Science.gov

Sample records for bio stimulatory response

  1. Stimulatory response of neutrophils from periodontitis patients with periodontal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Restaíno, C G; Chaparro, A; Valenzuela, M A; Kettlun, A M; Vernal, R; Silva, A; Puente, J; Jaque, M P; León, R; Gamonal, J

    2007-09-01

    Neutrophils play a crucial role in the defense of invading bacteria by releasing biologically active molecules. The response of peripheral blood neutrophils was studied in periodontitis-affected patients and in healthy controls towards stimulation to Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) extracts. Peripheral venous blood was drawn from 23 adult patients with moderate to advanced chronic periodontitis (probing depth >or=5 mm, attachment loss >or=3 mm), and 30 healthy volunteers. Neutrophil response followed by metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion was assayed by zymography and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively, on both whole blood and purified neutrophils. In addition to periodontal pathogen extracts, known stimulating agents were tested, such as Escherichia coli-lipopolysaccharide (LPS), phytohemagglutinin, and zymosan A. Neutrophil response, expressed as a secretion ratio under stimulated and non-stimulated conditions, measured in whole blood, showed no differences between periodontitis and healthy controls. Instead, in purified neutrophils from patients, MMP-9 exhibited a significantly higher secretion ratio with LPS and Pg (1.5- to 2-fold), whereas IL-8 showed a larger increase in secretion ratio (3- to 7-fold) in the presence of Pg, Aa, LPS, and zymosan A. Peripheral neutrophils of periodontitis-affected patients are more reactive as suggested by their significantly higher response toward periodontal pathogen extracts and other stimulating agents.

  2. Validation of an interferon stimulatory response element reporter gene assay for quantifying type I interferons.

    PubMed

    McCoski, S R; Xie, M; Hall, E B; Mercadante, P M; Spencer, T E; Lonergan, P; Ealy, A D

    2014-04-01

    The goal of this work was to develop a virus-free, cell-based interferon (IFN) bioassay and determine the utility of this assay on biological samples that contained IFN-τ, the trophoblast-secreted maternal recognition of pregnancy factor in ruminants. Madin-Darby bovine kidney cells were transduced with lentiviral particles that contained a firefly luciferase reporter construct driven by an IFN stimulatory response element (ISRE). Stably transduced cells were selected with the use of puromycin resistance. A linear, dose-responsive response was detected with human IFN-α and ovine IFN-τ. Interferon activity was detected in conditioned media from bovine trophoblast cells and uterine flushes collected from sheep and cattle. Activity also was detected in media collected after individual or small group culture of in vitro-produced bovine blastocysts at day 8 to 10 after fertilization. In summary, this IFN stimulatory response element-reporter assay may be used as an alternative to virus-dependent, cytopathic assays. It contains a similar sensitivity to IFNs and can be completed in a shorter time than cytopathic assays and does not require heightened biosafety conditions after cell transduction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Stimulatory effect of Eucalyptus essential oil on innate cell-mediated immune response.

    PubMed

    Serafino, Annalucia; Sinibaldi Vallebona, Paola; Andreola, Federica; Zonfrillo, Manuela; Mercuri, Luana; Federici, Memmo; Rasi, Guido; Garaci, Enrico; Pierimarchi, Pasquale

    2008-04-18

    Besides few data concerning the antiseptic properties against a range of microbial agents and the anti-inflammatory potential both in vitro and in vivo, little is known about the influence of Eucalyptus oil (EO) extract on the monocytic/macrophagic system, one of the primary cellular effectors of the immune response against pathogen attacks. The activities of this natural extract have mainly been recognized through clinical experience, but there have been relatively little scientific studies on its biological actions. Here we investigated whether EO extract is able to affect the phagocytic ability of human monocyte derived macrophages (MDMs) in vitro and of rat peripheral blood monocytes/granulocytes in vivo in absence or in presence of immuno-suppression induced by the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Morphological activation of human MDMs was analysed by scanning electron microscopy. Phagocytic activity was tested: i) in vitro in EO treated and untreated MDMs, by confocal microscopy after fluorescent beads administration; ii) in vivo in monocytes/granulocytes from peripheral blood of immuno-competent or 5-FU immuno-suppressed rats, after EO oral administration, by flow cytometry using fluorescein-labelled E. coli. Cytokine release by MDMs was determined using the BD Cytometric Bead Array human Th1/Th2 cytokine kit. EO is able to induce activation of MDMs, dramatically stimulating their phagocytic response. EO-stimulated internalization is coupled to low release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and requires integrity of the microtubule network, suggesting that EO may act by means of complement receptor-mediated phagocytosis. Implementation of innate cell-mediated immune response was also observed in vivo after EO administration, mainly involving the peripheral blood monocytes/granulocytes. The 5-FU/EO combined treatment inhibited the 5-FU induced myelotoxicity and raised the phagocytic activity of the granulocytic/monocytic system, significantly

  4. Comparative Ethanol-Induced Potentiation of Stimulatory Responses to Dexmethylphenidate Versus Methylphenidate.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Kennerly S; Straughn, Arthur B; Reeves, Owen T; Bernstein, Hilary; Malcolm, Robert

    2015-08-01

    The potentiation of positive subjective responses to immediate-release dexmethylphenidate (d-MPH) or dl-methylphenidate (dl-MPH) by ethanol was investigated over the time course of maximal drug exposure after a single dose. In a 4-way, randomized, crossover study design, 12 men and 12 women normal volunteers received d-MPH (0.15 mg/kg) or dl-MPH (0.3 mg/kg) with or without ethanol (0.6 g/kg). Serial visual analog scales were used as surrogates for drug abuse liability ("high," "good," "like," "stimulated," and "any drug effect"). Combining pure d-MPH with ethanol significantly (P < 0.005) increased the area under the effect curves (AUC(0-5.25h)) of all 5 subscales. The dl-MPH-ethanol combination significantly (P < 0.05) increased these AUCs with the exception of like (P = 0.08). Effects of the pure d-MPH-ethanol combination exhibited delayed potentiation relative to dl-MPH-ethanol. A pharmacokinetic interaction between the l-isomer of dl-MPH and ethanol has previously been shown to increase early exposure to d-MPH. Administration of the pure isomer d-MPH precludes this absorption phase pharmacokinetic interaction with ethanol. This notwithstanding, the pure d-MPH-ethanol combination resulted in comparable, if not greater, cumulative stimulant potentiation than the dl-MPH-ethanol combination. These findings provide evidence of a pharmacodynamic component to d-MPH-ethanol synergistic interactions and carry implications for the rational drug individualization in the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

  5. Non-responsiveness of antigen-experienced CD4 T cells reflects more stringent co-stimulatory requirements.

    PubMed Central

    Hamel, M E; Noteboom, E; Kruisbeek, A M

    1998-01-01

    We recently reported that previously activated T cells, irrespective of the nature of the first stimulus they encountered, are unable to respond to Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), nor to soluble anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (mAb) presented by splenic antigen-presenting cells (APC). Such previously activated T cells are, however, fully capable of responding to plate-bound anti-CD3 plus splenic APC. These data suggest differential integration of the T-cell receptor (TCR) and co-stimulatory signalling pathways in naive versus antigen-experienced T cells. Consistent with this hypothesis, anti-CD28 mAb restores the proliferative capacity of resting ex vivo CD45RBlo CD4+ T cells (representing previously activated T cells) to both soluble anti-CD3 mAb and SEB. Interestingly, mAb-mediated engagement of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) completely negates the rescue effects mediated by anti-CD28 mAb in CD45RBlo cells. Nevertheless, the non-responsiveness of CD45RBlo CD4+ T cells cannot be reversed by anti-CTLA-4 Fab fragments, indicating that it is not related to negative regulatory effects of CTLA-4 engagement itself. Interestingly, the addition of interleukin-2 (IL-2) restores the proliferative capacity of CD45RBlo CD4+ T cells to SEB and soluble anti-CD3 mAb. Moreover, when rescued by IL-2, the cells are less susceptible to the negative regulatory effects of CTLA-4 engagement. Together, these findings suggest that the non-responsiveness of CD45RBlo CD4+ T cells to certain stimuli may be related to inadequate TCR signalling, primarily affecting IL-2 production. Images Figure 1 PMID:9640247

  6. Non-responsiveness of antigen-experienced CD4 T cells reflects more stringent co-stimulatory requirements.

    PubMed

    Hamel, M E; Noteboom, E; Kruisbeek, A M

    1998-03-01

    We recently reported that previously activated T cells, irrespective of the nature of the first stimulus they encountered, are unable to respond to Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), nor to soluble anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (mAb) presented by splenic antigen-presenting cells (APC). Such previously activated T cells are, however, fully capable of responding to plate-bound anti-CD3 plus splenic APC. These data suggest differential integration of the T-cell receptor (TCR) and co-stimulatory signalling pathways in naive versus antigen-experienced T cells. Consistent with this hypothesis, anti-CD28 mAb restores the proliferative capacity of resting ex vivo CD45RBlo CD4+ T cells (representing previously activated T cells) to both soluble anti-CD3 mAb and SEB. Interestingly, mAb-mediated engagement of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) completely negates the rescue effects mediated by anti-CD28 mAb in CD45RBlo cells. Nevertheless, the non-responsiveness of CD45RBlo CD4+ T cells cannot be reversed by anti-CTLA-4 Fab fragments, indicating that it is not related to negative regulatory effects of CTLA-4 engagement itself. Interestingly, the addition of interleukin-2 (IL-2) restores the proliferative capacity of CD45RBlo CD4+ T cells to SEB and soluble anti-CD3 mAb. Moreover, when rescued by IL-2, the cells are less susceptible to the negative regulatory effects of CTLA-4 engagement. Together, these findings suggest that the non-responsiveness of CD45RBlo CD4+ T cells to certain stimuli may be related to inadequate TCR signalling, primarily affecting IL-2 production.

  7. Effects of vector-averaged gravity on the response to different stimulatory signals in T-Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadrucci, Sonia; Henggeler, Daniele; Lovis, Pascal; Lambers, Britta; Cogoli, Augusto

    2005-08-01

    In this study, we investigated the influence of several combinations of activators on the stimulation of purified T-Lymphocytes under vector-averaged gravity generated by the random positioning machine (RPM). Our results show that anti-CD3 antibody in combination with either anti-CD28 or Interleukin-2 (IL-2) acted favourably on the proliferation independently of gravity conditions. It was observed that proliferation in the RPM samples only decreased if the combination of activators included the lectins Concanavalin A (Con A) or Phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in combination with anti-CD28. In these samples, we further found a clear deficit in the upregulation of c- fos, IL-2 and the α-subunit of the IL-2 receptor (IL- 2Rα). Our results suggest that attenuation in T-cell activation is most likely due to a reduced expression and induction of early stimulatory factors, and is activator- dependent.

  8. Self-stimulatory behavior and perceptual reinforcement.

    PubMed Central

    Lovaas, I; Newsom, C; Hickman, C

    1987-01-01

    Self-stimulatory behavior is repetitive, stereotyped, functionally autonomous behavior seen in both normal and developmentally disabled populations, yet no satisfactory theory of its development and major characteristics has previously been offered. We present here a detailed hypothesis of the acquisition and maintenance of self-stimulatory behavior, proposing that the behaviors are operant responses whose reinforcers are automatically produced interoceptive and exteroceptive perceptual consequences. The concept of perceptual stimuli and reinforcers, the durability of self-stimulatory behaviors, the sensory extinction effect, the inverse relationship between self-stimulatory and other behaviors, the blocking effect of self-stimulatory behavior on new learning, and response substitution effects are discussed in terms of the hypothesis. Support for the hypothesis from the areas of sensory reinforcement and sensory deprivation is also reviewed. Limitations of major alternative theories are discussed, along with implications of the perceptual reinforcement hypothesis for the treatment of excessive self-stimulatory behavior and for theoretical conceptualizations of functionally related normal and pathological behaviors. PMID:3583964

  9. Bio-responsive polymer hydrogels homeostatically regulate blood coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Maitz, Manfred F.; Freudenberg, Uwe; Tsurkan, Mikhail V.; Fischer, Marion; Beyrich, Theresa; Werner, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Bio-responsive polymer architectures can empower medical therapies by engaging molecular feedback-response mechanisms resembling the homeostatic adaptation of living tissues to varying environmental constraints. Here we show that a blood coagulation-responsive hydrogel system can deliver heparin in amounts triggered by the environmental levels of thrombin, the key enzyme of the coagulation cascade, which—in turn—becomes inactivated due to released heparin. The bio-responsive hydrogel quantitatively quenches blood coagulation over several hours in the presence of pro-coagulant stimuli and during repeated incubation with fresh, non-anticoagulated blood. These features enable the introduced material to provide sustainable, autoregulated anticoagulation, addressing a key challenge of many medical therapies. Beyond that, the explored concept may facilitate the development of materials that allow the effective and controlled application of drugs and biomolecules. PMID:23868446

  10. Suppression of in vivo polyclonal IgE responses by monoclonal antibody to the lymphokine B-cell stimulatory factor 1.

    PubMed Central

    Finkelman, F D; Katona, I M; Urban, J F; Snapper, C M; Ohara, J; Paul, W E

    1986-01-01

    The lymphokine B-cell stimulatory factor 1 (BSF-1) has been shown to greatly enhance the differentiation of lipopolysaccharide-activated B cells into IgG1- and IgE-secreting cells in vitro. To determine whether in vivo IgG1 and IgE antibody responses are BSF-1 dependent, the ability of a monoclonal rat IgG1 anti-BSF-1 antibody, 11B11, to affect polyclonal IgG1 and IgE production in mice infected with the nematode parasite Nippostrongylus brasiliensis or injected with a purified goat antibody to mouse IgD was studied. 11B11-containing ascites fluid or purified 11B11 strongly inhibited IgE production in both systems but did not affect IgG1 production, while control ascites or normal rat IgG1 had no IgE-inhibitory activity. These results indicate an important physiologic role for BSF-1 in the generation of IgE antibody responses and suggest means for limiting the production of antibodies responsible for allergic reactions without inhibiting protective antibody responses. PMID:3491987

  11. Only signaling modules that discriminate sharply between stimulatory and nonstimulatory inputs require basal signaling for fast cellular responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artomov, Mykyta; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2010-09-01

    In many types of cells, binding of molecules to their receptors enables cascades of intracellular chemical reactions to take place (signaling). However, a low level of signaling also occurs in most unstimulated cells. Such basal signaling in resting cells can have many functions, one of which is that it is thought to be required for fast cellular responses to external stimuli. A mechanistic understanding of why this is true and which features of cellular signaling networks make basal signaling necessary for fast responses is unknown. We address this issue by obtaining the time required for activation of common types of cell signaling modules with and without basal signaling. Our results show that the absence of basal signaling does not have any dramatic effects on the response time for signaling modules that exhibit a graded response to increasing stimulus levels. In sharp contrast, signaling modules that exhibit sharp dose-response curves which discriminate sensitively between stimuli to which the cell needs to respond and low-grade inputs (or stochastic noise) require basal signaling for fast cellular responses. In such cases, we find that an optimal level of basal signaling balances the requirements for fast cellular responses while minimizing spurious activation without appropriate stimulation.

  12. Self-Stimulatory Behavior and Perceptual Reinforcement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovaas, Ivar; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A detailed hypothesis of the acquisition and maintenance of self-stimulatory behavior is offered, proposing that such behaviors are operant responses whose reinforcers are automatically produced perceptual consequences. Related concepts are discussed, and support for the hypothesis from the areas of sensory reinforcement and sensory deprivation is…

  13. The stimulatory and inhibitory components of cocaine's actions on the 5-HTP-induced 5-HT2A receptor response.

    PubMed

    Darmani, N A; Reeves, S L

    1996-11-01

    Previously we have shown that cocaine attenuates the 5-HT2A receptor-mediated head-twitch response (HTR) in mice produced by the 5-HT2A/C direct agonist (+/-)-1 (2.5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (DOI). This inhibition appears to be due to cocaine-induced indirect stimulation of the inhibitory serotonergic 5-HT1A and noradrenergic alpha 2 receptors via the inhibition of reuptake of synaptic serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE), respectively. In the present study, we investigated the effects of cocaine, its phenyltropane analogue WIN 35428, and the selective 5-HT (sertraline). NE (nisoxetine) and dopamine (DA) (GBR 12935) reuptake inhibitors on the 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP)-induced HTR. We utilized two experimental protocols where cocaine or the cited drugs were administered either after (protocol 1) or prior (protocol 2) to 5-HTP injection. Cocaine in both protocols produced a dose-dependent enhancement in the 5-HTP-induced HTR (ED50 4.68 +/- 1.21 and 3.55 +/- 1.31, respectively). Sertraline was more potent (ED50 2.64 +/- 1.1 and 2.1 +/- 1.54, respectively) in enhancing the induced behavior and dose by dose produced greater (3 to 10 times) HTRs than cocaine. On the other hand, nisoxetine dose dependently and completely attenuated the induced behavior (ID50 3.33 +/- 1.32 and 1.72 +/- 1.34, respectively), whereas GBR 12935 only at high doses (ID50 15.34 +/- 1.52 and 11.91 +/- 1.3, respectively) decreased the induced response. The inability of cocaine to induce as many HTRs as sertraline appears to lie in its ability to also indirectly stimulate the inhibitory 5-HT1A and alpha 2 receptors because the stimulant caused greater enhancement in the 5-HTP-induced HTRs in the presence of their corresponding antagonists [S(-)-UH 301 and yohimbine, respectively]. WIN 35428 was more potent (ED50 2.87 +/- 1.3 and 1.79 +/- 1.1 for protocols 1 and 2, respectively) in stimulating the 5-HTP-induced HTR and produced a bell-shaped dose-response curve. The results

  14. Characterization of a double-CRD-mutated Gal-8 recombinant protein that retains co-stimulatory activity on antigen-specific T-cell response.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Matías Nicolás; Tribulatti, María Virginia; Carabelli, Julieta; André-Leroux, Gwenaëlle; Caramelo, Julio Javier; Cattaneo, Valentina; Campetella, Oscar

    2016-04-01

    Galectins (Gals) constitute a family of mammalian lectins with affinity for β-galactosides, characterized by the presence of conserved CRDs (carbohydrate-recognition domains). We have found previously that Gal-8, from the tandem-repeat group with two linked CRDs, exerts two separate actions on CD4(+)T-cells: antigen-independent proliferation and, at lower concentration, antigen-specific co-stimulation. Whereas proliferation can be ascribed to the pro-inflammatory role of Gal-8, the co-stimulatory activity of borderline T-cell-specific responses allows the proposal of Gal-8 as an adjuvant in vaccination. To study the relevance of glycan-lectin interaction to these T-cell activities, we generated a double-mutated protein (Gal-8mut) by replacing canonical arginine residues on each CRD, so as to abolish sugar-binding capacity. As expected, Gal-8mut was unable to bind to lactosyl-Sepharose, confirming that lactose recognition was precluded; however, preservation of lectin activity was still evident since Gal-8mut displayed haemoagglutinatory effects and binding capacity to the T-cell surface. To search for glycan affinity, a glycan microarray analysis was conducted which revealed that Gal-8mut lost most low- and intermediate-, but retained high-, affinity interactions, mainly to polylactosamines and blood group antigens. These findings were supported further by molecular modelling. Regarding biological activity, Gal-8mut was unable to induce T-cell proliferation, but efficiently co-stimulated antigen-specific responses, bothin vitroandin vivo.Therefore Gal-8mut represents a useful tool to dissect the specificities of lectin-glycan interactions underlying distinctive Gal-8 activities on T-cell biology. Moreover, given its distinguishing properties, Gal-8mut could be used to enhance borderline immune responses without the non-specific pro-inflammatory activity or other potential adverse effects.

  15. Bio-inspired Nanomaterials for Biosensing and Cell Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Molly

    2012-02-01

    This talk will provide an overview of our recent developments in bio-inspired nanomaterials for tissue regeneration and sensing. Bio-responsive nanomaterials are of growing importance with potential applications including drug delivery, diagnostics and tissue engineering [1]. DNA-, protein- or peptide-functionalised nanoparticle (NP) aggregates are particularly useful systems since triggered changes in their aggregation states may be readily monitored. Our recent simple conceptually novel approaches to real-time monitoring of protease, lipase and kinase enzyme action using modular peptide functionalized NPs will be presented [2,3,4]. The highly interdisciplinary field of Tissue Engineering (TE) can also benefit from advances in the design of bio-responsive nanomaterials. TE involves the development of artificial scaffold structures on which new cells are encouraged to grow. The ability to control topography and chemistry at the nanoscale offers exciting possibilities for stimulating growth of new tissue through the development of novel nanostructured scaffolds that mimic the nanostructure of the tissues in the body [1,5,6]. Recent developments in this context will be discussed as well as novel approaches to in vivo tissue regeneration of large volumes of highly vascularised and hierarchically organized tissue [7,8,9]. [4pt] [1] MM Stevens, J George. Science 310:1135-1138 (2005)[0pt] [2] A Laromaine, L Koh, M Murugesan, RV Ulijn, MM Stevens. Journal of the American Chemical Society 129:4156-4157 (2007)[0pt] [3] J Ghadiali, MM Stevens. Advanced Materials 20: 4359-4363 (2008); J Ghadiali et al, ACS Nano 4:4915-4919 (2010)[0pt] [4] D Aili, M Mager, D Roche, MM Stevens. Nano Letters 11:1401-1405 (2011) [0pt] [5] E Place, ND Evans, MM Stevens. Nature Materials 8:457-470 (2009)[0pt] [6] MD Mager, V LaPointe, MM Stevens. Nature Chemistry 3:582-589 (2011)[0pt] [7] MM Stevens et. al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 102:11450-11455 (2005)[0pt] [8] E Gentleman et al. Nature

  16. Differential expression of migration inhibitory and migration stimulatory factors in two lines of mice genetically selected for high or low responsiveness to phytohemagglutinin. 1. Migration stimulatory factor(s) from T and B cells of immune spleen.

    PubMed

    Gauthier-Rahman, S; el-Gharbi, N; Siddiqui, M U; Couderc, J; Decreusefond, C; Stiffel, C

    1991-01-01

    Expression of the lymphokine migration inhibition factor in two lines of mice genetically selected for the high (Hi/PHA) or low (Lo/PHA) response of their lymph node cells to phytohemagglutinin was found to be modulated by concomitant expression of migration stimulation factor(s) [MStF(s)]. The expression of both lymphokines was dependent on genetic character and the immunizing dose of antigen. In mice immunized 5 days earlier with 50 micrograms ovalbumin in Freund's complete adjuvant (Ova in FCA immune), migration inhibition factor, assessed with a sensitive photoelectric method, was well expressed by male spleen or lymph node 24-hour culture supernatants of Lo/PHA but Hi/PHA, especially female, expressed marked MStF(s) instead. Immunization with 500 micrograms Ova in FCA markedly enhanced expression of MStF(s) in Lo/PHA but inhibited it in Hi/PHA. MStF(s) of Ova in FCA immune spleens of the two lines were found to derive from both T and B cells, B cell activity being greater. Lo/PHA were by far better expressors of both T- and B-cell-derived MStF(s) as compared to Hi/PHA (p less than 0.01). Spleen cells of mice immunized with FCA alone also expressed MStF(s) but to lesser extent than Ova in FCA immune spleens, expression by Lo/PHA B cells being significantly higher than in Hi/PHA (p less than 0.05). The MStF(s) of Ova in FCA immune spleens was found to be non-immunoglobulin in nature.

  17. Biophotonics and immune responses-Highlights from a new SPIE photonics west conference (BIOS 2006).

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei R; Huang, Zheng

    2006-09-01

    This report summarizes some highlights from the "Biophotonics and Immune Responses", a new 2006 SPIE Photonics West Biomedical Optics (BIOS 2006) Conference. Some exciting recent progresses in host immune responses elicited by photodynamic therapy and other novel phototherapies are discussed.

  18. Interferon. beta. /sub 2//B-cell stimulatory factor type 2 shares identity with monocyte-derived hepatocyte-stimulating factor and regulates the major acute phase protein response in liver cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gauldie, J.; Richards, C.; Harnish, D.; Lansdorp, P.; Baumann, H.

    1987-10-01

    One of the oldest and most preserved of the homeostatic responses of the body to injury is the acute phase protein response associated with inflammation. The liver responds to hormone-like mediators by the increased synthesis of a series of plasma proteins called acute phase reactants. In these studies, the authors examined the relationship of hepatocyte-stimulating factor derived from peripheral blood monocytes to interferon ..beta../sub 2/ (IFN-..beta../sub 2/), which has been cloned. Antibodies raised against fibroblast-derived IFN-..beta.. having neutralizing activity against both IFN-..beta../sub 1/ and ..beta../sub 2/ inhibited the major hepatocyte-stimulating activity derived from monocytes. Fibroblast-derived mediator elicited the identical stimulated response in human HepG2 cells and primary rat hepatocytes as the monocyte cytokine. Finally, recombinant-derived human B-cell stimulatory factor type 2 (IFN-..beta../sub 2/) from Escherichia coli induced the synthesis of all major acute phase proteins studied in human hepatoma HepG2 and primary rat hepatocyte cultures. These data demonstrate that monocyte-derived hepatocyte-stimulating factor and IFN-..beta../sub 2/ share immunological and functional identity and that IFN-..beta../sub 2/, also known as B-cell stimulatory factor and hybridoma plasmacytoma growth factor, has the hepatocyte as a major physiologic target and thereby is essential in controlling the hepatic acute phase response.

  19. Targeting co-stimulatory pathways: transplantation and autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Mandy L.; Adams, Andrew B.; Pearson, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    The myriad of co-stimulatory signals expressed, or induced, upon T-cell activation suggests that these signalling pathways shape the character and magnitude of the resulting autoreactive or alloreactive T-cell responses during autoimmunity or transplantation, respectively. Reducing pathological T-cell responses by targeting T-cell co-stimulatory pathways has met with therapeutic success in many instances, but challenges remain. In this Review, we discuss the T-cell co-stimulatory molecules that are known to have critical roles during T-cell activation, expansion, and differentiation. We also outline the functional importance of T cell co-stimulatory molecules in transplantation, tolerance and autoimmunity, and we describe how therapeutic blockade of these pathways might be harnessed to manipulate the immune response to prevent or attenuate pathological immune responses. Ultimately, understanding the interplay between individual co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory pathways engaged during T-cell activation and differentiation will lead to rational and targeted therapeutic interventions to manipulate T-cell responses and improve clinical outcomes. PMID:24100403

  20. Th1 stimulatory proteins of Leishmania donovani: comparative cellular and protective responses of rTriose phosphate isomerase, rProtein disulfide isomerase and rElongation factor-2 in combination with rHSP70 against visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Anil Kumar; Khare, Prashant; Joshi, Sumit; Kushawaha, Pramod Kumar; Sundar, Shyam; Dube, Anuradha

    2014-01-01

    In visceral leishmaniasis, the recovery from the disease is always associated with the generation of Th1-type of cellular responses. Based on this, we have previously identified several Th1-stimulatory proteins of Leishmania donovani -triose phosphate isomerase (TPI), protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and elongation factor-2 (EL-2) etc. including heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) which induced Th1-type of cellular responses in both cured Leishmania patients/hamsters. Since, HSPs, being the logical targets for vaccines aimed at augmenting cellular immunity and can be early targets in the immune response against intracellular pathogens; they could be exploited as vaccine/adjuvant to induce long-term immunity more effectively. Therefore, in this study, we checked whether HSP70 can further enhance the immunogenicity and protective responses of the above said Th1-stimulatory proteins. Since, in most of the studies, immunogenicity of HSP70 of L. donovani was assessed in native condition, herein we generated recombinant HSP70 and tested its potential to stimulate immune responses in lymphocytes of cured Leishmania infected hamsters as well as in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of cured patients of VL either individually or in combination with above mentioned recombinant proteins. rLdHSP70 alone elicited strong cellular responses along with remarkable up-regulation of IFN-γ and IL-12 cytokines and extremely lower level of IL-4 and IL-10. Among the various combinations, rLdHSP70 + rLdPDI emerged as superior one augmenting improved cellular responses followed by rLdHSP70 + rLdEL-2. These combinations were further evaluated for its protective potential wherein rLdHSP70 + rLdPDI again conferred utmost protection (∼80%) followed by rLdHSP70 + rLdEL-2 (∼75%) and generated a strong cellular immune response with significant increase in the levels of iNOS transcript as well as IFN-γ and IL-12 cytokines which was further supported by the high level of IgG2 antibody

  1. Nanotribological response of a plasma nitrided bio-steel.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Aniruddha; Chakraborty, Himel; Bhattacharya, Manjima; Ghosh, Jiten; Sreemany, Monjoy; Bysakh, Sandip; Rane, Ramkrishna; Joseph, Alphonsa; Jhala, Ghanshyam; Mukherjee, Subroto; Das, Mitun; Mukhopadhyay, Anoop K

    2017-01-01

    AISI 316L is a well known biocompatible, austenitic stainless steel (SS). It is thus a bio-steel. Considering its importance as a bio-prosthesis material here we report the plasma nitriding of AISI 316L (SS) followed by its microstructural and nanotribological characterization. Plasma nitriding of the SS samples was carried out in a plasma reactor with a hot wall vacuum chamber. For ease of comparison these plasma nitrided samples were termed as SSPN. The experimental results confirmed the formations of an embedded nitrided metal layer zone (ENMLZ) and an interface zone (IZ) between the ENMLZ and the unnitrided bulk metallic layer zone (BMLZ) in the SSPN sample. These ENMLZ and IZ in the SSPN sample were richer in iron nitride (FeN) chromium nitride (CrN) along with the austenite phase. The results from nanoindentation, microscratch, nanoscratch and sliding wear studies confirmed that the static contact deformation resistance, the microwear, nanowear and sliding wear resistance of the SSPN samples were much better than those of the SS samples. These results were explained in terms of structure-property correlations.

  2. A Comprehensive Evaluation System for Military Hospitals' Response Capability to Bio-terrorism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Jiang, Nan; Shao, Sicong; Zheng, Tao; Sun, Jianzhong

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study is to establish a comprehensive evaluation system for military hospitals' response capacity to bio-terrorism. Literature research and Delphi method were utilized to establish the comprehensive evaluation system for military hospitals' response capacity to bio-terrorism. Questionnaires were designed and used to survey the status quo of 134 military hospitals' response capability to bio-terrorism. Survey indicated that factor analysis method was suitable to for analyzing the comprehensive evaluation system for military hospitals' response capacity to bio-terrorism. The constructed evaluation system was consisted of five first-class and 16 second-class indexes. Among them, medical response factor was considered as the most important factor with weight coefficient of 0.660, followed in turn by the emergency management factor with weight coefficient of 0.109, emergency management consciousness factor with weight coefficient of 0.093, hardware support factor with weight coefficient of 0.078, and improvement factor with weight coefficient of 0.059. The constructed comprehensive assessment model and system are scientific and practical.

  3. Bio-Optical Response and Coupling with Physical Processes in the Lombok Strait Region

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    in the Lombok Strait Region Burton H. Jones Department of Biological Sciences University of Southern California Los Angeles, CA 90089-0371...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Bio-Optical Response and Coupling with Physical Processes in the Lombok Strait Region 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  4. Bio-Optical Response and Coupling with Physical Processes in the Lombok Strait Region

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-30

    Bio-Optical Response and Coupling with Physical Processes in the Lombok Strait...The Lombok Strait Region 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK

  5. Polymorphisms in B Cell Co-Stimulatory Genes Are Associated with IgG Antibody Responses against Blood–Stage Proteins of Plasmodium vivax

    PubMed Central

    Cassiano, Gustavo C.; Furini, Adriana A. C.; Capobianco, Marcela P.; Storti-Melo, Luciane M.; Cunha, Maristela G.; Kano, Flora S.; Carvalho, Luzia H.; Soares, Irene S.; Santos, Sidney E.; Póvoa, Marinete M.; Machado, Ricardo L. D.

    2016-01-01

    The development of an effective immune response can help decrease mortality from malaria and its clinical symptoms. However, this mechanism is complex and has significant inter-individual variation, most likely owing to the genetic contribution of the human host. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the influence of polymorphisms in genes involved in the costimulation of B-lymphocytes in the naturally acquired humoral immune response against proteins of the asexual stage of Plasmodium vivax. A total of 319 individuals living in an area of malaria transmission in the Brazilian Amazon were genotyped for four SNPs in the genes CD40, CD40L, BLYS and CD86. In addition, IgG antibodies against P. vivax apical membrane antigen 1 (PvAMA–1), Duffy binding protein (PvDBP) and merozoite surface protein 1 (PvMSP–119) were detected by ELISA. The SNP BLYS –871C>T was associated with the frequency of IgG responders to PvAMA–1 and PvMSP–119. The SNP CD40 –1C>T was associated with the IgG response against PvDBP, whereas IgG antibody titers against PvMSP–119 were influenced by the polymorphism CD86 +1057G>A. These data may help to elucidate the immunological aspects of vivax malaria and consequently assist in the design of malaria vaccines. PMID:26901523

  6. A novel recombinant Leishmania donovani p45, a partial coding region of methionine aminopeptidase, generates protective immunity by inducing a Th1 stimulatory response against experimental visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Reema; Kushawaha, Pramod K; Tripathi, Chandra Dev Pati; Sundar, Shyam; Dube, Anuradha

    2012-05-01

    The development of a vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis (VL) conferring long-lasting immunity remains a challenge. Identification and proteomic characterization of parasite proteins led to the detection of p45, a member of the methionine aminopeptidase family. To our knowledge the present study is the first known report that describes the molecular and immunological characterization of p45. Recombinant Leishmania donovani p45 (rLdp45) induced cellular responses in cured hamsters and generated Th1-type cytokines from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of cured/endemic VL patients. Immunization with rLdp45 exerted considerable prophylactic efficacy (∼85%) supported by an increase in mRNA expression of iNOS, IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-12 and decrease in TGF-β and IL-4, indicating its potential as a vaccine candidate against VL.

  7. Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulatory Factor Enhances the Pro-Inflammatory Response of Interferon-γ-Treated Macrophages to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sonali; Barr, Helen; Liu, Yi-Chia; Robins, Adrian; Heeb, Stephan; Williams, Paul; Fogarty, Andrew; Cámara, Miguel; Martínez-Pomares, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause severe infections at compromised epithelial surfaces, such those found in burns, wounds, and in lungs damaged by mechanical ventilation or recurrent infections, particularly in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. CF patients have been proposed to have a Th2 and Th17-biased immune response suggesting that the lack of Th1 and/or over exuberant Th17 responses could contribute to the establishment of chronic P. aeruginosa infection and deterioration of lung function. Accordingly, we have observed that interferon (IFN)-γ production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from CF patients positively correlated with lung function, particularly in patients chronically infected with P. aeruginosa. In contrast, IL-17A levels tended to correlate negatively with lung function with this trend becoming significant in patients chronically infected with P. aeruginosa. These results are in agreement with IFN-γ and IL-17A playing protective and detrimental roles, respectively, in CF. In order to explore the protective effect of IFN-γ in CF, the effect of IFN-γ alone or in combination with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), on the ability of human macrophages to control P. aeruginosa growth, resist the cytotoxicity induced by this bacterium or promote inflammation was investigated. Treatment of macrophages with IFN-γ, in the presence and absence of GM-CSF, failed to alter bacterial growth or macrophage survival upon P. aeruginosa infection, but changed the inflammatory potential of macrophages. IFN-γ caused up-regulation of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and TNF-α and down-regulation of IL-10 expression by infected macrophages. GM-CSF in combination with IFN-γ promoted IL-6 production and further reduction of IL-10 synthesis. Comparison of TNF-α vs. IL-10 and IL-6 vs. IL-10 ratios revealed the following hierarchy in regard to the pro-inflammatory potential of human macrophages

  8. Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulatory factor enhances the pro-inflammatory response of interferon-γ-treated macrophages to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sonali; Barr, Helen; Liu, Yi-Chia; Robins, Adrian; Heeb, Stephan; Williams, Paul; Fogarty, Andrew; Cámara, Miguel; Martínez-Pomares, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause severe infections at compromised epithelial surfaces, such those found in burns, wounds, and in lungs damaged by mechanical ventilation or recurrent infections, particularly in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. CF patients have been proposed to have a Th2 and Th17-biased immune response suggesting that the lack of Th1 and/or over exuberant Th17 responses could contribute to the establishment of chronic P. aeruginosa infection and deterioration of lung function. Accordingly, we have observed that interferon (IFN)-γ production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from CF patients positively correlated with lung function, particularly in patients chronically infected with P. aeruginosa. In contrast, IL-17A levels tended to correlate negatively with lung function with this trend becoming significant in patients chronically infected with P. aeruginosa. These results are in agreement with IFN-γ and IL-17A playing protective and detrimental roles, respectively, in CF. In order to explore the protective effect of IFN-γ in CF, the effect of IFN-γ alone or in combination with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), on the ability of human macrophages to control P. aeruginosa growth, resist the cytotoxicity induced by this bacterium or promote inflammation was investigated. Treatment of macrophages with IFN-γ, in the presence and absence of GM-CSF, failed to alter bacterial growth or macrophage survival upon P. aeruginosa infection, but changed the inflammatory potential of macrophages. IFN-γ caused up-regulation of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and TNF-α and down-regulation of IL-10 expression by infected macrophages. GM-CSF in combination with IFN-γ promoted IL-6 production and further reduction of IL-10 synthesis. Comparison of TNF-α vs. IL-10 and IL-6 vs. IL-10 ratios revealed the following hierarchy in regard to the pro-inflammatory potential of human macrophages

  9. Telehealth responses to bio-terrorism and emerging infections.

    PubMed

    Yellowlees, Peter; MacKenzie, John

    2003-01-01

    Emerging infectious diseases, such as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), are of huge economic importance. They are difficult to predict. The World Health Organization has a Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network, which was involved at an early stage in the SARS outbreak in 2003. Three major lessons were learned as a result of the SARS epidemic in 2003, involving communication, evidence-based action and global partnerships. It is proposed that a series of broadband global response networks should be developed. At a technical level the networks are essentially in place, such as the Internet2 global network. Suitable peripheral devices also exist. What has not yet been created is the appropriate software to allow the use of these networks, although a number of commercial products are in the process of development.

  10. Response to bio-terrorism directed against animals.

    PubMed

    Williams, J L; Sheesley, D

    2000-01-01

    The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has a long history of rapid direction, control, and eradication of devastating diseases. Our immediate response mechanisms to diseases such as avian influenza, Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis, and Newcastle disease, have long been recognized by the global emergency response community as models of control and eradication. APHIS and the U.S. livestock industries, in partnership with the Animal Agriculture Coalition, re-evaluated the Nation's animal health emergency preparedness and response systems. The group identified areas that negatively impact, biologically and/or economically, the Nation's animal and food production industries. To counter the increased risks including bioterrorism, APHIS plans to establish a world-class "Center of Excellence for Animal Health Emergency Management." APHIS, Intelligence agencies, other Federal departments, State governments, and industries are working together to provide accurate information on the foreign and domestic threats posed to the U.S. agricultural sector by biological weapons. Additionally, the same agencies and organizations are evaluating, updating, and improving the coordination and training mechanisms necessary to respond in the even of a widespread pest or disease outbreak.

  11. Targeting Co-Stimulatory Pathways in Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaopei; Yang, Yiping

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy with recombinant viral vectors such as adenovirus and adenovirus-associated virus holds great promise in treating a wide range of diseases because of the high efficiency with which the viruses transfer their genomes into host cells in vivo. However, the activation of the host immune responses remains a major hurdle to successful gene therapy. Studies in the past two decades have elucidated the important role co-stimulation plays in the activation of both T and B cells. This review summarizes our current understanding of T cell co-stimulatory pathways, and strategies targeting these co-stimulatory pathways in gene therapy applications as well as potential future directions. PMID:22046171

  12. Designing a bio-responsive robot from DNA origami.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ishay, Eldad; Abu-Horowitz, Almogit; Bachelet, Ido

    2013-07-08

    Nucleic acids are astonishingly versatile. In addition to their natural role as storage medium for biological information(1), they can be utilized in parallel computing(2,3) , recognize and bind molecular or cellular targets(4,5) , catalyze chemical reactions(6,7) , and generate calculated responses in a biological system(8,9). Importantly, nucleic acids can be programmed to self-assemble into 2D and 3D structures(10-12), enabling the integration of all these remarkable features in a single robot linking the sensing of biological cues to a preset response in order to exert a desired effect. Creating shapes from nucleic acids was first proposed by Seeman(13), and several variations on this theme have since been realized using various techniques(11,12,14,15) . However, the most significant is perhaps the one proposed by Rothemund, termed scaffolded DNA origami(16). In this technique, the folding of a long (>7,000 bases) single-stranded DNA 'scaffold' is directed to a desired shape by hundreds of short complementary strands termed 'staples'. Folding is carried out by temperature annealing ramp. This technique was successfully demonstrated in the creation of a diverse array of 2D shapes with remarkable precision and robustness. DNA origami was later extended to 3D as well(17,18) . The current paper will focus on the caDNAno 2.0 software(19) developed by Douglas and colleagues. caDNAno is a robust, user-friendly CAD tool enabling the design of 2D and 3D DNA origami shapes with versatile features. The design process relies on a systematic and accurate abstraction scheme for DNA structures, making it relatively straightforward and efficient. In this paper we demonstrate the design of a DNA origami nanorobot that has been recently described(20). This robot is 'robotic' in the sense that it links sensing to actuation, in order to perform a task. We explain how various sensing schemes can be integrated into the structure, and how this can be relayed to a desired effect

  13. Designing a Bio-responsive Robot from DNA Origami

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Ishay, Eldad; Abu-Horowitz, Almogit; Bachelet, Ido

    2013-01-01

    Nucleic acids are astonishingly versatile. In addition to their natural role as storage medium for biological information1, they can be utilized in parallel computing2,3 , recognize and bind molecular or cellular targets4,5 , catalyze chemical reactions6,7 , and generate calculated responses in a biological system8,9. Importantly, nucleic acids can be programmed to self-assemble into 2D and 3D structures10-12, enabling the integration of all these remarkable features in a single robot linking the sensing of biological cues to a preset response in order to exert a desired effect. Creating shapes from nucleic acids was first proposed by Seeman13, and several variations on this theme have since been realized using various techniques11,12,14,15 . However, the most significant is perhaps the one proposed by Rothemund, termed scaffolded DNA origami16. In this technique, the folding of a long (>7,000 bases) single-stranded DNA 'scaffold' is directed to a desired shape by hundreds of short complementary strands termed 'staples'. Folding is carried out by temperature annealing ramp. This technique was successfully demonstrated in the creation of a diverse array of 2D shapes with remarkable precision and robustness. DNA origami was later extended to 3D as well17,18 . The current paper will focus on the caDNAno 2.0 software19 developed by Douglas and colleagues. caDNAno is a robust, user-friendly CAD tool enabling the design of 2D and 3D DNA origami shapes with versatile features. The design process relies on a systematic and accurate abstraction scheme for DNA structures, making it relatively straightforward and efficient. In this paper we demonstrate the design of a DNA origami nanorobot that has been recently described20. This robot is 'robotic' in the sense that it links sensing to actuation, in order to perform a task. We explain how various sensing schemes can be integrated into the structure, and how this can be relayed to a desired effect. Finally we use Cando21 to

  14. Governing at a distance: social marketing and the (bio) politics of responsibility.

    PubMed

    Crawshaw, Paul

    2012-07-01

    In the recently published lectures from the College de France series, The Birth of Bio-Politics, Foucault (2009) offers his most explicit analysis of neo-liberal governmentality and its impact upon states and societies in the late twentieth century. Framed in terms of the bio-political as a mode of governance of populations and its relationship to neo-liberalism, these lectures offer a rich seam of theoretical resources with which to interrogate contemporary forms of governmentality. This paper seeks to apply these and some recent critical analysis by Foucauldian scholars, to the study of health governance, with particular reference to the use of social marketing as a strategy to improve the health of populations 'at a distance'. Reflecting a broader decollectivisation of welfare, such strategies are identified as exemplars of neo-liberal methods of governance through inculcating self management and individualisation of responsibility for health and wellbeing. Drawing on original empirical data collected with a sample of fifty long term unemployed men in 2009, this paper critically examines social marketing as a newer feature of health governance and reflects upon participants' responses to it as a strategy in the context of their wider understandings of health, choice and responsibility. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A Quick-responsive DNA Nanotechnology Device for Bio-molecular Homeostasis Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Songlin; Wang, Pei; Xiao, Chen; Li, Zheng; Yang, Bing; Fu, Jieyang; Chen, Jing; Wan, Neng; Ma, Cong; Li, Maoteng; Yang, Xiangliang; Zhan, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Physiological processes such as metabolism, cell apoptosis and immune responses, must be strictly regulated to maintain their homeostasis and achieve their normal physiological functions. The speed with which bio-molecular homeostatic regulation occurs directly determines the ability of an organism to adapt to conditional changes. To produce a quick-responsive regulatory system that can be easily utilized for various types of homeostasis, a device called nano-fingers that facilitates the regulation of physiological processes was constructed using DNA origami nanotechnology. This nano-fingers device functioned in linked open and closed phases using two types of DNA tweezers, which were covalently coupled with aptamers that captured specific molecules when the tweezer arms were sufficiently close. Via this specific interaction mechanism, certain physiological processes could be simultaneously regulated from two directions by capturing one biofactor and releasing the other to enhance the regulatory capacity of the device. To validate the universal application of this device, regulation of the homeostasis of the blood coagulant thrombin was attempted using the nano-fingers device. It was successfully demonstrated that this nano-fingers device achieved coagulation buffering upon the input of fuel DNA. This nano-device could also be utilized to regulate the homeostasis of other types of bio-molecules. PMID:27506964

  16. Bio-electrospraying the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans: studying whole-genome transcriptional responses and key life cycle parameters

    PubMed Central

    Mongkoldhumrongkul, Napachanok; Swain, Suresh C.; Jayasinghe, Suwan N.; Stürzenbaum, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Bio-electrospray, the direct jet-based cell handling approach, is able to handle a wide range of cells (spanning immortalized, primary to stem cells). Studies at the genomic, genetic and the physiological levels have shown that, post-treatment, cellular integrity is unperturbed and a high percentage (more than 70%, compared with control) of cells remain viable. Although, these results are impressive, it may be argued that cell-based systems are oversimplistic. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the bio-electrospray technology using sensitive and dynamically developing multi-cellular organisms that share, at least some, similarities with multi-cell microenviorments encountered with tissues and organs. This study addressed this issue by using a well-characterized model organism, the non-parasitic nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Nematode cultures were subjected to bio-electrospraying and compared with positive (heat shock) and negative controls (appropriate laboratory culture controls). Overall, bio-electrospraying did not modulate the reproductive output or induce significant changes in in vivo stress-responsive biomarkers (heat shock proteins). Likewise, whole-genome transcriptomics could not identify any biological processes, cellular components or molecular functions (gene ontology terms) that were significantly enriched in response to bio-electrospraying. This demonstrates that bio-electrosprays can be safely applied directly to nematodes and underlines its potential future use in the creation of multi-cellular environments within clinical applications. PMID:19776148

  17. Targeting the finite-deformation response of wavy biological tissues with bio-inspired material architectures.

    PubMed

    Tu, Wenqiong; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy

    2013-12-01

    The Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm driven by a homogenized-based model is employed to target the response of three types of heart-valve chordae tendineae with different stiffening characteristics due to different degrees of waviness of collagen fibril/fiber bundles. First, geometric and material parameters are identified through an extensive parametric study that produce excellent agreement of the simulated response based on simplified unit cell architectures with the actual response of the complex biological tissue. These include amplitude and wavelength of the crimped chordae microstructure, elastic moduli of the constituent phases, and degree of microstructural refinement of the stiff phase at fixed volume fraction whose role in the stiffening response is elucidated. The study also reveals potential non-uniqueness of bio-inspired wavy microstructures in attaining the targeted response of certain chordae tendineae crimp configurations. The homogenization-based Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm, whose predictions are validated through the parametric study, is then shown to be an excellent tool in identifying optimal unit cell architectures in the design space that exhibits very steep gradients. Finally, defect criticality of optimal unit cell architectures is investigated in order to assess their feasibility in replacing actual biological tendons with stiffening characteristics.

  18. The bio-response of osteocytes and its regulation on osteoblasts under vibration.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xin-Tong; Sun, Lian-Wen; Qi, Hong-Yu; Shi, Hao; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2016-04-01

    Vibration, especially at low magnitude and high frequency (LMHF), was demonstrated to be anabolic for bone, but how the LMHF vibration signal is perceived by osteocytes is not fully studied. On the other hand, the mechanotransduction of osteocytes under shear stress has been scientists' primary focus for years. Due to the small strain caused by low-magnitude vibration, whether the previous explanation for shear stress will still work for LMHF vibration is unknown. In this study, a finite element method (FEM) model based on the real geometrical shape of an osteocyte was built to compare the mechanical behaviors of osteocytes under LMHF vibration and shear stress. The bio-response of osteocytes to vibration under different frequencies, including the secretion of soluble factors and the concentration of intracellular calcium, were studied. The regulating effect of the conditioned medium (CM) from vibrated osteocytes on osteoblasts was also studied. The FEM analysis result showed the cell membrane deformation under LMHF vibration was very small (with a peak value of 1.09%) as compared to the deformation caused by shear stress (with a peak value of 6.65%). The F-actin stress fibers of osteocytes were reorganized, especially on the nucleus periphery after LMHF vibration. The vibration at 30 Hz has a promoting effect on osteocytes and the osteogenesis of osteoblasts, whereas vibration at 90 Hz was suppressive. These results lead to a conclusion that the bio-response of osteocytes to LMHF vibration is frequency-dependent and is more related to the cytoskeleton on nuclear periphery rather than the membrane deformation.

  19. Forensic DNA Barcoding and Bio-Response Studies of Animal Horn Products Used in Traditional Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yu M.; Peng, Cheng; Dong, Xiao P.; Chen, Shi L.; Sun, Li G.; Xiao, Xiao H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Animal horns (AHs) have been applied to traditional medicine for more than thousands of years, of which clinical effects have been confirmed by the history. But now parts of AHs have been listed in the items of wildlife conservation, which limits the use for traditional medicine. The contradiction between the development of traditional medicine and the protection of wild resources has already become the common concern of zoophilists, traditional medical professionals, economists, sociologists. We believe that to strengthen the identification for threatened animals, to prevent the circulation of them, and to seek fertile animals of corresponding bioactivities as substitutes are effective strategies to solve this problem. Methodology/Principal Findings A powerful technique of DNA barcoding based on the mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) was used to identify threatened animals of Bovidae and Cervidae, as well as their illegal adulterants (including 10 species and 47 specimens). Meanwhile, the microcalorimetric technique was used to characterize the differences of bio-responses when those animal specimens acted on model organism (Escherichia coli). We found that the COI gene could be used as a universal primer to identify threatened animals and illegal adulterants mentioned above. By analyzing 223 mitochondrial COI sequences, a 100% identification success rate was achieved. We further found that the horns of Mongolian Gazelle and Red Deer could be exploited as a substitute for some functions of endangered Saiga Antelope and Sika Deer in traditional medicine, respectively. Conclusion/Significance Although it needs a more comprehensive evaluation of bioequivalence in order to completely solve the problem of substitutes for threatened animals, we believe that the identification (DNA barcoding) of threatened animals combined with seeking substitutions (bio-response) can yet be regarded as a valid strategy for establishing a balance between the

  20. A bio-injectable algin-aminocaproic acid thixogel with tri-stimuli responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Chejara, Dharmesh R; Mabrouk, Mostafa; Badhe, Ravindra V; Mulla, Jameel A S; Kumar, Pradeep; Choonara, Yahya E; du Toit, Lisa C; Pillay, Viness

    2016-01-01

    In this article a novel bio-injectable algin-aminocaproic acid (Alg-ACA) tri-stimuli responsive thixogel system is reported. The designed soft thixotrophic hydrogel (thixogel) was characterized using various analytical techniques such as FT-IR, NMR, SEM, AFM and DSC. The soft thixogel system was further investigated for stress responsiveness using different rheological studies which confirmed the thixotropic nature of the gel [Thixotropic area (Ar) of Alg-ACA (1:0.5), Alg-ACA (1:1) and Alg-ACA (1:2), were 23.5%, 43.1%, and 27.59%, respectively, which were higher than that of Na-Alg (2.08%)]. The thixogel also demonstrated temperature and ultrasonication responsiveness. This tri-stimuli responsive soft thixogel system was rendered flowable (fluid) on applying the described physical stimuli and recovered its "rigid" gel structure upon removal of the applied stimuli. This approach of synthesizing a thixogels may be applicable to a broad variety of other natural polymers and has the potential for use in biomedical applications.

  1. Chlorophyll bloom in response to tropical cyclone Hudhud in the Bay of Bengal: Bio-Argo subsurface observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacko, Neethu

    2017-06-01

    Though previous studies have documented substantial increases in chlorophyll concentrations as a result of cyclones, most of them were based on satellite observations dealing with surface chlorophyll blooms. This study documents the subsurface biological response and the subsequent chlorophyll bloom observed in response to the tropical cyclone Hudhud as evident from a Bio-Argo float located at the central Bay of Bengal. Results show high chlorophyll concentrations of up to 4.5 mg m-3 which is anomalous in the normally warm, stratified, and oligotrophic Bay of Bengal. The chlorophyll bloom is attributed to the combined effect of subsurface chlorophyll entrainment and nutrient injection. The presence of a pre-existing cyclonic eddy and the decreased translation speed of the cyclone over this region could have played a role in inducing the biological response. This is the first ever report to document the evolution of a subsurface chlorophyll bloom in response to cyclone forcing using Bio-Argo observations.

  2. Reverse engineering biological networks :applications in immune responses to bio-toxins.

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, Anthony A.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Davidson, George S.; Haaland, David Michael; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Thomas, Edward Victor; Slepoy, Alexander; Zhang, Zhaoduo; May, Elebeoba Eni; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel

    2005-12-01

    Our aim is to determine the network of events, or the regulatory network, that defines an immune response to a bio-toxin. As a model system, we are studying T cell regulatory network triggered through tyrosine kinase receptor activation using a combination of pathway stimulation and time-series microarray experiments. Our approach is composed of five steps (1) microarray experiments and data error analysis, (2) data clustering, (3) data smoothing and discretization, (4) network reverse engineering, and (5) network dynamics analysis and fingerprint identification. The technological outcome of this study is a suite of experimental protocols and computational tools that reverse engineer regulatory networks provided gene expression data. The practical biological outcome of this work is an immune response fingerprint in terms of gene expression levels. Inferring regulatory networks from microarray data is a new field of investigation that is no more than five years old. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first attempt that integrates experiments, error analyses, data clustering, inference, and network analysis to solve a practical problem. Our systematic approach of counting, enumeration, and sampling networks matching experimental data is new to the field of network reverse engineering. The resulting mathematical analyses and computational tools lead to new results on their own and should be useful to others who analyze and infer networks.

  3. Stimulatory and inhibitory histamine receptors in canine cystic duct.

    PubMed Central

    Clanachan, A. S.; Courtney, D. F.; Scott, G. W.

    1982-01-01

    1 The effects of histamine receptor stimulation were assessed on the resistance of the canine cystic duct in vivo and on the contractility of circular muscle preparations of canine cystic duct in vitro. 2 In anaesthetized dogs, the H1-receptor agonist, 2-pyridylethylamine (0.05 to 15 mumol, i.a.), elicited dose-dependent increases in cystic duct resistance, whereas the H2-receptor agonist, 4-methylhistamine (0.05 to 15 mumol, i.a.) decreased cystic duct resistance. These responses were antagonized by the H1-receptor antagonist, diphenhydramine, and the H2-receptor antagonist, cimetidine, respectively. 3 Histamine (0.1 to 3000 nmol, i.a.) also increased cystic duct resistance in vivo. In the presence of diphenhydramine, the stimulatory effect of histamine was antagonized and slight decreases in cystic duct resistance became apparent. Cimetidine or prazosin also antagonized the stimulatory effects of histamine. 4 Histamine (1 to 100 microM) or 2-pyridylethylamine (1 to 100 microM) contracted, whereas 4-methylhistamine (1 to 100 microM) relaxed, circular muscle preparations of cystic duct. These excitatory and inhibitory responses were antagonized by diphenhydramine and cimetidine, respectively. 5 These results indicate that the canine cystic duct possesses excitatory H1- and inhibitory H2-receptors. The predominant effect of histamine is an H1-receptor-mediated increase in cystic duct resistance. Histamine, which may be released in association with cholecystitis, may exert significant effects on the regulation of bile flow in and out of the gallbladder and may contribute to gallbladder stasis during biliary disease. PMID:7150877

  4. Effect of anthrax immune globulin on response to BioThrax (anthrax vaccine adsorbed) in New Zealand white rabbits.

    PubMed

    Malkevich, Nina V; Basu, Subhendu; Rudge, Thomas L; Clement, Kristin H; Chakrabarti, Ajoy C; Aimes, Ronald T; Nabors, Gary S; Skiadopoulos, Mario H; Ionin, Boris

    2013-11-01

    Development of anthrax countermeasures that may be used concomitantly in a postexposure setting requires an understanding of the interaction between these products. Anthrax immune globulin intravenous (AIGIV) is a candidate immunotherapeutic that contains neutralizing antibodies against protective antigen (PA), a component of anthrax toxins. We evaluated the interaction between AIGIV and BioThrax (anthrax vaccine adsorbed) in rabbits. While pharmacokinetics of AIGIV were not altered by vaccination, the vaccine-induced immune response was abrogated in AIGIV-treated animals.

  5. Effect of Anthrax Immune Globulin on Response to BioThrax (Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed) in New Zealand White Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Malkevich, Nina V.; Basu, Subhendu; Rudge, Thomas L.; Clement, Kristin H.; Chakrabarti, Ajoy C.; Aimes, Ronald T.; Nabors, Gary S.; Skiadopoulos, Mario H.

    2013-01-01

    Development of anthrax countermeasures that may be used concomitantly in a postexposure setting requires an understanding of the interaction between these products. Anthrax immune globulin intravenous (AIGIV) is a candidate immunotherapeutic that contains neutralizing antibodies against protective antigen (PA), a component of anthrax toxins. We evaluated the interaction between AIGIV and BioThrax (anthrax vaccine adsorbed) in rabbits. While pharmacokinetics of AIGIV were not altered by vaccination, the vaccine-induced immune response was abrogated in AIGIV-treated animals. PMID:23979740

  6. To begin at the beginning: the science of bio-stimulation in cells and tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisland, Stuart K.; Wilson, Brian C.

    2006-02-01

    There have been numerous reports describing the phenomena of low-level light therapy (LLLT) within the clinic and its broad application to alleviate pain, enhance the rate of wound healing, including spinal cord injury, reduce inflammation, improve learning, bolster immunity and combat disease. Yet, despite the breadth of potential applications for which bio-stimulation may prove beneficial, there persists a dramatic ignorance in our understanding of the signal pathways that govern these effects. At the cellular level, there exist a variety of endogenous chromophores such as cytochrome C oxidase, NADPH, FAD, FMN and other factors intrinsic to the electron transport chain in mitochondria that absorb light of specific wavelength and will undoubtedly have their role in bio-stimulation, however the dose dependency of effect with regard to total light fluence and fluence rate, as well as the importance of specific subcellular targeting, remains elusive. Furthermore, the translation of cellular response(s) in vitro to in vivo needs to be expounded. Clearly, a rigorous examination of bio-stimulatory parameters as a function of cellular and tissue response is necessary if we are to attain optimized, reproducible protocols based on a true scientific rationale for using bio-stimulation as a therapeutic modality in clinic. This paper introduces a number of the challenges we now face for advancing the bio-stimulation phenomena into the scientific mainstream by highlighting our current knowledge in this field as well as some of the research that we are conducting using LLLT in combination with photodynamic therapy.

  7. Stimulatory effect of phytin on acid production by Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, A

    1997-06-01

    The stimulatory effect of phytin added to skim milk on acid production of Lactobacillus casei was examined. Phytin stimulated acid production of L. casei fairly well. The stimulatory effect of phytin on acid production was not shown when phytin was treated with Dowex 50 (H+) and neutralized by NaOH solution. The incinerated product of phytin maintained almost equal stimulatory effect on acid production as that before processing. The addition of Mn2+ in the amount contained in a reagent phytin augmented the stimulatory effect on acid production markedly. The further addition of Fe3+, Ca2+, Mg2+ and PO4(3-) in amounts corresponding to their contents in the preparation of phytin as well as Mn2+ increased the effect slightly. The four preparations of phytin contained 0.045-0.20% of Mn, and the greater the Mn content was, the greater the potentiation of acid production.

  8. Response of Surface Soil Hydrology to the Micro-Pattern of Bio-Crust in a Dry-Land Loess Environment, China.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Yu, Yun; Chen, Liding

    2015-01-01

    The specific bio-species and their spatial patterns play crucial roles in regulating eco-hydrologic process, which is significant for large-scale habitat promotion and vegetation restoration in many dry-land ecosystems. Such effects, however, are not yet fully studied. In this study, 12 micro-plots, each with size of 0.5 m in depth and 1 m in length, were constructed on a gentle grassy hill-slope with a mean gradient of 8° in a semiarid loess hilly area of China. Two major bio-crusts, including mosses and lichens, had been cultivated for two years prior to the field simulation experiments, while physical crusts and non-crusted bare soils were used for comparison. By using rainfall simulation method, four designed micro-patterns (i.e., upper bio-crust and lower bare soil, scattered bio-crust, upper bare soil and lower bio-crust, fully-covered bio-crust) to the soil hydrological response were analyzed. We found that soil surface bio-crusts were more efficient in improving soil structure, water holding capacity and runoff retention particularly at surface 10 cm layers, compared with physical soil crusts and non-crusted bare soils. We re-confirmed that mosses functioned better than lichens, partly due to their higher successional stage and deeper biomass accumulation. Physical crusts were least efficient in water conservation and erosion control, followed by non-crusted bare soils. More importantly, there were marked differences in the efficiency of the different spatial arrangements of bio-crusts in controlling runoff and sediment generation. Fully-covered bio-crust pattern provides the best option for soil loss reduction and runoff retention, while a combination of upper bio-crust and lower bare soil pattern is the least one. These findings are suggested to be significant for surface-cover protection, rainwater infiltration, runoff retention, and erosion control in water-restricted and degraded natural slopes.

  9. Performance Analysis of the Enhanced Bio-Inspired Planning Algorithm for Rapid Situation Awareness Response

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-18

    AFRL-RV- PS - AFRL-RV- PS - TR-2013-0106 TR-2013-0106 PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF THE ENHANCED BIO-INSPIRED PLANNING ALGORITHM FOR RAPID SITUATION...Qualified requestors may obtain copies of this report from the Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC) (http://www.dtic.mil). AFRL-RV- PS -TR...SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT Kirtland AFB, NM 87117-5776 NUMBER(S) AFRL-RV- PS -TR-2013-0106 12. DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved

  10. Evidence that bio-metallic mineral precipitation enhances the complex conductivity response at a hydrocarbon contaminated site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mewafy, Farag M.; Werkema, D. Dale; Atekwana, Estella A.; Slater, Lee D.; Abdel Aal, Gamal; Revil, André; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios

    2013-11-01

    The complex conductivity signatures of a hydrocarbon contaminated site, undergoing biodegradation, near Bemidji, Minnesota were investigated. This site is characterized by a biogeochemical process where iron reduction is coupled with the oxidation of hydrocarbon contaminants. The biogeochemical transformations have resulted in precipitation of different bio-metallic iron mineral precipitates such as magnetite, ferroan calcite, and siderite. Our main objective was to elucidate the major factors controlling the complex conductivity response at the site. We acquired laboratory complex conductivity measurements along four cores retrieved from the site in the frequency range between 0.001 and 1000 Hz. Our results show the following: (1) in general higher imaginary conductivity was observed for samples from contaminated locations compared to samples from the uncontaminated location, (2) the imaginary conductivity for samples contaminated with residual and free phase hydrocarbon (smear zone) was higher compared to samples with dissolved phase hydrocarbon, (3) vadose zone samples located above locations with free phase hydrocarbon show higher imaginary conductivity magnitude compared to vadose zone samples from the dissolved phase and uncontaminated locations, (4) the real conductivity was generally elevated for samples from the contaminated locations, but not as diagnostic to the presence of contamination as the imaginary conductivity; (5) for most of the contaminated samples the imaginary conductivity data show a well-defined peak between 0.001 and 0.01 Hz, and (6) sample locations exhibiting higher imaginary conductivity are concomitant with locations having higher magnetic susceptibility. Controlled experiments indicate that variations in electrolytic conductivity and water content across the site are unlikely to fully account for the higher imaginary conductivity observed within the smear zone of contaminated locations. Instead, using magnetite as an example of the

  11. Harnessing co-stimulatory TNF receptors for cancer immunotherapy: Current approaches and future opportunities.

    PubMed

    Waight, Jeremy D; Gombos, Randi B; Wilson, Nicholas S

    2017-01-03

    Co-stimulatory tumor necrosis factor receptors (TNFRs) can sculpt the responsiveness of T cells recognizing tumor-associated antigens. For this reason, agonist antibodies targeting CD137, CD357, CD134 and CD27 have received considerable attention for their therapeutic utility in enhancing anti-tumor immune responses, particularly in combination with other immuno-modulatory antibodies targeting co-inhibitory pathways in T cells. The design of therapeutic antibodies that optimally engage and activate co-stimulatory TNFRs presents an important challenge of how to promote effective anti-tumor immunity while avoiding serious immune-related adverse events. Here we review our current understanding of the expression, signaling and structural features of CD137, CD357, CD134 and CD27, and how this may inform the design of pharmacologically active immuno-modulatory antibodies targeting these receptors. This includes the integration of our emerging knowledge of the role of Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) in facilitating antibody-mediated receptor clustering and forward signaling, as well as promoting immune effector cell-mediated activities. Finally, we bring our current preclinical and clinical knowledge of co-stimulatory TNFR antibodies into the context of opportunities for next generation molecules with improved pharmacologic properties.

  12. Marked enhancement of the immune response to BioThrax® (Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed) by the TLR9 agonist CPG 7909 in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Rynkiewicz, Dianna; Rathkopf, Melinda; Sim, Iain; Waytes, A Thomas; Hopkins, Robert J; Giri, Lallan; DeMuria, Deborah; Ransom, Janet; Quinn, James; Nabors, Gary S; Nielsen, Carl J

    2011-08-26

    Immunization with BioThrax(®) (Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed) is a safe and effective means of preventing anthrax. Animal studies have demonstrated that the addition of CpG DNA adjuvants to BioThrax can markedly increase the immunogenicity of the vaccine, increasing both serum anti-protective antigen (PA) antibody and anthrax toxin-neutralizing antibody (TNA) concentrations. The immune response to CpG-adjuvanted BioThrax in animals was not only stronger, but was also more rapid and led to higher levels of protection in spore challenge models. The B-class CpG DNA adjuvant CPG 7909, a 24-base synthetic, single-strand oligodeoxynucleotide, was evaluated for its safety profile and adjuvant properties in a Phase 1 clinical trial. A double-blind study was performed in which 69 healthy subjects, age 18-45 years, were randomized to receive three doses of either: (1) BioThrax alone, (2) 1 mg of CPG 7909 alone or (3) BioThrax plus 1 mg of CPG 7909, all given intramuscularly on study days 0, 14 and 28. Subjects were monitored for IgG to PA by ELISA and for TNA titers through study day 56 and for safety through month 6. CPG 7909 increased the antibody response by 6-8-fold at peak, and accelerated the response by 3 weeks compared to the response seen in subjects vaccinated with BioThrax alone. No serious adverse events related to study agents were reported, and the combination was considered to be reasonably well tolerated. The marked acceleration and enhancement of the immune response seen by combining BioThrax and CPG 7909 offers the potential to shorten the course of immunization and reduce the time to protection, and may be particularly useful in the setting of post-exposure prophylaxis.

  13. A Case of AML Characterized by a Novel t(4;15)(q31;q22) Translocation That Confers a Growth-Stimulatory Response to Retinoid-Based Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Justin M.; Pereira, Lutecia; Fan, Yao-Shan; Brown, Geoffrey; Vega, Francisco; Swords, Ronan T.; Zelent, Arthur

    2017-01-01

    Here we report the case of a 30-year-old woman with relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who was treated with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) as part of investigational therapy (NCT02273102). The patient died from rapid disease progression following eight days of continuous treatment with ATRA. Karyotype analysis and RNA-Seq revealed the presence of a novel t(4;15)(q31;q22) reciprocal translocation involving the TMEM154 and RASGRF1 genes. Analysis of primary cells from the patient revealed the expression of TMEM154-RASGRF1 mRNA and the resulting fusion protein, but no expression of the reciprocal RASGRF1-TMEM154 fusion. Consistent with the response of the patient to ATRA therapy, we observed a rapid proliferation of t(4;15) primary cells following ATRA treatment ex vivo. Preliminary characterization of the retinoid response of t(4;15) AML revealed that in stark contrast to non-t(4;15) AML, these cells proliferate in response to specific agonists of RARα and RARγ. Furthermore, we observed an increase in the levels of nuclear RARγ upon ATRA treatment. In summary, the identification of the novel t(4;15)(q31;q22) reciprocal translocation opens new avenues in the study of retinoid resistance and provides potential for a new biomarker for therapy of AML. PMID:28696354

  14. Nonlinear Response of Bio-Polymers Subject to Stretching Flow with Thermal Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Mingge; Grinberg, Leopold; Caswell, Bruce; Karniadakis, George

    2013-11-01

    The dynamics of elastic filaments subject to hydrodynamic forces exhibits complex nonlinear dynamics in the neighborhood of stagnation points in the flow. Here, the motion of a single in-extensible bio-polymer with an-isotropic friction tensor subjected to a stretching flow is modeled with stochastic differential equations as well as dissipative particle dynamics simulations. Our results show that the negative tension induces a stretch-coil transition beyond a critical value, where the noise is amplificated due to the interaction between thermal noise and nonlinear effects.

  15. Differential expression of migration inhibitory and migration stimulatory factors in two lines of mice genetically selected for high or low responsiveness to phytohemagglutinin. 2. Effects of mitogenic or allogeneic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Gauthier-Rahman, S; Suzuki, K; Couderc, J; el-Gharbi, N; Decreusefond, C; Stiffel, C

    1991-01-01

    Expression of migration inhibition factor (MIF) following in vitro stimulation with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or allogeneic cells was explored in two lines of mice genetically selected for the high (Hi/PHA) or low (Lo/PHA) response of their lymphoid cells to PHA. Hi/PHA mice also have greater cell-mediated immune responses in mixed lymphocyte culture and graft-versus-host reactions, the poorer cell-mediated immune response of Lo/PHA being accompanied by a higher frequency of malignant tumours. Expression of MIF in PHA-pulsed spleen cell supernatants measured by a sensitive photoelectric method was found to be modulated by the concomitant presence of migration stimulation factor (MStF) derived from T cells. Both lymphokines were better expressed in Lo/PHA, as compared to Hi/PHA, under appropriate experimental conditions. Use of a low proliferative dose of mitogen (5 micrograms/ml PHA, 2-hour pulse) followed by culture in serum-free medium led Lo/PHA to express the highest titres of MIF, whereas a proliferative dose of PHA (50 micrograms/ml, 2-hour pulse) caused abrogation or occultation of expression of MIF and elective expression of MStF in this line. Hi/PHA mice expressed MIF equally at both mitogen doses, with transient expression of MStF followed by MIF after 50 micrograms/ml PHA, the kinetics of expression of the two lymphokines being different. Expression of MStF by spleen cells was an early event after PHA stimulation. In contrast to mitogenic stimulation, allogeneic stimulation in one-way mixed lymphocyte culture led to similar expression of MIF by both lines of mice. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  16. Assay of Substances Stimulatory to Legume Nodule Formation 1

    PubMed Central

    Schaffer, A. G.; Alexander, M.

    1967-01-01

    Two methods were developed for the assay of substances stimulatory to the nodulation of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) roots growing from segments of hypocotyl tissue. Coconut water was the chief source of active material, but extracts of cotyledons, hypocotyls and leaves of beans and of horse chestnut fruits were also stimulatory. High concentrations of nitrate improved nodulation both in the presence and absence of coconut water. The ash of coconut water was inactive. Whole alfalfa seedlings formed nodules in the dark when grown in the split medium, but nodulation was not improved by the addition of coconut water. PMID:16656537

  17. Vacancy-Rich Monolayer BiO2-x as a Highly Efficient UV, Visible, and Near-Infrared Responsive Photocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Wu, Xiaoyong; Pan, Wenfeng; Zhang, Gaoke; Chen, Hong

    2017-09-08

    Vacancy-rich layered materials with good electron-transfer property are of great interest. Herein, a full-spectrum responsive vacancy-rich monolayer BiO2-x has been synthesized. The increased density of states at the conduction band (CB) minimum in the monolayer BiO2-x is responsible for the enhanced photon response and photo-absorption, which were confirmed by UV/Vis-NIR diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS) and photocurrent measurements. Compared to bulk BiO2-x , monolayer BiO2-x has exhibited enhanced photocatalytic performance for rhodamine B and phenol removal under UV, visible, and near-infrared light (NIR) irradiation, which can be attributed to the vacancy VBi-O ''' as confirmed by the positron annihilation spectra. The presence of VBi-O ''' defects in monolayer BiO2-x promoted the separation of electrons and holes. This finding provides an atomic level understanding for developing highly efficient UV, visible, and NIR light responsive photocatalysts. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. The modulation of co-stimulatory molecules by circulating exosomes in primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, Takashi; Yang, Guo-Xiang; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Weici; Tanaka, Hajime; Wang, Jing; Leung, Patrick Sc; Okazaki, Kazuichi; He, Xiao-Song; Lu, Qianjin; Coppel, Ross L; Bowlus, Christopher L; Gershwin, M Eric

    2017-03-01

    Exosomes are nanoparticles of endocytic origin, secreted by a myriad of cell populations that are attracting increased attention by virtue of their ability to modulate cell-to-cell communications. They are also attracting attention in a variety of immunological issues, including autoimmunity and, in particular, their ability to regulate cytokine and chemokine activation. Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is considered a model autoimmune disease, which has a highly focused cytotoxic response against biliary epithelial cells. We have isolated exosomes from plasma from 29 patients with PBC and 30 healthy controls (HCs), and studied the effect of these exosomes on co-stimulatory molecule expression and cytokine production in mononuclear cell populations using an ex vivo system. We also identified the microRNA (miRNA) populations in PBC compared to HC exosomes. We report herein that although exosomes do not change cytokine production, they do significantly alter co-stimulatory molecule expression on antigen-presenting populations. Further, we demonstrated that CD86 up-regulated expression on CD14(+) monocytes, whereas CD40 up-regulated on CD11c(+) dendritic cells by exosomes from patients with PBC. In addition, there were differences of miRNA expression of circulating exosomes in patients with PBC. These data have significant importance based on observations that co-stimulatory molecules play a differential role in the regulation of T-cell activation. Our observation indicated that aberrant exosomes from PBC selectively induce expression of co-stimulatory molecules in different subset of antigen-presenting cells. These alterations may involve in pathogenesis of autoimmune liver disease.Cellular & Molecular Immunology advance online publication, 21 September 2015; doi:10.1038/cmi.2015.86.

  19. Effect of the nano-bio interface on the genotoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles and associated cellular responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Raju Yashaswi

    Several toxicological studies have shown that titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2), one of the most widely produced engineered nanoparticles, can induce genotoxicity; however, potential adverse health effects associated with their physicochemical properties are not fully understood. Proteins in a biological medium can adsorb to the surface of the nanoparticle resulting in the formation of a protein corona that can alter the physicochemical properties of the particle. Furthermore, the protein corona may impact the interaction between nanoparticles and cells, referred to as the nano-bio interface, effecting the uptake, distribution, and toxicity of the particles. Despite the potential influence of the composition of the biological medium on the physicochemical properties and genotoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles, the majority of studies have not examined systematically the influence of medium composition on protein corona, genotoxicity, and cellular responses. In this dissertation we tested the overall hypothesis that titanium dioxide nanoparticles in medium that produces the smallest agglomerates would be taken up into cells and induce genotoxicity, and that exposure would initiate the signaling of key mediators of a DNA damage and inflammation response. Three major findings were shown in this study: 1) Protein corona formation on the surface of nano-TiO2 can impact the nano-bio interface and change cellular interaction. 2) Smaller agglomerates of nano-TiO2 are taken up more by cells without inducing cell cycle arrest, thereby allowing induced DNA damage to be processed into micronuclei in BEAS-2B cells. 3) Nano-TiO 2 in medium that facilitates increased cellular interaction induces the upregulation of the ATM-Chk2 DNA damage response (similar to ionizing radiation) and NF-kappaB inflammation pathways. Taken together, our research provides a systematic examination of the physicochemical properties, genotoxicity, and cellular responses induced by

  20. Biophysical response of living cells to boron nitride nanoparticles: uptake mechanism and bio-mechanical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasel, Md. Alim Iftekhar; Li, Tong; Nguyen, Trung Dung; Singh, Sanjleena; Zhou, Yinghong; Xiao, Yin; Gu, YuanTong

    2015-11-01

    Boron nitride nanomaterials have attracted significant interest due to their superior chemical and physical properties. Despite these novel properties, investigation on the interaction between boron nitride nanoparticle (BN NP) and living systems has been limited. In this study, BN NP (100-250 nm) is assessed as a promising biomaterial for medical applications. The toxicity of BN NP is evaluated by assessing the cells behaviours both biologically (MTT assay, ROS detection etc.) and physically (atomic force microscopy). The uptake mechanism of BN NP is studied by analysing the alternations in cellular morphology based on cell imaging techniques. The results demonstrate in vitro cytocompatibility of BN NP with immense potential for use as an effective nanoparticle for various bio-medical applications.

  1. Preparation and cell response of bio-mineralized Fe3O4 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yin, Guangfu; Huang, Zhongbing; Deng, Min; Zeng, Jingwen; Gu, Jianwen

    2011-11-01

    Silk fibroin (SF)-coated Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles (NPs) with good superparamagnetism were successfully prepared via a bio-mineralization process at room temperature. Two cell tests revealed that mineralized SF-coated Fe(3)O(4) NPs presented good cytocompatibility for L929 and osteoblast cells and higher cell density after 5 d with high concentrations of SF-coated Fe(3)O(4) NPs (up to 0.5 mg/mL). These resulted from SF surface coating on NPs, nano-surface morphology and iron ion release of Fe(3)O(4) NPs. The mineralized SF-coated Fe(3)O(4) NPs could be envisioned for various bone orthopedic and therapeutic applications, in which SF-coated NPs location is controlled through an external magnetic field to promoted bone growth.

  2. Metaproteogenomic insights beyond bacterial response to naphthalene exposure and bio-stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Guazzaroni, María-Eugenia; Herbst, Florian-Alexander; Lores, Iván; Tamames, Javier; Peláez, Ana Isabel; López-Cortés, Nieves; Alcaide, María; Del Pozo, Mercedes V; Vieites, José María; von Bergen, Martin; Gallego, José Luis R; Bargiela, Rafael; López-López, Arantxa; Pieper, Dietmar H; Rosselló-Móra, Ramón; Sánchez, Jesús; Seifert, Jana; Ferrer, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Microbial metabolism in aromatic-contaminated environments has important ecological implications, and obtaining a complete understanding of this process remains a relevant goal. To understand the roles of biodiversity and aromatic-mediated genetic and metabolic rearrangements, we conducted ‘OMIC' investigations in an anthropogenically influenced and polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soil with (Nbs) or without (N) bio-stimulation with calcium ammonia nitrate, NH4NO3 and KH2PO4 and the commercial surfactant Iveysol, plus two naphthalene-enriched communities derived from both soils (CN2 and CN1, respectively). Using a metagenomic approach, a total of 52, 53, 14 and 12 distinct species (according to operational phylogenetic units (OPU) in our work equivalent to taxonomic species) were identified in the N, Nbs, CN1 and CN2 communities, respectively. Approximately 10 out of 95 distinct species and 238 out of 3293 clusters of orthologous groups (COGs) protein families identified were clearly stimulated under the assayed conditions, whereas only two species and 1465 COGs conformed to the common set in all of the mesocosms. Results indicated distinct biodegradation capabilities for the utilisation of potential growth-supporting aromatics, which results in bio-stimulated communities being extremely fit to naphthalene utilisation and non-stimulated communities exhibiting a greater metabolic window than previously predicted. On the basis of comparing protein expression profiles and metagenome data sets, inter-alia interactions among members were hypothesised. The utilisation of curated databases is discussed and used for first time to reconstruct ‘presumptive' degradation networks for complex microbial communities. PMID:22832345

  3. Response of Surface Soil Hydrology to the Micro-Pattern of Bio-Crust in a Dry-Land Loess Environment, China

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Yu, Yun; Chen, Liding

    2015-01-01

    The specific bio-species and their spatial patterns play crucial roles in regulating eco-hydrologic process, which is significant for large-scale habitat promotion and vegetation restoration in many dry-land ecosystems. Such effects, however, are not yet fully studied. In this study, 12 micro-plots, each with size of 0.5 m in depth and 1 m in length, were constructed on a gentle grassy hill-slope with a mean gradient of 8° in a semiarid loess hilly area of China. Two major bio-crusts, including mosses and lichens, had been cultivated for two years prior to the field simulation experiments, while physical crusts and non-crusted bare soils were used for comparison. By using rainfall simulation method, four designed micro-patterns (i.e., upper bio-crust and lower bare soil, scattered bio-crust, upper bare soil and lower bio-crust, fully-covered bio-crust) to the soil hydrological response were analyzed. We found that soil surface bio-crusts were more efficient in improving soil structure, water holding capacity and runoff retention particularly at surface 10 cm layers, compared with physical soil crusts and non-crusted bare soils. We re-confirmed that mosses functioned better than lichens, partly due to their higher successional stage and deeper biomass accumulation. Physical crusts were least efficient in water conservation and erosion control, followed by non-crusted bare soils. More importantly, there were marked differences in the efficiency of the different spatial arrangements of bio-crusts in controlling runoff and sediment generation. Fully-covered bio-crust pattern provides the best option for soil loss reduction and runoff retention, while a combination of upper bio-crust and lower bare soil pattern is the least one. These findings are suggested to be significant for surface-cover protection, rainwater infiltration, runoff retention, and erosion control in water-restricted and degraded natural slopes. PMID:26207757

  4. Bio-inspired vapor-responsive colloidal photonic crystal patterns by inkjet printing.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ling; Xie, Zhuoying; Wang, Wei; Yuan, Chunwei; Zhao, Yuanjin; Mu, Zhongde; Zhong, Qifeng; Gu, Zhongze

    2014-11-25

    Facile, fast, and cost-effective technology for patterning of responsive colloidal photonic crystals (CPCs) is of great importance for their practical applications. In this report, we develop a kind of responsive CPC patterns with multicolor shifting properties by inkjet printing mesoporous colloidal nanoparticle ink on both rigid and soft substrates. By adjusting the size and mesopores' proportion of nanoparticles, we can precisely control the original color and vapor-responsive color shift extent of mesoporous CPC. As a consequence, multicolor mesoporous CPCs patterns with complex vapor responsive color shifts or vapor-revealed implicit images are subsequently achieved. The complicated and reversible multicolor shifts of mesoporous CPC patterns are favorable for immediate recognition by naked eyes but hard to copy. This approach is favorable for integration of responsive CPCs with controllable responsive optical properties. Therefore, it is of great promise for developing advanced responsive CPC devices such as anticounterfeiting devices, multifunctional microchips, sensor arrays, or dynamic displays.

  5. Mixed lymphocyte culture stimulatory and responding capacity of lymphocytes from patients with lymphoproliferative diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Rühl, H; Vogt, W; Bochert, G; Schmidt, S; Moelle, R; Schaoua, H

    1975-01-01

    Lymphocyte reactivity in vitro was studied in patients with Hodgkin's disease, chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and lymphosarcoma. The responding capacity to phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) was markedly depressed and delayed in all three groups of patients compared with the PHA response observed in lymphocyte cultures from normal individuals. In one-way mixed lymphocyte culture experiments a significant decrease in responding capacity of the patients' lymphocytes to lymphocytes from normal donors could be demonstrated. In contrast, the stimulatory capacity of the patients' lymphocytes was found to be intact, or only slightly reduced. PMID:128426

  6. Reliability and Validity of the Zephyr[TM] BioHarness[TM] to Measure Respiratory Responses to Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hailstone, Jono; Kilding, Andrew E.

    2011-01-01

    The Zephyr[TM] BioHarness[TM] (Zephyr Technology, Auckland, New Zealand) is a wireless physiological monitoring system that has the ability to measure respiratory rate unobtrusively. However, the ability of the BioHarness[TM] to accurately and reproducibly determine respiratory rate across a range of intensities is currently unknown. The aim of…

  7. Reliability and Validity of the Zephyr[TM] BioHarness[TM] to Measure Respiratory Responses to Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hailstone, Jono; Kilding, Andrew E.

    2011-01-01

    The Zephyr[TM] BioHarness[TM] (Zephyr Technology, Auckland, New Zealand) is a wireless physiological monitoring system that has the ability to measure respiratory rate unobtrusively. However, the ability of the BioHarness[TM] to accurately and reproducibly determine respiratory rate across a range of intensities is currently unknown. The aim of…

  8. Comparative Responses of Anastrepha ludens and Anastrepha obliqua (Diptera: Tephritidae) to the Synthetic Attractant BioLure.

    PubMed

    Déctor, Nayeli; Malo, Edi A; Rojas, Julio C; Liedo, Pablo

    2016-10-01

    The responses of wild and sterile Anastrepha ludens (Loew) and Anastrepha obliqua (Mcquart) fruit flies to the synthetic attractant BioLure were determined by electroantennography (EAG), in field cage tests using MultiLure traps, and by release-recapture field experiments using sterile flies. In EAG bioassays, no differences were found between species, sexes, sterile and wild flies. There were only specific differences and interactions in dose responses. More A. ludens than A. obliqua individuals were captured in multilure traps in field cage test. In A. ludens, there was not significant difference between the number of females and males captured, whereas in A. obliqua more females than males were caught. Age showed a bimodal response in both species and both sexes, with peaks at 4 and 14 d old. In the release-recapture experiments, there were significant differences between species, sexes, and orchards and among the days after release. More individuals of A. ludens than A obliqua were recaptured. Only in A. obliqua the difference between the sexes was significant, with a 3.60:1 female:male ratio. Orchard conditions affected the recapture rate, but in both orchards the largest number of flies recaptured occurred during the first day after release (46 and 88% in each orchard). Our results show that the response to this synthetic lure is species-specific and contribute to better interpret trapping data. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Bio-inspired fabrication of stimuli-responsive photonic crystals with hierarchical structures and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tao; Peng, Wenhong; Zhu, Shenmin; Zhang, Di

    2016-03-01

    When the constitutive materials of photonic crystals (PCs) are stimuli-responsive, the resultant PCs exhibit optical properties that can be tuned by the stimuli. This can be exploited for promising applications in colour displays, biological and chemical sensors, inks and paints, and many optically active components. However, the preparation of the required photonic structures is the first issue to be solved. In the past two decades, approaches such as microfabrication and self-assembly have been developed to incorporate stimuli-responsive materials into existing periodic structures for the fabrication of PCs, either as the initial building blocks or as the surrounding matrix. Generally, the materials that respond to thermal, pH, chemical, optical, electrical, or magnetic stimuli are either soft or aggregate, which is why the manufacture of three-dimensional hierarchical photonic structures with responsive properties is a great challenge. Recently, inspired by biological PCs in nature which exhibit both flexible and responsive properties, researchers have developed various methods to synthesize metals and metal oxides with hierarchical structures by using a biological PC as the template. This review will focus on the recent developments in this field. In particular, PCs with biological hierarchical structures that can be tuned by external stimuli have recently been successfully fabricated. These findings offer innovative insights into the design of responsive PCs and should be of great importance for future applications of these materials.

  10. Bio-inspired fabrication of stimuli-responsive photonic crystals with hierarchical structures and their applications.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tao; Peng, Wenhong; Zhu, Shenmin; Zhang, Di

    2016-03-29

    When the constitutive materials of photonic crystals (PCs) are stimuli-responsive, the resultant PCs exhibit optical properties that can be tuned by the stimuli. This can be exploited for promising applications in colour displays, biological and chemical sensors, inks and paints, and many optically active components. However, the preparation of the required photonic structures is the first issue to be solved. In the past two decades, approaches such as microfabrication and self-assembly have been developed to incorporate stimuli-responsive materials into existing periodic structures for the fabrication of PCs, either as the initial building blocks or as the surrounding matrix. Generally, the materials that respond to thermal, pH, chemical, optical, electrical, or magnetic stimuli are either soft or aggregate, which is why the manufacture of three-dimensional hierarchical photonic structures with responsive properties is a great challenge. Recently, inspired by biological PCs in nature which exhibit both flexible and responsive properties, researchers have developed various methods to synthesize metals and metal oxides with hierarchical structures by using a biological PC as the template. This review will focus on the recent developments in this field. In particular, PCs with biological hierarchical structures that can be tuned by external stimuli have recently been successfully fabricated. These findings offer innovative insights into the design of responsive PCs and should be of great importance for future applications of these materials.

  11. Mode of stimulatory actions of cadmium ion on the mouse diaphragm.

    PubMed Central

    Fu, W. M.; Lin-Shiau, S. Y.

    1985-01-01

    Effects of Cd2+ on the phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparation of the mouse varied markedly in media containing various Ca2+ concentrations. In normal 2.5 mM Ca2+ medium, Cd2+ inhibited acetylcholine release from nerve endings without appreciable effect on the muscle membrane. However, Cd2+ elicited stimulatory effects on the muscle membrane in low Ca2+ medium (10(-3)-1 mM). These stimulatory effects included the induction of spontaneous contractions, augmentation of twitch responses to direct electrical stimulation and potentiation of the muscle contracture induced by acetylcholine, carbachol and high K+. By contrast, caffeine contracture was not affected by Cd2+. Tetrodotoxin, procaine, cysteine and glycerol pretreatment abolished these stimulatory effects of Cd2+. Moreover, changing the ionic composition of the bathing medium to one containing low Na+, high K+, high Mg2+ or high Ca2+ also antagonized these effects of Cd2+. In contrast, low Mg2+ markedly potentiated the frequency of spontaneous contractions induced by Cd2+. (+)-Tubocurarine and beta-bungarotoxin had no effect on Cd2+-induced spontaneous contractions indicating that they may be myogenic rather than neurogenic in origin. By use of conventional microelectrodes, it was found that Cd2+ not only depolarized the muscle membrane but also induced spontaneous action potentials at a high frequency (173 +/- 17 Hz). It is concluded that increased Na+ permeability of the muscle membrane is the essential step bringing about spontaneous contractions. The binding of Cd2+ to -SH groups of the membrane is closely related to the induction of these effects. PMID:4027479

  12. Enzyme-responsive multifunctional surfaces for controlled uptake/release of (bio)molecules.

    PubMed

    Mortato, Mariangela; Argentiere, Simona; De Gregorio, Gian Luca; Gigli, Giuseppe; Blasi, Laura

    2014-11-01

    The current trend in the development of biomaterials is towards bioactive and biodegradable systems. In particular, enzyme-responsive structures are useful tools to realize biodegradable surfaces for the controlled delivery of biomolecules/drugs through a triggered surface erosion process. Up to now, enzyme-responsive structures have been designed by covalent linkage between synthetic polymers and biodegradable functionalities that are responsive to chemical and biological cues (i.e. proteases or pH) [1-4]. Here, we present a novel approach to achieve enzyme-responsive surface-attached networks by exploiting the non-covalent interaction between streptavidin and biotin. The functional component of this three-dimensional (3D) structure is a layer of biotinylated peptides that are degraded by the action of specific proteases. The system was stable under typical physiological conditions; however, it was efficiently degraded upon enzyme exposure. Further, the controlled release of biomolecules and drugs--previously entrapped into the surface-attached network--was demonstrated to occur as a consequence of the enzymatic cleavage. This versatile approach does not require complex chemical procedures. Interestingly, it can be easily adapted to different enzyme-peptide partners and therefore is very attractive for tissue replacement, drug delivery and biosensing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Bio-stimuli-responsive multi-scale hyaluronic acid nanoparticles for deepened tumor penetration and enhanced therapy.

    PubMed

    Huo, Mengmeng; Li, Wenyan; Chaudhuri, Arka Sen; Fan, Yuchao; Han, Xiu; Yang, Chen; Wu, Zhenghong; Qi, Xiaole

    2017-09-01

    In this study, we developed bio-stimuli-responsive multi-scale hyaluronic acid (HA) nanoparticles encapsulated with polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers as the subunits. These HA/PAMAM nanoparticles of large scale (197.10±3.00nm) were stable during systematic circulation then enriched at the tumor sites; however, they were prone to be degraded by the high expressed hyaluronidase (HAase) to release inner PAMAM dendrimers and regained a small scale (5.77±0.25nm) with positive charge. After employing tumor spheroids penetration assay on A549 3D tumor spheroids for 8h, the fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled multi-scale HA/PAMAM-FITC nanoparticles could penetrate deeply into these tumor spheroids with the degradation of HAase. Moreover, small animal imaging technology in male nude mice bearing H22 tumor showed HA/PAMAM-FITC nanoparticles possess higher prolonged systematic circulation compared with both PAMAM-FITC nanoparticles and free FITC. In addition, after intravenous administration in mice bearing H22 tumors, methotrexate (MTX) loaded multi-scale HA/PAMAM-MTX nanoparticles exhibited a 2.68-fold greater antitumor activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. History of river regulation of the Noce River (NE Italy) and related bio-morphodynamic responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serlet, Alyssa; Scorpio, Vittoria; Mastronunzio, Marco; Proto, Matteo; Zen, Simone; Zolezzi, Guido; Bertoldi, Walter; Comiti, Francesco; Prà, Elena Dai; Surian, Nicola; Gurnell, Angela

    2016-04-01

    The Noce River is a hydropower-regulated Alpine stream in Northern-East Italy and a major tributary of the Adige River, the second longest Italian river. The objective of the research is to investigate the response of the lower course of the Noce to two main stages of hydromorphological regulation; channelization/ diversion and, one century later, hydropower regulation. This research uses a historical reconstruction to link the geomorphic response with natural and human-induced factors by identifying morphological and vegetation features from historical maps and airborne photogrammetry and implementing a quantitative analysis of the river response to channelization and flow / sediment supply regulation related to hydropower development. A descriptive overview is presented. The concept of evolutionary trajectory is integrated with predictions from morphodynamic theories for river bars that allow increased insight to investigate the river response to a complex sequence of regulatory events such as development of bars, islands and riparian vegetation. Until the mid-19th century the river had a multi-thread channel pattern. Thereafter (1852) the river was straightened and diverted. Upstream of Mezzolombardo village the river was constrained between embankments of approximately 100 m width while downstream they are of approximately 50 m width. Since channelization some interesting geomorphic changes have appeared in the river e.g. the appearance of alternate bars in the channel. In 1926 there was a breach in the right bank of the downstream part that resulted in a multi-thread river reach which can be viewed as a recovery to the earlier multi-thread pattern. After the 1950's the flow and sediment supply became strongly regulated by hydropower development. The analysis of aerial images reveals that the multi-thread reach became progressively stabilized by vegetation development over the bars, though signs of some dynamics can still be recognizable today, despite the

  15. Evaluation of thermo responsive magnetic nano-particles for high- Tc SQUID bio application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, S.; Toriyabe, C.; Torii, Y.; Hatsukade, Y.; Eki, T.; Katsura, S.; Ohnishi, N.; Wan, J.; Yang, S.; Zhang, Y.

    2007-10-01

    Immunoassay or detection of biological molecules using a high sensitive SQUID and magnetic nano-particles as labeling has been recently proposed. In this method, mostly a few particles are labeled on an antibody or biological molecules. If it is possible to give much more magnetic particles to the antibody, sensitivity must notably increase. We propose the use of thermo responsive magnetic nano-particles, which can agglutinate and disperse by themselves associated with temperature. As a preliminary experiment, we investigated the properties of thermo responsive nano-particles made of Fe3O4. By detailed study on the particles using an analyzer for a distribution of particle's outer dimension in aqueous liquid, it was found that the dimension increased with temperature above 25°, and became 400 nm at 30.5°. Magnetic measurements of the particles at different conditions using high-Tc SQUID have been done. The results suggested that the particles must be dried by heat before magnetic measurement to enhance the signal from the particles.

  16. Improvement influenza HA2 DNA vaccine cellular and humoral immune responses with Mx bio adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, Sina; Shahsavandi, Shahla; Maddadgar, Omid

    2017-03-01

    Immunization with DNA vaccines as a novel alternative to conventional vaccination strategy requires adjuvant for improving vaccine efficacy. The conserved immunogenic HA2 subunit, which harbors neutralizing epitopes is a promising vaccine candidate against influenza viruses. In this study, for the first time we explore the idea of using host interferon inducible Mx protein to increase the immunogenicity of HA2 H9N2 influenza DNA vaccine. The potency and safety of the Mx adjuvanted-HA2 vaccine was evaluated in BALB/c mice by different prime-boost strategies. To assess the effect of the vaccination on the virus clearance rate, mice were challenged with homologous influenza virus. Administration of the adjuvanted vaccine and boosting with the same regimen could effectively enhance both humoral and cellular immune responses in treated mice. These data demonstrated that Mx as host defense peptide can be potentiated for improving influenza vaccine efficacy.

  17. Nonintrusive 3D reconstruction of human bone models to simulate their bio-mechanical response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Tsouknidas; Antonis, Lontos; Savvas, Savvakis; Nikolaos, Michailidis

    2012-06-01

    3D finite element models representing functional parts of the human skeletal system, have been repeatedly introduced over the last years, to simulate biomechanical response of anatomical characteristics or investigate surgical treatment. The reconstruction of geometrically accurate FEM models, poses a significant challenge for engineers and physicians, as recent advances in tissue engineering dictate highly customized implants, while facilitating the production of alloplast materials that are employed to restore, replace or supplement the function of human tissue. The premises of every accurate reconstruction method, is to encapture the precise geometrical characteristics of the examined tissue and thus the selection of a sufficient imaging technique is of the up-most importance. This paper reviews existing and potential applications related to the current state-of-the-art of medical imaging and simulation techniques. The procedures are examined by introducing their concepts; strengths and limitations, while the authors also present part of their recent activities in these areas. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  18. Folding and Characterization of a Bio-responsive Robot from DNA Origami.

    PubMed

    Amir, Yaniv; Abu-Horowitz, Almogit; Bachelet, Ido

    2015-12-03

    The DNA nanorobot is a hollow hexagonal nanometric device, designed to open in response to specific stimuli and present cargo sequestered inside. Both stimuli and cargo can be tailored according to specific needs. Here we describe the DNA nanorobot fabrication protocol, with the use of the DNA origami technique. The procedure initiates by mixing short single-strand DNA staples into a stock mixture which is then added to a long, circular, single-strand DNA scaffold in presence of a folding buffer. A standard thermo cycler is programmed to gradually lower the mixing reaction temperature to facilitate the staples-to-scaffold annealing, which is the guiding force behind the folding of the nanorobot. Once the 60 hr folding reaction is complete, excess staples are discarded using a centrifugal filter, followed by visualization via agarose-gel electrophoresis (AGE). Finally, successful fabrication of the nanorobot is verified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), with the use of uranyl-formate as negative stain.

  19. Succession of biofilm communities responsible for biofouling of membrane bio-reactors (MBRs)

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jinxue; Lv, Pengyi; Zhang, Jinsong; Fane, Anthony G.; McDougald, Diane

    2017-01-01

    Biofilm formation is one of the main factors associated with membrane biofouling in membrane bioreactors (MBRs). As such, it is important to identify the responsible organisms to develop targeted strategies to control biofouling. This study investigated the composition and changes in the microbial communities fouling MBR membranes over time and correlated those changes with an increase in transmembrane pressure (TMP). Based on qPCR data, bacteria were the dominant taxa of the biofilm (92.9–98.4%) relative to fungi (1.5–6.9%) and archaea (0.03–0.07%). NMDS analysis indicated that during the initial stages of operation, the biofilm communities were indistinguishable from those found in the sludge. However, the biofilm community significantly diverged from the sludge over time and ultimately showed a unique biofilm profile. This suggested that there was strong selection for a group of organisms that were biofilm specialists. This pattern of succession and selection was correlated with the rapid increase in TMP, where bacteria including Rhodospirillales, Sphingomonadales and Rhizobiales dominated the biofilm at this time. While most of the identified fungal OTUs matched Candida sp., the majority of fungal communities were unclassified by 18S rRNA gene sequencing. Collectively, the data suggests that bacteria, primarily, along with fungi may play an important role in the rapid TMP increase and loss of system performance. PMID:28686622

  20. Divergent responses of fire to recent climate change: evidence from bio-regional patterns across south-eastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradstock, R.; Boer, M.; Penman, T.; Price, O.

    2012-04-01

    Fire activity is dependent on the growth of biomass (fuel), sufficient dryness of biomass (availability to burn), weather condition such as temperature, wind and humidity (rate of fire spread) and ignitions (natural or human caused). Differing fire regimes are predicted to emerge from differing syndromes of limitation by these fundamental drivers. These processes are in turn governed by complex relationships with vegetation and climate, as well as human populations. Fire regimes should therefore vary systematically across biophysical gradients as highlighted in recent, global analyses of fire patterns. In particular, fire in dry ecosystems may be fundamentally constrained by the growth of herbaceous biomass (fuel limitation), whereas in mesic, forested ecosystems the principal constraint on fire is predicted to be availability to burn (i.e. episodes where litter fuels derived form dominant woody plants are sufficiently dry to burn). This means fire oocurs primarily in response to rain in arid ecosystems (i.e. promotion of herbage growth) and, alternatively, to drought in mesic ecosystems (i.e. drying of fuel beds). These contrasting syndromes of fire provide scope for divergent responses to warmer and drier conditions under climate change, with fire potentially declining in arid ecosystems and increasing in mesic ecosystems as a result. We tested this prediction by examining the response of area burned from 1975 to 2009 across 32 bioregions covering south-eastern Australia, using mapped data derived from land and fire management archives. This range extends from arid grasslands through woodlands and sclerophyll forests to rainforests in the mesic, coastal fringe. Recent research has highlighted an increase in the severity of fire weather (i.e. annual sum of daily fire danger index) for the corresponding period across the part of the continent. We found that area burned tended to remain static or declined in semi-arid and arid bio-regions. By contrast in forested

  1. Stimulatory effect of Crocus sativus (saffron) on beta2-adrenoceptors of guinea pig tracheal chains.

    PubMed

    Nemati, H; Boskabady, M H; Ahmadzadef Vostakolaei, H

    2008-12-01

    To study the mechanism(s) of the relaxant effects of Crocus sativus (Iridaceae), the stimulatory effect of aqueous-ethanolic extracts of this plant and one of its constituent, safranal was examined on beta-adrenoceptors in tracheal chains of guinea pigs. The beta(2)-adrenergic stimulatory was tested by performing the cumulative concentration-response curves of isoprenaline-induced relaxation of pre-contracted isolated guinea pig tracheal chains. The studied solutions were included two concentrations of aqueous-ethanolic extract from Crocus sativus (0.1 and 0.2g%), safranal (1.25 and 2.5 microg), 10nM propranolol, and saline. The study was done in two different conditions including: non-incubated (group 1, n=9) and incubated tissues with 1 microM chlorpheniramine (group 2, n=6). The results showed clear leftward shifts in isoprenaline curves obtained in the presence of only higher concentration of the extract in group 1 and its both concentrations in group 2 compared with that of saline. The EC(50) (the effective concentration of isoprenaline, causing 50% of maximum response) obtained in the presence of both concentrations of the extract (0.17+/-0.06 and 0.12+/-0.02) and safranal (0.22+/-0.05 and 0.22+/-0.05) in group 1 and only in the presence of two concentrations of the extract (1.16+/-0.31 and 0.68+/-0.21) in group 2 was significantly lower compared to saline (1.00+/-0.22 and 4.06+/-1.04 for groups 1 and 2, respectively) (p<0.05-0.001). The maximum responses obtained in the presence of both concentrations of the extract and safranal in group 1 were significantly lower than that of saline (p<0.005 for all cases). All values (CR-1=(EC(50) obtained in the presence of active substances/EC(50), obtained in the presence of saline)-1) obtained in the presence of higher concentrations of extract in group 1, its both concentrations and higher concentration of safranal in group 2 were negative and there were significant differences in this value between propranolol and

  2. Anabaena sp. mediated bio-oxidation of arsenite to arsenate in synthetic arsenic (III) solution: Process optimization by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Jana, Animesh; Bhattacharya, Priyankari; Swarnakar, Snehasikta; Majumdar, Swachchha; Ghosh, Sourja

    2015-11-01

    Blue green algae Anabaena sp. was cultivated in synthetic arsenite solution to investigate its bio-oxidation potential for arsenic species. Response surface methodology (RSM) was employed based on a 3-level full factorial design considering four factors, viz. initial arsenic (III) concentration, algal dose, temperature and time. Bio-oxidation (%) of arsenic (III) was considered as response for the design. The study revealed that about 100% conversion of As (III) to As (V) was obtained for initial As (III) concentration of 2.5-7.5 mg/L at 30 °C for 72 h of exposure using 3 g/L of algal dose signifying a unique bio-oxidation potential of Anabaena sp. The dissolved CO2 (DCO2) and oxygen (DO) concentration in solution was monitored during the process and based on the data, a probable mechanism was proposed wherein algal cell acts like a catalytic membrane surface and expedites the bio-oxidation process. Bioaccumulation of arsenic, as well as, surface adsorption on algal cell was found considerably low. Lipid content of algal biomass grown in arsenite solution was found slightly lower than that of algae grown in synthetic media. Toxicity effects on algal cells due to arsenic exposure were evaluated in terms of comet assay and chlorophyll a content which indicated DNA damage to some extent along with very little decrease in chlorophyll a content. In summary, the present study explored the potential application of Anabaena sp. as an ecofriendly and sustainable option for detoxification of arsenic contaminated natural water with value-added product generation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A DNA vaccine encoding the 42 kDa C-terminus of merozoite surface protein 1 of Plasmodium falciparum induces antibody, interferon-gamma and cytotoxic T cell responses in rhesus monkeys: immuno-stimulatory effects of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjai; Villinger, Francois; Oakley, Miranda; Aguiar, Joao C; Jones, Trevor R; Hedstrom, Richard C; Gowda, Kalpana; Chute, John; Stowers, Anthony; Kaslow, David C; Thomas, Elaine K; Tine, John; Klinman, Dennis; Hoffman, Stephen L; Weiss, Walter W

    2002-04-01

    We have constructed a DNA plasmid vaccine encoding the C-terminal 42-kDa region of the merozoite surface protein 1 (pMSP1(42)) from the 3D7 strain of Plasmodium falciparum (Pf3D7). This plasmid expressed recombinant MSP1(42) after in vitro transfection in mouse VM92 cells. Rhesus monkeys immunized with pMSP1(42) produced antibodies reactive with Pf3D7 infected erythrocytes by IFAT, and by ELISA against yeast produced MSP1(19) (yMSP1(19)). Immunization also induced antigen specific T cell responses as measured by interferon-gamma production, and by classical CTL chromium release assays. In addition, immunization with pMSP1(42) primed animals for an enhanced antibody response to a subsequent boost with the recombinant yMSP1(19). We also evaluated Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) as an adjuvant for pMSP1(42.) We tested both rhesus GM-CSF expressed from a DNA plasmid, and E. coli produced recombinant human GM-CSF. Plasmids encoding rhesus GM-CSF (prhGM-CSF) and human GM-CSF (phuGM-CSF) were constructed; these plasmids expressed bio-active recombinant GMCSF. Co-immunization with a mixture of prhGM-CSF and pMSP1(42) induced higher specific antibody responses after the first dose of plasmid, but after three doses of DNA monkeys immunized with or without prhGM-CSF had the same final antibody titers and T cell responses. In comparison, rhuGM-CSF protein did not lead to accelerated antibody production after the first DNA dose. However, antibody titers were maintained at a slightly higher level in monkeys receiving GM-CSF protein, and they had a higher response to boosting with recombinant MSP1(19). The GM-CSF plasmid or protein appears to be less potent as an adjuvant in rhesus monkeys than each is in mice, and more work is needed to determine if GM-CSF can be a useful adjuvant in DNA vaccination of primates.

  4. Bio-Inspired Concepts: Studies of Biological Response to External Electric Fields for Cellular Manipulation and Diagnostics - Modeling and Experimentation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-03

    Dielectric Spectroscopy," IEEE trans. On Dielectrics and Electrical Insulation 8, 253 (2001). 8. M. Smoluchowski, "Drei vortrage uber diffusion...Intensity Electric Fields," IEEE Conf. On Dielectrics and Electrical Insulation (Bio- Electrics Workshop), Cancun, Mexico , Oct. 2002 (invited

  5. Response of Human Osteoblast to n-HA/PEEK—Quantitative Proteomic Study of Bio-effects of Nano-Hydroxyapatite Composite

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Minzhi; Li, Haiyun; Liu, Xiaochen; Wei, Jie; Ji, Jianguo; Yang, Shu; Hu, Zhiyuan; Wei, Shicheng

    2016-01-01

    Nano-sized hydroxyapatite (n-HA) is considered as a bio-active material, which is often mixed into bone implant material, polyetheretherketone (PEEK). To reveal the global protein expression modulations of osteoblast in response to direct contact with the PEEK composite containing high level (40%) nano-sized hydroxyapatite (n-HA/PEEK) and explain its comprehensive bio-effects, quantitative proteomic analysis was conducted on human osteoblast-like cells MG-63 cultured on n-HA/PEEK in comparison with pure PEEK. Results from quantitative proteomic analysis showed that the most enriched categories in the up-regulated proteins were related to calcium ion processes and associated functions while the most enriched categories in the down-regulated proteins were related to RNA process. This enhanced our understanding to the molecular mechanism of the promotion of the cell adhesion and differentiation with the inhibition of the cell proliferation on n-HA/PEEK composite. It also exhibited that although the calcium ion level of incubate environment hadn’t increased, merely the calcium fixed on the surface of material had influence to intracellular calcium related processes, which was also reflect by the higher intracellular Ca2+ concentration of n-HA/PEEK. This study could lead to more comprehensive cognition to the versatile biocompatibility of composite materials. It further proves that proteomics is useful in new bio-effect discovery. PMID:26956660

  6. Response of Human Osteoblast to n-HA/PEEK--Quantitative Proteomic Study of Bio-effects of Nano-Hydroxyapatite Composite.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Minzhi; Li, Haiyun; Liu, Xiaochen; Wei, Jie; Ji, Jianguo; Yang, Shu; Hu, Zhiyuan; Wei, Shicheng

    2016-03-09

    Nano-sized hydroxyapatite (n-HA) is considered as a bio-active material, which is often mixed into bone implant material, polyetheretherketone (PEEK). To reveal the global protein expression modulations of osteoblast in response to direct contact with the PEEK composite containing high level (40%) nano-sized hydroxyapatite (n-HA/PEEK) and explain its comprehensive bio-effects, quantitative proteomic analysis was conducted on human osteoblast-like cells MG-63 cultured on n-HA/PEEK in comparison with pure PEEK. Results from quantitative proteomic analysis showed that the most enriched categories in the up-regulated proteins were related to calcium ion processes and associated functions while the most enriched categories in the down-regulated proteins were related to RNA process. This enhanced our understanding to the molecular mechanism of the promotion of the cell adhesion and differentiation with the inhibition of the cell proliferation on n-HA/PEEK composite. It also exhibited that although the calcium ion level of incubate environment hadn't increased, merely the calcium fixed on the surface of material had influence to intracellular calcium related processes, which was also reflect by the higher intracellular Ca(2+) concentration of n-HA/PEEK. This study could lead to more comprehensive cognition to the versatile biocompatibility of composite materials. It further proves that proteomics is useful in new bio-effect discovery.

  7. Optimization of factors with C/N ratio and flocs biomass concentration in simulated aquaculture bio-flocs systems by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Yun-Jie; Zhu, Liang; Xu, Xiang-Yang

    2012-01-01

    The TAN (total ammonia nitrogen) removal efficiency was investigated in simulated aquaculture bio-flocs technology systems. The response surface methodology that was applied with a central composite rotational design and two key operational parameters, flocs biomass concentration and C/N ratio was varied in order to evaluate the system performance and achieve the optimal operational conditions in this study. A polynomial linear regression model was found to quantitatively describe the relationship between the two variables and response values with adequate fitness in the simulate aquaculture bio-flocs systems. The results showed that flocs biomass concentration and operational C/N ratio both had significant impacts on the response objectives, as well as the interactions between them. The optimal results attained from the model indicated that more than 90% TAN removal efficiency was achieved when the flocs biomass concentration and C/N ratio were around 2.0-2.5 (volatile suspended solids, g/l) and 13-16, respectively.

  8. Extracellular calcium transients and action potential configuration changes related to post-stimulatory potentiation in rabbit atrium.

    PubMed

    Hilgemann, D W

    1986-05-01

    Extracellular calcium transients were monitored with 2 mM tetramethylmurexide at low calcium (250 microM total, 130 microM free), and action potentials were monitored together with developed tension at normal calcium (1.3 mM) during the production and decay of post-stimulatory potentiation in rabbit left atrial strips. At normal calcium, the contractile potentiation produced by a brief burst of 4 Hz stimulation is lost in three to five post-stimulatory excitations, which correlate with a negative staircase of the late action potential. At low calcium, stimulation at 4 Hz for 3-8 s results in a net extracellular calcium depletion of 5-15 microM. At the subsequent potentiated contraction (1-45 s rest), total extracellular calcium increases by 4-8 microM. The contractile response at a second excitation is greatly suppressed and results in little or no further calcium shift; the sequence can be repeated immediately thereafter. Reducing external sodium to 60 mM (sucrose replacement) enhances post-rest contractions, suppresses the late action potential, nearly eliminates loss of contractility and net calcium efflux at post-rest excitations, and markedly reduces extracellular calcium depletion during rapid stimulation. 4-Aminopyridine (1 mM) markedly suppresses the rapid early repolarization of this preparation at post-rest excitations and the loss of contractility at post-rest stimulation from the rested state; during a post-stimulatory potentiation sequence at low calcium, replenishment of extracellular calcium takes several post-stimulatory excitations. Ryanodine (10 nM to 5 microM) abolishes the post-stimulatory contraction at rest periods of greater than 5 s. If the initial repolarization is rapid, ryanodine suppresses the late action potential, calcium efflux during quiescence is greatly accelerated, and subsequent excitations do not result in an accumulation of extracellular calcium. A positive staircase of the early action potential correlates with the magnitude

  9. Frameshifting in alphaviruses: a diversity of 3' stimulatory structures.

    PubMed

    Chung, Betty Y-W; Firth, Andrew E; Atkins, John F

    2010-03-26

    Programmed ribosomal frameshifting allows the synthesis of alternative, N-terminally coincident, C-terminally distinct proteins from the same RNA. Many viruses utilize frameshifting to optimize the coding potential of compact genomes, to circumvent the host cell's canonical rule of one functional protein per mRNA, or to express alternative proteins in a fixed ratio. Programmed frameshifting is also used in the decoding of a small number of cellular genes. Recently, specific ribosomal -1 frameshifting was discovered at a conserved U_UUU_UUA motif within the sequence encoding the alphavirus 6K protein. In this case, frameshifting results in the synthesis of an additional protein, termed TF (TransFrame). This new case of frameshifting is unusual in that the -1 frame ORF is very short and completely embedded within the sequence encoding the overlapping polyprotein. The present work shows that there is remarkable diversity in the 3' sequences that are functionally important for efficient frameshifting at the U_UUU_UUA motif. While many alphavirus species utilize a 3' RNA structure such as a hairpin or pseudoknot, some species (such as Semliki Forest virus) apparently lack any intra-mRNA stimulatory structure, yet just 20 nt 3'-adjacent to the shift site stimulates up to 10% frameshifting. The analysis, both experimental and bioinformatic, significantly expands the known repertoire of -1 frameshifting stimulators in mammalian and insect systems.

  10. Stimulatory role of grape pomace polyphenols on Lactobacillus acidophilus growth.

    PubMed

    Hervert-Hernández, Deisy; Pintado, Concepción; Rotger, Rafael; Goñi, Isabel

    2009-11-30

    Grape pomace is a natural product rich in dietary fiber and polyphenols. A major part of dietary polyphenols is not absorbed in the small intestine and can interact with colonic microbiota. The influence of grape polyphenols on Lactobacillus acidophilus CECT 903 growth was investigated through agar diffusion assays and cultures in liquid media. Grape phenolic extracts and some standards of phenolic compounds (caffeic acid, gallic acid, tannic acid, catechin, epicatechin, and quercetin) were assayed. All phenolic compounds tested did not exert an inhibitory effect on L. acidophilus growth at a maximum concentration of 5000 microg/disk in agar diffusion assays. In addition, a stimulatory trend in bacterial growth was observed in both grape phenolic extracts and tannic acid. The major finding was that grape pomace phenolic extract (1mg/mL) induced a significant biomass increase of L. acidophilus grown in liquid culture media. Further research into the interaction between phenolic compounds and other intestinal bacteria, as well as healthy consequences, is required.

  11. Bio-optical Dynamics and the Forecasting of Bio-optical Variability in the Sea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    Research on oceanic bio -optical processes and the prediction of ocean bio -optical properties requires coupled physical-biological- chemical models...with the capability of real data initialization and assimilation. The goal is to develop and prove such models, focusing specifically on the bio -optical...their response and sensitivities to local and remote forcings. The scientific/technical objectives of this project are (1) to develop the bio -optical

  12. An approach for prediction of optimum reaction conditions for laccase-catalyzed bio-transformation of 1-naphthol by response surface methodology (RSM).

    PubMed

    Ceylan, Hasan; Kubilay, Senol; Aktas, Nahit; Sahiner, Nurettin

    2008-04-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM) was successfully applied to enzymatic bio-transformation of 1-naphthol. The experiments were conducted in a closed system containing acetone and sodium acetate buffer, with laccase enzyme. Laccase enzyme used as catalyst was derived from Trametes versicolor (ATCC 200801). The enzymatic bio-transformation rate of 1-naphthol, based on measurements of initial dissolved oxygen (DO) consumption rate in the closed system, was optimized by the application of RSM. The independent variables, which had been found as the most effective variables on the initial DO consumption rate by screening experiments, were determined as medium temperature, pH and acetone content. A quadratic model was developed through RSM in terms of related independent variables to describe the DO consumption rate as the response. Based on contour plots and variance analysis, optimum operational conditions for maximizing initial DO consumption rate, while keeping acetone content at its minimum value, were 301 K of temperature, pH 6 and acetone content of 7% to obtain 9.17 x 10(-3) mM DO/min for initial oxidation rate.

  13. Expression profile of bio-defense genes in Penaeus monodon gills in response to formalin inactivated white spot syndrome virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Sudheer, N S; Poulose, Gigi; Thomas, Ancy; Viswanath, Kiron; Kulkarni, Amod; Narayanan, R B; Philip, Rosamma; Singh, I S Bright

    2015-05-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is the most devastating pathogen of penaeid shrimp. While developing technology to vaccinate shrimp against WSSV, it is imperative to look into the immune response of the animal at molecular level. However, very little information has been generated in this direction. The present study is an attempt to understand the expression of bio-defense genes in gill tissues of Penaeus monodon in response to formalin inactivated WSSV. A WSSV vaccine with a viral titer of 1×10(9) DNA copies was prepared and orally administered to P. monodon at a rate of 1.75×10(6) DNA copies of inactivated virus preparation (IVP) day(-1) for 7days. The animals were challenged with WSSV on 1st and 5th day post vaccination, and temporal expression of bio-defense genes in gill tissues was studied. Survival of 100% and 50% were observed respectively on 1st and 5th day post vaccination challenge. The humoral immune genes prophenoloxidase (proPO), alpha 2-macroglobulin (α2M), crustin and PmRACK, and the cell mediated immune genes caspase and Rab7 were up regulated in gill tissue upon vaccination and challenge. The expression of humoral gene crustin and cellular gene Rab7 was related to survival in IVP administered shrimp. Results of the study suggest that these genes have roles in protecting shrimp from WSSV on vaccination.

  14. Effects of polyhalogenated hydrocarbons and related contaminants on common tern reproduction: Integration of (bio)chemical and ecological responses

    SciTech Connect

    Murk, A.J.; Boudewijn, T.J.; Dirksen, S.; Bosveld, A.T.C.; Rossaert, G.; Ysebaert, T.; Meire, P.; Meininger, P.L.

    1995-12-31

    An integrated ecotoxicological study was made to establish the possible effects of polyhalogenated hydrocarbons (PHAHs) on common tern (Stema hirundo) reproduction. In eight Dutch or Belgian colonies, breeding biology and food choice were determined. In all colonies 15 second eggs from three-egg clutches were collected for artificial incubation and (bio)chemical analysis. Results from these analyses were combined with biological data from the remaining eggs of the clutches. A relationship was found between yolksac mono-ortho PCB levels and main food species (fish or insects) of the adult terns before egg-laying. Colony average breeding data differed only slightly, and were difficult to relate to PHAH levels. When the colonies were grouped after yolksac PHAH-patterns and main food species, significant differences in average egg laying date, egg laying period, incubation period, egg volume and chick weight could be related to differences in yolksac PHAH and retinoid levels, and hepatic EROD activity. The data from all colonies also were used as one dataset and correlated with the (bio)chemical parameters. In summary there were significant correlations or clear trends between yolksac PHAHs or hepatic EROD-activity and prolonged egg laying and incubation period, and smaller eggs and chicks. Lower yolksac retinoid and plasma thyroid hormone levels, and a higher ratio of plasma retinol over yolksac retinoids correlated with longer egg laying and incubation periods, and smaller chicks and eggs (only with thyroid hormone).

  15. Binding domains of stimulatory and inhibitory thyrotropin (TSH) receptor autoantibodies determined with chimeric TSH-lutropin/chorionic gonadotropin receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Nagayama, Y; Wadsworth, H L; Russo, D; Chazenbalk, G D; Rapoport, B

    1991-01-01

    We examined the relative effects of thyrotropin (TSH) and TSH receptor autoantibodies in the sera of patients with autoimmune thyroid disease on three TSH-lutropin/chorionic gonadotropin (LH/CG) receptor extracellular domain chimeras. Each chimera binds TSH with high affinity. Only the chimera with TSH receptor extracellular domains ABC (amino acids 1-260) had a functional (cAMP) response to thyroid stimulatory IgG. The chimeras with TSH receptor domains CD (amino acids 171-360) and DE (amino acids 261-418) were unresponsive. The lack of response of the chimera with TSH receptor domains DE was anticipated because it fails to transduce a signal with TSH stimulation, unlike the other two chimeras. A different spectrum of responses occurred when the TSH-LH/CG chimeras were examined in terms of autoantibody competition for TSH binding. IgG with TSH binding-inhibitory activity when tested with the wild-type TSH receptor also inhibited TSH binding to the chimera with TSH receptor domains DE. Dramatically, however, these IgG did not inhibit TSH binding to the chimera with TSH receptor domains CD, and had weak or absent activity with the chimera with TSH receptor domains ABC. Chimeras with TSH receptor domains ABC and DE were equally effective in affinity-purifying IgG with thyroid-stimulatory and TSH binding-inhibitory activities. Nonstimulatory IgG with TSH binding-inhibitory activity inhibited the action of stimulatory IgG on the wild-type TSH receptor, but not with the chimera containing TSH receptor domains ABC. In summary, TSH receptor autoantibodies and TSH bind to regions in both domains ABC and DE of the TSH receptor extracellular region. Stimulatory and inhibitory TSH receptor autoantibodies, as well as TSH, appear to bind to different sites in domains ABC, but similar sites in domains DE, of the receptor. Alternatively, TSH and the different TSH receptor antibodies bind with differing affinities to the same site in the ABC region. Images PMID:1711544

  16. Sensitivity of adipocyte lipolysis to stimulatory and inhibitory agonists in hypothyroidism and starvation.

    PubMed

    Saggerson, E D

    1986-09-01

    The responsiveness of lipolysis to the stimulatory agonists noradrenaline, corticotropin and glucagon and to the inhibitory agonists N6-phenylisopropyladenosine, prostaglandin E1 and nicotinic acid was investigated with rat white adipocytes incubated with a high concentration of adenosine deaminase (1 unit/ml). The cells were obtained from fed or 48 h-starved euthyroid animals or from fed or starved animals rendered hypothyroid by 4 weeks of treatment with low-iodine diet and propylthiouracil. Hypothyroidism increased sensitivity to and efficacy of all three inhibitory agonists in their opposition of noradrenaline-stimulated lipolysis. Starvation decreased sensitivity to all three inhibitory agonists when opposing basal lipolysis. Hypothyroidism decreased sensitivity to noradrenaline, glucagon and corticotropin by 37-, 4- and 4-fold respectively and decreased the maximum response to these agonists by approx. 50%, 50% and 75% respectively. Starvation reversed decreases in maximum response to these agonists in hypothyroidism. Starvation in the euthyroid state increased sensitivity to glucagon and noradrenaline, but did not alter sensitivity to corticotropin. Cells from hypothyroid rats were relatively insensitive to Bordetella pertussis toxin, which substantially increased basal lipolysis in the euthyroid state.

  17. A Response to "BIO 2010: Transforming Undergraduate Education for Future Research Biologists," from the Perspective of the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Major Program at Kenyon College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slonczewski, Joan L.; Marusak, Rosemary

    2004-01-01

    The National Research Council completed a major study of undergraduate biology education, "BIO 2010-Transforming Undergraduate Education For Future Research Biologists (BIO 2010)," funded by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the National Institutes of Health. The "BIO 2010" report recommends that biology pedagogy should use an…

  18. Inhibitory and stimulatory effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pyocyanine on human T and B lymphocytes and human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Ulmer, A J; Pryjma, J; Tarnok, Z; Ernst, M; Flad, H D

    1990-01-01

    Pyocyanine, a pigment produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, has dual dose-dependent stimulatory as well as inhibitory effects on immune responses in vitro as measured by DNA synthesis of human T and B lymphocytes, interleukin-2 (IL-2) production by human T lymphocytes, immunoglobulin production by human B lymphocytes, and monokine production by human monocytes. In general, stimulatory activity was found at low concentrations of pyocyanine, whereas high concentrations of the pigment resulted in an inhibition of responses. At a pyocyanine concentration of 0.1 micrograms/ml or less the proliferation of T and B lymphocytes was enhanced, but at 0.5 micrograms/ml it was suppressed. IL-2 production by T lymphocytes was enhanced at concentrations up to 0.5 micrograms/ml but totally inhibited at 1.0 micrograms/ml. The differentiation of B lymphocytes to become immunoglobulin-producing cells was also enhanced in the presence of low doses of pyocyanine, whereas secretion of immunoglobulin by B lymphocytes was suppressed at all concentrations of pyocyanine. In contrast to the dual effects of pyocyanine on lymphocyte response, lipopolysaccharide-induced IL-1 and tumor necrosis factor release by monocytes was markedly enhanced by low as well as high concentrations of pyocyanine. From these results we conclude that this property of pyocyanine may lead to suppression of specific defense mechanisms and enhance harmful inflammatory reactions of the host during infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:2106495

  19. Amelioration of drought-induced negative responses by elevated CO2 in field grown short rotation coppice mulberry (Morus spp.), a potential bio-energy tree crop.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, Kalva Madhana; Reddy, Kanubothula Sitarami; Reddy, Attipalli Ramachandra

    2017-05-01

    Present study describes the responses of short rotation coppice (SRC) mulberry, a potential bio-energy tree, grown under interactive environment of elevated CO2 (E) and water stress (WS). Growth in E stimulated photosynthetic performance in well-watered (WW) as well as during WS with significant increases in light-saturated photosynthetic rates (A Sat), water use efficiency (WUEi), intercellular [CO2], and photosystem-II efficiency (F V/F M and ∆F/F M') with concomitant reduction in stomatal conductance (g s) and transpiration (E) compared to ambient CO2 (A) grown plants. Reduced levels of proline, H2O2, and malondialdehyde (MDA) and higher contents of antioxidants including ascorbic acid and total phenolics in WW and WS in E plants clearly demonstrated lesser oxidative damage. Further, A plants showed higher transcript abundance and antioxidant enzyme activities under WW as well as during initial stages of WS (15 days). However, with increasing drought imposition (30 days), A plants showed down regulation of antioxidant systems compared to their respective E plants. These results clearly demonstrated that future increased atmospheric CO2 enhances the photosynthetic potential and also mitigate the drought-induced oxidative stress in SRC mulberry. In conclusion, mulberry is a potential bio-energy tree crop which is best suitable for short rotation coppice forestry-based mitigation of increased [CO2] levels even under intermittent drought conditions, projected to prevail in the fast-changing global climate.

  20. Alkaline phosphatase immobilization onto Bio-Gide® and Bio-Oss® for periodontal and bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Oortgiesen, Daniël A W; Plachokova, Adelina S; Geenen, Claudia; Meijer, Gert J; Walboomers, X Frank; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Jansen, John A

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) immobilization onto Bio-Gide(®) in vitro, and to study the in vivo performance of ALP-enriched Bio-Gide(®) and/or Bio-Oss(®) with the purpose to enhance periodontal regeneration. Alkaline phosphatase ALP was immobilized onto Bio-Gide(®) and Bio-Oss(®) . Forty-eight rats received periodontal defects, which were treated according to one of the following strategies: Bio-Gide(®), Bio-Gide(®) -ALP, Bio-Gide(®) -ALP/Bio-Oss(®), Bio-Gide(®) /Bio-Oss(®) -ALP, Bio-Gide(®) -ALP/Bio-Oss(®) -ALP, or empty. Micro-CT and histological analysis were performed. A 30 min ALP-deposition time was determined as optimal from mineralization capacity assessment and consequently used as Bio-Gide(®) -ALP membranes in the animal experiment. In vivo results showed that after 2 weeks, the defect and implanted materials were still visible, an inflammatory response was present, and membrane degradation was ongoing. Bone formation, although limited, was observed in the majority of Bio-Gide(®) -ALP specimens and all of the Bio-Gide(®) /Bio-Oss(®) -ALP specimens, and was significantly higher compared with Bio-Gide(®) and empty controls. After 6 weeks, the defects and particles were still visible, whereas membranes were completely degraded. The inflammatory response was decreased and bone formation appeared superior for Bio-Gide(®) -ALP treated defects. Immobilization of ALP onto guided tissue regeneration (GTR)/ guided bone regeneration (GBR)-materials (Bio-Gide(®) and Bio-Oss(®)) can enhance the performance of these materials in GTR/GBR procedures. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Bio-monitoring of the most industrialized area in Poland: Trees' response to climate and anthropogenic environmental changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sensuła, Barbara; Wilczyński, Sławomir; Piotrowska, Natalia

    2017-04-01

    Silesia is one of the regions with the highest levels of air pollution in Europe, highly industrialized over the years and highly populated. In this study, trees (Pinus Sylvestris L.)growing in the heavily urbanized area in close proximity to point-source pollution emitters, such as a heat and power plant, nitrogen plant, and steelworks in Silesia (Poland), were analyzed as bio-indicators of contemporary environmental changes. Trees are a very good archive of ecosystem changes, becouse they are sensitive to climate changes and anthropogenic pollution. The pollution impacts human, plants and animal life and different ecosystem processes. The changes in the ecosystem can disturb the metabolism and physiological processes of trees, and consequently, they also have an effect on the wood structure, tree ring width and the isotopic composition of wood and its components. The analysed samples covered the time period of the development of industrialization and the modernization in the industrial sector in Poland. In Poland, the systematic long-term monitoring of air pollutants is generally restricted to rural point-source regions in urban areas. Even for those areas, air pollution emissions were not continually monitored and data is only available for the last decades. Tree ring series that present long-term data can be used to analyse the ecosystem changes, caused by human activities. The conifers investigated in this study have grown for many years under the stress of environmental contamination. We analysed the spatiotemporal distribution of growth reductions, the depth of reduction with respect to the distance from the emitter, the relationship between tree growth and radiocarbon and stable isotope composition and climate during the industry development period and during pro-ecological strategy application. Pines chronologies indicate that trees have a similar sensitivity to most climatic elements of the previous and given year, but there is also observed a different

  2. Stimulatory effect of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans DNA on proinflammatory cytokine expression by human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Soto-Barreras, Uriel; Cortés-Sandoval, Gabriela; Dominguez-Perez, Ruben; Loyola-Leyva, Alejandra; Martinez-Rodriguez, Panfilo-Raymundo; Loyola-Rodriguez, Juan Pablo

    2017-10-01

    While different virulence factors have been reported of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), there is little information about the stimulatory effect of its DNA. The main purpose of this study was to assess the inflammatory response of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) stimulated with A. actinomycetemcomitans DNA. Cytokine levels of IL-6, IL-1α and TNF-α were measured on the supernatant of HGFs activated with 10, 25, 50 and 100μg/ml DNA of Aa during 24h. Primary cultures of HGFs were infected with Aa and its DNA at different times and concentrations to compare its cytotoxic effect. Cell damage and adhesion of Aa to HGFs were evaluated under light microscopy and Scanning electron microscopy respectively. There was a statistical difference (p<0.05) in cytokine expression in HGFs activated by bacterial DNA with a dose dependent on IL-6 expression and a significantly elevated expression of IL-1α and TNF-α compared to Human DNA negative control. Substantial morphological alterations were observed after infection of A. actinomycetemcomitans in HGFs but not with bDNA exposure. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans showed a high rate of adhesion and cell damage to HGFs after 30min. Genomic DNA of A. actinomycetemcomitans could be a factor in the pathogenesis of periodontitis that might play a major role in the inflammatory response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Mucosal Adjuvant Cyclic di-AMP Exerts Immune Stimulatory Effects on Dendritic Cells and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Libanova, Rimma; Lienenklaus, Stefan; Weiss, Siegfried; Guzmán, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    The cyclic di-nucleotide bis-(3′,5′)-cyclic dimeric adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) is a candidate mucosal adjuvant with proven efficacy in preclinical models. It was shown to promote specific humoral and cellular immune responses following mucosal administration. To date, there is only fragmentary knowledge on the cellular and molecular mode of action of c-di-AMP. Here, we report on the identification of dendritic cells and macrophages as target cells of c-di-AMP. We show that c-di-AMP induces the cell surface up-regulation of T cell co-stimulatory molecules as well as the production of interferon-β. Those responses were characterized by in vitro experiments with murine and human immune cells and in vivo studies in mice. Analyses of dendritic cell subsets revealed conventional dendritic cells as principal responders to stimulation by c-di-AMP. We discuss the impact of the reported antigen presenting cell activation on the previously observed adjuvant effects of c-di-AMP in mouse immunization studies. PMID:24755640

  4. Multiscale modeling reveals inhibitory and stimulatory effects of caffeine on acetaminophen-induced toxicity in humans.

    PubMed

    Thiel, C; Cordes, H; Baier, V; Blank, L M; Kuepfer, L

    2017-02-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is a widely used analgesic drug that is frequently co-administered with caffeine (CAF) in the treatment of pain. It is well known that APAP may cause severe liver injury after an acute overdose. However, the understanding of whether and to what extent CAF inhibits or stimulates APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in humans is still lacking. Here, a multiscale analysis is presented that quantitatively models the pharmacodynamic (PD) response of APAP during co-medication with CAF. Therefore, drug-drug interaction (DDI) processes were integrated into physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models at the organism level, whereas drug-specific PD response data were contextualized at the cellular level. The results provide new insights into the inhibitory and stimulatory effects of CAF on APAP-induced hepatotoxicity for crucially affected key cellular processes and individual genes at the patient level. This study might facilitate the risk assessment of drug combination therapies in humans and thus may improve patient safety in clinical practice. © 2017 The Authors CPT: Pharmacometrics & Systems Pharmacology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  5. Multiscale modeling reveals inhibitory and stimulatory effects of caffeine on acetaminophen‐induced toxicity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, C; Cordes, H; Baier, V; Blank, LM

    2017-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is a widely used analgesic drug that is frequently co‐administered with caffeine (CAF) in the treatment of pain. It is well known that APAP may cause severe liver injury after an acute overdose. However, the understanding of whether and to what extent CAF inhibits or stimulates APAP‐induced hepatotoxicity in humans is still lacking. Here, a multiscale analysis is presented that quantitatively models the pharmacodynamic (PD) response of APAP during co‐medication with CAF. Therefore, drug‐drug interaction (DDI) processes were integrated into physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models at the organism level, whereas drug‐specific PD response data were contextualized at the cellular level. The results provide new insights into the inhibitory and stimulatory effects of CAF on APAP‐induced hepatotoxicity for crucially affected key cellular processes and individual genes at the patient level. This study might facilitate the risk assessment of drug combination therapies in humans and thus may improve patient safety in clinical practice. PMID:28130915

  6. Immunosuppressive Myeloid Cells' Blockade in the Glioma Microenvironment Enhances the Efficacy of Immune-Stimulatory Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kamran, Neha; Kadiyala, Padma; Saxena, Meghna; Candolfi, Marianela; Li, Youping; Moreno-Ayala, Mariela A; Raja, Nicholas; Shah, Diana; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2017-01-04

    Survival of glioma (GBM) patients treated with the current standard of care remains dismal. Immunotherapeutic approaches that harness the cytotoxic and memory potential of the host immune system have shown great benefit in other cancers. GBMs have developed multiple strategies, including the accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) to induce immunosuppression. It is therefore imperative to develop multipronged approaches when aiming to generate a robust anti-tumor immune response. Herein, we tested whether combining MDSC depletion or checkpoint blockade would augment the efficacy of immune-stimulatory herpes simplex type-I thymidine kinase (TK) plus Fms-like tyrosine kinase ligand (Flt3L)-mediated immune stimulatory gene therapy. Our results show that MDSCs constitute >40% of the tumor-infiltrating immune cells. These cells express IL-4Rα, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), arginase, programmed death ligand 1 (PDL1), and CD80, molecules that are critically involved in antigen-specific T cell suppression. Depletion of MDSCs strongly enhanced the TK/Flt3L gene therapy-induced tumor-specific CD8 T cell response, which lead to increased median survival and percentage of long-term survivors. Also, combining PDL1 or CTLA-4 immune checkpoint blockade greatly improved the efficacy of TK/Flt3L gene therapy. Our results, therefore, indicate that blocking MDSC-mediated immunosuppression holds great promise for increasing the efficacy of gene therapy-mediated immunotherapies for GBM.

  7. Software Package for Bio-Signal Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-10-15

    We have developed a MatlabTM based software package for bio -signal analysis. The software is based on modular design and can thus be easily adapted...to fit on analysis of various kind of time variant or event-related bio -signals. Currently analysis programs for event-related potentials (ERP) heart...rate variability (HRV), galvanic skin responses (GSR) and quantitative EEG (qEEG) are implemented. A tool for time varying spectral analysis of bio

  8. Stimulatory effects of neuronally released norepinephrine on renin release in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Yasuo; Kawazoe, Shinka; Ichihara, Toshio; Shinyama, Hiroshi; Kageyama, Masaaki; Morimoto, Shiro )

    1988-10-01

    Extracellular high potassium inhibits renin release in vitro by increasing calcium concentrations in the juxtaglomerular cells. The authors found that the decreased response of renin release from rat kidney cortical slices in high potassium solution changed to a strikingly increased one in the presence of nifedipine at doses over 10{sup {minus}6} M. They then examined the stimulatory effect of extracellular high potassium in the presence of nifedipine on renin release. The enhancement of release was significantly suppressed either by propranolol or by metoprolol but not by prazosin. High potassium plus nifedipine-induced increase in renin release was markedly attenuated by renal denervation. The enhancing effect was not observed when the slices were incubated in calcium-free medium. Divalent cations such as Cd{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, and Mn{sup 2+} blocked this enhancement in a concentration-dependent manner. High potassium elicited an increase in {sup 3}H efflux from the slices preloaded with ({sup 3}H)-norepinephrine. The increasing effect was not influenced by nifedipine but was abolished by the removal of extracellular calcium or by the addition of divalent cations. These observations suggest to us that the high potassium plus nifedipine-induced increase in renin release from the slices is mediated by norepinephrine derived from renal sympathetic nerves and that this neuronally released norepinephrine stimulates renin release via activation of {beta}-adrenoceptors.

  9. Stimulatory versus suppressive effects of GM-CSF on tumor progression in multiple cancer types

    PubMed Central

    Hong, In-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, also called CSF-2) is best known for its critical role in immune modulation and hematopoiesis. A large body of experimental evidence indicates that GM-CSF, which is frequently upregulated in multiple types of human cancers, effectively marks cancer cells with a ‘danger flag' for the immune system. In this context, most studies have focused on its function as an immunomodulator, namely its ability to stimulate dendritic cell (DC) maturation and monocyte/macrophage activity. However, recent studies have suggested that GM-CSF also promotes immune-independent tumor progression by supporting tumor microenvironments and stimulating tumor growth and metastasis. Although some studies have suggested that GM-CSF has inhibitory effects on tumor growth and metastasis, an even greater number of studies show that GM-CSF exerts stimulatory effects on tumor progression. In this review, we summarize a number of findings to provide the currently available information regarding the anticancer immune response of GM-CSG. We then discuss the potential roles of GM-CSF in the progression of multiple types of cancer to provide insights into some of the complexities of its clinical applications. PMID:27364892

  10. Age-associated reduction of stimulatory effect of ghrelin on food intake in mice.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Yosuke; Kanai, Setsuko; Ohta, Minoru; Akimoto, Saeko; Uematsu, Hiroshi; Miyasaka, Kyoko

    2012-01-01

    Aging is associated with a progressive decrease in appetite and food intake. We focused on the age-associated changes of the stimulatory effect of the appetite-regulating peptide, ghrelin. Food intake and the concentrations of acyl ghrelin and desacyl ghrelin in the plasma and in the stomach were measured with and without overnight fasting in young and old mice. Moreover, the food intake in response to the intraperitoneal administration of graded doses of acyl ghrelin was compared between young and old mice. Fasting drives food intake in young mice, but not in old mice. The concentrations of acyl ghrelin and desacyl ghrelin in the plasma and in the stomach were higher in the old mice than in the young mice. Food intake did not increase in old mice when stimulated by the administration of 1-3 nmol of acyl ghrelin, which could produce a significant increase in food intake in young mice. In conclusion, food intake did not increase in old mice after either overnight fasting or the administration of acyl ghrelin. The release and synthesis of ghrelin seem to be rather higher in old mice compared to young mice. These increases might be the results of compensation for the decline of receptor (and/or post-receptor) functions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Delayed stimulatory effect of low-intensity shockwaves on human periosteal cells.

    PubMed

    Tam, Kam-Fai; Cheung, Wing-Hoi; Lee, Kwong-Man; Qin, Ling; Leung, Kwok-Sui

    2005-09-01

    We investigated the effect of shockwaves on cells explanted from normal human periosteum to study the potential mechanisms of their responses and to determine suitable treatment settings. The cells were subjected to one shockwave treatment with systematic combinations of energy intensities (range, 0.05-0.5 mJ/mm) and number of shocks (range, 500-2000) whereas control cells received no treatment. The immediate effect on cell viability and the long-lasting effect on proliferation, viable cell number at Day 18, and mineralization at Day 35 were assessed. We observed an immediate dose-dependent destructive effect of shockwaves. Energy intensity and number of shocks contributed equally to viability. Total energy dose (intensity x number of shocks) was a better reference for determining the shockwave effect. We also found a long-term stimulatory effect on proliferation, viable cell number, and calcium deposition of human periosteal cells. At the same total energy dose, low-intensity shockwaves with more shocks (0.12 mJ/mm at 1250 shocks) were more favorable for enhancing cellular activities than high-intensity waves with fewer shocks (0.5 mJ/mm at 300 shocks). These findings document some of the biochemical changes of periosteal cells during shockwave treatments.

  12. Phytotoxicity and stimulatory impacts of nanosized and bulk titanium dioxide on fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill).

    PubMed

    Feizi, Hassan; Kamali, Maryam; Jafari, Leila; Rezvani Moghaddam, Parviz

    2013-04-01

    The objective of the this study was to compare concentrations of nanosized TiO2 at 0, 5, 20, 40, 60 and 80 mg L(-1) with bulk TiO2 for phytotoxic and stimulatory effects on fennel seed germination and early growth stage. After 14 d of seed incubation, germination percentage highly improved following exposure to 60 ppm nanosized TiO2. Similar positive effects occurred in terms of shoot dry weight and germination rate. Application of bulk TiO2 particles in 40 ppm concentration greatly decreased shoot biomass up to 50% compared to the control. Application of 40 ppm nanosized TiO2 treatment improved mean germination time by 31.8% in comparison to the untreated control. In addition, low and intermediate concentrations of nanosized TiO2 enhanced indices such as germination value, vigor index and mean daily germination. In general, there was a considerable response by fennel seed to nanosized TiO2 presenting the possibility of a new approach to overcome problems with seed germination in some plant species, particularly medicinal plants. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Natural Killer Cell Immunomodulation: Targeting Activating, Inhibitory, and Co-stimulatory Receptor Signaling for Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chester, Cariad; Fritsch, Katherine; Kohrt, Holbrook E.

    2015-01-01

    There is compelling clinical and experimental evidence to suggest that natural killer (NK) cells play a critical role in the recognition and eradication of tumors. Efforts at using NK cells as antitumor agents began over two decades ago, but recent advances in elucidating NK cell biology have accelerated the development of NK cell-targeting therapeutics. NK cell activation and the triggering of effector functions is governed by a complex set of activating and inhibitory receptors. In the early phases of cancer immune surveillance, NK cells directly identify and lyse cancer cells. Nascent transformed cells elicit NK cell activation and are eliminated. However, as tumors progress, cancerous cells develop immunosuppressive mechanisms that circumvent NK cell-mediated killing, allowing for tumor escape and proliferation. Therapeutic intervention aims to reverse tumor-induced NK cell suppression and sustain NK cells’ tumorlytic capacities. Here, we review tumor–NK cell interactions, discuss the mechanisms by which NK cells generate an antitumor immune response, and discuss NK cell-based therapeutic strategies targeting activating, inhibitory, and co-stimulatory receptors. PMID:26697006

  14. Effect of Inducible Co-Stimulatory Molecule siRNA in Cerebral Infarction Rat Models

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yingquan; Yang, Yu; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Yina; Tan, Shengyu; Xu, Yan; Li, Dan; Ye, Ling; Chen, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Background T cell-induced inflammatory response and related cytokine secretion at the injury site may participate in the pathogenesis of cerebral infarction. Recent studies established inducible co-stimulatory molecule (ICOS) as a novel T cell-related factor for its activation and functions. We thus investigate the role of ICOS in cerebral infarction. Material/Methods The siRNA of ICOS was first used to suppress the gene expression in cultured lymphocytes. An in vivo study was then performed by intravenous application of ICOS siRNA in cerebral infarction rats. Survival rates, neurological scores, serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1, and IL-17 levels were observed. Results The expression of ICOS in cultured lymphocytes was significantly suppressed by siRNA. In the in vivo study, the application of siRNA effectively lowered mortality rates of rats, in addition to the improvement of neurological behaviors and amelioration of cerebral tissue damage. Serum levels of TNF-α, IL-1 and IL-17 were all significantly suppressed after siRNA injection. Conclusions ICOS siRNA can protect brain tissues from ischemia injuries after cerebral infarction, improve limb movement and coordination, lower the mortality rate of rats, and inhibit T cell-induced cytokines. These results collectively suggest the potential treatment efficacy of ICOS siRNA against cerebral infarction. PMID:26436531

  15. Two novel lupane triterpenoids from Paullinia pinnata L. with fibroblast stimulatory activity.

    PubMed

    Annan, Kofi; Houghton, Peter J

    2010-05-01

    Novel lupane triterpenoids from Paullinia pinnata L., a Ghanaian plant traditionally used for wound healing, were examined for in-vitro fibroblast stimulatory activity using the 142BR cell line. Bioactivity-guided isolation of the crude extract of P. pinnata L. was carried out in order to determine the nature of the compounds responsible for the stimulation of fibroblast proliferation. Two novel compounds were isolated and characterised, namely, 6beta-(3'-methoxy-4'-hydroxybenzoyl)-lup-20(29)-ene-one (1) and 6beta-(3'-methoxy-4'-hydroxybenzoyl)-lup-20(29)-ene-ol (2), together with three known compounds, friedelin (3), beta-sitosterol (4) and beta-sitosterol-3-D-glucoside (5). The methanol extract of the roots of P. pinnata caused a significant in-vitro increase (94%) in 142BR cell line proliferation at 20 microg/ml compared with the control. Compounds 1 and 2, which were isolated from the active chloroform fraction, have not previously been reported and showed a dose-dependent increase in proliferation of 142BR cells up to 3 microM; compounds 3, 4 and 5 had no effect on the 142BR cell line at the concentrations tested.

  16. Two peptides derived from trout IL-1beta have different stimulatory effects on immune gene expression after intraperitoneal administration.

    PubMed

    Hong, Suhee; Secombes, Chris J

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the biological activities of two IL-1beta derivatives on immune gene expression (i.e. IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, IL-8, MX, lysozyme) in fish using RT-PCR analysis, as a means to establish whether such peptides have value as immunostimulants in vivo. Two functional domains (P1 and P3) of the trout IL-1beta molecule were produced as synthetic peptides and tested for biological effects following intraperitoneal administration into rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). P1 and P3 showed different regulatory effects on the examined genes. P1 did not stimulate proinflammatory gene expression but induced rapid expression of the antiviral gene MX. In contrast, P3 showed more widespread stimulatory effects, and increased expression of the proinflammatory genes IL-1beta and IL-8, as well as the antibacterial lysozyme gene. Such data confirm that it is possible to produce bioactive peptide derivatives of cytokine molecules, and in addition that it is possible to engineer the peptides for different stimulatory repertoires, that may have value in enhancing particular types of immune response to enhance disease resistance in fish.

  17. Modulation of adenylyl cyclase by FPP and adenosine involves stimulatory and inhibitory adenosine receptors and g proteins.

    PubMed

    Fraser, L R; Adeoya-Osiguwa, S

    1999-08-01

    FPP and adenosine modulate the adenylyl cyclase (AC)/cAMP signal transduction pathway in mammalian spermatozoa to elicit a biphasic response, initially stimulating capacitation and then inhibiting spontaneous acrosome loss. This study addressed the hypothesis that responses to FPP involve interactions between receptors for FPP and adenosine, the biphasic responses involving stimulatory and inhibitory adenosine receptors. Gln-FPP, a competitive inhibitor of FPP, significantly inhibited binding of an adenosine analogue and responses to adenosine, especially in capacitated suspensions, consistent with interaction between FPP and adenosine receptors. CGS-21680 (1 microM), a stimulatory A2a adenosine receptor agonist, significantly stimulated capacitation and cAMP in uncapacitated cells, while cyclopentyl adenosine (1 microM), an inhibitory A1 adenosine receptor agonist only affected capacitated cells, inhibiting spontaneous acrosome loss. Responses to FPP and adenosine were inhibited in uncapacitated cells by a selective A2a antagonist and in capacitated cells by a selective A1 antagonist; subsequent investigations indicated possible involvement of G proteins. Like FPP, cholera toxin stimulated capacitation and cAMP production in uncapacitated cells, suggesting involvement of a G protein with a Galphas subunit. In contrast, pertussis toxin prevented FPP's inhibition of both spontaneous acrosome loss and cAMP production, suggesting involvement of a Galphai/o subunit. Immunoblotting evidence revealed the presence of proteins of the appropriate molecular weights for Galphas, Galphai2, Galpha i3, and Galphao subunits. This study provides the first direct evidence suggesting the involvement of two different types of adenosine receptors and both Galphas and Galphai/o subunits in the regulation of capacitation, resulting in modulation of AC activity and availability of cAMP. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Diabetes-prone BioBreeding rats do not have a normal immune response when weaned to a diet containing fermentable fibre.

    PubMed

    Stillie, RoseMarie; Bell, Rhonda C; Field, Catherine J

    2005-05-01

    Diet is known to modulate the development of diabetes in diabetes-prone BioBreeding (BBdp) rats. The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of fermentable fibre (FF) on immune function in BBdp and diabetes-resistant BioBreeding (BBdr) rats after weaning. Weanling BBdp (thirty-six to thirty-eight per diet) and BBdr rats (thirty to thirty-two per diet) were fed a nutritionally complete, semi-purified, casein-based diet containing either cellulose (control diet, 8 % w/w) or FF (3.2 % cellulose+4.8 % w/w inulin). At 35 d, the small intestine was excised and lymphocytes isolated from spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes and Peyer's patches. Feeding FF to both BBdr and BBdp rats affected the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines (P=0.02). In BBdr rats, feeding FF compared with cellulose resulted in an increased small intestinal length (P=0.0031), higher proliferative (stimulation) index from both splenocytes (P=0.001) and mesenteric lymph nodes (P=0.04), and an increased proportion of CD8+ T-cells in the Peyer's patches (P=0.003). We did not observe an effect of diet on the number of IgA-bearing cells in the jejunum from BBdr rats. Feeding FF to BBdp rats did not affect the same parameters. BBdp rats had both a higher proportion of B-cells in the Peyer's patches (P=0.01) and a higher number of IgA+ cells in the jejunum (P=0.0036) when fed a diet containing FF, a response not observed in BBdr rats. We demonstrate that several aspects of the BBdp immune system respond differently than that of BBdr rats when challenged at weaning with FF.

  19. Identification of Staphylococcus aureus Colony-Spreading Stimulatory Factors from Mammalian Serum

    PubMed Central

    Omae, Yosuke; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus forms giant colonies on soft-agar surfaces, which is called colony-spreading. In the present study, we searched for host factors that influence S. aureus colony-spreading activity. The addition of calf serum, porcine serum, or silkworm hemolymph to soft-agar medium stimulated S. aureus colony-spreading activity. Gel filtration column chromatography of calf serum produced a high molecular weight fraction and a low molecular weight fraction, both of which exhibited colony-spreading stimulatory activity. In the low molecular weight fraction, we identified the stimulatory factor as bovine serum albumin. The stimulatory fraction in the high molecular weight fraction was identified as high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. Delipidation of HDL abolished the stimulatory activity of HDL. Phosphatidylcholine, which is the major lipid component in HDL particles, stimulated the colony-spreading activity. Other phosphatidylcholine-containing lipoprotein particles, low-density lipoprotein and very low-density lipoprotein, also showed colony-spreading stimulatory activity. These findings suggest that S. aureus colony-spreading activity is stimulated by albumin and lipoprotein particles in mammalian serum. PMID:24831518

  20. Identification of Staphylococcus aureus colony-spreading stimulatory factors from mammalian serum.

    PubMed

    Omae, Yosuke; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus forms giant colonies on soft-agar surfaces, which is called colony-spreading. In the present study, we searched for host factors that influence S. aureus colony-spreading activity. The addition of calf serum, porcine serum, or silkworm hemolymph to soft-agar medium stimulated S. aureus colony-spreading activity. Gel filtration column chromatography of calf serum produced a high molecular weight fraction and a low molecular weight fraction, both of which exhibited colony-spreading stimulatory activity. In the low molecular weight fraction, we identified the stimulatory factor as bovine serum albumin. The stimulatory fraction in the high molecular weight fraction was identified as high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. Delipidation of HDL abolished the stimulatory activity of HDL. Phosphatidylcholine, which is the major lipid component in HDL particles, stimulated the colony-spreading activity. Other phosphatidylcholine-containing lipoprotein particles, low-density lipoprotein and very low-density lipoprotein, also showed colony-spreading stimulatory activity. These findings suggest that S. aureus colony-spreading activity is stimulated by albumin and lipoprotein particles in mammalian serum.

  1. Drug antigenicity, immunogenicity and co-stimulatory signalling: evidence for formation of a functional antigen through immune cell metabolism1

    PubMed Central

    Elsheikh, Ayman; Lavergne, Sidonie N.; Castrejon, J. Luis; Farrell, John; Wang, Haiyi; Sathish, Jean; Pichler, Werner J.; Park, B. Kevin; Naisbitt, Dean J.

    2011-01-01

    Recognition of drugs by immune cells is usually explained by the hapten model, which states that endogenous metabolites bind irreversibly to protein to stimulate immune cells. Synthetic metabolites interact directly with protein generating antigenic determinants for T-cells; however, experimental evidence relating intracellular metabolism in immune cells and the generation of physiologically relevant antigens to functional immune responses is lacking. The aim of this study was to develop an integrated approach using both animal and human experimental systems to characterize sulfamethoxazole (SMX) metabolism-derived antigenic protein adduct formation in immune cells and define the relationship between adduct formation, cell death, co-stimulatory signalling and stimulation of a T-cell response. Formation of SMX-derived adducts in antigen presenting cells was dose- and time-dependent, detectable at non-toxic concentrations and dependent on drug metabolizing enzyme activity. Adduct formation above a threshold induced necrotic cell death, dendritic cell co-stimulatory molecule expression and cytokine secretion. Antigen presenting cells cultured with SMX for 16h, the time needed for drug metabolism, stimulated T-cells from sensitized mice and lymphocytes and T-cell clones from allergic patients. Enzyme inhibition decreased SMX-derived protein adduct formation and the T-cell response. Dendritic cells cultured with SMX and adoptively transferred to recipient mice initiated an immune response; however, T-cells were stimulated with adducts derived from SMX metabolism in antigen presenting cells, not the parent drug. This study shows that antigen presenting cells metabolize SMX; subsequent protein binding generates a functional T-cell antigen. Adduct formation above a threshold stimulates cell death, which provides a maturation signal for dendritic cells. PMID:20980635

  2. Influence of seat foam and geometrical properties on BioRID P3 kinematic response to rear impacts.

    PubMed

    Szabo, T J; Voss, D P; Welcher, J B

    2003-12-01

    As the primary interface with the human body during rear impact, the automotive seat holds great promise for mitigation of Whiplash Associated Disorders (WAD). Recent research has chronicled the potential influence of both seat geometrical and constitutive properties on occupant dynamics and injury potential. Geometrical elements such as reduced head to head restraint, rearward offset, and increased head restraint height have shown strong correlation with reductions in occupant kinematics. The stiffness and energy absorption of both the seating foam and the seat infrastructure are also influential on occupant motion; however, the trends in injury mitigation are not as clear as for the geometrical properties. It is of interest to determine whether, for a given seat frame and infrastructure, the properties of the seating foam alone can be tailored to mitigate WAD potential. Rear impact testing was conducted using three model year 2000 automotive seats (Chevrolet Camaro, Chevrolet S-10 pickup, and Pontiac Grand Prix), using the BioRID P3 anthropometric rear impact dummy. Each seat was distinct in construction and geometry. Each seat back was tested with various foams (i.e., standard, viscoelastic, low or high density). Seat geometries and infrastructures were constant so that the influence of the seating foams on occupant dynamics could be isolated. Three tests were conducted on each foam combination for a given seat (total of 102 tests), with a nominal impact severity of Delta V = 11 km/h (nominal duration of 100 msec). The seats were compared across a host of occupant kinematic variables most likely to be associated with WAD causation. No significant differences (p < 0.05) were found between seat back foams for tests within any given seat. However, seat comparisons yielded several significant differences (p < 0.05). The Camaro seat was found to result in several significantly different occupant kinematic variables when compared to the other seats. No significant

  3. Bio-inactivation of human malignant cells through highly responsive diluted colloidal suspension of functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Roberta V.; Silva-Caldeira, Priscila P.; Pereira-Maia, Elene C.; Fabris, José D.; Cavalcante, Luis Carlos D.; Ardisson, José D.; Domingues, Rosana Z.

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic fluids, more specifically aqueous colloidal suspensions containing certain magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), have recently been gaining special interest due to their potential use in clinical treatments of cancerous formations in mammalians. The technological application arises mainly from their hyperthermic behavior, which means that the nanoparticles dissipate heat upon being exposed to an alternating magnetic field (AMF). If the temperature is raised to slightly above 43 °C, cancer cells are functionally inactivated or killed; however, normal cells tend to survive under those same conditions, entirely maintaining their bioactivity. Recent in vitro studies have revealed that under simultaneous exposure to an AMF and magnetic nanoparticles, certain lines of cancer cells are bio-inactivated even without experiencing a significant temperature increase. This non-thermal effect is cell specific, indicating that MNPs, under alternating magnetic fields, may effectively kill cancer cells under conditions that were previously thought to be implausible, considering that the temperature does not increase more than 5 °C, which is also true in cases for which the concentration of MNPs is too low. To experimentally test for this effect, this study focused on the feasibility of inducing K562 cell death using an AMF and aqueous suspensions containing very low concentrations of MNPs. The assay was designed for a ferrofluid containing magnetite nanoparticles, which were obtained through the co-precipitation method and were functionalized with citric acid; the particles had an average diameter of 10 ± 2 nm and a mean hydrodynamic diameter of approximately 40 nm. Experiments were first performed to test for the ability of the ferrofluid to release heat under an AMF. The results show that for concentrations ranging from 2.5 to 1.0 × 103 mg L-1, the maximum temperature increase was actually less than 2 °C. However, the in vitro test results from K562 cells and suspensions

  4. Activity of cyclooxygenase-2 and nitric oxide in milk leucocytes following intramammary inoculation of a bio-response modifier during bovine Staphylococcus aureus subclinical mastitis.

    PubMed

    De, U K; Mukherjee, Reena

    2014-09-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the effects of intramammary infusion of a bio-response modifier (BRM) prepared from Nocardia globerula on certain inflammatory markers and percentage of neutrophil/lymphocyte in mammary secretions during bovine Staphylococcus aureus subclinical mastitis (SCM). The somatic cell count (SCC), total bacterial count (TBC) in milk, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) activity, production of nitrite and nitrate (NOx) in milk leukocytes and neutrophil % and lymphocyte % in milk were evaluated before and after intramammary infusion of BRM in healthy and quarters inflicted with S. aureus SCM. Intramammary infusion of BRM significantly enhanced the SCC in earlier phase with subsequent reduction on day 7 after initiation of treatment. Whereas, the reduction of TBC was observed from day 3 onwards. The COX-2 activity and NOx production in milk cell increased initially on day 3 of post treatment but reduced on day 5 in SCM infected quarters following BRM infusion. The neutrophil % and lymphocyte % in milk also enhanced significantly on day 3 but reduced on day 5 in SCM infected quarters in response to BRM infusion. Initial influx of SCC, increased neutrophil%, lymphocyte % and enhanced COX-2 and NOx activity indicate the immunomodulatory potential of BRM in S. aureus SCM. Reduction of TBC could be due to increased leukocytosis or direct microbicidal activity of the activated milk cells. The beneficial effect of the BRM could be used as alternative therapy in the control of S. aureus SCM in cows, either alone or in conjunction with antibiotic therapy.

  5. T cell co-stimulatory molecules: a co-conspirator in the pathogenesis of eosinophilic esophagitis?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zili; Sferra, Thomas J; Eroglu, Yasemen

    2013-06-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) has become a common gastrointestinal disease. It is characterized by severe eosinophil infiltration in the esophagus. EoE is strongly associated with food allergy, asthma, atopic dermatitis, and other allergic diseases. T lymphocytes, especially Th2 cells, play an instrumental role in the development of allergic inflammation. Recent studies have shown that the ligation of co-stimulatory molecules contributes to the activation, differentiation, and proliferation of T cells. In this review, we will discuss the growing evidence of co-stimulatory molecules including OX40, Light, and HVEM in the pathogenesis of Th2-driven EoE. Our goal is to provide the rationale for the development of novel therapy therapies that target co-stimulatory molecules.

  6. Simultaneous and dose dependent melanoma cytotoxic and immune stimulatory activity of betulin.

    PubMed

    Pfarr, Kathrin; Danciu, Corina; Arlt, Olga; Neske, Christina; Dehelean, Cristina; Pfeilschifter, Josef M; Radeke, Heinfried H

    2015-01-01

    Conventional cytostatic cancer treatments rarely result in the complete eradication of tumor cells. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies focus on antagonizing the immunosuppressive activity of established tumors. In particular, recent studies of antigen-loaded dendritic cells (DCs) eliciting a specific antitumor immune response has raised the hopes of achieving the complete elimination of tumor tissue. Genistein, fingolimod and betulin have already been described as active compounds in different types of cancer. Herein, we applied an integrated screening approach to characterize both their cytostatic and their immune-modulating properties side-by-side. As will be described in detail, our data confirmed that all three compounds exerted proapoptotic and antiproliferative activity in different B16 melanoma cell lines to a given extent, as revealed by an MTT assay, CFSE and DAPI staining. However, while genistein and fingolimod also affected the survival of primary bone marrow (BM) derived DCs of C57BL/6 mice, betulin exhibited a lower cytotoxicity for BMDCs in comparison to the melanoma cells. Moreover, we could show for the first time, that only betulin caused a simultaneous, highly specific immune-stimulating activity, as measured by the IL-12p70 release of Toll-like receptor 4-stimulated BMDCs by ELISA, which was due to increased IL-12p35 mRNA expression. Interestingly, the activation of DCs resulted in enhanced T lymphocyte stimulation, indicated by increased IL-2 and IFN-γ production of cytotoxic T cells in spleen cell co-culture assays which led to a decreased viability of B16 cells in an antigen specific model system. This may overcome the immunosuppressive environment of a tumor and destroy tumor cells more effectively in vivo if the immune response is specific targeted against the tumor tissue by antigen-loaded dendritic cells. In summary, cytostatic agents, such as betulin, that simultaneously exhibit immune stimulatory activity may serve as lead compounds

  7. Crystal structure of the stimulatory complex of GTP cyclohydrolase I and its feedback regulatory protein GFRP.

    PubMed

    Maita, Nobuo; Okada, Kengo; Hatakeyama, Kazuyuki; Hakoshima, Toshio

    2002-02-05

    In the presence of phenylalanine, GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) forms a stimulatory 360-kDa complex with GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCHI), which is the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin. The crystal structure of the stimulatory complex reveals that the GTPCHI decamer is sandwiched by two GFRP homopentamers. Each GFRP pentamer forms a symmetrical five-membered ring similar to beta-propeller. Five phenylalanine molecules are buried inside each interface between GFRP and GTPCHI, thus enhancing the binding of these proteins. The complex structure suggests that phenylalanine-induced GTPCHI x GFRP complex formation enhances GTPCHI activity by locking the enzyme in the active state.

  8. Influence of dynamic coupled hydro-bio-mechanical processes on response of municipal solid waste and liner system in bioreactor landfills.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Krishna R; Kumar, Girish; Giri, Rajiv K

    2017-01-03

    A two-dimensional (2-D) mathematical model is presented to predict the response of municipal solid waste (MSW) of conventional as well as bioreactor landfills undergoing coupled hydro-bio-mechanical processes. The newly developed and validated 2-D coupled mathematical modeling framework combines and simultaneously solves a two-phase flow model based on the unsaturated Richard's equation, a plain-strain formulation of Mohr-Coulomb mechanical model and first-order decay kinetics biodegradation model. The performance of both conventional and bioreactor landfill was investigated holistically, by evaluating the mechanical settlement, extent of waste degradation with subsequent changes in geotechnical properties, landfill slope stability, and in-plane shear behavior (shear stress-displacement) of composite liner system and final cover system. It is concluded that for the given specific conditions considered, bioreactor landfill attained an overall stabilization after a continuous leachate injection of 16years, whereas the stabilization was observed after around 50years of post-closure in conventional landfills, with a total vertical strain of 36% and 37% for bioreactor and conventional landfills, respectively. The significant changes in landfill settlement, the extent of MSW degradation, MSW geotechnical properties, along with their influence on the in-plane shear response of composite liner and final cover system, between the conventional and bioreactor landfills, observed using the mathematical model proposed in this study, corroborates the importance of considering coupled hydro-bio-mechanical processes while designing and predicting the performance of engineered bioreactor landfills. The study underscores the importance of considering the effect of coupled processes while examining the stability and integrity of the liner and cover systems, which form the integral components of a landfill. Moreover, the spatial and temporal variations in the landfill settlement, the

  9. Nanofiber-structured hydrogel yarns with pH-response capacity and cardiomyocyte-drivability for bio-microactuator application.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shaohua; Duan, Bin; Qin, Xiaohong; Butcher, Jonathan T

    2017-09-15

    Polymeric hydrogels have great potential in soft biological micro-actuator applications. However, inappropriate micro-architecture, non-anisotropy, weak biomechanics, and inferior response behaviors limit their development. In this study, we designed and manufactured novel polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based hydrogel yarns composed with uniaxially aligned nanofibers. The nanofibrous hydrogel yarns possessed anisotropic architecture and robust mechanical properties with flexibility, and could be assembled into defined scaffold structures by subsequent processes. The as-prepared hydrogel yarns showed excellent pH response behaviors, with around 100% maximum length and 900% maximum diameter changes, and the pH response was completed within several seconds. Moreover, the hydrogel yarns displayed unique cell-responsive abilities to promote the cell adhesion, proliferation, and smooth muscle differentiation of human adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (HADMSC). Chicken cardiomyocytes were further seeded onto our nanofibrous hydrogel yarns to engineer living cell-based microactuators. Our results demonstrated that the uniaxially aligned nanofibrous networks within the hydrogel yarns were the key characteristics leading to the anisotropic organization of cardiac cells, and improved sarcomere organization, mimicking the cardiomyocyte bundles in the native myocardium. The construct is capable of sustaining spontaneous cardiomyocyte pumping behaviors for 7days. Our PAN-based nanofibrous hydrogel yarns are attractive for creating linear microactuators with pH-response capacity and biological microactuators with cardiomyocyte-drivability. A mechanically robust polyacrylonitrile-based nanofibrous hydrogel yarn is fabricated by using a modified electrospinning setup in combination with chemical modification processes. The as-prepared hydrogel yarn possesses a uniaxially aligned nanofiber microarchitecture and supports a rapid, pH-dependent expansion/contraction response within a few

  10. Co-stimulatory CD28 and transcription factor NFKB1 gene variants affect idiopathic recurrent miscarriages.

    PubMed

    Misra, Maneesh Kumar; Singh, Bharti; Mishra, Aditi; Agrawal, Suraksha

    2016-12-01

    Co-stimulatory CD28 and transcription factor NFKB1 genes are considered as a crucial player in the determination of inflammatory responses; genetic variability in these may modulate the risk for idiopathic recurrent miscarriages (IRM). We investigated the association of functional variants of CD28 (rs3116496 T/C) and NFKB1 (rs28362491 ins/del and rs696 A/G) with IRM cases. We recruited 200 IRM women with a history of at least three consecutive pregnancy losses before 20th week of pregnancy and 300 fertile control women. Determination of CD28 (rs3116496 T/C) and NFKB1 (rs28362491 ins/del and rs696 A/G) gene variants were based on the polymerase chain reaction pursued by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and validated with Sanger sequencing. Single marker analysis and multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) model used to predict the IRM risk. We observed nearly three- to twofold increased risk in single marker analysis for minor homozygous genotypes of rs3116496 T/C, rs28362491 ins/del and rs696 A/G tag-SNPs in IRM cases, suggesting the risk association. In MDR analysis, we observed 10.5-fold augmented risk among IRM women in three-SNP model (rs3116496 T/C, rs28362491 ins/del and rs696 A/G). The eQTL mapping analyses was performed to strengthen the results of our study. The eQTL mapping analysis revealed that the variations in CD28 and NFKB1 gene content might affect the abundance of transcripts of CD28 and Family with sequence similarity 177 member A1 (FAM177A1) genes, respectively. These results suggest that CD28 and NFKB1 gene variants may be associated with increased risks to IRM.

  11. Stimulatory and inhibitory effects of forskolin on adenylate cyclase in rat normal hepatocytes and hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, K; Sanae, F; Koshiura, R; Matsunaga, T; Takagi, K; Satake, T; Hasegawa, T

    1989-02-01

    Forskolin synergistically potentiated adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate formation by prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) in rat normal hepatocytes freshly prepared by collagenase digestion and rat ascites hepatoma AH66 cells, but dose-dependently inhibited the accumulation by PGE1 in AH66F cells. Forskolin activated adenylate cyclase in a dose-dependent manner in homogenates of all cell lines. In normal hepatocytes and AH66 cells, simultaneous addition of forskolin and other adenylate cyclase activators [isoproterenol (IPN), PGE1, guanosine 5'-triphosphate sodium salt (GTP), 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate sodium salt (Gpp (NH)p), NaF, cholera toxin, islet activating protein and MnCl2] gave greater than additive responses. On the other hand, in AH66F cells, the effect of forskolin on adenylate cyclase was hardly influenced by GTP, but forskolin diminished the activities induced by high concentrations of GTP to that by the diterpene alone. Forskolin also significantly inhibited the PGE1-stimulated and the guanine nucleotide binding regulatory protein-stimulated activities. Because AH66F cells were insensitive to IPN, the combination with forskolin and IPN gave similar activity to that obtained with the diterpene alone. The effect of forskolin on the activation by manganese ion was neither synergistic nor inhibitory but was additive in AH66F cells. These results suggest that forskolin promotes the interaction between the stimulatory guanine nucleotide binding regulatory protein and the catalytic unit in normal hepatocytes and AH66 cells, but in AH66F cells forskolin interferes with the coupling of the two components of adenylate cyclase.

  12. Temporal dissociation between sodium depletion and sodium appetite appearance: Involvement of inhibitory and stimulatory signals.

    PubMed

    Margatho, L O; Porcari, C Y; Macchione, A F; da Silva Souza, G D; Caeiro, X E; Antunes-Rodrigues, J; Vivas, L; Godino, A

    2015-06-25

    Our aim was to analyze the participation of inhibitory and stimulatory signals in the temporal dissociation between sodium depletion (SD) induced by peritoneal dialysis (PD) and the appearance of sodium appetite (SA), particularly 2h after PD, when the rats are hypovolemic/natremic but SA is not evident. We investigated the effects of bilateral injections of the serotonin (5-HT) receptor antagonist, methysergide, into the lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPBN) on hypertonic NaCl and water intake 2h vs. 24h after PD. We also studied plasma renin activity (PRA) and aldosterone (ALDO) concentration 2h vs. 24h after PD. Additionally, we combined the analysis of brain Fos immunoreactivity (Fos-ir) with the detection of double immunoreactivity in 5HT and oxytocinergic (OT) cells 2h after PD. Bilateral LPBN injections of methysergide (4μg/200nl at each site) increased NaCl intake when tested 2h after PD compared to controls. We found a significant increase in PRA and ALDO concentration after PD but no differences between 2 and 24h after PD. We also found for the first time a significant increase 2h after PD in the number of Fos-ir neurons in the brainstem nuclei that have been shown to be involved in the inhibition of SA. In summary, the results show that 5HT-mechanisms in the LPBN modulate sodium intake during the delay of SA when the renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) is increased. In addition, the activation of brainstem areas previously associated with the satiety phase of SA is in part responsible for the temporal dissociation between SD and behavioral arousal. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. GNAS defects identified by stimulatory G protein alpha-subunit signalling studies in platelets.

    PubMed

    Freson, Kathleen; Izzi, Benedetta; Labarque, Veerle; Van Helvoirt, Monique; Thys, Chantal; Wittevrongel, Christine; Bex, Marie; Bouillon, Roger; Godefroid, Nathalie; Proesmans, Willem; de Zegher, Francis; Jaeken, Jaak; Van Geet, Chris

    2008-12-01

    GNAS is an imprinted region that gives rise to several transcripts, antisense transcripts, and noncoding RNAs, including transcription of RNA encoding the alpha-subunit of the stimulatory G protein (Gsalpha). The complexity of the GNAS cluster results in ubiquitous genomic imprints, tissue-specific Gsalpha expression, and multiple genotype-phenotype relationships. Phenotypes resulting from genetic and epigenetic abnormalities of the GNAS region include Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy, pseudohypoparathyroidism types Ia (PHPIa) and Ib (PHPIb), and pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism (PPHP). The aim was to study the complex GNAS pathology by a functional test as an alternative to the generally used but labor-intensive erythrocyte complementation assay. We report the first platelet-based diagnostic test for Gsalpha hypofunction, supported by clinical, biochemical, and molecular data for six patients with PHPIa or PPHP and nine patients with PHPIb. The platelet test is based on the inhibition of platelet aggregation by cAMP, produced after Gsalpha stimulation. Platelets are easily accessible, and platelet aggregation responses were found to reflect Gsalpha signaling defects in patients, in concordance with the patient's phenotype and genotype. Gsalpha hypofunction in PHPIa and PPHP patients with GNAS mutations was clearly detected by this method. Mildly decreased or normal Gsalpha function was detected in patients with PHPIb with either an overall or exon 1A-only epigenetic defect, respectively. Platelet Gsalpha expression was reduced in both PHPIb patient groups, whereas XLalphas was up-regulated only in PHPIb patients with the broad epigenetic defect. The platelet-based test is a novel tool for establishing the diagnosis of Gsalpha defects, which may otherwise be quite challenging.

  14. Equipment for the Characterization of Synthetic Bio-hybrid Polymers and Micellar Nanoparticles for Stimuli Responsive Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-08

    UV -Vis spectrometer used to generate melting curves for DNA- and PNA-based polymers and nanoparticles. The final instrument was a Carl Zeiss...27709-2211 Plate reader, UV -Vis, Carl Zeiss Miscroscope REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM...polymeric nanoparticles and responsive materials. Another was a UV -Vis spectrometer used to generate melting curves for DNA- and PNA-based polymers and

  15. Bio indices for 2,4-D sensitivity between two plant species: Azolla pinnata R.Br. and Vernonia cinerea L. with their cellular responses.

    PubMed

    De, Arnab Kumar; Dey, Narottam; Adak, Malay Kumar

    2016-07-01

    In the present experiment a pteridophytic species Azolla and an angiospermic species Vernonia were evaluated on the basis of cellular reactivity for herbicidal action through ongoing concentrations. Initially, both the species recorded a significant activity of IAA-oxidase as mark of IAA metabolism with herbicidal sensitivity. Still, Vernonia species were more affected on 2,4-D mediated auxin catabolism. The loss of auxin concentrations on the tissues by 2,4-D reaction was also reflected on growth parameters including relative growth rate and chlorophyll biosynthesis. In a dose dependent manner Vernonia plants were more affected with loss of chlorophyll content and decline in relative growth rate. On the other hand, both those parameters were adjusted significantly with 2,4-D accumulation in Azolla. The stability of cellular metabolism was documented by significant down regulation of protein and lipid peroxidation with concomitant moderation to superoxide and hydrogen peroxide accumulation. The later two were more vulnerable to damage in the Vernonia plant with profuse accumulation of protein and lipid peroxidation products. Similarly, tissue specific reaction to superoxide and hydrogen peroxide accumulation were distinctly demarcated in two species significantly. As a whole, the cellular responses and metabolite distribution to 2,4-D sensitization are the features to describe bio-indices for aquatic fern species Azolla with comparison to angiospermic species Vernonia.

  16. Effects of Punishment Procedures on the Self-Stimulatory Behavior of an Autistic Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friman, Patrick C.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Three punishment procedures--contingent applications of water mist, lemon juice, and vinegar--were evaluated as aversive treatment methods for a self-stimulatory behavior exhibited by a severely retarded 11-year-old male. The water mist procedure was as effective as lemon juice or vinegar, presented less physical threat to the client, and was…

  17. Effects of Punishment Procedures on the Self-Stimulatory Behavior of an Autistic Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friman, Patrick C.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Three punishment procedures--contingent applications of water mist, lemon juice, and vinegar--were evaluated as aversive treatment methods for a self-stimulatory behavior exhibited by a severely retarded 11-year-old male. The water mist procedure was as effective as lemon juice or vinegar, presented less physical threat to the client, and was…

  18. Smart surface coating of drug nanoparticles with cross-linkable polyethylene glycol for bio-responsive and highly efficient drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Weijia; Zhang, Xiujuan; Chen, Xianfeng; Zhou, Mengjiao; Xu, Ruirui; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2016-04-01

    Many drug molecules can be directly used as nanomedicine without the requirement of any inorganic or organic carriers such as silica and liposome nanostructures. This new type of carrier-free drug nanoparticles (NPs) has great potential in clinical treatment because of its ultra-high drug loading capacity and biodegradability. For practical applications, it is essential for such nanomedicine to possess robust stability and minimal premature release of therapeutic molecules during circulation in the blood stream. To meet this requirement, herein, we develop GSH-responsive and crosslinkable amphiphilic polyethylene glycol (PEG) molecules to modify carrier-free drug NPs. These PEG molecules can be cross-linked on the surface of the NPs to endow them with greater stability and the cross-link is sensitive to intracellular environment for bio-responsive drug release. With this elegant design, our experimental results show that the liberation of DOX from DOX-cross-linked PEG NPs is dramatically slower than that from DOX-non-cross-linked PEG NPs, and the DOX release profile can be controlled by tuning the concentration of the reducing agent to break the cross-link between PEG molecules. More importantly, in vivo studies reveal that the DOX-cross-linked PEG NPs exhibit favorable blood circulation half-life (>4 h) and intense accumulation in tumor areas, enabling effective anti-cancer therapy. We expect this work will provide a powerful strategy for stabilizing carrier-free nanomedicines and pave the way to their successful clinical applications in the future.Many drug molecules can be directly used as nanomedicine without the requirement of any inorganic or organic carriers such as silica and liposome nanostructures. This new type of carrier-free drug nanoparticles (NPs) has great potential in clinical treatment because of its ultra-high drug loading capacity and biodegradability. For practical applications, it is essential for such nanomedicine to possess robust stability

  19. Brief Report: The Effects of Exercise on the Self-Stimulatory Behaviors and Positive Responding of Adolescents with Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal-Malek, Andrea; Mitchell, Stella

    1997-01-01

    A study investigated the effects of aerobic exercise on the self-stimulatory behaviors and academic performance of five adolescent males with autism. Results found there was a significant decrease in self-stimulatory behavior following the physical exercise. Academic performance increased after the aerobic exercise as compared to classroom…

  20. Exploring a post-traumatic stress disorder paradigm in Flinders sensitive line rats to model treatment-resistant depression I: bio-behavioural validation and response to imipramine.

    PubMed

    Brand, Sarel Jacobus; Harvey, Brian Herbert

    2017-08-01

    Co-morbid depression with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is often treatment resistant. In developing a preclinical model of treatment-resistant depression (TRD), we combined animal models of depression and PTSD to produce an animal with more severe as well as treatment-resistant depressive-like behaviours. Male Flinders sensitive line (FSL) rats, a genetic animal model of depression, were exposed to a stress re-stress model of PTSD [time-dependent sensitisation (TDS)] and compared with stress-naive controls. Seven days after TDS stress, depressive-like and coping behaviours as well as hippocampal and cortical noradrenaline (NA) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5HIAA) levels were analysed. Response to sub-chronic imipramine treatment (IMI; 10 mg/kg s.c.×7 days) was subsequently studied. FSL rats demonstrated bio-behavioural characteristics of depression. Exposure to TDS stress in FSL rats correlated negatively with weight gain, while demonstrating reduced swimming behaviour and increased immobility versus unstressed FSL rats. IMI significantly reversed depressive-like (immobility) behaviour and enhanced active coping behaviour (swimming and climbing) in FSL rats. The latter was significantly attenuated in FSL rats exposed to TDS versus unstressed FSL rats. IMI reversed reduced 5HIAA levels in unstressed FSL rats, whereas exposure to TDS negated this effect. Lowered NA levels in FSL rats were sustained after TDS with IMI significantly reversing this in the hippocampus. Combining a gene-X-environment model of depression with a PTSD paradigm produces exaggerated depressive-like symptoms that display an attenuated response to antidepressant treatment. This work confirms combining FSL rats with TDS exposure as a putative animal model of TRD.

  1. Enhanced solid-state citric acid bio-production using apple pomace waste through surface response methodology.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, G S; Brar, S K; Verma, M; Tyagi, R D

    2011-04-01

      To evaluate the potential of apple pomace (AP) supplemented with rice husk for hyper citric acid production through solid-state fermentation by Aspergillus niger NRRL-567. Optimization of two key parameters, such as moisture content and inducer (ethanol and methanol) concentration was carried out by response surface methodology.   In this study, the effect of two crucial process parameters for solid-state citric acid fermentation by A. niger using AP waste supplemented with rice husk were thoroughly investigated in Erlenmeyer flasks through response surface methodology. Moisture and methanol had significant positive effect on citric acid production by A. niger grown on AP (P < 0·05). Higher values of citric acid on AP by A. niger (342·41gkg(-1) and 248·42gkg(-1) dry substrate) were obtained with 75% (v/w) moisture along with two inducers [3% (v/w) methanol and 3% (v/w) ethanol] with fermentation efficiency of 93·90% and 66·42%, respectively depending upon the total carbon utilized after 144h of incubation period. With the same optimized parameters, conventional tray fermentation was conducted. The citric acid concentration of 187·96gkg(-1) dry substrate with 3% (v/w) ethanol and 303·34gkg(-1) dry substrate with 3% (v/w) methanol were achieved representing fermentation efficiency of 50·80% and 82·89% in tray fermentation depending upon carbon utilization after 120h of incubation period.   Apple pomace proved to be the promising substrate for the hyper production of citric acid through solid-state tray fermentation, which is an economical technique and does not require any sophisticated instrumentation.   The study established that the utilization of agro-industrial wastes have positive repercussions on the economy and will help to meet the increasing demands of citric acid and moreover will help to alleviate the environmental problems resulting from the disposal of agro-industrial wastes. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology

  2. Structural ensembles reveal intrinsic disorder for the multi-stimuli responsive bio-mimetic protein Rec1-resilin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balu, Rajkamal; Knott, Robert; Cowieson, Nathan P.; Elvin, Christopher M.; Hill, Anita J.; Choudhury, Namita R.; Dutta, Naba K.

    2015-06-01

    Rec1-resilin is the first recombinant resilin-mimetic protein polymer, synthesized from exon-1 of the Drosophila melanogaster gene CG15920 that has demonstrated unusual multi-stimuli responsiveness in aqueous solution. Crosslinked hydrogels of Rec1-resilin have also displayed remarkable mechanical properties including near-perfect rubber-like elasticity. The structural basis of these extraordinary properties is not clearly understood. Here we combine a computational and experimental investigation to examine structural ensembles of Rec1-resilin in aqueous solution. The structure of Rec1-resilin in aqueous solutions is investigated experimentally using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Both bench-top and synchrotron SAXS are employed to extract structural data sets of Rec1-resilin and to confirm their validity. Computational approaches have been applied to these experimental data sets in order to extract quantitative information about structural ensembles including radius of gyration, pair-distance distribution function, and the fractal dimension. The present work confirms that Rec1-resilin is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) that displays equilibrium structural qualities between those of a structured globular protein and a denatured protein. The ensemble optimization method (EOM) analysis reveals a single conformational population with partial compactness. This work provides new insight into the structural ensembles of Rec1-resilin in solution.

  3. Biomarkers kinetics in the assessment of ventilator-associated pneumonia response to antibiotics - results from the BioVAP study.

    PubMed

    Póvoa, Pedro; Martin-Loeches, Ignacio; Ramirez, Paula; Bos, Lieuwe D; Esperatti, Mariano; Silvestre, Joana; Gili, Gisela; Goma, Gemma; Berlanga, Eugenio; Espasa, Mateu; Gonçalves, Elsa; Torres, Antoni; Artigas, Antonio

    2017-05-08

    Our aim was to evaluate the role of biomarker kinetics in the assessment of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) response to antibiotics. We performed a prospective, multicenter, observational study to evaluate in 37 microbiologically documented VAP, the kinetics of C-reactive protein (CRP), procalcitonin (PCT), mid-region fragment of pro-adrenomedullin (MR-proADM). The kinetics of each variable, from day 1 to 6 of therapy, was assessed with a time dependent analysis comparing survivors and non-survivors. During the study period kinetics of CRP as well as its relative changes, CRP-ratio, was significantly different between survivors and non-survivors (p=0.026 and p=0.005, respectively). On day 4 of antibiotic therapy, CRP of survivors was 47% of the initial value while it was 96% in non-survivors. The kinetics of other studied variables did not distinguish between survivors and non-survivors. In survivors the bacterial load also decreased markedly. Adequate initial antibiotic therapy was associated with lower mortality (p=0.025) and faster CRP decrease (p=0.029). C-reactive protein kinetics can be used to identify VAP patients with poor outcome as soon as four days after the initiation of treatment. (Trial registration - NCT02078999; registered 3 August 2012). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Structural ensembles reveal intrinsic disorder for the multi-stimuli responsive bio-mimetic protein Rec1-resilin

    PubMed Central

    Balu, Rajkamal; Knott, Robert; Cowieson, Nathan P.; Elvin, Christopher M.; Hill, Anita J.; Choudhury, Namita R.; Dutta, Naba K.

    2015-01-01

    Rec1-resilin is the first recombinant resilin-mimetic protein polymer, synthesized from exon-1 of the Drosophila melanogaster gene CG15920 that has demonstrated unusual multi-stimuli responsiveness in aqueous solution. Crosslinked hydrogels of Rec1-resilin have also displayed remarkable mechanical properties including near-perfect rubber-like elasticity. The structural basis of these extraordinary properties is not clearly understood. Here we combine a computational and experimental investigation to examine structural ensembles of Rec1-resilin in aqueous solution. The structure of Rec1-resilin in aqueous solutions is investigated experimentally using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Both bench-top and synchrotron SAXS are employed to extract structural data sets of Rec1-resilin and to confirm their validity. Computational approaches have been applied to these experimental data sets in order to extract quantitative information about structural ensembles including radius of gyration, pair-distance distribution function, and the fractal dimension. The present work confirms that Rec1-resilin is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) that displays equilibrium structural qualities between those of a structured globular protein and a denatured protein. The ensemble optimization method (EOM) analysis reveals a single conformational population with partial compactness. This work provides new insight into the structural ensembles of Rec1-resilin in solution. PMID:26042819

  5. Structural ensembles reveal intrinsic disorder for the multi-stimuli responsive bio-mimetic protein Rec1-resilin.

    PubMed

    Balu, Rajkamal; Knott, Robert; Cowieson, Nathan P; Elvin, Christopher M; Hill, Anita J; Choudhury, Namita R; Dutta, Naba K

    2015-06-04

    Rec1-resilin is the first recombinant resilin-mimetic protein polymer, synthesized from exon-1 of the Drosophila melanogaster gene CG15920 that has demonstrated unusual multi-stimuli responsiveness in aqueous solution. Crosslinked hydrogels of Rec1-resilin have also displayed remarkable mechanical properties including near-perfect rubber-like elasticity. The structural basis of these extraordinary properties is not clearly understood. Here we combine a computational and experimental investigation to examine structural ensembles of Rec1-resilin in aqueous solution. The structure of Rec1-resilin in aqueous solutions is investigated experimentally using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Both bench-top and synchrotron SAXS are employed to extract structural data sets of Rec1-resilin and to confirm their validity. Computational approaches have been applied to these experimental data sets in order to extract quantitative information about structural ensembles including radius of gyration, pair-distance distribution function, and the fractal dimension. The present work confirms that Rec1-resilin is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) that displays equilibrium structural qualities between those of a structured globular protein and a denatured protein. The ensemble optimization method (EOM) analysis reveals a single conformational population with partial compactness. This work provides new insight into the structural ensembles of Rec1-resilin in solution.

  6. The in vivo regulation of heart rate in the murine sinoatrial node by stimulatory and inhibitory heterotrimeric G proteins.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Sonia; Ang, Richard; Abramowitz, Joel; Weinstein, Lee S; Chen, Min; Ludwig, Andreas; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Tinker, Andrew

    2013-08-15

    Reciprocal physiological modulation of heart rate is controlled by the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems acting on the sinoatrial (SA) node. However, there is little direct in vivo work examining the role of stimulatory and inhibitory G protein signaling in the SA node. Thus, we designed a study to examine the role of the stimulatory (Gαs) and inhibitory G protein (Gαi2) in in vivo heart rate regulation in the SA node in the mouse. We studied mice with conditional deletion of Gαs and Gαi2 in the conduction system using cre-loxP technology. We crossed mice in which cre recombinase expression was driven by a tamoxifen-inducible conduction system-specific construct with "Gαs floxed" and "Gαi2 floxed" mice. We studied the heart rate responses of adult mice compared with littermate controls by using radiotelemetry before and after administration of tamoxifen. The mice with conditional deletion of Gαs and Gαi2 had a loss of diurnal variation and were bradycardic or tachycardic, respectively, in the daytime. In mice with conditional deletion of Gαs, there was a selective loss of low-frequency power, while with deletion of Gαi2, there was a loss of high-frequency power in power spectral analysis of heart rate variability. There was no evidence of pathological arrhythmia. Pharmacological modulation of heart rate by isoprenaline was impaired in the Gαs mice, but a muscarinic agonist was still able to slow the heart rate in Gαi2 mice. We conclude that Gαs- and Gαi2-mediated signaling in the sinoatrial node is important in the reciprocal regulation of heart rate through the autonomic nervous system.

  7. FS laser processing of bio-polymer thin films for studying cell-to-substrate specific response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daskalova, A.; Nathala, Chandra S. R.; Kavatzikidou, P.; Ranella, A.; Szoszkiewicz, R.; Husinsky, W.; Fotakis, C.

    2016-09-01

    The use of ultra-short pulses for nanoengineering of biomaterials opens up possibilities for biological, medical and tissue engineering applications. Structuring the surface of a biomaterial into arrays with micro- and nanoscale features and architectures, defines new roadmaps to innovative engineering of materials. Thin films of novel collagen/elastin composite and gelatin were irradiated by Ti:sapphire fs laser in air at central wavelength 800 nm, with pulse durations in the range of 30 fs. The size and shape as well as morphological forms occurring in the resulted areas of interaction were analyzed as a function of irradiation fluence and number of pulses by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The fs interaction regime allows generation of well defined micro porous surface arrays. In this study we examined a novel composite consisting of collagen and elastin in order to create a biodegradable matrix to serve as a biomimetic surface for cell attachment. Confocal microscopy images of modified zones reveal formation of surface fringe patterns with orientation direction alongside the area of interaction. Outside the crater rim a wave-like topography pattern is observed. Structured, on a nanometer scale, surface array is employed for cell-culture experiments for testing cell's responses to substrate morphology. Mice fibroblasts migration was monitored after 3 days cultivation period using FESEM. We found that fibroblasts cells tend to migrate and adhere along the laser modified zones. The performed study proved that the immobilized collagen based biofilms suite as a template for successful fibroblasts cell guidance and orientation. Fs laser induced morphological modification of biomimetic materials exhibit direct control over fibroblasts behaviour due to induced change in their wettability state.

  8. Immune stimulatory and anti-tumour properties of haemin.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, A; Wang, J; Stenzel, K H; Novogrodsky, A

    1993-01-01

    IL-2 induces tumour regression in some patients with metastatic disease, but the dose of IL-2 is limited by severe toxicity. Agents that increase the expression of IL-2 receptors in the effector cells could be used to improve the effectiveness of IL-2 in mediating its anti-tumour effect. We have reported that haemin increased the expression of IL-2 receptors in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and synergized with IL-2 in the induction of mitogenicity, cytotoxicity and cytokine production. We now report on haemin-induced immune stimulation and tumour regression in mice. Haemin-induced mitogenicity in mouse splenocytes was potentiated up to two-fold by IL-2. The combination of haemin and IL-2 was also effective in inducing cytotoxicity for natural killer (NK)-resistant target cells. Maximal induction of cytotoxicity was attained at an optimal concentration of haemin of 10 microM. Higher concentrations were less effective. Splenocytes isolated from mice that had been treated in vivo with haemin and IL-2 incorporated twice the amount of 3H-thymidine compared with splenocytes from mice treated with either haemin or IL-2 alone. Cytotoxicity of splenocytes for NK-resistant target cells was not increased following in vivo administration of haemin and IL-2 when fresh splenocytes were tested. Cytotoxicity was enhanced, however, up to five-fold following 48 h in vitro incubation with IL-2. Administration of haemin and IL-2 resulted in a significant decrease (40%) of established hepatic metastases in mice. Either IL-2 or haemin alone at the dose used were ineffective. The anti-tumour effect of haemin and IL-2 was enhanced (63% decrease in metastases) by administration of the thiol compound, N-acetylcysteine. Since haemin can safely be administered to patients, it may represent a new class of biologic response modifiers that could enhance IL-2-mediated anti-tumour effects. PMID:8370158

  9. Loss of plant biodiversity eliminates stimulatory effect of elevated CO2 on earthworm activity in grasslands.

    PubMed

    Arnone, John A; Zaller, Johann G; Hofer, Gabriela; Schmid, Bernhard; Körner, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Earthworms are among the world's most important ecosystem engineers because of their effects on soil fertility and plant productivity. Their dependence on plants for carbon, however, means that any changes in plant community structure or function caused by rising atmospheric CO2 or loss of plant species diversity could affect earthworm activity, which may feed back on plant communities. Production of surface casts measured during three consecutive years in field experimental plots (n = 24, 1.2 m(2)) planted with local calcareous grassland species that varied in plant species richness (diversity levels: high, 31 species; medium, 12; low, 5) and were exposed to ambient (356 μl CO2 l(-1)) or elevated (600 μl CO2 l(-1)) CO2 was only consistently stimulated in high diversity plots exposed to elevated CO2 (+120 %, 31 spp: 603 ± 52 under ambient CO2 vs. 1,325 ± 204 g cast dwt. m(-2) year(-1) under elevated CO2 in 1996; +77 %, 940 ± 44 vs. 1,663 ± 204 g cast dwt. m(-2) year(-1) in 1998). Reductions in plant diversity had little effect on cast production in ecosystems maintained at ambient CO2, but the stimulatory effect of elevated CO2 on cast production disappeared when plant species diversity was decreased to 12 and 5 species. High diversity plots were also the only communities that included plant species that an earlier field study showed to be among the most responsive to elevated CO2 and to be most preferred by earthworms to deposit casts near. Further, the +87 % CO2-induced increase in cast production measured over the 3 years corresponded to a parallel increase in cumulative total nitrogen of 5.7 g N m(-2) and would help explain the large stimulation of aboveground plant biomass production observed in high-diversity communities under elevated CO2. The results of this study demonstrate how the loss of plant species from communities can alter responses of major soil heterotrophs and consequently ecosystem biogeochemistry.

  10. New Chemical, Bio-Optical and Physical Observations of Upper Ocean Response to the Passage of a Mesoscale Eddy Off Bermuda

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNeil, J. D.; Jannasch, H. W.; Dickey, T.; McGillicuddy, Dennis J., Jr.; Brzezinski, M.; Sakamoto, C. M.

    1999-01-01

    A mesoscale eddy advected across the Bermuda Testbed Mooring site over a 30-day period centered on July 14, 1995. Temperature and current measurements along with biogeochemical measurements were used to characterize the biological response of the upper ocean associated with the introduction of nitrate into the euphotic layer due to the doming of isotherms associated with the eddy. Complementary shipboard data showed an anomalous water mass, which extended from a depth of approximately 50 to 1000 m, manifesting as a cold surface expression and warm anomaly at depth. Although mesoscale eddies are frequently observed in the Sargasso Sea, the present observations are particularly unique because of the high-temporal-resolution measurements of the new instrumentation deployed on the mooring. Analyzers that measure nitrate plus nitrite were placed at depths of 80 and 200 m and bio-optical sensors were located at depths of 20, 35, 45, 71, and 86 m. Peak nitrate values of nearly 3.0 micro-M at 80 m and chlorophyll a values of 1.4 mg/cubic m at 71 m were observed, a well as a 25- to 30-meter shoaling of the 1% light level depth. A Doppler shift from the inertial period (22.8 hours) to 25.2 hours was observed in several time series records due to the movement of the eddy across the mooring. Inertial pumping brought cold, nutrient-rich waters farther into the euphotic zone than would occur solely by isothermal lifting. Silicic acid was depleted to undetectable levels owing to the growth of diatoms within the eddy. The chlorophyll a values associated with the eddy appear to be the largest recorded during the eight years of the ongoing US JGOFS Bermuda Atlantic Time Series Study program.

  11. New Chemical, Bio-Optical and Physical Observations of Upper Ocean Response to the Passage of a Mesoscale Eddy off Bermuda

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNeil, J. D.; Jannasch, H. W.; Dickey, T.; McGillicuddy, D.; Brzekinski, M.; Sakamoto, C. M.

    1999-01-01

    A mesoscale eddy advected across the Bermuda Testbed Mooring site over a 30-day period centered on July 14, 1995. Temperature and current measurements along with biogeochemical measurements were used to characterize the biological response of the upper ocean associated with the introduction of nitrate into the euphoric layer due to the doming of isotherms associated with the eddy. Complementary shipboard data showed an anomalous water mass, which extended from a depth of approximately 50 to 1000 m, manifesting as a cold surface expression and warm anomaly at depth. Although mesoscale eddies are frequently observed in the Sargasso Sea, the present observations are particularly unique because of the high-temporal-resolution measurements of the new instrumentation deployed on the mooring. Analyzers that measure nitrate plus nitrite were placed at depths of 80 and 200 m and bio-optical sensors were located at depths of 20, 35, 45, 71, and 86 m. Peak nitrate values of nearly 3.0 microns at 80 m and chlorophyll alpha values of 1.4 mg/cu m at 71 m were observed, as well as a 25- to 30-meter shoaling of the 1% light level depth. A Doppler shift from the inertial period (22.8 hours) to 25.2 hours was observed in several time series records due to the movement of the eddy across the mooring. Inertial pumping brought cold, nutrient-rich waters farther into the euphotic zone than would occur solely by isothermal lifting. Silicic acid was depleted to undetectable levels owing to the growth of diatoms within the eddy. The chlorophyll alpha values associated with the eddy appear to be the largest recorded during the 8 years of the ongoing U.S. JGOFS Bermuda Atlantic Time Series Study (BATS) program.

  12. Climatic response variability and machine learning: development of a modular technology framework for predicting bio-climatic change in pacific northwest ecosystems"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seamon, E.; Gessler, P. E.; Flathers, E.

    2015-12-01

    The creation and use of large amounts of data in scientific investigations has become common practice. Data collection and analysis for large scientific computing efforts are not only increasing in volume as well as number, the methods and analysis procedures are evolving toward greater complexity (Bell, 2009, Clarke, 2009, Maimon, 2010). In addition, the growth of diverse data-intensive scientific computing efforts (Soni, 2011, Turner, 2014, Wu, 2008) has demonstrated the value of supporting scientific data integration. Efforts to bridge this gap between the above perspectives have been attempted, in varying degrees, with modular scientific computing analysis regimes implemented with a modest amount of success (Perez, 2009). This constellation of effects - 1) an increasing growth in the volume and amount of data, 2) a growing data-intensive science base that has challenging needs, and 3) disparate data organization and integration efforts - has created a critical gap. Namely, systems of scientific data organization and management typically do not effectively enable integrated data collaboration or data-intensive science-based communications. Our research efforts attempt to address this gap by developing a modular technology framework for data science integration efforts - with climate variation as the focus. The intention is that this model, if successful, could be generalized to other application areas. Our research aim focused on the design and implementation of a modular, deployable technology architecture for data integration. Developed using aspects of R, interactive python, SciDB, THREDDS, Javascript, and varied data mining and machine learning techniques, the Modular Data Response Framework (MDRF) was implemented to explore case scenarios for bio-climatic variation as they relate to pacific northwest ecosystem regions. Our preliminary results, using historical NETCDF climate data for calibration purposes across the inland pacific northwest region

  13. New Chemical, Bio-Optical and Physical Observations of Upper Ocean Response to the Passage of a Mesoscale Eddy Off Bermuda

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNeil, J. D.; Jannasch, H. W.; Dickey, T.; McGillicuddy, Dennis J., Jr.; Brzezinski, M.; Sakamoto, C. M.

    1999-01-01

    A mesoscale eddy advected across the Bermuda Testbed Mooring site over a 30-day period centered on July 14, 1995. Temperature and current measurements along with biogeochemical measurements were used to characterize the biological response of the upper ocean associated with the introduction of nitrate into the euphotic layer due to the doming of isotherms associated with the eddy. Complementary shipboard data showed an anomalous water mass, which extended from a depth of approximately 50 to 1000 m, manifesting as a cold surface expression and warm anomaly at depth. Although mesoscale eddies are frequently observed in the Sargasso Sea, the present observations are particularly unique because of the high-temporal-resolution measurements of the new instrumentation deployed on the mooring. Analyzers that measure nitrate plus nitrite were placed at depths of 80 and 200 m and bio-optical sensors were located at depths of 20, 35, 45, 71, and 86 m. Peak nitrate values of nearly 3.0 micro-M at 80 m and chlorophyll a values of 1.4 mg/cubic m at 71 m were observed, a well as a 25- to 30-meter shoaling of the 1% light level depth. A Doppler shift from the inertial period (22.8 hours) to 25.2 hours was observed in several time series records due to the movement of the eddy across the mooring. Inertial pumping brought cold, nutrient-rich waters farther into the euphotic zone than would occur solely by isothermal lifting. Silicic acid was depleted to undetectable levels owing to the growth of diatoms within the eddy. The chlorophyll a values associated with the eddy appear to be the largest recorded during the eight years of the ongoing US JGOFS Bermuda Atlantic Time Series Study program.

  14. New Chemical, Bio-Optical and Physical Observations of Upper Ocean Response to the Passage of a Mesoscale Eddy off Bermuda

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNeil, J. D.; Jannasch, H. W.; Dickey, T.; McGillicuddy, D.; Brzekinski, M.; Sakamoto, C. M.

    1999-01-01

    A mesoscale eddy advected across the Bermuda Testbed Mooring site over a 30-day period centered on July 14, 1995. Temperature and current measurements along with biogeochemical measurements were used to characterize the biological response of the upper ocean associated with the introduction of nitrate into the euphoric layer due to the doming of isotherms associated with the eddy. Complementary shipboard data showed an anomalous water mass, which extended from a depth of approximately 50 to 1000 m, manifesting as a cold surface expression and warm anomaly at depth. Although mesoscale eddies are frequently observed in the Sargasso Sea, the present observations are particularly unique because of the high-temporal-resolution measurements of the new instrumentation deployed on the mooring. Analyzers that measure nitrate plus nitrite were placed at depths of 80 and 200 m and bio-optical sensors were located at depths of 20, 35, 45, 71, and 86 m. Peak nitrate values of nearly 3.0 microns at 80 m and chlorophyll alpha values of 1.4 mg/cu m at 71 m were observed, as well as a 25- to 30-meter shoaling of the 1% light level depth. A Doppler shift from the inertial period (22.8 hours) to 25.2 hours was observed in several time series records due to the movement of the eddy across the mooring. Inertial pumping brought cold, nutrient-rich waters farther into the euphotic zone than would occur solely by isothermal lifting. Silicic acid was depleted to undetectable levels owing to the growth of diatoms within the eddy. The chlorophyll alpha values associated with the eddy appear to be the largest recorded during the 8 years of the ongoing U.S. JGOFS Bermuda Atlantic Time Series Study (BATS) program.

  15. Borrelia burgdorferi elicited-IL-10 suppresses the production of inflammatory mediators, phagocytosis, and expression of co-stimulatory receptors by murine macrophages and/or dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yutein; Zhang, Nan; Wooten, R Mark

    2013-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) is a tick-borne spirochete that is the causative agent for Lyme disease. Our previous studies indicate that virulent Bb can potently enhance IL-10 production by macrophages (MØs) and that blocking IL-10 production significantly enhances bacterial clearance. We hypothesize that skin-associated APC types, such as MØs and dendritic cells (DCs) are potent producers of IL-10 in response to Bb, which may act in autocrine fashion to suppress APC responses critical for efficient Bb clearance. Our goal is to delineate which APC immune functions are dysregulated by Bb-elicited IL-10 using a murine model of Lyme disease. Our in vitro studies indicated that both APCs rapidly produce IL-10 upon exposure to Bb, that these levels inversely correlate with the production of many Lyme-relevant proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and that APCs derived from IL-10(-/-) mice produced greater amounts of these proinflammatory mediators than wild-type APCs. Phagocytosis assays determined that Bb-elicited IL-10 levels can diminish Bb uptake and trafficking by MØs, suppresses ROS production, but does not affect NO production; Bb-elicited IL-10 had little effect on phagocytosis, ROS, and NO production by DCs. In general, Bb exposure caused little-to-no upregulation of several critical surface co-stimulatory markers by MØs and DCs, however eliminating Bb-elicited IL-10 allowed a significant upregulation in many of these co-stimulatory receptors. These data indicate that IL-10 elicited from Bb-stimulated MØs and DCs results in decreased production of proinflammatory mediators and co-stimulatory molecules, and suppress phagocytosis-associated events that are important for mediating both innate and adaptive immune responses by APCs.

  16. Effects and side-effects of a brief overcorrection procedure in reducing multiple self-stimulatory behaviour: a single case analysis.

    PubMed

    Luiselli, J K; Pemberton, B W; Helfen, C S

    1978-12-01

    The use of positive practice overcorrection to reduce the classroom self-stimulatory behaviour of a mentally retarded child is described. An initial attempt to reduce four stereotyped hand movements through reinforcement of incompatible behaviour resulted in a decrease in three types of behaviour and an increase in the fourth. When one minute of positive practice overcorrection was then made contingent upon the increased behaviour, it was immediately reduced to near-zero levels with accompanying low occurrences of all other behaviour forms. Response suppression was durable following the evaluation of the overcorrection procedure at 2- and 3.5-month follow-ups.

  17. Co-Stimulatory Blockade of the CD28/CD80-86/CTLA-4 Balance in Transplantation: Impact on Memory T Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Ville, Simon; Poirier, Nicolas; Blancho, Gilles; Vanhove, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    CD28 and CTLA-4 are prototypal co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory cell surface signaling molecules interacting with CD80/86, known to be critical for immune response initiation and regulation, respectively. Initial “bench-to-beside” translation, two decades ago, resulted in the development of CTLA4-Ig, a biologic that targets CD80/86 and prevents T-cell costimulation. In spite of its proven effectiveness in inhibiting allo-immune responses, particularly in murine models, clinical experience in kidney transplantation with belatacept (high-affinity CTLA4-Ig molecule) reveals a high incidence of acute, cell-mediated rejection. Originally, the etiology of belatacept-resistant graft rejection was thought to be heterologous immunity, i.e., the cross-reactivity of the pool of memory T cells from pathogen-specific immune responses with alloantigens. Recently, the standard view that memory T cells arise from effector cells after clonal contraction has been challenged by a “developmental” model, in which less differentiated memory T cells generate effector cells. This review delineates how this shift in paradigm, given the differences in co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory signal depending on the maturation stage, could profoundly affect our understanding of the CD28/CD80-86/CTLA-4 blockade and highlights the potential advantages of selectively targeting CD28, instead of CD80/86, to control post-transplant immune responses. PMID:26322044

  18. The stimulatory effect of phosphatidylethanolamine on N-acylphosphatidylethanolamine-hydrolyzing phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD).

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Okamoto, Yasuo; Tsuboi, Kazuhito; Ueda, Natsuo

    2008-01-01

    N-Acylphosphatidylethanolamine (NAPE)-hydrolyzing phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD) is a membrane-bound enzyme which releases the endocannabinoid anandamide and other bioactive N-acylethanolamines from their corresponding NAPEs in animal tissues. Our previous studies showed that NAPE-PLD solubilized from the membrane is remarkably stimulated by millimolar concentrations of Ca(2+) while the membrane-bound form is much less sensitive to Ca(2+). This finding suggested that certain membrane constituents diminished the stimulatory effect of Ca(2+). In the present studies, we examined the effects of membrane fractions from COS-7 cells and brain tissue on the purified recombinant rat NAPE-PLD, and found that heat-stable membrane component(s) dose-dependently activated NAPE-PLD up to 4.8-5.0 fold. In the presence of the membrane fractions, however, the stimulatory effect of Ca(2+) on the purified NAPE-PLD was considerably reduced. When it was examined if the membrane fractions can be replaced with various pure phospholipids, phosphatidylethanolamine activated NAPE-PLD up to 3.3 fold, which was followed by decrease in the stimulatory effects of Ca(2+) and several other divalent cations. These results suggest that membrane components including phosphatidylethanolamine keep the membrane-associated form of NAPE-PLD constitutively active.

  19. Innate immune-stimulatory activity of Porphyromonas gingivalis fimbriae is eliminated by phase separation using Triton X-114.

    PubMed

    Nozoe, Kohji; Sanui, Terukazu; Takeshita, Masaaki; Fukuda, Takao; Haraguchi, Akira; Aida, Yoshitomi; Nishimura, Fusanori

    2017-02-01

    Fimbriae are virulence factors of Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis). In this study, the action of fimbriae on neutrophil respiratory burst and cytokine production by mononuclear cells (MNC) were investigated. Native or denatured form of purified P. gingivalis fimbriae contained endotoxin at an equivalence of 1-3μglipopolysaccharides(LPS)/mg protein. The endotoxin could be reduced to the equivalent of 1ng-LPS/mg protein by phase separation using Triton X-114. Unfractionated fimbriae caused serum-dependent priming of neutrophils for enhanced respiratory burst, but both native and denatured forms of Triton X-114-fractionated fimbriae were not active at 100μg/mL. Unfractionated fimbriae induced serum-dependent production of IL-1β by MNC. Triton X-114-fractionated fimbriae (10μg/mL)-induced production of IL-1β, IL-8 or TNF-α was much lower than that induced by unfractionated fimbriae or 10ng/mL P. gingivalis-LPS preparation. Triton X-114-fractionated fimbriae immobilized on polystyrene tubes induced adhesion-stimulated superoxide release by LPS-primed neutrophils in a β2 integrin-dependent manner. P. gingivalis cells caused priming of neutrophils; however, Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 antagonists did not affect this response. Thus, P. gingivalis fimbriae were ineffective in inducing innate immune response in leukocytes; however, they induced β2 integrin-mediated response by neutrophils. Immune-stimulatory components of P. gingivalis might be recognized by receptors other than TLR4.

  20. Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Secreted Sphingosine 1-Phosphate (S1P) Exerts a Stimulatory Effect on Skeletal Myoblast Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Alessia; Anderloni, Giulia; Pierucci, Federica; Matteini, Francesca; Chellini, Flaminia; Zecchi Orlandini, Sandra; Meacci, Elisabetta

    2014-01-01

    Bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have the potential to significantly contribute to skeletal muscle healing through the secretion of paracrine factors that support proliferation and enhance participation of the endogenous muscle stem cells in the process of repair/regeneration. However, MSC-derived trophic molecules have been poorly characterized. The aim of this study was to investigate paracrine signaling effects of MSCs on skeletal myoblasts. It was found, using a biochemical and morphological approach that sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), a natural bioactive lipid exerting a broad range of muscle cell responses, is secreted by MSCs and represents an important factor by which these cells exert their stimulatory effects on C2C12 myoblast and satellite cell proliferation. Indeed, exposure to conditioned medium obtained from MSCs cultured in the presence of the selective sphingosine kinase inhibitor (iSK), blocked increased cell proliferation caused by the conditioned medium from untreated MSCs, and the addition of exogenous S1P in the conditioned medium from MSCs pre-treated with iSK further increased myoblast proliferation. Finally, we also demonstrated that the myoblast response to MSC-secreted vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) involves the release of S1P from C2C12 cells. Our data may have important implications in the optimization of cell-based strategies to promote skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:25264785

  1. Targeting the T-cell co-stimulatory CD27/CD70 pathway in cancer immunotherapy: rationale and potential.

    PubMed

    van de Ven, Koen; Borst, Jannie

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, cancer immunotherapy was named 'breakthrough of the year' based on the outcome of clinical trials with blocking antibodies to the T-cell co-inhibitory receptors CTLA-4 and PD-1. This success has emphasized that cytotoxic T-cell responses to cancer can occur, but are limited by peripheral tolerance and by immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment. Targeting of CTLA-4, PD-1 or its ligands partly overcomes these limitations and can now be applied in multiple immunogenic cancer types. Furthermore, an increased success rate is expected from combining CTLA-4 and/or PD-1 blocking with deliberate engagement of T-cell co-stimulatory receptors, particularly TNF receptor (R) family members. The TNFR family includes CD27 (Tnfrsf7), for which an agonistic antibody has recently entered clinical trials. In this review, we describe how CD27 co-stimulation impacts the T-cell response, with the purpose to illuminate how CD27 agonism can be exploited in cancer immunotherapy.

  2. Sinomenine promotes differentiation but impedes maturation and co-stimulatory molecule expression of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongwen; Yang, Chengying; Jin, Naishi; Xie, Zhunyi; Fei, Lie; Jia, Zhengcai; Wu, Yuzhang

    2007-08-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) excel at presenting antigen to T cells and thus make a key contribution to the induction of primary and secondary immune responses. Sinomenine has been used for centuries in the treatment of patients with autoimmune diseases as it possesses immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the effect of sinomenine on the differentiation, maturation, and functionality of DC derived from monocytes has not been studied. We show here that DC differentiation is promoted when monocytes are treated with GM-CSF and IL-4 (IL-4) in the presence of sinomenine (200 microg/ml), as evidenced by the upregulation of CD1a while CD14 was decreased. In addition, incubation of immature DC with sinomenine significantly blunted lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced DC maturation, as shown by the reduction of expression of the maturation marker CD83 and co-stimulatory molecules, including CD86, B7-H1, and CD40. Moreover, sinomenine also prevented decreases in antigen (FITC-Dextran or Lucifer Yellow) uptake by LPS-treated DC. Mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLRs) revealed that sinomenine-treated DC impede the secretion of the cytokines IL-2 and IFN-gamma by co-cultured CD4(+) T cells. Therefore, modulation of DC differentiation, maturation, and functionality by sinomenine is of potential relevance to its immunomodulatory effects in controlling specific immune responses in autoimmune diseases, transplantation, and other immune-mediated conditions.

  3. Induction of multinucleated giant cells in response to small sized bovine bone substitute (Bio-Oss™) results in an enhanced early implantation bed vascularization

    PubMed Central

    Barbeck, M.; Udeabor, S. E.; Lorenz, J.; Kubesch, A.; Choukroun, J.; Sader, R. A.; Kirkpatrick, C. J.; Ghanaati, S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The host tissue reaction to the xenogeneic bone substitute Bio-Oss™ (Geistlich Biomaterials, Wolhousen, Switzerland) was investigated focusing on the participating inflammatory cells and implantation bed vascularization. Materials and Methods: Bio-Oss™ was implanted subcutaneously into CD1 mice for up to 60 days and analyzed by means of specialized histological and histomorphometrical techniques after explantation. Results: Bio-Oss™ induced within the first 15 days an early high vascularization combined with a marked presence of multinucleated giant cells. The latter cells were associated mainly with the smaller sized granules within the implantation bed. Toward the end of the study the number of multinucleated giant cells decreased while the tissue reaction to the larger granules was mainly mononuclear. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that smaller xenogeneic bone substitute granules induce multinucleated giant cells, whereas the larger-sized ones became integrated within the implantation bed by means of a mononuclear cell-triggered granulation tissue. Obviously, the presence of multinucleated giant cells within biomaterial implantation beds is not only related to the type of synthetic bone substitute material, but also to the granule size of the natural-based xenogeneic bone substitute material. PMID:25593863

  4. tmBioC: improving interoperability of text-mining tools with BioC.

    PubMed

    Khare, Ritu; Wei, Chih-Hsuan; Mao, Yuqing; Leaman, Robert; Lu, Zhiyong

    2014-01-01

    The lack of interoperability among biomedical text-mining tools is a major bottleneck in creating more complex applications. Despite the availability of numerous methods and techniques for various text-mining tasks, combining different tools requires substantial efforts and time owing to heterogeneity and variety in data formats. In response, BioC is a recent proposal that offers a minimalistic approach to tool interoperability by stipulating minimal changes to existing tools and applications. BioC is a family of XML formats that define how to present text documents and annotations, and also provides easy-to-use functions to read/write documents in the BioC format. In this study, we introduce our text-mining toolkit, which is designed to perform several challenging and significant tasks in the biomedical domain, and repackage the toolkit into BioC to enhance its interoperability. Our toolkit consists of six state-of-the-art tools for named-entity recognition, normalization and annotation (PubTator) of genes (GenNorm), diseases (DNorm), mutations (tmVar), species (SR4GN) and chemicals (tmChem). Although developed within the same group, each tool is designed to process input articles and output annotations in a different format. We modify these tools and enable them to read/write data in the proposed BioC format. We find that, using the BioC family of formats and functions, only minimal changes were required to build the newer versions of the tools. The resulting BioC wrapped toolkit, which we have named tmBioC, consists of our tools in BioC, an annotated full-text corpus in BioC, and a format detection and conversion tool. Furthermore, through participation in the 2013 BioCreative IV Interoperability Track, we empirically demonstrate that the tools in tmBioC can be more efficiently integrated with each other as well as with external tools: Our experimental results show that using BioC reduces >60% in lines of code for text-mining tool integration. The tmBioC toolkit

  5. tmBioC: improving interoperability of text-mining tools with BioC

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Ritu; Wei, Chih-Hsuan; Mao, Yuqing; Leaman, Robert; Lu, Zhiyong

    2014-01-01

    The lack of interoperability among biomedical text-mining tools is a major bottleneck in creating more complex applications. Despite the availability of numerous methods and techniques for various text-mining tasks, combining different tools requires substantial efforts and time owing to heterogeneity and variety in data formats. In response, BioC is a recent proposal that offers a minimalistic approach to tool interoperability by stipulating minimal changes to existing tools and applications. BioC is a family of XML formats that define how to present text documents and annotations, and also provides easy-to-use functions to read/write documents in the BioC format. In this study, we introduce our text-mining toolkit, which is designed to perform several challenging and significant tasks in the biomedical domain, and repackage the toolkit into BioC to enhance its interoperability. Our toolkit consists of six state-of-the-art tools for named-entity recognition, normalization and annotation (PubTator) of genes (GenNorm), diseases (DNorm), mutations (tmVar), species (SR4GN) and chemicals (tmChem). Although developed within the same group, each tool is designed to process input articles and output annotations in a different format. We modify these tools and enable them to read/write data in the proposed BioC format. We find that, using the BioC family of formats and functions, only minimal changes were required to build the newer versions of the tools. The resulting BioC wrapped toolkit, which we have named tmBioC, consists of our tools in BioC, an annotated full-text corpus in BioC, and a format detection and conversion tool. Furthermore, through participation in the 2013 BioCreative IV Interoperability Track, we empirically demonstrate that the tools in tmBioC can be more efficiently integrated with each other as well as with external tools: Our experimental results show that using BioC reduces >60% in lines of code for text-mining tool integration. The tmBioC toolkit

  6. Stimulatory actions of bioflavenoids on tyrosine uptake into cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, K.; Hamano, S.; Oka, M.; Teraoka, K. )

    1990-09-28

    The effects of flavenoids on L-({sup 14}C)tyrosine uptake into cultured adrenal chromaffin cells were examined. Flavone markedly stimulated tyrosine uptake into these cells in a manner dependent on its concentration. Apigenin also caused a moderate stimulatory action, but quercetin had no significant effect on the uptake. Flavone also stimulated the uptake of histidine, but did not affect the uptake of serine, lysine, or glutamic acid. These results are considered to propose the possibility that flavonoids may be able to stimulate the precursor uptake into the cells, resulting in an enhancement of the biogenic amine production.

  7. Effect of multiple endogenous biological factors on the response of the tephritids Anastrepha ludens and Anastrepha obliqua (Diptera: Tephritidae) to multilure traps baited with BioLure or NuLure in mango orchards.

    PubMed

    Arredondo, José; Flores, Salvador; Montoya, Pablo; Díaz-Fleischer, Francisco

    2014-06-01

    The physiological state of an insect is likely the most important endogenous factor influencing resource-oriented behavior, and it varies considerably among individuals. Trials were conducted in mango orchards to study the effect of multiple endogenous biological factors on the response of two fly species, Anastrepha ludens (Loew) and Anastrepha obliqua Maquart (Diptera: Tephritidae), to BioLure and NuLure baits. The biological factors of the two fly species that were tested were the following: 1) fertility status-sterile (irradiated) and fertile flies; 2) two types of diets (only sugar and a 3:1 mixture of sugar and hydrolyzed yeast protein; 3) sex, and 4) two sexual maturity conditions (2-4- and 15-18-d-old flies, representing immature and sexually mature flies, respectively, and 2-4-d-old flies treated with methoprene as an artificially induced sexually state male condition). The laboratory-treated flies were released into three different mango orchards. The trials were conducted in four blocks per orchard using eight traps in each block (50:50 BioLure: NuLure). The traps were replaced every 2 d during the 12-d period and the flies per trap per day values were calculated. More protein-fed, fertile, female, immature, and A. obliqua flies were caught compared with the other flies tested. In addition, the traps baited with NuLure attracted more flies than those baited with BioLure. Interaction analyses indicated that the type of bait and the sexual maturity status were the most important factors affecting the responses of the flies. Our study demonstrated that lures attract only a small segment of the fly population, those that have a specific hunger for amino acids-immature flies-and those that were protein-starved. The implications for improved trapping system designs are discussed.

  8. The RAD51-stimulatory compound RS-1 can exploit the RAD51 overexpression that exists in cancer cells and tumors

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Jennifer M; Logan, Hillary L.; Budke, Brian; Wu, Megan; Pawlowski, Michal; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Kozikowski, Alan P.; Bishop, Douglas K.; Connell, Philip P.

    2014-01-01

    RAD51 is the central protein that catalyzes DNA repair via homologous recombination (HR), a process that ensures genomic stability. RAD51 protein is commonly expressed at high levels in cancer cells relative to their non-cancerous precursors. High levels of RAD51 expression can lead to the formation of genotoxic RAD51 protein complexes on undamaged chromatin. We developed a therapeutic approach that exploits this potentially toxic feature of malignancy, using compounds that stimulate the DNA binding activity of RAD51 to promote cancer cell death. A panel of immortalized cell lines was challenged with the RAD51-stimulatory compound RS-1. Resistance to RS-1 tended to occur in cells with higher levels of RAD54L and RAD54B, which are Swi2/Snf2-related translocases known to dissociate RAD51 filaments from double-stranded DNA. In PC3 prostate cancer cells, RS-1 induced lethality was accompanied by the formation of microscopically visible RAD51 nuclear protein foci occurring in the absence of any DNA-damaging treatment. Treatment with RS-1 promoted significant anti-tumor responses in a mouse model, providing proof of principle for this novel therapeutic strategy. PMID:24753542

  9. Stimulatory effect of morphine on rat pineal melatonin synthesis via a cyclic AMP-dependent transcription pathway.

    PubMed

    Chetsawang, Banthit; Govitrapong, Piyarat

    2005-11-25

    The expression of mRNA of opioid receptors and the existence of opioid binding site in the rat pineal gland have been demonstrated previously. A major finding was that morphine enhanced the activity of the rate-limiting enzyme, N-acetyltransferase (NAT) and increased the level of melatonin in rat pineal gland. An attempt has been made in order to clarify the mechanism of this induction. In the present study, the stimulatory effect of morphine on the expression of NAT mRNA in the rat pineal gland has been demonstrated using semi-quantitative RT-PCR technique. The results showed that both acute and chronic morphine treatments significantly increased NAT mRNA expression in rat pineal gland. In addition, the effect of morphine on the phosphorylation of the transcription factors, cyclic AMP responsive element-binding protein (CREB) was investigated. Western blot analysis showed that morphine significantly increased phosphorylation of CREB. These results indicate that at least one downstream messenger pathway for the activation of opioidergic system on the induction of melatonin synthesis in the rat pineal gland acts via cyclic AMP-dependent cascade and transcription mechanism.

  10. Forensic Analysis of BIOS Chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershteyn, Pavel; Davis, Mark; Shenoi, Sujeet

    Data can be hidden in BIOS chips without hindering computer performance. This feature has been exploited by virus writers and computer game enthusiasts. Unused BIOS storage can also be used by criminals, terrorists and intelligence agents to conceal secrets. However, BIOS chips are largely ignored in digital forensic investigations. Few techniques exist for imaging BIOS chips and no tools are available specifically for analyzing BIOS data.

  11. Social influences on "self-stimulatory" behavior: analysis and treatment application.

    PubMed

    Durand, V M; Carr, E G

    1987-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the "self-stimulatory" behaviors exhibited by some individuals may be socially mediated. Four developmentally disabled children who exhibited hand flapping and body rocking participated in a series of three experiments conducted to assess the influence of social variables on stereotyped behavior and to develop a treatment based on the assessment. Experiment 1 used an assessment procedure to determine the relative influences of social attention and task demands on stereotyped behavior. For all four children, hand flapping and body rocking increased when difficult academic tasks were introduced. Experiment 2 involved the use of a procedural time-out and demonstrated that removing task demands contingent on stereotyped behavior resulted in increased rates of hand flapping and body rocking. In Experiment 3, these results were used to develop a communication treatment that consisted of teaching the children to request assistance on the difficult tasks. This treatment resulted in significant reductions in self-stimulatory behavior. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that some forms of repetitive stereotyped behavior may come to serve social functions (e.g., escape from aversive situations). Teaching a functionally equivalent communicative alternative to escape-motivated stereotyped behavior can be an effective form of intervention for this problem.

  12. Experimental modifications imply a stimulatory function for male tsetse fly genitalia, supporting cryptic female choice theory.

    PubMed

    Briceño, R D; Eberhard, William G

    2009-07-01

    One of the most sweeping of all patterns in morphological evolution is that animal genitalia tend to diverge more rapidly than do other structures. Abundant indirect evidence supports the cryptic female choice (CFC) explanation of this pattern, which supposes that male genitalia often function to court females during copulation; but direct experimental demonstrations of a stimulatory function have been lacking. In this study, we altered the form of two male genital structures that squeeze the female's abdomen rhythmically in Glossina pallidipes flies. As predicted by theory, this induced CFC against the male: ovulation and sperm storage decreased, while female remating increased. Further experiments showed that these effects were due to changes in tactile stimuli received by the female from the male's altered genitalia, and were not due to other possible changes in the males due to alteration of their genital form. Stimulation from male genital structures also induces females to permit copulation to occur. Together with previous studies of tsetse reproductive physiology, these data constitute the most complete experimental confirmation that sexual selection (probably by CFC) acts on the stimulatory properties of male genitalia.

  13. Co-stimulatory molecules in and beyond co-stimulation - tipping the balance in atherosclerosis?

    PubMed

    Gerdes, N; Zirlik, A

    2011-11-01

    A plethora of basic laboratory and clinical studies has uncovered the chronic inflammatory nature of atherosclerosis. The adaptive immune system with its front-runner, the T cell, drives the atherogenic process at all stages. T cell function is dependent on and controlled by a variety of either co-stimulatory or co-inhibitory signals. In addition, many of these proteins enfold T cell-independent pro-atherogenic functions on a variety of cell types. Accordingly they represent potential targets for immune-modulatory and/or anti-inflammatory therapy of atherosclerosis. This review focuses on the diverse role of co-stimulatory molecules of the B7 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-superfamily and their downstream signalling effectors in atherosclerosis. In particular, the contribution of CD28/CD80/CD86/CTLA4, ICOS/ICOSL, PD-1/PDL-1/2, TRAF, CD40/CD154, OX40/OX40L, CD137/CD137L, CD70/CD27, GITR/GITRL, and LIGHT to arterial disease is reviewed. Finally, the potential for a therapeutic exploitation of these molecules in the treatment of atherosclerosis is discussed.

  14. Neonatal Treatment With Beta-Cell Stimulatory Agents Reduces the Incidence of Diabetes in BB Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bock, Troels; Pedersen, Charlotte R.; Hansen, Susanne V.; Aaen, Kim; JØrgensen, Merete; Hansen, Michael WØllike; Kjaer, Troels W.; Hageman, Ida; Josefsen, Knud

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether various beta-cell stimulatory drugs, given neonatally, influence the incidence of diabetes in BB rats. Newborn BB rats were treated twice daily for 6 days and diabetes development was observed during the following 200-day study period. Compared to a diabetes incidence of 63.8% in 163 control BB rats which received saline or were untreated, the percentage of experimental BB rats that developed diabetes was as follows in the different subgroups: arginineglucose: 47% (n= 73, p < 0.02); glucagon: 37% (n = 93, p < 0.0001); tolbutamide-glucose: 36% (n = 58, p < 0.0005); and theophylline-glucose: 39% (n = 41, p < 0.005). A long-term arginine-glucose treatment was not superior to the shorter neonatal treatment. Histological examination revealed a higher degree of insulitis in diabetic than in non-diabetic animals but no difference according to the kind of treatment was observed. Finally, we found that the diabetes incidence in BB rats was higher in the first litter compared to subsequent litters (p = 0.04). Thus, neonatal treatment with various beta-cell stimulatory agents reduces diabetes incidence in BB rats. The theory behind the study, that the treatment accelerates beta-cell maturation leading to increased immunological tolerance towards beta cells, is discussed. PMID:11469386

  15. Molecular flexibility can influence the stimulatory ability of receptor–ligand interactions at cell–cell junctions

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Shuyan; Krogsgaard, Michelle; Davis, Mark M.; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2006-01-01

    Direct cell–cell communication is crucial for many processes in biology, particularly embryogenesis, interactions between hematopoetic cells, and in the nervous system. This communication is often mediated by the binding of receptors to cognate ligands at a cell–cell junction. One such interaction that is very important for the development of many immune responses is the binding of the αβ T cell receptor for antigen (TCR) on T lymphocytes with peptide–MHC complexes on other cells. In general, the stability (e.g., half-life) of TCR–peptide–MHC binding measured in solution correlates with functional responses. Several anomalies have been reported, however. For example, for some anomalous ligands, large changes in heat capacity can apparently substitute for a lack of stability in TCR–ligand interactions. Here, we show that, when there are significant conformational changes during receptor–ligand binding and the receptor/ligand have relatively rigid molecular subdomains, the difference between the half-life of this receptor–ligand complex at a cell–cell junction and that measured using soluble molecules is large. Thus, receptors/ligands with these specific molecular features do not follow correlations between stimulatory potency in the cellular environment and half-lives measured with soluble molecules. Our “first-principles” prescription for correcting the half-life measured in solution to obtain the pertinent value at a cell–cell junction illuminates the origin of correlations of T cell response with thermodynamic properties. Application of our ideas to diverse systems where receptor–ligand interactions occur across juxtaposed cells may help avoid debates about “anomalies” that may simply arise from receptor/ligand-specific differences between half-lives in solution and in the cellular environment. PMID:16537380

  16. Preparation and crystallization of the stimulatory and inhibitory complexes of GTP cyclohydrolase I and its feedback regulatory protein GFRP.

    PubMed

    Maita, N; Okada, K; Hirotsu, S; Hatakeyama, K; Hakoshima, T

    2001-08-01

    Mammalian GTP cyclohydrolase I is a decameric enzyme in the first and rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin, which is an essential cofactor for enzymes producing neurotransmitters such as catecholamines and for nitric oxide synthases. The enzyme is dually regulated by its feedback regulatory protein GFRP in the presence of its stimulatory effector phenylalanine and its inhibitory effector biopterin. Here, both the stimulatory and inhibitory complexes of rat GTP cyclohydrolase I bound to GFRP were crystallized by vapour diffusion. Diffraction data sets at resolutions of 3.0 and 2.64 A were collected for the stimulatory and inhibitory complexes, respectively. Each complex consists of two GTPCHI pentamer rings and two GFRP pentamer rings, with pseudo-52 point-group symmetry.

  17. Bio-Optical Instrumentation for Mapping of the Upper Ocean Using SeaSoar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    The implementation of an integrated physical/ bio -optical SeaSoar system provides the ability to obtain highly resolved spatial maps of the...variability of inherent bio -optical properties within the context of detailed physical structure and dynamics. This capability is important for: (1) Examining...the interaction between physical and bio -optical responses of the upper ocean to atmospheric forcing. (2) Observing the details of bio -optical

  18. BioWatch in a Box

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, M T; Dzentis, J M; Meyer, R M

    2006-02-01

    BioWatch, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) environmental monitoring program, has been successfully operating in many of the nation's urban centers since early 2003. This early warning environmental monitoring system can detect trace amounts of biological materials in the air, and has been used to provide information to assist public health experts determine whether detected materials are due to an intentional release (bioterrorism incident) or due to minute quantities that occur naturally in the environment. BioWatch information enables federal, state, and local officials to more quickly determine appropriate emergency response, medical care and consequence management.

  19. A secreted peptide growth factor, phytosulfokine, acting as a stimulatory factor of carrot somatic embryo formation.

    PubMed

    Hanai, H; Matsuno, T; Yamamoto, M; Matsubayashi, Y; Kobayashi, T; Kamada, H; Sakagami, Y

    2000-01-01

    Somatic embryogenesis of the carrot (Daucus carota L.) depends on a set of factors, some of which accumulate in culture medium (conditioned medium, CM). When embryogenic cell clusters were transferred to an embryo-inducing medium, addition of CM derived from somatic embryo culture markedly stimulated somatic embryo formation. The active principles were purified using a simple bioassay system and identified to be phytosulfokines (PSKs), sulfated oligopeptide growth factors originally isolated from a CM derived from asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) mesophyll culture. Quantification studies using a competition ELISA system employing an anti-PSK-alpha polyclonal antibody showed that PSK production might be related to growth of cells, rather than development of somatic embryos. Thus the stimulatory effect of PSK on somatic embryo formation might be due to promotion of cell proliferation.

  20. Involvement of mitochondrial activity in mediating ELF-EMF stimulatory effect on human sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Roberto; Delle Monache, Simona; Bennato, Francesca; Di Bartolomeo, Claudia; Scrimaglio, Renato; Cinque, Benedetta; Colonna, Rosella Cardigno

    2011-01-01

    It has recently been reported that the exposure of human spermatozoa to an extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic field (EMF) with a square waveform of 5 mT amplitude and frequency of 50 Hz improves sperm motility. The functional relationship between the energy metabolism and the enhancement of human sperm motility induced by ELF-EMF was investigated. Sperm exposure to ELF-EMF resulted in a progressive and significant increase of mitochondrial membrane potential and levels of ATP, ADP and NAD(+) that was associated with a progressive and significant increase in the sperm kinematic parameters. No significant effects were detected on other parameters such as ATP/ADP ratio and energy charge. When carbamoyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CICCP) was applied to inhibit the oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondria, the values of energy parameters and motility in the sperm incubated in the presence of glucose and exposed to ELF-EMF did not change, thus indicating that the glycolysis was not involved in mediating ELF-EMF stimulatory effect on motility. By contrast, when pyruvate and lactate were provided instead of glucose, the energy status and motility increased significantly in ELF-EMF-treated sperm. Under these culture conditions, the inhibition of glycolitic metabolism by 2-deoxy-D-glucose (DOG) again resulted in increased values of energy and kinematic parameters, indicating that gluconeogenesis was not involved in producing glucose for use in glycolysis. We concluded that the key role in mediating the stimulatory effects exerted by ELF-EMF on human sperm motility is played by mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation rather than glycolysis.

  1. Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    of mask respirators with bio -inspired adhesive integrated into their peripheral seals; and (2) assessment of the competitive position of the new bio -inspired adhesives in broader fields of application.

  2. Serological, biochemical, and functional identity of B cell-stimulatory factor 1 and B cell differentiation factor for IgG1

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    By three criteria, we have demonstrated that B cell stimulatory factor (BSF-1) and B cell differentiation factor (BCDF-gamma) are the same lymphokine. Highly purified preparations of high performance liquid chromatography-purified or affinity-purified BSF-1 had BCDF-gamma activity but not BCDF-mu activity. A monoclonal anti-BSF-1 antibody coupled to Sepharose depleted both BSF-1 and BCDF-gamma activity but not BCDF-mu activity from two different T cell supernatants. Soluble monoclonal anti-BSF-1 blocked the BSF-1 and BCDF-gamma but not the BCDF- mu responses. These results suggest that BSF-1 acts on both resting and activated B cells to induce different effects. PMID:3932582

  3. G-protein Stimulatory α Subunit Is Involved in Osteogenic Activity in Osteoblastic Cell Line SaOS-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Miwa; Suzuki, Akira; Ozono, Keiichi; Michigami, Toshimi

    2006-01-01

    In an attempt to study the roles of G-protein stimulatory subunit α (Gsα) in osteoblasts, we introduced an expression vector encoding Gsα into human osteoblastic cell line SaOS-2, and established the clones stably overexpressing Gsα (SaOS-2-Gsα). In SaOS-2-Gsα, the intracellular content of cyclic AMP (cAMP) was increased compared with the parental SaOS-2 cells. In addition, when treated with PTH[1-34], SaOS-2-Gsα exhibited more accumulation of intracellular cAMP compared with the parental cells, suggesting an increased responsiveness to PTH. We evaluated the proliferation rates of SaOS-2-Gsα and the parental SaOS-2 cells, and found that the proliferation was accelerated in SaOS-2-Gsα cells. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses exhibited the increased expression of Runx2, a transcription factor involved in osteoblast differentiation, in SaOS-2-Gsα cells. Finally, to examine the osteoblastic function in vivo, we inoculated SaOS-2-Gsα or parental SaOS-2 cells subcutaneously to immunocompromised nude mice. Although tumors in nude mice were not formed after inoculation of parental SaOS-2 cells, SaOS-2-Gsα cells proliferated in host animals leading to the formation of tumors with mineralized bone-like tissues. Taken together, these results suggest that the signals via Gsα play critical roles in the proliferation and osteogenic functions of osteoblasts. PMID:24790323

  4. Anti-CD4 treatment inhibits autoimmunity in scurfy mice through the attenuation of co-stimulatory signals.

    PubMed

    Mayer, C T; Tian, L; Hesse, C; Kühl, A A; Swallow, M; Kruse, F; Thiele, M; Gershwin, M E; Liston, A; Sparwasser, T

    2014-05-01

    A major concept in autoimmunity is that disruption of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) predisposes to breach of tolerance. This is exemplified by the Foxp3-linked disorder termed IPEX (immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked) which affects newborn children. There has been considerable clinical interest in the role of non-depleting anti-CD4 antibodies as a means of upregulating the function of Foxp3(+) Tregs in order to control detrimental inflammatory responses such as transplant rejection. However, according to the paradigm of a Treg-dependent mechanism of action, the effectiveness of anti-CD4 antibodies as a therapy for human autoimmune diseases is unclear considering that Treg function might be intrinsically impaired. Specifically, anti-CD4 therapy is expected to fail in patients suffering from the IPEX syndrome due to the lack of functional Foxp3(+) Tregs. Taking advantage of natural Foxp3 mutant scurfy (sf) mice closely resembling the IPEX syndrome, and genetically engineered mice depleted of Foxp3(+) Tregs, we report here that anti-CD4 treatment induces tolerance independent of Foxp3(+) Tregs. This so far undefined mechanism is dependent on the recessive non-infectious tolerization of autoreactive T cells. Treg-independent tolerance alone is powerful enough to suppress both the onset and severity of autoimmunity and reduces clinically relevant autoantibody levels and liver fibrosis. Mechanistically, tolerance induction requires the concomitant activation of autoreactive T cells and is associated with the down-regulation of the co-stimulatory TNF-receptor superfamily members OX40 and CD30 sustaining CD4(+) T cell survival. In the light of ongoing clinical trials, our results highlight an unexpected potency of anti-CD4 antibodies for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Particularly, CD4 blockade might represent a novel therapeutic option for the human IPEX syndrome.

  5. G-protein Stimulatory α Subunit Is Involved in Osteogenic Activity in Osteoblastic Cell Line SaOS-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Miwa; Suzuki, Akira; Ozono, Keiichi; Michigami, Toshimi

    2006-01-01

    In an attempt to study the roles of G-protein stimulatory subunit α (Gsα) in osteoblasts, we introduced an expression vector encoding Gsα into human osteoblastic cell line SaOS-2, and established the clones stably overexpressing Gsα (SaOS-2-Gsα). In SaOS-2-Gsα, the intracellular content of cyclic AMP (cAMP) was increased compared with the parental SaOS-2 cells. In addition, when treated with PTH[1-34], SaOS-2-Gsα exhibited more accumulation of intracellular cAMP compared with the parental cells, suggesting an increased responsiveness to PTH. We evaluated the proliferation rates of SaOS-2-Gsα and the parental SaOS-2 cells, and found that the proliferation was accelerated in SaOS-2-Gsα cells. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses exhibited the increased expression of Runx2, a transcription factor involved in osteoblast differentiation, in SaOS-2-Gsα cells. Finally, to examine the osteoblastic function in vivo, we inoculated SaOS-2-Gsα or parental SaOS-2 cells subcutaneously to immunocompromised nude mice. Although tumors in nude mice were not formed after inoculation of parental SaOS-2 cells, SaOS-2-Gsα cells proliferated in host animals leading to the formation of tumors with mineralized bone-like tissues. Taken together, these results suggest that the signals via Gsα play critical roles in the proliferation and osteogenic functions of osteoblasts.

  6. Immune stimulatory CpG oligodeoxynucleotides reduces Salmonella enterica subsp. Arizonae organ colonization and mortality in young turkeys

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) containing CpG dinucleotides (CpG ODN) mimic bacterial DNA and are stimulatory to the innate immune system of most vertebrate species. The immunostimulatory activities of CpG ODN have been studied extensively and are well characterized in human and murine immun...

  7. Role of increased CD8/CD28null T cells and alternative co-stimulatory molecules in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Hodge, G; Mukaro, V; Reynolds, P N; Hodge, S

    2011-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic inflammatory lung disease; it is a leading cause of death and existing treatments have no proven disease-modifying effect. The mechanisms underlying this resistance are largely unknown, but suggest the presence of some self-maintaining pathogenic process, possibly initiated by cigarette smoking, that prevents the normal resolution of inflammation. We have previously reported increased production of proinflammatory cytokines and granzyme b by CD8+ T cells in COPD; costimulatory receptor/ligand interactions required include CD80:86/CD28, B7-1/CTLA4, 4-1BB/1BBL and OX40/OX40L. We hypothesized that a dysregulated expression/function of these molecules may play a role in inflammatory/autoimmune components of COPD. We analysed T cell co-stimulatory molecules in blood from 34 controls, 15 smokers and 48 COPD subjects. We assessed the potential functional relevance of CD8/CD28null cells in COPD by measuring their production of proinflammatory cytokines, co-stimulatory molecules, granzyme and perforin. A smoke-exposed murine model was applied to investigate the relative expression of CD8/CD28null T cells in blood, lung tissue and airway. CD8/CD28null cells were increased in both current- and ex-smoker COPD groups; these cells expressed significantly more interferon (IFN)-γ, OX40, 4-1BB, CTLA4, granzyme and perforin when stimulated than CD8/CD28+ T cells. There were no changes in CD4/CD28null T cells. In mice exposed to cigarette smoke for 12 weeks, CD8/CD28null T cells were significantly increased in the airway with a trend for an increase in lung tissue and blood. Increased production of proinflammatory cytokines and expression of alternative co-stimulatory molecules by CD8/CD28null T cells may play a role in inflammatory or autoimmune responses in COPD and identify therapeutic targets. PMID:21910726

  8. Diamond bio electronics.

    PubMed

    Linares, Robert; Doering, Patrick; Linares, Bryant

    2009-01-01

    The use of diamond for advanced applications has been the dream of mankind for centuries. Until recently this dream has been realized only in the use of diamond for gemstones and abrasive applications where tons of diamonds are used on an annual basis. Diamond is the material system of choice for many applications, but its use has historically been limited due to the small size, high cost, and inconsistent (and typically poor) quality of available diamond materials until recently. The recent development of high quality, single crystal diamond crystal growth via the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process has allowed physcists and increasingly scientists in the life science area to think beyond these limitations and envision how diamond may be used in advanced applications ranging from quantum computing, to power generation and molecular imaging, and eventually even diamond nano-bots. Because of diamond's unique properties as a bio-compatible material, better understanding of diamond's quantum effects and a convergence of mass production, semiconductor-like fabrication process, diamond now promises a unique and powerful key to the realization of the bio-electronic devices being envisioned for the new era of medical science. The combination of robust in-the-body diamond based sensors, coupled with smart bio-functionalized diamond devices may lead to diamond being the platform of choice for bio-electronics. This generation of diamond based bio-electronic devices would contribute substantially to ushering in a paradigm shift for medical science, leading to vastly improved patient diagnosis, decrease of drug development costs and risks, and improved effectiveness of drug delivery and gene therapy programs through better timed and more customized solutions.

  9. Photobiology of Symbiodinium revisited: bio-physical and bio-optical signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennige, S. J.; Suggett, D. J.; Warner, M. E.; McDougall, K. E.; Smith, D. J.

    2009-03-01

    Light is often the most abundant resource within the nutrient-poor waters surrounding coral reefs. Consequently, zooxanthellae ( Symbiodinium spp.) must continually photoacclimate to optimise productivity and ensure coral success. In situ coral photobiology is becoming dominated by routine assessments using state-of-the-art non-invasive bio-optical or chlorophyll a fluorescence (bio-physical) techniques. Multiple genetic types of Symbiodinium are now known to exist; however, little focus has been given as to how these types differ in terms of characteristics that are observable using these techniques. Therefore, this investigation aimed to revisit and expand upon a pivotal study by Iglesias-Prieto and Trench (1994) by comparing the photoacclimation characteristics of different Symbiodinium types based on their bio-physical (chlorophyll a fluorescence, reaction centre counts) and bio-optical (optical absorption, pigment concentrations) ‘signatures’. Signatures described here are unique to Symbiodinium type and describe phenotypic responses to set conditions, and hence are not suitable to describe taxonomic structure of in hospite Symbiodinium communities. In this study, eight Symbiodinium types from clades and sub-clades (A-B, F) were grown under two PFDs (Photon Flux Density) and examined. The photoacclimation response by Symbiodinium was highly variable between algal types for all bio-physical and for many bio-optical measurements; however, a general preference to modifying reaction centre content over effective antennae-absorption was observed. Certain bio-optically derived patterns, such as light absorption, were independent of algal type and, when considered per photosystem, were matched by reaction centre stoichiometry. Only by better understanding genotypic and phenotypic variability between Symbiodinium types can future studies account for the relative taxonomic and physiological contribution by Symbiodinium to coral acclimation.

  10. Valorization of the Vicia faba mucilage on textile wastewater treatment as a bio-flocculant: process development and optimization using response surface methodology (RSM).

    PubMed

    Bouatay, Feriel; Eljebsi, Nesrine; Dridi-Dhaouadi, Sonia; Mhenni, Farouk

    2017-02-01

    The Vicia faba membranes are an abundant and a low cost product. In the present research paper, the extracted Vicia faba mucilage was tested as an eco-friendly flocculant for textile wastewater treatment. Its performance as flocculant, in decolorization, chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal and the concentration of total suspended solids was checked. The natural extracted product was characterized using infrared spectroscopy. The total sugars were determined in the extracted product. The effect study, followed by an optimization and modeling analysis, of some experimental parameters on the coagulation-flocculation performance, using Vicia faba mucilage (as a flocculant), combined with aluminum sulfate (as a coagulant), showed that the best conditions for the flocculation process were pH of the effluent about 7, flocculant dose about 6.75 mg/L, flocculation mixing time about 3 min and flocculation mixing speed about 30 rpm, leading to a decolorization equal to 92.32%, COD removal of about 97.52% and total suspended solids of about 15.3 mg/L. A comparison study between the flocculation performance of commercial reagents and the bio-agent showed that the natural product presented a good flocculation performance.

  11. Bio-microfluidics: biomaterials and biomimetic designs.

    PubMed

    Domachuk, Peter; Tsioris, Konstantinos; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G; Kaplan, David L

    2010-01-12

    Bio-microfluidics applies biomaterials and biologically inspired structural designs (biomimetics) to microfluidic devices. Microfluidics, the techniques for constraining fluids on the micrometer and sub-micrometer scale, offer applications ranging from lab-on-a-chip to optofluidics. Despite this wealth of applications, the design of typical microfluidic devices imparts relatively simple, laminar behavior on fluids and is realized using materials and techniques from silicon planar fabrication. On the other hand, highly complex microfluidic behavior is commonplace in nature, where fluids with nonlinear rheology flow through chaotic vasculature composed from a range of biopolymers. In this Review, the current state of bio-microfluidic materials, designs and applications are examined. Biopolymers enable bio-microfluidic devices with versatile functionalization chemistries, flexibility in fabrication, and biocompatibility in vitro and in vivo. Polymeric materials such as alginate, collagen, chitosan, and silk are being explored as bulk and film materials for bio-microfluidics. Hydrogels offer options for mechanically functional devices for microfluidic systems such as self-regulating valves, microlens arrays and drug release systems, vital for integrated bio-microfluidic devices. These devices including growth factor gradients to study cell responses, blood analysis, biomimetic capillary designs, and blood vessel tissue culture systems, as some recent examples of inroads in the field that should lead the way in a new generation of microfluidic devices for bio-related needs and applications. Perhaps one of the most intriguing directions for the future will be fully implantable microfluidic devices that will also integrate with existing vasculature and slowly degrade to fully recapitulate native tissue structure and function, yet serve critical interim functions, such as tissue maintenance, drug release, mechanical support, and cell delivery.

  12. Stimulatory effect of lymphocytes from Chagas' patients on spontaneously beating rat atria.

    PubMed Central

    de Bracco, M M; Sterin-Borda, L; Fink, S; Finiasz, M; Borda, E

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of lymphocytes from individuals infected with Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas' patients) on the contractile behaviour of living heart tissue. Chagas' lymphocytes (ChL) reacted with isolated rat atria preparations increasing the isometric development tension (IDT) and frequency of contractions (FC) in a dose-dependent manner. The maximal stimulatory effect was reached after 30-40 min of contract. In contrast, normal lymphocytes (NL) did not alter the basal IDT and FC values. beta-adrenergic antagonists, anti-histamine agents and inhibitors of the synthesis and action of arachidonic acid (AA) products were used to study the mechanisms of the reaction. (-)-propranolol (10(-7)M) and pyrilamine (10(-6)M) had no effect ruling out the participation of beta-adrenergic agonists or histamine. However, indomethacin (10(-6)M) and acetylsalicylic acid (1.8 X 10(-4)M) enhanced the effect of ChL. Inhibitors of the lipoxygenase pathway (5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid, 10(-7)M; nordihydroguairetic acid, 10(-5)M) and FPL55712, an antagonist of one of its terminal products: the slow reacting substance of anaphilaxis (SRS-A), abolished the reaction. Therefore, a fundamental role for SRS-A in the production of the stimulatory effect is postulated. Lymphocytes of the T cell lineage (E rosette forming cells, ERFC) are the effector cells involved in this reaction, whereas non-rosetting ChL depressed IDT. T ascertain if effector cells could be replaced by soluble factors, ChL were reacted with homogenates of rat atria and the cell free supernatants were added to beating rat atria. Positive ino- and chronotropic effects were obtained, indicating that soluble factors generated during the reaction can substitute for the intact effector cells. On the other hand if the effector cells were purified from Chagas' patients that had been treated 1 month to 6 years before the assay with trypanocidal drugs (3-methyl-4-(5'-nitrofurfurylidene-amino)-tetrahydro-4H

  13. TCR stimulation without co-stimulatory signals induces expression of "tolerogenic" genes in memory CD4 T cells but does not compromise cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Aini; Zheng, Xiong; Khattar, Mithun; Schroder, Paul; Stepkowski, Stanislaw; Xia, Jiahong; Chen, Wenhao

    2015-02-01

    Memory T cells resist co-stimulatory blockade and present a unique therapeutic challenge in transplantation and autoimmune diseases. Herein, we determined whether memory T cells express less "tolerogenic" genes than naïve T cells to reinforce a proliferative response under the deprivation of co-stimulatory signals. The expression of ∼40 tolerogenic genes in memory and naïve CD4(+) T cells was thus assessed during an in vitro TCR stimulation without co-stimulation. Briefly, upon TCR stimulation with an anti-CD3 mAb alone, memory CD4(+) T cells exhibited more proliferation than naïve CD4(+) T cells. To our surprise, at 24h upon anti-CD3 mAb stimulation, memory CD4(+) T cells expressed more than a 5-fold higher level of the transcription factor Egr2 and a 20-fold higher level of the transmembrane E3 ubiquitin ligase GRAIL than those in naïve T cells. Hence, the high-level expression of tolerogenic genes, Egr2 and GRAIL, in memory CD4(+) T cells does not prevent cell proliferation. Importantly, anti-CD3 mAb-stimulated memory CD4(+) T cells expressed high protein/gene levels of phosphorylated STAT5, Nedd4, Bcl-2, and Bcl-XL. Therefore, co-stimulation-independent proliferation of memory CD4(+) T cells may be due to elevated expression of molecules that support cell proliferation and survival, but not lack of tolerogenic molecules. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Important role of phosphodiesterase 3B for the stimulatory action of cAMP on pancreatic beta-cell exocytosis and release of insulin.

    PubMed

    Härndahl, Linda; Jing, Xing-Jun; Ivarsson, Rosita; Degerman, Eva; Ahrén, Bo; Manganiello, Vincent C; Renström, Erik; Holst, Lena Stenson

    2002-10-04

    Cyclic AMP potentiates glucose-stimulated insulin release and mediates the stimulatory effects of hormones such as glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) on pancreatic beta-cells. By inhibition of cAMP-degrading phosphodiesterase (PDE) and, in particular, selective inhibition of PDE3 activity, stimulatory effects on insulin secretion have been observed. Molecular and functional information on beta-cell PDE3 is, however, scarce. To provide such information, we have studied the specific effects of the PDE3B isoform by adenovirus-mediated overexpression. In rat islets and rat insulinoma cells, approximate 10-fold overexpression of PDE3B was accompanied by a 6-8-fold increase in membrane-associated PDE3B activity. The cAMP concentration was significantly lowered in transduced cells (INS-1(832/13)), and insulin secretion in response to stimulation with high glucose (11.1 mm) was reduced by 40% (islets) and 50% (INS-1). Further, the ability of GLP-1 (100 nm) to augment glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was inhibited by approximately 30% (islets) and 70% (INS-1). Accordingly, when stimulating with cAMP, a substantial decrease (65%) in exocytotic capacity was demonstrated in patch-clamped single beta-cells. In untransduced insulinoma cells, application of the PDE3-selective inhibitor OPC3911 (10 microm) was shown to increase glucose-stimulated insulin release as well as cAMP-enhanced exocytosis. The findings suggest a significant role of PDE3B as an important regulator of insulin secretory processes.

  15. Project BioShield

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-10

    to Congress. Expedited Peer Review . The Project BioShield Act of 2004 authorizes the HHS Secretary to use an expedited award process, rather than the...normal peer review process, for grants, contracts, and cooperative agreements related to biomedical countermeasure R&D activity, if the Secretary... peer review process will reduce the quality of the research.6 Peer review is designed to maximize the chances that only proposals with the greatest

  16. Project BioShield

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-27

    Expedited Peer Review . The Project BioShield Act of 2004 authorizes the HHS Secretary to use an expedited award process, rather than the normal peer ...such awards, or to many, will depend on what needs the Secretary deems pressing. Some scientists have expressed concerns that an expedited peer review process...will reduce the quality of the research.6 Peer review is designed to maximize the chances that only proposals with the greatest scientific

  17. BioReactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrosiano, John; Roberts, Randy; Cleland, Tim; Gray, Perry

    2003-04-18

    BioReactor is a simulation tool kit for modeling networks of coupled chemical processes (or similar productions rules). The tool kit is implemented in C++ and has the following functionality: 1. Monte Carlo discrete event simulator 2. Solvers for ordinary differential equations 3. Genetic algorithm optimization routines for reverse engineering of models using either Monte Carlo or ODE representation )i.e., 1 or 2)

  18. Retractile processes in T lymphocyte orientation on a stimulatory substrate: morphology and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipov, Sergey N.; Maly, Ivan V.

    2008-03-01

    T cells of the immune system target infected and tumor cells in crowded tissues with high precision by coming into direct contact with the intended target and orienting the intracellular Golgi apparatus and the associated organelles to the area of the cell-cell contact. The mechanism of this orientation remains largely unknown. To further elucidate it we used three-dimensional microscopy of living T cells presented with an artificial substrate mimicking the target cell surface. The data indicate that long, finger-like processes emanate from the T cell surface next to the intracellular Golgi apparatus. These processes come in contact with the substrate and retract. The retraction accompanies the reorientation of the T cell body which brings the Golgi apparatus closer to the stimulatory substrate. Numerical modeling indicates that considering the forces involved the retraction of a process attached with one end to the cell body near the Golgi apparatus and with the other end to the substrate can bring the Golgi apparatus to the substrate by moving the entire cell body. The dynamic scenarios that are predicted by the quantitative model explain features of the reorientation movements that we measured but could not explain previously. We propose that retraction of the surface processes is a force-generating mechanism contributing to the functional orientation of T lymphocytes.

  19. A stimulatory role for the La-related protein 4B in translation

    PubMed Central

    Schäffler, Katrin; Schulz, Kristina; Hirmer, Anja; Wiesner, Julia; Grimm, Michael; Sickmann, Albert; Fischer, Utz

    2010-01-01

    La-related proteins (LARPs) belong to an evolutionarily conserved family of factors with predicted roles in RNA metabolism. Here, we have analyzed the cellular interactions and function of LARP4B, a thus far uncharacterized member of the LARP family. We show that LARP4B is a cytosolic protein that accumulates upon arsenite treatment in cellular stress granules. Biochemical experiments further uncovered an interaction of LARP4B with the cytosolic poly(A) binding protein 1 (PABPC1) and the receptor for activated C Kinase (RACK1), a component of the 40S ribosomal subunit. Under physiological conditions, LARP4B co-sedimented with polysomes in cellular extracts, suggesting a role in translation. In agreement with this notion, overexpression of LARP4B stimulated protein synthesis, whereas knockdown of the factor by RNA interference impaired translation of a large number of cellular mRNAs. In sum, we identified LARP4B as a stimulatory factor of translation. We speculate that LARP4B exerts its function by bridging mRNA factors of the 3′ end with initiating ribosomes. PMID:20573744

  20. A stimulatory role for the La-related protein 4B in translation.

    PubMed

    Schäffler, Katrin; Schulz, Kristina; Hirmer, Anja; Wiesner, Julia; Grimm, Michael; Sickmann, Albert; Fischer, Utz

    2010-08-01

    La-related proteins (LARPs) belong to an evolutionarily conserved family of factors with predicted roles in RNA metabolism. Here, we have analyzed the cellular interactions and function of LARP4B, a thus far uncharacterized member of the LARP family. We show that LARP4B is a cytosolic protein that accumulates upon arsenite treatment in cellular stress granules. Biochemical experiments further uncovered an interaction of LARP4B with the cytosolic poly(A) binding protein 1 (PABPC1) and the receptor for activated C Kinase (RACK1), a component of the 40S ribosomal subunit. Under physiological conditions, LARP4B co-sedimented with polysomes in cellular extracts, suggesting a role in translation. In agreement with this notion, overexpression of LARP4B stimulated protein synthesis, whereas knockdown of the factor by RNA interference impaired translation of a large number of cellular mRNAs. In sum, we identified LARP4B as a stimulatory factor of translation. We speculate that LARP4B exerts its function by bridging mRNA factors of the 3' end with initiating ribosomes.

  1. Stimulatory Effects of Arsenic-Tolerant Soil Fungi on Plant Growth Promotion and Soil Properties

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Pankaj Kumar; Shenoy, Belle Damodara; Gupta, Manjul; Vaish, Aradhana; Mannan, Shivee; Singh, Nandita; Tewari, Shri Krishna; Tripathi, Rudra Deo

    2012-01-01

    Fifteen fungi were obtained from arsenic-contaminated agricultural fields in West Bengal, India and examined for their arsenic tolerance and removal ability in our previous study. Of these, the four best arsenic-remediating isolates were tested for plant growth promotion effects on rice and pea in the present study. A greenhouse-based pot experiment was conducted using soil inocula of individual fungi. The results indicated a significant (P<0.05) increase in plant growth and improvement of soil properties in inoculated soils compared to the control. A significant increase in plant growth was recorded in treated soils and varied from 16–293%. Soil chemical and enzymatic properties varied from 20–222% and 34–760%, respectively, in inoculated soil. Plants inoculated with inocula of Westerdykella and Trichoderma showed better stimulatory effects on plant growth and soil nutrient availability than Rhizopus and Lasiodiplodia. These fungi improved soil nutrient content and enhanced plant growth. These fungi may be used as bioinoculants for plant growth promotion and improved soil properties in arsenic-contaminated agricultural soils. PMID:23047145

  2. Upstream stimulatory factor regulates expression of the cell cycle-dependent cyclin B1 gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Cogswell, J P; Godlevski, M M; Bonham, M; Bisi, J; Babiss, L

    1995-01-01

    Progression through the somatic cell cycle requires the temporal regulation of cyclin gene expression and cyclin protein turnover. One of the best-characterized examples of this regulation is seen for the B-type cyclins. These cyclins and their catalytic component, cdc2, have been shown to mediate both the entry into and maintenance of mitosis. The cyclin B1 gene has been shown to be expressed between the late S and G2 phases of the cell cycle, while the protein is degraded specifically at interphase via ubiquitination. To understand the molecular basis for transcriptional regulation of the cyclin B1 gene, we cloned the human cyclin B1 gene promoter region. Using a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter system and both stable and transient assays, we have shown that the cyclin B1 gene promoter (extending to -3800 bp relative to the cap site) can confer G2-enhanced promoter activity. Further analysis revealed that an upstream stimulatory factor (USF)-binding site and its cognate transcription factor(s) are critical for expression from the cyclin B1 promoter in cycling HeLa cells. Interestingly, USF DNA-binding activity appears to be regulated in a G2-specific fashion, supporting the idea that USF may play some role in cyclin B1 gene activation. These studies suggest an important link between USF and the cyclin B1 gene, which in part explains how maturation promoting factor complex formation is regulated. PMID:7739559

  3. 2-bromopalmitate inhibition of stimulatory effect on LH in isolated luteal cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, C H; Robinson, J

    1982-04-05

    The effect of 2-bromopalmitate, an inhibitor of fatty acids oxidation, on progesterone synthesis in isolated luteal cells was studied. Incubation of the cells with increasing concentrations (0 - 2 mM) of the inhibitor resulted in an initial enhancement of progesterone synthesis, both in the presence and absence of LH (1 microgram/ml). In the LH-treated cells, this stimulation in steroid synthesis becomes markedly impaired at 2 mM 2-bromopalmitate. In the control cells, however, progesterone synthesis was sustained at the elevated level. At high concentrations of 2-bromopalmitate, the stimulatory effect of LH (relative to the controls) on steroidogenesis was progressively diminished, until it was completely abolished at an inhibitor concentration of 2 mM. The oxidation of labelled palmitic acid by luteal cells was also effectively inhibited by 2-bromopalmitate (1 mM). The results indicate that the steroidogenic effect of LH is mediated, in part, by fatty acid oxidation, and were explained in terms of the interaction between carbohydrate and fatty acid oxidation in supporting ovarian steroidogenesis.

  4. UV irradiation affects melanocyte stimulatory activity and protein binding of piperine.

    PubMed

    Soumyanath, Amala; Venkatasamy, Radhakrishnan; Joshi, Meghna; Faas, Laura; Adejuyigbe, Bimpe; Drake, Alex F; Hider, Robert C; Young, Antony R

    2006-01-01

    Piperine, the major alkaloid of black pepper (Piper nigrum L.; Piperaceae), stimulates melanocyte proliferation and dendrite formation in vitro. This property renders it a potential treatment for the skin depigmentation disorder vitiligo. However, piperine does not stimulate melanin synthesis in vitro, and treatments based on this compound may therefore be more effective with concomitant exposure of the skin to ultraviolet (UV) radiation or sunlight. The present study investigated the effect of UVA and simulated solar radiation (SSR) on the chemical stability of piperine, its melanocyte stimulatory effects and its ability to bind protein and DNA. Chromatographic and spectroscopic analysis confirmed the anticipated photoisomerization of irradiated piperine and showed the absence of any hydrolysis to piperinic acid. Isomerization resulted in the loss of ability to stimulate proliferation of a mouse melanocyte cell line, and to bind to human serum albumin. There was no evidence of DNA binding by piperine either before or after irradiation, showing the absence of photoadduct formation by either piperine or its geometric isomers. This is unlike the situation with psoralens, which form DNA adducts when administered with UVA in treating skin diseases. The present study suggests that exposure to bright sunlight should be avoided both during active application of piperine to the skin and in the storage of piperine products. If UVA radiation is used with piperine in the treatment of vitiligo, application of the compound and irradiation should be staggered to minimize photoisomerization. This approach is shown to effectively induce pigmentation in a sparsely pigmented mouse strain.

  5. Stimulatory effect of apigenin-6-C-beta-L-fucopyranoside on insulin secretion and glycogen synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cazarolli, Luisa Helena; Folador, Poliane; Moresco, Henrique Hunger; Brighente, Inês Maria Costa; Pizzolatti, Moacir Geraldo; Silva, Fátima Regina M Barreto

    2009-11-01

    In vivo and in vitro treatments were carried out to investigate the effects of apigenin-6-C-beta-L-fucopyranoside (1), isolated from Averrhoa carambola L. (Oxalidaceae), on serum glucose and insulin levels in hyperglycemic rats as well as its effect on glycogen synthesis in normal rat soleus muscle. Apigenin-6-C-beta-L-fucopyranoside showed an acute effect on blood glucose lowering in hyperglycemic rats and stimulated glucose-induced insulin secretion. A stimulatory effect of 1 on glycogen synthesis was observed when muscles were incubated with this flavonoid and also its effect was completely nullified by pre-treatment with insulin signal transduction inhibitors. Taking this into account, the MAPK-PP1 and PI3K-GSK3 pathways are involved in the apigenin-6-C-beta-L-fucopyranoside-induced increase in glycogen synthesis in muscle. This study provides evidence for dual effects of apigenin-6-C-beta-L-fucopyranoside as an antihyperglycemic (insulin secretion) as well as an insulinomimetic (glycogen synthesis) agent.

  6. Stimulatory effect and adsorption behavior of rhamnolipids on lignocelluloses degradation system.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jinju; Zhang, Shudong; Qiu, Zhen; Han, Hui; Zhang, Qiuzhuo

    2017-01-01

    Di-rhamnolipid and mixed rhamnolipid were added to rice straw degrading system to investigate their mechanism of stimulatory effect. By batch adsorption experiments, it was shown that the equilibrium adsorption time of rhamnolipids on rice straw single system was the shortest (50min). The adsorption capacity of Trichoderma reesei single system was the strongest, whose Qe,exp for di-rhamnolipid and mixed rhamnolipid was 10.57×10(-2)mg·g(-1) and 8.13×10(-2)mg·g(-1), respectively. The adsorption of rhamnolipids on consortia system was not the simple adduct of the two single systems. The adsorption of rhamnolipids on the three different systems might belong to chemisorptions. SEM and FTIR analyses were used to observe the morphology and to analyze the chemical functions in lignocellulosic biomass degradation with rhamnolipid. It was shown that after addition of rhamnolipids, the basic tissue in rice straw was severely destroyed and hydrogen bond was formed between biosurfactant and bacteria in lignocellulose degrading system.

  7. Israel Marine Bio-geographic Database (ISRAMAR-BIO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greengrass, Eyal; Krivenko, Yevgeniya; Ozer, Tal; Ben Yosef, Dafna; Tom, Moshe; Gertman, Isaac

    2015-04-01

    The knowledge of the space/time variations of species is the basis for any ecological investigations. While historical observations containing integral concentrations of biological parameters (chlorophyll, abundance, biomass…) are organized partly in ISRAMAR Cast Database, the taxon-specific data collected in Israel has not been sufficiently organized. This has been hindered by the lack of standards, variability of methods and complexity of biological data formalization. The ISRAMAR-BIO DB was developed to store various types of historical and future available information related to marine species observations and related metadata. Currently the DB allows to store biological data acquired by the following sampling devices such as: van veer grab, box corer, sampling bottles, nets (plankton, trawls and fish), quadrates, and cameras. The DB's logical unit is information regarding a specimen (taxa name, barcode, image), related attributes (abundance, size, age, contaminants…), habitat description, sampling device and method, time and space of sampling, responsible organization and scientist, source of information (cruise, project and publication). The following standardization of specimen and attributes naming were implemented: Taxonomy according to World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS: http://www.marinespecies.org). Habitat description according to Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standards (CMECS: http://www.cmecscatalog.org) Parameter name; Unit; Device name; Developmental stage; Institution name; Country name; Marine region according to SeaDataNet Vocabularies (http://www.seadatanet.org/Standards-Software/Common-Vocabularies). This system supports two types of data submission procedures, which support the above stated data structure. The first is a downloadable excel file with drop-down fields based on the ISRAMAR-BIO vocabularies. The file is filled and uploaded online by the data contributor. Alternatively, the same dataset can be assembled by

  8. Physical and Bio-Optical Processes in the Gulf of Mexico -- Linking Real-Time Circulation Models and Satellite Bio-Optical and SST Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-09

    Ocean circulation is shown to influence the bio -optical properties in open and coastal waters in the Gulf of Mexico. 3-dimensional physical ocean...supportive evidence of the degree which physical processes influence bio -optical processes in the surface ocean. NCOM assimilates daily SST along with...provide daily real-time observations. We demonstrate the response of the Mississippi River plume (observed through bio -optical signatures), to coastal

  9. Bio-Terrorism Threat and Casualty Prevention

    SciTech Connect

    NOEL,WILLIAM P.

    2000-01-01

    The bio-terrorism threat has become the ''poor man's'' nuclear weapon. The ease of manufacture and dissemination has allowed an organization with only rudimentary skills and equipment to pose a significant threat with high consequences. This report will analyze some of the most likely agents that would be used, the ease of manufacture, the ease of dissemination and what characteristics of the public health response that are particularly important to the successful characterization of a high consequence event to prevent excessive causalities.

  10. Stimulatory and Inhibitory Killer Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor Molecules are Expressed and Functional on Lupus T Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Dhiman; Liu, Ying; Wu, Ailing; Yarlagadda, Sushma; Gorelik, Gabriela J.; Kaplan, Mariana J.; Hewagama, Anura; Hinderer, Robert C.; Strickland, Faith M.; Richardson, Bruce C.

    2009-01-01

    T cells from lupus patients have hypomethylated DNA and overexpress genes normally suppressed by DNA methylation that contribute to disease pathogenesis. We found that stimulatory and inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin–like receptor (KIR3) genes are aberrantly overexpressed on experimentally demethylated T cells. We therefore asked if lupus T cells also overexpress KIR, and if the proteins are functional. T cells from lupus patients were found to overexpress KIR genes, and expression was proportional to disease activity. Antibodies to the stimulatory molecule KIR2DL4 triggered IFN-γ release by lupus T cells, and production was proportional to disease activity. Similarly, crosslinking the inhibitory molecule KIR3DL1 prevented the autoreactive macrophage killing that characterizes lupus T cells. These results indicate that aberrant T cell KIR expression may contribute to IFN overproduction and macrophage killing in human lupus, and suggest that antibodies to inhibitory KIR may be a treatment for this disease. PMID:19675166

  11. Stimulatory and inhibitory killer Ig-like receptor molecules are expressed and functional on lupus T cells.

    PubMed

    Basu, Dhiman; Liu, Ying; Wu, Ailing; Yarlagadda, Sushma; Gorelik, Gabriela J; Kaplan, Mariana J; Hewagama, Anura; Hinderer, Robert C; Strickland, Faith M; Richardson, Bruce C

    2009-09-01

    T cells from lupus patients have hypomethylated DNA and overexpress genes normally suppressed by DNA methylation that contribute to disease pathogenesis. We found that stimulatory and inhibitory killer cell Ig-like receptor (KIR) genes are aberrantly overexpressed on experimentally demethylated T cells. We therefore asked if lupus T cells also overexpress KIR, and if the proteins are functional. T cells from lupus patients were found to overexpress KIR genes, and expression was proportional to disease activity. Abs to the stimulatory molecule KIR2DL4 triggered IFN-gamma release by lupus T cells, and production was proportional to disease activity. Similarly, cross-linking the inhibitory molecule KIR3DL1 prevented the autoreactive macrophage killing that characterizes lupus T cells. These results indicate that aberrant T cell KIR expression may contribute to IFN overproduction and macrophage killing in human lupus, and they suggest that Abs to inhibitory KIR may be a treatment for this disease.

  12. BioSig-Air-Force

    SciTech Connect

    2011-07-15

    1) Configured servers: In coordination with the INSIGHT team, a hardware configuration was selected. Two nodes were purchased, configured, and shipped with compatible OS and database installation. The servers have been stress tested for reliability as they use leading edge technologies. Each node has two CPUs and 12 cores per CPU with maximum onboard memory for high performance. 2) LIM and Experimental module: The original BioSig system was developed for cancer research. Accordingly, the LIM system its corresponding web pages are being modified to facilitate (i) pathogene-donor interactions, (ii) media composition, (iii) chemical and siRNA plate configurations. The LIM system has been redesigned. The revised system allows design of new media and tracking it from lot-to-lot so that variations in the phenotypic responses can be tracked to a specific media and lot number. Similar associations are also possible with other experimental factors (e.g., donor-pathoge, siRNA, and chemical). Furthermore, the design of the experimental variables has also been revised to (i) interact with the newly developed LIM system, (ii) simplify experimental specifications, and (iii) test for potential operator's error during the data entry. Part of the complication has been due to the handshake between multiple teams that provide the small molecule plates and the team that creates assay plates. Our efforts have focused to harmonize these interactions (e.g., various data formats) so that each assay plate can be mapped to its source so that a correct set of experimental variables can be associated with each image. For example, depending upon the source of the chemical plates, they may have different formats. We have developed a canonical representation that registers SMILES code, for each chemical compound, along with its physiochemical properties. The schema for LIM conjunction with customized Web pages. 3) Import of Images and computed descriptors module: In coordination with the INSIGHT

  13. Immune-Stimulatory Effects of Althaea rosea Flower Extracts through the MAPK Signaling Pathway in RAW264.7 Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yon-Suk; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Nawarathna, Weligala Pahalagedara Amila Srilal; Dong, Xin; Shin, Woen-Bin; Park, Jin-Su; Moon, Sang-Ho; Park, Pyo-Jam

    2017-04-25

    Althaea rosea (Linn.) is a medicinal plant from China and Korea that has been traditionally used to control inflammation, to stop bedwetting and as a mouthwash in cases of bleeding gums. Its flowers are employed medicinally for their emollient, demulcent and diuretic properties, which make them useful in chest complaints. Furthermore, a flower extract decoction is used to improve blood circulation, for the treatment of constipation, dysmenorrhoea, haemorrhages, etc. However, the possible mechanisms of the immune-stimulatory effect remains to be elucidated. Therefore, we investigated the role of Althaea rosea flower (ARF) extracts in the immune-stimulatory effect of macrophages and the underlying mechanisms of action. ARF water extract (ARFW) could dose-dependently increase NO production and cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-α). We also found that ARFW significantly increased the expression of iNOS and COX-2 proteins in RAW264.7 cells. Consistent with these results, MAPK protein (JNK, ERK, p38) expression levels were induced after treatment with ARFW. Additionally, ARFW showed a marked increase in the phosphorylation level of IκBα and subsequent IκBα degradation allowing NF-κB nuclear translocation. These results suggest that the immune-stimulatory effect of A. rosea flower extracts is mediated through the translocation of NF-κB p65 subunit into the nucleus from the cytoplasm and subsequent activation of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-α) and other mediators (iNOS and COX-2), which occurs mainly through MAPK signalling pathway. Thus, we suggest that ARFW could be considered as a potential therapeutic agent useful in the development of immune-stimulatory compounds.

  14. Heterotrimeric G Stimulatory Protein α Subunit Is Required for Intestinal Smooth Muscle Contraction in Mice.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaoteng; Liu, Shangming; Lu, Qiulun; Zhang, Meng; Jiang, Xiuxin; Hu, Sanyuan; Li, Jingxin; Zhang, Cheng; Gao, Jiangang; Zhu, Min-Sheng; Feil, Robert; Li, Huashun; Chen, Min; Weinstein, Lee S; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Wencheng

    2017-04-01

    The α subunit of the heterotrimeric G stimulatory protein (Gsa), encoded by the guanine nucleotide binding protein, α-stimulating gene (Gnas, in mice), is expressed ubiquitously and mediates receptor-stimulated production of cyclic adenosine monophosphate and activation of the protein kinase A signaling pathway. We investigated the roles of Gsa in vivo in smooth muscle cells of mice. We performed studies of mice with Cre recombinase-mediated disruption of Gnas in smooth muscle cells (Gsa(SMKO) and SM22-CreER(T2), induced in adult mice by tamoxifen). Intestinal tissues were collected for histologic, biochemical, molecular, cell biology, and physiology analyses. Intestinal function was assessed in mice using the whole-gut transit time test. We compared gene expression patterns of intestinal smooth muscle from mice with vs without disruption of Gnas. Biopsy specimens from ileum of patients with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction and age-matched control biopsies were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Disruption of Gnas in smooth muscle of mice reduced intestinal motility and led to death within 4 weeks. Tamoxifen-induced disruption of Gnas in adult mice impaired contraction of intestinal smooth muscle and peristalsis. More than 80% of these died within 3 months of tamoxifen exposure, with features of intestinal pseudo-obstruction characterized by chronic intestinal dilation and dysmotility. Gsa deficiency reduced intestinal levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate and transcriptional activity of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein 1 (CREB1); this resulted in decreased expression of the forkhead box F1 gene (Foxf1) and protein, and contractile proteins, such as myosin heavy chain 11; actin, α2, smooth muscle, aorta; calponin 1; and myosin light chain kinase. We found decreased levels of Gsa, FOXF1, CREB1, and phosphorylated CREB1 proteins in intestinal muscle layers of patients with chronic intestinal pseudo

  15. Clinical application of bio ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anu, Sharma; Gayatri, Sharma

    2016-05-01

    Ceramics are the inorganic crystalline material. These are used in various field such as biomedical, electrical, electronics, aerospace, automotive and optical etc. Bio ceramics are the one of the most active areas of research. Bio ceramics are the ceramics which are biocompatible. The unique properties of bio ceramics make them an attractive option for medical applications and offer some potential advantages over other materials. During the past three decades, a number of major advances have been made in the field of bio ceramics. This review focuses on the use of these materials in variety of clinical scenarios.

  16. Clinical application of bio ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Anu, Sharma Gayatri, Sharma

    2016-05-06

    Ceramics are the inorganic crystalline material. These are used in various field such as biomedical, electrical, electronics, aerospace, automotive and optical etc. Bio ceramics are the one of the most active areas of research. Bio ceramics are the ceramics which are biocompatible. The unique properties of bio ceramics make them an attractive option for medical applications and offer some potential advantages over other materials. During the past three decades, a number of major advances have been made in the field of bio ceramics. This review focuses on the use of these materials in variety of clinical scenarios.

  17. Selaginellin and biflavonoids as protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors from Selaginella tamariscina and their glucose uptake stimulatory effects.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phi-Hung; Ji, Da-Jung; Han, Yu-Ran; Choi, Jae-Sue; Rhyu, Dong-Young; Min, Byung-Sun; Woo, Mi-Hee

    2015-07-01

    As part of an ongoing search for new antidiabetic agents from medicinal plants, the methanol extract of the aerial parts of Selaginella tamariscina was found to possess stimulatory effect on glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocyte cells. Thus, bioassay-guided isolation of this active extract yielded two new compounds (1 and 2) along with five known biflavonoids (3-7). Their structures were elucidated by extensive analysis of spectroscopic and physicochemical data. The absolute configuration of compound 2 was determined by specific rotation and CD data analysis. All isolates exhibited potent inhibitory effects on PTP1B enzyme with IC50 values ranging from 4.5±0.1 to 13.2±0.8μM. Furthermore, the isolates (1-7) showed significant stimulatory effects on 2-NBDG uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocyte cells. Of these, compounds (1, 6, and 7) which exhibited mixed-competitive inhibition modes against PTP1B, showed potent stimulatory effects on 2-NBDG uptake. This result indicated the potential of these biflavonoids as lead molecules for development of antidiabetic agents and the beneficial use of S. tamariscina against hyperglycemia.

  18. The stimulatory effect of the TLR4-mediated adjuvant glucopyranosyl lipid A is well preserved in old age.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, Birgit; Joos, Clemens; Reed, Steven G; Coler, Rhea; Grubeck-Loebenstein, Beatrix

    2016-02-01

    Many subunit vaccines require adjuvants to improve their limited immunogenicity. Various adjuvant candidates targeting toll-like receptors (TLRs) are currently under development including the synthetic TLR4 agonist glucopyranosyl lipid A (GLA). GLA has been investigated in the context of influenza vaccine, which is of particular importance for the elderly population. This study investigates the effect of GLA on antigen-presenting cells from young (median age 29 years, range 26-33 years) and older (median age 72 years, range 61-78 years) adults. Treatment with GLA efficiently increases the expression of co-stimulatory molecules on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) as well as on ex vivo myeloid DC. Expression of co-stimulatory molecules is less pronounced on ex vivo monocytes. Production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α, IL-12) as well as of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 is induced in monocyte-derived DC. In PBMC cultures myeloid DC and to an even greater extent monocytes produce TNF-α and IL-6 after stimulation with GLA. Production of IL-12 can also be observed in these cultures. There are no age-related differences in the capacity of GLA to induce expression of co-stimulatory molecules or production of cytokines by human antigen-presenting cells. Therefore, TLR4 agonists like GLA are particularly promising candidates as adjuvants of vaccines designed for elderly individuals.

  19. Stimulatory Agents Simultaneously Improving the Production and Antioxidant Activity of Polyphenols from Inonotus obliquus by Submerged Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiangqun; Shen, Mengwei; Quan, Lili

    2015-07-01

    Polyphenols are important secondary metabolites from the edible and medicinal mushroom Inonotus obliquus. Both the rarity of I. obliquus fruit body and the low efficiency of current method of submerged fermentation lead to a low yield of polyphenols. This study was aimed to determine the effect of applying stimulatory agents to liquid cultured I. obliquus on the simultaneous accumulation of exo-polyphenols (EPC) and endo-polyphenols (IPC). Linoleic acid was the most effective out of the 17 tested stimulatory agents, the majority of which increased the EPC and IPC production. The result was totally different from the stimulatory effect of Tween 80 for polysaccharide production in previous studies. The addition of 1.0 g/L linoleic acid on day 0 resulted in 7-, 14-, and 10-fold of increase (p < 0.05) in the production of EPC extracted by ethyl acetate (EA-EPC), EPC extracted by n-butyl alcohol (NB-EPC), and IPC, and significantly increased the production of ferulic acid, gallic acid, epicatechin-3-gallate (ECG), epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), phelligridin G, inoscavin B, and davallialactone. The EA-EPC, BA-EPC, and IPC from the linoleic acid-containing medium had significantly (p < 0.05) stronger scavenging activity against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radicals (DPPH), which was attributed to the higher content of these bioactive polyphenols.

  20. Ghrelin alters the stimulatory effect of cocaine on ethanol intake following mesolimbic or systemic administration.

    PubMed

    Cepko, Leah C S; Selva, Joaquín A; Merfeld, Emily B; Fimmel, Anna I; Goldberg, Sana A; Currie, Paul J

    2014-10-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that ghrelinergic and dopaminergic signaling interact in the neural control of motivation and ethanol reward. To further investigate a possible interaction between these two neurochemical systems, we examined the impact of ghrelin, cocaine and combined injections of ghrelin with cocaine, on voluntary ethanol intake. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were habituated to an 8% ethanol solution until intakes stabilized. Rats were then injected with ghrelin (2.5-10 nmol IP), cocaine (0.625-10 mg/kg IP) or ghrelin paired with cocaine. We also examined the impact of direct ghrelin (30-300 pmol) injections into the ventral tegmental area (VTA) co-administered with systemic cocaine. Ethanol consumption was measured at 2 and 6 h postinjection. While ghrelin and cocaine reliably increased ethanol intake, peripheral administration of the peptide elicited a dose-dependent differential effect on cocaine-induced intake. Pretreatment with ghrelin potentiated the effect of cocaine on ethanol intake at a low dose of 2.5 nmol, whereas 10 nmol suppressed cocaine-induced ethanol intake. This same 10 nmol dose was found to induce anxiogenic behavior as measured using an elevated plus maze paradigm. Finally, when injected directly into the VTA, ghrelin (300 pmol) potentiated the effect of systemic cocaine on ethanol intake. Combined subthreshold dosing of VTA ghrelin with a subthreshold dose of cocaine also evoked reliable increases in intake compared to vehicle. Overall, our data suggest that low doses of ghrelin elicit a stimulatory effect on cocaine-induced ethanol consummatory behavior and provide further support for an interactive role of dopaminergic and ghrelinergic transmission in ethanol reward. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Stimulatory and persistent effect of acute hyperoxia on respiratory gas exchange of the chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Stock, M K; Asson-Batres, M A; Metcalfe, J

    1985-11-01

    The hypothesis that oxygen availability limits growth of the normal chick embryo late in development predicts that an increase in oxygen availability would accelerate the rate of growth and, therefore, metabolism. We tested the prediction concerning metabolism by comparing the oxygen consumption (VO2) and carbon dioxide production (VCO2) of 14-18 day embryos acutely exposed to either 50% or 100% O2 with those of normoxic (21% O2) controls. Two hours of hyperoxia produced increases in both VO2 and VCO2; however, repeated measurements over time in normoxia also demonstrated a significant increase in gas exchange, presumably due to normal growth of the embryos. After correcting for the increase in VO2 due to growth, there was no effect of 60% O2 on day 14. Thereafter the stimulatory effect of 60% O2 increased gradually, reaching 6.1% on day 18. VCO2 was 4 to 6% higher in embryos acutely exposed to 60% O2 than in normoxic controls throughout the observation period, although the difference was significant only on day 18. The VO2 of embryos acutely exposed to 100% O2 was not significantly different from that observed in 60% O2, and was still significantly elevated 3 h after the eggs were returned to 21% O2. We conclude that acute hyperoxia late in incubation elicits an increase in embryonic VO2 and VCO2, with little or no effect on the respiratory exchange ratio, and that the stimulation of gas exchange by 100% O2 persists after the embryo is returned to normoxic conditions. These findings support the hypothesis that oxygen availability limits growth and metabolism of the normoxic chick embryo late in development.

  2. Stimulatory role of interleukin 10 in CD8(+) T cells through STATs in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Xi, Jianjun; Xu, Mingzheng; Song, Zongchang; Li, Hongqiang; Xu, Shumin; Wang, Chunmei; Song, Haihan; Bai, Jianwen

    2017-05-01

    CD8(+) T cells are considered to be critical in tumor surveillance and elimination. Increased CD8(+) T cell frequency and function is associated with better prognosis in cancer patients. Interleukin 10 is a cytokine with controversial roles in CD8(+) T cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity. We therefore examined the interleukin 10 expression and consumption in CD8(+) T cells harvested from the peripheral blood and resected tumors of gastric cancer patients of stages II-IV. We found that the gastric cancer patients presented significantly elevated frequencies of interleukin 10-expressing cells in both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells compared to healthy controls. But distinctive from the interleukin 10-expressing CD4(+) T cells, which increased in frequency in advanced cancer, the interleukin 10-expressing CD8(+) T cells did not increase with cancer stage in the peripheral blood and actually decreased with cancer stage in resected tumor. Interleukin 10 and interleukin 10 receptor expression was also enriched in interferon gamma-expressing activated CD8(+) T cells. Compared to interleukin 10-nonexpressing CD8(+) T cells, interleukin 10 receptor-expressing CD8(+) T cells secreted significantly elevated interferon gamma levels. Treatment of anti-CD3/CD28-stimulated, purified CD8(+) T cells with interleukin 10 alone could significantly enhance CD8(+) T cell survival, an effect dependent on interleukin 10 receptor expression. Interleukin 10 also increased CD8(+) T cell proliferation synergistically with interferon gamma but not alone. Analysis of downstream signal transducer and activator of transcription molecules showed that interleukin 10 treatment significantly increased the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 to lesser extent. Together, these results demonstrate that interleukin 10 possessed stimulatory roles in activated CD8(+) T cells from gastric cancer patients.

  3. Bio-forensics

    SciTech Connect

    Trewhella, J.

    2004-01-01

    Bioforensics presents significant technical challenges. Determining if an outbreak is natural or not, and then providing evidence to trace an outbreak to its origin is very complex. Los Alamos scientists pioneered research and development that has generated leading edge strain identification methods based on sequence data. Molecular characterization of environmental background samples enable development of highly specific pathogen signatures. Economic impacts of not knowing the relationships at the molecular level Many different kinds of data are needed for DNA-based bio-forensics.

  4. Ozone depletion due to the use of chlorofluorocarbon: Government and industry response. (Latest citations from the BioBusiness database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the response of business and government to atmospheric ozone depletion. Voluntary restrictions in the use of chlorofluorocarbons by industry and attempts to develop a substitute are examined. References cite studies of the ozone layer and the effects of aerosols worldwide, and examples of climatic models of ozone depletion. Government sponsored bans on chloroflourocarbons are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  5. Results from Fielding of the Bio-Surveillance Analysis, Feedback, Evaluation and Response (B-SAFER) System in Albuquerque, New Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Forslund, David; Umland, Edith; Brillman, Judith C.; Joyce, Ed; Froman, Philip; Burr, Tom; Judd, Stephen L.; Picard, Richard; Wokoun, Doug; Joner, Mike; Sewell, C. Mack

    2003-01-01

    Public health authorities need a surveillance system that is sensitive enough to detect a disease outbreak early to enable a proper response. In order to meet this challenge we have deployed a pilot component-based system in Albuquerque, NM as part of the National Biodefense Initiative (BDI). B-SAFER gathers routinely collected data from healthcare institutions to monitor disease events in the community. We describe initial results from the deployment of the system for the past 6 months. PMID:14728347

  6. Bio-tribology.

    PubMed

    Dowson, Duncan

    2012-01-01

    It is now forty six years since the separate topics of friction, lubrication, wear and bearing design were integrated under the title 'Tribology' [Department of Education and Science, Lubrication (Tribology) Education and Research. A Report on the Present Position and Industry's Needs, HMSO, London, 1966]. Significant developments have been reported in many established and new aspects of tribology during this period. The subject has contributed to improved performance of much familiar equipment, such as reciprocating engines, where there have been vast improvements in engine reliability and efficiency. Nano-tribology has been central to remarkable advances in information processing and digital equipment. Shortly after widespread introduction of the term tribology, integration with biology and medicine prompted rapid and extensive interest in the fascinating sub-field now known as Bio-tribology [D. Dowson and V. Wright, Bio-tribology, in The Rheology of Lubricants, ed. T. C. Davenport, Applied Science Publishers, Barking, 1973, pp. 81-88]. An outline will be given of some of the developments in the latter field.

  7. Bio-threat microparticle simulants

    DOEpatents

    Farquar, George Roy; Leif, Roald

    2014-09-16

    A bio-threat simulant that includes a carrier and DNA encapsulated in the carrier. Also a method of making a simulant including the steps of providing a carrier and encapsulating DNA in the carrier to produce the bio-threat simulant.

  8. Bio-threat microparticle simulants

    DOEpatents

    Farquar, George Roy; Leif, Roald N

    2012-10-23

    A bio-threat simulant that includes a carrier and DNA encapsulated in the carrier. Also a method of making a simulant including the steps of providing a carrier and encapsulating DNA in the carrier to produce the bio-threat simulant.

  9. What is BioOne?

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Roberta Bronson

    2005-01-01

    BioOne is a Web-based aggregation of full-text, high-impact bioscience research journals. Most of its titles are published by small societies or non-commercial publishers and have not been previously available in electronic format. This column describes the BioOne database and gives some basic information about the best ways to search its content.

  10. Autonomous Bio-Optical Instruments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-30

    Autonomous Bio -Optical Instruments Russ E. Davis Scripps Institution of Oceanography La Jolla CA 92093-0230 phone: (858) 534-4415 fax: (858) 534... Bio -Optical Instruments 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK

  11. Nanoparticles for the development of improved (bio)sensing systems.

    PubMed

    Pérez-López, Briza; Merkoçi, Arben

    2011-02-01

    Nanoparticles serve as fundamental building blocks for nanobiotechnology, especially in several applications in the development of novel (bio)sensing systems. Nanoparticles can be used for modification of the surfaces of (bio)sensing transducers or as optical or electroactive labels to improve different aspects of performance, for example sensitivity, detection limit, multidetection capability, and response stability. Nanoparticles can be integrated into the transducer materials on an individual basis or inside other matrices to ensure the immobilization of recognition biomolecules and/or receptors which are the principal components of the (bio)sensing systems. Incorporation of nanoparticles into optical and electrochemical (bio)sensing systems, including their use in microfluidic based systems has the advantages of enabling the design of robust, easy to use, portable, and cost-effective devices.

  12. Epiphytic bryophytes as bio-indicators of atmospheric nitrogen deposition in a subtropical montane cloud forest: Response patterns, mechanism, and critical load.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xian-Meng; Song, Liang; Liu, Wen-Yao; Lu, Hua-Zheng; Qi, Jin-Hua; Li, Su; Chen, Xi; Wu, Jia-Fu; Liu, Shuai; Wu, Chuan-Sheng

    2017-10-01

    Increasing trends of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition due to pollution and land-use changes are dramatically altering global biogeochemical cycles. Bryophytes, which are extremely vulnerable to N deposition, often play essential roles in these cycles by contributing to large nutrient pools in boreal and montane forest ecosystems. To interpret the sensitivity of epiphytic bryophytes for N deposition and to determine their critical load (CL) in a subtropical montane cloud forest, community-level, physiological and chemical responses of epiphytic bryophytes were tested in a 2-year field experiment of N additions. The results showed a significant decrease in the cover of the bryophyte communities at an N addition level of 7.4 kg ha(-1) yr(-1), which is consistent with declines in the biomass production, vitality, and net photosynthetic rate responses of two dominant bryophyte species. Given the background N deposition rate of 10.5 kg ha(-1)yr(-1) for the study site, a CL of N deposition is therefore estimated as ca. 18 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1). A disordered cellular carbon (C) metabolism, including photosynthesis inhibition and ensuing chlorophyll degradation, due to the leakage of magnesium and potassium and corresponding downstream effects, along with direct toxic effects of excessive N additions is suggested as the main mechanism driving the decline of epiphytic bryophytes. Our results confirmed the process of C metabolism and the chemical stability of epiphytic bryophytes are strongly influenced by N addition levels; when coupled to the strong correlations found with the loss of bryophytes, this study provides important and timely evidence on the response mechanisms of bryophytes in an increasingly N-polluted world. In addition, this study underlines a general decline in community heterogeneity and biomass production of epiphytic bryophytes induced by increasing N deposition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Bio-specific and bio-orthogonal chemistries to switch-off the quencher of a FRET-based fluorescent probe: application to living-cell biothiol imaging.

    PubMed

    Egloff, C; Jacques, S A; Nothisen, M; Weltin, D; Calligaro, C; Mosser, M; Remy, J-S; Wagner, A

    2014-09-11

    We report the first molecular system that is responsive to both a bio-specific and a bio-orthogonal stimulus. This dual activation process was applied to the design of a biothiol-specific FRET-based fluorescent probe that could be turned-on via an original concept of quencher bleaching.

  14. Upstream stimulatory factor 2 and hypoxia-inducible factor 2α (HIF2α) cooperatively activate HIF2 target genes during hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Pawlus, Matthew R; Wang, Liyi; Ware, Katie; Hu, Cheng-Jun

    2012-11-01

    While the functions of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α)/aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) and HIF2α/ARNT (HIF2) proteins in activating hypoxia-inducible genes are well established, the role of other transcription factors in the hypoxic transcriptional response is less clear. We report here for the first time that the basic helix-loop-helix-leucine-zip transcription factor upstream stimulatory factor 2 (USF2) is required for the hypoxic transcriptional response, specifically, for hypoxic activation of HIF2 target genes. We show that inhibiting USF2 activity greatly reduces hypoxic induction of HIF2 target genes in cell lines that have USF2 activity, while inducing USF2 activity in cells lacking USF2 activity restores hypoxic induction of HIF2 target genes. Mechanistically, USF2 activates HIF2 target genes by binding to HIF2 target gene promoters, interacting with HIF2α protein, and recruiting coactivators CBP and p300 to form enhanceosome complexes that contain HIF2α, USF2, CBP, p300, and RNA polymerase II on HIF2 target gene promoters. Functionally, the effect of USF2 knockdown on proliferation, motility, and clonogenic survival of HIF2-dependent tumor cells in vitro is phenocopied by HIF2α knockdown, indicating that USF2 works with HIF2 to activate HIF2 target genes and to drive HIF2-depedent tumorigenesis.

  15. Impaired gene expression of beta 1-adrenergic receptor, but not stimulatory G-protein Gs alpha, in rat ventricular myocardium treated with isoproterenol.

    PubMed

    Kizaki, Keiichiro; Momozaki, Masami; Akatsuka, Keiko; Fujimori, Yuuki; Uchide, Tsuyoshi; Temma, Kyosuke; Hara, Yukio

    2004-07-01

    We investigated the gene expression of beta(1)-adrenergic receptor (beta(1)AR) and stimulatory G-protein Gsalpha, important signal transduction elements for regulating heart rate and contractility, in ventricle after chronic treatment with isoproterenol (ISO) in rat. Rats were treated with ISO (4 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) twice a day for 4 d. Ventricle weight of the heart and ventricle weight/body weight ratio were increased by 23% and 25% compared with control, respectively. Positive inotropic responses to ISO in left atrial muscle preparations isolated from ISO-treated rats were markedly decreased. Northern blot hybridization showed that the mRNA transcript of beta(1)AR was significantly decreased in ventricle of ISO-treated rats, whereas Gsalpha mRNA level was unchanged. Present results demonstrate that the gene expression of myocardial beta(1)AR, but not Gsalpha, was decreased in rat myocardium of ISO-induced cardiac hypertrophy, and suggesting that decrease in the gene expression of beta(1)AR may be one of the mechanisms responsible for the diminished cardiac function.

  16. Bio-informatics analysis of a gene co-expression module in adipose tissue containing the diet-responsive gene Nnat

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Obesity causes insulin resistance in target tissues - skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, liver and the brain. Insulin resistance predisposes to type-2 diabetes (T2D) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Adipose tissue inflammation is an essential characteristic of obesity and insulin resistance. Neuronatin (Nnat) expression has been found to be altered in a number of conditions related to inflammatory or metabolic disturbance, but its physiological roles and regulatory mechanisms in adipose tissue, brain, pancreatic islets and other tissues are not understood. Results We identified transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) conserved in the Nnat promoter, and transcription factors (TF) abundantly expressed in adipose tissue. These include transcription factors concerned with the control of: adipogenesis (Pparγ, Klf15, Irf1, Creb1, Egr2, Gata3); lipogenesis (Mlxipl, Srebp1c); inflammation (Jun, Stat3); insulin signalling and diabetes susceptibility (Foxo1, Tcf7l2). We also identified NeuroD1 the only documented TF that controls Nnat expression. We identified KEGG pathways significantly associated with Nnat expression, including positive correlations with inflammation and negative correlations with metabolic pathways (most prominently oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, pyruvate metabolism) and protein turnover. 27 genes, including; Gstt1 and Sod3, concerned with oxidative stress; Sncg and Cxcl9 concerned with inflammation; Ebf1, Lgals12 and Fzd4 involved in adipogenesis; whose expression co-varies with Nnat were identified, and conserved transcription factor binding sites identified on their promoters. Functional networks relating to each of these genes were identified. Conclusions Our analysis shows that Nnat is an acute diet-responsive gene in white adipose tissue and hypothalamus; it may play an important role in metabolism, adipogenesis, and resolution of oxidative stress and inflammation in response to dietary excess. PMID:21187013

  17. Use of translucent indium tin oxide to measure stimulatory effects of a passive conductor during field stimulation of rabbit hearts.

    PubMed

    Knisley, Stephen B; Pollard, Andrew E

    2005-09-01

    Biomathematical models and experiments have indicated that passive extracellular conductors influence field stimulation. Because metallic conductors prevent optical mapping under the conductor, we have evaluated a passive translucent indium tin oxide (ITO) thin-film conductor to allow mapping of transmembrane potential (V(m)) and stimulatory current under the conductor. A 1-cm ITO disk was patterned photolithographically and positioned between 0.3-cm(2) mesh shock electrodes on the ventricular epicardium of isolated perfused rabbit hearts stained with 4-{2-[6-(dibutylamino)-2-naphthylenal]ethenyl}-1-(3-sulfopropyl)-, hydroxide, inner salt (di-4-ANEPPS). For a 1-A, 10-ms shock during the action potential plateau, optical maps from fluorescence collected using emission ratiometry (excitation at 488 nm and emissions at 510-570 and >590 nm) indicated that the disk altered V(m) by as much as the height of an action potential. DeltaV(m) became more positive near the edge of the disk, where the ITO conductance gradient was parallel to applied current, and more negative near the opposite edge, where the gradient was not parallel to current. For diastolic shocks, the disk expedited membrane excitation at the sites of positive DeltaV(m) in the heart and in a cardiac model with realistic ITO disk surface and interfacial conductances. Optical maps of ITO transmittance and the model indicated that the disk introduced anodal and cathodal stimulatory current at opposite edges of the disk. Thus ITO allows study of the stimulatory effects of a passive conductor in an electric field.

  18. Overview of the TAC-BIO sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabalo, Jerry; Sickenberger, Richard; De Lucia, Marla; Briles, John; Poldmae, Aime; Sickenberger, David

    2005-05-01

    In light of the current state of detection technologies designed to meet the current threat from biological agents, the need for a low-cost and lightweight sensor is clear. Such a sensor based on optical detection, with real time responses and no consumables, is possible. Devices arising from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's (DARPA) Semiconductor UV Optical Sources (SUVOS) are the enabling technology. These sources are capable of emitting UV wavelengths known to excite fluorescence from biological agent particles while costing a few dollars apiece and consuming low power. These devices are exploited in the TAC-Bio Sensor. A unique optical design is used to collect the usable portion of the LED emission and focus it into the probing region of the sensor. To compensate for the low UV power density relative to UV lasers, the TAC-Bio utilizes a unique opposed flow configuration to increase the interaction between particles and the UV beam. The current TAC-Bio sensor testbed is capable of detecting fluorescence Bacillus globigii (BG, an anthrax simulant) spore agglomerates down to 5 microns in diameter. Ongoing work is focusing on increasing signal to noise so that smaller particles, possibly single spores, can be detected, as well as on including additional data channels, such as light scattering, to increase selectivity of the sensor.

  19. Navigating the Bio-Politics of Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Nick; Motzkau, Johanna

    2011-01-01

    Childhood research has long shared a bio-political terrain with state agencies in which children figure primarily as "human futures". In the 20th century bio-social dualism helped to make that terrain navigable by researchers, but, as life processes increasingly become key sites of bio-political action, bio-social dualism is becoming…

  20. Navigating the Bio-Politics of Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Nick; Motzkau, Johanna

    2011-01-01

    Childhood research has long shared a bio-political terrain with state agencies in which children figure primarily as "human futures". In the 20th century bio-social dualism helped to make that terrain navigable by researchers, but, as life processes increasingly become key sites of bio-political action, bio-social dualism is becoming…

  1. BioSentinel: Developing a Space Radiation Biosensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santa Maria, Sergio R.

    2015-01-01

    BioSentinel is an autonomous fully self-contained science mission that will conduct the first study of the biological response to space radiation outside low Earth orbit (LEO) in over 40 years. The 4-unit (4U) BioSentinel biosensor system, is housed within a 6-Unit (6U) spacecraft, and uses yeast cells in multiple independent microfluidic cards to detect and measure DNA damage that occurs in response to ambient space radiation. Cell growth and metabolic activity will be measured using a 3-color LED detection system and a metabolic indicator dye with a dedicated thermal control system per fluidic card.

  2. The stimulatory effect of LXRalpha is blocked by SHP despite the presence of a LXRalpha binding site in the rabbit CYP7A1 promoter.

    PubMed

    Shang, Quan; Pan, Luxing; Saumoy, Monica; Chiang, John Y L; Tint, G Stephen; Salen, Gerald; Xu, Guorong

    2006-05-01

    The transcription of the cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase gene (CYP7A1) is greatly decreased in cholesterol-fed rabbits. To determine whether the molecular structure of the promoter is responsible for this downregulation, we cloned the rabbit CYP7A1 promoter, identified the binding sites for alpha-fetoprotein transcription factor (FTF) and liver X receptor (LXRalpha), and studied the effects of FTF, LXRalpha, and SHP on its transcription. Adding LXRalpha/retinoid X receptor together with their ligands (L/R) to the promoter/reporter construct transfected into HepG2 cells greatly increased its activity. FTF did not increase promoter activity, nor did it enhance the stimulatory effect of L/R. Mutating the FTF binding site abolished the promoter baseline activity. Increasing amounts of SHP abolished the effect of L/R, and FTF enhanced the ability of SHP to decrease promoter activity below baseline levels. Thus, downregulation of CYP7A1 in cholesterol-fed rabbits is attributable secondarily to the activation of farnesoid X receptor, which increases SHP expression to override the positive effects of LXRalpha. Although FTF is a competent factor for maintaining baseline activity, it does not further enhance and may suppress CYP7A1 transcription.

  3. Stimulatory effect of 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol-like substances from Solanum malacoxylon and Cestrum diurnum on phosphate transport in chick jejunum.

    PubMed

    Peterlik, M; Wasserman, R H

    1978-10-01

    Extracts of the calcinogenic plants Solanum malocoxylon and Cestrum diurnum stimulate phosphate absorption by the jejunum of vitamin D-deficient chicks, as determined by everted gut sac technique. Their action on cellular pathways of transepithelial phosphate transport is indistinguishable thereby from that of cholecalciferol. Increased net absorption from the lumen was due to enhanced uptake of phosphate from the luminal side, while leakage of tissue phosphate in the opposite direction was apparently unaffected. Steep serosa/mucosa concentration gradients were observed as consequence of enhanced levels of transepithelial phosphate flux in the mucosa-to-serosa direction. With respect to their stimulatory action on phosphate absorption, the calcinogenic plant factors retained their biological activity when phosphate transport was depressed by a high strontium diet. Their action in overcoming the strontium inhibition of phosphate absorption, calcium-binding protein synthesis, and alkaline phosphatase activity, was comparable to the effect of 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol. On the basis of these biological responses, the action of the plant factors from Solanum malacoxylon and Cestrum diurnum provides further evidence for their close resemblance to the hormonally active sterol.

  4. Immune stimulatory receptor CD40 is required for T-cell suppression and T regulatory cell activation mediated by myeloid-derived suppressor cells in cancer.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ping-Ying; Ma, Ge; Weber, Kaare J; Ozao-Choy, Junko; Wang, George; Yin, Bingjiao; Divino, Celia M; Chen, Shu-Hsia

    2010-01-01

    Immune tolerance to tumors is often associated with accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and an increase in the number of T-regulatory cells (Treg). In tumor-bearing mice, MDSCs can themselves facilitate the generation of tumor-specific Tregs. In this study, we demonstrate that expression of the immune stimulatory receptor CD40 on MDSCs is required to induce T-cell tolerance and Treg accumulation. In an immune reconstitution model, adoptive transfer of Gr-1+CD115+ monocytic MDSCs derived from CD40-deficient mice failed to recapitulate the ability of wild-type MDSCs to induce tolerance and Treg development in vivo. Agonistic anti-CD40 antibodies phenocopied the effect of CD40 deficiency and also improved the therapeutic efficacy of IL-12 and 4-1BB immunotherapy in the treatment of advanced tumors. Our findings suggest that CD40 is essential not only for MDSC-mediated immune suppression but also for tumor-specific Treg expansion. Blockade of CD40-CD40L interaction between MDSC and Treg may provide a new strategy to ablate tumoral immune suppression and thereby heighten responses to immunotherapy.

  5. Endotoxin free hyaluronan and hyaluronan fragments do not stimulate TNF-α, interleukin-12 or upregulate co-stimulatory molecules in dendritic cells or macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yifei; Arif , Arif; Olsson, Mia; Cali, Valbona; Hardman, Blair; Dosanjh, Manisha; Lauer, Mark; Midura, Ronald J.; Hascall, Vincent C.; Brown, Kelly L.; Johnson, Pauline

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycan, hyaluronan, has been described as a regulator of tissue inflammation, with hyaluronan fragments reported to stimulate innate immune cells. High molecular mass hyaluronan is normally present in tissues, but upon inflammation lower molecular mass fragments are generated. It is unclear if these hyaluronan fragments induce an inflammatory response or are a consequence of inflammation. In this study, mouse bone marrow derived macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) were stimulated with various sizes of hyaluronan from different sources, fragmented hyaluronan, hyaluronidases and heavy chain modified-hyaluronan (HA-HC). Key pro-inflammatory molecules, tumour necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1 beta, interleukin-12, CCL3, and the co-stimulatory molecules, CD40 and CD86 were measured. Only human umbilical cord hyaluronan, bovine testes and Streptomyces hyaluronlyticus hyaluronidase stimulated macrophages and DCs, however, these reagents were found to be contaminated with endotoxin, which was not fully removed by polymyxin B treatment. In contrast, pharmaceutical grade hyaluronan and hyaluronan fragments failed to stimulate in vitro-derived or ex vivo macrophages and DCs, and did not induce leukocyte recruitment after intratracheal instillation into mouse lungs. Hence, endotoxin-free pharmaceutical grade hyaluronan does not stimulate macrophages and DCs in our inflammatory models. These results emphasize the importance of ensuring hyaluronan preparations are endotoxin free. PMID:27869206

  6. Vaccination with a recombinant vaccinia vaccine containing the B7-1 co-stimulatory molecule causes no significant toxicity and enhances T cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Freund, Y R; Mirsalis, J C; Fairchild, D G; Brune, J; Hokama, L A; Schindler-Horvat, J; Tomaszewski, J E; Hodge, J W; Schlom, J; Kantor, J A; Tyson, C A; Donohue, S J

    2000-02-15

    B7-1 is a co-stimulatory molecule that provides a second signal for T-cell activation. Several studies have demonstrated that vaccination with a vector containing genes encoding B7-1 and an antigen appears to be efficacious at promoting immune responsiveness to the antigen. To evaluate the safety of such a protocol and determine the effect of the B7-1 vector on immune responsiveness, female C57BL/6 mice were administered Wyeth wild-type vaccinia virus (V-WT) or V-WT containing the gene for B7-1 (rV-B7-1) as a single s. c. injection or 3 monthly s.c. injections. Immunologic parameters were evaluated in half of the mice and general toxicity in the other half. Immunologic end points included determination of splenic lymphocyte phenotypes, mitogen-induced T- and B-cell proliferation, T-cell proliferation in response to alloantigens, cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CMC), natural killer cell activity and serum anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) titers. No significant signs of general toxicity were noted. The primary immunologic effect was an increase in the ability of spleen cells to lyse allogeneic targets and to proliferate in response to allogeneic stimulation. Numbers of splenic CD8(+) cells were also increased. These effects were more pronounced after 3 vaccinations than after a single vaccination. Minimal differences in ANA were observed between mice immunized with V-WT and rV-B7-1. In addition, no serum antibodies against B7-1 were detected in any mice. The data suggest that vaccination with rV-B7-1 augments CMC with minimal toxicity. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. There is no magic fruit fly trap: multiple biological factors influence the response of adult Anastrepha ludens and Anastrepha obliqua (Diptera: Tephritidae) individuals to MultiLure traps baited with BioLure or NuLure.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Fleischer, Francisco; Arredondo, José; Flores, Salvador; Montoya, Pablo; Aluja, Martín

    2009-02-01

    Field-cage experiments were performed to determine the effectiveness of MultiLure traps (Better World MFG Inc., Fresno, CA) baited with NuLure (Miller Chemical and Fertilizer Corp., Hanover, PA) or BioLure (Suterra LLC, Inc., Bend, OR) in capturing individually marked Mexican fruit fly, Anastrepha ludens (Loew), and West Indian fruit fly, Anastrepha obliqua (Macquart) (Diptera: Tephritidae), of both sexes. Experimental treatments involved wild and laboratory-reared flies of varying ages (2-4 and 15-18 d) and dietary histories (sugar only, open fruit, open fruit plus chicken feces, and hydrolyzed protein mixed with sugar). Data were divided into two parts: total captures over a 24-h period and trap visits/landings, entrances into interior of trap ,and effective captures (i.e., drowning in liquid bait or water) over a 5-h detailed observation period (0600-1100 hours). The response to the two baits varied by fly species, gender, physiological state, age, and strain. Importantly, there were several highly significant interactions among these factors, underlining the complex nature of the response. The two baits differed in attractiveness for A. obliqua but not A. ludens. The effect of strain (wild versus laboratory flies) was significant for A. ludens but not A. obliqua. For effect of dietary history, adults of both species, irrespective of sex, were significantly less responsive to both baits when fed on a mixture of protein and sugar when compared with adults fed the other diets. Finally, we confirmed previous observations indicating that McPhail-type traps are quite inefficient. Considering the total 24-h fly tenure in the cage, and independent of bait treatment and fly type (i.e., strain, adult diet, gender and age), of a total of 2,880 A. obliqua and 2,880 A. ludens adults released into the field cages over the entire study (15 replicates), only 564 (19.6%) and 174 (6%) individuals, respectively, were effectively caught. When only considering the 5-h detailed

  8. Bio-regenerative life support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macelroy, Robert D.; Wydeven, Theodore, Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The basis for and the potential uses of bio-regenerative life support are examined. Bio-regenerative life support systems are an alternative to physical-chemical regeneration techniques for use when resupply of a crew in space is expensive, or when the logistics of resupply are difficult. Many of the scientific studies required for bio-regenerative life support systems have been completed and preliminary development of some components will begin within the next 12 to 18 months. The focus of the work that lies ahead will be efficient power and mass use, long-term system stability, component function, systems integration, and extensive testing in the space environment. Because of the advantages of bio-regeneration, it is anticipated that human life support for long-term space missions will evolve to include increasingly large amounts of biologically-based regeneration.

  9. Functional tooth restoration by next-generation bio-hybrid implant as a bio-hybrid artificial organ replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Masamitsu; Inoue, Kaoru; Nakajima, Kei; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Yamazaki, Hiromichi; Isobe, Tomohide; Sugawara, Ayaka; Ogawa, Miho; Tanaka, Chie; Saito, Masahiro; Kasugai, Shohei; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Inoue, Takashi; Tezuka, Katsunari; Kuboki, Takuo; Yamaguchi, Akira; Tsuji, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Bio-hybrid artificial organs are an attractive concept to restore organ function through precise biological cooperation with surrounding tissues in vivo. However, in bio-hybrid artificial organs, an artificial organ with fibrous connective tissues, including muscles, tendons and ligaments, has not been developed. Here, we have enveloped with embryonic dental follicle tissue around a HA-coated dental implant, and transplanted into the lower first molar region of a murine tooth-loss model. We successfully developed a novel fibrous connected tooth implant using a HA-coated dental implant and dental follicle stem cells as a bio-hybrid organ. This bio-hybrid implant restored physiological functions, including bone remodelling, regeneration of severe bone-defect and responsiveness to noxious stimuli, through regeneration with periodontal tissues, such as periodontal ligament and cementum. Thus, this study represents the potential for a next-generation bio-hybrid implant for tooth loss as a future bio-hybrid artificial organ replacement therapy. PMID:25116435

  10. Functional tooth restoration by next-generation bio-hybrid implant as a bio-hybrid artificial organ replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Masamitsu; Inoue, Kaoru; Nakajima, Kei; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Yamazaki, Hiromichi; Isobe, Tomohide; Sugawara, Ayaka; Ogawa, Miho; Tanaka, Chie; Saito, Masahiro; Kasugai, Shohei; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Inoue, Takashi; Tezuka, Katsunari; Kuboki, Takuo; Yamaguchi, Akira; Tsuji, Takashi

    2014-08-13

    Bio-hybrid artificial organs are an attractive concept to restore organ function through precise biological cooperation with surrounding tissues in vivo. However, in bio-hybrid artificial organs, an artificial organ with fibrous connective tissues, including muscles, tendons and ligaments, has not been developed. Here, we have enveloped with embryonic dental follicle tissue around a HA-coated dental implant, and transplanted into the lower first molar region of a murine tooth-loss model. We successfully developed a novel fibrous connected tooth implant using a HA-coated dental implant and dental follicle stem cells as a bio-hybrid organ. This bio-hybrid implant restored physiological functions, including bone remodelling, regeneration of severe bone-defect and responsiveness to noxious stimuli, through regeneration with periodontal tissues, such as periodontal ligament and cementum. Thus, this study represents the potential for a next-generation bio-hybrid implant for tooth loss as a future bio-hybrid artificial organ replacement therapy.

  11. Moisture variation associated with water input and evaporation during sewage sludge bio-drying.

    PubMed

    Cai, Lu; Gao, Ding; Chen, Tong-Bin; Liu, Hong-Tao; Zheng, Guo-Di; Yang, Qi-Wei

    2012-08-01

    The variation of moisture during sewage sludge bio-drying was investigated. In situ measurements were conducted to monitor the bulk moisture and water vapor, while the moisture content, water generation, water evaporation and aeration water input of the bio-drying bulk were calculated based on the water mass balance. The moisture in the sewage sludge bio-drying material decreased from 66% to 54% in response to control technology for bio-drying. During the temperature increasing and thermophilic phases of sewage sludge bio-drying, the moisture content, water generation and water evaporation of the bulk initially increased and then decreased. The peak water generation and evaporation occurred during the thermophilic phase. During the bio-drying, water evaporation was much greater than water generation, and aeration facilitated the water evaporation.

  12. Optical Properties of Plasmonic Nanostructures for Bio-Imaging and Bio-Sensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravets, Vira V.

    Kravets, Vira V. (Ph.D., Physics). Optical properties of plasmonic nanostructures for bio-imaging and bio-sensing applications. Dissertation directed by Associate Professor Anatoliy Pinchuk. ABSTRACT. This dissertation explores the physics of free electron excitations in gold nanoparticle chains, silver nanoparticle colloids, and thin gold films. Electron excitations in nanostructures (surface plasmons, SP) are responsible for unique optical properties, which are applied in bio-sensing and bio-imaging applications. For gold nanoparticle chains, the effect of SP on resonance light absorption was studied experimentally and theoretically. Mainly, how the spectral position of the absorption peak depends on inter-particle distances. This dependence is used in “molecular rulers”, providing spatial resolution below the Rayleigh limit. The underlying theory is based on particle interaction via scattered dipole fields. Often in literature only the near-field component of the scattered field is considered. Here, I show that middle and far fields should not be neglected for calculation of extinction by particle chains. In silver nanoparticles, SP excitations produce two independent effects: (a) the intrinsic fluorescence of the particles, and (b) the enhancement of a molecule’s fluorescence by a particle’s surface. The mechanism of (a) is deduced by studying how fluorescence depends on particle size. For (b), I show that fluorescence of a dye molecule on the surface of a nanoparticle is enhanced, when compared to that of the free-standing dye. I demonstrate that the dye’s fluorescent quantum yield is dependent on the particle’s size, making labeled silver nanoparticles attractive candidates as bio-imaging agents. Labeled nanoparticles are applied to cell imaging, and their bio-compatibility with two cell lines is evaluated here. Finally, in gold films under attenuated total internal reflection (ATR) conditions, the SP create a propagating wave (SP-polariton, SPP

  13. Peripheral administration of a μ-opioid receptor agonist DAMGO suppresses the anxiolytic and stimulatory effects of caffeine.

    PubMed

    Sudakov, S K; Nazarova, G A; Alekseeva, E V; Kolpakov, A A

    2015-01-01

    We studied the possibility of modulation of the stimulatory and anxiolytic effects of caffeine by activation of μ-opioid receptors in the gastrointestinal tract. Caffeine in a dose of 10 mg/kg (but not in a dose of 100 mg/kg) had a strong anxiolytic and psychostimulant effect. This effect was manifested in a significant increase in the time spent in the open arms of the elevated plus-maze, elevation of locomotor activity, and stimulation of metabolism. Administration of DAMGO to animals receiving caffeine in a dose of 10 mg/kg abolished the anxiolytic and psychostimulant effects of caffeine. By contrast, administration of DAMGO to rats receiving caffeine in a dose of 100 mg/kg had the anxiolytic effect. Activation of peripheral μ-opioid receptors is followed by the inhibition of the central μ-opioid system. We observed a decrease in the number of μ-opioid receptors in the midbrain and cerebral cortex and inhibition of β-endorphin release from nerve ending of the cingulate cortex in rats. These changes are probably followed by activation of the adenosine system in the brain. Caffeine dose should be increased to achieve the effect. Therefore, the anxiolytic and stimulatory effects of caffeine in a dose of 10 mg/kg are abolished under these conditions. By contrast, the anxiolytic effect of caffeine in a dose of 100 mg/kg (not observed under normal conditions) develops after this treatment.

  14. A peculiar stimulatory effect of acetic and lactic acid on growth and fermentative metabolism of Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    PubMed

    Dang, T D T; Vermeulen, A; Ragaert, P; Devlieghere, F

    2009-05-01

    Stimulatory or protective effects of organic acids at low concentrations, e.g. acetic and lactic acid, on microorganisms have previously been reported. Especially in case of Zygosaccharomyces bailii, a peculiar growth stimulation by these two acids has recently been noticed. In order to elucidate this interesting phenomenon, growth and fermentative metabolism of Z. bailii was investigated in media with low pH (pH 4.0), high sugar (15% (w/v)) and different acetic and lactic acid concentrations. At both experimental temperatures (7 and 30 degrees C), a growth stimulation in the presence of 2.5% (v/v) lactic acid was observed. Furthermore at 7 degrees C, the yeast exhibited another unusual behaviour as it grew much faster in media containing 1.25% (v/v) acetic acid than in the control (without any acid). Production of fermentative metabolites was also increased together with the enhanced growth at both temperatures. These possible stimulatory effects of acetic and lactic acid should be taken into consideration when the acids are used at low doses for food preservative purpose. Presence of the acids may stimulate Z. bailii growth and fermentative metabolism, particularly at refrigeration temperature, consequently resulting in an earlier spoilage.

  15. Design and synthesis of lupeol analogues and their glucose uptake stimulatory effect in L6 skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Faheem; Maurya, Chandan Kumar; Dev, Kapil; Arha, Deepti; Rai, Amit Kumar; Tamrakar, Akhilesh Kumar; Maurya, Rakesh

    2014-06-15

    Structure modifications of lupeol at the isopropylene moiety have been described via allylic oxidation using selenium dioxide. The antidiabetic efficacy of lupeol analogues were evaluated in vitro as glucose uptake stimulatory effect in L6 skeletal muscle cells. From all tested compounds, 2, 3, 4b and 6b showed significant stimulation of glucose uptake with respective percent stimulation of 173.1 (p <0.001), 114.1 (p <0.001), 98.3 (p <0.001) and 107.3 (p <0.001) at 10μM concentration. Stimulation of glucose uptake by these compounds is associated with enhanced translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) and activation of IRS-1/PI3-K/AKT-dependent signaling pathway in L6 cells. Structure-activity relationship analysis of these analogues demonstrated that the integrity of α,β-unsaturated carbonyl and acetyl moieties were important in the retention of glucose uptake stimulatory effect. It is therefore proposed that naturally occurring lupeol and their analogues might reduce blood glucose, at least in part, through stimulating glucose utilization by skeletal muscles.

  16. PEGylated graphene oxide elicits strong immunological responses despite surface passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Nana; Weber, Jeffrey K.; Wang, Shuang; Luan, Binquan; Yue, Hua; Xi, Xiaobo; Du, Jing; Yang, Zaixing; Wei, Wei; Zhou, Ruhong; Ma, Guanghui

    2017-02-01

    Engineered nanomaterials promise to transform medicine at the bio-nano interface. However, it is important to elucidate how synthetic nanomaterials interact with critical biological systems before such products can be safely utilized in humans. Past evidence suggests that polyethylene glycol-functionalized (PEGylated) nanomaterials are largely biocompatible and elicit less dramatic immune responses than their pristine counterparts. We here report results that contradict these findings. We find that PEGylated graphene oxide nanosheets (nGO-PEGs) stimulate potent cytokine responses in peritoneal macrophages, despite not being internalized. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations support a mechanism by which nGO-PEGs preferentially adsorb onto and/or partially insert into cell membranes, thereby amplifying interactions with stimulatory surface receptors. Further experiments demonstrate that nGO-PEG indeed provokes cytokine secretion by enhancing integrin β8-related signalling pathways. The present results inform that surface passivation does not always prevent immunological reactions to 2D nanomaterials but also suggest applications for PEGylated nanomaterials wherein immune stimulation is desired.

  17. Characterization of glycolytic enzymes--rAldolase and rEnolase of Leishmania donovani, identified as Th1 stimulatory proteins, for their immunogenicity and immunoprophylactic efficacies against experimental visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Reema; Kumar, Vikash; Kushawaha, Pramod Kumar; Tripathi, Chandradev Pati; Joshi, Sumit; Sahasrabuddhe, Amogh Anant; Mitra, Kalyan; Sundar, Shyam; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Dube, Anuradha

    2014-01-01

    Th1 immune responses play an important role in controlling Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL) hence, Leishmania proteins stimulating T-cell responses in host, are thought to be good vaccine targets. Search of such antigens eliciting cellular responses in Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from cured/exposed/Leishmania patients and hamsters led to the identification of two enzymes of glycolytic pathway in the soluble lysate of a clinical isolate of Leishmania donovani--Enolase (LdEno) and aldolase (LdAld) as potential Th1 stimulatory proteins. The present study deals with the molecular and immunological characterizations of LdEno and LdAld. The successfully cloned and purified recombinant proteins displayed strong ability to proliferate lymphocytes of cured hamsters' along with significant nitric-oxide production and generation of Th1-type cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-12) from stimulated PBMCs of cured/endemic VL patients. Assessment of their prophylactic potentials revealed ∼ 90% decrease in parasitic burden in rLdEno vaccinated hamsters against Leishmania challenge, strongly supported by an increase in mRNA expression levels of iNOS, IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-12 transcripts along with extreme down-regulation of TGF-β, IL-4 and IL-10. However, animals vaccinated with rLdAld showed comparatively lesser prophylactic efficacy (∼ 65%) with inferior immunological response. Further, with a possible implication in vaccine design against VL, identification of potential T-cell epitopes of both the proteins was done using computational approach. Additionally, in-silico 3-D modelling of the proteins was done in order to explore the possibility of exploiting them as potential drug targets. The comparative molecular and immunological characterizations strongly suggest rLdEno as potential vaccine candidate against VL and supports the notion of its being effective T-cell stimulatory protein.

  18. The use of stem cells in biomedical research. Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO) position statement.

    PubMed

    1999-01-01

    On March 22, 1999, Carl B. Feldbaum, President of the Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO), submitted comments to the National Bioethics Advisory Committee (NBAC) in response to their request for comments on stem cell research. In the statement submitted to Harold Shapiro, PhD (Chair, NBAC), Mr. Feldbaum made clear that BIO members want to ensure that the promise of new therapies and cures from research using stem cells is realized in a responsible and ethical way. In addition, all BIO members are committed to ensuring that every avenue of promising research can be responsibly explored to improve the health of individuals living with currently intractable diseases.

  19. Bio-inspired vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posch, C.

    2012-01-01

    Nature still outperforms the most powerful computers in routine functions involving perception, sensing and actuation like vision, audition, and motion control, and is, most strikingly, orders of magnitude more energy-efficient than its artificial competitors. The reasons for the superior performance of biological systems are subject to diverse investigations, but it is clear that the form of hardware and the style of computation in nervous systems are fundamentally different from what is used in artificial synchronous information processing systems. Very generally speaking, biological neural systems rely on a large number of relatively simple, slow and unreliable processing elements and obtain performance and robustness from a massively parallel principle of operation and a high level of redundancy where the failure of single elements usually does not induce any observable system performance degradation. In the late 1980`s, Carver Mead demonstrated that silicon VLSI technology can be employed in implementing ``neuromorphic'' circuits that mimic neural functions and fabricating building blocks that work like their biological role models. Neuromorphic systems, as the biological systems they model, are adaptive, fault-tolerant and scalable, and process information using energy-efficient, asynchronous, event-driven methods. In this paper, some basics of neuromorphic electronic engineering and its impact on recent developments in optical sensing and artificial vision are presented. It is demonstrated that bio-inspired vision systems have the potential to outperform conventional, frame-based vision acquisition and processing systems in many application fields and to establish new benchmarks in terms of redundancy suppression/data compression, dynamic range, temporal resolution and power efficiency to realize advanced functionality like 3D vision, object tracking, motor control, visual feedback loops, etc. in real-time. It is argued that future artificial vision systems

  20. Bio-oil fractionation and condensation

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Robert C.; Jones, Samuel T.; Pollard, Anthony

    2017-04-04

    The present invention relates to a method of fractionating bio-oil vapors which involves providing bio-oil vapors comprising bio-oil constituents. The bio-oil vapors are cooled in a first stage which comprises a condenser having passages for the bio-oil separated by a heat conducting wall from passages for a coolant. The coolant in the condenser of the first stage is maintained at a substantially constant temperature, set at a temperature in the range of 75 to 100.degree. C., to condense a first liquid fraction of liquefied bio-oil constituents in the condenser of the first stage. The first liquid fraction of liquified bio-oil constituents from the condenser in the first stage is collected. Also disclosed are steps for subsequently recovering further liquid fractions of liquefied bio-oil constituents. Particular compositions of bio-oil condensation products are also described.

  1. Bio-oil fractionation and condensation

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Robert C; Jones, Samuel T; Pollard, Anthony

    2013-07-02

    A method of fractionating bio-oil vapors which involves providing bio-oil vapors comprising bio-oil constituents is described. The bio-oil vapors are cooled in a first stage which comprises a condenser having passages for the bio-oil separated by a heat conducting wall from passages for a coolant. The coolant in the condenser of the first stage is maintained at a substantially constant temperature, set at a temperature in the range of 75 to 100.degree. C., to condense a first liquid fraction of liquefied bio-oil constituents in the condenser of the first stage. The first liquid fraction of liquified bio-oil constituents from the condenser in the first stage is collected. Also described are steps for subsequently recovering further liquid fractions of liquefied bio-oil constituents. Particular compositions of bio-oil condensation products are also described.

  2. Assessing the Need for an On-Line Educational Module for Volunteer Leaders on Bio-Security in Washington State 4-H Livestock Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Jill L.; Moore, Dale A.; Newman, Jerry; Schmidt, Janet L.; Smith, Sarah M.; Smith, Jean; Kerr, Susan; Wallace, Michael; BoyEs, Pat

    2011-01-01

    4-H livestock projects present disease transmission risks that can be reduced by the use of bio-security practices. The responsibility of teaching bio-security to youth belongs primarily to volunteer leaders, who may not be aware of the importance of these practices. A needs assessment for an online educational module about bio-security revealed…

  3. Assessing the Need for an On-Line Educational Module for Volunteer Leaders on Bio-Security in Washington State 4-H Livestock Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Jill L.; Moore, Dale A.; Newman, Jerry; Schmidt, Janet L.; Smith, Sarah M.; Smith, Jean; Kerr, Susan; Wallace, Michael; BoyEs, Pat

    2011-01-01

    4-H livestock projects present disease transmission risks that can be reduced by the use of bio-security practices. The responsibility of teaching bio-security to youth belongs primarily to volunteer leaders, who may not be aware of the importance of these practices. A needs assessment for an online educational module about bio-security revealed…

  4. Bio-oil Stabilization by Hydrogenation over Reduced Metal Catalysts at Low Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Huamin; Lee, Suh-Jane; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Zacher, Alan H.

    2016-08-30

    Biomass fast pyrolysis integrated with bio-oil upgrading represents a very attractive approach for converting biomass to hydrocarbon transportation fuels. However, the thermal and chemical instability of bio-oils presents significant problems when they are being upgraded, and development of effective approaches for stabilizing bio-oils is critical to the success of the technology. Catalytic hydrogenation to remove reactive species in bio-oil has been considered as one of the most efficient ways to stabilize bio-oil. This paper provides a fundamental understanding of hydrogenation of actual bio-oils over a Ru/TiO2 catalyst under conditions relevant to practical bio-oil hydrotreating processes. Bio-oil feed stocks, bio-oils hydrogenated to different extents, and catalysts have been characterized to provide insights into the chemical and physical properties of these samples and to understand the correlation of the properties with the composition of the bio-oil and catalysts. The results indicated hydrogenation of various components of the bio-oil, including sugars, aldehydes, ketones, alkenes, aromatics, and carboxylic acids, over the Ru/TiO2 catalyst and 120 to 160oC. Hydrogenation of these species significantly changed the chemical and physical properties of the bio-oil and overall improved its thermal stability, especially by reducing the carbonyl content, which represented the content of the most reactive species (i.e., sugar, aldehydes, and ketones). The change of content of each component in response to increasing hydrogen additions suggests the following bio-oil hydrogenation reaction sequence: sugar conversion to sugar alcohols, followed by ketone and aldehyde conversion to alcohols, followed by alkene and aromatic hydrogenation, and then followed by carboxylic acid hydrogenation to alcohols. Hydrogenation of bio-oil samples with different sulfur contents or inorganic material contents suggested that sulfur poisoning of the reduced Ru metal catalysts was

  5. Phorbol ester and B cell-stimulatory factor synergize to induce B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells to simultaneous immunoglobulin secretion and DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, M; Matsson, P; Rosén, A; Sundström, C; Tötterman, T H; Nilsson, K

    1988-11-01

    This paper discusses the response of two B cell-type chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) clones, 173 and 183, to the phorbol ester TPA combined with a B cell-stimulatory factor (BSF) derived from a T helper cell hybridoma (MP6). Previous studies with 173 and 183 cells have consistently shown that TPA alone induces differentiation but no proliferation. However, when the two clones were exposed to TPA plus BSF-MP6, not only differentiation but also DNA synthesis was observed. Compared with TPA exposure alone, the fraction of cells with induced lymphoblastoid-plasmacytoid morphology increased and Ig secretion was enhanced. By a 1-hr TPA pulse followed by BSF-MP6, the DNA synthesis was further augmented, but less maturation was observed. T cell and monocyte removal, using cell sorting, showed that the DNA synthesis induced was independent of these cell types, also under serum-free conditions. Quantitation of several cell cycle-associated surface Ags showed that the 4F2, Ba, Bac-1, and cD23 Ags increased while the CD37 decreased in expression upon addition of BSF-MP6. We conclude that B-CLLs are inducible by TPA and BSF-MP6 not only to differentiation, but also to DNA synthesis even under serum-free conditions in vitro. The results furthermore suggest that the very low proliferation activity in B-CLL tumors in vivo may reflect a relative deficiency of proper growth and differentiation factors or a subnormal response of B-CLL cells to such factors.

  6. Bio-terrorism, "dirty bombs," hospitals, and security issues.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Jesse C

    2004-01-01

    In the event of a bio-terrorism event, the role of the hospital security department will be critical if the disaster plans of health care providers are to be successfully carried out. It is imperative, says the author, that security providers be involved in every step of disaster and emergency response planning.

  7. Analysis of Wear Behavior of Thermoplastic Bio-Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajpai, Pramendra Kumar; Chaudhary, Vijay

    2017-08-01

    In the present work, response surface methodology (RSM) has been used to model and predict the wear properties of Bio-composites fabricated in this study. Polished stainless steel counterface has been used to analyze the wear response of the bio-composite under dry contact condition. Three process variables namely applied sliding speed, normal load, and sliding distance were taken to investigate their effect on output response (specific wear rate). Statistical analysis was performed in the form of the analysis of variance (ANOVA) to analyze the significance and interaction of experimental parameters. The mathematical relationship between sliding wear input process parameters and output responses has been established to determine the values of output responses.

  8. A phase I dose-escalation study of oral BR-DIM (BioResponse 3,3′- Diindolylmethane) in castrate-resistant, non-metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Heath, Elisabeth I; Heilbrun, Lance K; Li, Jing; Vaishampayan, Ulka; Harper, Felicity; Pemberton, Pam; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2010-01-01

    3, 3′-diindolylmethane (DIM) modulates estrogen metabolism and acts as an anti-androgen which down-regulates the androgen receptor and prostate specific antigen (PSA). We conducted a dose-escalation, phase I study of BioResponse (BR)-DIM with objectives to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), toxicity profile, and phar-macokinetics (PK) of BR-DIM, and to assess its effects on serum PSA and quality of life (QoL). Patients and Methods: Cohorts of 3-6 patients received escalating doses of twice daily oral BR-DIM providing DIM at 75 mg, then 150 mg, 225 mg, and 300 mg. Toxicity was evaluated monthly. Serum PSA and QoL were measured at baseline, monthly during treatment, and at end of study. Results: 12 patients with castrate-resistant, non-metastatic, PSA relapse prostate cancer were treated over 4 dose cohorts; 2 patients (at 150 mg and 225 mg, respectively) underwent intra-patient dose escalation, by one dose level. After oral administration of the first dose of BR-DIM, the plasma exposure to DIM appeared dose proportional at doses ranging from 75 to 300 mg, with the mean Cmax and mean AUClast increasing from 41.6 to 236.4 ng/ml and from 192.0 to 899.0 ng/ml*h, respectively. Continued relatively stable systemic exposure to DIM was achieved following twice daily oral administration of BR-DIM. Minimal toxicity was observed. Two of the four patients treated at 300 mg had grade 3 asymptomatic hyponatremia (AH) discovered on routine blood work. The other 2 patients at this dose had no AH. Therefore, the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was deemed to be 300 mgand the recommended phase II dose (RP2D) of BR-DIM was 225 mg twice daily. One patient without AH at 225 mg experienced a 50% PSA decline. One patient with BR-DIM dose of 225 mg had PSA stabilization. The other 10 patients had an initial deceleration of their PSA rise (decrease in slope), but eventually progressed based on continual PSA rise or evidence of metastatic disease. Ten patients completed monthly Qo

  9. Innate stimulatory capacity of high molecular weight transition metals Au (gold) and Hg (mercury).

    PubMed

    Rachmawati, Dessy; Alsalem, Inás W A; Bontkes, Hetty J; Verstege, Marleen I; Gibbs, Sue; von Blomberg, B M E; Scheper, Rik J; van Hoogstraten, Ingrid M W

    2015-03-01

    Nickel, cobalt and palladium ions can induce an innate immune response by triggering Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 which is present on dendritic cells (DC). Here we studied mechanisms of action for DC immunotoxicity to gold and mercury. Next to gold (Na3Au (S2O3)2⋅2H2O) and mercury (HgCl2), nickel (NiCl2) was included as a positive control. MoDC activation was assessed by release of the pro-inflammatory mediator IL-8. Also PBMC were studied, and THP-1 cells were used as a substitution for DC for evaluation of cytokines and chemokines, as well as phenotypic, alterations in response to gold and mercury. Our results showed that both Na3Au (S2O3)2⋅2H2O and HgCl2 induce substantial release of IL-8, but not IL-6, CCL2 or IL-10, from MoDc, PBMC, or THP-1 cells. Also gold and, to a lesser extent mercury, caused modest dendritic cell maturation as detected by increased membrane expression of CD40 and CD80. Both metals thus show innate immune response capacities, although to a lower extent than reported earlier for NiCl2, CoCl2 and Na2 [PdCl4]. Importantly, the gold-induced response could be ascribed to TLR3 rather than TLR4 triggering, whereas the nature of the innate mercury response remains to be clarified. In conclusion both gold and mercury can induce innate immune responses, which for gold could be ascribed to TLR3 dependent signalling. These responses are likely to contribute to adaptive immune responses to these metals, as reflected by skin and mucosal allergies.

  10. Bio-nanopatterning of Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Bio-nanopatterning of surfaces is a very active interdisciplinary field of research at the interface between biotechnology and nanotechnology. Precise patterning of biomolecules on surfaces with nanometre resolution has great potential in many medical and biological applications ranging from molecular diagnostics to advanced platforms for fundamental studies of molecular and cell biology. Bio-nanopatterning technology has advanced at a rapid pace in the last few years with a variety of patterning methodologies being developed for immobilising biomolecules such as DNA, peptides, proteins and viruses at the nanoscale on a broad range of substrates. In this review, the status of research and development are described, with particular focus on the recent advances on the use of nanolithographic techniques as tools for biomolecule immobilisation at the nanoscale. Present strengths and weaknesses, as well future challenges on the different nanolithographic bio-nanopatterning approaches are discussed. PMID:21794192

  11. In vitro study of the biological interface of Bio-Oss: implications of the experimental setup.

    PubMed

    Mladenović, Živko; Sahlin-Platt, Annika; Andersson, Britta; Johansson, Anders; Björn, Erik; Ransjö, Maria

    2013-03-01

    To systematically investigate the biological interface of Bio-Oss by analysing dissolution-precipitation behaviour and osteogenic responses using in vitro experimental systems. Different concentrations (1-100 mg/ml) of Bio-Oss were incubated in cell culture medium for 24 h before elemental concentrations for calcium, phosphorus and silicon in the medium were analysed with inductive coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy. Radioactive calcium-45 isotope labelling technique was used to study possible precipitation of calcium on the Bio-Oss particle. Biological interface of Bio-Oss was studied in osteogenic experiments using mineralization medium and three different sources of cells (primary mouse bone marrow stromal cells, primary rat calvarial cells and MC3T3-E1 mouse pre-osteoblast cell line). Cells were fixed and stained with Toulidine blue, von Kossa or Alizarin Red staining for confirmation of extracellular matrix mineralization. Elemental analysis of the cell culture medium demonstrated a significant decrease of calcium and phosphorus and a dose-dependent release of silicon to the medium after incubation with Bio-Oss. A significant decrease of calcium and phosphorus in the medium occurred even at low concentrations of Bio-Oss. Uptake of calcium on the Bio-Oss particle was confirmed with radioactive calcium-45 isotope labelling technique. In osteogenic experiments with Bio-Oss (<1 mg/ml), matrix mineralization around the Bio-Oss particles were demonstrated in all three cell types with von Kossa and Alizarin Red staining. Dissolution-precipitation reactions occur at the surface of Bio-Oss, and osteogenic responses are seen at the biological interface. The concentration of Bio-Oss is a key factor for the experimental in vitro results, and may also have implications for the clinic. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Stimulatory Effects of Cinnamon Extract (Cinnamomum cassia) during the Initiation Stage of 3T3-L1 Adipocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Gil; Siaw, Joanna A.; Kang, Hye Won

    2016-01-01

    Cinnamon (Cinnamomum cassia) has an anti-diabetic effect by possibly increasing the lipid storage capacity of white adipocytes; however, this effect remains controversial. The aim of this study was to examine which stage of adipogenesis is critical for the stimulatory effect of cinnamon in adipogenesis using 3T3-L1 cells. Cells were treated with cinnamon extract during three different stages of adipogenesis. We found that genes related to adipogenesis and lipogenesis were enhanced when cinnamon extract was administered during the initiation stage of differentiation but not when administered during the preadipocyte and post stages of differentiation. At the same time, genes that were involved in the regulation of fatty acid oxidation were unexpectedly upregulated. Taken together, cinnamon may boost lipid storage in white adipocytes and increase the fatty acid oxidation capacity throughout the initiation stage of differentiation, which may be beneficial for the prevention of obesity-induced type II diabetes. PMID:28231178

  13. Complex biological and bio-inspired systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ecke, Robert E

    2009-01-01

    The understanding and characterization ofthe fundamental processes of the function of biological systems underpins many of the important challenges facing American society, from the pathology of infectious disease and the efficacy ofvaccines, to the development of materials that mimic biological functionality and deliver exceptional and novel structural and dynamic properties. These problems are fundamentally complex, involving many interacting components and poorly understood bio-chemical kinetics. We use the basic science of statistical physics, kinetic theory, cellular bio-chemistry, soft-matter physics, and information science to develop cell level models and explore the use ofbiomimetic materials. This project seeks to determine how cell level processes, such as response to mechanical stresses, chemical constituents and related gradients, and other cell signaling mechanisms, integrate and combine to create a functioning organism. The research focuses on the basic physical processes that take place at different levels ofthe biological organism: the basic role of molecular and chemical interactions are investigated, the dynamics of the DNA-molecule and its phylogenetic role are examined and the regulatory networks of complex biochemical processes are modeled. These efforts may lead to early warning algorithms ofpathogen outbreaks, new bio-sensors to detect hazards from pathomic viruses to chemical contaminants. Other potential applications include the development of efficient bio-fuel alternative-energy processes and the exploration ofnovel materials for energy usages. Finally, we use the notion of 'coarse-graining,' which is a method for averaging over less important degrees of freedom to develop computational models to predict cell function and systems-level response to disease, chemical stress, or biological pathomic agents. This project supports Energy Security, Threat Reduction, and the missions of the DOE Office of Science through its efforts to accurately

  14. PubChem BioAssay: 2014 update

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanli; Suzek, Tugba; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Jiyao; He, Siqian; Cheng, Tiejun; Shoemaker, Benjamin A.; Gindulyte, Asta; Bryant, Stephen H.

    2014-01-01

    PubChem’s BioAssay database (http://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) is a public repository for archiving biological tests of small molecules generated through high-throughput screening experiments, medicinal chemistry studies, chemical biology research and drug discovery programs. In addition, the BioAssay database contains data from high-throughput RNA interference screening aimed at identifying critical genes responsible for a biological process or disease condition. The mission of PubChem is to serve the community by providing free and easy access to all deposited data. To this end, PubChem BioAssay is integrated into the National Center for Biotechnology Information retrieval system, making them searchable by Entrez queries and cross-linked to other biomedical information archived at National Center for Biotechnology Information. Moreover, PubChem BioAssay provides web-based and programmatic tools allowing users to search, access and analyze bioassay test results and metadata. In this work, we provide an update for the PubChem BioAssay resource, such as information content growth, new developments supporting data integration and search, and the recently deployed PubChem Upload to streamline chemical structure and bioassay submissions. PMID:24198245

  15. MHC class I-like genes in cattle, MHCLA, with similarity to genes encoding NK cell stimulatory ligands.

    PubMed

    Larson, Joshua H; Rebeiz, Mark J; Stiening, Chad M; Windish, Ryan L; Beever, Jonathan E; Lewin, Harris A

    2003-04-01

    A comparative genomics approach for mining databases of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) was used to identify two members of a novel MHC class I gene family in cattle. These paralogous genes, named MHC class I-like gene family A1 ( MHCLA1) and MHCLA2, were shown by phylogenetic analysis to be related to human and mouse genes encoding NK cell stimulatory ligands, ULBP, RAET, H60 and Raet-1. Radiation hybrid mapping placed cattle MHCLA1 on BTA9, which, on the basis of existing comparative mapping data, identified the ULBP, RAET1, H60 and Raet1 genes as homologues of the cattle MHCLA genes. However, the human and mouse orthologues of MHCLA1 and MHCLA2 could not be defined due to extensive sequence divergence from all known members of the ULBP1/ RAET1/H60/Raet1 gene family. The cattle MHCLA1 molecule is predicted to be missing an alpha(3) domain, similar to the human and mouse homologues. Like the human ULBP genes, MHCLA1 was found to be transcribed constitutively in a variety of fetal and adult tissues by RT-PCR. The patterns of hybridization obtained by Southern blotting using MHCLA1 as a probe and DNA from 14 species representing five mammalian orders suggests that the MHCLA genes evolved rapidly in the Cetartiodactyla. Previous findings demonstrating that ULBPs serve as ligands for the NK cell NKG2D stimulatory receptor, and that this interaction can be blocked by a human cytomegalovirus glycoprotein that binds to ULBPs, suggests that the extensive divergence found among the cattle, human and mouse MHCLA homologues is due to selection exerted by viral pathogens.

  16. Stimulatory effect of oral administration of green tea and caffeine on locomotor activity in SKH-1 mice.

    PubMed

    Michna, Laura; Lu, Yao-Ping; Lou, You-Rong; Wagner, George C; Conney, Allan H

    2003-08-01

    Administration of green tea or caffeine was shown previously to inhibit ultraviolet B light-induced carcinogenesis in SKH-1 mice, and this effect was associated with a reduction in dermal fat. In the present study, oral administration of 0.6% green tea (6 mg tea solids/ml) or 0.04% caffeine (0.4 mg/ml; equivalent to the amount of caffeine in 0.6% green tea) as the sole source of drinking fluid to SKH-1 mice for 15 weeks increased total 24 hr locomotor activity by 47 and 24%, respectively (p<0.0001). Oral administration of 0.6% decaffeinated green tea (6 mg tea solids/ml) for 15 weeks increased locomotor activity by 9% (p<0.05). The small increase in locomotor activity observed in mice treated with decaffeinated green tea may have resulted from the small amounts of caffeine still remaining in decaffeinated green tea solutions (0.047 mg/ml). The stimulatory effects of orally administered green tea and caffeine on locomotor activity were paralleled by a 38 and 23% increase, respectively, in the dermal muscle layer thickness. In addition, treatment of the mice with 0.6% green tea or 0.04% caffeine for 15 weeks decreased the weight of the parametrial fat pad by 29 and 43%, respectively, and the thickness of the dermal fat layer was decreased by 51 and 47%, respectively. These results indicate that oral administration of green tea or caffeine to SKH-1 mice increases locomotor activity and muscle mass and decreases fat stores. The stimulatory effect of green tea and caffeine administration on locomotor activity described here may contribute to the effects of green tea and caffeine to decrease fat stores and to inhibit carcinogenesis induced by UVB in SKH-1 mice.

  17. Protection of immunocompromised mice from fungal infection with a thymus growth-stimulatory component from Selaginella involvens, a fern.

    PubMed

    Gayathri, V; Asha, V V; John, J Anil; Subramoniam, A

    2011-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that the water extract of Selaginella involvens (Sw.) Spring, a wild fern, exhibits thymus growth-stimulatory activity in adult mice (reversal of involution of thymus) and remarkable anti-lipid peroxidation activity. Follow-up studies were carried out in the present study. Activity-guided isolation of the active component (AC) was carried out. The effect of AC on immune function was studied using fungal (Aspergillus fumigatus) challenge in cortisone-treated mice. The in vitro antifungal activity of AC was assayed using disc diffusion assay. In vitro and in vivo effect of AC on DNA synthesis in thymus was studied using (3)H-thymidine incorporation. In in vitro anti-lipid peroxidation, hydroxyl radical scavenging and inhibition of superoxide production were assayed. The active principle/component (AC) was isolated in a chromatographically pure form from the water extract of S. involvens. AC showed positive reaction to glycosides. AC possessed both thymus growth-stimulatory and antioxidant properties. It protected cortisone-treated mice from A. fumigatus challenge. It did not exhibit in vitro antifungal activity. Increased (3)H-thymidine incorporation was observed in the reticuloepithelium of thymus obtained from AC-treated mice. However, in vitro AC treatment to thymus for 5 h did not result in an increase in (3)H-thymidine incorporation. AC (named as Selagin), from S. involvens, could reverse involution of thymus to a large extent, exhibit remarkable antioxidant activity, and protect immunocompromised mice from fungal infection. Therefore, it is very promising for the development of a drug to ameliorate old age-related health problems and prolong lifespan.

  18. Regulation of phosphatidylinositol turnover in brain synaptoneurosomes: stimulatory effects of agents that enhance influx of sodium ions.

    PubMed Central

    Gusovsky, F; Hollingsworth, E B; Daly, J W

    1986-01-01

    Norepinephrine and carbamoylcholine stimulate accumulation of [3H]inositol phosphates from [3H]inositol-labeled guinea pig cerebral cortical synaptoneurosomes through interaction with alpha 1-adrenergic and muscarinic receptors, respectively. In addition to such agonist, a variety of natural products that affect voltage-dependent sodium channels can markedly stimulate accumulation of [3H]inositol phosphates. These include alkaloids that activate sodium channels, such as batrachotoxin, veratridine, and aconitine; peptide toxins that alter activation or slow inactivation of sodium channels, such as various scorpion toxins from Leiurus, Centruroides, and Tityus species; and agents that cause repetitive firing of sodium channel-dependent action potentials, such as pyrethroids and pumiliotoxin B. Ouabain, and agent that will increase accumulation of internal sodium by inhibition of Na+, K+-ATPase, also stimulates formation of [3H]inositol phosphates, as does monensin, a sodium ionophore. Tetrodotoxin and saxitoxin, specific blockers of voltage-dependent sodium channels, prevent or reduce the stimulatory effects of sodium channel agents and ouabain on phosphatidylinositol turnover, while having lesser or no effect, respectively, on receptor-mediated or monensin-mediated stimulation. Removal of extracellular sodium ions markedly reduces stimulatory effects of sodium channel agents, while removal of extracellular calcium ions with EGTA blocks both receptor-mediated and sodium channel agent-mediated phosphatidylinositol turnover. The results provide evidence for a hitherto unsuspected messenger role for sodium ions in excitable tissue, whereby neuronal activity and the resultant influx of sodium will cause activation of phospholipase systems involved in hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositols, thereby generating two second messengers, the inositol phosphates, which mobilize calcium from internal stores, and the diacylglycerols, which activate protein kinase C. PMID:2422664

  19. Functional tooth restoration by allogeneic mesenchymal stem cell-based bio-root regeneration in swine.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fulan; Song, Tieli; Ding, Gang; Xu, Junji; Liu, Yi; Liu, Dayong; Fan, Zhipeng; Zhang, Chunmei; Shi, Songtao; Wang, Songlin

    2013-06-15

    Our previous proof-of-concept study showed the feasibility of regenerating the dental stem cell-based bioengineered tooth root (bio-root) structure in a large animal model. Here, we used allogeneic dental mesenchymal stem cells to regenerate bio-root, and then installed a crown on the bio-root to restore tooth function. A root shape hydroxyapatite tricalcium phosphate scaffold containing dental pulp stem cells was covered by a Vc-induced periodontal ligament stem cell sheet and implanted into a newly generated jaw bone implant socket. Six months after implantation, a prefabricated porcelain crown was cemented to the implant and subjected to tooth function. Clinical, radiological, histological, ultrastructural, systemic immunological evaluations and mechanical properties were analyzed for dynamic changes in the bio-root structure. The regenerated bio-root exhibited characteristics of a normal tooth after 6 months of use, including dentinal tubule-like and functional periodontal ligament-like structures. No immunological response to the bio-roots was observed. We developed a standard stem cell procedure for bio-root regeneration to restore adult tooth function. This study is the first to successfully regenerate a functional bio-root structure for artificial crown restoration by using allogeneic dental stem cells and Vc-induced cell sheet, and assess the recipient immune response in a preclinical model.

  20. Determination of Carbonyl Functional Groups in Bio-oils by Potentiometric Titration: The Faix Method

    DOE PAGES

    Black, Stuart; Ferrell, Jack R.

    2017-02-07

    We know that carbonyl compounds, present in bio-oils, are responsible for bio-oil property changes upon storage and during upgrading. Specifically, carbonyls cause an increase in viscosity (often referred to as 'aging') during storage of bio-oils. As such, carbonyl content has previously been used as a method of tracking bio-oil aging and condensation reactions with less variability than viscosity measurements. In addition, carbonyls are also responsible for coke formation in bio-oil upgrading processes. Given the importance of carbonyls in bio-oils, accurate analytical methods for their quantification are very important for the bio-oil community. Potentiometric titration methods based on carbonyl oximation havemore » long been used for the determination of carbonyl content in pyrolysis bio-oils. Here, we present a modification of the traditional carbonyl oximation procedures that results in less reaction time, smaller sample size, higher precision, and more accurate carbonyl determinations. And while traditional carbonyl oximation methods occur at room temperature, the Faix method presented here occurs at an elevated temperature of 80 degrees C.« less

  1. Determination of Carbonyl Functional Groups in Bio-oils by Potentiometric Titration: The Faix Method.

    PubMed

    Black, Stuart; Ferrell, Jack R

    2017-02-07

    Carbonyl compounds present in bio-oils are known to be responsible for bio-oil property changes upon storage and during upgrading. Specifically, carbonyls cause an increase in viscosity (often referred to as 'aging') during storage of bio-oils. As such, carbonyl content has previously been used as a method of tracking bio-oil aging and condensation reactions with less variability than viscosity measurements. Additionally, carbonyls are also responsible for coke formation in bio-oil upgrading processes. Given the importance of carbonyls in bio-oils, accurate analytical methods for their quantification are very important for the bio-oil community. Potentiometric titration methods based on carbonyl oximation have long been used for the determination of carbonyl content in pyrolysis bio-oils. Here, we present a modification of the traditional carbonyl oximation procedures that results in less reaction time, smaller sample size, higher precision, and more accurate carbonyl determinations. While traditional carbonyl oximation methods occur at room temperature, the Faix method presented here occurs at an elevated temperature of 80 °C.

  2. Determination of Carbonyl Functional Groups in Bio-oils by Potentiometric Titration: The Faix Method

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Stuart; Ferrell, Jack R. III

    2017-01-01

    Carbonyl compounds present in bio-oils are known to be responsible for bio-oil property changes upon storage and during upgrading. Specifically, carbonyls cause an increase in viscosity (often referred to as 'aging') during storage of bio-oils. As such, carbonyl content has previously been used as a method of tracking bio-oil aging and condensation reactions with less variability than viscosity measurements. Additionally, carbonyls are also responsible for coke formation in bio-oil upgrading processes. Given the importance of carbonyls in bio-oils, accurate analytical methods for their quantification are very important for the bio-oil community. Potentiometric titration methods based on carbonyl oximation have long been used for the determination of carbonyl content in pyrolysis bio-oils. Here, we present a modification of the traditional carbonyl oximation procedures that results in less reaction time, smaller sample size, higher precision, and more accurate carbonyl determinations. While traditional carbonyl oximation methods occur at room temperature, the Faix method presented here occurs at an elevated temperature of 80 degrees C.

  3. Functional Tooth Restoration by Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Bio-Root Regeneration in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Fulan; Song, Tieli; Ding, Gang; Xu, Junji; Liu, Yi; Liu, Dayong; Fan, Zhipeng; Zhang, Chunmei

    2013-01-01

    Our previous proof-of-concept study showed the feasibility of regenerating the dental stem cell-based bioengineered tooth root (bio-root) structure in a large animal model. Here, we used allogeneic dental mesenchymal stem cells to regenerate bio-root, and then installed a crown on the bio-root to restore tooth function. A root shape hydroxyapatite tricalcium phosphate scaffold containing dental pulp stem cells was covered by a Vc-induced periodontal ligament stem cell sheet and implanted into a newly generated jaw bone implant socket. Six months after implantation, a prefabricated porcelain crown was cemented to the implant and subjected to tooth function. Clinical, radiological, histological, ultrastructural, systemic immunological evaluations and mechanical properties were analyzed for dynamic changes in the bio-root structure. The regenerated bio-root exhibited characteristics of a normal tooth after 6 months of use, including dentinal tubule-like and functional periodontal ligament-like structures. No immunological response to the bio-roots was observed. We developed a standard stem cell procedure for bio-root regeneration to restore adult tooth function. This study is the first to successfully regenerate a functional bio-root structure for artificial crown restoration by using allogeneic dental stem cells and Vc-induced cell sheet, and assess the recipient immune response in a preclinical model. PMID:23363023

  4. Stimulatory effect of intracerebroventricular met- and leu-enkephalin on corticosterone secretion in rats.

    PubMed

    Gadek-Michalska, A; Bugajski, J

    1996-01-01

    The significance of enkephalins for the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, in spite of many efforts, is still elusive. We investigated the effect of leucine- and methionine-enkephalin on the HPA activity in conscious rats. These enkephalins, given intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) increased dose-dependently the activity of the HPA axis, measured indirectly through serum corticosterone levels. On a molar basis, leu-enkephalin exerted a stronger effect that met-enkephalin. Naloxone, an opioid receptor antagonist, given i.c.v. prior to enkephalins almost abolished the corticosterone response to met-enkephalin and significantly impaired the response to leu-enkephalin. Prazosin, an alpha 1-adrenergic antagonist, considerably reduced the increase in serum corticosterone levels induced by both enkephalins. Pretreatment of rats with yohimbine, an alpha 2-adrenergic antagonist, also considerably reduced the corticosterone response to met-enkephalin and significantly diminished the response induced by leu-enkephalin. Naloxone and yohimbine inhibited to the same extent the corticosterone response to met- and leu-enkephalin. This suggests an interaction between presynaptic opioid and alpha 2-receptors in regulation of the HPA function. Propranolol, a beta-adrenergic antagonist, given i.c.v. did not alter the corticosterone levels raised by met- and leu-enkephalin. These results indicate that both met- and leu-enkephalin increase the activity of the HPA axis in rats and both central opioid and adrenergic alpha-receptors are involved in this stimulation.

  5. Bio-Inspired Odor Source Localization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    1 Distribution A: Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Bio -Inspired Odor Source Localization Bio -Inspired Odor Source Localization...2011 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Bio -Inspired Odor Source Localization 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...Distribution Unlimited Bio -Inspired Odor Source Localization Why study odor tracking? • Engineer odor tracking systems – Gas leaks – Hazardous waste

  6. mTORC2 deficiency in myeloid DC enhances their allogeneic Th1 and Th17 stimulatory ability after TLR4 ligation in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Raïch-Regué, Dàlia; Rosborough, Brian R.; Watson, Alicia R.; McGeachy, Mandy J.; Turnquist, Hēth R.; Thomson, Angus W.

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key integrative kinase that functions in two independent complexes, mTOR complex (mTORC) 1 and mTORC2. In contrast to the well-defined role of mTORC1 in dendritic cells (DC), little is known about the function of mTORC2. Here, we demonstrate for the first time an enhanced ability of mTORC2-deficient myeloid DC to stimulate and polarize allogeneic T cells. We show that activated bone marrow-derived DC from conditional Rictor−/− mice exhibit lower co-inhibitory B7-H1 molecule expression independently of the stimulus and enhanced IL-6, TNFα, IL-12p70 and IL-23 production following TLR4 ligation. Accordingly, TLR4-activated Rictor−/− DC display augmented allogeneic T cell stimulatory ability, expanding IFN-γ+ and IL-17+, but not IL-10+ or CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in vitro. A similar DC profile was obtained by stimulating Dectin-1 (C-type lectin family member) on Rictor−/− DC. Using novel CD11c-specific Rictor−/− mice, we confirm the alloreactive Th1 and Th17 cell-polarizing ability of endogenous mTORC2-deficient DC after TLR4 ligation in vivo. Furthermore, we demonstrate that pro-inflammatory cytokines produced by Rictor−/− DC after LPS stimulation are key in promoting Th1/Th17 responses. These data establish that mTORC2 activity restrains conventional DC pro-inflammatory capacity and their ability to polarize T cells following TLR and non-TLR stimulation. Our findings provide new insight into the role of mTORC2 in regulating DC function and may have implications for emerging therapeutic strategies that target mTOR in cancer, infectious diseases, and transplantation. PMID:25840913

  7. Alpha1 adrenoreceptors mediate the stimulatory effects of oestrogen on stress-related hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activity in the female rat.

    PubMed

    Viau, V; Meaney, M J

    2004-01-01

    Variation in challenge-induced adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) release over the oestrous cycle occurs in response to fluctuations in circulating concentrations of oestrogen and progesterone. However, how these ovarian steroids interact to regulate the principal ACTH cosecretagogues, corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and arginine vasopressin is not understood. Here, we measured median eminence CRH and vasopressin content in intact cycling female rats, and in ovariectomized (OVX) females steroid-replaced in a manner that approximates the relative release patterns of oestrogen and progesterone seen over the oestrous cycle. Intact cycling females showed significantly higher median eminence CRH and vasopressin concentrations during proestrous and oestrous compared to the diestrous phase. In OVX rats, a single 10 micro g injection of oestrogen failed to mimic this increase in median eminence CRH and vasopressin. However, this dose significantly elevated CRH and vasopressin content in OVX rats previously exposed to diestrous concentrations of oestrogen and progesterone. Moreover, oestrogen priming enhanced restraint-induced depletion of CRH and vasopressin from the median eminence, but only against a background of low oestrogen and progesterone replacement. Oestrogen-induced elevations in median eminence vasopressin (but not CRH) content were reduced by peripheral administration of the alpha1 adrenoreceptor antagonist prazosin. Finally, plasma ACTH concentrations following central injection of the alpha1 receptor agonist, phenylephrine, were significantly higher in rats during proestrous compared to diestrous. These results indicate that the stimulatory effect of oestrogen on both the expression and stress-induced release of ACTH cosecretagogues is exerted only against a background of low oestrogen and progesterone levels, and is mediated, in part, via the alpha1 adrenoreceptor.

  8. mTOR and GSK-3 shape the CD4+ T-cell stimulatory and differentiation capacity of myeloid DCs after exposure to LPS.

    PubMed

    Turnquist, Heth R; Cardinal, Jon; Macedo, Camila; Rosborough, Brian R; Sumpter, Tina L; Geller, David A; Metes, Diana; Thomson, Angus W

    2010-06-10

    Prolonged inhibition of the kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), during myeloid dendritic cell (DC) generation confers resistance to maturation. Recently, however, mTOR inhibition immediately before Toll-like receptor ligation has been found to exert proinflammatory effects on myeloid cells, notably enhanced IL-12p40/p70 production. We show, for the first time, that mouse or human DCs generated under mTOR inhibition exhibit markedly enhanced IL-12p70 production after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation, despite impaired costimulatory molecule expression and poor T-cell stimulatory ability. Consistent with this finding, we reveal that increased IL-12p40 production occurs predominantly in CD86(lo) immature DCs. High IL-12p40/p70 production by CD86(lo) DC resulted from failed down-regulation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) activity and could not be ascribed to enhanced Akt function. Despite high IL-12p70 secretion, rapamycin-conditioned, LPS-stimulated DCs remained poor T-cell stimulators, failing to enhance allogeneic Th1 cell responses. We also report that inhibition of GSK-3 impedes the ability of LPS-stimulated DCs to induce forkhead box p3 in CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells, as does the absence of IL-12p40/p70. Thus, GSK-3 activity in DC is regulated via signaling linked to mTOR and modulates their capacity both to produce IL-12p40/p70 and induce forkhead box p3 in CD4(+) T cells under inflammatory conditions.

  9. 76 FR 53631 - BioPreferred Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-29

    ... biobased preferred procurement program (one part of the BioPreferred Program) is available on the Internet... Rule The USDA BioPreferred Program provides for the preferred procurement of biobased products by Federal agencies as well as a voluntary labeling program for biobased products. The BioPreferred Program...

  10. Joint BioEnergy Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Keasling, Jay; Simmons, Blake; Tartaglino, Virginia; Baidoo, Edward; Kothari, Ankita

    2015-06-15

    The Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Bioenergy Research Center dedicated to developing advanced biofuels—liquid fuels derived from the solar energy stored in plant biomass that can replace gasoline, diesel and jet fuels.

  11. Joint BioEnergy Institute

    ScienceCinema

    Keasling, Jay; Simmons, Blake; Tartaglino, Virginia; Baidoo, Edward; Kothari, Ankita

    2016-07-12

    The Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Bioenergy Research Center dedicated to developing advanced biofuels—liquid fuels derived from the solar energy stored in plant biomass that can replace gasoline, diesel and jet fuels.

  12. BIO: an alternative to RIO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuroglu, Bahri; Oktug, Sema

    2001-07-01

    RED (Random Early Detection) is the most popular active queue management algorithm, although it has some weaknesses. Recently, another active queue management algorithm, BLUE, was proposed and shown that it is more successful in controlling the queue length when high number of flows are active on ECN (Explicit Congestion Notification) capable networks. In this paper, RED and BLUE algorithms are evaluated for different levels of RTTs, with/without ECN support. It is shown that BLUE on ECN incapable networks is not as successful as on ECN capable networks. Differentiated Services architecture suggests that RIO (Red with In and Out) style queue management algorithms are to be used on each AF (Assured Forwarding) queue to offer different levels of services for different priorities at each AF class. Inspired of BLUE's success over RED on ECN capable networks, we developed a simple alternative to RIO, BIO (BLUE with In and Out). BIO, which runs two different BLUE algorithms for in and out packets, was expected to achieve lower loss rates while maximizing link utilization for high number of active flows on AF queues. However, due to the self-configuring architecture of the algorithm, it is observed that BIO marks packets too aggressively and degrades utilization. In this paper, the properties of BIO are also explained and the results obtained are justified.

  13. Stimulatory effect of Coca-Cola on gastroduodenal HCO3- secretion in rats.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Y; Aihara, E; Ise, F; Kita, K; Takeuchi, K

    2007-10-01

    We examined the effect of various carbonated beverages, especially Coca-Cola, on the HCO3- secretion in the rat stomach and duodenum. Under urethane anaesthesia, a chambered stomach or a proximal duodenal loop was perfused with saline, and HCO3- secretion was measured at pH 7.0 using a pH-stat method and by adding 2 mM HCl. The amount of CO2 contained in these beverages was about 4-7 g/mL. Coca-Cola topically applied to the mucosa for 10 min significantly increased the HCO3- secretion in both the stomach and the duodenum. The HCO3- response in the duodenum was totally abolished by indomethacin and also partially inhibited by acetazolamide, an inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase. Likewise, the response in the stomach was also markedly inhibited by either acetazolamide or indomethacin. The mucosal application of Coca-Cola increased the PGE2 contents in both the stomach and the duodenum. Other carbonated beverages, such as sparkling water, Fanta Grape or cider, also increased the HCO3- secretion in these tissues. These results suggest that Coca-Cola induces HCO3- secretion in both the stomach and the duodenum, and these responses may be attributable to both the intracellular supply of HCO3- generated via carbonic anhydrase, and endogenous PGs, probably related to the acidic pH of the solution.

  14. Adiposity induces lethal cytokine storm after systemic administration of stimulatory immunotherapy regimens in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Mirsoian, Annie; Bouchlaka, Myriam N; Sckisel, Gail D; Chen, Mingyi; Pai, Chien-Chun Steven; Maverakis, Emanuel; Spencer, Richard G; Fishbein, Kenneth W; Siddiqui, Sana; Monjazeb, Arta M; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart; Hesdorffer, Charles; Ferrucci, Luigi; Longo, Dan L; Blazar, Bruce R; Wiltrout, Robert H; Taub, Dennis D; Murphy, William J

    2014-11-17

    Aging is a contributing factor in cancer occurrence. We recently demonstrated that systemic immunotherapy (IT) administration in aged, but not young, mice resulted in induction of rapid and lethal cytokine storm. We found that aging was accompanied by increases in visceral fat similar to that seen in young obese (ob/ob or diet-induced obese [DIO]) mice. Yet, the effects of aging and obesity on inflammatory responses to immunotherapeutics are not well defined. We determine the effects of adiposity on systemic IT tolerance in aged compared with young obese mice. Both young ob/ob- and DIO-generated proinflammatory cytokine levels and organ pathologies are comparable to those in aged ad libitum mice after IT, culminating in lethality. Young obese mice exhibited greater ratios of M1/M2 macrophages within the peritoneal and visceral adipose tissues and higher percentages of TNF(+) macrophages in response to αCD40/IL-2 as compared with young lean mice. Macrophage depletion or TNF blockade in conjunction with αCD40/IL-2 prevented cytokine storms in young obese mice and protected from lethality. Calorie-restricted aged mice contain less visceral fat and displayed reduced cytokine levels, protection from organ pathology, and protection from lethality upon αCD40/IL-2 administration. Our data demonstrate that adiposity is a critical factor in the age-associated pathological responses to systemic anti-cancer IT. © 2014 Mirsoian et al.

  15. Adiposity induces lethal cytokine storm after systemic administration of stimulatory immunotherapy regimens in aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Mirsoian, Annie; Bouchlaka, Myriam N.; Sckisel, Gail D.; Chen, Mingyi; Pai, Chien-Chun Steven; Maverakis, Emanuel; Spencer, Richard G.; Fishbein, Kenneth W.; Siddiqui, Sana; Monjazeb, Arta M.; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart; Hesdorffer, Charles; Ferrucci, Luigi; Longo, Dan L.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Wiltrout, Robert H.; Taub, Dennis D.

    2014-01-01

    Aging is a contributing factor in cancer occurrence. We recently demonstrated that systemic immunotherapy (IT) administration in aged, but not young, mice resulted in induction of rapid and lethal cytokine storm. We found that aging was accompanied by increases in visceral fat similar to that seen in young obese (ob/ob or diet-induced obese [DIO]) mice. Yet, the effects of aging and obesity on inflammatory responses to immunotherapeutics are not well defined. We determine the effects of adiposity on systemic IT tolerance in aged compared with young obese mice. Both young ob/ob- and DIO-generated proinflammatory cytokine levels and organ pathologies are comparable to those in aged ad libitum mice after IT, culminating in lethality. Young obese mice exhibited greater ratios of M1/M2 macrophages within the peritoneal and visceral adipose tissues and higher percentages of TNF+ macrophages in response to αCD40/IL-2 as compared with young lean mice. Macrophage depletion or TNF blockade in conjunction with αCD40/IL-2 prevented cytokine storms in young obese mice and protected from lethality. Calorie-restricted aged mice contain less visceral fat and displayed reduced cytokine levels, protection from organ pathology, and protection from lethality upon αCD40/IL-2 administration. Our data demonstrate that adiposity is a critical factor in the age-associated pathological responses to systemic anti-cancer IT. PMID:25366964

  16. Bio-optical Dynamics and the Forecasting of Bio-optical Variability in the Sea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-09-30

    LONG-TERM GOAL. Research on oceanic bio -optical processes and the prediction of ocean bio -optical properties requires coupled physical-biological...develop the bio -optical model component of the Harvard Ocean Prediction System (HOPS); ii) to apply the bio -optical model to the study of real ocean...dynamical processes which govern the variability of bio -optical properties and associated effects on biogeochemical and ecosystem dynamical processes; iii

  17. Bio-optical Dynamics and the Forecasting of Bio-optical Variability in the Sea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-30

    LONG-TERM GOAL. Research on oceanic bio -optical processes and the prediction of ocean bio -optical properties requires coupled physical-biological...prove such models, focusing specifically on the bio -optical component. Ultimately, this research is directed towards the understanding of optical and...technical objectives of this project are i) to develop the bio -optical model component of the Harvard Ocean Prediction System (HOPS); ii) to apply the bio

  18. BioCreative V BioC track overview: collaborative biocurator assistant task for BioGRID

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun; Islamaj Doğan, Rezarta; Chatr-Aryamontri, Andrew; Chang, Christie S.; Oughtred, Rose; Rust, Jennifer; Batista-Navarro, Riza; Carter, Jacob; Ananiadou, Sophia; Matos, Sérgio; Santos, André; Campos, David; Oliveira, José Luís; Singh, Onkar; Jonnagaddala, Jitendra; Dai, Hong-Jie; Su, Emily Chia-Yu; Chang, Yung-Chun; Su, Yu-Chen; Chu, Chun-Han; Chen, Chien Chin; Hsu, Wen-Lian; Peng, Yifan; Arighi, Cecilia; Wu, Cathy H.; Vijay-Shanker, K.; Aydın, Ferhat; Hüsünbeyi, Zehra Melce; Özgür, Arzucan; Shin, Soo-Yong; Kwon, Dongseop; Dolinski, Kara; Tyers, Mike; Wilbur, W. John; Comeau, Donald C.

    2016-01-01

    BioC is a simple XML format for text, annotations and relations, and was developed to achieve interoperability for biomedical text processing. Following the success of BioC in BioCreative IV, the BioCreative V BioC track addressed a collaborative task to build an assistant system for BioGRID curation. In this paper, we describe the framework of the collaborative BioC task and discuss our findings based on the user survey. This track consisted of eight subtasks including gene/protein/organism named entity recognition, protein–protein/genetic interaction passage identification and annotation visualization. Using BioC as their data-sharing and communication medium, nine teams, world-wide, participated and contributed either new methods or improvements of existing tools to address different subtasks of the BioC track. Results from different teams were shared in BioC and made available to other teams as they addressed different subtasks of the track. In the end, all submitted runs were merged using a machine learning classifier to produce an optimized output. The biocurator assistant system was evaluated by four BioGRID curators in terms of practical usability. The curators’ feedback was overall positive and highlighted the user-friendly design and the convenient gene/protein curation tool based on text mining. Database URL: http://www.biocreative.org/tasks/biocreative-v/track-1-bioc/ PMID:27589962

  19. Bio-mimetic Flow Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Haecheon

    2009-11-01

    Bio-mimetic engineering or bio-mimetics is the application of biological methods and systems found in nature to the study and design of engineering systems and modern technology (from Wikipedia). The concept itself is old, but successful developments have been made recently, especially in the research field of flow control. The objective of flow control based on the bio-mimetic approach is to develop novel concepts for reducing drag, increasing lift and enhancing aerodynamic performance. For skin friction reduction, a few ideas have been suggested such as the riblet from shark, compliant surface from dolphin, microbubble injection and multiple front-body curvature from penguin, and V-shaped protrusion from sailfish. For form drag reduction, several new attempts have been also made recently. Examples include the V-shaped spanwise grooves from saguaro cactus, overall shape of box fish, longitudinal grooves on scallop shell, bill of swordfish, hooked comb on owl wing, trailing-edge protrusion on dragonfly wing, and fillet. For the enhancement of aerodynamic performance, focuses have been made on the birds, fish and insects: e.g., double layered feather of landing bird, leading-edge serration of humpback-whale flipper, pectoral fin of flying fish, long tail on swallowtail-butterfly wing, wing flapping motion of dragonfly, and alula in birds. Living animals adapt their bodies to better performance in multi purposes, but engineering requires single purpose in most cases. Therefore, bio-mimetic approaches often produce excellent results more than expected. However, they are sometimes based on people's wrong understanding of nature and produce unwanted results. Successes and failures from bio-mimetic approaches in flow control will be discussed in the presentation.

  20. S-Layer Protein Mediates the Stimulatory Effect of Lactobacillus helveticus MIMLh5 on Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Taverniti, Valentina; Stuknyte, Milda; Minuzzo, Mario; Arioli, Stefania; De Noni, Ivano; Scabiosi, Christian; Cordova, Zuzet Martinez; Junttila, Ilkka; Hämäläinen, Sanna; Turpeinen, Hannu; Mora, Diego; Karp, Matti; Pesu, Marko

    2013-01-01

    The ability to positively affect host health through the modulation of the immune response is a feature of increasing importance in measuring the probiotic potential of a bacterial strain. However, the identities of the bacterial cell components involved in cross talk with immune cells remain elusive. In this study, we characterized the dairy strain Lactobacillus helveticus MIMLh5 and its surface-layer protein (SlpA) using in vitro and ex vivo analyses. We found that MIMLh5 and SlpA exert anti-inflammatory effects by reducing the activation of NF-κB on the intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cell line. On the contrary, MIMLh5 and SlpA act as stimulators of the innate immune system by triggering the expression of proinflammatory factors tumor necrosis factor alpha and COX-2 in the human macrophage cell line U937 via recognition through Toll-like receptor 2. In the same experiments, SlpA protein did not affect the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10. A similar response was observed following stimulation of macrophages isolated from mouse bone marrow or the peritoneal cavity. These results suggest that SlpA plays a major role in mediating bacterial immune-stimulating activity, which could help to induce the host's defenses against and responses toward infections. This study supports the concept that the viability of bacterial cells is not always essential to exert immunomodulatory effects, thus permitting the development of safer therapies for the treatment of specific diseases according to a paraprobiotic intervention. PMID:23220964

  1. Three generation production biotechnology of biomass into bio-fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chaocheng

    2017-08-01

    The great change of climate change, depletion of natural resources, and scarcity of fossil fuel in the whole world nowadays have witnessed a sense of urgency home and abroad among scales of researchers, development practitioners, and industrialists to search for completely brand new sustainable solutions in the area of biomass transforming into bio-fuels attributing to our duty-that is, it is our responsibility to take up this challenge to secure our energy in the near future with the help of sustainable approaches and technological advancements to produce greener fuel from nature organic sources or biomass which comes generally from organic natural matters such as trees, woods, manure, sewage sludge, grass cuttings, and timber waste with a source of huge green energy called bio-fuel. Biomass includes most of the biological materials, livings or dead bodies. This energy source is ripely used industrially, or domestically for rather many years, but the recent trend is on the production of green fuel with different advance processing systems in a greener. More sustainable method. Biomass is becoming a booming industry currently on account of its cheaper cost and abundant resources all around, making it fairly more effective for the sustainable use of the bio-energy. In the past few years, the world has witnessed a remarkable development in the bio-fuel production technology, and three generations of bio-fuel have already existed in our society. The combination of membrane technology with the existing process line can play a vital role for the production of green fuel in a sustainable manner. In this paper, the science and technology for sustainable bio-fuel production will be introduced in detail for a cleaner world.

  2. Uridine from Pleurotus giganteus and Its Neurite Outgrowth Stimulatory Effects with Underlying Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Chia-Wei; David, Pamela; Wong, Kah-Hui; Naidu, Murali; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are linked to neuronal cell death and impairment of neurite outgrowth. An edible mushroom, Pleurotus giganteus was found to stimulate neurite outgrowth in vitro but the chemical constituents and the underlying mechanism is yet to be elucidated. The chemical constituents of P. giganteus (linoleic acid, oleic acid, cinnamic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, succinic acid, benzoic acid, and uridine) were tested for neurite outgrowth activity. Uridine (100 μM) was found to increase the percentage of neurite-bearing cells of differentiating neuroblastoma (N2a) cells by 43.1±0.5%, which was 1.8-fold higher than NGF (50 ng/mL)-treated cells. Uridine which was present in P. giganteus (1.80±0.03 g/100g mushroom extract) increased the phosphorylation of extracellular-signal regulated kinases (ERKs) and protein kinase B (Akt). Further, phosphorylation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) was also increased. MEK/ERK and PI3K-Akt-mTOR further induced phosphorylation of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) and expression of growth associated protein 43 (GAP43); all of which promoted neurite outgrowth of N2a cells. This study demonstrated that P. giganteus may enhance neurite outgrowth and one of the key bioactive molecules responsible for neurite outgrowth is uridine. PMID:26565787

  3. Uridine from Pleurotus giganteus and Its Neurite Outgrowth Stimulatory Effects with Underlying Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Phan, Chia-Wei; David, Pamela; Wong, Kah-Hui; Naidu, Murali; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are linked to neuronal cell death and impairment of neurite outgrowth. An edible mushroom, Pleurotus giganteus was found to stimulate neurite outgrowth in vitro but the chemical constituents and the underlying mechanism is yet to be elucidated. The chemical constituents of P. giganteus (linoleic acid, oleic acid, cinnamic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, succinic acid, benzoic acid, and uridine) were tested for neurite outgrowth activity. Uridine (100 μM) was found to increase the percentage of neurite-bearing cells of differentiating neuroblastoma (N2a) cells by 43.1 ± 0.5%, which was 1.8-fold higher than NGF (50 ng/mL)-treated cells. Uridine which was present in P. giganteus (1.80 ± 0.03 g/100g mushroom extract) increased the phosphorylation of extracellular-signal regulated kinases (ERKs) and protein kinase B (Akt). Further, phosphorylation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) was also increased. MEK/ERK and PI3K-Akt-mTOR further induced phosphorylation of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) and expression of growth associated protein 43 (GAP43); all of which promoted neurite outgrowth of N2a cells. This study demonstrated that P. giganteus may enhance neurite outgrowth and one of the key bioactive molecules responsible for neurite outgrowth is uridine.

  4. Stimulatory effect of dopamine on acid secretion from the isolated rat stomach.

    PubMed

    Tsai, L H; Cheng, J T

    1995-01-01

    The effect of dopamine (DA) on acid secretion was studied using the everted preparation of isolated rat stomachs. DA concentrations, measured by HPLC-ECD in the rumen, corpus and antrum were 1.06 nmol/mg protein, 0.49 nmol/mg protein and 2.92 nmol/mg protein, respectively. DA stimulated acid secretion at a concentration of 10 nM and elicited the maximum response at 10 microM, which was at a level approximately 1.56-fold that of the spontaneous secretion but only about half that of secretion induced by histamine at a concentration of 0.3 mM. The concentration-dependent stimulation by DA was antagonized by octopamine and SCH 23390. Failure of proglumide and cimetidine to affect this stimulation ruled out the participation of histamine and/or gastrin. Scopolamine and tetrodotoxin completely inhibited the acid secretion induced by low concentrations of DA but inhibited only partially the response induced by high concentrations of DA. The results obtained indicate that DA induces acid secretion via activation of the dopamine D1 receptor, located on the cholinergic neurons and on some nonneuronal cells, in the rat stomach.

  5. Bio-aerosols in indoor environment: composition, health effects and analysis.

    PubMed

    Srikanth, Padma; Sudharsanam, Suchithra; Steinberg, Ralf

    2008-01-01

    Bio-aerosols are airborne particles that are living (bacteria, viruses and fungi) or originate from living organisms. Their presence in air is the result of dispersal from a site of colonization or growth. The health effects of bio-aerosols including infectious diseases, acute toxic effects, allergies and cancer coupled with the threat of bioterrorism and SARS have led to increased awareness on the importance of bio-aerosols. The evaluation of bio-aerosols includes use of variety of methods for sampling depending on the concentration of microorganisms expected. There have been problems in developing standard sampling methods, in proving a causal relationship and in establishing threshold limit values for exposures due to the complexity of composition of bio-aerosols, variations in human response to their exposure and difficulties in recovering microorganisms. Currently bio-aerosol monitoring in hospitals is carried out for epidemiological investigation of nosocomial infectious diseases, research into airborne microorganism spread and control, monitoring biohazardous procedures and use as a quality control measure. In India there is little awareness regarding the quality of indoor air, mould contamination in indoor environments, potential source for transmission of nosocomial infections in health care facilities. There is an urgent need to undertake study of indoor air, to generate baseline data and explore the link to nosocomial infections. This article is a review on composition, sources, modes of transmission, health effects and sampling methods used for evaluation of bio-aerosols, and also suggests control measures to reduce the loads of bio-aerosols.

  6. Stimulatory Effect of Insulin on 5α-Reductase Type 1 (SRD5A1) Expression through an Akt-Dependent Pathway in Ovarian Granulosa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kayampilly, Pradeep P.; Wanamaker, Brett L.; Stewart, James A.; Wagner, Carrie L.; Menon, K. M. J.

    2010-01-01

    Elevated levels of 5α-reduced androgens have been shown to be associated with hyperandrogenism and hyperinsulinemia, the leading causes of ovulatory dysfunction in women. 5α-Dihydrotestosterone reduces ovarian granulosa cell proliferation by inhibiting FSH-mediated mitogenic signaling pathways. The present study examined the effect of insulin on 5α-reductase, the enzyme that catalyses the conversion of androgens to their 5α-derivatives. Granulosa cells isolated from immature rat ovaries were cultured in serum-free, phenol red-free DMEM-F12 media and treated with different doses of insulin (0, 0.1, 1.0, and 10.0 μg/ml) for different time intervals up to 12 h. The expression of 5α-reductase type 1 mRNA, the predominant isoform found in granulosa cells, showed a significant (P < 0.05) increase in response to the insulin treatment up to 12 h compared with control. The catalytic activity of 5α-reductase enzyme was also stimulated in a dose-depended manner (P < 0.05). Inhibiting the Akt-dependent signaling pathway abolished the insulin-mediated increase in 5α-reductase mRNA expression, whereas inhibition of the ERK-dependent pathway had no effect. The dose-dependent increase in 5α-reductase mRNA expression as well as catalytic activity seen in response to insulin treatment was also demonstrated in the human granulosa cell line (KGN). In addition to increased mRNA expression, a dose-dependent increase in 5α-reductase protein expression in response to insulin was also seen in KGN cells, which corroborated well with that of mRNA expression. These results suggest that elevated levels of 5α-reduced androgens seen in hyperinsulinemic conditions might be explained on the basis of a stimulatory effect of insulin on 5α-reductase in granulosa cells. The elevated levels of these metabolites, in turn, might adversely affect growth and proliferation of granulosa cells, thereby impairing follicle growth and ovulation. PMID:20810561

  7. Does orchiectomy enhance the immune-stimulatory effects of melatonin during experimental Chagas' disease?

    PubMed

    Santello, Fabricia Helena; Caetano, Leony Cristina; Filipin, Marina Del Vecchio; Brazão, Vânia; Caetano, Luana Naiara; Toldo, Míriam Paula Alonso; do Prado, José Clóvis

    2012-10-01

    Melatonin has been reported to play a fundamental role in T-cell immunoregulation. Control of Trypanosoma cruzi parasitism during the acute phase of infection is considered to be critically dependent on direct macrophage activation by cytokines. The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of exogenous melatonin treatment and the influences exerted by sexual hormones during the acute phase of the experimental Chagas' disease in rats. With melatonin treatment, orchiectomized animals (CMOR and IMOR) displayed the highest concentrations of IFN-γ and TNF-α. On the 7th day post-infection, untreated and treated orchiectomized animals (IOR and IMOR) showed an enhanced number of peritoneal macrophages. Nitric oxide levels were also increased in untreated and treated orchiectomized (IOR and IMOR) when compared to the other groups, with or without LPS. Our data suggest that melatonin therapy associated with orchiectomy induced a stimulating effect on the immune response to the parasite.

  8. Strong stimulation of recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli by combining stimulatory control elements in an expression cassette

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The XylS/Pm expression system has been used to produce recombinant proteins at industrial levels in Escherichia coli. Activation of transcription from the Pm promoter takes place in the presence of benzoic acid or derivatives of it. Previous mutagenesis studies resulted in identification of several variants of the expression control elements xylS (X), Pm (P) and the 5'-untranslated region (U) that individually gave rise to strongly stimulated expression. The goal of this study was to test if combination of such stimulatory mutations in the same expression vectors would lead to further increase of expression levels. Results We combined X, P and U variants that were originally identified due to their ability to strongly stimulate expression of the reporter gene bla (resistance to penicillin). Combination of optimized elements stimulated bla expression up to 75-fold (X, P and U combined) relative to the wild-type system, while accumulated transcript levels increased about 50-fold. This is much more than for the elements individually. We also tested combination of the variant elements on two other and unrelated genes, celB (encoding phosphoglucomutase) and the human growth factor gene gm-csf. Protein production from these genes is much more efficient than from bla in the wild-type system, but expression was still significantly stimulated by the combination of X, P and U variants, although not to the same extent as for bla. We also integrated a single copy of the expression cassette with each gene into the E. coli chromosome and found that the expression level from this single copy was higher for bla than for the wild-type plasmid system, while it was lower for celB and gm-csf. Conclusion Our results show that combination of stimulatory expression control elements can be used to further increase production of different proteins in E. coli. For one reporter gene (bla) this allowed for more protein production from a single gene copy integrated on the chromosome

  9. Involvement of opioid receptor subtypes in both stimulatory and inhibitory effects of the opioid peptides on prolactin secretion during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Soaje, M; Deis, R P

    2004-04-01

    1. We have previously demonstrated the existence of a dual neuromodulatory regulation of prolactin secretion by the opioid system. In the present work, we evaluated the opioid receptor subtypes involved in both the stimulatory and the inhibitory regulation of prolactin secretion in pregnant rats. 2. Specific opioid agonists and antagonists were administered intracerebro ventricular (i.c.v.) to rats on day 3 and on day 19 pregnancy in rats of pretreated with mifepristone. Blood samples were obtained after decapitation at 12.00 and 18.00 h. Serum prolactin levels were measured by RIA. 3. The mu-selective agonist DAMGO and beta-endorphin caused a significant increase in serum prolactin secretion on day 3 of pregnancy, during the diurnal surge and intersurge period. Pretreatment with naloxone prevented the increase on prolactin levels induced by DAMGO. The administration of U-50,488, a kappa-selective agonist or DPDPE, a delta-selective agonist, did not modify serum prolactin concentration while the mu1-antagonist naloxonazine reduced significantly serum prolactin levels. On day 19 of pregnancy, the release of prolactin induced by mifepristone was significantly increase by naloxonazine, while the kappa-antagonist nor-binaltorfimine induced only a small but significant increase. No effect was observed after administration of the delta-antagonist naltrindole. 4. We conclude that the mu-opioid receptor seems to be more specifically involved in both the stimulatory and inhibitory regulation by the opioid system on prolactin secretion during pregnancy. The increase on serum prolactin levels on day 3 after administration of DAMGO and beta-endorphin may suggest the participation of other regulatory mechanisms as the dopaminergic and serotoninergic systems. On day 19, only the endogenous ligands delta did not participate in the regulation of prolactin secretion, while the participation of the kappa-opioid receptor was significantly less effective than the endogenous ligand mu

  10. Bio-batteries and bio-fuel cells: leveraging on electronic charge transfer proteins.

    PubMed

    Kannan, A M; Renugopalakrishnan, V; Filipek, S; Li, P; Audette, G F; Munukutla, L

    2009-03-01

    Bio-fuel cells are alternative energy devises based on bio-electrocatalysis of natural substrates by enzymes or microorganisms. Here we review bio-fuel cells and bio-batteries based on the recent literature. In general, the bio-fuel cells are classified based on the type of electron transfer; mediated electron transfer and direct electron transfer or electronic charge transfer (ECT). The ECT of the bio-fuel cells is critically reviewed and a variety of possible applications are considered. The technical challenges of the bio-fuel cells, like bioelectrocatalysis, immobilization of bioelectrocatalysts, protein denaturation etc. are highlighted and future research directions are discussed leveraging on the use of electron charge transfer proteins. In addition, the packaging aspects of the bio-fuel cells are also analyzed and the found that relatively little work has been done in the engineering development of bio-fuel cells.

  11. Growth Stimulatory Effects and Genome-Wide Transcriptional Changes Produced by Protein Hydrolysates in Maize Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Santi, Chiara; Zamboni, Anita; Varanini, Zeno; Pandolfini, Tiziana

    2017-01-01

    Protein hydrolysates are an emerging class of crop management products utilized for improving nutrient assimilation and mitigating crop stress. They generally consist of a mixture of peptides and free amino acids derived from the hydrolysis of plant or animal sources. The present work was aimed at studying the effects and the action mechanisms of a protein hydrolysate derived from animal residues on maize root growth and physiology in comparison with the effects induced by either free amino acids or inorganic N supply. The application of the protein hydrolysate caused a remarkable enhancement of root growth. In particular, in the protein hydrolysate-treated plants the length and surface area of lateral roots were about 7 and 1.5 times higher than in plants treated with inorganic N or free amino acids, respectively. The root growth promoting effect of the protein hydrolysate was associated with an increased root accumulation of K, Zn, Cu, and Mn when compared with inorganic N and amino acids treatments. A microarray analysis allowed to dissect the transcriptional changes induced by the different treatments demonstrating treatment-specific effects principally on cell wall organization, transport processes, stress responses and hormone metabolism. PMID:28424716

  12. Stimulatory effect of ethanol on libertellenone H biosynthesis by Arctic fungus Eutypella sp. D-1.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chu; Xu, Ning; Gao, Yanyun; Sun, Xiaoyue; Yin, Ying; Cai, Menghao; Zhou, Xiangshan; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2016-02-01

    Libertellenone H (1) was a promising antitumor diterpenoid isolated from Arctic fungus Eutypella sp. D-1, however, its production was very limited. In this study, we investigated the effects of ethanol on cell growth and libertellenone H production. The mycelium in ethanol-feeding cultures was fragmented and dispersed, and the titer of libertellenone H was remarkably increased to 4.88 mg l(-1) in an optimal feeding manner, which was 16.4-fold higher than the control group. To provide an insight into the cell response to ethanol, genes critical to the libertellenone H biosynthesis were successfully cloned and their transcription levels were determined. The results suggested that the gene transcription levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl glutaric acyl coenzyme A reductase and geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase were up-regulated by ethanol stimulation. The results from this study were helpful for further understanding of the ethanol function on diterpenes biosynthesis as well as developing more effective strategies for over-production of these desired secondary metabolites.

  13. Stimulatory effects of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) on fibronectin matrix assembly.

    PubMed

    Pastino, Alexandra K; Greco, Todd M; Mathias, Rommel A; Cristea, Ileana M; Schwarzbauer, Jean E

    2017-05-01

    Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) are a heterogeneous group of compounds that form via non-enzymatic glycation of proteins throughout our lifespan and at a higher rate in certain chronic diseases such as diabetes. AGEs contribute to the progression of fibrosis, in part by stimulating cellular pathways that affect gene expression. Long-lived ECM proteins are targets for non-enzymatic glycation but the question of whether the AGE-modified ECM leads to excess ECM accumulation and fibrosis remains unanswered. In this study, cellular changes due to AGE accretion in the ECM were investigated. Non-enzymatic glycation of proteins in a decellularized fibroblast ECM was achieved by incubating the ECM in a solution of methylglyoxal (MGO). Mass spectrometry of fibronectin (FN) isolated from the glycated matrix identified twenty-eight previously unidentified MGO-derived AGE modification sites including functional sites such as the RGD integrin-binding sequence. Mesangial cells grown on the glycated, decellularized matrix assembled increased amounts of FN matrix. Soluble AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (BSA) also stimulated FN matrix assembly and this effect was reduced by function-blocking antibodies against the receptor for AGE (RAGE). These results indicate that cells respond to AGEs by increasing matrix assembly and that RAGE is involved in this response. This raises the possibility that the accumulation of ECM during the progression of fibrosis may be enhanced by cell interactions with AGEs on a glycated ECM.

  14. Stimulatory effect of stevioside on peripheral mu opioid receptors in animals.

    PubMed

    Yang, Po-Sheng; Lee, Jie-Jen; Tsao, Chiung-Wen; Wu, Hung-Tsung; Cheng, Juei-Tang

    2009-04-17

    Stevioside is a dietary supplement widely used as a sweetener to prevent hyperglycemic disorders. However, the action mechanisms of this substance for glucose homeostasis remain obscure. In the present study, a dose-related plasma glucose reduction was observed in Wistar rats receiving intraperitoneally injections of stevioside. Similar to the regulation of glucose metabolism by the activation of mu opioid receptors, this action of stevioside was reversed by naloxonazine under the blockade of mu opioid receptors. We also found that stevioside increased glycogen synthesis in isolated hepatocytes, which was concentration-dependently blocked by naloxonazine. Stevioside did not modify the plasma beta-endorphin levels in Wistar rats but it directly increased the phosphorylation of mu opioid receptors in Chinese hamster ovary cells transfected with mu opioid receptors. Unlike morphine, chronic administration of stevioside did not induce the withdrawal signs in mice. Furthermore, stevioside by intraperitoneal injections did not influence the feeding behaviors of rats. By contrast, intracerebroventricular injections of stevioside increased the rats' food intake, which was also inhibited by pretreatment with naloxonazine. These results showed that it is difficult for stevioside to enter the brain. Stevioside has the ability to activate peripheral mu opioid receptors for lowering plasma glucose and to increase glycogen synthesis in liver. Thus, the stimulation of peripheral mu opioid receptors is responsible for the action of stevioside in the regulation of glucose homeostasis.

  15. Microcavity surface plasmon resonance bio-sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosavian, Nazanin

    This work discusses a miniature surface plasmon biosensor which uses a dielectric sub- micron diameter core with gold spherical shell. The shell has a subwavelength nanoaperture believed to excite stationary plasmon resonances at the biosensor's surface. The sub-micron cavity enhances the measurement sensitivity of molecules binding to the sensor surface. We used visible-range optical spectroscopy to study the wavelength shift as bio-molecules absorbed-desorbed at the shell surface. We also used Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Focused Ion Beam (FIB) ablation to study the characteristics of microcavity surface plasmon resonance sensor (MSPRS) and the inner structure formed with metal deposition and its spectrum. We found that resonances at 580 nm and 670 nm responded to bound test agents and that Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) sensor intensity could be used to differentiate between D-glucose and L-glucose. The responsiveness of the system depended upon the mechanical integrity of the metallic surface coating.

  16. Darbepoietin-alfa has comparable erythropoietic stimulatory effects to recombinant erythropoietin whilst preserving the bone marrow microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Dewamitta, Sita R; Russell, Megan R; Nandurkar, Harshal; Walkley, Carl R

    2013-05-01

    Erythropoiesis stimulating agents are widely used for the treatment of anemia. Recently, we reported erythroid expansion with impaired B lymphopoiesis and loss of trabecular bone in C57BL/6 mice following ten days of treatment with low-dose short acting recombinant human erythropoietin. We have assessed erythropoietin against longer-acting darbepoietin-alfa at a comparable erythroid stimulatory dosage regime. Darbepoietin-alfa and erythropoietin induced similar in vivo erythropoietic expansion. Both agents induced an expansion of the colony-forming unit-erythroid populations. However, unlike erythropoietin, darbepoietin-alfa did not impair bone marrow B lymphopoiesis. Strikingly the bone loss observed with erythropoietin was not apparent following darbepoietin-alfa treatment. This analysis demonstrates that whilst darbepoietin-alfa has similar in vivo erythropoietic potency to erythropoietin, it preserves the bone marrow microenvironment. Thus erythropoietin and darbepoietin-alfa manifest different action showing that erythropoiesis stimulating agents have differential non-erythroid effects dependent on their duration of action.

  17. The stimulatory effect of neuropeptide Y on growth hormone expression, food intake, and growth in olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus).

    PubMed

    Li, Meijie; Tan, Xungang; Sui, Yulei; Jiao, Shuang; Wu, Zhihao; Wang, Lijuan; You, Feng

    2017-02-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a 36-amino acid peptide known to be a strong orexigenic (appetite-stimulating) factor in many species. In this study, we investigated the effect of NPY on food intake and growth in the olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus). Recombinant full-length NPY was injected intraperitoneally into olive flounder at the dose of 1 μg/g body weight; phosphate buffered saline was used as the negative control. In a long-term experiment, NPY and control groups were injected every fifth day over a period of 30 days. In a short-term experiment, NPY and control groups were given intraperitoneal injections and maintained for 24 h. Food intake and growth rates were significantly higher in fish injected with recombinant NPY than in the control fish (P < 0.05). Higher growth hormone (GH) and NPY mRNA transcript levels were observed in both experiments, indicating a stimulatory effect of NPY on GH release. These findings demonstrate that NPY is an effective appetite-stimulating factor in olive flounder with the potential to improve the growth of domestic fish species and enhance efficiency in aquaculture.

  18. Glucagon induces disaggregation of polymer-like structures of the. alpha. subunit of the stimulatory G protein in liver membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Shunichi; Rodbell, M. )

    1991-08-15

    The hydrodynamic behavior of G{alpha}{sub s}, the {alpha} subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein (G protein), in octyl glucoside extracts of rat liver membranes was investigated. As was previously shown for G proteins similarly extracted from brain synaptoneurosomes, G{alpha}{sub s} behaved as polydisperse structures with S values higher than that of heterotrimeric G proteins. When G{alpha}{sub s} in its membrane-bound form was ({sup 32}P)ADP-ribosylated by cholera toxin and the treated membranes were extracted with octyl glucoside, > 35% of the labeled G{alpha}{sub s} was found in material that sedimented through sucrose gradients and contained relatively low levels of immunoreactive G{alpha}{sub s}. These finding suggest that the glucagon receptor selectivity interacts with polymer-like structures of G{alpha}{sub 2} and that activation by GTP({gamma}S) results in disaggregation. The role of the {beta} and {gamma} subunits of G proteins in the hormone-induced process is not clear since the polymer-like structures extracted with octyl glucoside are devoid of {beta} and {gamma} subunits.

  19. [Machanism of the stimulatory effect of intracerebroventricular administration of histamine on gastatric acid secretion induced by pentagastrin in rats].

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Wang, Z L; Lu, G Q

    1997-08-01

    The present experiment was designed to study the mechanism underlying the stimulatory effect of histamine (HA, i.c.v.) on the gastric acid secretion in subdiaphragmatic vagotomized SD rats. Gastric acid was continuously washed out with 37 degrees C saline by a perfusion pump. Drugs were injected into the third ventricle or the vein to examine the effect on gastric acid secretion and the level of plasma corticosterone. The results are as follows: (1) HA (1.0 microgram, i.c.v.) potentiated gastric acid secretion induced by G-5, which could be abolished by preintramuscular injection of diphenhydramine hydrochloride (8.0 micrograms). (2) Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) (0.5 microgram, 1.0 microgram, i.c.v.) augmented gastric acid secretion in a dose dependent manner. (3) HA (1.0 microgram, i.c.v.) increased the plasma corticosterone level. (4) Intravenous injection of corticosterone 21-sulfale (15, 30 micrograms) augmented gastric acid secretion in a dose dependent manner. These results suggested that intracerebroventricular injection of HA could stimulate the release of CRF by specificably binding with H1 receptor in some areas of hypothalamus, which, in turn, increased gastric acid secretion induced by G-5 via increasing the level of plasma corticosterone.

  20. Heparin affin regulatory peptide/pleiotrophin mediates fibroblast growth factor 2 stimulatory effects on human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hatziapostolou, Maria; Polytarchou, Christos; Katsoris, Panagiotis; Courty, Jose; Papadimitriou, Evangelia

    2006-10-27

    Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) is a pleiotropic growth factor that has been implicated in prostate cancer formation and progression. In the present study we found that exogenous FGF2 significantly increased human prostate cancer LNCaP cell proliferation and migration. Heparin affin regulatory peptide (HARP) or pleiotrophin seems to be an important mediator of FGF2 stimulatory effects, since the latter had no effect on stably transfected LNCaP cells that did not express HARP. Moreover, FGF2, through FGF receptors (FGFRs), significantly induced HARP expression and secretion by LNCaP cells and increased luciferase activity of a reporter gene vector carrying the full-length promoter of HARP gene. Using a combination of Western blot analyses, as well as genetic and pharmacological inhibitors, we found that activation of FGFR by FGF2 in LNCaP cells leads to NAD(P)H oxidase-dependent hydrogen peroxide production, phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38, activation of AP-1, increased expression and secretion of HARP, and, finally, increased cell proliferation and migration. These results establish the role and the mode of activity of FGF2 in LNCaP cells and support an interventional role of HARP in FGF2 effects, providing new insights on the interplay among growth factor pathways within prostate cancer cells.

  1. Allele-Specific Phenotype Suggests a Possible Stimulatory Activity of RCAN-1 on Calcineurin in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weixun; Choi, Tae-Woo; Ahnn, Joohong; Lee, Sun-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Regulator of calcineurin 1 (RCAN1) binds to calcineurin through the PxIxIT motif, which is evolutionarily conserved. SP repeat phosphorylation in RCAN1 is required for its complete function. The specific interaction between RCAN1 and calcineurin is critical for calcium/calmodulin-dependent regulation of calcineurin serine/threonine phosphatase activity. In this study, we investigated two available deletion rcan-1 mutants in Caenorhabditis elegans, which proceed differently for transcription and translation. We found that rcan-1 may be required for calcineurin activity and possess calcineurin-independent function in body growth and egg-laying behavior. In the genetic background of enhanced calcineurin activity, the rcan-1 mutant expressing a truncated RCAN-1 which retains the calcineurin-binding PxIxIT motif but misses SP repeats stimulated growth, while rcan-1 lack mutant resulted in hyperactive egg-laying suppression. These data suggest rcan-1 has unknown functions independent of calcineurin, and may be a stimulatory calcineurin regulator under certain circumstances. PMID:27871170

  2. Influence of various treatments including povidone-iodine and healing stimulatory reagents in a rabbit ear wound model.

    PubMed

    Arai, Keitaro; Yamazaki, Masashi; Maeda, Tatsuo; Okura, Takaaki; Tsuboi, Ryoji

    2013-10-01

    Selecting an appropriate treatment for a given case of skin wound is crucial for inducing optimal healing. We used an animal model developed from normal rabbit ears in order to assess the efficacy of treatments for skin wounds with or without a wet dressing, anti microbial reagent or topical wound-stimulatory reagents. The degree of healing in each group was evaluated and compared using four histological parameters: (i) degree of reepithelialisation, (ii) amount of granulation tissue formation, and (iii) the number of capillary lumens and (iv) fibroblasts in the granulation tissue. Treatment using wet dressings resulted in an increase in capillary number compared with the open dry wound. Although the retention of povidone-iodine (PI) in wound tissue after application significantly inhibited reepithelialisation (P < 0.05), rinsing PI off with saline was comparable in effect to using only a wet dressing. The three topical reagents, namely, basic fibroblast growth factor, prostaglandin E1 and dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate, significantly improved reepithelialisation (P < 0.05). In conclusion, wounds should be kept hydrated by applying topical reagents. If there are any signs of bacterial infection, PI can be applied and rinsed later with saline in order to minimise its cytotoxic effects. © 2012 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Medicalhelplines.com Inc.

  3. Stimulatory drugs of abuse in surface waters and their removal in a conventional drinking water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Huerta-Fontela, Maria; Galceran, Maria Teresa; Ventura, Francesc

    2008-09-15

    The presence of psychoactive stimulatory drugs in raw waters used for drinking water production and in finished drinking water was evaluated in a Spanish drinking water treatment plant (DWTP). Contamination of the river basin which provides raw water to this DWTP was also studied. In surface waters, illicit drugs such as cocaine, benzoylecgonine (cocaine metabolite), amphetamine, methamphetamine, MDMA (ecstasy), and MDA were detected at mean concentrations ranging from 4 to 350 ng/L. Nicotine, caffeine, and their metabolites were also found at the microg/L level. The elimination of these compounds during drinking water treatment was investigated in a real waterworks. Amphetamine-type stimulants (except MDMA) were completely removed during prechlorination, flocculation, and sand filtration steps, yielding concentrations lowerthan their limits of detection (LODs). Further, ozone treatment was shown to be effective in partially eliminating caffeine (76%), while subsequent granulated activated carbon (GAC) filtration removed cocaine (100%), MDMA(88%), benzoylecgonine (72%), and cotinine (63%). Postchlorination achieved the complete elimination of cocaine and nicotine and only one parent compound (caffeine) and two metabolites (cotinine and benzoylecgonine) persisted throughout treatment although reductions of 90% for caffeine and benzoylecgonine and 74% for cotinine were obtained.

  4. Phosphatidylinositol turnover (PI) during synaptic activation results from the release of a stimulatory and in inhibitory agonist

    SciTech Connect

    Bencherif, M.; Rubio, R.; Berne, R.M.

    1986-03-05

    PI has been implicated in the process of synaptic transmission and is increased by agonists. It has been suggested that PI is involved in cellular Ca/sup + +/ mobilization and the process represents a series of hydrolytic reactions with inositol as the final product. Hence, the rate of release of /sup 3/H-inositol (/sup 3/H-Ins) from prelabelled inositol phospholipids can be used as an index of PI. In the /sup 3/H-inositol prelabelled frog sympathetic ganglia, they studied the effect of synaptic activity on PI. PI did not change during orthodromic stimulation (20 Hz, 5 min). However, upon cessation of the stimulation, PI increased rapidly and remained elevated for at least 30 min. This increase in PI was reduced by suffusing the ganglia with either acetylcholine or adenosine. In the presence of atropine (5 ..mu..M), orthodromic stimulation increased PI. They hypothesized that synaptic activation releases a long-lasting stimulatory agonist and a short-lived inhibitory (Ach/adenosine) agonist(s) affecting PI. To test this idea, 2 sympathetic ganglia were used. One was prelabelled with /sup 3/H-inositol and the other was not. The two ganglia were placed together in a 5 ..mu..l drop of Ringers solution containing atropine. Orthodromic stimuli were applied to the non-labelled ganglion and elicited release of /sup 3/H-Ins from the non-stimulated ganglion.

  5. Stimulatory effect of He-Ne low dose laser on injured sciatic nerves of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Rochkind, S.; Barrnea, L.; Razon, N.; Bartal, A.; Schwartz, M.

    1987-06-01

    Injury to a mammalian peripheral nerve is accompanied by a restorative process that is manifested after a delay. This process is expressed morphologically by the emergence of new nerve fibers. Restoration of function occurs when the regenerating fibers reconnect with the target organ. Because of the low rate of fiber elongation, the denervated target is partially degenerated by the time that the regenerating fibers approach it. To prevent such an atrophy, one must find a way to prevent the degeneration of the nerve, to speed up regeneration, or to maintain the target during the period of nerve degeneration. In the present work, we examined the potential of treatment with low energy laser radiation for improving regeneration or preventing degeneration of mammalian peripheral nerve after injury. After repeated injury for 20 consecutive days, treatment of the sciatic nerve of the rat with low energy laser (He-Ne, 17 mW) caused a significant increase in the amplitude of the action potential recorded in the corresponding gastrocnemius relative to the action potential of injured but not treated nerves. The action potential of the injured sciatic nerves that were laser-irradiated increased to values close to that of a noninjured nerve. The studies include follow-up for 1 year after the injury. This electrophysiological manifestation of the effect of laser treatment on injured nerves was accompanied by a diminution of the size of the scar tissue from these nerves. Yet to be resolved is whether these two phenomena (i.e., electrophysiological and morphological responses) coincide or whether they relate to each other.

  6. Screening of stimulatory effects of dietary risk factors on mouse intestinal cell kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Shivshankar, Pooja; Devi, Shyamala C. S.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Although epidemiological and experimental studies validate influence of genetic, environmental and dietary factors in the causation of various types of cancers including colon, results from all these sources are inconclusive. Hypothesizing that high fat diet and obesity are among the major predisposing factors in the incidence of colon cancer, we evaluated the role of diet constituted with food material derived from a tropical plant, Tamarindus indica Linn (TI). METHODS: A two part randomized double-blind study was conducted employing inbred Swiss albino mice from a single generation for the whole investigation. One day-old neonates (n = 12) were subcutaneously administered with monosodium glutamate (MSG) to induce obesity (OB). At weaning these animals were maintained on modified AIN-76 diet supplemented with 10% TI and 10% fat bolus (w/w, TIFB) for 8 wk. Subsequently, in the second part of study, four groups of animals belonging to the same generation, age and gender (n = 12 per group), were maintained on: AIN-76 control diet (CD); AIN-76 mixed with 10% TI extract (TI); and, mixed with 10% TI and 10% FB (TIFB) for 8 wk, to determine intestinal crypt cell proliferation, functionally-specific enzyme activities, fermentation profile, and energy preferences. RESULTS: We observed a significant increase in the crypt cell production rate in distal colonic segment of experimental animals when compared with the controls. This segment also contained significantly low butyrate levels compared to control and TIFB groups. All the experimental groups showed a gross decrease in the enzyme activities viz., succinate dehydrogenase, acid-galactosidase and dipeptidyl amino peptidase IV demonstrating pathological stress caused by the test regimens, and an altered metabolic flux in the cellular environment. CONCLUSION: We have demonstrated a cumulative response to the three dietary factors, one of which (TI) is reported, herein, for the first time to modulate kinetics of large

  7. Potentiation of T Cell Stimulatory Activity by Chemical Fixation of a Weak Peptide-MHC Complex

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Inkyu; Kim, Kwangmi; Choi, Sojin; Lomunova, Maria

    2017-01-01

    The stability of peptide-MHC complex (pMHC) is an important factor to shape the fate of peptide-specific T cell immune response, but how it influences on T cell activation process is poorly understood. To better understand that, we investigated various T cell activation events driven by Ld MHCI loaded with graded concentrations of P2Ca and QL9 peptides, respectively, with 2C TCR Tg T cells; the binding strength of P2Ca for Ld is measurably weaker than that of QL9, but either peptides in the context of Ld interact with 2C TCR with a similar strength. When their concentrations required for early T cell activation events, which occur within several minutes to an hour, were concerned, EC50s of QL9 were about 100 folds lower than those of P2Ca, which was expected from their association constants for Ld. When EC50s for late activation events, which takes over several hours to occur, were concerned, the differences grew even larger (> 300 folds), suggesting that, due to weak binding, Ld/P2Ca dissociate from each other more easily to lose its antigenicity in a short time. Accordingly, fixation of Ld/P2Ca with paraformaldehyde resulted in a significant improvement in its immunogenicity. These results imply that binding strength of a peptide for a MHC is a critical factor to determine the duration of pMHC-mediated T cell activation and thus the attainment of productive T cell activation. It is also suggested that paraformaldehyde fixation should be an effective tool to ameliorate the immunogenicity of pMHC with a poor stability. PMID:28152301

  8. A Novel Beta-Defensin Antimicrobial Peptide in Atlantic Cod with Stimulatory Effect on Phagocytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ruangsri, Jareeporn; Kitani, Yoichiro; Kiron, Viswanath; Lokesh, Jep; Brinchmann, Monica F.; Karlsen, Bård Ove; Fernandes, Jorge M. O.

    2013-01-01

    A novel defensin antimicrobial peptide gene was identified in Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua. This three exon/two intron defensin gene codes for a peptide precursor consisting of two domains: a signal peptide of 26 amino acids and a mature peptide of 40 residues. The mature cod defensin has six conserved cysteine residues that form 1–5, 2–4 and 3–6 disulphide bridges. This pattern is typical of beta-defensins and this gene was therefore named cod beta-defensin (defb). The tertiary structure of Defb exhibits an α/β fold with one α helix and β1β2β3 sheets. RT-PCR analysis indicated that defb transcripts were present mainly in the swim bladder and peritoneum wall but could also be detected at moderate to low levels in skin, head- and excretory kidneys. In situ hybridisation revealed that defb was specifically expressed by cells located in the swim bladder submucosa and the oocytes. During embryonic development, defb gene transcripts were detectable from the golden eye stage onwards and their expression was restricted to the swim bladder and retina. Defb was differentially expressed in several tissues following antigenic challenge with Vibrio anguillarum, being up-regulated up to 25-fold in head kidney. Recombinant Defb displayed antibacterial activity, with a minimal inhibitory concentration of 0.4–0.8 µM and 25–50 µM against the Gram-(+) bacteria Planococcus citreus and Micrococcus luteus, respectively. In addition, Defb stimulated phagocytic activity of cod head kidney leucocytes in vitro. These findings imply that beta-defensins may play an important role in the innate immune response of Atlantic cod. PMID:23638029

  9. Deriving bio-equivalents from in vitro bioassays: assessment of existing uncertainties and strategies to improve accuracy and reporting.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Martin; Vermeirssen, Etiënne L M; Buchinger, Sebastian; Behr, Maximilian; Magdeburg, Axel; Oehlmann, Jörg

    2013-08-01

    Bio-equivalents (e.g., 17β-estradiol or dioxin equivalents) are commonly employed to quantify the in vitro effects of complex human or environmental samples. However, there is no generally accepted data analysis strategy for estimating and reporting bio-equivalents. Therefore, the aims of the present study are to 1) identify common mathematical models for the derivation of bio-equivalents from the literature, 2) assess the ability of those models to correctly predict bio-equivalents, and 3) propose measures to reduce uncertainty in their calculation and reporting. We compiled a database of 234 publications that report bio-equivalents. From the database, we extracted 3 data analysis strategies commonly used to estimate bio-equivalents. These models are based on linear or nonlinear interpolation, and the comparison of effect concentrations (ECX ). To assess their accuracy, we employed simulated data sets in different scenarios. The results indicate that all models lead to a considerable misestimation of bio-equivalents if certain mathematical assumptions (e.g., goodness of fit, parallelism of dose-response curves) are violated. However, nonlinear interpolation is most suitable to predict bio-equivalents from single-point estimates. Regardless of the model, subsequent linear extrapolation of bio-equivalents generates additional inaccuracy if the prerequisite of parallel dose-response curves is not met. When all these factors are taken into consideration, it becomes clear that data analysis introduces considerable uncertainty in the derived bio-equivalents. To improve accuracy and transparency of bio-equivalents, we propose a novel data analysis strategy and a checklist for reporting Minimum Information about Bio-equivalent ESTimates (MIBEST). Copyright © 2013 SETAC.

  10. Kaolin Foliar Application Has a Stimulatory Effect on Phenylpropanoid and Flavonoid Pathways in Grape Berries

    PubMed Central

    Conde, Artur; Pimentel, Diana; Neves, Andreia; Dinis, Lia-Tânia; Bernardo, Sara; Correia, Carlos M.; Gerós, Hernâni; Moutinho-Pereira, José

    2016-01-01

    Drought, elevated air temperature, and high evaporative demand are increasingly frequent during summer in grape growing areas like the Mediterranean basin, limiting grapevine productivity and berry quality. The foliar exogenous application of kaolin, a radiation-reflecting inert mineral, has proven effective in mitigating the negative impacts of these abiotic stresses in grapevine and other fruit crops, however, little is known about its influence on the composition of the grape berry and on key molecular mechanisms and metabolic pathways notably important for grape berry quality parameters. Here, we performed a thorough molecular and biochemical analysis to assess how foliar application of kaolin influences major secondary metabolism pathways associated with berry quality-traits, leading to biosynthesis of phenolics and anthocyanins, with a focus on the phenylpropanoid, flavonoid (both flavonol- and anthocyanin-biosynthetic) and stilbenoid pathways. In grape berries from different ripening stages, targeted transcriptional analysis by qPCR revealed that several genes involved in these pathways—VvPAL1, VvC4H1, VvSTSs, VvCHS1, VvFLS1, VvDFR, and VvUFGT—were more expressed in response to the foliar kaolin treatment, particularly in the latter maturation phases. In agreement, enzymatic activities of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), flavonol synthase (FLS), and UDP-glucose:flavonoid 3-O-glucosyltransferase (UFGT) were about two-fold higher in mature or fully mature berries from kaolin-treated plants, suggesting regulation also at a transcriptional level. The expression of the glutathione S-transferase VvGST4, and of the tonoplast anthocyanin transporters VvMATE1 and VvABCC1 were also all significantly increased at véraison and in mature berries, thus, when anthocyanins start to accumulate in the vacuole, in agreement with previously observed higher total concentrations of phenolics and anthocyanins in berries from kaolin-treated plants, especially at full

  11. Stimulatory effects of chitinase on growth and immune defense of orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanhong; Feng, Shaozhen; Chen, Jun; Qin, Chaobin; Lin, Haoran; Li, Wensheng

    2012-05-01

    spleen in response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge, strongly suggesting the existence of an innate pathway for local defense against chitin-containing organisms. Moreover, the pathogen such as Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus could be inhibited by the recombinant protein of grouper chitinase1 to a certain extent.

  12. Proteomic insights into the stimulatory effect of Tween 80 on mycelial growth and exopolysaccharide production of an edible mushroom Pleurotus tuber-regium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo-Bo; Chen, Lei; Cheung, Peter C K

    2012-10-01

    Proteomic analysis was applied to investigate the mechanism of the stimulatory effect of Tween 80 on the mycelial growth and exopolysaccharide production by an edible mushroom Pleurotus tuber-regium. 32 differentially expressed proteins were identified by one-dimension gel electrophoresis. Combined with our previous findings, the up-regulation of heat shock proteins might help to maintain cellular viability under environmental stress. The up-regulation of ATP:citrate lyase isoform 2 could suppress the activity of tricarboxylic acid cycle and, consequently, stimulate exopolysaccharide production. The present results provide important insight to the mechanism by which stimulatory agents (Tween 80) can increase the production of useful fungal metabolites and also fill the gap of our knowledge on the under-developed mushroom proteomics.

  13. The Bio* toolkits--a brief overview.

    PubMed

    Mangalam, Harry

    2002-09-01

    Bioinformatics research is often difficult to do with commercial software. The Open Source BioPerl, BioPython and Biojava projects provide toolkits with multiple functionality that make it easier to create customised pipelines or analysis. This review briefly compares the quirks of the underlying languages and the functionality, documentation, utility and relative advantages of the Bio counterparts, particularly from the point of view of the beginning biologist programmer.

  14. The stimulatory effect of canrenoate, a mineralocorticoid antagonist, on the activity of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis is abolished by alprazolam, a benzodiazepine, in humans.

    PubMed

    Grottoli, S; Giordano, R; Maccagno, B; Pellegrino, M; Ghigo, E; Arvat, E

    2002-10-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) in the hippocampus play a major role in the control of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, mediating the proactive feedback of glucocorticoids in the maintenance of basal activity. Intracerebroventricular and intrahippocampal MR blockade stimulates HPA axis in animals; the systemic administration of mineralocorticoid antagonists enhances spontaneous and CRH-stimulated ACTH and cortisol secretion in humans. Benzodiazepines, namely alprazolam, activate central gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic receptors, which are mainly distributed in the hippocampus. Alprazolam has a inhibitory effect on HPA axis either in basal conditions or after central nervous system-mediated stimuli. In humans, alprazolam strongly reduces the corticotroph responsiveness to removal of glucocorticoid feedback by metyrapone. We studied the effect of alprazolam (0.02 mg/kg, orally) on the effect of canrenoate (CAN), an MR antagonist (200 mg as an iv bolus, followed by 200 mg infused in 250 ml saline) or placebo on ACTH, cortisol, and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) secretion in six normal young women (aged 25-32 yr; body mass index, 19-23 kg/m(2)). During placebo, ACTH, cortisol, and DHEA secretion showed a progressive decrease (baseline vs. nadir, mean +/- SEM, from 1830-2400 h, 2.6 +/- 0.3 vs. 1.4 +/- 0.3 pmol/liter, 133.2 +/- 16.4 vs. 46.9 +/- 5.2 nmol/liter, and 22.6 +/- 2.3 vs. 18.6 +/- 2.3 nmol/liter, respectively), although statistical significance was obtained for ACTH and cortisol only (P < 0.05). During CAN treatment, ACTH, cortisol, and DHEA secretion showed a progressive rise, which began at approximately 2100 h and peaked between 2300 and 2400 h (2.9 +/- 0.3 pmol/liter, 172.6 +/- 27.9 nmol/liter, and 45.3 +/- 10.7 nmol/liter, respectively; P < 0.05). Alprazolam abolished the CAN-induced increases in ACTH, cortisol, and DHEA levels (1.8 +/- 0.1 pmol/liter, 59.7 +/- 8.6 nmol/liter, and 19.8 +/- 6.7 nmol/liter; P < 0.05), inducing hormonal

  15. Investigation of intracellular signalling cascades mediating stimulatory effect of a Gymnema sylvestre extract on insulin secretion from isolated mouse and human islets of Langerhans.

    PubMed

    Al-Romaiyan, A; Liu, B; Docherty, R; Huang, G-C; Amiel, S; Persaud, S J; Jones, P M

    2012-12-01

    Traditional plant-based remedies such as Gymnema sylvestre (GS) extracts have been used to treat diabetes mellitus for many centuries. We have shown previously that a novel GS extract, OSA®, has a direct effect on insulin secretion but its mode of action has not been studied in detail Thus this study investigated the possible underlying mechanism(s) by which OSA® exerts its action. The effects of OSA® on [Ca(2+)]i and K(+) conductances were assessed by Ca(2+) microfluorimetry and electrophysiology in dispersed mouse islets and MIN6 β-cells, respectively. Isolated mouse (from 20 to 25 mice) and human (from 3 donors) islets, and MIN6 β-cells, were used to investigate whether the stimulatory effect of OSA® on insulin secretion was dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium and protein kinase activation. OSA ®-induced insulin secretion from mouse islets and MIN6 β-cells was inhibited by nifedipine, a voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel blocker, and by the removal of extracellular Ca(2+), respectively. OSA® did not affect the activities of KATP channels or voltage-dependent K(+) channels in MIN6 β-cells but it caused an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) concentrations in Fura-2-loaded mouse islet cells. The insulin secretagogue effect of OSA® was dependent, in part, on protein kinase activation since incubating mouse or human islets with staurosporine, a general protein kinase inhibitor, resulted in partial inhibition of OSA®-induced insulin secretion. Experiments using permeabilized, Ca(2+)-clamped MIN6 β-cells revealed a Ca(2+)-independent component action of OSA® at a late stage in the stimulus-response coupling pathway. OSA®-induced insulin secretion was unexpectedly associated with a decrease in intracellular cAMP levels. These data indicate that the GS isolate OSA® stimulates insulin secretion from mouse and human islets in vitro, at least in part as a consequence of Ca(2+) influx and protein kinase activation. © 2012 Blackwell

  16. Visualizing molecular profiles of glioblastoma with GBM-BioDP.

    PubMed

    Celiku, Orieta; Johnson, Seth; Zhao, Shuping; Camphausen, Kevin; Shankavaram, Uma

    2014-01-01

    Validation of clinical biomarkers and response to therapy is a challenging topic in cancer research. An important source of information for virtual validation is the datasets generated from multi-center cancer research projects such as The Cancer Genome Atlas project (TCGA). These data enable investigation of genetic and epigenetic changes responsible for cancer onset and progression, response to cancer therapies, and discovery of the molecular profiles of various cancers. However, these analyses often require bulk download of data and substantial bioinformatics expertise, which can be intimidating for investigators. Here, we report on the development of a new resource available to scientists: a data base called Glioblastoma Bio Discovery Portal (GBM-BioDP). GBM-BioDP is a free web-accessible resource that hosts a subset of the glioblastoma TCGA data and enables an intuitive query and interactive display of the resultant data. This resource provides visualization tools for the exploration of gene, miRNA, and protein expression, differential expression within the subtypes of GBM, and potential associations with clinical outcome, which are useful for virtual biological validation. The tool may also enable generation of hypotheses on how therapies impact GBM molecular profiles, which can help in personalization of treatment for optimal outcome. The resource can be accessed freely at http://gbm-biodp.nci.nih.gov (a tutorial is included).

  17. Growth performance and immunological and antioxidant status of Chinese shrimp, Fennerpenaeus chinensis reared in bio-floc culture system using probiotics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Su; Min, EunYoung; Kim, Jun-Hwan; Koo, Ja-Keun; Kang, Ju-Chan

    2015-11-01

    Chinese shrimp Fennerpenaeus chinensis (mean length 1.86 ± 0.15 cm, and weight 137.4 ± 12.7 mg) were reared in the different concentrations of bio-floc (control, 60, 80, 100, 120, and 140%) for 90 days. The growth rate was significantly increased over 100% bio-floc concentrations. In the immunological parameters, the gene expression of proPO and lysozyme was considerably increased over 120% bio-floc concentrations. The gene expression of SP was notably elevated at 140% bio-floc concentration. In the antioxidant enzymes, the activity of SOD was considerably decreased over 80% bio-floc concentrations. A notable decline in the activity of CAT was observed over 120% bio-floc concentrations. The results indicate that rearing of Chinese shrimp in bio-floc system can induce the increase of growth performance, enhancement of immune responses, and reduction of oxidative stress.

  18. Bio-inspired Fillers for Mechanical Enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korley, Lashanda

    2012-02-01

    An examination of natural materials has offered a new perspective on the development of multi-functional materials with enhanced mechanical properties. One important lesson from nature is the utilization of composite structures to impart improved mechanical behavior and enhanced functionality using nanofillers. A relatively unexplored expansion of this bio-inspired, nanoscale filler approach to high performance materials is the incorporation of responsive, multi-functional reinforcing elements in polymeric composites with the goal of combining superior mechanical behavior that can be tuned with additional functionality, such as sensing and bioactivity. One approach is the use of self-assembling small molecules that form uniform, one-dimensional nanostructures as an emerging class of filler components. Another pathway toward mechanical enhancement is the incorporation of stimuli-responsive and high-modulus electrospun nanofibers. We have probed the utilization of high-aspect ratio, self-assembled small molecules and responsive electrospun nanofibers as all-organic nanofillers to achieve significant modulus changes within elastomeric matrices. The influence of matrix-filler interactions and the role of hierarchical organization in these nature-inspired composites will be discussed. Potential applications in barrier technology and drug delivery have also been explored.

  19. Can the combination of flaxseed and its lignans with soy and its isoflavones reduce the growth stimulatory effect of soy and its isoflavones on established breast cancer?

    PubMed

    Power, Krista A; Thompson, Lilian U

    2007-07-01

    Consumption of phytoestrogen (PE)-rich foods (i. e., soy and flaxseed (FS)) is increasing because of their suggested health benefits. However, recent studies raise concern over the safety of soy and its isoflavones, particularly genistein (GEN), for postmenopausal breast cancer (BC), due to their potential stimulatory effects on human breast tissue and on the growth of existing tumors in rodents. FS, rich in PE lignans, which is metabolized to the mammalian lignans enterolactone (ENL) and enterodiol (END), has consistently been shown to have tumor inhibitory effects in a human clinical trial as well as rodent BC models. Using the preclinical athymic mouse postmenopausal BC model, combining FS with soy protein or GEN with END and ENL, was found to negate the tumor stimulatory effects of soy protein or GEN alone. The mechanism may be related to the modulation of estrogen receptor and MAPK signaling pathways. If these studies can be confirmed in clinical trials, then consumption of combined soy and FS, or their PEs, may reduce the tumor growth stimulatory effect of soy or GEN. This may indicate that if soy is consumed with lignan-rich foods, it may continue to induce its other beneficial health effects, without inducing adverse effect on postmenopausal BC.

  20. Antibacterial and osteo-stimulatory effects of a borate-based glass series doped with strontium ions.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiming; Stone, Wendy; Schemitsch, Emil H; Zalzal, Paul; Papini, Marcello; Waldman, Stephen D; Towler, Mark R

    2016-11-01

    This work considered the effect of both increasing additions of Strontium (Sr(2+)) and incubation time on solubility and both antibacterial and osteo-stimulatory effects of a series of glasses based on the B2O3-P2O5-CaCO3-Na2CO3-TiO2-SrCO3 series. The amorphous nature of all the glasses was confirmed by X-ray diffraction. Discs of each glass were immersed in de-ionized water for 1, 7 and 30 days, and the water extracts were used for ion release profiles, pH measurements and cytotoxicity testing. Atomic absorption spectroscopy was employed to detect the release of Na(+), Ca(2+) and Sr(2+) ions from the glasses with respect to maturation, which indicated that the addition of Sr(2+) retarded solubility of the glass series. This effect was also confirmed by weight loss analysis through comparing the initial weight of glass discs before and after periods of incubation. The incorporation of Sr(2+) in the glasses did not influence the pH of the water extracts when the glasses were stored for up to 30 days. Cytotoxicity testing with an osteoblastic cell line (MC3T3-E1) indicated that glasses with the higher (20 mol% and 25 mol%) Sr(2+) incorporation promoted proliferation of osteoblast cells, while the glasses with lower Sr(2+) contents inhibited cell growth. The glass series, except for Ly-B5 (which contained the highest Sr(2+) incorporation; 25 mol%), were bacteriostatic against S. aureus in the short term (1-7 days) as a result of the dissolution products released.

  1. The stimulatory effect of mannitol on levan biosynthesis: Lessons from metabolic systems analysis of Halomonas smyrnensis AAD6(T.).

    PubMed

    Ates, Ozlem; Arga, Kazim Y; Oner, Ebru Toksoy

    2013-01-01

    Halomonas smyrnensis AAD(T) is a halophilic, gram-negative bacterium that can efficiently produce levan from sucrose as carbon source via levansucrase activity. However, systems-based approaches are required to further enhance its metabolic performance for industrial application. As an important step toward this goal, the genome-scale metabolic network of Chromohalobacter salexigens DSM3043, which is considered a model organism for halophilic bacteria, has been reconstructed based on its genome annotation, physiological information, and biochemical information. In the present work, the genome-scale metabolic network of C. salexigens was recruited, and refined via integration of the available biochemical, physiological, and phenotypic features of H. smyrnensis AAD6(T) . The generic metabolic model, which comprises 1,393 metabolites and 1,108 reactions, was then systematically analyzed in silico using constraints-based simulations. To elucidate the relationship between levan biosynthesis and other metabolic processes, an enzyme-graph representation of the metabolic network and a graph decomposition technique were employed. Using the concept of control effective fluxes, significant links between several metabolic processes and levan biosynthesis were estimated. The major finding was the elucidation of the stimulatory effect of mannitol on levan biosynthesis, which was further verified experimentally via supplementation of mannitol to the fermentation medium. The optimal concentration of 30 g/L mannitol supplemented to the 50 g/L sucrose-based medium resulted in a twofold increase in levan production in parallel with increased sucrose hydrolysis rate, accumulated extracellular glucose, and decreased fructose uptake rate. © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  2. The co-stimulatory molecule B7-H3 promotes the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Ting; Liu, Fen; Sun, Zhangzhang; Shi, Hanping; Hua, Dong; Yang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    B7-H3, first recognized as a co-stimulatory molecule, is abnormally expressed in cancer tissues and is associated with cancer metastasis and a poor prognosis. However, as an initial event of metastasis, the relationship between the Epithelial–Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) in cancer cells and B7-H3 has still not been investigated. In this study, we first analyzed B7-H3 expression by immunohistochemistry in colorectal cancer tissues. B7-H3 was expressed in the cancer cell membrane and was associated with the T stage of colorectal cancer; it also showed a positive correlation with MMP2 and MMP9 expression in cancer tissues. Over-expression of B7-H3 in SW480 cells allowed cancer cells to invade and metastasize more than the control cells, whereas invasion and metastasis capabilities were decreased after B7-H3 was knocked down in Caco-2 cells. We further showed that B7-H3 down-regulated the expression of E-cadherin and β-catenin and up-regulated N-cadherin and Vimentin expression, implying that B7-H3 promoted the EMT in colorectal cancer cells. We also checked another character of the EMT, the stemness of cancer cells. CD133, CD44 and Oct4 were significantly elevated after the SW480 cells were transfected with B7-H3 and reduced in Caco-2 cells after B7-H3 was inhibited. In subsequent studies, we proved that B7-H3 upregulated the expression of Smad1 via PI3K-Akt. In conclusion, B7-H3 promotes the EMT in colorectal cancer cells by activating the PI3K-Akt pathway and upregulating the expression of Smad1. PMID:27145365

  3. Evaluating use of ferricyanide-mediated respiration bioassays to quantify stimulatory and inhibitory effects on Escherichia coli populations.

    PubMed

    Catterall, Kylie; Robertson, David; Teasdale, Peter R; Welsh, David T; John, Richard

    2010-03-15

    A number of recent studies have utilised ferricyanide as a respiratory mediator for microbial-based assays for determining water quality parameters such as biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and toxicity. The majority of assays published to date obtain a result by determining the difference in ferrocyanide accumulation between a test sample and one or more control samples. However, a validation of the relationship between ferrocyanide accumulation and standard measures of cell density or viability has not yet been performed. To this end, a rapid microbially catalysed ferricyanide-mediated respiration (FM-RES) assay was compared with standard plate count (SPC) and spectrophotometer (OD(600)) measurements on a growing batch culture of Escherichia coli. Good agreement was observed between all techniques, with predictable deviations noted in different phases of the growth curves. Standardised FM-RES assays showed excellent correlations with the SPC method under controlled conditions, indicating that short-term changes in microbial activity are due to a change in per-cell respiration, rather than changes in cell numbers. The FM-RES assay was then used to observe the changes in the respiration of E. coli induced by the addition of a glucose-glutamic acid (GGA) mixture, 3,5-dichlorophenol (3,5-DCP) and Ag(+) in various combinations and concentrations. Stimulation of respiration was pronounced in the presence of GGA while both 3,5-DCP and, in particular, Ag(+) demonstrated inhibitory respiratory effects. The results highlight the validity and suitability of ferricyanide-mediated respiration bioassays, with appropriate modification, to monitor either stimulatory effects on microbial populations, such as occurs with BOD, or inhibitory effects, such as occurs with toxicity assays. Crown Copyright (c) 2009. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Stimulatory effect of the secretogranin-ll derived peptide secretoneurin on food intake and locomotion in female goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Mikwar, M; Navarro-Martin, L; Xing, L; Volkoff, H; Hu, W; Trudeau, V L

    2016-04-01

    Secretoneurin (SN) is a conserved peptide derived by proteolytic processing from the middle domain of the ∼600 amino acid precursor secretogranin-II (SgII). Secretoneurin is widely distributed in secretory granules of endocrine cells and neurons and has important roles in reproduction as it stimulates luteinizing hormone release from the pituitary. A potential new role of SN in goldfish feeding is the subject of this study. Firstly, we established that acute (26 h; p<0.0001) and short-term (72 h; p=0.016) fasting increased SgIIa precursor mRNA levels 1.25-fold in the telencephalon, implicating SN in the control of feeding. Secondly, we determined that intracerebroventricular injections of the type A SN (SNa; 0.2 and 1 ng/g BW) increased food intake and locomotor behavior by 60 min. Fish injected with the lower and higher doses of SNa (0.2 and 1 ng/g) respectively exhibited significant 1.77- and 2.58-fold higher food intake (p<0.0001) than the saline-injected control fish. Locomotor behavior was increased by 1.35- and 2.26-fold for 0.2 ng/g SNa (p=0.0001) and 1 ng/g SNa (p<0.0001), respectively. Injection of 1 ng/g SNa increased mRNA levels of hypothalamic neuropeptide Y 1.36-fold (p=0.038) and decreased hypothalamic cocaine-and amphetamine-regulated transcript by 33% (p=0.01) at 2h and 5h post-injection, respectively. These data suggest interactions of SNa with stimulatory and inhibitory pathways of food intake control in fish.

  5. Small-molecule modulators of the OX40–OX40 ligand co-stimulatory protein–protein interaction

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yun; Margolles-Clark, Emilio; Bayer, Allison; Buchwald, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The OX40–OX40L protein–protein interaction (PPI) is an important cell-surface signalling co-stimulatory regulator within the TNFR superfamily (TNFRSF) and a promising therapeutic target for immunomodulation. PPIs are difficult to modulate using small-molecules. Here, we describe the identification of a small-molecule OX40 modulator and confirm its partial agonist character. Experimental Approach Cell-free screening assays were developed and used to identify OX40–OX40L inhibitors. Modified versions of this assay were used to elucidate the binding partner and the binding nature of active compounds. OX40-transfected sensor cells with NF-κB reporters were constructed and used to confirm and characterize activity and specificity. Immunomodulatory activity and partial agonist nature were further confirmed by ex vivo T-cell polarization assays. Key Results Several compounds that concentration-dependently affected OX40-OX40L were identified. Cell assays indicated that they were partial agonists with low micromolar potency and adequate selectivity. Under polarizing conditions based on TGF-β, the most promising compound mimicked the effect of an agonistic anti-OX40 antibody in suppressing regulatory T-cell generation and diverting CD4+CD62L+Foxp3− cells to TH9 phenotype in vitro. Conclusions and Implications We identified, to our knowledge, the first small-molecule compounds able to interfere with OX40–OX40L binding and, more importantly, to act as partial agonists of OX40. This is particularly interesting, as small-molecule agonism or activation of PPIs is considered unusually challenging and there are only few known examples. These results provide proof-of-principle evidence for the feasibility of small-molecule modulation of the OX40–OX40L interaction and for the existence of partial agonists for TNFRSF-PPIs. PMID:24930776

  6. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation with co-stimulatory blockade induces macrochimerism and tolerance without cytoreductive host treatment.

    PubMed

    Wekerle, T; Kurtz, J; Ito, H; Ronquillo, J V; Dong, V; Zhao, G; Shaffer, J; Sayegh, M H; Sykes, M

    2000-04-01

    Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (in immunocompetent adults) has always required cytoreductive treatment of recipients with irradiation or cytotoxic drugs to achieve lasting engraftment at levels detectable by non-PCR-based techniques ('macrochimerism' or 'mixed chimerism'). Only syngeneic marrow engraftment at such levels has been achieved in unconditioned hosts. This requirement for potentially toxic myelosuppressive host pre-conditioning has precluded the clinical use of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for many indications other than malignancies, including tolerance induction. We demonstrate here that treatment of naive mice with a high dose of fully major histocompatibility complex-mismatched allogeneic bone marrow, followed by one injection each of monoclonal antibody against CD154 and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 immunoglobulin, resulted in multi-lineage hematopoietic macrochimerism (of about 15%) that persisted for up to 34 weeks. Long-term chimeras developed donor-specific tolerance (donor skin graft survival of more than 145 days) and demonstrated ongoing intrathymic deletion of donor-reactive T cells. A protocol of high-dose bone marrow transplantation and co-stimulatory blockade can thus achieve allogeneic bone marrow engraftment without cytoreduction or T-cell depletion of the host, and eliminates a principal barrier to the more widespread use of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Although efforts have been made to minimize host pre-treatment for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for tolerance induction, so far none have succeeded in eliminating pre-treatment completely. Our demonstration that this can be achieved provides the rationale for a safe approach for inducing robust transplantation tolerance in large animals and humans.

  7. Identification of the somatostatin receptor subtypes (sst) mediating the divergent, stimulatory/inhibitory actions of somatostatin on growth hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Luque, Raúl M; Durán-Prado, Mario; García-Navarro, Socorro; Gracia-Navarro, Francisco; Kineman, Rhonda D; Malagón, María M; Castaño, Justo P

    2006-06-01

    It is well established that somatostatin acts through G protein-coupled receptors, termed sst, to inhibit GH release. However in pigs somatostatin can stimulate or inhibit in vitro GH secretion in a dose- and somatotrope subpopulation-dependent manner. We report herein that somatostatin-stimulated GH release is blocked by pretreatment with GTPgamma-S, suggesting an involvement of G protein-coupled receptors. Consistent with this, an sst5 selective agonist stimulated spontaneous GH secretion at doses ranging 10(-13) to 10(-9) m, without influencing GHRH-induced GH release. Conversely, sst1-, sst2-, sst3-, and sst4-specific agonists inhibited GHRH-evoked GH release but not basal GH secretion. Examination of the effects of sst-specific agonists on two subpopulations of somatotrope cells separated by density gradient centrifugation [low- (LD) and high-density (HD) cells] showed that only a low dose of the sst5 agonist stimulated GH release in LD somatotropes, whereas both low and high doses of this agonist stimulated GH release in HD cells. In marked contrast, sst1 and sst2 agonists blocked GHRH-stimulated GH release in LD cells at all doses tested, whereas only a high dose of the sst2 agonist inhibited GHRH-induced GH release in HD somatotropes. Interestingly, sst expression pattern in these subpopulations correlates with the distinct actions of sst-selective agonists; specifically, sst5 is more abundant in HD somatotropes, whereas sst1 and sst2 mRNA predominate in LD cells. These results indicate that in the pig, sst1 and sst2 are the primary mediators of the inhibitory effects of somatostatin, whereas sst5 or an sst5-related mechanism mediates the stimulatory action of somatostatin on GH release.

  8. Relationship between cerebral sigma-1 receptor occupancy and attenuation of cocaine's motor stimulatory effects in mice by PD144418.

    PubMed

    Lever, John R; Miller, Dennis K; Fergason-Cantrell, Emily A; Green, Caroline L; Watkinson, Lisa D; Carmack, Terry L; Lever, Susan Z

    2014-10-01

    Psychostimulant effects of cocaine are mediated partly by agonist actions at sigma-1 (σ1) receptors. Selective σ1 receptor antagonists attenuate these effects and provide a potential avenue for pharmacotherapy. However, the selective and high affinity σ1 antagonist PD144418 (1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-5-[3-(4-methylphenyl)-5-isoxazolyl]-1-propylpyridine) has been reported not to inhibit cocaine-induced hyperactivity. To address this apparent paradox, we evaluated aspects of PD144418 binding in vitro, investigated σ1 receptor and dopamine transporter (DAT) occupancy in vivo, and re-examined effects on locomotor activity. PD144418 displayed high affinity for σ1 sites (Ki 0.46 nM) and 3596-fold selectivity over σ2 sites (Ki 1654 nM) in guinea pig brain membranes. No appreciable affinity was noted for serotonin and norepinephrine transporters (Ki >100 μM), and the DAT interaction was weak (Ki 9.0 μM). In vivo, PD144418 bound to central and peripheral σ1 sites in mouse, with an ED50 of 0.22 μmol/kg in whole brain. No DAT occupancy by PD144418 (10.0 μmol/kg) or possible metabolites were observed. At doses that did not affect basal locomotor activity, PD144418 (1, 3.16, and 10 μmol/kg) attenuated cocaine-induced hyperactivity in a dose-dependent manner in mice. There was good correlation (r(2) = 0.88) of hyperactivity reduction with increasing cerebral σ1 receptor occupancy. The behavioral ED50 of 0.79 μmol/kg corresponded to 80% occupancy. Significant σ1 receptor occupancy and the ability to mitigate cocaine's motor stimulatory effects were observed for 16 hours after a single 10.0 μmol/kg dose of PD144418. U.S. Government work not protected by U.S. copyright.

  9. A bifunctional locus (BIO3-BIO1) required for biotin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Muralla, Rosanna; Chen, Elve; Sweeney, Colleen; Gray, Jennifer A; Dickerman, Allan; Nikolau, Basil J; Meinke, David

    2008-01-01

    We identify here the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) gene encoding the third enzyme in the biotin biosynthetic pathway, dethiobiotin synthetase (BIO3; At5g57600). This gene is positioned immediately upstream of BIO1, which is known to be associated with the second reaction in the pathway. Reverse genetic analysis demonstrates that bio3 insertion mutants have a similar phenotype to the bio1 and bio2 auxotrophs identified using forward genetic screens for arrested embryos rescued on enriched nutrient medium. Unexpectedly, bio3 and bio1 mutants define a single genetic complementation group. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrates that separate BIO3 and BIO1 transcripts and two different types of chimeric BIO3-BIO1 transcripts are produced. Consistent with genetic data, one of the fused transcripts is monocistronic and encodes a bifunctional fusion protein. A splice variant is bicistronic, with distinct but overlapping reading frames. The dual functionality of the monocistronic transcript was confirmed by complementing the orthologous auxotrophs of Escherichia coli (bioD and bioA). BIO3-BIO1 transcripts from other plants provide further evidence for differential splicing, existence of a fusion protein, and localization of both enzymatic reactions to mitochondria. In contrast to most biosynthetic enzymes in eukaryotes, which are encoded by genes dispersed throughout the genome, biotin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis provides an intriguing example of a bifunctional locus that catalyzes two sequential reactions in the same metabolic pathway. This complex locus exhibits several unusual features that distinguish it from biotin operons in bacteria and from other genes known to encode bifunctional enzymes in plants.

  10. A terracotta bio-battery.

    PubMed

    Ajayi, Folusho F; Weigele, Peter R

    2012-07-01

    Terracotta pots were converted into simple, single chamber, air-cathode bio-batteries. This bio-battery design used a graphite-felt anode and a conductive graphite coating without added catalyst on the exterior as a cathode. Bacteria enriched from river sediment served as the anode catalyst. These batteries gave an average OCV of 0.56 V ± 0.02, a Coulombic efficiency of 21 ± 5%, and a peak power of 1.06 mW ± 0.01(33.13 mW/m(2)). Stable current was also produced when the batteries were operated with hay extract in salt solution. The bacterial community on the anode of the batteries was tested for air tolerance and desiccation resistance over a period ranging from 2 days to 2 weeks. The results showed that the anode community could survive complete drying of the electrolyte for several days. These data support the further development of this technology as a potential power source for LED-based lighting in off-grid, rural communities. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Biosecurity--The Bio-Link Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Elaine A.

    2002-01-01

    Describes Bio-Link, the Advanced Technological Education (ATE) Center for Biotechnology established with funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF). Reports that Bio-Link, headquartered at City College of San Francisco, has created a national network and resource base for community colleges, industry, and others interested in biotechnology…

  12. Linking plasma kinetics to plasma-bio interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruggeman, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Cold non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas have received a lot of attention in the last decade due to their huge potential for biomedical applications. In my group, we have characterized an RF driven APPJ in great detail. The characterization includes electrical measurements, imaging, optical emission spectroscopy, (two photon enhanced) laser induced fluorescence, Thomson scattering, Rayleigh scattering, Raman scattering and mass spectrometry. This led to a detailed knowledge of the electron density, electron temperature, gas temperature, NO, O, OH, O3 densities, ionic species and air concentrations in the plasma effluent. Living organisms for in vitro studies are typically kept in complex solutions or culture media. Plasma-bio interactions involves not only the production of reactive species in the plasma gas phase but also transport to the liquid phase and plasma induced liquid phase chemistry and its impact on the living organisms. Reactive nitrogen and oxygen species have been identified as the key reactive species. Recent results of my group show that controlling the gas phase plasma chemistry can lead to significant different biological responses of the living organisms corresponding to different chemical pathways. The effect of plasma jet interaction with liquids containing mammalian cells, bacteria and virus will be discussed. The outcomes of these studies allow unraveling chemical pathways responsible for plasma-bio interactions and linking plasma kinetics to plasma-bio interactions.

  13. Are the bio- and chemiluminescence states of the firefly oxyluciferin the same as the fluorescence state?

    PubMed

    Navizet, Isabelle; Roca-Sanjuán, Daniel; Yue, Ling; Liu, Ya-Jun; Ferré, Nicolas; Lindh, Roland

    2013-01-01

    A usual strategy in both experimental and theoretical studies on bio- and chemiluminescence is to analyze the fluorescent properties of the bio- and chemiluminescence reaction product. Recent findings in a coelenteramide and Cypridina oxyluciferin model raise a concern on the validity of this procedure, showing that the light emitters in each of these luminescent processes might differ. Here, the thermal decomposition path of the firefly dioxetanone and the light emission states of the Firefly oxyluciferin responsible for the bio-, chemiluminescence, and fluorescence of the molecule are characterized using ab initio quantum chemistry and hybrid quantum chemistry/molecular mechanics methods to determine if the scenario found in the coelenteramide and Cypridina oxyluciferin study does also apply to the Firefly bioluminescent systems. The results point out to a unique emission state in the bio-, chemiluminescence, and fluorescence phenomena of the Firefly oxyluciferin and, therefore, using fluorescence properties of this system is reasonable.

  14. BioC interoperability track overview.

    PubMed

    Comeau, Donald C; Batista-Navarro, Riza Theresa; Dai, Hong-Jie; Doğan, Rezarta Islamaj; Yepes, Antonio Jimeno; Khare, Ritu; Lu, Zhiyong; Marques, Hernani; Mattingly, Carolyn J; Neves, Mariana; Peng, Yifan; Rak, Rafal; Rinaldi, Fabio; Tsai, Richard Tzong-Han; Verspoor, Karin; Wiegers, Thomas C; Wu, Cathy H; Wilbur, W John

    2014-01-01

    BioC is a new simple XML format for sharing biomedical text and annotations and libraries to read and write that format. This promotes the development of interoperable tools for natural language processing (NLP) of biomedical text. The interoperability track at the BioCreative IV workshop featured contributions using or highlighting the BioC format. These contributions included additional implementations of BioC, many new corpora in the format, biomedical NLP tools consuming and producing the format and online services using the format. The ease of use, broad support and rapidly growing number of tools demonstrate the need for and value of the BioC format. Database URL: http://bioc.sourceforge.net/.

  15. BioC interoperability track overview

    PubMed Central

    Comeau, Donald C.; Batista-Navarro, Riza Theresa; Dai, Hong-Jie; Islamaj Doğan, Rezarta; Jimeno Yepes, Antonio; Khare, Ritu; Lu, Zhiyong; Marques, Hernani; Mattingly, Carolyn J.; Neves, Mariana; Peng, Yifan; Rak, Rafal; Rinaldi, Fabio; Tsai, Richard Tzong-Han; Verspoor, Karin; Wiegers, Thomas C.; Wu, Cathy H.; Wilbur, W. John

    2014-01-01

    BioC is a new simple XML format for sharing biomedical text and annotations and libraries to read and write that format. This promotes the development of interoperable tools for natural language processing (NLP) of biomedical text. The interoperability track at the BioCreative IV workshop featured contributions using or highlighting the BioC format. These contributions included additional implementations of BioC, many new corpora in the format, biomedical NLP tools consuming and producing the format and online services using the format. The ease of use, broad support and rapidly growing number of tools demonstrate the need for and value of the BioC format. Database URL: http://bioc.sourceforge.net/ PMID:24980129

  16. BioPhotonics Workstation: a university tech transfer challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Bañas, Andrew; Tauro, Sandeep; Palima, Darwin

    2011-10-01

    Conventional optical trapping or tweezing is often limited in the achievable trapping range because of high numerical aperture and imaging requirements. To circumvent this, we are developing a next generation BioPhotonics Workstation platform that supports extension modules through a long working distance geometry. This geometry provides three dimensional and real time manipulation of a plurality of traps facilitating precise control and a rapid response in all sorts of optical manipulation undertakings. We present ongoing research and development activities for constructing a compact next generation BioPhotonics Workstation to be applied in three-dimensional studies on regulated microbial cell growth including their underlying physiological mechanisms, in vivo characterization of cell constituents and manufacturing of nanostructures and new materials.

  17. [Bio-indicating function of soil protozoa to environmental pollution].

    PubMed

    Song, Xueying; Song, Yufang; Sun, Tieheng; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Qixing

    2004-10-01

    Due to the abundant species and huge biomass, soil protozoa play an important role in soil ecosystem. As a bio-indicator, soil protozoa have many advantages over other soil animals. Studies on the community structures, quantities, and dynamic variations of biodiversity of soil protozoa could provide powerful means to evaluate natural environmental changes and to monitor the environmental pollution brought by anthropic activities. Based on the current study at home and abroad, this paper gave a review on the function of soil protozoa in ecosystems, their advantages as bio-indicator, and their responses to environmental factors, soil contaminants and the change of atmospheric CO2. The application prospect of soil protozoa in eco-toxicity diagnosis was also discussed.

  18. Fast-responding bio-based shape memory thermoplastic polyurethanes

    DOE PAGES

    Petrovic, Zoran S.; Milic, Jelena; Zhang, Fan; ...

    2017-05-31

    Fast response shape-memory polyurethanes were prepared from bio-based polyols, diphenyl methane diisocyanate and butane diol. The bio-based polyester polyols were synthesized from 9-hydroxynonanoic acid, a product obtained by ozonolysis of fatty acids extracted from soy oil and castor oil. The morphology of polyurethanes was investigated by synchrotron ultra-small angle X-ray scattering, which revealed the inter-domain spacing between the hard and soft phases, the degree of phase separation, and the level of intermixing between the hard and soft phases. We also conducted thorough investigations of the thermal, mechanical, and dielectric properties of the polyurethanes, and found that high crystallization rate ofmore » the soft segment gives these polyurethanes unique properties suitable for shapememory applications, such as adjustable transition temperatures, high degree of elastic elongations, and good mechanical strength. In conclusion, these materials are also potentially biodegradable and biocompatible, therefore suitable for biomedical and environmental applications.« less

  19. Updates to BioSamples database at European Bioinformatics Institute

    PubMed Central

    Faulconbridge, Adam; Burdett, Tony; Brandizi, Marco; Gostev, Mikhail; Pereira, Rui; Vasant, Drashtti; Sarkans, Ugis; Brazma, Alvis; Parkinson, Helen

    2014-01-01

    The BioSamples database at the EBI (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/biosamples) provides an integration point for BioSamples information between technology specific databases at the EBI, projects such as ENCODE and reference collections such as cell lines. The database delivers a unified query interface and API to query sample information across EBI’s databases and provides links back to assay databases. Sample groups are used to manage related samples, e.g. those from an experimental submission, or a single reference collection. Infrastructural improvements include a new user interface with ontological and key word queries, a new query API, a new data submission API, complete RDF data download and a supporting SPARQL endpoint, accessioning at the point of submission to the European Nucleotide Archive and European Genotype Phenotype Archives and improved query response times. PMID:24265224

  20. Improved RNA extraction method using the BioMasher and BioMasher power-plus.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takuji; Nakashima, Kentaro; Maruta, Yukio; Kiriyama, Tomomi; Sasaki, Michi; Sugiyama, Shunpei; Suzuki, Kana; Fujisaki, Hitomi; Sasaki, Jun; Kaku-Ushiki, Yuko; Tanida, Masatoshi; Irie, Shinkichi; Hattori, Shunji

    2012-12-01

    The BioMasher is a disposable homogenizer that was developed to homogenize bovine brain tissue for bovine spongiform encephalopathy diagnosis. Capable of preventing the biohazard risk from infectious samples, it also prevents cross-contamination among samples. The BioMasher is thus widely used in biochemical research, especially for RNA extraction. Here, we tested a novel BioMasher application for RNA extraction from animal and plant tissues. We also developed a grinding machine specific for the BioMasher, named the BioMasher Power-Plus. We developed RNA extraction protocols using the BioMasher combined with the BioMasher Power-Plus. We compared RNA extraction efficiency of the BioMasher with that of the FastPrep and the glass homogenizer. Though the RNA extraction efficiency by the BioMasher was nearly equivalent to that of the FastPrep and the glass homogenizer, sample preparation time was shorter for the BioMasher. The utility of RNA extraction by the BioMasher was examined in mouse, rat, and tomato tissue samples. In the rodent tissues, the highest extraction efficiency of total RNA was from liver, with lowest efficiency from fibrous tissues such as muscle. The quality of extracted total RNA was confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis which produced highly visible clear bands of 18S and 28S rRNAs. Reproducibility among different operators in RNA extraction from tomato roots was improved by using the BioMasher Power-Plus. The BioMasher and BioMasher Power-Plus provide an effective and easy homogenization method for total RNA extraction from some rodent and plant tissues.

  1. Canine Distemper Virus Infection Leads to an Inhibitory Phenotype of Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells In Vitro with Reduced Expression of Co-Stimulatory Molecules and Increased Interleukin-10 Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Herder, Vanessa; Stein, Veronika M.; Tipold, Andrea; Urhausen, Carola; Günzel-Apel, Anne-Rose; Rohn, Karl; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Beineke, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) exhibits a profound lymphotropism that causes immunosuppression and increased susceptibility of affected dogs to opportunistic infections. Similar to human measles virus, CDV is supposed to inhibit terminal differentiation of dendritic cells (DCs), responsible for disturbed repopulation of lymphoid tissues and diminished antigen presenting function in dogs. In order to testify the hypothesis that CDV-infection leads to an impairment of professional antigen presenting cells, canine DCs have been generated from peripheral blood monocytes in vitro and infected with CDV. Virus infection was confirmed and quantified by transmission electron microscopy, CDV-specific immunofluorescence, and virus titration. Flow cytometric analyses revealed a significant down-regulation of the major histocompatibility complex class II and co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 in CDV-infected DCs, indicative of disturbed antigen presenting capacity. Molecular analyses revealed an increased expression of the immune inhibitory cytokine interleukin-10 in DCs following infection. Results of the present study demonstrate that CDV causes phenotypical changes and altered cytokine expression of DCs, which represent potential mechanisms to evade host immune responses and might contribute to immune dysfunction and virus persistence in canine distemper. PMID:24769532

  2. Canine distemper virus infection leads to an inhibitory phenotype of monocyte-derived dendritic cells in vitro with reduced expression of co-stimulatory molecules and increased interleukin-10 transcription.

    PubMed

    Qeska, Visar; Barthel, Yvonne; Herder, Vanessa; Stein, Veronika M; Tipold, Andrea; Urhausen, Carola; Günzel-Apel, Anne-Rose; Rohn, Karl; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Beineke, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) exhibits a profound lymphotropism that causes immunosuppression and increased susceptibility of affected dogs to opportunistic infections. Similar to human measles virus, CDV is supposed to inhibit terminal differentiation of dendritic cells (DCs), responsible for disturbed repopulation of lymphoid tissues and diminished antigen presenting function in dogs. In order to testify the hypothesis that CDV-infection leads to an impairment of professional antigen presenting cells, canine DCs have been generated from peripheral blood monocytes in vitro and infected with CDV. Virus infection was confirmed and quantified by transmission electron microscopy, CDV-specific immunofluorescence, and virus titration. Flow cytometric analyses revealed a significant down-regulation of the major histocompatibility complex class II and co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 in CDV-infected DCs, indicative of disturbed antigen presenting capacity. Molecular analyses revealed an increased expression of the immune inhibitory cytokine interleukin-10 in DCs following infection. Results of the present study demonstrate that CDV causes phenotypical changes and altered cytokine expression of DCs, which represent potential mechanisms to evade host immune responses and might contribute to immune dysfunction and virus persistence in canine distemper.

  3. Involvement of formyl peptide receptors in the stimulatory effect of crotoxin on macrophages co-cultivated with tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Costa, E S; Faiad, O J; Landgraf, R G; Ferreira, A K; Brigatte, P; Curi, R; Cury, Y; Sampaio, S C

    2013-11-01

    Crotoxin (CTX) is the main neurotoxic component of Crotalus durissus terrificus snake venom. It inhibits tumour growth and modulates the function of macrophages, which are essential cells in the tumour microenvironment. The present study investigated the effect of CTX on the secretory activity of monocultured macrophages and macrophages co-cultivated with LLC-WRC 256 cells. The effect of the macrophage secretory activities on tumour cell proliferation was also evaluated. Macrophages pre-treated with CTX (0.3 μg/mL) for 2 h were co-cultivated with LLC-WRC 256 cells, and the secretory activity of the macrophages was determined after 12, 24 and 48 h. The co-cultivation of CTX-treated macrophages with the tumour cells caused a 20% reduction in tumour cell proliferation. The production of both H2O2 and NO was increased by 41% and 29% after 24 or 48 h of co-cultivation, respectively, compared to the values for the co-cultures of macrophages of control. The level of secreted IL-1β increased by 3.7- and 3.2-fold after 12 h and 24 h of co-cultivation, respectively. Moreover, an increased level of LXA4 (25%) was observed after 24 h of co-cultivation, and a 2.3- and 2.1-fold increased level of 15-epi-LXA4 was observed after 24 h and 48 h, respectively. Boc-2, a selective antagonist of formyl peptide receptors, blocked both the stimulatory effect of CTX on the macrophage secretory activity and the inhibitory effect of these cells on tumour cell proliferation. Taken together, these results indicate that CTX enhanced the secretory activity of macrophages, which may contribute to the antitumour activity of these cells, and that activation of formyl peptide receptors appears to play a major role in this effect. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Switchable bio-inspired adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroner, Elmar

    2015-03-01

    Geckos have astonishing climbing abilities. They can adhere to almost any surface and can run on walls and even stick to ceilings. The extraordinary adhesion performance is caused by a combination of a complex surface pattern on their toes and the biomechanics of its movement. These biological dry adhesives have been intensely investigated during recent years because of the unique combination of adhesive properties. They provide high adhesion, allow for easy detachment, can be removed residue-free, and have self-cleaning properties. Many aspects have been successfully mimicked, leading to artificial, bio-inspired, patterned dry adhesives, and were addressed and in some aspects they even outperform the adhesion capabilities of geckos. However, designing artificial patterned adhesion systems with switchable adhesion remains a big challenge; the gecko's adhesion system is based on a complex hierarchical surface structure and on advanced biomechanics, which are both difficult to mimic. In this paper, two approaches are presented to achieve switchable adhesion. The first approach is based on a patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer, where adhesion can be switched on and off by applying a low and a high compressive preload. The switch in adhesion is caused by a reversible mechanical instability of the adhesive silicone structures. The second approach is based on a composite material consisting of a Nickel- Titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy and a patterned adhesive PDMS layer. The NiTi alloy is trained to change its surface topography as a function of temperature, which results in a change of the contact area and of alignment of the adhesive pattern towards a substrate, leading to switchable adhesion. These examples show that the unique properties of bio-inspired adhesives can be greatly improved by new concepts such as mechanical instability or by the use of active materials which react to external stimuli.

  5. Mannosylated liposomes for bio-film targeting.

    PubMed

    Vyas, S P; Sihorkar, Vaibhav; Jain, Sanyog

    2007-02-07

    Vesicular systems in general are investigated to achieve bacterial bio-film targeting as their architecture mimics bio-membranes in terms of structure and bio-behavior. This paper elaborates upon the role of the inherent characteristics of the carrier system and further envisages the role of anchored ligands in navigating the contents in the vicinity of bio-films. Vesicles in the present study were coated with hydrophobic derivatives of mannan (cholesteryl mannan and sialo-mannan). The prepared vesicles were characterized for size, shape, percentage entrapment and ligand binding specificity and results were compared with the uncoated versions. Using a set of in vitro and in vivo models, the bio-film targeting potential of plain and mannosylated liposomal formulations were compared. Results suggested that mannosylated vesicles could be effectively targeted to the model bacterial bio-films, compared with plain vesicles. Moreover, the sialo-mannan coated liposomes recorded superior targetability as reflected in the significantly higher percentage growth inhibition when compared with cholesteryl mannan coated liposomes. The engineered systems thus have the potential use for the delivery of anti-microbial agents to the bio-films.

  6. Freely turning over palmitate in erythrocyte membrane proteins is not responsible for the anchoring of lipid rafts to the spectrin skeleton: a study with bio-orthogonal chemical probes.

    PubMed

    Ciana, Annarita; Achilli, Cesare; Hannoush, Rami N; Risso, Angela; Balduini, Cesare; Minetti, Giampaolo

    2013-03-01

    Erythrocyte lipid rafts are anchored to the underlying spectrin membrane skeleton [A. Ciana, C. Achilli, C. Balduini, G. Minetti, On the association of lipid rafts to the spectrin skeleton in human erythrocytes, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1808 (2011) 183-190]. The nature of this linkage and the molecules involved are poorly understood. The interaction is sensitive to the increase in pH and ionic strength induced by carbonate. Given the role of palmitoylation in modulating the partitioning of certain proteins between various sub-cellular compartments and the plasma membrane, we asked whether palmitoylation of p55, a peripheral protein located at the junctional complex between spectrin-actin-protein 4.1 that anchors the membrane skeleton to the lipid bilayer via the transmembrane protein glycophorin C, could contribute to the anchoring of lipid rafts to the membrane skeleton. We adopted a new, non-radioactive method for studying protein palmitoylation, based on bio-orthogonal chemical analogues of fatty acids, containing an omega-alkynyl group, to metabolically label cell proteins, which are then revealed by a "click chemistry" reaction of the alkynyl moiety with an azide-containing reporter tag. We show that the membrane localization and palmitoylation levels of p55 did not change after carbonate treatment. 2-bromopalmitate and cerulenin, two known palmitoylation inhibitors, completely inhibited p55 palmitoylation, and protein palmitoyl thioesterase-1 (PPT1) reduced it, without affecting the association between lipid rafts and membrane-skeleton, indicating, on the one hand, that p55 palmitoylation is enzymatic, and, on the other, that it is not involved in the modulation of the linkage of lipid rafts to the membrane-skeleton.

  7. The mechanism and properties of bio-photon emission and absorption in protein molecules in living systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xiao-feng

    2012-05-01

    The mechanism and properties of bio-photon emission and absorption in bio-tissues were studied using Pang's theory of bio-energy transport, in which the energy spectra of protein molecules are obtained from the discrete dynamic equation. From the energy spectra, it was determined that the protein molecules could both radiate and absorb bio-photons with wavelengths of <3 μm and 5-7 μm, consistent with the energy level transitions of the excitons. These results were consistent with the experimental data; this consisted of infrared absorption data from collagen, bovine serum albumin, the protein-like molecule acetanilide, plasma, and a person's finger, and the laser-Raman spectra of acidity I-type collagen in the lungs of a mouse, and metabolically active Escherichia coli. We further elucidated the mechanism responsible for the non-thermal biological effects produced by the infrared light absorbed by the bio-tissues, using the above results. No temperature rise was observed; instead, the absorbed infrared light promoted the vibrations of amides as well the transport of the bio-energy from one place to other in the protein molecules, which changed their conformations. These experimental results, therefore, not only confirmed the validity of the mechanism of bio-photon emission, and the newly developed theory of bio-energy transport mentioned above, but also explained the mechanism and properties of the non-thermal biological effects produced by the absorption of infrared light by the living systems.

  8. Mesenchymal stem cells attenuated PLGA-induced inflammatory responses by inhibiting host DC maturation and function.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Heng; Yang, Fei; Tang, Bo; Li, Xi-Mei; Chu, Ya-Nan; Liu, Yuan-Lin; Wang, Shen-Guo; Wu, De-Cheng; Zhang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    The poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) bio-scaffold is a biodegradable scaffold commonly used for tissue repair. However, implanted PLGA scaffolds usually cause serious inflammatory responses around grafts. To improve PLGA scaffold-based tissue repair, it is important to control the PLGA-mediated inflammatory responses. Recent evidence indicated that PLGA induce dendritic cell (DC) maturation in vitro, which may initiate host immune responses. In the present study, we explored the modulatory effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) on PLGA-induced DCs (PLGA-DC). We found that mouse MSCs inhibited PLGA-DC dendrite formation, as well as co-stimulatory molecule and pro-inflammatory factor expression. Functionally, MSC-educated PLGA-DCs promoted Th2 and regulatory T cell differentiation but suppressed Th1 and Th17 cell differentiation. Mechanistically, we determined that PLGA elicited DC maturation via inducing phosphorylation of p38/MAPK and ERK/MAPK pathway proteins in DCs. Moreover, MSCs suppressed PLGA-DCs by partially inactivating those pathways. Most importantly, we found that the MSCs were capable of suppressing DC maturation and immune function in vivo. Also, the proportion of mature DCs in the mice that received MSC-PLGA constructs greatly decreased compared with that of their PLGA-film implantation counterparts. Additionally, MSCs co-delivery increased regulatory T and Th2 cells but decreased the Th1 and Th17 cell numbers in the host spleens. Histological analysis showed that MSCs alleviated the inflammatory responses around the grafted PLGA scaffolds. In summary, our findings reveal a novel function for MSCs in suppressing PLGA-induced host inflammatory response and suggest that DCs are a new cellular target in improving PLGA scaffold-based tissue repair.

  9. BioBlend.objects: metacomputing with Galaxy.

    PubMed

    Leo, Simone; Pireddu, Luca; Cuccuru, Gianmauro; Lianas, Luca; Soranzo, Nicola; Afgan, Enis; Zanetti, Gianluigi

    2014-10-01

    BioBlend.objects is a new component of the BioBlend package, adding an object-oriented interface for the Galaxy REST-based application programming interface. It improves support for metacomputing on Galaxy entities by providing higher-level functionality and allowing users to more easily create programs to explore, query and create Galaxy datasets and workflows. BioBlend.objects is available online at https://github.com/afgane/bioblend. The new object-oriented API is implemented by the galaxy/objects subpackage. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  10. Branding the bio/biomedical engineering degree.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Herbert F

    2011-01-01

    The future challenges to medical and biological engineering, sometimes referred to as biomedical engineering or simply bioengineering, are many. Some of these are identifiable now and others will emerge from time to time as new technologies are introduced and harnessed. There is a fundamental issue regarding "Branding the bio/biomedical engineering degree" that requires a common understanding of what is meant by a B.S. degree in Biomedical Engineering, Bioengineering, or Biological Engineering. In this paper we address some of the issues involved in branding the Bio/Biomedical Engineering degree, with the aim of clarifying the Bio/Biomedical Engineering brand.

  11. Spider Silk: Mother Nature's Bio-Superlens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monks, James N.; Yan, Bing; Hawkins, Nicholas; Vollrath, Fritz; Wang, Zengbo

    2016-09-01

    This paper demonstrates a possible new microfiber bio near field lens that uses minor ampullate spider silk,spun from the Nephila edulis spider, to create a real time image of a surface using near field optical techniques. The microfiber bio lens is the world's first natural superlens created by exploring biological materials. The resolution of the surface image overcomes the diffraction limit, with the ability to resolve patterns at 100 nm under a standard white light source in reflection mode. This resolution offers further developments in superlens technology and paves the way for new bio optics.

  12. Stinging plants: as future bio-weapon.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sanjay Mohan; Kumar, Kamal

    2016-09-01

    In the present opinion paper, we have been introducing for the first time the stinging plants and/or their biological toxins as novel bio-threat agents that may be used for the development of bio-weapons for self-defence purpose. The selected studied stinging plants are having dual role as nutraceutical and ethno-pharmacological uses apart from their less explored stinging property. However, future detailed work is required for identification and characterization of the precise stinging chemical components that will be used for the formulation of novel bio-warfare agents for self-defence purpose.

  13. Bio-Chemo-Mechanical Models of Vascular Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungsil; Wagenseil, Jessica E

    2015-07-01

    Models of vascular mechanics are necessary to predict the response of an artery under a variety of loads, for complex geometries, and in pathological adaptation. Classic constitutive models for arteries are phenomenological and the fitted parameters are not associated with physical components of the wall. Recently, microstructurally-linked models have been developed that associate structural information about the wall components with tissue-level mechanics. Microstructurally-linked models are useful for correlating changes in specific components with pathological outcomes, so that targeted treatments may be developed to prevent or reverse the physical changes. However, most treatments, and many causes, of vascular disease have chemical components. Chemical signaling within cells, between cells, and between cells and matrix constituents affects the biology and mechanics of the arterial wall in the short- and long-term. Hence, bio-chemo-mechanical models that include chemical signaling are critical for robust models of vascular mechanics. This review summarizes bio-mechanical and bio-chemo-mechanical models with a focus on large elastic arteries. We provide applications of these models and challenges for future work.

  14. Bio-chemo-mechanical models of vascular mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jungsil; Wagenseil, Jessica E.

    2014-01-01

    Models of vascular mechanics are necessary to predict the response of an artery under a variety of loads, for complex geometries, and in pathological adaptation. Classic constitutive models for arteries are phenomenological and the fitted parameters are not associated with physical components of the wall. Recently, microstructurally-linked models have been developed that associate structural information about the wall components with tissue-level mechanics. Microstructurally-linked models are useful for correlating changes in specific components with pathological outcomes, so that targeted treatments may be developed to prevent or reverse the physical changes. However, most treatments, and many causes, of vascular disease have chemical components. Chemical signaling within cells, between cells, and between cells and matrix constituents affects the biology and mechanics of the arterial wall in the short- and long-term. Hence, bio-chemo-mechanical models that include chemical signaling are critical for robust models of vascular mechanics. This review summarizes bio-mechanical and bio-chemo-mechanical models with a focus on large elastic arteries. We provide applications of these models and challenges for future work. PMID:25465618

  15. Biochemical gas sensor (bio-sniffer) for ultrahigh-sensitive gaseous formaldehyde monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Yuki; Gessei, Tomoko; Takahashi, Daishi; Arakawa, Takahiro; Mitsubayashi, Kohji

    2010-10-15

    An ultrahigh-sensitive fiber-optic biochemical gas sensor (bio-sniffer) for continuous monitoring of indoor formaldehyde was constructed and tested. The bio-sniffer measures gaseous formaldehyde as fluorescence of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), which is the product of formaldehyde dehydrogenase (FALDH) reaction. The bio-sniffer device was constructed by attaching a flow cell with a FALDH immobilized membrane onto a fiber-optic NADH measurement system. The NADH measurement system utilizes an ultraviolet-light emitting diode (UV-LED) with peak emission of 335 nm as an excitation light source. The excitation light was introduced to an optical fiber probe, and fluorescence emission of neighboring NADH, which was produced by applying formaldehyde vapor to the FALDH membrane, was concentrically measured with a photomultiplier tube. Assessment of the bio-sniffer was carried out using a standard gas generator. Response, calibration range and selectivity to other chemical substances were investigated. Circulating phosphate buffer, which contained NAD+, available for continuous monitoring of formaldehyde vapor. The calibration range of the bio-sniffer was 2.5 ppb to 10 ppm, which covers the guideline value of the World Health Organization (80 ppb). High selectivity to other gaseous substances due to specific activity of FALDH was also confirmed. Considering its high sensitivity, a possible application of the bio-sniffer is continuous indoor formaldehyde monitoring to provide healthy residential atmosphere.

  16. Hydrolase BioH knockout in E. coli enables efficient fatty acid methyl ester bioprocessing.

    PubMed

    Kadisch, Marvin; Schmid, Andreas; Bühler, Bruno

    2017-03-01

    Fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) originating from plant oils are most interesting renewable feedstocks for biofuels and bio-based materials. FAMEs can also be produced and/or functionalized by engineered microbes to give access to, e.g., polymer building blocks. Yet, they are often subject to hydrolysis yielding free fatty acids, which typically are degraded by microbes. We identified BioH as the key enzyme responsible for the hydrolysis of medium-chain length FAME derivatives in different E. coli K-12 strains. E. coli ΔbioH strains showed up to 22-fold reduced FAME hydrolysis rates in comparison with respective wild-type strains. Knockout strains showed, beside the expected biotin auxotrophy, unchanged growth behavior and biocatalytic activity. Thus, high specific rates (~80 U g CDW(-1) ) for terminal FAME oxyfunctionalization catalyzed by a recombinant alkane monooxygenase could be combined with reduced hydrolysis. Biotransformations in process-relevant two-liquid phase systems profited from reduced fatty acid accumulation and/or reduced substrate loss via free fatty acid metabolization. The BioH knockout strategy was beneficial in all tested strains, although its effect was found to differ according to specific strain properties, such as FAME hydrolysis and FFA degradation activities. BioH or functional analogs can be found in virtually all microorganisms, making bioH deletion a broadly applicable strategy for efficient microbial bioprocessing involving FAMEs.

  17. Cognitive bio-radar: The natural evolution of bio-signals measurement.

    PubMed

    Malafaia, Daniel; Oliveira, Beatriz; Ferreira, Pedro; Varum, Tiago; Vieira, José; Tomé, Ana

    2016-10-01

    In this article we discuss a novel approach to Bio-Radar, contactless measurement of bio-signals, called Cognitive Bio-Radar. This new approach implements the Bio-Radar in a Software Defined Radio (SDR) platform in order to obtain awareness of the environment where it operates. Due to this, the Cognitive Bio-Radar can adapt to its surroundings in order to have an intelligent usage of the radio frequency spectrum to improve its performance. In order to study the feasibility of such implementation, a SDR based Bio-Radar testbench was developed and evaluated. The prototype is shown to be able to acquire the heartbeat activity and the respiratory effort. The acquired data is compared with the acquisitions from a Biopac research data acquisition system, showing coherent results for both heartbeat and breathing rate.

  18. Multitip scanning bio-Kelvin probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baikie, I. D.; Smith, P. J. S.; Porterfield, D. M.; Estrup, P. J.

    1999-03-01

    We have developed a novel multitip scanning Kelvin probe which can measure changes in biological surface potential ΔVs to within 2 mV and, quasisimultaneously monitor displacement to <1 μm. The control and measurement subcomponents are PC based and incorporate a flexible user interface permitting software control of each individual tip, measurement, and scan parameters. We review the mode of operation and design features of the scanning bio-Kelvin probe including tip steering, signal processing, tip calibration, and novel tip tracking/dithering routines. This system uniquely offers both tip-to-sample spacing control (which is essential to avoid spurious changes in ΔVs due to variations in mean spacing) and a dithering routine to maintain tip orientation to the biological specimen, irrespective of the latter's movement. These features permit long term (>48 h) "active" tracking of the displacement and biopotentials developed along and around a plant shoot in response to an environmental stimulus, e.g., differential illumination (phototropism) or changes in orientation (gravitropism).

  19. Chicken-Bio Nuggets Gasification process

    SciTech Connect

    Sheth, A.C.

    1996-12-31

    With the cost of landfill disposal skyrocketing and land availability becoming scarce, better options are required for managing our nation`s biomass waste. In response to this need, the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) is evaluating an innovative idea (described as Chicken-Bio Nuggets Gasification process) to gasify waste products from the poultry industry and industrial wood/biomass-based residues in {open_quotes}as-is{close_quotes} or aggregate form. The presence of potassium salts in the poultry waste as well as in the biomass can act as a catalyst in reducing the severity of the thermal gasification. As a result, the mixture of these waste products can be gasified at a much lower temperature (1,300-1,400{degrees}F versus 1,800-2,000{degrees}F for conventional thermal gasification). Also, these potassium salts act as a catalyst by accelerating the gasification reaction and enhancing the mediation reaction. Hence, the product gas from this UTSI concept can be richer in methane and probably can be used as a source of fuel (to replace propane in hard reach remote places) or as a chemical feed stock. Exxon Research and Engineering Company has tested a similar catalytic gasification concept in a fluid-bed gasifier using coal in a one ton/day pilot plant in Baytown, Texas. If found technically and economically feasible, this concept can be later on extended to include other kinds of waste products such as cow manure and wastes from swine, etc.

  20. BioMEMS for mitochondria medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmaraj, Divya

    A BioMEMS device to study cell-mitochondrial physiological functionalities was developed. The pathogenesis of many diseases including obesity, diabetes and heart failure as well as aging has been linked to functional defects of mitochondria. The synthesis of Adenosine Tri Phosphate (ATP) is determined by the electrical potential across the inner mitochondrial membrane and by the pH difference due to proton flux across it. Therefore, electrical characterization by E-fields with complementary chemical testing was used here. The BioMEMS device was fabricated as an SU-8 based microfluidic system with gold electrodes on SiO2/Si wafers for electromagnetic interrogation. Ion Sensitive Field Effect Transistors (ISFETs) were incorporated for proton studies important in the electron transport chain, together with monitoring Na+, K+ and Ca++ ions for ion channel studies. ISFETs are chemically sensitive Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) devices and their threshold voltage is directly proportional to the electrolytic H+ ion variation. These ISFETs (sensitivity ˜55 mV/pH for H+) were further realized as specific ion sensitive Chemical Field Effect Transistors (CHEMFETs) by depositing a specific ion sensitive membrane on the gate. Electrodes for dielectric spectroscopy studies of mitochondria were designed as 2- and 4-probe structures for optimized operation over a wide frequency range. In addition, to limit polarization effects, a 4-electrode set-up with unique meshed pickup electrodes (7.5x7.5 mum2 loops with 4 mum wires) was fabricated. Sensitivity of impedance spectroscopy to membrane potential changes was confirmed by studying the influence of uncouplers and glucose on mitochondria. An electrical model was developed for the mitochondrial sample, and its frequency response correlated with impedance spectroscopy experiments of sarcolemmal mitochondria. Using the mesh electrode structure, we obtained a reduction of 83.28% in impedance at 200 Hz. COMSOL

  1. New perspectives in signaling mediated by receptors coupled to stimulatory G protein: the emerging significance of cAMP efflux and extracellular cAMP-adenosine pathway.

    PubMed

    Godinho, Rosely O; Duarte, Thiago; Pacini, Enio S A

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) linked to stimulatory G (Gs) proteins (GsPCRs) mediate increases in intracellular cyclic AMP as consequence of activation of nine adenylyl cyclases , which differ considerably in their cellular distribution and activation mechanisms. Once produced, cyclic AMP may act via distinct intracellular signaling effectors such as protein kinase A and the exchange proteins activated by cAMP (Epacs). More recently, attention has been focused on the efflux of cAMP through a specific transport system named multidrug resistance proteins that belongs to the ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily. Outside the cell, cAMP is metabolized into adenosine, which is able to activate four distinct subtypes of adenosine receptors, members of the GPCR family: A1, A2A, A2B, and A3. Taking into account that this phenomenon occurs in numerous cell types, as consequence of GsPCR activation and increment in intracellular cAMP levels, in this review, we will discuss the impact of cAMP efflux and the extracellular cAMP-adenosine pathway on the regulation of GsPCR-induced cell response.

  2. New perspectives in signaling mediated by receptors coupled to stimulatory G protein: the emerging significance of cAMP efflux and extracellular cAMP-adenosine pathway

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Rosely O.; Duarte, Thiago; Pacini, Enio S. A.

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) linked to stimulatory G (Gs) proteins (GsPCRs) mediate increases in intracellular cyclic AMP as consequence of activation of nine adenylyl cyclases , which differ considerably in their cellular distribution and activation mechanisms. Once produced, cyclic AMP may act via distinct intracellular signaling effectors such as protein kinase A and the exchange proteins activated by cAMP (Epacs). More recently, attention has been focused on the efflux of cAMP through a specific transport system named multidrug resistance proteins that belongs to the ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily. Outside the cell, cAMP is metabolized into adenosine, which is able to activate four distinct subtypes of adenosine receptors, members of the GPCR family: A1, A2A, A2B, and A3. Taking into account that this phenomenon occurs in numerous cell types, as consequence of GsPCR activation and increment in intracellular cAMP levels, in this review, we will discuss the impact of cAMP efflux and the extracellular cAMP-adenosine pathway on the regulation of GsPCR-induced cell response. PMID:25859216

  3. [Preface for special issue on bio-based materials (2016)].

    PubMed

    Weng, Yunxuan

    2016-06-25

    Bio-based materials are new materials or chemicals with renewable biomass as raw materials such as grain, legume, straw, bamboo and wood powder. This class of materials includes bio-based polymer, biobased fiber, glycotechnology products, biobased rubber and plastics produced by biomass thermoplastic processing and basic biobased chemicals, for instance, bio-alcohols, organic acids, alkanes, and alkenes, obtained by bio-synthesis, bio-processing and bio-refinery. Owing to its environmental friendly and resource conservation, bio-based materials are becoming a new dominant industry taking the lead in the world scientific and technological innovation and economic development. An overview of bio-based materials development is reported in this special issue, and the industrial status and research progress of the following aspects, including biobased fiber, polyhydroxyalkanoates, biodegradable mulching film, bio-based polyamide, protein based biomedical materials, bio-based polyurethane, and modification and processing of poly(lactic acid), are introduced.

  4. Calixarenes in bio-medical researches.

    PubMed

    Rodik, Roman V; Boyko, Vyacheslav I; Kalchenko, Vitaly I

    2009-01-01

    Application of calixarene derivatives in bio-medical researches is reviewed in this article. Antiviral, bactericidal, antithrombothic, antituberculosis, anticancer activity as well as specific protein complexation, membranotropic properties and toxicity of modified calixarenes are discussed.

  5. Three-dimensional bio-printing.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qi; Hao, Jie; Lu, YangJie; Wang, Liu; Wallace, Gordon G; Zhou, Qi

    2015-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing technology has been widely used in various manufacturing operations including automotive, defence and space industries. 3D printing has the advantages of personalization, flexibility and high resolution, and is therefore becoming increasingly visible in the high-tech fields. Three-dimensional bio-printing technology also holds promise for future use in medical applications. At present 3D bio-printing is mainly used for simulating and reconstructing some hard tissues or for preparing drug-delivery systems in the medical area. The fabrication of 3D structures with living cells and bioactive moieties spatially distributed throughout will be realisable. Fabrication of complex tissues and organs is still at the exploratory stage. This review summarize the development of 3D bio-printing and its potential in medical applications, as well as discussing the current challenges faced by 3D bio-printing.

  6. Nano-Electronics and Bio-Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Viewgraph presentation on Nano-Electronics and Bio-Electronics is discussed. Topics discussed include: NASA Ames nanotechnology program, Potential Carbon Nanotube (CNT) application, CNT synthesis,Computational Nanotechnology, and protein nanotubes.

  7. Negated bio-events: analysis and identification

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Negation occurs frequently in scientific literature, especially in biomedical literature. It has previously been reported that around 13% of sentences found in biomedical research articles contain negation. Historically, the main motivation for identifying negated events has been to ensure their exclusion from lists of extracted interactions. However, recently, there has been a growing interest in negative results, which has resulted in negation detection being identified as a key challenge in biomedical relation extraction. In this article, we focus on the problem of identifying negated bio-events, given gold standard event annotations. Results We have conducted a detailed analysis of three open access bio-event corpora containing negation information (i.e., GENIA Event, BioInfer and BioNLP’09 ST), and have identified the main types of negated bio-events. We have analysed the key aspects of a machine learning solution to the problem of detecting negated events, including selection of negation cues, feature engineering and the choice of learning algorithm. Combining the best solutions for each aspect of the problem, we propose a novel framework for the identification of negated bio-events. We have evaluated our system on each of the three open access corpora mentioned above. The performance of the system significantly surpasses the best results previously reported on the BioNLP’09 ST corpus, and achieves even better results on the GENIA Event and BioInfer corpora, both of which contain more varied and complex events. Conclusions Recently, in the field of biomedical text mining, the development and enhancement of event-based systems has received significant interest. The ability to identify negated events is a key performance element for these systems. We have conducted the first detailed study on the analysis and identification of negated bio-events. Our proposed framework can be integrated with state-of-the-art event extraction systems. The

  8. The NCBI BioSystems database.

    PubMed

    Geer, Lewis Y; Marchler-Bauer, Aron; Geer, Renata C; Han, Lianyi; He, Jane; He, Siqian; Liu, Chunlei; Shi, Wenyao; Bryant, Stephen H

    2010-01-01

    The NCBI BioSystems database, found at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/biosystems/, centralizes and cross-links existing biological systems databases, increasing their utility and target audience by integrating their pathways and systems into NCBI resources. This integration allows users of NCBI's Entrez databases to quickly categorize proteins, genes and small molecules by metabolic pathway, disease state or other BioSystem type, without requiring time-consuming inference of biological relationships from the literature or multiple experimental datasets.

  9. BioMagResBank.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Eldon L; Akutsu, Hideo; Doreleijers, Jurgen F; Harano, Yoko; Ioannidis, Yannis E; Lin, Jundong; Livny, Miron; Mading, Steve; Maziuk, Dimitri; Miller, Zachary; Nakatani, Eiichi; Schulte, Christopher F; Tolmie, David E; Kent Wenger, R; Yao, Hongyang; Markley, John L

    2008-01-01

    The BioMagResBank (BMRB: www.bmrb.wisc.edu) is a repository for experimental and derived data gathered from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic studies of biological molecules. BMRB is a partner in the Worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB). The BMRB archive consists of four main data depositories: (i) quantitative NMR spectral parameters for proteins, peptides, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and ligands or cofactors (assigned chemical shifts, coupling constants and peak lists) and derived data (relaxation parameters, residual dipolar couplings, hydrogen exchange rates, pK(a) values, etc.), (ii) databases for NMR restraints processed from original author depositions available from the Protein Data Bank, (iii) time-domain (raw) spectral data from NMR experiments used to assign spectral resonances and determine the structures of biological macromolecules and (iv) a database of one- and two-dimensional (1)H and (13)C one- and two-dimensional NMR spectra for over 250 metabolites. The BMRB website provides free access to all of these data. BMRB has tools for querying the archive and retrieving information and an ftp site (ftp.bmrb.wisc.edu) where data in the archive can be downloaded in bulk. Two BMRB mirror sites exist: one at the PDBj, Protein Research Institute, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan (bmrb.protein.osaka-u.ac.jp) and the other at CERM, University of Florence, Florence, Italy (bmrb.postgenomicnmr.net/). The site at Osaka also accepts and processes data depositions.

  10. BioMagResBank

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Eldon L.; Akutsu, Hideo; Doreleijers, Jurgen F.; Harano, Yoko; Ioannidis, Yannis E.; Lin, Jundong; Livny, Miron; Mading, Steve; Maziuk, Dimitri; Miller, Zachary; Nakatani, Eiichi; Schulte, Christopher F.; Tolmie, David E.; Kent Wenger, R.; Yao, Hongyang; Markley, John L.

    2008-01-01

    The BioMagResBank (BMRB: www.bmrb.wisc.edu) is a repository for experimental and derived data gathered from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic studies of biological molecules. BMRB is a partner in the Worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB). The BMRB archive consists of four main data depositories: (i) quantitative NMR spectral parameters for proteins, peptides, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and ligands or cofactors (assigned chemical shifts, coupling constants and peak lists) and derived data (relaxation parameters, residual dipolar couplings, hydrogen exchange rates, pKa values, etc.), (ii) databases for NMR restraints processed from original author depositions available from the Protein Data Bank, (iii) time-domain (raw) spectral data from NMR experiments used to assign spectral resonances and determine the structures of biological macromolecules and (iv) a database of one- and two-dimensional 1H and 13C one- and two-dimensional NMR spectra for over 250 metabolites. The BMRB website provides free access to all of these data. BMRB has tools for querying the archive and retrieving information and an ftp site (ftp.bmrb.wisc.edu) where data in the archive can be downloaded in bulk. Two BMRB mirror sites exist: one at the PDBj, Protein Research Institute, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan (bmrb.protein.osaka-u.ac.jp) and the other at CERM, University of Florence, Florence, Italy (bmrb.postgenomicnmr.net/). The site at Osaka also accepts and processes data depositions. PMID:17984079

  11. Lasers for bio-optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sona, Alberto

    1992-03-01

    Lasers are being increasingly used in bioptics and in life sciences in general, especially for medical applications for therapy and diagnostics. Lasers are also broadly used in environment sciences to monitor atmospheric parameters and concentrations of molecular species of natural origin or coming from human activities such as the various kind of pollutants. The peculiar features of lasers exploited in these areas are mainly the capability of developing an action or performing a measurement without physical contact with the target and, if required, from a remote position with the assistance of suitable beam delivery systems such as telescopes, microscopes, or optical fibers. These features are directly related to the space and time coherence of the laser light and to the energy storage capability of the laser material which allow an extremely effective concentration of the beam energy in space, direction frequency, or time. A short description of the principle of operation and relevant properties of lasers are given and the most significant properties of the laser emission are briefly reviewed. Lasers for medical applications (mainly for therapy) will be mentioned, pointing out the specific property exploited for the various applications. Finally, examples of laser applications to the environmental sciences will be reported. A summary of the properties exploited in the various bio-optical applications is shown.

  12. Stimulatory effect of nobiletin, a citrus polymethoxy flavone, on catecholamine synthesis through Ser19 and Ser40 phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase in cultured bovine adrenal medullary cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Han; Yanagihara, Nobuyuki; Toyohira, Yumiko; Takahashi, Keita; Inagaki, Hirohide; Satoh, Noriaki; Li, Xiaoja; Goa, Xiumei; Tsutsui, Masato; Takahaishi, Kojiro

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported the dual effects of nobiletin, a compound of polymethoxy flavones found in citrus fruits, on catecholamine secretion in cultured bovine adrenal medullary cells. Here, we report the effects of nobiletin on catecholamine synthesis in the cells. Nobiletin increased the synthesis of (14)C-catecholamines from [(14)C]tyrosine in a time (20-30 min)- and concentration (1.0-100 μM)-dependent manner. Nobiletin (10-100 μM) also activated tyrosine hydroxylase activity. The stimulatory effect of nobiletin on (14)C-catecholamine synthesis was not observed when extracellular Ca(2+) was not present in the incubation medium. Protein kinase inhibitors including H-89, an inhibitor of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase, and KN-93, an inhibitor of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, suppressed the stimulatory effects of nobiletin on catecholamine synthesis as well as tyrosine hydroxylase activity. Nobiletin also induced the phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase at Ser(19) and Ser(40). Nobiletin (1.0-100 μM) inhibited (14)C-catecholamine synthesis induced by acetylcholine. The present findings suggest that nobiletin, by itself, stimulates catecholamine synthesis through tyrosine hydroxylase phosphorylation at Ser(19) and Ser(40), whereas it inhibits catecholamine synthesis induced by acetylcholine in bovine adrenal medulla.

  13. Alzheimer's disease: the pros and cons of pharmaceutical, nutritional, botanical, and stimulatory therapies, with a discussion of treatment strategies from the perspective of patients and practitioners.

    PubMed

    Wollen, Keith A

    2010-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by dysfunctional intracellular and extracellular biochemical processes that result in neuron death. This article summarizes hypotheses regarding cell dysfunction in AD and discusses the effectiveness of, and problems with, different therapies. Pharmaceutical therapies discussed include cholinesterase inhibitors, memantine, antihypertensive drugs, anti-inflammatory drugs, secretase inhibitors, insulin resistance drugs, etanercept, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and immunization. Nutritional and botanical therapies included are huperzine A, polyphenols, Ginkgo, Panax ginseng, Withania somnifera, phosphatidylserine, alpha-lipoic acid, omega-3 fatty acids, acetyl L-carnitine, coenzyme Q10, various vitamins and minerals, and melatonin. Stimulatory therapies discussed are physical exercise, cognitive training, music, and socialization. Finally, treatment strategies are discussed in light of the benefits and drawbacks of different therapeutic approaches. It is concluded that potential risks of both approved and non-approved therapies should be weighed against the potential benefits and certain consequences of disease progression. Approaches that target several dysfunctions simultaneously and that emphasize nutritional, botanical, and stimulatory therapies may offer the most benefit at this time.

  14. New Horizons in Enhancing the Proliferation and Differentiation of Neural Stem Cells Using Stimulatory Effects of the Short Time Exposure to Radiofrequency Radiation.

    PubMed

    Eghlidospour, M; Mortazavi, S M J; Yousefi, F; Mortazavi, S A R

    2015-09-01

    Mobile phone use and wireless communication technology have grown explosively over the past decades. This rapid growth has caused widespread global concern about the potential detrimental effects of this technology on human health. Stem cells generate specialized cell types of the tissue in which they reside through normal differentiation pathways. Considering the undeniable importance of stem cells in modern medicine, numerous studies have been performed on the effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on cellular processes such as: proliferation, differentiation, cell cycle and DNA repair processes. We have conducted extensive studies on beneficial (stimulatory) or detrimental biological effects of exposure to different sources of electromagnetic fields such as mobile phones, mobile phone base stations, mobile phone jammers, radar systems, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems and dentistry cavitrons over the past years. In this article, recent studies on the biological effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation in the range of radiofrequency (RF) on some important features of stem cells such as their proliferation and differentiation are reviewed. Studies reviewed in this paper indicate that the stimulatory or inhibitory effects of RF radiation on the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells depend on various factors such as the biological systems, experiment conditions, the frequency and intensity of RF and the duration of exposure.

  15. Alteration of consciousness via diverse photo-acoustic stimulatory patterns. Phenomenology and effect on salivary flow rate, alpha-amylase and total protein levels.

    PubMed

    Beck, Anita; Fábián, Gábor; Fejérdy, Pál; Krause, Wolf-Rainer; Hermann, Péter; Módos, Károly; Varga, Gábor; Fábián, Tibor Károly

    2015-12-01

    Long-term photo-acoustic stimulation is used for the induction of altered states of consciousness for both therapeutic and experimental purposes. Long-term photo-acoustic stimulation also leads to changes in the composition of saliva which have a key contribution to the efficiency of this technique in easing mucosal symptoms of oral psychosomatic patients. The aim of this study is to find out whether there is any cumulative effect of repeated stimulation and whether there are any detectable differences between diverse stimulatory patterns of long lasting photo-acoustic stimulation on the phenomenology of the appearing trance state and on salivary secretion. There was significant cumulative effect in relation with the appearance of day dreaming as phenomenological parameter, and in relation with protein output and amylase/protein ratio as salivary parameter. Pattern specific effect was detectable in relation with salivary flow rate only. Although our results clearly indicate the existence of certain cumulative and stimulation-pattern specific effects of repeated photo-acoustic stimulation, the absolute values of all these effects were relatively small in this study. Therefore, in spite of their theoretical importance there are no direct clinical consequences of these findings. However, our data do not exclude at all the possibility that repeated stimulation with other stimulatory parameters may lead to more pronounced effects. Further studies are needed to make clear conclusion in this respect.

  16. Suppressive effects of anti-allergic agent suplatast tosilate (IPD-1151T) on the expression of co-stimulatory molecules on mouse splenocytes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, M; Kawazu, K; Asano, K; Fumio, K; Mita, A; Adachi, M

    2001-12-01

    The effects of IPD-1151T on the expression of co-stimulatory molecules, CD40, CD80 and CD86, were investigated in vivo using mice with allergic disorders. BALB/c mice were immunized intraperitoneally with two doses of dinitrophenylated ovalbumin (DNP-OVA) at 1-week intervals. These mice then were treated intraperitoneally with 100 microg/kg of IPD-1151T once a day for 14 days, starting 7 days after the first immunization. On day 21, some mice were challenged intraperitoneally with DNP-OVA and the other mice were not challenged. All mice were autopsied on day 22 and assayed for immunoglobulin E, interleuken (IL)-4 and IL-5 productions following DNP-OVA immunization. The intraperitoneal treatment with IPD-1151T strongly suppressed immunoglobulin E contents in serum, which were enhanced by DNA-OVA immunization. IPD-1151T also caused a decrease in both IL-4 and IL-5 levels in splenic lymphocytes. We next examined the influence of IPD-1151T on co-stimulatory molecule expression on splenic lymphocytes. IPD-1151T caused suppression of CD40 and CD86 expression; however, the treatments did not affect CD80 expression.

  17. Stimulatory effect of an algal fucoidan on the release of vascular endothelial tissue-type plasminogen activator as a mechanism of fucoidan-mediated thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Min, Soon-Ki; Han, Sung-Mi; Jang, Jae-Seok; Kim, Jong-Ki

    2016-07-01

    Identifying a pharmacological means for increasing the production of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) is always desirable to cure impaired production of this enzyme. An algal fucoidan has been shown to exhibit both novel thrombolytic and synergistic stimulatory effects in a mouse thrombosis model. The plasma levels of active t-PA were measured in mouse arterial thrombus models that were treated with various fucoidans to investigate the mechanism of thrombolysis. The mean plasma level of active t-PA after the infusion of fucoidan was 2.136 ± 0.231 ng/ml for nonthrombolytic Fucus fucoidan and 3.917 ± 0.0.529 ng/ml for thrombolytic Undaria fucoidan, which resulted in a 1.56-2.29-fold increase compared with the healthy control group (1.706 ± 0.194 ng/ml) and the untreated thrombus group (2.506 ± 0.301 ng/ml) (P < 0.01). An algal fucoidan has demonstrated to exert a thrombolytic and stimulatory effect via the induction of t-PA release in a dose-dependent manner in an arterial thrombosis model.

  18. GPER, IGF-IR, and EGFR transduction signaling are involved in stimulatory effects of zinc in breast cancer cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Pisano, Assunta; Santolla, Maria Francesca; De Francesco, Ernestina Marianna; De Marco, Paola; Rigiracciolo, Damiano Cosimo; Perri, Maria Grazia; Vivacqua, Adele; Abonante, Sergio; Cappello, Anna Rita; Dolce, Vincenza; Belfiore, Antonino; Maggiolini, Marcello; Lappano, Rosamaria

    2017-02-01

    Zinc (Zn) is an essential trace mineral that contributes to the regulation of several cellular functions; however, it may be also implicated in the progression of breast cancer through different mechanisms. It has been largely reported that the classical estrogen receptor (ER), as well as the G protein estrogen receptor (GPER, previously known as GPR30) can exert a main role in the development of breast tumors. In the present study, we demonstrate that zinc chloride (ZnCl2 ) involves GPER in the activation of insulin-like growth factor receptor I (IGF-IR)/epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mediated signaling, which in turn triggers downstream pathways like ERK and AKT in breast cancer cells, and main components of the tumor microenvironment namely cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs). Further corroborating these findings, ZnCl2 stimulates a functional crosstalk of GPER with IGF-IR and EGFR toward the transcription of diverse GPER target genes. Then, we show that GPER contributes to the stimulatory effects induced by ZnCl2 on cell-cycle progression, proliferation, and migration of breast cancer cells as well as migration of CAFs. Together, our data provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms through which zinc may exert stimulatory effects in breast cancer cells and CAFs toward tumor progression. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Characterization of a new human B7-related protein: B7RP-1 is the ligand to the co-stimulatory protein ICOS.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, S K; Zhang, M; Pistillo, J; Horan, T; Khare, S D; Miner, K; Sonnenberg, M; Boone, T; Brankow, D; Dai, T; Delaney, J; Han, H; Hui, A; Kohno, T; Manoukian, R; Whoriskey, J S; Coccia, M A

    2000-10-01

    Optimal T cell activation requires the interactions of co-stimulatory molecules, such as those in the CD28 and B7 protein families. Recently, we described the co-stimulatory properties of the murine ligand to ICOS, which we designated as B7RP-1. Here, we report the co-stimulation of human T cells through the human B7RP-1 and ICOS interaction. This ligand-receptor pair interacts with a K:(D) approximately 33 nM and an off-rate with a t((1/2)) > 10 min. Interestingly, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha differentially regulates the expression of human B7RP-1 on B cells, monocytes and dendritic cells (DC). TNF-alpha enhances B7RP-1 expression on B cells and monocytes, while it inhibits it on DC. The human B7RP-1-Fc protein or cells that express membrane-bound B7RP-1 co-stimulate T cell proliferation in vitro. Specific cytokines, such as IFN-gamma and IL-10, are induced by B7RP-1 co-stimulation. Although IL-2 levels are not significantly increased, B7RP-1 co-stimulation is dependent on IL-2. These experiments define the human ortholog to murine B7RP-1 and characterize its interaction with human ICOS.

  20. New Horizons in Enhancing the Proliferation and Differentiation of Neural Stem Cells Using Stimulatory Effects of the Short Time Exposure to Radiofrequency Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Eghlidospour, M.; Mortazavi, S. M. J.; Yousefi, F.; Mortazavi, S. A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Mobile phone use and wireless communication technology have grown explosively over the past decades. This rapid growth has caused widespread global concern about the potential detrimental effects of this technology on human health. Stem cells generate specialized cell types of the tissue in which they reside through normal differentiation pathways. Considering the undeniable importance of stem cells in modern medicine, numerous studies have been performed on the effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on cellular processes such as: proliferation, differentiation, cell cycle and DNA repair processes. We have conducted extensive studies on beneficial (stimulatory) or detrimental biological effects of exposure to different sources of electromagnetic fields such as mobile phones, mobile phone base stations, mobile phone jammers, radar systems, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems and dentistry cavitrons over the past years. In this article, recent studies on the biological effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation in the range of radiofrequency (RF) on some important features of stem cells such as their proliferation and differentiation are reviewed. Studies reviewed in this paper indicate that the stimulatory or inhibitory effects of RF radiation on the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells depend on various factors such as the biological systems, experiment conditions, the frequency and intensity of RF and the duration of exposure. PMID:26396965

  1. Olfactory epithelium biosensor: odor discrimination of receptor neurons from a bio-hybrid sensing system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingjun; Hu, Ning; Zhang, Fenni; Zhang, Diming; Hsia, K Jimmy; Wang, Ping

    2012-12-01

    Bio-hybrid systems provide an opportunity for integrating a living bio-active unit and a proper biosensing system, to employ the unique properties of the bio-active unit. The biological olfactory system can sense and identify thousands of trace odors. The purpose of this study is to combine olfactory epithelium with microelectrode array (MEA) to establish an olfactory epithelium-MEA hybrid system to record the odor-induced electrophysiological activities of the tissue. In our experiments, extracellular potential of olfactory receptor neurons in intact epithelium were measured in the presence of ethyl ether, acetic acid, butanedione, and acetone, respectively. After the odor-induced response signals were analyzed in the time and frequency domain, the temporal characteristics of response signals were extracted. We found that olfactory epithelium-MEA hybrid system can reflect the in vitro odor information of different signal characteristics and firing modes in vitro. The bio-hybrid sensing system can represent a useful instrument to sense and detect the odorant molecules with well recognizing patterns. With the development of sensor technology, bio-hybrid systems will represent emerging and promising platforms for wide applications, ranging from health care to environmental monitoring.

  2. Preclinical and clinical studies of a collagen membrane (Bio-Gide).

    PubMed

    Schlegel, A K; Möhler, H; Busch, F; Mehl, A

    1997-04-01

    Membranes are used to guide the repopulation of defects by preferred cells and to achieve a specific healing effect. The collagen membrane studied, Bio-Gide, was developed particularly for periodontal, peri-implant applications or to improve the ossification of bone defects of any origin. Bio-Gide is a bilayer membrane; one compact and smooth layer is covered by a particularly dense film, designed to prevent the invasion of soft tissue in a membrane-protected bone defect. The other, rough side of Bio-Gide must be placed towards the bone defect in order to make bone ingrowth possible. As a prerequisite for its therapeutic use in humans, the collagen matrix must be devoid of major immunogenicity. The immunological response to the membrane material was analysed in rabbits. Later, a clinical prospective study provided information about the bone regeneration effect under the Bio-Gide membrane inserted in six patients selected at random. The immune response to the collagen membrane Bio-Gide and the bone healing was tested in these patients when undergoing oral surgery.

  3. Bio-Organic Reaction Animations (BioORA): Student Performance, Student Perceptions, and Instructor Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunersel, Adalet Baris; Fleming, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Research shows that computer animations are especially helpful in fields such as chemistry and in this mixed-methods study, we investigate the educational effectiveness of Bio-Organic Reaction Animations (BioORA), a 3-D software, in four undergraduate biochemistry classes at different universities. Statistically significant findings indicate that…

  4. Multi-Photon Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Fluorescent Bio-Probes and Bio-Molecules

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    the set-up of a multi-photon fluorescence microscope. The information can also be useful in the detection of multi-photon fluorescence in bio -chip...technology. In addition, we have investigated a few highly fluorescent bio -molecules commonly found in plant cells.

  5. Bio-Organic Reaction Animations (BioORA): Student Performance, Student Perceptions, and Instructor Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunersel, Adalet Baris; Fleming, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Research shows that computer animations are especially helpful in fields such as chemistry and in this mixed-methods study, we investigate the educational effectiveness of Bio-Organic Reaction Animations (BioORA), a 3-D software, in four undergraduate biochemistry classes at different universities. Statistically significant findings indicate that…

  6. Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Chris

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to the reviews of his book, "The Good Life of Teaching: An Ethics of Professional Practice." He begins by highlighting some of the main concerns of his book. He then offers a brief response, doing his best to address the main criticisms of his argument and noting where the four reviewers (Charlene…

  7. Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Chris

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to the reviews of his book, "The Good Life of Teaching: An Ethics of Professional Practice." He begins by highlighting some of the main concerns of his book. He then offers a brief response, doing his best to address the main criticisms of his argument and noting where the four reviewers (Charlene…

  8. Stimulatory heterotrimeric G protein augments gamma ray-induced apoptosis by up-regulation of Bak expression via CREB and AP-1 in H1299 human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoon Jung; Kim, So Young; Oh, Jung Min; Juhnn, Yong Sung

    2009-08-31

    Stimulatory heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins (Gs protein) stimulate cAMP generation in response to various signals, and modulate various cellular phenomena such as proliferation and apoptosis. This study aimed to investigate the effect of Gs proteins on gamma ray-induced apoptosis of lung cancer cells and its molecular mechanism, as an attempt to develop a new strategy to improve the therapeutic efficacy of gamma radiation. Expression of constitutively active mutant of the alpha subunit of Gs (GalphasQL) augmented gamma ray-induced apoptosis via mitochondrial dependent pathway when assessed by clonogenic assay, FACS analysis of PI stained cells, and western blot analysis of the cytoplasmic translocation of cytochrome C and the cleavage of caspase-3 and ploy(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) in H1299 human lung cancer cells. GalphasQL up-regulated the Bak expression at the levels of protein and mRNA. Treatment with inhibitors of PKA (H89), SP600125 (JNK inhibitor), and a CRE-decoy blocked GalphasQL-stimulated Bak reporter luciferase activity. Expression of GalphasQL increased basal and gamma ray-induced luciferase activity of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) and AP-1, and the binding of CREB and AP-1 to Bak promoter. Furthermore, prostaglandin E2, a Galphas activating signal, was found to augment gamma ray-induced apoptosis, which was abolished by treatment with a prostanoid receptor antagonist. These results indicate that Galphas augments gamma ray-induced apoptosis by up-regulation of Bak expression via CREB and AP-1 in H1299 lung cancer cells, suggesting that the efficacy of radiotherapy of lung cancer may be improved by modulating Gs signaling pathway.

  9. Bio-functionalization of biomedical metals.

    PubMed

    Xiao, M; Chen, Y M; Biao, M N; Zhang, X D; Yang, B C

    2017-01-01

    Bio-functionalization means to endow biomaterials with bio-functions so as to make the materials or devices more suitable for biomedical applications. Traditionally, because of the excellent mechanical properties, the biomedical metals have been widely used in clinic. However, the utilized functions are basically supporting or fixation especially for the implantable devices. Nowadays, some new functions, including bioactivity, anti-tumor, anti-microbial, and so on, are introduced to biomedical metals. To realize those bio-functions on the metallic biomedical materials, surface modification is the most commonly used method. Surface modification, including physical and chemical methods, is an effective way to alter the surface morphology and composition of biomaterials. It can endow the biomedical metals with new surface properties while still retain the good mechanical properties of the bulk material. Having analyzed the ways of realizing the bio-functionalization, this article briefly summarized the bio-functionalization concepts of six hot spots in this field. They are bioactivity, bony tissue inducing, anti-microbial, anti-tumor, anticoagulation, and drug loading functions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Promoting Bio-Ethanol in the United States by Incorporating Lessons from Brazil's National Alcohol Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Du, Yangbo

    2007-01-01

    Current U.S. energy policy supports increasing the use of bio-ethanol as a gasoline substitute, which Brazil first produced on a large scale in response to the 1970s energy crises. Brazil's National Alcohol Program stood out among its contemporaries regarding its success at displacing a third of Brazil's gasoline requirements, primarily due to…

  11. BioLab: Using Yeast Fermentation as a Model for the Scientific Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pigage, Helen K.; Neilson, Milton C.; Greeder, Michele M.

    This document presents a science experiment demonstrating the scientific method. The experiment consists of testing the fermentation capabilities of yeasts under different circumstances. The experiment is supported with computer software called BioLab which demonstrates yeast's response to different environments. (YDS)

  12. An In vitro Study of Bio-Control and Plant Growth Promotion Potential of Salicaceae Endophytes.

    PubMed

    Kandel, Shyam L; Firrincieli, Andrea; Joubert, Pierre M; Okubara, Patricia A; Leston, Natalie D; McGeorge, Kendra M; Mugnozza, Giuseppe S; Harfouche, Antoine; Kim, Soo-Hyung; Doty, Sharon L

    2017-01-01

    Microbial communities in the endosphere of Salicaceae plants, poplar (Populus trichocarpa) and willow (Salix sitchensis), have been demonstrated to be important for plant growth promotion, protection from biotic and abiotic stresses, and degradation of toxic compounds. Our study aimed to investigate bio-control activities of Salicaceae endophytes against various soil borne plant pathogens including Rhizoctonia solani AG-8, Fusarium culmorum, Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici, and Pythium ultimum. Additionally, different plant growth promoting traits such as biological nitrogen fixation (BNF), indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) biosynthesis, phosphate solubilization, and siderophore production were assessed in all bio-control positive strains. Burkholderia, Rahnella, Pseudomonas, and Curtobacterium were major endophyte genera that showed bio-control activities in the in-vitro assays. The bio-control activities of Burkholderia strains were stronger across all tested plant pathogens as compared to other stains. Genomes of sequenced Burkholderia strains WP40 and WP42 were surveyed to identify the putative genes involved in the bio-control activities. The ocf and hcnABC gene clusters responsible for biosynthesis of the anti-fungal metabolites, occidiofungin and hydrogen cyanide, are present in the genomes of WP40 and WP42. Nearly all endophyte strains showing the bio-control activities produced IAA, solubilized tricalcium phosphate, and synthesized siderophores in the culture medium. Moreover, some strains reduced acetylene into ethylene in the acetylene reduction assay, a common assay used for BNF. Salicaceae endophytes could be useful for bio-control of various plant pathogens, and plant growth promotion possibly through the mechanisms of BNF, IAA production, and nutrient acquisition.

  13. An In vitro Study of Bio-Control and Plant Growth Promotion Potential of Salicaceae Endophytes

    PubMed Central

    Kandel, Shyam L.; Firrincieli, Andrea; Joubert, Pierre M.; Okubara, Patricia A.; Leston, Natalie D.; McGeorge, Kendra M.; Mugnozza, Giuseppe S.; Harfouche, Antoine; Kim, Soo-Hyung; Doty, Sharon L.

    2017-01-01

    Microbial communities in the endosphere of Salicaceae plants, poplar (Populus trichocarpa) and willow (Salix sitchensis), have been demonstrated to be important for plant growth promotion, protection from biotic and abiotic stresses, and degradation of toxic compounds. Our study aimed to investigate bio-control activities of Salicaceae endophytes against various soil borne plant pathogens including Rhizoctonia solani AG-8, Fusarium culmorum, Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici, and Pythium ultimum. Additionally, different plant growth promoting traits such as biological nitrogen fixation (BNF), indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) biosynthesis, phosphate solubilization, and siderophore production were assessed in all bio-control positive strains. Burkholderia, Rahnella, Pseudomonas, and Curtobacterium were major endophyte genera that showed bio-control activities in the in-vitro assays. The bio-control activities of Burkholderia strains were stronger across all tested plant pathogens as compared to other stains. Genomes of sequenced Burkholderia strains WP40 and WP42 were surveyed to identify the putative genes involved in the bio-control activities. The ocf and hcnABC gene clusters responsible for biosynthesis of the anti-fungal metabolites, occidiofungin and hydrogen cyanide, are present in the genomes of WP40 and WP42. Nearly all endophyte strains showing the bio-control activities produced IAA, solubilized tricalcium phosphate, and synthesized siderophores in the culture medium. Moreover, some strains reduced acetylene into ethylene in the acetylene reduction assay, a common assay used for BNF. Salicaceae endophytes could be useful for bio-control of various plant pathogens, and plant growth promotion possibly through the mechanisms of BNF, IAA production, and nutrient acquisition. PMID:28348550

  14. The All Terrain Bio nano Gear for Space Radiation Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Ummat, Ajay; Mavroidis, Constantinos

    2007-01-30

    This paper discusses about the relevance of detecting space radiations which are very harmful and pose numerous health issues for astronauts. There are many ways to detect radiations, but we present a non-invasive way of detecting them in real-time while an astronaut is in the mission. All Terrain Bio-nano (ATB) gear system is one such concept where we propose to detect various levels of space radiations depending on their intensity and warn the astronaut of probable biological damage. A basic framework for radiation detection system which utilizes bio-nano machines is discussed. This radiation detection system is termed as 'radiation-responsive molecular assembly' (RMA) for the detection of space radiations. Our objective is to create a device which could detect space radiations by creating an environment equivalent to human cells within its structure and bio-chemically sensing the effects induced therein. For creating such an environment and further bio-chemically sensing space radiations bio-nano systems could be potentially used. These bio-nano systems could interact with radiations and signal based on the intensity of the radiations their relative biological effectiveness. Based on the energy and kind of radiation encountered, a matrix of signals has to be created which corresponds to a particular biological effect. The key advantage of such a design is its ability to interact with the radiation at e molecular scale; characterize its intensity based on energy deposition and relate it to the relative biological effectiveness based on the correspondence established through molecular structures and bond strengths of the bio-nano system.

  15. A histological evaluation of the involvement of Bio-Oss in osteoblastic differentiation and matrix synthesis.

    PubMed

    Tapety, Fabricio I; Amizuka, Norio; Uoshima, Katsumi; Nomura, Shuichi; Maeda, Takeyasu

    2004-06-01

    This study was designed to investigate the responses of bone cells to a deproteinized bovine bone material, Bio-Oss (Geistlich-Pharma, Wolhunsen, Switzerland), which was grafted in artificial bone defects of rat femurs. Standardized bone defects in the cortical bone of the right femurs were grafted with Bio-Oss particles. Narrow penetrations were prepared on the bottom of the cavity, enabling osteogenic cells to migrate from the bone marrow. A defect in the left femur without Bio-Oss was used as a control. The treated femurs were histochemically examined at 1, 3, 5, 7, and 14 days after the operation. At day 1, no osteogenic migration into the cavities occurred in either the control or experimental groups. At day 3, alkaline phosphatase (ALPase) immunohistochemistry showed a migration of the positive cells at the bottom of the cavities of the experimental groups, but not in the control ones. At day 5, new bone formation was recognized at the bottom of the cavity of both groups. In the experimental group, ALPase-positive cells were localized on Bio-Oss and/or on the thin bone matrix that covered this material. The superficial layer of Bio-Oss underlying the newly formed bone exhibited osteocalcin immunoreactivity. Transmission electron microscopy revealed osteoblasts depositing bone matrices--including collagen fibers--on the surface of Bio-Oss. At days 7 and 14, woven bone occupied the previous cavities of both control and experimental groups, accompanied by osteoclasts. Thus, Bio-Oss appears to serve as a scaffold for osteogenic cells as well as to promote osteoblastic differentiation and matrix synthesis.

  16. Bios-3: Siberian experiments in bioregenerative life support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salisbury, F. B.; Gitelson, J. I.; Lisovsky, G. M.

    1997-01-01

    The Russian experience with the bioregenerative life support system Bios-3 at Krasnoyarsk, Siberia, is reviewed. A brief review of other bioregenerative systems examines Biosphere 2 in Oracle, Arizona, and the Bios-1 and Bios-2 systems that preceded Bios-3. Physical details of the Bios-3 facility are provided. The use of Chlorella and higher plants for gas exchange is examined. Long-term studies of human habitation are discussed. Other topics include microflora in Bios-3, the theory of closed systems, and problems for the future.

  17. Bios-3: Siberian experiments in bioregenerative life support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salisbury, F. B.; Gitelson, J. I.; Lisovsky, G. M.

    1997-01-01

    The Russian experience with the bioregenerative life support system Bios-3 at Krasnoyarsk, Siberia, is reviewed. A brief review of other bioregenerative systems examines Biosphere 2 in Oracle, Arizona, and the Bios-1 and Bios-2 systems that preceded Bios-3. Physical details of the Bios-3 facility are provided. The use of Chlorella and higher plants for gas exchange is examined. Long-term studies of human habitation are discussed. Other topics include microflora in Bios-3, the theory of closed systems, and problems for the future.

  18. BrisSynBio: a BBSRC/EPSRC-funded Synthetic Biology Research Centre.

    PubMed

    Sedgley, Kathleen R; Race, Paul R; Woolfson, Derek N

    2016-06-15

    BrisSynBio is the Bristol-based Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC)/Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC)-funded Synthetic Biology Research Centre. It is one of six such Centres in the U.K. BrisSynBio's emphasis is on rational and predictive bimolecular modelling, design and engineering in the context of synthetic biology. It trains the next generation of synthetic biologists in these approaches, to facilitate translation of fundamental synthetic biology research to industry and the clinic, and to do this within an innovative and responsible research framework. © 2016 The Author(s).

  19. BrisSynBio: a BBSRC/EPSRC-funded Synthetic Biology Research Centre

    PubMed Central

    Sedgley, Kathleen R.; Race, Paul R.; Woolfson, Derek N.

    2016-01-01

    BrisSynBio is the Bristol-based Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC)/Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC)-funded Synthetic Biology Research Centre. It is one of six such Centres in the U.K. BrisSynBio's emphasis is on rational and predictive bimolecular modelling, design and engineering in the context of synthetic biology. It trains the next generation of synthetic biologists in these approaches, to facilitate translation of fundamental synthetic biology research to industry and the clinic, and to do this within an innovative and responsible research framework. PMID:27284028

  20. BioC viewer: a web-based tool for displaying and merging annotations in BioC

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Soo-Yong; Kim, Sun; Wilbur, W. John; Kwon, Dongseop

    2016-01-01

    BioC is an XML-based format designed to provide interoperability for text mining tools and manual curation results. A challenge of BioC as a standard format is to align annotations from multiple systems. Ideally, this should not be a major problem if users follow guidelines given by BioC key files. Nevertheless, the misalignment between text and annotations happens quite often because different systems tend to use different software development environments, e.g. ASCII vs. Unicode. We first implemented the BioC Viewer to assist BioGRID curators as a part of the BioCreative V BioC track (Collaborative Biocurator Assistant Task). For the BioC track, the BioC Viewer helped curate protein-protein interaction and genetic interaction pairs appearing in full-text articles. Here, we describe the BioC Viewer itself as well as improvements made to the BioC Viewer since the BioCreative V Workshop to address the misalignment issue of BioC annotations. While uploading BioC files, a BioC merge process is offered when there are files from the same full-text article. If there is a mismatch between an annotated offset and text, the BioC Viewer adjusts the offset to correctly align with the text. The BioC Viewer has a user-friendly interface, where most operations can be performed within a few mouse clicks. The feedback from BioGRID curators has been positive for the web interface, particularly for its usability and learnability. Database URL: http://viewer.bioqrator.org PMID:27515823

  1. BioC viewer: a web-based tool for displaying and merging annotations in BioC.

    PubMed

    Shin, Soo-Yong; Kim, Sun; Wilbur, W John; Kwon, Dongseop

    2016-01-01

    BioC is an XML-based format designed to provide interoperability for text mining tools and manual curation results. A challenge of BioC as a standard format is to align annotations from multiple systems. Ideally, this should not be a major problem if users follow guidelines given by BioC key files. Nevertheless, the misalignment between text and annotations happens quite often because different systems tend to use different software development environments, e.g. ASCII vs. Unicode. We first implemented the BioC Viewer to assist BioGRID curators as a part of the BioCreative V BioC track (Collaborative Biocurator Assistant Task). For the BioC track, the BioC Viewer helped curate protein-protein interaction and genetic interaction pairs appearing in full-text articles. Here, we describe the BioC Viewer itself as well as improvements made to the BioC Viewer since the BioCreative V Workshop to address the misalignment issue of BioC annotations. While uploading BioC files, a BioC merge process is offered when there are files from the same full-text article. If there is a mismatch between an annotated offset and text, the BioC Viewer adjusts the offset to correctly align with the text. The BioC Viewer has a user-friendly interface, where most operations can be performed within a few mouse clicks. The feedback from BioGRID curators has been positive for the web interface, particularly for its usability and learnability.Database URL: http://viewer.bioqrator.org.

  2. Bios-3 project in Krasnoyarsk, Russia

    PubMed

    Wheeler, R M

    1994-01-01

    The article in this issue by Gitelson and Okladnikov provides a valuable summary of some of the work conducted at the Bios-3 project in Krasnoyarsk, Russia. As the title suggests, the focus is on humans and their role in a CELSS biosphere. I am aware of several translated reports and some recent articles by Dr. Gitelson and colleagues in which the Bios project is described, but this paper provides some information that I have not seen previously in an english article. Although the discussion is focused on bioregeneration, the authors state that complementary physicochemical technologies and some stowage may be needed in a CELSS. For example, animal protein foods were taken into the Bios-3 chamber, since, as the authors state, "products of animal origin would make the system considerably more complicated and energy inefficient."

  3. Upscaling of Bio-mediated Soil Improvement

    SciTech Connect

    J. T. DeJong; B. C. Martinez; B. M. Mortensen; D. C. Nelson; J. T. Waller; M. H. Weil; T. R. Ginn; T. Weathers; T. Barkouki; Y. Fujita; G. Redden; C. Hunt; D. Major; B. Tunyu

    2009-10-01

    As demand for soil improvement continues to increase, new, sustainable, and innocuous methods are needed to alter the mechanical properties of soils. Recent research has demonstrated the potential of bio-mediated soil improvement for geotechnical applications (DeJong et al. 2006, Whiffin et al. 2007). Upscaling the bio-mediated treatment process for in situ implementation presents a number of challenges to be addressed, including soil and pore fluid interactions, bioaugmentation versus biostimulation of microbial communities, controlled distribution of mediated calcite precipitation, and permanence of the cementation. Current studies are utilizing large-scale laboratory experiments, non-destructive geophysical measurements, and modeling, to develop an optimized and predictable bio-mediated treatment method.

  4. On calcium phosphate bio-cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepuk, A. A.; Veresov, A. G.; Putlyaev, V. I.

    2007-10-01

    The prospect of clinical applications of bio-cements in bone implantation and tissue substitution implies strict requirements as regards material reliability and robustness. We suggest a technique to enhance the mechanical properties of bio-cements based on α-Ca3(PO4)2. Various types of mechanical testing, including compressive deformation analysis, proved that the most robust bio-cement might be fabricated of α-TCP and 1% chitosan. The kinetics of transformation in experiments was considered in order to define the best selection of substance ratios and terms of stabilization. It is essential to increase the ultimate strength and other properties so that they are close to those of cortical bone and this was achieved with the additives chitosan and hydroxyapatite nanoparticles.

  5. Changes in myocardial beta1-adrenergic receptor and stimulatory G-protein gene expression after chronic treatment with doxorubicin in rat.

    PubMed

    Kizaki, Keiichiro; Akatsuka, Keiko; Momozaki, Masami; Fujimori, Yuuki; Uchide, Tsuyoshi; Temma, Kyosuke; Hara, Yukio

    2004-08-01

    The gene expression of beta(1)-adrenergic receptor (beta(1)AR) and stimulatory G-protein Gsalpha in ventricle after chronic treatment with doxorubicin (DOX) in rat was investigated. The rats were treated with DOX in a dose of 2.5 mg/kg once a week for 5 weeks, the cumulative dose being 12.5 mg/kg. Two weeks after the last injection, the positive inotropic effect of isoproterenol was noticeably decreased in left atrial muscle preparations isolated from DOX-treated rats. Northern blot hybridization showed that the mRNA transcripts of beta(1)AR and Gsalpha, important signal transduction elements for regulating heart rate and contractility, were significantly decreased in the ventricle of DOX-treated rats. Thus, chronic treatment with DOX decreases the gene expression levels of myocardial beta(1)AR and Gsalpha.

  6. Pyrolysis of hornbeam (Carpinus betulus L.) sawdust: Characterization of bio-oil and bio-char.

    PubMed

    Moralı, Uğur; Yavuzel, Nazan; Şensöz, Sevgi

    2016-12-01

    Slow pyrolysis of hornbeam (Carpinus betulus L.) sawdust was performed to produce bio-oil and bio-char. The operational variables were as follows: pyrolysis temperature (400-600°C), heating rate (10-50°Cmin(-1)) and nitrogen flow rate (50-150cm(3)min(-1)). Physicochemical and thermogravimetric characterizations of hornbeam sawdust were performed. The characteristics of bio-oil and bio-char were analyzed on the basis of various spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques such as FTIR, GC-MS, 1H NMR, SEM, BET. Higher heating value, density and kinematic viscosity of the bio-oil with maximum yield of 35.28% were 23.22MJkg(-1), 1289kgm(-3) and 0.6mm(2)s(-1), respectively. The bio-oil with relatively high fuel potential can be obtained from the pyrolysis of the hornbeam sawdust and the bio-char with a calorific value of 32.88MJkg(-1) is a promising candidate for solid fuel applications that also contributes to the preservation of the environment.

  7. Determining the bio-based content of bio-plastics used in Thailand by radiocarbon analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploykrathok, T.; Chanyotha, S.

    2017-06-01

    Presently, there is an increased interest in the development of bio-plastic products from agricultural materials which are biodegradable in order to reduce the problem of waste disposal. Since the amount of modern carbon in bio-plastics can indicate how much the amount of agricultural materials are contained in the bio-plastic products, this research aims to determine the modern carbon in bio-plastic using the carbon dioxide absorption method. The radioactivity of carbon-14 contained in the sample is measured by liquid scintillation counter (Tri-carb 3110 TR, PerkinElmer). The percentages of bio-based content in the samples were determined by comparing the observed modern carbon content with the values contained in agricultural raw materials. The experimental results show that only poly(lactic acid) samples have the modern carbon content of 97.4%, which is close to the agricultural materials while other bio-plastics types are found to have less than 50% of the modern carbon content. In other words, most of these bio-plastic samples were mixed with other materials which are not agriculturally originated.

  8. Utilization of different waste proteins to create a novel PGPR-containing bio-organic fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Sun, Li; Zhao, Jianshu; Huang, Rong; Li, Rong; Shen, Qirong

    2015-01-14

    High-quality bio-organic fertilizers (BIOs) cannot be produced without the addition of some proteins, while many waste proteins are haphazardly disposed, causing serious environmental pollution. In this study, several waste proteins were used as additives to assist with the reproduction of the functional microbe (Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SQR9) inoculated into matured composts to produce BIOs. An optimized composition of solid-state fermentation (SSF) raw materials was predicted by response surface methodology and experimental validation. The results showed that 7.61% (w/w, DW, the same below) rapeseed meal, 8.85% expanded feather meal, 6.47% dewatered blue algal sludge and 77.07% chicken compost resulted in maximum biomass of strain SQR-9 and the maximum amount of lipopeptides 7 days after SSF. Spectroscopy experiments showed that the inner material structural changes in the novel SSF differed from the control and the novel BIO had higher dissolved organic matter. This study offers a high value-added utilization of waste proteins for producing economical but high-quality BIO.

  9. Biological and mechanical evaluation of a Bio-Hybrid scaffold for autologous valve tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Jahnavi, S; Saravanan, U; Arthi, N; Bhuvaneshwar, G S; Kumary, T V; Rajan, S; Verma, R S

    2017-04-01

    Major challenge in heart valve tissue engineering for paediatric patients is the development of an autologous valve with regenerative capacity. Hybrid tissue engineering approach is recently gaining popularity to design scaffolds with desired biological and mechanical properties that can remodel post implantation. In this study, we fabricated aligned nanofibrous Bio-Hybrid scaffold made of decellularized bovine pericardium: polycaprolactone-chitosan with optimized polymer thickness to yield the desired biological and mechanical properties. CD44(+), αSMA(+), Vimentin(+) and CD105(-) human valve interstitial cells were isolated and seeded on these Bio-Hybrid scaffolds. Subsequent biological evaluation revealed interstitial cell proliferation with dense extra cellular matrix deposition that indicated the viability for growth and proliferation of seeded cells on the scaffolds. Uniaxial mechanical tests along axial direction showed that the Bio-Hybrid scaffolds has at least 20 times the strength of the native valves and its stiffness is nearly 3 times more than that of native valves. Biaxial and uniaxial mechanical studies on valve interstitial cells cultured Bio-Hybrid scaffolds revealed that the response along the axial and circumferential direction was different, similar to native valves. Overall, our findings suggest that Bio-Hybrid scaffold is a promising material for future development of regenerative heart valve constructs in children. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Utilization of different waste proteins to create a novel PGPR-containing bio-organic fertilizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yan; Sun, Li; Zhao, Jianshu; Huang, Rong; Li, Rong; Shen, Qirong

    2015-01-01

    High-quality bio-organic fertilizers (BIOs) cannot be produced without the addition of some proteins, while many waste proteins are haphazardly disposed, causing serious environmental pollution. In this study, several waste proteins were used as additives to assist with the reproduction of the functional microbe (Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SQR9) inoculated into matured composts to produce BIOs. An optimized composition of solid-state fermentation (SSF) raw materials was predicted by response surface methodology and experimental validation. The results showed that 7.61% (w/w, DW, the same below) rapeseed meal, 8.85% expanded feather meal, 6.47% dewatered blue algal sludge and 77.07% chicken compost resulted in maximum biomass of strain SQR-9 and the maximum amount of lipopeptides 7 days after SSF. Spectroscopy experiments showed that the inner material structural changes in the novel SSF differed from the control and the novel BIO had higher dissolved organic matter. This study offers a high value-added utilization of waste proteins for producing economical but high-quality BIO.

  11. Utilization of different waste proteins to create a novel PGPR-containing bio-organic fertilizer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Sun, Li; Zhao, Jianshu; Huang, Rong; Li, Rong; Shen, Qirong

    2015-01-01

    High-quality bio-organic fertilizers (BIOs) cannot be produced without the addition of some proteins, while many waste proteins are haphazardly disposed, causing serious environmental pollution. In this study, several waste proteins were used as additives to assist with the reproduction of the functional microbe (Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SQR9) inoculated into matured composts to produce BIOs. An optimized composition of solid-state fermentation (SSF) raw materials was predicted by response surface methodology and experimental validation. The results showed that 7.61% (w/w, DW, the same below) rapeseed meal, 8.85% expanded feather meal, 6.47% dewatered blue algal sludge and 77.07% chicken compost resulted in maximum biomass of strain SQR-9 and the maximum amount of lipopeptides 7 days after SSF. Spectroscopy experiments showed that the inner material structural changes in the novel SSF differed from the control and the novel BIO had higher dissolved organic matter. This study offers a high value-added utilization of waste proteins for producing economical but high-quality BIO. PMID:25586328

  12. Bio-Decontamination of Water and Surfaces by DC Discharges in Atmospheric Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machala, Zdenko; Tarabová, Barbora; Pelach, Michal; Šipoldová, Zuzana; Hensel, Karol; Janda, Mário; Šikurová, Libuša

    Two types of DC-driven atmospheric air discharges, including a streamer corona and a transient spark with short high current pulses of limited energy, were employed for bio-decontamination of water and various surfaces (agar plates, plastic foils, human teeth) contaminated by bacteria or spores (Salmonella typhimurium, Bacillus cereus). Both discharges generate cold non-equilibrium plasma. The discharges combined with the electro-spraying of the treated water through the needle electrode lead to fast and efficient bio-decontamination. Experiments comparing direct and indirect plasma effects, oxidation stress measurements in the cell membranes, and chemical changes induced in the treated water enable assessment of the plasma agents being responsible for microbial inactivation. Radicals and reactive oxygen species seem to be dominant biocidal agents, although deeper understanding of the plasma-induced water chemistry and of the temporal evolution of the bio-inactivation processes is needed.

  13. Neurite outgrowth stimulatory effects of culinary-medicinal mushrooms and their toxicity assessment using differentiating Neuro-2a and embryonic fibroblast BALB/3T3

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mushrooms are not only regarded as gourmet cuisine but also as therapeutic agent to promote cognition health. However, little toxicological information is available regarding their safety. Therefore, the aim of this study was to screen selected ethno-pharmacologically important mushrooms for stimulatory effects on neurite outgrowth and to test for any cytotoxicity. Methods The stimulatory effect of mushrooms on neurite outgrowth was assessed in differentiating mouse neuroblastoma (N2a) cells. Neurite length was measured using Image-Pro Insight processor system. Neuritogenesis activity was further validated by fluorescence immunocytochemical staining of neurofilaments. In vitro cytotoxicity was investigated by using mouse embryonic fibroblast (BALB/3T3) and N2a cells for any embryo- and neuro-toxic effects; respectively. Results Aqueous extracts of Ganoderma lucidum, Lignosus rhinocerotis, Pleurotus giganteus and Grifola frondosa; as well as an ethanol extract of Cordyceps militaris significantly (p < 0.05) promoted the neurite outgrowth in N2a cells by 38.4 ± 4.2%, 38.1 ± 2.6%, 33.4 ± 4.6%, 33.7 ± 1.5%, and 35.8 ± 3.4%; respectively. The IC50 values obtained from tetrazolium (MTT), neutral red uptake (NRU) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assays showed no toxic effects following 24 h exposure of N2a and 3T3 cells to mushroom extracts. Conclusion Our results indicate that G. lucidum, L. rhinocerotis, P. giganteus, G. frondosa and C. militaris may be developed as safe and healthy dietary supplements for brain and cognitive health. PMID:24119256

  14. Neurite outgrowth stimulatory effects of culinary-medicinal mushrooms and their toxicity assessment using differentiating Neuro-2a and embryonic fibroblast BALB/3T3.

    PubMed

    Phan, Chia-Wei; David, Pamela; Naidu, Murali; Wong, Kah-Hui; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary

    2013-10-11

    Mushrooms are not only regarded as gourmet cuisine but also as therapeutic agent to promote cognition health. However, little toxicological information is available regarding their safety. Therefore, the aim of this study was to screen selected ethno-pharmacologically important mushrooms for stimulatory effects on neurite outgrowth and to test for any cytotoxicity. The stimulatory effect of mushrooms on neurite outgrowth was assessed in differentiating mouse neuroblastoma (N2a) cells. Neurite length was measured using Image-Pro Insight processor system. Neuritogenesis activity was further validated by fluorescence immunocytochemical staining of neurofilaments. In vitro cytotoxicity was investigated by using mouse embryonic fibroblast (BALB/3T3) and N2a cells for any embryo- and neuro-toxic effects; respectively. Aqueous extracts of Ganoderma lucidum, Lignosus rhinocerotis, Pleurotus giganteus and Grifola frondosa; as well as an ethanol extract of Cordyceps militaris significantly (p < 0.05) promoted the neurite outgrowth in N2a cells by 38.4 ± 4.2%, 38.1 ± 2.6%, 33.4 ± 4.6%, 33.7 ± 1.5%, and 35.8 ± 3.4%; respectively. The IC50 values obtained from tetrazolium (MTT), neutral red uptake (NRU) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assays showed no toxic effects following 24 h exposure of N2a and 3T3 cells to mushroom extracts. Our results indicate that G. lucidum, L. rhinocerotis, P. giganteus, G. frondosa and C. militaris may be developed as safe and healthy dietary supplements for brain and cognitive health.

  15. Signals from activation of B-cell receptor with anti-IgD can override the stimulatory effects of excess BAFF on mature B cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tue G; Morris, Jonathan M

    2014-09-01

    The selection and maturation of B-cell clones are critically determined by tonic signals from activated B cell receptors (BCR) and survival signals from BAFF cytokine. These finely tuned and coordinated signals provide a net positive signal that can promote the selection, maturation, proliferation and differentiation of a developing B cell. Stimulation with an anti-IgD antibody can also activate BCR but can lead to depletion and an arrest of mature B-cell development in vivo. It is not known whether survival signals from excess BAFF can override the suppressive effects of treatment with anti-IgD on mature B cells in vivo. Herein, we examined the effects of co-treatment of BAFF and anti-IgD on the mature B-cell compartment and antibody production in vivo by treating mice with either 1mg/kg BAFF or anti-IgD alone or in combination for 3 consecutive days. We found that co-treatment with anti-IgD significantly abrogated these stimulatory effects of BAFF treatment on splenic CD19+ B cells as well as mature CD19+IgD(hi)IgM+ B cells in vivo. Anti-IgD down-regulated the expression of the BCR complex (mIgM, mIgD and CD19) and the BAFF receptor TACI without regard to the presence of BAFF. Anti-IgD treatment also significantly negated BAFF-induced IgM production in vivo. Both BAFF and anti-IgD could individually stimulate IL-10 synthesis in B cells but did not affect one another. Taken together, our data suggest that activation of BCR with an anti-IgD antibody can override the stimulatory effects from excess BAFF on B cell proliferation and antibody production by down-regulating the expression of BCR complex and BAFF receptors.

  16. Stimulatory effect of taurine on calcium ion uptake in rod outer segments of the rat retina is independent of taurine uptake.

    PubMed

    Militante, J D; Lombardini, J B

    1999-10-01

    Taurine stimulates ATP-dependent Ca(2+) uptake in the rat rod outer segments (ROS). This stimulation has been linked to the function of the cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel, implying an important physiologic role for taurine in visual signal transduction. Calmodulin (CaM) has been reported to affect taurine transport in the choroid plexus and also to inhibit the cyclic nucleotide-gated channel; thus, the effects of the competitive CaM inhibitors trifluoperazine (TFP) and N-(8-aminooctyl)-5-iodonaphthalene-1-sulfonamide (J-8) were studied on Ca(2+) and taurine uptake in the rat ROS. Pretreatment of the ROS preparation with TFP and J-8 for 5 min before measurement of Ca(2+)-uptake activity produced inhibition of the effects of taurine on ATP-dependent Ca(2+) uptake. Both TFP and J-8 also were effective in inhibiting high-affinity taurine uptake. In both uptake systems, inhibition by TFP was noncompetitive. These data initially suggested that the stimulatory effects of taurine on ATP-dependent Ca(2+) uptake are dependent on taurine uptake. However, competitive inhibition of taurine uptake by guanidinoethane sulfonate did not produce any effect on the stimulatory effects of taurine. Previous studies have proposed that taurine binds directly to the plasma membrane, and our study demonstrated that TFP inhibits taurine binding to the ROS. In addition, our study demonstrated that taurine uptake is unaffected by varying the concentration of Ca(2+) and that the effects of TFP are independent of Ca(2+), suggesting that TFP acts through a CaM-independent mechanism.

  17. [Correlation of Plasma Co-stimulatory Molecules B7-H2 and B7-H3 with Platelet Auto-antibodies in Patients with Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura].

    PubMed

    Zuo, Bin; Zhao, Yun-Xiao; Yang, Jian-Feng; He, Yang

    2015-08-01

    To investigate whether the plasma level of platelet auto- antibodies in ITP patients is related to that of co-stimulatory molecules sB7-H2 and sB7-H3. A total of 61 ITP patients and 25 healthy controls from the First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University from June 2012 to August 2013 were enrolled in this study. The expression levels of platelet auto-antibodies against 5 glycoproteins (GPIX, GP Ib, GP IIIa, GPIIb and P-selectin) in plasma were detected by flow cytometric immuno-beads array, and the expression of soluable co-stimulatory molecules sB7-H2 and sB7-H3 was measured by ELISA. The plasma levels of 5 auto-antibodies against platelet membrance glycoproteins significantly increased in ITP patiens (P < 0.01). Compared with healthy controls, sB7-H2 levels increased (P < 0.05), while the sB7-H3 level did not significantly change (r = 0.13, P > 0.05). However, the correlation analysis showed that sB7-H3 negatively correlated with platelet P-selectin auto-antibody (r = -0.46, P < 0.05), and sB7-H2 and sB7-H3 significantly reduced in ITP patients with positive P-selectin auto-antibody (P < 0.01). In ITP patients, platelet counts negatively correlated with sB7-H2 (r = -0.3907, P < 0.01), but did not correlate with sB7-H3. Soluble costimulatory molecule sB7-H2 elevates in ITP patients, and the level of sB7-H3 is associated with auto-antibodies against P-selectin, suggesting that costimulatory molecules B7-H2 and B7-H3 may be involved in the pathogenesis of immune regulation abnormality in ITP.

  18. Stimulatory effect of menaquinone-7 on bone formation in elderly female rat femoral tissues in vitro: prevention of bone deterioration with aging.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi; Uchiyama, Satoshi; Tsukamoto, Yoshinori

    2002-12-01

    Menaquinone-7 (MK-7) is vitamin K2 which is a series of vitamins with multiisoprene units at the 3-position of the naphthoquinone. MK-7 has been shown to prevent bone loss in ovariectomized rats, an animal model for osteoporosis. This study was undertaken to determine whether MK-7 has a stimulatory effect on bone components of elderly female rats in vitro. The femoral-diaphyseal and -metaphyseal tissues obtained from young (4 weeks old) or elderly (50 weeks old) female rats were cultured for 48 h in a Dullbecco's modified Eagle's medium (high glucose, 4.5%) supplemented with antibiotics and bovine serum albumin. Calcium content, alkaline phosphatase activity and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in the diaphyseal and metaphyseal tissues obtained from elderly rats were significantly decreased as compared with those of young rats, indicating that aging causes a deterioration of bone formation. The presence of MK-7 (10(-6) or 10(-5) M) caused a significant increase in biochemical components in the femoral-diaphyseal and -metaphyseal tissues obtained from elderly rat in vitro. The anabolic effect of MK-7 (10(-6) or 10(-5) M) on the femoral calcium content was significantly enhanced in the presence of phytoestrogen genistein (10(-6) or 10(-5) M), suggesting that the mode of action of MK-7 differ from that of genistein. The effect of MK-7 (10(-5) M) in increasing calcium content, alkaline phosphatase activity and DNA content in the diaphyseal and metaphyseal tissues was completely abolished in the presence of cycloheximide (10(-6) M), an inhibitor of protein synthesis in vitro. These findings demonstrate that MK-7 has a stimulatory effect on bone formation in the femoral tissues of elderly female rats in vitro. MK-7 may have a preventive role for bone deterioration with aging.

  19. Data sharing through an NIH central database repository: a cross-sectional survey of BioLINCC users

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Joseph S; Ritchie, Jessica D; Finn, Emily; Desai, Nihar R; Lehman, Richard L; Krumholz, Harlan M; Gross, Cary P

    2016-01-01

    Objective To characterise experiences using clinical research data shared through the National Institutes of Health (NIH)'s Biologic Specimen and Data Repository Information Coordinating Center (BioLINCC) clinical research data repository, along with data recipients’ perceptions of the value, importance and challenges with using BioLINCC data. Design and setting Cross-sectional web-based survey. Participants All investigators who requested and received access to clinical research data from BioLINCC between 2007 and 2014. Main outcome measures Reasons for BioLINCC data request, research project plans, interactions with original study investigators, BioLINCC experience and other project details. Results There were 536 investigators who requested and received access to clinical research data from BioLINCC between 2007 and 2014. Of 441 potential respondents, 195 completed the survey (response rate=44%); 89% (n=174) requested data for an independent study, 17% (n=33) for pilot/preliminary analysis. Commonly cited reasons for requesting data through BioLINCC were feasibility of collecting data of similar size and scope (n=122) and insufficient financial resources for primary data collection (n=76). For 95% of respondents (n=186), a primary research objective was to complete new research, as opposed to replicate prior analyses. Prior to requesting data from BioLINCC, 18% (n=36) of respondents had contacted the original study investigators to obtain data, whereas 24% (n=47) had done so to request collaboration. Nearly all (n=176; 90%) respondents found the data to be suitable for their proposed project; among those who found the data unsuitable (n=19; 10%), cited reasons were data too complicated to use (n=5) and data poorly organised (n=5). Half (n=98) of respondents had completed their proposed projects, of which 67% (n=66) have been published. Conclusions Investigators were primarily using clinical research data from BioLINCC for independent research, making use of

  20. Fuel Cells on Bio-Gas (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Remick, R. J.

    2009-03-04

    The conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Fuel cells operating on bio-gas offer a pathway to renewable electricity generation; (2) With federal incentives of $3,500/kW or 30% of the project costs, reasonable payback periods of less than five years can be achieved; (3) Tri-generation of electricity, heat, and hydrogen offers an alternative route to solving the H{sub 2} infrastructure problem facing fuel cell vehicle deployment; and (4) DOE will be promoting bio-gas fuel cells in the future under its Market Transformation Programs.

  1. Constraints to bio-energy development

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, V.B.

    1980-01-01

    The energy crisis has prompted research and development of renewable, domestic, cost-effective and publicly acceptable energy alternatives. Among these are the bioconversion technologies. To date bio-energy research has been directed toward the mechanics of the conversion processes and technical assessment of the environmental impacts. However, there are other obstacles to overcome before biomass can be converted to more useful forms of energy that fit existing need. Barriers to bio-energy resource application in the US are identified. In addition, examples from several agricultural regions serve to illustrate site-specific resource problems.

  2. Bio-Mos: an effective inducer of dicentracin gene expression in European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax).

    PubMed

    Terova, Genciana; Forchino, Andrea; Rimoldi, Simona; Brambilla, Fabio; Antonini, Micaela; Saroglia, Marco

    2009-08-01

    Concern over the use of dietary antibiotics in aquaculture has encouraged the industry to search for alternatives that both enhance performance and afford protection from disease. Bio-Mos, derived from the outer cell wall of a specific strain of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Alltech Inc, USA) is a product that fits these criteria. Here, we present data on the impact of a Bio-Mos supplemented diet on the mRNA copy number of the antimicrobial peptide dicentracin, whose transcript regulation has not yet been explored in fish.We analyzed Bio-Mos-induced changes in the expression of sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) dicentracin,using a one-tube two-temperature real-time RT-PCR with which the gene expression can be absolutely quantified using the standard curve method. Our results revealed that 30 days of feeding fish with diets containing Bio-Mos supplemented at either 3 per thousand or 5 per thousand significantly increased the dicentracin mRNA copy number in the head kidney. Furthermore, the mRNA copy number in fish fed at 3 per thousand was significantly higher than that of the group fed at 5 per thousand for the same period of feeding Bio-Mos. A longer feeding period (60 days)did not further increase the dicentracin transcript levels as compared to the values recorded after 30 days of feeding either in the group fed at 3 per thousand or in the one fed at 5 per thousand diet. However, the transcript levels in fish fed at 3 per thousand proved to be significantly higher than those of the controls after 60 days of feeding. These findings offer new information about the response of antimicrobial peptides at the transcriptional level to diets supplemented with immune response modulators, and support a role of Bio-Mos in promoting sea bass nonspecific immune system.

  3. BioJava: an open-source framework for bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Holland, R C G; Down, T A; Pocock, M; Prlić, A; Huen, D; James, K; Foisy, S; Dräger, A; Yates, A; Heuer, M; Schreiber, M J

    2008-09-15

    BioJava is a mature open-source project that provides a framework for processing of biological data. BioJava contains powerful analysis and statistical routines, tools for parsing common file formats and packages for manipulating sequences and 3D structures. It enables rapid bioinformatics application development in the Java programming language. BioJava is an open-source project distributed under the Lesser GPL (LGPL). BioJava can be downloaded from the BioJava website (http://www.biojava.org). BioJava requires Java 1.5 or higher. All queries should be directed to the BioJava mailing lists. Details are available at http://biojava.org/wiki/BioJava:MailingLists.

  4. Palladium catalyzed hydrogenation of bio-oils and organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Douglas C [Kennewick, WA; Hu, Jianli [Richland, WA; Hart,; Todd, R [Kennewick, WA; Neuenschwander, Gary G [Burbank, WA

    2011-06-07

    The invention provides palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of bio-oils and certain organic compounds. Experimental results have shown unexpected and superior results for palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of organic compounds typically found in bio-oils.

  5. Palladium catalyzed hydrogenation of bio-oils and organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Hu, Jianli; Hart, Todd R.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.

    2008-09-16

    The invention provides palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of bio-oils and certain organic compounds. Experimental results have shown unexpected and superior results for palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of organic compounds typically found in bio-oils.

  6. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, Japan, Bio-Functional Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-17

    BIO -Functional Materials Selected abstracts on the design, structure, and functions of bio -functional materials; "priority areas of research" sponsored by the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture

  7. A stimulatory Mls-1 superantigen is destroyed by ultraviolet light while other Mtv-7 antigens remain intact

    SciTech Connect

    Dannecker, G.; Mecheri, S.; Clarke, K.; Dudhane, A.; Zhiqin Wang; Hoffmann, M.K. )

    1992-12-01

    Accessory cells present Ag together with costimulatory signals as immunogens and without costimulatory signals as tolerogens. Responsiveness and unresponsiveness are thus alternatives of T cell immune reactions to Ag. Superantigens appear to make an exception; being presented by accessory cells capable of providing costimulatory signals, these Ag induce a strong T cell response but leave T cells unresponsive to a secondary challenge (anergy). The authors show here that T cell anergy is not a mandatory consequence of superantigen-induced activation. Mls-1[sup [minus

  8. Stimulatory actions of di-8-butyl-amino-naphthyl-ethylene-pyridinium-propyl-sulfonate (di-8-ANEPPS), voltage-sensitive dye, on the BKCa channel in pituitary tumor (GH3) cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sheng-Nan; Lin, Ming-Wei; Wang, Ya-Jean

    2008-01-01

    Di-8-ANEPPS (4-{2-[6-(dibutylamino)-2-naphthalenyl]-ethenyl}-1-(3-sulfopropyl)pyridinium inner salt) has been used as a fast-response voltage-sensitive styrylpyridinium probe. However, little is known regarding the mechanism of di-8-ANEPPS actions on ion currents. In this study, the effects of this dye on ion currents were investigated in pituitary GH(3) cells. In whole-cell configuration, di-8-ANEPPS (10 microM) reversibly increased the amplitude of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) current. In inside-out configuration, di-8-ANEPPS (10 microM) applied to the intracellular surface of the membrane caused no change in single-channel conductance; however, it did enhance the activity of large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK(Ca)) channels with an EC(50) value of 7.5 microM. This compound caused a left shift in the activation curve of BK(Ca) channels with no change in the gating charge of these channels. A decrease in mean closed time of the channels was seen in the presence of this dye. In the cell-attached mode, di-8-ANEPPS applied on the extracellular side of the membrane also activated BK(Ca) channels. However, neither voltage-gated K(+) nor ether-à-go-go-related gene (erg)-mediated K(+) currents in GH(3) cells were affected by di-8-APPNES. Under current-clamp configuration, di-8-ANEPPS (10 microM) decreased the firing of action potentials in GH(3) cells. In pancreatic betaTC-6 cells, di-8-APPNES (10 microM) also increased BK(Ca)-channel activity. Taken together, this study suggests that during the exposure to di-8-ANEPPS, the stimulatory effects on BK(Ca) channels could be one of potential mechanisms through which it may affect cell excitability.

  9. [Implantable loop recorder BioMonitor 2 (Biotronik)].

    PubMed

    Lewalter, Thorsten; Jilek, Clemens

    2016-12-01

    The implantable loop recorder BioMonitor 2 is available with an emphasis on syncope and one on detection of atrial tachycardias. The BioMonitor 2 can be easily implanted. The BioMonitor 2 pilot study showed a high and over time stable signal and the telemetric performance was above average.

  10. Boron brings big benefits to bio-based blends

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The solution to the problems with bio-based lubrication can be approached by a combination of blending and additive strategies. However, many additives do not show efficacy when used in bio-based lubricants. Additive addition also lowers the bio-based content of the blend, which in turn limits the a...

  11. BioProject Number PRJNA230524

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This BioProject consists of raw genotyping-by-sequencing data collected in 96-plex format on an Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing system. There were four to six experimental replicates for each of the 46 plants. The development of tens of thousands of mapped SNP markers in wild tomato species was hig...

  12. A Review of BioTutor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duhrkopf, Richard

    1994-01-01

    A review of BioTutor which is software to accompany the third edition of Neil Campbell's textbook, "Biology," is provided. The review includes a brief description of the software and a discussion of good and bad features of the software. In the closing words, the reviewer expresses a considerable amount of concern regarding the quality of this…

  13. BioModels: ten-year anniversary.

    PubMed

    Chelliah, Vijayalakshmi; Juty, Nick; Ajmera, Ishan; Ali, Raza; Dumousseau, Marine; Glont, Mihai; Hucka, Michael; Jalowicki, Gaël; Keating, Sarah; Knight-Schrijver, Vincent; Lloret-Villas, Audald; Natarajan, Kedar Nath; Pettit, Jean-Baptiste; Rodriguez, Nicolas; Schubert, Michael; Wimalaratne, Sarala M; Zhao, Yangyang; Hermjakob, Henning; Le Novère, Nicolas; Laibe, Camille

    2015-01-01

    BioModels (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/biomodels/) is a repository of mathematical models of biological processes. A large set of models is curated to verify both correspondence to the biological process that the model seeks to represent, and reproducibility of the simulation results as described in the corresponding peer-reviewed publication. Many models submitted to the database are annotated, cross-referencing its components to external resources such as database records, and terms from controlled vocabularies and ontologies. BioModels comprises two main branches: one is composed of models derived from literature, while the second is generated through automated processes. BioModels currently hosts over 1200 models derived directly from the literature, as well as in excess of 140,000 models automatically generated from pathway resources. This represents an approximate 60-fold growth for literature-based model numbers alone, since BioModels' first release a decade ago. This article describes updates to the resource over this period, which include changes to the user interface, the annotation profiles of models in the curation pipeline, major infrastructure changes, ability to perform online simulations and the availability of model content in Linked Data form. We also outline planned improvements to cope with a diverse array of new challenges. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Bio-gas production from alligator weeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latif, A.

    1976-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to study the effect of temperature, sample preparation, reducing agents, light intensity and pH of the media, on bio-gas and methane production from the microbial anaerobic decomposition of alligator weeds (Alternanthera philoxeroides. Efforts were also made for the isolation and characterization of the methanogenic bacteria.

  15. Immersive Protein Gaming for Bio Edutainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Yiyu; Lu, Baifang; Zheng, Jianmin; Li, Lin

    2006-01-01

    Games have long been used as a tool for teaching important subject matter, from concept building to problem solving. Through fun learning, students may further develop their curiosities and interest in their study. This article addresses the issue of learning biomolecular structures by virtual reality gaming. A bio edutainment solution featuring…

  16. BioNet Digital Communications Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gifford, Kevin; Kuzminsky, Sebastian; Williams, Shea

    2010-01-01

    BioNet v2 is a peer-to-peer middleware that enables digital communication devices to talk to each other. It provides a software development framework, standardized application, network-transparent device integration services, a flexible messaging model, and network communications for distributed applications. BioNet is an implementation of the Constellation Program Command, Control, Communications and Information (C3I) Interoperability specification, given in CxP 70022-01. The system architecture provides the necessary infrastructure for the integration of heterogeneous wired and wireless sensing and control devices into a unified data system with a standardized application interface, providing plug-and-play operation for hardware and software systems. BioNet v2 features a naming schema for mobility and coarse-grained localization information, data normalization within a network-transparent device driver framework, enabling of network communications to non-IP devices, and fine-grained application control of data subscription band width usage. BioNet directly integrates Disruption Tolerant Networking (DTN) as a communications technology, enabling networked communications with assets that are only intermittently connected including orbiting relay satellites and planetary rover vehicles.

  17. Immersive Protein Gaming for Bio Edutainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Yiyu; Lu, Baifang; Zheng, Jianmin; Li, Lin

    2006-01-01

    Games have long been used as a tool for teaching important subject matter, from concept building to problem solving. Through fun learning, students may further develop their curiosities and interest in their study. This article addresses the issue of learning biomolecular structures by virtual reality gaming. A bio edutainment solution featuring…

  18. Monkey Baker in bio-pack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    A squirrel monkey, Baker, in bio-pack couch being readied for Jupiter (AM-18 flight). Jupiter, AM-18 mission, also carried an American-born rhesus monkey, Able into suborbit. The flight was successful and both monkeys were recovered in good condition. AM-18 was launched on May 28, 1959.

  19. Tool Integration Framework for Bio-Informatics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    Research ACCRE: Advanced Computing Centre for Research & Education NB: Initial Experiment with Yeast Cell Cycle Data Figure 9: Model Estimation and...t ts Basic Tools • SBML Extension • Bio- SPICE Dashboard Add-Ons i l • L t si • i - I s r - s Core Technologies • Building block components for

  20. Evaluation of the BioVapor Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    The BioVapor model addresses transport and biodegradation of petroleum vapors in the subsurface. This presentation describes basic background on the nature and scientific basis of environmental transport models. It then describes a series of parameter uncertainty runs of the Bi...

  1. Integrated Corn-Based Bio-Refinery

    SciTech Connect

    2006-04-01

    The Integrated Corn-Based Bio-Refinery (ICBR) process will use new technology to convert corn grain and stover into fermentable sugars for the parallel production of value-added chemicals such as 1,3-propanediol (PDO) and fuel ethanol.

  2. Preparation of small bio-compatible microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Dreyer, William J. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Small, round, bio-compatible microspheres capable of covalently bonding proteins and having a uniform diameter below about 3500 A are prepared by substantially instantaneously initiating polymerization of an aqueous emulsion containing no more than 35% total monomer including an acrylic monomer substituted with a covalently bondable group such a hydroxyl, amino or carboxyl and a minor amount of a cross-linking agent.

  3. Evaluation of the BioVapor Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    The BioVapor model addresses transport and biodegradation of petroleum vapors in the subsurface. This presentation describes basic background on the nature and scientific basis of environmental transport models. It then describes a series of parameter uncertainty runs of the Bi...

  4. bioDBnet - Biological Database Network

    Cancer.gov

    bioDBnet is a comprehensive resource of most of the biological databases available from different sites like NCBI, Uniprot, EMBL, Ensembl, Affymetrix. It provides a queryable interface to all the databases available, converts identifiers from one database into another and generates comprehensive reports.

  5. Design of pyrolysis reactor for production of bio-oil and bio-char simultaneously

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aladin, Andi; Alwi, Ratna Surya; Syarif, Takdir

    2017-05-01

    The residues from the wood industry are the main contributors to biomass waste in Indonesia. The conventional pyrolysis process, which needs a large energy as well as to produce various toxic chemical to the environment. Therefore, a pyrolysis unit on the laboratory scale was designed that can be a good alternative to achieve zero-waste and low energy cost. In this paper attempts to discuss design and system of pyrolysis reactor to produce bio-oil and bio-char simultaneously.

  6. BioCD: Self-referencing interferometer for biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma, Manoj

    The holy-grail of modern medical science is to provide personalized health-care. An individual's state of health can be correlated to the pattern of concentration of several 'marker' molecules, for e.g. the presence of Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) beyond a certain threshold in the body is a strong indication of prostate cancer. To realize the dream of personalized healthcare, a large number of markers have to be identified and correlated to the state of health across diverse populations. The identified markers have to be quantified subsequently to define an individual's state of health. The technology used to achieve the above should be sensitive, accurate, reliable, high-throughput and should be cheap and simple enough to be able to be available in a clinician's office. Interferometry has been used as a sensitive metrology tool in fields ranging from semiconductor inspection to astronomy. This thesis demonstrates a self-referencing interferometric biosensor (BioCD) with a surface normal design potentially capable of scaling up to thousands of tests per sensor substrates. The sensor concept is similar to an optical CD in that gold microstructures fabricated on the BioCD surface act as wavefront splitting interferometers. In contrast to the optical CD, the BioCD operates in a condition called quadrature, which provides maximum linear response to small phase changes caused by protein binding events. The gold microstructures generate a carrier wave when the BioCD is spun, and protein binding is detected as a modulation of an envelope of the carrier wave pattern created by the immobilized capture proteins. By immobilizing reference and target proteins, differential measurements that automatically subtract out non-specific binding can be obtained. We have demonstrated a detection limit of about 1 ng/ml with this technology, which is a clinically relevant figure for many human and veterinary applications. The specific and non-specific binding signals are separated by

  7. A Simple Stimulatory Device for Evoking Point-like Tactile Stimuli: A Searchlight for LFP to Spike Transitions

    PubMed Central

    Zippo, Antonio G.; Nencini, Sara; Caramenti, Gian Carlo; Valente, Maurizio; Storchi, Riccardo; Biella, Gabriele E.M.

    2014-01-01

    Current neurophysiological research has the aim to develop methodologies to investigate the signal route from neuron to neuron, namely in the transitions from spikes to Local Field Potentials (LFPs) and from LFPs to spikes. LFPs have a complex dependence on spike activity and their relation is still poorly understood1. The elucidation of these signal relations would be helpful both for clinical diagnostics (e.g. stimulation paradigms for Deep Brain Stimulation) and for a deeper comprehension of neural coding strategies in normal and pathological conditions (e.g. epilepsy, Parkinson disease, chronic pain). To this aim, one has to solve technical issues related to stimulation devices, stimulation paradigms and computational analyses. Therefore, a custom-made stimulation device was developed in order to deliver stimuli well regulated in space and time that does not incur in mechanical resonance. Subsequently, as an exemplification, a set of reliable LFP-spike relationships was extracted. The performance of the device was investigated by extracellular recordings, jointly spikes and LFP responses to the applied stimuli, from the rat Primary Somatosensory cortex. Then, by means of a multi-objective optimization strategy, a predictive model for spike occurrence based on LFPs was estimated. The application of this paradigm shows that the device is adequately suited to deliver high frequency tactile stimulation, outperforming common piezoelectric actuators. As a proof of the efficacy of the device, the following results were presented: 1) the timing and reliability of LFP responses well match the spike responses, 2) LFPs are sensitive to the stimulation history and capture not only the average response but also the trial-to-trial fluctuations in the spike activity and, finally, 3) by using the LFP signal it is possible to estimate a range of predictive models that capture different aspects of the spike activity. PMID:24686295

  8. BioProject and BioSample databases at NCBI: facilitating capture and organization of metadata.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Tanya; Clark, Karen; Gevorgyan, Robert; Gorelenkov, Vyacheslav; Gribov, Eugene; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Kimelman, Michael; Pruitt, Kim D; Resenchuk, Sergei; Tatusova, Tatiana; Yaschenko, Eugene; Ostell, James

    2012-01-01

    As the volume and complexity of data sets archived at NCBI grow rapidly, so does the need to gather and organize the associated metadata. Although metadata has been collected for some archival databases, previously, there was no centralized approach at NCBI for collecting this information and using it across databases. The BioProject database was recently established to facilitate organization and classification of project data submitted to NCBI, EBI and DDBJ databases. It captures descriptive information about research projects that result in high volume submissions to archival databases, ties together related data across multiple archives and serves as a central portal by which to inform users of data availability. Concomitantly, the BioSample database is being developed to capture descriptive information about the biological samples investigated in projects. BioProject and BioSample records link to corresponding data stored in archival repositories. Submissions are supported by a web-based Submission Portal that guides users through a series of forms for input of rich metadata describing their projects and samples. Together, these databases offer improved ways for users to query, locate, integrate and interpret the masses of data held in NCBI's archival repositories. The BioProject and BioSample databases are available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject and http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/biosample, respectively.

  9. BioProject and BioSample databases at NCBI: facilitating capture and organization of metadata

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Tanya; Clark, Karen; Gevorgyan, Robert; Gorelenkov, Vyacheslav; Gribov, Eugene; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Kimelman, Michael; Pruitt, Kim D.; Resenchuk, Sergei; Tatusova, Tatiana; Yaschenko, Eugene; Ostell, James

    2012-01-01

    As the volume and complexity of data sets archived at NCBI grow rapidly, so does the need to gather and organize the associated metadata. Although metadata has been collected for some archival databases, previously, there was no centralized approach at NCBI for collecting this information and using it across databases. The BioProject database was recently established to facilitate organization and classification of project data submitted to NCBI, EBI and DDBJ databases. It captures descriptive information about research projects that result in high volume submissions to archival databases, ties together related data across multiple archives and serves as a central portal by which to inform users of data availability. Concomitantly, the BioSample database is being developed to capture descriptive information about the biological samples investigated in projects. BioProject and BioSample records link to corresponding data stored in archival repositories. Submissions are supported by a web-based Submission Portal that guides users through a series of forms for input of rich metadata describing their projects and samples. Together, these databases offer improved ways for users to query, locate, integrate and interpret the masses of data held in NCBI's archival repositories. The BioProject and BioSample databases are available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject and http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/biosample, respectively. PMID:22139929

  10. Technical and clinical validation of the Allergen BioCube® for timothy grass

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Paul; Lane, Keith J.; Stein, Linda; Abelson, Mark B.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Field studies for allergic rhinitis (AR) commonly have inconsistent allergen concentrations and subject exposure patterns due to varying environmental conditions and subject behaviors. A technical and clinical validation study was conducted for the Allergen BioCube® using timothy grass to confirm uniform allergen concentration and clinically relevant subject symptom responses. Methods Allergen concentrations were verified by laser particle counts. Subjects (N = 14) with positive skin test reactions and no symptoms at screening received four 3‐h timothy grass exposures in the BioCube over consecutive days. Subjects evaluated nasal itching, sneezing, rhinorrhea, and nasal congestion while in the BioCube; Total Nasal Symptom Score (TNSS) was computed. Peak Nasal Inspiratory Flow (PNIF), Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR), sIgE blood tests, and Nasal Inflammation Score (NIS) were assessed. A correlation analysis was conducted for mean sIgE, skin test, and TNSS. Results Uniform timothy grass concentrations were achieved in the BioCube, both spatially and temporally, at all subject positions. Mean TNSS increased substantially from pre‐exposure levels (0.36 ± 0.74 to 1.86 ± 2.14) to maximums of 7.07 ± 2.76 at 1.5 h and 6.71 ± 2.70 at 3 h BioCube exposure. Twelve (86%) subjects had TNSS increases ≥6 units. PNIF decreased 12–24% from baseline at 3‐h BioCube exposure. NIS increased (baseline = 0) to 3.7 (maximum score = 4). A low/moderate correlation (r = 0.485) occurred between mean sIgE blood levels and mean skin tests; neither sIgE or skin tests correlated with mean TNSS. However, subjects with high skin test scores or positive blood IgE tended to also have higher TNSS. Conclusions The Allergen BioCube achieved technical and clinical validation for uniform timothy grass concentration and clinically meaningful AR sign and symptom responses. The Allergen BioCube can be used to assess the efficacy of

  11. A bio-inspired sensor coupled with a bio-bar code and hybridization chain reaction for Hg(2+) assay.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huifeng; Zhu, Xi; Ye, Hongzhi; Yu, Lishuang; Chen, Guonan; Chi, Yuwu; Liu, Xianxiang

    2015-10-18

    In this article, a bio-inspired DNA sensor is developed, which is coupled with a bio-bar code and hybridization chain reaction. This bio-inspired sensor has a high sensitivity toward Hg(2+), and has been used to assay Hg(2+) in the extraction of Bauhinia championi with good satisfaction.

  12. Bio-Optics and Bio-Inspired Optical Materials.

    PubMed

    Tadepalli, Sirimuvva; Slocik, Joseph M; Gupta, Maneesh K; Naik, Rajesh R; Singamaneni, Srikanth

    2017-09-22

    Through the use of the limited materials palette, optimally designed micro- and nanostructures, and tightly regulated processes, nature demonstrates exquisite control of light-matter interactions at various length scales. In fact, control of light-matter interactions is an important element in the evolutionary arms race and has led to highly engineered optical materials and systems. In this review, we present a detailed summary of various optical effects found in nature with a particular emphasis on the materials and optical design aspects responsible for their optical functionality. Using several representative examples, we discuss various optical phenomena, including absorption and transparency, diffraction, interference, reflection and antireflection, scattering, light harvesting, wave guiding and lensing, camouflage, and bioluminescence, that are responsible for the unique optical properties of materials and structures found in nature and biology. Great strides in understanding the design principles adapted by nature have led to a tremendous progress in realizing biomimetic and bioinspired optical materials and photonic devices. We discuss the various micro- and nanofabrication techniques that have been employed for realizing advanced biomimetic optical structures.

  13. Carboxylic acid (bio)isosteres in drug design.

    PubMed

    Ballatore, Carlo; Huryn, Donna M; Smith, Amos B

    2013-03-01

    The carboxylic acid functional group can be an important constituent of a pharmacophore, however, the presence of this moiety can also be responsible for significant drawbacks, including metabolic instability, toxicity, as well as limited passive diffusion across biological membranes. To avoid some of these shortcomings while retaining the desired attributes of the carboxylic acid moiety, medicinal chemists often investigate the use of carboxylic acid (bio)isosteres. The same type of strategy can also be effective for a variety other purposes, for example, to increase the selectivity of a biologically active compound or to create new intellectual property. Several carboxylic acid isosteres have been reported, however, the outcome of any isosteric replacement cannot be readily predicted as this strategy is generally found to be dependent upon the particular context (i.e., the characteristic properties of the drug and the drug-target). As a result, screening of a panel of isosteres is typically required. In this context, the discovery and development of novel carboxylic acid surrogates that could complement the existing palette of isosteres remains an important area of research. The goal of this Minireview is to provide an overview of the most commonly employed carboxylic acid (bio)isosteres and to present representative examples demonstrating the use and utility of each isostere in drug design.

  14. Animal botulism outcomes in the AniBioThreat project.

    PubMed

    Woudstra, Cédric; Tevell Åberg, Annica; Skarin, Hanna; Anniballi, Fabrizio; De Medici, Dario; Bano, Luca; Koene, Miriam; Löfström, Charlotta; Hansen, Trine; Hedeland, Mikael; Fach, Patrick

    2013-09-01

    Botulism disease in both humans and animals is a worldwide concern. Botulinum neurotoxins produced by Clostridium botulinum and other Clostridium species are the most potent biological substances known and are responsible for flaccid paralysis leading to a high mortality rate. Clostridium botulinum and botulinum neurotoxins are considered potential weapons for bioterrorism and have been included in the Australia Group List of Biological Agents. In 2010 the European Commission (DG Justice, Freedom and Security) funded a 3-year project named AniBioThreat to improve the EU's capacity to counter animal bioterrorism threats. A detection portfolio with screening methods for botulism agents and incidents was needed to improve tracking and tracing of accidental and deliberate contamination of the feed and food chain with botulinum neurotoxins and other Clostridia. The complexity of this threat required acquiring new genetic information to better understand the diversity of these Clostridia and develop detection methods targeting both highly specific genetic markers of these Clostridia and the neurotoxins they are able to produce. Several European institutes participating in the AniBioThreat project collaborated on this program to achieve these objectives. Their scientific developments are discussed here.

  15. Carboxylic Acid (Bio)Isosteres in Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Ballatore, Carlo; Huryn, Donna M.; Smith, Amos B.

    2013-01-01

    The carboxylic acid functional group can be an important constituent of a pharmacophore, however, the presence of this moiety can also be responsible for significant drawbacks, including metabolic instability, toxicity, as well as limited passive diffusion across biological membranes. To avoid some of these shortcomings while retaining the desired attributes of the carboxylic acid moiety, medicinal chemists often investigate the use of carboxylic acid (bio)isosteres. The same type of strategy can also be effective for a variety other purposes, for example, to increase the selectivity of a biologically active compound or to create new intellectual property. Several carboxylic acid isosteres have been reported, however, the outcome of any isosteric replacement cannot be readily predicted as this strategy is generally found to be dependent upon the particular context (i.e., the characteristic properties of the drug and the drug–target). As a result, screening of a panel of isosteres is typically required. In this context, the discovery and development of novel carboxylic acid surrogates that could complement the existing palette of isosteres remains an important area of research. The goal of this Minireview is to provide an overview of the most commonly employed carboxylic acid (bio)isosteres and to present representative examples demonstrating the use and utility of each isostere in drug design. PMID:23361977

  16. The influence of selected prebiotics on the growth of lactic acid bacteria for bio-yoghurt production.

    PubMed

    Gustaw, Waldemar; Kordowska-Wiater, Monika; Kozioł, Justyna

    2011-01-01

    Prebiotics are a category of nutritional com-pounds grouped together, not necessarily by structural similarities, but by ability to promote the growth of spe-cific beneficial (probiotic) gut bacteria. Fructooligosaccharides (FOS) and inulin are among the most famous prebiotic compounds. In order to improve viability of probiotic bacteria during storage, fermented food should be supplemented with prebiotics. Yoghurts were produced from skimmed milk powder and prebiotics (FOS, inulin or resistant starch), which were added at concentrations of 1%, 2% and 3%. Yoghurts were stored in +4°C for three weeks. Every week each kind of fermented drink was examined in order to check the growth of lactic acid bacteria. Apparent viscosity and texture of bio-yoghurt were determinated during refrigerated storage. The FOS and inulin addition to yoghurt caused an increase in the numbers of all bacteria in comparison to control yoghurt obtained without addition of prebiotics. The viable counts of Str. thermophilus, Lb. acidophilus and Bifidobacterium sp. when 1% of FOS was added to yoghurt were about 9 log cfu/g, 7.8 log cfu/g and 7.7 log cfu/g, respectively. In the presence of 1% of inulin, streptococci and bifidobacteria reached the growth at the level 8.8 log cfu/g and 7.5 respectively. Hardness and adhesiveness of yoghurt obtained with addition resistant starch increased systematically during 21 days of refrigerated storage. The numbers of lactic acid bacteria in obtained bio-yoghurts were sufficient in 97% of samples (10(6)-10(9) cfu/g) according to FAO/WHO protocols. Generally, viability of bacteria was sufficient for 14 days and then their numbers decreased but usually not below 10(6) cfu/g. Prebiotics as FOS and inulin added to bio-yoghurt exhibited stimulatory effect on growth Lb. acidophilus and Bifidobacterium sp. Addition of prebiotics caused an increase in apparent viscosity and hardness (in case of FOS) and decrease in syneresis of obtained bio-yoghurts.

  17. beta-Cell mitochondria exhibit membrane potential heterogeneity that can be altered by stimulatory or toxic fuel levels.

    PubMed

    Wikstrom, Jakob D; Katzman, Shana M; Mohamed, Hibo; Twig, Gilad; Graf, Solomon A; Heart, Emma; Molina, Anthony J A; Corkey, Barbara E; de Vargas, Lina Moitoso; Danial, Nika N; Collins, Sheila; Shirihai, Orian S

    2007-10-01

    beta-Cell response to glucose is characterized by mitochondrial membrane potential (Delta Psi) hyperpolarization and the production of metabolites that serve as insulin secretory signals. We have previously shown that glucose-induced mitochondrial hyperpolarization accompanies the concentration-dependent increase in insulin secretion within a wide range of glucose concentrations. This observation represents the integrated response of a large number of mitochondria within each individual cell. However, it is currently unclear whether all mitochondria within a single beta-cell represent a metabolically homogenous population and whether fuel or other stimuli can recruit or silence sizable subpopulations of mitochondria. This study offers insight into the different metabolic states of beta-cell mitochondria. We show that mitochondria display a wide heterogeneity in Delta Psi and a millivolt range that is considerably larger than the change in millivolts induced by fuel challenge. Increasing glucose concentration recruits mitochondria into higher levels of homogeneity, while an in vitro diabetes model results in increased Delta Psi heterogeneity. Exploration of the mechanism behind heterogeneity revealed that temporary changes in Delta Psi of individual mitochondria, ATP-hydrolyzing mitochondria, and uncoupling protein 2 are not significant contributors to Delta Psi heterogeneity. We identified BAD, a proapoptotic BCL-2 family member previously implicated in mitochondrial recruitment of glucokinase, as a significant factor influencing the level of heterogeneity. We suggest that mitochondrial Delta Psi heterogeneity in beta-cells reflects a metabolic reservoir recruited by an increased level of fuels and therefore may serve as a therapeutic target.

  18. Stimulatory effect of N-acetyl Muramyl dipeptide in vivo: proliferation of bone marrow progenitor cells in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Wuest, B; Wachsmuth, E D

    1982-01-01

    The effects of single and multiple injections of N-acetyl muramyl dipeptide (MDP) on peripheral leukocytes, colony-forming cells (i.e., bone marrow granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells), and the humoral immune response (to bovine serum albumin) were investigated in mice. Whereas low doses of MDP (0.1 to 1 mg/kg) provoked lymphocytosis, larger doses (10 mg/kg upward) resulted in lymphocytopenia and an increase in the number of young stab neutrophils and monocytes. MDP induced a dose-dependent increase in the number of bone-marrow macrophage progenitor cells, the maximum being reached by a dose around 10 mg/kg. A 50% increase in the maximum effect was produced by a dose around 0.1 mg/kg. The higher the dose, the longer the increase in these progenitor cells persisted. MDP mediated a dose-dependent antibody response to small amounts of bovine serum albumin, correlating with the proliferation of progenitor cells. PMID:7118246

  19. A Bifunctional Locus (BIO3-BIO1) Required for Biotin Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Muralla, Rosanna; Chen, Elve; Sweeney, Colleen; Gray, Jennifer A.; Dickerman, Allan; Nikolau, Basil J.; Meinke, David

    2008-01-01

    We identify here the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) gene encoding the third enzyme in the biotin biosynthetic pathway, dethiobiotin synthetase (BIO3; At5g57600). This gene is positioned immediately upstream of BIO1, which is known to be associated with the second reaction in the pathway. Reverse genetic analysis demonstrates that bio3 insertion mutants have a similar phenotype to the bio1 and bio2 auxotrophs identified using forward genetic screens for arrested embryos rescued on enriched nutrient medium. Unexpectedly, bio3 and bio1 mutants define a single genetic complementation group. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrates that separate BIO3 and BIO1 transcripts and two different types of chimeric BIO3-BIO1 transcripts are produced. Consistent with genetic data, one of the fused transcripts is monocistronic and encodes a bifunctional fusion protein. A splice variant is bicistronic, with distinct but overlapping reading frames. The dual functionality of the monocistronic transcript was confirmed by complementing the orthologous auxotrophs of Escherichia coli (bioD and bioA). BIO3-BIO1 transcripts from other plants provide further evidence for differential splicing, existence of a fusion protein, and localization of both enzymatic reactions to mitochondria. In contrast to most biosynthetic enzymes in eukaryotes, which are encoded by genes dispersed throughout the genome, biotin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis provides an intriguing example of a bifunctional locus that catalyzes two sequential reactions in the same metabolic pathway. This complex locus exhibits several unusual features that distinguish it from biotin operons in bacteria and from other genes known to encode bifunctional enzymes in plants. PMID:17993549

  20. Bio-terrorism, human security and public health: can international law bring them together in an age of globalization?

    PubMed

    Aginam, Obijiofor

    2005-09-01

    Bio-terrorism, the use of a microorganism with the deliberate intent of causing infection, before and since the anthrax attacks in the United States in October 2001, has emerged as a real medical and public health threat. The link between bio-terrorism, human security and public health raises complex questions on the normative trajectories of international law, the mandates of international organizations, and global health governance. In May 2001, the World Health Assembly of the World Health Organization (WHO) passed a resolution entitled "Global Health Security: Epidemic Alert and Response" which inter alia, urged WHO member states to participate actively in the verification and validation of surveillance data and information concerning health emergencies of international concern. This article explores the links between bio-terrorism, human security and public health, and investigates the effectiveness of international legal mechanisms that link them in an age of globalization of public health. The article explores the interaction of WHO's 'soft-law' approaches to global health security, and the 'moribund' negotiations of the verification and monitoring protocol to the Biological Weapons Convention 1972. Can international law link bio-terrorism, public health and human security? Does the WHO collaborate with other international organizations within and outside the United Nations system to develop effective legal and governance approaches to bio-terrorism and global health security? The article concludes that the globalization of public health threats like bio-terrorism requires globalized legal approaches.

  1. Determination of Carbonyl Groups in Pyrolysis Bio-oils Using Potentiometric Titration: Review and Comparison of Methods

    DOE PAGES

    Black, Stuart; Ferrell, Jack R.

    2016-01-06

    Carbonyl compounds present in bio-oils are known to be responsible for bio-oil property changes upon storage and during upgrading. As such, carbonyl content has previously been used as a method of tracking bio-oil aging and condensation reactions with less variability than viscosity measurements. Given the importance of carbonyls in bio-oils, accurate analytical methods for their quantification are very important for the bio-oil community. Potentiometric titration methods based on carbonyl oximation have long been used for the determination of carbonyl content in pyrolysis bio-oils. Here in this study, we present a modification of the traditional carbonyl oximation procedures that results inmore » less reaction time, smaller sample size, higher precision, and more accurate carbonyl determinations. Some compounds such as carbohydrates are not measured by the traditional method (modified Nicolaides method), resulting in low estimations of the carbonyl content. Furthermore, we have shown that reaction completion for the traditional method can take up to 300 hours. The new method presented here (the modified Faix method) reduces the reaction time to 2 hours, uses triethanolamine (TEA) in the place of pyridine, and requires a smaller sample size for the analysis. Carbonyl contents determined using this new method are consistently higher than when using the traditional titration methods.« less

  2. Determination of Carbonyl Groups in Pyrolysis Bio-oils Using Potentiometric Titration: Review and Comparison of Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Stuart; Ferrell, Jack R.

    2016-01-06

    Carbonyl compounds present in bio-oils are known to be responsible for bio-oil property changes upon storage and during upgrading. As such, carbonyl content has previously been used as a method of tracking bio-oil aging and condensation reactions with less variability than viscosity measurements. Given the importance of carbonyls in bio-oils, accurate analytical methods for their quantification are very important for the bio-oil community. Potentiometric titration methods based on carbonyl oximation have long been used for the determination of carbonyl content in pyrolysis bio-oils. Here in this study, we present a modification of the traditional carbonyl oximation procedures that results in less reaction time, smaller sample size, higher precision, and more accurate carbonyl determinations. Some compounds such as carbohydrates are not measured by the traditional method (modified Nicolaides method), resulting in low estimations of the carbonyl content. Furthermore, we have shown that reaction completion for the traditional method can take up to 300 hours. The new method presented here (the modified Faix method) reduces the reaction time to 2 hours, uses triethanolamine (TEA) in the place of pyridine, and requires a smaller sample size for the analysis. Carbonyl contents determined using this new method are consistently higher than when using the traditional titration methods.

  3. Xenogeneic Bio-Root Prompts the Constructive Process Characterized by Macrophage Phenotype Polarization in Rodents and Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Sun, Jingjing; Li, Jie; Yang, Hefeng; Luo, Xiangyou; Chen, Jinlong; Xie, Li; Huo, Fangjun; Zhu, Tian; Guo, Weihua; Tian, Weidong

    2017-03-01

    Tissue or organ regeneration using xenogeneic matrices is a promising approach to address the shortage of donor matrices for allotransplantation. Success of such approach has been demonstrated to correlate with macrophage-mediated fibrotic homeostasis and tissue remodeling. The previous studies have demonstrated that treated dentin matrix (TDM) could be a suitable bioactive substrate for allogeneic tooth root regeneration. This study constructed xenogeneic bioengineered tooth root (bio-root) via a combination of porcine TDM (pTDM) with allogeneic dental follicle cells (DFCs). Macrophage phenotypes are used to evaluate the remodeling process of xenogeneic bio-roots in vitro and in vivo. pTDM can facilitate odontoblast differentiation of human derived DFCs. Xenogeneic bio-roots in rat subcutaneous tissue prompt constructive response via M1 macrophage infiltration during early postimplantation stages and increase restorative M2 phenotype at later stages. After implantation of bio-roots into jaws of rhesus monkeys for six months, periodontal ligament-like fibers accompanied by macrophage polarization are observed, which are positive for COL-1, Periostin, βIII-tubulin and display such structures as fibroblasts and blood vessels. The reconstructed bio-root possesses biomechanical properties for the dissipation of masticatory forces. These results support that xenogeneic bio-root could maintain fibrotic homeostasis during remodeling process and highlight the potential application of xenogeneic matrices in regenerative medicine.

  4. Enhanced Cr(VI) removal from groundwater by Fe(0)-H2O system with bio-amended iron corrosion.

    PubMed

    Yin, Weizhao; Li, Yongtao; Wu, Jinhua; Chen, Guocai; Jiang, Gangbiao; Li, Ping; Gu, Jingjing; Liang, Hao; Liu, Chuansheng

    2017-02-27

    A one-pot bio-iron system was established to investigate synergetic abiotic and biotic effects between iron and microorganisms on Cr(VI) removal. More diverse iron corrosion and reactive solids, such as green rusts, lepidocrocite and magnetite were found in the bio-iron system than in the Fe(0)-H2O system, leading to 4.3 times higher Cr(VI) removal efficiency in the bio-iron system than in the Fe(0)-H2O system. The cycling experiment also showed that the Cr(VI) removal capacity of Fe(0) in the bio-iron system was 12.4 times higher than that in the Fe(0)-H2O system. A 62days of life-span could be achieved in the bio-iron system, while the Fe(0)-H2O system lost its efficacy after 30days. Enhanced effects of extra Fe(2+) on Cr(VI) removal was observed, largely contributed to the adsorbed Fe(2+) on iron surface, which could function as an extra reductant for Cr(VI) and promote the electron transfer on the solid phase. The results also showed that the reduction of Cr(VI) by microorganisms was insignificant, indicating the adsorption/co-precipitation of Cr by iron oxides on iron surface was responsible for the overall Cr(VI) removal. Our study demonstrated that the bio-amended iron corrosion could improve the performance of Fe(0) for Cr(VI) removal from groundwater.

  5. Selective stimulatory action of olfactory ensheathing glia-conditioned medium on oligodendroglial differentiation, with additional reference to signaling mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Litia A; Vitorino, Louise C; Guimarães, Roberta P M; Allodi, Silvana; de Melo Reis, Ricardo A; Cavalcante, Leny A

    2014-07-04

    We examined the effects of conditioned medium from olfactory ensheathing glia (OEGCM) on the differentiation of oligodendrocytes in mixed cultures of early postnatal hippocampi. Differentiation was judged from the numerical density (ND) of cells immunoreactive to 2'3' cyclic nucleotide 3'phosphodiesterase (CNPase) and O4 antibodies. NDs increased according to inverted-U dose-response curves, particularly for CNPase+ cells (9-fold at optimal dilution) and these changes were blocked by inhibitors of ERK1, p38-MAPK, and PI3K. Our results raise the possibility that OEG secreted factor(s) may counteract demyelination induced by trauma, neurodegenerative diseases, and advanced age, and should stimulate novel methods to deliver these factors and/or potentiating chemicals.

  6. Release of somatostatin-like immunoreactivity from the perfused canine thyroid. Selective stimulatory effect of calcium ions.

    PubMed

    Laurberg, P; Orskov, H

    1981-05-01

    It is well accepted that the C cells of the thyroid contain somatostatin, but the role in local endocrine function has not yet been firmly established in this organ, and it has not been proved that thyroidal somatostatin is released into the circulation. We have measured the contents of somatostatin-like immunoreactivity in the effluent of canine thyroid glands perfused without recirculation with a synthetic buffer medium. During basal conditions a definite release was consistently found in the order of 10 pg/ml corresponding to 12 pg/min. The somatostatin-like immunoreactivity was studied in dilution experiments and by gel-filtration chromatography, and found to have properties identical to those of synthetic cyclic somatostatin, which was also recovered quantitatively when added to sampling tubes. Various compounds were infused in concentrations that are highly active in pancreas perfusion experiments. 14-min infusion of arginine, 5 and 11.5 mmol/liter; isoproterenol, 10 and 23.7 nmol/liter and 68.7 mumol/liter; acetylcholine, 5 mumol/liter, carbamylcholine, 10 and 100 mumol/liter; glucagon, 1 and 30 nmol/liter; and porcine calcitonin, 1 and 100 ng/ml did not affect the basal release of somatostatin-like immunoreactivity significantly. Neither did an increase from the control level of 4 mmol/liter glucose of 10 or 20 mmol/liter, nor an increase in the control level of 4.4 mmol/liter K+ to 7.5 or 14.4 mmol/liter. Each of these compounds were tested in three or four dogs. The effect of an increase in Ca++ from the control level of 1.5 mmol/liter to 2.25, 3.0, and 4.5 mmol/liter was tested in random order in five thyroid lobes. All three doses elicited an immediate increase in effluent somatostatin-like immunoreactivity. In most experiments the response was biphasic with an early spike, followed by a stable level that was maintained during prolonged Ca++ infusion. The secretory response was not diminished through a series of repeated short pulses of calcium infusion

  7. Role of Histone Acetylation in the Stimulatory Effect of Valproic Acid on Vascular Endothelial Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator Expression

    PubMed Central

    Magnusson, Mia; Bergh, Niklas; Lunke, Sebastian; El-Osta, Assam; Medcalf, Robert L.; Svensson, Per-Arne; Karlsson, Lena; Jern, Sverker

    2012-01-01

    Aims Stimulated release of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) is pivotal for an intravascular fibrinolytic response and protects the circulation from occluding thrombosis. Hence, an impaired t-PA production is associated with increased risk for atherothrombotic events. A pharmacological means to stimulate the production of this enzyme may thus be desirable. We investigated if the anti-epileptic drug valproic acid (VPA) is capable of enhancing t-PA expression in vitro in vascular endothelial cells, and further examined if its histone deacetylase (HDAC)-inhibitory activity is of importance for regulating t-PA expression. Methods and Results Human endothelial cells were exposed to valproic acid and t-PA mRNA and protein levels were quantified. Potential changes in histone acetylation status globally and at the t-PA promoter were examined by western blot and chromatin immunoprecipitation. Valproic acid dose-dependently stimulated t-PA mRNA and protein expression in endothelial cells reaching a 2–4-fold increase at clinically relevant concentrations and 10-fold increase at maximal concentrations. Transcription profiling analysis revealed that t-PA is selectively targeted by this agent. Augmented histone acetylation was detected at the t-PA transcription start site, and an attenuated VPA-response was observed with siRNA knock of HDAC3, HDAC5 and HDAC7. Conclusions Valproic acid induces t-PA expression in cultured endothelial cells, and this is associated with increased histone acetylation at the t-PA promoter. Given the apparent potency of valproic acid in stimulating t-PA expression in vitro this substance may be a candidate for pharmacological modulation of endogenous fibrinolysis in man. PMID:22363677

  8. Mesenchymal Stromal Cell-Like Cells Set the Balance of Stimulatory and Inhibitory Signals in Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Bacskai, Ildikó; Mázló, Anett; Kis-Tóth, Katalin; Szabó, Attila; Panyi, György; Sarkadi, Balázs; Apáti, Ágota; Rajnavölgyi, Éva

    2015-08-01

    The major reservoir of human multipotent mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) is the bone marrow (BM) with the capability to control hematopoietic stem cell development. The regenerative potential of MSCs is associated with enhanced endogenous repair and healing mechanisms that modulate inflammatory responses. Our previous results revealed that MSC-like (MSCl) cells derived from pluripotent human embryonic stem cells resemble BM-derived MSCs in morphology, phenotype, and differentiating potential. In this study, we investigated the effects of MSCl cells on the phenotype and f