct than cytokine-treated THP-1 cells. Similar phenomena were also observed in the human myeloid leukemia cell line, KG-1. Furthermore, with treatment of DNCB, naive THP-1 cells showed augmented expression of HLA, CD80 and secretion of IL-1 beta. The response of THP-1 cells to a sensitizer was similar to that of LCs/DCs. Upon demonstrating the differentiation of monocyte cells in our system, we then evaluated a series of chemicals, including known sensitizers and non-sensitizers, for their potential to augment CD54 and CD86 expression on naive THP-1 cells. Indeed, known sensitizers such as PPD and 2-MBT significantly augmented CD54 and CD86 expression in a

  12. Diamond bio electronics.

    PubMed

    Linares, Robert; Doering, Patrick; Linares, Bryant

    2009-01-01

    The use of diamond for advanced applications has been the dream of mankind for centuries. Until recently this dream has been realized only in the use of diamond for gemstones and abrasive applications where tons of diamonds are used on an annual basis. Diamond is the material system of choice for many applications, but its use has historically been limited due to the small size, high cost, and inconsistent (and typically poor) quality of available diamond materials until recently. The recent development of high quality, single crystal diamond crystal growth via the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process has allowed physcists and increasingly scientists in the life science area to think beyond these limitations and envision how diamond may be used in advanced applications ranging from quantum computing, to power generation and molecular imaging, and eventually even diamond nano-bots. Because of diamond's unique properties as a bio-compatible material, better understanding of diamond's quantum effects and a convergence of mass production, semiconductor-like fabrication process, diamond now promises a unique and powerful key to the realization of the bio-electronic devices being envisioned for the new era of medical science. The combination of robust in-the-body diamond based sensors, coupled with smart bio-functionalized diamond devices may lead to diamond being the platform of choice for bio-electronics. This generation of diamond based bio-electronic devices would contribute substantially to ushering in a paradigm shift for medical science, leading to vastly improved patient diagnosis, decrease of drug development costs and risks, and improved effectiveness of drug delivery and gene therapy programs through better timed and more customized solutions.

  13. Diamond bio electronics.

    PubMed

    Linares, Robert; Doering, Patrick; Linares, Bryant

    2009-01-01

    The use of diamond for advanced applications has been the dream of mankind for centuries. Until recently this dream has been realized only in the use of diamond for gemstones and abrasive applications where tons of diamonds are used on an annual basis. Diamond is the material system of choice for many applications, but its use has historically been limited due to the small size, high cost, and inconsistent (and typically poor) quality of available diamond materials until recently. The recent development of high quality, single crystal diamond crystal growth via the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process has allowed physcists and increasingly scientists in the life science area to think beyond these limitations and envision how diamond may be used in advanced applications ranging from quantum computing, to power generation and molecular imaging, and eventually even diamond nano-bots. Because of diamond's unique properties as a bio-compatible material, better understanding of diamond's quantum effects and a convergence of mass production, semiconductor-like fabrication process, diamond now promises a unique and powerful key to the realization of the bio-electronic devices being envisioned for the new era of medical science. The combination of robust in-the-body diamond based sensors, coupled with smart bio-functionalized diamond devices may lead to diamond being the platform of choice for bio-electronics. This generation of diamond based bio-electronic devices would contribute substantially to ushering in a paradigm shift for medical science, leading to vastly improved patient diagnosis, decrease of drug development costs and risks, and improved effectiveness of drug delivery and gene therapy programs through better timed and more customized solutions. PMID:19745488

  14. Stimulatory effects of stress on gonadotropin secretion in estrogen-treated women.

    PubMed

    Puder, J J; Freda, P U; Goland, R S; Ferin, M; Wardlaw, S L

    2000-06-01

    Although stress is known to inhibit the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, recent studies in the monkey show that, under certain conditions, in the presence of estrogen, stress may actually stimulate LH release. We investigated the effects of a mild inflammatory stress (2.0-3.0 ng/kg endotoxin) on LH release in five postmenopausal women with and without transdermal estradiol (E2, 0.1 mg) replacement. In another five E2-treated women, LH release was studied when the adrenal was stimulated directly by a 3-h ACTH infusion (Cortrosyn, 50 microg/h). Mean E2 levels were less than 12 pg/mL in the unreplaced subjects and were 86 +/- 10 pg/mL and 102 +/- 18 pg/mL in the two groups of E2-replaced subjects. Blood was sampled every 15-20 min for 2 h before and for 7 h after endotoxin or ACTH injection. Mean cortisol and progesterone levels increased in all three groups over time (P < 0.001). In the women without E2 replacement, basal LH was 26.8 +/- 5.3 mIU/mL and did not change significantly, over time, after endotoxin (P = 0.58). In the same women on E2, however, a significant increase in LH occurred after endotoxin (P = 0.02), from a mean hourly baseline of 15.3 +/- 5.4 mIU/mL to a peak of 50.0 +/- 25.2 mIU/mL. During the ACTH infusion, there was a significant stimulation of LH release in the E2-replaced subjects (P < 0.001), from a mean hourly baseline of 13.3 +/- 3.0 mIU/mL to a peak of 44.1 +/- 11.7 mIU/mL. In both groups, this increase occurred 2-4 h after the initial rise in progesterone and persisted to the end. We conclude that, in the presence of sufficient estrogen, activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis leads to a stimulation of LH release. This is likely related to a rise in adrenal progesterone and its known stimulatory effect on LH release in the presence of E2. These studies provide a potential mechanism in the human by which an acute stress during the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle might lead to a premature LH surge and thereby

  15. Hydropsychidae as bio-indicators.

    PubMed

    Higler, L W; Tolkamp, H H

    1983-09-01

    The applicability of single species as bio-indicators for the characterization of running waters is investigated. For this, species of the family of Hydropsychidae (Trichoptera) are chosen. Ten species have been recorded for the Dutch fauna, but some of them have disappeared and others are restricted in their distribution nowadays. Several authors have established a distribution pattern of Hydropsychidae according to a zonation from source to large river. In The Netherlands we could use this scheme only in small, fast running streams. For the characterization of lowland streams more data on the fauna are required. In the large rivers only one species is occurring (Hydropsyche contubernalis), increasing in numbers during the last decade. Probably a certain improvement of the water quality of the river Rhine is responsible for this.

  16. Role of dopaminergic and serotonergic systems on behavioral stimulatory effects of low-dose alprazolam and lorazepam.

    PubMed

    Bentué-Ferrer, D; Reymann, J M; Tribut, O; Allain, H; Vasar, E; Bourin, M

    2001-02-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated that alprazolam and lorazepam, administered at low doses to healthy volunteers, improve cognitive functions and psychomotor performances. Paradoxical effects of low-dose benzodiazepines have been also observed in mice, in experimental pharmacology. The aim of this work was to determine, in rat, the effect of similar low-doses of benzodiazepines on spontaneous locomotor activity and performance in the elevated zero-maze, and to investigate the underlying neurobiological mechanisms. The dose-effect and the time-course of the action were studied for both compounds. Spontaneous locomotor activity was measured using a photoelectric actimeter. The level of anxiety of the animals was assessed in the elevated zero-maze. Dopamine, serotonin, and their metabolites were assayed in the extracellular striatal fluid of the awake rat, obtained by microdialysis, by HPLC--EC. Spontaneous locomotor activity observed in rats given low-dose alprazolam and lorazepam evidenced a stimulatory effect only with alprazolam. The effect was maximum 90 min after administration of 0.0050 mg/kg alprazolam. An anxiogenic-like action was evidenced with the elevated zero-maze for the two compounds. We observed a statistically significant increase in striatal dopamine concentrations only with alprazolam, during the period corresponding to the behavioral stimulatory effects. We also showed a marked trend towards increased levels of serotonin with alprazolam but this modification was not significant, in spite of statistically significant variations of 5-HIAA. In the rat, behavioral stimulatory effects of low-dose benzodiazepines is evidenced with alprazolam but not lorazepam. This effect could be explained, at least in part, by increased extracellular dopamine concentrations in the striatum. Their different structures could explain the different pattern observed for the two benzodiazepines.

  17. BioReactor

    2003-04-18

    BioReactor is a simulation tool kit for modeling networks of coupled chemical processes (or similar productions rules). The tool kit is implemented in C++ and has the following functionality: 1. Monte Carlo discrete event simulator 2. Solvers for ordinary differential equations 3. Genetic algorithm optimization routines for reverse engineering of models using either Monte Carlo or ODE representation )i.e., 1 or 2)

  18. Israel Marine Bio-geographic Database (ISRAMAR-BIO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greengrass, Eyal; Krivenko, Yevgeniya; Ozer, Tal; Ben Yosef, Dafna; Tom, Moshe; Gertman, Isaac

    2015-04-01

    The knowledge of the space/time variations of species is the basis for any ecological investigations. While historical observations containing integral concentrations of biological parameters (chlorophyll, abundance, biomass…) are organized partly in ISRAMAR Cast Database, the taxon-specific data collected in Israel has not been sufficiently organized. This has been hindered by the lack of standards, variability of methods and complexity of biological data formalization. The ISRAMAR-BIO DB was developed to store various types of historical and future available information related to marine species observations and related metadata. Currently the DB allows to store biological data acquired by the following sampling devices such as: van veer grab, box corer, sampling bottles, nets (plankton, trawls and fish), quadrates, and cameras. The DB's logical unit is information regarding a specimen (taxa name, barcode, image), related attributes (abundance, size, age, contaminants…), habitat description, sampling device and method, time and space of sampling, responsible organization and scientist, source of information (cruise, project and publication). The following standardization of specimen and attributes naming were implemented: Taxonomy according to World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS: http://www.marinespecies.org). Habitat description according to Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standards (CMECS: http://www.cmecscatalog.org) Parameter name; Unit; Device name; Developmental stage; Institution name; Country name; Marine region according to SeaDataNet Vocabularies (http://www.seadatanet.org/Standards-Software/Common-Vocabularies). This system supports two types of data submission procedures, which support the above stated data structure. The first is a downloadable excel file with drop-down fields based on the ISRAMAR-BIO vocabularies. The file is filled and uploaded online by the data contributor. Alternatively, the same dataset can be assembled by

  19. Herpes simplex virus virion stimulatory protein mRNA leader contains sequence elements which increase both virus-induced transcription and mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Blair, E D; Blair, C C; Wagner, E K

    1987-08-01

    To investigate the role of 5' noncoding leader sequence of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) mRNA in infected cells, the promoter for the 65,000-dalton virion stimulatory protein (VSP), a beta-gamma polypeptide, was introduced into plasmids bearing the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) gene together with various lengths of adjacent viral leader sequences. Plasmids containing longer lengths of leader sequence gave rise to significantly higher levels of CAT enzyme in transfected cells superinfected with HSV-1. RNase T2 protection assays of CAT mRNA showed that transcription was initiated from an authentic viral cap site in all VSP-CAT constructs and that CAT mRNA levels corresponded to CAT enzyme levels. Use of cis-linked simian virus 40 enhancer sequences demonstrated that the effect was virus specific. Constructs containing 12 and 48 base pairs of the VSP mRNA leader gave HSV infection-induced CAT activities intermediate between those of the leaderless construct and the VSP-(+77)-CAT construct. Actinomycin D chase experiments demonstrated that the longest leader sequences increased hybrid CAT mRNA stability at least twofold in infected cells. Cotransfection experiments with a cosmid bearing four virus-specified transcription factors (ICP4, ICP0, ICP27, and VSP-65K) showed that sequences from -3 to +77, with respect to the viral mRNA cap site, also contained signals responsive to transcriptional activation. PMID:3037112

  20. Bio-Terrorism Threat and Casualty Prevention

    SciTech Connect

    NOEL,WILLIAM P.

    2000-01-01

    The bio-terrorism threat has become the ''poor man's'' nuclear weapon. The ease of manufacture and dissemination has allowed an organization with only rudimentary skills and equipment to pose a significant threat with high consequences. This report will analyze some of the most likely agents that would be used, the ease of manufacture, the ease of dissemination and what characteristics of the public health response that are particularly important to the successful characterization of a high consequence event to prevent excessive causalities.

  1. Monocytes/macrophages infected with Toxoplasma gondii do not increase co-stimulatory molecules while maintaining their migratory ability.

    PubMed

    Seipel, Daniele; Ribeiro-Gomes, Flavia Lima; Barcelos, Michelle Willmen; Ramalho, André Villaça; Kanashiro, Milton M; Kipnis, Thereza Liberman; Arnholdt, Andrea Cristina Veto

    2009-09-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that is able to disseminate into deep tissues and cross biological barriers, reaching immunoprivileged sites such as the brain and retina. The parasite is able to infect macrophages and dendritic cells and use them for dispersal throughout the body, but the activation state of those cells is unknown. We investigated the ability of human and murine cells from monocytic/macrophage lineages that had not previously been exposed to inflammatory cytokines to up-regulate co-stimulatory and adhesion molecules upon infection. Toxoplasma gondii-infected human monocytes (freshly isolated and THP1 lineage) were unable to up-regulate CD86, CD83, CD40 or CD1a. CD80 expression increased in infected cells but expression of l-selectin and beta2 integrin was unaltered. We evaluated the ability of infected macrophages from wild type C57/BL/6 or CD14(-/-) mice to migrate in 8 mum transwells. Infected cells from CD14(-/-) mice were more likely to de-adhere than infected cells from wild type mice but they did not show any increase in migratory ability. The non-stimulatory profile of these infected cells may contribute to parasite spread throughout the lymphatic circulation in the initial phases of infection.

  2. BioSig-Air-Force

    SciTech Connect

    2011-07-15

    1) Configured servers: In coordination with the INSIGHT team, a hardware configuration was selected. Two nodes were purchased, configured, and shipped with compatible OS and database installation. The servers have been stress tested for reliability as they use leading edge technologies. Each node has two CPUs and 12 cores per CPU with maximum onboard memory for high performance. 2) LIM and Experimental module: The original BioSig system was developed for cancer research. Accordingly, the LIM system its corresponding web pages are being modified to facilitate (i) pathogene-donor interactions, (ii) media composition, (iii) chemical and siRNA plate configurations. The LIM system has been redesigned. The revised system allows design of new media and tracking it from lot-to-lot so that variations in the phenotypic responses can be tracked to a specific media and lot number. Similar associations are also possible with other experimental factors (e.g., donor-pathoge, siRNA, and chemical). Furthermore, the design of the experimental variables has also been revised to (i) interact with the newly developed LIM system, (ii) simplify experimental specifications, and (iii) test for potential operator's error during the data entry. Part of the complication has been due to the handshake between multiple teams that provide the small molecule plates and the team that creates assay plates. Our efforts have focused to harmonize these interactions (e.g., various data formats) so that each assay plate can be mapped to its source so that a correct set of experimental variables can be associated with each image. For example, depending upon the source of the chemical plates, they may have different formats. We have developed a canonical representation that registers SMILES code, for each chemical compound, along with its physiochemical properties. The schema for LIM conjunction with customized Web pages. 3) Import of Images and computed descriptors module: In coordination with the INSIGHT

  3. BioSig-Air-Force

    2011-07-15

    1) Configured servers: In coordination with the INSIGHT team, a hardware configuration was selected. Two nodes were purchased, configured, and shipped with compatible OS and database installation. The servers have been stress tested for reliability as they use leading edge technologies. Each node has two CPUs and 12 cores per CPU with maximum onboard memory for high performance. 2) LIM and Experimental module: The original BioSig system was developed for cancer research. Accordingly, the LIMmore » system its corresponding web pages are being modified to facilitate (i) pathogene-donor interactions, (ii) media composition, (iii) chemical and siRNA plate configurations. The LIM system has been redesigned. The revised system allows design of new media and tracking it from lot-to-lot so that variations in the phenotypic responses can be tracked to a specific media and lot number. Similar associations are also possible with other experimental factors (e.g., donor-pathoge, siRNA, and chemical). Furthermore, the design of the experimental variables has also been revised to (i) interact with the newly developed LIM system, (ii) simplify experimental specifications, and (iii) test for potential operator's error during the data entry. Part of the complication has been due to the handshake between multiple teams that provide the small molecule plates and the team that creates assay plates. Our efforts have focused to harmonize these interactions (e.g., various data formats) so that each assay plate can be mapped to its source so that a correct set of experimental variables can be associated with each image. For example, depending upon the source of the chemical plates, they may have different formats. We have developed a canonical representation that registers SMILES code, for each chemical compound, along with its physiochemical properties. The schema for LIM conjunction with customized Web pages. 3) Import of Images and computed descriptors module: In coordination with the

  4. Clinical application of bio ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anu, Sharma; Gayatri, Sharma

    2016-05-01

    Ceramics are the inorganic crystalline material. These are used in various field such as biomedical, electrical, electronics, aerospace, automotive and optical etc. Bio ceramics are the one of the most active areas of research. Bio ceramics are the ceramics which are biocompatible. The unique properties of bio ceramics make them an attractive option for medical applications and offer some potential advantages over other materials. During the past three decades, a number of major advances have been made in the field of bio ceramics. This review focuses on the use of these materials in variety of clinical scenarios.

  5. Ozone depletion due to the use of chlorofluorocarbon: Government and industry response. (Latest citations from the BioBusiness database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the response of business and government to atmospheric ozone depletion. Voluntary restrictions in the use of chlorofluorocarbons by industry and attempts to develop a substitute are examined. References cite studies of the ozone layer and the effects of aerosols worldwide, and examples of climatic models of ozone depletion. Government sponsored bans on chloroflourocarbons are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  6. Bio-forensics

    SciTech Connect

    Trewhella, J.

    2004-01-01

    Bioforensics presents significant technical challenges. Determining if an outbreak is natural or not, and then providing evidence to trace an outbreak to its origin is very complex. Los Alamos scientists pioneered research and development that has generated leading edge strain identification methods based on sequence data. Molecular characterization of environmental background samples enable development of highly specific pathogen signatures. Economic impacts of not knowing the relationships at the molecular level Many different kinds of data are needed for DNA-based bio-forensics.

  7. Characterization of glycolytic enzymes--rAldolase and rEnolase of Leishmania donovani, identified as Th1 stimulatory proteins, for their immunogenicity and immunoprophylactic efficacies against experimental visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Reema; Kumar, Vikash; Kushawaha, Pramod Kumar; Tripathi, Chandradev Pati; Joshi, Sumit; Sahasrabuddhe, Amogh Anant; Mitra, Kalyan; Sundar, Shyam; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Dube, Anuradha

    2014-01-01

    Th1 immune responses play an important role in controlling Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL) hence, Leishmania proteins stimulating T-cell responses in host, are thought to be good vaccine targets. Search of such antigens eliciting cellular responses in Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from cured/exposed/Leishmania patients and hamsters led to the identification of two enzymes of glycolytic pathway in the soluble lysate of a clinical isolate of Leishmania donovani--Enolase (LdEno) and aldolase (LdAld) as potential Th1 stimulatory proteins. The present study deals with the molecular and immunological characterizations of LdEno and LdAld. The successfully cloned and purified recombinant proteins displayed strong ability to proliferate lymphocytes of cured hamsters' along with significant nitric-oxide production and generation of Th1-type cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-12) from stimulated PBMCs of cured/endemic VL patients. Assessment of their prophylactic potentials revealed ∼ 90% decrease in parasitic burden in rLdEno vaccinated hamsters against Leishmania challenge, strongly supported by an increase in mRNA expression levels of iNOS, IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-12 transcripts along with extreme down-regulation of TGF-β, IL-4 and IL-10. However, animals vaccinated with rLdAld showed comparatively lesser prophylactic efficacy (∼ 65%) with inferior immunological response. Further, with a possible implication in vaccine design against VL, identification of potential T-cell epitopes of both the proteins was done using computational approach. Additionally, in-silico 3-D modelling of the proteins was done in order to explore the possibility of exploiting them as potential drug targets. The comparative molecular and immunological characterizations strongly suggest rLdEno as potential vaccine candidate against VL and supports the notion of its being effective T-cell stimulatory protein.

  8. Bio-tribology.

    PubMed

    Dowson, Duncan

    2012-01-01

    It is now forty six years since the separate topics of friction, lubrication, wear and bearing design were integrated under the title 'Tribology' [Department of Education and Science, Lubrication (Tribology) Education and Research. A Report on the Present Position and Industry's Needs, HMSO, London, 1966]. Significant developments have been reported in many established and new aspects of tribology during this period. The subject has contributed to improved performance of much familiar equipment, such as reciprocating engines, where there have been vast improvements in engine reliability and efficiency. Nano-tribology has been central to remarkable advances in information processing and digital equipment. Shortly after widespread introduction of the term tribology, integration with biology and medicine prompted rapid and extensive interest in the fascinating sub-field now known as Bio-tribology [D. Dowson and V. Wright, Bio-tribology, in The Rheology of Lubricants, ed. T. C. Davenport, Applied Science Publishers, Barking, 1973, pp. 81-88]. An outline will be given of some of the developments in the latter field.

  9. Bio-threat microparticle simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Farquar, George Roy; Leif, Roald

    2014-09-16

    A bio-threat simulant that includes a carrier and DNA encapsulated in the carrier. Also a method of making a simulant including the steps of providing a carrier and encapsulating DNA in the carrier to produce the bio-threat simulant.

  10. Bio-threat microparticle simulants

    DOEpatents

    Farquar, George Roy; Leif, Roald N

    2012-10-23

    A bio-threat simulant that includes a carrier and DNA encapsulated in the carrier. Also a method of making a simulant including the steps of providing a carrier and encapsulating DNA in the carrier to produce the bio-threat simulant.

  11. What is BioOne?

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Roberta Bronson

    2005-01-01

    BioOne is a Web-based aggregation of full-text, high-impact bioscience research journals. Most of its titles are published by small societies or non-commercial publishers and have not been previously available in electronic format. This column describes the BioOne database and gives some basic information about the best ways to search its content.

  12. Innate stimulatory capacity of high molecular weight transition metals Au (gold) and Hg (mercury).

    PubMed

    Rachmawati, Dessy; Alsalem, Inás W A; Bontkes, Hetty J; Verstege, Marleen I; Gibbs, Sue; von Blomberg, B M E; Scheper, Rik J; van Hoogstraten, Ingrid M W

    2015-03-01

    Nickel, cobalt and palladium ions can induce an innate immune response by triggering Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 which is present on dendritic cells (DC). Here we studied mechanisms of action for DC immunotoxicity to gold and mercury. Next to gold (Na3Au (S2O3)2⋅2H2O) and mercury (HgCl2), nickel (NiCl2) was included as a positive control. MoDC activation was assessed by release of the pro-inflammatory mediator IL-8. Also PBMC were studied, and THP-1 cells were used as a substitution for DC for evaluation of cytokines and chemokines, as well as phenotypic, alterations in response to gold and mercury. Our results showed that both Na3Au (S2O3)2⋅2H2O and HgCl2 induce substantial release of IL-8, but not IL-6, CCL2 or IL-10, from MoDc, PBMC, or THP-1 cells. Also gold and, to a lesser extent mercury, caused modest dendritic cell maturation as detected by increased membrane expression of CD40 and CD80. Both metals thus show innate immune response capacities, although to a lower extent than reported earlier for NiCl2, CoCl2 and Na2 [PdCl4]. Importantly, the gold-induced response could be ascribed to TLR3 rather than TLR4 triggering, whereas the nature of the innate mercury response remains to be clarified. In conclusion both gold and mercury can induce innate immune responses, which for gold could be ascribed to TLR3 dependent signalling. These responses are likely to contribute to adaptive immune responses to these metals, as reflected by skin and mucosal allergies.

  13. Protein kinases as switches for the function of upstream stimulatory factors: implications for tissue injury and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Horbach, Tina; Götz, Claudia; Kietzmann, Thomas; Dimova, Elitsa Y.

    2015-01-01

    The upstream stimulatory factors (USFs) are regulators of important cellular processes. Both USF1 and USF2 are supposed to have major roles in metabolism, tissue protection and tumor development. However, the knowledge about the mechanisms that control the function of USFs, in particular in tissue protection and cancer, is limited. Phosphorylation is a versatile tool to regulate protein functions. Thereby, phosphorylation can positively or negatively affect different aspects of transcription factor function including protein stability, protein–protein interaction, cellular localization, or DNA binding. The present review aims to summarize the current knowledge about the regulation of USFs by direct phosphorylation and the consequences for USF functions in tissue protection and cancer. PMID:25741280

  14. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 stimulatory activity by Gardnerella vaginalis: relationship to biotypes and other pathogenic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Simoes, J A; Hashemi, F B; Aroutcheva, A A; Heimler, I; Spear, G T; Shott, S; Faro, S

    2001-07-01

    Stimulation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 expression by Gardnerella vaginalis is one possible cause for an increase in the amount of virus in the genital tract. The ability of G. vaginalis to induce HIV expression in chronically infected U1 cells was investigated, along with its possible relationship to biotype, genotype, and resistance to metronidazole and bacteriocin. Significant HIV stimulatory activity was found in 5 (50%) lysates of G. vaginalis. The ability to induce HIV expression in U1 cells was statistically associated with G. vaginalis biotype (P=.048) but not with genotype or resistance to metronidazole and bacteriocin. Further studies to explore the in vivo relevance of HIV activation by G. vaginalis in the female genital tract are warranted, since prevention strategies of bacterial vaginosis and colonization by certain biotypes of G. vaginalis may be valuable in reducing the risk of sexual transmission of HIV.

  15. MHC class I-like genes in cattle, MHCLA, with similarity to genes encoding NK cell stimulatory ligands.

    PubMed

    Larson, Joshua H; Rebeiz, Mark J; Stiening, Chad M; Windish, Ryan L; Beever, Jonathan E; Lewin, Harris A

    2003-04-01

    A comparative genomics approach for mining databases of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) was used to identify two members of a novel MHC class I gene family in cattle. These paralogous genes, named MHC class I-like gene family A1 ( MHCLA1) and MHCLA2, were shown by phylogenetic analysis to be related to human and mouse genes encoding NK cell stimulatory ligands, ULBP, RAET, H60 and Raet-1. Radiation hybrid mapping placed cattle MHCLA1 on BTA9, which, on the basis of existing comparative mapping data, identified the ULBP, RAET1, H60 and Raet1 genes as homologues of the cattle MHCLA genes. However, the human and mouse orthologues of MHCLA1 and MHCLA2 could not be defined due to extensive sequence divergence from all known members of the ULBP1/ RAET1/H60/Raet1 gene family. The cattle MHCLA1 molecule is predicted to be missing an alpha(3) domain, similar to the human and mouse homologues. Like the human ULBP genes, MHCLA1 was found to be transcribed constitutively in a variety of fetal and adult tissues by RT-PCR. The patterns of hybridization obtained by Southern blotting using MHCLA1 as a probe and DNA from 14 species representing five mammalian orders suggests that the MHCLA genes evolved rapidly in the Cetartiodactyla. Previous findings demonstrating that ULBPs serve as ligands for the NK cell NKG2D stimulatory receptor, and that this interaction can be blocked by a human cytomegalovirus glycoprotein that binds to ULBPs, suggests that the extensive divergence found among the cattle, human and mouse MHCLA homologues is due to selection exerted by viral pathogens.

  16. BioArchitecture

    PubMed Central

    Gunning, Peter

    2012-01-01

    BioArchitecture is a term used to describe the organization and regulation of biological space. It applies to the principles which govern the structure of molecules, polymers and mutiprotein complexes, organelles, membranes and their organization in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. It also covers the integration of cells into their three dimensional environment at the level of cell-matrix, cell-cell interactions, integration into tissue/organ structure and function and finally into the structure of the organism. This review will highlight studies at all these levels which are providing a new way to think about the relationship between the organization of biological space and the function of biological systems. PMID:23267413

  17. Bio-prospecting of distillery yeasts as bio-control and bio-remediation agents.

    PubMed

    Ubeda, Juan F; Maldonado, María; Briones, Ana I; Francisco, J Fernández; González, Francisco J

    2014-05-01

    This work constitutes a preliminary study in which the capacity of non-Saccharomyces yeasts isolated from ancient distilleries as bio-control agents against moulds and in the treatment of waste waters contaminated by heavy metals-i.e. bio-remediation-is shown. In the first control assays, antagonist effect between non-Saccharomyces yeasts, their extracts and supernatants against some moulds, analysing the plausible (not exhaustive) involved factors were qualitatively verified. In addition, two enzymatic degrading properties of cell wall plant polymers, quitinolitic and pectinolitic, were screened. Finally, their use as agents of bio-remediation of three heavy metals (cadmium, chromium and lead) was analysed semi-quantitatively. The results showed that all isolates belonging to Pichia species effectively inhibited all moulds assayed. Moreover, P. kudriavzevii is a good candidate for both bio-control and bio-remediation because it inhibited moulds and accumulated the major proportion of the three tested metals. PMID:24370629

  18. Bio-prospecting of distillery yeasts as bio-control and bio-remediation agents.

    PubMed

    Ubeda, Juan F; Maldonado, María; Briones, Ana I; Francisco, J Fernández; González, Francisco J

    2014-05-01

    This work constitutes a preliminary study in which the capacity of non-Saccharomyces yeasts isolated from ancient distilleries as bio-control agents against moulds and in the treatment of waste waters contaminated by heavy metals-i.e. bio-remediation-is shown. In the first control assays, antagonist effect between non-Saccharomyces yeasts, their extracts and supernatants against some moulds, analysing the plausible (not exhaustive) involved factors were qualitatively verified. In addition, two enzymatic degrading properties of cell wall plant polymers, quitinolitic and pectinolitic, were screened. Finally, their use as agents of bio-remediation of three heavy metals (cadmium, chromium and lead) was analysed semi-quantitatively. The results showed that all isolates belonging to Pichia species effectively inhibited all moulds assayed. Moreover, P. kudriavzevii is a good candidate for both bio-control and bio-remediation because it inhibited moulds and accumulated the major proportion of the three tested metals.

  19. Stimulatory and inhibitory effects of neuropeptide Y on growth hormone secretion in acromegaly in vivo.

    PubMed

    Watanobe, H; Tamura, T

    1997-02-01

    It has been reported that neuropeptide Y (NPY) affects growth hormone (GH) secretion in several animal species. With respect to the role of NPY in regulating GH release in humans, one previous study has reported that NPY inhibited GH secretion from cultured GH-secreting pituitary adenoma cells in vitro. However, since it has yet to be explored whether NPY affects GH secretion in acromegaly in vivo, in this study we attempted to examine the effect of intravenous (i.v.) bolus injection of 100 microg of human NPY on plasma GH levels in 15 patients with active acromegaly, trying to find a possible correlation among GH responses to NPY, thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH;500 microg, i.v.), luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH;100 microg, i.v.), and bromocriptine (Br;2.5 mg, per os). NPY significantly increased GH secretion (more than twice the basal level) in 4 (27%) patients, and all of them were responsive to LHRH and non-responsive to Br. In contrast, 3 (20%) acromegalics showed a significant decrease in GH levels (less than half the baseline) after NPY, and all these patients were responsive to both TRH and Br. From these results, we hypothesize that the NPY-induced increase in GH release may be a feature of somatotroph-like pituitary adenoma causing acromegaly, whereas the NPY-induced decrease in GH secretion may be a feature of lactotroph-like adenoma.

  20. Coordinated action of IgE and a B-cell-stimulatory factor on the CD23 receptor molecule up-regulates B-lymphocyte growth.

    PubMed Central

    Guy, G R; Gordon, J

    1987-01-01

    The CD23 (BLAST-2) antigen, recently identified as the low-affinity IgE receptor of B lymphocytes, has also been implicated as the focus for growth-promoting signals delivered to activated B cells by a low molecular weight B-cell growth factor (BCGF). Here we show that IgE and BCGF can coordinate B-lymphocyte growth through their opposing effects on the CD23 molecule. While the activation of purified quiescent B cells with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate led to the induction of 45-kDa CD23 at the surface membrane, the inclusion of IgE increased CD23 expression by a factor of approximately equal to 5. The addition of BCGF resulted in the rapid release of a 35-kDa form of CD23 from the cell surface. This shed molecule is associated with autocrine growth factor activity. Substantially more of this material was generated by BCGF acting on cells that had been stimulated in the presence of IgE. The combined effects of IgE and BCGF on DNA synthesis in activated B cells were more than additive. IgE similarly augmented the stimulatory capacity of a CD23 antibody that mimics the biological actions of BCGF. Binding of the anti-receptor antibody to its 45-kDa target at the B-cell surface also prompted the release of the 35-kDa soluble species. These results demonstrate a pleiotropy in the CD23 molecule with regard to both ligand binding and the subsequent behavior of the receptor. The ability of this single receptor to orchestrate a B-lymphocyte response through a variety of ligands and its role in normal and transformed autocrine growth are discussed. Images PMID:2957693

  1. Overview of the TAC-BIO sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabalo, Jerry; Sickenberger, Richard; De Lucia, Marla; Briles, John; Poldmae, Aime; Sickenberger, David

    2005-05-01

    In light of the current state of detection technologies designed to meet the current threat from biological agents, the need for a low-cost and lightweight sensor is clear. Such a sensor based on optical detection, with real time responses and no consumables, is possible. Devices arising from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's (DARPA) Semiconductor UV Optical Sources (SUVOS) are the enabling technology. These sources are capable of emitting UV wavelengths known to excite fluorescence from biological agent particles while costing a few dollars apiece and consuming low power. These devices are exploited in the TAC-Bio Sensor. A unique optical design is used to collect the usable portion of the LED emission and focus it into the probing region of the sensor. To compensate for the low UV power density relative to UV lasers, the TAC-Bio utilizes a unique opposed flow configuration to increase the interaction between particles and the UV beam. The current TAC-Bio sensor testbed is capable of detecting fluorescence Bacillus globigii (BG, an anthrax simulant) spore agglomerates down to 5 microns in diameter. Ongoing work is focusing on increasing signal to noise so that smaller particles, possibly single spores, can be detected, as well as on including additional data channels, such as light scattering, to increase selectivity of the sensor.

  2. BioSentinel: Developing a Space Radiation Biosensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santa Maria, Sergio R.

    2015-01-01

    BioSentinel is an autonomous fully self-contained science mission that will conduct the first study of the biological response to space radiation outside low Earth orbit (LEO) in over 40 years. The 4-unit (4U) BioSentinel biosensor system, is housed within a 6-Unit (6U) spacecraft, and uses yeast cells in multiple independent microfluidic cards to detect and measure DNA damage that occurs in response to ambient space radiation. Cell growth and metabolic activity will be measured using a 3-color LED detection system and a metabolic indicator dye with a dedicated thermal control system per fluidic card.

  3. Stimulatory effect of Coca-Cola on gastroduodenal HCO3- secretion in rats.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Y; Aihara, E; Ise, F; Kita, K; Takeuchi, K

    2007-10-01

    We examined the effect of various carbonated beverages, especially Coca-Cola, on the HCO3- secretion in the rat stomach and duodenum. Under urethane anaesthesia, a chambered stomach or a proximal duodenal loop was perfused with saline, and HCO3- secretion was measured at pH 7.0 using a pH-stat method and by adding 2 mM HCl. The amount of CO2 contained in these beverages was about 4-7 g/mL. Coca-Cola topically applied to the mucosa for 10 min significantly increased the HCO3- secretion in both the stomach and the duodenum. The HCO3- response in the duodenum was totally abolished by indomethacin and also partially inhibited by acetazolamide, an inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase. Likewise, the response in the stomach was also markedly inhibited by either acetazolamide or indomethacin. The mucosal application of Coca-Cola increased the PGE2 contents in both the stomach and the duodenum. Other carbonated beverages, such as sparkling water, Fanta Grape or cider, also increased the HCO3- secretion in these tissues. These results suggest that Coca-Cola induces HCO3- secretion in both the stomach and the duodenum, and these responses may be attributable to both the intracellular supply of HCO3- generated via carbonic anhydrase, and endogenous PGs, probably related to the acidic pH of the solution.

  4. Stimulatory effects of muramyl dipeptide upon neutrophils isolated from a local bacterial infection.

    PubMed Central

    Lamont, P. M.; Maier, K. G.; Melton, L.; Polk, H. C.

    1987-01-01

    This study examined the effects of muramyl dipeptide (MDP) in vivo upon the local inflammatory response to a bacterial challenge. In addition to quantitative bacteriology of the tissues surrounding an infected suture, polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) involved in the local inflammatory response were extracted and estimations made of their number, viability and phagocytic activity. Fewer bacteria were recovered from the muscle around the suture in MDP-treated animals compared to placebo-treated controls (P less than 0.02), although there was no difference in the number of bacteria on the suture itself. Polymorphonuclear leucocytes were present in greater numbers (P less than 0.01), more PMNs were viable (P less than 0.01) and more PMNs had visibly phagocytosed bacteria (P less than 0.01) in the MDP group compared to the placebo group. These data indicate that MDP enhances the local inflammatory response to infection with increased influx, viability and phagocytic activity of PMNs, resulting in improved local control of a test bacterial challenge. PMID:3318904

  5. Plants Can Benefit from Herbivory: Stimulatory Effects of Sheep Saliva on Growth of Leymus chinensis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jushan; Wang, Ling; Wang, Deli; Bonser, Stephen P.; Sun, Fang; Zhou, Yifa; Gao, Ying; Teng, Xing

    2012-01-01

    Background Plants and herbivores can evolve beneficial interactions. Growth factors found in animal saliva are probably key factors underlying plant compensatory responses to herbivory. However, there is still a lack of knowledge about how animal saliva interacts with herbivory intensities and how saliva can mobilize photosynthate reserves in damaged plants. Methodology/Principal Findings The study examined compensatory responses to herbivory and sheep saliva addition for the grass species Leymus chinensis in three experiments over three years. The first two experiments were conducted in a factorial design with clipping (four levels in 2006 and five in 2007) and two saliva treatment levels. The third experiment examined the mobilization and allocation of stored carbohydrates following clipping and saliva addition treatments. Animal saliva significantly increased tiller number, number of buds, and biomass, however, there was no effect on height. Furthermore, saliva effects were dependent on herbivory intensities, associated with meristem distribution within perennial grass. Animal saliva was found to accelerate hydrolyzation of fructans and accumulation of glucose and fructose. Conclusions/Significance The results demonstrated a link between saliva and the mobilization of carbohydrates following herbivory, which is an important advance in our understanding of the evolution of plant responses to herbivory. Herbivory intensity dependence of the effects of saliva stresses the significance of optimal grazing management. PMID:22235277

  6. Adiposity induces lethal cytokine storm after systemic administration of stimulatory immunotherapy regimens in aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Mirsoian, Annie; Bouchlaka, Myriam N.; Sckisel, Gail D.; Chen, Mingyi; Pai, Chien-Chun Steven; Maverakis, Emanuel; Spencer, Richard G.; Fishbein, Kenneth W.; Siddiqui, Sana; Monjazeb, Arta M.; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart; Hesdorffer, Charles; Ferrucci, Luigi; Longo, Dan L.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Wiltrout, Robert H.; Taub, Dennis D.

    2014-01-01

    Aging is a contributing factor in cancer occurrence. We recently demonstrated that systemic immunotherapy (IT) administration in aged, but not young, mice resulted in induction of rapid and lethal cytokine storm. We found that aging was accompanied by increases in visceral fat similar to that seen in young obese (ob/ob or diet-induced obese [DIO]) mice. Yet, the effects of aging and obesity on inflammatory responses to immunotherapeutics are not well defined. We determine the effects of adiposity on systemic IT tolerance in aged compared with young obese mice. Both young ob/ob- and DIO-generated proinflammatory cytokine levels and organ pathologies are comparable to those in aged ad libitum mice after IT, culminating in lethality. Young obese mice exhibited greater ratios of M1/M2 macrophages within the peritoneal and visceral adipose tissues and higher percentages of TNF+ macrophages in response to αCD40/IL-2 as compared with young lean mice. Macrophage depletion or TNF blockade in conjunction with αCD40/IL-2 prevented cytokine storms in young obese mice and protected from lethality. Calorie-restricted aged mice contain less visceral fat and displayed reduced cytokine levels, protection from organ pathology, and protection from lethality upon αCD40/IL-2 administration. Our data demonstrate that adiposity is a critical factor in the age-associated pathological responses to systemic anti-cancer IT. PMID:25366964

  7. Navigating the Bio-Politics of Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Nick; Motzkau, Johanna

    2011-01-01

    Childhood research has long shared a bio-political terrain with state agencies in which children figure primarily as "human futures". In the 20th century bio-social dualism helped to make that terrain navigable by researchers, but, as life processes increasingly become key sites of bio-political action, bio-social dualism is becoming less useful…

  8. Functional tooth restoration by next-generation bio-hybrid implant as a bio-hybrid artificial organ replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Masamitsu; Inoue, Kaoru; Nakajima, Kei; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Yamazaki, Hiromichi; Isobe, Tomohide; Sugawara, Ayaka; Ogawa, Miho; Tanaka, Chie; Saito, Masahiro; Kasugai, Shohei; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Inoue, Takashi; Tezuka, Katsunari; Kuboki, Takuo; Yamaguchi, Akira; Tsuji, Takashi

    2014-08-13

    Bio-hybrid artificial organs are an attractive concept to restore organ function through precise biological cooperation with surrounding tissues in vivo. However, in bio-hybrid artificial organs, an artificial organ with fibrous connective tissues, including muscles, tendons and ligaments, has not been developed. Here, we have enveloped with embryonic dental follicle tissue around a HA-coated dental implant, and transplanted into the lower first molar region of a murine tooth-loss model. We successfully developed a novel fibrous connected tooth implant using a HA-coated dental implant and dental follicle stem cells as a bio-hybrid organ. This bio-hybrid implant restored physiological functions, including bone remodelling, regeneration of severe bone-defect and responsiveness to noxious stimuli, through regeneration with periodontal tissues, such as periodontal ligament and cementum. Thus, this study represents the potential for a next-generation bio-hybrid implant for tooth loss as a future bio-hybrid artificial organ replacement therapy.

  9. Bio-regenerative life support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macelroy, Robert D.; Wydeven, Theodore, Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The basis for and the potential uses of bio-regenerative life support are examined. Bio-regenerative life support systems are an alternative to physical-chemical regeneration techniques for use when resupply of a crew in space is expensive, or when the logistics of resupply are difficult. Many of the scientific studies required for bio-regenerative life support systems have been completed and preliminary development of some components will begin within the next 12 to 18 months. The focus of the work that lies ahead will be efficient power and mass use, long-term system stability, component function, systems integration, and extensive testing in the space environment. Because of the advantages of bio-regeneration, it is anticipated that human life support for long-term space missions will evolve to include increasingly large amounts of biologically-based regeneration.

  10. Bio-based backsheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Stanley B.

    2008-08-01

    A primary goal of Photovoltaics is to generate electricity while reducing reliance on the world's petroleum supply. However, PV backsheets are produced from petro-based chemicals, which, to a certain extent, defeat the purpose of using solar energy. Materials from three sustainable resources were targeted for PV backsheet development: PLA made from corn, a cellulosic made from cotton, and a type of nylon made from castor beans. Some of these films were coated with various materials to lower the WVTR. Modules produced using these backsheets were subjected to rigorous testing, including the damp heat test and the wet Hypot test as outlined in UL 1703. As cast PLA film tends to be very brittle. This problem is solved with additives or biaxial orientation. PLA film is UV stable and highly transparent which would merit it for consideration as a front glazing as well as for a backsheet. However, its moisture resistance is not robust. A cellulosic film made from cotton was considered which has a continuous duty temperature rating of 105°C. This product had to be modified significantly to convert it from a hydrophilic film to a hydrophobic one. Additionally, this material has an RTI value of 90°C. Nylon 11, produced from castor beans, is very interesting because it is bio-sustainable, but not biodegradable. It has improved moisture properties over the more common nylons, and has an RTI value of 105°C.

  11. Differential effects of stimulatory factors on natural killer cell activities of young and aged mice.

    PubMed

    Nogusa, Shoko; Murasko, Donna M; Gardner, Elizabeth M

    2012-09-01

    Age-associated influences on natural killer (NK) cell functions following cytokine stimulation were examined in splenocytes from C57BL/6 mice. NK cells of both young and aged mice exhibited significantly increased: interferon-γ production after interleukin (IL)-12 or IL-15 alone or any combination of IL-12, IL-18, and IL-2; cytotoxicity after IL-2 or IL-15; and granzyme B expression after IL-15. The only significant age-associated differences were observed in interferon-γ production after IL-15 or IL-12 + 18 + 2 and in granzyme B expression following IL-2 or IL-15. Perforin expression did not increase following stimulation; however, NK cells from aged mice expressed significantly higher levels than young mice. These results underscore the complexity of the cytokine-induced functional activities of NK cells and illustrate the differential response of NK cells from young and aged mice to cytokine stimulation.

  12. Stimulatory Effects of Polysaccharide Fraction from Solanum nigrum on RAW 264.7 Murine Macrophage Cells

    PubMed Central

    Razali, Faizan Naeem; Ismail, Amirah; Abidin, Nurhayati Zainal; Shuib, Adawiyah Suriza

    2014-01-01

    The polysaccharide fraction from Solanum nigrum Linne has been shown to have antitumor activity by enhancing the CD4+/CD8+ ratio of the T-lymphocyte subpopulation. In this study, we analyzed a polysaccharide extract of S. nigrum to determine its modulating effects on RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells since macrophages play a key role in inducing both innate and adaptive immune responses. Crude polysaccharide was extracted from the stem of S. nigrum and subjected to ion-exchange chromatography to partially purify the extract. Five polysaccharide fractions were then subjected to a cytotoxicity assay and a nitric oxide production assay. To further analyze the ability of the fractionated polysaccharide extract to activate macrophages, the phagocytosis activity and cytokine production were also measured. The polysaccharide fractions were not cytotoxic, but all of the fractions induced nitric oxide in RAW 264.7 cells. Of the five fractions tested, SN-ppF3 was the least toxic and also induced the greatest amount of nitric oxide, which was comparable to the inducible nitric oxide synthase expression detected in the cell lysate. This fraction also significantly induced phagocytosis activity and stimulated the production of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6. Our study showed that fraction SN-ppF3 could classically activate macrophages. Macrophage induction may be the manner in which polysaccharides from S. nigrum are able to prevent tumor growth. PMID:25299340

  13. Stimulatory effect of ethanol on libertellenone H biosynthesis by Arctic fungus Eutypella sp. D-1.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chu; Xu, Ning; Gao, Yanyun; Sun, Xiaoyue; Yin, Ying; Cai, Menghao; Zhou, Xiangshan; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2016-02-01

    Libertellenone H (1) was a promising antitumor diterpenoid isolated from Arctic fungus Eutypella sp. D-1, however, its production was very limited. In this study, we investigated the effects of ethanol on cell growth and libertellenone H production. The mycelium in ethanol-feeding cultures was fragmented and dispersed, and the titer of libertellenone H was remarkably increased to 4.88 mg l(-1) in an optimal feeding manner, which was 16.4-fold higher than the control group. To provide an insight into the cell response to ethanol, genes critical to the libertellenone H biosynthesis were successfully cloned and their transcription levels were determined. The results suggested that the gene transcription levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl glutaric acyl coenzyme A reductase and geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase were up-regulated by ethanol stimulation. The results from this study were helpful for further understanding of the ethanol function on diterpenes biosynthesis as well as developing more effective strategies for over-production of these desired secondary metabolites.

  14. Bio-inspired vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posch, C.

    2012-01-01

    Nature still outperforms the most powerful computers in routine functions involving perception, sensing and actuation like vision, audition, and motion control, and is, most strikingly, orders of magnitude more energy-efficient than its artificial competitors. The reasons for the superior performance of biological systems are subject to diverse investigations, but it is clear that the form of hardware and the style of computation in nervous systems are fundamentally different from what is used in artificial synchronous information processing systems. Very generally speaking, biological neural systems rely on a large number of relatively simple, slow and unreliable processing elements and obtain performance and robustness from a massively parallel principle of operation and a high level of redundancy where the failure of single elements usually does not induce any observable system performance degradation. In the late 1980`s, Carver Mead demonstrated that silicon VLSI technology can be employed in implementing ``neuromorphic'' circuits that mimic neural functions and fabricating building blocks that work like their biological role models. Neuromorphic systems, as the biological systems they model, are adaptive, fault-tolerant and scalable, and process information using energy-efficient, asynchronous, event-driven methods. In this paper, some basics of neuromorphic electronic engineering and its impact on recent developments in optical sensing and artificial vision are presented. It is demonstrated that bio-inspired vision systems have the potential to outperform conventional, frame-based vision acquisition and processing systems in many application fields and to establish new benchmarks in terms of redundancy suppression/data compression, dynamic range, temporal resolution and power efficiency to realize advanced functionality like 3D vision, object tracking, motor control, visual feedback loops, etc. in real-time. It is argued that future artificial vision systems

  15. A phase I dose-escalation study of oral BR-DIM (BioResponse 3,3′- Diindolylmethane) in castrate-resistant, non-metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Heath, Elisabeth I; Heilbrun, Lance K; Li, Jing; Vaishampayan, Ulka; Harper, Felicity; Pemberton, Pam; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2010-01-01

    3, 3′-diindolylmethane (DIM) modulates estrogen metabolism and acts as an anti-androgen which down-regulates the androgen receptor and prostate specific antigen (PSA). We conducted a dose-escalation, phase I study of BioResponse (BR)-DIM with objectives to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), toxicity profile, and phar-macokinetics (PK) of BR-DIM, and to assess its effects on serum PSA and quality of life (QoL). Patients and Methods: Cohorts of 3-6 patients received escalating doses of twice daily oral BR-DIM providing DIM at 75 mg, then 150 mg, 225 mg, and 300 mg. Toxicity was evaluated monthly. Serum PSA and QoL were measured at baseline, monthly during treatment, and at end of study. Results: 12 patients with castrate-resistant, non-metastatic, PSA relapse prostate cancer were treated over 4 dose cohorts; 2 patients (at 150 mg and 225 mg, respectively) underwent intra-patient dose escalation, by one dose level. After oral administration of the first dose of BR-DIM, the plasma exposure to DIM appeared dose proportional at doses ranging from 75 to 300 mg, with the mean Cmax and mean AUClast increasing from 41.6 to 236.4 ng/ml and from 192.0 to 899.0 ng/ml*h, respectively. Continued relatively stable systemic exposure to DIM was achieved following twice daily oral administration of BR-DIM. Minimal toxicity was observed. Two of the four patients treated at 300 mg had grade 3 asymptomatic hyponatremia (AH) discovered on routine blood work. The other 2 patients at this dose had no AH. Therefore, the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was deemed to be 300 mgand the recommended phase II dose (RP2D) of BR-DIM was 225 mg twice daily. One patient without AH at 225 mg experienced a 50% PSA decline. One patient with BR-DIM dose of 225 mg had PSA stabilization. The other 10 patients had an initial deceleration of their PSA rise (decrease in slope), but eventually progressed based on continual PSA rise or evidence of metastatic disease. Ten patients completed monthly Qo

  16. Oxidative Stress Impairs the Stimulatory Effect of S100 Proteins on Protein Phosphatase 5 Activity.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Fuminori; Tsuchiya, Mitsumasa; Shimamoto, Seiko; Fujimoto, Tomohito; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi; Tokuda, Masaaki; Kobayashi, Ryoji

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is the consequence of an imbalance between the production of harmful reactive oxygen species and the cellular antioxidant system for neutralization, and it activates multiple intracellular signaling pathways, including apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1). Protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) is a serine/threonine phosphatase involved in oxidative stress responses. Previously, we reported that S100 proteins activate PP5 in a calcium-dependent manner. S100 proteins belong to a family of small EF-hand calcium-binding proteins involved in many processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and inflammation. Therefore, we investigated the effects of oxidative stress on S100 proteins, their interaction with PP5, and PP5 enzyme activity. Recombinant S100A2 was easily air-oxidized or Cu-oxidized, and oxidized S100A2 formed cross-linked dimers and higher molecular-mass complexes. The binding of oxidized S100A2 to PP5 was reduced, resulting in decreased PP5 activation in vitro. Oxidation also impaired S100A1, S100A6, S100B, and S100P to activate PP5, although the low dose of oxidized S100 proteins still activated PP5. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced S100A2 oxidation in human keratinocytes (HaCaT) and human hepatocellular carcinoma (Huh-7) cells. Furthermore, H2O2 reduced the binding of S100A2 to PP5 and decreased PP5 activation in HaCaT and Huh-7 cells. Importantly, even the low dose of S100A2 achieved by knocking down increased dephosphorylation of ASK1 and reduced caspase 3/7 activity in Huh-7 cells treated with H2O2. These results indicate that oxidative stress impairs the ability of S100 proteins to bind and activate PP5, which in turn modulates the ASK1-mediated signaling cascades involved in apoptosis. PMID:27600583

  17. A Novel Beta-Defensin Antimicrobial Peptide in Atlantic Cod with Stimulatory Effect on Phagocytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ruangsri, Jareeporn; Kitani, Yoichiro; Kiron, Viswanath; Lokesh, Jep; Brinchmann, Monica F.; Karlsen, Bård Ove; Fernandes, Jorge M. O.

    2013-01-01

    A novel defensin antimicrobial peptide gene was identified in Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua. This three exon/two intron defensin gene codes for a peptide precursor consisting of two domains: a signal peptide of 26 amino acids and a mature peptide of 40 residues. The mature cod defensin has six conserved cysteine residues that form 1–5, 2–4 and 3–6 disulphide bridges. This pattern is typical of beta-defensins and this gene was therefore named cod beta-defensin (defb). The tertiary structure of Defb exhibits an α/β fold with one α helix and β1β2β3 sheets. RT-PCR analysis indicated that defb transcripts were present mainly in the swim bladder and peritoneum wall but could also be detected at moderate to low levels in skin, head- and excretory kidneys. In situ hybridisation revealed that defb was specifically expressed by cells located in the swim bladder submucosa and the oocytes. During embryonic development, defb gene transcripts were detectable from the golden eye stage onwards and their expression was restricted to the swim bladder and retina. Defb was differentially expressed in several tissues following antigenic challenge with Vibrio anguillarum, being up-regulated up to 25-fold in head kidney. Recombinant Defb displayed antibacterial activity, with a minimal inhibitory concentration of 0.4–0.8 µM and 25–50 µM against the Gram-(+) bacteria Planococcus citreus and Micrococcus luteus, respectively. In addition, Defb stimulated phagocytic activity of cod head kidney leucocytes in vitro. These findings imply that beta-defensins may play an important role in the innate immune response of Atlantic cod. PMID:23638029

  18. Assessing the Need for an On-Line Educational Module for Volunteer Leaders on Bio-Security in Washington State 4-H Livestock Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Jill L.; Moore, Dale A.; Newman, Jerry; Schmidt, Janet L.; Smith, Sarah M.; Smith, Jean; Kerr, Susan; Wallace, Michael; BoyEs, Pat

    2011-01-01

    4-H livestock projects present disease transmission risks that can be reduced by the use of bio-security practices. The responsibility of teaching bio-security to youth belongs primarily to volunteer leaders, who may not be aware of the importance of these practices. A needs assessment for an online educational module about bio-security revealed…

  19. Phosphatidylinositol turnover (PI) during synaptic activation results from the release of a stimulatory and in inhibitory agonist

    SciTech Connect

    Bencherif, M.; Rubio, R.; Berne, R.M.

    1986-03-05

    PI has been implicated in the process of synaptic transmission and is increased by agonists. It has been suggested that PI is involved in cellular Ca/sup + +/ mobilization and the process represents a series of hydrolytic reactions with inositol as the final product. Hence, the rate of release of /sup 3/H-inositol (/sup 3/H-Ins) from prelabelled inositol phospholipids can be used as an index of PI. In the /sup 3/H-inositol prelabelled frog sympathetic ganglia, they studied the effect of synaptic activity on PI. PI did not change during orthodromic stimulation (20 Hz, 5 min). However, upon cessation of the stimulation, PI increased rapidly and remained elevated for at least 30 min. This increase in PI was reduced by suffusing the ganglia with either acetylcholine or adenosine. In the presence of atropine (5 ..mu..M), orthodromic stimulation increased PI. They hypothesized that synaptic activation releases a long-lasting stimulatory agonist and a short-lived inhibitory (Ach/adenosine) agonist(s) affecting PI. To test this idea, 2 sympathetic ganglia were used. One was prelabelled with /sup 3/H-inositol and the other was not. The two ganglia were placed together in a 5 ..mu..l drop of Ringers solution containing atropine. Orthodromic stimuli were applied to the non-labelled ganglion and elicited release of /sup 3/H-Ins from the non-stimulated ganglion.

  20. Glucagon induces disaggregation of polymer-like structures of the. alpha. subunit of the stimulatory G protein in liver membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Shunichi; Rodbell, M. )

    1991-08-15

    The hydrodynamic behavior of G{alpha}{sub s}, the {alpha} subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein (G protein), in octyl glucoside extracts of rat liver membranes was investigated. As was previously shown for G proteins similarly extracted from brain synaptoneurosomes, G{alpha}{sub s} behaved as polydisperse structures with S values higher than that of heterotrimeric G proteins. When G{alpha}{sub s} in its membrane-bound form was ({sup 32}P)ADP-ribosylated by cholera toxin and the treated membranes were extracted with octyl glucoside, > 35% of the labeled G{alpha}{sub s} was found in material that sedimented through sucrose gradients and contained relatively low levels of immunoreactive G{alpha}{sub s}. These finding suggest that the glucagon receptor selectivity interacts with polymer-like structures of G{alpha}{sub 2} and that activation by GTP({gamma}S) results in disaggregation. The role of the {beta} and {gamma} subunits of G proteins in the hormone-induced process is not clear since the polymer-like structures extracted with octyl glucoside are devoid of {beta} and {gamma} subunits.

  1. Stimulatory effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles on visual sensitivity and electroretinography b-waves in the bullfrog eye.

    PubMed

    Wahid, Fazli; Ul-Islam, Mazhar; Khan, Romana; Khan, Taous; Khattak, Waleed Ahmad; Hwang, Kyung-Hee; Park, Jong Seok; Chang, Su-Chan; Kim, You Young

    2013-08-01

    During the last decade, a large number of studies have focused on the development of nanomaterials for medical applications. Therefore, the present study was designed to evaluate the stimulatory effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles in the vertebrate visual system. Zinc oxide nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized through photoluminescence, ultraviolet (UV)-visible spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements. Furthermore, various electrophysiological recordings were obtained from the bullfrog eyecup preparations under various treatment conditions. Photoluminescence data showed a central peak at 386 nm while the UV-visible spectrum showed a sharp absorption band centered around 367 nm. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements showed that synthesized zinc oxide nanoparticles have a polycrystalline wurtzite structure, with a round to oval shape and an average particle size of > 40 nm. Electroretinography (ERG) demonstrated that zinc oxide nanoparticles significantly increased the ERG b-wave amplitude in dark-adapted bullfrog eyecups and in the presence of background illumination. Zinc oxide nanoparticles also improved the visual sensitivity by 0.7 log unit of light intensity and shortened the duration of rhodopsin regeneration. Based on the results obtained, it was concluded that zinc oxide nanoparticles may be used to improve visual functions. The present study may add new dimensions to the biomedical applications of nanomaterials in eye research. PMID:23926809

  2. Retroviral induction of GSK-3β expression blocks the stimulatory action of physical exercise on the maturation of newborn neurons.

    PubMed

    Llorens-Martín, María; Teixeira, Catia M; Jurado-Arjona, Jerónimo; Rakwal, Randeep; Shibato, Junko; Soya, Hideaki; Ávila, Jesús

    2016-09-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) is a key process for certain types of hippocampal-dependent learning. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is accompanied by memory deficits related to alterations in AHN. Given that the increased activity of GSK-3β has been related to alterations in the population of hippocampal granule neurons in AD patients, we designed a novel methodology by which to induce selective GSK-3β overexpression exclusively in newborn granule neurons. To this end, we injected an rtTA-IRES-EGFP-expressing retrovirus into the hippocampus of tTO-GSK-3β mice. Using this novel retroviral strategy, we found that GSK-3β caused a cell-autonomous impairment of the morphological and synaptic maturation of newborn neurons. In addition, we examined whether GSK-3β overexpression in newborn neurons limits the effects of physical activity. While physical exercise increased the number of dendritic spines, the percentage of mushroom spines, and the head diameter of the same in tet-OFF cells, these effects were not triggered in tet-ON cells. This observation suggests that GSK-3β blocks the stimulatory actions of exercise. Given that the activity of GSK-3β is increased in the brains of individuals with AD, these data may be relevant for non-pharmacological therapies for AD. PMID:27010990

  3. Lysosomal Lipases PLRP2 and LPLA2 Process Mycobacterial Multi-acylated Lipids and Generate T Cell Stimulatory Antigens.

    PubMed

    Gilleron, Martine; Lepore, Marco; Layre, Emilie; Cala-De Paepe, Diane; Mebarek, Naila; Shayman, James A; Canaan, Stéphane; Mori, Lucia; Carrière, Frédéric; Puzo, Germain; De Libero, Gennaro

    2016-09-22

    Complex antigens require processing within antigen-presenting cells (APCs) to form T cell stimulatory complexes with CD1 antigen-presenting molecules. It remains unknown whether lipids with multi-acylated moieties also necessitate digestion by lipases to become capable of binding CD1 molecules and stimulate T cells. Here, we show that the mycobacterial tetra-acylated glycolipid antigens phosphatidyl-myo-inositol mannosides (PIM) are digested to di-acylated forms by pancreatic lipase-related protein 2 (PLRP2) and lysosomal phospholipase A2 (LPLA2) within APCs. Recombinant PLRP2 and LPLA2 removed the sn1- and sn2-bound fatty acids from the PIM glycerol moiety, as revealed by mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance studies. PLRP2 or LPLA2 gene silencing in APCs abolished PIM presentation to T cells, thus revealing an essential role of both lipases in vivo. These findings show that endosomal lipases participate in lipid antigen presentation by processing lipid antigens and have a role in T cell immunity against mycobacteria. PMID:27662254

  4. Influence of various treatments including povidone-iodine and healing stimulatory reagents in a rabbit ear wound model.

    PubMed

    Arai, Keitaro; Yamazaki, Masashi; Maeda, Tatsuo; Okura, Takaaki; Tsuboi, Ryoji

    2013-10-01

    Selecting an appropriate treatment for a given case of skin wound is crucial for inducing optimal healing. We used an animal model developed from normal rabbit ears in order to assess the efficacy of treatments for skin wounds with or without a wet dressing, anti microbial reagent or topical wound-stimulatory reagents. The degree of healing in each group was evaluated and compared using four histological parameters: (i) degree of reepithelialisation, (ii) amount of granulation tissue formation, and (iii) the number of capillary lumens and (iv) fibroblasts in the granulation tissue. Treatment using wet dressings resulted in an increase in capillary number compared with the open dry wound. Although the retention of povidone-iodine (PI) in wound tissue after application significantly inhibited reepithelialisation (P < 0.05), rinsing PI off with saline was comparable in effect to using only a wet dressing. The three topical reagents, namely, basic fibroblast growth factor, prostaglandin E1 and dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate, significantly improved reepithelialisation (P < 0.05). In conclusion, wounds should be kept hydrated by applying topical reagents. If there are any signs of bacterial infection, PI can be applied and rinsed later with saline in order to minimise its cytotoxic effects.

  5. Darbepoietin-alfa has comparable erythropoietic stimulatory effects to recombinant erythropoietin whilst preserving the bone marrow microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Dewamitta, Sita R.; Russell, Megan R.; Nandurkar, Harshal; Walkley, Carl R.

    2013-01-01

    Erythropoiesis stimulating agents are widely used for the treatment of anemia. Recently, we reported erythroid expansion with impaired B lymphopoiesis and loss of trabecular bone in C57BL/6 mice following ten days of treatment with low-dose short acting recombinant human erythropoietin. We have assessed erythropoietin against longer-acting darbepoietin-alfa at a comparable erythroid stimulatory dosage regime. Darbepoietin-alfa and erythropoietin induced similar in vivo erythropoietic expansion. Both agents induced an expansion of the colony-forming unit-erythroid populations. However, unlike erythropoietin, darbepoietin-alfa did not impair bone marrow B lymphopoiesis. Strikingly the bone loss observed with erythropoietin was not apparent following darbepoietin-alfa treatment. This analysis demonstrates that whilst darbepoietin-alfa has similar in vivo erythropoietic potency to erythropoietin, it preserves the bone marrow microenvironment. Thus erythropoietin and darbepoietin-alfa manifest different action showing that erythropoiesis stimulating agents have differential non-erythroid effects dependent on their duration of action. PMID:23242598

  6. The stimulatory effect of mannitol on levan biosynthesis: Lessons from metabolic systems analysis of Halomonas smyrnensis AAD6(T.).

    PubMed

    Ates, Ozlem; Arga, Kazim Y; Oner, Ebru Toksoy

    2013-01-01

    Halomonas smyrnensis AAD(T) is a halophilic, gram-negative bacterium that can efficiently produce levan from sucrose as carbon source via levansucrase activity. However, systems-based approaches are required to further enhance its metabolic performance for industrial application. As an important step toward this goal, the genome-scale metabolic network of Chromohalobacter salexigens DSM3043, which is considered a model organism for halophilic bacteria, has been reconstructed based on its genome annotation, physiological information, and biochemical information. In the present work, the genome-scale metabolic network of C. salexigens was recruited, and refined via integration of the available biochemical, physiological, and phenotypic features of H. smyrnensis AAD6(T) . The generic metabolic model, which comprises 1,393 metabolites and 1,108 reactions, was then systematically analyzed in silico using constraints-based simulations. To elucidate the relationship between levan biosynthesis and other metabolic processes, an enzyme-graph representation of the metabolic network and a graph decomposition technique were employed. Using the concept of control effective fluxes, significant links between several metabolic processes and levan biosynthesis were estimated. The major finding was the elucidation of the stimulatory effect of mannitol on levan biosynthesis, which was further verified experimentally via supplementation of mannitol to the fermentation medium. The optimal concentration of 30 g/L mannitol supplemented to the 50 g/L sucrose-based medium resulted in a twofold increase in levan production in parallel with increased sucrose hydrolysis rate, accumulated extracellular glucose, and decreased fructose uptake rate.

  7. Bio-oil fractionation and condensation

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Robert C; Jones, Samuel T; Pollard, Anthony

    2013-07-02

    A method of fractionating bio-oil vapors which involves providing bio-oil vapors comprising bio-oil constituents is described. The bio-oil vapors are cooled in a first stage which comprises a condenser having passages for the bio-oil separated by a heat conducting wall from passages for a coolant. The coolant in the condenser of the first stage is maintained at a substantially constant temperature, set at a temperature in the range of 75 to 100.degree. C., to condense a first liquid fraction of liquefied bio-oil constituents in the condenser of the first stage. The first liquid fraction of liquified bio-oil constituents from the condenser in the first stage is collected. Also described are steps for subsequently recovering further liquid fractions of liquefied bio-oil constituents. Particular compositions of bio-oil condensation products are also described.

  8. Stimulatory and inhibitory effects of guanine nucleotides on arginine-vasotocin-sensitive adenylate cyclase in the epithelial cell membranes of the bullfrog bladder.

    PubMed

    Mishina, T; Shimada, H; Marumo, F

    1983-11-01

    The effects of arginine-vasotocin and nucleotides on the steady-state kinetics of the adenylate cyclase activity in the epithelial cell membranes of the bullfrog (Rana catesbiana) bladder were studied. Arginine-vasotocin stimulated adenylate cyclase more effectively than oxytocin or arginine-vasopressin, with respect to both the maximal hormonal activation ratio relative to basal, and the hormone concentration yielding a half-maximal response (apparent Km). Arginine-vasotocin, GTP and its analogue guanyl-5'-yl imidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p) increased the Vmax of the basal adenylate cyclase activity, but showed no effect of the apparent Km of the system for ATP. In addition, Gpp(NH)p enhanced the arginine-vasotocin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity, further increasing the Vmax, while GTP showed no statistically significant effect. Dual effects of GDP were apparent: it was stimulatory at 1 x 10(-5) mol/l and inhibitory at 1 x 10(-3) mol/l, on both the basal and the arginine-vasotocin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. Guanosine 5'-monophosphate, CTP, UTP and ITP showed no apparent effect on the enzyme activity. Sodium fluoride acted in the same manner as GTP on the adenylate cyclase system, increasing only basal activity. Adenylate cyclase activities exhibited pH optima that were less distinct in the presence than in the absence of Gpp(NH)p. The Arrhenius plot of the temperature experiment showed that a high-energy step was involved for activation by Gpp(NH)p or arginine-vasotocin. When the relative activation ratios by arginine-vasotocin at different ATP concentrations were studied, a distinct activation optimum was shown at 2.5 x 10(-4) mol ATP/l, either in the absence or presence of Gpp(NH)p. The possibility that GTP, GDP nd ATP play a regulatory role in the epithelial cells of the bullfrog bladder by adjusting the responsiveness of the system to a natural hormone, arginine-vasotocin, is discussed. PMID:6606697

  9. Impaired growth hormone-releasing hormone signal transduction in the dwarf (dw) rat is independent of a generalized defect in the stimulatory G-protein, Gs alpha.

    PubMed

    Zeitler, P; Downs, T R; Frohman, L A

    1993-12-01

    The homozygous dwarf (dw) rat pituitary is characterized by a 95% reduction in GH content as well as a 75-80% reduction in the number of somatotrophs. The nature of the mutation responsible for this phenotype is unknown. Previous investigations from our laboratory indicate that dw somatotrophs exhibit decreased sensitivity and a reduced GH secretory response to GH-releasing hormone in vitro, accompanied by a decreased generation of cAMP. We hypothesized that dw rats have a defect in the pathway linking the GH-releasing hormone receptor to adenylyl cyclase and focused on the expression and function of the stimulatory G-protein, Gs alpha. When corrected for differences in pituitary size and cell number, GH mRNA content was reduced by 78% compared to that in controls. However, there was no difference in Gs alpha mRNA content or size in dw pituitaries. Similarly, there was no difference in the content or size of mRNA for the pituitary transcription factor pit-1 in dw pituitaries. Immunoblot analysis of pituitary membrane proteins using a Gs alpha-specific antibody revealed no differences in size, quantity, or relative distribution of Gs alpha peptides between control and dw pituitaries. In addition, cholera toxin effectively ribosylated dw Gs alpha, and there were no differences in the size, quantity, or relative distribution of ribosylated membrane proteins between dw and control pituitaries. Finally, to examine for mutations in other regions of the Gs alpha-coding sequence, we cloned the full-length Gs alpha cDNA from dw rat pituitaries by polymerase chain reaction. The sequence of this clone was identical to that of normal rat Gs alpha cDNA. These results indicate that 1) 52-kilodalton Gs alpha appears to predominate in both normal and dw pituitary; 2) the content, function, and sequence of Gs alpha in adult dw rats are normal; and 3) a generalized Gs alpha regulatory or structural mutation as the cause of the observed phenotype can be excluded. The results also

  10. Kaolin Foliar Application Has a Stimulatory Effect on Phenylpropanoid and Flavonoid Pathways in Grape Berries

    PubMed Central

    Conde, Artur; Pimentel, Diana; Neves, Andreia; Dinis, Lia-Tânia; Bernardo, Sara; Correia, Carlos M.; Gerós, Hernâni; Moutinho-Pereira, José

    2016-01-01

    Drought, elevated air temperature, and high evaporative demand are increasingly frequent during summer in grape growing areas like the Mediterranean basin, limiting grapevine productivity and berry quality. The foliar exogenous application of kaolin, a radiation-reflecting inert mineral, has proven effective in mitigating the negative impacts of these abiotic stresses in grapevine and other fruit crops, however, little is known about its influence on the composition of the grape berry and on key molecular mechanisms and metabolic pathways notably important for grape berry quality parameters. Here, we performed a thorough molecular and biochemical analysis to assess how foliar application of kaolin influences major secondary metabolism pathways associated with berry quality-traits, leading to biosynthesis of phenolics and anthocyanins, with a focus on the phenylpropanoid, flavonoid (both flavonol- and anthocyanin-biosynthetic) and stilbenoid pathways. In grape berries from different ripening stages, targeted transcriptional analysis by qPCR revealed that several genes involved in these pathways—VvPAL1, VvC4H1, VvSTSs, VvCHS1, VvFLS1, VvDFR, and VvUFGT—were more expressed in response to the foliar kaolin treatment, particularly in the latter maturation phases. In agreement, enzymatic activities of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), flavonol synthase (FLS), and UDP-glucose:flavonoid 3-O-glucosyltransferase (UFGT) were about two-fold higher in mature or fully mature berries from kaolin-treated plants, suggesting regulation also at a transcriptional level. The expression of the glutathione S-transferase VvGST4, and of the tonoplast anthocyanin transporters VvMATE1 and VvABCC1 were also all significantly increased at véraison and in mature berries, thus, when anthocyanins start to accumulate in the vacuole, in agreement with previously observed higher total concentrations of phenolics and anthocyanins in berries from kaolin-treated plants, especially at full

  11. Stimulatory effects of chitinase on growth and immune defense of orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanhong; Feng, Shaozhen; Chen, Jun; Qin, Chaobin; Lin, Haoran; Li, Wensheng

    2012-05-01

    spleen in response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge, strongly suggesting the existence of an innate pathway for local defense against chitin-containing organisms. Moreover, the pathogen such as Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus could be inhibited by the recombinant protein of grouper chitinase1 to a certain extent. PMID:22365990

  12. Kaolin Foliar Application Has a Stimulatory Effect on Phenylpropanoid and Flavonoid Pathways in Grape Berries.

    PubMed

    Conde, Artur; Pimentel, Diana; Neves, Andreia; Dinis, Lia-Tânia; Bernardo, Sara; Correia, Carlos M; Gerós, Hernâni; Moutinho-Pereira, José

    2016-01-01

    Drought, elevated air temperature, and high evaporative demand are increasingly frequent during summer in grape growing areas like the Mediterranean basin, limiting grapevine productivity and berry quality. The foliar exogenous application of kaolin, a radiation-reflecting inert mineral, has proven effective in mitigating the negative impacts of these abiotic stresses in grapevine and other fruit crops, however, little is known about its influence on the composition of the grape berry and on key molecular mechanisms and metabolic pathways notably important for grape berry quality parameters. Here, we performed a thorough molecular and biochemical analysis to assess how foliar application of kaolin influences major secondary metabolism pathways associated with berry quality-traits, leading to biosynthesis of phenolics and anthocyanins, with a focus on the phenylpropanoid, flavonoid (both flavonol- and anthocyanin-biosynthetic) and stilbenoid pathways. In grape berries from different ripening stages, targeted transcriptional analysis by qPCR revealed that several genes involved in these pathways-VvPAL1, VvC4H1, VvSTSs, VvCHS1, VvFLS1, VvDFR, and VvUFGT-were more expressed in response to the foliar kaolin treatment, particularly in the latter maturation phases. In agreement, enzymatic activities of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), flavonol synthase (FLS), and UDP-glucose:flavonoid 3-O-glucosyltransferase (UFGT) were about two-fold higher in mature or fully mature berries from kaolin-treated plants, suggesting regulation also at a transcriptional level. The expression of the glutathione S-transferase VvGST4, and of the tonoplast anthocyanin transporters VvMATE1 and VvABCC1 were also all significantly increased at véraison and in mature berries, thus, when anthocyanins start to accumulate in the vacuole, in agreement with previously observed higher total concentrations of phenolics and anthocyanins in berries from kaolin-treated plants, especially at full maturity

  13. Stimulatory effects of chitinase on growth and immune defense of orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanhong; Feng, Shaozhen; Chen, Jun; Qin, Chaobin; Lin, Haoran; Li, Wensheng

    2012-05-01

    spleen in response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge, strongly suggesting the existence of an innate pathway for local defense against chitin-containing organisms. Moreover, the pathogen such as Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus could be inhibited by the recombinant protein of grouper chitinase1 to a certain extent.

  14. Complex biological and bio-inspired systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ecke, Robert E

    2009-01-01

    The understanding and characterization ofthe fundamental processes of the function of biological systems underpins many of the important challenges facing American society, from the pathology of infectious disease and the efficacy ofvaccines, to the development of materials that mimic biological functionality and deliver exceptional and novel structural and dynamic properties. These problems are fundamentally complex, involving many interacting components and poorly understood bio-chemical kinetics. We use the basic science of statistical physics, kinetic theory, cellular bio-chemistry, soft-matter physics, and information science to develop cell level models and explore the use ofbiomimetic materials. This project seeks to determine how cell level processes, such as response to mechanical stresses, chemical constituents and related gradients, and other cell signaling mechanisms, integrate and combine to create a functioning organism. The research focuses on the basic physical processes that take place at different levels ofthe biological organism: the basic role of molecular and chemical interactions are investigated, the dynamics of the DNA-molecule and its phylogenetic role are examined and the regulatory networks of complex biochemical processes are modeled. These efforts may lead to early warning algorithms ofpathogen outbreaks, new bio-sensors to detect hazards from pathomic viruses to chemical contaminants. Other potential applications include the development of efficient bio-fuel alternative-energy processes and the exploration ofnovel materials for energy usages. Finally, we use the notion of 'coarse-graining,' which is a method for averaging over less important degrees of freedom to develop computational models to predict cell function and systems-level response to disease, chemical stress, or biological pathomic agents. This project supports Energy Security, Threat Reduction, and the missions of the DOE Office of Science through its efforts to accurately

  15. Bio-nanopatterning of Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, Paula M.; Yeung, Chun L.; Preece, Jon A.

    2007-08-01

    Bio-nanopatterning of surfaces is a very active interdisciplinary field of research at the interface between biotechnology and nanotechnology. Precise patterning of biomolecules on surfaces with nanometre resolution has great potential in many medical and biological applications ranging from molecular diagnostics to advanced platforms for fundamental studies of molecular and cell biology. Bio-nanopatterning technology has advanced at a rapid pace in the last few years with a variety of patterning methodologies being developed for immobilising biomolecules such as DNA, peptides, proteins and viruses at the nanoscale on a broad range of substrates. In this review, the status of research and development are described, with particular focus on the recent advances on the use of nanolithographic techniques as tools for biomolecule immobilisation at the nanoscale. Present strengths and weaknesses, as well future challenges on the different nanolithographic bio-nanopatterning approaches are discussed.

  16. Bio-threat preparedness: Need for a paradigm shift

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, A.K.; Roy, Kaushik

    2014-01-01

    India of late has been vulnerable to Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) threat, on account of its unique geographic position. Biological threat is an imminent threat in the hands of a terrorist. The public health system of our country is overburdened due to its present role and bio-attack response is not a priority area. This paper suggests that as the prime focus is on the CR and N threats in the integrated CBRN preparedness strategy and that specialized and technical forces are needed to deal with a bio-threat; hence there is a need for a paradigm shift in policy. The emerging field of bio-threat needs to be delinked from the joint family of ‘CBRN’, with consequent structural and functional changes. A separate specialized cadre needs to be formed for dealing with bio-threat, created from the pool of doctors and non-medical scientists from the AFMS and the DRDO. Structural changes are needed in the organization, to bring in the resources of NCDC, New Delhi for enhanced disease surveillance capacity and creation of a bio-threat mitigation node in the AFMC, Pune. PMID:24843207

  17. Relationship between cerebral sigma-1 receptor occupancy and attenuation of cocaine's motor stimulatory effects in mice by PD144418.

    PubMed

    Lever, John R; Miller, Dennis K; Fergason-Cantrell, Emily A; Green, Caroline L; Watkinson, Lisa D; Carmack, Terry L; Lever, Susan Z

    2014-10-01

    Psychostimulant effects of cocaine are mediated partly by agonist actions at sigma-1 (σ1) receptors. Selective σ1 receptor antagonists attenuate these effects and provide a potential avenue for pharmacotherapy. However, the selective and high affinity σ1 antagonist PD144418 (1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-5-[3-(4-methylphenyl)-5-isoxazolyl]-1-propylpyridine) has been reported not to inhibit cocaine-induced hyperactivity. To address this apparent paradox, we evaluated aspects of PD144418 binding in vitro, investigated σ1 receptor and dopamine transporter (DAT) occupancy in vivo, and re-examined effects on locomotor activity. PD144418 displayed high affinity for σ1 sites (Ki 0.46 nM) and 3596-fold selectivity over σ2 sites (Ki 1654 nM) in guinea pig brain membranes. No appreciable affinity was noted for serotonin and norepinephrine transporters (Ki >100 μM), and the DAT interaction was weak (Ki 9.0 μM). In vivo, PD144418 bound to central and peripheral σ1 sites in mouse, with an ED50 of 0.22 μmol/kg in whole brain. No DAT occupancy by PD144418 (10.0 μmol/kg) or possible metabolites were observed. At doses that did not affect basal locomotor activity, PD144418 (1, 3.16, and 10 μmol/kg) attenuated cocaine-induced hyperactivity in a dose-dependent manner in mice. There was good correlation (r(2) = 0.88) of hyperactivity reduction with increasing cerebral σ1 receptor occupancy. The behavioral ED50 of 0.79 μmol/kg corresponded to 80% occupancy. Significant σ1 receptor occupancy and the ability to mitigate cocaine's motor stimulatory effects were observed for 16 hours after a single 10.0 μmol/kg dose of PD144418.

  18. Stimulatory effect of the secretogranin-ll derived peptide secretoneurin on food intake and locomotion in female goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Mikwar, M; Navarro-Martin, L; Xing, L; Volkoff, H; Hu, W; Trudeau, V L

    2016-04-01

    Secretoneurin (SN) is a conserved peptide derived by proteolytic processing from the middle domain of the ∼600 amino acid precursor secretogranin-II (SgII). Secretoneurin is widely distributed in secretory granules of endocrine cells and neurons and has important roles in reproduction as it stimulates luteinizing hormone release from the pituitary. A potential new role of SN in goldfish feeding is the subject of this study. Firstly, we established that acute (26 h; p<0.0001) and short-term (72 h; p=0.016) fasting increased SgIIa precursor mRNA levels 1.25-fold in the telencephalon, implicating SN in the control of feeding. Secondly, we determined that intracerebroventricular injections of the type A SN (SNa; 0.2 and 1 ng/g BW) increased food intake and locomotor behavior by 60 min. Fish injected with the lower and higher doses of SNa (0.2 and 1 ng/g) respectively exhibited significant 1.77- and 2.58-fold higher food intake (p<0.0001) than the saline-injected control fish. Locomotor behavior was increased by 1.35- and 2.26-fold for 0.2 ng/g SNa (p=0.0001) and 1 ng/g SNa (p<0.0001), respectively. Injection of 1 ng/g SNa increased mRNA levels of hypothalamic neuropeptide Y 1.36-fold (p=0.038) and decreased hypothalamic cocaine-and amphetamine-regulated transcript by 33% (p=0.01) at 2h and 5h post-injection, respectively. These data suggest interactions of SNa with stimulatory and inhibitory pathways of food intake control in fish. PMID:26860475

  19. The co-stimulatory molecule B7-H3 promotes the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Ting; Liu, Fen; Sun, Zhangzhang; Shi, Hanping; Hua, Dong; Yang, Chen

    2016-05-31

    B7-H3, first recognized as a co-stimulatory molecule, is abnormally expressed in cancer tissues and is associated with cancer metastasis and a poor prognosis. However, as an initial event of metastasis, the relationship between the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT ) in cancer cells and B7-H3 has still not been investigated. In this study, we first analyzed B7-H3 expression by immunohistochemistry in colorectal cancer tissues. B7-H3 was expressed in the cancer cell membrane and was associated with the T stage of colorectal cancer; it also showed a positive correlation with MMP2 and MMP9 expression in cancer tissues. Over-expression of B7-H3 in SW480 cells allowed cancer cells to invade and metastasize more than the control cells, whereas invasion and metastasis capabilities were decreased after B7-H3 was knocked down in Caco-2 cells. We further showed that B7-H3 down-regulated the expression of E-cadherin and β-catenin and up-regulated N-cadherin and Vimentin expression, implying that B7-H3 promoted the EMT in colorectal cancer cells. We also checked another character of the EMT, the stemness of cancer cells. CD133, CD44 and Oct4 were significantly elevated after the SW480 cells were transfected with B7-H3 and reduced in Caco-2 cells after B7-H3 was inhibited. In subsequent studies, we proved that B7-H3 upregulated the expression of Smad1 via PI3K-Akt. In conclusion, B7-H3 promotes the EMT in colorectal cancer cells by activating the PI3K-Akt pathway and upregulating the expression of Smad1. PMID:27145365

  20. Immunological consequences of stress-related proteins--cytosolic tryparedoxin peroxidase and chaperonin TCP20--identified in splenic amastigotes of Leishmania donovani as Th1 stimulatory, in experimental visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Anil Kumar; Khare, Prashant; Joshi, Sumit; Rawat, Keerti; Yadav, Narendra; Sundar, Shyam; Dube, Anuradha

    2015-04-01

    In earlier studies, proteomic characterization of splenic amastigote fractions from clinical isolates of Leishmania donovani, exhibiting significant cellular responses in cured Leishmania subjects, led to the identification of cytosolic tryparedoxin peroxidase (LdcTryP) and chaperonin-TCP20 (LdTCP20) as Th1-stimulatory proteins. Both the proteins, particularly LdTCP20 for the first time, were successfully cloned, overexpressed, purified and were found to be localized in the cytosol of purified splenic amastigotes. When evaluated against lymphocytes of cured Leishmania-infected hamsters, the purified recombinant proteins (rLdcTryP and rLdTCP20) induced their proliferations as well as nitric oxide production. Similarly, these proteins also generated Th1-type cytokines (IFN-γ/IL-12) from stimulated PBMCs of cured/endemic Leishmania patients. Further, vaccination with rLdcTryP elicited noticeable delayed-type hypersensitivity response and offered considerably good prophylactic efficacy (~78% inhibition) against L. donovani challenge in hamsters, which was well supported by the increased mRNA expression of Th1 and Th2 cytokines. However, animals vaccinated with rLdTCP20 exhibited comparatively lesser prophylactic efficacy (~55%) with inferior immunological response. The results indicate the potentiality of rLdcTryP protein, between the two, as a suitable anti-leishmanial vaccine. Since, rLdTCP20 is also an important target, for optimization, further attempts towards determination of immunodominant regions for designing fusion peptides may be taken up. PMID:25498563

  1. Joint BioEnergy Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Keasling, Jay; Simmons, Blake; Tartaglino, Virginia; Baidoo, Edward; Kothari, Ankita

    2015-06-15

    The Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Bioenergy Research Center dedicated to developing advanced biofuels—liquid fuels derived from the solar energy stored in plant biomass that can replace gasoline, diesel and jet fuels.

  2. Bio-Microrheology: A Frontier in Microrheology

    PubMed Central

    Weihs, Daphne; Mason, Thomas G.; Teitell, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    Cells continuously adapt to changing conditions through coordinated molecular and mechanical responses. This adaptation requires the transport of molecules and signaling through intracellular regions with differing material properties, such as variations in viscosity or elasticity. To determine the impact of regional variations on cell structure and physiology, an approach, termed bio-microrheology, or the study of deformation and flow of biological materials at small length scales has emerged. By tracking the thermal and driven motion of probe particles, organelles, or molecules, the local physical environment in distinct subcellular regions can be explored. On the surface or inside cells, tracking the motion of particles can reveal the rheological properties that influence cell features, such as shape and metastatic potential. Cellular microrheology promises to improve our concepts of regional and integrated properties, structures, and transport in live cells. Since bio-microrheology is an evolving methodology, many specific details, such as how to interpret complex combinations of thermally mediated and directed probe transport, remain to be fully explained. This work reviews the current state of the field and discusses the utility and challenges of this emerging approach. PMID:16963507

  3. BioCreative V BioC track overview: collaborative biocurator assistant task for BioGRID

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun; Islamaj Doğan, Rezarta; Chatr-Aryamontri, Andrew; Chang, Christie S.; Oughtred, Rose; Rust, Jennifer; Batista-Navarro, Riza; Carter, Jacob; Ananiadou, Sophia; Matos, Sérgio; Santos, André; Campos, David; Oliveira, José Luís; Singh, Onkar; Jonnagaddala, Jitendra; Dai, Hong-Jie; Su, Emily Chia-Yu; Chang, Yung-Chun; Su, Yu-Chen; Chu, Chun-Han; Chen, Chien Chin; Hsu, Wen-Lian; Peng, Yifan; Arighi, Cecilia; Wu, Cathy H.; Vijay-Shanker, K.; Aydın, Ferhat; Hüsünbeyi, Zehra Melce; Özgür, Arzucan; Shin, Soo-Yong; Kwon, Dongseop; Dolinski, Kara; Tyers, Mike; Wilbur, W. John; Comeau, Donald C.

    2016-01-01

    BioC is a simple XML format for text, annotations and relations, and was developed to achieve interoperability for biomedical text processing. Following the success of BioC in BioCreative IV, the BioCreative V BioC track addressed a collaborative task to build an assistant system for BioGRID curation. In this paper, we describe the framework of the collaborative BioC task and discuss our findings based on the user survey. This track consisted of eight subtasks including gene/protein/organism named entity recognition, protein–protein/genetic interaction passage identification and annotation visualization. Using BioC as their data-sharing and communication medium, nine teams, world-wide, participated and contributed either new methods or improvements of existing tools to address different subtasks of the BioC track. Results from different teams were shared in BioC and made available to other teams as they addressed different subtasks of the track. In the end, all submitted runs were merged using a machine learning classifier to produce an optimized output. The biocurator assistant system was evaluated by four BioGRID curators in terms of practical usability. The curators’ feedback was overall positive and highlighted the user-friendly design and the convenient gene/protein curation tool based on text mining. Database URL: http://www.biocreative.org/tasks/biocreative-v/track-1-bioc/ PMID:27589962

  4. BioCreative V BioC track overview: collaborative biocurator assistant task for BioGRID.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun; Islamaj Doğan, Rezarta; Chatr-Aryamontri, Andrew; Chang, Christie S; Oughtred, Rose; Rust, Jennifer; Batista-Navarro, Riza; Carter, Jacob; Ananiadou, Sophia; Matos, Sérgio; Santos, André; Campos, David; Oliveira, José Luís; Singh, Onkar; Jonnagaddala, Jitendra; Dai, Hong-Jie; Su, Emily Chia-Yu; Chang, Yung-Chun; Su, Yu-Chen; Chu, Chun-Han; Chen, Chien Chin; Hsu, Wen-Lian; Peng, Yifan; Arighi, Cecilia; Wu, Cathy H; Vijay-Shanker, K; Aydın, Ferhat; Hüsünbeyi, Zehra Melce; Özgür, Arzucan; Shin, Soo-Yong; Kwon, Dongseop; Dolinski, Kara; Tyers, Mike; Wilbur, W John; Comeau, Donald C

    2016-01-01

    BioC is a simple XML format for text, annotations and relations, and was developed to achieve interoperability for biomedical text processing. Following the success of BioC in BioCreative IV, the BioCreative V BioC track addressed a collaborative task to build an assistant system for BioGRID curation. In this paper, we describe the framework of the collaborative BioC task and discuss our findings based on the user survey. This track consisted of eight subtasks including gene/protein/organism named entity recognition, protein-protein/genetic interaction passage identification and annotation visualization. Using BioC as their data-sharing and communication medium, nine teams, world-wide, participated and contributed either new methods or improvements of existing tools to address different subtasks of the BioC track. Results from different teams were shared in BioC and made available to other teams as they addressed different subtasks of the track. In the end, all submitted runs were merged using a machine learning classifier to produce an optimized output. The biocurator assistant system was evaluated by four BioGRID curators in terms of practical usability. The curators' feedback was overall positive and highlighted the user-friendly design and the convenient gene/protein curation tool based on text mining.Database URL: http://www.biocreative.org/tasks/biocreative-v/track-1-bioc/. PMID:27589962

  5. Bio-mimetic Flow Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Haecheon

    2009-11-01

    Bio-mimetic engineering or bio-mimetics is the application of biological methods and systems found in nature to the study and design of engineering systems and modern technology (from Wikipedia). The concept itself is old, but successful developments have been made recently, especially in the research field of flow control. The objective of flow control based on the bio-mimetic approach is to develop novel concepts for reducing drag, increasing lift and enhancing aerodynamic performance. For skin friction reduction, a few ideas have been suggested such as the riblet from shark, compliant surface from dolphin, microbubble injection and multiple front-body curvature from penguin, and V-shaped protrusion from sailfish. For form drag reduction, several new attempts have been also made recently. Examples include the V-shaped spanwise grooves from saguaro cactus, overall shape of box fish, longitudinal grooves on scallop shell, bill of swordfish, hooked comb on owl wing, trailing-edge protrusion on dragonfly wing, and fillet. For the enhancement of aerodynamic performance, focuses have been made on the birds, fish and insects: e.g., double layered feather of landing bird, leading-edge serration of humpback-whale flipper, pectoral fin of flying fish, long tail on swallowtail-butterfly wing, wing flapping motion of dragonfly, and alula in birds. Living animals adapt their bodies to better performance in multi purposes, but engineering requires single purpose in most cases. Therefore, bio-mimetic approaches often produce excellent results more than expected. However, they are sometimes based on people's wrong understanding of nature and produce unwanted results. Successes and failures from bio-mimetic approaches in flow control will be discussed in the presentation.

  6. Canine distemper virus infection leads to an inhibitory phenotype of monocyte-derived dendritic cells in vitro with reduced expression of co-stimulatory molecules and increased interleukin-10 transcription.

    PubMed

    Qeska, Visar; Barthel, Yvonne; Herder, Vanessa; Stein, Veronika M; Tipold, Andrea; Urhausen, Carola; Günzel-Apel, Anne-Rose; Rohn, Karl; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Beineke, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) exhibits a profound lymphotropism that causes immunosuppression and increased susceptibility of affected dogs to opportunistic infections. Similar to human measles virus, CDV is supposed to inhibit terminal differentiation of dendritic cells (DCs), responsible for disturbed repopulation of lymphoid tissues and diminished antigen presenting function in dogs. In order to testify the hypothesis that CDV-infection leads to an impairment of professional antigen presenting cells, canine DCs have been generated from peripheral blood monocytes in vitro and infected with CDV. Virus infection was confirmed and quantified by transmission electron microscopy, CDV-specific immunofluorescence, and virus titration. Flow cytometric analyses revealed a significant down-regulation of the major histocompatibility complex class II and co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 in CDV-infected DCs, indicative of disturbed antigen presenting capacity. Molecular analyses revealed an increased expression of the immune inhibitory cytokine interleukin-10 in DCs following infection. Results of the present study demonstrate that CDV causes phenotypical changes and altered cytokine expression of DCs, which represent potential mechanisms to evade host immune responses and might contribute to immune dysfunction and virus persistence in canine distemper.

  7. Canine Distemper Virus Infection Leads to an Inhibitory Phenotype of Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells In Vitro with Reduced Expression of Co-Stimulatory Molecules and Increased Interleukin-10 Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Herder, Vanessa; Stein, Veronika M.; Tipold, Andrea; Urhausen, Carola; Günzel-Apel, Anne-Rose; Rohn, Karl; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Beineke, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) exhibits a profound lymphotropism that causes immunosuppression and increased susceptibility of affected dogs to opportunistic infections. Similar to human measles virus, CDV is supposed to inhibit terminal differentiation of dendritic cells (DCs), responsible for disturbed repopulation of lymphoid tissues and diminished antigen presenting function in dogs. In order to testify the hypothesis that CDV-infection leads to an impairment of professional antigen presenting cells, canine DCs have been generated from peripheral blood monocytes in vitro and infected with CDV. Virus infection was confirmed and quantified by transmission electron microscopy, CDV-specific immunofluorescence, and virus titration. Flow cytometric analyses revealed a significant down-regulation of the major histocompatibility complex class II and co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 in CDV-infected DCs, indicative of disturbed antigen presenting capacity. Molecular analyses revealed an increased expression of the immune inhibitory cytokine interleukin-10 in DCs following infection. Results of the present study demonstrate that CDV causes phenotypical changes and altered cytokine expression of DCs, which represent potential mechanisms to evade host immune responses and might contribute to immune dysfunction and virus persistence in canine distemper. PMID:24769532

  8. Bio-batteries and bio-fuel cells: leveraging on electronic charge transfer proteins.

    PubMed

    Kannan, A M; Renugopalakrishnan, V; Filipek, S; Li, P; Audette, G F; Munukutla, L

    2009-03-01

    Bio-fuel cells are alternative energy devises based on bio-electrocatalysis of natural substrates by enzymes or microorganisms. Here we review bio-fuel cells and bio-batteries based on the recent literature. In general, the bio-fuel cells are classified based on the type of electron transfer; mediated electron transfer and direct electron transfer or electronic charge transfer (ECT). The ECT of the bio-fuel cells is critically reviewed and a variety of possible applications are considered. The technical challenges of the bio-fuel cells, like bioelectrocatalysis, immobilization of bioelectrocatalysts, protein denaturation etc. are highlighted and future research directions are discussed leveraging on the use of electron charge transfer proteins. In addition, the packaging aspects of the bio-fuel cells are also analyzed and the found that relatively little work has been done in the engineering development of bio-fuel cells.

  9. Bio-enabled synthesis of metamaterials.

    PubMed

    DuFort, Christopher C; Dragnea, Bogdan

    2010-01-01

    Biological systems offer more than an inspiration for the spontaneous hierarchical organization of matter at length scales between 1 and 1000 nm. They also provide useful principles and molecular building blocks that have recently emerged with the proven ability to generate extended three-dimensional structures of hybrid biotic/abiotic components arranged with molecular precision. These principles and tools draw from the methods of molecular biology and modern biochemistry and are expected to provide unmatched flexibility in building supramolecular architectures, notably structures made of artificial atoms whose coupled responses to electromagnetic or elastic excitations have been predicted to yield astonishing properties unparalleled by any conventional materials. To illustrate the potential of merging bio-enabled organization with metamaterials synthesis, we provide here a succinct overview of the architectural constraints leading to metamaterial behavior together with examples of biological material assembly that are particularly promising to comply with these constraints. PMID:20055682

  10. Deriving bio-equivalents from in vitro bioassays: assessment of existing uncertainties and strategies to improve accuracy and reporting.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Martin; Vermeirssen, Etiënne L M; Buchinger, Sebastian; Behr, Maximilian; Magdeburg, Axel; Oehlmann, Jörg

    2013-08-01

    Bio-equivalents (e.g., 17β-estradiol or dioxin equivalents) are commonly employed to quantify the in vitro effects of complex human or environmental samples. However, there is no generally accepted data analysis strategy for estimating and reporting bio-equivalents. Therefore, the aims of the present study are to 1) identify common mathematical models for the derivation of bio-equivalents from the literature, 2) assess the ability of those models to correctly predict bio-equivalents, and 3) propose measures to reduce uncertainty in their calculation and reporting. We compiled a database of 234 publications that report bio-equivalents. From the database, we extracted 3 data analysis strategies commonly used to estimate bio-equivalents. These models are based on linear or nonlinear interpolation, and the comparison of effect concentrations (ECX ). To assess their accuracy, we employed simulated data sets in different scenarios. The results indicate that all models lead to a considerable misestimation of bio-equivalents if certain mathematical assumptions (e.g., goodness of fit, parallelism of dose-response curves) are violated. However, nonlinear interpolation is most suitable to predict bio-equivalents from single-point estimates. Regardless of the model, subsequent linear extrapolation of bio-equivalents generates additional inaccuracy if the prerequisite of parallel dose-response curves is not met. When all these factors are taken into consideration, it becomes clear that data analysis introduces considerable uncertainty in the derived bio-equivalents. To improve accuracy and transparency of bio-equivalents, we propose a novel data analysis strategy and a checklist for reporting Minimum Information about Bio-equivalent ESTimates (MIBEST).

  11. Filamentous actin and its associated binding proteins are the stimulatory site for 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase association within the membrane of human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Real-Hohn, Antonio; Zancan, Patricia; Da Silva, Daniel; Martins, Eliane R; Salgado, Leonardo T; Mermelstein, Claudia S; Gomes, Andre M O; Sola-Penna, Mauro

    2010-05-01

    Glycolytic enzymes reversibly associate with the human erythrocyte membrane (EM) as part of their regulatory mechanism. The site for this association has been described as the amino terminus of band 3, a transmembrane anion transporter. Binding of glycolytic enzymes to this site is recognized to inhibit glycolysis, since binding inhibits the catalytic activity of these enzymes, including the rate-limiting enzyme 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase (PFK). However, the existence of a putative stimulatory site for glycolytic enzymes within the EM has been proposed. PFK has been described as able to reversibly associate with other proteins, such as microtubules, which inhibit the enzyme, and filamentous actin, which activates the enzyme. Here, it is demonstrated that PFK also binds to actin filaments and its associated binding proteins in the protein meshwork that forms the erythrocyte cytoskeleton. Through fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments using either confocal microscopy or fluorescence spectroscopy, we show that, within the EM, PFK and actin filaments containing its associated binding proteins are located close enough to propose binding between them. Moreover, specifically blocking PFK binding to band 3 results in an association of the enzyme with the EM that increases the enzyme's catalytic activity. Conversely, disruption of the association between PFK and actin filaments containing its associated binding proteins potentiates the inhibitory action of the EM on the enzyme. Furthermore, it is shown that insulin signaling increases the association of PFK to actin filaments and its associated binding proteins, revealing that this event may play a role on the stimulatory effects of insulin on erythrocyte glycolysis. In summary, the present work presents evidence that filamentous actin and its associated binding proteins are the stimulatory site for PFK within the EM.

  12. [The "stimulatory proteodyschylia" in the amitriptylin (Laroxyl) treated rat parotid gland. Experiments on the effect of antidepressive pharmacotherapy on the parotid glands of the rat (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Chilla, R; Hoffmann, G; Arglebe, C

    1977-06-30

    The activity of total amylase and isoamylases in the rat parotid gland is reduced by treatment with Amitriptylin (Laroxyl) for 3 and 7 days while the protein content of the glands remains constant. These changes are no longer visible after treatment for 21 days and following a period without drug application. To differentiate the disturbances of protein secretion (proteodyschylia) prominent in the clinical picture of sialadenosis, the following classification is proposed. We suggest the term "stimulatory proteodyschylia" for a decrease of acinar amylolytic activity, here caused by Amitriptylin application, as opposed to the "inhibitory proteodyschylia" characterized by an acinar amylase congestion.

  13. New perspectives in signaling mediated by receptors coupled to stimulatory G protein: the emerging significance of cAMP efflux and extracellular cAMP-adenosine pathway.

    PubMed

    Godinho, Rosely O; Duarte, Thiago; Pacini, Enio S A

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) linked to stimulatory G (Gs) proteins (GsPCRs) mediate increases in intracellular cyclic AMP as consequence of activation of nine adenylyl cyclases , which differ considerably in their cellular distribution and activation mechanisms. Once produced, cyclic AMP may act via distinct intracellular signaling effectors such as protein kinase A and the exchange proteins activated by cAMP (Epacs). More recently, attention has been focused on the efflux of cAMP through a specific transport system named multidrug resistance proteins that belongs to the ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily. Outside the cell, cAMP is metabolized into adenosine, which is able to activate four distinct subtypes of adenosine receptors, members of the GPCR family: A1, A2A, A2B, and A3. Taking into account that this phenomenon occurs in numerous cell types, as consequence of GsPCR activation and increment in intracellular cAMP levels, in this review, we will discuss the impact of cAMP efflux and the extracellular cAMP-adenosine pathway on the regulation of GsPCR-induced cell response.

  14. New perspectives in signaling mediated by receptors coupled to stimulatory G protein: the emerging significance of cAMP efflux and extracellular cAMP-adenosine pathway

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Rosely O.; Duarte, Thiago; Pacini, Enio S. A.

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) linked to stimulatory G (Gs) proteins (GsPCRs) mediate increases in intracellular cyclic AMP as consequence of activation of nine adenylyl cyclases , which differ considerably in their cellular distribution and activation mechanisms. Once produced, cyclic AMP may act via distinct intracellular signaling effectors such as protein kinase A and the exchange proteins activated by cAMP (Epacs). More recently, attention has been focused on the efflux of cAMP through a specific transport system named multidrug resistance proteins that belongs to the ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily. Outside the cell, cAMP is metabolized into adenosine, which is able to activate four distinct subtypes of adenosine receptors, members of the GPCR family: A1, A2A, A2B, and A3. Taking into account that this phenomenon occurs in numerous cell types, as consequence of GsPCR activation and increment in intracellular cAMP levels, in this review, we will discuss the impact of cAMP efflux and the extracellular cAMP-adenosine pathway on the regulation of GsPCR-induced cell response. PMID:25859216

  15. Bio-inspired Fillers for Mechanical Enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korley, Lashanda

    2012-02-01

    An examination of natural materials has offered a new perspective on the development of multi-functional materials with enhanced mechanical properties. One important lesson from nature is the utilization of composite structures to impart improved mechanical behavior and enhanced functionality using nanofillers. A relatively unexplored expansion of this bio-inspired, nanoscale filler approach to high performance materials is the incorporation of responsive, multi-functional reinforcing elements in polymeric composites with the goal of combining superior mechanical behavior that can be tuned with additional functionality, such as sensing and bioactivity. One approach is the use of self-assembling small molecules that form uniform, one-dimensional nanostructures as an emerging class of filler components. Another pathway toward mechanical enhancement is the incorporation of stimuli-responsive and high-modulus electrospun nanofibers. We have probed the utilization of high-aspect ratio, self-assembled small molecules and responsive electrospun nanofibers as all-organic nanofillers to achieve significant modulus changes within elastomeric matrices. The influence of matrix-filler interactions and the role of hierarchical organization in these nature-inspired composites will be discussed. Potential applications in barrier technology and drug delivery have also been explored.

  16. Growth performance and immunological and antioxidant status of Chinese shrimp, Fennerpenaeus chinensis reared in bio-floc culture system using probiotics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Su; Min, EunYoung; Kim, Jun-Hwan; Koo, Ja-Keun; Kang, Ju-Chan

    2015-11-01

    Chinese shrimp Fennerpenaeus chinensis (mean length 1.86 ± 0.15 cm, and weight 137.4 ± 12.7 mg) were reared in the different concentrations of bio-floc (control, 60, 80, 100, 120, and 140%) for 90 days. The growth rate was significantly increased over 100% bio-floc concentrations. In the immunological parameters, the gene expression of proPO and lysozyme was considerably increased over 120% bio-floc concentrations. The gene expression of SP was notably elevated at 140% bio-floc concentration. In the antioxidant enzymes, the activity of SOD was considerably decreased over 80% bio-floc concentrations. A notable decline in the activity of CAT was observed over 120% bio-floc concentrations. The results indicate that rearing of Chinese shrimp in bio-floc system can induce the increase of growth performance, enhancement of immune responses, and reduction of oxidative stress.

  17. Stimulatory effect of nobiletin, a citrus polymethoxy flavone, on catecholamine synthesis through Ser19 and Ser40 phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase in cultured bovine adrenal medullary cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Han; Yanagihara, Nobuyuki; Toyohira, Yumiko; Takahashi, Keita; Inagaki, Hirohide; Satoh, Noriaki; Li, Xiaoja; Goa, Xiumei; Tsutsui, Masato; Takahaishi, Kojiro

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported the dual effects of nobiletin, a compound of polymethoxy flavones found in citrus fruits, on catecholamine secretion in cultured bovine adrenal medullary cells. Here, we report the effects of nobiletin on catecholamine synthesis in the cells. Nobiletin increased the synthesis of (14)C-catecholamines from [(14)C]tyrosine in a time (20-30 min)- and concentration (1.0-100 μM)-dependent manner. Nobiletin (10-100 μM) also activated tyrosine hydroxylase activity. The stimulatory effect of nobiletin on (14)C-catecholamine synthesis was not observed when extracellular Ca(2+) was not present in the incubation medium. Protein kinase inhibitors including H-89, an inhibitor of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase, and KN-93, an inhibitor of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, suppressed the stimulatory effects of nobiletin on catecholamine synthesis as well as tyrosine hydroxylase activity. Nobiletin also induced the phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase at Ser(19) and Ser(40). Nobiletin (1.0-100 μM) inhibited (14)C-catecholamine synthesis induced by acetylcholine. The present findings suggest that nobiletin, by itself, stimulates catecholamine synthesis through tyrosine hydroxylase phosphorylation at Ser(19) and Ser(40), whereas it inhibits catecholamine synthesis induced by acetylcholine in bovine adrenal medulla.

  18. Mechanism of action of the stimulatory effect of apigenin-6-C-(2''-O-alpha-l-rhamnopyranosyl)-beta-L-fucopyranoside on 14C-glucose uptake.

    PubMed

    Cazarolli, Luisa Helena; Folador, Poliane; Moresco, Henrique Hunger; Brighente, Inês Maria Costa; Pizzolatti, Moacir Geraldo; Silva, Fátima Regina Mena Barreto

    2009-05-15

    There has been a growing interest in hypoglycemic agents from natural products, particularly those derived from plants. Flavonoids are naturally occurring phenolic compounds with a broad range of biological activities and the beneficial effects of flavonoids have been studied in relation to diabetes mellitus, either through their capacity to avoid glucose absorption or to improve glucose tolerance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism of action of the stimulatory effect of apigenin-6-C-(2''-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl)-beta-L-fucopyranoside (1), isolated from Averrhoa carambola L. (Oxalidaceae) leaves, on (14)C-glucose uptake. This compound (1) was found to have an acute effect on blood glucose lowering in diabetic rats and stimulated glucose-induced insulin secretion after oral treatment in hyperglycemic rats. A significant stimulatory effect of compound 1 on (14)C-glucose uptake was observed at 50 and 100 microM. The effect of compound 1 on glucose uptake was completely nullified by wortmannin, an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), RO318220, an inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC), PD98059, a specific inhibitor of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK), cycloheximide, an inhibitor of protein synthesis, and colchicine, a microtubule-depolymerizing agent. Compound 1 (100 microM) and insulin (10 nM) did not show any synergistic effect on glucose uptake. These results suggest that the flavonoid may have a dual target of action, as an insulin-secretagogue and also as an insulin-mimetic agent.

  19. Alzheimer's disease: the pros and cons of pharmaceutical, nutritional, botanical, and stimulatory therapies, with a discussion of treatment strategies from the perspective of patients and practitioners.

    PubMed

    Wollen, Keith A

    2010-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by dysfunctional intracellular and extracellular biochemical processes that result in neuron death. This article summarizes hypotheses regarding cell dysfunction in AD and discusses the effectiveness of, and problems with, different therapies. Pharmaceutical therapies discussed include cholinesterase inhibitors, memantine, antihypertensive drugs, anti-inflammatory drugs, secretase inhibitors, insulin resistance drugs, etanercept, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and immunization. Nutritional and botanical therapies included are huperzine A, polyphenols, Ginkgo, Panax ginseng, Withania somnifera, phosphatidylserine, alpha-lipoic acid, omega-3 fatty acids, acetyl L-carnitine, coenzyme Q10, various vitamins and minerals, and melatonin. Stimulatory therapies discussed are physical exercise, cognitive training, music, and socialization. Finally, treatment strategies are discussed in light of the benefits and drawbacks of different therapeutic approaches. It is concluded that potential risks of both approved and non-approved therapies should be weighed against the potential benefits and certain consequences of disease progression. Approaches that target several dysfunctions simultaneously and that emphasize nutritional, botanical, and stimulatory therapies may offer the most benefit at this time.

  20. Stimulatory effect of an algal fucoidan on the release of vascular endothelial tissue-type plasminogen activator as a mechanism of fucoidan-mediated thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Min, Soon-Ki; Han, Sung-Mi; Jang, Jae-Seok; Kim, Jong-Ki

    2016-07-01

    Identifying a pharmacological means for increasing the production of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) is always desirable to cure impaired production of this enzyme. An algal fucoidan has been shown to exhibit both novel thrombolytic and synergistic stimulatory effects in a mouse thrombosis model. The plasma levels of active t-PA were measured in mouse arterial thrombus models that were treated with various fucoidans to investigate the mechanism of thrombolysis. The mean plasma level of active t-PA after the infusion of fucoidan was 2.136 ± 0.231 ng/ml for nonthrombolytic Fucus fucoidan and 3.917 ± 0.0.529 ng/ml for thrombolytic Undaria fucoidan, which resulted in a 1.56-2.29-fold increase compared with the healthy control group (1.706 ± 0.194 ng/ml) and the untreated thrombus group (2.506 ± 0.301 ng/ml) (P < 0.01). An algal fucoidan has demonstrated to exert a thrombolytic and stimulatory effect via the induction of t-PA release in a dose-dependent manner in an arterial thrombosis model.

  1. New Horizons in Enhancing the Proliferation and Differentiation of Neural Stem Cells Using Stimulatory Effects of the Short Time Exposure to Radiofrequency Radiation.

    PubMed

    Eghlidospour, M; Mortazavi, S M J; Yousefi, F; Mortazavi, S A R

    2015-09-01

    Mobile phone use and wireless communication technology have grown explosively over the past decades. This rapid growth has caused widespread global concern about the potential detrimental effects of this technology on human health. Stem cells generate specialized cell types of the tissue in which they reside through normal differentiation pathways. Considering the undeniable importance of stem cells in modern medicine, numerous studies have been performed on the effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on cellular processes such as: proliferation, differentiation, cell cycle and DNA repair processes. We have conducted extensive studies on beneficial (stimulatory) or detrimental biological effects of exposure to different sources of electromagnetic fields such as mobile phones, mobile phone base stations, mobile phone jammers, radar systems, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems and dentistry cavitrons over the past years. In this article, recent studies on the biological effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation in the range of radiofrequency (RF) on some important features of stem cells such as their proliferation and differentiation are reviewed. Studies reviewed in this paper indicate that the stimulatory or inhibitory effects of RF radiation on the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells depend on various factors such as the biological systems, experiment conditions, the frequency and intensity of RF and the duration of exposure. PMID:26396965

  2. New Horizons in Enhancing the Proliferation and Differentiation of Neural Stem Cells Using Stimulatory Effects of the Short Time Exposure to Radiofrequency Radiation.

    PubMed

    Eghlidospour, M; Mortazavi, S M J; Yousefi, F; Mortazavi, S A R

    2015-09-01

    Mobile phone use and wireless communication technology have grown explosively over the past decades. This rapid growth has caused widespread global concern about the potential detrimental effects of this technology on human health. Stem cells generate specialized cell types of the tissue in which they reside through normal differentiation pathways. Considering the undeniable importance of stem cells in modern medicine, numerous studies have been performed on the effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on cellular processes such as: proliferation, differentiation, cell cycle and DNA repair processes. We have conducted extensive studies on beneficial (stimulatory) or detrimental biological effects of exposure to different sources of electromagnetic fields such as mobile phones, mobile phone base stations, mobile phone jammers, radar systems, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems and dentistry cavitrons over the past years. In this article, recent studies on the biological effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation in the range of radiofrequency (RF) on some important features of stem cells such as their proliferation and differentiation are reviewed. Studies reviewed in this paper indicate that the stimulatory or inhibitory effects of RF radiation on the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells depend on various factors such as the biological systems, experiment conditions, the frequency and intensity of RF and the duration of exposure.

  3. PD-1 Co-inhibitory and OX40 Co-stimulatory Crosstalk Regulates Helper T Cell Differentiation and Anti-Plasmodium Humoral Immunity.

    PubMed

    Zander, Ryan A; Obeng-Adjei, Nyamekye; Guthmiller, Jenna J; Kulu, Divine I; Li, Jun; Ongoiba, Aissata; Traore, Boubacar; Crompton, Peter D; Butler, Noah S

    2015-05-13

    The differentiation and protective capacity of Plasmodium-specific T cells are regulated by both positive and negative signals during malaria, but the molecular and cellular details remain poorly defined. Here we show that malaria patients and Plasmodium-infected rodents exhibit atypical expression of the co-stimulatory receptor OX40 on CD4 T cells and that therapeutic enhancement of OX40 signaling enhances helper CD4 T cell activity, humoral immunity, and parasite clearance in rodents. However, these beneficial effects of OX40 signaling are abrogated following coordinate blockade of PD-1 co-inhibitory pathways, which are also upregulated during malaria and associated with elevated parasitemia. Co-administration of biologics blocking PD-1 and promoting OX40 signaling induces excessive interferon-gamma that directly limits helper T cell-mediated support of humoral immunity and decreases parasite control. Our results show that targeting OX40 can enhance Plasmodium control and that crosstalk between co-inhibitory and co-stimulatory pathways in pathogen-specific CD4 T cells can impact pathogen clearance. PMID:25891357

  4. New Horizons in Enhancing the Proliferation and Differentiation of Neural Stem Cells Using Stimulatory Effects of the Short Time Exposure to Radiofrequency Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Eghlidospour, M.; Mortazavi, S. M. J.; Yousefi, F.; Mortazavi, S. A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Mobile phone use and wireless communication technology have grown explosively over the past decades. This rapid growth has caused widespread global concern about the potential detrimental effects of this technology on human health. Stem cells generate specialized cell types of the tissue in which they reside through normal differentiation pathways. Considering the undeniable importance of stem cells in modern medicine, numerous studies have been performed on the effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on cellular processes such as: proliferation, differentiation, cell cycle and DNA repair processes. We have conducted extensive studies on beneficial (stimulatory) or detrimental biological effects of exposure to different sources of electromagnetic fields such as mobile phones, mobile phone base stations, mobile phone jammers, radar systems, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems and dentistry cavitrons over the past years. In this article, recent studies on the biological effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation in the range of radiofrequency (RF) on some important features of stem cells such as their proliferation and differentiation are reviewed. Studies reviewed in this paper indicate that the stimulatory or inhibitory effects of RF radiation on the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells depend on various factors such as the biological systems, experiment conditions, the frequency and intensity of RF and the duration of exposure. PMID:26396965

  5. A terracotta bio-battery.

    PubMed

    Ajayi, Folusho F; Weigele, Peter R

    2012-07-01

    Terracotta pots were converted into simple, single chamber, air-cathode bio-batteries. This bio-battery design used a graphite-felt anode and a conductive graphite coating without added catalyst on the exterior as a cathode. Bacteria enriched from river sediment served as the anode catalyst. These batteries gave an average OCV of 0.56 V ± 0.02, a Coulombic efficiency of 21 ± 5%, and a peak power of 1.06 mW ± 0.01(33.13 mW/m(2)). Stable current was also produced when the batteries were operated with hay extract in salt solution. The bacterial community on the anode of the batteries was tested for air tolerance and desiccation resistance over a period ranging from 2 days to 2 weeks. The results showed that the anode community could survive complete drying of the electrolyte for several days. These data support the further development of this technology as a potential power source for LED-based lighting in off-grid, rural communities.

  6. A terracotta bio-battery.

    PubMed

    Ajayi, Folusho F; Weigele, Peter R

    2012-07-01

    Terracotta pots were converted into simple, single chamber, air-cathode bio-batteries. This bio-battery design used a graphite-felt anode and a conductive graphite coating without added catalyst on the exterior as a cathode. Bacteria enriched from river sediment served as the anode catalyst. These batteries gave an average OCV of 0.56 V ± 0.02, a Coulombic efficiency of 21 ± 5%, and a peak power of 1.06 mW ± 0.01(33.13 mW/m(2)). Stable current was also produced when the batteries were operated with hay extract in salt solution. The bacterial community on the anode of the batteries was tested for air tolerance and desiccation resistance over a period ranging from 2 days to 2 weeks. The results showed that the anode community could survive complete drying of the electrolyte for several days. These data support the further development of this technology as a potential power source for LED-based lighting in off-grid, rural communities. PMID:22609660

  7. Linking plasma kinetics to plasma-bio interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruggeman, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Cold non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas have received a lot of attention in the last decade due to their huge potential for biomedical applications. In my group, we have characterized an RF driven APPJ in great detail. The characterization includes electrical measurements, imaging, optical emission spectroscopy, (two photon enhanced) laser induced fluorescence, Thomson scattering, Rayleigh scattering, Raman scattering and mass spectrometry. This led to a detailed knowledge of the electron density, electron temperature, gas temperature, NO, O, OH, O3 densities, ionic species and air concentrations in the plasma effluent. Living organisms for in vitro studies are typically kept in complex solutions or culture media. Plasma-bio interactions involves not only the production of reactive species in the plasma gas phase but also transport to the liquid phase and plasma induced liquid phase chemistry and its impact on the living organisms. Reactive nitrogen and oxygen species have been identified as the key reactive species. Recent results of my group show that controlling the gas phase plasma chemistry can lead to significant different biological responses of the living organisms corresponding to different chemical pathways. The effect of plasma jet interaction with liquids containing mammalian cells, bacteria and virus will be discussed. The outcomes of these studies allow unraveling chemical pathways responsible for plasma-bio interactions and linking plasma kinetics to plasma-bio interactions.

  8. Are the bio- and chemiluminescence states of the firefly oxyluciferin the same as the fluorescence state?

    PubMed

    Navizet, Isabelle; Roca-Sanjuán, Daniel; Yue, Ling; Liu, Ya-Jun; Ferré, Nicolas; Lindh, Roland

    2013-01-01

    A usual strategy in both experimental and theoretical studies on bio- and chemiluminescence is to analyze the fluorescent properties of the bio- and chemiluminescence reaction product. Recent findings in a coelenteramide and Cypridina oxyluciferin model raise a concern on the validity of this procedure, showing that the light emitters in each of these luminescent processes might differ. Here, the thermal decomposition path of the firefly dioxetanone and the light emission states of the Firefly oxyluciferin responsible for the bio-, chemiluminescence, and fluorescence of the molecule are characterized using ab initio quantum chemistry and hybrid quantum chemistry/molecular mechanics methods to determine if the scenario found in the coelenteramide and Cypridina oxyluciferin study does also apply to the Firefly bioluminescent systems. The results point out to a unique emission state in the bio-, chemiluminescence, and fluorescence phenomena of the Firefly oxyluciferin and, therefore, using fluorescence properties of this system is reasonable.

  9. Biosecurity--The Bio-Link Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Elaine A.

    2002-01-01

    Describes Bio-Link, the Advanced Technological Education (ATE) Center for Biotechnology established with funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF). Reports that Bio-Link, headquartered at City College of San Francisco, has created a national network and resource base for community colleges, industry, and others interested in biotechnology…

  10. 76 FR 53631 - BioPreferred Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-29

    ..., and 3202 RIN 0503-AA41 BioPreferred Program AGENCY: Office of Procurement and Property Management... final action to relocate the BioPreferred Program, established under the authority of section 9002 of the Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002 (FSRIA), as amended by the Food, Conservation,...

  11. Updates to BioSamples database at European Bioinformatics Institute

    PubMed Central

    Faulconbridge, Adam; Burdett, Tony; Brandizi, Marco; Gostev, Mikhail; Pereira, Rui; Vasant, Drashtti; Sarkans, Ugis; Brazma, Alvis; Parkinson, Helen

    2014-01-01

    The BioSamples database at the EBI (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/biosamples) provides an integration point for BioSamples information between technology specific databases at the EBI, projects such as ENCODE and reference collections such as cell lines. The database delivers a unified query interface and API to query sample information across EBI’s databases and provides links back to assay databases. Sample groups are used to manage related samples, e.g. those from an experimental submission, or a single reference collection. Infrastructural improvements include a new user interface with ontological and key word queries, a new query API, a new data submission API, complete RDF data download and a supporting SPARQL endpoint, accessioning at the point of submission to the European Nucleotide Archive and European Genotype Phenotype Archives and improved query response times. PMID:24265224

  12. [Bio-indicating function of soil protozoa to environmental pollution].

    PubMed

    Song, Xueying; Song, Yufang; Sun, Tieheng; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Qixing

    2004-10-01

    Due to the abundant species and huge biomass, soil protozoa play an important role in soil ecosystem. As a bio-indicator, soil protozoa have many advantages over other soil animals. Studies on the community structures, quantities, and dynamic variations of biodiversity of soil protozoa could provide powerful means to evaluate natural environmental changes and to monitor the environmental pollution brought by anthropic activities. Based on the current study at home and abroad, this paper gave a review on the function of soil protozoa in ecosystems, their advantages as bio-indicator, and their responses to environmental factors, soil contaminants and the change of atmospheric CO2. The application prospect of soil protozoa in eco-toxicity diagnosis was also discussed.

  13. BioC interoperability track overview

    PubMed Central

    Comeau, Donald C.; Batista-Navarro, Riza Theresa; Dai, Hong-Jie; Islamaj Doğan, Rezarta; Jimeno Yepes, Antonio; Khare, Ritu; Lu, Zhiyong; Marques, Hernani; Mattingly, Carolyn J.; Neves, Mariana; Peng, Yifan; Rak, Rafal; Rinaldi, Fabio; Tsai, Richard Tzong-Han; Verspoor, Karin; Wiegers, Thomas C.; Wu, Cathy H.; Wilbur, W. John

    2014-01-01

    BioC is a new simple XML format for sharing biomedical text and annotations and libraries to read and write that format. This promotes the development of interoperable tools for natural language processing (NLP) of biomedical text. The interoperability track at the BioCreative IV workshop featured contributions using or highlighting the BioC format. These contributions included additional implementations of BioC, many new corpora in the format, biomedical NLP tools consuming and producing the format and online services using the format. The ease of use, broad support and rapidly growing number of tools demonstrate the need for and value of the BioC format. Database URL: http://bioc.sourceforge.net/ PMID:24980129

  14. Improved RNA extraction method using the BioMasher and BioMasher power-plus.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takuji; Nakashima, Kentaro; Maruta, Yukio; Kiriyama, Tomomi; Sasaki, Michi; Sugiyama, Shunpei; Suzuki, Kana; Fujisaki, Hitomi; Sasaki, Jun; Kaku-Ushiki, Yuko; Tanida, Masatoshi; Irie, Shinkichi; Hattori, Shunji

    2012-12-01

    The BioMasher is a disposable homogenizer that was developed to homogenize bovine brain tissue for bovine spongiform encephalopathy diagnosis. Capable of preventing the biohazard risk from infectious samples, it also prevents cross-contamination among samples. The BioMasher is thus widely used in biochemical research, especially for RNA extraction. Here, we tested a novel BioMasher application for RNA extraction from animal and plant tissues. We also developed a grinding machine specific for the BioMasher, named the BioMasher Power-Plus. We developed RNA extraction protocols using the BioMasher combined with the BioMasher Power-Plus. We compared RNA extraction efficiency of the BioMasher with that of the FastPrep and the glass homogenizer. Though the RNA extraction efficiency by the BioMasher was nearly equivalent to that of the FastPrep and the glass homogenizer, sample preparation time was shorter for the BioMasher. The utility of RNA extraction by the BioMasher was examined in mouse, rat, and tomato tissue samples. In the rodent tissues, the highest extraction efficiency of total RNA was from liver, with lowest efficiency from fibrous tissues such as muscle. The quality of extracted total RNA was confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis which produced highly visible clear bands of 18S and 28S rRNAs. Reproducibility among different operators in RNA extraction from tomato roots was improved by using the BioMasher Power-Plus. The BioMasher and BioMasher Power-Plus provide an effective and easy homogenization method for total RNA extraction from some rodent and plant tissues. PMID:22813946

  15. Freely turning over palmitate in erythrocyte membrane proteins is not responsible for the anchoring of lipid rafts to the spectrin skeleton: a study with bio-orthogonal chemical probes.

    PubMed

    Ciana, Annarita; Achilli, Cesare; Hannoush, Rami N; Risso, Angela; Balduini, Cesare; Minetti, Giampaolo

    2013-03-01

    Erythrocyte lipid rafts are anchored to the underlying spectrin membrane skeleton [A. Ciana, C. Achilli, C. Balduini, G. Minetti, On the association of lipid rafts to the spectrin skeleton in human erythrocytes, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1808 (2011) 183-190]. The nature of this linkage and the molecules involved are poorly understood. The interaction is sensitive to the increase in pH and ionic strength induced by carbonate. Given the role of palmitoylation in modulating the partitioning of certain proteins between various sub-cellular compartments and the plasma membrane, we asked whether palmitoylation of p55, a peripheral protein located at the junctional complex between spectrin-actin-protein 4.1 that anchors the membrane skeleton to the lipid bilayer via the transmembrane protein glycophorin C, could contribute to the anchoring of lipid rafts to the membrane skeleton. We adopted a new, non-radioactive method for studying protein palmitoylation, based on bio-orthogonal chemical analogues of fatty acids, containing an omega-alkynyl group, to metabolically label cell proteins, which are then revealed by a "click chemistry" reaction of the alkynyl moiety with an azide-containing reporter tag. We show that the membrane localization and palmitoylation levels of p55 did not change after carbonate treatment. 2-bromopalmitate and cerulenin, two known palmitoylation inhibitors, completely inhibited p55 palmitoylation, and protein palmitoyl thioesterase-1 (PPT1) reduced it, without affecting the association between lipid rafts and membrane-skeleton, indicating, on the one hand, that p55 palmitoylation is enzymatic, and, on the other, that it is not involved in the modulation of the linkage of lipid rafts to the membrane-skeleton.

  16. Switchable bio-inspired adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroner, Elmar

    2015-03-01

    Geckos have astonishing climbing abilities. They can adhere to almost any surface and can run on walls and even stick to ceilings. The extraordinary adhesion performance is caused by a combination of a complex surface pattern on their toes and the biomechanics of its movement. These biological dry adhesives have been intensely investigated during recent years because of the unique combination of adhesive properties. They provide high adhesion, allow for easy detachment, can be removed residue-free, and have self-cleaning properties. Many aspects have been successfully mimicked, leading to artificial, bio-inspired, patterned dry adhesives, and were addressed and in some aspects they even outperform the adhesion capabilities of geckos. However, designing artificial patterned adhesion systems with switchable adhesion remains a big challenge; the gecko's adhesion system is based on a complex hierarchical surface structure and on advanced biomechanics, which are both difficult to mimic. In this paper, two approaches are presented to achieve switchable adhesion. The first approach is based on a patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer, where adhesion can be switched on and off by applying a low and a high compressive preload. The switch in adhesion is caused by a reversible mechanical instability of the adhesive silicone structures. The second approach is based on a composite material consisting of a Nickel- Titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy and a patterned adhesive PDMS layer. The NiTi alloy is trained to change its surface topography as a function of temperature, which results in a change of the contact area and of alignment of the adhesive pattern towards a substrate, leading to switchable adhesion. These examples show that the unique properties of bio-inspired adhesives can be greatly improved by new concepts such as mechanical instability or by the use of active materials which react to external stimuli.

  17. Neurite outgrowth stimulatory effects of culinary-medicinal mushrooms and their toxicity assessment using differentiating Neuro-2a and embryonic fibroblast BALB/3T3

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mushrooms are not only regarded as gourmet cuisine but also as therapeutic agent to promote cognition health. However, little toxicological information is available regarding their safety. Therefore, the aim of this study was to screen selected ethno-pharmacologically important mushrooms for stimulatory effects on neurite outgrowth and to test for any cytotoxicity. Methods The stimulatory effect of mushrooms on neurite outgrowth was assessed in differentiating mouse neuroblastoma (N2a) cells. Neurite length was measured using Image-Pro Insight processor system. Neuritogenesis activity was further validated by fluorescence immunocytochemical staining of neurofilaments. In vitro cytotoxicity was investigated by using mouse embryonic fibroblast (BALB/3T3) and N2a cells for any embryo- and neuro-toxic effects; respectively. Results Aqueous extracts of Ganoderma lucidum, Lignosus rhinocerotis, Pleurotus giganteus and Grifola frondosa; as well as an ethanol extract of Cordyceps militaris significantly (p < 0.05) promoted the neurite outgrowth in N2a cells by 38.4 ± 4.2%, 38.1 ± 2.6%, 33.4 ± 4.6%, 33.7 ± 1.5%, and 35.8 ± 3.4%; respectively. The IC50 values obtained from tetrazolium (MTT), neutral red uptake (NRU) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assays showed no toxic effects following 24 h exposure of N2a and 3T3 cells to mushroom extracts. Conclusion Our results indicate that G. lucidum, L. rhinocerotis, P. giganteus, G. frondosa and C. militaris may be developed as safe and healthy dietary supplements for brain and cognitive health. PMID:24119256

  18. PacBio Sequencing and Its Applications

    PubMed Central

    Rhoads, Anthony; Au, Kin Fai

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule, real-time sequencing developed by Pacific BioSciences offers longer read lengths than the second-generation sequencing (SGS) technologies, making it well-suited for unsolved problems in genome, transcriptome, and epigenetics research. The highly-contiguous de novo assemblies using PacBio sequencing can close gaps in current reference assemblies and characterize structural variation (SV) in personal genomes. With longer reads, we can sequence through extended repetitive regions and detect mutations, many of which are associated with diseases. Moreover, PacBio transcriptome sequencing is advantageous for the identification of gene isoforms and facilitates reliable discoveries of novel genes and novel isoforms of annotated genes, due to its ability to sequence full-length transcripts or fragments with significant lengths. Additionally, PacBio’s sequencing technique provides information that is useful for the direct detection of base modifications, such as methylation. In addition to using PacBio sequencing alone, many hybrid sequencing strategies have been developed to make use of more accurate short reads in conjunction with PacBio long reads. In general, hybrid sequencing strategies are more affordable and scalable especially for small-size laboratories than using PacBio Sequencing alone. The advent of PacBio sequencing has made available much information that could not be obtained via SGS alone. PMID:26542840

  19. Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Chris

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to the reviews of his book, "The Good Life of Teaching: An Ethics of Professional Practice." He begins by highlighting some of the main concerns of his book. He then offers a brief response, doing his best to address the main criticisms of his argument and noting where the four reviewers (Charlene…

  20. The mechanism and properties of bio-photon emission and absorption in protein molecules in living systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xiao-feng

    2012-05-01

    The mechanism and properties of bio-photon emission and absorption in bio-tissues were studied using Pang's theory of bio-energy transport, in which the energy spectra of protein molecules are obtained from the discrete dynamic equation. From the energy spectra, it was determined that the protein molecules could both radiate and absorb bio-photons with wavelengths of <3 μm and 5-7 μm, consistent with the energy level transitions of the excitons. These results were consistent with the experimental data; this consisted of infrared absorption data from collagen, bovine serum albumin, the protein-like molecule acetanilide, plasma, and a person's finger, and the laser-Raman spectra of acidity I-type collagen in the lungs of a mouse, and metabolically active Escherichia coli. We further elucidated the mechanism responsible for the non-thermal biological effects produced by the infrared light absorbed by the bio-tissues, using the above results. No temperature rise was observed; instead, the absorbed infrared light promoted the vibrations of amides as well the transport of the bio-energy from one place to other in the protein molecules, which changed their conformations. These experimental results, therefore, not only confirmed the validity of the mechanism of bio-photon emission, and the newly developed theory of bio-energy transport mentioned above, but also explained the mechanism and properties of the non-thermal biological effects produced by the absorption of infrared light by the living systems.

  1. Bio-Chemo-Mechanical Models of Vascular Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungsil; Wagenseil, Jessica E

    2015-07-01

    Models of vascular mechanics are necessary to predict the response of an artery under a variety of loads, for complex geometries, and in pathological adaptation. Classic constitutive models for arteries are phenomenological and the fitted parameters are not associated with physical components of the wall. Recently, microstructurally-linked models have been developed that associate structural information about the wall components with tissue-level mechanics. Microstructurally-linked models are useful for correlating changes in specific components with pathological outcomes, so that targeted treatments may be developed to prevent or reverse the physical changes. However, most treatments, and many causes, of vascular disease have chemical components. Chemical signaling within cells, between cells, and between cells and matrix constituents affects the biology and mechanics of the arterial wall in the short- and long-term. Hence, bio-chemo-mechanical models that include chemical signaling are critical for robust models of vascular mechanics. This review summarizes bio-mechanical and bio-chemo-mechanical models with a focus on large elastic arteries. We provide applications of these models and challenges for future work.

  2. Branding the bio/biomedical engineering degree.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Herbert F

    2011-01-01

    The future challenges to medical and biological engineering, sometimes referred to as biomedical engineering or simply bioengineering, are many. Some of these are identifiable now and others will emerge from time to time as new technologies are introduced and harnessed. There is a fundamental issue regarding "Branding the bio/biomedical engineering degree" that requires a common understanding of what is meant by a B.S. degree in Biomedical Engineering, Bioengineering, or Biological Engineering. In this paper we address some of the issues involved in branding the Bio/Biomedical Engineering degree, with the aim of clarifying the Bio/Biomedical Engineering brand.

  3. Spider Silk: Mother Nature's Bio-Superlens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monks, James N.; Yan, Bing; Hawkins, Nicholas; Vollrath, Fritz; Wang, Zengbo

    2016-09-01

    This paper demonstrates a possible new microfiber bio near field lens that uses minor ampullate spider silk,spun from the Nephila edulis spider, to create a real time image of a surface using near field optical techniques. The microfiber bio lens is the world's first natural superlens created by exploring biological materials. The resolution of the surface image overcomes the diffraction limit, with the ability to resolve patterns at 100 nm under a standard white light source in reflection mode. This resolution offers further developments in superlens technology and paves the way for new bio optics.

  4. Chicken-Bio Nuggets Gasification process

    SciTech Connect

    Sheth, A.C.

    1996-12-31

    With the cost of landfill disposal skyrocketing and land availability becoming scarce, better options are required for managing our nation`s biomass waste. In response to this need, the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) is evaluating an innovative idea (described as Chicken-Bio Nuggets Gasification process) to gasify waste products from the poultry industry and industrial wood/biomass-based residues in {open_quotes}as-is{close_quotes} or aggregate form. The presence of potassium salts in the poultry waste as well as in the biomass can act as a catalyst in reducing the severity of the thermal gasification. As a result, the mixture of these waste products can be gasified at a much lower temperature (1,300-1,400{degrees}F versus 1,800-2,000{degrees}F for conventional thermal gasification). Also, these potassium salts act as a catalyst by accelerating the gasification reaction and enhancing the mediation reaction. Hence, the product gas from this UTSI concept can be richer in methane and probably can be used as a source of fuel (to replace propane in hard reach remote places) or as a chemical feed stock. Exxon Research and Engineering Company has tested a similar catalytic gasification concept in a fluid-bed gasifier using coal in a one ton/day pilot plant in Baytown, Texas. If found technically and economically feasible, this concept can be later on extended to include other kinds of waste products such as cow manure and wastes from swine, etc.

  5. Late administration of murine CTLA-4 blockade prolongs CD8-mediated anti-tumor effects following stimulatory cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sckisel, Gail D.; Mirsoian, Annie; Bouchlaka, Myriam N.; Tietze, Julia K.; Chen, Mingyi; Blazar, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    We have demonstrated that immunostimulatory therapies such as interleukin-2 (IL-2) and anti-CD40 (αCD40) can be combined to deliver synergistic anti-tumor effects. While this strategy has shown success, efficacy varies depending on a number of factors including tumor type and severe toxicities can be seen. We sought to determine whether blockade of negative regulators such as cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) could simultaneously prolong CD8+ T cell responses and augment T cell anti-tumor effects. We devised a regimen in which anti-CTLA-4 was administered late so as to delay contraction and minimize toxicities. This late administration both enhanced and prolonged CD8 T cell activation without the need for additional IL-2. The quality of the T cell response was improved with increased frequency of effector/effector memory phenotype cells along with improved lytic ability and bystander expansion. This enhanced CD8 response translated to improved anti-tumor responses both at the primary and metastatic sites. Importantly, toxicities were not exacerbated with combination. This study provides a platform for rational design of immunotherapy combinations to maximize anti-tumor immunity while minimizing toxicities. PMID:26423422

  6. Cognitive bio-radar: The natural evolution of bio-signals measurement.

    PubMed

    Malafaia, Daniel; Oliveira, Beatriz; Ferreira, Pedro; Varum, Tiago; Vieira, José; Tomé, Ana

    2016-10-01

    In this article we discuss a novel approach to Bio-Radar, contactless measurement of bio-signals, called Cognitive Bio-Radar. This new approach implements the Bio-Radar in a Software Defined Radio (SDR) platform in order to obtain awareness of the environment where it operates. Due to this, the Cognitive Bio-Radar can adapt to its surroundings in order to have an intelligent usage of the radio frequency spectrum to improve its performance. In order to study the feasibility of such implementation, a SDR based Bio-Radar testbench was developed and evaluated. The prototype is shown to be able to acquire the heartbeat activity and the respiratory effort. The acquired data is compared with the acquisitions from a Biopac research data acquisition system, showing coherent results for both heartbeat and breathing rate.

  7. Cognitive bio-radar: The natural evolution of bio-signals measurement.

    PubMed

    Malafaia, Daniel; Oliveira, Beatriz; Ferreira, Pedro; Varum, Tiago; Vieira, José; Tomé, Ana

    2016-10-01

    In this article we discuss a novel approach to Bio-Radar, contactless measurement of bio-signals, called Cognitive Bio-Radar. This new approach implements the Bio-Radar in a Software Defined Radio (SDR) platform in order to obtain awareness of the environment where it operates. Due to this, the Cognitive Bio-Radar can adapt to its surroundings in order to have an intelligent usage of the radio frequency spectrum to improve its performance. In order to study the feasibility of such implementation, a SDR based Bio-Radar testbench was developed and evaluated. The prototype is shown to be able to acquire the heartbeat activity and the respiratory effort. The acquired data is compared with the acquisitions from a Biopac research data acquisition system, showing coherent results for both heartbeat and breathing rate. PMID:27578058

  8. BioMEMS for mitochondria medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmaraj, Divya

    A BioMEMS device to study cell-mitochondrial physiological functionalities was developed. The pathogenesis of many diseases including obesity, diabetes and heart failure as well as aging has been linked to functional defects of mitochondria. The synthesis of Adenosine Tri Phosphate (ATP) is determined by the electrical potential across the inner mitochondrial membrane and by the pH difference due to proton flux across it. Therefore, electrical characterization by E-fields with complementary chemical testing was used here. The BioMEMS device was fabricated as an SU-8 based microfluidic system with gold electrodes on SiO2/Si wafers for electromagnetic interrogation. Ion Sensitive Field Effect Transistors (ISFETs) were incorporated for proton studies important in the electron transport chain, together with monitoring Na+, K+ and Ca++ ions for ion channel studies. ISFETs are chemically sensitive Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) devices and their threshold voltage is directly proportional to the electrolytic H+ ion variation. These ISFETs (sensitivity ˜55 mV/pH for H+) were further realized as specific ion sensitive Chemical Field Effect Transistors (CHEMFETs) by depositing a specific ion sensitive membrane on the gate. Electrodes for dielectric spectroscopy studies of mitochondria were designed as 2- and 4-probe structures for optimized operation over a wide frequency range. In addition, to limit polarization effects, a 4-electrode set-up with unique meshed pickup electrodes (7.5x7.5 mum2 loops with 4 mum wires) was fabricated. Sensitivity of impedance spectroscopy to membrane potential changes was confirmed by studying the influence of uncouplers and glucose on mitochondria. An electrical model was developed for the mitochondrial sample, and its frequency response correlated with impedance spectroscopy experiments of sarcolemmal mitochondria. Using the mesh electrode structure, we obtained a reduction of 83.28% in impedance at 200 Hz. COMSOL

  9. Activation of the rat follicle-stimulating hormone receptor promoter by steroidogenic factor 1 is blocked by protein kinase a and requires upstream stimulatory factor binding to a proximal E box element.

    PubMed

    Heckert, L L

    2001-05-01

    The receptor for the pituitary glycoprotein hormone FSH (FSHR) and the nuclear hormone receptor steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) play important roles in control of the hypothalamic-pituitary- gonadal axis. FSHR is essential for integrating the pituitary FSH signal to gonadal response, while SF-1 is an important transcriptional regulator of many genes that function within this axis and is essential for the development of gonads and adrenal glands. Given the critical role of SF-1 in regulation of the gonads and the coexpression of FSHR and SF-1 in Sertoli and granulosa cells, we examined the ability of SF-1 to regulate transcription of the FSHR gene. We found that SF-1 stimulated rat FSHR promoter activity in a dose-dependent and promoter-specific manner. Examination of various promoter deletion mutants indicated that SF-1 acts through the proximal promoter region and upstream promoter sequences. An E box element within the proximal promoter is essential for activation of the FSHR promoter by SF-1. This element binds the transcriptional regulators USF1 and USF2 (upstream stimulatory factors 1 and 2) but not SF-1, as shown by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. In addition, functional studies identified a requirement for the USF proteins in SF-1 activation of FSHR and mapped an important regulatory domain within exons 4 and 5 of USF2. Cotransfection studies revealed that activation of protein kinase A leads to inhibition of SF-1-stimulated transcription of FSHR, while it synergized with SF-1 to activate the equine LH beta-promoter (ebeta). Thus, stimulation of the cAMP pathway differentially regulates SF-1 activation of the FSHR and ebeta-promoters.

  10. Three-dimensional bio-printing.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qi; Hao, Jie; Lu, YangJie; Wang, Liu; Wallace, Gordon G; Zhou, Qi

    2015-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing technology has been widely used in various manufacturing operations including automotive, defence and space industries. 3D printing has the advantages of personalization, flexibility and high resolution, and is therefore becoming increasingly visible in the high-tech fields. Three-dimensional bio-printing technology also holds promise for future use in medical applications. At present 3D bio-printing is mainly used for simulating and reconstructing some hard tissues or for preparing drug-delivery systems in the medical area. The fabrication of 3D structures with living cells and bioactive moieties spatially distributed throughout will be realisable. Fabrication of complex tissues and organs is still at the exploratory stage. This review summarize the development of 3D bio-printing and its potential in medical applications, as well as discussing the current challenges faced by 3D bio-printing. PMID:25921944

  11. Nano-Electronics and Bio-Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Viewgraph presentation on Nano-Electronics and Bio-Electronics is discussed. Topics discussed include: NASA Ames nanotechnology program, Potential Carbon Nanotube (CNT) application, CNT synthesis,Computational Nanotechnology, and protein nanotubes.

  12. Three-dimensional bio-printing.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qi; Hao, Jie; Lu, YangJie; Wang, Liu; Wallace, Gordon G; Zhou, Qi

    2015-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing technology has been widely used in various manufacturing operations including automotive, defence and space industries. 3D printing has the advantages of personalization, flexibility and high resolution, and is therefore becoming increasingly visible in the high-tech fields. Three-dimensional bio-printing technology also holds promise for future use in medical applications. At present 3D bio-printing is mainly used for simulating and reconstructing some hard tissues or for preparing drug-delivery systems in the medical area. The fabrication of 3D structures with living cells and bioactive moieties spatially distributed throughout will be realisable. Fabrication of complex tissues and organs is still at the exploratory stage. This review summarize the development of 3D bio-printing and its potential in medical applications, as well as discussing the current challenges faced by 3D bio-printing.

  13. A Simple Stimulatory Device for Evoking Point-like Tactile Stimuli: A Searchlight for LFP to Spike Transitions

    PubMed Central

    Zippo, Antonio G.; Nencini, Sara; Caramenti, Gian Carlo; Valente, Maurizio; Storchi, Riccardo; Biella, Gabriele E.M.

    2014-01-01

    Current neurophysiological research has the aim to develop methodologies to investigate the signal route from neuron to neuron, namely in the transitions from spikes to Local Field Potentials (LFPs) and from LFPs to spikes. LFPs have a complex dependence on spike activity and their relation is still poorly understood1. The elucidation of these signal relations would be helpful both for clinical diagnostics (e.g. stimulation paradigms for Deep Brain Stimulation) and for a deeper comprehension of neural coding strategies in normal and pathological conditions (e.g. epilepsy, Parkinson disease, chronic pain). To this aim, one has to solve technical issues related to stimulation devices, stimulation paradigms and computational analyses. Therefore, a custom-made stimulation device was developed in order to deliver stimuli well regulated in space and time that does not incur in mechanical resonance. Subsequently, as an exemplification, a set of reliable LFP-spike relationships was extracted. The performance of the device was investigated by extracellular recordings, jointly spikes and LFP responses to the applied stimuli, from the rat Primary Somatosensory cortex. Then, by means of a multi-objective optimization strategy, a predictive model for spike occurrence based on LFPs was estimated. The application of this paradigm shows that the device is adequately suited to deliver high frequency tactile stimulation, outperforming common piezoelectric actuators. As a proof of the efficacy of the device, the following results were presented: 1) the timing and reliability of LFP responses well match the spike responses, 2) LFPs are sensitive to the stimulation history and capture not only the average response but also the trial-to-trial fluctuations in the spike activity and, finally, 3) by using the LFP signal it is possible to estimate a range of predictive models that capture different aspects of the spike activity. PMID:24686295

  14. A simple stimulatory device for evoking point-like tactile stimuli: a searchlight for LFP to spike transitions.

    PubMed

    Zippo, Antonio G; Nencini, Sara; Caramenti, Gian Carlo; Valente, Maurizio; Storchi, Riccardo; Biella, Gabriele E M

    2014-01-01

    Current neurophysiological research has the aim to develop methodologies to investigate the signal route from neuron to neuron, namely in the transitions from spikes to Local Field Potentials (LFPs) and from LFPs to spikes. LFPs have a complex dependence on spike activity and their relation is still poorly understood(1). The elucidation of these signal relations would be helpful both for clinical diagnostics (e.g. stimulation paradigms for Deep Brain Stimulation) and for a deeper comprehension of neural coding strategies in normal and pathological conditions (e.g. epilepsy, Parkinson disease, chronic pain). To this aim, one has to solve technical issues related to stimulation devices, stimulation paradigms and computational analyses. Therefore, a custom-made stimulation device was developed in order to deliver stimuli well regulated in space and time that does not incur in mechanical resonance. Subsequently, as an exemplification, a set of reliable LFP-spike relationships was extracted. The performance of the device was investigated by extracellular recordings, jointly spikes and LFP responses to the applied stimuli, from the rat Primary Somatosensory cortex. Then, by means of a multi-objective optimization strategy, a predictive model for spike occurrence based on LFPs was estimated. The application of this paradigm shows that the device is adequately suited to deliver high frequency tactile stimulation, outperforming common piezoelectric actuators. As a proof of the efficacy of the device, the following results were presented: 1) the timing and reliability of LFP responses well match the spike responses, 2) LFPs are sensitive to the stimulation history and capture not only the average response but also the trial-to-trial fluctuations in the spike activity and, finally, 3) by using the LFP signal it is possible to estimate a range of predictive models that capture different aspects of the spike activity. PMID:24686295

  15. Stimulatory effect of oCRH on alpha-subunit secretion during petrosal sinus sampling in patients with Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Vignati, F; Berselli, M E; Boccardi, E; Branca, V; Loli, P

    1992-11-01

    During bilateral and simultaneous venous sampling of the inferior petrosal sinuses for preoperative localization of ACTH secreting microadenomas, alpha-subunit levels, in addition to ACTH, were determined in 9 patients with Cushing's disease. The aim of the study was to evaluate the possible occurrence of unilateral increases of alpha-subunit in basal conditions and the alpha-subunit responsiveness to oCRH. All the patients examined showed a central to peripheral and an intersinus gradient of ACTH concentrations before and/or after oCRH stimulation. Seven patients showed a central to peripheral alpha-subunit gradient in basal conditions. Lateralization of alpha-subunit concentrations was recorded in 4 patients in basal conditions (intersinus gradient > or = 1.55) and paralleled the side with the highest ACTH concentrations. After oCRH stimulation all but one patient showed a unilateral alpha-subunit increase in blood from the inferior petrosal sinus with the highest oCRH stimulated ACTH increase. The present data confirm the occurrence of an increase of alpha-subunit concentration in response to nonspecific stimulation with exogenously administered oCRH, concurrent with an ipsilateral increase of ACTH levels. The mechanism underlying this finding is still unclear, although a paracrine effect from the corticotroph tumour on adjacent pituitary tissue seems so far the most likely explanation.

  16. A Comparative Study of the T Cell Stimulatory and Polarizing Capacity of Human Primary Blood Dendritic Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Sittig, Simone P.; Bakdash, Ghaith; Weiden, Jorieke; Sköld, Annette E.; Tel, Jurjen; Figdor, Carl G.; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are central players of immune responses; they become activated upon infection or inflammation and migrate to lymph nodes, where they can initiate an antigen-specific immune response by activating naive T cells. Two major types of naturally occurring DCs circulate in peripheral blood, namely, myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). Myeloid DCs (mDCs) can be subdivided based on the expression of either CD1c or CD141. These human DC subsets differ in surface marker expression, Toll-like receptor (TLR) repertoire, and transcriptional profile, suggesting functional differences between them. Here, we directly compared the capacity of human blood mDCs and pDCs to activate and polarize CD4+ T cells. CD141+ mDCs show an overall more mature phenotype over CD1c+ mDC and pDCs; they produce less IL-10 and more IL-12 than CD1c+ mDCs. Despite these differences, all subsets can induce the production of IFN-γ in naive CD4+ T cells. CD1c+ and CD141+ mDCs especially induce a strong T helper 1 profile. Importantly, naive CD4+ T cells are not polarized towards regulatory T cells by any subset. These findings further establish all three human blood DCs—despite their differences—as promising candidates for immunostimulatory effectors in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27057096

  17. Stimulatory effects of maitotoxin on insulin release in insulinoma HIT cells: Role of calcium uptake and phosphoinositide breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Soergel, D.G.; Gusovsky, F.; Yasumoto, T.; Daly, J.W. )

    1990-12-01

    In hamster insulinoma (HIT) cells, maitotoxin (MTX) induces a time-dependent and concentration-dependent release of insulin that requires the presence of extracellular calcium. The response is nearly completely blocked by cinnarizine and cadmium, but is not inhibited by the L-type calcium channel blocker nifedipine or by manganese. MTX induces 45Ca+ uptake in these cells in a dose-dependent mode, and the uptake is blocked with cinnarizine, nifedipine and cadmium, and is partially inhibited by manganese. MTX induces phosphoinositide breakdown in HIT cells, and the response is partially blocked by cadmium, but is not affected by nifedipine, cinnarizine or manganese. High concentrations of potassium ions also induce insulin release and calcium uptake in HIT cells. Both effects of potassium are blocked partially by nifedipine, cadmium and cinnarizine. High concentrations of potassium do not induce phosphoinositide breakdown in HIT cells. The results suggest that MTX-elicited release of insulin is attained by two mechanisms: (1) a nifedipine-sensitive action, which results from MTX-induced activation of L-type calcium channels, which can be mimicked with high potassium concentrations; and (2) a nifedipine-insensitive action, which may be initiated by the activation of phosphoinositide breakdown by MTX. Such an activation of phospholipase C would result in the formation of 1,4,5-inositol trisphosphate, a release of intracellular calcium and then release of insulin to the extracellular space. Cinnarizine is proposed to block both MTX-elicited mechanisms, the first by blockade of calcium channels and the second by blocking 1,4,5-inositol trisphosphate-induced release of internal calcium. Either mechanism alone appears capable of eliciting release of insulin.

  18. Stimulatory Effects of Coumestrol on Embryonic and Fetal Development Through AKT and ERK1/2 MAPK Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Lim, Whasun; Song, Gwonhwa

    2016-12-01

    Successful establishment of pregnancy is required for fetal-maternal interactions regulating implantation, embryonic development and placentation. A uterine environment with insufficient growth factors and nutrients increases the incidence of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) leading to an impaired uterine environment. In the present study, we demonstrated the effects of the phytoestrogen coumestrol on conceptus development in the pig that is regarded as an excellent biomedical animal model for research on IUGR. Results of this study indicated that coumestrol induced migration of porcine trophectoderm (pTr) cells in a concentration-dependent manner. In response to coumestrol, the phosphorylation of AKT, P70S6K, S6, ERK1/2 MAPK, and P90RSK proteins were activated in pTr cells and ERK1/2 MAPK and P90RSK phosphorylation was prolonged for a longer period than for the other proteins. To identify the signal transduction pathway induced by coumestrol, pharmacological inhibitors U0126 (an ERK1/2 inhibitor) and LY294002 (a PI3K inhibitor) were used to pretreat pTr cells. The results showed that coumestrol-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 MAPK and P90RSK was blocked by U0126. In addition, the increased phosphorylation in response to coumestrol was completely inhibited following pre-treatment incubation of pTr cells in the presence of LY294002 and U0126. Furthermore, these two inhibitors suppressed the ability of coumestrol to induce migration of pTr cells. Collectively, these findings suggest that coumestrol affects embryonic development through activation of the PI3K/AKT and ERK1/2 MAPK cell signal transduction pathways and improvement in the uterine environment through coumestrol supplementation may provide beneficial effects of enhancing embryonic and fetal survival and development. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2733-2740, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Soluble mouse B7-H3 down-regulates dendritic cell stimulatory capacity to allogenic T cell proliferation and production of IL-2 and IFN-gamma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Junfa; Huang, Baojun; Xiong, Ping; Feng, Wei; Xu, Yong; Fang, Min; Zheng, Fang; Gong, Feili

    2006-06-01

    B7-H3 is a recently identified member of the B7 gene family. Its ubiquitous expression in both lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues suggests that it could play an important role in the maintenance of self-tolerance. However, the exact function of B7-H3 is still elusive. The purpose of current study is to demonstrate the possible function of soluble mouse B7-H3 for prevention of DC-mediated T cell activation. For this purpose, we established a soluble mouse B7-H3 fusion protein (mB7h3-hIg) eukaryotic expression vector (pmB7h3-hIg) with a C-terminal human IgG1 Fc. A C57BL/6 (B6)-derived dendritic cell line (DC2.4 cells) was used for the establishment of stable transfectants for generation of soluble mB7h3-hIg. Ectopic mB7h3-hIg expression was confirmed by RT-PCR, Western blot and ELISA analyses. A 49.7 kD protein was detected by Western blot from DC2.4 cells transfected with pmB7h3-hIg. It was found that soluble mB7h3-hIg expression has no effect on cell cycling and apoptosis and the expression of CD80 and CD86 of the DC2.4 cells. However, ectopic soluble mB7h3-hIg expression was found to significantly affect the allo-stimulatory capability for DC2.4 cells. DC2.4 cells expressing soluble mB7h3-hIg showed a significant reduced allo-stimulatory capability as compared with the controls determined by MLC. Further studies revealed that soluble mB7h3-hIg could also inhibit IL-2 and IFN-gamma production of allogenic T cells. These results suggested a great potential of soluble B7-H3 for treatment of graft rejection and autoimmume disease.

  20. Bio-Organic Reaction Animations (BioORA): Student Performance, Student Perceptions, and Instructor Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunersel, Adalet Baris; Fleming, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Research shows that computer animations are especially helpful in fields such as chemistry and in this mixed-methods study, we investigate the educational effectiveness of Bio-Organic Reaction Animations (BioORA), a 3-D software, in four undergraduate biochemistry classes at different universities. Statistically significant findings indicate that…

  1. BioLab: Using Yeast Fermentation as a Model for the Scientific Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pigage, Helen K.; Neilson, Milton C.; Greeder, Michele M.

    This document presents a science experiment demonstrating the scientific method. The experiment consists of testing the fermentation capabilities of yeasts under different circumstances. The experiment is supported with computer software called BioLab which demonstrates yeast's response to different environments. (YDS)

  2. Promoting Bio-Ethanol in the United States by Incorporating Lessons from Brazil's National Alcohol Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Du, Yangbo

    2007-01-01

    Current U.S. energy policy supports increasing the use of bio-ethanol as a gasoline substitute, which Brazil first produced on a large scale in response to the 1970s energy crises. Brazil's National Alcohol Program stood out among its contemporaries regarding its success at displacing a third of Brazil's gasoline requirements, primarily due to…

  3. Glucose uptake-stimulatory activity of Tinospora cordifolia stem extracts in Ehrlich ascites tumor cell model system.

    PubMed

    Joladarashi, Darukeshwara; Chilkunda, Nandini D; Salimath, Paramahans Veerayya

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a multifunctional disorder with several causes and multiple consequences. Nutraceuticals play a vital role in ameliorating diabetic condition. The stems of the plant, Tinospora cordifolia (T. cordifolia) are often used in Ayurvedic medicine for the management of diabetes. Earlier studies have shown that T. cordifolia to be a potent antidiabetic plant material by virtue of being rich in nutraceuticals. In the present study we were interested to know if, T. cordifolia stem extracts are able to promote glucose uptake through glucose transporters, 1 (GLUT1) and 3 (GLUT3), which are responsible for basal glucose uptake. Hence, Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) cells were chosen as a model which harbours both GLUT1 and GLUT3 and glucose uptake was measured using a fluorescent analog 2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]-2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-NBDG). Serially, solvent extracted T. cordifolia stems, especially water, ethanol and methanol extracts showed glucose uptake activity. Uptake was stimulated in a dose dependent manner at dosages of 1-100 μg. Glucose-stimulating activity does not seem to be solely due to polyphenol content since methanol extract, with high amount of polyphenol content (9.5 ± 0.1 g kg(-1)), did not stimulate higher glucose uptake activity when compared to water extract. PMID:24426067

  4. The All Terrain Bio nano Gear for Space Radiation Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Ummat, Ajay; Mavroidis, Constantinos

    2007-01-30

    This paper discusses about the relevance of detecting space radiations which are very harmful and pose numerous health issues for astronauts. There are many ways to detect radiations, but we present a non-invasive way of detecting them in real-time while an astronaut is in the mission. All Terrain Bio-nano (ATB) gear system is one such concept where we propose to detect various levels of space radiations depending on their intensity and warn the astronaut of probable biological damage. A basic framework for radiation detection system which utilizes bio-nano machines is discussed. This radiation detection system is termed as 'radiation-responsive molecular assembly' (RMA) for the detection of space radiations. Our objective is to create a device which could detect space radiations by creating an environment equivalent to human cells within its structure and bio-chemically sensing the effects induced therein. For creating such an environment and further bio-chemically sensing space radiations bio-nano systems could be potentially used. These bio-nano systems could interact with radiations and signal based on the intensity of the radiations their relative biological effectiveness. Based on the energy and kind of radiation encountered, a matrix of signals has to be created which corresponds to a particular biological effect. The key advantage of such a design is its ability to interact with the radiation at e molecular scale; characterize its intensity based on energy deposition and relate it to the relative biological effectiveness based on the correspondence established through molecular structures and bond strengths of the bio-nano system.

  5. Tumor-derived α-fetoprotein impairs the differentiation and T cell stimulatory activity of human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Pardee, Angela D; Shi, Jian; Butterfield, Lisa H

    2014-12-01

    Several tumor-derived factors have been implicated in dendritic cell (DC) dysfunction in cancer patients. α-fetoprotein (AFP) is an oncofetal Ag that is highly expressed in abnormalities of prenatal development and several epithelial cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In HCC patients exhibiting high levels of serum AFP, we observed a lower ratio of myeloid/plasmacytoid circulating DCs compared with patients with low serum AFP levels and healthy donors. To test the effect of AFP on DC differentiation in vitro, peripheral blood monocytes from healthy donors were cultured in the presence of cord blood-derived normal AFP (nAFP) or HCC tumor-derived AFP (tAFP), and DC phenotype and function were assessed. Although the nAFP and tAFP isoforms only differ at one carbohydrate group, low (physiological) levels of tAFP, but not nAFP, significantly inhibited DC differentiation. tAFP-conditioned DCs expressed diminished levels of DC maturation markers, retained a monocyte-like morphology, exhibited limited production of inflammatory mediators, and failed to induce robust T cell proliferative responses. Mechanistic studies revealed that the suppressive activity of tAFP is dependent on the presence of low molecular mass (LMM) species that copurify with tAFP and function equivalently to the LMM fractions of both tumor and nontumor cell lysates. These data reveal the unique ability of tAFP to serve as a chaperone protein for LMM molecules, both endogenous and ubiquitous in nature, which function cooperatively to impair DC differentiation and function. Therefore, novel therapeutic approaches that antagonize the regulatory properties of tAFP will be critical to enhance immunity and improve clinical outcomes.

  6. Stimulatory Influences of Far Infrared Therapy on the Transcriptome and Genetic Networks of Endothelial Progenitor Cells Receiving High Glucose Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tzu-Chiao; Lin, Chin-Sheng; Tsai, Tsung-Neng; Cheng, Shu-Meng; Lin, Wei-Shiang; Cheng, Cheng-Chung; Wu, Chun-Hsien; Hsu, Chih-Hsueng

    2015-01-01

    Background Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play a fundamental role in vascular repair and angiogenesis- related diseases. It is well-known that the process of angiogenesis is faulty in patients with diabetes. Long-term exposure of peripheral blood EPCs to high glucose (HG-EPCs) has been shown to impair cell proliferation and other functional competencies. Far infrared (FIR) therapy can promote ischemia-induced angiogenesis in diabetic mice and restore high glucose-suppressed endothelial progenitor cell functions both in vitro and in vivo. However, the detail mechanisms and global transcriptome alternations are still unclear. Methods In this study, we investigated the influences of FIR upon HG-EPC gene expressions. EPCs were obtained from the peripheral blood and treated with high glucose. These cells were then subjected to FIR irradiation and functional assays. Results Those genes responsible for fibroblast growth factors, Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription and prostaglandin signaling pathways were significantly induced in HG-EPCs after FIR treatment. On the other hand, mouse double minute 2 homolog, genes involved in glycogen metabolic process, and genes involved in cardiac fibrosis were down-regulated. We also observed complex genetic networks functioning in FIR-treated HG-EPCs, in which several genes, such as GATA binding protein 3, hairy and enhancer of split-1, Sprouty Homolog 2, MAPK and Sirtuin 1, acted as hubs to maintain the stability and connectivity of the whole genetic network. Conclusions Deciphering FIR-affected genes will not only provide us with new knowledge regarding angiogenesis, but also help to develop new biomarkers for evaluating the effects of FIR therapy. Our findings may also be adapted to develop new methods to increase EPC activities for treating diabetes-related ischemia and metabolic syndrome-associated cardiovascular disorders. PMID:27122901

  7. Analysis of expression and function of the co-stimulatory receptor SLAMF1 in immune cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

    PubMed

    Liñán-Rico, L; Hernández-Castro, B; Doniz-Padilla, L; Portillo-Salazar, H; Baranda, L; Cruz-Muñoz, M E; González-Amaro, R

    2015-10-01

    The signaling lymphocytic activation molecule SLAMF1 (CD150) is a co-stimulatory molecule that is expressed by most immune cells, including T regulatory (Treg) lymphocytes. Since different abnormalities have been reported regarding the number and function of Foxp3+ Treg cells in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), we decided to analyze the expression and function of CD150 in these regulatory lymphocytes in this condition. We isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 20 patients with SLE, and 20 healthy controls. The expression of SLAMF1 was determined by multi-parametric flow cytometry and the suppressive function of CD4+CD25+ lymphocytes, upon engagement or not of CD150 with an agonistic monoclonal antibody, was analyzed by an assay of inhibition of cell proliferation. We observed a significantly increased expression of SLAMF1 by CD3+CD4+ helper T cells and CD19+ B cells in patients with SLE and active disease. However, similar levels of SLAMF1 expression were detected in Foxp3+ Treg cells from patients and controls. In contrast, a higher proportion of SLE patients increased their suppressive function of Treg cells upon CD150 engagement compared to healthy controls. Our data suggest that SLAMF1 is another significant piece in the intricate defective immune-regulatory function of patients with SLE.

  8. DNA-binding activity of the transcription factor upstream stimulatory factor 1 (USF-1) is regulated by cyclin-dependent phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, E; Mayr, P; Coda-Zabetta, F; Woodman, P G; Boam, D S

    1999-01-01

    The ubiquitous transcription factor upstream stimulatory factor (USF) 1 is a member of the bzHLH (leucine zipper-basic-helix-loop-helix) family, which is structurally related to the Myc family of proteins. It plays a role in the regulation of many genes, including the cyclin B1 gene, which is active during the G2/M and M phases of the cell cycle and may also play a role in the regulation of cellular proliferation. We show that the affinity of recombinant USF-1 for DNA is greatly increased by treatment with active cyclin A2-p34(cdc2) or cyclin B1-p34(cdc2) complexes and that its interaction with DNA is dependent on p34(cdc2)-mediated phosphorylation. We have localized the phosphorylation site(s) to a region that lies outside the minimal DNA-binding domain but overlaps with the previously identified USF-specific region. Deletion studies of USF-1 suggest that amino acids 143-197 regulate DNA-binding activity in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. PMID:10548544

  9. Isolation and characterization of a glucose/mannose-specific lectin with stimulatory effect on nitric oxide production by macrophages from the emperor banana.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jack Ho; Ng, T B

    2006-02-01

    Emperor banana (Musa basjoo cv. 'Emperor Banana') is a banana cultivar that has not been studied previously. In this study, a glucose/mannose-specific lectin has been purified from the emperor banana by affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, ion exchange chromatography on Mono S and gel filtration by fast protein liquid chromatography on Superdex 75. This lectin was composed of two identical 15-kDa subunits with N-terminal amino acid sequence similarity to other lectins from other Musa species. Emperor banana lectin stimulated [3H-methyl]-thymidine uptake by mouse splenocytes and nitric oxide production by mouse macrophages. In contrast to Con A, the mitogenic activity of emperor banana lectin toward mouse splenocytes but not its stimulatory effect on nitric oxide production by mouse macrophages could be abrogated by 200 mM glucose. Emperor banana lectin also inhibited proliferation of leukemia cell (L1210) and the activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. In summary, this is the first report of the macrophage-stimulating, antiproliferative and HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibiting activities of a banana lectin.

  10. BrisSynBio: a BBSRC/EPSRC-funded Synthetic Biology Research Centre

    PubMed Central

    Sedgley, Kathleen R.; Race, Paul R.; Woolfson, Derek N.

    2016-01-01

    BrisSynBio is the Bristol-based Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC)/Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC)-funded Synthetic Biology Research Centre. It is one of six such Centres in the U.K. BrisSynBio's emphasis is on rational and predictive bimolecular modelling, design and engineering in the context of synthetic biology. It trains the next generation of synthetic biologists in these approaches, to facilitate translation of fundamental synthetic biology research to industry and the clinic, and to do this within an innovative and responsible research framework. PMID:27284028

  11. Bios-3: Siberian experiments in bioregenerative life support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salisbury, F. B.; Gitelson, J. I.; Lisovsky, G. M.

    1997-01-01

    The Russian experience with the bioregenerative life support system Bios-3 at Krasnoyarsk, Siberia, is reviewed. A brief review of other bioregenerative systems examines Biosphere 2 in Oracle, Arizona, and the Bios-1 and Bios-2 systems that preceded Bios-3. Physical details of the Bios-3 facility are provided. The use of Chlorella and higher plants for gas exchange is examined. Long-term studies of human habitation are discussed. Other topics include microflora in Bios-3, the theory of closed systems, and problems for the future.

  12. BioC viewer: a web-based tool for displaying and merging annotations in BioC

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Soo-Yong; Kim, Sun; Wilbur, W. John; Kwon, Dongseop

    2016-01-01

    BioC is an XML-based format designed to provide interoperability for text mining tools and manual curation results. A challenge of BioC as a standard format is to align annotations from multiple systems. Ideally, this should not be a major problem if users follow guidelines given by BioC key files. Nevertheless, the misalignment between text and annotations happens quite often because different systems tend to use different software development environments, e.g. ASCII vs. Unicode. We first implemented the BioC Viewer to assist BioGRID curators as a part of the BioCreative V BioC track (Collaborative Biocurator Assistant Task). For the BioC track, the BioC Viewer helped curate protein-protein interaction and genetic interaction pairs appearing in full-text articles. Here, we describe the BioC Viewer itself as well as improvements made to the BioC Viewer since the BioCreative V Workshop to address the misalignment issue of BioC annotations. While uploading BioC files, a BioC merge process is offered when there are files from the same full-text article. If there is a mismatch between an annotated offset and text, the BioC Viewer adjusts the offset to correctly align with the text. The BioC Viewer has a user-friendly interface, where most operations can be performed within a few mouse clicks. The feedback from BioGRID curators has been positive for the web interface, particularly for its usability and learnability. Database URL: http://viewer.bioqrator.org PMID:27515823

  13. BioC viewer: a web-based tool for displaying and merging annotations in BioC.

    PubMed

    Shin, Soo-Yong; Kim, Sun; Wilbur, W John; Kwon, Dongseop

    2016-01-01

    BioC is an XML-based format designed to provide interoperability for text mining tools and manual curation results. A challenge of BioC as a standard format is to align annotations from multiple systems. Ideally, this should not be a major problem if users follow guidelines given by BioC key files. Nevertheless, the misalignment between text and annotations happens quite often because different systems tend to use different software development environments, e.g. ASCII vs. Unicode. We first implemented the BioC Viewer to assist BioGRID curators as a part of the BioCreative V BioC track (Collaborative Biocurator Assistant Task). For the BioC track, the BioC Viewer helped curate protein-protein interaction and genetic interaction pairs appearing in full-text articles. Here, we describe the BioC Viewer itself as well as improvements made to the BioC Viewer since the BioCreative V Workshop to address the misalignment issue of BioC annotations. While uploading BioC files, a BioC merge process is offered when there are files from the same full-text article. If there is a mismatch between an annotated offset and text, the BioC Viewer adjusts the offset to correctly align with the text. The BioC Viewer has a user-friendly interface, where most operations can be performed within a few mouse clicks. The feedback from BioGRID curators has been positive for the web interface, particularly for its usability and learnability.Database URL: http://viewer.bioqrator.org. PMID:27515823

  14. Large area CMOS bio-pixel array for compact high sensitive multiplex biosensing.

    PubMed

    Sandeau, Laure; Vuillaume, Cassandre; Contié, Sylvain; Grinenval, Eva; Belloni, Federico; Rigneault, Hervé; Owens, Roisin M; Fournet, Margaret Brennan

    2015-02-01

    A novel CMOS bio-pixel array which integrates assay substrate and assay readout is demonstrated for multiplex and multireplicate detection of a triplicate of cytokines with single digit pg ml(-1) sensitivities. Uniquely designed large area bio-pixels enable individual assays to be dedicated to and addressed by single pixels. A capability to simultaneously measure a large number of targets is provided by the 128 available pixels. Chemiluminescent assays are carried out directly on the pixel surface which also detects the emitted chemiluminescent photons, facilitating a highly compact sensor and reader format. The high sensitivity of the bio-pixel array is enabled by the high refractive index of silicon based pixels. This in turn generates a strong supercritical angle luminescence response significantly increasing the efficiency of the photon collection over conventional farfield modalities. PMID:25490928

  15. Upscaling of Bio-mediated Soil Improvement

    SciTech Connect

    J. T. DeJong; B. C. Martinez; B. M. Mortensen; D. C. Nelson; J. T. Waller; M. H. Weil; T. R. Ginn; T. Weathers; T. Barkouki; Y. Fujita; G. Redden; C. Hunt; D. Major; B. Tunyu

    2009-10-01

    As demand for soil improvement continues to increase, new, sustainable, and innocuous methods are needed to alter the mechanical properties of soils. Recent research has demonstrated the potential of bio-mediated soil improvement for geotechnical applications (DeJong et al. 2006, Whiffin et al. 2007). Upscaling the bio-mediated treatment process for in situ implementation presents a number of challenges to be addressed, including soil and pore fluid interactions, bioaugmentation versus biostimulation of microbial communities, controlled distribution of mediated calcite precipitation, and permanence of the cementation. Current studies are utilizing large-scale laboratory experiments, non-destructive geophysical measurements, and modeling, to develop an optimized and predictable bio-mediated treatment method.

  16. Kinetic Modeling using BioPAX ontology

    PubMed Central

    Ruebenacker, Oliver; Moraru, Ion. I.; Schaff, James C.; Blinov, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Thousands of biochemical interactions are available for download from curated databases such as Reactome, Pathway Interaction Database and other sources in the Biological Pathways Exchange (BioPAX) format. However, the BioPAX ontology does not encode the necessary information for kinetic modeling and simulation. The current standard for kinetic modeling is the System Biology Markup Language (SBML), but only a small number of models are available in SBML format in public repositories. Additionally, reusing and merging SBML models presents a significant challenge, because often each element has a value only in the context of the given model, and information encoding biological meaning is absent. We describe a software system that enables a variety of operations facilitating the use of BioPAX data to create kinetic models that can be visualized, edited, and simulated using the Virtual Cell (VCell), including improved conversion to SBML (for use with other simulation tools that support this format). PMID:20862270

  17. bioDBnet: the biological database network

    PubMed Central

    Mudunuri, Uma; Che, Anney; Yi, Ming; Stephens, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: bioDBnet is an online web resource that provides interconnected access to many types of biological databases. It has integrated many of the most commonly used biological databases and in its current state has 153 database identifiers (nodes) covering all aspects of biology including genes, proteins, pathways and other biological concepts. bioDBnet offers various ways to work with these databases including conversions, extensive database reports, custom navigation and has various tools to enhance the quality of the results. Importantly, the access to bioDBnet is updated regularly, providing access to the most recent releases of each individual database. Availability: http://biodbnet.abcc.ncifcrf.gov Contact: stephensr@mail.nih.gov Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online PMID:19129209

  18. Dry electrode bio-potential recordings.

    PubMed

    Gargiulo, Gaetano; Bifulco, Paolo; McEwan, Alistair; Nasehi Tehrani, Joubin; Calvo, Rafael A; Romano, Maria; Ruffo, Mariano; Shephard, Richard; Cesarelli, Mario; Jin, Craig; Mohamed, Armin; van Schaik, André

    2010-01-01

    As wireless bio-medical long term monitoring moves towards personal monitoring it demands very high input impedance systems capable to extend the reading of bio-signal during the daily activities offering a kind of "stress free", convenient connection, with no need for skin preparation. In particular we highlight the development and broad applications of our own circuits for wearable bio-potential sensor systems enabled by the use of an FET based amplifier circuit with sufficiently high impedance to allow the use of passive dry electrodes which overcome the significant barrier of gel based contacts. In this paper we present the ability of dry electrodes in long term monitoring of ECG, EEG and fetal ECG.

  19. Utilization of different waste proteins to create a novel PGPR-containing bio-organic fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Sun, Li; Zhao, Jianshu; Huang, Rong; Li, Rong; Shen, Qirong

    2015-01-01

    High-quality bio-organic fertilizers (BIOs) cannot be produced without the addition of some proteins, while many waste proteins are haphazardly disposed, causing serious environmental pollution. In this study, several waste proteins were used as additives to assist with the reproduction of the functional microbe (Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SQR9) inoculated into matured composts to produce BIOs. An optimized composition of solid-state fermentation (SSF) raw materials was predicted by response surface methodology and experimental validation. The results showed that 7.61% (w/w, DW, the same below) rapeseed meal, 8.85% expanded feather meal, 6.47% dewatered blue algal sludge and 77.07% chicken compost resulted in maximum biomass of strain SQR-9 and the maximum amount of lipopeptides 7 days after SSF. Spectroscopy experiments showed that the inner material structural changes in the novel SSF differed from the control and the novel BIO had higher dissolved organic matter. This study offers a high value-added utilization of waste proteins for producing economical but high-quality BIO. PMID:25586328

  20. Utilization of different waste proteins to create a novel PGPR-containing bio-organic fertilizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yan; Sun, Li; Zhao, Jianshu; Huang, Rong; Li, Rong; Shen, Qirong

    2015-01-01

    High-quality bio-organic fertilizers (BIOs) cannot be produced without the addition of some proteins, while many waste proteins are haphazardly disposed, causing serious environmental pollution. In this study, several waste proteins were used as additives to assist with the reproduction of the functional microbe (Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SQR9) inoculated into matured composts to produce BIOs. An optimized composition of solid-state fermentation (SSF) raw materials was predicted by response surface methodology and experimental validation. The results showed that 7.61% (w/w, DW, the same below) rapeseed meal, 8.85% expanded feather meal, 6.47% dewatered blue algal sludge and 77.07% chicken compost resulted in maximum biomass of strain SQR-9 and the maximum amount of lipopeptides 7 days after SSF. Spectroscopy experiments showed that the inner material structural changes in the novel SSF differed from the control and the novel BIO had higher dissolved organic matter. This study offers a high value-added utilization of waste proteins for producing economical but high-quality BIO.

  1. Utilization of different waste proteins to create a novel PGPR-containing bio-organic fertilizer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Sun, Li; Zhao, Jianshu; Huang, Rong; Li, Rong; Shen, Qirong

    2015-01-01

    High-quality bio-organic fertilizers (BIOs) cannot be produced without the addition of some proteins, while many waste proteins are haphazardly disposed, causing serious environmental pollution. In this study, several waste proteins were used as additives to assist with the reproduction of the functional microbe (Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SQR9) inoculated into matured composts to produce BIOs. An optimized composition of solid-state fermentation (SSF) raw materials was predicted by response surface methodology and experimental validation. The results showed that 7.61% (w/w, DW, the same below) rapeseed meal, 8.85% expanded feather meal, 6.47% dewatered blue algal sludge and 77.07% chicken compost resulted in maximum biomass of strain SQR-9 and the maximum amount of lipopeptides 7 days after SSF. Spectroscopy experiments showed that the inner material structural changes in the novel SSF differed from the control and the novel BIO had higher dissolved organic matter. This study offers a high value-added utilization of waste proteins for producing economical but high-quality BIO. PMID:25586328

  2. Data sharing through an NIH central database repository: a cross-sectional survey of BioLINCC users

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Joseph S; Ritchie, Jessica D; Finn, Emily; Desai, Nihar R; Lehman, Richard L; Krumholz, Harlan M; Gross, Cary P

    2016-01-01

    Objective To characterise experiences using clinical research data shared through the National Institutes of Health (NIH)'s Biologic Specimen and Data Repository Information Coordinating Center (BioLINCC) clinical research data repository, along with data recipients’ perceptions of the value, importance and challenges with using BioLINCC data. Design and setting Cross-sectional web-based survey. Participants All investigators who requested and received access to clinical research data from BioLINCC between 2007 and 2014. Main outcome measures Reasons for BioLINCC data request, research project plans, interactions with original study investigators, BioLINCC experience and other project details. Results There were 536 investigators who requested and received access to clinical research data from BioLINCC between 2007 and 2014. Of 441 potential respondents, 195 completed the survey (response rate=44%); 89% (n=174) requested data for an independent study, 17% (n=33) for pilot/preliminary analysis. Commonly cited reasons for requesting data through BioLINCC were feasibility of collecting data of similar size and scope (n=122) and insufficient financial resources for primary data collection (n=76). For 95% of respondents (n=186), a primary research objective was to complete new research, as opposed to replicate prior analyses. Prior to requesting data from BioLINCC, 18% (n=36) of respondents had contacted the original study investigators to obtain data, whereas 24% (n=47) had done so to request collaboration. Nearly all (n=176; 90%) respondents found the data to be suitable for their proposed project; among those who found the data unsuitable (n=19; 10%), cited reasons were data too complicated to use (n=5) and data poorly organised (n=5). Half (n=98) of respondents had completed their proposed projects, of which 67% (n=66) have been published. Conclusions Investigators were primarily using clinical research data from BioLINCC for independent research, making use of

  3. Fuel Cells on Bio-Gas (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Remick, R. J.

    2009-03-04

    The conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Fuel cells operating on bio-gas offer a pathway to renewable electricity generation; (2) With federal incentives of $3,500/kW or 30% of the project costs, reasonable payback periods of less than five years can be achieved; (3) Tri-generation of electricity, heat, and hydrogen offers an alternative route to solving the H{sub 2} infrastructure problem facing fuel cell vehicle deployment; and (4) DOE will be promoting bio-gas fuel cells in the future under its Market Transformation Programs.

  4. Bio-inspired optofluidic lasers with luciferin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiang; Chen, Qiushu; Sun, Yuze; Fan, Xudong

    2013-05-01

    The authors demonstrate a bio-inspired optofluidic laser with luciferin, a class of light-emitting compounds synthesized by many different organisms, as the gain medium. The laser characteristics under various conditions such as solution pH value and luciferin concentration are investigated. The authors demonstrate an optofluidic fluorescence resonance energy transfer laser by using luciferin and Rhodamine 6G as the donor and the acceptor, respectively, which takes advantage of the large Stokes shift of luciferin to avoid potential cross excitation of the acceptor. Their work leads to the photonic devices using biosynthesized materials as the gain medium and optofluidic intra-cavity bio/chemical sensing.

  5. Constraints to bio-energy development

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, V.B.

    1980-01-01

    The energy crisis has prompted research and development of renewable, domestic, cost-effective and publicly acceptable energy alternatives. Among these are the bioconversion technologies. To date bio-energy research has been directed toward the mechanics of the conversion processes and technical assessment of the environmental impacts. However, there are other obstacles to overcome before biomass can be converted to more useful forms of energy that fit existing need. Barriers to bio-energy resource application in the US are identified. In addition, examples from several agricultural regions serve to illustrate site-specific resource problems.

  6. BioSig: An imaging bioinformatic system for studying phenomics

    SciTech Connect

    Parvin, Bahram; Yang, Qing; Fontenay, Gerald; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2002-07-01

    Organisms express their genomes in a cell-specific manner, resulting in a variety of cellular phenotypes or phenomes. Mapping cell phenomes under a variety of experimental conditions is necessary in order to understand the responses of organisms to stimuli. Representing such data requires an integrated view of experimental and informatic protocols. BioSig provides the foundation for cataloging cellular responses as a function of specific conditioning, treatment, staining, etc. for either in vivo or in vitro studies. A data model has been developed to capture a wide variety of experimental conditions and map them to image collections and their computed high-level representations. Samples are imaged with light microscopy and each image is represented with an attributed graph. The graph representation contains information about cellular morphology, protein localization, and organization of the cells in the corresponding tissue or cultured colony. The informatics architecture is distribute d and enables database content to be shared among multiple researchers.

  7. Palladium catalyzed hydrogenation of bio-oils and organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Hu, Jianli; Hart, Todd R.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.

    2008-09-16

    The invention provides palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of bio-oils and certain organic compounds. Experimental results have shown unexpected and superior results for palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of organic compounds typically found in bio-oils.

  8. Palladium catalyzed hydrogenation of bio-oils and organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Douglas C [Kennewick, WA; Hu, Jianli [Richland, WA; Hart,; Todd, R [Kennewick, WA; Neuenschwander, Gary G [Burbank, WA

    2011-06-07

    The invention provides palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of bio-oils and certain organic compounds. Experimental results have shown unexpected and superior results for palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of organic compounds typically found in bio-oils.

  9. Boron brings big benefits to bio-based blends

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The solution to the problems with bio-based lubrication can be approached by a combination of blending and additive strategies. However, many additives do not show efficacy when used in bio-based lubricants. Additive addition also lowers the bio-based content of the blend, which in turn limits the a...

  10. Relationship between Cerebral Sigma-1 Receptor Occupancy and Attenuation of Cocaine’s Motor Stimulatory Effects in Mice by PD144418

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Dennis K.; Fergason-Cantrell, Emily A.; Green, Caroline L.; Watkinson, Lisa D.; Carmack, Terry L.; Lever, Susan Z.

    2014-01-01

    Psychostimulant effects of cocaine are mediated partly by agonist actions at sigma-1 (σ1) receptors. Selective σ1 receptor antagonists attenuate these effects and provide a potential avenue for pharmacotherapy. However, the selective and high affinity σ1 antagonist PD144418 (1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-5-[3-(4-methylphenyl)-5-isoxazolyl]-1-propylpyridine) has been reported not to inhibit cocaine-induced hyperactivity. To address this apparent paradox, we evaluated aspects of PD144418 binding in vitro, investigated σ1 receptor and dopamine transporter (DAT) occupancy in vivo, and re-examined effects on locomotor activity. PD144418 displayed high affinity for σ1 sites (Ki 0.46 nM) and 3596-fold selectivity over σ2 sites (Ki 1654 nM) in guinea pig brain membranes. No appreciable affinity was noted for serotonin and norepinephrine transporters (Ki >100 μM), and the DAT interaction was weak (Ki 9.0 μM). In vivo, PD144418 bound to central and peripheral σ1 sites in mouse, with an ED50 of 0.22 μmol/kg in whole brain. No DAT occupancy by PD144418 (10.0 μmol/kg) or possible metabolites were observed. At doses that did not affect basal locomotor activity, PD144418 (1, 3.16, and 10 μmol/kg) attenuated cocaine-induced hyperactivity in a dose-dependent manner in mice. There was good correlation (r2 = 0.88) of hyperactivity reduction with increasing cerebral σ1 receptor occupancy. The behavioral ED50 of 0.79 μmol/kg corresponded to 80% occupancy. Significant σ1 receptor occupancy and the ability to mitigate cocaine’s motor stimulatory effects were observed for 16 hours after a single 10.0 μmol/kg dose of PD144418. PMID:25100754

  11. Anti-cooperative biphasic equilibrium binding of transcription factor upstream stimulatory factor to its cognate DNA monitored by protein fluorescence changes.

    PubMed

    Sha, M; Ferré-D'Amaré, A R; Burley, S K; Goss, D J

    1995-08-18

    Upstream stimulatory factor USF is a human transcriptional activation factor, which uses a basic/helix-loop-helix/ leucin zipper (b/HLH/Z) motif to homodimerize and recognize specific sequences in the promoter region of both nuclear and viral genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II. Steady state fluorescence spectroscopy demonstrated that the basic/helix-loop-helix/leucin zipper domain of USF binds its DNA targets with high affinity and specificity, whereas removal of the leucine zipper yielding the basic/helix-loop-helix minimal DNA binding region reduces both affinity and specificity. Stopped flow method provided kinetic evidence for a two-step binding process involving rapid formation of a protein-DNA intermediate followed by a slow isomerization step, which is consistent with the basic region undergoing a random coil to alpha-helix folding transition on specific DNA recognition. The leucine zipper is also necessary for USF to function as a bivalent homotetramer, capable of binding two distinct recognition sites simultaneously and mediating DNA looping under physiologic conditions. Titration studies revealed that the first binding event has a equilibrium constant Keq = (2.2 +/- 2.0) x 10(9) M-1 for major late promoter DNA, whereas the second binding event occurs with a remarkable reduced affinity, Keq = (1.2 +/- 0.8) x 10(8) M-1. This anticooperative feature of DNA binding by the homotetramer suggests that USF stimulates transcription by mediating DNA looping between nearby recognition sites located in class II nuclear and viral gene promoters.

  12. Insulin-Mediated Down-Regulation of Apolipoprotein A5 Gene Expression through the Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Pathway: Role of Upstream Stimulatory Factor

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Maxime; Helleboid-Chapman, Audrey; Jakel, Heidelinde; Martin, Geneviève; Duran-Sandoval, Daniel; Staels, Bart; Rubin, Edward M.; Pennacchio, Len A.; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Fruchart-Najib, Jamila; Fruchart, Jean-Charles

    2005-01-01

    The apolipoprotein A5 gene (APOA5) has been repeatedly implicated in lowering plasma triglyceride levels. Since several studies have demonstrated that hyperinsulinemia is associated with hypertriglyceridemia, we sought to determine whether APOA5 is regulated by insulin. Here, we show that cell lines and mice treated with insulin down-regulate APOA5 expression in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, we found that insulin decreases human APOA5 promoter activity, and subsequent deletion and mutation analyses uncovered a functional E box in the promoter. Electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that this APOA5 E box binds upstream stimulatory factors (USFs). Moreover, in transfection studies, USF1 stimulates APOA5 promoter activity, and the treatment with insulin reduced the binding of USF1/USF2 to the APOA5 promoter. The inhibition of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway abolished insulin's effect on APOA5 gene expression, while the inhibition of the P70 S6 kinase pathway with rapamycin reversed its effect and increased APOA5 gene expression. Using an oligonucleotide precipitation assay for USF from nuclear extracts, we demonstrate that phosphorylated USF1 fails to bind to the APOA5 promoter. Taken together, these data indicate that insulin-mediated APOA5 gene transrepression could involve a phosphorylation of USFs through the PI3K and P70 S6 kinase pathways that modulate their binding to the APOA5 E box and results in APOA5 down-regulation. The effect of exogenous hyperinsulinemia in men showed a decrease in the plasma ApoAV level. These results suggest a potential contribution of the APOA5 gene in hypertriglyceridemia associated with hyperinsulinemia. PMID:15684402

  13. Isolation and characterization of a molecule stimulatory to growth of somatic embryos from early stage female gametophyte tissue of loblolly pine.

    PubMed

    De Silva, Veronica; Bostwick, David; Burns, Kristi L; Oldham, Charlie D; Skryabina, Anna; Sullards, M Cameron; Wu, Di; Zhang, Yalin; May, Sheldon W; Pullman, Gerald S

    2008-04-01

    Loblolly pine (LP, Pinus taeda) is the primary commercial species in southern forests of the US. Somatic embryogenesis (SE) is an effective technique to implement clonal tree production of high-value genotypes from breeding and genetic engineering programs. Unlike angiosperm embryos with attached cotyledons as seed storage organs, the diploid conifer embryo is surrounded by the unattached haploid female gametophyte (FG). The FG is not present in culture. This presents a dilemma if the FG produces necessary or regulatory compounds for embryo growth, since in culture these important compounds would be missing and would have to be added as supplements. We report here the direct evidence that extracts from early-stage FG indeed stimulate early-stage somatic embryo (SME) growth and multiplication, whereas extracts from late-stage FG inhibit early-stage SME growth. Furthermore, we have now isolated this stimulatory substance from early-stage FG tissue, and identified this substance as citric acid on the basis of NMR and mass spectrometry. We then demonstrated that topical application of citric acid to SMEs stimulates embryo colony growth at P = 0.05. Moreover, we find that there is a good correlation between the amount of citric acid isolated from FG tissue (65 nmoles per stage 2-3 FG) and the amount of citric acid that stimulates colony growth (25-50 nmoles) when applied topically to SMEs. This approach of isolating and characterizing a molecule from plant tissue, and investigating its role on SE processes can provide valuable information leading to further applications of these molecules to improve LP SE protocols.

  14. Expression of two human beta-adrenergic receptors in Escherichia coli: functional interaction with two forms of the stimulatory G protein.

    PubMed Central

    Freissmuth, M; Selzer, E; Marullo, S; Schütz, W; Strosberg, A D

    1991-01-01

    When expressed in Escherichia coli, the human beta 1- and beta 2-adrenergic receptors retain their ligand binding specificity. Their functional integrity was investigated by analyzing receptor-guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory (G) protein coupling by using two splice variants of the alpha subunit of the stimulatory G protein Gs synthesized in E. coli (rGs alpha-S and rGs alpha-L) and the beta gamma subunits of G protein purified from bovine brain. In competition binding experiments with (-)-[125I]iodocyanopindolol and (-)-isoproterenol, rGs alpha-S.beta gamma and rGs alpha-L.beta gamma reconstituted guanine nucleotide-sensitive high-affinity agonist binding with comparable affinities, whereas rGs alpha PT, a mutant of rGs alpha-L with an altered carboxyl terminus, and a recombinant subtype of the alpha subunit of the inhibitory G protein, rGi alpha-1, were approximately 20- and approximately 200-fold less potent, respectively. A comparison of the beta 1- and beta 2-adrenergic receptor expressed in E. coli with the beta 2-receptor in S49 murine lymphoma cyc- cell membranes revealed a similar affinity of rGs alpha-S and rGs alpha-L for the recombinant and native receptors. After stable incorporation of rGs alpha-S.beta gamma into E. coli membranes, receptor-G protein coupling was also verified by determining the isoproterenol-mediated acceleration of the rate for guanine 5'-[gamma-[35S]thio]triphosphate binding. These results show that (i) receptor-G protein coupling can be reconstituted in E. coli using recombinant components and that (ii) such an approach may be more generally used to evaluate coupling preferences between defined molecular species of receptors and G-protein subunits. PMID:1656450

  15. BioNet Digital Communications Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gifford, Kevin; Kuzminsky, Sebastian; Williams, Shea

    2010-01-01

    BioNet v2 is a peer-to-peer middleware that enables digital communication devices to talk to each other. It provides a software development framework, standardized application, network-transparent device integration services, a flexible messaging model, and network communications for distributed applications. BioNet is an implementation of the Constellation Program Command, Control, Communications and Information (C3I) Interoperability specification, given in CxP 70022-01. The system architecture provides the necessary infrastructure for the integration of heterogeneous wired and wireless sensing and control devices into a unified data system with a standardized application interface, providing plug-and-play operation for hardware and software systems. BioNet v2 features a naming schema for mobility and coarse-grained localization information, data normalization within a network-transparent device driver framework, enabling of network communications to non-IP devices, and fine-grained application control of data subscription band width usage. BioNet directly integrates Disruption Tolerant Networking (DTN) as a communications technology, enabling networked communications with assets that are only intermittently connected including orbiting relay satellites and planetary rover vehicles.

  16. Bio-gas production from alligator weeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latif, A.

    1976-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to study the effect of temperature, sample preparation, reducing agents, light intensity and pH of the media, on bio-gas and methane production from the microbial anaerobic decomposition of alligator weeds (Alternanthera philoxeroides. Efforts were also made for the isolation and characterization of the methanogenic bacteria.

  17. Integrated Corn-Based Bio-Refinery

    SciTech Connect

    2006-04-01

    The Integrated Corn-Based Bio-Refinery (ICBR) process will use new technology to convert corn grain and stover into fermentable sugars for the parallel production of value-added chemicals such as 1,3-propanediol (PDO) and fuel ethanol.

  18. Immersive Protein Gaming for Bio Edutainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Yiyu; Lu, Baifang; Zheng, Jianmin; Li, Lin

    2006-01-01

    Games have long been used as a tool for teaching important subject matter, from concept building to problem solving. Through fun learning, students may further develop their curiosities and interest in their study. This article addresses the issue of learning biomolecular structures by virtual reality gaming. A bio edutainment solution featuring…

  19. Preparation of small bio-compatible microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Dreyer, William J. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Small, round, bio-compatible microspheres capable of covalently bonding proteins and having a uniform diameter below about 3500 A are prepared by substantially instantaneously initiating polymerization of an aqueous emulsion containing no more than 35% total monomer including an acrylic monomer substituted with a covalently bondable group such a hydroxyl, amino or carboxyl and a minor amount of a cross-linking agent.

  20. A Review of BioTutor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duhrkopf, Richard

    1994-01-01

    A review of BioTutor which is software to accompany the third edition of Neil Campbell's textbook, "Biology," is provided. The review includes a brief description of the software and a discussion of good and bad features of the software. In the closing words, the reviewer expresses a considerable amount of concern regarding the quality of this…

  1. BioMEMS in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Nuxoll, Eric

    2013-11-01

    The drive to design micro-scale medical devices which can be reliably and uniformly mass produced has prompted many researchers to adapt processing technologies from the semiconductor industry. By operating at a much smaller length scale, the resulting biologically-oriented microelectromechanical systems (BioMEMS) provide many opportunities for improved drug delivery: Low-dose vaccinations and painless transdermal drug delivery are possible through precisely engineered microneedles which pierce the skin's barrier layer without reaching the nerves. Low-power, low-volume BioMEMS pumps and reservoirs can be implanted where conventional pumping systems cannot. Drug formulations with geometrically complex, extremely uniform micro- and nano-particles are formed through micromolding or with microfluidic devices. This review describes these BioMEMS technologies and discusses their current state of implementation. As these technologies continue to develop and capitalize on their simpler integration with other MEMS-based systems such as computer controls and telemetry, BioMEMS' impact on the field of drug delivery will continue to increase.

  2. Monkey Baker in bio-pack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    A squirrel monkey, Baker, in bio-pack couch being readied for Jupiter (AM-18 flight). Jupiter, AM-18 mission, also carried an American-born rhesus monkey, Able into suborbit. The flight was successful and both monkeys were recovered in good condition. AM-18 was launched on May 28, 1959.

  3. Evaluation of the BioVapor Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    The BioVapor model addresses transport and biodegradation of petroleum vapors in the subsurface. This presentation describes basic background on the nature and scientific basis of environmental transport models. It then describes a series of parameter uncertainty runs of the Bi...

  4. BioProject Number PRJNA230524

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This BioProject consists of raw genotyping-by-sequencing data collected in 96-plex format on an Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing system. There were four to six experimental replicates for each of the 46 plants. The development of tens of thousands of mapped SNP markers in wild tomato species was hig...

  5. BioCD: Self-referencing interferometer for biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma, Manoj

    The holy-grail of modern medical science is to provide personalized health-care. An individual's state of health can be correlated to the pattern of concentration of several 'marker' molecules, for e.g. the presence of Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) beyond a certain threshold in the body is a strong indication of prostate cancer. To realize the dream of personalized healthcare, a large number of markers have to be identified and correlated to the state of health across diverse populations. The identified markers have to be quantified subsequently to define an individual's state of health. The technology used to achieve the above should be sensitive, accurate, reliable, high-throughput and should be cheap and simple enough to be able to be available in a clinician's office. Interferometry has been used as a sensitive metrology tool in fields ranging from semiconductor inspection to astronomy. This thesis demonstrates a self-referencing interferometric biosensor (BioCD) with a surface normal design potentially capable of scaling up to thousands of tests per sensor substrates. The sensor concept is similar to an optical CD in that gold microstructures fabricated on the BioCD surface act as wavefront splitting interferometers. In contrast to the optical CD, the BioCD operates in a condition called quadrature, which provides maximum linear response to small phase changes caused by protein binding events. The gold microstructures generate a carrier wave when the BioCD is spun, and protein binding is detected as a modulation of an envelope of the carrier wave pattern created by the immobilized capture proteins. By immobilizing reference and target proteins, differential measurements that automatically subtract out non-specific binding can be obtained. We have demonstrated a detection limit of about 1 ng/ml with this technology, which is a clinically relevant figure for many human and veterinary applications. The specific and non-specific binding signals are separated by

  6. Animal botulism outcomes in the AniBioThreat project.

    PubMed

    Woudstra, Cédric; Tevell Åberg, Annica; Skarin, Hanna; Anniballi, Fabrizio; De Medici, Dario; Bano, Luca; Koene, Miriam; Löfström, Charlotta; Hansen, Trine; Hedeland, Mikael; Fach, Patrick

    2013-09-01

    Botulism disease in both humans and animals is a worldwide concern. Botulinum neurotoxins produced by Clostridium botulinum and other Clostridium species are the most potent biological substances known and are responsible for flaccid paralysis leading to a high mortality rate. Clostridium botulinum and botulinum neurotoxins are considered potential weapons for bioterrorism and have been included in the Australia Group List of Biological Agents. In 2010 the European Commission (DG Justice, Freedom and Security) funded a 3-year project named AniBioThreat to improve the EU's capacity to counter animal bioterrorism threats. A detection portfolio with screening methods for botulism agents and incidents was needed to improve tracking and tracing of accidental and deliberate contamination of the feed and food chain with botulinum neurotoxins and other Clostridia. The complexity of this threat required acquiring new genetic information to better understand the diversity of these Clostridia and develop detection methods targeting both highly specific genetic markers of these Clostridia and the neurotoxins they are able to produce. Several European institutes participating in the AniBioThreat project collaborated on this program to achieve these objectives. Their scientific developments are discussed here.

  7. Animal botulism outcomes in the AniBioThreat project.

    PubMed

    Woudstra, Cédric; Tevell Åberg, Annica; Skarin, Hanna; Anniballi, Fabrizio; De Medici, Dario; Bano, Luca; Koene, Miriam; Löfström, Charlotta; Hansen, Trine; Hedeland, Mikael; Fach, Patrick

    2013-09-01

    Botulism disease in both humans and animals is a worldwide concern. Botulinum neurotoxins produced by Clostridium botulinum and other Clostridium species are the most potent biological substances known and are responsible for flaccid paralysis leading to a high mortality rate. Clostridium botulinum and botulinum neurotoxins are considered potential weapons for bioterrorism and have been included in the Australia Group List of Biological Agents. In 2010 the European Commission (DG Justice, Freedom and Security) funded a 3-year project named AniBioThreat to improve the EU's capacity to counter animal bioterrorism threats. A detection portfolio with screening methods for botulism agents and incidents was needed to improve tracking and tracing of accidental and deliberate contamination of the feed and food chain with botulinum neurotoxins and other Clostridia. The complexity of this threat required acquiring new genetic information to better understand the diversity of these Clostridia and develop detection methods targeting both highly specific genetic markers of these Clostridia and the neurotoxins they are able to produce. Several European institutes participating in the AniBioThreat project collaborated on this program to achieve these objectives. Their scientific developments are discussed here. PMID:23971804

  8. Antibacterial surfaces developed from bio-inspired approaches.

    PubMed

    Glinel, K; Thebault, P; Humblot, V; Pradier, C M; Jouenne, T

    2012-05-01

    Prevention of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on the surfaces of materials is a topic of major medical and societal importance. Various synthetic approaches based on immobilization or release of bactericidal substances such as metal derivatives, polyammonium salts and antibiotics were extensively explored to produce antibacterial coatings. Although providing encouraging results, these approaches suffer from the use of active agents which may be associated with side-effects such as cytotoxicity, hypersensibility, inflammatory responses or the progressive alarming phenomenon of antibiotic resistance. In addition to these synthetic approaches, living organisms, e.g. animals and plants, have developed fascinating strategies over millions of years to prevent efficiently the colonization of their surfaces by pathogens. These strategies have been recently mimicked to create a new generation of bio-inspired biofilm-resistant surfaces. In this review, we discuss some of these bio-inspired methods devoted to the development of antibiofilm surfaces. We describe the elaboration of antibacterial coatings based on natural bactericidal substances produced by living organisms such as antimicrobial peptides, bacteriolytic enzymes and essential oils. We discuss also the development of layers mimicking algae surfaces and based on anti-quorum-sensing molecules which affect cell-to-cell communication. Finally, we report on very recent strategies directly inspired from marine animal life and based on surface microstructuring. PMID:22289644

  9. BioProject and BioSample databases at NCBI: facilitating capture and organization of metadata

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Tanya; Clark, Karen; Gevorgyan, Robert; Gorelenkov, Vyacheslav; Gribov, Eugene; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Kimelman, Michael; Pruitt, Kim D.; Resenchuk, Sergei; Tatusova, Tatiana; Yaschenko, Eugene; Ostell, James

    2012-01-01

    As the volume and complexity of data sets archived at NCBI grow rapidly, so does the need to gather and organize the associated metadata. Although metadata has been collected for some archival databases, previously, there was no centralized approach at NCBI for collecting this information and using it across databases. The BioProject database was recently established to facilitate organization and classification of project data submitted to NCBI, EBI and DDBJ databases. It captures descriptive information about research projects that result in high volume submissions to archival databases, ties together related data across multiple archives and serves as a central portal by which to inform users of data availability. Concomitantly, the BioSample database is being developed to capture descriptive information about the biological samples investigated in projects. BioProject and BioSample records link to corresponding data stored in archival repositories. Submissions are supported by a web-based Submission Portal that guides users through a series of forms for input of rich metadata describing their projects and samples. Together, these databases offer improved ways for users to query, locate, integrate and interpret the masses of data held in NCBI's archival repositories. The BioProject and BioSample databases are available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject and http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/biosample, respectively. PMID:22139929

  10. Bio-terrorism, human security and public health: can international law bring them together in an age of globalization?

    PubMed

    Aginam, Obijiofor

    2005-09-01

    Bio-terrorism, the use of a microorganism with the deliberate intent of causing infection, before and since the anthrax attacks in the United States in October 2001, has emerged as a real medical and public health threat. The link between bio-terrorism, human security and public health raises complex questions on the normative trajectories of international law, the mandates of international organizations, and global health governance. In May 2001, the World Health Assembly of the World Health Organization (WHO) passed a resolution entitled "Global Health Security: Epidemic Alert and Response" which inter alia, urged WHO member states to participate actively in the verification and validation of surveillance data and information concerning health emergencies of international concern. This article explores the links between bio-terrorism, human security and public health, and investigates the effectiveness of international legal mechanisms that link them in an age of globalization of public health. The article explores the interaction of WHO's 'soft-law' approaches to global health security, and the 'moribund' negotiations of the verification and monitoring protocol to the Biological Weapons Convention 1972. Can international law link bio-terrorism, public health and human security? Does the WHO collaborate with other international organizations within and outside the United Nations system to develop effective legal and governance approaches to bio-terrorism and global health security? The article concludes that the globalization of public health threats like bio-terrorism requires globalized legal approaches. PMID:16229381

  11. BioASF: a framework for automatically generating executable pathway models specified in BioPAX

    PubMed Central

    Haydarlou, Reza; Jacobsen, Annika; Bonzanni, Nicola; Feenstra, K. Anton; Abeln, Sanne; Heringa, Jaap

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Biological pathways play a key role in most cellular functions. To better understand these functions, diverse computational and cell biology researchers use biological pathway data for various analysis and modeling purposes. For specifying these biological pathways, a community of researchers has defined BioPAX and provided various tools for creating, validating and visualizing BioPAX models. However, a generic software framework for simulating BioPAX models is missing. Here, we attempt to fill this gap by introducing a generic simulation framework for BioPAX. The framework explicitly separates the execution model from the model structure as provided by BioPAX, with the advantage that the modelling process becomes more reproducible and intrinsically more modular; this ensures natural biological constraints are satisfied upon execution. The framework is based on the principles of discrete event systems and multi-agent systems, and is capable of automatically generating a hierarchical multi-agent system for a given BioPAX model. Results: To demonstrate the applicability of the framework, we simulated two types of biological network models: a gene regulatory network modeling the haematopoietic stem cell regulators and a signal transduction network modeling the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. We observed that the results of the simulations performed using our framework were entirely consistent with the simulation results reported by the researchers who developed the original models in a proprietary language. Availability and Implementation: The framework, implemented in Java, is open source and its source code, documentation and tutorial are available at http://www.ibi.vu.nl/programs/BioASF. Contact: j.heringa@vu.nl PMID:27307645

  12. Stimulatory effect of luteinizing hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1, and epidermal growth factor on vascular endothelial growth factor production in cultured bubaline luteal cells.

    PubMed

    Chouhan, V S; Dangi, S S; Babitha, V; Verma, M R; Bag, S; Singh, G; Sarkar, M

    2015-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the temporal (24, 48, and 72 hours) and dose-dependent (0, 5, 10, and 100 ng/mL of LH, insulin-like growth factor 1 [IGF-1], and EGF) in vitro expression and secretion patterns of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in luteal cell culture during different stages of estrous cycle in water buffaloes. Corpus luteum samples from ovaries of early luteal phase (ELP; Days 1-4), midluteal phase (Days 5-10), and late luteal phase (Days 11-16) were collected from a local slaughterhouse. The samples were then processed and cultured in (serum containing) appropriate cell culture medium and incubated separately with three factors (LH, IGF-1, or EGF) at the previously mentioned three dose-duration combinations. At the end of the respective incubation periods, VEGF was assayed in the spent culture medium by ELISA, whereas the cultured cells were used for VEGF mRNA expression by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results of the present study disclosed dose- and time-dependent stimulatory effects of LH, IGF-1, and EGF on VEGF production in bubaline luteal cells. The VEGF expression and secretion from the cultured luteal cells were highest during the ELP, intermediate in the midluteal phase, and lowest in the late luteal phase of the estrous cycle for all the three tested factors. Comparison of the results of the three treatments depicted EGF as the most potent stimulating factor followed by IGF-1 and LH. Immunocytochemistry findings in luteal cell culture of ELP agreed with the VEGF expression and secretion. In conclusion, mRNA expression, protein secretion, and immunolocalization of VEGF data clearly indicated for the first time that LH, IGF-1, and EGF play an important role in stimulating luteal angiogenesis in buffalo CL. The highest expression and secretion of VEGF in the ELP might be associated with the development of blood vessels in early growth of CL, which in turn gets augmented by the aforementioned

  13. Stimulatory effect of luteinizing hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1, and epidermal growth factor on vascular endothelial growth factor production in cultured bubaline luteal cells.

    PubMed

    Chouhan, V S; Dangi, S S; Babitha, V; Verma, M R; Bag, S; Singh, G; Sarkar, M

    2015-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the temporal (24, 48, and 72 hours) and dose-dependent (0, 5, 10, and 100 ng/mL of LH, insulin-like growth factor 1 [IGF-1], and EGF) in vitro expression and secretion patterns of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in luteal cell culture during different stages of estrous cycle in water buffaloes. Corpus luteum samples from ovaries of early luteal phase (ELP; Days 1-4), midluteal phase (Days 5-10), and late luteal phase (Days 11-16) were collected from a local slaughterhouse. The samples were then processed and cultured in (serum containing) appropriate cell culture medium and incubated separately with three factors (LH, IGF-1, or EGF) at the previously mentioned three dose-duration combinations. At the end of the respective incubation periods, VEGF was assayed in the spent culture medium by ELISA, whereas the cultured cells were used for VEGF mRNA expression by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results of the present study disclosed dose- and time-dependent stimulatory effects of LH, IGF-1, and EGF on VEGF production in bubaline luteal cells. The VEGF expression and secretion from the cultured luteal cells were highest during the ELP, intermediate in the midluteal phase, and lowest in the late luteal phase of the estrous cycle for all the three tested factors. Comparison of the results of the three treatments depicted EGF as the most potent stimulating factor followed by IGF-1 and LH. Immunocytochemistry findings in luteal cell culture of ELP agreed with the VEGF expression and secretion. In conclusion, mRNA expression, protein secretion, and immunolocalization of VEGF data clearly indicated for the first time that LH, IGF-1, and EGF play an important role in stimulating luteal angiogenesis in buffalo CL. The highest expression and secretion of VEGF in the ELP might be associated with the development of blood vessels in early growth of CL, which in turn gets augmented by the aforementioned

  14. Genotoxicity of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) disodium salt (BioPQQ™).

    PubMed

    Nakano, Masahiko; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Imamura, Tadashi; Lau, Annette; Lynch, Barry

    2013-11-01

    The genotoxic potential of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) disodium salt (BioPQQ™) was evaluated in a battery of genotoxicity tests. The results of the bacterial mutation assay (Ames test) were negative. Weak positive results were obtained in 2 separate in vitro chromosomal aberration test in Chinese hamster lung (CHL) fibroblasts. Upon testing in an in vitro chromosomal aberration test in human peripheral blood lymphocytes, no genotoxic activity of PQQ was noted. In the in vivo micronucleus assay in mice, PQQ at doses up to 2,000 mg/kg body weight demonstrated that no genotoxic effects are expressed in vivo in bone marrow erythrocytes. The weak responses in the in vitro test CHL cells were considered of little relevance under conditions of likely human exposure. PQQ disodium was concluded to have no genotoxic activity in vivo.

  15. Nano-bio effects: interaction of nanomaterials with cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Liang-Chien; Jiang, Xiumei; Wang, Jing; Chen, Chunying; Liu, Ru-Shi

    2013-04-01

    With the advancements in nanotechnology, studies on the synthesis, modification, application, and toxicology evaluation of nanomaterials are gaining increased attention. In particular, the applications of nanomaterials in biological systems are attracting considerable interest because of their unique, tunable, and versatile physicochemical properties. Artificially engineered nanomaterials can be well controlled for appropriate usage, and the tuned physicochemical properties directly influence the interactions between nanomaterials and cells. This review summarizes recently synthesized major nanomaterials that have potential biomedical applications. Focus is given on the interactions, including cellular uptake, intracellular trafficking, and toxic response, while changing the physicochemical properties of versatile materials. The importance of physicochemical properties such as the size, shape, and surface modifications of the nanomaterials in their biological effects is also highlighted in detail. The challenges of recent studies and future prospects are presented as well. This review benefits relatively new researchers in this area and gives them a systematic overview of nano-bio interaction, hopefully for further experimental design.

  16. Optofluidic Bio-Lasers: Concept and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xudong; Yun, Seok-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    An optofluidic bio-laser integrates biological materials into the gain medium while forming an optical cavity in the fluidic environment, either on a microfluidic chip or within a biological system. The laser emission has characteristics fundamentally different from conventional fluorescence emission. It can be highly sensitive to a specific molecular change in the gain medium as the light-matter interaction is amplified by the resonance in the cavity. The enhanced sensitivity can be used to probe and quantify the underlying biochemical and biological processes in vitro in a microfluidic device, in situ in a cell (cytosol), or in vivo in a live organism. Here we describe the principle of the optofluidic bio-laser, review its recent progress and provide an outlook of this emerging technology. PMID:24481219

  17. NETTAB 2012 on "Integrated Bio-Search"

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The NETTAB 2012 workshop, held in Como on November 14-16, 2012, was devoted to "Integrated Bio-Search", that is to technologies, methods, architectures, systems and applications for searching, retrieving, integrating and analyzing data, information, and knowledge with the aim of answering complex bio-medical-molecular questions, i.e. some of the most challenging issues in bioinformatics today. It brought together about 80 researchers working in the field of Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, Biology, Computer Science and Engineering. More than 50 scientific contributions, including keynote and tutorial talks, oral communications, posters and software demonstrations, were presented at the workshop. This preface provides a brief overview of the workshop and shortly introduces the peer-reviewed manuscripts that were accepted for publication in this Supplement. PMID:24564635

  18. GAG BioScience GmbH.

    PubMed

    Melmer, Georg

    2003-11-01

    Completion of the human genome project led to an explosion in available genomic information. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have emerged as a versatile and powerful tool for genotyping almost all variant species. The unique technological platform developed by GAG BioScience is exclusively based on SNP detection and allows genotyping of up to 60,000 samples per day. An analysis robot, a mass spectrometer and a database form a practically self-controlled analysis and documentation system that achieves high-throughput rates of samples with absolute precision. By using a Laboratory Information and Management System, up to 150 million genotypes can be simultaneously retrieved and stored. In cooperation with a partner, GAG BioScience develops new and powerful tools for further data analysis.

  19. A Systems Approach to Bio-Oil Stabilization - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Robert C; Meyer, Terrence; Fox, Rodney; Submramaniam, Shankar; Shanks, Brent; Smith, Ryan G

    2011-12-23

    products: condensable vapors, non-condensable gases, and liquid aerosols. Traditionally these are recovered by a spray quencher or a conventional shell and tube condenser. The spray quencher or condenser is typically followed by an electrostatic precipitator to yield 1 or 2 distinct fractions of bio-oil. The pyrolyzer system developed at Iowa State University incorporates a proprietary fractionating condenser train. The system collects the bio-oil into five unique fractions. For conditions typical of fluidized bed pyrolyzers, stage fractions have been collected that are carbohydrate-rich (anhydrosugars), lignin-rich, and an aqueous solution of carboxylic acids and aldehydes. One important feature is that most of the water normally found in bio-oil appears in the last stage fraction along with several water-soluble components that are thought to be responsible for bio-oil aging (low molecular weight carboxylic acids and aldehydes). Research work on laser diagnostics for hot-vapor filtration and bio-oil recovery centered on development of analytical techniques for in situ measurements during fast pyrolysis, hot-vapor filtration, and fractionation relative to bio-oil stabilization. The methods developed in this work include laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), laser-induced incandescence (LII), and laser scattering for elemental analysis (N, O, H, C), detection of particulates, and detection of aerosols, respectively. These techniques were utilized in simulated pyrolysis environments and applied to a small-scale pyrolysis unit. Stability of Bio-oils is adversely affected by the presence of particulates that are formed as a consequence of thermal pyrolysis, improving the CFD simulations of moving bed granular filter (MBGF) is useful for improving the design of MBGF for bio-oil production. The current work uses fully resolved direct numerical simulation (where the flow past each granule is accurately represented) to calculate the filter efficiency that is used in the

  20. BioSAR Airborne Biomass Sensing System

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, R.L.; Johnson, P.

    2007-05-24

    This CRADA was developed to enable ORNL to assist American Electronics, Inc. test a new technology--BioSAR. BioSAR is a an airborne, low frequency (80-120 MHz {approx} FM radio frequencies) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) technology which was designed and built for NASA by ZAI-Amelex under Patrick Johnson's direction. At these frequencies, leaves and small branches are nearly transparent and the majority of the energy reflected from the forest and returned to the radar is from the tree trunks. By measuring the magnitude of the back scatter, the volume of the tree trunk and therefore the biomass of the trunks can be inferred. The instrument was successfully tested on tropical rain forests in Panama. Patrick Johnson, with American Electronics, Inc received a Phase II SBIR grant from DOE Office of Climate Change to further test and refine the instrument. Mr Johnson sought ORNL expertise in measuring forest biomass in order for him to further validate his instrument. ORNL provided ground truth measurements of forest biomass at three locations--the Oak Ridge Reservation, Weyerhaeuser Co. commercial pine plantations in North Carolina, and American Energy and Power (AEP) Co. hardwood forests in southern Ohio, and facilitated flights over these forests. After Mr. Johnson processed the signal data from BioSAR instrument, the processed data were given to ORNL and we attempted to derive empirical relationships between the radar signals and the ground truth forest biomass measurements using standard statistical techniques. We were unsuccessful in deriving such relationships. Shortly before the CRADA ended, Mr Johnson discovered that FM signal from local radio station broadcasts had interfered with the back scatter measurements such that the bulk of the signal received by the BioSAR instrument was not backscatter from the radar but rather was local radio station signals.

  1. [Delayed infection after Bio-alcamid implantation].

    PubMed

    Serrano, C; Serrano, S

    2006-09-01

    Bio-alcamid (Polymekon) is a gelatinous endoprothesis constituted of poly-alkyl-imide and water that is used for correction of aesthetic alterations. It presents very good tolerance with few adverse effects. We present a case of localized infection in one of the sites of injection, three months after the implant was placed in the nasolabial furrows and lips. It would be the first case of a delayed infection following injection of this material, although there are few references in this field.

  2. Examining porous bio-active glass as a potential osteo-odonto-keratoprosthetic skirt material.

    PubMed

    Huhtinen, Reeta; Sandeman, Susan; Rose, Susanna; Fok, Elsie; Howell, Carol; Fröberg, Linda; Moritz, Niko; Hupa, Leena; Lloyd, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    Bio-active glass has been developed for use as a bone substitute with strong osteo-inductive capacity and the ability to form strong bonds with soft and hard tissue. The ability of this material to enhance tissue in-growth suggests its potential use as a substitute for the dental laminate of an osteo-odonto-keratoprosthesis. A preliminary in vitro investigation of porous bio-active glass as an OOKP skirt material was carried out. Porous glass structures were manufactured from bio-active glasses 1-98 and 28-04 containing varying oxide formulation (1-98, 28-04) and particle size range (250-315 μm for 1-98 and 28-04a, 315-500 μm for 28-04b). Dissolution of the porous glass structure and its effect on pH was measured. Structural 2D and 3D analysis of porous structures were performed. Cell culture experiments were carried out to study keratocyte adhesion and the inflammatory response induced by the porous glass materials. The dissolution results suggested that the porous structure made out of 1-98 dissolves faster than the structures made from glass 28-04. pH experiments showed that the dissolution of the porous glass increased the pH of the surrounding solution. The cell culture results showed that keratocytes adhered onto the surface of each of the porous glass structures, but cell adhesion and spreading was greatest for the 98a bio-glass. Cytokine production by all porous glass samples was similar to that of the negative control indicating that the glasses do not induce a cytokine driven inflammatory response. Cell culture results support the potential use of synthetic porous bio-glass as an OOKP skirt material in terms of limited inflammatory potential and capacity to induce and support tissue ingrowth.

  3. Utilization of palm oil sludge through pyrolysis for bio-oil and bio-char production.

    PubMed

    Thangalazhy-Gopakumar, Suchithra; Al-Nadheri, Wail Mohammed Ahmed; Jegarajan, Dinesh; Sahu, J N; Mubarak, N M; Nizamuddin, S

    2015-02-01

    In this study, pyrolysis technique was utilized for converting palm oil sludge to value added materials: bio-oil (liquid fuel) and bio-char (soil amendment). The bio-oil yield obtained was 27.4±1.7 wt.% having a heating value of 22.2±3.7 MJ/kg and a negligible ash content of 0.23±0.01 wt.%. The pH of bio-oil was in alkaline region. The bio-char yielded 49.9±0.3 wt.%, which was further investigated for sorption efficiency by adsorbing metal (Cd(2+) ions) from water. The removal efficiency of Cd(2+) was 89.4±2%, which was almost similar to the removal efficiency of a commercial activated carbon. The adsorption isotherm was well described by Langmuir model. Therefore, pyrolysis is proved as an efficient tool for palm oil sludge management, where the waste was converted into valuable products. PMID:25278112

  4. Utilization of palm oil sludge through pyrolysis for bio-oil and bio-char production.

    PubMed

    Thangalazhy-Gopakumar, Suchithra; Al-Nadheri, Wail Mohammed Ahmed; Jegarajan, Dinesh; Sahu, J N; Mubarak, N M; Nizamuddin, S

    2015-02-01

    In this study, pyrolysis technique was utilized for converting palm oil sludge to value added materials: bio-oil (liquid fuel) and bio-char (soil amendment). The bio-oil yield obtained was 27.4±1.7 wt.% having a heating value of 22.2±3.7 MJ/kg and a negligible ash content of 0.23±0.01 wt.%. The pH of bio-oil was in alkaline region. The bio-char yielded 49.9±0.3 wt.%, which was further investigated for sorption efficiency by adsorbing metal (Cd(2+) ions) from water. The removal efficiency of Cd(2+) was 89.4±2%, which was almost similar to the removal efficiency of a commercial activated carbon. The adsorption isotherm was well described by Langmuir model. Therefore, pyrolysis is proved as an efficient tool for palm oil sludge management, where the waste was converted into valuable products.

  5. Beclometasone oral--DOR BioPharma.

    PubMed

    2007-01-01

    orBec is an oral enteric-coated tablet formulation of the corticosteroid beclometasone, which has been developed by Enteron Pharmaceuticals, a subsidiary of Corporate Technology Development (now DOR BioPharma). orBec is being developed for the treatment of gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and an NDA has been filed in the US. DOR BioPharma has also filed an MAA in Europe for the same indication.orBec is designed to reduce the need for systemic immunosuppressive drugs, thereby improving the outcome of bone marrow and stem cell transplantation.DOR BioPharma may seek a marketing partner in the US and elsewhere for orBec in GVHD and will seek a partner for other potential indications of the drug.In December 2001, Corporate Technology Development was acquired by Endorex Corporation (now DOR BioPharma). In October 1998, Enteron Pharmaceuticals (DOR BioPharma) entered into an exclusive, worldwide, royalty bearing license agreement with George B. McDonald, MD, including the right to grant sublicenses, for the rights to the intellectual property and know-how relating to orBec. In January 2007, DOR BioPharma received $US3 million under a non-binding letter of intent from Sigma-Tau Pharmaceuticals. The agreement grants Sigma-Tau an exclusive right to negotiate terms and conditions for a possible business transaction or strategic alliance regarding orBec and potentially other DOR pipeline compounds until 1 March 2007. Under the terms of the agreement, Sigma-Tau purchased $US1 million of DOR's common stock, with an additional $US2 million paid in cash. If no agreement is reached by 1 March 2007, DOR will return the $US2 million to Sigma-Tau within 60 days. DOR BioPharma received an unsolicited proposal from Cell Therapeutics, Inc. to acquire DOR BioPharma in January 2007. Because of the non-binding agreement already signed with Sigma-Tau, DOR BioPharma's board of directors cannot consider Cell Therapeutics' merger proposal at this time. orBec has been filed for

  6. Bio-based Polymer Foam from Soyoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnaillie, Laetitia M.; Wool, Richard P.

    2006-03-01

    The growing bio-based polymeric foam industry is presently lead by plant oil-based polyols for polyurethanes and starch foams. We developed a new resilient, thermosetting foam system with a bio-based content higher than 80%. The acrylated epoxidized soybean oil and its fatty acid monomers is foamed with pressurized carbon dioxide and cured with free-radical initiators. The foam structure and pore dynamics are highly dependent on the temperature, viscosity and extent of reaction. Low-temperature cure hinds the destructive pore coalescence and the application of a controlled vacuum results in foams with lower densities ˜ 0.1 g/cc, but larger cells. We analyze the physics of foam formation and stability, as well as the structure and mechanical properties of the cured foam using rigidity percolation theory. The parameters studied include temperature, vacuum applied, and cross-link density. Additives bring additional improvements: nucleating agents and surfactants help produce foams with a high concentration of small cells and low bulk density. Hard and soft thermosetting foams with a bio content superior to 80% are successfully produced and tested. Potential applications include foam-core composites for hurricane-resistant housing, structural reinforcement for windmill blades, and tissue scaffolds.

  7. Engineering tissue with BioMEMS.

    PubMed

    Borenstein, Jeffrey T; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2011-11-01

    In summary, microfluidic-BioMEMS platforms are increasingly contributing to tissue engineering in many different ways. First, the accurate control of the cell environment in settings suitable for cell screening and with imaging compatibility is greatly advancing our ability to optimize cell sources for a variety of tissue-engineering applications. Second, the microfluidic technology is ideal for the formation of perfusable networks, either to study their stability and maturation or to use these networks as templates for engineering vascularized tissues. Third, the approaches based on microfluidic and BioMEMS devices enable engineering and the study of minimally functional modules of complex tissues, such as liver sinusoid, kidney nephron, and lung bronchiole. This brief article highlighted some of the unique advantages of this elegant technology using representative examples of tissue-engineering research. We focused on some of the universal needs of the area of tissue engineering: tissue vascularization, faithful recapitulation in vitro of functional units of our tissues and organs, and predictable selection and differentiation of stem cells that are being addressed using the power and versatility of microfluidic-BioMEMS platforms.

  8. BIOMASS TO BIO-OIL BY LIQUEFACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Huamin; Wang, Yong

    2013-01-10

    Significant efforts have been devoted to develop processes for the conversion of biomass, an abundant and sustainable source of energy, to liquid fuels and chemicals, in order to replace diminishing fossil fuels and mitigate global warming. Thermochemical and biochemical methods have attracted the most attention. Among the thermochemical processes, pyrolysis and liquefaction are the two major technologies for the direct conversion of biomass to produce a liquid product, often called bio-oil. This chapter focuses on the liquefaction, a medium-temperature and high-pressure thermochemical process for the conversion of biomass to bio-oil. Water has been most commonly used as a solvent and the process is known as hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL). Fundamentals of HTL process, key factors determining HTL behavior, role of catalyst in HTL, properties of produced bio-oil, and the current status of the technology are summarized. The liquefaction of biomass by using organic solvents, a process called solvolysis, is also discussed. A wide range of biomass feedstocks have been tested for liquefaction including wood, crop residues, algae, food processing waste, and animal manure.

  9. Bio gas oil production from waste lard.

    PubMed

    Hancsók, Jeno; Baladincz, Péter; Kasza, Tamás; Kovács, Sándor; Tóth, Csaba; Varga, Zoltán

    2011-01-01

    Besides the second generations bio fuels, one of the most promising products is the bio gas oil, which is a high iso-paraffin containing fuel, which could be produced by the catalytic hydrogenation of different triglycerides. To broaden the feedstock of the bio gas oil the catalytic hydrogenation of waste lard over sulphided NiMo/Al(2)O(3) catalyst, and as the second step, the isomerization of the produced normal paraffin rich mixture (intermediate product) over Pt/SAPO-11 catalyst was investigated. It was found that both the hydrogenation and the decarboxylation/decarbonylation oxygen removing reactions took place but their ratio depended on the process parameters (T = 280-380°C, P = 20-80 bar, LHSV = 0.75-3.0  h(-1) and H(2)/lard ratio: 600  Nm(3)/m(3)). In case of the isomerization at the favourable process parameters (T = 360-370°C, P = 40-50 bar, LHSV = 1.0  h(-1) and H(2)/hydrocarbon ratio: 400  Nm(3)/m(3)) mainly mono-branching isoparaffins were obtained. The obtained products are excellent Diesel fuel blending components, which are practically free of heteroatoms. PMID:21403875

  10. [Bio-oil production from biomass pyrolysis in molten salt].

    PubMed

    Ji, Dengxiang; Cai, Tengyue; Ai, Ning; Yu, Fengwen; Jiang, Hongtao; Ji, Jianbing

    2011-03-01

    In order to investigate the effects of pyrolysis conditions on bio-oil production from biomass in molten salt, experiments of biomass pyrolysis were carried out in a self-designed reactor in which the molten salt ZnCl2-KCl (with mole ratio 7/6) was selected as heat carrier, catalyst and dispersion agent. The effects of metal salt added into ZnCl2-KCl and biomass material on biomass pyrolysis were discussed, and the main compositions of bio-oil were determined by GC-MS. Metal salt added into molten salt could affect pyrolysis production yields remarkably. Lanthanon salt could enhance bio-oil yield and decrease water content in bio-oil, when mole fraction of 5.0% LaCl3 was added, bio-oil yield could reach up to 32.0%, and water content of bio-oil could reduce to 61.5%. The bio-oil and char yields were higher when rice straw was pyrolysed, while gas yield was higher when rice husk was used. Metal salts showed great selectivity on compositions of bio-oil. LiCl and FeCl2 promoted biomass to pyrolyse into smaller molecular weight compounds. CrCl3, CaCl2 and LaCl3 could restrain second pyrolysis of bio-oil. The research provided a scientific reference for production of bio-oil from biomass pyrolysis in molten salt.

  11. Physical oceanographic processes influence bio-optical properties in the Tasman Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherukuru, Nagur; Davies, Peter L.; Brando, Vittorio E.; Anstee, Janet M.; Baird, Mark E.; Clementson, Lesley A.; Doblin, Martina A.

    2016-04-01

    Remote sensing observations show optical signatures to conform to the physical oceanographic patterns in the Tasman Sea. To test the link between physical oceanographic processes and bio-optical properties we investigated an in situ bio-optical dataset collected in the Tasman Sea. Analysis of in situ observations showed the presence of four different water masses in the Tasman Sea, formed by the relatively warm and saline East Australia Current (EAC) water, a mesoscale cold core eddy on the continental slope, cooler Tasman Sea water on the shelf and river plume water. The distribution of suspended substances and their inherent optical properties in these water masses were distinctly different. Light absorption and attenuation budgets indicate varying optical complexity between the water masses. Specific inherent optical properties of suspended particulate and dissolved substances in each group were different as they were influenced by physical and biogeochemical processes specific to that water mass. Remote sensing reflectance signature varied in response to changing bio-optical properties between the water masses; thus providing the link between physical oceanographic processes, bio-optical properties and the optical signature. Findings presented here extend our knowledge of the Tasman Sea, its optical environment and the role of physical oceanographic processes in influencing the inherent optical properties and remote sensing signature in this complex oceanographic region.

  12. PVA bio-nanocomposites: a new take-off using cellulose nanocrystals and PLGA nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rescignano, N; Fortunati, E; Montesano, S; Emiliani, C; Kenny, J M; Martino, S; Armentano, I

    2014-01-01

    The formation of a new generation of hybrid bio-nanocomposites is reported: these are intended at modulating the mechanical, thermal and biocompatibility properties of the poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) by the combination of cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) and poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) loaded with bovine serum albumin fluorescein isothiocynate conjugate (FITC-BSA). CNC were synthesized from microcrystalline cellulose by hydrolysis, while PLGA nanoparticles were produced by a double emulsion with subsequent solvent evaporation. Firstly, binary bio-nanocomposites with different CNC amounts were developed in order to select the right content of CNC. Next, ternary PVA/CNC/NPs bio-nanocomposites were developed. The addition of CNC increased the elongation properties without compromising the other mechanical responses. Thermal analysis underlined the nucleation effect of the synergic presence of cellulose and nanoparticles. Remarkably, bio-nanocomposite films are suitable to vehiculate biopolymeric nanoparticles to adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells successfully, thus representing a new tool for drug delivery strategies.

  13. Bio-Nanobattery Development and Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Glen C.; Choi, Sang H.; Chu, Sang-Hyon; Kim, Jae-Woo; Watt, Gerald D.; Lillehei, T.; Park, Yeonjoon; Elliott, James R.

    2005-01-01

    A bio-nanobattery is an electrical energy storage device that utilizes organic materials and processes on an atomic, or nanometer-scale. The bio-nanobattery under development at NASA s Langley Research Center provides new capabilities for electrical power generation, storage, and distribution as compared to conventional power storage systems. Most currently available electronic systems and devices rely on a single, centralized power source to supply electrical power to a specified location in the circuit. As electronic devices and associated components continue to shrink in size towards the nanometer-scale, a single centralized power source becomes impractical. Small systems, such as these, will require distributed power elements to reduce Joule heating, to minimize wiring quantities, and to allow autonomous operation of the various functions performed by the circuit. Our research involves the development and characterization of a bio-nanobattery using ferritins reconstituted with both an iron core (Fe-ferritin) and a cobalt core (Co-ferritin). Synthesis and characterization of the Co-ferritin and Fe-ferritin electrodes were performed, including reducing capability and the half-cell electrical potentials. Electrical output of nearly 0.5 V for the battery cell was measured. Ferritin utilizing other metallic cores were also considered to increase the overall electrical output. Two dimensional ferritin arrays were produced on various substrates to demonstrate the feasibility of a thin-film nano-scaled power storage system for distributed power storage applications. The bio-nanobattery will be ideal for nanometerscaled electronic applications, due to the small size, high energy density, and flexible thin-film structure. A five-cell demonstration article was produced for concept verification and bio-nanobattery characterization. Challenges to be addressed include the development of a multi-layered thin-film, increasing the energy density, dry-cell bionanobattery

  14. Method to upgrade bio-oils to fuel and bio-crude

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, Philip H; Pittman, Jr., Charles U; Ingram, Jr., Leonard L; Gajjela, Sanjeev; Zhang, Zhijun; Bhattacharya, Priyanka

    2013-12-10

    This invention relates to a method and device to produce esterified, olefinated/esterified, or thermochemolytic reacted bio-oils as fuels. The olefinated/esterified product may be utilized as a biocrude for input to a refinery, either alone or in combination with petroleum crude oils. The bio-oil esterification reaction is catalyzed by addition of alcohol and acid catalyst. The olefination/esterification reaction is catalyzed by addition of resin acid or other heterogeneous catalyst to catalyze olefins added to previously etherified bio-oil; the olefins and alcohol may also be simultaneously combined and catalyzed by addition of resin acid or other heterogeneous catalyst to produce the olefinated/esterified product.

  15. MULTIFUNCTIONAL NANO-BIO MATERIALS WITHIN CELLULAR MACHINERY.

    PubMed

    Rozhkova, E A; Ulasov, I V; Kim, D-H; Dimitrijevic, N M; Novosad, V; Bader, S D; Lesniak, M S; Rajh, T

    2011-08-01

    Functional nanoscale materials that possess specific physical or chemical properties can leverage energy transduction in vivo. Once these materials integrate with biomolecules they combine physical properties of inorganic material and the biorecognition capabilities of bio-organic moieties. Such nano-bio hybrids can be interfaced with living cells, the elementary functional units of life. These nano-bio systems are capable of bio-manipulation or actuation via altering intracellular biochemical pathways. Thus, nano-bio conjugates are appealing for a wide range of applications from the life sciences and nanomedicine to catalysis and clean energy production. Here we highlight recent progress in our efforts to develop smart nano-bio hybrid materials, and to study their performance within cellular machinery under application of external stimuli, such as light or magnetic fields.

  16. MULTIFUNCTIONAL NANO–BIO MATERIALS WITHIN CELLULAR MACHINERY

    PubMed Central

    ROZHKOVA, E. A.; ULASOV, I. V.; KIM, D.-H.; DIMITRIJEVIC, N. M.; NOVOSAD, V.; BADER, S. D.; LESNIAK, M. S.; RAJH, T.

    2011-01-01

    Functional nanoscale materials that possess specific physical or chemical properties can leverage energy transduction in vivo. Once these materials integrate with biomolecules they combine physical properties of inorganic material and the biorecognition capabilities of bio-organic moieties. Such nano–bio hybrids can be interfaced with living cells, the elementary functional units of life. These nano–bio systems are capable of bio-manipulation or actuation via altering intracellular biochemical pathways. Thus, nano–bio conjugates are appealing for a wide range of applications from the life sciences and nanomedicine to catalysis and clean energy production. Here we highlight recent progress in our efforts to develop smart nano–bio hybrid materials, and to study their performance within cellular machinery under application of external stimuli, such as light or magnetic fields. PMID:23105163

  17. BioC implementations in Go, Perl, Python and Ruby.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wanli; Islamaj Doğan, Rezarta; Kwon, Dongseop; Marques, Hernani; Rinaldi, Fabio; Wilbur, W John; Comeau, Donald C

    2014-01-01

    As part of a communitywide effort for evaluating text mining and information extraction systems applied to the biomedical domain, BioC is focused on the goal of interoperability, currently a major barrier to wide-scale adoption of text mining tools. BioC is a simple XML format, specified by DTD, for exchanging data for biomedical natural language processing. With initial implementations in C++ and Java, BioC provides libraries of code for reading and writing BioC text documents and annotations. We extend BioC to Perl, Python, Go and Ruby. We used SWIG to extend the C++ implementation for Perl and one Python implementation. A second Python implementation and the Ruby implementation use native data structures and libraries. BioC is also implemented in the Google language Go. BioC modules are functional in all of these languages, which can facilitate text mining tasks. BioC implementations are freely available through the BioC site: http://bioc.sourceforge.net. Database URL: http://bioc.sourceforge.net/ PMID:24961236

  18. BioC implementations in Go, Perl, Python and Ruby

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wanli; Islamaj Doğan, Rezarta; Kwon, Dongseop; Marques, Hernani; Rinaldi, Fabio; Wilbur, W. John; Comeau, Donald C.

    2014-01-01

    As part of a communitywide effort for evaluating text mining and information extraction systems applied to the biomedical domain, BioC is focused on the goal of interoperability, currently a major barrier to wide-scale adoption of text mining tools. BioC is a simple XML format, specified by DTD, for exchanging data for biomedical natural language processing. With initial implementations in C++ and Java, BioC provides libraries of code for reading and writing BioC text documents and annotations. We extend BioC to Perl, Python, Go and Ruby. We used SWIG to extend the C++ implementation for Perl and one Python implementation. A second Python implementation and the Ruby implementation use native data structures and libraries. BioC is also implemented in the Google language Go. BioC modules are functional in all of these languages, which can facilitate text mining tasks. BioC implementations are freely available through the BioC site: http://bioc.sourceforge.net. Database URL: http://bioc.sourceforge.net/ PMID:24961236

  19. BioC implementations in Go, Perl, Python and Ruby.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wanli; Islamaj Doğan, Rezarta; Kwon, Dongseop; Marques, Hernani; Rinaldi, Fabio; Wilbur, W John; Comeau, Donald C

    2014-01-01

    As part of a communitywide effort for evaluating text mining and information extraction systems applied to the biomedical domain, BioC is focused on the goal of interoperability, currently a major barrier to wide-scale adoption of text mining tools. BioC is a simple XML format, specified by DTD, for exchanging data for biomedical natural language processing. With initial implementations in C++ and Java, BioC provides libraries of code for reading and writing BioC text documents and annotations. We extend BioC to Perl, Python, Go and Ruby. We used SWIG to extend the C++ implementation for Perl and one Python implementation. A second Python implementation and the Ruby implementation use native data structures and libraries. BioC is also implemented in the Google language Go. BioC modules are functional in all of these languages, which can facilitate text mining tasks. BioC implementations are freely available through the BioC site: http://bioc.sourceforge.net. Database URL: http://bioc.sourceforge.net/

  20. Development of a bio-inspired transformable robotic fin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yikun; Xia, Yu; Qin, Fenghua; Xu, Min; Li, Weihua; Zhang, Shiwu

    2016-01-01

    Fish swim by oscillating their pectoral fins forwards and backwards in a cyclic motion such that their geometric parameters and aspect ratios change according to how fast or slow a fish wants to swim; these complex motions result in a complicated hydrodynamic response. This paper focuses on the dynamic change in the shape of a fin to improve the underwater propulsion of bio-inspired mechanism. To do this, a novel transformable robotic fin has been developed to investigate how this change in shape affects the hydrodynamic forces acting on the fin. This robotic fin has a multi-link frame and a flexible surface skin where changes in shape are activated by a purpose designed multi-link mechanism driven by a transformation motor. A drag platform has been designed to study the performance of this variable robotic fin. Numerous experiments were carried out to determine how various controlling modes affect the thrust capability of this fin. The kinematic parameters associated with this robotic fin include the oscillating frequency and amplitude, and the drag velocity. The fin has four modes to control the cyclic motion; these were also investigated in combination with the variable kinematic parameters. The results will help us understand the locomotion performance of this transformable robotic fin. Note that different controlling modes influence the propulsive performance of this robotic fin, which means its propulsive performance can be optimized in a changing environment by adapting its shape. This study facilitates the development of bio-inspired unmanned underwater vehicles with a very high swimming performance. PMID:27580003

  1. Research and fabrication of integrated bio-sensor for blood analysis based on µTAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    En, De; Wei, Jianxia; Tong, Zhengrong; Chen, Caihe; Cui, Yuming; Xu, Kexin; Si, Qin; Li, Chao; Liu, Jie

    2007-01-01

    For simultaneously detecting multi-parameters of blood in the clinical diagnosis, the analysis apparatus should be smaller in size, more reliable and sensitive. So a kind of integrated bio-sensor for blood analysis based on Micro Total Analysis System (μTAS) is presented. It provides modern bio-sensor prospect with a novel technology. A multi-parameters of blood analysis integration sensor is μTAS bio-sensor based on 4 groups of interdigital array (IDA)microelectrodes. The IDA microelectrodes are fabricated on glass substrates by photography, film deposition and other microfabrication techniques. Thin-film gold microelectrode with a thickness of 250nm is deposited on a chromium-adhesion layer. The finger microelectrode width and space are both 10μm. The work space is 2×2cm2. The concentration of Blood sugar, Total Cholesterol, Acetone body and Lactic acid is measured by detecting steady-state limiting currents in IDA microelectrodes modified with enzymes on the "generate-collect" mode. Blood distribution structure is designed and fabricated, to distribute blood and isolate reaction areas. By contrasting two kinds of process flow based on lift-off and etching, etching is adopted to preparation method of microelectrode. A multi-channel apparatus for current measurement is accompleted. The system characteristics of the bio-sensor are tested. The curve of the apparatus time to current response is achieved by testing on real-time. The relationships between parameter concentration and current are analyzed in detail. The experimental data indicates: current measurement dimension 0~40μA, certainty of measurement 0.1μA, the performances of the bio-sensor meets design requirement.

  2. THE SECONDARY IMMUNE RESPONSE TO A HAPTEN IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Klinman, Norman R.

    1971-01-01

    The in vitro secondary stimulation of the production of anti-hapten antibody has been analyzed with a view to elucidating the role of the carrier molecule and cell-to-cell interactions in this response. Stimulation was carried out on fragment cultures of the spleens of irradiated BALB/c mice which had been reconstituted with 3–4 x 107 spleen cells from isologous mice previously immunized with DNP-Hy. The results indicated that the response was maximized by stimulation with DNP-Hy, the homologous complex, however anti-DNP antibody production could be obtained by stimulation with DNP on several nonhomologous carriers including poly-D-lysine, a poor immunogen. The results also indicated that while DNP-Hy and DNP-nonhomologous-carrier complexes were stimulatory at equally low DNP concentrations, at DNP concentrations over 10–6 M DNP-Hy was stimulatory, while DNP on nonhomologous carriers was inhibitory. The results are interpreted as indicating that: (a) the affinity of the antigen-cell interaction is more likely determined by multivalent binding than by carrier recognition, (b) that a stimulatory interaction of a polyvalent antigen with a B-lymphocyte cannot be excluded, (c) that if cell-to-cell interaction is necessary for stimulation, then both cells may recognize the same determinant, and (d) that the marked enhancement of antigenic stimulation attributable to carrier recognition may result from stimulatory interactions of cells recognizing different antigenic determinants. A mechanism is postulated whereby stimulation is dependent on the formation of stable complexes resulting from two cells sharing in the binding of numerous antigen molecules. Cells recognizing carrier determinants would increase the probability of such interactions particularly at high antigen concentrations. PMID:4101805

  3. Bio-objects and the media: the role of communication in bio-objectification processes

    PubMed Central

    Maeseele, Pieter; Allgaier, Joachim; Martinelli, Lucia

    2013-01-01

    The representation of biological innovations in and through communication and media practices is vital for understanding the nature of “bio-objects” and the process we call “bio-objectification.” This paper discusses two ideal-typical analytical approaches based on different underlying communication models, ie, the traditional (science- and media-centered) and media sociological (a multi-layered process involving various social actors in defining the meanings of scientific and technological developments) approach. In this analysis, the latter is not only found to be the most promising approach for understanding the circulation, (re)production, and (re)configuration of meanings of bio-objects, but also to interpret the relationship between media and science. On the basis of a few selected examples, this paper highlights how media function as a primary arena for the (re)production and (re)configuration of scientific and biomedical information with regards to bio-objects in the public sphere in general, and toward decision-makers, interest groups, and the public in specific. PMID:23771763

  4. BioGRID REST Service, BiogridPlugin2 and BioGRID WebGraph: new tools for access to interaction data at BioGRID

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Andrew G.; Wildenhain, Jan; Tyers, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Summary: The Biological General Repository for Interaction Datasets (BioGRID) representational state transfer (REST) service allows full URL-based access to curated protein and genetic interaction data at the BioGRID database. Appending URL parameters allows filtering of data by various attributes including gene names and identifiers, PubMed ID and evidence type. We also describe two visualization tools that interface with the REST service, the BiogridPlugin2 for Cytoscape and the BioGRID WebGraph. Availability and implementation: BioGRID data and applications are completely free for commercial and non-commercial use. http://webservice.thebiogrid.org/resources/interactions (REST Service), http://wiki.thebiogrid.org/doku.php/biogridrest(REST Service parameter list and help), http://webservice.thebiogrid.org/resources/application.wadl(REST Service WADL), http://thebiogrid.org/download.php (BiogridPlugin2, v2.1 download), http://wiki.thebiogrid.org/doku.php/biogridplugin2 (BiogridPlugin2 help) and http://tyerslab.bio.ed.ac.uk/tools/BioGRID_webgraph.php(BioGRID WebGraph). Contact: andrew.winter@ed.ac.uk, m.tyers@ed.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:21300700

  5. Bio-effectors from waste materials as growth promoters for tomato plants, an agronomic and metabolomic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou Chehade, Lara; Chami, Ziad Al; De Pascali, Sandra; Cavoski, Ivana; Fanizzi, Francesco Paolo

    2015-04-01

    In organic farming, where nutrient management is constrained and sustainability is claimed, bio-effectors pave their way. Considering selected bio-effectors, this study integrates metabolomics to agronomy in depicting induced relevant phenomena. Extracts of three agro-industrial wastes (Lemon processing residues, Fennel processing residues and Brewer's spent grain) are being investigated as sources of bio-effectors for the third trial consequently. Corresponding individual and mixture aqueous extracts are assessed for their synergistic and/or single agronomic and qualitative performances on soil-grown tomato, compared to both a control and humic acid treatments. A metabolomic profiling of tomato fruits via the Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, as holistic indicator of fruit quality and extract-induced responses, complements crop productivity and organoleptic/nutritional qualitative analyses. Results are expected to show mainly an enhancement of the fruit qualitative traits, and to confirm partly the previous results of better crop productivity and metabolism enhancement. Waste-derived bio-effectors could be, accordingly, demonstrated as potential candidates of plant-enhancing substances. Keywords: bio-effectors, organic farming, agro-industrial wastes, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), tomato.

  6. BioJazz: in silico evolution of cellular networks with unbounded complexity using rule-based modeling.

    PubMed

    Feng, Song; Ollivier, Julien F; Swain, Peter S; Soyer, Orkun S

    2015-10-30

    Systems biologists aim to decipher the structure and dynamics of signaling and regulatory networks underpinning cellular responses; synthetic biologists can use this insight to alter existing networks or engineer de novo ones. Both tasks will benefit from an understanding of which structural and dynamic features of networks can emerge from evolutionary processes, through which intermediary steps these arise, and whether they embody general design principles. As natural evolution at the level of network dynamics is difficult to study, in silico evolution of network models can provide important insights. However, current tools used for in silico evolution of network dynamics are limited to ad hoc computer simulations and models. Here we introduce BioJazz, an extendable, user-friendly tool for simulating the evolution of dynamic biochemical networks. Unlike previous tools for in silico evolution, BioJazz allows for the evolution of cellular networks with unbounded complexity by combining rule-based modeling with an encoding of networks that is akin to a genome. We show that BioJazz can be used to implement biologically realistic selective pressures and allows exploration of the space of network architectures and dynamics that implement prescribed physiological functions. BioJazz is provided as an open-source tool to facilitate its further development and use. Source code and user manuals are available at: http://oss-lab.github.io/biojazz and http://osslab.lifesci.warwick.ac.uk/BioJazz.aspx.

  7. Bio/chemoinformatics in India: an outlook.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shipra; Chavan, Sonali; Deobagkar, Dileep N; Deobagkar, Deepti D

    2015-07-01

    With the advent of significant establishment and development of Internet facilities and computational infrastructure, an overview on bio/chemoinformatics is presented along with its multidisciplinary facts, promises and challenges. The Government of India has paved the way for more profound research in biological field with the use of computational facilities and schemes/projects to collaborate with scientists from different disciplines. Simultaneously, the growth of available biomedical data has provided fresh insight into the nature of redundant and compensatory data. Today, bioinformatics research in India is characterized by a powerful grid computing systems, great variety of biological questions addressed and the close collaborations between scientists and clinicians, with a full spectrum of focuses ranging from database building and methods development to biological discoveries. In fact, this outlook provides a resourceful platform highlighting the funding agencies, institutes and industries working in this direction, which would certainly be of great help to students seeking their career in bioinformatics. Thus, in short, this review highlights the current bio/chemoinformatics trend, educations, status, diverse applicability and demands for further development. PMID:25159593

  8. Bermuda Bio Optics Project. Chapter 14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Norm

    2003-01-01

    The Bermuda BioOptics Project (BBOP) is a collaborative effort between the Institute for Computational Earth System Science (ICESS) at the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB) and the Bermuda Biological Station for Research (BBSR). This research program is designed to characterize light availability and utilization in the Sargasso Sea, and to provide an optical link by which biogeochemical observations may be used to evaluate bio-optical models for pigment concentration, primary production, and sinking particle fluxes from satellite-based ocean color sensors. The BBOP time-series was initiated in 1992, and is carried out in conjunction with the U.S. JGOFS Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) at the Bermuda Biological Station for Research. The BATS program itself has been observing biogeochemical processes (primary productivity, particle flux and elemental cycles) in the mesotrophic waters of the Sargasso Sea since 1988. Closely affiliated with BBOP and BATS is a separate NASA-funded study of the spatial variability of biogeochemical processes in the Sargasso Sea using high-resolution AVHRR and SeaWiFS data collected at Bermuda (N. Nelson, P.I.). The collaboration between BATS and BBOP measurements has resulted in a unique data set that addresses not only the SIMBIOS goals but also the broader issues of important factors controlling the carbon cycle.

  9. Overview of the TAC-BIO detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabalo, Jerry; DeLucia, Marla; Goad, Aime; Lacis, John; Narayanan, Fiona; Sickenberger, David

    2008-10-01

    Ultra Violet (UV) induced fluorescence remains a core technique for the real time detection of biological aerosols. With this approach, the detection of an aerosolized biological event is based on the fluorescent and scattering signals observed from biological particles when exposed to one or more UV sources. In 2004, the Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (ECBC) initiated an effort to develop a low cost, small, lightweight, low power biological agent detector, identified as the TAC-BIO, based on this principle. Unlike previous laser based detectors, this program has capitalized on Semiconductor UV Optical Sources (SUVOS) being developed by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). Compared to the existing UV lasers, these SUVOS devices and their commercial counter-parts offered a means of achieving small, low cost, low power UV excitation sources. A general design philosophy of incorporating these devices with other low cost components has allowed ECBC to develop a detector that provides a credible degree of performance while maintaining the target size weight and power attributes. This paper presents an overview of the TAC-BIO and some of the findings to date.

  10. BioMe: biologically relevant metals.

    PubMed

    Tus, Alan; Rakipovic, Alen; Peretin, Goran; Tomic, Sanja; Sikic, Mile

    2012-07-01

    In this article, we introduce BioMe (biologically relevant metals), a web-based platform for calculation of various statistical properties of metal-binding sites. Users can obtain the following statistical properties: presence of selected ligands in metal coordination sphere, distribution of coordination numbers, percentage of metal ions coordinated by the combination of selected ligands, distribution of monodentate and bidentate metal-carboxyl, bindings for ASP and GLU, percentage of particular binuclear metal centers, distribution of coordination geometry, descriptive statistics for a metal ion-donor distance and percentage of the selected metal ions coordinated by each of the selected ligands. Statistics is presented in numerical and graphical forms. The underlying database contains information about all contacts within the range of 3 Å from a metal ion found in the asymmetric crystal unit. The stored information for each metal ion includes Protein Data Bank code, structure determination method, types of metal-binding chains [protein, ribonucleic acid (RNA), deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), water and other] and names of the bounded ligands (amino acid residue, RNA nucleotide, DNA nucleotide, water and other) and the coordination number, the coordination geometry and, if applicable, another metal(s). BioMe is on a regular weekly update schedule. It is accessible at http://metals.zesoi.fer.hr.

  11. Analysis and classification of broadband echoes using bio-inspired dolphin pulses.

    PubMed

    Pailhas, Yan; Capus, Chris; Brown, Keith; Moore, Patrick

    2010-06-01

    To date most sonars use narrow band pulses and often only the echo envelope is used for object detection and classification. This paper considers the advantages afforded by bio-inspired sonar for object identification and classification through the analysis and the understanding of the broadband echo structure. Using the biomimetic dolphin based sonar system in conjunction with bio-inspired pulses developed from observations of bottlenose dolphins performing object identification tasks, results are presented from experiments carried out in a wave tank and harbor. In these experiments responses of various targets to two different bio-inspired signals are measured and analyzed. The differences in response demonstrate the strong dependency between signal design and echo interpretation. In the simulations and empirical data, the resonance phenomena of these targets cause strong notches and peaks in the echo spectra. With precision in the localization of these peaks and dips of around 1 kHz, the locations are very stable for broadside insonification of the targets and they can be used as features for classification. This leads to the proposal of a broadband classifier which operates by extracting the notch positions in the target echo spectra.

  12. Optical properties of bio-inspired peptide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handelman, Amir; Apter, Boris; Rosenman, Gil

    2016-04-01

    Supramolecular self-assembled bio-inspired peptide nanostructures are favorable to be implemented in diverse nanophotonics applications due to their superior physical properties such as wideband optical transparency, high second-order nonlinear response, waveguiding properties and more. Here, we focus on the optical properties found in di-phenylalanine peptide nano-architectures, with special emphasize on their linear and nonlinear optical waveguiding effects. Using both simulation and experiments, we show their ability to passively guide light at both fundamental and second-harmonic frequencies. In addition, we show that at elevated temperatures, 140-180°C, these native supramolecular structures undergo irreversible thermally induced transformation via re-assembling into completely new thermodynamically stable phase having nanofiber morphology similar to those of amyloid fibrils. In this new phase, the peptide nanofibers lose their second-order nonlinear response, while exhibit profound modification of optoelectronic properties followed by the appearance of visible (blue and green) photoluminescence (PL). Our study propose a new generation of multifunctional optical waveguides with variety of characteristics, which self-assembled into 1D-elongated nanostructures and could be used as building blocks of many integrated photonic devices.

  13. Life-Cycle Assessment of Pyrolysis Bio-Oil Production*

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, Philip; Puettmann, Maureen E.; Penmetsa, Venkata Kanthi; Cooper, Jerome E.

    2012-07-01

    As part ofthe Consortium for Research on Renewable Industrial Materials' Phase I life-cycle assessments ofbiofuels, lifecycle inventory burdens from the production of bio-oil were developed and compared with measures for residual fuel oil. Bio-oil feedstock was produced using whole southern pine (Pinus taeda) trees, chipped, and converted into bio-oil by fast pyrolysis. Input parameters and mass and energy balances were derived with Aspen. Mass and energy balances were input to SimaPro to determine the environmental performance of bio-oil compared with residual fuel oil as a heating fuel. Equivalent functional units of 1 MJ were used for demonstrating environmental preference in impact categories, such as fossil fuel use and global warming potential. Results showed near carbon neutrality of the bio-oil. Substituting bio-oil for residual fuel oil, based on the relative carbon emissions of the two fuels, estimated a reduction in CO2 emissions by 0.075 kg CO2 per MJ of fuel combustion or a 70 percent reduction in emission over residual fuel oil. The bio-oil production life-cycle stage consumed 92 percent of the total cradle-to-grave energy requirements, while feedstock collection, preparation, and transportation consumed 4 percent each. This model provides a framework to better understand the major factors affecting greenhouse gas emissions related to bio-oil production and conversion to boiler fuel during fast pyrolysis.

  14. BioCapacitor--a novel category of biosensor.

    PubMed

    Hanashi, Takuya; Yamazaki, Tomohiko; Tsugawa, Wakako; Ferri, Stefano; Nakayama, Daisuke; Tomiyama, Masamitsu; Ikebukuro, Kazunori; Sode, Koji

    2009-03-15

    This research reports on the development of an innovative biosensor, known as BioCapacitor, in which biological recognition elements are combined with a capacitor functioning as the transducer. The analytical procedure of the BioCapacitor is based on the following principle: a biocatalyst, acting as a biological recognition element, oxidizes or reduces the analyte to generate electric power, which is then charged into a capacitor via a charge pump circuit (switched capacitor regulator) until the capacitors attains full capacity. Since the charging rate of the capacitor depends on the biocatalytic reaction of the analyte, the analyte concentration can be determined by monitoring the time/frequency required for the charge/discharge cycle of the BioCapacitor via a charge pump circuit. As a representative model, we constructed a BioCapacitor composed of FAD-dependent glucose dehydrogenase (FADGDH) as the anodic catalyst, and attempted a glucose measurement. Charge/discharge frequency of the BioCapacitor increased with the increasing glucose concentration, exhibiting good correlation with glucose concentration. We have also constructed a wireless sensing system using the BioCapacitor combined with an infrared light emitting diode (IRLED), an IR phototransistor system. In the presence of glucose, the IRLED signal was observed due to the discharge of the BioCapacitor and detected by an IR phototransistor in a wireless receiver. Therefore, a BioCapacitor employing FADGDH as its anodic catalyst can be operated as a self-powered enzyme sensor. PMID:19013784

  15. Nano-Bio Quantum Technology for Device-Specific Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H.

    2009-01-01

    The areas discussed are still under development: I. Nano structured materials for TE applications a) SiGe and Be.Te; b) Nano particles and nanoshells. II. Quantum technology for optical devices: a) Quantum apertures; b) Smart optical materials; c) Micro spectrometer. III. Bio-template oriented materials: a) Bionanobattery; b) Bio-fuel cells; c) Energetic materials.

  16. Bio-composites from mycelium reinforced agricultural substrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a need for biodegradable alternatives to the inert plastics and expanded foams currently used in in manufacturing processes and device components. The material focused on in this report is a bio-composite patented by Ecovative Design, LLC. The bio-composite utilizes the fungus mycelium to i...

  17. Bio-Monitoring of Ozone by Young Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenzini, Giacomo; Nali, Cristina

    2004-01-01

    An educational pilot project on the bio-monitoring of air quality was carried out in the Umbria Region of Central Italy. It involved about 1000 young students (ages 4 to 16) from 42 schools of 16 municipalities in active biomonitoring of tropospheric ozone with bio-indicator sensitive tobacco seedlings. Some 6500 raw biological readings were used…

  18. Querying and computing with BioCyc databases.

    PubMed

    Krummenacker, Markus; Paley, Suzanne; Mueller, Lukas; Yan, Thomas; Karp, Peter D

    2005-08-15

    We describe multiple methods for accessing and querying the complex and integrated cellular data in the BioCyc family of databases: access through multiple file formats, access through Application Program Interfaces (APIs) for LISP, Perl and Java, and SQL access through the BioWarehouse relational database. PMID:15961440

  19. Bio-optical footprints created by mesoscale eddies in the Sargasso Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, D. A.; Peterson, P.; McGillicuddy, D. J., Jr.; Maritorena, S.; Nelson, N. B.

    2011-07-01

    We investigate the bio-optical footprints made by mesoscale eddies in the Sargasso Sea and the processes that create them through an eddy-centric approach. Many (>10,000) eddies are identified and followed in time using satellite altimetry observations and the spatial ocean color patterns surrounding each eddy are assessed. We find through a sequence of statistical hypothesis tests that not one but several mechanisms (i.e., eddy pumping, eddy advection and eddy-Ekman pumping) are responsible for the spatial-temporal ocean color patterns following individual eddies. Both eddy pumping and the eddy-Ekman pumping mechanisms alter subsurface nutrient distributions thereby driving biogeochemical cycles, while the eddy advection mechanism to first order stirs existing horizontal gradients in bio-optical properties. This work illustrates both the promise and some of the limitations of satellite observations for assessing the biogeochemical impacts of mesoscale eddies.

  20. The BioSentinel Bioanalytical Microsystem: Characterizing DNA Radiation Damage in Living Organisms Beyond Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricco, A. J.; Hanel, R.; Bhattacharya, S.; Boone, T.; Tan, M.; Mousavi, A.; Rademacher, A.; Schooley, A.; Klamm, B.; Benton, J.; Padgen, M.; Gentry, D.; Friedericks, C.; Defouw, G.; Parra, M.; Santa Maria, S.; Marina, D.; Swan, B. G.; Wheeler, S.; Gavalas, S.; Lewis, B.; Sanchez, H.; Chartres, J.; Lusby, T.

    2016-01-01

    We will present details and initial lab test results from an integrated bioanalytical microsystem designed to conduct the first biology experiments beyond low Earth orbit (LEO) since Apollo 17 (1972). The 14-kg, 12x24x37-cm BioSentinel spacecraft (Figure 1) assays radiation-responsive yeast in its science payload by measuring DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) repaired via homologous recombination, a mechanism common to all eukaryotes including humans. S. cerevisiae (brewer's yeast) in 288 microwells are provided with nutrient and optically assayed for growth and metabolism via 3-color absorptimetry monthly during the 18-month mission. BioSentinel is one of several secondary payloads to be deployed by NASA's Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1) launch vehicle into approximately 0.95 AU heliocentric orbit in July 2018; it will communicate with Earth from up to 100 million km.

  1. Bio-phobias/techno-philias: virtual reality exposure as treatment for phobias of 'nature'.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Joyce; Smith, Mick

    2003-09-01

    In modern society natural objects like spiders or snakes have a primary role as the loci of specific phobias. Drawing on interviews with members of the UK National Phobics Society (NPS) and associated service providers, this paper explores the implications of the increasingly significant role played by new media, particularly Virtual Reality technologies, in the treatment of these 'bio-phobias'. While advanced technological approaches provide new possibilities for individual sufferers to experiment with and control their phobic responses they also exemplify certain aspects of those specifically modern social relations that are the media within which bio-phobic behaviours develop. From a critical sociological perspective the techno-philic move to the medium of cyber-space may actually exaggerate characteristically modern social relations that seek (but never convincingly manage) to assert complete 'cultural' control over the unpredictable 'natural' elements threatening our cultural integrity. PMID:12919450

  2. A novel concept for protein microarray: land-contrast BioCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuefeng; Zhao, Ming; Nolte, David D.

    2009-02-01

    We present a new type of protein microarray called the Land-contrast (LC) BioCD in which imaging contrast is induced by a patterned substrate rather than by patterned protein. This is realized by etching spot patterns in a silicon wafer. On the spot region the silicon dioxide thickness is 140 nm and on the land it is 77 nm. The spot and the land have equal reflectance but opposite interferometric quadrature responses for protein layer. Protein is evenly immobilized on the entire chip and detected by reflectometry. Therefore there is no need for protein printing, nor spectrometers, nor high angles nor polarization control to image the surface-bound protein. The LC BioCD can facilitate research on protein microarrays.

  3. Acidity of biomass fast pyrolysis bio-oils

    SciTech Connect

    Oasmaa, Anja; Elliott, Douglas C.; Korhonen, Jaana

    2010-12-17

    The use of the TAN method for measuring the acidity of biomass fast pyrolysis bio-oil was evaluated. Suggestions for carrying out the analysis have been made. The TAN method by ASTM D664 or D3339 can be used for measuring the acidity of fast pyrolysis bio-oils and their hydrotreating products. The main difference between the methods is that ASTM D664 is specified for higher TAN values than ASTM D3339. Special focus should be placed on the interpretation of the TAN curves because they differ significantly from those of mineral oils. The curve for bio-oils is so gentle that the automatic detection may not observe the end point properly and derivatization should be used. The acidity of fast pyrolysis bio-oils is mainly derived (60-70%) from volatile acids. Other groups of compounds in fast pyrolysis bio-oils that influence acidity include phenolics, fatty and resin acids, and hydroxy acids.

  4. Quercetin as natural stabilizing agent for bio-polymer

    SciTech Connect

    Morici, Elisabetta; Arrigo, Rossella; Dintcheva, Nadka Tzankova

    2014-05-15

    The introduction of antioxidants in polymers is the main way to prevent or delay the degradation process. In particular natural antioxidants receive attention in the food industry also because of their presumed safety. In this work bio-polymers, i.e. a commercial starch-based polymer (Mater-Bi®) and a bio-polyester (PLA), and a bio-polyether (PEO) were additivated with quercetin, a natural flavonoid antioxidants, in order to formulate bio-based films for ecosustainable packaging and outdoor applications. The photo-oxidation behavior of unstabilized and quercetin stabilized films was analyzed and compared with the behavior of films additivated with a commercial synthetic light stabilizer. The quercetin is able to slow down the photo-degradation rate of all bio-polymeric films investigated in similar way to the synthetic stabilizer.

  5. Quercetin as natural stabilizing agent for bio-polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morici, Elisabetta; Arrigo, Rossella; Dintcheva, Nadka Tzankova

    2014-05-01

    The introduction of antioxidants in polymers is the main way to prevent or delay the degradation process. In particular natural antioxidants receive attention in the food industry also because of their presumed safety. In this work bio-polymers, i.e. a commercial starch-based polymer (Mater-Bi®) and a bio-polyester (PLA), and a bio-polyether (PEO) were additivated with quercetin, a natural flavonoid antioxidants, in order to formulate bio-based films for ecosustainable packaging and outdoor applications. The photo-oxidation behavior of unstabilized and quercetin stabilized films was analyzed and compared with the behavior of films additivated with a commercial synthetic light stabilizer. The quercetin is able to slow down the photo-degradation rate of all bio-polymeric films investigated in similar way to the synthetic stabilizer.

  6. Green bio-oil extraction for oil crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zainab, H.; Nurfatirah, N.; Norfaezah, A.; Othman, H.

    2016-06-01

    The move towards a green bio-oil extraction technique is highlighted in this paper. The commonly practised organic solvent oil extraction technique could be replaced with a modified microwave extraction. Jatropha seeds (Jatropha curcas) were used to extract bio-oil. Clean samples were heated in an oven at 110 ° C for 24 hours to remove moisture content and ground to obtain particle size smaller than 500μm. Extraction was carried out at different extraction times 15 min, 30 min, 45 min, 60 min and 120 min to determine oil yield. The biooil yield obtained from microwave assisted extraction system at 90 minutes was 36% while that from soxhlet extraction for 6 hours was 42%. Bio-oil extracted using the microwave assisted extraction (MAE) system could enhance yield of bio-oil compared to soxhlet extraction. The MAE extraction system is rapid using only water as solvent which is a nonhazardous, environment-friendly technique compared to soxhlet extraction (SE) method using hexane as solvent. Thus, this is a green technique of bio-oil extraction using only water as extractant. Bio-oil extraction from the pyrolysis of empty fruit bunch (EFB), a biomass waste from oil palm crop, was enhanced using a biocatalyst derived from seashell waste. Oil yield for non-catalytic extraction was 43.8% while addition of seashell based biocatalyst was 44.6%. Oil yield for non-catalytic extraction was 43.8% while with addition of seashell-based biocatalyst was 44.6%. The pH of bio-oil increased from 3.5 to 4.3. The viscosity of bio-oil obtained by catalytic means increased from 20.5 to 37.8 cP. A rapid and environment friendly extraction technique is preferable to enhance bio-oil yield. The microwave assisted approach is a green, rapid and environmental friendly extraction technique for the production of bio-oil bearing crops.

  7. A Survey of Business Trends at BioOne Publishing Partners and its Implications for BioOne

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Todd A.; Joseph, Heather; Waltham, Mary

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a survey of BioOne participating publishers that was conducted during the fall of 2003. In that survey, BioOne collected data from 18 not-for-profit publishers on circulation levels, scholarly output in terms of pages and articles produced, revenues, and expenditures. From eight of the publishers, complete profit, loss, and…

  8. The Future of Bio-technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trent, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    Hosts of technologies, most notably in electronics, have been on the path of miniaturization for decades and in 2005 they have crossed the threshold of the nano-scale. Crossing the nano-scale threshold is a milestone in miniaturization, setting impressive new standards for component-packing densities. It also brings technology to a scale at which quantum effects and fault tolerance play significant roles and approaches the feasible physical limit form many conventional "top-down" manufacturing methods. I will suggest that the most formidable manufacturing problems in nanotechnology will be overcome and major breakthroughs will occur in a host of technologies, when nanotechnology converges with bio-technology; i.e. I will argue that the future of bio-technology is in nanotechnology. In 2005, methods in molecular biology, microscopy, bioinformatics, biochemistry, and genetic engineering have focused considerable attention on the nano-scale. On this scale, biology is a kind of recursive chemistry in which molecular recognition, self-assembly, self-organization and self-referencing context-control lead to the emergence of the complexity of structures and processes that are fundamental to all life forms. While we are still far from understanding this complexity, we are on the threshold of being able to use at least some of these biological properties for .technology. I will discuss the use of biomolecules, such as DNA, RNA, and proteins as "tools" for the bio-technologist of the future. More specifically, I will present in some detail an example of how we are using a genetically engineered 60-kDa protein (HSP60) from an organism living in near boiling sulfuric acid to build nano-scale templates for arranging metallic nanoparticles. These "extremophile" HSP60s self-assemble into robust double-ring structures called "chaperonins," which further assemble into filaments and arrays with nanometer accuracy. I will discuss our efforts to use chaperonins to organize quantum

  9. Microanalytical Methods for Bio-Forensics Investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, L N; Weber, P K; Grant, R P; Ghosal, S; Michael, J R

    2006-02-10

    Forensics investigations of bio-crime or bio-terrorism incidents require careful analysis of collected evidentiary material. Although the biological markers in the evidentiary material are important (e.g. genomic signatures, protein markers), the elemental make-up of the organisms themselves and the surrounding non-biological material is extremely useful for attributing a specific process and, perhaps, specific persons to the production of the biological agent. This talk will describe the coordinated use of microanalytical techniques such as SEM-EDX, STEM-EDX, and NanoSIMS for generating compositional signatures for bio-forensics investigations. These analytical techniques span length scales from the 50 {micro}m range to the 5nm range. The range of analytical sensitivities spans from {approx}.5wt% for EDX down to parts per billion for SIMS techniques. In addition, we will discuss the use of spectrum imaging techniques for rapidly extracting the key elemental signatures from large scale data sets. Spectrum imaging techniques combined with multivariate statistical analysis allow for the collection and interrogation or enormous quantities of data without pre-biasing the answer.[1] Spectrum imaging has been used successfully in EDX microanalysis[1] (both in the SEM and TEM) and TOF-SIMS[2]. In this study, a set of test biological agents, ?-irradiated Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), were examined using the aforementioned microanalytical techniques. The sample set included a number of processing conditions to gauge the ability of these techniques to identify the production methods of these simulated agents. Complementary but distinct forensic signatures were obtained by all three analytical techniques. Figure 1 shows two types of silicate particles observed among the spore material itself. At this length scale, the spores themselves cannot be resolved, but the presence of these silicates is key marker for distinguishing this production route. A STEM-EDX spectrum image from

  10. The bio-gripper: a fluid-driven micro-manipulator of living tissue constructs for additive bio-manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Ip, Blanche C; Cui, Francis; Tripathi, Anubhav; Morgan, Jeffrey R

    2016-06-01

    We previously developed the Bio-Pick, Place, and Perfuse (Bio-P3) instrument to fabricate large perfusable tissue constructs by stacking and aligning scaffold-free living microtissues with integrated lumens. The Bio-P3 required an actuating mechanism to manipulate living microtissues of various sizes and shapes that are fragile, and must remain in an aqueous environment. The optical transparency of the Bio-P3 gripping device was essential to provide unobstructed visuals for accurate alignment of microtissues. We previously engineered a pilot fluid force-driven bio-gripper that can pick-and-place microtissue in planar position without causing cellular damage by pulling culture medium through track-etched membrane-integrated cell culture inserts. In this study, we invented a new flexible bio-gripper design that maximized the bio-gripper utilities. We utilized experimental approaches, multivariate analyzes, and theoretical modeling to elucidate how membrane characteristics (pore size, pore density, membrane thickness, membrane area, and surface chemistry) altered bio-gripper robustness and the flow rate (Q(c)) required for successful gripping. We devised two standardized tests and synthetic parts that mimicked microtissues, to systematically quantify bio-gripper performance. All thirteen syringe pump-driven bio-grippers except one successfully gripped and released synthetic parts with values of Q(c) that coincided with our mathematical simulation of the fluid mechanics of gripping. The bio-gripper could grip synthetic parts of various sizes, shapes and masses, demonstrating the robustness of the actuating mechanism. Multivariate analysis of experimental data indicated that both membrane porosity and thickness modulated Q(c), and in addition, revealed that membrane pore density determined membrane optical transparency. Fabricating large tissue constructs requires repeated stacking of microtissues. We showed that one bio-gripper could pick-and-place living microtissues

  11. The bio-gripper: a fluid-driven micro-manipulator of living tissue constructs for additive bio-manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Ip, Blanche C; Cui, Francis; Tripathi, Anubhav; Morgan, Jeffrey R

    2016-05-25

    We previously developed the Bio-Pick, Place, and Perfuse (Bio-P3) instrument to fabricate large perfusable tissue constructs by stacking and aligning scaffold-free living microtissues with integrated lumens. The Bio-P3 required an actuating mechanism to manipulate living microtissues of various sizes and shapes that are fragile, and must remain in an aqueous environment. The optical transparency of the Bio-P3 gripping device was essential to provide unobstructed visuals for accurate alignment of microtissues. We previously engineered a pilot fluid force-driven bio-gripper that can pick-and-place microtissue in planar position without causing cellular damage by pulling culture medium through track-etched membrane-integrated cell culture inserts. In this study, we invented a new flexible bio-gripper design that maximized the bio-gripper utilities. We utilized experimental approaches, multivariate analyzes, and theoretical modeling to elucidate how membrane characteristics (pore size, pore density, membrane thickness, membrane area, and surface chemistry) altered bio-gripper robustness and the flow rate (Q(c)) required for successful gripping. We devised two standardized tests and synthetic parts that mimicked microtissues, to systematically quantify bio-gripper performance. All thirteen syringe pump-driven bio-grippers except one successfully gripped and released synthetic parts with values of Q(c) that coincided with our mathematical simulation of the fluid mechanics of gripping. The bio-gripper could grip synthetic parts of various sizes, shapes and masses, demonstrating the robustness of the actuating mechanism. Multivariate analysis of experimental data indicated that both membrane porosity and thickness modulated Q(c), and in addition, revealed that membrane pore density determined membrane optical transparency. Fabricating large tissue constructs requires repeated stacking of microtissues. We showed that one bio-gripper could pick-and-place living microtissues

  12. T lymphocyte responses to antigens of gram-negative bacteria in pyelonephritis.

    PubMed

    Wilz, S W; Kurnick, J T; Pandolfi, F; Rubin, R H; Warren, H S; Goldstein, R; Kersten, C M; McCluskey, R T

    1993-10-01

    We showed previously that large numbers of T lymphocytes accumulate within a few days in the kidneys of rats with ascending pyelonephritis induced with Escherichia coli or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. CD4+ T cells propagated from the lesions exhibited MHC-restricted proliferative responses to formalin-fixed bacteria of the species used to induce infection. In the present study we investigated further the nature of the antigens responsible for the T cell proliferation and studied the ability of different bacterial strains and species to produce proliferative responses. We found that heat-killed bacteria were more stimulatory than formalin-fixed bacteria, and that soluble supernatants of heat-killed organism were also effective. The stimulatory effects of supernatants were destroyed by trypsin and the responses were MHC-restricted. Twelve different E. coli strains, with or without characteristics of uropathogenicity in humans, were all highly stimulatory to T cells derived from a kidney infected with a single E. coli strain. Strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter aerogenes, and Serratia marcescens--species of Enterobacteriaceae closely related to E. coli--were also stimulatory, whereas more distantly related bacteria--Proteus, Morganella, and P. aeruginosa--were not. T cells propagated from kidneys infected with P. aeruginosa responded to supernatants of this organism, but not to E. coli supernatants. We conclude that a protein antigen (or antigens) shared by strains of E. coli and related Enterobacteriaceae, but not by other gram-negative bacteria, produce MHC-restricted proliferative responses of CD4+ T cells that infiltrate rat kidneys infected with E. coli.

  13. LivBioSig: development of a toolbox for online bio-signals processing and experimentation.

    PubMed

    Lorrain, T; Niazi, I K; Thibergien, O; Jiang, N; Farina, D

    2011-01-01

    Various research fields, such as brain computer interface, requires online acquisition and analysis of biological data to validate assumptions or to help obtaining insights into the physiological processes of the human body. In this paper we introduce the LivBioSig toolbox for online bio-signals processing and experimentation. This open source and modularized MATLAB toolbox allows performing various experiment paradigms involving online signal processing. These currently include synchronous and asynchronous BCI experiments, and event related stimulation experiments. The use of Graphic User Interfaces (GUI) makes the system suitable even for beginner Matlab users, and the experiments easily configurable. The modularized structure allows advanced users to develop the toolbox further to adapt it to the needs of the research fields.

  14. Fast Pyrolysis Oil Stabilization: An Integrated Catalytic and Membrane Approach for Improved Bio-oils. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    George W. Huber; Upadhye, Aniruddha A.; Ford, David M.; Bhatia, Surita R.; Badger, Phillip C.

    2012-10-19

    with model AFBO excluding guaiacol were also conducted. NF membranes showed retention factors of glucose greater than 80% and of acetic acid less than 15% when operated at transmembrane pressures near 60 bar. Task 3.0 Acid Removal by Catalytic Processing It was found that the TAN reduction in bio-oil was very difficult using low temperature hydrogenation in flow and batch reactors. Acetic acid is very resilient to hydrogenation and we could only achieve about 16% conversion for acetic acid. Although it was observed that acetic acid was not responsible for instability of aqueous fraction of bio-oil during ageing studies (described in task 5). The bimetallic catalyst PtRe/ceria-zirconia was found to be best catalyst because its ability to convert the acid functionality with low conversion to gas phase carbon. Hydrogenation of the whole bio-oil was carried out at 125°C, 1450 psi over Ru/C catalyst in a flow reactor. Again, negligible acetic acid conversion was obtained in low temperature hydrogenation. Hydrogenation experiments with whole bio-oil were difficult to perform because of difficulty to pumping the high viscosity oil and reactor clogging. Task 4.0 Acid Removal using Ion Exchange Resins DOWEX M43 resin was used to carry out the neutralization of bio-oil using a packed bed column. The pH of the bio-oil increased from 2.43 to 3.7. The GC analysis of the samples showed that acetic acid was removed from the bio-oil during the neutralization and recovered in the methanol washing. But it was concluded that process would not be economical at large scale as it is extremely difficult to regenerate the resin once the bio-oil is passed over it. Task 5.0 Characterization of Upgraded Bio-oils We investigated the viscosity, microstructure, and chemical composition of bio-oils prepared by a fast pyrolysis approach, upon aging these fuels at 90ºC for periods of several days. Our results suggest that the viscosity increase is not correlated with the acids or char present in the

  15. Bio-inspired accommodating fluidic intraocular lens.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Wen; Johnson, Daniel; Tsai, Frank S; Cho, Sung Hwan; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2009-10-15

    The invention of intraocular lens (IOL), a substitute for crystalline lens, represents a major advancement in cataract surgery. After about sixty years of IOL development, one key remaining problem is its limited accommodation range compared with natural eyes. To overcome this performance limit, we explore bio-inspired fluidic IOL. By mimicking the working principle of natural eyes, a fluidic intraocular lens can achieve an exceedingly large accommodation range. An experiment on fluidic IOL demonstrated a very high tuning range of 12 D. This accommodation range was achieved with a modest amount of force (0.06 N) and equatorial radius change (0.286 mm), in conditions matching well with the characteristics of aged eyes. PMID:19838277

  16. Bio-based polycarbonate as synthetic toolbox.

    PubMed

    Hauenstein, O; Agarwal, S; Greiner, A

    2016-01-01

    Completely bio-based poly(limonene carbonate) is a thermoplastic polymer, which can be synthesized by copolymerization of limonene oxide (derived from limonene, which is found in orange peel) and CO2. Poly(limonene carbonate) has one double bond per repeating unit that can be exploited for further chemical modifications. These chemical modifications allow the tuning of the properties of the aliphatic polycarbonate in nearly any direction. Here we show synthetic routes to demonstrate that poly(limonene carbonate) is the perfect green platform polymer, from which many functional materials can be derived. The relevant examples presented in this study are the transformation from an engineering thermoplastic into a rubber, addition of permanent antibacterial activity, hydrophilization and even pH-dependent water solubility of the polycarbonate. Finally, we show a synthetic route to yield the completely saturated counterpart that exhibits improved heat processability due to lower reactivity. PMID:27302694

  17. Bio-inspired networks for optoelectronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Bing; Huang, Yuanlin; Li, Ruopeng; Peng, Qiang; Luo, Junyi; Pei, Ke; Herczynski, Andrzej; Kempa, Krzysztof; Ren, Zhifeng; Gao, Jinwei

    2014-11-01

    Modern optoelectronics needs development of new materials characterized not only by high optical transparency and electrical conductivity, but also by mechanical strength, and flexibility. Recent advances employ grids of metallic micro- and nanowires, but the overall performance of the resulting material composites remains unsatisfactory. In this work, we propose a new strategy: application of natural scaffoldings perfected by evolution. In this context, we study two bio-inspired networks for two specific optoelectronic applications. The first network, intended for solar cells, light sources and similar devices, has a quasi-fractal structure and is derived directly from a chemically extracted leaf venation system. The second network is intended for touch screens and flexible displays, and is obtained by metalizing a spider’s silk web. We demonstrate that each of these networks attain an exceptional optoelectonic and mechanical performance for its intended purpose, providing a promising direction in the development of more efficient optoelectronic devices.

  18. Review of Bio-EMC Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Soichi; Wake, Kanako; Fukunaga, Kaori; Yamanaka, Yukio

    2001-12-01

    Biological aspects of electromagnetic compatibility (Bio-EMC) have been studied by EMC Research Group of CRL. There are two main subjects in the field. One is related to rules and regulations of electromagnetic-wave hazards, especially development of standard estimation methods of electromagnetic power deposited in human bodies exposed to microwaves from cellular telephones or VHF-band radio waves. Another is development of exposure setups for laboratory animals used in biological studies on health effects of electromagnetic waves and their dosimetry. Novel phantoms are also being developed in order to perform highly accurate dosimetry in above studies. It is expected that these studies contribute development of compliance tests for radiofrequency protection guidelines and improvement of rationale of those guidelines, which consequently provides safety environment including appropriate radio wave applications.

  19. Aurelia aurita bio-inspired tilt sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Colin; Villanueva, Alex; Priya, Shashank

    2012-10-01

    The quickly expanding field of mobile robots, unmanned underwater vehicles, and micro-air vehicles urgently needs a cheap and effective means for measuring vehicle inclination. Commonly, tilt or inclination has been mathematically derived from accelerometers; however, there is inherent error in any indirect measurement. This paper reports a bio-inspired tilt sensor that mimics the natural balance organ of jellyfish, called the ‘statocyst’. Biological statocysts from the species Aurelia aurita were characterized by scanning electron microscopy to investigate the morphology and size of the natural sensor. An artificial tilt sensor was then developed by using printed electronics that incorporates a novel voltage divider concept in conjunction with small surface mount devices. This sensor was found to have minimum sensitivity of 4.21° with a standard deviation of 1.77°. These results open the possibility of developing elegant tilt sensor architecture for both air and water based platforms.

  20. Droplet microfluidics in (bio)chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Basova, Evgenia Yu; Foret, Frantisek

    2015-01-01

    Droplet microfluidics may soon change the paradigm of performing chemical analyses and related instrumentation. It can improve not only the analysis scale, possibility for sensitivity improvement, and reduced consumption of chemical and biological reagents, but also the speed of performing a variety of unit operations. At present, microfluidic platforms can reproducibly generate monodisperse droplet populations at kHz or higher rates with droplet sizes suitable for high-throughput experiments, single-cell detection or even single molecule analysis. In addition to being used as microreactors with volume in the micro- to femtoliter range, droplet based systems have also been used to directly synthesize particles and encapsulate biological entities for biomedicine and biotechnology applications. This minireview summarizes various droplet microfluidics operations and applications for (bio)chemical assays described in the literature during the past few years.

  1. Bio-based polycarbonate as synthetic toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauenstein, O.; Agarwal, S.; Greiner, A.

    2016-06-01

    Completely bio-based poly(limonene carbonate) is a thermoplastic polymer, which can be synthesized by copolymerization of limonene oxide (derived from limonene, which is found in orange peel) and CO2. Poly(limonene carbonate) has one double bond per repeating unit that can be exploited for further chemical modifications. These chemical modifications allow the tuning of the properties of the aliphatic polycarbonate in nearly any direction. Here we show synthetic routes to demonstrate that poly(limonene carbonate) is the perfect green platform polymer, from which many functional materials can be derived. The relevant examples presented in this study are the transformation from an engineering thermoplastic into a rubber, addition of permanent antibacterial activity, hydrophilization and even pH-dependent water solubility of the polycarbonate. Finally, we show a synthetic route to yield the completely saturated counterpart that exhibits improved heat processability due to lower reactivity.

  2. Bio-based polycarbonate as synthetic toolbox.

    PubMed

    Hauenstein, O; Agarwal, S; Greiner, A

    2016-06-15

    Completely bio-based poly(limonene carbonate) is a thermoplastic polymer, which can be synthesized by copolymerization of limonene oxide (derived from limonene, which is found in orange peel) and CO2. Poly(limonene carbonate) has one double bond per repeating unit that can be exploited for further chemical modifications. These chemical modifications allow the tuning of the properties of the aliphatic polycarbonate in nearly any direction. Here we show synthetic routes to demonstrate that poly(limonene carbonate) is the perfect green platform polymer, from which many functional materials can be derived. The relevant examples presented in this study are the transformation from an engineering thermoplastic into a rubber, addition of permanent antibacterial activity, hydrophilization and even pH-dependent water solubility of the polycarbonate. Finally, we show a synthetic route to yield the completely saturated counterpart that exhibits improved heat processability due to lower reactivity.

  3. Bio-based polycarbonate as synthetic toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Hauenstein, O.; Agarwal, S.; Greiner, A.

    2016-01-01

    Completely bio-based poly(limonene carbonate) is a thermoplastic polymer, which can be synthesized by copolymerization of limonene oxide (derived from limonene, which is found in orange peel) and CO2. Poly(limonene carbonate) has one double bond per repeating unit that can be exploited for further chemical modifications. These chemical modifications allow the tuning of the properties of the aliphatic polycarbonate in nearly any direction. Here we show synthetic routes to demonstrate that poly(limonene carbonate) is the perfect green platform polymer, from which many functional materials can be derived. The relevant examples presented in this study are the transformation from an engineering thermoplastic into a rubber, addition of permanent antibacterial activity, hydrophilization and even pH-dependent water solubility of the polycarbonate. Finally, we show a synthetic route to yield the completely saturated counterpart that exhibits improved heat processability due to lower reactivity. PMID:27302694

  4. Tough, bio-inspired hybrid materials

    SciTech Connect

    Munch, Etienne; Launey, Maximimilan E.; Alsem, Daan H.; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2008-10-06

    The notion of mimicking natural structures in the synthesis of new structural materials has generated enormous interest but has yielded few practical advances. Natural composites achieve strength and toughness through complex hierarchical designs extremely difficult to replicate synthetically. Here we emulate Nature's toughening mechanisms through the combination of two ordinary compounds, aluminum oxide and polymethylmethacrylate, into ice-templated structures whose toughness can be over 300 times (in energy terms) that of their constituents. The final product is a bulk hybrid ceramic material whose high yield strength and fracture toughness ({approx}200 MPa and {approx}30 MPa{radical}m) provide specific properties comparable to aluminum alloys. These model materials can be used to identify the key microstructural features that should guide the synthesis of bio-inspired ceramic-based composites with unique strength and toughness.

  5. DCE Bio Detection System Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lind, Michael A.; Batishko, Charles R.; Morgen, Gerald P.; Owsley, Stanley L.; Dunham, Glen C.; Warner, Marvin G.; Willett, Jesse A.

    2007-12-01

    The DCE (DNA Capture Element) Bio-Detection System (Biohound) was conceived, designed, built and tested by PNNL under a MIPR for the US Air Force under the technical direction of Dr. Johnathan Kiel and his team at Brooks City Base in San Antonio Texas. The project was directed toward building a measurement device to take advantage of a unique aptamer based assay developed by the Air Force for detecting biological agents. The assay uses narrow band quantum dots fluorophores, high efficiency fluorescence quenchers, magnetic micro-beads beads and selected aptamers to perform high specificity, high sensitivity detection of targeted biological materials in minutes. This final report summarizes and documents the final configuration of the system delivered to the Air Force in December 2008

  6. Integrated bio-inspired fluidic imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Frank S.; Johnson, Daniel; Cho, Sung Hwan; Qiao, Wen; Arianpour, Ashkan; Francis, Cameron S.; Kim, Nam-Hyong; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2010-02-01

    We developed a new type of optical lens device that can change its curvature like crystalline lens in human eye. The curvature changing capability of the lens allows for a tremendous tuning range in its optical power and subsequently enables miniaturized imaging systems that can perform autofocus, optical zoom, and other advanced functions. In this paper, we study the physical properties of bio-inspired fluidic lenses and demonstrate the optical functionality through miniaturized optical systems constructed with such lenses. We report an auto-focusing optical system that can turn from a camera to a microscope, and demonstrate more than 4X optical zoom with a very short total track length. Finally, we demonstrate the benefits of fluidic lens zoom camera through minimally invasive gallbladder removal surgery.

  7. Bio-inspired networks for optoelectronic applications.

    PubMed

    Han, Bing; Huang, Yuanlin; Li, Ruopeng; Peng, Qiang; Luo, Junyi; Pei, Ke; Herczynski, Andrzej; Kempa, Krzysztof; Ren, Zhifeng; Gao, Jinwei

    2014-01-01

    Modern optoelectronics needs development of new materials characterized not only by high optical transparency and electrical conductivity, but also by mechanical strength, and flexibility. Recent advances employ grids of metallic micro- and nanowires, but the overall performance of the resulting material composites remains unsatisfactory. In this work, we propose a new strategy: application of natural scaffoldings perfected by evolution. In this context, we study two bio-inspired networks for two specific optoelectronic applications. The first network, intended for solar cells, light sources and similar devices, has a quasi-fractal structure and is derived directly from a chemically extracted leaf venation system. The second network is intended for touch screens and flexible displays, and is obtained by metalizing a spider's silk web. We demonstrate that each of these networks attain an exceptional optoelectonic and mechanical performance for its intended purpose, providing a promising direction in the development of more efficient optoelectronic devices.

  8. Process attributes in bio-ontologies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Biomedical processes can provide essential information about the (mal-) functioning of an organism and are thus frequently represented in biomedical terminologies and ontologies, including the GO Biological Process branch. These processes often need to be described and categorised in terms of their attributes, such as rates or regularities. The adequate representation of such process attributes has been a contentious issue in bio-ontologies recently; and domain ontologies have correspondingly developed ad hoc workarounds that compromise interoperability and logical consistency. Results We present a design pattern for the representation of process attributes that is compatible with upper ontology frameworks such as BFO and BioTop. Our solution rests on two key tenets: firstly, that many of the sorts of process attributes which are biomedically interesting can be characterised by the ways that repeated parts of such processes constitute, in combination, an overall process; secondly, that entities for which a full logical definition can be assigned do not need to be treated as primitive within a formal ontology framework. We apply this approach to the challenge of modelling and automatically classifying examples of normal and abnormal rates and patterns of heart beating processes, and discuss the expressivity required in the underlying ontology representation language. We provide full definitions for process attributes at increasing levels of domain complexity. Conclusions We show that a logical definition of process attributes is feasible, though limited by the expressivity of DL languages so that the creation of primitives is still necessary. This finding may endorse current formal upper-ontology frameworks as a way of ensuring consistency, interoperability and clarity. PMID:22928880

  9. Four principles of bio-musicology

    PubMed Central

    Fitch, W. Tecumseh

    2015-01-01

    As a species-typical trait of Homo sapiens, musicality represents a cognitively complex and biologically grounded capacity worthy of intensive empirical investigation. Four principles are suggested here as prerequisites for a successful future discipline of bio-musicology. These involve adopting: (i) a multicomponent approach which recognizes that musicality is built upon a suite of interconnected capacities, of which none is primary; (ii) a pluralistic Tinbergian perspective that addresses and places equal weight on questions of mechanism, ontogeny, phylogeny and function; (iii) a comparative approach, which seeks and investigates animal homologues or analogues of specific components of musicality, wherever they can be found; and (iv) an ecologically motivated perspective, which recognizes the need to study widespread musical behaviours across a range of human cultures (and not focus solely on Western art music or skilled musicians). Given their pervasiveness, dance and music created for dancing should be considered central subcomponents of music, as should folk tunes, work songs, lullabies and children's songs. Although the precise breakdown of capacities required by the multicomponent approach remains open to debate, and different breakdowns may be appropriate to different purposes, I highlight four core components of human musicality—song, drumming, social synchronization and dance—as widespread and pervasive human abilities spanning across cultures, ages and levels of expertise. Each of these has interesting parallels in the animal kingdom (often analogies but in some cases apparent homologies also). Finally, I suggest that the search for universal capacities underlying human musicality, neglected for many years, should be renewed. The broad framework presented here illustrates the potential for a future discipline of bio-musicology as a rich field for interdisciplinary and comparative research. PMID:25646514

  10. Four principles of bio-musicology.

    PubMed

    Fitch, W Tecumseh

    2015-03-19

    As a species-typical trait of Homo sapiens, musicality represents a cognitively complex and biologically grounded capacity worthy of intensive empirical investigation. Four principles are suggested here as prerequisites for a successful future discipline of bio-musicology. These involve adopting: (i) a multicomponent approach which recognizes that musicality is built upon a suite of interconnected capacities, of which none is primary; (ii) a pluralistic Tinbergian perspective that addresses and places equal weight on questions of mechanism, ontogeny, phylogeny and function; (iii) a comparative approach, which seeks and investigates animal homologues or analogues of specific components of musicality, wherever they can be found; and (iv) an ecologically motivated perspective, which recognizes the need to study widespread musical behaviours across a range of human cultures (and not focus solely on Western art music or skilled musicians). Given their pervasiveness, dance and music created for dancing should be considered central subcomponents of music, as should folk tunes, work songs, lullabies and children's songs. Although the precise breakdown of capacities required by the multicomponent approach remains open to debate, and different breakdowns may be appropriate to different purposes, I highlight four core components of human musicality--song, drumming, social synchronization and dance--as widespread and pervasive human abilities spanning across cultures, ages and levels of expertise. Each of these has interesting parallels in the animal kingdom (often analogies but in some cases apparent homologies also). Finally, I suggest that the search for universal capacities underlying human musicality, neglected for many years, should be renewed. The broad framework presented here illustrates the potential for a future discipline of bio-musicology as a rich field for interdisciplinary and comparative research. PMID:25646514

  11. Extraction of Bio-oils from Microalgae

    SciTech Connect

    Cooney, Michael; Young, Greg; Nagle, Nick

    2009-12-01

    A wide variety of terrestrial biomass feed stocks have been identified as suitable candidates for fractionation and conversion into biofuels. In particular, microalgae have been promoted as a future source of transportation fuels primarily because of their stated potential to produce up to 10 times more oil per acre than traditional biofuel crops. Their ability to grow relatively fast, be harvested on a daily basis, and grown in earthen ponds or closed photobioreactors that occupy marginal or poor crop lands using salt or brackish water, are often referenced. When these attractive traits are coupled with the potential to concomitantly harvest valuable co-products such as biopolymers, proteins, and animal feeds, one can see why microalgae are often touted as biotechnology's “green gold”. The development of large-scale microalgae farms, however, has been slowed by limitations in downstream processing technology. For example, traditional methods to dewater, extract, and recover bio-oil from oil-seeds possess little utility for microalgae. The extreme requirement of dewatering poses tremendous hurdles for any technology processing biofuels from microalgae. To further complicate matters, identifying the most appropriate paths for appropriate extraction technology depends heavily on the microalgal species and its cultivation status, both of which are highly characterized for higher plants as compared to microalgae. In this review we discuss existing extraction methodologies as they have and can be applied to microalgae. Commentary is provided on their potential as a unit operation that exists within the framework of an industrial-scale microalgal cultivation process that extends from the production of biomass in photobioreactors to the fractionation of the recovered bio-oil.

  12. Bio and health informatics meets cloud : BioVLab as an example.

    PubMed

    Chae, Heejoon; Jung, Inuk; Lee, Hyungro; Marru, Suresh; Lee, Seong-Whan; Kim, Sun

    2013-01-01

    The exponential increase of genomic data brought by the advent of the next or the third generation sequencing (NGS) technologies and the dramatic drop in sequencing cost have driven biological and medical sciences to data-driven sciences. This revolutionary paradigm shift comes with challenges in terms of data transfer, storage, computation, and analysis of big bio/medical data. Cloud computing is a service model sharing a pool of configurable resources, which is a suitable workbench to address these challenges. From the medical or biological perspective, providing computing power and storage is the most attractive feature of cloud computing in handling the ever increasing biological data. As data increases in size, many research organizations start to experience the lack of computing power, which becomes a major hurdle in achieving research goals. In this paper, we review the features of publically available bio and health cloud systems in terms of graphical user interface, external data integration, security and extensibility of features. We then discuss about issues and limitations of current cloud systems and conclude with suggestion of a biological cloud environment concept, which can be defined as a total workbench environment assembling computational tools and databases for analyzing bio/medical big data in particular application domains. PMID:25825658

  13. Bio and health informatics meets cloud : BioVLab as an example.

    PubMed

    Chae, Heejoon; Jung, Inuk; Lee, Hyungro; Marru, Suresh; Lee, Seong-Whan; Kim, Sun

    2013-01-01

    The exponential increase of genomic data brought by the advent of the next or the third generation sequencing (NGS) technologies and the dramatic drop in sequencing cost have driven biological and medical sciences to data-driven sciences. This revolutionary paradigm shift comes with challenges in terms of data transfer, storage, computation, and analysis of big bio/medical data. Cloud computing is a service model sharing a pool of configurable resources, which is a suitable workbench to address these challenges. From the medical or biological perspective, providing computing power and storage is the most attractive feature of cloud computing in handling the ever increasing biological data. As data increases in size, many research organizations start to experience the lack of computing power, which becomes a major hurdle in achieving research goals. In this paper, we review the features of publically available bio and health cloud systems in terms of graphical user interface, external data integration, security and extensibility of features. We then discuss about issues and limitations of current cloud systems and conclude with suggestion of a biological cloud environment concept, which can be defined as a total workbench environment assembling computational tools and databases for analyzing bio/medical big data in particular application domains.

  14. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor STI571 enhances thyroid cancer cell motile response to Hepatocyte Growth Factor.

    PubMed

    Frasca, F; Vigneri, P; Vella, V; Vigneri, R; Wang, J Y

    2001-06-28

    The Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF) and its receptor Met are physiological regulators of cell migration. HGF and Met have also been implicated in tumor progression and metastasis. We show here that the tyrosine kinase inhibitor STI571 has a stimulatory effect on HGF-induced migration and branching morphogenesis in thyroid cancer but not in primary or immortalized thyroid epithelial cells. These stimulatory effects of STI571 are observed at a concentration that is clinically relevant. The STI571-enhanced motile response can be correlated with an increase in the Met receptor tyrosine phosphorylation as well as ERK and Akt activation by HGF. Interestingly, one of the targets of STI571, namely the c-Abl tyrosine kinase, is activated by HGF and is recruited at the migrating edge of thyroid cancer cells. These data suggests that c-Abl and/or STI571-inhibited tyrosine kinases can negatively regulate the Met receptor to restrain the motile response in thyroid cancer cells.

  15. Alkaline hydrothermal liquefaction of swine carcasses to bio-oil.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ji-Lu; Zhu, Ming-Qiang; Wu, Hai-tang

    2015-09-01

    It is imperative that swine carcasses are disposed of safely, practically and economically. Alkaline hydrothermal liquefaction of swine carcasses to bio-oil was performed. Firstly, the effects of temperature, reaction time and pH value on the yield of each liquefaction product were determined. Secondly, liquefaction products, including bio-oil and solid residue, were characterized. Finally, the energy recovery ratio (ERR), which was defined as the energy of the resultant products compared to the energy input of the material, was investigated. Our experiment shows that reaction time had certain influence on the yield of liquefaction products, but temperature and pH value had bigger influence on the yield of liquefaction products. Yields of 62.2wt% bio-oil, having a high heating value of 32.35MJ/kg and a viscosity of 305cp, and 22wt% solid residue were realized at a liquefaction temperature of 250°C, a reaction time of 60min and a pH value of 9.0. The bio-oil contained up to hundreds of different chemical components that may be classified according to functional groups. Typical compound classes in the bio-oil were hydrocarbons, organic acids, esters, ketones and heterocyclics. The energy recovery ratio (ERR) reached 93.63%. The bio-oil is expected to contribute to fossil fuel replacement in stationary applications, including boilers and furnaces, and upgrading processes for the bio-oil may be used to obtain liquid transport fuels. PMID:26013692

  16. The BioGRID interaction database: 2015 update.

    PubMed

    Chatr-Aryamontri, Andrew; Breitkreutz, Bobby-Joe; Oughtred, Rose; Boucher, Lorrie; Heinicke, Sven; Chen, Daici; Stark, Chris; Breitkreutz, Ashton; Kolas, Nadine; O'Donnell, Lara; Reguly, Teresa; Nixon, Julie; Ramage, Lindsay; Winter, Andrew; Sellam, Adnane; Chang, Christie; Hirschman, Jodi; Theesfeld, Chandra; Rust, Jennifer; Livstone, Michael S; Dolinski, Kara; Tyers, Mike

    2015-01-01

    The Biological General Repository for Interaction Datasets (BioGRID: http://thebiogrid.org) is an open access database that houses genetic and protein interactions curated from the primary biomedical literature for all major model organism species and humans. As of September 2014, the BioGRID contains 749,912 interactions as drawn from 43,149 publications that represent 30 model organisms. This interaction count represents a 50% increase compared to our previous 2013 BioGRID update. BioGRID data are freely distributed through partner model organism databases and meta-databases and are directly downloadable in a variety of formats. In addition to general curation of the published literature for the major model species, BioGRID undertakes themed curation projects in areas of particular relevance for biomedical sciences, such as the ubiquitin-proteasome system and various human disease-associated interaction networks. BioGRID curation is coordinated through an Interaction Management System (IMS) that facilitates the compilation interaction records through structured evidence codes, phenotype ontologies, and gene annotation. The BioGRID architecture has been improved in order to support a broader range of interaction and post-translational modification types, to allow the representation of more complex multi-gene/protein interactions, to account for cellular phenotypes through structured ontologies, to expedite curation through semi-automated text-mining approaches, and to enhance curation quality control.

  17. Alkaline hydrothermal liquefaction of swine carcasses to bio-oil.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ji-Lu; Zhu, Ming-Qiang; Wu, Hai-tang

    2015-09-01

    It is imperative that swine carcasses are disposed of safely, practically and economically. Alkaline hydrothermal liquefaction of swine carcasses to bio-oil was performed. Firstly, the effects of temperature, reaction time and pH value on the yield of each liquefaction product were determined. Secondly, liquefaction products, including bio-oil and solid residue, were characterized. Finally, the energy recovery ratio (ERR), which was defined as the energy of the resultant products compared to the energy input of the material, was investigated. Our experiment shows that reaction time had certain influence on the yield of liquefaction products, but temperature and pH value had bigger influence on the yield of liquefaction products. Yields of 62.2wt% bio-oil, having a high heating value of 32.35MJ/kg and a viscosity of 305cp, and 22wt% solid residue were realized at a liquefaction temperature of 250°C, a reaction time of 60min and a pH value of 9.0. The bio-oil contained up to hundreds of different chemical components that may be classified according to functional groups. Typical compound classes in the bio-oil were hydrocarbons, organic acids, esters, ketones and heterocyclics. The energy recovery ratio (ERR) reached 93.63%. The bio-oil is expected to contribute to fossil fuel replacement in stationary applications, including boilers and furnaces, and upgrading processes for the bio-oil may be used to obtain liquid transport fuels.

  18. The BioGRID interaction database: 2015 update

    PubMed Central

    Chatr-aryamontri, Andrew; Breitkreutz, Bobby-Joe; Oughtred, Rose; Boucher, Lorrie; Heinicke, Sven; Chen, Daici; Stark, Chris; Breitkreutz, Ashton; Kolas, Nadine; O'Donnell, Lara; Reguly, Teresa; Nixon, Julie; Ramage, Lindsay; Winter, Andrew; Sellam, Adnane; Chang, Christie; Hirschman, Jodi; Theesfeld, Chandra; Rust, Jennifer; Livstone, Michael S.; Dolinski, Kara; Tyers, Mike

    2015-01-01

    The Biological General Repository for Interaction Datasets (BioGRID: http://thebiogrid.org) is an open access database that houses genetic and protein interactions curated from the primary biomedical literature for all major model organism species and humans. As of September 2014, the BioGRID contains 749 912 interactions as drawn from 43 149 publications that represent 30 model organisms. This interaction count represents a 50% increase compared to our previous 2013 BioGRID update. BioGRID data are freely distributed through partner model organism databases and meta-databases and are directly downloadable in a variety of formats. In addition to general curation of the published literature for the major model species, BioGRID undertakes themed curation projects in areas of particular relevance for biomedical sciences, such as the ubiquitin-proteasome system and various human disease-associated interaction networks. BioGRID curation is coordinated through an Interaction Management System (IMS) that facilitates the compilation interaction records through structured evidence codes, phenotype ontologies, and gene annotation. The BioGRID architecture has been improved in order to support a broader range of interaction and post-translational modification types, to allow the representation of more complex multi-gene/protein interactions, to account for cellular phenotypes through structured ontologies, to expedite curation through semi-automated text-mining approaches, and to enhance curation quality control. PMID:25428363

  19. Pyrolysis of waste animal fats in a fixed-bed reactor: Production and characterization of bio-oil and bio-char

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Hassen-Trabelsi, A.; Kraiem, T.; Naoui, S.; Belayouni, H.

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • Produced bio-fuels (bio-oil and bio-char) from some animal fatty wastes. • Investigated the effects of main parameters on pyrolysis products distribution. • Determined the suitable conditions for the production of the maximum of bio-oil. • Characterized bio-oils and bio-chars obtained from several animal fatty wastes. - Abstract: Several animal (lamb, poultry and swine) fatty wastes were pyrolyzed under nitrogen, in a laboratory scale fixed-bed reactor and the main products (liquid bio-oil, solid bio-char and syngas) were obtained. The purpose of this study is to produce and characterize bio-oil and bio-char obtained from pyrolysis of animal fatty wastes. The maximum production of bio-oil was achieved at a pyrolysis temperature of 500 °C and a heating rate of 5 °C/min. The chemical (GC–MS analyses) and spectroscopic analyses (FTIR analyses) of bio-oil showed that it is a complex mixture consisting of different classes of organic compounds, i.e., hydrocarbons (alkanes, alkenes, cyclic compounds…etc.), carboxylic acids, aldehydes, ketones, esters,…etc. According to fuel properties, produced bio-oils showed good properties, suitable for its use as an engine fuel or as a potential source for synthetic fuels and chemical feedstock. Obtained bio-chars had low carbon content and high ash content which make them unattractive for as renewable source energy.

  20. [A history and philosophy of bio-medical ethics seen from a dentist's point of view].

    PubMed

    Kang, Shinik

    2002-01-01

    When we think about ethics or morals, we tend to look at them from the viewpoint of here and now. Actual implications of then and there, however, could be different. That is why we should study history of bio-ethics along with philosophy involved in it. Bio-medical ethics is situated in spatial and cultural dimension as well as temporal and historical. Dentistry has been in a peculiar situation in that although it has evolved from the same root as medicine, it has become a separate discipline. Ethical implications of dentistry, however, share the historical and philosophical background with its mother discipline, i.e., medicine, surgery, barber-surgery and even smithery. This paper tries to grasp the main ideas of bio-medical ethics from the ancient Greek and China, and picks up three of them as guiding principles, i.e., deontology and teleology from the west and self-cultivation from the east. It also tracks down the contents of modern biomedical ethics; from etiquette to ethics, from morals to contract (ethics of autonomy), and ethics of professional responsibility. Finally it reviews and analyzes two different traditions of dental professional regulation from the legal and ethical point of view (U.S. and Europe), and proposes a new direction for the construction of dental ethics in Korea.

  1. Fragment-Based Exploration of Binding Site Flexibility in Mycobacterium tuberculosis BioA

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Ran; Geders, Todd W.; Liu, Feng; Park, Sae Woong; Schnappinger, Dirk; Aldrich, Courtney C.; Finzel, Barry C.

    2015-01-01

    The PLP-dependent transaminase (BioA) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other pathogens that catalyzes the second step of biotin biosynthesis is a now well-validated target for antibacterial development. Fragment screening by differential scanning fluorimetry has been performed to discover new chemical scaffolds and promote optimization of existing inhibitors. Calorimetry confirms binding of six molecules with high ligand efficiency. Thermodynamic data identifies which molecules bind with the enthalpy driven stabilization preferred in compounds that represent attractive starting points for future optimization. Crystallographic characterization of complexes with these molecules reveals the dynamic nature of the BioA active site. Different side chain conformational states are stabilized in response to binding by different molecules. A detailed analysis of conformational diversity in available BioA structures is presented, resulting in the identification of two states that might be targeted with molecular scaffolds incorporating well-defined conformational attributes. This new structural data can be used as part of a scaffold hopping strategy to further optimize existing inhibitors or create new small molecules with improved therapeutic potential. PMID:26068403

  2. [Characteristics and operation of enhanced continuous bio-hydrogen production reactor using support carrier].

    PubMed

    Ren, Nan-qi; Tang, Jing; Gong, Man-li

    2006-06-01

    A kind of granular activated carbon, whose granular size is no more than 2mm and specific gravity is 1.54g/cm3, was used as the support carrier to allow retention of activated sludge within a continuous stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) using molasses wastewater as substrate for bio-hydrogen production. Continuous operation characteristics and operational controlling strategy of the enhanced continuous bio-hydrogen production system were investigated. It was indicated that, support carriers could expand the activity scope of hydrogen production bacteria, make the system fairly stable in response to organic load impact and low pH value (pH <3.8), and maintain high biomass concentration in the reactor at low HRT. The reactor with ethanol-type fermentation achieved an optimal hydrogen production rate of 0.37L/(g x d), while the pH value ranged from 3.8 to 4.4, and the hydrogen content was approximately 40% approximately 57% of biogas. It is effective to inhibit the methanogens by reducing the pH value of the bio-hydrogen production system, consequently accelerate the start-up of the reactor.

  3. Linear and nonlinear optical waveguiding in bio-inspired peptide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Handelman, Amir; Apter, Boris; Turko, Nir; Rosenman, Gil

    2016-01-01

    Unique linear and nonlinear optical properties of bioinspired peptide nanostructures such as wideband transparency and high second-order nonlinear optical response, combined with elongated tubular shape of variable size and rapid self-assembly fabrication process, make them promising for diverse bio-nano-photonic applications. This new generation of nanomaterials of biological origin possess physical properties similar to those of biological structures. Here, we focus on new specific functionality of ultrashort peptide nanotubes to guide light at fundamental and second-harmonic generation (SHG) frequency in horizontal and vertical peptide nanotubes configurations. Conducted simulations and experimental data show that these self-assembled linear and nonlinear optical bio-waveguides provide strong optical power confinement factor, demonstrate pronounced directionality of SHG and high conversion efficiency of SHG ∼10(-5). Our study gives new insight on physics of light propagation in nanostructures of biological origin and opens the avenue towards new and unexpected applications of these waveguiding effects in bio-nanomaterials both for biomedical nonlinear microscopy imaging recognition and development of novel integrated nanophotonic devices.

  4. Bio-antioxidants - a chemical base of their antioxidant activity and beneficial effect on human health.

    PubMed

    Kancheva, V D; Kasaikina, O T

    2013-01-01

    The paradox of aerobic life is that higher eukaryotic organisms cannot exist without oxygen, yet oxygen is inherently dangerous to their existence. Autoxidation of organic substances frequently occurs via free radical mechanism which generates different active radicals and peroxides OH(•), O2 (•-), LO2 (•), HOOH, LOOH, so called reactive oxygen species (ROS), which appear to be responsible for oxygen toxicity. To survive in such an unfriendly oxygen environment, living organisms generate - or obtain from food - a variety of water- and lipid-soluble antioxidant compounds. Biologically active compounds with antioxidant potential, i.e. bio-antioxidants (natural and their synthetic analogues) have a wide range of applications. They are important drugs, antibiotics, agrochemical substitutes, and food preservatives. Many of the drugs today are synthetic modifications of naturally obtained substances. This review presents information about the chemical base of antioxidant activities and beneficial effects on human health of known and new bio-antioxidants. There is abundant literature on the phenolic antioxidants and tocopherols in particular. In this review the following bio-antioxidants are considered: A) Carotenoids, B) Cathecholamines, C) Phospholipids, D) Chalcones, E) Coumarins, F) Phenolic acids, G) Flavonoids, H) Lignans, and I) Tannins.

  5. How Events at the Nano/Bio Interface Determine Good and Adverse Biological Outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nel, Andre

    2014-03-01

    We have come to recognize that much of biology is executed at the nanoscale level, therefore providing a rational approach to using discovery about the structure and function of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) at the nano/bio interface for interrogation of disease, diagnosis, treatment, and imaging at levels of sophistication not possible before. Moreover, the behavior of ENM's at the nano/bio interface also constitutes the basis for hazard generation and is therefore key for understanding the safety assessment and safer design of nanomaterials. In this overview, I will discuss how discovery at the molecular, cellular, organ and systemic nano/bio interfaces has helped us to my progress progress in the fields of nanomedicine and nanotoxicology. I will explain how the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials relate to nanoscale interactions at the membrane, intracellular organelles, tissues and organs in response to exposure to a variety of commercial ENMs as well as for therapeutic nanocarriers. I will delineate how the use of high throughput screening to establish structure-activity relationships can be used for the design of improved nanocarriers for cancer treatment as well as hazard and risk ranking of large categories of commercial ENMs on their way to the marketplace.

  6. Bio-objects’ political capacity: a research agenda

    PubMed Central

    Maeseele, Pieter; Hendrickx, Kim; Pavone, Vincenzo; Van Hoyweghen, Ine

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the merits of foregrounding the dichotomy of politicization vs de-politicization for our understanding of bio-objects in order to study their production, circulation, and governance in European societies. By asking how bio-objects are configured in science, policy, public, and media discourses and practices, we focus on the role of socio-technical configurations in generating political relations. The bio-object thereby serves as an entry point to approach and conceptualize “the political” in an innovative way. PMID:23630150

  7. Pyrolysis of sunflower seed hulls for obtaining bio-oils.

    PubMed

    Casoni, Andrés I; Bidegain, Maximiliano; Cubitto, María A; Curvetto, Nestor; Volpe, María A

    2015-02-01

    Bio-oils from pyrolysis of as received sunflower seed hulls (SSH), hulls previously washed with acid (SSHA) and hulls submitted to a mushroom enzymatic attack (BSSH) were analyzed. The concentration of lignin, hemicellulose and cellulose varied with the pre-treatment. The liquid corresponding to SSH presented a relatively high concentration of acetic acid and a high instability to storage. The bio-oil from SSHA showed a high concentration of furfural and an appreciable amount of levoglucosenone. Lignin was degraded upon enzymatic activity, for this reason BSSH led to the highest yield of bio-oil, with relative high concentration of acetic acid and stability to storage.

  8. Optimization and characterization of bio-oil produced by microwave assisted pyrolysis of oil palm shell waste biomass with microwave absorber.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Faisal; Abdullah, Tuan Amran Tuan; Mat, Ramli; Ani, Farid Nasir

    2015-08-01

    In this study, solid oil palm shell (OPS) waste biomass was subjected to microwave pyrolysis conditions with uniformly distributed coconut activated carbon (CAC) microwave absorber. The effects of CAC loading (wt%), microwave power (W) and N2 flow rate (LPM) were investigated on heating profile, bio-oil yield and its composition. Response surface methodology based on central composite design was used to study the significance of process parameters on bio-oil yield. The coefficient of determination (R(2)) for the bio-oil yield is 0.89017 indicating 89.017% of data variability is accounted to the model. The largest effect on bio-oil yield is from linear and quadratic terms of N2 flow rate. The phenol content in bio-oil is 32.24-58.09% GC-MS area. The bio-oil also contain 1,1-dimethyl hydrazine of 10.54-21.20% GC-MS area. The presence of phenol and 1,1-dimethyl hydrazine implies that the microwave pyrolysis of OPS with carbon absorber has the potential to produce valuable fuel products.

  9. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin bio-oils by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Michailof, Chrysoula; Sfetsas, Themistoklis; Stefanidis, Stylianos; Kalogiannis, Konstantinos; Theodoridis, Georgios; Lappas, Angelos

    2014-11-21

    Thermal and catalytic pyrolysis are efficient processes for the transformation of biomass to bio-oil, a liquid energy carrier and a general source of chemicals. The elucidation of the bio-oil's composition is essential for a rational design of both its production and utilization process. However, the complex composition of bio-oils hinders their complete qualitative and quantitative analysis, and conventional chromatographic techniques lack the necessary separation power. Two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-ToFMS) is considered a suitable technique for bio-oil analysis due to its increased separation and resolution capacity. This work presents the tentative qualitative and quantitative analysis of bio-oils resulting from the thermal and catalytic pyrolysis of standard xylan, cellulose, lignin and their mixture by GC×GC-ToFMS. Emphasis is placed on the development of the quantitative method using phenol-d6 as internal standard. During the method development, a standard solution of 39 compounds was used for the determination of the respective Relative Response Factors (RRF) employing statistical methods, ANOVA and WLSLR, for verification of the data. The developed method was applied to the above mentioned bio-oils and their detailed analysis is presented. The different compounds produced and their diverse concentration allows for an elucidation of the pyrolysis mechanism and highlight the effect of the catalyst.

  10. Optimization and characterization of bio-oil produced by microwave assisted pyrolysis of oil palm shell waste biomass with microwave absorber.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Faisal; Abdullah, Tuan Amran Tuan; Mat, Ramli; Ani, Farid Nasir

    2015-08-01

    In this study, solid oil palm shell (OPS) waste biomass was subjected to microwave pyrolysis conditions with uniformly distributed coconut activated carbon (CAC) microwave absorber. The effects of CAC loading (wt%), microwave power (W) and N2 flow rate (LPM) were investigated on heating profile, bio-oil yield and its composition. Response surface methodology based on central composite design was used to study the significance of process parameters on bio-oil yield. The coefficient of determination (R(2)) for the bio-oil yield is 0.89017 indicating 89.017% of data variability is accounted to the model. The largest effect on bio-oil yield is from linear and quadratic terms of N2 flow rate. The phenol content in bio-oil is 32.24-58.09% GC-MS area. The bio-oil also contain 1,1-dimethyl hydrazine of 10.54-21.20% GC-MS area. The presence of phenol and 1,1-dimethyl hydrazine implies that the microwave pyrolysis of OPS with carbon absorber has the potential to produce valuable fuel products. PMID:25794811

  11. Smart sensor chip based on bioMEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madan, Rajesh; Kumar, Sandeep; Bagga, Ellis; Bajpai, Ram P.; Bharadwaj, Lalit M.

    2004-03-01

    The smart sensor chip for simultaneous detection of a large number of disease markers is the most recent interest in the field of nanobiotechnology. Potential applications include miniaturized sensors to detect biological agents and diseases, biocompatible and improved systems for drug delivery. They are the simplest biomicroelectromechanical system (BioMEMS) devices that offer a very promising future to the development of novel physical, chemical and biological sensors. They can simultaneously detect a large number of antigens, antibodies, DNA molecules, trace metals, hormones, proteins, gases, microorganisms, toxins, chemical warfare agents, explosives etc. in gaseous, vacuum and liquid medium. Smart sensor chips would be of greater use in intensive care units (ICUs) where multiple disease markers are to be assessed precisely in very less time. These sensors employ highly specific biochemical reactions between complementary biomolecules in the same way that nature has used in our body to detect, diagnose and treat various types of diseases. They have aroused considerable interest because of their high specificity, ultra-high sensitivity, simplicity, low cost, less analyte requirement (in μl), less steps involved, non-hazardous procedure, quick response, low power requirement and a unique capability of detecting a large number of analytes simultaneously in a single step.

  12. The stimulatory effect of rabphilin 3a on regulated exocytosis from insulin-secreting cells does not require an association-dissociation cycle with membranes mediated by Rab 3.

    PubMed

    Arribas, M; Regazzi, R; Garcia, E; Wollheim, C B; De Camilli, P

    1997-11-01

    Rabphilin 3a is a Rab 3-GTP binding protein concentrated on secretory vesicles of neurons and endocrine cells. There is evidence that rabphilin 3a undergoes cycles of association-dissociation with membranes and that recruitment of rabphilin 3a to secretory vesicles is mediated by Rab 3a, suggesting that rabphilin 3a is a downstream effector of this Rab. In this study we have investigated whether a membrane-anchored form of rabphilin 3a mimics the action of rabphilin 3a on secretion and bypasses the need for Rab 3 function. Overexpression of both wild-type rabphilin 3a and of a transmembrane anchored form of rabphilin 3a stimulated (about 2-fold) evoked secretion of coexpressed human proinsulin from clonal HIT-T15 cells. A similar transmembrane-anchored protein which lacked the Rab 3 binding region stimulated secretion even more effectively. Unexpectedly, a rabphilin 3a deletion mutant missing the Rab 3 binding domain was also stimulatory on secretion, although a further deletion of rabphilin to exclude the first of the two proline-rich regions abolished its stimulatory effect. The first of these two mutants was primarily particulate, while the second mutant was primarily soluble, suggesting that the first proline-rich region of rabphilin 3a plays a role in targeting rabphilin to its site of action. We conclude that the action of rabphilin 3a can be independent of Rab 3 if other mechanisms produce a sufficient concentration of the protein in proximity of exocytotic sites. These results provide new evidence for a fundamental similarity in the mechanisms by which Ras and Rab GTPase produce their distinct physiological effects.

  13. Retrofitting hetrotrophically cultivated algae biomass as pyrolytic feedstock for biogas, bio-char and bio-oil production encompassing biorefinery.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Omprakash; Agarwal, Manu; Naresh Kumar, A; Venkata Mohan, S

    2015-02-01

    Algal biomass grown hetrotrophically in domestic wastewater was evaluated as pyrolytic feedstock for harnessing biogas, bio-oil and bio-char. Freshly harvested microalgae (MA) and lipid extracted microalgae (LEMA) were pyrolysed in packed bed reactor in the presence and absence of sand as additive. MA (without sand additive) depicted higher biogas (420 ml/g; 800 °C; 3 h) and bio-oil (0.70 ml/g; 500 °C; 3 h). Sand addition enhanced biogas production (210 ml/g; 600 °C; 2 h) in LEMA operation. The composition of bio-gas and bio-oil was found to depend on the nature of feedstock as well as the process conditions viz., pyrolytic-temperature, retention time and presence of additive. Sand additive improved the H2 composition while pyrolytic temperature increment caused a decline in CO2 fraction. Bio-char productivity increased with increasing temperature specifically with LEMA. Integration of thermo-chemical process with microalgae cultivation showed to yield multiple resources and accounts for environmental sustainability in the bio-refinery framework.

  14. Bio-related noble metal nanoparticle structure property relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Donovan Nicholas

    Structure property relationships of noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) can be drastically different than bulk properties of the same metals. This research study used state-of-the-art analytical electron microscopy and scanned probe microscopy to determine material properties on the nanoscale of bio-related Au and Pd NPs. Recently, it has been demonstrated the self-assembly of Au NPs on functionalized silica surfaces creates a conductive surface. Determination of the aggregate morphology responsible for electron conduction was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In addition, changes in the electrical properties of the substrates after low temperature (<350°C) annealing was also studied. It was found that coalescence and densification of the Au NP aggregates disrupted the interconnected network which subsequently created a loss of conductivity. Investigation of bio-related Au/SiO2 core-shell NPs determined why published experimental results showed the sol-gel silica shell improved, by almost an order of magnitude, the detection efficiency of a DNA detection assay. Novel 360° rotation scanning TEM (STEM) imaging allowed study of individual NP surface morphology and internal structure. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) spectrum imaging determined optoelectronic properties and chemical composition of the silica shell used to encapsulate Au NPs. Results indicated the sol-gel deposited SiO2 had a band gap energy of ˜8.9eV, bulk plasmon-peak energy of ˜25.5eV and chemical composition of stoichiometric SiO2. Lastly, an attempt to elicit structure property relationships of novel RNA mediated Pd hexagon NPs was performed. Selected area electron diffraction (SAD), low voltage scanning transmission electron microscopy (LV-STEM), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were chosen for characterization of atomic ordering, chemical composition and optoelectronic properties of the novel

  15. Recycling used palm oil and used engine oil to produce white bio oil, bio petroleum diesel and heavy fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-abbas, Mustafa Hamid; Ibrahim, Wan Aini Wan; Sanagi, Mohd. Marsin

    2012-09-01

    Recycling waste materials produced in our daily life is considered as an additional resource of a wide range of materials and it conserves the environment. Used engine oil and used cooking oil are two oils disposed off in large quantities as a by-product of our daily life. This study aims at providing white bio oil, bio petroleum diesel and heavy fuel from the disposed oils. Toxic organic materials suspected to be present in the used engine oil were separated using vacuum column chromatography to reduce the time needed for the separation process and to avoid solvent usage. The compounds separated were detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and found to contain toxic aromatic carboxylic acids. Used cooking oils (thermally cracked from usage) were collected and separated by vacuum column chromatography. White bio oil produced was examined by GC-MS. The white bio oil consists of non-toxic hydrocarbons and is found to be a good alternative to white mineral oil which is significantly used in food industry, cosmetics and drugs with the risk of containing polycyclic aromatic compounds which are carcinogenic and toxic. Different portions of the used cooking oil and used engine were mixed to produce several blends for use as heavy oil fuels. White bio oil was used to produce bio petroleum diesel by blending it with petroleum diesel and kerosene. The bio petroleum diesel produced passed the PETRONAS flash point and viscosity specification test. The heat of combustion of the two blends of heavy fuel produced was measured and one of the blends was burned to demonstrate its burning ability. Higher heat of combustion was obtained from the blend containing greater proportion of used engine oil. This study has provided a successful recycled alternative for white bio oil, bio petroleum fuel and diesel which can be an energy source.

  16. A proposed bio-panel to predict risk for spontaneous preterm birth among African American women.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Shannon L; Christian, Lisa M; Neal, Jeremy L

    2015-11-01

    Preterm birth (PTB), or birth prior to 37 weeks gestation, impacts 11.5% of U.S. deliveries. PTB results in significant morbidity and mortality among affected children and imposes a large societal financial burden. Racial disparities in PTB are alarming. African American women are at more than 1.5 times the risk for PTB than white women. Unfortunately, the medical community's ability to predict who is at risk for PTB is extremely limited. History of a prior PTB remains the strongest predictor during a singleton gestation. Cervical length and fetal fibronectin measurement are helpful tools. However, usefulness is limited, particularly among the 95% of U.S. women currently pregnant and lacking a history of PTB. Therefore, preventive therapies do not reach a great number of women who may benefit from them. This manuscript, in response to the pressing need for predictors of PTB risk and elimination of racial disparities in PTB, presents a proposed bio-panel for use in predicting risk for spontaneous PTB among African American women. This bio-panel, measured each trimester, includes stimulated production of interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-1 receptor antagonist (Ra), soluble(s) TNF receptor(R) 1, and sTNFR2, and cortisol responsiveness. We hypothesize that greater IL-1β and TNF-α production, decreased IL-1Ra, sTNFR1, and sTNFR2 production, and decreased cortisol responsiveness at each time point as well as a more expedient alignment with this unfavorable profile over time will be associated with PTB. The choice to focus on inflammatory parameters is supported by data highlighting a crucial role for inflammation in labor. Specific inflammatory mediators have been chosen due to their potential importance in preterm labor among African American women. The bio-panel also focuses on inflammatory regulation (i.e., cytokine production upon ex vivo stimulation), which is hypothesized to provide insight into potential in vivo leukocyte responses and

  17. BioEnergy Feasibility in South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugo, Wim

    2015-04-01

    The BioEnergy Atlas for South Africa is the result of a project funded by the South African Department of Science and Technology, and executed by SAEON/ NRF with the assistance of a number of collaborators in academia, research institutions, and government. Now nearing completion, the Atlas provides an important input to policy and decision support in the country, significantly strengthens the availability of information resources on the topic, and provides a platform whereby current and future contributions on the subject can be managed, preserved, and disseminated. Bioenergy assessments have been characterized in the past by poor availability and quality of data, an over-emphasis on potentials and availability studies instead of feasibility assessment, and lack of comprehensive evaluation in competition with alternatives - both in respect of competing bioenergy resources and other renewable and non-renewable options. The BioEnergy Atlas in its current edition addresses some of these deficiencies, and identifies specific areas of interest where future research and effort can be directed. One can qualify the potentials and feasible options for BioEnergy exploitation in South Africa as follows: (1) Availability is not a fixed quantum. Availability of biomass and resulting energy products are sensitive to both the exclusionary measures one applies (food security, environmental, social and economic impacts) and the price at which final products will be competitive. (2) Availability is low. Even without allowing for feasibility and final product costs, the availability of biomass is low: biomass productivity in South Africa is not high by global standards due to rainfall constraints, and most arable land is used productively for food and agribusiness-related activities. This constrains the feasibility of purposely cultivated bioenergy crops. (3) Waste streams are important. There are significant waste streams from domestic solid waste and sewage, some agricultural

  18. Bio-Inspired Engineering of Exploration Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Sanita

    2003-01-01

    The multidisciplinary concept of "bioinspired engineering of exploration systems" (BEES) is described, which is a guiding principle of the continuing effort to develop biomorphic explorers as reported in a number of articles in the past issues of NASA Tech Briefs. The intent of BEES is to distill from the principles found in successful nature-tested mechanisms of specific crucial functions that are hard to accomplish by conventional methods but that are accomplished rather deftly in nature by biological organisms. The intent is not just to mimic operational mechanisms found in a specific biological organism but to imbibe the salient principles from a variety of diverse bio-organisms for the desired crucial function. Thereby, we can build explorer systems that have specific capabilities endowed beyond nature, as they will possess a combination of the best nature-tested mechanisms for that particular function. The approach consists of selecting a crucial function, for example, flight or some selected aspects of flight, and develop an explorer that combines the principles of those specific attributes as seen in diverse flying species into one artificial entity. This will allow going beyond biology and achieving unprecedented capability and adaptability needed in encountering and exploring what is as yet unknown. A classification of biomorphic flyers into two main classes of surface and aerial explorers is illustrated in the figure, with examples of a variety of biological organisms that provide the inspiration in each respective subclass. Such biomorphic explorers may possess varied mobility modes: surface-roving, burrowing, hopping, hovering, or flying, to accomplish surface, subsurface, and aerial exploration. Preprogrammed for a specific function, they could serve as one-way communicating beacons, spread over the exploration site, autonomously looking for/at the targets of interest. In a hierarchical organization, these biomorphic explorers would report to the next

  19. The BioPAX community standard for pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Syed, Mustafa H

    2010-01-01

    Biological Pathway Exchange (BioPAX) is a standard language to represent biological pathways at the molecular and cellular level and to facilitate the exchange of pathway data. The rapid growth of the volume of pathway data has spurred the development of databases and computational tools to aid interpretation; however, use of these data is hampered by the current fragmentation of pathway information across many databases with incompatible formats. BioPAX, which was created through a community process, solves this problem by making pathway data substantially easier to collect, index, interpret and share. BioPAX can represent metabolic and signaling pathways, molecular and genetic interactions and gene regulation networks. Using BioPAX, millions of interactions, organized into thousands of pathways, from many organisms are available from a growing number of databases. This large amount of pathway data in a computable form will support visualization, analysis and biological discovery.

  20. Bio-based polyurethane foams from renewable resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanzione, M.; Russo, V.; Sorrentino, A.; Tesser, R.; Lavorgna, M.; Oliviero, M.; Di Serio, M.; Iannace, S.; Verdolotti, L.

    2016-05-01

    In the last decades, bio-derived natural materials, such as vegetable oils, polysaccharides and biomass represent a rich source of hydroxyl precursors for the synthesis of polyols which can be potentially used to synthesize "greener" polyurethane foams. Herein a bio-based precursor (obtained from succinic acid) was used as a partial replacement of conventional polyol to synthesize PU foams. A mixture of conventional and bio-based polyol in presence of catalysts, silicone surfactant and diphenylmethane di-isocyanate (MDI) was expanded in a mold and cured for two hours at room temperature. Experimental results highlighted the suitability of this bio-precursor to be used in the production of flexible PU foams. Furthermore the chemo-physical characterization of the resulting foams show an interesting improvement in thermal stability and elastic modulus with respect to the PU foams produced with conventional polyol.

  1. Optical closure of parameterized bio-optical relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shuangyan; Fischer, Jürgen; Schaale, Michael; He, Ming-xia

    2014-03-01

    An optical closure study on bio-optical relationships was carried out using radiative transfer model matrix operator method developed by Freie Universität Berlin. As a case study, the optical closure of bio-optical relationships empirically parameterized with in situ data for the East China Sea was examined. Remote-sensing reflectance ( R rs) was computed from the inherent optical properties predicted by these biooptical relationships and compared with published in situ data. It was found that the simulated R rs was overestimated for turbid water. To achieve optical closure, bio-optical relationships for absorption and scattering coefficients for suspended particulate matter were adjusted. Furthermore, the results show that the Fournier and Forand phase functions obtained from the adjusted relationships perform better than the Petzold phase function. Therefore, before bio-optical relationships are used for a local sea area, the optical closure should be examined.

  2. Bio-Functional Au/Si Nanorods for Pathogen Detection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technical Abstract Nanotechnology applications for food safety and biosecurity, especially development of nanoscale sensors for foodborne pathogen measurement are emerging. A novel bio-functional nanosensor for Salmonella detection was developed using hetero-nanorods. The silica nanorods were fabr...

  3. BioTorrents: A File Sharing Service for Scientific Data

    PubMed Central

    Langille, Morgan G. I.; Eisen, Jonathan A.

    2010-01-01

    The transfer of scientific data has emerged as a significant challenge, as datasets continue to grow in size and demand for open access sharing increases. Current methods for file transfer do not scale well for large files and can cause long transfer times. In this study we present BioTorrents, a website that allows open access sharing of scientific data and uses the popular BitTorrent peer-to-peer file sharing technology. BioTorrents allows files to be transferred rapidly due to the sharing of bandwidth across multiple institutions and provides more reliable file transfers due to the built-in error checking of the file sharing technology. BioTorrents contains multiple features, including keyword searching, category browsing, RSS feeds, torrent comments, and a discussion forum. BioTorrents is available at http://www.biotorrents.net. PMID:20418944

  4. Past, Present, and Future Production of Bio-oil

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, Philip; Yu, Fei; Gajjela, Sanjeev

    2009-04-01

    Bio-oil is a liquid product produced by fast pyrol-ysis of biomass. The fast pyrolysis is performed by heating the biomass rapidly (2 sec) at temperatures ranging from 350 to 650 oC. The vapors produced by this rapid heating are then condensed to produce a dark brown water-based emulsion composed of frag-ments of the original hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin molecules contained in the biomass. Yields range from 60 to 75% based on the feedstock type and the pyrolysis reactor employed. The bio-oil pro-duced by this process has a number of negative prop-erties that are produced mainly by the high oxygen content (40 to 50%) contributed by that contained in water (25 to 30% of total mass) and oxygenated compounds. Each bio-oil contains hundreds of chemi-cal compounds. The chemical composition of bio-oil renders it a very recalcitrant chemical compound. To date, the difficulties in utilizing bio-oil have limited its commercial development to the production of liq-uid smoke as food flavoring. Practitioners have at-tempted to utilize raw bio-oil as a fuel; they have also applied many techniques to upgrade bio-oil to a fuel. Attempts to utilize raw bio-oil as a combustion engine fuel have resulted in engine or turbine dam-age; however, Stirling engines have been shown to successfully combust raw bio-oil without damage. Utilization of raw bio-oil as a boiler fuel has met with more success and an ASTM standard has recently been released describing bio-oil characteristics in relation to assigned fuel grades. However, commercialization has been slow to follow and no reports of distribution of these bio-oil boiler fuels have been reported. Co-feeding raw bio-oil with coal has been successfully performed but no current power generation facilities are following this practice. Upgrading of bio-oils to hydrocarbons via hydroprocessing is being performed by several organizations. Currently, limited catalyst life is the obstacle to commercialization of this tech-nology. Researchers

  5. Bio-logging of physiological parameters in higher marine vertebrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponganis, Paul J.

    2007-02-01

    Bio-logging of physiological parameters in higher marine vertebrates had its origins in the field of bio-telemetry in the 1960s and 1970s. The development of microprocessor technology allowed its first application to bio-logging investigations of Weddell seal diving physiology in the early 1980s. Since that time, with the use of increased memory capacity, new sensor technology, and novel data processing techniques, investigators have examined heart rate, temperature, swim speed, stroke frequency, stomach function (gastric pH and motility), heat flux, muscle oxygenation, respiratory rate, diving air volume, and oxygen partial pressure (P) during diving. Swim speed, heart rate, and body temperature have been the most commonly studied parameters. Bio-logging investigation of pressure effects has only been conducted with the use of blood samplers and nitrogen analyses on animals diving at isolated dive holes. The advantages/disadvantages and limitations of recording techniques, probe placement, calibration techniques, and study conditions are reviewed.

  6. DC-STAMP knock-down deregulates cytokine production and T-cell stimulatory capacity of LPS-matured dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dendritic cells (DCs) are the highly specialized antigen presenting cells of the immune system that play a key role in regulating immune responses. DCs can efficiently initiate immune responses or induce tolerance. Due to this dual function, DCs are studied in the context of immunotherapy for both cancer and autoimmune diseases. Characterization of DC-specific genes, leading to better understanding of DC immunobiology, will help to guide their use in clinical settings. We previously identified DC-STAMP, a multi-membrane spanning protein preferentially expressed by DCs. DC-STAMP resides in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of immature DCs and translocates towards the Golgi compartment upon maturation. In this study we knocked down DC-STAMP in mouse bone marrow-derived DCs (mBMDCs) to determine its function. Results We demonstrate that DC-STAMP knock-down mBMDCs secrete less IL-6, IL-12, TNF-α and IL-10 while IL-1 production is enhanced. Moreover, LPS-matured DC-STAMP knock-down mBMDCs show impaired T cell activation potential and induction of Th1 responses in an alloreaction. Conclusions We show that DC-STAMP plays an important role in cytokine production by mBMDCs following LPS exposure. Our results reveal a novel function of DC-STAMP in regulating DC-initiated immune responses. PMID:21978263

  7. Alkaline hydrothermal liquefaction of swine carcasses to bio-oil

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Ji-Lu Zhu, Ming-Qiang; Wu, Hai-tang

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Swine carcasses can be converted to bio-oil by alkaline hydrothermal liquefaction. • It seems that the use of the bio-oil for heat or CHP is technically suitable. • Some valuable chemicals were found in the bio-oils. • The bio-oil and the solid residue constituted an energy efficiency of 93.63% for the feedstock. • The solid residue can be used as a soil amendment, to sequester C and for preparing activated carbon. - Abstract: It is imperative that swine carcasses are disposed of safely, practically and economically. Alkaline hydrothermal liquefaction of swine carcasses to bio-oil was performed. Firstly, the effects of temperature, reaction time and pH value on the yield of each liquefaction product were determined. Secondly, liquefaction products, including bio-oil and solid residue, were characterized. Finally, the energy recovery ratio (ERR), which was defined as the energy of the resultant products compared to the energy input of the material, was investigated. Our experiment shows that reaction time had certain influence on the yield of liquefaction products, but temperature and pH value had bigger influence on the yield of liquefaction products. Yields of 62.2 wt% bio-oil, having a high heating value of 32.35 MJ/kg and a viscosity of 305cp, and 22 wt% solid residue were realized at a liquefaction temperature of 250 °C, a reaction time of 60 min and a pH value of 9.0. The bio-oil contained up to hundreds of different chemical components that may be classified according to functional groups. Typical compound classes in the bio-oil were hydrocarbons, organic acids, esters, ketones and heterocyclics. The energy recovery ratio (ERR) reached 93.63%. The bio-oil is expected to contribute to fossil fuel replacement in stationary applications, including boilers and furnaces, and upgrading processes for the bio-oil may be used to obtain liquid transport fuels.

  8. Water repellency: a whole-farm bio-economic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadi Ghadim, A. K.

    2000-05-01

    A whole-farm bio-economic model was used to assess the profitability of innovations aimed at improving agricultural production on the non-wetting sands of wheatbelt farms of Western Australia. It was found that amelioration of water repellency might be an economical option for some farms in the northern wheatbelt of Western Australia. It was shown that a minimum of 30% increase in lupin yields and a 10% increase in wheat yields would be required before expenditure on innovations aimed at improving production on non-wetting soils could be justified. However, due to costs of amelioration of repellency much higher crop yield responses may be required for economical adoption of such innovations on most farms. The decision to ameliorate water repellency depends not only on the consideration of direct benefits and costs per hectare of ameliorated sand but also on other whole-farm factors. One such factor found to be important was the scale of relevance or the soil mix of the farm. It was found that farms with proportionately large areas of non-wetting sands were more likely to benefit from adoption of innovations aimed at amelioration of repellency. Another important factor in the decision to adopt innovations for amelioration of water repellency is availability of alternative enterprises on the non-wetting soils. In particular, whether or not sandplain lupins ( lupinus cosentinii) and tagasaste ( chamaecystisus proliferus) were options that a farmer could consider determined the profitability of taking remedial measures against water repellency. This study identified, through a series of sensitivity analyses, the magnitude of production responses that may be required for profitable amelioration of water repellency. Some gaps in our knowledge of biological and economic parameters related to costs and benefits of various innovations have also been highlighted and discussed.

  9. Security enhanced BioEncoding for protecting iris codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouda, Osama; Tsumura, Norimichi; Nakaguchi, Toshiya

    2011-06-01

    Improving the security of biometric template protection techniques is a key prerequisite for the widespread deployment of biometric technologies. BioEncoding is a recently proposed template protection scheme, based on the concept of cancelable biometrics, for protecting biometric templates represented as binary strings such as iris codes. The main advantage of BioEncoding over other template protection schemes is that it does not require user-specific keys and/or tokens during verification. Besides, it satisfies all the requirements of the cancelable biometrics construct without deteriorating the matching accuracy. However, although it has been shown that BioEncoding is secure enough against simple brute-force search attacks, the security of BioEncoded templates against more smart attacks, such as record multiplicity attacks, has not been sufficiently investigated. In this paper, a rigorous security analysis of BioEncoding is presented. Firstly, resistance of BioEncoded templates against brute-force attacks is revisited thoroughly. Secondly, we show that although the cancelable transformation employed in BioEncoding might be non-invertible for a single protected template, the original iris code could be inverted by correlating several templates used in different applications but created from the same iris. Accordingly, we propose an important modification to the BioEncoding transformation process in order to hinder attackers from exploiting this type of attacks. The effectiveness of adopting the suggested modification is validated and its impact on the matching accuracy is investigated empirically using CASIA-IrisV3-Interval dataset. Experimental results confirm the efficacy of the proposed approach and show that it preserves the matching accuracy of the unprotected iris recognition system.

  10. Multi-culture solar heated bio-shelter. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    A rooftop greenhouse (bio-shelter) that is heated with active and passive solar systems is presented. The intent of the greenhouse is to grow vegetables hydroponically the year-round using a nutrient flow technique; and to growth the giant tropical Malaysian prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii in a recycling raceway water system heated with solar power. The produce grown was continuously monitored and the harvests weighed in order to estimate the year-round production potential of the bio-shelter greenhouse.

  11. Special issue on bio-ontologies and phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Soldatova, Larisa N; Collier, Nigel; Oellrich, Anika; Groza, Tudor; Verspoor, Karin; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Dumontier, Michel; Shah, Nigam H

    2015-01-01

    The bio-ontologies and phenotypes special issue includes eight papers selected from the 11 papers presented at the Bio-Ontologies SIG (Special Interest Group) and the Phenotype Day at ISMB (Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology) conference in Boston in 2014. The selected papers span a wide range of topics including the automated re-use and update of ontologies, quality assessment of ontological resources, and the systematic description of phenotype variation, driven by manual, semi- and fully automatic means. PMID:26682035

  12. The Serratia marcescens bioH gene encodes an esterase.

    PubMed

    Akatsuka, Hiroyuki; Kawai, Eri; Sakurai, Naoki; Omori, Kenji

    2003-01-01

    The 3.9 kb chromosomal DNA was cloned from Serratia marcescens Sr41, which confers on Escherichia coli cells a phenotype of clear halo formation on tributyrin agar plates. Three complete open reading frames (ORFs) were identified in the inserted DNA, and one ORF was demonstrated to encode a 28 kDa protein of 255 amino acids related to esterase activity. Interestingly, the ORF was 70% identical to a product of the E. coli bioH gene, which lies at a locus separated from the bioABFCD operon and acts in the early steps of the biotin synthetic pathway before pimeloyl-CoA synthesis. This gene complemented a bioH-deficient mutation of E. coli. From the sequence analysis, BioH is presumed to be a serine hydrolase, which belongs to the alpha/beta hydrolase-fold family comprising a wide variety of hydrolases including esterases. A catalytic triad composed of a nucleophilic residue (Ser80), an acidic residue (Asp206), and histidine (His234) was conserved in BioH, and the nucleophilic residue Ser, a catalytic center, was situated in the consensus sequence of G-X-S-X-G-G, a nucleophile elbow. Although the enzymatic function of BioH is not yet elucidated, the bioH gene products from S. marcescens and E. coli show esterase activity, which may imply the hydrolysis of a precursor leading to pimeloyl-CoA ester. The esterase activity of BioH and its CoA binding activity recently reported agree with a current hypothesis of pimeloyl-CoA ester synthesis from CoA and acylester derivatives including an acyl-carrier protein.

  13. Preparation and characterization of bio-diesels from various bio-oils.

    PubMed

    Lang, X; Dalai, A K; Bakhshi, N N; Reaney, M J; Hertz, P B

    2001-10-01

    Methyl, ethyl, 2-propyl and butyl esters were prepared from canola and linseed oils through transesterification using KOH and/ or sodium alkoxides as catalysts. In addition, methyl and ethyl esters were prepared from rapeseed and sunflower oils using the same catalysts. Chemical composition of the esters was determined by HPLC for the class of lipids and by GC for fatty acid compositions. The bio-diesel esters were characterized for their physical and fuel properties including density, viscosity, iodine value, acid value, cloud point, pure point, gross heat of combustion and volatility. Methyl and ethyl esters prepared from a particular vegetable oil had similar viscosities, cloud points and pour points, whereas methyl, ethyl, 2-propyl and butyl esters derived from a particular vegetable oil had similar gross heating values. However, their densities, which were 2 7% higher than those of diesel fuels, statistically decreased in the order of methyl approximately 2-propyl > ethyl > butyl esters. Butyl esters showed reduced cloud points (-6 degrees C to -10 degrees C) and pour points (-13 degrees C to -16 degrees C) similar to those of summer diesel fuel having cloud and pour points of -8 degrees C and -15 degrees C, respectively. The viscosities of bio-diesels (3.3-7.6 x 10(-4) Pa s at 40 degrees C) were much less than those of pure oils (22.4-45.1 x 10(-4) Pa s at 40 degrees C) and were twice those of summer and winter diesel fuels (3.50 and 1.72 x 10(-4) Pa s at 40 degrees C), and their gross heat contents of approximately 40 MJ/kg were 11% less than those of diesel fuels (approximately 45 MJ/kg). For different esters from the same vegetable oil, methyl esters were the most volatile, and the volatility decreased as the alkyl group grew bulkier. However, the bio-diesels were considerably less volatile than the conventional diesel fuels. PMID:11554602

  14. The occurrence of hormetic dose responses in the toxicological literature, the hormesis database: an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Calabrese, Edward J. . E-mail: edwardc@schoolph.umass.edu; Blain, Robyn

    2005-02-01

    A relational retrieval database has been developed compiling toxicological studies assessing the occurrence of hormetic dose responses and their quantitative characteristics. This database permits an evaluation of these studies over numerous parameters, including study design and dose-response features and physical/chemical properties of the agents. The database contains approximately 5600 dose-response relationships satisfying evaluative criteria for hormesis across over approximately 900 agents from a broadly diversified spectrum of chemical classes and physical agents. The assessment reveals that hormetic dose-response relationships occur in males and females of numerous animal models in all principal age groups as well as across species displaying a broad range of differential susceptibilities to toxic agents. The biological models are extensive, including plants, viruses, bacteria, fungi, insects, fish, birds, rodents, and primates, including humans. The spectrum of endpoints displaying hormetic dose responses is also broad being inclusive of growth, longevity, numerous metabolic parameters, disease incidences (including cancer), various performance endpoints such as cognitive functions, immune responses among others. Quantitative features of the hormetic dose response reveal that the vast majority of cases display a maximum stimulatory response less than two-fold greater than the control while the width of the stimulatory response is typically less than 100-fold in dose range immediately contiguous with the toxicological NO(A)EL. The database also contains a quantitative evaluation component that differentiates among the various dose responses concerning the strength of the evidence supporting a hormetic conclusion based on study design features, magnitude of the stimulatory response, statistical significance, and reproducibility of findings.

  15. Programming cell fate on bio-functionalized silicon.

    PubMed

    Premnath, Priyatha; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2015-04-01

    Controlling the growth of cells on the surface of silicon without an additive layer or topographical modification is unexplored. This research article delineates the discovery of unique properties of a bio-functionalized silicon substrate, programmed to repel or control cells, generated by ultrafast femtosecond pulse interaction with silicon. Remarkably, bio-functionalization in any shape or size without change in topology or morphology is observed indicating only sub-surface phase transformations. Material characterization reveals the presence of a unique mixture of phases of SiO2 and Si. Consequently, these variations in phase alter the physicochemical characteristics on the surface of silicon resulting in its bio-functionalization. The culture of mouse embryonic fibroblasts shows unique adhesion characteristics on these bio-functionalized silicon surfaces that include cell controlling, cell trapping, and cell shaping. Furthermore, the directionality of fibroblasts is restrained parallel to bio-functionalized zones as evidenced by changes in cytoskeleton. The controlling of proliferation, migration and adhesion of cells is attributed to unique phase bio-functionalization. This method presents considerable promise in a myriad of applications such as tissue engineering, MEMS, and lab-on-a-chip devices.

  16. Bio-Mimetic Sensors Based on Molecularly Imprinted Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Algieri, Catia; Drioli, Enrico; Guzzo, Laura; Donato, Laura

    2014-01-01

    An important challenge for scientific research is the production of artificial systems able to mimic the recognition mechanisms occurring at the molecular level in living systems. A valid contribution in this direction resulted from the development of molecular imprinting. By means of this technology, selective molecular recognition sites are introduced in a polymer, thus conferring it bio-mimetic properties. The potential applications of these systems include affinity separations, medical diagnostics, drug delivery, catalysis, etc. Recently, bio-sensing systems using molecularly imprinted membranes, a special form of imprinted polymers, have received the attention of scientists in various fields. In these systems imprinted membranes are used as bio-mimetic recognition elements which are integrated with a transducer component. The direct and rapid determination of an interaction between the recognition element and the target analyte (template) was an encouraging factor for the development of such systems as alternatives to traditional bio-assay methods. Due to their high stability, sensitivity and specificity, bio-mimetic sensors-based membranes are used for environmental, food, and clinical uses. This review deals with the development of molecularly imprinted polymers and their different preparation methods. Referring to the last decades, the application of these membranes as bio-mimetic sensor devices will be also reported. PMID:25196110

  17. BioID Identification of Lamin-Associated Proteins.

    PubMed

    Mehus, Aaron A; Anderson, Ruthellen H; Roux, Kyle J

    2016-01-01

    A- and B-type lamins support the nuclear envelope, contribute to heterochromatin organization, and regulate a myriad of nuclear processes. The mechanisms by which lamins function in different cell types and the mechanisms by which lamin mutations cause over a dozen human diseases (laminopathies) remain unclear. The identification of proteins associated with lamins is likely to provide fundamental insight into these mechanisms. BioID (proximity-dependent biotin identification) is a unique and powerful method for identifying protein-protein and proximity-based interactions in living cells. BioID utilizes a mutant biotin ligase from bacteria that is fused to a protein of interest (bait). When expressed in living cells and stimulated with excess biotin, this BioID-fusion protein promiscuously biotinylates directly interacting and vicinal endogenous proteins. Following biotin-affinity capture, the biotinylated proteins can be identified using mass spectrometry. BioID thus enables screening for physiologically relevant protein associations that occur over time in living cells. BioID is applicable to insoluble proteins such as lamins that are often refractory to study by other methods and can identify weak and/or transient interactions. We discuss the use of BioID to elucidate novel lamin-interacting proteins and its applications in a broad range of biological systems, and provide detailed protocols to guide new applications.

  18. Catalytic Hydroprocessing of Chemical Models for Bio-oil

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.

    2008-12-12

    Bio-oil (product liquids from fast pyrolysis of biomass) is a complex mixture of oxygenates derived from the thermal breakdown of the bio-polymers in biomass. In the case of lignocellulosic biomass, the structures of three major components, cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin, are well represented by the bio-oil components. In order to study the chemical mechanisms of catalytic hydroprocessing of bio-oil, three model compounds were chosen to represent those components. Guaiacol represents the large number of mono- and di-methoxy phenols found in bio-oil derived from softwood or hardwood, respectively. Furfural represents a major pyrolysis product group from cellulosics. Acetic acid is a major product from biomass pyrolysis, derived from the hemicellulose, which has important impacts on the further processing of the bio-oil because of the acidic character. These three compounds were processed using palladium or ruthenium catalyst over a temperature range from 150°C to 300°C. The batch reactor was sampled during each test over a period of four hours. The samples were analyzed by gas chromatography with both a mass selective detector and a flame ionization detector. The products were determined and the reaction pathways for their formation are suggested based on these results. Both temperature and catalyst metal have significant effects on the product composition.

  19. Bio-mimetic sensors based on molecularly imprinted membranes.

    PubMed

    Algieri, Catia; Drioli, Enrico; Guzzo, Laura; Donato, Laura

    2014-07-30

    An important challenge for scientific research is the production of artificial systems able to mimic the recognition mechanisms occurring at the molecular level in living systems. A valid contribution in this direction resulted from the development of molecular imprinting. By means of this technology, selective molecular recognition sites are introduced in a polymer, thus conferring it bio-mimetic properties. The potential applications of these systems include affinity separations, medical diagnostics, drug delivery, catalysis, etc. Recently, bio-sensing systems using molecularly imprinted membranes, a special form of imprinted polymers, have received the attention of scientists in various fields. In these systems imprinted membranes are used as bio-mimetic recognition elements which are integrated with a transducer component. The direct and rapid determination of an interaction between the recognition element and the target analyte (template) was an encouraging factor for the development of such systems as alternatives to traditional bio-assay methods. Due to their high stability, sensitivity and specificity, bio-mimetic sensors-based membranes are used for environmental, food, and clinical uses. This review deals with the development of molecularly imprinted polymers and their different preparation methods. Referring to the last decades, the application of these membranes as bio-mimetic sensor devices will be also reported.

  20. BioLit: integrating biological literature with databases.

    PubMed

    Fink, J Lynn; Kushch, Sergey; Williams, Parker R; Bourne, Philip E

    2008-07-01

    BioLit is a web server which provides metadata describing the semantic content of all open access, peer-reviewed articles which describe research from the major life sciences literature archive, PubMed Central. Specifically, these metadata include database identifiers and ontology terms found within the full text of the article. BioLit delivers these metadata in the form of XML-based article files and as a custom web-based article viewer that provides context-specific functionality to the metadata. This resource aims to integrate the traditional scientific publication directly into existing biological databases, thus obviating the need for a user to search in multiple locations for information relating to a specific item of interest, for example published experimental results associated with a particular biological database entry. As an example of a possible use of BioLit, we also present an instance of the Protein Data Bank fully integrated with BioLit data. We expect that the community of life scientists in general will be the primary end-users of the web-based viewer, while biocurators will make use of the metadata-containing XML files and the BioLit database of article data. BioLit is available at http://biolit.ucsd.edu.

  1. Programming cell fate on bio-functionalized silicon.

    PubMed

    Premnath, Priyatha; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2015-04-01

    Controlling the growth of cells on the surface of silicon without an additive layer or topographical modification is unexplored. This research article delineates the discovery of unique properties of a bio-functionalized silicon substrate, programmed to repel or control cells, generated by ultrafast femtosecond pulse interaction with silicon. Remarkably, bio-functionalization in any shape or size without change in topology or morphology is observed indicating only sub-surface phase transformations. Material characterization reveals the presence of a unique mixture of phases of SiO2 and Si. Consequently, these variations in phase alter the physicochemical characteristics on the surface of silicon resulting in its bio-functionalization. The culture of mouse embryonic fibroblasts shows unique adhesion characteristics on these bio-functionalized silicon surfaces that include cell controlling, cell trapping, and cell shaping. Furthermore, the directionality of fibroblasts is restrained parallel to bio-functionalized zones as evidenced by changes in cytoskeleton. The controlling of proliferation, migration and adhesion of cells is attributed to unique phase bio-functionalization. This method presents considerable promise in a myriad of applications such as tissue engineering, MEMS, and lab-on-a-chip devices. PMID:25731099

  2. Bio-integrated electronics and sensor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Woon-Hong; Webb, R. Chad; Lee, Woosik; Jung, Sungyoung; Rogers, John A.

    2013-05-01

    Skin-mounted epidermal electronics, a strategy for bio-integrated electronics, provide an avenue to non-invasive monitoring of clinically relevant physiological signals for healthcare applications. Current conventional systems consist of single-point sensors fastened to the skin with adhesives, and sometimes with conducting gels, which limits their use outside of clinical settings due to loss of adhesion and irritation to the user. In order to facilitate extended use of skin-mounted healthcare sensors without disrupting everyday life, we envision electronic monitoring systems that integrate seamlessly with the skin below the notice of the user. This manuscript reviews recent significant results towards our goal of wearable electronic sensor systems for long-term monitoring of physiological signals. Ultra-thin epidermal electronic systems (EES) are demonstrated for extended use on the skin, in a conformal manner, including during everyday bathing and sleeping activities. We describe the assessment of clinically relevant physiological parameters, such as electrocardiograms (ECG), electromyograms (EMG), electroencephalograms (EEG), temperature, mechanical strain and thermal conductivity, using examples of multifunctional EES devices. Additionally, we demonstrate capability for real life application of EES by monitoring the system functionality, which has no discernible change, during cyclic fatigue testing.

  3. Terahertz signature characterization of bio-simulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majewski, Alexander J.; Miller, Peter; Abreu, Rene; Grotts, Jeffrey; Globus, Tatiana; Brown, Elliott

    2005-05-01

    Collaboration with the University of Virginia (UVa) and the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) has resulted in the collection of signature data in the THz region of the spectrum for ovalbumin, Bacillus Subtilis (BG) and RNA from MS2 phage. Two independent experimental measurement systems were used to characterize the bio-simulants. Prior to our efforts, only a limited signature database existed. The goal was to evaluate a larger ensemble of biological agent simulants (BG, MS2 and ovalbumin) by measuring their THz absorption spectra. UCSB used a photomixer spectrometer and UVa a Fourier Transform spectrometer to measure absorption spectra. Each group used different sample preparation techniques and made multiple measurements to provide reliable statistics. Data processing culminated in applying proprietary algorithms to develop detection filters for each simulant. Through a covariance matrix approach, the detection filters extract signatures over regions with strong absorption and ignore regions with large signature variation (noise). The discrimination capability of these filters was also tested. The probability of detection and false alarm for each simulant was analyzed by each simulant specific filter. We analyzed a limited set of Bacillus thuringiensis (BT) data (a near neighbor to BG) and were capable of discriminating between BT and BG. The signal processing and filter construction demonstrates signature specificity and filter discrimination capabilities.

  4. BIO-Plex Information System Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry; Boulanger, Richard; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes a suggested design for an integrated information system for the proposed BIO-Plex (Bioregenerative Planetary Life Support Systems Test Complex) at Johnson Space Center (JSC), including distributed control systems, central control, networks, database servers, personal computers and workstations, applications software, and external communications. The system will have an open commercial computing and networking, architecture. The network will provide automatic real-time transfer of information to database server computers which perform data collection and validation. This information system will support integrated, data sharing applications for everything, from system alarms to management summaries. Most existing complex process control systems have information gaps between the different real time subsystems, between these subsystems and central controller, between the central controller and system level planning and analysis application software, and between the system level applications and management overview reporting. An integrated information system is vitally necessary as the basis for the integration of planning, scheduling, modeling, monitoring, and control, which will allow improved monitoring and control based on timely, accurate and complete data. Data describing the system configuration and the real time processes can be collected, checked and reconciled, analyzed and stored in database servers that can be accessed by all applications. The required technology is available. The only opportunity to design a distributed, nonredundant, integrated system is before it is built. Retrofit is extremely difficult and costly.

  5. Bio-Inspired Self-Cleaning Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kesong; Jiang, Lei

    2012-08-01

    Self-cleaning surfaces have drawn a lot of interest for both fundamental research and practical applications. This review focuses on the recent progress in mechanism, preparation, and application of self-cleaning surfaces. To date, self-cleaning has been demonstrated by the following four conceptual approaches: (a) TiO2-based superhydrophilic self-cleaning, (b) lotus effect self-cleaning (superhydrophobicity with a small sliding angle), (c) gecko setae-inspired self-cleaning, and (d) underwater organisms-inspired antifouling self-cleaning. Although a number of self-cleaning products have been commercialized, the remaining challenges and future outlook of self-cleaning surfaces are also briefly addressed. Through evolution, nature, which has long been a source of inspiration for scientists and engineers, has arrived at what is optimal. We hope this review will stimulate interdisciplinary collaboration among material science, chemistry, biology, physics, nanoscience, engineering, etc., which is essential for the rational design and reproducible construction of bio-inspired multifunctional self-cleaning surfaces in practical applications.

  6. Acceptability of bio-engineered vaccines.

    PubMed

    Danner, K

    1997-01-01

    For hundreds of years bacterial and viral vaccines have been-in a way-bioengineered and were generally well received by the public, the authorities, and the medical profession. Today, additional tools, e.g. molecular biology, enable new approaches to the development of better and safer products. Various vaccines derived from gene technology have now been licensed for commercial use and are acknowledged within the scientific community. Acceptance by the public and the politicians is, however, negatively influenced by the discussions encompassing gene manipulation in man and animals, transgenic plant, and "novel food". Lack of information leads to confusion and fear. Concurrently, the absence of spectacular and life-threatening epidemics limits the perceived value of immune prophylaxis and its benefits. Scientists in institutes and industry are in a position to stimulate acceptability of bio-engineered vaccines by following some simple rule: (1) adherence to the principles of safety; (2) establishment of analytical and control methods; (3) well functioning regulatory and reporting systems; (4) demonstration of usefulness and economic benefits; (5) open communication; and (6) correct and prudent wording. PMID:9023035

  7. Catalytic applications of bio-inspired nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacardo, Dennis Kien Balaong

    The biomimetic synthesis of Pd nanoparticles was presented using the Pd4 peptide, TSNAVHPTLRHL, isolated from combinatorial phage display library. Using this approach, nearly monodisperse and spherical Pd nanoparticles were generated with an average diameter of 1.9 +/- 0.4 nm. The peptide-based nanocatalyst were employed in the Stille coupling reaction under energy-efficient and environmentally friendly reaction conditions of aqueous solvent, room temperature and very low catalyst loading. To this end, the Pd nanocatalyst generated high turnover frequency (TOF) value and quantitative yields using ≥ 0.005 mol% Pd as well as catalytic activities with different aryl halides containing electron-withdrawing and electron-donating groups. The Pd4-capped Pd nanoparticles followed the atom-leaching mechanism and were found to be selective with respect to substrate identity. On the other hand, the naturally-occurring R5 peptide (SSKKSGSYSGSKGSKRRIL) was employed in the synthesis of biotemplated Pd nanomaterials which showed morphological changes as a function of Pd:peptide ratio. TOF analysis for hydrogenation of olefinic alcohols showed similar catalytic activity regardless of nanomorphology. Determination of catalytic properties of these bio-inspired nanomaterials are important as they serve as model system for alternative green catalyst with applications in industrially important transformations.

  8. Rotational molding of bio-polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, Antonio; Maffezzoli, Alfonso; Forleo, Stefania

    2014-05-01

    This paper is aimed to study the suitability of bio-polymers, including poly-lactic acid (PLLA) and Mater-Bi, for the production of hollow components by rotational molding. In order to reduce the brittleness of PLLA, the material was mixed with two different plasticizers, bis-ethyl-hexyl-phthalate (DEHP) and poly-ethylene-glycol (PEG). The materials were characterized in terms of sinterability. To this purpose, thermomechanical (TMA) analysis was performed at different heating rates, in order to identify the endset temperatures of densification and the onset temperatures of degradation. Results obtained indicated that the materials are characterized by a very fast sintering process, occurring just above the melting temperature, and an adequately high onset of degradation. The difference between the onset of degradation and the endset of sintering, defined as the processing window of the polymer, is sufficiently wide, indicating that the polymers can be efficiently processed by rotational molding. Therefore, a laboratory scale apparatus was used for the production of PLLA and Mater-Bi prototypes. The materials were processed using very similar conditions to those used for LLDPE. The production of void-free samples of uniform wall thickness was considered as an indication of the potentiality of the process for the production of biodegradable containers.

  9. Economic Assessment of FMDv Releases from the National Bio and Agro Defense Facility

    PubMed Central

    Pendell, Dustin L.; Marsh, Thomas L.; Coble, Keith H.; Lusk, Jayson L.; Szmania, Sara C.

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the economic consequences of hypothetical foot-and-mouth disease releases from the future National Bio and Agro Defense Facility in Manhattan, Kansas. Using an economic framework that estimates the impacts to agricultural firms and consumers, quantifies costs to non-agricultural activities in the epidemiologically impacted region, and assesses costs of response to the government, we find the distribution of economic impacts to be very significant. Furthermore, agricultural firms and consumers bear most of the impacts followed by the government and the regional non-agricultural firms. PMID:26114546

  10. Proprietary hydrocortisone creams. Vasoconstrictor activities and bio-availabilities of six preparations.

    PubMed

    Barry, B W; Woodford, R

    1976-10-01

    Six proprietary hydrocortisone creams were evaluated for vasoconstrictor activities and bio-availabilities using an occluded blanching test. Statistical analysis showed a significant difference between the formulations. Dioderm, containing 0-1% hydrocortisone, was significantly more active than the 1% hydrocortisone creams--Alphaderm, Calmurid HC, Efcortelan and Vioform-Hydrocortisone. There was no significant difference between Dioderm and Dioderm C. Unlike creams containing more potent corticosteroids the hydrocortisone formulations apparently failed to produce steroid reservoirs in the stratum corneum as assessed by the blanching response.

  11. Advances in a framework to compare bio-dosimetry methods for triage in large-scale radiation events

    PubMed Central

    Flood, Ann Barry; Boyle, Holly K.; Du, Gaixin; Demidenko, Eugene; Nicolalde, Roberto J.; Williams, Benjamin B.; Swartz, Harold M.

    2014-01-01

    Planning and preparation for a large-scale nuclear event would be advanced by assessing the applicability of potentially available bio-dosimetry methods. Using an updated comparative framework the performance of six bio-dosimetry methods was compared for five different population sizes (100–1 000 000) and two rates for initiating processing of the marker (15 or 15 000 people per hour) with four additional time windows. These updated factors are extrinsic to the bio-dosimetry methods themselves but have direct effects on each method's ability to begin processing individuals and the size of the population that can be accommodated. The results indicate that increased population size, along with severely compromised infrastructure, increases the time needed to triage, which decreases the usefulness of many time intensive dosimetry methods. This framework and model for evaluating bio-dosimetry provides important information for policy-makers and response planners to facilitate evaluation of each method and should advance coordination of these methods into effective triage plans. PMID:24729594

  12. Field-effect-based multifunctional hybrid sensor module for the determination of both (bio-)chemical and physical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoening, Michael J.; Poghossian, Arshak; Schultze, J. Walter; Lueth, Hans

    2002-02-01

    Sensor systems for multi-parameter detection in fluidics usually combine different sensors, which are designed to detect either a physical or (bio-)chemical parameter. Therefore, such systems include a more complicated fabrication technology and measuring set-up. In this work, an ISFET (ion-sensitive field-effect transistor), which is well known as a (bio-)chemical sensor, is utilized as transducer for the detection of both (bio-)chemical and physical parameters. A multifunctional hybrid module for the determination of two (bio-)chemical parameters (pH, penicillin concentration) and three physical parameters (temperature, flow velocity and flow direction) using only two sensor structures, an ion generator and a reference electrode, is realized and its performance has been investigated. Here, a multifunctionality of the sensor system is achieved by means of different sensor arrangements and/or different operation modes. A Ta2O5-gate ISFET was used as transducer for all sensors. A novel time-of-flight type ISFET-based flow-velocity (flow rate) and flow-direction sensor using in-situ electrochemical generation of chemical tracers is presented. Due to the fast response of the ISFET (usually in the millisecond range), an ISFET-based flow sensor is suitable for the measurement of the flow velocity in a wide range. With regard to practical applications, pH measurements with this ISFET were performed in rain droplets.

  13. Bio-preparates support the productivity of potato plants grown under desert farming conditions of north Sinai: Five years of field trials

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Mohammed T.; Hamza, Mervat A.; Youssef, Hanan H.; Youssef, Gehan H.; Fayez, Mohamed; Monib, Mohamed; Hegazi, Nabil A.

    2013-01-01

    Organic agriculture as well as good agricultural practices (GAPs) intrigues the concern of both consumers and producers of agricultural commodities. Bio-preparates of various rhizospheric microorganisms (RMOs) are potential sources of biological inputs supporting plant nutrition and health. The response of open-field potatoes to the application of RMO bio-preparates, the biofertilizer “Biofertile” and the bioagent “Biocontrol”, were experimented over 5 successive years under N-hunger of north Sinai desert soils. Both vegetative and tuber yields of a number of tested cultivars were significantly improved due to rhizobacterial treatments. In the majority of cases, the biofertilizer “Biofertile” did successfully supply ca. 50% of plant N requirements, as the yield of full N-fertilized plants was comparable to those received 50% N simultaneously with bio-preparates treatment. The magnitude of inoculation was cultivar-dependent; cvs. Valor and Oceania were among the most responsive ones. Bio-preparate introduction to the plant–soil system was successful via soaking of tubers and/or spraying the plant canopy. The “Biocontrol” formulation was supportive in controlling plant pathogens and significantly increased the fruit yields. The cumulative effect of both bio-preparates resulted in tuber yield increases of ca. 25% over control. PMID:25685470

  14. Bio-preparates support the productivity of potato plants grown under desert farming conditions of north Sinai: Five years of field trials.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Mohammed T; Hamza, Mervat A; Youssef, Hanan H; Youssef, Gehan H; Fayez, Mohamed; Monib, Mohamed; Hegazi, Nabil A

    2014-01-01

    Organic agriculture as well as good agricultural practices (GAPs) intrigues the concern of both consumers and producers of agricultural commodities. Bio-preparates of various rhizospheric microorganisms (RMOs) are potential sources of biological inputs supporting plant nutrition and health. The response of open-field potatoes to the application of RMO bio-preparates, the biofertilizer "Biofertile" and the bioagent "Biocontrol", were experimented over 5 successive years under N-hunger of north Sinai desert soils. Both vegetative and tuber yields of a number of tested cultivars were significantly improved due to rhizobacterial treatments. In the majority of cases, the biofertilizer "Biofertile" did successfully supply ca. 50% of plant N requirements, as the yield of full N-fertilized plants was comparable to those received 50% N simultaneously with bio-preparates treatment. The magnitude of inoculation was cultivar-dependent; cvs. Valor and Oceania were among the most responsive ones. Bio-preparate introduction to the plant-soil system was successful via soaking of tubers and/or spraying the plant canopy. The "Biocontrol" formulation was supportive in controlling plant pathogens and significantly increased the fruit yields. The cumulative effect of both bio-preparates resulted in tuber yield increases of ca. 25% over control. PMID:25685470

  15. Licensing the future: report on BioMed Central's public consultation on open data in peer-reviewed journals.

    PubMed

    Hrynaszkiewicz, Iain; Busch, Stefan; Cockerill, Matthew J

    2013-01-01

    We report the outcomes of BioMed Central's public consultation on implementing open data-compliant licensing in peer-reviewed open access journals. Respondents (42) to the 2012 consultation were six to one in favor (29 in support; 5 against; 8 abstentions) of changing our authors' default open access copyright license agreement, to introduce the Creative Commons CC0 public domain waiver for data published in BioMed Central's journals. We summarize the different questions we received in response to the consultation and our responses to them - matters such as citation, plagiarism, patient privacy, and commercial use were raised. In light of the support for open data in our journals we outline our plans to implement, in September 2013, a combined Creative Commons Attribution license for published articles (papers) and Creative Commons CC0 waiver for published data. PMID:23962139

  16. Licensing the future: report on BioMed Central's public consultation on open data in peer-reviewed journals.

    PubMed

    Hrynaszkiewicz, Iain; Busch, Stefan; Cockerill, Matthew J

    2013-08-21

    We report the outcomes of BioMed Central's public consultation on implementing open data-compliant licensing in peer-reviewed open access journals. Respondents (42) to the 2012 consultation were six to one in favor (29 in support; 5 against; 8 abstentions) of changing our authors' default open access copyright license agreement, to introduce the Creative Commons CC0 public domain waiver for data published in BioMed Central's journals. We summarize the different questions we received in response to the consultation and our responses to them - matters such as citation, plagiarism, patient privacy, and commercial use were raised. In light of the support for open data in our journals we outline our plans to implement, in September 2013, a combined Creative Commons Attribution license for published articles (papers) and Creative Commons CC0 waiver for published data.

  17. Paracoccus denitrificans possesses two BioR homologs having a role in regulation of biotin metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Youjun; Kumar, Ritesh; Ravcheev, Dmitry A; Zhang, Huimin

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we determined that BioR, the GntR family of transcription factor, acts as a repressor for biotin metabolism exclusively distributed in certain species of α-proteobacteria, including the zoonotic agent Brucella melitensis and the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens. However, the scenario is unusual in Paracoccus denitrificans, another closely related member of the same phylum α-proteobacteria featuring with denitrification. Not only does it encode two BioR homologs Pden_1431 and Pden_2922 (designated as BioR1 and BioR2, respectively), but also has six predictive BioR-recognizable sites (the two bioR homolog each has one site, whereas the two bio operons (bioBFDAGC and bioYB) each contains two tandem BioR boxes). It raised the possibility that unexpected complexity is present in BioR-mediated biotin regulation. Here we report that this is the case. The identity of the purified BioR proteins (BioR1 and BioR2) was confirmed with LC-QToF-MS. Phylogenetic analyses combined with GC percentage raised a possibility that the bioR2 gene might be acquired by horizontal gene transfer. Gel shift assays revealed that the predicted BioR-binding sites are functional for the two BioR homologs, in much similarity to the scenario seen with the BioR site of A. tumefaciens bioBFDAZ. Using the A. tumefaciens reporter system carrying a plasmid-borne LacZ fusion, we revealed that the two homologs of P. denitrificans BioR are functional repressors for biotin metabolism. As anticipated, not only does the addition of exogenous biotin stimulate efficiently the expression of bioYB operon encoding biotin transport/uptake system BioY, but also inhibits the transcription of the bioBFDAGC operon resembling the de novo biotin synthetic pathway. EMSA-based screening failed to demonstrate that the biotin-related metabolite is involved in BioR-DNA interplay, which is consistent with our former observation with Brucella BioR. Our finding defined a complex regulatory network for biotin

  18. The BioSample Database (BioSD) at the European Bioinformatics Institute

    PubMed Central

    Gostev, Mikhail; Faulconbridge, Adam; Brandizi, Marco; Fernandez-Banet, Julio; Sarkans, Ugis; Brazma, Alvis; Parkinson, Helen

    2012-01-01

    The BioSample Database (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/biosamples) is a new database at EBI that stores information about biological samples used in molecular experiments, such as sequencing, gene expression or proteomics. The goals of the BioSample Database include: (i) recording and linking of sample information consistently within EBI databases such as ENA, ArrayExpress and PRIDE; (ii) minimizing data entry efforts for EBI database submitters by enabling submitting sample descriptions once and referencing them later in data submissions to assay databases and (iii) supporting cross database queries by sample characteristics. Each sample in the database is assigned an accession number. The database includes a growing set of reference samples, such as cell lines, which are repeatedly used in experiments and can be easily referenced from any database by their accession numbers. Accession numbers for the reference samples will be exchanged with a similar database at NCBI. The samples in the database can be queried by their attributes, such as sample types, disease names or sample providers. A simple tab-delimited format facilitates submissions of sample information to the database, initially via email to biosamples@ebi.ac.uk PMID:22096232

  19. [Determination of lead in microemulsified rapeseed oil and bio-diesel oil by GFAAS].

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng-qing; He, Xiao-min; Du, Ping; Wang, Min; Chen, Hao; Wu, Mou-cheng

    2008-10-01

    Bio-diesel oil has attracted much attention as a substitutable energy sources for its renewable and eco-friendly property. However, problems of lead contamination in fuel are also emphasized increasingly at present. So it was of quite significance to determine the contents of lead in bio-diesel oil and its raw material rapeseed oil. An effective method was developed for the rapid determination of lead in rapeseed oil and bio-diesel oil by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) after their stabilization as microemulsions. In this research work, polyethyleneglycol octyl phenyl ether and n-butanol were used for emulsifier and auxiliary emulsifying agent, respectively. For Pb, efficient thermal stabilization was obtained using NH4H2PO4 as matrix modifier. Sample stabilization was necessary because of evident analyte losses that occurred immediately after sampling. Excellent long-term sample stabilization and the influence of the microemulsion composition on the GFAAS response were observed by mixing different organic solvents. The ashing and atomization temperature and ramp rate influenced the sensitivity obtained for Ph. Take this into account, the optimum conditions of the graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric determination of Pb in rapeseed oil and bio-diesel oil samples were investigated. The results showed that the microemulsion was quite stable when the value of V(20% polyethyleneglycol octyl phenyl ether), V(n-butanol), V(oil) and V(water) was 0.1: 8.9: 0.5: 0.5, without matrix interference effect. The determination limit of the proposed method was 126.2 microg x L(-1) for Pb, comfortably below the values found in the analyzed samples. The recoveries were from 81.8% to 109.0%, which performed using the addition of different concentrations of lead to bio-diesel oil, rapeseed oil and petrochemical diesel samples. The relative standard deviation of determination was 5.84%. This work showed the great efficiency of the microemulsion

  20. Sex steroid hormones do not enhance the direct stimulatory effect of kisspetin-10 on the secretion of growth hormone from bovine anterior pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Ezzat Ahmed, Ahmed; Saito, Hayato; Sawada, Tatsuru; Yaegashi, Tomoyoshi; Jin, Jin; Sawai, Ken; Yamashita, Tetsuro; Hashizume, Tsutomu

    2011-02-01

    The aims of the present study were to clarify the effect of kisspeptin10 (Kp10) on the secretion of growth hormone (GH) from bovine anterior pituitary (AP) cells, and evaluate the ability of sex steroid hormones to enhance the sensitivity of somatotrophic cells to Kp10. AP cells prepared from 8-11-month-old castrated calves were incubated for 12 h with estradiol (E(2), 10(-8) mol/L),progesterone (P(4), 10(-8) mol/L), testosterone (T, 10(-8) mol/L), or vehicle only (control), and then for 2 h with Kp10. The amount of GH released in the medium was measured by a time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay. Kp10 (10(-6) or 10(-5) mol/L) significantly stimulated the secretion of GH from the AP cells regardless of steroid treatments (P < 0.05), and E(2), P(4), and T had no effect on this response. The GH-releasing response to growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH, 10(-8) mol/L) was significantly greater than that to Kp10 (P < 0.05). The present results suggest that Kp10 directly stimulates the release of GH from somatotrophic cells and sex steroid hormones do not enhance the sensitivity of these cells to Kp10. Furthermore, they suggest that the GH-releasing effect of Kp10 is less potent than that of GHRH.

  1. What is life? Bio-physical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Gladyshev, G P

    2009-01-01

    Life arises and develops in gravitationally bound atomic systems, under certain conditions, in the presence of the inflow of energy. A condition of structural dynamic reactivity to the energy inflow qualifies what are anthropomorphically considered as "alive objects". Alive objects, in this perspective, include such rudimentary animate atomic structures as the retinal molecule C20H28o to the herpes simplex virus C102H152N26o29 to the human being, a twenty-six element atomic structure, which can be quantified further as thermodynamic quasi-closed supramolecular systems, which are part of natural open systems. These systems appear and evolve in periodic conditions near to internal equilibrium. This systems attribute of dynamic life can be understood further by the determination and use of mathematical "state functions", which are functions that quantify the state of a system defined by the ensemble of physical quantities: temperature, pressure, composition, etc., which characterize the system, but neither by its surroundings nor by its history. In this view, the phenomenon of a life is easily understood as a general consequence of the laws of the universe, in particular, the laws of thermodynamics, which in the geocentric perspective translate to a formulation of "hierarchical thermodynamics" and a "principle of substance stability". The formation of living thermodynamic structures, in short, arises on the nanolevel by a constantly varying environment that causes variety of living forms. The definition of a life as the bio-chemical-physical phenomenon can thus be given on the basis of the exact sciences, i. e. chemistry, physics, and thermodynamics, without mention of numerous private attributes of a living substance and without physically baseless models of mathematical modeling, such as Prigoginean thermodynamics.

  2. Microfabricated devices for bio-applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiaojun; Szaro, Ben G.; Gracias, Alison; Baselmans, Sofie; Tokranova, Natalya; Xu, Bai; Castracane, James

    2005-01-01

    This paper focuses on the development of two MEMS-based devices for lab-on-a-chip bio-applications. The first device is designed to facilitate cell secretion studies by enabling parallel electrochemical detection with millisecond resolution. Initial prototypes of micro-arrays have been fabricated with Cr/Au microelectrodes on various substrates such as polyimide, SU-8 and SiO2. An FT cell-line (bullfrog fibroblast, American Tissue Culture Collection) has been successfully established and cultured directly on these prototype micro-arrays. It is well known that the FT cells can uptake hormones or other macromolecules from the culture media through a non-specific uptake mechanism which is still under investigation. After culturing on micro-arrays, FT cells were loaded with norepinephrine of various concentrations by incubation in the culture media supplied with norepinephrines. Rapid elevation of intracellular Ca2+ levels triggers the exocytosis of norepinephrine which then can be detected by the Cr/Au electrodes. Microfabrication of these prototype micro-arrays as well as cell culture and electrochemical detection results will be presented in this paper. The second device is designed for 3-dimensional transportation of living cells on chips. Initial prototypes of micro-arrays were fabricated with SU-8 buried channels on a silicon substrate. Both single-layered and double-layered SU-8 buried channels have been realized to enable 2D and 3D cell transportation. Stained solutions were used to visualize fluid transport through the channel networks. Following this, living FT cells in solution were successfully transported through single-layered SU-8 channels. Testing of 3D transportation of living FT cells is underway. Microfabrication of these prototype micro-arrays and living cell transportation on chips will also be presented in this paper.

  3. BioEnergy Feasibility in South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugo, Wim

    2015-04-01

    The BioEnergy Atlas for South Africa is the result of a project funded by the South African Department of Science and Technology, and executed by SAEON/ NRF with the assistance of a number of collaborators in academia, research institutions, and government. Now nearing completion, the Atlas provides an important input to policy and decision support in the country, significantly strengthens the availability of information resources on the topic, and provides a platform whereby current and future contributions on the subject can be managed, preserved, and disseminated. Bioenergy assessments have been characterized in the past by poor availability and quality of data, an over-emphasis on potentials and availability studies instead of feasibility assessment, and lack of comprehensive evaluation in competition with alternatives - both in respect of competing bioenergy resources and other renewable and non-renewable options. The BioEnergy Atlas in its current edition addresses some of these deficiencies, and identifies specific areas of interest where future research and effort can be directed. One can qualify the potentials and feasible options for BioEnergy exploitation in South Africa as follows: (1) Availability is not a fixed quantum. Availability of biomass and resulting energy products are sensitive to both the exclusionary measures one applies (food security, environmental, social and economic impacts) and the price at which final products will be competitive. (2) Availability is low. Even without allowing for feasibility and final product costs, the availability of biomass is low: biomass productivity in South Africa is not high by global standards due to rainfall constraints, and most arable land is used productively for food and agribusiness-related activities. This constrains the feasibility of purposely cultivated bioenergy crops. (3) Waste streams are important. There are significant waste streams from domestic solid waste and sewage, some agricultural

  4. A Bio-Realistic Analog CMOS Cochlea Filter With High Tunability and Ultra-Steep Roll-Off.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shiwei; Koickal, Thomas Jacob; Hamilton, Alister; Cheung, Rebecca; Smith, Leslie S

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents the design and experimental results of a cochlea filter in analog very large scale integration (VLSI) which highly resembles physiologically measured response of the mammalian cochlea. The filter consists of three specialized sub-filter stages which respectively provide passive response in low frequencies, actively tunable response in mid-band frequencies and ultra-steep roll-off at transition frequencies from pass-band to stop-band. The sub-filters are implemented in balanced ladder topology using floating active inductors. Measured results from the fabricated chip show that wide range of mid-band tuning including gain tuning of over 20 dB, Q factor tuning from 2 to 19 as well as the bio-realistic center frequency shift are achieved by adjusting only one circuit parameter. Besides, the filter has an ultra-steep roll-off reaching over 300 dB/dec. By changing biasing currents, the filter can be configured to operate with center frequencies from 31 Hz to 8 kHz. The filter is 9th order, consumes 59.5 ∼ 90.0 μW power and occupies 0.9 mm2 chip area. A parallel bank of the proposed filter can be used as the front-end in hearing prosthesis devices, speech processors as well as other bio-inspired auditory systems owing to its bio-realistic behavior, low power consumption and small size.

  5. Thermogravimetric investigation on the degradation properties and combustion performance of bio-oils.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xueyong; Meng, Jiajia; Moore, Andrew M; Chang, Jianmin; Gou, Jinsheng; Park, Sunkyu

    2014-01-01

    The degradation properties and combustion performance of raw bio-oil, aged bio-oil, and bio-oil from torrefied wood were investigated through thermogravimetric analysis. A three-stage process was observed for the degradation of bio-oils, including devolatilization of the aqueous fraction and light compounds, transition of the heavy faction to solid, and combustion of carbonaceous residues. Pyrolysis kinetics parameters were calculated via the reaction order model and 3D-diffusion model, and combustion indexes were used to qualitatively evaluate the thermal profiles of tested bio-oils for comparison with commercial oils such as fuel oils. It was found that aged bio-oil was more thermally instable and produced more combustion-detrimental carbonaceous solid. Raw bio-oil and bio-oil from torrefied wood had comparable combustion performance to fuel oils. It was considered that bio-oil has a potential to be mixed with or totally replace the fuel oils in boilers.

  6. [Effects of bio-fertilizer on organically cultured cucumber growth and soil biological characteristics].

    PubMed

    Cao, Dan; Zong, Liang-gang; Xiao, Jun; Zhang, Qian; Zhao, Yan

    2010-10-01

    Field trials of organic farming were conducted to examine the effects of different bio-fertilizers on the organically cultured cucumber growth, soil enzyme activities, and soil microbial biomass. Four treatments were installed, i. e., organic fertilizer only (CK), bio-fertilizer "Zhonghe" combined with organic fertilizer (ZHH), bio-fertilizer "NST" combined with organic fertilizer (NST), and bio-fertilizer "Bio" combined with organic fertilizer (BIO). Bio-fertilizers combined with organic fertilizer increased the cucumber yield significantly, and improved the root growth and leaf chlorophyll content. Comparing with that in CK, the cucumber yield in treatments ZHH, NST, and BIO was increased by 10.4%, 12.4%, and 29.2%, respectively. At the seedling stage, early flowering stage, and picking time of cucumber, the soil microbial biomass C and N in treatments ZHH, NST, and BIO were significantly higher than that in CK, and the activities of soil urease, acid phosphatase, and catalase were also higher.

  7. Composition and parameters of household bio-waste in four seasons.

    PubMed

    Hanc, Ales; Novak, Pavel; Dvorak, Milan; Habart, Jan; Svehla, Pavel

    2011-07-01

    Bio-waste makes up almost half portion of municipal solid waste. The characterization of household bio-waste is important in determining the most appropriate treatment method. The differences in composition and parameters of bio-waste derived from urban settlement (U-bio-waste) and family houses (F-bio-waste) during the four climate seasons are described in this paper. Twelve components and 20 parameters for bio-waste were evaluated. The composition of U-bio-waste was almost steady over those seasons, unlike F-bio-waste. U-bio-waste was comprised mainly (58.2%) of fruit and vegetable debris. F-bio-waste was primarily made up of seasonal garden components. The amount of variation among seasons in both type of bio-waste increased in sequence: basic parametersbio-waste were found out. Results of this research could be utilized to support another composition and parameters of bio-waste and be suitable for establishing bio-waste processing.

  8. Genome sequence of "Candidatus Microthrix parvicella" Bio17-1, a long-chain-fatty-acid-accumulating filamentous actinobacterium from a biological wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Muller, Emilie E L; Pinel, Nicolás; Gillece, John D; Schupp, James M; Price, Lance B; Engelthaler, David M; Levantesi, Caterina; Tandoi, Valter; Luong, Khai; Baliga, Nitin S; Korlach, Jonas; Keim, Paul S; Wilmes, Paul

    2012-12-01

    "Candidatus Microthrix" bacteria are deeply branching filamentous actinobacteria which occur at the water-air interface of biological wastewater treatment plants, where they are often responsible for foaming and bulking. Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of a strain from this genus: "Candidatus Microthrix parvicella" strain Bio17-1. PMID:23144412

  9. Genome Sequence of “Candidatus Microthrix parvicella” Bio17-1, a Long-Chain-Fatty-Acid-Accumulating Filamentous Actinobacterium from a Biological Wastewater Treatment Plant

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Emilie E. L.; Pinel, Nicolás; Gillece, John D.; Schupp, James M.; Price, Lance B.; Engelthaler, David M.; Levantesi, Caterina; Tandoi, Valter; Luong, Khai; Baliga, Nitin S.; Korlach, Jonas; Keim, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    “Candidatus Microthrix” bacteria are deeply branching filamentous actinobacteria which occur at the water-air interface of biological wastewater treatment plants, where they are often responsible for foaming and bulking. Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of a strain from this genus: “Candidatus Microthrix parvicella” strain Bio17-1. PMID:23144412

  10. Principle of bio-inspired insect wing rotational hinge design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Fan

    A principle for designing and fabricating bio-inspired miniature artificial insect flapping wing using flexure rotational hinge design is presented. A systematic approach of selecting rotational hinge stiffness value is proposed. Based on the understanding of flapping wing aerodynamics, a dynamic simulation is constructed using the established quasi-steady model and the wing design. Simulations were performed to gain insight on how different parameters affect the wing rotational response. Based on system resonance a model to predict the optimal rotational hinge stiffness based on given wing parameter and flapping wing kinematic is proposed. By varying different wing parameters, the proposed method is shown to be applicable to a wide range of wing designs with different sizes and shapes. With the selected hinge stiffness value, aspects of the rotational joint design is discussed and an integrated wing-hinge structure design using laminated carbon fiber and polymer film is presented. Manufacturing process of such composite structure is developed to achieve high accuracy and repeatability. The yielded hinge stiffness is verified by measurements. To validate the proposed model, flapping wing experiments were conducted. A flapping actuation set up is built using DC motor and a controller is implemented on a microcontroller to track desired wing stroke kinematic. Wing stroke and rotation kinematic were extracted using a high speed camera and the lift generation is evaluated. A total of 49 flapping experiments were presented, experimental data shows good correlation with the model's prediction. With the wing rotational hinge stiffness designed so that the rotational resonant frequency is twice as the stroke frequency, the resulting wing rotation generates near optimal lift. With further simulation, the proposed model shows low sensitivity to wing parameter variation. As a result, giving a design parameter of a flapping wing robot platform, the proposed principle can

  11. Computational Metabolomics Operations at BioCyc.org.

    PubMed

    Karp, Peter D; Billington, Richard; Holland, Timothy A; Kothari, Anamika; Krummenacker, Markus; Weaver, Daniel; Latendresse, Mario; Paley, Suzanne

    2015-05-22

    BioCyc.org is a genome and metabolic pathway web portal covering 5500 organisms, including Homo sapiens, Arabidopsis thaliana, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli. These organism-specific databases have undergone variable degrees of curation. The EcoCyc (Escherichia coli Encyclopedia) database is the most highly curated; its contents have been derived from 27,000 publications. The MetaCyc (Metabolic Encyclopedia) database within BioCyc is a "universal" metabolic database that describes pathways, reactions, enzymes and metabolites from all domains of life. Metabolic pathways provide an organizing framework for analyzing metabolomics data, and the BioCyc website provides computational operations for metabolomics data that include metabolite search and translation of metabolite identifiers across multiple metabolite databases. The site allows researchers to store and manipulate metabolite lists using a facility called SmartTables, which supports metabolite enrichment analysis. That analysis operation identifies metabolite sets that are statistically over-represented for the substrates of specific metabolic pathways. BioCyc also enables visualization of metabolomics data on individual pathway diagrams and on the organism-specific metabolic map diagrams that are available for every BioCyc organism. Most of these operations are available both interactively and as programmatic web services.

  12. Gradient packing bed bio-filter for landfill methane mitigation.

    PubMed

    Obulisamy, Parthiba Karthikeyan; Sim Yan May, Jane; Rajasekar, Balasubramanian

    2016-10-01

    We assessed the suitability of various biogenic materials for development of a gradient packed bed bio-filter to mitigate the methane (CH4) emission from landfills. Five different biogenic materials (windrow compost-WC; vermicompost-VC; landfill top cover-LTC; landfill bottom soil-LBS; and river soil sediment-SS) were screened. Among these materials, the VC showed a better CH4 oxidation potential (MOP) of 12.6μg CH4 gdw(-1)h(-1). Subsequently, the VC was used as a packing material along with wood chips in proto-type bio-filters. Wood chips were mixed at 5-15% to form three distinct gradients in a test bio-filter. Under the three different CH4 loading rates of 33, 44 and 55 gCH4 m(-3)h(-1), the achieved MOPs were 31, 41, and 47gCH4 m(-3)h(-1), respectively. The gradient packed bed bio-filter is effective for landfill CH4 mitigation than the conventional bio-filter as the latter shows gas channeling effects with poor MOPs.

  13. Computational Metabolomics Operations at BioCyc.org

    PubMed Central

    Karp, Peter D.; Billington, Richard; Holland, Timothy A.; Kothari, Anamika; Krummenacker, Markus; Weaver, Daniel; Latendresse, Mario; Paley, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    BioCyc.org is a genome and metabolic pathway web portal covering 5500 organisms, including Homo sapiens, Arabidopsis thaliana, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli. These organism-specific databases have undergone variable degrees of curation. The EcoCyc (Escherichia coli Encyclopedia) database is the most highly curated; its contents have been derived from 27,000 publications. The MetaCyc (Metabolic Encyclopedia) database within BioCyc is a “universal” metabolic database that describes pathways, reactions, enzymes and metabolites from all domains of life. Metabolic pathways provide an organizing framework for analyzing metabolomics data, and the BioCyc website provides computational operations for metabolomics data that include metabolite search and translation of metabolite identifiers across multiple metabolite databases. The site allows researchers to store and manipulate metabolite lists using a facility called SmartTables, which supports metabolite enrichment analysis. That analysis operation identifies metabolite sets that are statistically over-represented for the substrates of specific metabolic pathways. BioCyc also enables visualization of metabolomics data on individual pathway diagrams and on the organism-specific metabolic map diagrams that are available for every BioCyc organism. Most of these operations are available both interactively and as programmatic web services. PMID:26011592

  14. Gradient packing bed bio-filter for landfill methane mitigation.

    PubMed

    Obulisamy, Parthiba Karthikeyan; Sim Yan May, Jane; Rajasekar, Balasubramanian

    2016-10-01

    We assessed the suitability of various biogenic materials for development of a gradient packed bed bio-filter to mitigate the methane (CH4) emission from landfills. Five different biogenic materials (windrow compost-WC; vermicompost-VC; landfill top cover-LTC; landfill bottom soil-LBS; and river soil sediment-SS) were screened. Among these materials, the VC showed a better CH4 oxidation potential (MOP) of 12.6μg CH4 gdw(-1)h(-1). Subsequently, the VC was used as a packing material along with wood chips in proto-type bio-filters. Wood chips were mixed at 5-15% to form three distinct gradients in a test bio-filter. Under the three different CH4 loading rates of 33, 44 and 55 gCH4 m(-3)h(-1), the achieved MOPs were 31, 41, and 47gCH4 m(-3)h(-1), respectively. The gradient packed bed bio-filter is effective for landfill CH4 mitigation than the conventional bio-filter as the latter shows gas channeling effects with poor MOPs. PMID:26883060

  15. Flow Type Bio-Chemical Calorimeter with Micro Differential Thermopile Sensor.

    PubMed

    Saito, Masataka; Nakabeppu, Osamu

    2015-04-01

    Bio-chemical calorimeters with a MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) thermopile sensor have been studied for monitoring detailed processes of the biochemical reactions of a minute sample with a high temporal resolution. The bio-calorimeters are generally divided into a batch-type and a flow-type. We developed a highly sensitive batch-type calorimeter which can detect a 100 nW level thermal reaction. However it shows a long settling time of 2 hours because of the heat capacity of a whole calorimeter. Thus, the flow-type calorimeters in passive and active mode have been studied for measuring the thermal reactions in an early stage after starting an analysis. The flow-type calorimeter consists of the MEMS differential thermopile sensor, a pair of micro channel reactor in a PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) sheet in a three-fold thermostat chamber. The calorimeter in the passive mode was tested with dilution reactions of ethanol to water and NaCl aqueous solution to water. It was shown that the calorimeter detects exo- and endothermic reaction over 250 nW at solution flow rate of 0.05 ~ 1 µl/min with a settling time of about 4 minutes. In the active mode, a response test was conducted by using heat removal by water flow from the reactor channel. The active calorimetry enhances the response time about three to four times faster. PMID:26353514

  16. Lessons learned from U.S. Department of Defense 911-Bio Advanced Concept Technology Demonstrations.

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, T.; Gasper, W.; Lacher, L.; Newsom, D.; Yantosik, G.

    1999-07-06

    The US Department of Defense (DoD), in cooperation with other federal agencies, has taken many initiatives to improve its ability to support civilian response to a domestic biological terrorism incident. This paper discusses one initiative, the 911-Bio Advanced Concept Technology Demonstrations (ACTDs), conducted by the Office of the Secretary of Defense during 1997 to better understand: (1) the capability of newly developed chemical and biological collection and identification technologies in a field environment; (2) the ability of specialized DoD response teams to use these new technologies within the structure of cooperating DoD and civilian consequence management organizations; and (3) the adequacy of current modeling tools for predicting the dispersal of biological hazards. This paper discusses the experience of the ACTDs from the civilian community support perspective. The 911-Bio ACTD project provided a valuable opportunity for DoD and civilian officials to learn how they should use their combined capabilities to manage the aftermath of a domestic biological terrorism incident.

  17. The importance of assessing self-reported HIV status in bio-behavioural surveys.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Lisa G; Sabin, Miriam Lewis; Prybylski, Dimitri; Sabin, Keith; McFarland, Willi; Baral, Stefan; Kim, Andrea A; Raymond, H Fisher

    2016-08-01

    In bio-behavioural surveys measuring prevalence of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), respondents should be asked the results of their last HIV test. However, many government authorities, nongovernmental organizations, researchers and other civil society stakeholders have stated that respondents involved in such surveys should not be asked to self-report their HIV status. The reasons offered for not asking respondents to report their status are that responses may be inaccurate and that asking about HIV status may violate the respondents' human rights and exacerbate stigma and discrimination. Nevertheless, we contend that, in the antiretroviral therapy era, asking respondents in bio-behavioural surveys to self-report their HIV status is essential for measuring and improving access to - and coverage of - services for the care, treatment and prevention of HIV infection. It is also important for estimating the true size of the unmet needs in addressing the HIV epidemic and for interpreting the behaviours associated with the acquisition and transmission of HIV infection correctly. The data available indicate that most participants in health-related surveys are willing to respond to a question about HIV status - as one of possibly several sensitive questions about sexual and drug use behaviours. Ultimately, normalizing the self-reporting of HIV status could help the global community move from an era of so-called exceptionalism to one of destigmatization - and so improve the epidemic response worldwide.

  18. Flow Type Bio-Chemical Calorimeter with Micro Differential Thermopile Sensor.

    PubMed

    Saito, Masataka; Nakabeppu, Osamu

    2015-04-01

    Bio-chemical calorimeters with a MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) thermopile sensor have been studied for monitoring detailed processes of the biochemical reactions of a minute sample with a high temporal resolution. The bio-calorimeters are generally divided into a batch-type and a flow-type. We developed a highly sensitive batch-type calorimeter which can detect a 100 nW level thermal reaction. However it shows a long settling time of 2 hours because of the heat capacity of a whole calorimeter. Thus, the flow-type calorimeters in passive and active mode have been studied for measuring the thermal reactions in an early stage after starting an analysis. The flow-type calorimeter consists of the MEMS differential thermopile sensor, a pair of micro channel reactor in a PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) sheet in a three-fold thermostat chamber. The calorimeter in the passive mode was tested with dilution reactions of ethanol to water and NaCl aqueous solution to water. It was shown that the calorimeter detects exo- and endothermic reaction over 250 nW at solution flow rate of 0.05 ~ 1 µl/min with a settling time of about 4 minutes. In the active mode, a response test was conducted by using heat removal by water flow from the reactor channel. The active calorimetry enhances the response time about three to four times faster.

  19. The importance of assessing self-reported HIV status in bio-behavioural surveys.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Lisa G; Sabin, Miriam Lewis; Prybylski, Dimitri; Sabin, Keith; McFarland, Willi; Baral, Stefan; Kim, Andrea A; Raymond, H Fisher

    2016-08-01

    In bio-behavioural surveys measuring prevalence of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), respondents should be asked the results of their last HIV test. However, many government authorities, nongovernmental organizations, researchers and other civil society stakeholders have stated that respondents involved in such surveys should not be asked to self-report their HIV status. The reasons offered for not asking respondents to report their status are that responses may be inaccurate and that asking about HIV status may violate the respondents' human rights and exacerbate stigma and discrimination. Nevertheless, we contend that, in the antiretroviral therapy era, asking respondents in bio-behavioural surveys to self-report their HIV status is essential for measuring and improving access to - and coverage of - services for the care, treatment and prevention of HIV infection. It is also important for estimating the true size of the unmet needs in addressing the HIV epidemic and for interpreting the behaviours associated with the acquisition and transmission of HIV infection correctly. The data available indicate that most participants in health-related surveys are willing to respond to a question about HIV status - as one of possibly several sensitive questions about sexual and drug use behaviours. Ultimately, normalizing the self-reporting of HIV status could help the global community move from an era of so-called exceptionalism to one of destigmatization - and so improve the epidemic response worldwide. PMID:27516638

  20. Graphene Quantum Dots Interfaced with Single Bacterial Spore for Bio-Electromechanical Devices: A Graphene Cytobot

    PubMed Central

    Sreeprasad, T. S.; Nguyen, Phong; Alshogeathri, Ahmed; Hibbeler, Luke; Martinez, Fabian; McNeil, Nolan; Berry, Vikas

    2015-01-01

    The nanoarchitecture and micromachinery of a cell can be leveraged to fabricate sophisticated cell-driven devices. This requires a coherent strategy to derive cell's mechanistic abilities, microconstruct, and chemical-texture towards such microtechnologies. For example, a microorganism's hydrophobic membrane encapsulating hygroscopic constituents allows it to sustainably withhold a high aquatic pressure. Further, it provides a rich surface chemistry available for nano-interfacing and a strong mechanical response to humidity. Here we demonstrate a route to incorporate a complex cellular structure into microelectromechanics by interfacing compatible graphene quantum dots (GQDs) with a highly responsive single spore microstructure. A sensitive and reproducible electron-tunneling width modulation of 1.63 nm within a network of GQDs chemically-secured on a spore was achieved via sporal hydraulics with a driving force of 299.75 Torrs (21.7% water at GQD junctions). The electron-transport activation energy and the Coulomb blockade threshold for the GQD network were 35 meV and 31 meV, respectively; while the inter-GQD capacitance increased by 1.12 folds at maximum hydraulic force. This is the first example of nano/bio interfacing with spores and will lead to the evolution of next-generation bio-derived microarchitectures, probes for cellular/biochemical processes, biomicrorobotic-mechanisms, and membranes for micromechanical actuation. PMID:25774962

  1. Nerve growth factor displays stimulatory effects on human skin and lung fibroblasts, demonstrating a direct role for this factor in tissue repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micera, Alessandra; Vigneti, Eliana; Pickholtz, Dalia; Reich, Reuven; Pappo, Orit; Bonini, Sergio; Maquart, François Xavier; Aloe, Luigi; Levi-Schaffer, Francesca

    2001-05-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a polypeptide which, in addition to its effect on nerve cells, is believed to play a role in inflammatory responses and in tissue repair. Because fibroblasts represent the main target and effector cells in these processes, to investigate whether NGF is involved in lung and skin tissue repair, we studied the effect of NGF on fibroblast migration, proliferation, collagen metabolism, modulation into myofibroblasts, and contraction of collagen gel. Both skin and lung fibroblasts were found to produce NGF and to express tyrosine kinase receptor (trkA) under basal conditions, whereas the low-affinity p75 receptor was expressed only after prolonged NGF exposure. NGF significantly induced skin and lung fibroblast migration in an in vitro model of wounded fibroblast and skin migration in Boyden chambers. Nevertheless NGF did not influence either skin or lung fibroblast proliferation, collagen production, or metalloproteinase production or activation. In contrast, culture of both lung and skin fibroblasts with NGF modulated their phenotype into myofibroblasts. Moreover, addition of NGF to both fibroblast types embedded in collagen gel increased their contraction. Fibrotic human lung or skin tissues displayed immunoreactivity for NGF, trkA, and p75. These data show a direct pro-fibrogenic effect of NGF on skin and lung fibroblasts and therefore indicate a role for NGF in tissue repair and fibrosis.

  2. Stimulatory effects of Cuminum cyminum and flavonoid glycoside on Cyclosporine-A and restraint stress induced immune-suppression in Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Prashant Singh; Satti, Naresh Kumar; Suri, Krishan Avtar; Amina, Musarat; Bani, Sarang

    2010-04-15

    Many herbs and spices are known to modulate the immune system and have been shown to restore the immunity in immuno-compromised individuals. Spices generally used to increase the taste and flavor of food also has the history of usage as an ayurvedic medicine. Therefore to explore the health modulating effects of Cuminum cyminum and to identify the active compound, immunomodulatory properties were evaluated using flowcytometry and ELISA in normal and immune-suppressed animals. C. cyminum and compound 1 stimulated the T cells and Th1 cytokines expression in normal animals. Swiss albino mice subjected to Cyclosporine-A induced immune-suppression were dosed orally with C. cyminum (25, 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg) on consecutive days. The results showed that administration significantly increased T cells (CD4 and CD8) count and Th1 predominant immune response in a dose dependent manner thereby suggesting immunomodulatory activity through modulation of T lymphocytes expression. In restraint stress induced immune-suppressed animals, compound 1 countered the depleted T lymphocytes, decreased the elevated corticosterone levels and size of adrenal glands and increased the weight of thymus and spleen. Based on the data we may conclude that C. cyminum is a potent immunomodulator and may develop as a lead to recover the immunity of immuno-compromised individuals.

  3. Rotenone exerts similar stimulatory effects on H2O2 production by isolated brain mitochondria from young-adult and old rats.

    PubMed

    Michelini, Luiz G B; Figueira, Tiago R; Siqueira-Santos, Edilene S; Castilho, Roger F

    2015-03-01

    Chronic and systemic treatment of rodents with rotenone, a classical inhibitor of mitochondrial respiratory complex I, results in neurochemical, behavioral, and neuropathological features of Parkinson's disease. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether brain mitochondria from old rats (24 months old) would be more susceptible to rotenone-induced inhibition of oxygen consumption and increased generation of H2O2 than mitochondria from young-adult rats (3-4 months old). Isolated brain mitochondria were incubated in the presence of different rotenone concentrations (5, 10, and 100nM), and oxygen consumption and H2O2 production were measured during respiratory states 3 (ADP-stimulated respiration) and 4 (resting respiration). Respiratory state 3 and citrate synthase activity were significantly lower in mitochondria from old rats. Mitochondria from young-adult and old rats showed similar sensitivity to rotenone-induced inhibition of oxygen consumption. Similarly, H2O2 production rates by both types of mitochondria were dose-dependently stimulated to the same extent by increasing concentrations of rotenone. We conclude that rotenone exerts similar effects on oxygen consumption and H2O2 production by isolated brain mitochondria from young-adult and old rats. Therefore, aging does not increase the mitochondrial H2O2 generation in response to complex I inhibition.

  4. Image Formation in Bio-optical Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Eric

    2012-02-01

    Over the past two decades a number of optical sensing methods have emerged with potential to provide complementary information to traditional medical imaging modalities in application areas ranging from basic science to disease diagnosis and treatment monitoring. Though still largely in the research and development stage, modalities including diffuse optical tomography (DOT), fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT), photo-acoustic tomography (PAT), and bio-luminescence tomography (BLT) have excited much interest due to their natural functional imaging capability, their relatively low cost, and the fact that none required the use of ionizing radiation. These advantages however are tempered by a number of challenges associated with the processing of these data. Specifically, these data types all rely in one way or another on the interaction of light with tissue. The diffusive nature of this interaction inherently limits the spatial resolution of these modalities. As a result the process of forming an image is a far more delicate task than is the case with more standard imaging modalities such as X-ray computed tomography (CT). Two basic methods have been explored to address the ill-posedness of these problems in order to improve the information content in the resulting images. The optical data may be augmented either through the use of spectral diversity or by attempting to integrate optical data types with information from other modalities such as CT or MRI. Alternatively, a mathematical technique known as regularization can be used to impose physically-based constraints on the reconstruction. In this talk, I shall provide an overview of the work in my group in optical image formation within the contexts of DOT for breast cancer imaging and FMT for small animal imaging. The focus of the talk will be on methods that integrate data augmentation and mathematical regularization. In the case of FMT, we shall discuss our work in combining the optical data with information

  5. Bio-assays for microchemical environmental contaminants

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Richard E.

    1967-01-01

    A solution of the problem of environmental contamination must be based on accurate measurement of the extent of the contamination and of the resulting hazards. This paper reviews the methods for the estimation of microchemical contaminants in water with the aid of living organisms. The methods are grouped according to the nature of the response of the organism to the contaminant—namely, acute response (usually death), behavioural change, physiological change, biochemical and histochemical change, ecological change, embryological and regenerational change, growth change, histological change and perception by man or aquatic organisms. Finally, the following problems are discussed: selection of appropriate tests and standardization, the dangers of sequential concentration and the need for multi-parametric assays (assays involving several responses of a single organism, or responses of several organisms) for complete characterization of the effects of a contaminant on the environment. ImagesFIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6 PMID:5299747

  6. BlenX4Bio - BlenX for Biologists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priami, Corrado; Ballarini, Paolo; Quaglia, Paola

    We introduce BlenX4Bio, a high-level interface for the programming language BlenX. BlenX4Bio allows biologists to write BlenX programs without having any programming skills. The main elements of a biological model are specified by filling in a number of tables. Such tables include descriptions of both static and dynamic aspects of the biological system at hand and can then be automatically mapped to BlenX programs for simulation and analysis by means of the CoSBi Lab software platform. In this paper we illustrate the main characteristics of BlenX4Bio through examples taken from biology textbooks.

  7. Bio-enhanced repair of the anterior cruciate ligament

    PubMed Central

    Proffen, Benedikt L.; Sieker, Jakob T.; Murray, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Suture repair of the ACL has been widely abandoned in favor of ACL reconstruction, largely due to the high rates of failure and unreliability of the outcomes following suture repair. However, there have been recent basic science studies which suggest that combining a suture repair with a biologic adjunct may improve the results of suture repair of the ACL, with several studies in large animal models showing equivalent strength of an ACL treated with bio-enhanced repaired with that of an ACL graft at 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery. In addition, the groups treated with bio-enhanced repair had significantly less osteoarthritis when compared with the animals undergoing ACL reconstruction. These findings have led to a renewed interest in bio-enhanced primary repair as a way to make repair of the ACL a viable option for a select group of patients in the future. PMID:25595694

  8. Catalytic Hydrogenation of Bio-Oil for Chemicals and Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2006-02-14

    The scope of work includes optimizing processing conditions and demonstrating catalyst lifetime for catalyst formulations that are readily scaleable to commercial operations. We use a bench-scale, continuous-flow, packed-bed, catalytic, tubular reactor, which can be operated in the range of 100-400 mL/hr., from 50-400 C and up to 20MPa (see Figure 1). With this unit we produce upgraded bio-oil from whole bio-oil or useful bio-oil fractions, specifically pyrolytic lignin. The product oils are fractionated, for example by distillation, for recovery of chemical product streams. Other products from our tests have been used in further testing in petroleum refining technology at UOP and fractionation for product recovery in our own lab. Further scale-up of the technology is envisioned and we will carry out or support process design efforts with industrial partners, such as UOP.

  9. Mathematical Modelling of Bacterial Populations in Bio-remediation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliadou, Ioanna A.; Vayenas, Dimitris V.; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V.

    2011-09-01

    An understanding of bacterial behaviour concerns many field applications, such as the enhancement of water, wastewater and subsurface bio-remediation, the prevention of environmental pollution and the protection of human health. Numerous microorganisms have been identified to be able to degrade chemical pollutants, thus, a variety of bacteria are known that can be used in bio-remediation processes. In this study the development of mathematical models capable of describing bacterial behaviour considered in bio-augmentation plans, such as bacterial growth, consumption of nutrients, removal of pollutants, bacterial transport and attachment in porous media, is presented. The mathematical models may be used as a guide in designing and assessing the conditions under which areas contaminated with pollutants can be better remediated.

  10. Hydroprocessing Bio-oil and Products Separation for Coke Production

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Hart, Todd R.

    2013-04-01

    Fast pyrolysis of biomass can be used to produce a raw bio-oil product, which can be upgraded by catalytic hydroprocessing to hydrocarbon liquid products. In this study the upgraded products were distilled to recover light naphtha and oils and to produce a distillation resid with useful properties for coker processing and production of renewable, low-sulfur electrode carbon. For this hydroprocessing work, phase separation of the bio-oil was applied as a preparatory step to concentrate the heavier, more phenolic components thus generating a more amenable feedstock for resid production. Low residual oxygen content products were produced by continuous-flow, catalytic hydroprocessing of the phase separated bio-oil.

  11. [(Bio)artificial liver support: ready for the patient?].

    PubMed

    Chamuleau, R A F M

    2016-05-01

    In 2016, an intensive-care physician has at his disposal a number of artificial organs for the support of patients with organ failure. Examples are the artificial kidney and the heart-lung machine. Artificial livers are being developed for patients with severe liver failure whose lives can only be saved at the present time by a transplant with a donor liver. These artificial livers are based either on a device that removes toxic materials from the patient's blood with, for example, albumin dialysis, or make use of bio-reactors filled with functioning liver cells, the so-called bio-artificial liver. In theory, the bio-artificial liver has the greatest potential to increase life expectancy. The results of clinical studies are also very promising. They are not yet sufficient, however, to permit general clinical use.

  12. [(Bio)artificial liver support: ready for the patient?].

    PubMed

    Chamuleau, R A F M

    2016-05-01

    In 2016, an intensive-care physician has at his disposal a number of artificial organs for the support of patients with organ failure. Examples are the artificial kidney and the heart-lung machine. Artificial livers are being developed for patients with severe liver failure whose lives can only be saved at the present time by a transplant with a donor liver. These artificial livers are based either on a device that removes toxic materials from the patient's blood with, for example, albumin dialysis, or make use of bio-reactors filled with functioning liver cells, the so-called bio-artificial liver. In theory, the bio-artificial liver has the greatest potential to increase life expectancy. The results of clinical studies are also very promising. They are not yet sufficient, however, to permit general clinical use. PMID:27166453

  13. BioFET-SIM web interface: implementation and two applications.

    PubMed

    Hediger, Martin R; Jensen, Jan H; De Vico, Luca

    2012-01-01

    We present a web interface which allows us to conveniently set up calculations based on the BioFET-SIM model. With the interface, the signal of a BioFET sensor can be calculated depending on its parameters, as well as the signal dependence on pH. As an illustration, two case studies are presented. In the first case, a generic peptide with opposite charges on both ends is inverted in orientation on a semiconducting nanowire surface leading to a corresponding change in sign of the computed sensitivity of the device. In the second case, the binding of an antibody/antigen complex on the nanowire surface is studied in terms of orientation and analyte/nanowire surface distance. We demonstrate how the BioFET-SIM web interface can aid in the understanding of experimental data and postulate alternative ways of antibody/antigen orientation on the nanowire surface.

  14. C-MEMS for bio-sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yin; Agrawal, Richa; Wang, Chunlei

    2015-05-01

    Developing highly sensitive, selective, and reproducible miniaturized bio-sensing platforms require reliable biointerface which should be compatible with microfabrication techniques. In this study, we have fabricated pyrolyzed carbon arrays with high surface area as a bio-sensing electrode, and developed the surface functionalization methods to increase biomolecules immobilization efficiency and further understand electrochemical phenomena at biointerfaces. The carbon microelectrode arrays with high aspect ratio have been fabricated by carbon microelectromechanical systems (C-MEMS) and nanomaterials such as graphene have been integrated to further increase surface area. To achieve the efficient covalent immobilization of biomolecules, various oxidation and reduction functionalization methods have been investigated. The oxidation treatment in this study includes vacuum ultraviolet, electrochemical activation, UV/Ozone and oxygen RIE. The reduction treatment includes direct amination and diazonium grafting. The developed bio-sensing platform was then applied for several applications, such as: DNA sensor; H2O2 sensor; aptamer sensor and HIV sensor.

  15. BioFET-SIM Web Interface: Implementation and Two Applications

    PubMed Central

    Hediger, Martin R.; Jensen, Jan H.; De Vico, Luca

    2012-01-01

    We present a web interface which allows us to conveniently set up calculations based on the BioFET-SIM model. With the interface, the signal of a BioFET sensor can be calculated depending on its parameters, as well as the signal dependence on pH. As an illustration, two case studies are presented. In the first case, a generic peptide with opposite charges on both ends is inverted in orientation on a semiconducting nanowire surface leading to a corresponding change in sign of the computed sensitivity of the device. In the second case, the binding of an antibody/antigen complex on the nanowire surface is studied in terms of orientation and analyte/nanowire surface distance. We demonstrate how the BioFET-SIM web interface can aid in the understanding of experimental data and postulate alternative ways of antibody/antigen orientation on the nanowire surface. PMID:23056201

  16. The BioHome: A spinoff of space technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Anne

    1990-01-01

    The discussion of the BioHome is prefaced with some information about the work done at the environmental lab over the past 15 years concerning environmental issues related to biological life support such as the use of water hyacinths for wastewater purification, artificial marshes, indoor polluted air revitalization, and the reduction of organic contaminants using a biological system comprised of plants and microorganisms. One of the main concerns, especially with respect to a closed environment, is whether or not these systems are expelling microorganisms into the air. Analyses are being conducted to determine the numbers and types of microbes that are emitted. The BioHome is a 650 sq ft habitat that will enable the evaluation of the efficiency of bioregenerative technology in a closed system. This BioHome system is described and its functions discussed.

  17. Immuno-Stimulatory Activity of Escherichia coli Mutants Producing Kdo2-Monophosphoryl-Lipid A or Kdo2-Pentaacyl-Monophosphoryl-Lipid A

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Biwen; Han, Yaning; Li, Ye; Li, Yanyan; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    Lipid A is the active center of lipopolysaccharide which also known as endotoxin. Monophosphoryl-lipid A (MPLA) has less toxicity but retains potent immunoadjuvant activity; therefore, it can be developed as adjuvant for improving the strength and duration of the immune response to antigens. However, MPLA cannot be chemically synthesized and can only be obtained by hydrolyzing lipopolysaccharide (LPS) purified from Gram-negative bacteria. Purifying LPS is difficult and time-consuming and can damage the structure of MPLA. In this study, Escherichia coli mutant strains HWB01 and HWB02 were constructed by deleting several genes and integrating Francisella novicida gene lpxE into the chromosome of E. coli wild type strain W3110. Compared with W3110, HWB01 and HWB02 synthesized very short LPS, Kdo2-monophosphoryl-lipid A (Kdo2-MPLA) and Kdo2-pentaacyl-monophosphoryl-lipid A (Kdo2-pentaacyl-MPLA), respectively. Structural changes of LPS in the outer membranes of HWB01 and HWB02 increased their membrane permeability, surface hydrophobicity, auto-aggregation ability and sensitivity to some antibiotics, but the abilities of these strains to activate the TLR4/MD-2 receptor of HKE-Blue hTLR4 cells were deceased. Importantly, purified Kdo2-MPLA and Kdo2-pentaacyl-MPLA differed from wild type LPS in their ability to stimulate the mammalian cell lines THP-1 and RAW264.7. The purification of Kdo2-MPLA and Kdo2-pentaacyl-MPLA from HWB01 and HWB02, respectively, is much easier than the purification of LPS from W3110, and these lipid A derivatives could be important tools for developing future vaccine adjuvants. PMID:26710252

  18. Bcl-2 immunoreactivity in salivary gland neoplasms is unrelated to the expression of mRNA for natural killer cell stimulatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-12.

    PubMed

    Hellquist, H B; Karlsson, M G; Viale, G; Karlsson, C; Davidsson, A; Dell'Orto, P; Olofsson, J

    1996-10-01

    Certain cytokines are involved in the generation of natural killer (NK) cells and participate in the regulation of the proto-oncogene bcl-2. We aimed to study the mRNA expression of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4 and IL-5, the composition of the tumour infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL), and the expression of bcl-2 in 14 benign and malignant human parotid tumours. T IL were predominantly composed of T lymphocytes and NK cells. We found evidence for the homing of T cells, and for generation of NK cells in the vicinity of the tumours. mRNA for IL-2 and IL-12, were identified but IL-4 mRNA was not found. The cytokine profiles and the composition of TIL of the two tumour categories were indistinguishable, suggesting that these host-response variables do not explain the differences in biological behaviour of these particular tumours. The results support a shift towards Th 1 (T helper 1) cells and interferon-gamma production, and that IL-12 also in vivo may play an important role in the regulatory interaction between innate resistance and adaptive immunity in tumour diseases. Most infiltrating lymphocytes showed strong expression of bcl-2; an interesting observation with regard to lymphocytic apoptosis in neoplastic diseases. The immunoreactivity for the bcl-2 protein varied considerably between and within tumours, and almost all benign tumours showed strong bcl-2 positively whereas several of the malignant tumours showed weak or absent staining. The variable expression of bcl-2 protein suggests a different susceptibility of tumour cells to apoptosis. The results also indicate that bcl-2 cannot pla a major role as protective agent in the specific apoptotic pathway induced by NK cells.

  19. Analytical development of a binuclear oxo-manganese complex bio-inspired on oxidase enzyme for doping control analysis of acetazolamide.

    PubMed

    Machini, Wesley B S; Teixeira, Marcos F S

    2016-05-15

    A bio-inspired electrochemical sensor using a binuclear oxo-manganese complex was evaluated and applied in the detection of a substance associated with doping in sports: acetazolamide (ACTZ). Investigation was made of the influence of different experimental variables on the electrocatalytic oxidation of ACTZ by the bio-inspired sensor, such as pH and interfering species. The bio-inspired sensor showed the best response in the range from 5.00×10(-9) to 7.00×10(-8) mol L(-1) ACTZ, with a linear range from 5.00×10(-9) to 2.50×10(-8) mol L(-1) and a detection limit of 4.76×10(-9) mol L(-1). The sensor exhibited characteristics similar to the Michaelis-Menten model of an enzymatic electrode, due to the use of a multinucleated complex of manganese with μ-oxo units, which was able to mimic the properties of enzymes with manganese as a cofactor in their composition, such as Mn-containing oxidase. The determination of ACTZ with the bio-inspired sensor was evaluated using three different synthetic biological fluids (plasma, saliva, and urine), demonstrating its viability for use with real samples. The analysis of ACTZ in real urine samples using the bio-inspired sensor, simulating the method adopted by the World Anti-Doping Agency, which revealed viable, suggesting a new and promising platform to be used in these analysis.

  20. Controlled continuous bio-hydrogen production using different biogas release strategies.

    PubMed

    Esquivel-Elizondo, S; Chairez, I; Salgado, E; Aranda, J S; Baquerizo, G; Garcia-Peña, E I

    2014-08-01

    Dark fermentation for bio-hydrogen (bio-H2) production is an easily operated and environmentally friendly technology. However, low bio-H2 production yield has been reported as its main drawback. Two strategies have been followed in the past to improve this fact: genetic modifications and adjusting the reaction conditions. In this paper, the second one is followed to regulate the bio-H2 release from the reactor. This operating condition alters the metabolic pathways and increased the bio-H2 production twice. Gas release was forced in the continuous culture to study the equilibrium in the mass transfer between the gaseous and liquid phases. This equilibrium depends on the H2, CO2, and volatile fatty acids production. The effect of reducing the bio-H2 partial pressure (bio-H2 pp) to enhance bio-H2 production was evaluated in a 30 L continuous stirred tank reactor. Three bio-H2 release strategies were followed: uncontrolled, intermittent, and constant. In the so called uncontrolled fermentation, without bio-H2 pp control, a bio-H2 molar yield of 1.2 mol/mol glucose was obtained. A sustained low bio-H2 pp of 0.06 atm increased the bio-H2 production rate from 16.1 to 108 mL/L/h with a stable bio-H2 percentage of 55% (v/v) and a molar yield of 1.9 mol/mol glucose. Biogas release enhanced bio-H2 production because lower bio-H2 pp, CO2 concentration, and reduced volatile fatty acids accumulation prevented the associated inhibitions and bio-H2 consumption.

  1. Platelet cytosolic 44-kDa protein is a substrate of cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation and is not recognized by antisera against the. alpha. subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein

    SciTech Connect

    Molina Y Vedia, L.M.; Reep, B.R.; Lapetina, E.G. )

    1988-08-01

    ADP-ribosylation induced by cholera toxin and pertussis toxin was studied in particulate and cytosolic fractions of human platelets. Platelets were disrupted by a cycle of freezing and thawing in the presence of a hyposmotic buffer containing protease inhibitors. In both fractions, the A subunit of cholera toxin ADP-ribosylates two proteins with molecular masses of 42 and 44 kDa, whereas pertussis toxin ADP-ribosylates a 41-kDa polypeptide. Two antisera against the {alpha} subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein recognize only the 42-kDa polypeptide. Cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation of the 42- and 44-kDa proteins is reduced by pretreatment of platelets with iloprost, a prostacyclin analog. The 44-kDa protein, which is substrate of cholera toxin, could be extracted completely from the membrane and recovered in the cytosolic fraction when the cells were disrupted by Dounce homogenization and the pellet was extensively washed. A 44-kDa protein can also be labeled with 8-azidoguanosine 5{prime}-({alpha}-{sup 32}P)triphosphate in the cytosol and membranes. These finding indicate that cholera and pertussis toxins produced covalent modifications of proteins present in particulate and cytosolic platelet fractions. Moreover, the 44-kDa protein might be an {alpha} subunit of a guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein that is not recognized by available antisera.

  2. The basic helix-loop-helix, leucine zipper transcription factor, USF (upstream stimulatory factor), is a key regulator of SF-1 (steroidogenic factor-1) gene expression in pituitary gonadotrope and steroidogenic cells.

    PubMed

    Harris, A N; Mellon, P L

    1998-05-01

    Tissue-specific expression of the mammalian FTZ-F1 gene is essential for adrenal and gonadal development and sexual differentiation. The FTZ-F1 gene encodes an orphan nuclear receptor, termed SF-1 (steroidogenic factor-1) or Ad4BP, which is a primary transcriptional regulator of several hormone and steroidogenic enzyme genes that are critical for normal physiological function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in reproduction. The objective of the current study is to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying transcriptional regulation of SF-1 gene expression in the pituitary. We have studied a series of deletion and point mutations in the SF-1 promoter region for transcriptional activity in alphaT3-1 and L/betaT2 (pituitary gonadotrope), CV-1, JEG-3, and Y1 (adrenocortical) cell lines. Our results indicate that maximal expression of the SF-1 promoter in all cell types requires an E box element at -82/-77. This E box sequence (CACGTG) is identical to the binding element for USF (upstream stimulatory factor), a member of the helix-loop-helix family of transcription factors. Studies of the SF-1 gene E box element using gel mobility shift and antibody supershift assays indicate that USF may be a key transcriptional regulator of SF-1 gene expression.

  3. The Interplay of mRNA Stimulatory Signals Required for AUU-Mediated Initiation and Programmed −1 Ribosomal Frameshifting in Decoding of Transposable Element IS911▿†

    PubMed Central

    Prère, Marie-Françoise; Canal, Isabelle; Wills, Norma M.; Atkins, John F.; Fayet, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    The IS911 bacterial transposable element uses −1 programmed translational frameshifting to generate the protein required for its mobility: translation initiated in one gene (orfA) shifts to the −1 frame and continues in a second overlapping gene (orfB), thus generating the OrfAB transposase. The A-AAA-AAG frameshift site of IS911 is flanked by two stimulatory elements, an upstream Shine-Dalgarno sequence and a downstream stem-loop. We show here that, while they can act independently, these stimulators have a synergistic effect when combined. Mutagenic analyses revealed features of the complex stem-loop that make it a low-efficiency stimulator. They also revealed the dual role of the upstream Shine-Dalgarno sequence as (i) a stimulator of frameshifting, by itself more potent than the stem-loop, and (ii) a mandatory determinant of initiation of OrfB protein synthesis on an AUU codon directly preceding the A6G motif. Both roles rely on transient base pairing of the Shine-Dalgarno sequence with the 3′ end of 16S rRNA. Because of its effect on frameshifting, the Shine-Dalgarno sequence is an important determinant of the level of transposase in IS911-containing cells, and hence of the frequency of transposition. PMID:21478364

  4. BioWarehouse: a bioinformatics database warehouse toolkit

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Thomas J; Pouliot, Yannick; Wagner, Valerie; Gupta, Priyanka; Stringer-Calvert, David WJ; Tenenbaum, Jessica D; Karp, Peter D

    2006-01-01

    Background This article addresses the problem of interoperation of heterogeneous bioinformatics databases. Results We introduce BioWarehouse, an open source toolkit for constructing bioinformatics database warehouses using the MySQL and Oracle relational database managers. BioWarehouse integrates its component databases into a common representational framework within a single database management system, thus enabling multi-database queries using the Structured Query Language (SQL) but also facilitating a variety of database integration tasks such as comparative analysis and data mining. BioWarehouse currently supports the integration of a pathway-centric set of databases including ENZYME, KEGG, and BioCyc, and in addition the UniProt, GenBank, NCBI Taxonomy, and CMR databases, and the Gene Ontology. Loader tools, written in the C and JAVA languages, parse and load these databases into a relational database schema. The loaders also apply a degree of semantic normalization to their respective source data, decreasing semantic heterogeneity. The schema supports the following bioinformatics datatypes: chemical compounds, biochemical reactions, metabolic pathways, proteins, genes, nucleic acid sequences, features on protein and nucleic-acid sequences, organisms, organism taxonomies, and controlled vocabularies. As an application example, we applied BioWarehouse to determine the fraction of biochemically characterized enzyme activities for which no sequences exist in the public sequence databases. The answer is that no sequence exists for 36% of enzyme activities for which EC numbers have been assigned. These gaps in sequence data significantly limit the accuracy of genome annotation and metabolic pathway prediction, and are a barrier for metabolic engineering. Complex queries of this type provide examples of the value of the data warehousing approach to bioinformatics research. Conclusion BioWarehouse embodies significant progress on the database integration problem for

  5. BioSpider: a web server for automating metabolome annotations.

    PubMed

    Knox, Craig; Shrivastava, Savita; Stothard, Paul; Eisner, Roman; Wishart, David S

    2007-01-01

    One of the growing challenges in life science research lies in finding useful, descriptive or quantitative data about newly reported biomolecules (genes, proteins, metabolites and drugs). An even greater challenge is finding information that connects these genes, proteins, drugs or metabolites to each other. Much of this information is scattered through hundreds of different databases, abstracts or books and almost none of it is particularly well integrated. While some efforts are being undertaken at the NCBI and EBI to integrate many different databases together, this still falls short of the goal of having some kind of human-readable synopsis that summarizes the state of knowledge about a given biomolecule - especially small molecules. To address this shortfall, we have developed BioSpider. BioSpider is essentially an automated report generator designed specifically to tabulate and summarize data on biomolecules - both large and small. Specifically, BioSpider allows users to type in almost any kind of biological or chemical identifier (protein/gene name, sequence, accession number, chemical name, brand name, SMILES string, InCHI string, CAS number, etc.) and it returns an in-depth synoptic report (approximately 3-30 pages in length) about that biomolecule and any other biomolecule it may target. This summary includes physico-chemical parameters, images, models, data files, descriptions and predictions concerning the query molecule. BioSpider uses a web-crawler to scan through dozens of public databases and employs a variety of specially developed text mining tools and locally developed prediction tools to find, extract and assemble data for its reports. Because of its breadth, depth and comprehensiveness, we believe BioSpider will prove to be a particularly valuable tool for researchers in metabolomics. BioSpider is available at: www.biospider.ca PMID:17990488

  6. Large-scale biohydrogen production from bio-oil.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Susanjib; Kumar, Amit

    2010-10-01

    Large amount of hydrogen is consumed during the upgrading of bitumen into synthetic crude oil (SCO), and this hydrogen is exclusively produced from natural gas in Western Canada. Because of large amount of emission from natural gas, alternative sources for hydrogen fuel especially renewable feedstocks could significantly reduce CO(2) emissions. In this study, biomass is converted to bio-oil by fast pyrolysis. This bio-oil is steam reformed near bitumen upgrading plant for producing hydrogen fuel. A techno-economic model is developed to estimate the cost of hydrogen from biomass through the pathway of fast pyrolysis. Three different feedstocks including whole-tree biomass, forest residues (i.e. limbs, branches, and tops of tree produced during logging operations), and straw (mostly from wheat and barley crops) are considered for biohydrogen production. Delivered cost of biohydrogen from whole-tree-based biomass ($2.40/kg of H(2)) is lower than that of forest residues ($3.00/kg of H(2)) and agricultural residues ($4.55/kg of H(2)) at a plant capacity of 2000 dry tonnes/day. In this study, bio-oil is produced in the field/forest and transported to a distance of 500 km from the centralized remote bio-oil production plant to bitumen upgrading plant. Feedstock delivery cost and capital cost are the largest cost contributors to the bio-oil production cost, while more than 50% of the cost of biohydrogen production is contributed by bio-oil production and transportation. Carbon credits of $133, $214, and $356/tonne of CO(2) equivalent could make whole-tree, forest residues, and straw-based biohydrogen production competitive with natural gas-based H(2) for a natural gas price of $5/GJ, respectively.

  7. The water footprint of sweeteners and bio-ethanol.

    PubMed

    Gerbens-Leenes, Winnie; Hoekstra, Arjen Y

    2012-04-01

    An increasing demand for food together with a growing demand for energy crops result in an increasing demand for and competition over water. Sugar cane, sugar beet and maize are not only essential food crops, but also important feedstock for bio-ethanol. Crop growth requires water, a scarce resource. This study aims to assess the green, blue and grey water footprint (WF) of sweeteners and bio-ethanol from sugar cane, sugar beet and maize in the main producing countries. The WFs of sweeteners and bio-ethanol are mainly determined by the crop type that is used as a source and by agricultural practise and agro-climatic conditions; process water footprints are relatively small. The weighted global average WF of sugar cane is 209 m(3)/tonne; for sugar beet this is 133 m(3)/tonne and for maize 1222 m(3)/tonne. Large regional differences in WFs indicate that WFs of crops for sweeteners and bio-ethanol can be improved. It is more favourable to use maize as a feedstock for sweeteners or bio-ethanol than sugar beet or sugar cane. The WF of sugar cane contributes to water stress in the Indus and Ganges basins. In the Ukraine, the large grey WF of sugar beet contributes to water pollution. In some western European countries, blue WFs of sugar beet and maize need a large amount of available blue water for agriculture. The allocation of the limited global water resources to bio-energy on a large scale will be at the cost of water allocation to food and nature.

  8. Computing through Scientific Abstractions in SysBioPS

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, George; Stephan, Eric G.; Gracio, Deborah K.

    2004-10-13

    Today, biologists and bioinformaticists have a tremendous amount of computational power at their disposal. With the availability of supercomputers, burgeoning scientific databases and digital libraries such as GenBank and PubMed, and pervasive computational environments such as the Grid, biologists have access to a wealth of computational capabilities and scientific data at hand. Yet, the rapid development of computational technologies has far exceeded the typical biologist’s ability to effectively apply the technology in their research. Computational sciences research and development efforts such as the Biology Workbench, BioSPICE (Biological Simulation Program for Intra-Cellular Evaluation), and BioCoRE (Biological Collaborative Research Environment) are important in connecting biologists and their scientific problems to computational infrastructures. On the Computational Cell Environment and Heuristic Entity-Relationship Building Environment projects at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, we are jointly developing a new breed of scientific problem solving environment called SysBioPSE that will allow biologists to access and apply computational resources in the scientific research context. In contrast to other computational science environments, SysBioPSE operates as an abstraction layer above a computational infrastructure. The goal of SysBioPSE is to allow biologists to apply computational resources in the context of the scientific problems they are addressing and the scientific perspectives from which they conduct their research. More specifically, SysBioPSE allows biologists to capture and represent scientific concepts and theories and experimental processes, and to link these views to scientific applications, data repositories, and computer systems.

  9. Sizing nanomaterials in bio-fluids by cFRAP enables protein aggregation measurements and diagnosis of bio-barrier permeability

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Ranhua; Vandenbroucke, Roosmarijn E.; Broos, Katleen; Brans, Toon; Van Wonterghem, Elien; Libert, Claude; Demeester, Jo; De Smedt, Stefaan C.; Braeckmans, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Sizing nanomaterials in complex biological fluids, such as blood, remains a great challenge in spite of its importance for a wide range of biomedical applications. In drug delivery, for instance, it is essential that aggregation of protein-based drugs is avoided as it may alter their efficacy or elicit immune responses. Similarly it is of interest to determine which size of molecules can pass through biological barriers in vivo to diagnose pathologies, such as sepsis. Here, we report on continuous fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (cFRAP) as a analytical method enabling size distribution measurements of nanomaterials (1–100 nm) in undiluted biological fluids. We demonstrate that cFRAP allows to measure protein aggregation in human serum and to determine the permeability of intestinal and vascular barriers in vivo. cFRAP is a new analytical technique that paves the way towards exciting new applications that benefit from nanomaterial sizing in bio-fluids. PMID:27653841

  10. Sizing nanomaterials in bio-fluids by cFRAP enables protein aggregation measurements and diagnosis of bio-barrier permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Ranhua; Vandenbroucke, Roosmarijn E.; Broos, Katleen; Brans, Toon; van Wonterghem, Elien; Libert, Claude; Demeester, Jo; de Smedt, Stefaan C.; Braeckmans, Kevin

    2016-09-01

    Sizing nanomaterials in complex biological fluids, such as blood, remains a great challenge in spite of its importance for a wide range of biomedical applications. In drug delivery, for instance, it is essential that aggregation of protein-based drugs is avoided as it may alter their efficacy or elicit immune responses. Similarly it is of interest to determine which size of molecules can pass through biological barriers in vivo to diagnose pathologies, such as sepsis. Here, we report on continuous fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (cFRAP) as a analytical method enabling size distribution measurements of nanomaterials (1-100 nm) in undiluted biological fluids. We demonstrate that cFRAP allows to measure protein aggregation in human serum and to determine the permeability of intestinal and vascular barriers in vivo. cFRAP is a new analytical technique that paves the way towards exciting new applications that benefit from nanomaterial sizing in bio-fluids.

  11. Nicotine and ethanol co-use in Long-Evans rats: Stimulatory effects of perinatal exposure to a fat-rich diet.

    PubMed

    Karatayev, Olga; Lukatskaya, Olga; Moon, Sang-Ho; Guo, Wei-Ran; Chen, Dan; Algava, Diane; Abedi, Susan; Leibowitz, Sarah F

    2015-08-01

    Clinical studies demonstrate frequent co-existence of nicotine and alcohol abuse and suggest that this may result, in part, from the ready access to and intake of fat-rich diets. Whereas animal studies show that high-fat diet intake in adults can enhance the consumption of either nicotine or ethanol and that maternal consumption of a fat-rich diet during pregnancy increases operant responding for nicotine in offspring, little is known about the impact of dietary fat on the co-abuse of these two drugs. The goal of this study was to test in Long-Evans rats the effects of perinatal exposure to fat on the co-use of nicotine and ethanol, using a novel paradigm that involves simultaneous intravenous (IV) self-administration of these two drugs. Fat- vs. chow-exposed offspring were characterized and compared, first in terms of their nicotine self-administration behavior, then in terms of their nicotine/ethanol self-administration behavior, and lastly in terms of their self-administration of ethanol in the absence of nicotine. The results demonstrate that maternal consumption of fat compared to low-fat chow during gestation and lactation significantly stimulates nicotine self-administration during fixed-ratio testing. It also increases nicotine/ethanol self-administration during fixed-ratio and dose-response testing, with BEC elevated to 120 mg/dL, and causes an increase in breakpoint during progressive ratio testing. Of particular note is the finding that rats perinatally exposed to fat self-administer significantly more of the nicotine/ethanol mixture as compared to nicotine alone, an effect not evident in the chow-control rats. After removal of nicotine from the nicotine/ethanol mixture, this difference between the fat- and chow-exposed rats was lost, with both groups failing to acquire the self-administration of ethanol alone. Together, these findings suggest that perinatal exposure to a fat-rich diet, in addition to stimulating self-administration of nicotine, causes

  12. The Stimulatory Adenosine Receptor ADORA2B Regulates Serotonin (5-HT) Synthesis and Release in Oxygen-Depleted EC Cells in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Svejda, Bernhard; Alaimo, Daniele; Brenna, Oystein; Pfragner, Roswitha; Gustafsson, Bjorn I.; Kidd, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Objective We recently demonstrated that hypoxia, a key feature of IBD, increases enterochromaffin (EC) cell 5-HT secretion, which is also physiologically regulated by the ADORA2B mechanoreceptor. Since hypoxia is associated with increased extracellular adenosine, we wanted to examine whether this nucleotide amplifies HIF-1α-mediated 5-HT secretion. Design The effects of hypoxia were studied on IBD mucosa, isolated IBD-EC cells, isolated normal EC cells and the EC cell tumor derived cell line KRJ-1. Hypoxia (0.5% O2) was compared to NECA (adenosine agonist), MRS1754 (ADORA2B receptor antagonist) and SCH442146 (ADORA2A antagonist) on HIF signaling and 5-HT secretion. Antisense approaches were used to mechanistically evaluate EC cells in vitro. PCR and western blot were used to analyze transcript and protein levels of HIF-1α signaling and neuroendocrine cell function. An animal model of colitis was evaluated to confirm hypoxia:adenosine signaling in vivo. Results HIF-1α is upregulated in IBD mucosa and IBD-EC cells, the majority (∼90%) of which express an activated phenotype in situ. Hypoxia stimulated 5-HT release maximally at 30 mins, an effect amplified by NECA and selectively inhibited by MRS1754, through phosphorylation of TPH-1 and activation of VMAT-1. Transient transfection with Renilla luciferase under hypoxia transcriptional response element (HRE) control identified that ADORA2B activated HIF-1α signaling under hypoxic conditions. Additional signaling pathways associated with hypoxia:adenosine included MAP kinase and CREB. Antisense approaches mechanistically confirmed that ADORA2B signaling was linked to these pathways and 5-HT release under hypoxic conditions. Hypoxia:adenosine activation which could be reversed by 5′-ASA treatment was confirmed in a TNBS-model. Conclusion Hypoxia induced 5-HT synthesis and secretion is amplified by ADORA2B signaling via MAPK/CREB and TPH-1 activation. Targeting ADORA2s may decrease EC cell 5-HT production and

  13. Methods for the in vitro determination of an individual disposition towards TH1- or TH2-reactivity by the application of appropriate stimulatory antigens

    PubMed Central

    BARTH, H; BERG, P A; KLEIN, R

    2003-01-01

    In this study we performed several methods for the determination of cytokines (RT-PCR for the demonstration of cytokine mRNA and flow cytometry for the analysis of intracellular cytokines) and compared them with a recently established test system stimulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) with TH1- and TH2-relevant recall antigens and analysing type 1 and type 2 cytokines by ELISA. Aim of the study was therefore to evaluate the reliability of TH1/TH2 cytokine profiles in two individuals with different types of an allergic/atopic disposition: one of them showed a strong TH1/type 1-mediated tuberculin-reaction (subject A), the other (subject B) revealed elevated IgE-levels and eosinophil counts (TH2/type 2-mediated). PBMC were incubated with the type 1-antigen purified protein derivative (PPD) and the type 2-antigen tetanus-toxoid (TT) for seven days. From the comparison of ELISA with RT-PCR and flow cytometry-analysis it became evident that all three methods allowed the definition of subject A as a ‘type 1-responder’. Subject B showed a pure type 2-response in the ELISA method; PCR and flow cytometry analysis revealed the simultaneous production of type 1- and type 2-cytokines resulting in a mixed type 1/type 2-profile. Active immunization of subject A with TT at the end of the observation period of 12 months resulted in a transient shift from type 1- to a mixed type 1/type 2-profile (simultaneous PPD-induced IFN-γ- and TT-induced IL-5 production). From this pilot study based on clear cut clinical criteria concerning either a humoral or cellular immunological reactivity towards allergens/antigens it is suggested that the determination of type 1/type 2-cytokines by ELISA in supernatants of PBMC stimulated with type 1/type 2-relevant antigens is a useful approach for a better classification of ‘type1-’ or ‘type 2-responder’. PMID:12974758

  14. Nicotine and ethanol co-use in Long-Evans rats: Stimulatory effects of perinatal exposure to a fat-rich diet

    PubMed Central

    Karatayev, Olga; Lukatskaya, Olga; Moon, Sang-Ho; Guo, Wei-Ran; Chen, Dan; Algava, Diane; Abedi, Susan; Leibowitz, Sarah F.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies demonstrate frequent co-existence of nicotine and alcohol abuse and suggest that this may result, in part, from the ready access to and intake of fat-rich diets. Whereas animal studies show that high-fat diet intake in adults can enhance the consumption of either nicotine or ethanol and that maternal consumption of a fat-rich diet during pregnancy increases operant responding for nicotine in offspring, little is known about the impact of dietary fat on the co-abuse of these two drugs. The goal of this study was to test in Long-Evans rats the effects of perinatal exposure to fat on the co-use of nicotine and ethanol, using a novel paradigm that involves simultaneous intravenous (IV) self-administration of these two drugs. Fat- vs. chow-exposed offspring were characterized and compared, first in terms of their nicotine self-administration behavior, then in terms of their nicotine/ethanol self-administration behavior, and lastly in terms of their self-administration of ethanol in the absence of nicotine. The results demonstrate that maternal consumption of fat compared to low-fat chow during gestation and lactation significantly stimulates nicotine self-administration during fixed-ratio testing. It also increases nicotine/ethanol self-administration during fixed-ratio and dose-response testing, with BEC elevated to 120 mg/dL, and causes an increase in breakpoint during progressive ratio testing. Of particular note is the finding that rats perinatally exposed to fat self-administer significantly more of the nicotine/ethanol mixture as compared to nicotine alone, an effect not evident in the chow-control rats. After removal of nicotine from the nicotine/ethanol mixture, this difference between the fat- and chow-exposed rats was lost, with both groups failing to acquire the self-administration of ethanol alone. Together, these findings suggest that perinatal exposure to a fat-rich diet, in addition to stimulating self-administration of nicotine, causes

  15. Bio-speckle assessment of bruising in fruits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajuelo, M.; Baldwin, G.; Rabal, H.; Cap, N.; Arizaga, R.; Trivi, M.

    2003-07-01

    The dynamic speckle patterns or bio-speckle is a phenomenon produced by laser illumination of active materials, such as a biological tissue. Fruits, even hard peel ones, show a speckle activity that can be related to maturity, turgor, damage, aging, and mechanical properties. In this case, we suggest a bio-speckle technique as a potential methodology for the study of impact on apples and the analysis of bruises produced by them. The aim is to correlate physical properties of apples with quality factors using a non-contact and non-invasive technique.

  16. BioData: a national aquatic bioassessment database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacCoy, Dorene

    2011-01-01

    BioData is a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) web-enabled database that for the first time provides for the capture, curation, integration, and delivery of bioassessment data collected by local, regional, and national USGS projects. BioData offers field biologists advanced capabilities for entering, editing, and reviewing the macroinvertebrate, algae, fish, and supporting habitat data from rivers and streams. It offers data archival and curation capabilities that protect and maintain data for the long term. BioData provides the Federal, State, and local governments, as well as the scientific community, resource managers, the private sector, and the public with easy access to tens of thousands of samples collected nationwide from thousands of stream and river sites. BioData also provides the USGS with centralized data storage for delivering data to other systems and applications through automated web services. BioData allows users to combine data sets of known quality from different projects in various locations over time. It provides a nationally aggregated database for users to leverage data from many independent projects that, until now, was not feasible at this scale. For example, from 1991 to 2011, the USGS Idaho Water Science Center collected more than 816 bioassessment samples from 63 sites for the National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program and more than 477 samples from 39 sites for a cooperative USGS and State of Idaho Statewide Water Quality Network (fig. 1). Using BioData, 20 years of samples collected for both of these projects can be combined for analysis. BioData delivers all of the data using current taxonomic nomenclature, thus relieving users of the difficult and time-consuming task of harmonizing taxonomy among samples collected during different time periods. Fish data are reported using the Integrated Taxonomic Information Service (ITIS) Taxonomic Serial Numbers (TSN's). A simple web-data input interface and self-guided, public data

  17. Bio-inspired supramolecular self-assembly towards soft nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    LIN, Yiyang; MAO, Chuanbin

    2011-01-01

    Supramolecular self-assembly has proven to be a reliable approach towards versatile nanomaterials based on multiple weak intermolecular forces. In this review, the development of bio-inspired supramolecular self-assembly into soft materials and their applications are summarized. Molecular systems used in bio-inspired “bottom-up self-assembly” involve small organic molecules, peptides or proteins, nucleic acids, and viruses. Self-assembled soft nanomaterials have been exploited in various applications such as inorganic nanomaterial synthesis, drug or gene delivery, tissue engineering, and so on. PMID:21980594

  18. Bio-Refineries Bioprocess Technologies for Waste-Water Treatment, Energy and Product Valorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keith Cowan, A.

    2010-04-01

    Increasing pressure is being exerted on communities and nations to source energy from forms other than fossil fuels. Also, potable water is becoming a scarce resource in many parts of the world, and there remains a large divide in the demand and utilization of plant products derived from genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and non-GMOs. The most extensive user and manager of terrestrial ecosystems is agriculture which is also the de facto steward of natural resources. As stated by Miller (2008) no other industry or institution comes close to the comparative advantage held for this vital responsibility while simultaneously providing food, fiber, and other biology-based products, including energy. Since modern commercial agriculture is transitioning from the production of bulk commodities to the provision of standardized products and specific-attribute raw materials for differentiated markets, we can argue that processes such as mass cultivation of microalgae and the concept of bio-refineries be seen as part of a `new' agronomy. EBRU is currently exploring the integration of bioprocess technologies using microalgae as biocatalysts to achieve waste-water treatment, water polishing and endocrine disruptor (EDC) removal, sustainable energy production, and exploitation of the resultant biomass in agriculture as foliar fertilizer and seed coatings, and for commercial extraction of bulk commodities such as bio-oils and lecithin. This presentation will address efforts to establish a fully operational solar-driven microalgae bio-refinery for use not only in waste remediation but to transform waste and biomass to energy, fuels, and other useful materials (valorisation), with particular focus on environmental quality and sustainability goals.

  19. Bio-Imaging of Colorectal Cancer Models Using Near Infrared Labeled Epidermal Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Gadi; Lecht, Shimon; Arien-Zakay, Hadar; Ettinger, Keren; Amsalem, Orit; Oron-Herman, Mor; Yavin, Eylon; Prus, Diana; Benita, Simon; Nissan, Aviram; Lazarovici, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Novel strategies that target the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have led to the clinical development of monoclonal antibodies, which treat metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) but only subgroups of patients with increased wild type KRAS and EGFR gene copy, respond to these agents. Furthermore, resistance to EGFR blockade inevitably occurred, making future therapy difficult. Novel bio-imaging (BOI) methods may assist in quantization of EGFR in mCRC tissue thus complementing the immunohistochemistry methodology, in guiding the future treatment of these patients. The aim of the present study was to explore the usefulness of near infrared-labeled EGF (EGF-NIR) for bio-imaging of CRC using in vitro and in vivo orthotopic tumor CRC models and ex vivo human CRC tissues. We describe the preparation and characterization of EGF-NIR and investigate binding, using BOI of a panel of CRC cell culture models resembling heterogeneity of human CRC tissues. EGF-NIR was specifically and selectively bound by EGFR expressing CRC cells, the intensity of EGF-NIR signal to background ratio (SBR) reflected EGFR levels, dose-response and time course imaging experiments provided optimal conditions for quantization of EGFR levels by BOI. EGF-NIR imaging of mice with HT-29 orthotopic CRC tumor indicated that EGF-NIR is more slowly cleared from the tumor and the highest SBR between tumor and normal adjacent tissue was achieved two days post-injection. Furthermore, images of dissected tissues demonstrated accumulation of EGF-NIR in the tumor and liver. EGF-NIR specifically and strongly labeled EGFR positive human CRC tissues while adjacent CRC tissue and EGFR negative tissues expressed weak NIR signals. This study emphasizes the use of EGF-NIR for preclinical studies. Combined with other methods, EGF-NIR could provide an additional bio-imaging specific tool in the standardization of measurements of EGFR expression in CRC tissues. PMID:23144978

  20. BioSig: A bioinformatic system for studying the mechanism of intra-cell signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Parvin, B.; Cong, G.; Fontenay, G.; Taylor, J.; Henshall, R.; Barcellos-Hoff, M.H.

    2000-12-15

    Mapping inter-cell signaling pathways requires an integrated view of experimental and informatic protocols. BioSig provides the foundation of cataloging inter-cell responses as a function of particular conditioning, treatment, staining, etc. for either in vivo or in vitro experiments. This paper outlines the system architecture, a functional data model for representing experimental protocols, algorithms for image analysis, and the required statistical analysis. The architecture provides remote shared operation of an inverted optical microscope, and couples instrument operation with images acquisition and annotation. The information is stored in an object-oriented database. The algorithms extract structural information such as morphology and organization, and map it to functional information such as inter-cellular responses. An example of usage of this system is included.