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Sample records for bio-released gold ions

  1. In vivo liberation of gold ions from gold implants. Autometallographic tracing of gold in cells adjacent to metallic gold.

    PubMed

    Danscher, Gorm

    2002-05-01

    For some years, the implantation of small pieces of gold has been used as an unauthorised remedy for osteoarthritis and pain. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether gold ions are released from gold implants. Pieces of pure gold were placed in the connective tissue of skin, bone and brains of anaesthetised animals. Ten days to several months later the animals were anaesthetised and killed by transcardial perfusion. Tissue blocks containing the gold pieces were cut, and the sections were silver-enhanced by autometallography. It was found that gold ions are released from the implanted gold and diffuse out into the surrounding tissue. The gold-containing cells in connective tissues were macrophages, mast cells and fibroblasts. In the brain, gold accumulated in astrocytes and neurons. Proton-induced X-ray emission spectroscopy analysis of the tissue surrounding gold implants confirmed that gold ions are liberated. The findings suggest that the gold implant technique, on a local scale, mimics systemic treatment with a gold-containing drug.

  2. Phage based green chemistry for gold ion reduction and gold retrieval.

    PubMed

    Setyawati, Magdiel I; Xie, Jianping; Leong, David T

    2014-01-22

    The gold mining industry has taken its toll on the environment, triggering the development of more environmentally benign processes to alleviate the waste load release. Here, we demonstrate the use of bacteriophages (phages) for biosorption and bioreduction of gold ions from aqueous solution, which potentially can be applied to remediate gold ions from gold mining waste effluent. Phage has shown a remarkably efficient sorption of gold ions with a maximum gold adsorption capacity of 571 mg gold/g dry weight phage. The product of this phage mediated process is gold nanocrystals with the size of 30-630 nm. Biosorption and bioreduction processes are mediated by the ionic and covalent interaction between gold ions and the reducing groups on the phage protein coat. The strategy offers a simple, ecofriendly and feasible option to recover of gold ions to form readily recoverable products of gold nanoparticles within 24 h.

  3. Synthesis of gold structures by gold-binding peptide governed by concentration of gold ion and peptide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungok; Kim, Dong-Hun; Lee, Sylvia J; Rheem, Youngwoo; Myung, Nosang V; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2016-08-01

    Although biological synthesis methods for the production of gold structures by microorganisms, plant extracts, proteins, and peptide have recently been introduced, there have been few reports pertaining to controlling their size and morphology. The gold ion and peptide concentrations affected on the size and uniformity of gold plates by a gold-binding peptide Midas-11. The higher concentration of gold ions produced a larger size of gold structures reached 125.5 μm, but an increased amount of Midas-11 produced a smaller size of gold platelets and increased the yield percentage of polygonal gold particles rather than platelets. The mechanisms governing factors controlling the production of gold structures were primarily related to nucleation and growth. These results indicate that the synthesis of gold architectures can be controlled by newly isolated and substituted peptides under different reaction conditions.

  4. Ion-selective electrodes for gold and silver determination.

    PubMed

    Petrukhin, O M; Avdeeva, E N; Shavnya, Y V; Yankauskas, V P; Kazlauskas, R M; Bychkov, A S; Zolotov, Y A

    1987-01-01

    Some new ion-selective electrodes for silver and gold are described. They are based on the ion-associate species formed by the cyanide, chloride or thiourea complexes of the metals, with hydrophobic anions or cations, as appropriate. The electrodes have been applied to the determination of gold and silver in various technological process solutions in industry.

  5. Gold Ion-Angiotensin Peptide Interaction by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jenny; Jayathilaka, Lasanthi P.; Gupta, Shalini; Huang, Jin-Sheng; Lee, Bao-Shiang

    2012-05-01

    Stimulated by the interest in developing gold compounds for treating cancer, gold ion-angiotensin peptide interactions are investigated by mass spectrometry. Under the experimental conditions used, the majority of gold ion-angiotensin peptide complexes contain gold in the oxidation states I and III. Both ESI-MS and MALDI-TOF MS detect singly/multiply charged ions for mononuclear/multinuclear gold-attached peptides, which are represented as [peptide + a Au(I) + b Au(III) + (e - a -3b) H]e+, where a,b ≥ 0 and e is charge. ESI-MS data shows singly/multiply charged ions of Au(I)-peptide and Au(III)-peptide complexes. This study reveals that MALDI-TOF MS mainly detects singly charged Au(I)-peptide complexes, presumably due to the ionization process. The electrons in the MALDI plume seem to efficiently reduce Au(III) to Au(I). MALDI also tends to enhance the higher polymeric forms of gold-peptide complexes regardless of the laser power used. Collision-induced dissociation experiments of the mononuclear and dinuclear gold-attached peptide ions for angiotensin peptides show that the gold ion (a soft acid) binding sites are in the vicinity of Cys (a soft ligand), His (a major anchor of peptide for metal ion chelation), and the basic residue Arg. Data also suggests that the abundance of gold-attached peptides increases with higher gold concentration until saturation, after which an increase in gold ion concentration leads to the aggregation and/or precipitation of gold-bound peptides.

  6. Ion plated gold films: Properties, tribological behavior and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, Talivaldis

    1987-01-01

    The glow discharge energizing favorably modifies and controls the coating/substrate adherence and the nucleation and growth sequence of ion plated gold films. As a result the adherence, coherence, internal stresses, and morphology of the films are significantly improved. Gold ion plated films because of their graded coating/substrate interface and fine uniform densely packed microstructure not only improve the tribological properties but also induce a surface strengthening effect which improves the mechanical properties such as yield, tensile, and fatigue strength. Consequently significant improvements in the tribological performance of ion plated gold films as compared to vapor deposited gold films are shown in terms of decreased friction/wear and prolonged endurance life.

  7. Ion beam analysis of gold jewelry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demortier, Guy

    1992-02-01

    PIXE milliprobe in a nonvacuum assembly has been proven to be a very rapid and accurate method for the elemental analysis of gold jewelry artefacts. Using protons whose energy is lower than 3 MeV, it is possible to obtain, in a few minutes, the actual composition (copper, iron, gold, silver, etc.) of narrow parts of artefacts, without any sampling, even at microscopic level. Most of the studies of our group in this field concern solders on these jewelry items. Narrow regions of gold artefacts have also been studied with a PIXE microprobe. They were then irradiated in vacuum. Nuclear reaction analyses induced by 2 MeV deuterons are also performed to identify the presence of light elements and, particularly O, N and S. Traces of these elements are of primary importance to characterize the origin of the ores used in various workmanships. Interferences of X-ray lines of Au with those of traces of Cu and Zn are solved using a method of selective excitation of X-rays of these elements. Analytical results have been interpreted in order to understand the workmanship of goldsmiths from the Antiquity. Fakes and repairs (or ornaments added to original artefacts) may also be identified. The ancient recipes are improved to give new soldering procedures at low temperature.

  8. The spectral lines of highly charged gold ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Feng; Yang, Jiamin; Zhang, Jiyan; Jiang, Gang

    2015-02-01

    Extreme ultraviolet spectra of highly charged gold were produced with an electron beam ion trap at the University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo. The X-ray spectra (3240-3360 eV) of Au with well-defined maximum charge states ranging from Cu- to Se-like ions were recorded. Guided by configuration interaction calculations, the strongest 3d-5f transitions have been well defined.

  9. Energy loss of coasting gold ions and deuterons in RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    Abreu,N.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brown, K.A.; Butler, J.J.; FischW; Harvey, M.; Tepikian, S.

    2008-06-23

    The total energy loss of coasting gold ion beams was measured at RHIC at two energies, corresponding to a gamma of 75.2 and 107.4. We describe the experiment and observations and compare the measured total energy loss with expectations from ionization losses at the residual gas, the energy loss due to impedance and synchrotron radiation. We find that the measured energy losses are below what is expected from free space synchrotron radiation. We believe that this shows evidence for suppression of synchrotron radiation which is cut off at long wavelength by the presence of the conducting beam pipe.

  10. Effects of chloride and silver ions on gold nanorod formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ock Park, Jin; Cho, So-Hye; Jeong, Dae-Yong; Kong, Young-Min; Lee, Seung Yong

    2015-01-01

    The ability to tune the longitudinal localized surface plasmon resonance of gold nanorods (AuNRs) via simple modification of their aspect ratio is a large contributing factor to their widespread use across multiple fields. An understanding of the synthesis conditions that affect the aspect ratio and yield of AuNRs is therefore of utmost importance. From this perspective, we take a systematic approach in investigating the effect of the following conditions on the seed-mediated formation of AuNRs: the addition of chloride or silver ions, and the use of a hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) source with different levels of effectiveness on controlling the shape of growing AuNRs.

  11. Role of hydrogen ions in standard and activation heap leaching of gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubtsov, YuI

    2017-02-01

    The role of hydrogen ions in activation heap leaching of gold from rebellious ore has been studied, which has allowed enhancing gold recovery. The author puts forward a gold leaching circuit with the use of activated oxygen-saturated solutions acidified to pH = 6–9.

  12. Effect of gold ion concentration on size and properties of gold nanoparticles in TritonX-100 based inverse microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Tokeer; Wani, Irshad A.; Ahmed, Jahangeer; Al-Hartomy, Omar A.

    2014-04-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been prepared successfully using TritonX-100 inverse microemulsion at different concentrations of HAuCl4 (0.1, 0.05, 0.04, 0.03, 0.02 and 0.01 M). We have studied the effect of gold ion concentration on the particle size, morphology, surface area and optical properties of the gold nanoparticles. The gold nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, UV-Visible spectroscopy and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area analysis. X-ray diffraction studies show the monophasic nature of the gold nanoparticles. TritonX-100 stabilized gold nanoparticles were appeared to be agglomerated at higher concentrations (0.1 and 0.05 M) of Au3+ with an average grain size of 60 and 50 nm, respectively. Monodisperse and uniform gold nanoparticles with well-defined morphologies of an average grain size of 15 and 25 nm were obtained at lower concentrations (0.01 and 0.02 M). UV-Visible spectroscopy shows the characteristic surface plasmon resonance peak ~540 nm along with the peaks at shorter and longer wavelengths may be due to the higher order plasmon resonance of the gold nanoparticles. The surface areas of the gold nanoparticles were found to be in the range of 5.8-107 m2/g which were well in agreement with the electron microscopic studies.

  13. Effect of gold ion concentration on size and properties of gold nanoparticles in TritonX-100 based inverse microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Tokeer; Wani, Irshad A.; Ahmed, Jahangeer; Al-Hartomy, Omar A.

    2013-04-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been prepared successfully using TritonX-100 inverse microemulsion at different concentrations of HAuCl4 (0.1, 0.05, 0.04, 0.03, 0.02 and 0.01 M). We have studied the effect of gold ion concentration on the particle size, morphology, surface area and optical properties of the gold nanoparticles. The gold nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, UV-Visible spectroscopy and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area analysis. X-ray diffraction studies show the monophasic nature of the gold nanoparticles. TritonX-100 stabilized gold nanoparticles were appeared to be agglomerated at higher concentrations (0.1 and 0.05 M) of Au3+ with an average grain size of 60 and 50 nm, respectively. Monodisperse and uniform gold nanoparticles with well-defined morphologies of an average grain size of 15 and 25 nm were obtained at lower concentrations (0.01 and 0.02 M). UV-Visible spectroscopy shows the characteristic surface plasmon resonance peak ~540 nm along with the peaks at shorter and longer wavelengths may be due to the higher order plasmon resonance of the gold nanoparticles. The surface areas of the gold nanoparticles were found to be in the range of 5.8-107 m2/g which were well in agreement with the electron microscopic studies.

  14. Morphology of gold and copper ion-plated coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1978-01-01

    Copper and gold films (0.2 to 2 microns thick) were ion plated onto polished 304-stainless-steel, glass, mica surfaces. These coatings were examined by SEM for defects in their morphological growth. Three types of defects were distinguished: nodular growth, abnormal or runaway growth, and spits. The cause for each type of defect was investigated. Nodular growth is due to inherent substrate microdefects, abnormal or runaway growth is due to external surface inclusions, and spits are due to nonuniform evaporation (ejection of droplets). All these defects induce stresses and produce porosity in the coatings and thus weaken their mechanical properties. During surface rubbing, large nodules are pulled out, leaving vacancies in the coatings.

  15. Gold ion implantation into alumina using an "inverted ion source" configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvadori, M. C.; Teixeira, F. S.; Sgubin, L. G.; Araujo, W. W. R.; Spirin, R. E.; Cattani, M.; Oks, E. M.; Brown, I. G.

    2014-02-01

    We describe an approach to ion implantation in which the plasma and its electronics are held at ground potential and the ion beam is injected into a space held at high negative potential, allowing considerable savings both economically and technologically. We used an "inverted ion implanter" of this kind to carry out implantation of gold into alumina, with Au ion energy 40 keV and dose (3-9) × 1016 cm-2. Resistivity was measured in situ as a function of dose and compared with predictions of a model based on percolation theory, in which electron transport in the composite is explained by conduction through a random resistor network formed by Au nanoparticles. Excellent agreement is found between the experimental results and the theory.

  16. Surface enhanced Raman scattering of amino acids assisted by gold nanoparticles and Gd(3+) ions.

    PubMed

    López-Neira, Juan Pablo; Galicia-Hernández, José Mario; Reyes-Coronado, Alejandro; Pérez, Elías; Castillo-Rivera, Francisco

    2015-05-07

    The surface enhanced raman scattering (SERS) signal from the l-tyrosine (tyr) molecule adsorbed on gold nanoparticles (Au-tyr) is compared with the SERS signal assisted by the presence of gadolinium ions (Gd(3+)) coordinated with the Au-tyr system. An enhancement factor of the SERS signal in the presence of Gd(3+) ions was ∼5 times higher than that produced by l-tyrosine adsorbed on gold nanoparticles. The enhancement of the SERS signal can be attributed to a corresponding increase in the local electric field due to the presence of Gd(3+) ions in the vicinity of a gold dimer configuration. This scenario was confirmed by solving numerically Maxwell equations, showing an increase of 1 order of magnitude in the local electric scattered field when the Gd(3+) ion is located in between a gold dimer compared with naked gold nanoparticles.

  17. Tribological characteristics of gold films deposited on metals by ion plating and vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    The graded interface between an ion-plated film and a substrate is discussed as well as the friction and wear properties of ion-plated gold. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiling and microhardness depth profiling were used to investigate the interface. The friction and wear properties of ion-plated and vapor-deposited gold films were studied both in an ultra high vacuum system to maximize adhesion and in oil to minimize adhesion. The results indicate that the solubility of gold on the substrate material controls the depth of the graded interface. Thermal diffusion and chemical diffusion mechanisms are thought to be involved in the formation of the gold-nickel interface. In iron-gold graded interfaces the gold was primarily dispersed in the iron and thus formed a physically bonded interface. The hardness of the gold film was influenced by its depth and was also related to the composition gradient between the gold and the substrate. The graded nickel-gold interface exhibited the highest hardness because of an alloy hardening effect. The effects of film thickness on adhesion and friction were established.

  18. Tribological characteristics of gold films deposited on metals by ion plating and vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    The graded interface between an ion-plated film and a substrate is discussed as well as the friction and wear properties of ion-plated gold. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiling and microhardness depth profiling were used to investigate the interface. The friction and wear properties of ion-plated and vapor-deposited gold films were studied both in an ultra high vacuum system to maximize adhesion and in oil to minimize adhesion. The results indicate that the solubility of gold on the substrate material controls the depth of the graded interface. Thermal diffusion and chemical diffusion mechanisms are thought to be involved in the formation of the gold-nickel interface. In iron-gold graded interfaces the gold was primarily dispersed in the iron and thus formed a physically bonded interface. The hardness of the gold film was influenced by its depth and was also related to the composition gradient between the gold and the substrate. The graded nickel-gold interface exhibited the highest hardness because of an alloy hardening effect. The effects of film thickness on adhesion and friction were established.

  19. Colorimetric detection of manganese(II) ions using gold/dopa nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Kannan Badri; Park, Hyun Ho

    2014-10-01

    We report here a one-pot, greener, eco-friendly strategy for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles using L-dopa. The as-prepared dopa-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs/dopa) can detect low concentrations of manganese(II) metal ions in aqueous solution. The binding forces between dopa and Mn2+ ions cause dopa-functionalized gold nanoparticles to come closer together, decreasing the interparticle distance and aggregating it with a change in color of colloidal solution from red to purplish-blue. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis showed a decreased surface charge on the surface of gold nanoparticles when exposed to Mn2+ ions, which caused cross-linking aggregation. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) images also revealed the aggregation of gold nanoparticles with the addition of Mn2+ ions. The extinction ratio of absorbance at 700-550 nm (A700/A550) was linear against the concentration of [Mn2+] ions. Thus, the optical absorption spectra of gold colloidal solution before and after the addition of Mn2+ ions reveal the concentration of Mn2+ ions in solution.

  20. Colorimetric detection of manganese(II) ions using gold/dopa nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Kannan Badri; Park, Hyun Ho

    2014-10-15

    We report here a one-pot, greener, eco-friendly strategy for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles using L-dopa. The as-prepared dopa-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs/dopa) can detect low concentrations of manganese(II) metal ions in aqueous solution. The binding forces between dopa and Mn(2+) ions cause dopa-functionalized gold nanoparticles to come closer together, decreasing the interparticle distance and aggregating it with a change in color of colloidal solution from red to purplish-blue. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis showed a decreased surface charge on the surface of gold nanoparticles when exposed to Mn(2+) ions, which caused cross-linking aggregation. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) images also revealed the aggregation of gold nanoparticles with the addition of Mn(2+) ions. The extinction ratio of absorbance at 700-550nm (A700/A550) was linear against the concentration of [Mn(2+)] ions. Thus, the optical absorption spectra of gold colloidal solution before and after the addition of Mn(2+) ions reveal the concentration of Mn(2+) ions in solution.

  1. Preparation of gold microparticles using halide ions in bulk block copolymer phases via photoreduction

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Sang-Ho; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Lee, Won-Ki; Lee, Jong-Chan

    2009-06-15

    Gold microparticles were prepared from the gold salt in the solid bulk phase of a poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) block copolymer via a photoreduction process in the presence of halide ions. The shapes and sizes of the gold microparticles were found to be dependent on the types and amount of halide ions as well as the types of cations used due to the combined effects of the adsorption power and oxidative dissolution ability of the additives on gold surfaces. Gold nanorods were obtained when poly(ethylene oxide) was used instead of the block copolymer. This suggests that the poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) parts in the block copolymer are essential for the formation of gold microparticles, even though the degree of the direct interaction between the PPO blocks and gold salt is not significant. - Graphical abstract: Gold microparticles were successfully prepared using halide ions as additives in the polymeric bulk phase via photoreduction with the glow lamp irradiation.

  2. Gold

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirkemo, Harold; Newman, William L.; Ashley, Roger P.

    1998-01-01

    Through the ages, men and women have cherished gold, and many have had a compelling desire to amass great quantities of it -- so compelling a desire, in fact, that the frantic need to seek and hoard gold has been aptly named "gold fever." Gold was among the first metals to be mined because it commonly occurs in its native form -- that is, not combined with other elements -- because it is beautiful and imperishable, and because exquisite objects can be made from it.

  3. Mycocrystallization of gold ions by the fungus Cylindrocladium floridanum.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Kannan Badri; Sakthivel, Natarajan

    2013-11-01

    The size and morphology determines the thermodynamic, physical and electronic properties of metal nanoparticles. The extracellular synthesis of gold nanoparticles by fungus, Cylindrocladium floridanum, which acts as a source of reducing and stabilizing agent has been described. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized using techniques such as UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). Based on the evidence of HR-TEM, the synthesized particles were found to be spherical with an average size of 19.05 nm. Powder XRD pattern proved the formation of (111)-oriented face-centered cubic crystals of metallic gold. This microbial approach by fungus for the green synthesis of spherical gold nanoparticles has many advantages such as economic viability, scaling up and environment friendliness.

  4. Formation of silicon nanodots via ion beam sputtering of ultrathin gold thin film coatings on Si

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Ion beam sputtering of ultrathin film Au coatings used as a physical catalyst for self-organization of Si nanostructures has been achieved by tuning the incident particle energy. This approach holds promise as a scalable nanomanufacturing parallel processing alternative to candidate nanolithography techniques. Structures of 11- to 14-nm Si nanodots are formed with normal incidence low-energy Ar ions of 200 eV and fluences above 2 × 1017 cm-2. In situ surface characterization during ion irradiation elucidates early stage ion mixing migration mechanism for nanodot self-organization. In particular, the evolution from gold film islands to the formation of ion-induced metastable gold silicide followed by pure Si nanodots formed with no need for impurity seeding. PMID:21711934

  5. Friction and hardness of gold films deposited by ion plating and evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with ion-plated and vapor-deposited gold films on various substrates in contact with a 0.025-mm-radius spherical silicon carbide rider in mineral oil. Hardness measurements were also made to examine the hardness depth profile of the coated gold on the substrate. The results indicate that the hardness is influenced by the depth of the gold coating from the surface. The hardness increases with an increase in the depth. The hardness is also related to the composition gradient in the graded interface between the gold coating and the substrate. The graded interface exhibited the highest hardness resulting from an alloy hardening effect. The coefficient of friction is inversely related to the hardness, namely, the load carrying capacity of the surface. The greater the hardness that the metal surface possesses, the lower is the coefficient of friction. The graded interface exhibited the lowest coefficient of friction.

  6. Visualization of expanding warm dense gold and diamond heated uniformly by laser-generated ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, W.; Albright, B. J.; Bradley, P. A.; Gautier, D. C.; Palaniyappan, S.; Vold, E. L.; Santiago Cordoba, M. A.; Hamilton, C. E.; Fernández, J. C.

    2015-11-01

    With a laser-generated beam of quasi-monoenergetic ions, a solid density target can be heated uniformly and isochorically. On the LANL Trident laser facility, we have used a beam of quasi-monoenergetic aluminum ions to heat gold and diamond foils. We visualized directly the expanding warm dense gold and diamond with an optical streak camera. Furthermore, we present a new technique to determine the initial temperatures of these heated samples from the measured expansion speeds of gold and diamond into vacuum. These temperatures are in good agreement with the expected temperatures calculated using the total deposited energy into the cold targets and SESAME equation-of-state tables at solid densities. We anticipate the uniformly heated solid density target will allow for direct quantitative measurements of equation-of-state, conductivity, opacity, and stopping power of warm dense matter, benefiting plasma physics, astrophysics, and nuclear physics. *This work is sponsored by the LANL LDRD Program.

  7. Charge Retention by Gold Clusters on Surfaces Prepared Using Soft Landing of Mass Selected Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Grant E.; Priest, Thomas A.; Laskin, Julia

    2012-01-24

    Monodisperse gold clusters have been prepared on surfaces in different charge states through soft landing of mass-selected ions. Ligand-stabilized gold clusters were prepared in methanol solution by reduction of chloro(triphenylphosphine)gold(I) with borane tert-butylamine complex in the presence of 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane. Electrospray ionization was used to introduce the clusters into the gas-phase and mass-selection was employed to isolate a single ionic cluster species (Au11L53+, L = 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane) which was delivered to surfaces at well controlled kinetic energies. Using in-situ time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) it is demonstrated that the Au11L53+ cluster retains its 3+ charge state when soft landed onto the surface of a 1H,1H,2H,2H-

  8. Synthesis of aluminum oxide supported fluorescent gold nanodots for the detection of silver ions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Cheng; Yeh, Ting-Yin; Ou, Chung-Mao; Shih, Chung-Chien; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2013-06-07

    Photoluminescent gold nanodots (Au NDs) on aluminum oxide nanoparticles (Al2O3 NPs) with the emission wavelengths ranging from 510 to 630 nm are unveiled. Orange Al2O3 NP@AuNDs show high selectivity and sensitivity towards Ag(+) ions by metallophilic Ag(+)-Au(+) interactions and induced fluorescence quenching of Au NDs.

  9. FY2014 Parameters for Gold Ions in Booster, AGS, and RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C. J.

    2014-07-30

    The nominal parameters for gold ions in Booster, AGS, and RHIC are given for the FY2014 running period. The parameters are worked out using various formulas to derive mass, kinetic parameters, RF parameters, ring parameters, etc.. The ''standard setup'', ''medium-energy'', and ''low-energy'' parameters are summarized in separate sections.

  10. FY2014 Parameters for Helions and Gold Ions in Booster, AGS, and RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C. J.

    2014-08-15

    The nominal parameters for helions (helion is the bound state of two protons and one neutron, the nucleus of a helium-3 atom) and gold ions in Booster, AGS, and RHIC are given for the FY2014 running period. The parameters are found using various formulas to derive mass, helion anomalous g-factor, kinetic parameters, RF parameters, ring parameters, etc..

  11. Charge retention by gold clusters on surfaces prepared using soft landing of mass selected ions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Grant E; Priest, Thomas; Laskin, Julia

    2012-01-24

    Monodisperse gold clusters have been prepared on surfaces in different charge states through soft landing of mass-selected ions. Ligand-stabilized gold clusters were prepared in methanol solution by reduction of chloro(triphenylphosphine)gold(I) with borane tert-butylamine complex in the presence of 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane. Electrospray ionization was used to introduce the clusters into the gas phase, and mass selection was employed to isolate a single ionic cluster species (Au(11)L(5)(3+), L = 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane), which was delivered to surfaces at well-controlled kinetic energies. Using in situ time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), it is demonstrated that the Au(11)L(5)(3+) cluster retains its 3+ charge state when soft landed onto the surface of a 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecanethiol self-assembled monolayer (FSAM) on gold. In contrast, when deposited onto 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid (COOH-SAM) and 1-dodecanethiol (HSAM) surfaces on gold, the clusters exhibit larger relative abundances of the 2+ and 1+ charge states, respectively. The kinetics of charge reduction on the FSAM and HSAM surfaces are investigated using in situ Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) SIMS. It is shown that an extremely slow interfacial charge reduction occurs on the FSAM surface while an almost instantaneous neutralization takes place on the surface of the HSAM. Our results demonstrate that the size and charge state of small gold clusters on surfaces, both of which exert a dramatic influence on their chemical and physical properties, may be tuned through soft landing of mass-selected ions onto carefully selected substrates.

  12. Adsorption of gold ions from industrial wastewater using activated carbon derived from hard shell of apricot stones - an agricultural waste.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, Mansooreh; Kaghazchi, Tahereh

    2008-09-01

    In this study, hard shell of apricot stones was selected from agricultural solid wastes to prepare effective and low cost adsorbent for the gold separation from gold-plating wastewater. Different adsorption parameters like adsorbent dose, particle size of activated carbon, pH and agitation speed of mixing on the gold adsorption were studied. The results showed that under the optimum operating conditions, more than 98% of gold was adsorbed onto activated carbon after only 3h. The equilibrium adsorption data were well described by the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. Isotherms have been used to obtain thermodynamic parameters. Gold desorption studies were performed with aqueous solution mixture of sodium hydroxide and organic solvents at ambient temperatures. Quantitative recovery of gold ions is possible by this method. As hard shell of apricot stones is a discarded as waste from agricultural and food industries, the prepared activated carbon is expected to be an economical product for gold ion recovery from wastewater.

  13. Selective detection of mercury (II) ion using nonlinear optical properties of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Darbha, Gopala Krishna; Singh, Anant Kumar; Rai, Uma Shanker; Yu, Eugene; Yu, Hongtao; Chandra Ray, Paresh

    2008-06-25

    Contamination of the environment with heavy metal ions has been an important concern throughout the world for decades. Driven by the need to detect trace amounts of mercury in environmental samples, this article demonstrates for the first time that nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of MPA-HCys-PDCA-modified gold nanoparticles can be used for rapid, easy and reliable screening of Hg(II) ions in aqueous solution, with high sensitivity (5 ppb) and selectivity over competing analytes. The hyper Rayleigh scattering (HRS) intensity increases 10 times after the addition of 20 ppm Hg(2+) ions to modified gold nanoparticle solution. The mechanism for HRS intensity change has been discussed in detail using particle size-dependent NLO properties as well as a two-state model. Our results show that the HRS assay for monitoring Hg(II) ions using MPA-HCys-PDCA-modified gold nanoparticles has excellent selectivity over alkali, alkaline earth (Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+)), and transition heavy metal ions (Pb(2+), Pb(+), Mn(2+), Fe(2+), Cu(2+), Ni(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+)).

  14. Nanoporous gold based optical sensor for sub-ppt detection of mercury ions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Chang, Haixin; Hirata, Akihiko; Wu, Hongkai; Xue, Qi-Kun; Chen, Mingwei

    2013-05-28

    Precisely probing heavy metal ions in water is important for molecular biology, environmental protection, and healthy monitoring. Although many methods have been reported in the past decade, developing a quantitative approach capable of detecting sub-ppt level heavy metal ions with high selectivity is still challenging. Here we report an extremely sensitive and highly selective nanoporous gold/aptamer based surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) sensor. The optical sensor has an unprecedented detection sensitivity of 1 pM (0.2 ppt) for Hg(2+) ions, the most sensitive Hg(2+) optical sensor known so far. The sensor also exhibits excellent selectivity. Dilute Hg(2+) ions can be identified in an aqueous solution containing 12 metal ions as well as in river water and underground water. Moreover, the SERRS sensor can be reused without an obvious loss of the sensitivity and selectivity even after 10 cycles.

  15. Polarization of gold in nanopores leads to ion current rectification

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Crystal; Hinkle, Preston; Menestrina, Justin; Vlassiouk, Ivan V.; Siwy, Zuzanna S.

    2016-10-03

    Biomimetic nanopores with rectifying properties are relevant components of ionic switches, ionic circuits, and biological sensors. Rectification indicates that currents for voltages of one polarity are higher than currents for voltages of the opposite polarity. Ion current rectification requires the presence of surface charges on the pore walls, achieved either by the attachment of charged groups or in multielectrode systems by applying voltage to integrated gate electrodes. Here we present a simpler concept for introducing surface charges via polarization of a thin layer of Au present at one entrance of a silicon nitride nanopore. In an electric field applied by two electrodes placed in bulk solution on both sides of the membrane, the Au layer polarizes such that excess positive charge locally concentrates at one end and negative charge concentrates at the other end. Consequently, a junction is formed between zones with enhanced anion and cation concentrations in the solution adjacent to the Au layer. This bipolar double layer together with enhanced cation concentration in a negatively charged silicon nitride nanopore leads to voltage-controlled surface-charge patterns and ion current rectification. The experimental findings are supported by numerical modeling that confirm modulation of ionic concentrations by the Au layer and ion current rectification even in low-aspect ratio nanopores. Lastly, our findings enable a new strategy for creating ionic circuits with diodes and transistors.

  16. Polarization of gold in nanopores leads to ion current rectification

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Crystal; Hinkle, Preston; Menestrina, Justin; ...

    2016-10-03

    Biomimetic nanopores with rectifying properties are relevant components of ionic switches, ionic circuits, and biological sensors. Rectification indicates that currents for voltages of one polarity are higher than currents for voltages of the opposite polarity. Ion current rectification requires the presence of surface charges on the pore walls, achieved either by the attachment of charged groups or in multielectrode systems by applying voltage to integrated gate electrodes. Here we present a simpler concept for introducing surface charges via polarization of a thin layer of Au present at one entrance of a silicon nitride nanopore. In an electric field applied bymore » two electrodes placed in bulk solution on both sides of the membrane, the Au layer polarizes such that excess positive charge locally concentrates at one end and negative charge concentrates at the other end. Consequently, a junction is formed between zones with enhanced anion and cation concentrations in the solution adjacent to the Au layer. This bipolar double layer together with enhanced cation concentration in a negatively charged silicon nitride nanopore leads to voltage-controlled surface-charge patterns and ion current rectification. The experimental findings are supported by numerical modeling that confirm modulation of ionic concentrations by the Au layer and ion current rectification even in low-aspect ratio nanopores. Lastly, our findings enable a new strategy for creating ionic circuits with diodes and transistors.« less

  17. Range parameters of slow gold ions implanted into light targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, V.

    2009-08-01

    Interatomic potentials for Au-C, Au-B, Au-N and Au-Si systems, calculated with density-functional theory (DFT) methods, have been used to evaluate the range parameters of gold in B, Si, BN and SiC films at energies of about 10-400 keV. The potentials have been employed to describe scattering angles of a projectile and to calculate the nuclear stopping powers and the higher moments of the energy, transferred in single collisions. Utilizing these findings the range parameters have been obtained by the standard transport theory and by Monte-Carlo simulations. A velocity proportional electronic stopping was included into the consideration. The approach developed corresponds completely to the standard classical scheme of the calculation of range parameters. Good agreement between the computed range parameters and available experimental data allow us to conclude that correlation effects between the nuclear and electronic stopping can be neglected in the energy range in question. Moreover, it is proven for the first time that the model by Grande, et al. [P.L. Grande, F.C. Zawislak, D. Fink, M. Behar, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 61 (1991) 282], which relies on the importance of correlation effects, contains inherent contradictions.

  18. A microcantilever-based silver ion sensor using DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles as mass amplifier.

    PubMed

    You, Juneseok; Song, Yeongjin; Park, Chanho; Jang, Kuewhan; Na, Sungsoo

    2017-04-13

    Silver ions have been used to sterilize many products, however, it has recently been demonstrated that silver ions can be toxic. This toxicity has been researched over many years with the lethal concentration at 10 μM. Silver ions can accumulate through the food chain, causing serious health problems in species. Hence, there is a need for a commercially available silver ion sensor, with high detection sensitivity. In this work, we develop an ultra-sensitive silver ion sensor platform, using cytosine-based DNA and gold nanoparticle as the mass amplifier. We achieve a lower detection limit for silver ions of 10 pM; this detection limit is one million times lower than the toxic concentration. Using our sensor platform we examine highly selective characteristics of other typical ions in water from natural sources. Furthermore, our sensor platform is able to detect silver ions in a real practical sample of commercially available drinking water. Our sensor platform, which we have termed a 'MAIS' (Mass Amplifier Ion Sensor), with the simple detection procedure, high sensitivity, selectivity and real practical applicability has shown potential as an early toxicity assessment of silver ions for the environment.

  19. Gold nanoflowers based colorimetric detection of Hg2+ and Pb2+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalawade, Pradnya; Kapoor, Sudhir

    2013-12-01

    An optical detection method based on the interaction of gold nanoflowers with Hg2+ and Pb2+ has been described. After interaction, gold nanoflowers change the color from violet to wine red. The nanoflowers are capable of determining Hg2+ and Pb2+ over a dynamic range of 1.0 × 10-6 and 1.0 × 10-5 M, respectively. The response time of nanoflowers depends on the concentration of ions. The presence of both Hg2+ and Pb2+ ions in the mixture having Au nanoflowers induced color changes of the solution within several seconds even at 1.0 × 10-6 M. Common metal ions were chosen to investigate their interference in Hg2+ and Pb2+ detection, and the concentration of each metal ion studied was 1.0 × 10-5 M. Other metallic ions could not induce color change even at 1.0 × 10-5 M. The feasibility of our method to detect Hg2+ and Pb2+ ions at high concentration in real water samples was verified. Water samples were from our own laboratory and no pretreatment was made. As the particles are stable they can be used for more than 3 months without observing any major deviation.

  20. Size-dependent stability toward dissociation and ligand binding energies of phosphine-ligated gold cluster ions

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Grant E.; Priest, Thomas A.; Laskin, Julia

    2014-01-01

    The stability of sub-nanometer size gold clusters ligated with organic molecules is of paramount importance to the scalable synthesis of monodisperse size-selected metal clusters with highly tunable chemical and physical properties. For the first time, a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR-MS) equipped with surface induced dissociation (SID) has been employed to investigate the time and collision energy resolved fragmentation behavior of cationic doubly charged gold clusters containing 7-9 gold atoms and 6-7 triphenylphosphine (TPP) ligands prepared by reduction synthesis in solution. The TPP ligated gold clusters are demonstrated to fragment through three primary dissociation pathways: (1) Loss of a neutral TPP ligand from the precursor gold cluster, (2) asymmetric fission and (3) symmetric fission and charge separation of the gold core resulting in formation of complementary pairs of singly charged fragment ions. Threshold energies and activation entropies of these fragmentation pathways have been determined employing Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) modeling of the experimental SID data. It is demonstrated that the doubly charged cluster ion containing eight gold atoms and six TPP ligands, (8,6)2+, exhibits exceptional stability compared to the other cationic gold clusters examined in this study due to its large ligand binding energy of 1.76 eV. Our findings demonstrate the dramatic effect of the size and extent of ligation on the gas-phase stability and preferred fragmentation pathways of small TPP-ligated gold clusters.

  1. Self-assembly of core-satellite gold nanoparticles for colorimetric detection of copper ions.

    PubMed

    Weng, Ziqing; Wang, Hongbin; Vongsvivut, Jitraporn; Li, Runqing; Glushenkov, Alexey M; He, Jin; Chen, Ying; Barrow, Colin J; Yang, Wenrong

    2013-11-25

    Molecule-coated nanoparticles are hybrid materials which can be engineered with novel properties. The molecular coating of metal nanoparticles can provide chemical functionality, enabling assembly of the nanoparticles that are important for applications, such as biosensing devices. Herein, we report a new self-assembly of core-satellite gold nanoparticles linked by a simple amino acid l-Cysteine for biosensing of Cu(2+). The plasmonic properties of core-satellite nano-assemblies were investigated, a new red shifted absorbance peak from about 600 to 800 nm was found, with specific wavelength depending on ratios with assembly of large and small gold nanoparticles. The spectral features obtained using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) provided strong evidence for the assembly of the Cu(2+) ions to the L-Cysteine molecules leading to the successful formation of the core-satellite Cu(l-Cysteine) complex on the gold surfaces. In addition, a linear relationship between the concentration of mediating Cu(2+) and absorbance of self-assembled gold nanoparticles (GNPs) at 680 nm was obtained. These results strongly address the potential strategy for applying the functionalized GNPs as novel biosensing tools in trace detections of certain metal ions.

  2. Single pass electron beam cooling of gold ions between EBIS LINAC and booster is theoretically possible!

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, A.

    2011-01-01

    Electron beam cooling is examined as an option to reduce momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster. Electron beam parameters are based on experimental data (obtained at BNL) of electron beams extracted from a plasma cathode. Many issues, regarding a low energy high current electron beam that is needed for electron beam cooling to reduce momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster, were examined. Computations and some experimental data indicate that none of these issues is a show stopper. Preliminary calculations indicate that single pass cooling is feasible; momentum spread can be reduced by more than an order of magnitude in about one meter. Hence, this option cooling deserves further more serious considerations.

  3. Electrically conductive polyimide film containing gold (III) ions, composition, and process of making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caplan, Maggie L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); St. Clair, Anne K. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An electrically conductive, thermooxidatively stable poltimide, especially a film thereof, is prepared from an intimate admixture of a particular polyimide and gold (III) ions, in an amount sufficient to provide between 17 and 21 percent by weight of gold (III) ions, based on the weight of electrically conductive, thermooxidatively stable polyimide. The particular polyimide is prepared from a polyamic acid which has been synthesized from a dianhydride/diamine combination selected from the group consisting of 3,3',4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride and 2,2-bis[4-(4 -aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane; 3,3',4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride and 4,4'-oxydianiline; 2,2'-bis(3,4-dicarboxyphenyl)hexafluoropropane dianhydride and 4,4'-oxydianiline; and 3,3'4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride and 2,2-bis(3-aminophenyl)hexafluoropropane.

  4. Analysis of cardiac tissue by gold cluster ion bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranyosiova, M.; Chorvatova, A.; Chorvat, D.; Biro, Cs.; Velic, D.

    2006-07-01

    Specific molecules in cardiac tissue of spontaneously hypertensive rats are studied by using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). The investigation determines phospholipids, cholesterol, fatty acids and their fragments in the cardiac tissue, with special focus on cardiolipin. Cardiolipin is a unique phospholipid typical for cardiomyocyte mitochondrial membrane and its decrease is involved in pathologic conditions. In the positive polarity, the fragments of phosphatydilcholine are observed in the mass region of 700-850 u. Peaks over mass 1400 u correspond to intact and cationized molecules of cardiolipin. In animal tissue, cardiolipin contains of almost exclusively 18 carbon fatty acids, mostly linoleic acid. Linoleic acid at 279 u, other fatty acids, and phosphatidylglycerol fragments, as precursors of cardiolipin synthesis, are identified in the negative polarity. These data demonstrate that SIMS technique along with Au 3+ cluster primary ion beam is a good tool for detection of higher mass biomolecules providing approximately 10 times higher yield in comparison with Au +.

  5. SETUP AND PERFORMANCE OF THE RHIC INJECTOR ACCELERATORS FOR THE 2007 RUN WITH GOLD IONS

    SciTech Connect

    GARDNER,C.; AHRENS, L.; ALESSI, J.; BENJAMIN, J.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    Gold ions for the 2007 run of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) are accelerated in the Tandem, Booster and AGS prior to injection into RHIC. The setup and performance of this chain of accelerators is reviewed with a focus on improvements in the quality of beam delivered to RHIC. In particular, more uniform stripping foils between Booster and AGS7 and a new bunch merging scheme in AGS have provided beam bunches with reduced longitudinal emittance for RHIC.

  6. Dilute nitric or nitrous acid solution containing halide ions as effective media for pure gold dissolution.

    PubMed

    Hojo, Masashi; Yamamoto, Masahiko; Okamura, Kei

    2015-08-14

    The greatly enhanced oxidation ability of dilute aqueous nitric acid (0.10-2.0 mol L(-1)) containing bromide and iodide salts as well as chloride salts has been examined based on the dissolution kinetics of pure gold at 30-60 °C. It has been found that bromide salts are more effective than chloride salts in gaining the ability of dissolving gold in dilute aqueous nitric acid solution. At 60 °C, a piece of gold-wire (ca. 20 mg) is dissolved in 20 mL of as low as 0.10 mol L(-1) HNO3 solution containing 1.0-5.0 mol L(-1) NaBr and the dissolution rate constant, log(k/s(-1)), increases linearly (from -5.78 to -4.52) with the increasing NaBr concentration. The addition of organic solvents, such as acetonitrile and acetic acid, causes acceleration of gold dissolution in LiBr and NaBr solutions. With increasing MeCN contents, for instance, the log(k/s(-1)) value of 0.10 mol L(-1) HNO3 solution containing 2.0 mol L(-1) NaBr increases linearly from -5.30 to -4.61 at 30% (v/v) MeCN. The bromide salts affect the gold dissolution rate constant in the order of KBr < NaBr < LiBr < CaBr2. With increasing NaI concentration (0.20-3.0 mol L(-1)), some acceleration in log(k/s(-1)) of 0.50 or 1.0 mol L(-1) HNO3 solution has been observed; however, the slope of acceleration as the function of NaI concentration is much smaller than that of NaCl or NaBr. The gold dissolution ability has been examined also for nitrous acid containing chloride and bromide ions at 35 °C. The NaNO2 solution containing twice or more amounts of HX (X = Cl, Br) gives the maximum efficiency for gold dissolution, according to the log(k/s(-1)) values of the mixed solutions of NaNO2 (0.10-2.0 mol L(-1)) and HX of various concentrations. The influence of oxidation by dilute nitric and nitrous acids on the gold dissolution is discussed from the standpoint of the redox potentials in "modified" aqueous solutions and not of the changes in the activity coefficients of ions.

  7. Isochoric heating of solid gold targets with the PW-laser-driven ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinke, Sven; Ji, Qing; Bulanov, Stepan; Barnard, John; Schenkel, Thomas; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2016-10-01

    We present an end-to-end simulation for isochoric heating of solid gold targets using ion beams produced with the BELLA PW laser at LBNL: (i) 2D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations are applied to study the ion source characteristics of the PW laser-target interaction at the long focal length (f/#65) beamline at laser intensities of 5x1019W/cm2 at spot size of ω0 = 52 μm on a CH target. (ii) In order to transport the ion beams to an EMP-free environment, an active plasma lens will be used. This was modeled by calculating the Twiss parameters of the ion beam from the appropriate transport matrixes using the source parameters obtained from the PIC simulation. Space charge effects were considered as well. (iii) Hydrodynamic simulations indicate that these ion beams can isochorically heat a 1 mm3 gold target to the Warm Dense Matter state. This work was supported by Fusion Energy Science, and LDRD funding from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, provided by the Director, Office of Science, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  8. Radiosensitizing effect of gold nanoparticles in carbon ion irradiation of human cervical cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Harminder; Avasthi, D. K.; Pujari, Geetanjali; Sarma, Asitikantha

    2013-07-18

    Noble metal nanoparticles have received considerable attention in biotechnology for their role in bio sensing due to surface plasmon resonance, medical diagnostics due to better imaging contrast and therapy. The radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) has been gaining popularity in radiation therapy of cancer cells. The better depth dose profile of energetic ion beam proves its superiority over gamma radiation for fighting against cancer. In the present work, the glucose capped gold nanoparticles (Glu-AuNP) were synthesised and internalized in the HeLa cells. Transmission electron microscopic analysis of ultrathin sections of Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells confirmed the internalization of Glu-AuNPs. Control HeLa cells and Glu-AuNp treated HeLa cells were irradiated at different doses of 62 MeV 12C ion beam (LET - 290keV/{mu}m) at BIO beam line of using 15UD Pelletron accelerator at Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, India. The survival fraction was assessed by colony forming assay which revealed that the dose of carbon ion for 90% cell killing in Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells and control HeLa cells are 2.3 and 3.2 Gy respectively. This observation shows {approx} 28% reduction of {sup 12}C{sup 6+} ion dose for Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells as compared to control HeLa cells.

  9. Radiosensitizing effect of gold nanoparticles in carbon ion irradiation of human cervical cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Harminder; Avasthi, D. K.; Pujari, Geetanjali; Sarma, Asitikantha

    2013-07-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles have received considerable attention in biotechnology for their role in bio sensing due to surface plasmon resonance, medical diagnostics due to better imaging contrast and therapy. The radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) has been gaining popularity in radiation therapy of cancer cells. The better depth dose profile of energetic ion beam proves its superiority over gamma radiation for fighting against cancer. In the present work, the glucose capped gold nanoparticles (Glu-AuNP) were synthesised and internalized in the HeLa cells. Transmission electron microscopic analysis of ultrathin sections of Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells confirmed the internalization of Glu-AuNPs. Control HeLa cells and Glu-AuNp treated HeLa cells were irradiated at different doses of 62 MeV 12C ion beam (LET - 290keV/μm) at BIO beam line of using 15UD Pelletron accelerator at Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, India. The survival fraction was assessed by colony forming assay which revealed that the dose of carbon ion for 90% cell killing in Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells and control HeLa cells are 2.3 and 3.2 Gy respectively. This observation shows ˜ 28% reduction of 12C6+ ion dose for Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells as compared to control HeLa cells.

  10. Selective disulfide bond cleavage in gold(I) cationized polypeptide ions formed via gas-phase ion/ion cation switching.

    PubMed

    Gunawardena, Harsha P; O'Hair, Richard A J; McLuckey, Scott A

    2006-09-01

    Gaseous multiply protonated disulfide-linked peptides have been subjected to reactions with AuCl2(-) ions to explore the possibility of effecting cation switching of Au+ for two protons and to determine whether cationization by Au+ ions affords selective dissociation of disulfide linkages. The incorporation of Au+ into several model disulfide-linked peptides proved to be straightforward. The primary ion/ion reaction channels were proton transfer, which does not lead to Au+ incorporation, and attachment of AuCl2(-) ions to the polypeptide cation, which does incorporate Au+. Fragmentation of the attachment product, the extent of which varied with peptide and charge state, led to losses of one or more molecules of HCl and, to some extent, cleavage of polypeptides at the disulfide linkage into its two constituent chains. Collisional activation of the intact metal-ion-incorporated peptides showed cleavage of the disulfide linkage to be a major, and in some cases exclusive, process. Cations with protons as the only cationizing agents showed only small contributions from cleavage of the disulfide linkage. These results indicate that Au+ incorporation into a disulfide-linked polypeptide ion is a promising way to effect selective dissociation of disulfide bonds. Cation switching via ion/ion reactions is a convenient means for incorporating gold and is attractive because it avoids the requirement of adding metal salts to the analyte solution.

  11. Label-free colorimetric detection of cadmium ions in rice samples using gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yongming; Zhang, Yi; Shao, Huawu; Wang, Zhuo; Wang, Xuefei; Jiang, Xingyu

    2014-09-02

    A simple and label-free colorimetric method for cadmium ions (Cd(2+)) detection using unmodified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is reported. The unmodified AuNPs easily aggregate in a high concentration of NaCl solution, but the presence of glutathione (GSH) can prevent the salt-induced aggregation of AuNPs. When Cd(2+) is added to the stable mixture of AuNPs, GSH, and NaCl, Cd(2+) can coordinate with 4× GSH as a spherical shaped complex, which decreases the amount of free GSH on the surface of gold nanoparticles to weaken the stability of AuNPs, and AuNPs will easily aggregate in high-salt conditions. On the basis of the mechanism, we design a simple, label-free colorimetric method using AuNPs accompanied by GSH in a high-salt environment to detect Cd(2+) in water and digested rice samples.

  12. Biosensors Based on Nano-Gold/Zeolite-Modified Ion Selective Field-Effect Transistors for Creatinine Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozansoy Kasap, Berna; Marchenko, Svitlana V.; Soldatkin, Oleksandr O.; Dzyadevych, Sergei V.; Akata Kurc, Burcu

    2017-03-01

    The combination of advantages of using zeolites and gold nanoparticles were aimed to be used for the first time to improve the characteristic properties of ion selective field-effect transistor (ISFET)-based creatinine biosensors. The biosensors with covalently cross-linked creatinine deiminase using glutaraldehyde (GA) were used as a control group, and the effect of different types of zeolites on biosensor responses was investigated in detail by using silicalite, zeolite beta (BEA), nano-sized zeolite beta (Nano BEA) and zeolite BEA including gold nanoparticle (BEA-Gold). The presence of gold nanoparticles was investigated by ICP, STEM-EDX and XPS analysis. The chosen zeolite types allowed investigating the effect of aluminium in the zeolite framework, particle size and the presence of gold nanoparticles in the zeolitic framework.

  13. Visualization of expanding warm dense gold and diamond heated rapidly by laser-generated ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, W.; Albright, B. J.; Bradley, P. A.; Gautier, D. C.; Palaniyappan, S.; Vold, E. L.; Cordoba, M. A. Santiago; Hamilton, C. E.; Fernández, J. C.

    2015-09-22

    With the development of several novel heating sources, scientists can now heat a small sample isochorically above 10,000 K. Although matter at such an extreme state, known as warm dense matter, is commonly found in astrophysics (e.g., in planetary cores) as well as in high energy density physics experiments, its properties are not well understood and are difficult to predict theoretically. This is because the approximations made to describe condensed matter or high-temperature plasmas are invalid in this intermediate regime. A sufficiently large warm dense matter sample that is uniformly heated would be ideal for these studies, but has been unavailable to date. We have used a beam of quasi-monoenergetic aluminum ions to heat gold and diamond foils uniformly and isochorically. For the first time, we visualized directly the expanding warm dense gold and diamond with an optical streak camera. Furthermore, we present a new technique to determine the initial temperature of these heated samples from the measured expansion speeds of gold and diamond into vacuum. We anticipate the uniformly heated solid density target will allow for direct quantitative measurements of equation-of-state, conductivity, opacity, and stopping power of warm dense matter, benefiting plasma physics, astrophysics, and nuclear physics.

  14. Visualization of expanding warm dense gold and diamond heated rapidly by laser-generated ion beams

    DOE PAGES

    Bang, W.; Albright, B. J.; Bradley, P. A.; ...

    2015-09-22

    With the development of several novel heating sources, scientists can now heat a small sample isochorically above 10,000 K. Although matter at such an extreme state, known as warm dense matter, is commonly found in astrophysics (e.g., in planetary cores) as well as in high energy density physics experiments, its properties are not well understood and are difficult to predict theoretically. This is because the approximations made to describe condensed matter or high-temperature plasmas are invalid in this intermediate regime. A sufficiently large warm dense matter sample that is uniformly heated would be ideal for these studies, but has beenmore » unavailable to date. We have used a beam of quasi-monoenergetic aluminum ions to heat gold and diamond foils uniformly and isochorically. For the first time, we visualized directly the expanding warm dense gold and diamond with an optical streak camera. Furthermore, we present a new technique to determine the initial temperature of these heated samples from the measured expansion speeds of gold and diamond into vacuum. We anticipate the uniformly heated solid density target will allow for direct quantitative measurements of equation-of-state, conductivity, opacity, and stopping power of warm dense matter, benefiting plasma physics, astrophysics, and nuclear physics.« less

  15. Silica-gold bilayer-based transfer of focused ion beam-fabricated nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaofei; Geisler, Peter; Krauss, Enno; Kullock, René; Hecht, Bert

    2015-10-21

    The demand for using nanostructures fabricated by focused ion beam (FIB) on delicate substrates or as building blocks for complex devices motivates the development of protocols that allow FIB-fabricated nanostructures to be transferred from the original substrate to the desired target. However, transfer of FIB-fabricated nanostructures is severely hindered by FIB-induced welding of structure and substrate. Here we present two (ex and in situ) transfer methods for FIB-fabricated nanostructures based on a silica-gold bilayer evaporated onto a bulk substrate. Utilizing the poor adhesion between silica and gold, the nanostructures can be mechanically separated from the bulk substrate. For the ex situ transfer, a spin-coated poly(methyl methacrylate) film is used to carry the nanostructures so that the bilayer can be etched away after being peeled off. For the in situ transfer, using a micro-manipulator inside the FIB machine, a cut-out piece of silica on which a nanostructure has been fabricated is peeled off from the bulk substrate and thus carries the nanostructure to a target substrate. We demonstrate the performance of both methods by transferring plasmonic nano-antennas fabricated from single-crystalline gold flakes by FIB milling to a silicon wafer and to a scanning probe tip.

  16. Multipath colourimetric assay for copper(II) ions utilizing MarR functionalized gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yulong; Wang, Limin; Su, Zhenhe; Xue, Juanjuan; Dong, Jinbo; Zhang, Cunzheng; Hua, Xiude; Wang, Minghua; Liu, Fengquan

    2017-02-01

    We use the multiple antibiotic resistance regulator (MarR), as a highly selective biorecognition elements in a multipath colourimetric sensing strategy for the fast detection of Cu2+ in water samples. The colourimetric assay is based on the aggregation of MarR-coated gold nanoparticles in the presence of Cu2+ ions, which induces a red-to-purple colour change of the solution. The colour variation in the gold nanoparticle aggregation process can be used for qualitative and quantitative detection of Cu2+ by the naked eye, and with UV–vis and smartphone-based approaches. The three analysis techniques used in the multipath colourimetric assay complement each other and provide greater flexibility for differing requirements and conditions, making the assay highly applicable for Cu2+ detection. Under optimal conditions, the Cu2+ concentration was quantified in less than 5 min with limits of detection for the naked eye, UV–vis and smartphone-based approaches of 1 μM, 405 nM and 61 nM, respectively. Moreover, the sensing system exhibited excellent selectivity and practical application for Cu2+ detection in real water samples. Thus, our strategy has great potential for application in on-site monitoring of Cu2+, and the unique response of MarR towards copper ions may provide a new approach to Cu2+ sensing.

  17. Multipath colourimetric assay for copper(II) ions utilizing MarR functionalized gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yulong; Wang, Limin; Su, Zhenhe; Xue, Juanjuan; Dong, Jinbo; Zhang, Cunzheng; Hua, Xiude; Wang, Minghua; Liu, Fengquan

    2017-01-01

    We use the multiple antibiotic resistance regulator (MarR), as a highly selective biorecognition elements in a multipath colourimetric sensing strategy for the fast detection of Cu2+ in water samples. The colourimetric assay is based on the aggregation of MarR-coated gold nanoparticles in the presence of Cu2+ ions, which induces a red-to-purple colour change of the solution. The colour variation in the gold nanoparticle aggregation process can be used for qualitative and quantitative detection of Cu2+ by the naked eye, and with UV–vis and smartphone-based approaches. The three analysis techniques used in the multipath colourimetric assay complement each other and provide greater flexibility for differing requirements and conditions, making the assay highly applicable for Cu2+ detection. Under optimal conditions, the Cu2+ concentration was quantified in less than 5 min with limits of detection for the naked eye, UV–vis and smartphone-based approaches of 1 μM, 405 nM and 61 nM, respectively. Moreover, the sensing system exhibited excellent selectivity and practical application for Cu2+ detection in real water samples. Thus, our strategy has great potential for application in on-site monitoring of Cu2+, and the unique response of MarR towards copper ions may provide a new approach to Cu2+ sensing. PMID:28155905

  18. Physical response of gold nanoparticles to single self-ion bombardment

    DOE PAGES

    Bufford, Daniel C.; Hattar, Khalid

    2014-09-23

    The reliability of nanomaterials depends on maintaining their specific sizes and structures. However, the stability of many nanomaterials in radiation environments remains uncertain due to the lack of a fully developed fundamental understanding of the radiation response on the nanoscale. To provide an insight into the dynamic aspects of single ion effects in nanomaterials, gold nanoparticles (NPs) with nominal diameters of 5, 20, and 60 nm were subjected to self-ion irradiation at energies of 46 keV, 2.8 MeV, and 10 MeV in situ inside of a transmission electron microscope. Ion interactions created a variety of far-from-equilibrium structures including small (~1more » nm) sputtered nanoclusters from the parent NPs of all sizes. Single ions created surface bumps and elongated nanofilaments in the 60 nm NPs. As a result, similar shape changes were observed in the 20 nm nanoparticles, while the 5 nm nanoparticles were transiently melted or explosively broken apart.« less

  19. Physical response of gold nanoparticles to single self-ion bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Bufford, Daniel C.; Hattar, Khalid

    2014-09-23

    The reliability of nanomaterials depends on maintaining their specific sizes and structures. However, the stability of many nanomaterials in radiation environments remains uncertain due to the lack of a fully developed fundamental understanding of the radiation response on the nanoscale. To provide an insight into the dynamic aspects of single ion effects in nanomaterials, gold nanoparticles (NPs) with nominal diameters of 5, 20, and 60 nm were subjected to self-ion irradiation at energies of 46 keV, 2.8 MeV, and 10 MeV in situ inside of a transmission electron microscope. Ion interactions created a variety of far-from-equilibrium structures including small (~1 nm) sputtered nanoclusters from the parent NPs of all sizes. Single ions created surface bumps and elongated nanofilaments in the 60 nm NPs. As a result, similar shape changes were observed in the 20 nm nanoparticles, while the 5 nm nanoparticles were transiently melted or explosively broken apart.

  20. Silica-gold bilayer-based transfer of focused ion beam-fabricated nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaofei; Geisler, Peter; Krauss, Enno; Kullock, René; Hecht, Bert

    2015-10-01

    The demand for using nanostructures fabricated by focused ion beam (FIB) on delicate substrates or as building blocks for complex devices motivates the development of protocols that allow FIB-fabricated nanostructures to be transferred from the original substrate to the desired target. However, transfer of FIB-fabricated nanostructures is severely hindered by FIB-induced welding of structure and substrate. Here we present two (ex and in situ) transfer methods for FIB-fabricated nanostructures based on a silica-gold bilayer evaporated onto a bulk substrate. Utilizing the poor adhesion between silica and gold, the nanostructures can be mechanically separated from the bulk substrate. For the ex situ transfer, a spin-coated poly(methyl methacrylate) film is used to carry the nanostructures so that the bilayer can be etched away after being peeled off. For the in situ transfer, using a micro-manipulator inside the FIB machine, a cut-out piece of silica on which a nanostructure has been fabricated is peeled off from the bulk substrate and thus carries the nanostructure to a target substrate. We demonstrate the performance of both methods by transferring plasmonic nano-antennas fabricated from single-crystalline gold flakes by FIB milling to a silicon wafer and to a scanning probe tip.The demand for using nanostructures fabricated by focused ion beam (FIB) on delicate substrates or as building blocks for complex devices motivates the development of protocols that allow FIB-fabricated nanostructures to be transferred from the original substrate to the desired target. However, transfer of FIB-fabricated nanostructures is severely hindered by FIB-induced welding of structure and substrate. Here we present two (ex and in situ) transfer methods for FIB-fabricated nanostructures based on a silica-gold bilayer evaporated onto a bulk substrate. Utilizing the poor adhesion between silica and gold, the nanostructures can be mechanically separated from the bulk substrate. For the ex

  1. SU-E-T-518: Investigation of Gold Nanoparticle Radiosensitization for Carbon Ion Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y; Held, K; Paganetti, H; Schuemann, J; McMahon, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose The aim of this work is to investigate the radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles (GNP) in carbon ion irradiation. Nano-scale dosimetric characteristics of GNP interaction with carbon ions as well as the secondary particles generated as a carbon beam traverses the water phantom were studied. Methods Monte Carlo simulations were carried out using TOPAS (Tool for Particle Simulation). First, a water phantom was irradiated by the carbon ion beam and the particle shower spectrum at several depths was recorded in phase spaces. We analyzed the number and energy spectrum of each particle type. Then, the phase spaces obtained from Step 1 were modified to nanometer scale to irradiate a single 50 nm GNP. The secondary electrons that escaped from the GNPs following interactions with each particle type were recorded as phase spaces. The number and energy spectrum of the secondary electrons were studied. The same simulations were repeated replacing the GNPs with water nanoparticles (WNPs) with the same size. The energy absorbed in either GNP or WNP was scored. Results There is a large amount of secondary particles generated through carbon ion beam interaction with the water phantom. Analysis of the secondary electrons generated by the primary particles which escape from the nanoparticle revealed that majority (above 80%) of these electrons were generated by the GNP interaction with Carbon beam itself, making it the biggest contributor to the enhancement. The ratio of the energy absorbed by GNP and WNP is about 8–10 for charged particles and above 3000 for gammas. Conclusion We showed in the study the GNPs may potentially be used to enhance carbon ion therapy, and the main mechanism of enhancement is the interaction with Carbon ion particles itself.

  2. Voltammetric detection of cadmium ions at glutathione-modified gold electrodes.

    PubMed

    Chow, Edith; Hibbert, D Brynn; Gooding, J Justin

    2005-06-01

    An electrochemical sensor for the detection of cadmium ions is described using immobilized glutathione as a selective ligand. First, a self-assembled monolayer of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) was formed on a gold electrode. The carboxyl terminus then allowed attachment of glutathione (GSH)via carbodiimide coupling to give the MPA-GSH modified electrode. A cadmium ion forms a complex with glutathione via the free sulfhydryl group and also to the carboxyl groups. The complexed ion is reduced by linear and Osteryoung square wave voltammetry with a detection limit of 5 nM. The effect of the kinetics of accumulation of cadmium on the measured current was investigated and modeled. Increasing the temperature of accumulation and electrochemical analysis caused an increase in the voltammetric peak of approximately 4% per degrees C around room temperature. The modified electrode could be regenerated, being stable for more than 16 repeated uses and more than two weeks if used once a day. Some interference from Pb(2+) and Cu(2+) was observed but the effects of Zn(2+), Ni(2+), Cr(3+) and Ba(2+) were insignificant.

  3. Precise Determination of the Lyman-1 Transition Energy in Hydrogen-like Gold Ions with Microcalorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft-Bermuth, S.; Andrianov, V.; Bleile, A.; Echler, A.; Egelhof, P.; Grabitz, P.; Kilbourne, C.; Kiselev, O.; McCammon, D.; Scholz, P.

    2014-09-01

    The precise determination of the transition energy of the Lyman-1 line in hydrogen-like heavy ions provides a sensitive test of quantum electrodynamics in very strong Coulomb fields. We report the determination of the Lyman-1 transition energy of gold ions (Au) with microcalorimeters at the experimental storage ring at GSI. X-rays produced by the interaction of 125 MeV/u Au ions with an internal argon gas-jet target were detected. The detector array consisted of 14 pixels with silicon thermistors and Sn absorbers, for which an energy resolution of 50 eV for an X-ray energy of 59.5 keV was obtained in the laboratory. The Lyman-1 transition energy was determined for each pixel in the laboratory frame, then transformed into the emitter frame and averaged. A Dy-159 source was used for energy calibration. The absolute positions of the detector pixels, which are needed for an accurate correction of the Doppler shift, were determined by topographic measurements and by scanning a collimated Am-241 source across the cryostat window. The energy of the Lyman-1 line in the emitter frame is eV, in good agreement with theoretical predictions. The systematic error is dominated by the uncertainty in the position of the cryostat relative to the interaction region of beam and target.

  4. Many-body theory of the neutralization of strontium ions on gold surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamperin, M.; Bronold, F. X.; Fehske, H.

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by experimental evidence for mixed-valence correlations affecting the neutralization of strontium ions on gold surfaces, we set up an Anderson-Newns model for the Sr:Au system and calculate the neutralization probability α as a function of temperature. We employ quantum-kinetic equations for the projectile Green functions in the finite -U noncrossing approximation. Our results for α agree reasonably well with the experimental data as far as the overall order of magnitude is concerned, showing in particular the correlation-induced enhancement of α . The experimentally found nonmonotonous temperature dependence, however, could not be reproduced. Instead of an initially increasing and then decreasing α , we find over the whole temperature range only a weak negative temperature dependence. It arises, however, clearly from a mixed-valence resonance in the projectile's spectral density and thus supports qualitatively the interpretation of the experimental data in terms of a mixed-valence scenario.

  5. Silver Ions Direct Twin-Plane Formation during the Overgrowth of Single-Crystal Gold Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    It is commonly agreed that the crystalline structure of seeds dictates the crystallinity of final nanoparticles in a seeded-growth process. Although the formation of monocrystalline particles does require the use of single-crystal seeds, twin planes may stem from either single- or polycrystalline seeds. However, experimental control over twin-plane formation remains difficult to achieve synthetically. Here, we show that a careful interplay between kinetics and selective surface passivation offers a unique handle over the emergence of twin planes (in decahedra and triangles) during the growth over single-crystalline gold nanoparticles of quasi-spherical shape. Twinning can be suppressed under conditions of slow kinetics in the presence of silver ions, yielding single-crystalline particles with high-index facets. PMID:27656688

  6. Gold nanoparticles for the colorimetric and fluorescent detection of ions and small organic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dingbin; Wang, Zhuo; Jiang, Xingyu

    2011-04-01

    In recent years, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have drawn considerable research attention in the fields of catalysis, drug delivery, imaging, diagnostics, therapy and biosensors due to their unique optical and electronic properties. In this review, we summarized recent advances in the development of AuNP-based colorimetric and fluorescent assays for ions including cations (such as Hg2+, Cu2+, Pb2+, As3+, Ca2+, Al3+, etc) and anions (such as NO2-, CN-, PF6-, F-, I-, oxoanions), and small organic molecules (such as cysteine, homocysteine, trinitrotoluene, melamine and cocaine, ATP, glucose, dopamine and so forth). Many of these species adversely affect human health and the environment. Moreover, we paid particular attention to AuNP-based colorimetric and fluorescent assays in practical applications.

  7. STM characterization of DNA immobilized via Zr ion glue onto gold thiol SAMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourbeyram, S.; Shervedani, R. K.; Sabzyan, H.

    2013-10-01

    In this paper layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly of calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) onto gold-mercaptopropionic acid self-assembled monolayer via Zr(IV) ion glue, Au-MPA-Zr(IV)-ct-DNA SAM, is monitored by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) technique. The STM images of Au-MPA-Zr(IV) template show well-organized arrays of rod-like peaks. ct-DNA has been immobilized on the Au-MPA-Zr(IV) surface in hilly forms, implying globular structure for the immobilized ct-DNA. This immobilization strategy offers a simple and fast method to prepare the Au-MPA-Zr(IV)-ct-DNA template with promising applications for immobilization and study of the other compounds.

  8. Logical regulation of the enzyme-like activity of gold nanoparticles by using heavy metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lien, Chia-Wen; Chen, Ying-Chieh; Chang, Huan-Tsung; Huang, Chih-Ching

    2013-08-01

    In this study we employed self-deposition and competitive or synergistic interactions between metal ions and gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) to develop OR, AND, INHIBIT, and XOR logic gates through regulation of the enzyme-like activity of Au NPs. In the presence of various metal ions (Ag+, Bi3+, Pb2+, Pt4+, and Hg2+), we found that Au NPs (13 nm) exhibited peroxidase-, oxidase-, or catalase-like activity. After Ag+, Bi3+, or Pb2+ ions had been deposited on the Au NPs, the particles displayed strong peroxidase-like activity; on the other hand, they exhibited strong oxidase- and catalase-like activities after reactions with Ag+/Hg2+ and Hg2+/Bi3+ ions, respectively. The catalytic activities of these Au NPs arose mainly from the various oxidation states of the surface metal atoms/ions. Taking advantage of this behavior, we constructed multiplex logic operations--OR, AND, INHIBIT, and XOR logic gates--through regulation of the enzyme-like activity after the introduction of metal ions into the Au NP solution. When we deposited Hg2+ and/or Bi3+ ions onto the Au NPs, the catalase-like activities of the Au NPs were strongly enhanced (>100-fold). Therefore, we could construct an OR logic gate by using Hg2+/Bi3+ as inputs and the catalase-like activity of the Au NPs as the output. Likewise, we constructed an AND logic gate by using Pt4+ and Hg2+ as inputs and the oxidase-like activity of the Au NPs as the output; the co-deposition of Pt and Hg atoms/ions on the Au NPs was responsible for this oxidase-like activity. Competition between Pb2+ and Hg2+ ions for the Au NPs allowed us to develop an INHIBIT logic gate--using Pb2+ and Hg2+ as inputs and the peroxidase-like activity of the Au NPs as the output. Finally, regulation of the peroxidase-like activity of the Au NPs through the two inputs Ag+ and Bi3+ enabled us to construct an XOR logic gate.In this study we employed self-deposition and competitive or synergistic interactions between metal ions and gold nanoparticles (Au NPs

  9. Soft Landing of Mass-Selected Gold Clusters: Influence of Ion and Ligand on Charge Retention and Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Grant E.; Laskin, Julia

    2015-02-01

    Herein, we employ a combination of reduction synthesis in solution, soft landing of mass-selected precursor and product ions, and in situ time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) to examine the influence of ion and the length of diphosphine ligands on the charge retention and reactivity of ligated gold clusters deposited onto self-assembled monolayer surfaces (SAMs). Product ions (Au10L42+, (10,4)2+, L = 1,3-bis(diphenyl-phosphino)propane, DPPP) were prepared through in-source collision induced dissociation (CID) and precursor ions [(8,4)2+, L = 1,6-bis(diphenylphosphino)hexane, DPPH] were synthesized in solution for comparison to (11,5)3+ precursor ions ligated with DPPP investigated previously (ACS Nano 2012, 6, 573 and J. Phys. Chem. C. 2012, 116, 24977). Similar to (11,5)3+ precursor ions, the (10,4)2+ product ions are shown to retain charge on 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecanethiol monolayers (FSAMs). Additional abundant peaks at higher m/z indicative of reactivity are observed in the TOF-SIMS spectrum of (10,4)2+ product ions that are not seen for (11,5)3+ precursor ions. The abundance of (10,4)2+ on 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid (COOH-SAMs) is demonstrated to be lower than on FSAMs, consistent with partial reduction of charge. The (10,4)2+ product ion on 1-dodecanethiol (HSAMs) exhibits peaks similar to those seen on the COOH-SAM. On the HSAM, higher m/z peaks indicative of reactivity are observed similar to those on the FSAM. The (8,4)2+ DPPH precursor ions are shown to retain charge on FSAMs similar to (11,5)3+ precursor ions prepared with DPPP. An additional peak corresponding to attachment of one gold atom to (8,4)2+ is observed at higher m/z for DPPH-ligated clusters. On the COOH-SAM, (8,4)2+ is less abundant than on the FSAM consistent with partial neutralization. The results indicate that although retention of charge by product ions generated by CID is similar to precursor ions their reactivity during analysis with SIMS is different

  10. Preconcentration of gold ions from water samples by modified organo-nanoclay sorbent prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometry determination.

    PubMed

    Afzali, Daryoush; Mostafavi, Ali; Mirzaei, Mohammad

    2010-09-15

    In this work, the applicability of modified organo nanoclay as a new and easy prepared solid sorbent for the preconcentration of trace amounts of Au(III) ion from water samples is studied. The organo nanoclay was modified with 5-(4'-dimethylamino benzyliden)-rhodanine and used as a sorbent for separation of Au(III) ions. The sorption of gold ions was quantitative in the pH range of 2.0-6.0. Quantitative desorption occurred with 6.0 mL of 1.0 mol L(-1) Na(2)S(2)O(3). The amount of eluted Au(III) was measured using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. In the initial solution the linear dynamic range was in the range of 0.45 ng mL(-1) to 10.0 microg mL(-1), the detection limit was 0.1 ng mL(-1) and the preconcentration factor was 105. Also, the relative standard deviation was +/-2.3% (n=8 and C=2.0 microg mL(-1)) and the maximum capacity of the sorbent was 3.9 mg of Au(III) per gram of modified organo nanoclay. The influences of the experimental parameters including sample pH, eluent volume and eluent type, sample volume, and interference of some ions on the recoveries of the gold ion were investigated. The proposed method was applied for preconcentration and determination of gold in different samples.

  11. A novel electrode surface fabricated by directly attaching gold nanoparticles onto NH2+ ions implanted-indium tin oxide substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chenyao; Jiao, Jiao; Chen, Qunxia; Xia, Ji; Li, Shuoqi; Hu, Jingbo; Li, Qilong

    2010-12-01

    A new type of gold nanoparticle attached to a NH2+ ion implanted-indium tin oxide surface was fabricated without using peculiar binder molecules, such as 3-(aminopropyl)-trimethoxysilane. A NH 2/indium tin oxide film was obtained by implantation at an energy of 80 keV with a fluence of 5 × 10 15 ions/cm 2. The gold nanoparticle-modified film was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and electrochemical techniques and compared with a modified bare indium tin oxide surface and 3-(aminopropyl)-trimethoxysilane linked surface, which exhibited a relatively low electron transfer resistance and high electrocatalytic activity. The results demonstrate that NH2+ ion implanted-indium tin oxide films can provide an important route to immobilize nanoparticles, which is attractive in developing new biomaterials.

  12. Development of double-pulse lasers ablation system for generating gold ion source under applying an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, A. A. I.

    2015-12-01

    Double-pulse lasers ablation (DPLA) technique was developed to generate gold (Au) ion source and produce high current under applying an electric potential in an argon ambient gas environment. Two Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers operating at 1064 and 266 nm wavelengths are combined in an unconventional orthogonal (crossed-beam) double-pulse configuration with 45° angle to focus on a gold target along with a spectrometer for spectral analysis of gold plasma. The properties of gold plasma produced under double-pulse lasers excitation were studied. The velocity distribution function (VDF) of the emitted plasma was studied using a dedicated Faraday-cup ion probe (FCIP) under argon gas discharge. The experimental parameters were optimized to attain the best signal to noise (S/N) ratio. The results depicted that the VDF and current signals depend on the discharge applied voltage, laser intensity, laser wavelength and ambient argon gas pressure. A seven-fold increases in the current signal by increasing the discharge applied voltage and ion velocity under applying double-pulse lasers field. The plasma parameters (electron temperature and density) were also studied and their dependence on the delay (times between the excitation laser pulse and the opening of camera shutter) was investigated as well. This study could provide significant reference data for the optimization and design of DPLA systems engaged in laser induced plasma deposition thin films and facing components diagnostics.

  13. Sorption characteristics and chromatographic separation of gold (I and III) from silver and base metal ions using polyurethane foams.

    PubMed

    Farag, A B; Soliman, M H; Abdel-Rasoul, O S; el-Shahawi, M S

    2007-10-10

    The influence of different parameters on the sorption profiles of trace and ultra traces of gold (I) species from the aqueous cyanide media onto the solid sorbents ion exchange polyurethane foams (IEPUFs) and commercial unloaded polyurethane foams (PUFs) based polyether type has been investigated. The retention of gold (I) species onto the investigated solid sorbents followed a first-order rate equation with an overall rate constant k in the range 2.2-2.8+/-0.2 s(-1). The sorption data of gold (I) followed Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models. Thus, the a dual-mode of sorption mechanism involving absorption related to "weak base anion exchanger" and an added component for "surface adsorption" seems the most likely proposed dual mechanism for retention profile of gold (I) by the IEPUFs and PUFs solid sorbents. The capacity of the IEPUFs and PUFs towards gold (I) sorption calculated from the sorption isotherms was found to be 11.21+/-1.8 and 5.29+/-0.9 mg g(-1), respectively. The chromatographic separation of the spiked inorganic gold (I) from de ionized water at concentrations 5-15 microg mL(-1) onto the developed IEPUFs and PUFs packed columns at 10 mL min(-1) flow rate was successfully achieved. The retained gold (I) species were then recovered quantitatively from the IEPUFs (98.4+/-2.4%, n=5) and PUFs (95.4+/-3.4%, n=5) packed columns using perchloric acid (60 mL, 1.0 mol L(-1)) as a proper eluting agent. Thiourea (1.0 mol L(-1))-H2SO4 (0.1 mol L(-1)) system was also used as eluting agent for the recovery of gold (I) from IEPUFS (95.4+/-5.4%, n=3) and also PUFs (93.4+/-4.4%, n=3) packed columns. The performance of the IEPUFs and PUFs packed columns in terms of the height equivalent to the theoretical plates (HETP), number of plates (N), and critical and breakthrough capacities towards gold (I) species were evaluated. The developed IEPUFs packed column was applied successfully for complete retention and recovery (98.5+/-2.7) of gold (III) species spiked onto

  14. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy depth profiling and tribological characterization of ion-plated gold on various metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    For the case of ion-plated gold, the graded interface between gold and a nickel substrate and a nickel substrate, such tribological properties as friction and microhardness are examined by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis and depth profiling. Sliding was conducted against SiC pins in both the adhesive process, where friction arises from adhesion between sliding surfaces, and abrasion, in which friction is due to pin indentation and groove-plowing. Both types of friction are influenced by coating depth, but with opposite trends: the graded interface exhibited the highest adhesion, but the lowest abrasion. The coefficient of friction due to abrasion is inversely related to hardness. Graded interface microhardness values are found to be the highest, due to an alloying effect. There is almost no interface gradation between the vapor-deposited gold film and the substrate.

  15. Biosensors Based on Nano-Gold/Zeolite-Modified Ion Selective Field-Effect Transistors for Creatinine Detection.

    PubMed

    Ozansoy Kasap, Berna; Marchenko, Svitlana V; Soldatkin, Oleksandr O; Dzyadevych, Sergei V; Akata Kurc, Burcu

    2017-12-01

    The combination of advantages of using zeolites and gold nanoparticles were aimed to be used for the first time to improve the characteristic properties of ion selective field-effect transistor (ISFET)-based creatinine biosensors. The biosensors with covalently cross-linked creatinine deiminase using glutaraldehyde (GA) were used as a control group, and the effect of different types of zeolites on biosensor responses was investigated in detail by using silicalite, zeolite beta (BEA), nano-sized zeolite beta (Nano BEA) and zeolite BEA including gold nanoparticle (BEA-Gold). The presence of gold nanoparticles was investigated by ICP, STEM-EDX and XPS analysis. The chosen zeolite types allowed investigating the effect of aluminium in the zeolite framework, particle size and the presence of gold nanoparticles in the zeolitic framework.After the synthesis of different types of zeolites in powder form, bare biosensor surfaces were modified by drop-coating of zeolites and creatinine deiminase (CD) was adsorbed on this layer. The sensitivities of the obtained biosensors to 1 mM creatinine decreased in the order of BEA-Gold > BEA > Nano BEA > Silicalite > GA. The highest sensitivity belongs to BEA-Gold, having threefold increase compared to GA, which can be attributed to the presence of gold nanoparticle causing favourable microenvironment for CD to avoid denaturation as well as increased surface area. BEA zeolites, having aluminium in their framework, regardless of particle size, gave higher responses than silicalite, which has no aluminium in its structure. These results suggest that ISFET biosensor responses to creatinine can be tailored and enhanced upon carefully controlled alteration of zeolite parameters used to modify electrode surfaces.

  16. Interaction of gold nanoparticles mediated by captopril and S-nitrosocaptopril: the effect of manganese ions in mild acid medium.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Emilia; Prado-Gotor, Rafael

    2015-01-07

    We report herein results regarding reactivity and assembly of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) mediated by captopril (cap) and S-nitrosocaptopril (NOcap), two angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and antihypertensive agents. The results were compared with that of cysteine (Cys), a thiol-containing amino acid found in plasma. The interparticle interactions were characterized by monitoring the evolution of the surface plasmon resonance band using the spectrophotometric method. The original gold nanoparticles were efficiently modified by small amounts of Mn(+2) ions, which are adsorbed onto the surface of 15.4 nm citrate-capped gold nanoparticles, giving rise to manganese-gold nanoparticles (Mn-AuNPs) that, in mild acid medium, have proved to be highly sensitive and a rapid colorimetric detection method for thiols. Depending on the concentration of the Mn(+2) ions the aggregation of AuNPs can be rapidly induced. The kinetics of the assembly process has been studied. Good first-order kinetics has been observed, with the exception of captopril-mediated nanoparticle aggregation at low concentration of either cap or acid. The rate of Cys-mediated assembly of gold nanoparticles in aqueous 10 mM acetic acid is more than 20-times faster than pure AuNPs and concentrations of Cys as low as 34 nM can be detected in less than 40 min under conditions of stable Mn-AuNPs. Similar effects were observed with cap or NOcap. The assembly-disassembly reversibility is shown with cap and NOcap and depends highly on pH.

  17. Ion transport and electron transfer at self-assembled alkylthiol/gold monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boubour, Emmanuelle

    The electrical and electrochemical properties of self-assembled n-alkylthiol monolayers (SAMs) on gold are important if SAMs are to be used as molecular building blocks in biomimetic membranes and in micro- or nano-electronics. Ion transport and electron transfer at SAM/electrolyte interfaces are two important processes which have been characterized by cyclic voltammetry and a.c. impedance spectroscopy. Ion transport from an aqueous phase to the hydrophobic SAM region has been addressed by investigating the insulating properties of a wide variety of X(CH2)nS/Au SAMs (X = CH3, OH, CO2H and CF 3, and n = 7, 9, 11, 15). It was established that when the phase angle at a frequency characteristic of ion diffusion processes ( i.e. 1 Hz) is ≥88°, the SAM is defect-free and obeys the Helmholtz ideal capacitor model. However, when ϕ1HZ < 88°, the SAM is no longer an ionic insulator and ion/water penetration from the electrolyte into the SAM hydrophobic region is observed. The behavior of the phase angle with frequency was used to characterize the permeability of SAMs to electrolyte ions (K+, H2PO4 -, and HPO42-) as a function of the applied d.c. potential. A critical potential, Vc, was identified for each type of SAM corresponding to a transition from an insulating state to a more permeable state. When X = CH3, V c becomes more cathodic with increasing chainlength, i.e. Vc = -0.15 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) for n = 7, -0.25 V for n = 9, 11, and -0.35 V for n = 15. The SAM ionic permeability can also be modulated by maintaining n constant (15) and by varying the terminal group X. Vc is considerably more anodic for hydrophilic SAM/electrolyte interfaces (+0.25 V vs . Ag/AgCl for X = OH and + 0.15 V for X = CO2H) than for hydrophobic interfaces (-0.35 V for X = CH3). The kinetics of electron transfer at CH3(CH2)15CH3 SAMs have been investigated by a.c. impedance spectroscopy at various d.c. overpotentials with three redox couples, Ru(NH3)63+/2+, Fe(CN)63-/4-, and Co(bpy)3 3+/2+. Fits

  18. Colorimetric sensor array based on gold nanoparticles and amino acids for identification of toxic metal ions in water.

    PubMed

    Sener, Gulsu; Uzun, Lokman; Denizli, Adil

    2014-01-01

    A facile colorimetric sensor array for detection of multiple toxic heavy metal ions (Hg(2+), Cd(2+), Fe(3+), Pb(2+), Al(3+), Cu(2+), and Cr(3+)) in water is demonstrated using 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA)-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and five amino acids (lysine, cysteine, histidine, tyrosine, and arginine). The presence of amino acids (which have functional groups that can form complexes with metal ions and MUA) regulates the aggregation of MUA-capped particles; it can either enhance or diminish the particle aggregation. The combinatorial colorimetric response of all channels of the sensor array (i.e., color change in each of AuNP and amino acid couples) enables naked-eye discrimination of all of the metal ions tested in this study with excellent selectivity.

  19. Measurement of fragmentation cross sections of 12C ions on a thin gold target with the FIRST apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toppi, M.; Abou-Haidar, Z.; Agodi, C.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Aumann, T.; Balestra, F.; Battistoni, G.; Bocci, A.; Böhlen, T. T.; Boudard, A.; Brunetti, A.; Carpinelli, M.; Cirio, R.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cortes-Giraldo, M. A.; Cuttone, G.; de Napoli, M.; Durante, M.; Fernández-García, J. P.; Finck, Ch.; Golosio, B.; Iarocci, E.; Iazzi, F.; Ickert, G.; Introzzi, R.; Juliani, D.; Krimmer, J.; Kummali, A. H.; Kurz, N.; Labalme, M.; Leifels, Y.; Le Fèvre, A.; Leray, S.; Marchetto, F.; Monaco, V.; Morone, M. C.; Nicolosi, D.; Oliva, P.; Paoloni, A.; Piersanti, L.; Pleskac, R.; Randazzo, N.; Rescigno, R.; Romano, F.; Rossi, D.; Rosso, V.; Rousseau, M.; Sacchi, R.; Sala, P.; Salvador, S.; Sarti, A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schuy, C.; Sciubba, A.; Sfienti, C.; Simon, H.; Sipala, V.; Spiriti, E.; Tropea, S.; Vanstalle, M.; Younis, H.; Patera, V.; FIRST Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    A detailed knowledge of the light ions interaction processes with matter is of great interest in basic and applied physics. As an example, particle therapy and space radioprotection require highly accurate fragmentation cross-section measurements to develop shielding materials and estimate acute and late health risks for manned missions in space and for treatment planning in particle therapy. The Fragmentation of Ions Relevant for Space and Therapy experiment at the Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion research (GSI) was designed and built by an international collaboration from France, Germany, Italy, and Spain for studying the collisions of a 12C ion beam with thin targets. The collaboration's main purpose is to provide the double-differential cross-section measurement of carbon-ion fragmentation at energies that are relevant for both tumor therapy and space radiation protection applications. Fragmentation cross sections of light ions impinging on a wide range of thin targets are also essential to validate the nuclear models implemented in MC simulations that, in such an energy range, fail to reproduce the data with the required accuracy. This paper presents the single differential carbon-ion fragmentation cross sections on a thin gold target, measured as a function of the fragment angle and kinetic energy in the forward angular region (θ ≲6° ), aiming to provide useful data for the benchmarking of the simulation softwares used in light ions fragmentation applications. The 12C ions used in the measurement were accelerated at the energy of 400 MeV/nucleon by the SIS (heavy ion synchrotron) GSI facility.

  20. Nanoparticles for multi-modality cancer diagnosis: Simple protocol for self-assembly of gold nanoclusters mediated by gadolinium ions.

    PubMed

    Hou, Wenxiu; Xia, Fangfang; Alfranca, Gabriel; Yan, Hao; Zhi, Xiao; Liu, Yanlei; Peng, Chen; Zhang, Chunlei; de la Fuente, Jesus Martinez; Cui, Daxiang

    2017-03-01

    It is essential to develop a simple synthetic strategy to improve the quality of multifunctional contrast agents for cancer diagnosis. Herein, we report a time-saving method for gadolinium (Gd(3+)) ions-mediated self-assembly of gold nanoclusters (GNCs) into monodisperse spherical nanoparticles (GNCNs) under mild conditions. The monodisperse, regular and colloidal stable GNCNs were formed via selectively inducing electrostatic interactions between negatively-charged carboxylic groups of gold nanoclusters and trivalent cations of gadolinium in aqueous solution. In this way, the Gd(3+) ions were chelated into GNCNs without the use of molecular gadolinium chelates. With the co-existence of GNCs and Gd(3+) ions, the formed GNCNs exhibit significant luminescence intensity enhancement for near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging, high X-ray attenuation for computed tomography (CT) imaging and reasonable r1 relaxivity for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The excellent biocompatibility of the GNCNs was proved both in vitro and in vivo. Meanwhile, the GNCNs also possess unique NIRF/CT/MR imaging ability in A549 tumor-bearing mice. In a nutshell, the simple and safe GNCNs hold great potential for tumor multi-modality clinical diagnosis.

  1. Time-of-flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry and cyclic voltammetry studies of self-assembly of dodecanethiol on a nanoporous gold surface.

    PubMed

    Hafez, Aly M; Huber, Andreas; Wenclawiak, Bernd W

    2013-03-19

    Preparation of a nanoporous gold surface by dealloying (etching) of a 585 gold plate (58.5% Au, 30% Ag, and 11.5% non-noble metals) was studied by applying acidic and thermal treatment of the gold plate. The gold plate surface was studied before and after the etching process using different analytical techniques like field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analyzer (EDX), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and time-of-flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). CV analysis of the gold surface has shown that overnight etching with warm nitric acid increases the surface area 20 times higher than before etching. FE-SEM analysis has shown that a nanoporous gold surface with pore diameter ≤100 nm was obtained. SIMS depth profile analysis and EDX analysis have shown that the nanoporous gold surface was obtained as a result of removing the silver and copper from the first layers of the plate. The nanoporous gold surface was used as a substrate for self-assembly of dodecanethiol and has shown a higher extraction efficiency than the unetched gold alloy.

  2. Core-satellites assembly of silver nanoparticles on a single gold nanoparticle via metal ion-mediated complex.

    PubMed

    Choi, Inhee; Song, Hyeon Don; Lee, Suseung; Yang, Young In; Kang, Taewook; Yi, Jongheop

    2012-07-25

    We report core-satellites (Au-Ag) coupled plasmonic nanoassemblies based on bottom-up, high-density assembly of molecular-scale silver nanoparticles on a single gold nanoparticle surface, and demonstrate direct observation and quantification of enhanced plasmon coupling (i.e., intensity amplification and apparent spectra shift) in a single particle level. We also explore metal ion sensing capability based on our coupled plasmonic core-satellites, which enabled at least 1000 times better detection limit as compared to that of a single plasmonic nanoparticle. Our results demonstrate and suggest substantial promise for the development of coupled plasmonic nanostructures for ultrasensitive detection of various biological and chemical analytes.

  3. Derivation of guideline values for gold (III) ion toxicity limits to protect aquatic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sun-Hwa; Lee, Woo-Mi; Shin, Yu-Jin; Yoon, Sung-Ji; Kim, Shin Woong; Kwak, Jin Il; An, Youn-Joo

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on estimating the toxicity values of various aquatic organisms exposed to gold (III) ion (Au(3+)), and to propose maximum guideline values for Au(3+) toxicity that protect the aquatic ecosystem. A comparative assessment of methods developed in Australia and New Zealand versus the European Community (EC) was conducted. The test species used in this study included two bacteria (Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis), one alga (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata), one euglena (Euglena gracilis), three cladocerans (Daphnia magna, Moina macrocopa, and Simocephalus mixtus), and two fish (Danio rerio and Oryzias latipes). Au(3+) induced growth inhibition, mortality, immobilization, and/or developmental malformations in all test species, with responses being concentration-dependent. According to the moderate reliability method of Australia and New Zealand, 0.006 and 0.075 mg/L of guideline values for Au(3+) were obtained by dividing 0.33 and 4.46 mg/L of HC5 and HC50 species sensitivity distributions (SSD) with an FACR (Final Acute to Chronic Ratio) of 59.09. In contrast, the EC method uses an assessment factor (AF), with the 0.0006 mg/L guideline value for Au(3+) being divided with the 48-h EC50 value for 0.60 mg/L (the lowest toxicity value obtained from short term results) by an AF of 1000. The Au(3+) guideline value derived using an AF was more stringent than the SSD. We recommend that more toxicity data using various bioassays are required to develop more accurate ecological risk assessments. More chronic/long-term exposure studies on sensitive endpoints using additional fish species and invertebrates not included in the current dataset will be needed to use other derivation methods (e.g., US EPA and Canadian Type A) or the "High Reliability Method" from Australia/New Zealand. Such research would facilitate the establishment of guideline values for various pollutants that reflect the universal effects of various pollutants in aquatic ecosystems. To

  4. Activation of oxygen-mediating pathway using copper ions: fine-tuning of growth kinetics in gold nanorod overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenqi; Zhang, Hui; Wen, Tao; Yan, Jiao; Hou, Shuai; Shi, Xiaowei; Hu, Zhijian; Ji, Yinglu; Wu, Xiaochun

    2014-10-21

    Growth kinetics plays an important role in the shape control of nanocrystals (NCs). Herein, we presented a unique way to fine-tune the growth kinetics via oxidative etching activated by copper ions. For the overgrowth of gold nanorods (Au NRs), competitive adsorption of dissolved oxygen on rod surface was found to slow down the overgrowth rate. Copper ions were able to remove the adsorbed oxygen species from the Au surface via oxidative etching, thus exposing more reaction sites for Au deposition. In this way, copper ions facilitated the overgrowth process. Furthermore, Cu(2+) rather than Cu(+) acted as the catalyst for the oxidative etching. Comparative study with Ag(+) indicated that Cu(2+) cannot regulate NC shapes via an underpotential deposition mechanism. In contrast, Ag(+) led to the formation of Au tetrahexahedra (THH) and a slight decrease of the growth rate at similar growth conditions. Combining the distinct roles of the two ions enabled elongated THH to be produced. Copper ions activating the O2 pathway suggested that dissolved oxygen has a strong affinity for the Au surface. Moreover, the results of NC-sensitized singlet oxygen ((1)O2) indicated that the absorbed oxygen species on the surface of Au NCs bounded with low-index facets mainly existed in the form of molecular O2.

  5. Aspheric Solute Ions Modulate Gold Nanoparticle Interactions in an Aqueous Solution: An Optimal Way to Reversibly Concentrate Functionalized Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Oscar D; Chen, Liao Y; Whetten, Robert L; Demeler, Borries

    2015-01-01

    Nanometer-sized gold particles (AuNPs) are of peculiar interest because their behaviors in an aqueous solution are sensitive to changes in environmental factors including the size and shape of the solute ions. In order to determine these important characteristics, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations on the icosahedral Au144 nanoparticles each coated with a homogeneous set of 60 thiolates (4-mercapto-benzoate, pMBA) in eight aqueous solutions having ions of varying sizes and shapes (Na+, K+, tetramethylamonium cation TMA+, trisamonium cation TRS+, Cl−, and OH−). For each solution, we computed the reversible work (potential of mean of force) to bring two nanoparticles together as a function of their separation distance. We found that the behavior of pMBA protected Au144 nanoparticles can be readily modulated by tuning their aqueous environmental factors (pH and solute ion combinations). We examined the atomistic details on how the sizes and shapes of solute ions quantitatively factor in the definitive characteristics of nanoparticle-environment and nanoparticle-nanoparticle interactions. We predict that tuning the concentrations of non-spherical composite ions such as TRS+ in an aqueous solution of AuNPs be an effective means to modulate the aggregation propensity desired in biomedical and other applications of small charged nanoparticles. PMID:26581232

  6. Aspheric Solute Ions Modulate Gold Nanoparticle Interactions in an Aqueous Solution: An Optimal Way To Reversibly Concentrate Functionalized Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Oscar D; Chen, Liao Y; Whetten, Robert L; Demeler, Borries

    2015-12-17

    Nanometer-sized gold particles (AuNPs) are of peculiar interest because their behaviors in an aqueous solution are sensitive to changes in environmental factors including the size and shape of the solute ions. In order to determine these important characteristics, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations on the icosahedral Au144 nanoparticles each coated with a homogeneous set of 60 thiolates (4-mercaptobenzoate, pMBA) in eight aqueous solutions having ions of varying sizes and shapes (Na(+), K(+), tetramethylamonium cation TMA(+), tris-ammonium cation TRS(+), Cl(-), and OH(-)). For each solution, we computed the reversible work (potential of mean of force) to bring two nanoparticles together as a function of their separation distance. We found that the behavior of pMBA protected Au144 nanoparticles can be readily modulated by tuning their aqueous environmental factors (pH and solute ion combinations). We examined the atomistic details on how the sizes and shapes of solute ions quantitatively factor in the definitive characteristics of nanoparticle-environment and nanoparticle-nanoparticle interactions. We predict that tuning the concentrations of nonspherical composite ions such as TRS(+) in an aqueous solution of AuNPs be an effective means to modulate the aggregation propensity desired in biomedical and other applications of small charged nanoparticles.

  7. Colorimetric Signal Amplification Assay for Mercury Ions Based on the Catalysis of Gold Amalgam.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhengbo; Zhang, Chenmeng; Gao, Qinggang; Wang, Guo; Tan, Lulu; Liao, Qing

    2015-11-03

    Mercury is a major threat to the environment and to human health. It is highly desirable to develop a user-friendly kit for on-site mercury detection. Such a method must be able to detect mercury below the threshold levels (10 nM) for drinking water defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Herein, we for the first time reported catalytically active gold amalgam-based reaction between 4-nitrophenol and NaBH4 with colorimetric sensing function. We take advantage of the correlation between the catalytic properties and the surface area of gold amalgam, which is proportional to the amount of the gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-bound Hg(2+). As the concentration of Hg(2+) increases until the saturation of Hg onto the AuNPs, the catalytic performance of the gold amalgam is much stronger due to the formation of gold amalgam and the increase of the nanoparticle surface area, leading to the decrease of the reduction time of 4-nitrophenol for the color change. This sensing system exhibits excellent selectivity and ultrahigh sensitivity up to the 1.45 nM detection limit. The practical use of this system for Hg(2+) determination in tap water samples is also demonstrated successfully.

  8. Coverage Dependent Charge Reduction of Cationic Gold Clusters on Surfaces Prepared Using Soft Landing of Mass-selected Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Grant E.; Priest, Thomas A.; Laskin, Julia

    2012-11-29

    The ionic charge state of monodisperse cationic gold clusters on surfaces may be controlled by selecting the coverage of mass-selected ions soft landed onto a substrate. Polydisperse diphosphine-capped gold clusters were synthesized in solution by reduction of chloro(triphenylphosphine)gold(I) with borane tert-butylamine in the presence of 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane. The polydisperse gold clusters were introduced into the gas phase by electrospray ionization and mass selection was employed to select a multiply charged cationic cluster species (Au11L53+, m/z = 1409, L = 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane) which was delivered to the surfaces of four different self-assembled monolayers on gold (SAMs) at coverages of 1011 and 1012 clusters/mm2. Employing the spatial profiling capabilities of in-situ time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) it is shown that, in addition to the chemical functionality of the monolayer (as demonstrated previously: ACS Nano, 2012, 6, 573) the coverage of cationic gold clusters on the surface may be used to control the distribution of ionic charge states of the soft-landed multiply charged clusters. In the case of a 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecanethiol SAM (FSAM) almost complete retention of charge by the deposited Au11L53+ clusters was observed at a lower coverage of 1011 clusters/mm2. In contrast, at a higher coverage of 1012 clusters/mm2, pronounced reduction of charge to Au11L52+ and Au11L5+ was observed on the FSAM. When soft landed onto 16- and 11-mercaptohexadecanoic acid surfaces on gold (16,11-COOH-SAMs), the mass-selected Au11L53+ clusters exhibited partial reduction of charge to Au11L52+ at lower coverage and additional reduction of charge to both Au11L52+ and Au11L5+ at higher coverage. The reduction of charge was found to be more pronounced on the surface of the shorter (thinner) C11 than the longer (thicker) C16-COOH-SAM. On the surface of the 1-dodecanethiol (HSAM) monolayer, the most abundant charge state

  9. Gold nano-particle formation from crystalline AuCN: Comparison of thermal, plasma- and ion-beam activated decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Mihály T.; Bertóti, Imre; Mohai, Miklós; Németh, Péter; Jakab, Emma; Szabó, László; Szépvölgyi, János

    2017-02-01

    In this work, in addition to the conventional thermal process, two non-conventional ways, the plasma and ion beam activations are described for preparing gold nanoparticles from microcrystalline AuCN precursor. The phase formation at plasma and ion beam treatments was compared with that at thermal treatments and the products and transformations were characterized by thermogravimetry-mass-spectrometry (TG-MS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TG-MS measurements in Ar atmosphere revealed that AuCN decomposition starts at 400 °C and completes at ≈700 °C with evolution of gaseous (CN)2. XPS and TEM show that in heat treatment at 450 °C for 1 h in Ar, loss of nitrogen and carbon occurs and small, 5-30 nm gold particles forms. Heating at 450 °C for 10 h in sealed ampoule, much larger, 60-200 nm size and well faceted Au particles develop together with a fibrous (CN)n polymer phase, and the Au crystallites are covered by a 3-5 nm thick polymer shell. Low pressure Ar plasma treatment at 300 eV energy results in 4-20 nm size Au particles and removes most of the nitrogen and part of carbon. During Ar+ ion bombardment with 2500 eV energy, 5-30 nm size Au crystallites form already in 10 min, with preferential loss of nitrogen and with increased amount of carbon residue. The results suggest that plasma and ion beam activation, acting similarly to thermal treatment, may be used to prepare Au nanoparticles from AuCN on selected surface areas either by depositing AuCN precursors on selected regions or by focusing the applied ionized radiation. Thus they may offer alternative ways for preparing tailor-made catalysts, electronic devices and sensors for different applications.

  10. Colloidal gold nanoparticle probe-based immunochromatographic assay for the rapid detection of chromium ions in water and serum samples

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xi; Xiang, Jun-Jian; Tang, Yong; Zhang, Xiao-Li; Fu, Qiang-Qiang; Zou, Jun-Hui; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-09-01

    An immunochromatographic assay (ICA) using gold nanoparticles coated with monoclonal antibody (McAb) for the detection of chromium ions (Cr) in water and serum samples was developed, optimized, and validated. Gold nanoparticles coated with affinity- purified monoclonal antibodies against isothiocyanobenzyl-EDTA (iEDTA)-chelated Cr3+ were used as the detecting reagent in this completive immunoassay-based one- step test strip. The ICA was investigated to measure chromium speciation in water samples. Chromium standard samples of 0-80 ng/mL in water were determined by the test strips. The results showed that the visual lowest detection limit (LDL) of the test strip was 50.0 ng/mL. A portable colorimetric lateral flow reader was used for the quantification of Cr. The results indicated that the linear range of the ICA with colorimetric detection was 5-80 ng/mL. The ICA was also validated for the detection of chromium ions in serum samples. The test trips showed high stability in that they could be stored at at 37 C for at least 12 weeks without significant loss of activity. The test strip also showed good selectivity for Cr detection with negligible interference from other heavy metals. Because of its low cost and short testing time (within 5 min), the test strip is especially suitable for on-site large- scale screening of Cr-polluted water samples, biomonitoring of Cr exposure, and many other field applications.

  11. Terbium ion-coordinated carbon dots for fluorescent aptasensing of adenosine 5'-triphosphate with unmodified gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mingdi; Gao, Zhuangqiang; Zhou, Qian; Lin, Youxiu; Lu, Minghua; Tang, Dianping

    2016-12-15

    This work reports on a novel time-resolved fluorescent aptasensing platform for the quantitative monitoring of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) by interaction of dispersive/agglomerate gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with terbium ion-coordinated carbon dots (Tb-CDs). To construct such a fluorescent nanoprobe, Tb-CDs with high-efficient fluorescent intensity are first synthesized by the microwave method with terbium ions (Tb(3+)). The aptasensing system consists of ATP aptamer, AuNP and Tb-CD. The dispersive/agglomerate gold nanoparticles are acquired through the reaction of the aptamer with target ATP. Upon target ATP introduction, the aptamers bind with the analytes to form new aptamer-ATP complexes and coat on the surface of AuNPs to inhibit their aggregation in the high salt solution. In this case, the fluorescent signal of Tb-CDs is quenched by the dispersive AuNPs on the basis of the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). At the absence of target analyte, gold nanoparticles tend to aggregate in the high salt state even if the aptamers are present. Thus, the added Tb-CDs maintain their intrinsic fluorescent intensity. Experimental results indicated that the aptasensing system exhibited good fluorescent responses toward ATP in the dynamic range from 40nM to 4.0μM with a detection limit of 8.5nM at 3sblank criterion. The repeatability and intermediate precision is less than 9.5% at three concentrations including 0.04, 0.4 and 2.0μM ATP. The selectivity was acceptable toward guanosine 5'-triphosphate, uridine 5'-triphosphate and cytidine 5'-triphosphate. The methodology was applied to evaluate the blank human serum spiked with target ATP, and the recoveries (at 3 concentration levels) ranged between 97.0% and 103.7%. Importantly, this detection scheme is rapid, simple, cost-effective, and does not require extensive sample preparation or separation.

  12. Detection of Copper(II) Ions Using Glycine on Hydrazine-Adsorbed Gold Nanoparticles via Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Nguyễn Hoàng; Seo, Chulhun; Joo, Sang-Woo

    2016-01-01

    A facile, selective, and sensitive detection method for the Cu2+ ions in environmental and biological solutions has been newly developed by observing the unique CN stretching peaks at ~2108 cm−1 upon the dissociative adsorption of glycine (GLY) in hydrazine buffer on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The relative abundance of Cu species on AuNPs was identified from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. UV-Vis spectra also indicated that the Au particles aggregated to result in the color change owing to the destabilization induced by the GLY-Cu2+ complex. The CN stretching band at ~2108 cm−1 could be observed to indicate the formation of the CN species from GLY on the hydrazine-covered AuNP surfaces. The other ions of Fe3+, Fe2+, Hg2+, Mg2+, Mn2+, Ni2+, Zn2+, Cr3+, Co2+, Cd2+, Pb2+, Ca2+, NH4+, Na+, and K+ at high concentrations of 50 µM did not produce such spectral changes. The detection limit based on the CN band for the determination of the Cu2+ ion could be estimated to be as low as 500 nM in distilled water and 1 µM in river water, respectively. We attempted to apply our method to estimate intracellular ion detection in cancer cells for more practical purposes. PMID:27792178

  13. High-Resolution 3D Imaging and Quantification of Gold Nanoparticles in a Whole Cell Using Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao; Chen, Ce-Belle; Udalagama, Chammika N.B.; Ren, Minqin; Fong, Kah Ee; Yung, Lin Yue Lanry; Giorgia, Pastorin; Bettiol, Andrew Anthony; Watt, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Increasing interest in the use of nanoparticles (NPs) to elucidate the function of nanometer-sized assemblies of macromolecules and organelles within cells, and to develop biomedical applications such as drug delivery, labeling, diagnostic sensing, and heat treatment of cancer cells has prompted investigations into novel techniques that can image NPs within whole cells and tissue at high resolution. Using fast ions focused to nanodimensions, we show that gold NPs (AuNPs) inside whole cells can be imaged at high resolution, and the precise location of the particles and the number of particles can be quantified. High-resolution density information of the cell can be generated using scanning transmission ion microscopy, enhanced contrast for AuNPs can be achieved using forward scattering transmission ion microscopy, and depth information can be generated from elastically backscattered ions (Rutherford backscattering spectrometry). These techniques and associated instrumentation are at an early stage of technical development, but we believe there are no physical constraints that will prevent whole-cell three-dimensional imaging at <10 nm resolution. PMID:23561518

  14. Gold nanoparticles decorated on cobalt porphyrin-modified glassy carbon electrode for the sensitive determination of nitrite ion.

    PubMed

    Muthukumar, Palanisamy; Abraham John, S

    2014-05-01

    The present study reports the electrochemical determination of nitrite ion using citrate-gold nanoparticles (cit-AuNPs) decorated on meso-tetra(para-aminophenyl)porphyrinatocobalt(II) (Co(II)MTpAP) self-assembled glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The decoration of cit-AuNPs on Co(II)MTpAP was achieved with the aid of amine groups present on the surface of the self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of Co(II)MTpAP. The SEM image shows that the cit-AuNPs were densely packed on Co(II)MTpAP. The AuNPs decorated electrode was successfully used for the determination of nitrite ion. The cit-AuNPs decorated electrode not only shifted nitrite ion oxidation potential towards less positive potential but also greatly enhanced its current when compared to bare and Co(II)MTpAP SAM modified electrodes. The amperometric current increases linearly while increasing the concentration of nitrite ion ranging from 0.5×10(-6) to 4.7×10(-3) M and the detection limit was found to be 60 nM (S/N=3). Further, the modified electrode was successfully used to determine nitrite ion in the presence of 200-fold excess of common interferents such as Na+, NO3-, I-, K+, CO3(2-), Ca2+, SO4(2-), NH4+, Cl- and glucose. The practical application of the cit-AuNPs decorated electrode was demonstrated by determining nitrite ion in water samples.

  15. Simultaneous ejection of two molecular ions from keV gold atomic and polyatomic projectile impacts.

    PubMed

    Rickman, R D; Verkhoturov, S V; Parilis, E S; Schweikert, E A

    2004-01-30

    We present the first experimental data on the simultaneous ejection of two molecular ions from the impact of Au(+)(n) (1< or =n< or =4) with energies ranging between 17 and 56 keV. The yields from single phenylalanine (Ph) emission, coemission of two Ph ions, and emission of the Ph dimer were measured. Large increases (1 to 2 orders of magnitude) in coemitted ion yields were observed with increasing projectile energy and complexity. Correlation coefficients were calculated for the coemission of two Ph ions; their behavior suggests differences in emission pathways for bombardment by atomic and polyatomic projectiles.

  16. The XPS depth profiling and tribological characterization of ion-plated gold on various metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    Friction properties were measured with a gold film; the graded interface between gold and nickel substrate; and the nickel substrate. All sliding was conducted against hard silicon carbide pins in two processes. In the adhesive process, friction arises primarily from adhesion between sliding surfaces. In the abrasion process, friction occurs as a result of the hard pin sliding against the film, indenting into it, and plowing a series of grooves. Copper and 440 C stainless steel substrates were also used. Results indicate that the friction related to both adhesion and abrasion is influenced by coating depth. The trends in friction behavior as a function of film depth are, however, just the opposite. The graded interface exhibited the highest adhesion and friction, while the graded interface resulted in the lowest abrasion and friction. The coefficient of friction due to abrasion is inversely related to the hardness. The greater the hardness of the surface, the lower is the abrasion and friction. The microhardness in the graded interface exhibited the highest hardness due to an alloy hardening effect. Almost no graded interface between the vapor-deposited gold film and the substrates was detected.

  17. EQCM Measurements: Redox-Induced Changes in Solvent and Ion Content in Anchored Redox Monolayers of Organosulfur Compounds and Their Electrocatalysis on Gold Electrodes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    EQCM Mwasurements: Redox-Induced Changes in Solvent and M0 Content in Anchored Redox Monolayers of Organosulfur CD Compounds and their Electrocatalysis ...REDOX-INDUCED CHANGES IN SOLVENT AND ION CONTENT IN ANCHORED REDOX MONOLAYERS OF ORGANOSULFUR COMPOUNDS AND THEIR ELECTROCATALYSIS ON GOLD...Measurements: Redox-Induced Changes in Solvent and Ion Content in Anchored Redox Monolayers of Organosulfur Compounds and their Electrocatalysis on

  18. Tailored SERS substrates obtained with cathodic arc plasma ion implantation of gold nanoparticles into a polymer matrix.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Jacqueline; Teixeira, Fernanda S; Zanatta, Antonio R; Salvadori, Maria C; Gordon, Reuven; Oliveira, Osvaldo N

    2012-02-14

    This manuscript reports on the fabrication of plasmonic substrates using cathodic arc plasma ion implantation, in addition to their performance as SERS substrates. The technique allows for the incorporation of a wide layer of metallic nanoparticles into a polymer matrix, such as PMMA. The ability to pattern different structures using the PMMA matrix is one of the main advantages of the fabrication method. This opens up new possibilities for obtaining tailored substrates with enhanced performance for SERS and other surface-enhanced spectroscopies, as well as for exploring the basic physics of patterned metal nanostructures. The architecture of the SERS-active substrate was varied using three adsorption strategies for incorporating a laser dye (rhodamine): alongside the nanoparticles into the polymer matrix, during the polymer cure and within nanoholes lithographed on the polymer. As a proof-of-concept, we obtained the SERS spectra of rhodamine for the three types of substrates. The hypothesis of incorporation of rhodamine molecules into the polymer matrix during the cathodic arc plasma ion implantation was supported by FDTD (Finite-Difference Time-Domain) simulations. In the case of arrays of nanoholes, rhodamine molecules could be adsorbed directly on the gold surface, then yielding a well-resolved SERS spectrum for a small amount of analyte owing to the short-range interactions and the large longitudinal field component inside the nanoholes. The results shown here demonstrate that the approach based on ion implantation can be adapted to produce reproducible tailored substrates for SERS and other surface-enhanced spectroscopies.

  19. A sensitive and selective colorimetric method for detection of copper ions based on anti-aggregation of unmodified gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hormozi-Nezhad, M Reza; Abbasi-Moayed, Samira

    2014-11-01

    A highly sensitive and selective colorimetric method for detection of copper ions, based on anti-aggregation of D-penicillamine (D-PC) induced aggregated gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was developed. Copper ions can hinder the aggregation of AuNPs induced by D-PC, through formation of mixed-valence complex with D-PC that is a selective copper chelator. In the presence of a fixed amount of D-PC, the aggregation of AuNPs decreases with increasing concentrations of Cu(2+) along with a color change from blue to red in AuNPs solution and an increase in the absorption ratio (A520/A650). Under the optimum experimental conditions (pH 7, [AuNPs] =3.0 nmol L(-1) and [NaCl]=25 mmol L(-1)), a linear calibration curve for Cu(2+) was obtained within the range of 0.05-1.85 µmol L(-1) with a limit of detection (3Sb) of 30 nmol L(-1). Excellent selectivity toward Cu(2+) was observed among various metal ions due to a specific complex formation between Cu(2+) and D-PC. The proposed method has been successfully applied for the detection of Cu(2+) in various real samples.

  20. Synthesis of nanocrystalline thin films of gold on the surface of GaSb by swift heavy ion

    SciTech Connect

    Jadhav, Vidya; Dubey, S. K.; Yadav, A. D.; Singh, A.

    2013-02-05

    Thin films of gold ({approx}100 nm thick) were deposited on p-type GaSb substrates. These samples were irradiated with 100 MeV Fe{sup 7+}ions for the fluence of 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} and 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} ions cm{sup -2}. After irradiation, samples were characterized using AFM, UV-VIS -NIR, X-Ray Diffraction techniques. AFM studies showed the presence of clusters on the surface of GaSb. R.M.S. roughness of the sample was found to increase w.r.t ion fluence. Absorption coefficient obtained from the Ultra violet - Visible NIR (UV-VIS -NIR) spectra of the samples irradiated with various fluences compared with non irradiated GaSb. The annealing experiment showed a significant improvement in the absorption coefficient after rapid thermal annealing at temperature of 400 Degree-Sign C. X-Ray Diffraction study reveals different orientations of Au film.

  1. A colorimetric probe based on desensitized ionene-stabilized gold nanoparticles for single-step test for sulfate ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipova, Viktoriya V.; Apyari, Vladimir V.; Dmitrienko, Stanislava G.

    2015-03-01

    Desensitized ionene-stabilized gold nanoparticles have been prepared and applied as a colorimetric probe for the single-step test for sulfate ions at the relatively high concentration level. The approach is based on aggregation of the nanoparticles leading to the change in absorption spectra and color of the solution. These nanoparticles are characterized by the decreased sensitivity due to both electrostatic and steric stabilization, which allows for simple, and rapid direct single-step determination of sulfate at the relatively high concentration level in real water samples without sample pretreatment or dilution. Influence of different factors (the time of interaction, pH, the concentrations of sulfate ions and the nanoparticles) on the aggregation and analytical performance of the procedure was investigated. The method allows for the determination of sulfate ions in the mass range of 0.2-0.4 mg with RSD of 5% from the sample volume of less than 2 mL. It has a sharp dependence of the colorimetric response on the concentration of sulfate, which makes it prospective for indicating deviations of the sulfate concentration regarding some declared value chosen within the above range. The time of the analysis is 2 min. The method was applied to the analysis of mineral water samples.

  2. Simple Colorimetric Detection of Amyloid β-peptide (1-40) based on Aggregation of Gold Nanoparticles in the Presence of Copper Ions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yanli; Dong, Hui; Liu, Lantao; Xu, Maotian

    2015-05-13

    A simple method for specific colorimetric sensing of Alzheimer's disease related amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) is developed based on the aggregation of gold nanoparticles in the presence of copper ion. The detection of limit for Aβ(1-40) is 0.6 nM and the promising results from practical samples (human serum) indicate the great potential for the routine detection.

  3. Chemically modified cellulose strips with pyridoxal conjugated red fluorescent gold nanoclusters for nanomolar detection of mercuric ions.

    PubMed

    Bothra, Shilpa; Upadhyay, Yachana; Kumar, Rajender; Ashok Kumar, S K; Sahoo, Suban K

    2017-04-15

    One-pot approach was adopted for the synthesis of highly luminescent near-infrared (NIR)-emitting gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a protecting agent. The vitamin B6 cofactor pyridoxal was conjugated with the luminescent BSA-AuNCs through the free amines of BSA and then employed for the nanomolar detection of Hg(2+) in aqueous medium via selective fluorescence quenching of AuNCs. This nano-assembly was successfully applied for the real sample analysis of Hg(2+) in fish, tap water and river water. The study also presents chemically-modified cellulosic paper strips with the pyridoxal conjugated BSA-AuNCs for detecting Hg(2+) ion up to 1nM.

  4. UV-Visible Spectroscopy Detection of Iron(III) Ion on Modified Gold Nanoparticles With a Hydroxamic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami, C.; Alizadeh, A.; Taher, M. A.; Hamidi, Z.; Bahrami, B.

    2016-09-01

    The present work describes the preparation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) functionalized with hydroxamic acid and the use of them in UV-visible spectroscopy detection of iron(III) ions. The prepared AuNPs were thoroughly characterized by using UV-visible spectroscopy, TEM, and 1H NMR techniques. The newly synthesized hydroxamic acid-AuNPs are brown in color due to the intense surface plasmon absorption band centered at 527 nm. In the presence of Fe(III), the surface plasmon absorption band is centered at 540 nm. However, the sensitivity of hydroxamic acid-AuNPs towards other metal ions such as Mg(II), Ca(II), Ag(I), Cu(II), Mn(II), Cr(II), Ni(II), Co(II),Fe(II), Hg(II), and Pb(II) can be negligible. This highly selective sensor allows a direct quantitative assay of Fe(III) with a UVvisible spectroscopy detection limited to 45.8 nM.

  5. Differential hERG ion channel activity of ultrasmall gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Leifert, Annika; Pan, Yu; Kinkeldey, Anne; Schiefer, Frank; Setzler, Julia; Scheel, Olaf; Lichtenbeld, Hera; Schmid, Günter; Wenzel, Wolfgang; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi; Simon, Ulrich

    2013-05-14

    Understanding the mechanism of toxicity of nanomaterials remains a challenge with respect to both mechanisms involved and product regulation. Here we show toxicity of ultrasmall gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Depending on the ligand chemistry, 1.4-nm-diameter AuNPs failed electrophysiology-based safety testing using human embryonic kidney cell line 293 cells expressing human ether-á-go-go-Related gene (hERG), a Food and Drug Administration-established drug safety test. In patch-clamp experiments, phosphine-stabilized AuNPs irreversibly blocked hERG channels, whereas thiol-stabilized AuNPs of similar size had no effect in vitro, and neither particle blocked the channel in vivo. We conclude that safety regulations may need to be reevaluated and adapted to reflect the fact that the binding modality of surface functional groups becomes a relevant parameter for the design of nanoscale bioactive compounds.

  6. Differential hERG ion channel activity of ultrasmall gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Leifert, Annika; Pan, Yu; Kinkeldey, Anne; Schiefer, Frank; Setzler, Julia; Scheel, Olaf; Lichtenbeld, Hera; Schmid, Günter; Wenzel, Wolfgang; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi; Simon, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism of toxicity of nanomaterials remains a challenge with respect to both mechanisms involved and product regulation. Here we show toxicity of ultrasmall gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Depending on the ligand chemistry, 1.4-nm-diameter AuNPs failed electrophysiology-based safety testing using human embryonic kidney cell line 293 cells expressing human ether-á-go-go-Related gene (hERG), a Food and Drug Administration-established drug safety test. In patch-clamp experiments, phosphine-stabilized AuNPs irreversibly blocked hERG channels, whereas thiol-stabilized AuNPs of similar size had no effect in vitro, and neither particle blocked the channel in vivo. We conclude that safety regulations may need to be reevaluated and adapted to reflect the fact that the binding modality of surface functional groups becomes a relevant parameter for the design of nanoscale bioactive compounds. PMID:23630249

  7. Ion-shaping of embedded gold hollow nanoshells into vertically aligned prolate morphologies

    PubMed Central

    Coulon, Pierre-Eugéne; Amici, Julia; Clochard, Marie-Claude; Khomenkov, Vladimir; Dufour, Christian; Monnet, Isabelle; Grygiel, Clara; Perruchas, Sandrine; Ulysse, Christian; Largeau, Ludovic; Rizza, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    Ion beam shaping is a novel technique with which one can shape nano-structures that are embedded in a matrix, while simultaneously imposing their orientation in space. In this work, we demonstrate that the ion-shaping technique can be implemented successfully to engineer the morphology of hollow metallic spherical particles embedded within a silica matrix. The outer diameter of these particles ranges between 20 and 60 nm and their shell thickness between 3 and 14 nm. Samples have been irradiated with 74 MeV Kr ions at room temperature and for increasing fluences up to 3.8 × 1014 cm−2. In parallel, the experimental results have been theoretically simulated by using a three-dimensional code based on the thermal-spike model. These calculations show that the particles undergo a partial melting during the ion impact, and that the amount of molten phase is maximal when the impact is off-center, hitting only one hemisphere of the hollow nano-particle. We suggest a deformation scenario which differs from the one that is generally proposed for solid nano-particles. Finally, these functional materials can be seen as building blocks for the fabrication of nanodevices with really three-dimensional architecture. PMID:26883992

  8. A simple "clickable" biosensor for colorimetric detection of copper(II) ions based on unmodified gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qinpeng; Li, Wenhua; Tang, Shiyun; Hu, Yufang; Nie, Zhou; Huang, Yan; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2013-03-15

    A novel colorimetric copper(II) biosensor has been developed based on the high specificity of alkyne-azide click reaction to the catalysis of copper ions and unmodified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as the signal reporter. The clickable DNA probe consists of two parts: an azide group-modified double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) hybrid with an elongated tail and a short alkyne-modified single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). Because of low melting temperature of the short ssDNA, these two parts are separated in the absence of Cu(2+). Copper ion-induced azide-alkyne click ligation caused a structural change of probe from the separated form to entire dsDNA form. This structural change of probe can be monitored by the unmodified AuNPs via mediating their aggregation with a red-to-blue colorimetric read-out because of the differential ability of ssDNA and dsDNA to protect AuNPs against salt-induced aggregation. Under the optimum conditions, this biosensor can sensitively and specifically detect Cu(2+) with a low detection limit of 250 nM and a linear range of 0.5-10 μM. The method is simple and economic without dual-labeling DNA and AuNPs modification. It is also highly selective for Cu(2+) in the presence of high concentrations of other environmentally relevant metal ions because of the great specificity of the copper-caused alkyne-azide click reaction, which potentially meets the requirement of the detection in real samples.

  9. Chemical speciation and recovery of gold(I, III) from wastewater and silver by liquid-liquid extraction with the ion-pair reagent amiloride mono hydrochloride and AAS determination.

    PubMed

    El-Shahawi, M S; Bashammakh, A S; Bahaffi, S O

    2007-06-15

    A novel and low cost liquid-liquid extraction procedure for the separation of gold(III) at trace level from aqueous medium of pH 5-9 has been developed. The method has been based upon the formation of a yellow colored ternary complex ion associate of tetrachloro gold(III) complex anion, AuCl(4)(-) with the ion-pair reagent 1-(3,5-diamino-6-chloropyrazinecarboxyl) guanidine hydrochloride monohydrate, namely amiloride, DPG(+).Cl(-). The effect of various parameters, e.g. pH, organic solvent, shaking time, etc. on the preconcentration of gold(III) from the aqueous media by the DPG(+).Cl(-) reagent has been investigated. The colored gold species was quantitatively extracted into 4-methyl pentan-2-one. The chemical composition of the ion associate of DPG(+).Cl(-) with AuCl(4)(-) in the organic solvent has been determined by the Job's method. The molar absorptivity (2.19x10(4)Lmol(-1)cm(-1)) of the associate DPG(+).AuCl(4)(-) at 362nm enabled a convenient application of the developed extraction procedure for the separation and AAS determination of traces of aurate ions. Mono-valence gold ions after oxidation to gold(III) with bromine water in HCl (1.0molL(-1)) media have been also extracted quantitatively from the aqueous media by the developed procedure. The chemical speciation of mono- and/or tri-valence gold species spiked to fresh and industrial wastewater samples has been achieved. The method has been also applied successfully from the separation of gold(I) and gold(III) species from metallic ions and silver. The developed method has also the advantage of freedom from most diverse ions.

  10. Investigation of argon ion sputtering on the secondary electron emission from gold samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jing; Cui, Wanzhao; Li, Yun; Xie, Guibai; Zhang, Na; Wang, Rui; Hu, Tiancun; Zhang, Hongtai

    2016-09-01

    Secondary electron (SE) yield, δ, is a very sensitive surface property. The values of δ often are not consistent for even identical materials. The influence of surface changes on the SE yield was investigated experimentally in this article. Argon ion sputtering was used to remove the contamination from the surface. Surface composition was monitored by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and surface topography was scanned by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) before and after every sputtering. It was found that argon sputtering can remove contamination and roughen the surface. An "equivalent work function" is presented in this thesis to establish the relationship between SE yield and surface properties. Argon ion sputtering of 1.5keV leads to a significant increase of so called "work function" (from 3.7 eV to 6.0 eV), and a decrease of SE yield (from 2.01 to 1.54). These results provided a new insight into the influence of surface changes on the SE emission.

  11. Hybridization-modulated ion fluxes through peptide-nucleic-acid- functionalized gold nanotubes. A new approach to quantitative label-free DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Jágerszki, Gyula; Gyurcsányi, Róbert E; Höfler, Lajos; Pretsch, Ernö

    2007-06-01

    The inner walls of gold nanotubes, prepared by template synthesis in the nanopores of polycarbonate track etch membranes, have been chemically modified with peptide nucleic acid (PNA) and used for label-free quantification of complementary DNA sequences. Selective binding of DNA to the PNA-modified nanotubes is shown to decrease the flux of optically detected anionic markers through the nanotubes in a concentration-dependent manner. The strong dependence of the biorecognition-modulated ion transport through the nanopores on the ionic strength suggests a dominantly electrostatic exclusion mechanism of the ion flux decrease as a result of DNA binding to the PNA-modified nanopores.

  12. Negative ionization of the secondary ions of silver and gold sputtered from their elemental surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindona, A.; Riccardi, P.; Maletta, S.; Rudi, S. A.; Falcone, G.

    2007-03-01

    Calculations of the ionization probabilities of Ag- and Au- particles, ejected during sputtering of clean Ag(1 0 0) and Au(1 0 0) surfaces, respectively, are reported. An effective one-electron theory is used to describe: the plane metal surface, with a projected band gap, the secondary emitted atom, whose charge state is investigated, and its nearest-neighbor substrate atom, put in motion by the collision cascade generated by the primary ion beam. Suitable rectilinear trajectories are selected to describe the motion of these two atoms outside the solid. A good agreement is found with van Der Heide's experiments (P.A.W. van Der Heide, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 157 (1999) 126).

  13. Transmission sputtering of gold thin films by low-energy (< 1 keV) xenon ions. I. The system and the measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayrault, Guy; Seidman, David N.

    1982-10-01

    A novel system for direct measurement of the transmission-sputtering yields of ion-irradiated thin films is described. The system was specifically designed for the study of the transmission sputtering caused by low-energy (<1 keV) xenon ions. The xenon ion beam employed is first mass-analyzed in a specially constructed corssed magnetic- and electric-field mass spectrometer; this analyzer eliminates all energetic neutral and singly charged ions of mass less than 40 amu; it is also expected that ≤2% of the xenon ions which actually reach a specimen are doubly charged. The analyzed xenon ion beam is made to impinge on a gold thin film (˜100-500 Å thick) which is mounted in a JEM 200 transmission electron-microscope holder. The temperature of the specimen can be varied between ˜25 and 300 K employing a continuous transfer liquid-helium cryostat. The particles (atoms or ions) ejected from the unirradiated surface of the gold thin film are detected by two channeltron electron-multiplier arrays (CEMA) in the Chevron configuration; the Chevron detector is able to detect individual transmission-sputtered particles when operated in the saturated mode. To further enhance resolution, the electron cascades (produced by the CEMA), are amplified and shaped electronically into uniform square pulses. The shaped signals are detected with an Ithaco 391A lock-in amplifier (LIA). With the aid of a ratiometer feature in the LIA, we are able to measure directly the ratio of the transmission-sputtered current It to the incident ion current Ib; for Ibn=1 μA cm-2, a ratio of It/Ib as small as 1×10-9 has been measured. A detailed discussion of the calibration procedure and the experimental errors, involved in this technique, are also presented.

  14. Nondegenerate Four-Wave Mixing in Gold Nanocomposites Formed by Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Saonov, V.P.; Zhu, J.G.; Lepeshkin, N.N.; Armstrong, R.L.; Shalaev, V.M.; Ying, Z.C.; White, C.W.; Zuhr, R.A.

    1999-07-01

    Nondegenerate four-wave mixing technique has been used to investigate the third-order nonlinear susceptibility for nanocomposite material with Au nanocrystals formed inside a SiO{sub 2} glass matrix. High concentrations of encapsulated Au nanocrystals are formed by implantation of Au ions into fused silica glass substrates and thermal annealing. The size distribution and the depth profiles of the Au nanoparticles can be controlled by the implantation dose, energy and annealing temperatures. The high value of the third-order susceptibility - (0.26--1.3)x10{sup -7} esu was found in the range of the frequency detunings near the surface plasmon resonance. Two characteristic relaxation times, 0.66 ps and 5.3 ps, have been extracted from the detuning curve of the third-order susceptibility as the probe-beam frequency changes and the pump-beam frequency fixed at the plasmon resonance. The first relaxation time was attributed to electron-phonon relaxation, and the second to thermal diffusion to the host medium. The efficient nondegenerate conversion is attractive for optical processing.

  15. Interface-state-controlled segregation of gold during ion-beam-induced epitaxy of amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Custer, J.S.; Thompson, M.O. ); Jacobson, D.C.; Poate, J.M. )

    1991-10-15

    Segregation coefficients and velocity enhancements for Au in amorphous Si during ion-beam-induced epitaxial crystallization were measured. At 320 {degree}C, velocity enhancements of up to 2.5 times were observed, and interface breakdown occurred at interfacial Au concentrations of 11 at. %. Although qualitatively similar to thermal solid-phase epitaxy, these velocity enhancements are substantially reduced in magnitude while the interface breakdown occurs at much higher concentrations. Between 250 {degree}C and 400 {degree}C, Au is trapped at the moving interface with segregation coefficients {ital k}, which are approximately velocity and concentration independent and vary between 0.001 and 0.012. In contrast with classical segregation, however, {ital k} increases linearly with interface position during the initial stages of growth to a temperature-dependent steady-state value. At 250 {degree}C, for example, {ital k} increases by at least a factor of 4 to 0.012 during growth. These results suggest an evolving interface structure from the initial thermal configuration to an irradiation-induced steady-state configuration with a higher trapping efficiency.

  16. Detection of mercury ions based on mercury-induced switching of enzyme-like activity of platinum/gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Chao-Wei; Chang, Hsiang-Yu; Chang, Jia-Yaw; Huang, Chih-Ching

    2012-10-01

    In this study, bimetallic platinum/gold nanoparticles (Pt/Au NPs) were found to exhibit peroxidase-like activity, and the deposition of mercury was found to switch the enzymatic activity to a catalase-like activity. Based on this phenomenon, we developed a new method for detecting mercury ions through their deposition on bimetallic Pt/Au NPs to switch the catalytic activity of Pt/Au NPs. Pt/Au NPs could be easily prepared through reduction of Au3+ and Pt4+ by sodium citrate in a one-pot synthesis. The peroxidase catalytic activity of the Pt/Au NPs was controlled by varying the ratios of Pt to Au. The Pt0.1/Au NPs (prepared with a [Au3+]/[Pt4+] molar ratio of 9.0/1.0) showed excellent oxidation catalysis for H2O2-mediated oxidation of Amplex® Red (AR) to resorufin. The oxidized product of AR, resorufin, fluoresces more strongly (excitation/emission wavelength maxima ca. 570/585 nm) than AR alone. The peroxidase catalytic activity of Pt0.1/Au NPs was switched to catalase-like activity in the presence of mercury ions in a 5.0 mM tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris)-borate solution (pH 7.0) through the deposition of Hg on the particle surfaces owing to the strong Hg-Au metallic bond. The catalytic activity of Hg-Pt0.1/Au NPs is superior (by at least 5-fold) to that of natural catalase (from bovine liver). Under optimal solution conditions [5.0 mM Tris-borate (pH 7.0), H2O2 (50 mM), and AR (10 μM)] and in the presence of the masking agents polyacrylic acid and tellurium nanowires, the Pt0.1/Au NPs allowed the selective detection of inorganic mercury (Hg2+) and methylmercury ions (MeHg+) at concentrations as low as several nanomolar. This simple, fast, and cost-effective system enabled selective determination of the spiked concentrations of Hg2+ and MeHg+ in tap, pond, and stream waters.In this study, bimetallic platinum/gold nanoparticles (Pt/Au NPs) were found to exhibit peroxidase-like activity, and the deposition of mercury was found to switch the enzymatic

  17. Colorimetric detection of mercury ion based on unmodified gold nanoparticles and target-triggered hybridization chain reaction amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qing; Yang, Xiaohan; Yang, Xiaohai; Liu, Pei; Wang, Kemin; Huang, Jin; Liu, Jianbo; Song, Chunxia; Wang, Jingjing

    2015-02-01

    A novel unmodified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs)-based colorimetric strategy for label-free, specific and sensitive mercury ion (Hg2+) detection was demonstrated by using thymine-Hg2+-thymine (T-Hg2+-T) recognition mechanism and hybridization chain reaction (HCR) amplification strategy. In this protocol, a structure-switching probe (H0) was designed to recognize Hg2+ and then propagated a chain reaction of hybridization events between two other hairpin probes (H1 and H2). In the absence of Hg2+, all hairpin probes could stably coexist in solution, the exposed sticky ends of hairpin probes were capable of stabilizing AuNPs. As a result, salt-induced AuNPs aggregation could be effectively prevented. In the presence of Hg2+, thymine bases of H0 could specifically interact with Hg2+ to form stable T-Hg2+-T complex. Consequently, the hairpin structure of H0 probe was changed. As H1/H2 probes were added, the HCR process could be triggered and nicked double-helixes were formed. Since it was difficult for the formed nicked double-helixes to inhibit salt-induced AuNPs aggregation, a red-to-blue color change was observed in the colloid solution as the salt concentration increased. With the elegant amplification effect of HCR, a detection limit of around 30 nM was achieved (S/N = 3), which was about 1-2 orders of magnitudes lower than that of previous unmodified AuNPs-based colorimetric methods. By using the T-Hg2+-T recognition mechanism, high selectivity was also obtained. As an unmodified AuNPs-based colorimetric strategy, the system was simple in design, convenient in operation, and eliminated the requirements of separation processes, chemical modifications, and sophisticated instrumentations.

  18. Highly Sensitive Aluminium(III) Ion Sensor Based on a Self-assembled Monolayer on a Gold Nanoparticles Modified Screen-printed Carbon Electrode.

    PubMed

    See, Wong Pooi; Heng, Lee Yook; Nathan, Sheila

    2015-01-01

    A new approach for the development of a highly sensitive aluminium(III) ion sensor via the preconcentration of aluminium(III) ion with a self-assembled monolayer on a gold nanoparticles modified screen-printed carbon electrode and current mediation by potassium ferricyanide redox behavior during aluminium(III) ion binding has been attempted. A monolayer of mercaptosuccinic acid served as an effective complexation ligand for the preconcentration of trace aluminium; this led to an enhancement of aluminium(III) ion capture and thus improved the sensitivity of the sensor with a detection limit of down to the ppb level. Under the optimum experimental conditions, the sensor exhibited a wide linear dynamic range from 0.041 to 12.4 μM. The lower detection limit of the developed sensor was 0.037 μM (8.90 ppb) using a 10 min preconcentration time. The sensor showed excellent selectivity towards aluminium(III) ion over other interference ions.

  19. Highly stable water dispersible calix[4]pyrrole octa-hydrazide protected gold nanoparticles as colorimetric and fluorometric chemosensors for selective signaling of Co(II) ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Keyur D.; Vyas, Disha J.; Makwana, Bharat A.; Darjee, Savan M.; Jain, Vinod K.

    2014-03-01

    Water dispersible stable gold nanoparticles (AuNps) have been synthesized by using calix[4]pyrrole octa-hydrazide (CPOH) as a reducing as well as stabilizing agent. CPOH-AuNps have been characterized by surface plasmon resonance, particle size analyzer and transmission electron microscopy. CPOH-AuNps are water dispersible, highly stable for more than 150 days at neutral pH with a size of less than 10 nm and zeta potential of 15 ± 2 MeV. Ion sensing property of CPOH-AuNps has been investigated for various metal ions Pb(II), Cd(II), Mn(II), Fe(III), Ni(II), Zn(II), Hg(II), Co(II) and Cu(II) by colorimetry and spectrofluorimetry. Among all the metal ions investigated, only Co(II) ions gives sharp colour change from ruby red to blue and is easily detectable by naked-eye. CPOH-AuNps being fluorescent in nature also shows great sensitivity and selectivity for Co(II) ions. Co(II) ions can be selectively detected at very low concentration level of 1 nM in a facile way of fluorescence quenching.

  20. Successive coordination of palladium(II)-ions and terpyridine-ligands to a pyridyl-terminated self-assembled monolayer on gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppenberg, Johannes; Richter, Sebastian; Darlatt, Erik; Traulsen, Christoph H.-H.; Min, Hyegeun; Unger, Wolfgang E. S.; Schalley, Christoph A.

    2012-02-01

    The deposition of palladium on a novel, reversibly protonatable, pyridyl-terminated self-assembled monolayer on gold substrates has been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS spectroscopy) and time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). For this purpose, 12-(pyridin-4-yl)dodecane-1-thiol, consisting of a surface-active head group, an unfunctionalized hydrocarbon backbone and a terminal pyridyl group, has been synthesized and deposited on gold surfaces. Coordination of Pd(II) ions to the pyridyl group was examined. Furthermore, a reversible protonation/deprotonation cycle has been applied, and the relation between protonation and the amount of complexed palladium was studied. Investigation of the SAM by angle-resolved NEXAFS spectroscopy revealed the aliphatic backbone to be preferentially upright oriented with the aromatic head group being not preferentially oriented. The palladium layer was further coordinated with a CF3-labeled terpyridine ligand in order to prove the accessibility of the Pd(II) ions to further complexation and the platform useful for deposition of further layers toward a multi-layered system.

  1. Porous polymer monolithic columns with gold nanoparticles as an intermediate ligand for the separation of proteins in reverse phase-ion exchange mixed mode.

    PubMed

    Terborg, Lydia; Masini, Jorge C; Lin, Michelle; Lipponen, Katriina; Riekolla, Marja-Liisa; Svec, Frantisek

    2015-05-01

    A new approach has been developed for the preparation of mixed-mode stationary phases to separate proteins. The pore surface of monolithic poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) capillary columns was functionalized with thiols and coated with gold nanoparticles. The final mixed mode surface chemistry was formed by attaching, in a single step, alkanethiols, mercaptoalkanoic acids, and their mixtures on the free surface of attached gold nanoparticles. Use of these mixtures allowed fine tuning of the hydrophobic/hydrophilic balance. The amount of attached gold nanoparticles according to thermal gravimetric analysis was 44.8 wt.%. This value together with results of frontal elution enabled calculation of surface coverage with the alkanethiol and mercaptoalkanoic acid ligands. Interestingly, alkanethiols coverage in a range of 4.46-4.51 molecules/nm(2) significantly exceeded that of mercaptoalkanoic acids with 2.39-2.45 molecules/nm(2). The mixed mode character of these monolithic stationary phases was for the first time demonstrated in the separations of proteins that could be achieved in the same column using gradient elution conditions typical of reverse phase (using gradient of acetonitrile in water) and ion exchange chromatographic modes (applying gradient of salt in water), respectively.

  2. Porous polymer monolithic columns with gold nanoparticles as an intermediate ligand for the separation of proteins in reverse phase-ion exchange mixed mode

    PubMed Central

    Terborg, Lydia; Masini, Jorge C.; Lin, Michelle; Lipponen, Katriina; Riekolla, Marja-Liisa; Svec, Frantisek

    2014-01-01

    A new approach has been developed for the preparation of mixed-mode stationary phases to separate proteins. The pore surface of monolithic poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) capillary columns was functionalized with thiols and coated with gold nanoparticles. The final mixed mode surface chemistry was formed by attaching, in a single step, alkanethiols, mercaptoalkanoic acids, and their mixtures on the free surface of attached gold nanoparticles. Use of these mixtures allowed fine tuning of the hydrophobic/hydrophilic balance. The amount of attached gold nanoparticles according to thermal gravimetric analysis was 44.8 wt.%. This value together with results of frontal elution enabled calculation of surface coverage with the alkanethiol and mercaptoalkanoic acid ligands. Interestingly, alkanethiols coverage in a range of 4.46–4.51 molecules/nm2 significantly exceeded that of mercaptoalkanoic acids with 2.39–2.45 molecules/nm2. The mixed mode character of these monolithic stationary phases was for the first time demonstrated in the separations of proteins that could be achieved in the same column using gradient elution conditions typical of reverse phase (using gradient of acetonitrile in water) and ion exchange chromatographic modes (applying gradient of salt in water), respectively. PMID:26257942

  3. The fate of silver ions in the photochemical synthesis of gold nanorods: an extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis.

    PubMed

    Giannici, Francesco; Placido, Tiziana; Curri, Maria Lucia; Striccoli, Marinella; Agostiano, Angela; Comparelli, Roberto

    2009-12-14

    Water-soluble gold nanorods (Au NRs) were synthesized using a silver-ion mediated photochemical route under UV irradiation. Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) measurements on the Ag K-edge were performed on samples obtained at different Ag/Au ratios and at increasing irradiation times in order to investigate the fate of silver ions during the growth of Au NRs. EXAFS measurements allowed to probe the chemical state and the local environment of silver in the final product. Experimental data suggest that Ag atoms are placed on top of the Au particles as metallic Ag(0), while no significant contribution to the EXAFS spectra comes from AgBr or other Ag(+) based species. The reported results strongly support the deposition of Ag(0) islands on the (110) surfaces of the Au particles, thus driving the anisotropic growth via the (111) surfaces.

  4. In vitro studies on radiosensitization effect of glucose capped gold nanoparticles in photon and ion irradiation of HeLa cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Harminder; Pujari, Geetanjali; Semwal, Manoj K.; Sarma, Asitikantha; Avasthi, Devesh Kumar

    2013-04-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles are of great interest due to their potential applications in diagnostics and therapeutics. In the present work, we synthesized glucose capped gold nanoparticle (Glu-AuNP) for internalization in the HeLa cell line (human cervix cancer cells). The capping of glucose on Au nanoparticle was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. The Glu-AuNP did not show any toxicity to the HeLa cell. The γ-radiation and carbon ion irradiation of HeLa cell with and without Glu-AuNP were performed to evaluate radiosensitization effects. The study revealed a significant reduction in radiation dose for killing the HeLa cells with internalized Glu-AuNPs as compared to the HeLa cells without Glu-AuNP. The Glu-AuNP treatment resulted in enhancement of radiation effect as evident from increase in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for carbon ion irradiated HeLa cells.

  5. Electron and ion transfer through multilayers of gold nanoclusters covered by self-assembled monolayers of alkylthiols with various functional groups.

    PubMed

    Uosaki, Kohei; Kondo, Toshihiro; Okamura, Masayuki; Song, Wenbo

    2002-01-01

    The electrochemical characteristics of various kinds of multilayers of gold nanoclusters (GNCs) were investigated. Two types of gold nanoclusters, one covered by self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA), hexanethiol (C6SH), and ferrocenylhexanethiol (FcC6SH), MHF-GNC, and the other with MUA and C6SH, MH-GNC, were used. The multilayers were constructed on a Au(111) surface based on a carboxylate/metal cation (Cu++)/carboxylate or carboxylate/cationic polymer (poly(allylamine hydrochloride):PAH)/carboxylate electrostatic interaction. While the multilayers constructed by the former method were stable only in nonaqueous solutions, those constructed by the latter method were stable even in aqueous solutions. Electrochemical measurements of the multilayers of MHF-GNCs showed a pair of waves corresponding to the redox of the ferrocene group around 350-480 mV and the charge of these peaks, i.e., the amount of adsorbed GNC, increased linearly with the construction cycle up to 6 cycles in the former and to 18 cycles in the latter. A rather reversible redox response of the ferrocene moiety was observed even at the gold electrodes with five GNC layers of two different sequences in which MHF-GNC exists as the layer closest to the gold electrode, ie., the first layer, or as the outermost layer with MH-GNC in the other layers. These results show the facile transfer of electrons and ions through the multilayers of the SAM-covered GNCs and electron transfer between the ferrocene moiety and the Au(111) electrode takes place through the GNC cores by hopping.

  6. Z-scan study of nonlinear absorption of gold nano-particles prepared by ion implantation in various types of silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husinsky, W.; Ajami, A.; Nekvindova, P.; Svecova, B.; Pesicka, J.; Janecek, M.

    2012-05-01

    Metal nano-clusters composite glasses synthesized by ion implantation have been shown as promising nonlinear photonic material. In this paper, we report on the nonlinear absorption measurements of gold nano-particles implanted in four structurally different types of silicate glasses. All targets containing gold nano-particles in a layer 500 nm under the surface of the glass have been prepared by ion implantation with subsequent annealing. The targets were characterized by UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and by the Z-scan technique. The resulting nano-particles differed in size, range of particle size and shape as well as depth distribution characteristic for glasses with different chemical compositions. With the Z-scan technique, it can be shown that the nano-particles produced in silicate glasses exhibit substantial two-photon absorption (TPA). The TPA coefficient differed depending on size, shape, and depth distribution of the metal nano-clusters and the structure and composition of the glass substrates. The highest TPA coefficient (16.25 cm/GW) was found for the glass BK7 in which the largest non-spherical nano-particles have been observed in the thinnest layer.

  7. Importance of nanoparticle size in colorimetric and SERS-based multimodal trace detection of Ni(II) ions with functional gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Krpetić, Zeljka; Guerrini, Luca; Larmour, Iain A; Reglinski, John; Faulds, Karen; Graham, Duncan

    2012-03-12

    Colorimetric detection of analytes using gold nanoparticles along with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) are areas of intense research activity since they both offer sensing of very low concentrations of target species. Multimodal detection promotes the simultaneous detection of a sample by a combination of different techniques; consequently, surface chemistry design in the development of multimodal nanosensors is important for rapid and sensitive evaluation of the analytes by diverse analytical methods. Herein it is shown that nanoparticle size plays an important role in the design of functional nanoparticles for colorimetric and SERS-based sensing applications, allowing controlled nanoparticle assembly and tunable sensor response. The design and preparation of robust nanoparticle systems and their assembly is reported for trace detection of Ni(II) ions as a model system in an aqueous solution. The combination of covalently attached nitrilotriacetic acid moieties along with the L-carnosine dipeptide on the nanoparticle surface represents a highly sensitive platform for rapid and selective detection of Ni(II) ions. This systematic study demonstrates that significantly lower detection limits can be achieved by finely tuning the assembly of gold nanoparticles of different core sizes. The results clearly demonstrate the feasibility and usefulness of a multimodal approach.

  8. Convenient purification of gold clusters by co-precipitation for improved sensing of hydrogen peroxide, mercury ions and pesticides.

    PubMed

    Guan, Guijian; Zhang, Shuang-Yuan; Cai, Yongqing; Liu, Shuhua; Bharathi, M S; Low, Michelle; Yu, Yong; Xie, Jianping; Zheng, Yuangang; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Han, Ming-Yong

    2014-06-01

    An effective separation process is developed to remove free protein from the protein-protected gold clusters via co-precipitation with zinc hydroxide on their surface. After dialysis, the purified clusters exhibit an enhanced fluorescence for improved sensitive detection and selective visualization.

  9. Collective optical Kerr effect exhibited by an integrated configuration of silicon quantum dots and gold nanoparticles embedded in ion-implanted silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Torres, C.; López-Suárez, A.; Can-Uc, B.; Rangel-Rojo, R.; Tamayo-Rivera, L.; Oliver, A.

    2015-07-01

    The study of the third-order optical nonlinear response exhibited by a composite containing gold nanoparticles and silicon quantum dots nucleated by ion implantation in a high-purity silica matrix is presented. The nanocomposites were explored as an integrated configuration containing two different ion-implanted distributions. The time-resolved optical Kerr gate and z-scan techniques were conducted using 80 fs pulses at a 825 nm wavelength; while the nanosecond response was investigated by a vectorial two-wave mixing method at 532 nm with 1 ns pulses. An ultrafast purely electronic nonlinearity was associated to the optical Kerr effect for the femtosecond experiments, while a thermal effect was identified as the main mechanism responsible for the nonlinear optical refraction induced by nanosecond pulses. Comparative experimental tests for examining the contribution of the Au and Si distributions to the total third-order optical response were carried out. We consider that the additional defects generated by consecutive ion irradiations in the preparation of ion-implanted samples do not notably modify the off-resonance electronic optical nonlinearities; but they do result in an important change for near-resonant nanosecond third-order optical phenomena exhibited by the closely spaced nanoparticle distributions.

  10. Radiation synthesized poly( n-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone)-stabilized-gold nanoparticles as LSPR-based optical sensor for mercury ions estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Nilanjal; Kumar, Virendra; Goel, Narender Kumar; Varshney, Lalit

    2015-07-01

    Poly( n-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone)-stabilized-gold nanoparticles (PVP-Au-NPs) have been synthesized via a green-60Co-Gamma radiolytic route and employed as a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR)-based optical sensor for estimation of trace quantities of Hg2+ ion in aqueous solutions. The in situ generated PVP-Au-NPs were characterized using UV-vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and particle size analysis techniques. Reaction conditions were optimized to obtain uniformly dispersed PVP-Au-NPs with average particle size of 7.1 ± 1.6 nm (±s), which exhibited a narrow LSPR band at 527 nm. The decrease in LSPR band intensity of PVP-Au-NPs with increase in Hg2+ ion concentration was found to be linear in the Hg2+ ion concentration range of 0-100 nM. The LSPR-based PVP-Au-NPs optical sensor system was found to be selective for Hg2+ and independent of interference from other metal ions such as Ca2+, Cu2+, Cd2+, and Fe2+ up to a concentration of 500 nM.

  11. Gold Rush!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brahier, Daniel J.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a mathematical investigation of gold--how it is weighed, stored, used, and valued. For grades 3-4, children estimate the value of treasure chests filled with gold coins and explore the size and weight of gold bars. Children in grades 5-6 explore how gold is mined and used, and how the value of gold changes over time. (PVD)

  12. Effective and selective recovery of gold and palladium ions from metal wastewater using a sulfothermophilic red alga, Galdieria sulphuraria.

    PubMed

    Ju, Xiaohui; Igarashi, Kensuke; Miyashita, Shin-Ichi; Mitsuhashi, Hiroaki; Inagaki, Kazumi; Fujii, Shin-Ichiro; Sawada, Hitomi; Kuwabara, Tomohiko; Minoda, Ayumi

    2016-07-01

    The demand for precious metals has increased in recent years. However, low concentrations of precious metals dissolved in wastewater are yet to be recovered because of high operation costs and technical problems. The unicellular red alga, Galdieria sulphuraria, efficiently absorbs precious metals through biosorption. In this study, over 90% of gold and palladium could be selectively recovered from aqua regia-based metal wastewater by using G. sulphuraria. These metals were eluted from the cells into ammonium solutions containing 0.2M ammonium salts without other contaminating metals. The use of G. sulphuraria is an eco-friendly and cost-effective way of recovering low concentrations of gold and palladium discarded in metal wastewater.

  13. Fluorinated colloidal gold immunolabels for imaging select proteins in parallel with lipids using high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Robert L.; Frisz, Jessica F.; Hanafin, William P.; Carpenter, Kevin J.; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Weber, Peter K.; Kraft, Mary L.

    2014-01-01

    The local abundance of specific lipid species near a membrane protein is hypothesized to influence the protein’s activity. The ability to simultaneously image the distributions of specific protein and lipid species in the cell membrane would facilitate testing these hypotheses. Recent advances in imaging the distribution of cell membrane lipids with mass spectrometry have created the desire for membrane protein probes that can be simultaneously imaged with isotope labeled lipids. Such probes would enable conclusive tests of whether specific proteins co-localize with particular lipid species. Here, we describe the development of fluorine-functionalized colloidal gold immunolabels that facilitate the detection and imaging of specific proteins in parallel with lipids in the plasma membrane using high-resolution SIMS performed with a NanoSIMS. First, we developed a method to functionalize colloidal gold nanoparticles with a partially fluorinated mixed monolayer that permitted NanoSIMS detection and rendered the functionalized nanoparticles dispersible in aqueous buffer. Then, to allow for selective protein labeling, we attached the fluorinated colloidal gold nanoparticles to the nonbinding portion of antibodies. By combining these functionalized immunolabels with metabolic incorporation of stable isotopes, we demonstrate that influenza hemagglutinin and cellular lipids can be imaged in parallel using NanoSIMS. These labels enable a general approach to simultaneously imaging specific proteins and lipids with high sensitivity and lateral resolution, which may be used to evaluate predictions of protein co-localization with specific lipid species. PMID:22284327

  14. Functionalized gold nanoparticles/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites for ultrasensitive electrochemical sensing of mercury ions based on thymine-mercury-thymine structure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nan; Lin, Meng; Dai, Hongxiu; Ma, Houyi

    2016-05-15

    A sensitive, selective and reusable electrochemical biosensor for the determination of mercury ions (Hg(2+)) has been developed based on thymine (T) modified gold nanoparticles/reduced graphene oxide (AuNPs/rGO) nanocomposites. Graphene oxide (GO) was electrochemically reduced on a glassy carbon substrate. Subsequently, AuNPs were deposited onto the surface of rGO by cyclic voltammetry. For functionalization of the electrode, the carboxylic group of the thymine-1-acetic acid was covalently coupled with the amine group of the cysteamine which self-assembled onto AuNPs. The structural features of the T bases functionalized AuNPs/rGO electrode were confirmed by attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) spectroscopy. Each step of the modification process was characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedence spectroscopy (EIS). The T bases modified AuNPs/rGO electrode was applied to detect various trace metal ions by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The proposed biosensor was found to be highly sensitive to Hg(2+) in the range of 10 ng/L-1.0 µg/L. The biosensor afforded excellent selectivity for Hg(2+) against other heavy metal ions such as Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Pb(2+), Cu(2+), Ni(2+), and Co(2+). Furthermore, the developed sensor exhibited a high reusability through a simple washing. In addition, the prepared biosensor was successfully applied to assay Hg(2+) in real environmental samples.

  15. Applications of vitamin B6 cofactor pyridoxal 5‧-phosphate and pyridoxal 5‧-phosphate crowned gold nanoparticles for optical sensing of metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothra, Shilpa; Upadhyay, Yachana; Kumar, Rajender; Sahoo, Suban K.

    2017-03-01

    Vitamin B6 cofactor pyridoxal 5‧-phosphate (PLP) and PLP crowned gold nanoparticles (PLP-AuNPs) was applied for the optical chemosensing of metal ions in aqueous medium. PLP showed a visually detectable colour change from colourless to yellow and 'turn-off' fluorescence in the presence of Fe3 +. The fluorescence intensity of PLP at 433 nm was also blue-shifted and enhanced at 395 nm upon addition of Al3 +. When the PLP was functionalized over AuNPs surface, the wine red colour of PLP-AuNPs was turned to purplish-blue and the SPR band at 525 nm was red-shifted upon addition of Al3 +, Cd2 + and Pb2 + due to the complexation-induced aggregation of nanoparticles. The developed sensing systems exhibited good selectivity and specificity for the detected analytes (Fe3 +, Al3 +, Cd2 + and Pb2 +).

  16. Highly sensitive electrochemical sensor for mercury(II) ions by using a mercury-specific oligonucleotide probe and gold nanoparticle-based amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhiqiang; Su, Yuanyuan; Li, Jiang; Li, Di; Zhang, Jiong; Song, Shiping; Zhao, Yun; Li, Genxi; Fan, Chunhai

    2009-09-15

    We report a highly sensitive electrochemical sensor for the detection of Hg(2+) ions in aqueous solution by using a thymine (T)-rich, mercury-specific oligonucleotide (MSO) probe and gold nanoparticles (Au NPs)-based signal amplification. The MSO probe contains seven thymine bases at both ends and a "mute" spacer in the middle, which, in the presence of Hg(2+), forms a hairpin structure via the Hg(2+)-mediated coordination of T-Hg(2+)-T base pairs. The thiolated MSO probe is immobilized on Au electrodes to capture free Hg(2+) in aqueous media, and the MSO-bound Hg(2+) can be electrochemically reduced to Hg(+), which provides a readout signal for quantitative detection of Hg(2+). This direct immobilization strategy leads to a detection limit of 1 microM. In order to improve the sensitivity, MSO probe-modified Au NPs are employed to amplify the electrochemical signals. Au NPs are comodified with the MSO probe and a linking probe that is complementary to a capture DNA probe immobilized on gold electrodes. We demonstrated that this Au NPs-based sensing strategy brings about an amplification factor of more than 3 orders of magnitude, leading to a limit of detection of 0.5 nM (100 ppt), which satisfactorily meets the sensitivity requirement of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This Au NPs-based Hg(2+) sensor also exhibits excellent selectivity over a spectrum of interference metal ions. Considering the high sensitivity and selectivity of this sensor, as well as the cost-effective and portable features of electrochemical techniques, we expect this Au NPs amplified electrochemical sensor will be a promising candidate for field detection of environmentally toxic mercury.

  17. Colorimetric sensing of silver(I) and mercury(II) ions based on an assembly of Tween 20-stabilized gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Yan; Yu, Cheng-Ju; Lin, Yen-Hsiu; Tseng, Wei-Lung

    2010-08-15

    We have developed a rapid and homogeneous method for the highly selective detection of Hg(2+) and Ag(+) using Tween 20-modified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Citrate ions were found to still be adsorbed on the Au surface when citrate-capped AuNPs were modified with Tween 20, which stabilizes the citrate-capped AuNPs against conditions of high ionic strength. When citrate ions had reduced Hg(2+) and Ag(+) to form Hg-Au alloys and Ag on the surface of the AuNPs, Tween 20 was removed from the NP surface. As a result, the AuNPs were unstable under a high-ionic-strength solution, resulting in NP aggregation. The formation of Hg-Au alloys or Ag on the surface of the AuNPs was demonstrated by means of inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Tween 20-AuNPs could selectively detect Hg(2+) and Ag(+) at concentrations as low as 0.1 and 0.1 microM in the presence of NaCl and EDTA, respectively. Moreover, the probe enables the analysis of AgNPs with a minimum detectable concentration that corresponds to 1 pM. This probe was successfully applied to detect Hg(2+) in drinking water and seawater, Ag(+) in drinking water, and AgNPs in drinking water.

  18. Characterization of silver ions adsorbed on gold nanorods: surface analysis by using surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Niidome, Yasuro; Nakamura, Yuki; Honda, Kanako; Akiyama, Yasuyuki; Nishioka, Koji; Kawasaki, Hideya; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2009-04-07

    Surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS) indicated AgBr2-, which adsorbed on gold nanorod surfaces, was a key material to control the anisotropic growth of gold nanorods.

  19. Selective determination of gold(III) ion using CuO microsheets as a solid phase adsorbent prior by ICP-OES measurement.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mohammed M; Khan, Sher Bahadar; Marwani, Hadi M; Asiri, Abdullah M; Alamry, Khalid A; Al-Youbi, Abdulrahman O

    2013-01-30

    We have prepared calcined CuO microsheets (MSs) by a wet-chemical process using reducing agents in alkaline medium and characterized by UV/vis., fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) etc. The detailed structural, compositional, and optical characterizations of the MSs were evaluated by XRD pattern, FT-IR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and UV-vis spectroscopy, respectively which confirmed that the obtained MSs are well-crystalline CuO and possessed good optical properties. The CuO MSs morphology was investigated by FESEM, which confirmed that the calcined nanomaterials were sheet-shaped and grown in large-quantity. Here, the efficiency of the CuO MS was applied for a selective adsorption of gold(III) ion prior to its detection by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The selectivity of CuO MSs towards various metal ions, including Au(III), Cd(II), Co(II), Cr(III), Fe(III), Pd(II), and Zn(II) was analyzed. Based on the adsorption isotherm study, it was confirmed that the selectivity of MSs phase was mostly towards Au(III) ion. The static adsorption capacity for Au(III) was calculated to be 57.0 mg g(-1). From Langmuir adsorption isotherm, it was confirmed that the adsorption process was mainly monolayer-adsorption onto a surface containing a finite number of adsorption sites.

  20. Hollow nanospheres composed of titanium dioxide nanocrystals modified with carbon and gold for high performance lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Hongbo; Cao, Xueqin; Zhang, Yu; Geng, Kaiming; Qu, Genlong; Tang, Minghua; Zheng, Junwei; Yang, Yonggang; Gu, Hongwei

    2015-10-01

    Herein, we reported a facile route to fabricate carbon and Au treated TiO2 mesoporous hollow spheres (MHTiO2@C-Au) as high performance anode materials for lithium ion batteries. The high porosity of the hollow spheres, together with the inner carbon supporting and superficial Au coating, enhanced the cycling stability and rate performance of the MHTiO2@C-Au electrode significantly. The MHTiO2@C-Au composite exhibits a high reversible specific capacity of 186.6 mA h g-1 after 200 cycles at the current density of 1.0C, superior rate performances of around 151.0 mA h g-1 at the current rate of 5.0C. The outstanding electrochemical property is attributed to the overall structural features of the MHTiO2@C-Au, which can not only shorten the diffusion path of lithium ions and electrons, but also improve the stability of the hollow structures during the lithium ion insertion and extraction process.

  1. Glutathione Modified Gold Nanoparticles for Sensitive Colorimetric Detection of Pb(2+) Ions in Rainwater Polluted by Leaking Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yaming; Hong, Ying; Gao, Peng; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja

    2016-12-20

    In the past few years, the advent of lead halide perovskite solar cells (PSCs) has revolutionized the prospects of the third- generation photovoltaics and the reported power conversion efficiency (PCE) has been updated to 22%. Nevertheless, two main challenges, including the poisonous content of Pb and the vexing instability toward water, still lie between the lab-based PSCs technology and large scale commercialization. With this background, we first evaluated Pb(2+) concentration from the rainwater samples polluted by three types of markets promising PSCs with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry measurements (ICP-MS) as a case study. The influence of possible conditions (pH value and exposure time) on the contents of Pb(2+) from the three PSCs was systematically compared and discussed. Furthermore, an optimized glutathione functionalized gold nanoparticles (GSH-AuNPs) colorimetric sensing assay was used to determine Pb(2+) leaking from PSCs for the first time. The Pb(2+)-induced aggregation of sensing assay could be monitored via both naked eye and UV-vis spectroscopy with a detection limit of 15 and 13 nM, which are all lower than the maximum level in drinking water permitted by WHO. The quantitative detection results were compared and in good agreement with that of ICP-MS. The results indicate that the content of Pb(2+) from three PSCs are in the same order of magnitude under various conditions. By the use of the prepared GSH-AuNPs self-assembled sensing assay, the fast and on-site detection of Pb(2+) from PSCs can be realized.

  2. An ultrasensitive sandwich-type electrochemical immunosensor based on signal amplification strategy of gold nanoparticles functionalized magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes loaded with lead ions.

    PubMed

    Li, Faying; Han, Jian; Jiang, Liping; Wang, Yulan; Li, Yueyun; Dong, Yunhui; Wei, Qin

    2015-06-15

    In this study, a novel and ultrasensitive sandwich-type electrochemical immunosensor was prepared for the quantitative detection of alpha fetoprotein (AFP), a well-known hepatocellular carcinoma biomarker. Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) functionalized magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs-Fe3O4) were prepared and utilized for the adsorption of lead ions (Pb(2+)) and the secondary antibodies (Ab2). The resultant nanocomposites (Pb(2+)@Au@MWCNTs-Fe3O4) were used as the label for signal amplification, showing better electrocatalytic activity towards the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) than MWCNTs, MWCNTs-Fe3O4 or Au@MWCNTs-Fe3O4 due to the synergetic effect presented in Pb(2+)@Au@MWCNTs-Fe3O4. Moreover, Au NPs were electrodeposited on the surface of glassy carbon electrode (GCE) for the effective immobilization of primary antibodies (Ab1). Under the optimal conditions, a linear range from 10 fg/mL to 100 ng/mL and a detection limit of 3.33 fg/mL were obtained. The proposed electrochemical sandwich-type immunosensor shows high sensitivity, good selectivity and stability for the quantitative detection of AFP, holding a great potential in clinical and diagnostic applications.

  3. Gold-coated silicon nanowire-graphene core-shell composite film as a polymer binder-free anode for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Han-Jung; Lee, Sang Eon; Lee, Jihye; Jung, Joo-Yun; Lee, Eung-Sug; Choi, Jun-Hyuk; Jung, Jun-Ho; Oh, Minsub; Hyun, Seungmin; Choi, Dae-Geun

    2014-07-01

    We designed and fabricated a gold (Au)-coated silicon nanowires/graphene (Au-SiNWs/G) hybrid composite as a polymer binder-free anode for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). A large amount of SiNWs for LIB anode materials can be prepared by metal-assisted chemical etching (MaCE) process. The Au-SiNWs/G composite film on current collector was obtained by vacuum filtration using an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane and hot pressing method. Our experimental results show that the Au-SiNWs/G composite has a stable reversible capacity of about 1520 mA h/g which was maintained for 20 cycles. The Au-SiNWs/G composite anode showed much better cycling performance than SiNWs/polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF)/Super-P, SiNWs/G composite, and pure SiNWs anodes. The improved electrochemical properties of the Au-SiNWs/G composite anode material is mainly ascribed to the composite's porous network structure.

  4. Ultrasensitive detection of lead ion sensor based on gold nanodendrites modified electrode and electrochemiluminescent quenching of quantum dots by electrocatalytic silver/zinc oxide coupled structures.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Kong, Qingkun; Bian, Zhaoquan; Ma, Chao; Ge, Shenguang; Zhang, Yan; Yu, Jinghua; Yan, Mei

    2015-03-15

    A signal-off electrochemiluminescence (ECL) DNA sensor based on gold nanodendrites (Au NDs) modified indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode for the detection of lead ion (Pb(2+)) was developed. Well-defined Au NDs were prepared on ITO electrode using low-potential synthesis, assisted by ethylenediamine. Based on Pb(2+)-specific deoxyribozyme, the silver/zinc oxide (Ag/ZnO) with coupled structure, prepared by one-pot method, was close to the surface of the electrode to catalyze the reduction of part of H2O2, the coreactant for cathodic ECL emission, leading to a decrease of ECL intensity. In addition, taking advantage of the larger surface area to capture a large amount of capture probe as well as excellent conductivity of Au NDs, the sensor could detect Pb(2+) quantitatively in a wider range, and performed excellent selectivity. Furthermore, such simple and sensitive DNA sensor was successfully applied for the detection of Pb(2+) in lake water and human serum samples, respectively.

  5. Gold coating for a high performance Li4Ti5O12 nanorod aggregates anode in lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Guo, Yuanyuan; Liu, Lixiang; Wang, Shixiong; Yang, Xiangjun; Guo, Hong

    2014-01-01

    An effective strategy by combination of alcoholysis, solid-state reaction and coating techniques is employed to prepare Au@Li4Ti5O12 nanorod aggregates as anode materials for Li-ion batteries. The lithium diffusion coefficient of resulting Au@Li4Ti5O12 is 7.32 × 10-10 cm2 s-1, and its stable reversible capacity is 169 mAh g-1 with the retention of 91.1% after 100 cycles at 5 C. Moreover, it also exhibits excellent rate-capability performance. The superior cycling performance can be attributed to the unique nanorod characteristics, structural stability, and the improved ionic and electronic conduction in the electrode due to the uniform nano coating of Au.

  6. Fabrication of copper and gold nanoclusters in MgO (100) by MeV ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.L.; Ila, D.; Williams, E.K.; Sarkisov, S.S.; Poker, D.B.; Hensley, D.K.

    1997-10-01

    MeV ions of Au and Cu were implanted into single crystals of MgO (100) and the formation of metallic nanoclusters was observed by an indirect method of optical absorption spectrophotometry. Using Mei`s theory the authors related the observed optical absorption band to the formation of nanoclusters and using Doyle`s theory, as well as Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RB S), the authors correlated the fill width half maximum (FWHM) of the absorption bands to the estimated size of the metallic nanoclusters between 1--10 nm. These clusters were formed by implantation above the threshold fluence for cluster formation and by a combination of threshold fluence of the implanted species and thermal annealing. The changes in the estimated size of the nanoclusters, after annealing at temperatures ranging from 5,000 C to 10,000 C, were observed using optical absorption spectrophotometry and calculated using Doyle`s theory.

  7. Efficient On-Off Ratiometric Fluorescence Probe for Cyanide Ion Based on Perturbation of the Interaction between Gold Nanoclusters and a Copper(II)-Phthalocyanine Complex.

    PubMed

    Shojaeifard, Zahra; Hemmateenejad, Bahram; Shamsipur, Mojtaba

    2016-06-22

    A new ratiometric fluorescent sensor was developed for the sensitive and selective detection of cyanide ion (CN(-)) in aqueous media. The ratiometric sensing system is based on CN(-) modulated recovery of copper(II) phthalocyanine (Cu(PcTs)) fluorescence signal at the expense of diminished fluorescence intensity of gold nanoclusters (AuNCs). Preliminary experiments revealed that the AuNCs and Cu(PcTs) possess a turn-off effect on each other, the interaction of which being verified through studying their interactions by principle component analysis (PCA) and multivariate cure resolution-alternating least-squares (MCR-ALS) methods. In the presence of CN(-) anion, the AuNCs and Cu(PcTs) interaction was perturbed, so that the fluorescence of Cu (PcTs), already quenched by AuNCs, was found to be efficiently recovered, while the fluorescence intensity of AuNCs was quenched via the formation of a stable [Au(CN)2](-) species. The ratiometric variation of AuNCs and Cu(PcTs) fluorescence intensities leads to designing a highly sensitive probe for CN(-) ion detection. Under the optimal conditions, CN(-) anion was detected without needing any etching time, over the concentration range of 100 nM-220 μM, with a detection limit of 75 nM, which is much lower than the allowable level of CN(-) in water permitted by the World Health Organization (WHO). Moreover, the detection of CN(-) was developed based on the CN(-) effects on the blue and red florescent colors of Cu(PcTs) and AuNCs, respectively. The designed probe displays a continuous color change from red to blue by addition of CN(-), which can be clearly observed by the naked eye in the range of 7-350 μM, under UV lamp. The prepared AuNCs/Cu(PcTs) probe was successfully utilized for the selective and sensitive determination of CN(-) anion in two different types of natural water (Rodbal dam and rainwater) and also in blood serum as a biological sample.

  8. Gold nanodumbbell-seeded growth of silver nanobars and nanobipyramids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jin-Pei; Chen, Chih-Wei; Hsieh, Wei-Chi; Wang, Chao-Hsien; Hsu, Cheng-Yung; Lin, Jyun-Hao

    2014-03-01

    Gold nanodumbbells (NDs) are prepared by the reduction of gold ions in the presence of gold nanorods. Gold NDs are then employed for the synthesis of gold-silver core-shell nanoparticles (Au@Ag NPs). The quasi-ellipsoidal NPs could be found at room temperature, but Au@Ag bar and triangular bipyramid (TBP) NPs were obtained at 75 °C. Our results show that the long ends of gold NDs are in the position of the bar center and closely paralleled the shorter edge of TBP. Mechanisms in the growth of silver on gold NDs are proposed for the formations of these Au@Ag NPs.

  9. Preparation of conductive gold nanowires in confined environment of gold-filled polymer nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Mitschang, Fabian; Langner, Markus; Vieker, Henning; Beyer, André; Greiner, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Continuous conductive gold nanofibers are prepared via the "tubes by fiber templates" process. First, poly(l-lactide) (PLLA)-stabilized gold nanoparticles (AuNP) with over 60 wt% gold are synthesized and characterized, including gel permeation chromatography coupled with a diode array detector. Subsequent electrospinning of these AuNP with template PLLA results in composite nanofibers featuring a high gold content of 57 wt%. Highly homogeneous gold nanowires are obtained after chemical vapor deposition of 345 nm of poly(p-xylylene) (PPX) onto the composite fibers followed by pyrolysis of the polymers at 1050 °C. The corresponding heat-induced transition from continuous gold-loaded polymer tubes to smooth gold nanofibers is studied by transmission electron microscopy and helium ion microscopy using both secondary electrons and Rutherford backscattered ions.

  10. Orientations of polyoxometalate anions on gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sharet, Shelly; Sandars, Ella; Wang, Yifeng; Zeiri, Offer; Neyman, Alevtina; Meshi, Louisa; Weinstock, Ira A

    2012-09-07

    Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy of polyoxometalate-protected gold nanoparticles reveals that the Preyssler ion, [NaP(5)W(30)O(110)](14-), lies "face down" with its C(5) axis perpendicular to the gold surface, while the Finke-Droege ion, [P(4)W(30)Zn(4)(H(2)O)(2)O(112)](16-), is "tilted", with its long axis close to 60° from the normal to the surface.

  11. Gold Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Epner Technology Inc. responded to a need from Goddard Space Flight Center for the ultimate in electroplated reflectivity needed for the Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA). Made of beryllium, the MOLA mirror was coated by Epner Technology Laser Gold process, specially improved for the project. Improved Laser Gold- coated reflectors have found use in an epitaxial reactor built for a large semiconductor manufacturer as well as the waveguide in Braun-Thermoscan tympanic thermometer and lasing cavities in various surgical instruments.

  12. Gold Nanoantennas

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    An array of gold nanoantennas laced into an artificial membrane enhances the fluorescence intensity of three different molecules when they pass through plasmonic hot spots in the array. Watch for the blue, green and red flashes. The photobleaching at the end of each fluorescence event (white flashes) is indicative of single molecule observations.

  13. Determination of low levels of cadmium ions by the under potential deposition on a self-assembled monolayer on gold electrode.

    PubMed

    Noyhouzer, Tomer; Mandler, Daniel

    2011-01-17

    The electrochemical determination of low levels of Cd using a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) modified Au electrode is reported. Determination was based on the stripping of Cd, which was deposited by under potential deposition (UPD). A series of short alkanethiol SAMs bearing different end groups, i.e., sulfonate, carboxylate and ammonium, were examined. Lowest level of detection (ca. 50 ngL(-1)) was achieved with a 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) monolayer using subtractive anodic square wave voltammetry (SASV). Additional surface methods, namely, reductive desorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, were applied to determine the interfacial structure of the electrodeposited Cd on the modified electrodes. We conclude that the deposited Cd forms a monoatomic layer, which bridges between the gold surface and the alkanethiol monolayer associating with both the gold and the sulfur atoms.

  14. Biomineralization of gold: biofilms on bacterioform gold.

    PubMed

    Reith, Frank; Rogers, Stephen L; McPhail, D C; Webb, Daryl

    2006-07-14

    Bacterial biofilms are associated with secondary gold grains from two sites in Australia. 16S ribosomal DNA clones of the genus Ralstonia that bear 99% similarity to the bacterium Ralstonia metallidurans-shown to precipitate gold from aqueous gold(III) tetrachloride-were present on all DNA-positive gold grains but were not detected in the surrounding soils. These results provide evidence for the bacterial contribution to the authigenic formation of secondary bacterioform gold grains and nuggets.

  15. Is It Real Gold?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Harold H.

    1999-01-01

    Features acid tests for determining whether jewelry is "real" gold or simply gold-plated. Describes the carat system of denoting gold content and explains how alloys are used to create various shades of gold jewelry. Addresses the question of whether gold jewelry can turn a wearer's skin green by considering various oxidation reactions.…

  16. X-ray diffraction study of gold nitride films: Observation of a solid solution phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, L.; Hase, T. P. A.; Hunt, M. R. C.; Brieva, A. C.; Šiller, L.

    2008-12-01

    The structure of nitride containing gold films produced by reactive ion sputtering and nitrogen plasma etching is investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. It is found that gold nitride is a solid solution of nitrogen atoms dissolved in a fcc gold matrix. Differences between the strain and lattice parameters of gold and gold nitride films were observed and are explained by interstitial nitrogen present in the latter.

  17. Mercaptoethane sulfonate protected, water-soluble gold and silver nanoparticles: Syntheses, characterization and their building multilayer films with polyaniline via ion-dipole interactions.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiangqin; Bao, Haifeng; Guo, Hongwei; Zhang, Lei; Qi, Li; Jiang, Junguang; Niu, Li; Dong, Shaojun

    2006-03-15

    Mercaptoethane sulfonate protected, water-soluble gold and silver nanoparticles (Au-MES and Ag-MES) are synthesized by one-phase method and characterized by TEM, TGA and XPS techniques, UV-vis and FTIR spectra. Both Au-MES and Ag-MES nanoparticles are soluble in the water up to 2.0 mg/ml and the stability of Au-MES is much better than that of Ag-MES. When dissolved in the water, they behave like a polyanion and can be used to build multilayer films with polyaniline (PANI) by way of layer-by-layer. A new approach is presented to fabricate the multilayer films of Au-MES/PANI and Ag-MES/PANI. The assembly mechanism of these multilayer films is also discussed. We anticipate highly conducting PANI films can be obtained by doping with these nanoparticles.

  18. Electrochemical detection of copper ions leached from CuO nanoparticles in saline buffers and biological media using a gold wire working electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldisserri, Carlo; Costa, Anna Luisa

    2016-04-01

    We performed explorative cyclic voltammetry in phosphate-buffered saline buffers, Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM), and fetal bovine serum-added DMEM using Au wire as working electrode, both in the absence and in the presence of known nominal concentrations of Cu2+ ions or 15 nm CuO nanoparticles. Addition of either Cu2+ ions or aqueous suspension of CuO nanoparticles caused a single anodic peak to appear in the double-layer region of all three pristine media. The height of the anodic peak was found to increase in a monotonic fashion vs. Cu2+ concentration in Cu2+-added media, and versus time since CuO addition in CuO-added media. Stepwise addition of glycine to Cu2+-added phosphate-buffered saline buffer caused an increasing cathodic shift of the anodic peak accompanied by decreasing peak currents. Results indicate that preparing Cu2+-free suspensions of CuO nanoparticles in such media is difficult, owing to the presence of leached copper ions. The implications on results of experiments in which CuO nanoparticle-added biological media are used as cell culture substrates are discussed. Literature data on the interactions between Cu2+ ions, dissolved carbon dioxide in aqueous CuO suspensions, and amino acids present in such media are compared to our results.

  19. Multienergy gold ion implantation for enhancing the field electron emission characteristics of heterogranular structured diamond films grown on Au-coated Si substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaran, K. J.; Manoharan, D.; Sundaravel, B.; Lin, I. N.

    2016-09-01

    Multienergy Au-ion implantation enhanced the electrical conductivity of heterogranular structured diamond films grown on Au-coated Si substrates to a high level of 5076.0 (Ω cm)-1 and improved the field electron emission (FEE) characteristics of the films to low turn-on field of 1.6 V/μm, high current density of 5.4 mA/cm2 (@ 2.65 V/μm), and high lifetime stability of 1825 min. The catalytic induction of nanographitic phases in the films due to Au-ion implantation and the formation of diamond-to-Si eutectic interface layer due to Au-coating on Si together encouraged the efficient conducting channels for electron transport, thereby improved the FEE characteristics of the films.

  20. Label-Free LSPR Detection of Trace Lead(II) Ions in Drinking Water by Synthetic Poly(mPD-co-ASA) Nanoparticles on Gold Nanoislands.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Guangyu; Ng, Siu Pang; Liang, Xiongyi; Ding, Ning; Chen, Xiangfeng; Wu, Chi-Man Lawrence

    2017-02-07

    Using self-assembly gold nanoislands (SAM-AuNIs) functionalized by poly(m-phenylenediamine-co-aniline-2-sulfonic acid) (poly(mPD-co-ASA)) copolymer nanoparticles as specific receptors, a highly sensitive localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) optochemical sensor is demonstrated for detection of trace lead cation (Pb(II)) in drinking water. The copolymer receptor is optimized in three aspects: (1) mole ratio of mPD:ASA monomers, (2) size of copolymer nanoparticles, and (3) surface density of the copolymer. It is shown that the 95:5 (mPD:ASA mole ratio) copolymer with size less than 100 nm exhibits the best Pb(II)-sensing performance, and the 200 times diluted standard copolymer solution contributes to the most effective functionalization protocol. The resulting poly(mPD-co-ASA)-functionalized LSPR sensor attains the detection limit to 0.011 ppb toward Pb(II) in drinking water, and the linear dynamic range covers 0.011 to 5000 ppb (i.e., 6 orders of magnitude). In addition, the sensing system exhibits robust selectivity to Pb(II) in the presence of other metallic cations as well as common anions. The proposed functional copolymer functionalized on AuNIs is found to provide excellent Pb(II)-sensing performance using simple LSPR instrumentation for rapid drinking-water inspection.

  1. Analysis of gold(I/III)-complexes by HPLC-ICP-MS demonstrates gold(III) stability in surface waters.

    PubMed

    Ta, Christine; Reith, Frank; Brugger, Joël; Pring, Allan; Lenehan, Claire E

    2014-05-20

    Understanding the form in which gold is transported in surface- and groundwaters underpins our understanding of gold dispersion and (bio)geochemical cycling. Yet, to date, there are no direct techniques capable of identifying the oxidation state and complexation of gold in natural waters. We present a reversed phase ion-pairing HPLC-ICP-MS method for the separation and determination of aqueous gold(III)-chloro-hydroxyl, gold(III)-bromo-hydroxyl, gold(I)-thiosulfate, and gold(I)-cyanide complexes. Detection limits for the gold species range from 0.05 to 0.30 μg L(-1). The [Au(CN)2](-) gold cyanide complex was detected in five of six waters from tailings and adjacent monitoring bores of working gold mines. Contrary to thermodynamic predictions, evidence was obtained for the existence of Au(III)-complexes in circumneutral, hypersaline waters of a natural lake overlying a gold deposit in Western Australia. This first direct evidence for the existence and stability of Au(III)-complexes in natural surface waters suggests that Au(III)-complexes may be important for the transport and biogeochemical cycling of gold in surface environments. Overall, these results show that near-μg L(-1) enrichments of Au in environmental waters result from metastable ligands (e.g., CN(-)) as well as kinetically controlled redox processes leading to the stability of highly soluble Au(III)-complexes.

  2. Synthesis, structure, properties and immobilization on a gold surface of the monoribbed-functionalized tris-dioximate cobalt(II) clathrochelates and an electrocatalytic hydrogen production from H+ ions.

    PubMed

    Voloshin, Y Z; Belov, A S; Vologzhanina, A V; Aleksandrov, G G; Dolganov, A V; Novikov, V V; Varzatskii, O A; Bubnov, Y N

    2012-05-28

    The cycloaddition of the mono- and dichloroglyoximes to the cobalt(II) bis-α-benzyldioximate afforded the cobalt(II) mono- and dichloroclathrochelates in moderate yields (40-60%). These complexes undergo nucleophilic substitution of their reactive chlorine atoms with aliphatic amines, alcohols and thiolate anions. In the case of ethylenediamine and 1,2-ethanedithiol, only the macrobicyclic products with α,α'-N(2)- and α,α'-S(2)-alicyclic six-numbered ribbed fragments were obtained. The cobalt(II) cage complexes with terminal mercapto groups were synthesized using aliphatic dithiols. The crystal and molecular structures of the six cobalt(II) clathrochelates were obtained by X-ray diffraction. Their CoN(6)-coordination polyhedra possess a geometry intermediate between a trigonal prism and a trigonal antiprism, and the encapsulated cobalt(II) ions are shifted from their centres due to the structural Jahn-Teller effect with the Co-N distances varying significantly (by 0.10-0.26 Å). The electrochemistry of the complexes obtained was studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV). The anodic waves correspond to the quasi-reversible Co(2+/3+) oxidations, whereas the cathodic ranges contain the quasi-reversibile waves assigned to the Co(2+/+) reductions; all the cobalt(i)-containing clathrochelate anions formed are stable in the CV time scale. The electrocatalytic properties of the cobalt complexes obtained were studied in the production of hydrogen from H(+) ions: the addition of HClO(4) resulted in the formation of the same catalytic cathodic reduction Co(2+/+) waves. The controlled-potential electrolysis with gas chromatography analysis confirmed the production of H(2) in high Faraday yields. The efficiency of this electrocatalytic process was enhanced by an immobilization of the complexes with terminal mercapto groups on a surface of the working gold electrode.

  3. Toxicological risk assessment of elemental gold following oral exposure to sheets and nanoparticles - A review.

    PubMed

    Hadrup, Niels; Sharma, Anoop K; Poulsen, Morten; Nielsen, Elsa

    2015-07-01

    Elemental gold is used as a food coloring agent and in dental fillings. In addition, gold nanoparticles are gaining increasing attention due to their potential use as inert carriers for medical purposes. Although elemental gold is considered to be inert, there is evidence to suggest the release of gold ions from its surface. Elemental gold, or the released ions, is, to some extent, absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract. Gold is distributed to organs such as the liver, heart, kidneys and lungs. The main excretion route of absorbed gold is through urine. Data on the oral toxicity of elemental gold is limited. The acute toxicity of elemental gold seems to be low, as rats were unaffected by a single dose of 2000mg nanoparticles/kg of body weight. Information on repeated dose toxicity is very limited. Skin rashes have been reported in humans following the ingestion of liquors containing gold. In addition, gold released from dental restorations has been reported to increase the risk of developing gold hypersensitivity. Regarding genotoxicity, in vitro studies indicate that gold nanoparticles induce DNA damage in mammalian cells. In vivo, gold nanoparticles induce genotoxic effects in Drosophila melanogaster; however, genotoxicity studies in mammals are lacking. Overall, based on the literature and taking low human exposure into account, elemental gold via the oral route is not considered to pose a health concern to humans in general.

  4. Preparation of concave magnetoplasmonic core-shell supraparticles of gold-coated iron oxide via ion-reducible layer-by-layer method for surface enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Kyu; Song, Younseong; Tran, Van Tan; Kim, Jeonghyo; Park, Enoch Y; Lee, Jaebeom

    2017-03-23

    Preparation of suprastructure assemblies with unique colloidal and optical properties remains challenging. Non-uniform covering of magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) with an external inert Au shell has been attempted to protect the magnetic core against oxidation as well as to produce multifunctional supraparticles (SPs) possessing respective optical and magnetic properties. In this study, a concave Au NP coating was deposited on magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with precise control of the shell thickness and roughness through a layer-by-layer (LbL) assisted ionic reduction method termed ion-reducible LbL (IR-LbL) method. Surface enhanced Raman spectra were obtained using graphene quantum dots (GQDs) on the magnetically aligned structure of the prepared core-shell SPs. It is probable that this synthesis method and the generated SPs are essential for characterizing the merge of electronics and magnetism in the nano-regime and may be applicable for further electronics, magnetic storage, and biomedical applications.

  5. Oxidation of atomic gold ions: thermochemistry for the activation of O(2) and N(2)O BY Au(+) ((1)S(0) and (3)D).

    PubMed

    Li, Feng-Xia; Gorham, Katrine; Armentrout, P B

    2010-10-28

    Reaction of Au(+) ((1)S(0) and (3)D) with O(2) and N(2)O is studied as a function of kinetic energy using guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry. A flow tube ion source produces Au(+) primarily in its (1)S(0) (5d(10)) electronic ground state level but with some (3)D and perhaps higher lying excited states. The distribution of states can be altered by adding N(2)O, which completely quenches the excited states, or CH(4) to the flow gases. Cross sections as a function of kinetic energy are measured for both neutral reagents and both ground and excited states of Au(+). Formation of AuO(+) is common to both systems with the N(2)O system also exhibiting AuN(2)(+) and AuNO(+) formation. All reactions of Au(+) ((1)S(0)) are observed to be endothermic, whereas the excitation energy available to the (3)D state allows some reactions to be exothermic. Because of the closed shell character of ground state Au(+) ((1)S(0), 5d(10)), the reactivity of these systems is low and has cross sections with onsets and peaks at higher energies than expected from the known thermochemistry but lower than energies expected from impulsive processes. Analyses of the endothermic reaction cross sections yield the 0 K bond dissociation energy (BDE) in eV of D(0)(Au(+)-O) = 1.12 ± 0.08, D(0)(Au(+)-N(2)) ≥ 0.30 ± 0.04, and D(0)(Au(+)-NO) = 0.89 ± 0.17, values that are all speculative because of the unusual experimental behavior. Combining the AuO(+) BDE measured here with literature data also yields the ionization energy of AuO as 10.38 ± 0.23 eV. Quantum chemical calculations show reasonable agreement with the experimental bond energies and provide the electronic structures of these species.

  6. Monomer adsorption of indocyanine green to gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Guerrini, Luca; Hartsuiker, Liesbeth; Manohar, Srirang; Otto, Cees

    2011-10-05

    NIR-dye encoded gold nanoparticles (GNP) are rapidly emerging as contrast agents in many bio-imaging/sensing applications. The coding process is usually carried out without control or a clear understanding of the metal-liquid interface properties which, in contrast, are critical in determining the type and extension of dye-metal interaction. In this paper, we investigated the effect of gold surface composition on the adsorption of indocyanine green (ICG) on GNP, simulating the surface conditions of gold nanorods on citrate-capped gold nanospheres. These substrates allowed a careful control of the metal-liquid interface composition and, thus, detailed absorption and fluorescence concentration studies of the effects of each individual chemical in the colloidal solution (i.e. bromide anions, cetyl trimethylammonium ions and Ag(+) ions) on the ICG-gold interaction. This study reveals the drastic effect that these experimental parameters can have on the ICG adsorption on GNP.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of functional multicomponent nanosized gallium chelated gold crystals.

    PubMed

    Zambre, Ajit; Silva, Francisco; Upendran, Anandhi; Afrasiabi, Zahra; Xin, Yan; Paulo, António; Kannan, Raghuraman

    2014-03-28

    In this communication, we describe a novel synthetic method for fabricating multicomponent gold nanoparticles containing both gallium ions and biomolecules on the surface. Detailed compositional analysis, using STEM-HAADF and EELS spectroscopy, confirmed the crystalline nature of gold and chelation of gallium ions. The presence of the biomolecule was validated using conventional ELISA.

  8. Role of CO2 in the formation of gold deposits.

    PubMed

    Phillips, G N; Evans, K A

    2004-06-24

    Much of global gold production has come from deposits with uneconomic concentrations of base metals, such as copper, lead and zinc. These 'gold-only' deposits are thought to have formed from hot, aqueous fluids rich in carbon dioxide, but only minor significance has been attached to the role of the CO2 in the process of gold transport. This is because chemical bonding between gold ions and CO2 species is not strong, and so it is unlikely that CO2 has a direct role in gold transport. An alternative indirect role for CO2 as a weak acid that buffers pH has also appeared unlikely, because previously inferred pH values for such gold-bearing fluids are variable. Here we show that such calculated pH values are unlikely to record conditions of gold transport, and propose that CO2 may play a critical role during gold transport by buffering the fluid in a pH range where elevated gold concentration can be maintained by complexation with reduced sulphur. Our conclusions, which are supported by geochemical modelling, may provide a platform for new gold exploration methods.

  9. A halogen-free synthesis of gold nanoparticles using gold(III) oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sashuk, Volodymyr; Rogaczewski, Konrad

    2016-09-01

    Gold nanoparticles are one of the most used nanomaterials. They are usually synthesized by the reduction of gold(III) chloride. However, the presence of halide ions in the reaction mixture is not always welcome. In some cases, these ions have detrimental influence on the morphology and structure of resulting nanoparticles. Here, we present a simple and halogen-free procedure to prepare gold nanoparticles by reduction of gold(III) oxide in neat oleylamine. The method provides the particles with an average size below 10 nm and dispersity of tens of percent. The process of nanoparticle formation was monitored using UV-Vis spectroscopy. The structure and chemical composition of the nanoparticles was determined by SEM, XPS and EDX. We also proposed the mechanism of reduction of gold(III) oxide based on MS, IR and NMR data. Importantly, the synthetic protocol is general and applicable for the preparation of other coinage metal nanoparticles from the corresponding metal oxides. For instance, we demonstrated that the absence of halogen enables efficient alloying of metals when preparing gold-silver bimetallic nanoparticles.

  10. Acoustic vibrations of single suspended gold nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, Todd A.

    The acoustic vibrations for single gold nanowires and gold plates were studied using time-resolved ultrafast transient absorption. The objective of this work was to remove the contribution of the supporting substrate from the damping of the acoustic vibrations of the metal nano-objects. This was achieved by suspending the nano-objects across trenches created by photolithography and reactive ion etching. Transient absorption measurements for single suspended gold nanowires were initially completed in air and water environments. The acoustic vibrations for gold nanowires over the trench in air last typically for several nanoseconds, whereas gold nanowires in water are damped more quickly. Continuum mechanics models suggest that the acoustic impedance mismatch between air and water dominates the damping rate. Later transient absorption studies on single suspended gold nanowires were completed in glycerol and ethylene glycol environments. However, our continuum mechanical model suggests nearly complete damping in glycerol due to its high viscosity, but similar damping rates are seen between the two liquids. The continuum mechanics model thus incorrectly addresses high viscosity effects on the lifetimes of the acoustic vibrations, and more complicated viscoelastic interactions occur for the higher viscosity liquids. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  11. Determination of the concentration and the average number of gold atoms in a gold nanoparticle by osmotic pressure.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan; Wang, Lixia; Chen, Dejun; Wang, Gongke

    2012-06-26

    For an ideal solution, an analytical expression for the macromolecule concentration, electrolyte concentration, and solution osmotic pressure is obtained on the basis of the van't Hoff equation and the Donnan equilibrium. The expression was further applied to a colloid solution of about 3 nm glutathione-stabilized gold nanoparticles. The concentration of the colloid solution and the average net ion charge number for each gold nanoparticle were determined with the measured osmotic pressure data. Meanwhile, the gold contents of the solutions were analyzed by means of atomic absorption spectrophotometry, and the results were combined with the determined concentration of gold nanoparticle colloids to determine that the average number of gold atoms per 3 nm gold nanoparticle is 479, which is 1/1.7 times the number of atoms in bulk metallic gold of the same size. The same proportion also occurred in the 2 nm 4-mercaptobenzoic acid monolayer-protected gold nanoparticles prepared by Ackerson et al., who utilized the quantitative high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscope to determine the average number of gold atoms per nanoparticle (Ackerson, C. J.; Jadzinsky, P. D.; Sexton J. Z.; Bushnell, D. A.; Kornberg, R. D. Synthesis and Bioconjugation of 2 and 3 nm-Diameter Gold Nanoparticles. Bioconjugate Chem. 2010, 21, 214-218).

  12. Speciation of surface gold in pressure oxidized carbonaceous gold ores by TOF-SIMS and TOF-LIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimov, S. S.; Chryssoulis, S. L.; Sodhi, R. N.

    2003-01-01

    To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt ever to speciate gold preg-robbed by carbonaceous matter using a surface sensitive microbeam technique. This approach enables the direct determination of gold species sorbed on carbonaceous particulates thus providing a new tool in understanding the chemistry of gold sorption on carbon. The reasoning behind this effort was to study the detrimental effect chloride ions have on gold recovery by pressure oxidation of carbonaceous sulfide ores, a technology largely used by the mining industry. The characterization of the sorbed gold species involved three surface sensitive microbeam analytical techniques (TOF-SIMS, TOF-LIMS and XPS) providing confirmatory results for better accuracy. Optimum conditions for detection of gold compounds with minimum fragmentation by TOF-SIMS and TOF-LIMS mass spectrometers have been determined. A reference library of 16 major gold complexes with halogen, thiosulfate, cyanide and thiocyanate groups relevant to the gold recovery processes has been established. The most suitable of the microbeam techniques tested was found to be negative (-ve) ion TOF-LIMS, offering best sensitivity and a small analytical spot size.

  13. GOLD PLATING PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Seegmiller, R.

    1957-08-01

    An improved bath is reported for plating gold on other metals. The composition of the plating bath is as follows: Gold cyanide from about 15 to about 50 grams, potassium cyanide from about 70 to about 125 grams, and sulfonated castor oil from about 0.1 to about 10 cc. The gold plate produced from this bath is smooth, semi-hard, and nonporous.

  14. Plant Extract (Bupleurum falcatum) as a Green Factory for Biofabrication of Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lee, You Jeong; Cha, Song-Hyun; Lee, Kyoung Jin; Kim, Yeong Shik; Cho, Seonho; Park, Youmie

    2015-09-01

    This work describes a biofabrication process for gold nanoparticles in which the plant extract (Bupleurum falcatum) is used as a reducing agent to convert gold ions to gold nanoparticles. Biofabricated gold nanoparticles with spherical shapes were observed with an average diameter of 10.5 ± 2.3 nm. The color of the gold nanoparticles was purple, with a surface plasmon resonance peak at 542 nm. The face-centered cubic structure of crystalline gold was confirmed by high-resolution X-ray diffraction patterns. The biofabricated gold nanoparticles demonstrated excellent catalytic activity towards the 4-nitrophenol reduction reaction. The current report suggests that plant extracts are valuable natural sources for the biofabrication of gold nanoparticles with excellent catalytic activities.

  15. Gold nanoparticle based surface enhanced fluorescence for detection of organophosphorus agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasary, Samuel S. R.; Rai, Uma S.; Yu, Hongtao; Anjaneyulu, Yerramilli; Dubey, Madan; Ray, Paresh Chandra

    2008-07-01

    Organophosphorus agents (OPA) represent a serious concern to public safety as nerve agents and pesticides. Here we report the development of gold nanoparticle based surface enhanced fluorescence (NSEF) spectroscopy for rapid and sensitive screening of organophosphorus agents. Fluorescent from Eu 3+ ions that are bound within the electromagnetic field of gold nanoparticles exhibit a strong enhancement. In the presence of OPA, Eu 3+ ions are released from the gold nanoparticle surface and thus a very distinct fluorescence signal change was observed. We discussed the mechanism of fluorescence enhancement and the role of OPA for fluorescence intensity change in the presence of gold nanoparticles.

  16. Therapeutic gold, silver, and platinum nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Miko; Foote, Matthew; Prow, Tarl W

    2015-01-01

    There are an abundance of nanoparticle technologies being developed for use as part of therapeutic strategies. This review focuses on a narrow class of metal nanoparticles that have therapeutic potential that is a consequence of elemental composition and size. The most widely known of these are gold nanoshells that have been developed over the last two decades for photothermal ablation in superficial cancers. The therapeutic effect is the outcome of the thickness and diameter of the gold shell that enables fine tuning of the plasmon resonance. When these metal nanoparticles are exposed to the relevant wavelength of light, their temperature rapidly increases. This in turn induces a localized photothermal ablation that kills the surrounding tumor tissue. Similarly, gold nanoparticles have been developed to enhance radiotherapy. The high-Z nature of gold dramatically increases the photoelectric cross-section. Thus, the photoelectric effects are significantly increased. The outcome of these interactions is enhanced tumor killing with lower doses of radiation, all while sparing tissue without gold nanoparticles. Silver nanoparticles have been used for their wound healing properties in addition to enhancing the tumor-killing effects of anticancer drugs. Finally, platinum nanoparticles are thought to serve as a reservoir for platinum ions that can induce DNA damage in cancer cells. The future is bright with the path to clinical trials is largely cleared for some of the less complex therapeutic metal nanoparticle systems.

  17. One-pot synthesis of gold nanorods via autocatalytic growth of sonochemically formed gold seeds: the effect of irradiation time on the formation of seeds and nanorods.

    PubMed

    Okitsu, Kenji; Nunota, Yuho

    2014-11-01

    A one-pot synthesis for gold nanorods was developed using sonochemical reduction of gold ions in an aqueous solution in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, silver nitrate, and ascorbic acid, where we focused on the autocatalytic growth of gold seeds formed by ultrasonic irradiation for short times. In growth experiments with these sonochemically formed gold seeds, sigmoidal shape growth curves were observed, and the induction period before growth began was longer for shorter irradiation times. This result indicated that the number of sonochemically formed gold seeds increased with increasing irradiation time. The average aspect ratio of the gold nanorods produced changed from 2.0 at an irradiation time of 0.5min to 3.6 at 15min. The gold nanorods produced were longer and wider when the irradiation time was shorter.

  18. Investigating the Toxicity, Uptake, Nanoparticle Formation and Genetic Response of Plants to Gold

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Andrew F.; Rylott, Elizabeth L.; Anderson, Christopher W. N.; Bruce, Neil C.

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the physiological and genetic responses of Arabidopsis thaliana L. (Arabidopsis) to gold. The root lengths of Arabidopsis seedlings grown on nutrient agar plates containing 100 mg/L gold were reduced by 75%. Oxidized gold was subsequently found in roots and shoots of these plants, but gold nanoparticles (reduced gold) were only observed in the root tissues. We used a microarray-based study to monitor the expression of candidate genes involved in metal uptake and transport in Arabidopsis upon gold exposure. There was up-regulation of genes involved in plant stress response such as glutathione transferases, cytochromes P450, glucosyl transferases and peroxidases. In parallel, our data show the significant down-regulation of a discreet number of genes encoding proteins involved in the transport of copper, cadmium, iron and nickel ions, along with aquaporins, which bind to gold. We used Medicago sativa L. (alfalfa) to study nanoparticle uptake from hydroponic culture using ionic gold as a non-nanoparticle control and concluded that nanoparticles between 5 and 100 nm in diameter are not directly accumulated by plants. Gold nanoparticles were only observed in plants exposed to ionic gold in solution. Together, we believe our results imply that gold is taken up by the plant predominantly as an ionic form, and that plants respond to gold exposure by up-regulating genes for plant stress and down-regulating specific metal transporters to reduce gold uptake. PMID:24736522

  19. Extracellular mycosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using Fusarium solani

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, K.; Arumugam, A.

    2014-08-01

    The development of eco-friendly methods for the synthesis of nanomaterial shape and size is an important area of research in the field of nanotechnology. The present investigation deals with the extracellular rapid biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using Fusarium solani culture filtrate. The UV-vis spectra of the fungal culture filtrate medium containing gold ion showed peak at 527 nm corresponding to the plasmon absorbance of gold nanoparticles. FTIR spectra provide an evidence for the presence of heterocyclic compound in the culture filtrate, which increases the stability of the synthesized gold nanoparticles. The X-ray analysis respects the Bragg's law and confirmed the crystalline nature of the gold nanoparticles. AFM analysis showed the results of particle sizes (41 nm). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the gold nanoparticles are spherical in shape with the size range from 20 to 50 nm. The use of F. solani will offer several advantages since it is considered as a non-human pathogenic organism. The fungus F. solani has a fast growth rate, rapid capacity of metallic ions reduction, NPs stabilization and facile and economical biomass handling. Extracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles could be highly advantageous from the point of view of synthesis in large quantities, time consumption, eco-friendly, non-toxic and easy downstream processing.

  20. Ionic transport properties of template-synthesized gold nanotube membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng

    Ionic transport in nanotubes exhibits unique properties due to the strong interactions between ions and the nanotube surface. The main objective of my research is to explore and regulate the ionic transport in gold nanotube membranes. Chapter 1 overviews a versatile method of fabricating nanostructured materials, called the template synthesis. Important parameters of the template synthesis are introduced such as templates and deposition methods. The template synthesis method is used to prepare membranes used in this dissertation. Chapter 2 describes a method to increase the ionic conductivity in membranes containing gold nanotubes with small diameter (4 nm). The gold nanotube membrane is prepared by the electroless plating of gold in a commercially available polycarbonate membrane. Voltages are applied to the gold nanotube membrane and fixed charges are injected on the gold nanotube walls. We show that ionic conductivity of the gold nanotube membrane can be enhanced in aqueous potassium chloride (KCl) solution at negative applied voltages. When the most negative voltage (-0.8 V vs. Ag/AgCl) is applied to the membrane, the ionic conductivity of the solution inside the gold nanotube (94 mS.cm-1) is comparable to that of 1 M aqueous KCl, over two orders of magnitude higher than that of the 0.01 M KCl contacting the membrane. Chapter 3 explores another important transport property of the gold nanotube membrane -- ion permselectivity. When the permselective membrane separates two electrolyte solutions at different concentrations, a membrane potential is developed and measured by the potentiometric method. Surface charge density and the ion mobilities are estimated by fitting the experimental data with a pre-existing model. The surface charge density of the gold nanotube membrane in this research is estimated to be 2 muC/cm2. Chapter 4 describes voltage-controlled ionic transport in a gold/polypyrrole membrane doped with sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (DBS). Polypyrrole

  1. Titration of gold nanoparticles in phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Han-Wen; Schadt, Mark J; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2015-12-07

    In the organic-aqueous phase transfer process of gold nanoparticles, there are two types of distinctive interfaces involving hydrophilic and hydrophobic ligands, the understanding of which is important for the design of functional nanomaterials for analytical/bioanalytical applications and the control over the nanoparticles' nanoactivity and nanotoxicity in different phases. This report describes new findings of an investigation of the quantitative aspect of ligand ion pairing at the capping monolayer structure that drives the phase extraction of gold nanoparticles. Alkanethiolate-capped gold nanoparticles of 8 nm diameter with high size monodispersity (RSD ∼ 5%) were first derivatized by a ligand place exchange reaction with 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid to form a mixed monolayer shell consisting of both hydrophobic (-CH3) and hydrophilic (-COOH) groups. It was followed by quantitative titration of the resulting nanoparticles with a cationic species (-NR4(+)) in a toluene phase, yielding ion pairing of -NR4(+) and -COO(-) on part of the capping monolayer. Analysis of the phase extraction allowed a quantitative determination of the percentage of ion pairing and structural changes in the capping monolayer on the nanoparticles. The results, along with morphological characterization, are discussed in terms of the interfacial structural changes and their implications on the rational design of surface-functionalized nanoparticles and fine tuning of the interfacial reactivity.

  2. Gold emissivities for hydrocode applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, C.; Wagon, F.; Galmiche, D.; Loiseau, P.; Dattolo, E.; Babonneau, D.

    2004-10-01

    The Radiom model [M. Busquet, Phys Fluids B 5, 4191 (1993)] is designed to provide a radiative-hydrodynamic code with non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) data efficiently by using LTE tables. Comparison with benchmark data [M. Klapisch and A. Bar-Shalom, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transf. 58, 687 (1997)] has shown Radiom to be inaccurate far from LTE and for heavy ions. In particular, the emissivity was found to be strongly underestimated. A recent algorithm, Gondor [C. Bowen and P. Kaiser, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transf. 81, 85 (2003)], was introduced to improve the gold non-LTE ionization and corresponding opacity. It relies on fitting the collisional ionization rate to reproduce benchmark data given by the Averroès superconfiguration code [O. Peyrusse, J. Phys. B 33, 4303 (2000)]. Gondor is extended here to gold emissivity calculations, with two simple modifications of the two-level atom line source function used by Radiom: (a) a larger collisional excitation rate and (b) the addition of a Planckian source term, fitted to spectrally integrated Averroès emissivity data. This approach improves the agreement between experiments and hydrodynamic simulations.

  3. Chalcogenide centred gold complexes.

    PubMed

    Gimeno, M Concepción; Laguna, Antonio

    2008-09-01

    Chalcogenide-centred gold complexes are an important class of compounds in which a central chalcogen is surrounded by several gold atoms or gold and other metals. They have special characteristics such as unusual geometries, electron deficiency and properties such as luminescence or non-linear optical properties. The best known species are the trinuclear [E(AuPR3)3]+, 'oxonium' type species, that have high synthetic applicability, not only in other chalcogen-centred species, but in many other organometallic derivatives. The aurophilic interactions play an important role in the stability, preference for a particular geometry and luminescence properties in this type of derivatives (critical review, 117 references).

  4. Alkyl and Aromatic Amines as Digestive Ripening/Size Focusing Agents for Gold Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yijun; Jose, Deepa; Sorensen, Christopher; Klabunde, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    Both long chain alkyl thiols and alkyl amines behave as size focusing agents for gold nanoparticles, a process that is under thermodynamic control. However, amines do not oxidize surface gold atoms while thiols do oxidize surface gold to gold(I) with evolution of hydrogen gas. Therefore, alkyl amines participate in digestive ripening by a different mechanism. The efficiency of alkyl amines for this process is described and compared, and ultimate gold particle size differences are discussed. Reported herein is a detailed investigation of alkyl chain lengths for alkyl amines, aromatic amines (aniline), and unusually reactive amines (2-phenylethyl amine). Also, two methods of preparation of the crude gold nanoparticles were employed: gold ion reduction/inverse micelle vs. metal vaporization (Solvated Metal Atom Dispersion—SMAD).

  5. Gold nanoprobes for theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Panchapakesan, Balaji; Book-Newell, Brittany; Sethu, Palaniappan; Rao, Madhusudhana; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoprobes have become attractive diagnostic and therapeutic agents in medicine and life sciences research owing to their reproducible synthesis with atomic level precision, unique physical and chemical properties, versatility of their morphologies, flexibility in functionalization, ease of targeting, efficiency in drug delivery and opportunities for multimodal therapy. This review highlights some of the recent advances and the potential for gold nanoprobes in theranostics. PMID:22122586

  6. Gold-bearing skarns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Theodore, Ted G.; Orris, Greta J.; Hammerstrom, Jane M.; Bliss, James D.

    1991-01-01

    In recent years, a significant proportion of the mining industry's interest has been centered on discovery of gold deposits; this includes discovery of additional deposits where gold occurs in skarn, such as at Fortitude, Nevada, and at Red Dome, Australia. Under the classification of Au-bearing skarns, we have modeled these and similar gold-rich deposits that have a gold grade of at least 1 g/t and exhibit distinctive skarn mineralogy. Two subtypes, Au-skarns and byproduct Au-skarns, can be recognized on the basis of gold, silver, and base-metal grades, although many other geological factors apparently are still undistinguishable largely because of a lack of detailed studies of the Au-skarns. Median grades and tonnage for 40 Au-skarn deposits are 8.6 g/t Au, 5.0 g/t Ag, and 213,000 t. Median grades and tonnage for 50 byproduct and Au-skarn deposits are 3.7 g/t Au, 37 g/t Ag, and 330,000 t. Gold-bearing skarns are generally calcic exoskarns associated with intense retrograde hydrosilicate alteration. These skarns may contain economic amounts of numerous other commodities (Cu, Fe, Pb, Zn, As, Bi, W, Sb, Co, Cd, and S) as well as gold and silver. Most Au-bearing skarns are found in Paleozoic and Cenozoic orogenic-belt and island-arc settings and are associated with felsic to intermediate intrusive rocks of Paleozoic to Tertiary age. Native gold, electru, pyrite, pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, arsenopyrite, sphalerite, galena, bismuth minerals, and magnetite or hematite are the most common opaque minerals. Gangue minerals typically include garnet (andradite-grossular), pyroxene (diopside-hedenbergite), wollastonite, chlorite, epidote, quartz, actinolite-tremolite, and (or) calcite.

  7. Getting the Gold Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Epner Technology, Inc., worked with Goddard Space Center to apply gold coating to the Vegetation Canopy Lidar (VCL) mirror. This partnership resulted in new commercial applications for Epner's LaserGold(R) process in the automotive industry. Previously, the company did not have equipment large enough to handle the plating of the stainless steel panels cost effectively. Seeing a chance to renew this effort, Epner Technology and Goddard entered into an agreement by which NASA would fund the facility needed to do the gold-plating, and Epner Technology would cover all other costs as part of their internal research and development. The VCL mirror project proceeded successfully, fulfilling Goddard's needs and leaving Epner Technology with a new facility to provide LaserGold for the automotive industry. The new capability means increased power savings and improvements in both quality and production time for BMW Manufacturing Corporation of Spartanburg, South Carolina, and Cadillac of Detroit, Michigan, as well as other manufacturers who have implemented Epner Technology's LaserGold process. LaserGold(R) is a registered trademark of Epner Technology, Inc.

  8. Gold in minerals and the composition of native gold

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Robert Sprague; Fleischer, Michael

    1969-01-01

    Gold occurs in nature mainly as the metal and as various alloys. It forms complete series of solid solutions with silver, copper, nickel, palladium, and platinum. In association with the platinum metals, gold occurs as free gold as well as in solid solution. The native elements contain the most gold, followed by the sulfide minerals. Several gold tellurides are known, but no gold selenides have been reported, and only one sulfide, the telluride-sulfide mineral nagyagite, is known. The nonmetallic minerals carry the least gold, and the light-colored minerals generally contain less gold than the dark minerals. Some conclusions in the literature are conflicting in regard to the relation of fineness of native gold to its position laterally and vertically within a lode, the nature of the country rocks, and the location and size of nuggets in a streambed, as well as to the variation of fineness within an individual nugget.

  9. Hydroquinone Based Synthesis of Gold Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Picciolini, Silvia; Mehn, Dora; Ojea-Jiménez, Isaac; Gramatica, Furio; Morasso, Carlo

    2016-08-10

    Gold nanorods are an important kind of nanoparticles characterized by peculiar plasmonic properties. Despite their widespread use in nanotechnology, the synthetic methods for the preparation of gold nanorods are still not fully optimized. In this paper we describe a new, highly efficient, two-step protocol based on the use of hydroquinone as a mild reducing agent. Our approach allows the preparation of nanorods with a good control of size and aspect ratio (AR) simply by varying the amount of hexadecyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and silver ions (Ag(+)) present in the "growth solution". By using this method, it is possible to markedly reduce the amount of CTAB, an expensive and cytotoxic reagent, necessary to obtain the elongated shape. Gold nanorods with an aspect ratio of about 3 can be obtained in the presence of just 50 mM of CTAB (versus 100 mM used in the standard protocol based on the use of ascorbic acid), while shorter gold nanorods are obtained using a concentration as low as 10 mM.

  10. Laser Desorption Ionization Quadrupole Ion Trap Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry of Au m Fe n +/- Clusters Generated from Gold-Iron Nanoparticles and their Giant Nanoflowers. Electrochemical and/or Plasma Assisted Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawale, Ravi Madhukar; Ausekar, Mayuri Vilas; Pavliňák, David; Galmiz, Oleksandr; Kubáček, Pavel; Havel, Josef

    2017-02-01

    Gold nanoparticles (NP) with average diameter 100 nm synthesized from tetrachloroauric acid solution using stainless steel as a reducing agent were found to contain iron. Applying simultaneously high frequency (HF) plasma discharge in solution during the electrochemical reduction, giant gold-iron nanoflowers with average size 1000-5000 nm were formed. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows the morphology of the nanopowders produced as polygonal yet nearly spherical, whereas iron content in both products determined by energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) was found to be at 2.5 at. %. Laser desorption ionization (LDI) of both nanomaterials and mass spectrometric analysis show the formation of Au m Fe n +/- ( m = 1-35; n = 1-3) clusters. Structure of few selected clusters in neutral or monocharged forms were computed by density functional theory (DFT) calculations and it was found that typical distances of an iron nucleus from adjacent gold nuclei lie in the interval 2.5 to 2.7 Å. Synthetized Au-Fe nanoparticles were found stable for at least 2 mo at room temperature (even in aqueous solution) without any stabilizing agent. Produced Au-Fe nanoparticles in combination with standard MALDI matrices enhance ionization of peptides and might find use in nanomedicine.

  11. 2D-3D transition of gold cluster anions resolved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Mikael P.; Lechtken, Anne; Schooss, Detlef; Kappes, Manfred M.; Furche, Filipp

    2008-05-01

    Small gold cluster anions Aun- are known for their unusual two-dimensional (2D) structures, giving rise to properties very different from those of bulk gold. Previous experiments and calculations disagree about the number of gold atoms nc where the transition to 3D structures occurs. We combine trapped ion electron diffraction and state of the art electronic structure calculations to resolve this puzzle and establish nc=12 . It is shown that theoretical studies using traditional generalized gradient functionals are heavily biased towards 2D structures. For a correct prediction of the 2D-3D crossover point it is crucial to use density functionals yielding accurate jellium surface energies, such as the Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria (TPSS) functional or the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functional modified for solids (PBEsol). Further, spin-orbit effects have to be included, and large, flexible basis sets employed. This combined theoretical-experimental approach is promising for larger gold and other metal clusters.

  12. Electrical bending actuation of gold-films with nanotextured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, K. W.; Gao, P.; Martin, C. R.; Ngan, A. H. W.

    2015-01-01

    An actuating material system comprising a gold-film with nanotextured surface was fabricated. Using electroless gold plating onto a substrate of porous anodized aluminum oxide, a thin film of gold with a high density of short gold nanofibers on its surface was made. When one end of such a film was connected to an ion generator, bending was achieved upon electrical charging in air. Experiments showed that the free end of an 8 mm film could be displaced by more than 1.6 mm with a bending strain of 0.08%. In contrast with other types of thin-film artificial muscle materials, the present Au-film did not require any electrolyte to function. With the relatively easy fabrication method, this nanotextured film shows promising actuation behavior in air.

  13. Plasmonic Gold Decorated MWCNT Nanocomposite for Localized Plasmon Resonance Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozhikandathil, J.; Badilescu, S.; Packirisamy, M.

    2015-08-01

    The synergism of excellent properties of carbon nanotubes and gold nanoparticles is used in this work for bio-sensing of recombinant bovine growth hormones (rbST) by making Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNT) locally optically responsive by augmenting it optical properties through Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR). To this purpose, locally gold nano particles decorated gold-MWCNT composite was synthesized from a suspension of MWCNT bundles and hydrogen chloroauric acid in an aqueous solution, activated ultrasonically and, then, drop-casted on a glass substrate. The slow drying of the drop produces a “coffee ring” pattern that is found to contain gold-MWCNT nanocomposites, accumulated mostly along the perimeter of the ring. The reaction is studied also at low-temperature, in the vacuum chamber of the Scanning Electron Microscope and is accounted for by the local melting processes that facilitate the contact between the bundle of tubes and the gold ions. Biosensing applications of the gold-MWCNT nanocomposite using their LSPR properties are demonstrated for the plasmonic detection of traces of bovine growth hormone. The sensitivity of the hybrid platform which is found to be 1 ng/ml is much better than that measuring with gold nanoparticles alone which is only 25 ng/ml.

  14. Biological synthesis of triangular gold nanoprisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, S. Shiv; Rai, Akhilesh; Ankamwar, Balaprasad; Singh, Amit; Ahmad, Absar; Sastry, Murali

    2004-07-01

    The optoelectronic and physicochemical properties of nanoscale matter are a strong function of particle size. Nanoparticle shape also contributes significantly to modulating their electronic properties. Several shapes ranging from rods to wires to plates to teardrop structures may be obtained by chemical methods; triangular nanoparticles have been synthesized by using a seeded growth process. Here, we report the discovery that the extract from the lemongrass plant, when reacted with aqueous chloroaurate ions, yields a high percentage of thin, flat, single-crystalline gold nanotriangles. The nanotriangles seem to grow by a process involving rapid reduction, assembly and room-temperature sintering of 'liquid-like' spherical gold nanoparticles. The anisotropy in nanoparticle shape results in large near-infrared absorption by the particles, and highly anisotropic electron transport in films of the nanotriangles.

  15. Biorecovery of gold

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eisler, R.

    2003-01-01

    Recovery of ionic and metallic gold (Au) from a wide variety of solutions by selected species of bacteria, yeasts, fungi, algae, and higher plants is documented. Gold accumulations were up to 7.0 g/kg dry weight (DW) in various species of bacteria, 25.0 g/kg DW in freshwater algae, 84.0 g/kg DW in peat, and 100.0 g/kg DW in dried fungus mixed with keratinous material. Mechanisms of accumulation include oxidation, dissolution, reduction, leaching, and sorption. Uptake patterns are significantly modified by the physicochemical milieu. Crab exoskeletons accumulate up to 4.9 g Au/kg DW; however, gold accumulations in various tissues of living teleosts, decapod crustaceans, and bivalve molluscs are negligible.

  16. Nanoscale Phase Segregation of Mixed Thiolates on Gold Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Harkness, Kellen M.; Balinski, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Phase segregation and domain formation is observed within the protecting monolayer of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using ion mobility-mass spectrometry, a two-dimensional gas-phase separation technique. Experimental data is compared to a theoretical model that represents a randomly distributed ligand mixture. Deviations from this model provide evidence for nanophase separation resulting in anisotropic AuNPs. PMID:21882306

  17. Gold-bismuth clusters.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Ana

    2014-08-07

    Metal clusters have interesting characteristics, such as the relationship between properties and size of the cluster. This is not always apparent, so theoretical studies can provide relevant information. In this report, optimized structures and electron donor-acceptor properties of AunBim clusters are reported (n + m = 2-7, 20). Density functional theory calculations were performed to obtain optimized structures. The ground states of gold clusters formed with up to seven atoms are planar. The presence of Bi modifies the structure, and the clusters become 3-D. Several optimized geometries have at least one Bi atom bonded to gold or bismuth atoms and form structures similar to NH3. This fragment is also present in clusters with 20 atoms, where the formation of Au3Bi stabilizes the structures. Bismuth clusters are better electron donors and worse electron acceptors than gold clusters. Mixed clusters fall in between these two extremes. The presence of Bi atoms in gold clusters modifies the electron donor-acceptor properties of the clusters, but there is no correlation between the number of Bi atoms present in the cluster and the capacity for donating electrons. The effect of planarity in Au19Bi clusters is the same as that in Au20 clusters. The properties of pure gold clusters are certainly interesting, but clusters formed by Bi and Au are more important because the introduction of different atoms modifies the geometry, the stability, and consequently the physical and chemical properties. Apparently, the presence of Bi may increase the reactivity of gold clusters, but further studies are necessary to corroborate this hypothesis.

  18. Defining rules for the shape evolution of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Langille, Mark R; Personick, Michelle L; Zhang, Jian; Mirkin, Chad A

    2012-09-05

    The roles of silver ions and halides (chloride, bromide, and iodide) in the seed-mediated synthesis of gold nanostructures have been investigated, and their influence on the growth of 10 classes of nanoparticles that differ in shape has been determined. We systematically studied the effects that each chemical component has on the particle shape, on the rate of particle formation, and on the chemical composition of the particle surface. We demonstrate that halides can be used to (1) adjust the reduction potential of the gold ion species in solution and (2) passivate the gold nanoparticle surface, both of which control the reaction kinetics and thus enable the selective synthesis of a series of different particle shapes. We also show that silver ions can be used as an underpotential deposition agent to access a different set of particle shapes by controlling growth of the resulting gold nanoparticles through surface passivation (more so than kinetic effects). Importantly, we show that the density of silver coverage can be controlled by the amount and type of halide present in solution. This behavior arises from the decreasing stability of the underpotentially deposited silver layer in the presence of larger halides due to the relative strengths of the Ag(+)/Ag(0)-halide and Au(+)/Au(0)-halide interactions, as well as the passivation effects of the halides on the gold particle surface. We summarize this work by proposing a set of design considerations for controlling the growth and final shape of gold nanoparticles prepared by seed-mediated syntheses through the judicious use of halides and silver ions.

  19. GOLD CLUSTER LABELS AND RELATED TECHNOLOGIES IN MOLECULAR MORPHOLOGY.

    SciTech Connect

    HAINFELD,J.F.; POWELL,R.D.

    2004-02-04

    Although intensely colored, even the largest colloidal gold particles are not, on their own, sufficiently colored for routine use as a light microscopy stain: only with very abundant antigens or with specialized illumination methods can bound gold be seen. Colloidal gold probes were developed primarily as markers for electron microscopy, for which their very high electron density and selectivity for narrow size distributions when prepared in different ways rendered them highly suited. The widespread use of gold labeling for light microscopy was made possible by the introduction of autometallographic enhancement methods. In these processes, the bound gold particles are exposed to a solution containing metal ions and a reducing agent; they catalyze the reduction of the ions, resulting in the deposition of additional metal selectively onto the particles. On the molecular level, the gold particles are enlarged up to 30-100 nm in diameter; on the macroscale level, this results in the formation of a dark stain in regions containing bound gold particles, greatly increasing visibility and contrast. The applications of colloidal gold have been described elsewhere in this chapter, we will focus on the use of covalently linked cluster complexes of gold and other metals. A gold cluster complex is a discrete molecular coordination compound comprising a central core, or ''cluster'' of electron-dense metal atoms, ligated by a shell of small organic molecules (ligands), which are linked to the metal atoms on the surface of the core. This structure gives clusters several important advantages as labels. The capping of the metal surface by ligands prevents non-specific binding to cell and tissue components, which can occur with colloidal gold. Cluster compounds are more stable and may be used under a wider range of conditions. Unlike colloidal gold, clusters do not require additional macromolecules such as bovine serum albumin or polyethylene glycol for stabilization, and the total

  20. Chemistry for oncotheranostic gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Trouiller, Anne Juliette; Hebié, Seydou; El Bahhaj, Fatima; Napporn, Teko W; Bertrand, Philippe

    2015-06-24

    This review presents in a comprehensive ways the chemical methods used to functionalize gold nanoparticles with focus on anti-cancer applications. The review covers the parameters required for the synthesis gold nanoparticles with defined shapes and sizes, method for targeted delivery in tumours, and selected examples of anti-cancers compounds delivered with gold nanoparticles. A short survey of bioassays for oncology based on gold nanoparticles is also presented.

  1. Chemically functionalized gold nanoparticles: Synthesis, characterization, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Weston Lewis

    This thesis focuses on the development and application of gold nanoparticle based detection systems and biomimetic structures. Each class of modified nanoparticle has properties that are defined by its chemical moieties that interface with solution and the gold nanoparticle core. In Chapter 2, a comparison of the biomolecular composition and binding properties of various preparations of antibody oligonucleotide gold nanoparticle conjugates is presented. These constructs differed significantly in terms of their structure and binding properties. Chapter 3 reports the use of electroless gold deposition as a light scattering signal enhancer in a multiplexed, microarray-based scanometric immunoassay using the gold nanoparticle probes evaluated in Chapter 2. The use of gold development results in greater signal enhancement than the typical silver development, and multiple rounds of metal development were found to increase the resulting signal compared to one development. Chapter 4 describes an amplified scanometric detection method for human telomerase activity. Gold nanoparticles functionalized with specific oligonucleotide sequences can efficiently capture telomerase enzymes and subsequently be elongated. Both the elongated and unmodified oligonucleotide sequences are simultaneously measured. At low telomerase concentrations, elongated strands cannot be detected, but the unmodified sequences, which come from the same probe particles, can be detected because their concentration is higher, providing a novel form of amplification. Chapter 5 reports the development of a novel colorimetric nitrite and nitrate ion assay based upon gold nanoparticle probes functionalized with Griess reaction reagents. This assay takes advantage of the distance-dependent plasmonic properties of the gold nanoparticles and the ability of nitrite ion to facilitate the cross coupling of novel nanoparticle probes. The assay works on the concept of a kinetic end point and can be triggered at the EPA

  2. Controlling the Shape and Crystallinity of Gold and Silver Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Personick, Michelle Louise

    The strong dependence of the optical, electronic, and catalytic properties of noble metal nanoparticles on their shape has necessitated the high-yield synthesis of gold and silver nanostructures with precisely defined morphologies. This directed synthesis requires a detailed mechanistic understanding of the chemical and physical factors which control nanoparticle shape; however, these mechanistic explanations are still incomplete. To this end, the work of this dissertation seeks to enhance the understanding of nanoparticle growth on a mechanistic level, while also developing synthetic methods for producing novel nanoparticle shapes. Chapter 1 describes the state of the art in shape-controlled noble metal nanoparticle synthesis prior to the work conducted in this dissertation. In Chapter 2, a method is reported for synthesizing {110}-faceted bipyramids and rhombic dodecahedra, in which the combination of a chloride-containing surfactant and a low concentration of silver ions leads to the stabilization of the {110} facets. Chapter 3 explores in mechanistic detail the use of silver underpotential deposition to control particle growth in the synthesis of four gold nanoparticle shapes: octahedra, rhombic dodecahedra, truncated ditetragonal prisms, and concave cubes. This mechanistic understanding is expanded in Chapter 4, where the independent and synergistic roles of silver ions and halide ions in the seed-mediated synthesis of gold nanoparticles are systematically probed, culminating in a set of design considerations for controlling the shape of gold nanoparticles. Chapter 5 investigates the role of excitation wavelength in controlling the rate of silver ion reduction in the plasmon-mediated synthesis of silver nanoparticles and describes the synthesis of silver cubes with an unusual twinning structure. Finally, Chapter 6 combines the mechanistic insights gained in Chapters 2-5 to address a standing challenge in shape-controlled gold nanoparticle synthesis: the direct

  3. Gold and silver nanoparticles from Trianthema decandra: synthesis, characterization, and antimicrobial properties

    PubMed Central

    Geethalakshmi, R; Sarada, DVL

    2012-01-01

    Background There is an increasing commercial demand for nanoparticles due to their wide applicability in various markets, including medicine, catalysis, electronics, chemistry, and energy. In this report, a simple and ecofriendly chemical reaction for the synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles from Trianthema decandra (Aizoaceae) has been developed. Methods and results On treatment of aqueous solutions containing chloroauric acid or silver nitrate with root extract of T. decandra, stable gold or silver nanoparticles were rapidly formed. The kinetics of reduction of gold and silver ions during the reaction was analyzed by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. Field emission-scanning electron microscopy showed formation of gold nanoparticles in various shapes, including spherical, cubical, triangular, and hexagonal, while silver nanoparticles were spherical. The size of the gold nanoparticles was 33–65 nm and that of the silver nanoparticles was 36–74 nm. Energy dispersive x-ray and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the presence of metallic gold and metallic silver in the respective nanoparticles. The antimicrobial properties of the synthesized nanoparticles were analyzed using the Kirby-Bauer method. The results show varied susceptibility of microorganisms to the gold and silver nanoparticles. Conclusion It is believed that phytochemicals present in T. decandra extract reduce the silver and gold ions into metallic nanoparticles. This strategy reduces the cost of production and the environmental impact. The silver and gold nanoparticles formed showed strong activity against all microorganisms tested. PMID:23091381

  4. Derivatized gold clusters and antibody-gold cluster conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hainfeld, James F.; Furuya, Frederic R.

    1994-11-01

    Antibody- or antibody fragment-gold cluster conjugates are shown wherein the conjugate size can be as small as 5.0 nm. Methods and reagents are disclosed in which antibodies, Fab' or F(ab').sub.2 fragments thereof are covalently bound to a stable cluster of gold atoms. The gold clusters may contain 6, 8, 9, 11, 13, 55 or 67 gold atoms in their inner core. The clusters may also contain radioactive gold. The antibody-cluster conjugates are useful in electron microscopy applications as well as in clinical applications that include imaging, diagnosis and therapy.

  5. Derivatized gold clusters and antibody-gold cluster conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hainfeld, J.F.; Furuya, F.R.

    1994-11-01

    Antibody- or antibody fragment-gold cluster conjugates are shown wherein the conjugate size can be as small as 5.0 nm. Methods and reagents are disclosed in which antibodies, Fab' or F(ab')[sub 2] fragments are covalently bound to a stable cluster of gold atoms. The gold clusters may contain 6, 8, 9, 11, 13, 55 or 67 gold atoms in their inner core. The clusters may also contain radioactive gold. The antibody-cluster conjugates are useful in electron microscopy applications as well as in clinical applications that include imaging, diagnosis and therapy. 7 figs.

  6. Earth's continental crustal gold endowment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frimmel, H. E.

    2008-03-01

    The analysis of the temporal distribution of gold deposits, combined with gold production data as well as reserve and resource estimates for different genetic types of gold deposit, revealed that the bulk of the gold known to be concentrated in ore bodies was added to the continental crust during a giant Mesoarchaean gold event at a time (3 Ga) when the mantle temperature reached a maximum and the dominant style of tectonic movement changed from vertical, plume-related to subhorizontal plate tectonic. A magmatic derivation of the first generation of crustal gold from a relatively hot mantle that was characterized by a high degree of partial melting is inferred from the gold chemistry, specifically high Os contents. While a large proportion of that gold is still present in only marginally modified palaeoplacer deposits of the Mesoarchaean Witwatersrand Basin in South Africa, accounting for about 40% of all known gold, the remainder has been recycled repeatedly on a lithospheric scale, predominantly by plate-tectonically induced magmatic and hydrothermal fluid circulation, to produce the current variety of gold deposit types. Post-Archaean juvenile gold addition to the continental crust has been limited, but a mantle contribution to some of the largest orogenic or intrusion-related gold deposits is indicated, notably for the Late Palaeozoic Tien Shan gold province. Magmatic fluids in active plate margins seem to be the most effective transport medium for gold mobilization, giving rise to a large proportion of volcanic-arc related gold deposits. Due to their generally shallow crustal level of formation, they have a low preservation potential. In contrast, those gold deposits that form at greater depth are more widespread also in older rocks. This explains the high proportion of orogenic (including intrusion-related) gold (32%) amongst all known gold deposits. The overall proportion of gold concentrated in known ore bodies is only 7 × 10- 7 of the estimated total

  7. Gold and gold working in Late Bronze Age Northern Greece.

    PubMed

    Vavelidis, M; Andreou, S

    2008-04-01

    Numerous objects of gold displaying an impressive variety of types and manufacturing techniques are known from the Late Bronze Age (LBA) contexts of Mycenaean Greece, but very little is known about the origin and processing of gold during the second millennium B.C: . Ancient literature and recent research indicate that northern Greece is probably the richest gold-bearing region in Greece, and yet, very little evidence exists regarding the exploitation of its deposits and the production as well as use of gold in the area during prehistory. The unusual find of a group of small stone crucibles at the prehistoric settlement of Thessaloniki Toumba, one with visible traces of gold melting, proves local production and offers a rare opportunity to examine the process of on-site gold working. Furthermore, the comparison of the chemical composition of prehistoric artefacts from two settlements with those of gold deposits in their immediate areas supports the local extraction of gold and opens up the prospect for some of the Mycenaean gold to have originated in northern Greece. The scarcity of gold items in northern Greek LBA contexts may not represent the actual amount of gold produced and consumed, but could be a result of the local social attitudes towards the circulation and deposition of artefacts from precious metals.

  8. GOLD PRESSURE VESSEL SEAL

    DOEpatents

    Smith, A.E.

    1963-11-26

    An improved seal between the piston and die member of a piston-cylinder type pressure vessel is presented. A layer of gold, of sufficient thickness to provide an interference fit between the piston and die member, is plated on the contacting surface of at least one of the members. (AEC)

  9. Digging for Gold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, John K.

    2012-01-01

    In the case of higher education, the hills are more like mountains of data that "we're accumulating at a ferocious rate," according to Gerry McCartney, CIO of Purdue University (Indiana). "Every higher education institution has this data, but it just sits there like gold in the ground," complains McCartney. Big Data and the new tools people are…

  10. 'Cascade Gold' raspberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Cascade Gold’ is a new gold fruited, floricane fruiting raspberry cultivar (Rubus idaeus L.) jointly released by Washington State University (WSU), Oregon State University (OSU) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). It has been evaluated at Puyallup, Wash. in plantings from 1988 to 2008. ...

  11. Gold Nanoparticle Microwave Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Krantz, Kelsie E.; Christian, Jonathan H.; Coopersmith, Kaitlin; Washington, II, Aaron L.; Murph, Simona H.

    2016-07-27

    At the nanometer scale, numerous compounds display different properties than those found in bulk material that can prove useful in areas such as medicinal chemistry. Gold nanoparticles, for example, display promise in newly developed hyperthermia therapies for cancer treatment. Currently, gold nanoparticle synthesis is performed via the hot injection technique which has large variability in final particle size and a longer reaction time. One underdeveloped area by which these particles could be produced is through microwave synthesis. To initiate heating, microwaves agitate polar molecules creating a vibration that gives off the heat energy needed. Previous studies have used microwaves for gold nanoparticle synthesis; however, polar solvents were used that partially absorbed incident microwaves, leading to partial thermal heating of the sample rather than taking full advantage of the microwave to solely heat the gold nanoparticle precursors in a non-polar solution. Through this project, microwaves were utilized as the sole heat source, and non-polar solvents were used to explore the effects of microwave heating only as pertains to the precursor material. Our findings show that the use of non-polar solvents allows for more rapid heating as compared to polar solvents, and a reduction in reaction time from 10 minutes to 1 minute; this maximizes the efficiency of the reaction, and allows for reproducibility in the size/shape of the fabricated nanoparticles.

  12. Spectroscopic study of gold nanoparticle formation through high intensity laser irradiation of solution

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Takahiro Sato, Shunichi; Herbani, Yuliati; Ursescu, Daniel; Banici, Romeo; Dabu, Razvan Victor

    2013-08-15

    A spectroscopic study of the gold nanoparticle (NP) formation by high-intensity femtosecond laser irradiation of a gold ion solution was reported. The effect of varying energy density of the laser on the formation of gold NPs was also investigated. The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peak of the gold nanocolloid in real-time UV-visible absorption spectra during laser irradiation showed a distinctive progress; the SPR absorption peak intensity increased after a certain irradiation time, reached a maximum and then gradually decreased. During this absorption variation, at the same time, the peak wavelength changed from 530 to 507 nm. According to an empirical equation derived from a large volume of experimental data, the estimated mean size of the gold NPs varied from 43.4 to 3.2 nm during the laser irradiation. The mean size of gold NPs formed at specific irradiation times by transmission electron microscopy showed the similar trend as that obtained in the spectroscopic analysis. From these observations, the formation mechanism of gold NPs during laser irradiation was considered to have two steps. The first is a reduction of gold ions by reactive species produced through a non-linear reaction during high intensity laser irradiation of the solution; the second is the laser fragmentation of produced gold particles into smaller pieces. The gold nanocolloid produced after the fragmentation by excess irradiation showed high stability for at least a week without the addition of any dispersant because of the negative charge on the surface of the nanoparticles probably due to the surface oxidation of gold nanoparticles. A higher laser intensity resulted in a higher efficiency of gold NPs fabrication, which was attributed to a larger effective volume of the reaction.

  13. A rationale on the role of intermediate Au(III)-vitamin C complexation in the production of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zümreoglu-Karan, B.

    2009-07-01

    Preparation of gold nanoparticles, particularly gold nanorods, by wet chemistry processes involves gold seeds, an Au(III) salt, structure directing surfactants, and metal ion additives in the growth solution into which a weak reducing agent is added. The most commonly employed weak reducing agent is l-ascorbic acid (vitamin C) which is known to reduce many metal ions in the solution phase and form complexes with relatively low stability constants. A purple-gray gold-ascorbate compound, obtained from the reaction of sodium tetrachloroaurate(III) with sodium ascorbate, is now reported. The compound possesses the expected structural features of vitamin C-metal complexes as verified by its 13C CP-MAS NMR spectrum. A discussion is also presented on the possibility of gold-ascorbate complexation operating in gold nanoparticle formation.

  14. Bio-mediated synthesis, characterization and cytotoxicity of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Klekotko, Magdalena; Matczyszyn, Katarzyna; Siednienko, Jakub; Olesiak-Banska, Joanna; Pawlik, Krzysztof; Samoc, Marek

    2015-11-21

    We report here a "green" approach for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in which the Mentha piperita extract was applied for the bioreduction of chloroauric acid and the stabilization of the formed nanostructures. The obtained GNPs were characterized by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The reduction of gold ions with the plant extract leads to the production of nanoparticles with various shapes (spherical, triangular and hexagonal) and sizes (from 10 to 300 nm). The kinetics of the reaction was monitored and various conditions of the synthesis were investigated. As a result, we established protocols optimized towards the synthesis of nanospheres and nanoprisms of gold. The cytotoxic effect of the obtained gold nanoparticles was studied by performing MTT assay, which showed lower cytotoxicity of the biosynthesized GNPs compared to gold nanorods synthesized using the usual seed-mediated growth. The results suggest that the synthesis using plant extracts may be a useful method to produce gold nanostructures for various biological and medical applications.

  15. Toxic effects of gold nanoparticles on Salmonella typhimurium bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuguang; Lawson, Rasheeda; Ray, Paresh C; Yu, Hongtao

    2013-01-01

    Nanometer-sized gold, due to its beautiful and bountiful color and unique optical properties, is a versatile material for many industrial and societal applications. We have studied the effect of gold nanoparticles on Salmonella typhimurium strain TA 102. The gold nanoparticles in solution prepared using the citrate reduction method is found not to be toxic or mutagenic but photomutagenic to the bacteria; however, careful control experiments indicate that the photomutagenicity is due to the co-existing citrate and Au3+ ions, not due to the gold nanoparticle itself. Au3+ is also found to be photomutagenic to the bacteria at concentrations lower than 1 µM, but toxic at higher concentrations. The toxicity of Au3+ is enhanced by light irradiation. The photomutagenicity of both citrate and Au3+ is likely due to the formation of free radicals, as a result of light-induced citrate decarboxylation or Au3+ oxidation of co-existing molecules. Both processes can generate free radicals that may cause DNA damage and mutation. Studies of the interaction of gold nanoparticles with the bacteria indicate that gold nanoparticles can be absorbed onto the bacteria surface but not able to penetrate the bacteria wall to enter the bacteria. PMID:21415096

  16. Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles: A green approach.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Shakeel; Annu; Ikram, Saiqa; Yudha S, Salprima

    2016-08-01

    Nanotechnology is an immensely developing field due to its extensive range of applications in different areas of technology and science. Different types of methods are employed for synthesis of nanoparticles due to their wide applications. The conventional chemical methods have certain limitations with them either in the form of chemical contaminations during their syntheses procedures or in later applications and use of higher energy. During the last decade research have been focussed on developing simple, clean, non-toxic, cost effective and eco-friendly protocols for synthesis of nanoparticles. In order to get this objective, biosynthesis methods have been developed in order to fill this gap. The biosynthesis of nanoparticles is simple, single step, eco-friendly and a green approach. The biochemical processes in biological agents reduce the dissolved metal ions into nano metals. The various biological agents like plant tissues, fungi, bacteria, etc. are used for biosynthesis for metal nanoparticles. In this review article, we summarised recent literature on biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles which have revolutionised technique of synthesis for their applications in different fields. Due to biocompatibility of gold nanoparticles, it has find its applications in biomedical applications. The protocol and mechanism of biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles along with various applications have also been discussed.

  17. Gold Nanoparticles Cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironava, Tatsiana

    Over the last two decades gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been used for many scientific applications and have attracted attention due to the specific chemical, electronic and optical size dependent properties that make them very promising agents in many fields such as medicine, imagine techniques and electronics. More specifically, biocompatible gold nanoparticles have a huge potential for use as the contrast augmentation agent in X-ray Computed Tomography and Photo Acoustic Tomography for early tumor diagnostic as well these nanoparticles are extensively researched for enhancing the targeted cancer treatment effectiveness such as photo-thermal and radiotherapy. In most biomedical applications biocompatible gold nanoparticles are labeled with specific tumor or other pathology targeting antibodies and used for site specific drug delivery. However, even though gold nanoparticles poses very high level of anti cancer properties, the question of their cytotoxicity ones they are released in normal tissue has to be researched. Moreover, the huge amount of industrially produced gold nanoparticles raises the question of these particles being a health hazard, since the penetration is fairly easy for the "nano" size substances. This study focuses on the effect of AuNPs on a human skin tissue, since it is fall in both categories -- the side effects for biomedical applications and industrial workers and users' exposure during production and handling. Therefore, in the present project, gold nanoparticles stabilized with the biocompatible agent citric acid were generated and characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The cytotoxic effect of AuNPs release to healthy skin tissue was modeled on 3 different cell types: human keratinocytes, human dermal fibroblasts, and human adipose derived stromal (ADS) cells. The AuNPs localization inside the cell was found to be cell type dependent. Overall cytotoxicity was found to be dependent

  18. Mechanisms of gold recovery from aqueous solutions using a novel tannin gel adsorbent synthesized from natural condensed tannin.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Takeshi; Nakano, Yoshio

    2005-11-01

    We report a novel recovery system for gold (Au), which is one of the precious metals contained in electronic scrap, utilizing tannin gel particles. Tannin gel particles were prepared by a process of cross-linking of condensed tannin (wattle tannin), which is a ubiquitous and inexpensive natural material having many hydroxyl groups. The adsorption mechanism of gold onto tannin gel particles was elucidated: the adsorption of gold takes place through the reduction of trivalent gold ions to metallic gold on the surface of tannin gel particles, which is accompanied by the simultaneous oxidization of the hydroxyl groups of tannin gel. Additionally, the adsorption capacity of gold was found to be extremely high, 8000 mg-Au/g-dry gel. The outstanding characteristics of tannin gel particles for gold offers the possibility of efficient recovery of other precious metals.

  19. Spiky gold nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L; Park, So-Jung

    2010-12-21

    We report a high-yield synthetic method for a new type of metal nanostructure, spiky gold nanoshells, which combine the morphological characteristics of hollow metal nanoshells and nanorods. Our method utilizes block copolymer assemblies and polymer beads as templates for the growth of spiky nanoshells. Various shapes of spiky metal nanoshells were prepared in addition to spherical nanoshells by using block copolymer assemblies such as rod-like micelles, vesicles, and bilayers as templates. Furthermore, spiky gold shells encapsulating magnetic nanoparticles or quantum dots were prepared based on the ability of block copolymers to self-assemble with various types of nanoparticles and molecules. The capability to encapsulate other materials in the core, the shape tunability, and the highly structured surface of spiky nanoshells should benefit a range of imaging, sensing, and medical applications of metal nanostructures.

  20. Radioactive gold ring dermatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.A.; Aldrich, J.E. )

    1990-08-01

    A superficial squamous cell carcinoma developed in a woman who wore a radioactive gold ring for more than 30 years. Only part of the ring was radioactive. Radiation dose measurements indicated that the dose to basal skin layer was 2.4 Gy (240 rad) per week. If it is assumed that the woman continually wore her wedding ring for 37 years since purchase, she would have received a maximum dose of approximately 4600 Gy.

  1. 'Pot of Gold'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows the rock dubbed 'Pot of Gold' (upper left), located near the base of the 'Columbia Hills' in Gusev Crater. The rock's nodules and layered appearance have inspired rover team members to investigate the rock's detailed chemistry in coming sols. This picture was taken on sol 158 (June 13, 2004).

  2. Annealing Effects on the Surface Plasmon of MgO Implanted with Gold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueda, A.; Mu, R.; Tung, Y. -S.; Henderson, D. O.; White, C. W.; Zuhr, R. A.; Zhu, Jane G.; Wang, P. W.

    1997-01-01

    Gold ion implantation was carried out with the energy of 1.1 MeV into (100) oriented MgO single crystal. Implanted doses are 1, 3, 6, 10 x 10(exp 16) ions/sq cm. The gold irradiation results in the formation of gold ion implanted layer with a thickness of 0.2 microns and defect formation. In order to form gold colloids from the as-implanted samples, we annealed the gold implanted MgO samples in three kinds of atmospheres: (1)Ar only, (2)H2 and Ar, and (3)O2 and Ar. The annealing over 1200 C enhanced the gold colloid formation which shows surface plasmon resonance band of gold. The surface plasmon bands of samples annealed in three kinds of atmospheres were found to be at 535 nm (Ar only), 524 nm(H2+Ar), and 560 nm (02+Ar), The band positions of surface plasmon can be reversibly changed by an additional annealing.

  3. Setup and performance of RHIC for the 2008 run with deuteron-gold collisions.

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner,C.; Abreu, N.P.; Ahren, L.; Alessi, J.; Bai, M.; et al.

    2008-06-23

    This year (2008) deuterons and gold ions were collided in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the first time since 2003. The setup and performance of the collider for the 2008 run is reviewed with a focus on improvements that have led to an order of magnitude increase in luminosity over that achieved in the 2003 run.

  4. Gold-gold junction electrodes:the disconnection method.

    PubMed

    Dale, Sara E C; Vuorema, Anne; Ashmore, Ellen M Y; Kasprzyk-Horden, Barbara; Sillanpää, Mika; Denuault, Guy; Marken, Frank

    2012-02-01

    The formation of gold-gold junction electrodes for application in electroanalysis is described here based on electro-deposition from a non-cyanide gold plating bath. Converging growth of two hemispherical gold deposits on two adjacent platinum microelectrodes (both 100 µm diameter in glass, ca. 45 µm gap) followed by careful etching in aqueous chloride solution was employed. During growth both gold hemispheres "connect" and during etching "disconnection" is evident in a drop in current. Gold-gold junctions with sub-micron gaps are formed and applied for the electroanalytical detection of sub-micromolar concentrations of hydroquinone in 0.1 M phosphate buffer pH 7 (E(rev) = 0.04 V vs. SCE) and sub-micromolar concentration of dopamine in 0.1 M phosphate buffer pH 7 (E(rev) = 0.14 V vs. SCE). The potential future uses in analysis and limitations of gold-gold junction electrodes are discussed.

  5. Industry Forum Navy Gold Coast

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-13

    NAVFAC Southwest Lora E. Morrow Deputy for Small Business NAVFAC Southwest NAVFAC Southwest Industry Forum Navy Gold Coast August...REPORT DATE 13 AUG 2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Industry Forum Navy Gold Coast 5a...S) 12. DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES NDIA 27th Navy Gold Coast

  6. 31 CFR 100.4 - Gold coin and gold certificates in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Gold coin and gold certificates in... MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN In General § 100.4 Gold coin and gold certificates in general. Gold coins, and gold certificates of the type issued...

  7. 31 CFR 100.4 - Gold coin and gold certificates in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gold coin and gold certificates in... MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN In General § 100.4 Gold coin and gold certificates in general. Gold coins, and gold certificates of the type issued...

  8. 31 CFR 100.4 - Gold coin and gold certificates in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gold coin and gold certificates in... EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN In General § 100.4 Gold coin and gold certificates in general. Gold coins, and gold certificates of the type issued before January 30, 1934, are exchangeable, as...

  9. 31 CFR 100.4 - Gold coin and gold certificates in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gold coin and gold certificates in... MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN In General § 100.4 Gold coin and gold certificates in general. Gold coins, and gold certificates of the type issued...

  10. 31 CFR 100.4 - Gold coin and gold certificates in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gold coin and gold certificates in... MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN In General § 100.4 Gold coin and gold certificates in general. Gold coins, and gold certificates of the type issued...

  11. Surface-stabilized gold nanocatalysts

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng [Knoxville, TN; Yan, Wenfu [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-12-08

    A surface-stabilized gold nanocatalyst includes a solid support having stabilizing surfaces for supporting gold nanoparticles, and a plurality of gold nanoparticles having an average particle size of less than 8 nm disposed on the stabilizing surfaces. The surface-stabilized gold nanocatalyst provides enhanced stability, such as at high temperature under oxygen containing environments. In one embodiment, the solid support is a multi-layer support comprising at least a first layer having a second layer providing the stabilizing surfaces disposed thereon, the first and second layer being chemically distinct.

  12. Notes on dumping gold beam in the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C.J.; Ahrens, L.; Thieberger, P.

    2010-08-01

    Localized losses of gold beam in the AGS during RHIC Run 8 produced vacuum leaks which required the replacement of several vacuum chambers. A review of what happened and why was given by Leif Ahrens at the Run 8 Retreat. The following notes trace the subsequent development of clean dumping of gold beam on the beam dump in the J10 straight. The novel idea of stripping Au77+ ions in order to put them directly into the upstream face of the dump was introduced by Leif Ahrens and developed by all three of us. George Mahler made the actual stripping device and Dave Gassner developed its control. Leif Ahrens successfully commissioned the device with gold beam during Run 10. The reader may find it helpful to first view the figures herein and then refer to the text for details.

  13. Microscale Heat Transfer Transduced by Surface Plasmon Resonant Gold Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Roper, D. Keith; Ahn, W.; Hoepfner, M.

    2008-01-01

    Visible radiation at resonant frequencies is transduced to thermal energy by surface plasmons on gold nanoparticles. Temperature in ≤10-microliter aqueous suspensions of 20-nanometer gold particles irradiated by a continuous wave Ar+ ion laser at 514 nm increased to a maximum equilibrium value. This value increased in proportion to incident laser power and in proportion to nanoparticle content at low concentration. Heat input to the system by nanoparticle transduction of resonant irradiation equaled heat flux outward by conduction and radiation at thermal equilibrium. The efficiency of transducing incident resonant light to heat by microvolume suspensions of gold nanoparticles was determined by applying an energy balance to obtain a microscale heat-transfer time constant from the transient temperature profile. Measured values of transduction efficiency were increased from 3.4% to 9.9% by modulating the incident continuous wave irradiation. PMID:19011696

  14. Gold-implanted shallow conducting layers in polymethylmethacrylate

    SciTech Connect

    Teixeira, F. S.; Salvadori, M. C.; Cattani, M.; Brown, I. G.

    2009-03-15

    PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) was ion implanted with gold at very low energy and over a range of different doses using a filtered cathodic arc metal plasma system. A nanometer scale conducting layer was formed, fully buried below the polymer surface at low implantation dose, and evolving to include a gold surface layer as the dose was increased. Depth profiles of the implanted material were calculated using the Dynamic TRIM computer simulation program. The electrical conductivity of the gold-implanted PMMA was measured in situ as a function of dose. Samples formed at a number of different doses were subsequently characterized by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, and test patterns were formed on the polymer by electron beam lithography. Lithographic patterns were imaged by atomic force microscopy and demonstrated that the contrast properties of the lithography were well maintained in the surface-modified PMMA.

  15. Chemical analysis of the superatom model for sulfur-stabilized gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Jeffrey R; Wang, Yun; Cankurtaran, Burak O; Ford, Michael J

    2010-06-23

    The superatom model for nanoparticle structure is shown to be inadequate for the prediction of the thermodynamic stability of gold nanoparticles. The observed large HOMO-LUMO gaps for stable nanoparticles predicted by this model are, for sulfur-stabilized gold nanoparticles, attributed to covalent interactions of the metal with thiyl adsorbate radicals rather than ionic interactions with thiolate adsorbate ions, as is commonly presumed. In particular, gold adatoms in the stabilizing layer are shown to be of Au(0) nature, subtle but significantly different from the atoms of the gold core owing to the variations in the proportion of gold-gold and gold-sulfur links that form. These interactions explain the success of the superatom model in describing the electronic structure of both known and informatory nanoparticle compositions. Nanoparticle reaction energies are, however, found not to correlate with the completion of superatom shells. Instead, local structural effects are found to dominate the chemistry and in particular the significantly different chemical properties of gold nanoparticle and bulk surfaces. These conclusions are drawn from density-functional-theory calculations for the Au(102)(p-mercaptobenzoic acid)(44) nanoparticle based on the X-ray structure (Jadzinsky, P. D.; et al. Science 2007, 318, 430), as well calculations for the related Au(102)(S(*)-CH(3))(44) nanoparticle, for the inner gold-cluster cores, for partially and overly reacted cores, and for Au(111) surface adsorbates.

  16. Facile green synthesis of variable metallic gold nanoparticle using Padina gymnospora, a brown marine macroalga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, M.; Kalaivani, R.; Manikandan, S.; Sangeetha, N.; Kumaraguru, A. K.

    2013-04-01

    The process of development of reliable and eco-friendly metallic nanoparticles is an important step in the field of nanotechnology. To achieve this, use of natural sources like biological systems becomes essential. In the present work, extracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using Padina gymnospora has been attempted and achieved rapid formation of gold nanoparticles in a short duration. The UV-vis spectrum of the aqueous medium containing gold ion showed peak at 527 nm corresponding to the plasmon absorbance of gold nanoparticles. Scanning electron microscopy showed the formation of well-dispersed gold nanoparticles. FTIR spectra of brown alga confirmed that hydroxyl groups present in the algal polysaccharides were involved in the gold bioreduction. AFM analysis showed the results of particle sizes (53-67 nm) and average height of the particle roughness (60.0 nm). X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectrum of the gold nanoparticles exhibited Bragg reflections corresponding to gold nanoparticles. This environment-friendly method of biological gold nanoparticle synthesis can be applied potentially in various products that directly come in contact with the human body, such as cosmetics, and foods and consumer goods, besides medical applications.

  17. Experimental abrasion of detrital gold

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yeend, Warren E.

    1975-01-01

    The physical breakdown and abrasion rates of gold were studied using a tumbler to simulate natural high-energy environments. The gold fragments were tumbled for periods ranging from 30 to 240 h with different combinations of sand, cobbles, and water at velocities of 0.5 and 2.0 mi/h (0.85 and 3.22 km/h). With sand and gravel, the common bedload of the rivers that deposited the gold-bearing Tertiary sedimentary rocks of the Sierra Nevada, gold is abraded at rates of 0.015 to 0.007 percent (by weight) per hour of travel (at 0.5 mi/h or 0.845 km/h). Cobbles, rather than sand, are responsible for most of the physical changes and abrasion of the gold. Ten gold fragments tumbled for 120 h with cobbles and water (no sand) were broken down to 68 recoverable fragments and lost about 25 percent of their weight to particles smaller than could be recovered using conventional panning techniques. Gold tumbled for 120 h with sand and water lost less than 1 percent of its weight. Gold was abraded faster by wet sand than by dry sand. Velocity appears to be more important as a factor in abrasion of gold than travel distance a fourfold increase in velocity produced a tenfold increase in hourly abrasion rates of gold. Scanning electron microscope examination of the gold fragments after the tumbling experiments revealed differences in surface texture between fragments tumbled with (1) sand, (2) sand and cobbles, and (3) cobbles only.

  18. One-dimensional fossil-like γ-Fe2O3@carbon nanostructure: preparation, structural characterization and application as adsorbent for fast and selective recovery of gold ions from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunawan, Poernomo; Xiao, Wen; Hao Chua, Marcus Wen; Poh-Choo Tan, Cheryl; Ding, Jun; Zhong, Ziyi

    2016-10-01

    One-dimensional (1D) magnetic nanostructures with high thermal stability have important industrial applications, but their fabrication remains a big challenge. Herein we demonstrate a scalable approach for the preparation of stable 1D γ-Fe2O3@carbon, which is also applicable for other metal oxide-core and carbon-shell nanostructures, such as 1D TiO2@carbon. One-dimensional ferric oxyhydroxide (α-FeO(OH)) was initially prepared by a hydrothermal method, followed by carbon coating through hydrothermal treatment of the resulting metal oxide in glucose solution. After calcination in N2 gas at 500 °C and subsequent exposure to air, the initial carbon-coated 1D α-Fe2O3 was converted to 1D γ-Fe2O3@carbon, which was very stable without any observed changes even after 1.5 years of storage under ambient conditions. The materials were then used as adsorbents and found to be highly selective towards Au (III) adsorption, of which the maximum adsorption capacity is about 600 mg Au/g sorbent (1132 mg Au/g carbon). The spent sorbent containing Au after adsorption can be readily collected by applying a magnetic field due to the presence of the magnetic core, and the adsorbed Au particles are subsequently recovered after the combustion and dissolution of the sorbent. This work demonstrates not only a facile approach to the fabrication of robust 1D magnetic materials with a stable carbon shell, but also a possible cyanide-free process for the fast and selective recovery of gold from electronic waste and industrial water.

  19. An unusual red-to-brown colorimetric sensing method for ultrasensitive silver(I) ion detection based on a non-aggregation of hyperbranched polyethylenimine derivative stabilized gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Liu, Yang; Li, Zhongfa; Liu, Junshen; Xu, Li; Liu, Xunyong

    2015-08-07

    Here we have developed a facile and rapid colorimetric method for the sensitive and selective detection of Ag(+) based on the non-aggregation of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) capped with hyperbranched polyethylenimine derivatives. In the detection process, an unusual colour change from red to brown was observed due to the formation of Au-Ag core-shell nanoparticles, which was more sensitive than that of the usual colorimetric assays (red to blue) based on the aggregation of Au NPs. After the colour changed, the non-aggregation-based Au-Ag core-shell nanomaterials did not aggregate further and could remain stable for a long time, which was convenient to record, detect and observe. The sensing probe exhibited a drastically long observing time for detecting Ag(+) owing to the stability of the Au-Ag core-shell non-aggregates, high sensitivity with a low detection limit of 8.76 nM by the naked eye and 1.09 nM by using a UV-vis spectrophotometer and a good linear relationship within the range from 1.09 to 109 nM. The colour change of the system is very fast, occurring within 1 to 2 minutes. Moreover, the proposed method also showed a remarkably high selectivity toward Ag(+) and was successfully used in tap water and drinking water samples. Therefore, this unusual colorimetric assay based on the non-aggregation of Au NPs has a great potential as a simple, rapid, sensitive and selective detection method for the detection of Ag(+).

  20. Caffeic acid: potential applications in nanotechnology as a green reducing agent for sustainable synthesis of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yu Seon; Cha, Song-Hyun; Yoon, Hye-Ran; Kang, Young-Hwa; Park, Youmie

    2015-04-01

    The sustainable synthesis of gold nanoparticles from gold ions was conducted with caffeic acid as a green reducing agent. The formation of gold nanoparticles was confirmed by spectroscopic and microscopic methods. Spherical nanoparticles with an average diameter of 29.99 ± 7.43 nm were observed in high- resolution transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images. The newly prepared gold nanoparticles exhibited catalytic activity toward the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol in the presence of sodium borohydride. This system enables the preparation of green catalysts using plant natural products as reducing agents, which fulfills the growing need for sustainability initiatives.

  1. STATUS AND RECENT PERFORMANCE OF THE ACCELERATORS THAT SERVE AS GOLD INJECTOR FOR RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    AHRENS,L.; ALESSI,J.; VAN ASSELT,W.; BENJAMIN,J.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; BRENNAN,J.M.; BROWN,K.A.; CARLSON,C.; DELONG,J.; GARDNER,C.J.; GLENN,J.W.; HAYES,T.; ROSER,T.; SMITH,K.S.; STESKI,D.; TSOUPAS,N.; ZENO,K.; ZHANG,S.Y.

    2001-06-18

    The recent successful commissioning and operation [1] of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) requires the injection of gold ions of specified energy and intensity with longitudinal and transverse emittances small enough to meet the luminosity requirements of the collider. Ion beams with the desired characteristics are provided by a series of three accelerators, the Tandem, Booster and AGS. The current status and recent performance of these accelerators are reviewed in this paper.

  2. Platinum monolayer electrocatalyst on gold nanostructures on silicon for photoelectrochemical hydrogen evolution.

    PubMed

    Kye, Joohong; Shin, Muncheol; Lim, Bora; Jang, Jae-Won; Oh, Ilwhan; Hwang, Seongpil

    2013-07-23

    Pt monolayer decorated gold nanostructured film on planar p-type silicon is utilized for photoelectrochemical H2 generation in this work. First, gold nanostructured film on silicon was spontaneously produced by galvanic displacement of the reduction of gold ion and the oxidation of silicon in the presence of fluoride anion. Second, underpotential deposition (UPD) of copper under illumination produced Cu monolayer on gold nanostructured film followed by galvanic exchange of less-noble Cu monolayer with more-noble PtCl6(2-). Pt(shell)/Au(core) on p-type silicon showed the similar activity with platinum nanoparticle on silicon for photoelectrochemical hydrogen evolution reaction in spite of low platinum loading. From Tafel analysis, Pt(shell)/Au(core) electrocatalyst shows the higher area-specific activity than platinum nanoparticle on silicon demonstrating the significant role of underlying gold for charge transfer reaction from silicon to H(+) through platinum catalyst.

  3. Impedance Analysis of Colloidal Gold Nanoparticles in Chromatography Paper for Quantitation of an Immunochromatographic Assay.

    PubMed

    Hori, Fumitaka; Harada, Yuji; Kuretake, Tatsumi; Uno, Shigeyasu

    2016-01-01

    A detection method of gold nanoparticles in chromatography paper has been developed for a simple, cost-effective and reliable quantitation of immunochromatographic strip test. The time courses of the solution resistance in chromatography paper with the gold nanoparticles solution are electrochemically measured by chrono-impedimetry. The dependence of the solution resistance on the concentration of gold nanoparticles has been successfully observed. The main factor to increase the solution resistance may be obstruction of the ion transport due to the presence of gold nanoparticles. The existence of gold nanoparticles with 1.92 × 10(9) particles/mL in an indistinctly-colored chromatography paper is also identified by a solution resistance measurement. This indicates that the solution resistance assay has the potential to lower the detection limit of the conventional qualitative assay.

  4. Where's the silver? Imaging trace silver coverage on the surface of gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Stephen R; McBride, James R; Rosenthal, Sandra J; Wright, David W

    2014-04-09

    The development of the seeded growth synthesis for gold nanorods provided the first simple, convenient wet chemistry route to these nanomaterials. Over the past decade, the original silver-assisted seeded growth procedure has been the subject of further modifications that have continuously expanded access to anisotropic gold nanoparticles; however, the role of silver in formation of gold nanorods remains poorly understood. We report the first experimental evidence on the position of silver present on gold nanorods using advanced energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Our results indicate the deposition of silver ions on the surface shows no preference for a specific face or axis. Furthermore, we show that the "dog bone" structures developed from gold nanorod solutions show preferential deposition of silver atoms on the ends and in the crevices.

  5. Sulfur radical species form gold deposits on Earth

    PubMed Central

    Pokrovski, Gleb S.; Kokh, Maria A.; Guillaume, Damien; Borisova, Anastassia Y.; Gisquet, Pascal; Hazemann, Jean-Louis; Lahera, Eric; Del Net, William; Proux, Olivier; Testemale, Denis; Haigis, Volker; Jonchière, Romain; Seitsonen, Ari P.; Ferlat, Guillaume; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Saitta, Antonino Marco; Boiron, Marie-Christine; Dubessy, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Current models of the formation and distribution of gold deposits on Earth are based on the long-standing paradigm that hydrogen sulfide and chloride are the ligands responsible for gold mobilization and precipitation by fluids across the lithosphere. Here we challenge this view by demonstrating, using in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy and solubility measurements, coupled with molecular dynamics and thermodynamic simulations, that sulfur radical species, such as the trisulfur ion S3−, form very stable and soluble complexes with Au+ in aqueous solution at elevated temperatures (>250 °C) and pressures (>100 bar). These species enable extraction, transport, and focused precipitation of gold by sulfur-rich fluids 10–100 times more efficiently than sulfide and chloride only. As a result, S3− exerts an important control on the source, concentration, and distribution of gold in its major economic deposits from magmatic, hydrothermal, and metamorphic settings. The growth and decay of S3− during the fluid generation and evolution is one of the key factors that determine the fate of gold in the lithosphere. PMID:26460040

  6. Sulfur radical species form gold deposits on Earth.

    PubMed

    Pokrovski, Gleb S; Kokh, Maria A; Guillaume, Damien; Borisova, Anastassia Y; Gisquet, Pascal; Hazemann, Jean-Louis; Lahera, Eric; Del Net, William; Proux, Olivier; Testemale, Denis; Haigis, Volker; Jonchière, Romain; Seitsonen, Ari P; Ferlat, Guillaume; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Saitta, Antonino Marco; Boiron, Marie-Christine; Dubessy, Jean

    2015-11-03

    Current models of the formation and distribution of gold deposits on Earth are based on the long-standing paradigm that hydrogen sulfide and chloride are the ligands responsible for gold mobilization and precipitation by fluids across the lithosphere. Here we challenge this view by demonstrating, using in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy and solubility measurements, coupled with molecular dynamics and thermodynamic simulations, that sulfur radical species, such as the trisulfur ion S3(-), form very stable and soluble complexes with Au(+) in aqueous solution at elevated temperatures (>250 °C) and pressures (>100 bar). These species enable extraction, transport, and focused precipitation of gold by sulfur-rich fluids 10-100 times more efficiently than sulfide and chloride only. As a result, S3(-) exerts an important control on the source, concentration, and distribution of gold in its major economic deposits from magmatic, hydrothermal, and metamorphic settings. The growth and decay of S3(-) during the fluid generation and evolution is one of the key factors that determine the fate of gold in the lithosphere.

  7. Anticancer Gold(III) Porphyrins Target Mitochondrial Chaperone Hsp60.

    PubMed

    Hu, Di; Liu, Yungen; Lai, Yau-Tsz; Tong, Ka-Chung; Fung, Yi-Man; Lok, Chun-Nam; Che, Chi-Ming

    2016-01-22

    Identification of the molecular target(s) of anticancer metal complexes is a formidable challenge since most of them are unstable toward ligand exchange reaction(s) or biological reduction under physiological conditions. Gold(III) meso-tetraphenylporphyrin (gold-1 a) is notable for its high stability in biological milieux and potent in vitro and in vivo anticancer activities. Herein, extensive chemical biology approaches employing photo-affinity labeling, click chemistry, chemical proteomics, cellular thermal shift, saturation-transfer difference NMR, protein fluorescence quenching, and protein chaperone assays were used to provide compelling evidence that heat-shock protein 60 (Hsp60), a mitochondrial chaperone and potential anticancer target, is a direct target of gold-1 a in vitro and in cells. Structure-activity studies with a panel of non-porphyrin gold(III) complexes and other metalloporphyrins revealed that Hsp60 inhibition is specifically dependent on both the gold(III) ion and the porphyrin ligand.

  8. When cyclopropenes meet gold catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Miege, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    Summary Cyclopropenes as substrates entered the field of gold catalysis in 2008 and have proven to be valuable partners in a variety of gold-catalyzed reactions. The different contributions in this growing research area are summarized in this review. PMID:21804867

  9. Antibody-gold cluster conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hainfeld, J.F.

    1988-06-28

    Antibody- or antibody fragment-gold cluster conjugates are shown wherein the conjugate size can be about 5.0 nm. Methods and reagents are disclosed in which antibodies or Fab' fragments thereof are covalently bound to a stable cluster of gold atoms. 2 figs.

  10. Experimental and theoretical realization of enhanced light scattering spectroscopy of gold nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yunbo; Song, Linlin; Qiao, Yisha

    2015-01-12

    Assisted with transmission electron microscopy and extinction spectra, the enhanced light scattering (ELS) experiments were performed with gold nanoparticles. Although both the nanospheres and nanorods can enhance light scattering in study aggregation, the spectral characteristics of gold nanorods is relatively simple compared to that of nanospheres. This will further extend the application range of ELS method to determinate the amounts of inorganic ions in analytical field and investigate on the macromolecular aggregation in polymeric research due to its simplicity, rapidity, and sensitivity.

  11. Memecylon edule leaf extract mediated green synthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Elavazhagan, Tamizhamudu; Arunachalam, Kantha D

    2011-01-01

    We used an aqueous leaf extract of Memecylon edule (Melastomataceae) to synthesize silver and gold nanoparticles. To our knowledge, this is the first report where M. edule leaf broth was found to be a suitable plant source for the green synthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles. On treatment of aqueous solutions of silver nitrate and chloroauric acid with M. edule leaf extract, stable silver and gold nanoparticles were rapidly formed. The gold nanoparticles were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR). The kinetics of reduction of aqueous silver and gold ions during reaction with the M. edule leaf broth were easily analyzed by UV-visible spectroscopy. SEM analysis showed that aqueous gold ions, when exposed to M. edule leaf broth, were reduced and resulted in the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles in the size range 20–50 nm. TEM analysis of gold nanoparticles showed formation of triangular, circular, and hexagonal shapes in the size range 10–45 nm. The resulting silver nanoparticles were predominantly square with uniform size range 50–90 nm. EDAX results confirmed the presence of triangular nanoparticles in the adsorption peak of 2.30 keV. Further FTIR analysis was also done to identify the functional groups in silver and gold nanoparticles. The characterized nanoparticles of M. edule have potential for various medical and industrial applications. Saponin presence in aqueous extract of M. edule is responsible for the mass production of silver and gold nanoparticles. PMID:21753878

  12. Memecylon edule leaf extract mediated green synthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Elavazhagan, Tamizhamudu; Arunachalam, Kantha D

    2011-01-01

    We used an aqueous leaf extract of Memecylon edule (Melastomataceae) to synthesize silver and gold nanoparticles. To our knowledge, this is the first report where M. edule leaf broth was found to be a suitable plant source for the green synthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles. On treatment of aqueous solutions of silver nitrate and chloroauric acid with M. edule leaf extract, stable silver and gold nanoparticles were rapidly formed. The gold nanoparticles were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR). The kinetics of reduction of aqueous silver and gold ions during reaction with the M. edule leaf broth were easily analyzed by UV-visible spectroscopy. SEM analysis showed that aqueous gold ions, when exposed to M. edule leaf broth, were reduced and resulted in the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles in the size range 20-50 nm. TEM analysis of gold nanoparticles showed formation of triangular, circular, and hexagonal shapes in the size range 10-45 nm. The resulting silver nanoparticles were predominantly square with uniform size range 50-90 nm. EDAX results confirmed the presence of triangular nanoparticles in the adsorption peak of 2.30 keV. Further FTIR analysis was also done to identify the functional groups in silver and gold nanoparticles. The characterized nanoparticles of M. edule have potential for various medical and industrial applications. Saponin presence in aqueous extract of M. edule is responsible for the mass production of silver and gold nanoparticles.

  13. Mixed monolayer protected gold atom-oxide cluster synthesis and characterization.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, Sindhu R; Aneesh, Padamadathil K; Sukumar, Chinthu; Rao, Talasila P

    2012-07-21

    Small atomic gold clusters in solution, Au(n), stabilized by cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and cysteine, have been synthesized potentiodynamically in quiescent aqueous solutions. The electrodissolution of gold to gold ions during an anodic scan and subsequent cluster formation during a cathodic scan in underpotential (UPDD) and overpotential dissolution-deposition (OPDD) regions were studied. The experimental potentiodynamic I-E profiles and chronoamperometric i-t transients are fit into reported theoretical models of adsorption and electrocrystallization. The plausible application of clusters/cluster film to cysteine sensing based on fluorescence quenching and square wave stripping voltammetry is demonstrated.

  14. Green Chemistry Approach for the Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles Using the Fungus Alternaria sp.

    PubMed

    Dhanasekar, Naresh Niranjan; Rahul, Ganga Ravindran; Narayanan, Kannan Badri; Raman, Gurusamy; Sakthivel, Natarajan

    2015-07-01

    The synthesis of gold nanoparticles has gained tremendous attention owing to their immense applications in the field of biomedical sciences. Although several chemical procedures are used for the synthesis of nanoparticles, the release of toxic and hazardous by-products restricts their use in biomedical applications. In the present investigation, gold nanoparticles were synthesized biologically using the culture filtrate of the filamentous fungus Alternaria sp. The culture filtrate of the fungus was exposed to three different concentrations of chloroaurate ions. In all cases, the gold ions were reduced to Au(0), leading to the formation of stable gold nanoparticles of variable sizes and shapes. UV-Vis spectroscopy analysis confirmed the formation of nanoparticles by reduction of Au(3+) to Au(0). TEM analysis revealed the presence of spherical, rod, square, pentagonal, and hexagonal morphologies for 1 mM chloroaurate solution. However, quasi-spherical and spherical nanoparticles/heart-like morphologies with size range of about 7-13 and 15-18 nm were observed for lower molar concentrations of 0.3 and 0.5 mM gold chloride solution, respectively. The XRD spectrum revealed the face-centered cubic crystals of synthesized gold nanoparticles. FT-IR spectroscopy analysis confirmed the presence of aromatic primary amines, and the additional SPR bands at 290 and 230 nm further suggested that the presence of amino acids such as tryptophan/tyrosine or phenylalanine acts as the capping agent on the synthesized mycogenic gold nanoparticles.

  15. Ion implanted dielectric elastomer circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Benjamin M.; Rosset, Samuel; Anderson, Iain A.; Shea, Herbert R.

    2013-06-01

    Starfish and octopuses control their infinite degree-of-freedom arms with panache—capabilities typical of nature where the distribution of reflex-like intelligence throughout soft muscular networks greatly outperforms anything hard, heavy, and man-made. Dielectric elastomer actuators show great promise for soft artificial muscle networks. One way to make them smart is with piezo-resistive Dielectric Elastomer Switches (DES) that can be combined with artificial muscles to create arbitrary digital logic circuits. Unfortunately there are currently no reliable materials or fabrication process. Thus devices typically fail within a few thousand cycles. As a first step in the search for better materials we present a preliminary exploration of piezo-resistors made with filtered cathodic vacuum arc metal ion implantation. DES were formed on polydimethylsiloxane silicone membranes out of ion implanted gold nano-clusters. We propose that there are four distinct regimes (high dose, above percolation, on percolation, low dose) in which gold ion implanted piezo-resistors can operate and present experimental results on implanted piezo-resistors switching high voltages as well as a simple artificial muscle inverter. While gold ion implanted DES are limited by high hysteresis and low sensitivity, they already show promise for a range of applications including hysteretic oscillators and soft generators. With improvements to implanter process control the promise of artificial muscle circuitry for soft smart actuator networks could become a reality.

  16. Biochemical synthesis of gold and zinc nanoparticles in reverse micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorova, E. M.

    2010-04-01

    Gold and zinc nanoparticles were obtained in AOT reverse micelles in isooctane by reduction of the corresponding metal ions by the natural pigment quercetin (the biochemical synthesis technique). Gold and zinc ions were introduced into the micellar solution of quercetin in the form of aqueous solutions, HAuCl4 and [Zn(NH3)4]SO4, to the water to AOT molar ratios 1-3 and 3-4, respectively. The process of nanoparticle formation was investigated by spectrophotometry. Nanoparticle size and shape were determined by transmission electron microscopy. The data obtained allow to conclude that there are two steps in metal ion-quercetin interaction: (1) complex formation, and (2) complex dissociation with subsequent formation of nanoparticles and a second product, presumably oxidized quercetin. Gold nanoparticles were found to be of various shapes (spheres, hexahedrons, triangles, and cylinders) and sizes, mainly in the 10-20 nm range; zinc nanoparticles are chiefly spherical and ˜5 nm in size. In both cases, the nanoparticles are stable in the air in micellar solution over long periods of time (from a several months to a several years).

  17. Secondary ion emission and images from a biologic matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Peter J.; McMahon, John M.; Short, Robert T.

    1995-05-01

    Secondary ion mass spectra and images were obtained from organic compounds deposited on gold and 30-50 [mu]m thick biologic tissue substrates. Analyte solutions were prepared from acetylcholine chloride, choline chloride, and methylphenylpyridinium (MPP+) iodide. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was used to distinguish secondary ions characteristic of the analyte from secondary ions characteristic of the tissue itself. Effects of primary ion damage appear similar regardless of substrate. Samples of choline chloride deposited on a gold substrate are exceptional; secondary ion emission from such samples appeared unaffected by primary ion dose. Emission of acetylcholine secondary ions was found to decay with a rate independent of primary ion dose, but dependent on the substrate. These results show that the distribution of organic compounds can be mapped from biologic tissue under conditions of static SIMS, but matrix effects and chemical noise must be considered.

  18. The biodistribution of gold nanoparticles designed for renal clearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alric, Christophe; Miladi, Imen; Kryza, David; Taleb, Jacqueline; Lux, François; Bazzi, Rana; Billotey, Claire; Janier, Marc; Perriat, Pascal; Roux, Stéphane; Tillement, Olivier

    2013-06-01

    Owing to their tunable optical properties and their high absorption cross-section of X- and γ-ray, gold nanostructures appear as promising agents for remotely controlled therapy. Since the efficiency of cancer therapy is not limited to the eradication of the tumour but rests also on the sparing of healthy tissue, a biodistribution study is required in order to determine whether the behaviour of the nanoparticles after intravenous injection is safe (no accumulation in healthy tissue, no uptake by phagocytic cell-rich organs (liver, spleen) and renal clearance). The biodistribution of Au@DTDTPA nanoparticles which are composed of a gold core and a DTDTPA (dithiolated polyaminocarboxylate) shell can be established by X-ray imaging (owing to the X-ray absorption of the gold core) and by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) since the DTDTPA shell was designed for the immobilization of paramagnetic gadolinium ions. However scintigraphy appears better suited for a biodistribution study owing to a great sensitivity. The successful immobilization of radioelements (99mTc, 111In) in the DTDTPA shell, instead of gadolinium ions, renders possible the follow up of Au@DTDTPA by scintigraphy which showed that Au@DTDTPA nanoparticles exhibit a safe behaviour after intravenous injection to healthy rats.Owing to their tunable optical properties and their high absorption cross-section of X- and γ-ray, gold nanostructures appear as promising agents for remotely controlled therapy. Since the efficiency of cancer therapy is not limited to the eradication of the tumour but rests also on the sparing of healthy tissue, a biodistribution study is required in order to determine whether the behaviour of the nanoparticles after intravenous injection is safe (no accumulation in healthy tissue, no uptake by phagocytic cell-rich organs (liver, spleen) and renal clearance). The biodistribution of Au@DTDTPA nanoparticles which are composed of a gold core and a DTDTPA (dithiolated polyaminocarboxylate

  19. In situ gold nanoparticles formation: contrast agent for dental optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Braz, Ana K S; de Araujo, Renato E; Ohulchanskyy, Tymish Y; Shukla, Shoba; Bergey, Earl J; Gomes, Anderson S L; Prasad, Paras N

    2012-06-01

    In this work we demonstrate the potential use of gold nanoparticles as contrast agents for the optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging technique in dentistry. Here, a new in situ photothermal reduction procedure was developed, producing spherical gold nanoparticles inside dentinal layers and tubules. Gold ions were dispersed in the primer of commercially available dental bonding systems. After the application and permeation in dentin by the modified adhesive systems, the dental bonding materials were photopolymerized concurrently with the formation of gold nanoparticles. The gold nanoparticles were visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The SEM images show the presence of gold nanospheres in the hybrid layer and dentinal tubules. The diameter of the gold nanoparticles was determined to be in the range of 40 to 120 nm. Optical coherence tomography images were obtained in two- and three-dimensions. The distribution of nanoparticles was analyzed and the extended depth of nanosphere production was determined. The results show that the OCT technique, using in situ formed gold nanoparticles as contrast enhancers, can be used to visualize dentin structures in a non-invasive and non-destructive way.

  20. In situ gold nanoparticles formation: contrast agent for dental optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braz, Ana K. S.; Araujo, Renato E. de; Ohulchanskyy, Tymish Y.; Shukla, Shoba; Bergey, Earl J.; Gomes, Anderson S. L.; Prasad, Paras N.

    2012-06-01

    In this work we demonstrate the potential use of gold nanoparticles as contrast agents for the optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging technique in dentistry. Here, a new in situ photothermal reduction procedure was developed, producing spherical gold nanoparticles inside dentinal layers and tubules. Gold ions were dispersed in the primer of commercially available dental bonding systems. After the application and permeation in dentin by the modified adhesive systems, the dental bonding materials were photopolymerized concurrently with the formation of gold nanoparticles. The gold nanoparticles were visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The SEM images show the presence of gold nanospheres in the hybrid layer and dentinal tubules. The diameter of the gold nanoparticles was determined to be in the range of 40 to 120 nm. Optical coherence tomography images were obtained in two- and three-dimensions. The distribution of nanoparticles was analyzed and the extended depth of nanosphere production was determined. The results show that the OCT technique, using in situ formed gold nanoparticles as contrast enhancers, can be used to visualize dentin structures in a non-invasive and non-destructive way.

  1. Anti-metastatic activity of biologically synthesized gold nanoparticles on human fibrosarcoma cell line HT-1080.

    PubMed

    Karuppaiya, Palaniyandi; Satheeshkumar, Elumalai; Chao, Wei-Ting; Kao, Lin-Yi; Chen, Emily Chin-Fun; Tsay, Hsin-Sheng

    2013-10-01

    Plants are exploited as a potential source for the large-scale production of noble gold nanoparticles in the recent years owing to their various potential applications in nanobiotechnology and nanomedicine. The present work describes green biosynthetic procedures for the production of gold nanoparticles for the first time by using an aqueous extract of the Dysosma pleiantha rhizome. The biosynthesized gold nanoparticles were confirmed and characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results revealed that aqueous extract of D. pleiantha rhizome has potential to reduce chloroauric ions into gold nanoparticles and the synthesized gold nanoparticles were showed spherical in shape with an average of 127nm. Further, we investigated the anti-metastatic activity of biosynthesized gold nanoparticles against human fibrosarcoma cancer cell line HT-1080. The results showed that the biosynthesized gold nanoparticles were non-toxic to cell proliferation and, also it can inhibit the chemo-attractant cell migration of human fibrosarcoma cancer cell line HT-1080 by interfering the actin polymerization pathway. Thus, the usage of gold nanoparticles biosynthesized from D. pleiantha rhizome can be used as a potential candidate in the drug and gene delivery to metastatic cancer.

  2. Ore petrology and geochemistry of Tertiary gold telluride deposits of the Colorado mineral belt

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, J.A.; Romberger, S.B.

    1985-01-01

    Epithermal gold telluride deposits from the Colorado mineral belt share a number of similarities: relationship to alkalic stocks; high fluorine and CO/sub 2/ content; and similar paragenesis. Petrography of deposits in the Jamestown, Cripple Creek, and La Plata districts has resulted in a composite paragenesis: early Fe-Cu-Pb-Zn sulfides + hematite; tetrahedrite; high Te tellurides; low Te tellurides; late native gold. Fluid inclusion studies suggest telluride deposition occurred below 200/sup 0/C from low salinity. Gangue and alteration mineralogy indicates the ore fluids were near neutral pH during telluride deposition. The presence of hematite and locally barite suggest relatively oxidizing conditions. Evaluation of thermodynamic stabilities of tellurides and aqueous tellurium species indicates that progressive oxidation is consistent with the observed ore mineral paragenesis. Available data on gold bisulfide and chloride complexes suggest neither were important in the transport of gold in these systems. Thermodynamic data suggest the ditelluride ion (Te/sub 2//sup 2 -/) predominates in the range of inferred physiochemical conditions for the transport and deposition of gold in these systems. Inferred complexes such as AuTe/sub 2//sup -/ could account for the gold transport, and oxidation would be the most effective mechanism of precipitation of gold telluride or native gold. Published data suggest the associated alkalic stocks may be the ultimate source of the metals, since they are enriched in Au, Ag, Te, As, and Bi.

  3. Rapid extra-/intracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles by the fungus Penicillium sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Liangwei; Xian, Liang; Feng, Jia-Xun

    2011-03-01

    In this work, the fungus Penicillium was used for rapid extra-/intracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles. AuCl4 - ions reacted with the cell filtrate of Penicillium sp. resulting in extracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles within 1 min. Intracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles was obtained by incubating AuCl4 - solution with fungal biomass for 8 h. The gold nanoparticles were characterized by means of visual observation, UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The extracellular nanoparticles exhibited maximum absorbance at 545 nm in UV-Vis spectroscopy. The XRD spectrum showed Bragg reflections corresponding to the gold nanocrystals. TEM exhibited the formed spherical gold nanoparticles in the size range from 30 to 50 nm with an average size of 45 nm. SEM and TEM revealed that the intracellular gold nanoparticles were well dispersed on the cell wall and within the cell, and they are mostly spherical in shape with an average diameter of 50 nm. The presence of gold was confirmed by EDX analysis.

  4. 20th-Century Gold Rush.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wargo, Joseph G.

    1992-01-01

    Presents Nevada's gold rush activities spurred by technological advancements in search methods. Describes the events that led to the twentieth-century gold rush, the techniques for finding deposits and the geological formation process of disseminated gold deposits. Vignettes present the gold extraction process, cross-section, and profile of a…

  5. 41 CFR 101-45.002 - Gold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Gold. 101-45.002 Section... PERSONAL PROPERTY § 101-45.002 Gold. (a) Gold will be sold in accordance with this section and part 102-38 of the Federal Management Regulation. (b) Sales of gold shall be processed to— (1) Use the sealed...

  6. 41 CFR 101-45.002 - Gold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Gold. 101-45.002 Section... PERSONAL PROPERTY § 101-45.002 Gold. (a) Gold will be sold in accordance with this section and part 102-38 of the Federal Management Regulation. (b) Sales of gold shall be processed to— (1) Use the sealed...

  7. 41 CFR 101-45.002 - Gold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gold. 101-45.002 Section... PERSONAL PROPERTY § 101-45.002 Gold. (a) Gold will be sold in accordance with this section and part 102-38 of the Federal Management Regulation. (b) Sales of gold shall be processed to— (1) Use the sealed...

  8. 41 CFR 101-45.002 - Gold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2011-07-01 2007-07-01 true Gold. 101-45.002 Section... PERSONAL PROPERTY § 101-45.002 Gold. (a) Gold will be sold in accordance with this section and part 102-38 of the Federal Management Regulation. (b) Sales of gold shall be processed to— (1) Use the sealed...

  9. 41 CFR 101-45.002 - Gold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Gold. 101-45.002 Section... PERSONAL PROPERTY § 101-45.002 Gold. (a) Gold will be sold in accordance with this section and part 102-38 of the Federal Management Regulation. (b) Sales of gold shall be processed to— (1) Use the sealed...

  10. Ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ehlers, Kenneth W.

    1984-01-01

    A magnetic filter for an ion source reduces the production of undesired ion species and improves the ion beam quality. High-energy ionizing electrons are confined by the magnetic filter to an ion source region, where the high-energy electrons ionize gas molecules. One embodiment of the magnetic filter uses permanent magnets oriented to establish a magnetic field transverse to the direction of travel of ions from the ion source region to the ion extraction region. In another embodiment, low energy 16 eV electrons are injected into the ion source to dissociate gas molecules and undesired ion species into desired ion species.

  11. Enhancement of gold recovery using bioleaching from gold concentrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S. H.; Cho, K. H.; Kim, B. J.; Choi, N. C.; Park, C. Y.

    2012-04-01

    The gold in refractory ores is encapsulated as fine particles (sometimes at a molecular level) in the crystal structure of the sulfide (typically pyrite with or without arsenopyrite) matrix. This makes it impossible to extract a significant amount of refractory gold by cyanidation since the cyanide solution cannot penetrate the pyrite/arsenopyrite crystals and dissolve gold particles, even after fine grinding. To effectively extract gold from these ores, an oxidative pretreatment is necessary to break down the sulfide matrix. The most popular methods of pretreatment include nitric acid oxidation, roasting, pressure oxidation and biological oxidation by microorganisms. This study investigated the bioleaching efficiency of Au concentrate under batch experimental conditions (adaptation cycles and chemical composition adaptation) using the indigenous acidophilic bacteria collected from gold mine leachate in Sunsin gold mine, Korea. We conducted the batch experiments at two different chemical composition (CuSO4 and ZnSO4), two different adaptation cycles 1'st (3 weeks) and 2'nd (6 weeks). The results showed that the pH in the bacteria inoculating sample decreased than initial condition and Eh increased. In the chemical composition adaptation case, the leached accumulation content of Fe and Pb was exhibited in CuSO4 adaptation bacteria sample more than in ZnSO4 adaptation bacteria samples, possibly due to pre-adaptation effect on chalcopyrite (CuFeS2) in gold concentrate. And after 21 days on the CuSO4 adaptation cycles case, content of Fe and Pb was appeared at 1'st adaptation bacteria sample(Fe - 1.82 and Pb - 25.81 times per control sample) lower than at 2'nd adaptation bacteria sample(Fe - 2.87 and Pb - 62.05 times per control sample). This study indicates that adaptation chemical composition and adaptation cycles can play an important role in bioleaching of gold concentrate in eco-/economic metallurgy process.

  12. Deposition of plasmon gold-fluoropolymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safonov, Alexey I.; Sulyaeva, Veronica S.; Timoshenko, Nikolay I.; Kubrak, Konstantin V.; Starinskiy, Sergey V.

    2016-12-01

    Degradation-resistant two-dimensional metal-fluoropolymer composites consisting of gold nanoparticles coated with a thin fluoropolymer film were deposited on a substrate by hot wire chemical vapour deposition (HWCVD) and ion sputtering. The morphology and optical properties of the obtained coatings were determined. The thickness of the thin fluoropolymer film was found to influence the position of the surface plasmon resonance peak. Numerical calculations of the optical properties of the deposited materials were performed using Mie theory and the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The calculation results are consistent with the experimental data. The study shows that the position of the resonance peak can be controlled by changing the surface concentration of particles and the thickness of the fluoropolymer coating. The protective coating was found to prevent the plasmonic properties of the nanoparticles from changing for several months.

  13. Defect recovery and damage reduction in borosilicate glasses under double ion beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mir, A. H.; Peuget, S.; Toulemonde, M.; Bulot, P.; Jegou, C.; Miro, S.; Bouffard, S.

    2015-11-01

    A sodium borosilicate glass was irradiated sequentially and simultaneously with alpha particles and gold ions. Alpha particles induced partial recovery of the network damage and mechanical properties in the gold pre-irradiated glass, while no such recovery effect was observed during gold irradiation of the alpha pre-irradiated glass. The damage capacity of the gold ions was significantly reduced during simultaneous irradiation with alpha particles and gold ions. These results highlight that the irradiation sequence of the ions plays an important role in controlling the final damage level; and if properly employed, irradiation can be employed to induce defect recovery. Such results are of paramount importance to understand the radiation damage in nuclear reactor components and in nuclear waste glass matrices which are subjected to multiple particle irradiations.

  14. A Nanoscale-Localized Ion Damage Josephson Junction Using Focused Ion Beam and Ion Implanter.

    PubMed

    Wu, C H; Ku, W S; Jhan, F J; Chen, J H; Jeng, J T

    2015-05-01

    High-T(c) Josephson junctions were fabricated by nanolithography using focused ion beam (FIB) milling and ion implantation. The junctions were formed in a YBa2Cu3O7-x, thin film in regions defined using a gold-film mask with 50-nm-wide (top) slits, engraved by FIB. The focused ion beam system parameters for dwell time and passes were set to remove gold up to a precise depth. 150 keV oxygen ions were implanted at a nominal dose of up to 5 x 10(13) ions/cm2 into YBa2Cu3O7-x microbridges through the nanoscale slits. The current-voltage curves of the ion implantation junctions exhibit resistive-shunted-junction-like behavior at 77 K. The junction had an approximately linear temperature dependence of critical current. Shapiro steps were observed under microwave irradiation. A 50-nm-wide slit and 0-20-nm-thick buffer layers were chosen in order to make Josephson junctions due to the V-shape of the FIB-milled trench.

  15. Colloidal Synthesis of Gold Semishells

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Fernández, Denis; Pérez-Juste, Jorge; Pastoriza-Santos, Isabel; Liz-Marzán, Luis M

    2012-01-01

    This work describes a novel and scalable colloid chemistry strategy to fabricate gold semishells based on the selective growth of gold on Janus silica particles (500 nm in diameter) partly functionalized with amino groups. The modulation of the geometry of the Janus silica particles allows us to tune the final morphology of the gold semishells. This method also provides a route to fabricating hollow gold semishells through etching of the silica cores with hydrofluoric acid. The optical properties were characterized by visible near-infrared (vis-NIR) spectroscopy and compared with simulations performed using the boundary element method (BEM). These revealed that the main optical features are located beyond the NIR region because of the large core size. PMID:24551496

  16. Gold, currencies and market efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristoufek, Ladislav; Vosvrda, Miloslav

    2016-05-01

    Gold and currency markets form a unique pair with specific interactions and dynamics. We focus on the efficiency ranking of gold markets with respect to the currency of purchase. By utilizing the Efficiency Index (EI) based on fractal dimension, approximate entropy and long-term memory on a wide portfolio of 142 gold price series for different currencies, we construct the efficiency ranking based on the extended EI methodology we provide. Rather unexpected results are uncovered as the gold prices in major currencies lay among the least efficient ones whereas very minor currencies are among the most efficient ones. We argue that such counterintuitive results can be partly attributed to a unique period of examination (2011-2014) characteristic by quantitative easing and rather unorthodox monetary policies together with the investigated illegal collusion of major foreign exchange market participants, as well as some other factors discussed in some detail.

  17. Synthesis and Characterization of Gold Clusters Ligated with 1,3-Bis(dicyclohexylphosphino)propane

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Grant E.; Priest, Thomas A.; Laskin, Julia

    2013-09-01

    In this multidisciplinary study we combine chemical reduction synthesis of novel gold clusters in solution with high-resolution analytical mass spectrometry (MS) to gain insight into the composition of the gold clusters and how their size, ionic charge state and ligand substitution influences their gas-phase fragmentation pathways. Ultra small cationic gold clusters ligated with 1,3-bis(dicyclohexylphosphino)propane (DCPP) were synthesized for the first time and introduced into the gas phase using electrospray ionization (ESI). Mass-selected cluster ions were fragmented employing collision induced dissociation (CID) and the product ions were analysed using MS. The solutions were found to contain the multiply charged cationic gold clusters Au9L43+, Au13L53+, Au6L32+, Au8L32+ and Au10L42+ (L = DCPP). The gas-phase fragmentation pathways of these cluster ions were examined systematically employing CID combined with MS. In addition, CID experiments were performed on related gold clusters of the same size and ionic charge state but capped with 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane (DPPP) ligands containing phenyl functional groups at the two phosphine centers instead of cyclohexane rings. It is shown that this relatively small change in the molecular substitution of the two phosphine centers in diphosphine ligands (C6H11 versus C6H5) exerts a pronounced influence on the size of the species that are preferentially formed in solution during reduction synthesis as well as the gas-phase fragmentation channels of otherwise identical gold cluster ions. The mass spectrometry results indicate that in addition to the length of the alkyl chain between the two phosphine centers, the substituents at the phosphine centers also play a crucial role in determining the composition, size and stability of diphosphine ligated gold clusters synthesized in solution.

  18. GOLD: The Genomes Online Database

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kyrpides, Nikos; Liolios, Dinos; Chen, Amy; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Hugenholtz, Philip; Markowitz, Victor; Bernal, Alex

    Since its inception in 1997, GOLD has continuously monitored genome sequencing projects worldwide and has provided the community with a unique centralized resource that integrates diverse information related to Archaea, Bacteria, Eukaryotic and more recently Metagenomic sequencing projects. As of September 2007, GOLD recorded 639 completed genome projects. These projects have their complete sequence deposited into the public archival sequence databases such as GenBank EMBL,and DDBJ. From the total of 639 complete and published genome projects as of 9/2007, 527 were bacterial, 47 were archaeal and 65 were eukaryotic. In addition to the complete projects, there were 2158 ongoing sequencing projects. 1328 of those were bacterial, 59 archaeal and 771 eukaryotic projects. Two types of metadata are provided by GOLD: (i) project metadata and (ii) organism/environment metadata. GOLD CARD pages for every project are available from the link of every GOLD_STAMP ID. The information in every one of these pages is organized into three tables: (a) Organism information, (b) Genome project information and (c) External links. [The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) in 2007: Status of genomic and metagenomic projects and their associated metadata, Konstantinos Liolios, Konstantinos Mavromatis, Nektarios Tavernarakis and Nikos C. Kyrpides, Nucleic Acids Research Advance Access published online on November 2, 2007, Nucleic Acids Research, doi:10.1093/nar/gkm884]

    The basic tables in the GOLD database that can be browsed or searched include the following information:

    • Gold Stamp ID
    • Organism name
    • Domain
    • Links to information sources
    • Size and link to a map, when available
    • Chromosome number, Plas number, and GC content
    • A link for downloading the actual genome data
    • Institution that did the sequencing
    • Funding source
    • Database where information resides
    • Publication status and information

    • Gold, coal and oil.

      PubMed

      Dani, Sergio U

      2010-03-01

      Jared Diamond has hypothesized that guns, germs and steel account for the fate of human societies. Here I propose an extension of Diamond's hypothesis and put it in other terms and dimensions: gold, coal and oil account not only for the fate of human societies but also for the fate of mankind through the bodily accumulation of anthropogenic arsenic, an invisible weapon of mass extinction and evolutionary change. The background is clear; arsenic species fulfill seven criteria for a weapon of mass extinction and evolutionary change: (i) bioavailability to all living organisms; (ii) imperceptibility; (iii) acute toxicity; (iv) bioaccumulation and chronic toxicity; (v) adverse impact on reproductive fitness and reproductive outcomes and early-age development and growth in a wide range of microbial, plant and animal species including man; (vi) widespread geographical distribution, mobility and ecological persistence on a centennial to millennial basis and (vii) availability in necessary and sufficient amounts to exert evolutionarily meaningful effects. The proof is becoming increasingly feasible as human exploitation of gold, coal and oil deposits cause sustainable rises of arsenic concentrations in the biosphere. Paradoxically, humans are among the least arsenic-resistant organisms because humans are long-lived, encephalized and complex social metazoans. An arsenic accumulation model is presented here to describe how arsenic accumulates in the human body with increasing age and at different provisionally safe exposure levels. Arsenic accumulates in the human body even at daily exposure levels which are within the lowest possible WHO provisional tolerance limits, yielding bodily arsenic concentrations which are above WHO provisional limits. Ongoing consequences of global scale arsenic poisoning of mankind include age-specific rises in morbidity and mortality followed by adaptive changes. The potential rise of successful forms of inborn resistance to arsenic in humans

    • In situ non-DLVO stabilization of surfactant-free, plasmonic gold nanoparticles: effect of Hofmeister's anions.

      PubMed

      Merk, Vivian; Rehbock, Christoph; Becker, Felix; Hagemann, Ulrich; Nienhaus, Hermann; Barcikowski, Stephan

      2014-04-22

      Specific ion effects ranking in the Hofmeister sequence are ubiquitous in biochemical, industrial, and atmospheric processes. In this experimental study specific ion effects inexplicable by the classical DLVO theory have been investigated at curved water-metal interfaces of gold nanoparticles synthesized by a laser ablation process in liquid in the absence of any organic stabilizers. Notably, ion-specific differences in colloidal stability occurred in the Hückel regime at extraordinarily low salinities below 50 μM, and indications of a direct influence of ion-specific effects on the nanoparticle formation process are found. UV-vis, zeta potential, and XPS measurements help to elucidate coagulation properties, electrokinetic potential, and the oxidation state of pristine gold nanoparticles. The results clearly demonstrate that stabilization of ligand-free gold nanoparticles scales proportionally with polarizability and antiproportionally with hydration of anions located at defined positions in a direct Hofmeister sequence of anions. These specific ion effects might be due to the adsorption of chaotropic anions (Br(-), SCN(-), or I(-)) at the gold/water interface, leading to repulsive interactions between the partially oxidized gold particles during the nanoparticle formation process. On the other hand, kosmotropic anions (F(-) or SO4(2-)) seem to destabilize the gold colloid, whereas Cl(-) and NO3(-) give rise to an intermediate stability. Quantification of surface charge density indicated that particle stabilization is dominated by ion adsorption and not by surface oxidation. Fundamental insights into specific ion effects on ligand-free aqueous gold nanoparticles beyond purely electrostatic interactions are of paramount importance in biomedical or catalytic applications, since colloidal stability appears to depend greatly on the type of salt rather than on the amount.

  1. Shape tailored green synthesis and catalytic properties of gold nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Anish; MeenaKumari, M.; Philip, Daizy

    2014-01-01

    The use of environmentally benign procedures is highly desirable for the synthesis of nanoparticles. Here we report a simple, versatile, economic, ecofriendly and reproducible green method for the size-tunable synthesis of stable and crystalline gold nanoparticles of varied shape using aqueous extract of Garcinia Combogia fruit. The predominant anisotropic nature in the morphology of synthesized particles at lower quantities of extract gradually shifted to spherical particles with larger quantity of extract and increase of temperature. The onset of reduction, the time-evolution of the Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) and the catalytic activity are studied using UV-Visible spectroscopy. The Selected Area Diffraction (SAED) pattern, the lattice fringes in the High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopic (HRTEM) image and the X-ray Diffraction (XRD) pattern clearly show the pure crystalline nature of the synthesized gold nanoparticles. The role of carboxyl group present in Garcinia Combogia fruit extract in the reduction of chloroaurate ions is established using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectra. The size dependent catalytic activity of the green synthesized gold nanoparticles on the reduction of 4-Nitrophenol to 4-Aminophenol using sodium borohydride is studied and reported for the first time. The first order kinetics is fitted and rate constants are calculated. Catalytically active green synthesized gold nanoparticles with controllable size and shape presents an advanced step in future biomedical and chemical applications.

  2. Plasmonic Gold Decorated MWCNT Nanocomposite for Localized Plasmon Resonance Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Ozhikandathil, J.; Badilescu, S.; Packirisamy, M.

    2015-01-01

    The synergism of excellent properties of carbon nanotubes and gold nanoparticles is used in this work for bio-sensing of recombinant bovine growth hormones (rbST) by making Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNT) locally optically responsive by augmenting it optical properties through Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR). To this purpose, locally gold nano particles decorated gold–MWCNT composite was synthesized from a suspension of MWCNT bundles and hydrogen chloroauric acid in an aqueous solution, activated ultrasonically and, then, drop-casted on a glass substrate. The slow drying of the drop produces a “coffee ring” pattern that is found to contain gold–MWCNT nanocomposites, accumulated mostly along the perimeter of the ring. The reaction is studied also at low-temperature, in the vacuum chamber of the Scanning Electron Microscope and is accounted for by the local melting processes that facilitate the contact between the bundle of tubes and the gold ions. Biosensing applications of the gold–MWCNT nanocomposite using their LSPR properties are demonstrated for the plasmonic detection of traces of bovine growth hormone. The sensitivity of the hybrid platform which is found to be 1 ng/ml is much better than that measuring with gold nanoparticles alone which is only 25 ng/ml. PMID:26282187

  3. Shape tailored green synthesis and catalytic properties of gold nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Anish; MeenaKumari, M; Philip, Daizy

    2014-01-24

    The use of environmentally benign procedures is highly desirable for the synthesis of nanoparticles. Here we report a simple, versatile, economic, ecofriendly and reproducible green method for the size-tunable synthesis of stable and crystalline gold nanoparticles of varied shape using aqueous extract of Garcinia Combogia fruit. The predominant anisotropic nature in the morphology of synthesized particles at lower quantities of extract gradually shifted to spherical particles with larger quantity of extract and increase of temperature. The onset of reduction, the time-evolution of the Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) and the catalytic activity are studied using UV-Visible spectroscopy. The Selected Area Diffraction (SAED) pattern, the lattice fringes in the High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopic (HRTEM) image and the X-ray Diffraction (XRD) pattern clearly show the pure crystalline nature of the synthesized gold nanoparticles. The role of carboxyl group present in Garcinia Combogia fruit extract in the reduction of chloroaurate ions is established using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectra. The size dependent catalytic activity of the green synthesized gold nanoparticles on the reduction of 4-Nitrophenol to 4-Aminophenol using sodium borohydride is studied and reported for the first time. The first order kinetics is fitted and rate constants are calculated. Catalytically active green synthesized gold nanoparticles with controllable size and shape presents an advanced step in future biomedical and chemical applications.

  4. Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using Nyctanthes arbortristis flower extract.

    PubMed

    Das, Ratul Kumar; Gogoi, Nayanmoni; Bora, Utpal

    2011-06-01

    The present study explores the reducing and capping potentials of ethanolic flower extract of the plant Nyctanthes arbortristis for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles. The extract at different volume fractions were stirred with HAuCl4 aqueous solution at 80 °C for 30 min. The UV-Vis spectroscopic analysis of the reaction products confirmed successful reduction of Au(3+) ions to gold nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) revealed dominant spherical morphology of the gold nanoparticles with an average diameter of 19.8 ± 5.0 nm. X-ray diffraction (XRD) study confirmed crystalline nature of the synthesized particles. Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis of the purified and lyophilized gold nanoparticles confirmed the surface adsorption of biomolecules during preparation and caused long-term (6 months) stability. Low reaction temperature (25 °C) favored anisotropy. The strong reducing power of the flower extract can also be tested in the green synthesis of other metallic nanoparticles.

  5. Gold nanoparticle (AuNPs) and gold nanopore (AuNPore) catalysts in organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Takale, Balaram S; Bao, Ming; Yamamoto, Yoshinori

    2014-04-07

    Organic synthesis using gold has gained tremendous attention in last few years, especially heterogeneous gold catalysis based on gold nanoparticles has made its place in almost all organic reactions, because of the robust and green nature of gold catalysts. In this context, gold nanopore (AuNPore) with a 3D metal framework is giving a new dimension to heterogeneous gold catalysts. Interestingly, AuNPore chemistry is proving better than gold nanoparticles based chemistry. In this review, along with recent advances, major discoveries in heterogeneous gold catalysis are discussed.

  6. Mixed monolayer protected gold atom-oxide cluster synthesis and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nambiar, Sindhu R.; Aneesh, Padamadathil K.; Sukumar, Chinthu; Rao, Talasila P.

    2012-06-01

    Small atomic gold clusters in solution, Aun, stabilized by cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and cysteine, have been synthesized potentiodynamically in quiescent aqueous solutions. The electrodissolution of gold to gold ions during an anodic scan and subsequent cluster formation during a cathodic scan in underpotential (UPDD) and overpotential dissolution-deposition (OPDD) regions were studied. The experimental potentiodynamic I-E profiles and chronoamperometric i-t transients are fit into reported theoretical models of adsorption and electrocrystallization. The plausible application of clusters/cluster film to cysteine sensing based on fluorescence quenching and square wave stripping voltammetry is demonstrated.Small atomic gold clusters in solution, Aun, stabilized by cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and cysteine, have been synthesized potentiodynamically in quiescent aqueous solutions. The electrodissolution of gold to gold ions during an anodic scan and subsequent cluster formation during a cathodic scan in underpotential (UPDD) and overpotential dissolution-deposition (OPDD) regions were studied. The experimental potentiodynamic I-E profiles and chronoamperometric i-t transients are fit into reported theoretical models of adsorption and electrocrystallization. The plausible application of clusters/cluster film to cysteine sensing based on fluorescence quenching and square wave stripping voltammetry is demonstrated. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30446e

  7. Modeling of gold production in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muda, Nora; Ainuddeen, Nasihah Rasyiqah; Ismail, Hamizun; Umor, Mohd Rozi

    2013-04-01

    This study was conducted to identify the main factors that contribute to the gold production and hence determine the factors that affect to the development of the mining industry in Malaysia. An econometric approach was used by performing the cointegration analysis among the factors to determine the existence of long term relationship between the gold prices, the number of gold mines, the number of workers in gold mines and the gold production. The study continued with the Granger analysis to determine the relationship between factors and gold production. Results have found that there are long term relationship between price, gold production and number of employees. Granger causality analysis shows that there is only one way relationship between the number of employees with gold production in Malaysia and the number of gold mines in Malaysia.

  8. Anti-aggregation-based spectrometric detection of Hg(II) at physiological pH using gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Rajeshwari, A; Karthiga, D; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan; Mukherjee, Amitava

    2016-10-01

    An efficient detection method for Hg (II) ions at physiological pH (pH7.4) was developed using tween 20-modified gold nanorods (NRs) in the presence of dithiothreitol (DTT). Thiol groups (-SH) at the end of DTT have a higher affinity towards gold atoms, and they can covalently interact with gold NRs and leads to their aggregation. The addition of Hg(II) ions prevents the aggregation of gold NRs due to the covalent bond formation between the -SH group of DTT and Hg(II) ions in the buffer system. The changes in the longitudinal surface plasmon resonance peak of gold NRs were characterized using a UV-visible spectrophotometer. The absorption intensity peak of gold NRs at 679nm was observed to reduce after interaction with DTT, and the absorption intensity was noted to increase by increasing the concentration of Hg(II) ions. The TEM analysis confirms the morphological changes of gold NRs before and after addition of Hg(II) ions in the presence of DTT. Further, the aggregation and disaggregation of gold NRs were confirmed by particle size and zeta potential analysis. The developed method shows an excellent linearity (y=0.001x+0.794) for the graph plotted between the absorption ratio and Hg(II) concentration (1 to 100pM) under the optimized conditions. The limit of detection was noted to be 0.42pM in the buffer system. The developed method was tested in simulated body fluid, and it was found to have a good recovery rate.

  9. Ion-Ion Neutralization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-31

    plasma were identified using a downstream quadrupole mass spectrometer. In these experimento it is a simple matter to establish H+(H 2 0):f as the...pressure as predicted by the Thomson t2rnary mechanism whicK hzr been suownr to be valid experimentally at hiTh rrsurs (,han and Peron, 1:EI4 hereafter t...of NO , NO2 ions in various gases and the ternary recombination coefficients of these ions in the higher pres:;ure ( Thomson ) re"ie. Equation (5) cr>n

  10. Gold nanonetwork film on the ITO surface exhibiting one-dimensional optical properties

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A network of gold nanostructures exhibiting one-dimensional gold nanostructure properties may become a prospective novel structure for optical, electrical and catalytic applications benefited by its unusual characteristics resulting from the collective properties of individual nanostructures in the network. In this paper, we demonstrate a facile method for the formation of high-density gold nanonetwork film on the substrate surface composed of quasi-1D nanoparticles (typically fusiform) with length ca. 10 nm - via reduction of gold ions in the presence of nanoseeds attached surface, binary surfactants of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and hexamethyleneteramine and Ag+ ions. The length of the nanonetworks can be up to ca. 100 nm, which corresponds to the aspect ratio of ca. 10. The quasi-1D gold nanostructures as well as the nanonetworks were found to be sensitive to the binary surfactants system and the Ag+ ions as they can only be formed if all the chemicals are available in the reaction. The nanonetworks exhibit unique 1D optical properties with the presence of transverse and longitudinal surface plasmon resonance absorption. Owing to their peculiar structures that are composed of small quasi-1D nanoparticles, the nanonetworks may produce unusual optical and catalytic properties, which are potentially used in surface-enhanced Raman scattering, catalysis and optical and non-linear optical applications. PMID:22587640

  11. Monoclonal antibody "gold rush".

    PubMed

    Maggon, Krishan

    2007-01-01

    The market, sales and regulatory approval of new human medicines, during the past few years, indicates increasing number and share of new biologics and emergence of new multibillion dollar molecules. The global sale of monoclonal antibodies in 2006 were $20.6 billion. Remicade had annual sales gain of $1 billion during the past 3 years and five brands had similar increase in 2006. Rituxan with 2006 sales of $4.7 billion was the best selling monoclonal antibody and biological product and the 6th among the top selling medicinal brand. It may be the first biologic and monoclonal antibody to reach $10 billion annual sales in the near future. The strong demand from cancer and arthritis patients has surpassed almost all commercial market research reports and sales forecast. Seven monoclonal antibody brands in 2006 had sales exceeding $1 billion. Humanized or fully human monoclonal antibodies with low immunogenicity, enhanced antigen binding and reduced cellular toxicity provide better clinical efficacy. The higher technical and clinical success rate, overcoming of technical hurdles in large scale manufacturing, low cost of market entry and IND filing, use of fully human and humanized monoclonal antibodies has attracted funds and resources towards R&D. Review of industry research pipeline and sales data during the past 3 years indicate a real paradigm shift in industrial R&D from pharmaceutical to biologics and monoclonal antibodies. The antibody bandwagon has been joined by 200 companies with hundreds of new projects and targets and has attracted billions of dollars in R&D investment, acquisitions and licensing deals leading to the current Monoclonal Antibody Gold Rush.

  12. Goldschlager allergy in a gold allergic patient.

    PubMed

    Guenthner, T; Stork, C M; Cantor, R M

    1999-08-01

    We describe the case of gold allergy after ingestion of GOLDSCHLAGER, a gold-containing liquor, in a patient with a previous allergy to gold jewelry. The patient was not aware that genuine gold particles were contained in the schnapps liquor and that ingestion could result in a reaction similar to that experienced by individuals sensitive to gold jewelry. Clinicians should be familiar with the presence of gold particles in GOLDSCHLAGER liquor and the potential for allergic reactions to occur in those so predisposed.

  13. Comparative study of formation and stabilization of gold and silver clusters and nanoparticles in mordenites.

    PubMed

    Bogdanchikova, N; Tuzovskaya, I; Pestryakov, A; Susarrey-Arce, A

    2011-06-01

    Supporting silver and gold on mordenites by ion-exchange method with further reduction with H2 leads to formation of neutral and charged metal clusters inside zeolite channels as well as metal nanoparticles on external surface of mordenite. A portion of the cluster states of the metals and stability of the clusters depend strongly on acidity of zeolite (determined by SiO2/Al2O3 molar ratio) and nature of zeolite cation (H+, Na+, NH4+). The investigations of silver and gold samples after prolonged storage for 6 and 12 months revealed that silver clusters are comparatively stable while oxidation of gold clusters and nanoparticles by air is the probable cause of deactivation of gold catalysts. The comparison of the results for Au and Ag samples allow suggesting NaM15 and NaM24 mordenites for effective synthesis of complex Au-Ag clusters as active and stable species of catalytic reactions occurring at room temperature.

  14. Selective Gold Recovery and Catalysis in a Highly Flexible Methionine-Decorated Metal-Organic Framework.

    PubMed

    Mon, Marta; Ferrando-Soria, Jesús; Grancha, Thais; Fortea-Pérez, Francisco R; Gascon, Jorge; Leyva-Pérez, Antonio; Armentano, Donatella; Pardo, Emilio

    2016-06-29

    A novel chiral 3D bioMOF exhibiting functional channels with thio-alkyl chains derived from the natural amino acid l-methionine (1) has been rationally prepared. The well-known strong affinity of gold for sulfur derivatives, together with the extremely high flexibility of the thioether "arms" decorating the channels, account for a selective capture of gold(III) and gold(I) salts in the presence of other metal cations typically found in electronic wastes. The X-ray single-crystal structures of the different gold adsorbates Au(III)@1 and Au(I)@1 suggest that the selective metal capture occurs in a metal ion recognition process somehow mimicking what happens in biological systems and protein receptors. Both Au(III)@1 and Au(I)@1 display high activity as heterogeneous catalyst for the hydroalkoxylation of alkynes, further expanding the application of these novel hybrid materials.

  15. Extracellular biosynthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles using Krishna tulsi ( Ocimum sanctum) leaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, Daizy; Unni, C.

    2011-05-01

    Aqueous extract of Ocimum sanctum leaf is used as reducing agent for the environmentally friendly synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were characterized using UV-vis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FTIR analysis. These methods allow the synthesis of hexagonal gold nanoparticles having size ∼30 nm showing two surface plasmon resonance (SPR) bands by changing the relative concentration of HAuCl 4 and the extract. Broadening of SPR is observed at larger quantities of the extract possibly due to biosorption of gold ions. Silver nanoparticles with size in the range 10-20 nm having symmetric SPR band centered around 409 nm are obtained for the colloid synthesized at room temperature at a pH of 8. Crystallinity of the nanoparticles is confirmed from the XRD pattern. Biomolecules responsible for capping are different in gold and silver nanoparticles as evidenced by the FTIR spectra.

  16. Seeded Growth of Monodisperse Gold Nanorods Using Bromide-Free Surfactant Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, XC; Gao, YZ; Chen, J; Reifsnyder, DC; Zheng, C; Murray, CB

    2013-05-01

    We demonstrate for the first time that monodisperse gold nanorods (NRs) with broadly tunable dimensions and longitudinal surface plasmon resonances can be synthesized using a bromide-free surfactant mixture composed of alkyltrimethylammonium chloride and sodium oleate. It is found that uniform gold NRs can be obtained even with an iodide concentration approaching 100 mu M in the growth solution. In contrast to conventional wisdom, our results provide conclusive evidence that neither bromide as the surfactant counterion nor a high concentration of bromide ions in the growth solution is essential for gold NR formation. Correlated electron microscopy study of three-dimensional structures of gold NRs reveals a previously unprecedented octagonal prismatic structure enclosed predominantly by high index {310} crystal planes. These findings should have profound implications for a comprehensive mechanistic understanding of seeded growth of anisotropic metal nanocrystals.

  17. Root extracts of Polygala tenuifolia for the green synthesis of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jun, Sang Hui; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Koo, Yean Kyoung; Park, Yohan; Kim, Jinwoong; Cho, Seonho; Park, Youmie

    2014-08-01

    Traditional medicinal plants possess diverse active constituents for exerting their biological activities. Recently, the innovative applications of plant extracts have revealed their promise as 'green' reducing agents for the reduction of metal ions during the synthesis of metallic nanoparticles. Herein, we report the use of 70% ethanol extracts from Polygala tenuifolia roots as a 'green' reducing agent for the production of gold nanoparticles by reducing gold(III) chloride trihydrate. Gold nanoparticles were characterized using UV-Visible spectrophotometry, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The gold nanoparticles had characteristic surface plasmon resonance bands at 535 nm. HR-TEM and AFM images revealed major spherical-shaped nanoparticles. The average diameter was measured to be 9.77±3.09 nm using HR-TEM images. The crystalline structure of the gold nanoparticles was confirmed through lattice fringes and circular spots within the selected area electron diffraction in the HR-TEM images along with the XRD peaks. The gold nanoparticles exhibited enhanced anticoagulant activity, as assessed by activated partial thromboplastin time. The current method is a straightforward, environmentally friendly, and inexpensive method for the production of gold nanoparticles using extracts from traditional medicinal plants.

  18. Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using Stevia rebaudiana leaf extracts: Characterization and their stability.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Babak; Mohammadzadeh, M; Babakhani, B

    2015-07-01

    Various methods invented and developed for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles that increases daily consumed. According to this method, including potential environmental pollution problems and the complexity of the synthesis, in this study, the feasibility of using the leaves extract of Stevia rebaudiana (SR) for the reduction of gold ions to nanoparticles form have been studied. Stevia leaves were used to prepare the aqueous extract for this study. Gold nanoparticles were characterized with different techniques such as UV-vis spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Transmission electron microscopy experiments showed that these nanoparticles are spherical and uniformly distributed and its size is from 5 to 20 nm. FT-IR spectroscopy revealed that gold nanoparticles were functionalized with biomolecules that have primary amine group (NH2), carbonyl group, OH groups and other stabilizing functional groups. X-ray diffraction pattern showed high purity and face centered cubic structure of gold nanoparticles with size of 17 nm. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) implies the right of forming gold nanoparticles. The results, confirm that gold nanoparticles have synthesized by the leaves extract of S. rebaudiana (SR).

  19. Generation of quasi-monoenergetic carbon ions accelerated parallel to the plane of a sandwich target

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J. W.; Murakami, M.; Weng, S. M.; Xu, H.; Ju, J. J.; Luan, S. X.; Yu, W.

    2014-12-15

    A new ion acceleration scheme, namely, target parallel Coulomb acceleration, is proposed in which a carbon plate sandwiched between gold layers is irradiated with intense linearly polarized laser pulses. The high electrostatic field generated by the gold ions efficiently accelerates the embedded carbon ions parallel to the plane of the target. The ion beam is found to be collimated by the concave-shaped Coulomb potential. As a result, a quasi-monoenergetic and collimated C{sup 6+}-ion beam with an energy exceeding 10 MeV/nucleon is produced at a laser intensity of 5 × 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}.

  20. Gold(III)-CO and gold(III)-CO2 complexes and their role in the water-gas shift reaction

    PubMed Central

    Roşca, Dragoş-Adrian; Fernandez-Cestau, Julio; Morris, James; Wright, Joseph A.; Bochmann, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    The water-gas shift (WGS) reaction is an important process for the generation of hydrogen. Heterogeneous gold catalysts exhibit good WGS activity, but the nature of the active site, the oxidation state, and competing reaction mechanisms are very much matters of debate. Homogeneous gold WGS systems that could shed light on the mechanism are conspicuous by their absence: gold(I)–CO is inactive and gold(III)–CO complexes were unknown. We report the synthesis of the first example of an isolable CO complex of Au(III). Its reactivity demonstrates fundamental differences between the CO adducts of the neighboring d8 ions Pt(II) and Au(III): whereas Pt(II)-CO is stable to moisture, Au(III)–CO compounds are extremely susceptible to nucleophilic attack and show WGS reactivity at low temperature. The key to understanding these dramatic differences is the donation/back-donation ratio of the M–CO bond: gold-CO shows substantially less back-bonding than Pt-CO, irrespective of closely similar ν(CO) frequencies. Key WGS intermediates include the gold-CO2 complex [(C^N^C)Au]2(μ-CO2), which reductively eliminates CO2. The species identified here are in accord with Au(III) as active species and a carboxylate WGS mechanism. PMID:26601313

  1. Chrysopogon zizanioides aqueous extract mediated synthesis, characterization of crystalline silver and gold nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Arunachalam, Kantha D; Annamalai, Sathesh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    The exploitation of various plant materials for the biosynthesis of nanoparticles is considered a green technology as it does not involve any harmful chemicals. The aim of this study was to develop a simple biological method for the synthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles using Chrysopogon zizanioides. To exploit various plant materials for the biosynthesis of nanoparticles was considered a green technology. An aqueous leaf extract of C. zizanioides was used to synthesize silver and gold nanoparticles by the bioreduction of silver nitrate (AgNO3) and chloroauric acid (HAuCl4) respectively. Water-soluble organics present in the plant materials were mainly responsible for reducing silver or gold ions to nanosized Ag or Au particles. The synthesized silver and gold nanoparticles were characterized by ultraviolet (UV)-visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The kinetics decline reactions of aqueous silver/gold ion with the C. zizanioides crude extract were determined by UV-visible spectroscopy. SEM analysis showed that aqueous gold ions, when exposed to the extract were reduced and resulted in the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles in the size range 20-50 nm. This eco-friendly approach for the synthesis of nanoparticles is simple, can be scaled up for large-scale production with powerful bioactivity as demonstrated by the synthesized silver nanoparticles. The synthesized nanoparticles can have clinical use as antibacterial, antioxidant, as well as cytotoxic agents and can be used for biomedical applications.

  2. Chrysopogon zizanioides aqueous extract mediated synthesis, characterization of crystalline silver and gold nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Arunachalam, Kantha D; Annamalai, Sathesh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    The exploitation of various plant materials for the biosynthesis of nanoparticles is considered a green technology as it does not involve any harmful chemicals. The aim of this study was to develop a simple biological method for the synthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles using Chrysopogon zizanioides. To exploit various plant materials for the biosynthesis of nanoparticles was considered a green technology. An aqueous leaf extract of C. zizanioides was used to synthesize silver and gold nanoparticles by the bioreduction of silver nitrate (AgNO3) and chloroauric acid (HAuCl4) respectively. Water-soluble organics present in the plant materials were mainly responsible for reducing silver or gold ions to nanosized Ag or Au particles. The synthesized silver and gold nanoparticles were characterized by ultraviolet (UV)-visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The kinetics decline reactions of aqueous silver/gold ion with the C. zizanioides crude extract were determined by UV-visible spectroscopy. SEM analysis showed that aqueous gold ions, when exposed to the extract were reduced and resulted in the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles in the size range 20–50 nm. This eco-friendly approach for the synthesis of nanoparticles is simple, can be scaled up for large-scale production with powerful bioactivity as demonstrated by the synthesized silver nanoparticles. The synthesized nanoparticles can have clinical use as antibacterial, antioxidant, as well as cytotoxic agents and can be used for biomedical applications. PMID:23861583

  3. Direct visualization of lead corona and its nanomolar colorimetric detection using anisotropic gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Charu; Chaudhary, Abhishek; Gupta, Abhishek; Nandi, Chayan K

    2015-03-11

    The study presents dithiothreitol (DTT) functionalized anisotropic gold nanoparticles (GNP) based colorimetric sensor for detection of toxic lead ions in water. Our results demonstrate the selectivity and sensitivity of the developed sensor over various heavy metal ions with detection limit of ∼9 nM. The mechanism of sensing is explained on the basis of unique corona formation around the DTT functionalized anisotropic GNP.

  4. Incorporation of gold into silicon by thin film deposition and pulsed laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrender, Jeffrey M.; Hudspeth, Quentin; Malladi, Girish; Efstathiadis, Harry; Mathews, Jay

    2016-12-01

    We report on the incorporation of gold into silicon at a peak concentration of 1.9 × 1020 at./cm3, four orders of magnitude above the equilibrium solubility limit, using pulsed laser melting of a thin film deposited on the silicon surface. We vary the film thickness and laser process parameters (fluence, number of shots) to quantify the range of concentrations that can be achieved. Our approach achieves gold concentrations comparable to those achieved with ion implantation followed by pulsed laser melting, in a layer with high crystalline quality. This approach offers an attractive alternative to ion implantation for forming high quality, high concentration layers of transition metals like gold in silicon.

  5. High Brightness Plasmon-Enhanced Nanostructured Gold Photoemitters

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Yu; Joly, Alan G.; Kong, Lingmei; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2014-12-30

    Plasmonic nanohole arrays are fabricated in gold thin films by focused ion beam (FIB) lithography. Subsequent heat treatment creates sub 100 nm nanometric structures including tips, rods and flakes, all localized in the nanohole array region. The combined nanohole array and nanostructured surface comprise an efficient photoemitter. High brightness photoemission is observed from this construct using photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM), following 780 nm femtosecond (fs) laser irradiation. By comparing our observables to results of finite difference time domain (FDTD) calculations, we demonstrate that photoemission from the sub-100 nm structures is enhanced in the region of propagating surface plasmons launched from the nanohole arrays. Additionally, by tuning hole diameter and separation in the nanohole array, the photoemission intensity of nanostructured photoemitters can be controlled. We observe a photoemission enhancement of over 108, relative to photoemission from the flat region of the gold substrate at laser intensities well below the ablation threshold.

  6. Synthesis and optical properties of gold nanorods with controllable morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Tianyu; Dai, Zhigao; Mei, Fei; Zhang, Xingang; Zhou, Yuanming; Xu, Jinxia; Wu, Wei; Xiao, Xiangheng; Jiang, Changzhong

    2016-11-01

    Searching for architectural building blocks with tunable morphology and peculiarity is a prominent challenge for novel diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Here, the aqueous-based seed-mediated methods for preparing highly mono-dispersed Au nanorods with a different aspect ratio are systematically studied by controlling the amounts of Ag ions and seeds. We also explore the effect of pH on the synthesis of gold nanorods. The realization of the overlap of longitudinal plasmon band and excitation source with different degrees is made by changing the aspect ratio of nanorod in order to determine its effect on the overall surface enhancement. In addition, the gold octahedra are prepared by overgrowth on Au nanorods. The SERS effects of Au nanorods are researched and the FDTD simulations are performed to reveal the morphology induced plasmon modes.

  7. Gold nanoparticles for photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wanwan; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a biomedical imaging modality that provides functional information regarding the cellular and molecular signatures of tissue by using endogenous and exogenous contrast agents. There has been tremendous effort devoted to the development of PA imaging agents, and gold nanoparticles as exogenous contrast agents have great potential for PA imaging due to their inherent and geometrically induced optical properties. The gold-based nanoparticles that are most commonly employed for PA imaging include spheres, rods, shells, prisms, cages, stars and vesicles. This article provides an overview of the current state of research in utilizing these gold nanomaterials for PA imaging of cancer, atherosclerotic plaques, brain function and image-guided therapy. PMID:25600972

  8. Study of Vegetable Biodiesel Enhanced by Gold Nanoparticles Using Thermal-Lens Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Pérez, J. L.; Fuentes, R. Gutiérrez; Correa-Pacheco, Z. N.; Tánori-Cordova, J.; Cruz-Orea, A.; Gamboa, G. López

    2015-06-01

    In this work, experimental results for the enhancement of the thermal diffusivity of a colloidal suspension of gold nanoparticles in biodiesel oil are reported. Different concentrations of Au nanoparticles are prepared using a microemulsion method, by simultaneous reduction of Au ions in the presence of hydrazine as a reducing agent. The thermal diffusivity was found to increase with increasing nanoparticle concentration.

  9. Synthesis and luminescence modulation of pyrazine-based gold(III) pincer complexes.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Cestau, Julio; Bertrand, Benoît; Blaya, Maria; Jones, Garth A; Penfold, Thomas J; Bochmann, Manfred

    2015-12-04

    The first examples of pyrazine-based gold(III) pincer complexes are reported; their intense photoemissions can be modified by protonation, N-alkylation or metal ions, without the need for altering the ligand framework. Emissions shift from red (77 K) to blue (298 K) due to thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF).

  10. Economic geology: Gold buried by oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillard, Fabrice; Copard, Yoann

    2015-03-01

    The Witwatersrand Basin in South Africa contains extraordinary amounts of gold. Thermodynamic calculations suggest that the gold may have accumulated there in response to a perfect storm of conditions available only during the Archaean.

  11. Recent Developments in Australian Gold Extraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiele, Rodney B.

    1995-01-01

    Describes new technologies that have greatly improved the extraction efficiency of gold ore, including: altering plant layout to promote efficiency, engaging Filiblast forced oxidation and bioxidation systems, and updating the electrowinning procedure at the gold recovery stage. (JRH)

  12. A new green chemistry method based on plant extracts to synthesize gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes Castillo, Milka Odemariz

    solved. In this work, secondary metabolites were extracted from alfalfa biomass in liquid phase by hot water, isopropanol, and methanol, and used to reduce tetrachloroaurate ion (AuCl4-) for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles. Biosyntheses of gold nanoparticles were performed by mixing 0.75, 1.5 and 3.0 mM Au3+ solutions with each one of the extracts at a ratio of 3:1 respectively, and shaken at room temperature for 1h. Resulting gold colloids were characterized by UV-Vis spectrophotometry and electron microscopy techniques, showing size and morphology dependency on the reaction conditions. Isopropanol alfalfa extracts reacted with Au 3+ produced gold nanoparticles with a size range of 15-60 nm. The most abundant were from 40-50 nm, and the morphologies found were polygons, decahedra and icosahedra. Methanol alfalfa extracts produced monodisperse 50 nm decahedral and icosahedral gold nanoparticles. Lastly, water alfalfa extracts reacted with Au3+ produced triangular, truncated triangular and hexagonal nanoplates with diameters ranging from 500 nm to 4 mum and thicknesses of ˜15-40 nm. The production of gold nanoplates by alfalfa extracts has never been reported before. In order to extract the formed gold nanoparticles from the biomass, physical and chemical extractions were used. For the chemical extraction, NaCl, dilute H2SO4, Triton X and DI water were tested. In these cases, the best results were obtained with DI water, followed by NaCl. The extracted nanoparticles had an absorption band at about 539 nm. For the physical extractions, alfalfa biomass containing gold nanoparticles were exposed to 400°C, 500°C, 550°C and 600°C to recover the gold nanoparticles. X-ray diffractograms taken after pyrolysis of the biomass showed that the recovered nanoparticles kept their crystal structure.

  13. Formation, structure, and orientation of gold silicide on gold surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, A. K.; Bauer, E.

    1976-01-01

    The formation of gold silicide on Au films evaporated onto Si(111) surfaces is studied by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). Surface condition, film thickness, deposition temperature, annealing temperature, and heating rate during annealing are varied. Several oriented crystalline silicide layers are observed.

  14. Hematite spindles with optical functionalities: growth of gold nanoshells and assembly of gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Spuch-Calvar, Miguel; Pérez-Juste, Jorge; Liz-Marzán, Luis M

    2007-06-01

    The layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly method, combined with the seeded growth technique, have been used to deposit gold shells on the surface of hematite (alpha-Fe(2)O(3)) spindles. While the LBL method yields dense coatings of preformed Au nanoparticles, when AuCl(-)(4) ions are further reduced by a mild reducing agent, thicker, rough nanostructured shells can be grown. The deposition process was monitored by TEM and UV-visible spectroscopy, demonstrating a gradual change in the optical features of the colloids as the surface is more densely covered. The particles so-prepared can find useful applications in cancer therapy and as SERS substrates. Additionally, we show that Au nanorods can be assembled on hematite spindles, providing a flexible way to tune the optical properties of the resulting composite colloids.

  15. Understanding ligand effects in gold clusters using mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Grant E.; Laskin, Julia

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes recent research on the influence of phosphine ligands on the size, stability, and reactivity of gold clusters synthesized in solution. Sub-nanometer clusters exhibit size- and composition-dependent properties that are unique from those of larger nanoparticles. The highly tunable properties of clusters and their high surface-to-volume ratio make them promising candidates for a variety of technological applications. However, because “each-atom-counts” toward defining cluster properties it is critically important to develop robust synthesis methods to efficiently prepare clusters of predetermined size. For decades phosphines have been known to direct the size-selected synthesis of gold clusters. Despite the preparation of numerous species it is still not understood how different functional groups at phosphine centers affect the size and properties of gold clusters. Using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) it is possible to characterize the effect of ligand substitution on the distribution of clusters formed in solution at defined reaction conditions. In addition, ligand exchange reactions on preformed clusters may be monitored using ESI-MS. Collision induced dissociation (CID) may also be employed to obtain qualitative insight into the fragmentation of mixed ligand clusters and the relative binding energies of differently substituted phosphines. Quantitative ligand binding energies and cluster stability may be determined employing surface induced dissociation (SID) in a custom-built Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR-MS). Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) based modeling of the SID data allows dissociation energies and entropy values to be extracted that may be compared with the results of high-level theoretical calculations. The charge reduction and reactivity of atomically precise gold clusters, including partially ligated species generated in the gas-phase by in source CID, on well

  16. Sans Studies Insight Into Improving of Yield of Block Copolymer-Stabilized Gold Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Debes; Aswal, V. K.

    2010-01-01

    Triblock copolymer poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO) are well known as dispersion stabilizers. It has also been recently found that they can act as reducing agents along with stabilizers and these two properties of block copolymers together have provided a single-step synthesis and stabilization of gold nanoparticles at ambient temperature. We have studied the synthesis of stable gold nanoparticle solutions using block copolymer P85. Gold nanoparticles are prepared from 1 wt% aqueous solution of P85 mixed with varying concentration of HAuCl4.3H2O salt in the range 0.001 to 0.1 wt%. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band in UV-visible absorption spectra confirm the formation of the gold nanoparticles and the maximum yield of the nanoparticles is found to be quite low at 0.005 wt% of the salt solution. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements in these systems suggest that a very small fraction of the block copolymers (<1%) is only associated with the gold nanoparticles and remaining form their own micelles, which probably results in the low yield. This can be explained as on an average a high block copolymer-to-gold ion ratio r0 (22) is required for 1 wt% P85 in the reduction reaction to produce gold nanoparticles. Based on this understanding, a step-addition method is used to enhance the yield of gold nanoparticles by manifold where the gold salt is added in small steps to maintain higher value of r(>r0) and therefore continuous formation of nanoparticles.

  17. Single-crystalline gold nanoplates from a commercial gold plating solution.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhonghao; Lapeyre, Véronique; Ravaine, Valérie; Ravaine, Serge; Kuhn, Alexander

    2009-03-01

    A novel route was proposed to synthesize gold nanoplates using a commercial gold plating solution as the reactant. Single-crystalline gold nanoplates can be successfully synthesized by reacting gold plating solution with HCl. The as-prepared nanoplates are from several micrometers to tens of micrometers in size. The effects of reactant concentration and temperature on the morphology of the gold products were investigated. The size of the gold nanoplate increases with the decrease of the amount of gold plating solution, while irregular gold nanoparticles are formed as the HCl concentration becomes low. When the reaction temperature is as low as room temperature, nanoplates with a concavity form. Specifically, it is found that the Cl- plays an important role for the formation of these gold nanoplates. The formation mechanism of the gold nanoplates is studied in detail.

  18. Structural change from doping the gold cluster.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yiji; Wang, Shu-Guang; Li, Jia

    2011-05-01

    Doping gold clusters with a transition metal (M@Au(n)) causes structural change. To determine the mechanism by which these changes occur, the central gold atom of Au(5) was doped with its same row transition metals Pt, Ir, Os, Re, and W. Based on theoretical calculations, a similar trend was found in other gold clusters.

  19. Highly active thermally stable nanoporous gold catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, Juergen; Wittstock, Arne; Biener, Monika M.; Bagge-Hansen, Michael; Baeumer, Marcus; Wichmann, Andre; Neuman, Bjoern

    2016-12-20

    In one embodiment, a system includes a nanoporous gold structure and a plurality of oxide particles deposited on the nanoporous gold structure; the oxide particles are characterized by a crystalline phase. In another embodiment, a method includes depositing oxide nanoparticles on a nanoporous gold support to form an active structure and functionalizing the deposited oxide nanoparticles.

  20. Gold, Silver and Bronze Citations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Presents the gold, silver, and bronze winners of a competition, which judged the most outstanding learning environments at educational institutions nationwide. Jurors spent two days reviewing projects, focusing on concepts and ideas that made them exceptional. For each citation, the article offers information on the firm, client, total area, total…

  1. Dissociative Scattering of Hyperthermal Energy CF3+ Ions from Modified Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rezayat, Talayeh; Shukla, Anil K.

    2007-02-28

    We have studied surface-induced dissociation (SID) of a small polyatomic ion, CF3+, at several collision energies between 29 eV and 159 eV in collision with fluorinated alkyl thiol on gold 111 crystal.

  2. Electron-phonon equilibration in laser-heated gold films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, T. G.; Mabey, P.; Gericke, D. O.; Hartley, N. J.; Doyle, H. W.; McGonegle, D.; Rackstraw, D. S.; Higginbotham, A.; Gregori, G.

    2014-07-01

    By irradiating a thin metal foil with an intense short-pulse laser, we have created a uniform system far from equilibrium. The deposited energy is initially deposited only within the electronic subsystem, and the subsequent evolution of the system is determined by the details of the electron-phonon coupling. Here, we measure the time evolution of the lattice parameter through multilayer Bragg diffraction and compare the result to classical molecular dynamic simulations to determine the lattice temperature. The electron-ion coupling constant for gold is then determined by comparison with the evolution of a two-temperature electron-phonon system.

  3. Bimodal porous gold opals for molecular sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Weon-Sik; Yu, Hyunung; Ham, Sung-Kyoung; Lee, Myung-Jin; Jung, Jin-Seung; Robinson, David B.

    2013-11-01

    We have fabricated bimodal porous gold skeletons by double-templating routes using poly(styrene) colloidal opals as templates. The fabricated gold skeletons show a bimodal pore-size distribution, with small pores within spheres and large pores between spheres. The templated bimodal porous gold skeletons were applied in Raman scattering experiments to study sensing efficiency for probe molecules. We found that the bimodal porous gold skeletons showed obvious enhancement of Raman scattering signals versus that of the unimodal porous gold which only has interstitial pores of several hundred nanometers.

  4. Gold nephropathy in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Husserl, F E; Shuler, S E

    1979-01-01

    A 2-year-old girl was treated with gold salts for juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Treatment had to be discontinued when persistent proteinuria was detected. As this case report indicates, close monitoring of the urine is mandatory during treatment with gold salts to detect early signs of toxicity: hematuria followed by casts and then proteinuria as therapy is continued. Histologic examination with electron microscopy will help to differentiate the different forms of gold toxicity. When the findings are consistent with gold-induced renal involvement, therapy should be discontinued. The gold nephropathy usually resolves in time, with no permanent renal damage.

  5. Gold recycling; a materials flow study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amey, Earle B.

    2000-01-01

    This materials flow study includes a description of trends in consumption, loss, and recycling of gold-containing materials in the United States in 1998 in order to illustrate the extent to which gold is presently being recycled and to identify recycling trends. The quantity of gold recycled, as a percent of the apparent supply of gold, was estimated to be about 30 percent. Of the approximately 446 metric tons of gold refined in the United States in 1998, the fabricating and industrial use losses were 3 percent.

  6. Invertebrate water extracts as biocompatible reducing agents for the green synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Han, Lina; Kim, Yeong Shik; Cho, Seonho; Park, Youmie

    2013-08-01

    We report the use of water extracts of two invertebrates, snail body and earthworm, as biocompatible reducing agents for the green synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles. The reaction conditions were optimized by varying the extract concentration, gold ion or silver ion concentration, reaction time, and reaction temperature. The gold and silver nanoparticles exhibited their characteristic surface plasmon resonance bands. Mostly spherical and amorphous shapes of the nanoparticles were synthesized. The average diameters of the gold and silver nanoparticles were 4.56 +/- 1.81 nm and 11.12 +/- 5.25 nm, respectively, when the extract of snail body was used as the reducing agent. The earthworm extracts produced gold and silver nanoparticles with average diameters of 6.70 +/- 2.69 nm and 12.19 +/- 4.28 nm, respectively. This report suggests that the invertebrate natural products have potential as biocompatible reducing agents for the green synthesis of metallic nanoparticles. This utility would open up novel applications of invertebrate natural products as nanocomposites and in nanomedicine.

  7. Cyto- and genotoxicity assessment of Gold nanoparticles obtained by laser ablation in A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Bucchianico, Sebastiano; Migliore, Lucia; Marsili, Paolo; Vergari, Chiara; Giammanco, Francesco; Giorgetti, Emilia

    2015-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles have attracted enormous interest in biomedical applications, based on their unique optical properties. However, their toxicity on human tissues is still an open issue. Beyond the potential intrinsic toxicity of nanostructured gold, a non-negligible contribution of stabilizers or reaction by-products related to current wet chemical synthesis procedures can be expected. Aimed at isolating gold contribution from that of any other contaminant, we produced colloidal suspensions of Gold nanoparticles having average size <10 nm in deionized water or acetone by pulsed laser ablation, that permits preparation of uncoated and highly stable Gold nanoparticles in pure solvents. Subsequently, we investigated the role of surface chemistry, size, and dispersivity of synthesized Gold nanoparticles in exerting toxicity in a cell model system of deep respiratory tract, representing the main route of exposure to NPs, namely adenocarcinoma epithelial A549 cells. Gold nanoparticles prepared in water showed no particular signs of cytotoxicity, cytostasis, and/or genotoxicity as assessed by MTT colorimetric viability test and Cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay up to concentrations of the order of 5 μg/mL. In contrast, Gold nanoparticles produced in pure acetone and then transferred into deionized water showed impaired cell viability, apoptosis responses, micronuclei, and dicentric chromosomes induction as well as nuclear budding, as a function of the amount of surface contaminants like amorphous carbon and enolate ions.

  8. Dating native gold by noble gas analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedermann, S.; Eugster, O.; Hofmann, B.; Thalmann, CH.; Reimold, W. U.

    1993-01-01

    Our recent work on He, Ne, and Ar in Alpine gold samples has demonstrated that gold is extremely retentive for He and could thus, in principle, be used for U/Th-He-4 dating. For vein-type gold from Brusson, Northern Italy, we derived a U/Th-He-4 age of 36 Ma, in agreement with the K-Ar formation age of associated muscovites and biotites. However, in placer gold from the Napf area, Central Switzerland, we observed large excesses of both He-4 and radiogenic Ar-40 (Ar-40 sub rad, defined as Ar-40-295.5-Ar-.36). The gas release systematics indicate two distinct noble gas components, one of which is released below about 800 C and the other one at the melting point of gold (1064 C). We now present results of He and Xe measurements in a 1 g placer gold sample from the river Kruempelgraben, as well as He and Ar data for Brusson vein-type gold and for gold from the Lily Gold Mine, South Africa. We calculate reasonable U/Th-He-4 as well as U-Xe ages based on those gases which are released at approximately 800 C. Probably the low-temperature components represent in-situ-produced radiogenic He and fission Xe, whereas the gases evolving when gold melts have been trapped during gold formation. Therefore, only the low-temperature components are relevant for dating purposes.

  9. Mammalian sensitivity to elemental gold (Au?)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eisler, R.

    2004-01-01

    There is increasing documentation of allergic contact dermatitis and other effects from gold jewelry, gold dental restorations, and gold implants. These effects were especially pronounced among females wearing body-piercing gold objects. One estimate of the prevalence of gold allergy worldwide is 13%, as judged by patch tests with monovalent organogold salts. Eczema of the head and neck was the most common response of individuals hypersensitive to gold, and sensitivity can last for at least several years. Ingestion of beverages containing flake gold can result in allergic-type reactions similar to those seen in gold-allergic individuals exposed to gold through dermal contact and other routes. Studies with small laboratory mammals and injected doses of colloidal gold showed increased body temperatures, accumulations in reticular cells, and dose enhancement in tumor therapy; gold implants were associated with tissue injuries. It is proposed that Au? toxicity to mammals is associated, in part, with formation of the more reactive Au+ and Au3+ species.

  10. Fragmentation of biomolecules using slow highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruehlicke, Christiane; Schneider, Dieter; DuBois, Robert; Balhorn, Rodney

    1997-02-01

    We present first results of biomolecular fragmentation studies with slow highly charged ions (HCI). A thin layer of the tripeptide RVA was deposited on gold targets and irradiated with slow (few 100 keV) ions, e.g. Xe50+ and Xe15+, extracted from the LLNL EBIT (electron beam ion trap). The secondary ions released upon ion impact were mass analyzed via Time-Of-Flight Secondary-Ion-Mass-Spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). The results show a strong dependence of the positive and negative ion yields on the charge state of the incident ion. We also found that incident ions with high charge states cause the ejection of fragments with a wide mass range as well as the intact molecule (345 amu). The underlying mechanisms are not yet understood but electron depletion of the target due to the high incident charge is likely to cause a variety of fragmentation processes.

  11. Chromosomal instability induced by heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limoli, C. L.; Ponnaiya, B.; Corcoran, J. J.; Giedzinski, E.; Morgan, W. F.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: To establish the dose-response relationship for the induction of chromosomal instability in GM10115 cells exposed to high-energy iron ions (1 GeV/nucleon, mean LET 146 keV/microm) and gold ions (11 GeV/nucleon, mean LET 1450 keV/microm). Past work has established that sparsely ionizing X-rays can induce a long-lived destabilization of chromosomes in a dose-dependent manner at an incidence of approximately 3% per gray. The present investigation assesses the capacity of High-Z and High-energy (HZE) particles to elicit this same endpoint. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Clonal populations derived from single progenitor cells surviving heavy-ion irradiation were analyzed cytogenetically to identify those clones showing a persistent destablization of chromosomes. RESULTS: Dose-response data, with a particular emphasis at low dose (< 1.0 Gy), indicate a frequency of approximately 4% per gray for the induction of chromosomal instability in clones derived from single progenitor cells surviving exposure to iron ions. The induction of chromosomal instability by gold ions was, however, less responsive to applied dose, as the observed incidence of this phenotype varied from 0 to 10% over 1-8 Gy. Both iron and gold ions gave dose-dependent increases in the yield of chromosomal aberrations (both chromosome- and chromatid-type) measured at the first mitosis following irradiation, as well as shoulderless survival curves having D0=0.87 and 1.1 Gy respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the present dose-response data, the relative biological effectiveness of iron ions is 1.3 for the induction of chromosomal instability, and this indicates that heavy ions are only slightly more efficient than X-rays at eliciting this delayed phenotype.

  12. Deposition of gold nanoparticles on silica spheres by electroless metal plating technique.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yoshio; Tadaki, Yohei; Nagao, Daisuke; Konno, Mikio

    2005-03-15

    A previously proposed method for metal deposition with silver [Kobayashi et al., Chem. Mater. 13 (2001) 1630] was extended to uniform deposition of gold nanoparticles on submicrometer-sized silica spheres. The present method consisted of three steps: (1) the adsorption of Sn(2+) ions took place on surface of silica particles, (2) Ag(+) ions added were reduced and simultaneously adsorbed to the surface, while Sn(2+) was oxidized to Sn(4+), and (3) Au(+) ions added were reduced and deposited on the Ag surface. TEM observation, X-ray diffractometry, and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy revealed that gold metal nanoparticles with an average particle size of 13 nm and a crystal size of 5.1 nm were formed on the silica spheres with a size of 273 nm at an Au concentration of 0.77 M.

  13. Ultrasensitive SERS detection of mercury based on the assembled gold nanochains.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liguang; Yin, Honghong; Ma, Wei; Kuang, Hua; Wang, Libing; Xu, Chuanlai

    2015-05-15

    Mercuric ions (Hg(2+)) mediate the transformation of single-stranded DNA to form double helical DNA by T-Hg(2+)-T interaction between base pairs. With this strategy, DNA modified gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) were assembled into chains which were displayed remarkable surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal. Under optimized conditions, the length of gold nanochains was directly proportional to the mercuric ions concentrations over 0.001-0.5 ng mL(-1) and the limit of detection (LOD) in drinking water was as low as 0.45 pg mL(-1). With ultrasensitivity and excellent selectivity, this feasible and simple method is potentially as a promising tool for monitoring of mercury ions in food safety and environmental applications.

  14. Benchmark Measurements of the Ionization Balance of Non-LTE Gold

    SciTech Connect

    Heeter, R F; Hansen, S B; Fournier, K B; Foord, M E; Froula, D H; Mackinnon, A J; May, M J; Schneider, M B; Young, B F

    2007-04-20

    The authors present a series of benchmark measurements of the ionization balance of well characterized gold plasmas with and without external radiation fields at electron densities near 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3} and various electron temperatures spanning the range 0.8 to 2.4 keV. They have analyzed time- and space-resolved M-shell gold emission spectra using a sophisticated collisional-radiative model with hybrid level structure, finding average ion changes ranging from 42 to 50. At the lower temperatures, the spectra exhibit significant sensitivity to external radiation fields and include emission features from complex N-shell ions not previously studied at these densities. The measured spectra and inferred provide a stringent test for non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) models of complex high-Z ions.

  15. Understanding the Seed-Mediated Growth of Gold Nanorods through a Fractional Factorial Design of Experiments.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Nathan D; Harvey, Samantha; Idesis, Fred A; Murphy, Catherine J

    2017-02-28

    Since the development of simple, aqueous protocols for the synthesis of anisotropic metal nanoparticles, research into many promising, valuable applications of gold nanorods has grown considerably, but a number of challenges remain, including gold-particle yield, robustness to minor impurities, and precise control of gold nanorod surface chemistry. Herein we present the results of a composite fractional factorial series of experiments designed to screen seven additional potential avenues of control and to understand the seed-mediated silver-assisted synthesis of gold nanorods. These synthesis variables are the amount of sodium borohydride used and the rate of stirring when producing seed nanoparticles, the age of and the amount of seeds added, the reaction temperature, the amounts of silver nitrate and ascorbic acid added, and the age of the reduced growth solution before seed nanoparticles are added to initiate rod formation. This statistical experimental design and analysis method, besides determining which experimental variables are important and which are not when synthesizing gold nanorods (and quantifying their effects), gives further insight into the mechanism of growth by measuring the degree to which variables interact with each other by mapping out their mechanistic connections. This work demonstrates that when forming gold nanorods by the reduction of auric ions by ascorbic acid onto seed nanoparticles, ascorbic acid determines how much gold is reduced, and the amount of seeds determine how it is divided, yet both influence the intrinsic growth rates, in both width and length, of the forming nanorods. Furthermore, this work shows that the reduction of gold proceeds via direct reduction on the surface of seeds and not through a disproportionation reaction. Further control over the length of gold nanorods can be achieved by tuning the amount of silver nitrate or the reaction temperature. This work shows that silver does not directly influence rod length or

  16. In situ synthesis of gold nanoparticles in exponentially-growing layer-by-layer films.

    PubMed

    Shen, Liyan; Rapenne, Laetitia; Chaudouet, Patrick; Ji, Jian; Picart, Catherine

    2012-12-15

    In situ synthesis of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) in polyelectrolytes multilayers (PEMs) has recently gained much attention. Due to the versatility of their composition, PEMs offer a unique opportunity to synthesize a variety of NPs. So far, mostly cationic precursors have been used and only few studies have investigated the possibility of using amine groups to bind anionic precursors. Here, we use exponentially growing poly(L-lysine)/hyaluronan (PLL/HA) films as a nanoreservoir to bind and sequester aurochlorate (AuCl(4)(-)) anions thanks to the large number of free amine groups. The polypeptide-polysaccharide reactive template enabled the formation in a spatially-confined environment of gold NP at a very high yield. The synthesized gold NPs were homogenous and well-dispersed in the nanocomposite. Importantly, there was no particular effect of the film-ending layer (either PLL or HA). The largest particles of ~9 nm and the largest amount of gold were obtained at acidic pH of 3. When the pH was increased, smaller and more numerous NPs were synthesized but the total amount of gold was lower. Based on UV-visible spectrometry, FTIR and TEM data, we finally propose a scheme for the mechanism of gold NPs formation, in which several groups of PLL and HA contribute to the binding of gold ions, the nucleation and growth of NPs, and their stabilization in the "bulk" of the film.

  17. In situ synthesis of gold nanoparticles in exponentially-growing layer-by-layer films

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Liyan; Rapenne, Laetitia; Chaudouet, Patrick; Ji, Jian; Picart, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    In situ synthesis of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) in polyelectrolytes multilayers (PEMs) has recently gained much attention. Due to the versatility of their composition, PEMs offer a unique opportunity to synthesize a variety of NPs. So far, mostly cationic precursors have been used and only few studies have investigated the possibility of using amine groups to bind anionic precursors. Here, we use exponentially growing poly(L-lysine)/hyaluronan (PLL/HA) films as a nanoreservoir to bind and sequester aurochlorate (AuCl4−) anions thanks to the large number of free amine groups. The polypeptide-polysaccharide reactive template enabled the formation in a spatially-confined environment of gold NP at a very high yield. The synthesized gold NPs were homogenous and well-dispersed in the nanocomposite. Importantly, there was no particular effect of the film-ending layer (either PLL or HA). The largest particles of ~ 9 nm and the largest amount of gold were obtained at acidic pH of 3. When the pH was increased, smaller and more numerous NPs were synthesized but the total amount of gold was lower. Based on UV-visible spectrometry, FTIR and TEM data, we finally propose a scheme for the mechanism of gold NPs formation, in which several groups of PLL and HA contribute to the binding of gold ions, the nucleation and growth of NPs, and their stabilization in the “bulk” of the film. PMID:22981588

  18. Phytofabrication of gold nanoparticles assisted by leaves of Suaeda monoica and its free radical scavenging property.

    PubMed

    Arockiya Aarthi Rajathi, F; Arumugam, R; Saravanan, S; Anantharaman, P

    2014-06-05

    Development of biologically inspired experimental processes for the synthesis of nanoparticles is evolving into an important branch of nanotechnology. An eco-friendly synthesis of inorganic nanoparticle is a fast growing research in the limb of nanotechnology. In the present study, it is reported that Suaeda monoica leaf mediated synthesis of gold nanoparticles by the reduction of gold ions. The formation of gold nanoparticle was confirmed by color changes from turbid brown to deep purple violet color and a characteristic peak at 535 nm. The morphology and structure of synthesized gold nanoparticles were characterized on Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) equipped with a Thermo EDAX attachment, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), (FT-IR), Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) which reveals that the Au nanoparticles are spherical and the average particle size is 12.96 nm. Crystalline nature of the nanoparticles is confirmed from the XRD pattern. FTIR spectrum indicates that the biomolecules of carboxyl, amine and hydroxyl functional groups involved in the reduction of gold nanoparticles. The biosynthesized gold nanoparticles displayed considerable antioxidant capacity.

  19. Ultrasmooth gold thin films by self-limiting galvanic displacement on silicon.

    PubMed

    Gutés, Albert; Carraro, Carlo; Maboudian, Roya

    2011-05-01

    Galvanic displacement (GD), a type of electroless deposition, has been used to obtain ultrasmooth gold thin films on silicon <111>. The novel aspect of the method presented herein is the absence of fluoride ions in the liquid phase, and its principal advantage when compared to previous efforts is that the process is inherently self-limiting. The self-limiting factor is due to the fact that in the absence of fluorinated species, no silicon oxide is removed during the process. Thus, the maximum gold film thickness is achieved when elemental silicon is no longer available once the surface is oxidized completely during the galvanic displacement process. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy has been used as a tool for thickness measurement, using the gold to silicon ratio as an analytical signal. Three gold plating solutions with different concentrations of KAuCl₄ (2, 0.2, and 0.02 mM) have been used to obtain information about the formation rate of the gold film. This XPS analysis demonstrates the formation of gold films to a maximum thickness of ∼3.5 Å. Atomic force microscopy is used to confirm surface smoothness, suggesting that the monolayer growth does not follow the Volmer-Weber growth mode, in contrast to the GD process from aqueous conditions with fluorinated species.

  20. Hierarchical Nanoporous Gold-Platinum with Heterogeneous Interfaces for Methanol Electrooxidation

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Shuang; Xiao, Fei; Hu, Yuan; Yuan, Songliu; Wang, Shuai; Qian, Lihua; Liu, Yunqi

    2014-01-01

    The electrocatalysts utilized as the prospective electrodes in fuel cells and high efficient energy conversion devices require both the interconnected channels for efficient electrolyte transportation and the superior catalytic activity with long service life. In this work, nanoporous gold with the rigid skeletons in three dimensions is partially decorated by porous platinum shell containing nanoscale interstitials, aiming to create the heterogeneous gold-platinum interfaces and facilitate the electrolyte transportation as well. In comparison with no catalytic activity of bare nanoporous gold, the catalytic activity of hierarchical nanoporous gold-platinum towards electrochemical oxidation of methanol increases with the loading level of platinum shells, resulting in the highest electrochemical area of 70.4 m2·g−1 after the normalization by the mass of platinum. Heterogeneous gold-platinum interfaces affect the tolerance of the absorbed intermediate species because of the oxidization by the oxygenated species absorbed on the gold surface and the enhanced ion transportation within the porous platinum shell. PMID:24621809

  1. Gallium in the Carlin-type gold deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, P.A.; Ikramuddin, M.

    1985-01-01

    Gallium and aluminum are dispersed elements and are associated with each other because of their similar geochemical characteristics. The somewhat larger size of the Ga ion suggests that it may concentrate in residual melts and hydrothermal solutions. Ga and Al are also presumed to have different mobilities at a pH range of 3.4-4.1 and in alkaline solutions. Very little precise and accurate data exist on the concentration of Ga in hydrothermally altered rocks. In order to understand the behavior of Ga during hydrothermal processes and to explore the possibility of utilizing Ga as a guide to mineral deposits, unmineralized and mineralized rocks from four Carlin-type gold deposits were studied. Ga was analyzed by a newly developed precise and accurate method by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The Carlin-type gold deposits studied include Carlin and Alligator Ridge deposits of Nevada, Mercur deposit of Utah, and north Moccasin deposits of Montana. In all the mineralized areas there is more Ga in hydrothermally altered (mineralized) rocks than in unaltered (unmineralized) rocks. The enrichment factors for Ga differ from deposit to deposit. The highest enrichment of Ga is found in the north Moccasin deposits, where the average values in unmineralized and mineralized rocks are about 2 ppm and 10 ppm respectively. The oxidized mineralized rocks of the Carlin-type gold deposits have higher contents of Ga than carbonaceous rocks, while siliceous rocks contain the lowest Ga concentrations.

  2. Robust nanogap electrodes by self-terminating electroless gold plating.

    PubMed

    Serdio V, Victor M; Azuma, Yasuo; Takeshita, Shuhei; Muraki, Taro; Teranishi, Toshiharu; Majima, Yutaka

    2012-11-21

    Robust nanogap electrodes for nanodevices with a separation of 3.0 ± 1.7 nm were simultaneously mass-produced at a yield of 90% by a combination of electron beam lithography (EBL) and electroless gold plating (EGP). Nanogap electrodes demonstrated their robustness as they maintained their structure unchanged up to temperatures of 170 °C, during the isotropic oxygen plasma ashing removal of the amorphous carbon overlayer resulting from scanning electron microscopy observations, therefore maintaining their surface reactivity for EGP and formation of a self-assembled monolayer. A gold layer grows over the electrode surface during EGP, narrowing the separation between the electrodes; growth stops around 3 nm due to a self-termination phenomenon. This is the main factor in the high yield and reproducibility of the EGP process because it prevents contact between the electrodes. A 90% yield is achieved by also controlling the etching and physisorption of gold clusters, which is accomplished by reduction of triiodide ions and heat treatment of the EGP solution, respectively. A mixed self-assembled monolayer of octanethiol and decanedithiol can be formed at the surface of the nanogap electrodes after the oxygen plasma treatment, and decanethiol-protected Au nanoparticles were chemisorbed between the self-terminated nanogap electrodes via decanedithiol. Chemically assembled single-electron transistors based on the nanogap electrodes exhibit ideal, stable, and reproducible Coulomb diamonds.

  3. Metallic glass as a temperature sensor during ion plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    The temperature of the interface and/or a superficial layer of a substrate during ion plating was investigated using a metallic glass of the composition Fe67Co18B14Si1 as the substrate and as the temperature sensor. Transmission electron microscopy and diffraction studies determined the microstructure of the ion-plated gold film and the substrate. Results indicate that crystallization occurs not only in the film, but also in the substrate. The grain size of crystals formed during ion plating was 6 to 60 nm in the gold film and 8 to 100 nm in the substrate at a depth of 10 to 15 micrometers from the ion-plated interface. The temperature rise of the substrate during ion plating was approximately 500 C. Discontinuous changes in metallurgical microstructure, and physical, chemical, and mechanical properties during the amorphous to crystalline transition in metallic glasses make metallic glasses extremely useful materials for temperature sensor applications in coating processes.

  4. Metallic glass as a temperature sensor during ion plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    The temperature of the interface and/or a superficial layer of a substrate during ion plating was investigated using a metallic glass of the composition Fe67Co18B14Si1 as the substrate and as the temperature sensor. Transmission electron microscopy and diffraction studies determined the microstructure of the ion-plated gold film and the substrate. Results indicate that crystallization occurs not only in the film, but also in the substrate. The grain size of crystals formed during ion plating was 6 to 60 nm in the gold film and 8 to 100 nm in the substrate at a depth of 10 to 15 micrometers from the ion-plated interface. The temperature rise of the substrate during ion plating was approximately 500 C. Discontinuous changes in metallurgical microstructure, and physical, chemical, and mechanical properties during the amorphous to crystalline transition in metallic glasses make metallic glasses extremely useful materials for temperature sensor applications in coating processes.

  5. One pot, rapid and efficient synthesis of water dispersible gold nanoparticles using alpha-amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wangoo, Nishima; Kaur, Sarabjit; Bajaj, Manish; Jain, D. V. S.; Sharma, Rohit K.

    2014-10-01

    A detailed study on the synthesis of spherical and monodispersed gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using all of the 20 naturally occurring α-amino acids has been reported. The synthesized nanoparticles have been further characterized using various techniques such as absorbance spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance. Size control of the nanoparticles has been achieved by varying the ratio of the gold ion to the amino acid. These monodispersed water soluble AuNPs synthesized using non-toxic, naturally occurring α-amino acids as reducing and capping/stabilizing agents serve as a remarkable example of green chemistry.

  6. Efficient Coupling and Transport of a Surface Plasmon at 780 nm in a Gold Nanostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Yu; Joly, Alan G.; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2015-08-28

    We studied plasmonic nanostructures in single-crystal gold with scanning electron and femtosecond photoemission electron microscopies. We designed an integrated laser coupling and nanowire waveguide structure by focused ion beam lithography in single-crystal gold flakes. The photoemission results show that the laser field is efficiently coupled into a propagating surface plasmon by a simple hole structure and propagates efficiently in an adjacent nano-bar waveguide. A strong local field is created by the propagating surface plasmon at the nano-bar tip. A similar structure, with a decreased waveguide width and thickness, displayed significantly more intense photoemission indicating enhanced local electric field at the sharper tip.

  7. Visualizing expanding warm dense matter heated by laser-generated ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, Woosuk

    2015-08-24

    This PowerPoint presentation concluded with the following. We calculated the expected heating per atom and temperatures of various target materials using a Monte Carlo simulation code and SESAME EOS tables. We used aluminum ion beams to heat gold and diamond uniformly and isochorically. A streak camera imaged the expansion of warm dense gold (5.5 eV) and diamond (1.7 eV). GXI-X recorded all 16 x-ray images of the unheated gold bar targets proving that it could image the motion of the gold/diamond interface of the proposed target.

  8. Synthesis and Functionalization of Gold Nanoparticles Using Chemically Modified ssDNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabrese, P. G.

    In the first part of this thesis, methods for functionalizing spherical gold nanoparticles with nucleic acid binding ligands (aptamers) that target the VEGF receptor complex were developed. In order to provide a multiplexed labeling strategy for imaging the VEGF receptor complex in electron microscopy, gold nanoparticles of distinct sizes were conjugated to modified ssDNA aptamers that target the VEGF-A cytokine, the VEGFR-2 RTK receptor and a membrane associated co-receptor, Nrp-1. The modified ssDNA gold nanoparticle conjugates were applied to a human lung carcinoma cell line (A549) which has been shown to express each of these proteins and used as a model system for VEGF signaling. Binding constants for the modified aptamers were also determined using a fluorescence polarization anisotropy assay to determine KD and KOFF for the aptamers with their respective proteins. In the latter part of this thesis, a modied ssDNA SELEX protocol was also developed in order to evolve imidazole modied ssDNA sequences that assemble gold nanoparticles from Au3+ precursor ions in aqueous solution. Active sequences bound to nanoparticles were partitioned from inactive sequences based on density via ultracentrifugation through a discontinuous sucrose gradient. Colloidal gold solutions produced by the evolved pool had a distinct absorbance spectra and produced nanoparticles with a narrower distribution of sizes compared to colloidal gold solutions produced by the starting randomized pool of imidazole modified ssDNA. Sequencing data from the evolved pool shows that conserved 5 and 6 nt motifs were shared amongst many of the isolates, which indicates that these motifs could serve as chelation sites for gold atoms or help stabilize colloidal gold solutions in a base specific manner.

  9. Toxicity and Biokinetics of Colloidal Gold Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Mi-Rae; Bae, Song-Hwa; Go, Mi-Ran; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Hwang, Yun-Gu; Choi, Soo-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) have promising potential for diverse biological application, but it has not been completely determined whether Au-NP has potential toxicity in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, toxicity of Au-NP was evaluated in human intestinal cells as well as in rats after 14-day repeated oral administration. Biokinetic study was also performed to assess oral absorption and tissue distribution. The results demonstrated that Au-NP did not cause cytotoxic effects on cells after 24 h exposure in terms of inhibition of cell proliferation, membrane damage, and oxidative stress. However, when a small number of cells were exposed to Au-NP for seven days, colony forming ability remarkably decreased by Au-NP treatment, suggesting its potential toxicity after long-term exposure at high concentration. Biokinetic study revealed that Au-NP slowly entered the blood stream and slightly accumulated only in kidney after oral administration to rats. Whereas, orally administered Au ions were rapidly absorbed, and then distributed in kidney, liver, lung, and spleen at high levels, suggesting that the biological fate of Au-NP is primarily in nanoparticulate form, not in ionic Au. Fourteen-day repeated oral toxicity evaluation showed that Au-NP did not cause severe toxicity in rats based on histopathological, hematological, and serum biochemical analysis.

  10. Bending Gold Nanorods with Light.

    PubMed

    Babynina, Anastasia; Fedoruk, Michael; Kühler, Paul; Meledin, Alexander; Döblinger, Markus; Lohmüller, Theobald

    2016-10-12

    V-shaped gold nanoantennas are the functional components of plasmonic metasurfaces, which are capable of manipulating light in unprecedented ways. Designing a metasurface requires the custom arrangement of individual antennas with controlled shape and orientation. Here, we show how highly crystalline gold nanorods in solution can be bent, one-by-one, into a V-shaped geometry and printed to the surface of a solid support through a combination of plasmonic heating and optical force. Significantly, we demonstrate that both the bending angle and the orientation of each rod-antenna can be adjusted independent from each other by tuning the laser intensity and polarization. This approach is applicable for the patterning of V-shaped plasmonic antennas on almost any substrate, which holds great potential for the fabrication of ultrathin optical components and devices.

  11. Biomolecular Assembly of Gold Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Micheel, Christine Marya

    2005-05-20

    Over the past ten years, methods have been developed to construct discrete nanostructures using nanocrystals and biomolecules. While these frequently consist of gold nanocrystals and DNA, semiconductor nanocrystals as well as antibodies and enzymes have also been used. One example of discrete nanostructures is dimers of gold nanocrystals linked together with complementary DNA. This type of nanostructure is also known as a nanocrystal molecule. Discrete nanostructures of this kind have a number of potential applications, from highly parallel self-assembly of electronics components and rapid read-out of DNA computations to biological imaging and a variety of bioassays. My research focused in three main areas. The first area, the refinement of electrophoresis as a purification and characterization method, included application of agarose gel electrophoresis to the purification of discrete gold nanocrystal/DNA conjugates and nanocrystal molecules, as well as development of a more detailed understanding of the hydrodynamic behavior of these materials in gels. The second area, the development of methods for quantitative analysis of transmission electron microscope data, used computer programs written to find pair correlations as well as higher order correlations. With these programs, it is possible to reliably locate and measure nanocrystal molecules in TEM images. The final area of research explored the use of DNA ligase in the formation of nanocrystal molecules. Synthesis of dimers of gold particles linked with a single strand of DNA possible through the use of DNA ligase opens the possibility for amplification of nanostructures in a manner similar to polymerase chain reaction. These three areas are discussed in the context of the work in the Alivisatos group, as well as the field as a whole.

  12. DNA-templated gold nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadzadegan, Reza; Mohabatkar, Hassan; Sheikhi, Mohammad Hossein; Safavi, Afsaneh; Khajouee, Mahmood Barati

    2008-10-01

    We have developed simple methods of reproducibly creating deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-templated gold nanowires on silicon. First DNA nanowires were aligned on silicon surfaces. Briefly, modified silicon wafer was soaked in the DNA solution, and then the solution was removed using micropipettes; the surface tension at the moving air-solution interface is sufficient to align the DNA nanowires on the silicon wafer. In another attempt, an aqueous dispersion of sodium azide-stabilized gold nanoparticles was prepared. The nanoparticles aligned double-stranded λ-DNA to form a linear nanoparticle array. Continuous gold nanowires were obtained. The above nanowires were structurally characterized using scanning electron microscopy. The results of the characterizations show the wires to be 57-323 nm wide, to be continuous with a length of 2.8-9.5 μm. The use of DNA as a template for the self-assembly of conducting nanowires represents a potentially important approach in the fabrication of nanoscale interconnects.

  13. Distinguishing Between Legally and Illegally Produced Gold in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Richard J; Dixon, Roger D; Merkle, Roland K W

    2016-01-01

    The identification of gold-bearing material is essential for combating the theft of gold in South Africa. Material seized in police operations is generally a mixture of gold from different mines, and as such cannot be traced back to a single location. ICP-OES analysis of material dissolved by acid dissolution provided a database of gold compositions comprising gold from South African mines, illegal gold stolen from the mines, and commercial gold alloys and jewelery. Discrimination between legal and illegal gold was possible due to the presence of Pb, As, Sb, Sn, Se, and Te in the stolen material, elements which are not present in legally produced gold. The presence of these elements is a quick and simple way to distinguish between gold alloys based on refined gold, such as in commercially manufactured jewelery, and gold alloys containing a proportion of unrefined and therefore illegally obtained gold.

  14. Physiological investigation of gold nanorods toward watermelon.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yujie; Li, Junli; Ren, Hongxuan; Huang, Jin; Yuan, Hong

    2014-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the phytotoxicity and oxidant stress of the gold nanorods toward watermelon, and hence give a quantitative risk assessment of both seeds and plants phase. The seed germination, the activity of antioxidant enzymes, and the contents of soluble protein and malondialdehyde (MDA) have been measured while the plant roots were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was found that the gold nanorods significantly promoted the root elongation. Furthermore, the results on the enzymes activities of plant indicated that oxidative stress happened in the plant treated with gold nanorods. However, the gold nanorods resulted in the phytotoxicity toward plant especially at high concentration. The TEM images of the plant roots with and without the treatment of gold nanorods showed the significant different size of starch granules. In conclusion, significant physiological changes of plant occurred after treatment with the gold nanorods.

  15. Template based synthesis of gold nanotubes using biologically synthesized gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ballabh, R; Nara, S

    2015-12-01

    Reliable experimental protocols using green technologies to synthesize metallic nanostructures widen their applications, both biological as well as biomedical. Here, we describe a method for synthesizing gold nanotubes using biologically synthesized gold nanoparticles in a template based approach. E. coli DH5α was used as bionanofactory to synthesize gold nanoparticles. These nanoparticles were then deposited on sodium sulfate (Na2SO4) nanowires which were employed as sacrificial template for gold nanotube (Au-NT) formation. The gold nanoparticles, sodium sulphate nanowires and gold nanotubes were appropriately characterized using transmission electron microscopy. The TEM results showed that the average diameter of gold nanotubes was 72 nm and length up to 4-7 μm. The method discussed herein is better than other reported conventional chemical synthesis approaches as it uses biologically synthesized gold nanoparticles, and does not employ any harsh conditions/solvents for template removal which makes it a clean and ecofriendly method.

  16. Electrochemical Assay of Gold-Plating Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiodo, R.

    1982-01-01

    Gold content of plating solution is assayed by simple method that required only ordinary electrochemical laboratory equipment and materials. Technique involves electrodeposition of gold from solution onto electrode, the weight gain of which is measured. Suitable fast assay methods are economically and practically necessary in electronics and decorative-plating industries. If gold content in plating bath is too low, poor plating may result, with consequent economic loss to user.

  17. Ion colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.

    2011-12-01

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions [77Asb1, 81Bou1]. The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the

  18. AGNES at vibrated gold microwire electrode for the direct quantification of free copper concentrations.

    PubMed

    Domingos, Rute F; Carreira, Sara; Galceran, Josep; Salaün, Pascal; Pinheiro, José P

    2016-05-12

    The free metal ion concentration and the dynamic features of the metal species are recognized as key to predict metal bioavailability and toxicity to aquatic organisms. Quantification of the former is, however, still challenging. In this paper, it is shown for the first time that the concentration of free copper (Cu(2+)) can be quantified by applying AGNES (Absence of Gradients and Nernstian equilibrium stripping) at a solid gold electrode. It was found that: i) the amount of deposited Cu follows a Nernstian relationship with the applied deposition potential, and ii) the stripping signal is linearly related with the free metal ion concentration. The performance of AGNES at the vibrating gold microwire electrode (VGME) was assessed for two labile systems: Cu-malonic acid and Cu-iminodiacetic acid at ionic strength 0.01 M and a range of pH values from 4.0 to 6.0. The free Cu concentrations and conditional stability constants obtained by AGNES were in good agreement with stripping scanned voltammetry and thermodynamic theoretical predictions obtained by Visual MinteQ. This work highlights the suitability of gold electrodes for the quantification of free metal ion concentrations by AGNES. It also strongly suggests that other solid electrodes may be well appropriate for such task. This new application of AGNES is a first step towards a range of applications for a number of metals in speciation, toxicological and environmental studies for the direct determination of the key parameter that is the free metal ion concentration.

  19. Fast Ion Beam Microscopy of Whole Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, Frank; Chen, Xiao; Chen, Ce-Belle; Udalagama, Chammika Nb; Ren, Minqin; Pastorin, G.; Bettiol, Andrew

    2013-08-01

    The way in which biological cells function is of prime importance, and the determination of such knowledge is highly dependent on probes that can extract information from within the cell. Probing deep inside the cell at high resolutions however is not easy: optical microscopy is limited by fundamental diffraction limits, electron microscopy is not able to maintain spatial resolutions inside a whole cell without slicing the cell into thin sections, and many other new and novel high resolution techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM) and near field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) are essentially surface probes. In this paper we show that microscopy using fast ions has the potential to extract information from inside whole cells in a unique way. This novel fast ion probe utilises the unique characteristic of MeV ion beams, which is the ability to pass through a whole cell while maintaining high spatial resolutions. This paper first addresses the fundamental difference between several types of charged particle probes, more specifically focused beams of electrons and fast ions, as they penetrate organic material. Simulations show that whereas electrons scatter as they penetrate the sample, ions travel in a straight path and therefore maintain spatial resolutions. Also described is a preliminary experiment in which a whole cell is scanned using a low energy (45 keV) helium ion microscope, and the results compared to images obtained using a focused beam of fast (1.2 MeV) helium ions. The results demonstrate the complementarity between imaging using low energy ions, which essentially produce a high resolution image of the cell surface, and high energy ions, which produce an image of the cell interior. The characteristics of the fast ion probe appear to be ideally suited for imaging gold nanoparticles in whole cells. Using scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM) to image the cell interior, forward scattering transmission ion microscopy (FSTIM) to improve the

  20. Ion mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matteson, S.; Nicolet, M.-A.

    1983-01-01

    Recent experimental studies of the ion-mixing phenomenon are summarized. Ion mixing is differentiated from ion implantation and shown to be a useful technique for overcoming the sputter-dependent limitations of implantation processes. The fundamental physical principles of ion/solid interactions are explored. The basic experimental configurations currently in use are characterized: bilayered samples, multilayered samples, and samples with a thin marker layer. A table listing the binary systems (metal-semiconductor or metal-metal) which have been investigated using each configuration is presented. Results are discussed, and some sample data are plotted. The prospects for future application of ion mixing to the alteration of solid surface properties are considered. Practical applications are seen as restricted by economic considerations to the production of small, expensive components or to fields (such as the semiconductor industry) which already have facilities for ion implantation.

  1. ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Martina, E.F.

    1958-04-22

    An improved ion source particularly adapted to provide an intense beam of ions with minimum neutral molecule egress from the source is described. The ion source structure includes means for establishing an oscillating electron discharge, including an apertured cathode at one end of the discharge. The egress of ions from the source is in a pencil like beam. This desirable form of withdrawal of the ions from the plasma created by the discharge is achieved by shaping the field at the aperture of the cathode. A tubular insulator is extended into the plasma from the aperture and in cooperation with the electric fields at the cathode end of the discharge focuses the ions from the source,

  2. Formation of Gold(III) Alkyls from Gold Alkoxide Complexes

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The gold(III) methoxide complex (C∧N∧C)AuOMe (1) reacts with tris(p-tolyl)phosphine in benzene at room temperature under O abstraction to give the methylgold product (C∧N∧C)AuMe (2) together with O=P(p-tol)3 ((C∧N∧C) = [2,6-(C6H3tBu-4)2pyridine]2–). Calculations show that this reaction is energetically favorable (ΔG = −32.3 kcal mol–1). The side products in this reaction, the Au(II) complex [Au(C∧N∧C)]2 (3) and the phosphorane (p-tol)3P(OMe)2, suggest that at least two reaction pathways may operate, including one involving (C∧N∧C)Au• radicals. Attempts to model the reaction by DFT methods showed that PPh3 can approach 1 to give a near-linear Au–O–P arrangement, without phosphine coordination to gold. The analogous reaction of (C∧N∧C)AuOEt, on the other hand, gives exclusively a mixture of 3 and (p-tol)3P(OEt)2. Whereas the reaction of (C∧N∧C)AuOR (R = But, p-C6H4F) with P(p-tol)3 proceeds over a period of hours, compounds with R = CH2CF3, CH(CF3)2 react almost instantaneously, to give 3 and O=P(p-tol)3. In chlorinated solvents, treatment of the alkoxides (C∧N∧C)AuOR with phosphines generates [(C∧N∧C)Au(PR3)]Cl, via Cl abstraction from the solvent. Attempts to extend the synthesis of gold(III) alkoxides to allyl alcohols were unsuccessful; the reaction of (C∧N∧C)AuOH with an excess of CH2=CHCH2OH in toluene led instead to allyl alcohol isomerization to give a mixture of gold alkyls, (C∧N∧C)AuR′ (R′ = −CH2CH2CHO (10), −CH2CH(CH2OH)OCH2CH=CH2 (11)), while 2-methallyl alcohol affords R′ = CH2CH(Me)CHO (12). The crystal structure of 11 was determined. The formation of Au–C instead of the expected Au–O products is in line with the trend in metal–ligand bond dissociation energies for Au(III): M–H > M–C > M–O.

  3. Native gold in Hawaiian alkalic magma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sisson, T.W.

    2003-01-01

    Native gold found in fresh basanite glass from the early submarine phase of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, may be the first documented case of the transport of gold as a distinct precious metal phase in a mantle-derived magma. The gold-bearing glass is a grain in bedded volcanic glass sandstone (Japan Marine Science and Technology Center (JAMSTEC) sample S508-R3) collected by the submersible Shinkai 6500 at 3879 m depth off Kilauea's south flank. Extensive outcrops there expose debris-flow breccias and sandstones containing submarine-erupted alkalic rock fragments and glasses from early Kilauea. Precipitation of an immiscible gold liquid resulted from resorption of magmatic sulfides during crystallization-differentiation, with consequent liberation of sulfide-hosted gold. Elevated whole-rock gold concentrations (to 36 ppb) for fresh lavas and clasts from early Kilauea further show that some magmas erupted at the beginning stages of Hawaiian shield volcanoes were distinctly gold rich, most likely owing to limited residual sulfide in their mantle source. Alkalic magmas at other ocean islands may also be gold rich, and oceanic hot-spot provinces may contain underappreciated gold resources.

  4. Gold ink coating of thermocouple sheaths

    DOEpatents

    Ruhl, H. Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    A method is provided for applying a gold ink coating to a thermocouple sheath which includes the steps of electropolishing and oxidizing the surface of the thermocouple sheath, then dipping the sheath into liquid gold ink, and finally heat curing the coating. The gold coating applied in this manner is highly reflective and does not degrade when used for an extended period of time in an environment having a temperature over 1000.degree. F. Depending on the application, a portion of the gold coating covering the tip of the thermocouple sheath is removed by abrasion.

  5. Microstructural and surface characterization of thin gold films on n-Ge (1 1 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nel, J. M.; Chawanda, A.; Auret, F. D.; Jordaan, W.; Odendaal, R. Q.; Hayes, M.; Coelho, S.

    2009-12-01

    Thin gold films were fabricated by vacuum resistive deposition on the n-Ge (1 1 1) wafers. The films were annealed between 300 and 600 °C. These resulting thin films were then characterised using scanning electron microscopy (field emission and back-scattering modes), Rutherford back scattering spectroscopy and time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF-SIMS). For temperatures below the eutectic temperature the distribution of both the gold and the germanium on the surface are uniform. Above the eutectic temperature, the formation of gold rich islands on the surface of the Germanium were observed. These changes in the microstructure were found to correspond to changes in the electrical characteristics of the diodes.

  6. Synthesis of Plant-Mediated Gold Nanoparticles And Catalytic Role of Biomatrix-Embedded Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, N.C.; Sahi, S.V.; Nath, S.; Parsons, J.G.; Gardea-Torresdey, J.L.; Pal, T.

    2009-06-04

    Growth of Sesbania seedlings in chloroaurate solution resulted in the accumulation of gold with the formation of stable gold nanoparticles in plant tissues. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the intracellular distribution of monodisperse nanospheres, possibly due to reduction of the metal ions by secondary metabolites present in cells. X-ray absorption near-edge structure and extended X-ray absorption fine structure demonstrated a high degree of efficiency for the biotransformation of Au(III) into Au(0) by plant tissues. The catalytic function of the nanoparticle-rich biomass was substantiated by the reduction of aqueous 4-nitrophenol (4-NP). This is the first report of gold nanoparticle-bearing biomatrix directly reducing a toxic pollutant, 4-NP.

  7. Starfruit-shaped gold nanorods and nanowires: synthesis and SERS characterization.

    PubMed

    Vigderman, Leonid; Zubarev, Eugene R

    2012-06-19

    Recently, branched and star-shaped gold nanoparticles have received significant attention for their unique optical and electronic properties, but most examples of such nanoparticles have a zero-dimensional shape with varying numbers of branches coming from a quasi-spherical core. This report details the first examples of higher-order penta-branched gold particles including rod-, wire-, and platelike particles which contain a uniquely periodic starfruitlike morphology. These nanoparticles are synthesized in the presence of silver ions by a seed-mediated approach based on utilizing highly purified pentahedrally twinned gold nanorods and nanowires as seed particles. The extent of the growth can be varied, leading to shifts in the plasmon resonances of the particles. In addition, the application of the starfruit rods for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is demonstrated.

  8. Gold Fever! Seattle Outfits the Klondike Gold Rush. Teaching with Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, Marc K.

    This lesson is based on the National Register of Historic Places registration file, "Pioneer Square Historic District," and other sources about Seattle (Washington) and the Klondike Gold Rush. The lesson helps students understand how Seattle exemplified the prosperity of the Klondike Gold Rush after 1897 when news of a gold strike in…

  9. Photo-bio-synthesis of irregular shaped functionalized gold nanoparticles using edible mushroom Pleurotus florida and its anticancer evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Ravishankar; Sharanabasava, V G; Deshpande, Raghunandan; Shetti, Ullas; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Venkataraman, A

    2013-08-05

    A green chemistry approach to the synthesis of gold nanoparticles using edible mushroom Pleurotus florida (Oyster mushroom) by photo-irradiation method has been attempted. The mixture containing the aqueous gold ions and the mushroom extract was exposed to sunlight; this resulted in the formation of biofunctionalized gold nanoparticles. These nanoparticles were characterized using various techniques like UV-visible spectroscopy; X-ray diffraction studies, Energy dispersive X-ray analysis, Field emission scanning electron microscopy, Atomic force microscopy, Transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. The obtained biofunctionalized gold nanoparticles showed effective anti-cancer property against four different cancer cell lines A-549 (Human lung carcinoma), K-562 (Human chronic myelogenous leukemia bone marrow), HeLa (Human cervix) and MDA-MB (Human adenocarcinoma mammary gland) and no lethal effect is observed in Vero (African green monkey kidney normal cell) cell lines.

  10. Study of the Agglomeration of 5 to 25nm Gold Nanoparticles as a Function of Viscosity and Ionic Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefankiewicz, Adam; Dobbins, Tabbetha

    2013-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) attached to carcinoma cells and treated with light irradiation are able to convert the light into heat energy, thus killing those cells. In order to get the particles to the affected area, they may be entered into the circulatory system where the environment is highly viscous and comprised of high salt concentrations. This study examines the aggregation behavior of gold nanoparticles under those conditions. Surface charge creates coulombic repulsion between particles. Likewise, highly viscous solutions will prevent aggregation by limiting the rate of transport of gold through the solution. This study examines the aggregation behavior of gold nanopartilces as a function of viscosity (varied using polyethylene glycol). The study also examines the role of excess ions in the solution (varied using 5-Bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate disodium salt). The aggregation phenomena was explored using dynamic light scattering for particle size analysis. Early results are presented here.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of biomatrixed-gold nanoparticles by the mushroom Flammulina velutipes and its heterogeneous catalytic potential.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Kannan Badri; Park, Hyun Ho; Han, Sung Soo

    2015-12-01

    Sustainable and greener synthesis of intracellular gold nanoparticles using mushroom Flammulina velutipes is reported. Incubation of a mushroom in chloroaurate solution resulted in the synthesis and immobilization of stable gold nanoparticles inside the mushroom mycelia. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) analysis revealed the presence of gold nanoparticles (⩽20nm) inside the mycelia, primarily on the inner surface of the cell membrane. Inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) revealed that the accumulated gold concentration ranged from 64.4 to 330.5mgkg(-1) dry weight (DW) in the mushroom mycelia. The reduction of Au(3+) ions to Au(0) and stabilization of gold nanoparticles occurred within 1h, and the formation of fcc crystalline gold nanoparticles was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. This facile intracellular synthesis of gold nanoparticles by a mushroom without using any toxic chemicals or technologically expensive processes is used as a heterogeneous catalyst in the reduction of organic pollutants methylene blue (MB) and 4-nitrophenol (4NP). The reduction reaction follows pseudo-first order kinetics with a reaction rate constant of 0.0529min(-1) and 0.1236min(-1) for MB and 4NP, respectively. This biological process of biomatrixing of metal nanoparticles for heterogeneous catalytic reactions is simple, nontoxic, environmentally benign, and economically viable compared to the chemical synthetic routes.

  12. Ion-Plated Soft Metallic Films Reduce Friction and Wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1986-01-01

    Ion plating is ion-assisted or glow-discharge surface-deposition technique. In this process, ions or energetic atoms transfer energy, momentum, and charge to substrate and deposited surface film. Process controlled to modify physical characteristics of surface, subsurface chemical conditions, and surface and subsurface microstructures as well. Ion plating with such soft, thin metallic films as gold, silver, or lead has great potential for producing self-contained lubricating surfaces. Such films reduce friction, wear, and corrosion on sliding or rotating mechanical surfaces used in wide range of environments.

  13. Concurrent in situ ion irradiation transmission electron microscope

    DOE PAGES

    Hattar, K.; Bufford, D. C.; Buller, D. L.

    2014-08-29

    An in situ ion irradiation transmission electron microscope has been developed and is operational at Sandia National Laboratories. This facility permits high spatial resolution, real time observation of electron transparent samples under ion irradiation, implantation, mechanical loading, corrosive environments, and combinations thereof. This includes the simultaneous implantation of low-energy gas ions (0.8–30 keV) during high-energy heavy ion irradiation (0.8–48 MeV). In addition, initial results in polycrystalline gold foils are provided to demonstrate the range of capabilities.

  14. Gold nanorod plasmonic upconversion microlaser.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ce; Soltani, Soheil; Armani, Andrea M

    2013-01-01

    Plasmonic-photonic interactions have stimulated significant interdisciplinary interest, leading to rapid innovations in solar design and biosensors. However, the development of an optically pumped plasmonic laser has failed to keep pace due to the difficulty of integrating a plasmonic gain material with a suitable pump source. In the present work, we develop a method for coating high quality factor toroidal optical cavities with gold nanorods, forming a photonic-plasmonic laser. By leveraging the two-photon upconversion capability of the nanorods, lasing at 581 nm with a 20 μW threshold is demonstrated.

  15. Precision gold conductors for HMCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widmer, M. R.

    1994-08-01

    Ti/Pd/Au multiple code coded switch (MCCS) networks were built and compared to Cr/Au MCCS networks. The data showed no measurable difference between the two systems. Interface resistance of both types of networks was measured as a diagnostic aid to determine if hydrogen was affecting the Ti/Pd/Au MCCS networks. The data showed that although hydrogen does affect Ti/Pd/Au, the changes are not significant with respect to MCCS environments. An evaluation of several proprietary gold electroplating solutions for use in the production of Ti/Pd/Au conductors was performed. All the testing results were comparable to the current product requirements.

  16. A label-free gold-nanoparticle-based SERS assay for direct cyanide detection at the parts-per-trillion level.

    PubMed

    Senapati, Dulal; Dasary, Samuel S R; Singh, Anant K; Senapati, Tapas; Yu, Hongtao; Ray, Paresh C

    2011-07-18

    Cyanide is an extremely toxic lethal poison known to humankind. Developing rapid, highly sensitive, and selective detection of cyanide from water samples is extremely essential for human life safety. Driven by the need, here we report a gold-nanoparticle-based label-free surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) system for highly toxic cyanide ion recognition in parts-per-trillion level and to examine gold-nanoparticle-cyanide interaction. We have shown that the SERS assay can be used to probe the gold nanoparticle dissociation process in the presence of cyanide ions. Our experimental data indicates that gold-nanoparticle-based SERS can detect cyanide from a water sample at the 110 ppt level with excellent discrimination against other common anions and cations. The results also show that the SERS probe can be used to detect cyanide from environmental samples.

  17. 16 CFR Appendix to Part 23 - Exemptions Recognized in the Assay for Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled Gold Plate, Silver, and Platinum Industry..., Silver, and Platinum Industry Products (a) Exemptions recognized in the industry and not to be considered... in any assay for quality of a silver industry product include screws, rivets, springs, spring...

  18. 16 CFR Appendix to Part 23 - Exemptions Recognized in the Assay for Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled Gold Plate, Silver, and Platinum Industry..., Silver, and Platinum Industry Products (a) Exemptions recognized in the industry and not to be considered... in any assay for quality of a silver industry product include screws, rivets, springs, spring...

  19. Ion Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulik, James D.; Sawicki, Eugene

    1979-01-01

    Accurate for the analysis of ions in solution, this form of analysis enables the analyst to directly assay many compounds that previously were difficult or impossible to analyze. The method is a combination of the methodologies of ion exchange, liquid chromatography, and conductimetric determination with eluant suppression. (Author/RE)

  20. Innate stimulatory capacity of high molecular weight transition metals Au (gold) and Hg (mercury).

    PubMed

    Rachmawati, Dessy; Alsalem, Inás W A; Bontkes, Hetty J; Verstege, Marleen I; Gibbs, Sue; von Blomberg, B M E; Scheper, Rik J; van Hoogstraten, Ingrid M W

    2015-03-01

    Nickel, cobalt and palladium ions can induce an innate immune response by triggering Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 which is present on dendritic cells (DC). Here we studied mechanisms of action for DC immunotoxicity to gold and mercury. Next to gold (Na3Au (S2O3)2⋅2H2O) and mercury (HgCl2), nickel (NiCl2) was included as a positive control. MoDC activation was assessed by release of the pro-inflammatory mediator IL-8. Also PBMC were studied, and THP-1 cells were used as a substitution for DC for evaluation of cytokines and chemokines, as well as phenotypic, alterations in response to gold and mercury. Our results showed that both Na3Au (S2O3)2⋅2H2O and HgCl2 induce substantial release of IL-8, but not IL-6, CCL2 or IL-10, from MoDc, PBMC, or THP-1 cells. Also gold and, to a lesser extent mercury, caused modest dendritic cell maturation as detected by increased membrane expression of CD40 and CD80. Both metals thus show innate immune response capacities, although to a lower extent than reported earlier for NiCl2, CoCl2 and Na2 [PdCl4]. Importantly, the gold-induced response could be ascribed to TLR3 rather than TLR4 triggering, whereas the nature of the innate mercury response remains to be clarified. In conclusion both gold and mercury can induce innate immune responses, which for gold could be ascribed to TLR3 dependent signalling. These responses are likely to contribute to adaptive immune responses to these metals, as reflected by skin and mucosal allergies.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of genistein conjugated with gold nanoparticles and the study of their cytotoxic properties.

    PubMed

    Stolarczyk, Elżbieta U; Stolarczyk, Krzysztof; Łaszcz, Marta; Kubiszewski, Marek; Maruszak, Wioleta; Olejarz, Wioletta; Bryk, Dorota

    2017-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles conjugated with drug substances are used in diagnostics and therapies. Apart from the combinations involving gold nanoparticles conjugated with drug substances through linkers, a direct bonding is also known. In our paper the example of such a direct bonding between gold nanoparticles and genistein (AuNPs-GE) is presented. This conjugate was obtained in a one-pot synthesis and the formation of AuNPs-GE was monitored in terms of color change and UV-Vis spectroscopy. It has been shown that genistein reduces Au(3+) ions to spherical Au(0) nanocrystallites and acts as a stabilizing agent. The efficiency of the purification of the conjugate from free genistein was controlled by the capillary electrophoresis. Gold nanoparticles are homogeneously shaped and have a narrow range of size from 14 to 33nm and the size of the nanoparticles modified with genistein is around 64.64±0.41nm, as measured by the TEM and DSL techniques, respectively. The zeta potential of the gold nanoparticles modified with genistein is -19.32±0.82mV and suggests a high stability of the nanoparticles and lower toxicity for the normal cells. The identity of genistein on the gold nanoparticles was proved by the electrochemistry, NMR and Raman spectroscopy. The mechanism of the conjugate forming has been proposed. The coverage of gold nanoparticles with genistein 5.09% (m/m) has been calculated from the TGA analysis. Moreover, it has been proved that the obtained conjugate is characterized by a high cytotoxic activity towards cancer cells, as observed in the cell line test.

  2. Colloidal Gold--Collagen Protein Core--Shell Nanoconjugate: One-Step Biomimetic Synthesis, Layer-by-Layer Assembled Film, and Controlled Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Xing, Ruirui; Jiao, Tifeng; Yan, Linyin; Ma, Guanghui; Liu, Lei; Dai, Luru; Li, Junbai; Möhwald, Helmuth; Yan, Xuehai

    2015-11-11

    The biogenic synthesis of biomolecule-gold nanoconjugates is of key importance for a broad range of biomedical applications. In this work, a one-step, green, and condition-gentle strategy is presented to synthesize stable colloidal gold-collagen core-shell nanoconjugates in an aqueous solution at room temperature, without use of any reducing agents and stabilizing agents. It is discovered that electrostatic binding between gold ions and collagen proteins and concomitant in situ reduction by hydroxyproline residues are critically responsible for the formation of the core-shell nanoconjugates. The film formed by layer-by-layer assembly of such colloidal gold-collagen nanoconjugates can notably improve the mechanical properties and promote cell adhesion, growth, and differentiation. Thus, the colloidal gold-collagen nanoconjugates synthesized by such a straightforward and clean manner, analogous to a biomineralization pathway, provide new alternatives for developing biologically based hybrid biomaterials toward a range of therapeutic and diagnostic applications.

  3. Radiotracer study of the adsorption of organic compounds on gold. adsorption of chloroacetic and phenylacetic acid, and the effects of cadmium, copper, and silver adatoms on it

    SciTech Connect

    Horani, G.; Andreev, V.N.; Vazarinov, V.E.

    1986-04-01

    This paper studies the adsorption of monochloroacetic and phenylacetic acid (MA and PA, respectively) by the radiotracer technique on gold-plated gold electrodes in acidic solutions. The authors also study the effect of cadmium, copper, and silver adatoms on these processes. The adsorption of MA was measured as a function of potential of the electrode. Data from these measurements are presented. Data show that cadmium, copper, and silver ions present in the solution have no effect on the adsorption of PA at potentials where they are not adsorbed on the gold surface. It is confirmed that the radiotracer technique will be as effective in adsorption studies on the gold-plated gold electrode as it was in the case of the platinized platinum electrode.

  4. Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of gold/silver-tellurium nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsiang-Yu; Cang, Jinshun; Roy, Prathik; Chang, Huan-Tsung; Huang, Yi-Cheng; Huang, Chih-Ching

    2014-06-11

    Gold-tellurium nanostructures (Au-Te NSs), silver-tellurium nanostructures (Ag-Te NSs), and gold/silver-tellurium nanostructures (Au/Ag-Te NSs) have been prepared through galvanic reactions of tellurium nanotubes (Te NTs) with Au(3+), Ag(+), and both ions, respectively. Unlike the use of less environmentally friendly hydrazine, fructose as a reducing agent has been used to prepare Te NTs from TeO2 powders under alkaline conditions. The Au/Ag-Te NSs have highly catlaytic activity to convert nonfluorescent Amplex Red to form fluorescent product, revealing their great strength of generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). Au/Ag-Te NSs relative to the other two NSs exhibit greater antimicrobial activity toward the growth of E. coli, S. enteritidis, and S. aureus; the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of Au/Ag-Te NSs were much lower (>10-fold) than that of Ag-Te NSs and Au-Te NSs. The antibacterial activity of Au/Ag-Te NSs is mainly due to the release of Ag(+) ions and Te-related ions and also may be due to the generated ROS which destroys the bacteria membrane. In vitro cytotoxicity and hemolysis analyses have revealed their low toxicity in selected human cell lines and insignificant hemolysis in red blood cells. In addition, inhibition zone measurements using a Au/Ag-Te NSs-loaded konjac jelly film have suggested that it has great potential in practial application such as wound dressing for reducing bacterial wound infection. Having great antibacterial activitiy and excellent biocompatibility, the low-cost Au/Ag-Te NSs hold great potential as effective antimicrobial drugs.

  5. Preparing metal-complex surfaces based on self-assembled monolayers of thiols and disulfides on gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolzhikova, V. D.; Bogdanova, Yu. G.; Majouga, A. G.; Beloglazkina, E. K.; Kudrinsky, A. A.

    2017-02-01

    The complexation of monolayers of sulfur-containing ligands self-assembled on surface of gold with Co(II) and Cu(II) ions is studied using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and wetting measurements. The optimum conditions for obtaining metal-complex surfaces and the compositions of the resulting monolayers are determined.

  6. A simple strategy to fabricate poly (acrylamide-co-alginate)/gold nanocomposites for inactivation of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanan; Lou, Zhichao; Zhang, Xiaohong; Hu, Xiaodan; Zhang, Haiqian

    2014-12-01

    A facile and efficient approach to prepare uniform gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) in hybrid hydrogel consisting of acrylamide (AM) and alginate (SA) for antibacterial applications is reported. In this study, reduction of gold ions by acrylamide and alginate (AM-SA) occurred before the polymerization and as-obtained gold colloids are stabilized by AM-SA immediately in the absence of commonly used reducing agents and protective reagents. Via transmittance electron microscopy results, we can conclude that the obtained gold nanoparticles in hydrogel are well dispersed. Furthermore, ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared and thermogravimetric analysis were used to characterize the structure and composition of the synthetic nanocomposites. Our approach provides well-dispersed nanoparticles around 8 mm in size. It is important to underline that nanoparticle aggregation was not observed during and after gel formation. The prepared Au NPs exhibited remarkable stability in the presence of high pH s, and a range of salt concentrations. Importantly, the hydrogel/gold nanocomposites showed a non-compromised activity to inhibit the growth of a model bacterium, Escherichia coli. With their excellent mechanical behavior, as well as the remained antibacterial activity, the nanocomposites should get various potential applications in the fields of pharmaceutical science and tissue engineering.

  7. A simple soft lithographic nanopatterning of gold on gallium arsenide via galvanic displacement.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyuneui; Noh, Jung-Hyun; Choi, Dae-Geun; Kim, Wan-Doo; Maboudian, Roya

    2010-08-01

    Nanoscale patterning of gold layers on GaAs substrate is demonstrated using a combination of soft lithographic molding and galvanic displacement deposition. First, an electroless deposition method has been developed to plate gold on GaAs with ease and cost-effectiveness. The electroless metallization process is performed by dipping the GaAs substrates into a gold salt solution without any reducing agents or additives. The deposition proceeds via galvanic displacement in which gold ions in the aqueous solution are reduced by electrons arising from the GaAs substrate itself. The deposition rate, surface morphology and adhesion property can be modulated by the plating parameters such as the choice of acids and the immersion time. Second, soft lithographic patterning of nanodots, nanorings, and nanolines are demonstrated on GaAs substrates with hard-polydimethylsiloxane (h-PDMS) mold and plasma etching. This method can be easily applied to the metallization and nanopatterning of gold on GaAs surfaces.

  8. Biogenic Preparation of Gold Nanostructures Reduced from Piper longum Leaf Broth and Their Electrochemical Studies.

    PubMed

    Mallikarjuna, K; Narasimha, G; John Sushma, N; Dillip, G R; Subba Reddy, B V; Sreedhar, B; Deva Prasad Raju, B

    2015-02-01

    Exploitation of green chemical procedures for the synthesis of metal nanoparticles by biological process has received great attention in the field of nanotechnology. To demonstrate a biogenic method that involves the reduction of aqueous gold ions by the extract of Piper longum leaves leading to the formation of different morphological gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The formation of gold nano-structures has been characterized by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns indicates the AuNPs are highly crystalline nature with the face-centered cubic (111), (200), (220) and (311) facets, respectively. The AuNPs have different sizes and morphologies that are identified by TEM studies. The involvement of water soluble bio-molecules such as carboxylic acids, flavonoids, proteins and terpenoids were identified by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Raman spectrum. The responsible mechanism of improving acidic nature and the process of encapsulation of gold nanoparticles by Piper longum extract was discussed. Additionally, we have demonstrated the modified carbon paste electrode using gold nanoparticles by means of cyclic voltammetry in a solution of 1 M KCI and 1 mM [Fe(CN)6]3-/4-. The analysis of cyclic voltammetry shows electronic transmission rate between modified Au-CPE and Bare-CPE electrode increased.

  9. Size specific emission in peptide capped gold quantum clusters with tunable photoswitching behavior.

    PubMed

    Baral, Abhishek; Basu, Kingshuk; Ghosh, Sirshendu; Bhattacharyya, Kalishankar; Roy, Subhasish; Datta, Ayan; Banerjee, Arindam

    2017-03-16

    Three different types of fluorescent gold clusters (namely blue, green and red emitting) have been prepared from a gold precursor (chloroauric acid) under moderate conditions in aqueous medium. A cysteine containing dipeptide has been used for the formation of these quantum clusters as this peptide molecule contains a thiol group in the side chain to cap these nascently formed clusters and the free amino and carboxylic moieties assist in water solubility. Thus, the clusters are also environmentally friendly as the capped peptide is made up of only naturally occurring protein amino acids. These clusters have been well characterized by using UV-visible, fluorescence, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)spectroscopy, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and ultrahigh resolution field emission gun-transmission electron microscopy (UHR-FEG-TEM). Arrangements of gold atoms and their interaction with the corresponding ligands in three different fluorescent clusters have been predicted computationally. The excited state behavior of three different clusters has also been studied using time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). Time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) and computational studies suggest intersystem crossing (S1 → T1) in the case of red-emitting Au23 clusters. Interestingly, these gold clusters exhibit semiconducting and photoswitching properties (Ion/Ioff), which are shown to be controlled by varying the size of these clusters. This holds future promise of using these gold cluster based nanomaterials for optoelectronic applications.

  10. A Placer-Gold Evaluation Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunley, A. Tom

    1984-01-01

    A laboratory exercise allowing students to use drillhole data to simulate the process of locating a placer gold paystreak is presented. As part of the activity students arithmetically compute the value of their gold, mining costs, and personal profits or losses, and decide on development plans for the claim. (BC)

  11. RF Sputtering of Gold Contacts On Niobium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, D. W.

    1983-01-01

    Reliable gold contacts are deposited on niobium by combination of RF sputtering and photolithography. Process results in structures having gold only where desired for electrical contact. Contacts are stable under repeated cycling from room temperature to 4.2 K and show room-temperature contact resistance as much as 40 percent below indium contacts made by thermalcompression bonding.

  12. Sesquicentennial: Gold Rush to Golden Statehood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabato, George

    1998-01-01

    Provides an annotated bibliography of educational resources that can be used to support instructional units on the Gold Rush or the sesquicentennial of California's statehood. The materials include workbooks, videos, teacher's guides, monographs, and magazines. Offers a brief history of the Gold Rush and a set of relevant discussion questions.…

  13. Gold-nickel-titanium brazing alloy

    DOEpatents

    Mizuhara, Howard

    1990-07-03

    A brazing alloy in accordance with this invention has the following composition, by weight: 91 to 99% gold, 0.5 to 7% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium. Alternatively, with palladium present, the composition is as follows, by weight: 83 to 96% gold; 3 to 10% palladium; 0.5 to 5% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium.

  14. The Gold Mining Camp: A Simulation Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoltman, Joseph P.; Keach, Everett T., Jr.

    This economics simulation game complements the third grade Gold Mining Unit developed by Project Social Studies at the University of Minnesota. The simulation is designed for three purposes: 1) to reinforce the prior learning which occurs in the gold mining camp unit; 2) to involve eight-year-olds in the process of solving simulated economic…

  15. Gold-nickel-titanium brazing alloy

    DOEpatents

    Mizuhara, Howard

    1995-01-03

    A brazing alloy in accordance with this invention has the following composition, by weight: 91 to 99 gold, 0.5 to 7% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium. Alternatively, with palladium present, the composition is as follows, by weight: 83 to 96% gold; 3 to 10% palladium; 0.5 to 5% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium.

  16. Gold-Collar Workers. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wonacott, Michael E.

    The gold-collar worker has problem-solving abilities, creativity, talent, and intelligence; performs non-repetitive and complex work difficult to evaluate; and prefers self management. Gold-collar information technology workers learn continually from experience; recognize the synergy of teams; can demonstrate leadership; and are strategic thinkers…

  17. Gold of the Pharaohs 6000 years of gold mining in Egypt and Nubia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemm, Dietrich; Klemm, Rosemarie; Murr, Andreas

    2001-08-01

    The legendary wealth in gold of ancient Egypt seems to correspond with an unexpected high number of gold production sites in the Eastern Desert of Egypt and Nubia. This contribution introduces briefly the general geology of these vast regions and discusses the geology of the different varieties of the primary gold occurrences (always related to auriferous quartz mineralization in veins or shear zones) as well as the variable physico-chemical genesis of the gold concentrations. The development of gold mining over time, from Predynastic (ca. 3000 BC) until the end of Arab gold production times (about 1350 AD), including the spectacular Pharaonic periods is outlined, with examples of its remaining artefacts, settlements and mining sites in remote regions of the Eastern Desert of Egypt and Nubia. Finally, some estimates on the scale of gold production are presented.

  18. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, H.

    1988-01-01

    The conceptual design of a Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RACK) to be constructed in the existing 3.8 km tunnel at Brookhaven has been developed. The collider has been designed to provide collisions of gold ions at six intersection points with a luminosity of about 5 /times/ 10/sup 26/cm/sup /minus/2/sec/sup /minus/1/ at an energy of 100 GeV/u in each beam. Collisions with different ion species, including protons, will be possible. The collider consists of two interlaced, but otherwise separate, superconducting magnet rings. The 9.7 m long dipoles will operate at 3.5 T. Their 8 cm aperture was determined by the dimensions of gold ion beams taking into account diffusion due to intrabeam scattering. Heavy ion beams will be available from the Tandem Van de Graaff/Booster/AGS complex. The salient design features and the reasons for major design choices of the proposed machine are discussed in this paper. 24 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Switchable imbibition in nanoporous gold

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yahui; Markmann, Jürgen; Duan, Huiling; Weissmüller, Jörg; Huber, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous imbibition enables the elegant propelling of nano-flows because of the dominance of capillarity at small length scales. The imbibition kinetics are, however, solely determined by the static host geometry, the capillarity, and the fluidity of the imbibed liquid. This makes active control particularly challenging. Here we show for aqueous electrolyte imbibition in nanoporous gold that the fluid flow can be reversibly switched on and off through electric potential control of the solid–liquid interfacial tension, that is, we can accelerate the imbibition front, stop it, and have it proceed at will. Simultaneous measurements of the mass flux and the electrical current allow us to document simple scaling laws for the imbibition kinetics, and to explore the charge transport in the metallic nanopores. Our findings demonstrate that the high electric conductivity along with the pathways for fluid/ionic transport render nanoporous gold a versatile, accurately controllable electrocapillary pump and flow sensor for minute amounts of liquids with exceptionally low operating voltages. PMID:24980062

  20. Fabrication of gold nanorods with tunable longitudinal surface plasmon resonance peaks by reductive dopamine.

    PubMed

    Su, Gaoxing; Yang, Chi; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2015-01-20

    Hydroxyphenol compounds are often used as reductants in controlling the growth of nanoparticles. Herein, dopamine was used as an effective reductant in seed-mediated synthesis of gold nanorods (GNRs). The as-prepared GNRs (83 × 16 nm) were monodisperse and had a high degree of purity. The conversion ratio from gold ions to GNRs was around 80%. In addition, dopamine worked as an additive. At a very low concentration of hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB; 0.025 M), thinner and shorter GNRs (60 × 9 nm) were successfully prepared. By regulating the concentration of silver ions, CTAB, seeds, and reductant, GNRs with longitudinal surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) peaks ranging from 680 to 1030 nm were synthesized. The growth process was tracked using UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy, and it was found that a slow growth rate was beneficial to the formation of GNRs.

  1. Smart textile device using ion polymer metal compound.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Taro; Ihara, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a smart textile device that detects angular displacement of attached surface using ion polymer metal compound. The device was composed of ion polymer metal compound (IPMC) which was fabricated from Nafion resin by heat-press and chemical gold plating. The generated voltage from IPMC was measured as a function of bending angle. Fabricated IPMC device was weaved into a cotton cloth and multidirectional movements were detected.

  2. Tumor necrosis factor interaction with gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, De-Hao; Elzey, Sherrie; Delrio, Frank W.; Keene, Athena M.; Tyner, Katherine M.; Clogston, Jeffrey D.; Maccuspie, Robert I.; Guha, Suvajyoti; Zachariah, Michael R.; Hackley, Vincent A.

    2012-05-01

    We report on a systematic investigation of molecular conjugation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) protein onto gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and the subsequent binding behavior to its antibody (anti-TNF). We employ a combination of physical and spectroscopic characterization methods, including electrospray-differential mobility analysis, dynamic light scattering, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, fluorescence assay, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The native TNF used in this study exists in the active homotrimer configuration prior to conjugation. After binding to AuNPs, the maximum surface density of TNF is (0.09 +/- 0.02) nm-2 with a binding constant of 3 × 106 (mol L-1)-1. Dodecyl sulfate ions induce desorption of monomeric TNF from the AuNP surface, indicating a relatively weak intermolecular binding within the AuNP-bound TNF trimers. Anti-TNF binds to both TNF-conjugated and citrate-stabilized AuNPs, showing that non-specific binding is significant. Based on the number of anti-TNF molecules adsorbed, a substantially higher binding affinity was observed for the TNF-conjugated surface. The inclusion of thiolated polyethylene glycol (SH-PEG) on the AuNPs inhibits the binding of anti-TNF, and the amount of inhibition is related to the number ratio of surface bound SH-PEG to TNF and the way in which the ligands are introduced. This study highlights the challenges in quantitatively characterizing complex hybrid nanoscale conjugates, and provides insight on TNF-AuNP formation and activity.We report on a systematic investigation of molecular conjugation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) protein onto gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and the subsequent binding behavior to its antibody (anti-TNF). We employ a combination of physical and spectroscopic characterization methods, including electrospray-differential mobility analysis, dynamic light scattering, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis

  3. Enzyme-catalysed deposition of ultrathin silver shells on gold nanorods: a universal and highly efficient signal amplification strategy for translating immunoassay into a litmus-type test.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinjian; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2015-04-25

    On the basis of enzyme-catalysed reduction of silver ions and consequent deposition of ultrathin silver shells on gold nanorods, a highly efficient signal amplification method for immunoassay is developed. For a model analyte prostate-specific antigen, a 10(4)-fold improvement over conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay is accomplished by leveraging on the cumulative nature of the enzymatic reaction and the sensitive response of plasnomic gold nanorods to the deposition the silver shells.

  4. The interaction of gold with gallium arsenide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, Victor G.; Fatemi, Navid S.

    1988-01-01

    Gold and gold-based alloys, commonly used as solar-cell contact materials, are known to react readily with gallium arsenide. Experiments designed to identify the mechanisms involved in these GaAs-metal interactions have yielded several interesting results. It is shown that the reaction of GaAs with gold takes place via a dissociative diffusion process. It is shown further that the GaAs-metal reaction rate is controlled to a very great extent by the condition of the free surface of the contact metal, an interesting example of which is the previously unexplained increase in the reaction rate that has been observed for samples annealed in a vacuum environment as compared to those annealed in a gaseous ambient. A number of other hard-to-explain observations, such as the low-temperature formation of voids in the gold lattice and crystallite growth on the gold surface, are also explained by invoking this mechanism.

  5. Synthesis of camptothecin-loaded gold nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Zhimin; Liu, Zhiguo; Zu, Yuangang; Fu, Yujie; Zhao, Chunjian; Zhao, Xiuhua; Meng, Ronghua; Tan, Shengnan

    2010-04-01

    Camptothecin-loaded gold nanomaterials have been synthesized by the sodium borohydride reduction method under a strong basic condition. The obtained gold nanomaterials have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. The camptothecin-loaded gold colloidal solution was very stable and can be stored for more than two months at room temperature without obvious changes. The color of the colloidal solution can change from wine red to purple and blue during the acidifying process. It was revealed that the release of camptothecin and the aggregation of gold nanoparticles can be controlled by tuning the solution pH. The present study implied that the gold nanomaterials can be used as the potential carrier for CPT delivery.

  6. Ordering Gold Nanoparticles with DNA Origami Nanoflowers.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Robert; Santiago, Ibon; Ardavan, Arzhang; Turberfield, Andrew J

    2016-08-23

    Nanostructured materials, including plasmonic metamaterials made from gold and silver nanoparticles, provide access to new materials properties. The assembly of nanoparticles into extended arrays can be controlled through surface functionalization and the use of increasingly sophisticated linkers. We present a versatile way to control the bonding symmetry of gold nanoparticles by wrapping them in flower-shaped DNA origami structures. These "nanoflowers" assemble into two-dimensonal gold nanoparticle lattices with symmetries that can be controlled through auxiliary DNA linker strands. Nanoflower lattices are true composites: interactions between the gold nanoparticles are mediated entirely by DNA, and the DNA origami will fold into its designed form only in the presence of the gold nanoparticles.

  7. Tailored nanoporous gold for ultrahigh fluorescence enhancement.

    PubMed

    Lang, X Y; Guan, P F; Fujita, T; Chen, M W

    2011-03-07

    We report molecular fluorescence enhancement of free-standing nanoporous gold in which the nanoporosity can be arbitrarily tailored by the combination of dealloying and electroless gold plating. The nanoporous gold fabricated by this facile method possesses unique porous structures with large gold ligaments and very small pores, and exhibits significant improvements in surface enhanced fluorescence as well as structure rigidity. It demonstrates that the confluence effect of improved quantum yield and excitation of fluorophores is responsible for the large fluorescence enhancement due to the near-field enhancement of nanoporous gold, which arises from the strong electromagnetic coupling between neighboring ligaments and the weakening of plasmon damping of the large ligaments because of the small pore size and large ligament size, respectively.

  8. Magnetically mediated vortexlike assembly of gold nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianfei; Dong, Jian; Sun, Dongke; Guo, Zhirui; Gu, Ning

    2012-04-24

    Gold nanoshells currently attract increasing research interests due to the important role in many subjects. For practical applications, random arrangement of the nanoparticles is often unfavored so that the assembly of gold nanoshells is becoming a central issue. We here proposed to utilize time-variant magnetic field to direct the assembly of gold nanoshells. It was discovered that the alternating magnetic field can mediate the vortex-like assembly of gold nanoshells. The mechanism was explored and thought to be relative with the electric field of induction which caused the thermal gradient on the substrate and the electric force. The vortexlike structure as well as the assembly mechanism will play an important role in research and application of gold nanomaterials.

  9. ToF-SIMS and XPS Characterization of Protein Films Adsorbed onto Bare and Sodium Styrenesulfonate-Grafted Gold Substrates.

    PubMed

    Foster, Rami N; Harrison, Elisa T; Castner, David G

    2016-04-05

    The adsorption of single-component bovine serum albumin (BSA), bovine fibrinogen (Fgn), and bovine immunoglobulin G (IgG) films as well as multicomponent bovine plasma films onto bare and sodium styrenesulfonate (NaSS)-grafted gold substrates was characterized. The adsorption isotherms, measured via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, showed that at low solution concentrations all three single-component proteins adsorb with higher affinity onto gold surfaces compared to NaSS surfaces. However, at higher concentrations, NaSS surfaces adsorb the same or more total protein than gold surfaces. This may be because proteins that adsorb onto NaSS undergo structural rearrangements, resulting in a larger fraction of irreversibly adsorbed species over time. Still, with the possible exception of BSA adsorbed onto gold, neither surface appeared to have saturated at the highest protein solution concentration studied. Principal component (PC) analysis of amino acid mass fragments from time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectra distinguished between the same protein adsorbed onto NaSS and gold surfaces, suggesting that proteins adsorb differently on NaSS and gold surfaces. Explored further using peak ratios for buried/surface amino acids for each protein, we found that proteins denature more on NaSS surfaces than on gold surfaces. Also, using peak ratios for asymmetrically distributed amino acids, potential structural differences were postulated for BSA and IgG adsorbed onto NaSS and gold surfaces. PC modeling, used to track changes in plasma adsorption with time, suggests that plasma films on NaSS and Au surfaces become more Fgn-like with increasing adsorption time. However, the PC models included only three proteins, where plasma is composed of hundreds of proteins. Therefore, while both gold and NaSS appear to adsorb more Fgn with time, further study is required to confirm that this is representative of the final state of the plasma films.

  10. Surface pattern formation during MeV energy ion beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S. K.; Nair, K. G. M.; Kannan, R. Kamala; Kamruddin, M.; Panigrahi, B. K.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2012-06-05

    Surface patterning during high energy heavy ion irradiation is a relatively recent observation. We report in this paper the results of a study on the formation of self organized ripple patterns on silica surface irradiated with MeV energy gold ions.

  11. Influence of ion bombardment on the photoluminescence response of embedded CdS nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanta, Dambarudhar; Singh, Fouran; Avasthi, D.; Choudhury, Amarjyoti

    2006-06-01

    Semiconductor nanoparticles (CdS) were fabricated by an inexpensive chemical route using polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as the dielectric host matrix. Nano-CdS in PVA were subjected to ion irradiation (using oxygen, chlorine and gold) in the medium energy range (80-100 MeV) and under fluence variation of 1011-1013 ions/cm2. The nature of light emission was found to be drastically different in each of the three cases. Photoluminescence spectra of oxygen irradiated samples exhibit band edge emission (2.8 eV) as well as trap related emission (1.76 eV) whereas band edge emission is found to be bleached out for chlorine ion irradiated nano-CdS. The intense broad PL peaks, noticeable in the case of gold ion irradiated samples suggest superposition of the two peaks — namely, band edge emission and trap related emission. Furthermore, in the case of gold ion irradiated nano-CdS, energy shift in the PL spectra reveals variation in size distribution caused by the extra pressure effect of heavy gold ion beams. The mechanism of such a difference as a result of ion irradiation-type and ion-fluence is discussed in detail.

  12. Influence of ion bombardment on the photoluminescence response of embedded CdS nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanta, Dambarudhar; Singh, Fouran; Avasthi, D. K.; Choudhury, Amarjyoti

    2006-06-01

    Semiconductor nanoparticles (CdS) were fabricated by an inexpensive chemical route using polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as the dielectric host matrix. Nano-CdS in PVA were subjected to ion irradiation (using oxygen, chlorine and gold) in the medium energy range (80 100 MeV) and under fluence variation of 1011 1013 ions/cm2. The nature of light emission was found to be drastically different in each of the three cases. Photoluminescence spectra of oxygen irradiated samples exhibit band edge emission (2.8 eV) as well as trap related emission (1.76 eV) whereas band edge emission is found to be bleached out for chlorine ion irradiated nano-CdS. The intense broad PL peaks, noticeable in the case of gold ion irradiated samples suggest superposition of the two peaks — namely, band edge emission and trap related emission. Furthermore, in the case of gold ion irradiated nano-CdS, energy shift in the PL spectra reveals variation in size distribution caused by the extra pressure effect of heavy gold ion beams. The mechanism of such a difference as a result of ion irradiation-type and ion-fluence is discussed in detail.

  13. Development of yttrium alloy ion source and its application in nanofabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukharchyk, Nadezhda; Neumann, Ronna; Mazarov, Swetlana; Bushev, Pavel; Wieck, Andreas D.; Mazarov, Paul

    2016-12-01

    We present a new YAuSi Liquid Metal Alloy Ion Source (LMAIS) generating focused ion beams of yttrium ions, and its prospective applications for nanofabrication, sample preparation, lithographic and implantation processes. Working parameters of the AuSiY LMAIS are similar to other gold-silicon based LMAIS. We found anomalously high emission current of triple charged yttrium ions. Influence of yttrium implantation on optical qualities of the implanted ion-ensembles is shown in luminescence of co-implanted Erbium ions.

  14. Gold-silver alloy nanoshells: a new candidate for nanotherapeutics and diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We have developed novel gold-silver alloy nanoshells as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) dual T1 (positive) and T2 (negative) contrast agents as an alternative to typical gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents. Specifically, we have doped iron oxide nanoparticles with Gd ions and sequestered the ions within the core by coating the nanoparticles with an alloy of gold and silver. Thus, these nanoparticles are very innovative and have the potential to overcome toxicities related to renal clearance of contrast agents such as nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. The morphology of the attained nanoparticles was characterized by XRD which demonstrated the successful incorporation of Gd(III) ions into the structure of the magnetite, with no major alterations of the spinel structure, as well as the growth of the gold-silver alloy shells. This was supported by TEM, ICP-AES, and SEM/EDS data. The nanoshells showed a saturation magnetization of 38 emu/g because of the presence of Gd ions within the crystalline structure with r1 and r2 values of 0.0119 and 0.9229 mL mg-1 s-1, respectively (Au:Ag alloy = 1:1). T1- and T2-weighted images of the nanoshells showed that these agents can both increase the surrounding water proton signals in the T1-weighted image and reduce the signal in T2-weighted images. The as-synthesized nanoparticles exhibited strong absorption in the range of 600-800 nm, their optical properties being strongly dependent upon the thickness of the gold-silver alloy shell. Thus, these nanoshells have the potential to be utilized for tumor cell ablation because of their absorption as well as an imaging agent. PMID:21995302

  15. Operational Stochastic Cooling in the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J. M.; Severino, F.

    2008-05-02

    Operational stochastic cooling of 100 GeV/nucleon gold beams has been achieved in the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider. We discuss the physics and technology of the longitudinal cooling system and present results with the beams. A simulation algorithm is described and shown to accurately model the system.

  16. Creating The Perfect Liquid In Heavy-Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Jacak, B.; Steinberg, P.

    2010-05-01

    In 2005 the four experimental groups at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) announced that collisions of gold nuclei at ultrarelativistic energies produced a 'perfect liquid' of quarks and gluons. That's something quite different from the gaseous quark-gluon state theorists and experimenters were expecting from quantum chromodynamics, the standard theory of the strong interaction.

  17. Molecular Beam Optical Study of Gold Sulfide and Gold Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruohan; Yu, Yuanqin; Steimle, Timothy

    2016-06-01

    Gold-sulfur and gold-oxygen bonds are key components to numerous established and emerging technologies that have applications as far ranging as medical imaging, catalysis, electronics, and material science. A major theoretical challenge for describing this bonding is correctly accounting for the large relativistic and electron correlation effects. Such effects are best studied in diatomic, AuX, molecules. Recently, the observed AuS electronic state energy ordering was measured and compared to a simple molecular orbital diagram prediction. Here we more thoroughly investigate the nature of the electronic states of both AuS and AuO from the analysis of high-resolution (FWHM\\cong35MHz) optical Zeeman spectroscopy of the (0,0){B}2Σ--{X}2Π3/2 bands. The determined fine and hyperfine parameters for the {B}2Σ- state of AuO differ from those extracted from the analysis of a hot, Doppler-limited, spectrum. It is demonstrated that the nature of the {B}2Σ- states of AuO and AuS are radically different. The magnetic tuning of AuO and AuS indicates that the {B}2Σ- states are heavily contaminated. Supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No.1265885. D. L. Kokkin, R. Zhang, T. C. Steimle, I. A. Wyse, B. W. Pearlman and T. D. Varberg, J. Phys. Chem. A., 119(48), 4412, 2015. L. C. O'Brien, B. A. Borchert, A. Farquhar, S. Shaji, J. J. O'Brien and R. W. Field, J. Mol. Spectrosc., 252(2), 136, 2008

  18. ION SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Cook, B.

    1959-02-10

    An ion switch capable of transferring large magnitudes of power is described. An ion switch constructed in accordance with the invention includes a pair of spaced control electrodes disposed in a highly evacuated region for connection in a conventional circuit to control the passing of power therethrough. A controllable ionic conduction path is provided directiy between the control electrodes by a source unit to close the ion switch. Conventional power supply means are provided to trigger the source unit and control the magnitude, durations and pulse repetition rate of the aforementioned ionic conduction path.

  19. Variation in the uptake of nanoparticles by monolayer cultured cells using high resolution MeV ion beam imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Ye; Mi, Zhaohong; Vanga, Sudheer Kumar; Chen, Ce-Belle; Bettiol, Andrew A.; Watt, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Gold nanoparticle uptake by cells is being increasingly studied because of its potential in biomedical applications. In this work, we show how scanning transmission ion microscopy can be employed to visualize and quantify 50 nm gold nanoparticles taken up by individual cells. Preliminary studies have indicated that the cellular content of gold nanoparticles exhibits a wide variation (up to a factor of 10) among individual cells. This cell-to-cell variation can affect the efficiency of utilizing gold nanoparticles for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes.

  20. Development of an analytical method for trace gold in aqueous solution using polyurethane foam sorbents: kinetic and thermodynamic characteristic of gold(III) sorption.

    PubMed

    Bashammakh, A S; Bahaffi, S O; Al-Shareef, F M; El-Shahawi, M S

    2009-03-01

    The kinetic parameters of gold(III) sorption by unloaded polyurethane foams (PUFs) and PUFs impregnated with some onium cations e.g. tetramethylammonium perchlorate (TMA(+)ClO(4)(-)), tetrabutylammonium iodide (TBA(+)I(-)), and tetraheptylammonium bromide (THA(+)Br(-)), have been determined. The retention steps were found to be fast, reached equilibrium in a few minutes and followed a first-order rate equation with an overall rate constant, k, of 0.0076 and 0.007 min(-1), respectively. The thermodynamic characteristics of gold(III) retention by the unloaded PUFs and THA(+)Br(-) immobilized PUFs have been critically studied. The negative values of DeltaH and DeltaS are interpreted as the exothermic and spontaneous reaction of gold(III) sorption onto unloaded PUFs and foams impregnated with THA(+)Br(-). The cellular structure of the PUFs sorbent offer unique advantages over conventional bulk-type sorbents in the rapid, versatile effective separation and/or preconcentration of gold ions.

  1. Gold's future role in fuel cell systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Don; Holliday, Richard; Thompson, David

    Innovative recent research has suggested that gold-based catalysts are potentially capable of being effectively employed in fuel cells and related hydrogen fuel processing. The justification for developing the gold catalyst technologies described, is not only based on their promising technical performance, but also the relatively low stable price and greater availability of gold compared with the platinum group metals. The employment of gold catalysts could therefore produce a welcome reduction in the capital cost of fuel cell installations. The most likely first use for gold catalysts is for the removal of carbon monoxide impurities from the hydrogen feedstock streams used for fuel cells. Such hydrogen is usually obtained from reforming reactions (from hydrocarbons or methanol) either from free-standing plant or from an on-board reformer in a vehicle in the case of transport applications. Absence of carbon monoxide would enable fuel cells to run at lower temperatures and with improved efficiency. Effectiveness of gold catalysts in this application has already been demonstrated. Preferential oxidation (PROX) of carbon monoxide in hydrogen-rich reformer gas is best effected by a gold catalyst (Au/α-Fe 2O 3) which is significantly more active at lower temperatures than the commercial PROX catalyst, i.e. Pt/γ-Al 2O 3 currently used for this purpose. Supported gold catalysts are also very active in the water gas shift reaction used for producing hydrogen from carbon monoxide and water. Research has shown that gold supported on iron oxide (Au/α-Fe 2O 3) catalyst is more active at lower temperatures than both the α-Fe 2O 3 support and the mixed copper/zinc oxide (CuO/ZnO) catalyst currently used commercially. Preparation of gold on iron oxide and gold on titania (Au/Fe 2O 3 and Au/TiO 2) by deposition-precipitation produces more active catalysts than by conventional co-precipitation. Other applications for gold in fuel cells are described and include its use as a

  2. Simultaneous detection of ultratrace lead and copper with gold nanoparticles patterned on carbon nanotube thin film.

    PubMed

    Bui, Minh-Phuong Ngoc; Li, Cheng Ai; Han, Kwi Nam; Pham, Xuan-Hung; Seong, Gi Hun

    2012-04-21

    Highly sensitive detection of a Pb(2+)-Cu(2+) mixture using gold nanoparticles patterned on single-walled carbon nanotube (AuNP-SWCNT) film is reported. The gold nanoparticles were deposited electrochemically on carbon nanotube film using a cyclic voltammetry technique. The film showed a homogeneous size and density that could be easily controlled by the potential scanning cycle and gold precursor concentration. Square wave stripping voltammetry (SWSV) was applied to the simultaneous detection of Pb(2+) and Cu(2+) under optimized conditions. The AuNP-SWCNT electrode exhibited a high increase in sensitivity with a limit of detection of 0.546 ppb (R(2) = 0.984) and 0.613 ppb (R(2) = 0.991) for Pb(2+) and Cu(2+) ions, respectively, in a mixture of Pb(2+)-Cu(2+) solution (S/N = 3, n = 5), and a good linear response in the range from 3.31 ppb to 22.29 ppb. The electrode exhibited high reproducibility in repetitive measurements with a relative standard deviation as low as 4.2% and 2.6% for Pb(2+) and Cu(2+) ions, respectively. An interference study showed that Sb(3+), As(3+), Zn(2+), Ca(2+), and Na(+) ions did not have a significant effect. This study demonstrated an alternative approach to the rapid and reliable detection of heavy metals of environmental interest.

  3. Brightening Gold Nanoparticles: New Sensing Approach Based on Plasmon Resonance Energy Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lei; Jing, Chao; Gu, Zhen; Long, Yi-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Scattering recovered plasmonic resonance energy transfer (SR-PRET) was reported by blocking the plasmon resonance energy transfer (PRET) from gold nanoparticle (GNP) to the adsorbed molecules (RdBS). Due to the selective cleavage of the Si-O bond by F− ions, the quenching is switched off causing an increase in the brightness of the GNPs,detected using dark-field microscopy (DFM) were brightened. This method was successfully applied to the determination of fluoride ions in water. The SR-PRET provides a potential approach for a vitro/vivo sensing with high sensitivity and selectivity. PMID:25959016

  4. Coal-gold agglomeration: an alternative separation process in gold recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Akcil, A.; Wu, X.Q.; Aksay, E.K.

    2009-07-01

    Considering the increasing environmental concerns and the potential for small gold deposits to be exploited in the future, the uses of environmentally friendly processes are essential. Recent developments point to the potential for greatly increased plant performance through a separation process that combines the cyanide and flotation processes. In addition, this kind of alternative treatment processes to the traditional gold recovery processes may reduce the environmental risks of present small-scale gold mining. Gold recovery processes that applied to different types of gold bearing ore deposits show that the type of deposits plays an important role for the selection of mineral processing technologies in the production of gold and other precious metals. In the last 25 years, different alternative processes have been investigated on gold deposits located in areas where environmental issues are a great concern. In 1988, gold particles were first recovered by successful pilot trial of coal-gold agglomeration (CGA) process in Australia. The current paper reviews the importance of CGA in the production of gold ore and identifies areas for further development work.

  5. Exposure to metallic gold in patients with contact allergy to gold sodium thiosulfate.

    PubMed

    Ahnlide, I; Björkner, B; Bruze, M; Möller, H

    2000-12-01

    Gold allergy is common, with approximately 10% of patients patch tested because of eczematous disease being positive to gold sodium thiosulfate (GSTS). However, clinical relevance seems to be rare. The aim of this prospective double-blind study was to demonstrate the effects of exposure to metallic gold, in this case earrings, in gold-positive patients. 60 female patients with pierced earlobes test-positive to GSTS were included in the study. The patients were randomized into 2 groups, 30 patients receiving earrings with a surface layer consisting of 24-carat gold and 30 patients earrings with a surface layer of titanium nitride, virtually indistinguishable from gold. The patients wore the earrings for 8 weeks. During the study, any dermatitis on the earlobes, as well as on other body sites, was registered. The skin reactions observed were weak but, in total, 17 of the 60 patients had a skin reaction (local or remote) during the study, 12 of whom had received gold earrings and 5 titanium (p<0.05). 11 patients had a reaction on the earlobes, 7 of whom had received gold earrings and 4 titanium (NS). With these facts it is hard to exclude that exposure to gold jewelry can be clinically relevant in persons hypersensitive to gold.

  6. ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Blue, C.W.; Luce, J.S.

    1960-07-19

    An ion source is described and comprises an arc discharge parallel to the direction of and inside of a magnetic field. an accelerating electrode surrounding substantially all of the discharge except for ion exit apertures, and means for establishing an electric field between that electrode and the arc discharge. the electric field being oriented at an acute angle to the magnetic field. Ions are drawn through the exit apertures in the accelrating electrcde in a direction substantially divergent to the direction of the magnetic field and so will travel in a spiral orbit along the magnetic field such that the ions will not strike the source at any point in their orbit within the magnetic field.

  7. Ion focusing

    DOEpatents

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Baird, Zane; Peng, Wen-Ping

    2017-01-17

    The invention generally relates to apparatuses for focusing ions at or above ambient pressure and methods of use thereof. In certain embodiments, the invention provides an apparatus for focusing ions that includes an electrode having a cavity, at least one inlet within the electrode configured to operatively couple with an ionization source, such that discharge generated by the ionization source is injected into the cavity of the electrode, and an outlet. The cavity in the electrode is shaped such that upon application of voltage to the electrode, ions within the cavity are focused and directed to the outlet, which is positioned such that a proximal end of the outlet receives the focused ions and a distal end of the outlet is open to ambient pressure.

  8. ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Leland, W.T.

    1960-01-01

    The ion source described essentially eliminater the problem of deposits of nonconducting materials forming on parts of the ion source by certain corrosive gases. This problem is met by removing both filament and trap from the ion chamber, spacing them apart and outside the chamber end walls, placing a focusing cylinder about the filament tip to form a thin collimated electron stream, aligning the cylinder, slits in the walls, and trap so that the electron stream does not bombard any part in the source, and heating the trap, which is bombarded by electrons, to a temperature hotter than that in the ion chamber, so that the tendency to build up a deposit caused by electron bombardment is offset by the extra heating supplied only to the trap.

  9. Ion focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Baird, Zane; Peng, Wen-Ping

    2015-11-10

    The invention generally relates to apparatuses for focusing ions at or above ambient pressure and methods of use thereof. In certain embodiments, the invention provides an apparatus for focusing ions that includes an electrode having a cavity, at least one inlet within the electrode configured to operatively couple with an ionization source, such that discharge generated by the ionization source is injected into the cavity of the electrode, and an outlet. The cavity in the electrode is shaped such that upon application of voltage to the electrode, ions within the cavity are focused and directed to the outlet, which is positioned such that a proximal end of the outlet receives the focused ions and a distal end of the outlet is open to ambient pressure.

  10. Investigation of thiol derivatized gold nanoparticle sensors for gas analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Jared S.

    Analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air and exhaled breath by sensor array is a very useful testing technique. It can provide non-invasive, fast, inexpensive testing for many diseases. Breath analysis has been very successful in identifying cancer and other diseases by using a chemiresistor sensor or array with gold nanoparticles to detect biomarkers. Acetone is a biomarker for diabetes and having a portable testing device could help to monitor diabetic and therapeutic progress. An advantage to this testing method is it is conducted at room temperature instead of 200 degrees Celsius. 3. The objective of this research is to determine the effect of thiol derivatized gold nanoparticles based on sensor(s) detection of VOCs. The VOCs to be tested are acetone, ethanol, and a mixture of acetone and ethanol. Each chip is tested under all three VOCs and three concentration levels (0.1, 1, and 5.0 ppm). VOC samples are used to test the sensors' ability to detect and differentiate VOCs. Sensors (also referred to as a chip) are prepared using several types of thiol derivatized gold nanoparticles. The factors are: thiol compound and molar volume loading of the thiol in synthesis. The average resistance results are used to determine the VOC selectivity of the sensors tested. The results show a trend of increasing resistance as VOC concentration is increased relative to dry air; which is used as baseline for VOCs. Several sensors show a high selectivity to one or more VOCs. Overall the 57 micromoles of 4-methoxy-toluenethiol sensor shows the strongest selectivity for VOCs tested. 3. Gerfen, Kurt. 2012. Detection of Acetone in Air Using Silver Ion Exchanged ZSM-5 and Zinc Oxide Sensing Films. Master of Science thesis, University of Louisville.

  11. The adsorption of gold, palladium and platinum from acidic chloride solutions on mesoporous carbons.

    DOE PAGES

    Zalupski, Peter R.; McDowell, Rocklan; Dutech, Guy

    2014-08-05

    Studies on the adsorption characteristics of gold, palladium and platinum on mesoporous carbon (CMK-3) and sulfur-impregnated mesoporous carbon (CMK-3/S) evaluated the benefits/drawbacks of the presence of a layer of elemental sulfur inside mesoporous carbon structures. Adsorption isotherms collected for Au(III), Pd(II) and Pt(IV) on those materials suggest that sulfur does enhance the adsorption of those metal ions in mildly acidic environment (pH 3). The isotherms collected in 1 M HCl show that the benefit of sulfur disappears due to the competing influence of large concentration of hydrogen ions on the ion-exchanging mechanism of metal ions sorption on mesoporous carbon surfaces.more » The collected acid dependencies illustrate similar adsorption characteristics for CMK-3 and CMK-3/S in 1-5 M HCl concentration range. Sorption of metal ions from diluted aqueous acidic mixtures of actual leached electronic waste demonstrated the feasibility of recovery of gold from such liquors.« less

  12. The adsorption of gold, palladium and platinum from acidic chloride solutions on mesoporous carbons.

    SciTech Connect

    Zalupski, Peter R.; McDowell, Rocklan; Dutech, Guy

    2014-08-05

    Studies on the adsorption characteristics of gold, palladium and platinum on mesoporous carbon (CMK-3) and sulfur-impregnated mesoporous carbon (CMK-3/S) evaluated the benefits/drawbacks of the presence of a layer of elemental sulfur inside mesoporous carbon structures. Adsorption isotherms collected for Au(III), Pd(II) and Pt(IV) on those materials suggest that sulfur does enhance the adsorption of those metal ions in mildly acidic environment (pH 3). The isotherms collected in 1 M HCl show that the benefit of sulfur disappears due to the competing influence of large concentration of hydrogen ions on the ion-exchanging mechanism of metal ions sorption on mesoporous carbon surfaces. The collected acid dependencies illustrate similar adsorption characteristics for CMK-3 and CMK-3/S in 1-5 M HCl concentration range. Sorption of metal ions from diluted aqueous acidic mixtures of actual leached electronic waste demonstrated the feasibility of recovery of gold from such liquors.

  13. Gold-catalyzed naphthalene functionalization

    PubMed Central

    Rivilla, Iván

    2011-01-01

    Summary The complexes IPrMCl (IPr = 1,3-bis(diisopropylphenyl)imidazol-2-ylidene, M = Cu, 1a; M = Au, 1b), in the presence of one equiv of NaBAr'4 (Ar' = 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl), catalyze the transfer of carbene groups: C(R)CO2Et (R = H, Me) from N2C(R)CO2Et to afford products that depend on the nature of the metal center. The copper-based catalyst yields exclusively a cycloheptatriene derivative from the Buchner reaction, whereas the gold analog affords a mixture of products derived either from the formal insertion of the carbene unit into the aromatic C–H bond or from its addition to a double bond. In addition, no byproducts derived from carbene coupling were observed. PMID:21647320

  14. Gold nanoparticles in cardiovascular imaging.

    PubMed

    Varna, Mariana; Xuan, Hoa V; Fort, Emmanuel

    2017-04-06

    Although originally applied in the field of oncology, recent results have illustrated the considerable potential of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in the imaging of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). CVDs represent the leading cause of mortality and disability in the world. The principal cause underpinning CVDs is atherosclerosis, which develops into mid and large blood vessels, often leading to severe complications. Thanks to their unique physicochemical properties, GNPs have drawn much attention from the research community in cardiovascular imaging. Thus, the optical properties of GNPs have led to their utilization as contrast agents for optical or X-ray imaging modalities allowing the detection of atherosclerotic plaques, intravascular thrombus, or fibrotic tissue. In this study, we detail the most promising preclinical scientific progresses based on the use of GNPs for imaging in cardiovascular field and their improvements for a potential clinical application. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  15. Cancer theranostics with gold nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun; Wallace, Michael; Melancon, Marites P

    2014-09-01

    Gold nanoshells (AuNSs) present a vivid example of integrating nanoscience in order to solve a biomedical problem. AuNSs exhibit tunable surface plasmon resonance, which can be tuned to the near-infrared region in order to realize optimal tissue penetration. The highly efficient light-to-heat transformation by AuNSs during laser irradiation causes thermal damage to the tumor without damaging healthy organs. Transient nanobubbles can form around AuNSs during laser treatment and induce mechanical stress specifically in tumor cells. AuNSs also serve as a versatile platform for the delivery of various diagnostic and therapeutic agents. In this article, we describe the physicochemical properties of AuNSs in the context of their design, preparation and application in cancer theranostics. Ultimately, we look beyond the current research on AuNSs and discussed future challenges to their successful translation into clinical use.

  16. Annealing of gold nanostructures sputtered on polytetrafluoroethylene

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanolayers sputtered on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) surface and their changes induced by post-deposition annealing at 100°C to 300°C are studied. Changes in surface morphology and roughness are examined by atomic force microscopy, electrical sheet resistance by two point technique, zeta potential by electrokinetic analysis and chemical composition by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in dependence on the gold layer thickness. Transition from discontinuous to continuous gold coverage takes place at the layer thicknesses 10 to 15 nm and this threshold remains practically unchanged after the annealing at the temperatures below 200°C. The annealing at 300°C, however, leads to significant rearrangement of the gold layer and the transition threshold increases to 70 nm. Significant carbon contamination and the presence of oxidized structures on gold-coated samples are observed in XPS spectra. Gold coating leads to a decrease in the sample surface roughness. Annealing at 300°C of pristine PTFE and gold-coated PTFE results in significant increase of the sample surface roughness. PMID:22078024

  17. Functionalization of gold nanoparticles as antidiabetic nanomaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatachalam, M.; Govindaraju, K.; Mohamed Sadiq, A.; Tamilselvan, S.; Ganesh Kumar, V.; Singaravelu, G.

    2013-12-01

    In the present investigation, functionalization of gold nanoparticles synthesized using propanoic acid 2-(3-acetoxy-4,4,14-trimethylandrost-8-en-17-yl) (PAT) an active biocomponent isolated from Cassia auriculata is studied in detail. On reaction of PAT with aqueous HAuCl4, rapid formation of stable gold nanoparticles was achieved. Formation of gold nanoparticles was confirmed by UV-vis spectroscopy, XRD, GC-MS, FTIR, TEM and SEM with EDAX. Gold nanoparticles mostly were monodisperse, spherical in shape and ranged in size 12-41 nm. Gold nanoparticles synthesised using PAT was administered to alloxan (150 mg/kg body weight) induced diabetic male albino rats at different doses (0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0 mg/kg body weight) for 28 days. Plasma glucose level, cholesterol and triglyceride were significantly (p < 0.001) reduced in experimental animals treated with gold nanoparticles at dosage of 0.5 mg/kg body weight and plasma insulin increased significantly. The newly genre green gold nanoparticles exhibit remarkable protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitory activity.

  18. Gold nano-particles fixed on glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worsch, Christian; Wisniewski, Wolfgang; Kracker, Michael; Rüssel, Christian

    2012-09-01

    A simple process for producing wear resistant gold nano-particle coatings on transparent substrates is proposed. Soda-lime-silica glasses were sputtered with gold and subsequently coated with SiO2 using a combustion chemical vapor deposition technique. Some samples were first coated with silica, sputtered with gold and then coated with a second layer of silica. The samples were annealed for 20 min at either 550 or 600 °C. This resulted in the formation of round, well separated gold nano-particles with sizes from 15 to 200 nm. The color of the coated glass was equivalent to that of gold-ruby glasses. Silica/gold/silica coatings annealed at 600 °C for 20 min were strongly adherent and scratch resistant. X-ray diffraction and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) were used to describe the crystal orientations of the embedded particles. The gold particles are preferably oriented with their (1 1 1) planes perpendicular to the surface.

  19. Gold metal liquid-like droplets.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Evgeny; Scanlon, Micheál D; Momotenko, Dmitry; Vrubel, Heron; Méndez, Manuel A; Brevet, Pierre-Francois; Girault, Hubert H

    2014-09-23

    Simple methods to self-assemble coatings and films encompassing nanoparticles are highly desirable in many practical scenarios, yet scarcely any examples of simple, robust approaches to coat macroscopic droplets with continuous, thick (multilayer), reflective and stable liquid nanoparticle films exist. Here, we introduce a facile and rapid one-step route to form films of reflective liquid-like gold that encase macroscopic droplets, and we denote these as gold metal liquid-like droplets (MeLLDs). The present approach takes advantage of the inherent self-assembly of gold nanoparticles at liquid-liquid interfaces and the increase in rates of nanoparticle aggregate trapping at the interface during emulsification. The ease of displacement of the stabilizing citrate ligands by appropriate redox active molecules that act as a lubricating molecular glue is key. Specifically, the heterogeneous interaction of citrate stabilized aqueous gold nanoparticles with the lipophilic electron donor tetrathiafulvalene under emulsified conditions produces gold MeLLDs. This methodology relies exclusively on electrochemical reactions, i.e., the oxidation of tetrathiafulvalene to its radical cation by the gold nanoparticle, and electrostatic interactions between the radical cation and nanoparticles. The gold MeLLDs are reversibly deformable upon compression and decompression and kinetically stable for extended periods of time in excess of a year.

  20. Gold nanoparticles produced in a microalga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luangpipat, Tiyaporn; Beattie, Isabel R.; Chisti, Yusuf; Haverkamp, Richard G.

    2011-12-01

    An efficient biological route to production of gold nanoparticles which allows the nanoparticles to be easily recovered remains elusive. Live cells of the green microalga Chlorella vulgaris were incubated with a solution of gold chloride and harvested by centrifugation. Nanoparticles inside intact cells were identified by transmission electron microscopy and confirmed to be metallic gold by synchrotron based X-ray powder diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. These intracellular gold nanoparticles were 40-60 nm in diameter. At a concentration of 1.4% Au in the alga, a better than 97% recovery of the gold from solution was achieved. A maximum of 4.2% Au in the alga was obtained. Exposure of C. vulgaris to solutions containing dissolved salts of palladium, ruthenium, and rhodium also resulted in the production of the corresponding nanoparticles within the cells. These were surmised to be also metallic, but were produced at a much lower intracellular concentration than achieved with gold. Iridium was apparently toxic to the alga. No nanoparticles were observed using platinum solutions. C. vulgaris provides a possible route to large scale production of gold nanoparticles.

  1. Functionalization of gold nanoparticles as antidiabetic nanomaterial.

    PubMed

    Venkatachalam, M; Govindaraju, K; Mohamed Sadiq, A; Tamilselvan, S; Ganesh Kumar, V; Singaravelu, G

    2013-12-01

    In the present investigation, functionalization of gold nanoparticles synthesized using propanoic acid 2-(3-acetoxy-4,4,14-trimethylandrost-8-en-17-yl) (PAT) an active biocomponent isolated from Cassia auriculata is studied in detail. On reaction of PAT with aqueous HAuCl4, rapid formation of stable gold nanoparticles was achieved. Formation of gold nanoparticles was confirmed by UV-vis spectroscopy, XRD, GC-MS,FTIR, TEM and SEM with EDAX. Gold nanoparticles mostly were monodisperse, spherical in shape and ranged in size 12-41 nm. Gold nanoparticles synthesised using PAT was administered to alloxan (150 mg/kg body weight) induced diabetic male albino rats at different doses (0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0mg/kg body weight) for 28 days. Plasma glucose level, cholesterol and triglyceride were significantly (p<0.001) reduced in experimental animals treated with gold nanoparticles at dosage of 0.5mg/kg body weight and plasma insulin increased significantly. The newly genre green gold nanoparticles exhibit remarkable protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitory activity.

  2. Nature vs. nurture: gold perpetuates "stemness".

    PubMed

    Paul, Willi; Sharma, Chandra P; Deb, Kaushik Dilip

    2011-01-01

    Adult tissues contain quiescent reservoirs of multipotent somatic stem cells and pluripotent embryonic-like stem cells (ELSCs). Credited with regenerative properties gold is used across both -contemporary and -ancient medicines. Here, we show that gold exerted these effects by enhancing the pool of pluripotent ELSC while improving their stemness. We used hESCs as an in-vitro model to understand if gold could enhance self-renewal and pluripotency. Swarna-bhasma (SB), an ancient Indian gold microparticulate (41.1 nm), preparation, reduced spontaneous-differentiation, improved self-renewal, pluripotency and proliferation of hESCs. Colloidal gold-nanoparticles (GNP) (15.59 nm) were tested to confirm that the observations were attributable to nanoparticulate-gold. SB and GNP exposure: maintained -stemness, -karyotypic stability, enhanced pluripotency till day-12, increased average colony-sizes, and reduced the number of autonomously-derived differentiated FGFR1 positive fibroblast-niche-cells/colony. Particulate-gold induced upregulation of FGFR1 and IGF2 expression, and decrease in IGF1 secretion indicates IGF1/2 mediated support for enhanced pluripotency and self-renewal in hESCs.

  3. Gel Electrophoresis of Gold-DNA Nanoconjugates

    DOE PAGES

    Pellegrino, T.; Sperling, R. A.; Alivisatos, A. P.; ...

    2007-01-01

    Gold-DNA conjugates were investigated in detail by a comprehensive gel electrophoresis study based on 1200 gels. A controlled number of single-stranded DNA of different length was attached specifically via thiol-Au bonds to phosphine-stabilized colloidal gold nanoparticles. Alternatively, the surface of the gold particles was saturated with single stranded DNA of different length either specifically via thiol-Au bonds or by nonspecific adsorption. From the experimentally determined electrophoretic mobilities, estimates for the effective diameters of the gold-DNA conjugates were derived by applying two different data treatment approaches. The first method is based on making a calibration curve for the relation between effectivemore » diameters and mobilities with gold nanoparticles of known diameter. The second method is based on Ferguson analysis which uses gold nanoparticles of known diameter as reference database. Our study shows that effective diameters derived from gel electrophoresis measurements are affected with a high error bar as the determined values strongly depend on the method of evaluation, though relative changes in size upon binding of molecules can be detected with high precision. Furthermore, in this study, the specific attachment of DNA via gold-thiol bonds to Au nanoparticles is compared to nonspecific adsorption of DNA. Also, the maximum number of DNA molecules that can be bound per particle was determined.« less

  4. Alkanetelluroxide-protected gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Silverton, Latoya C; Haasch, Richard; Tong, Yu Ye

    2008-07-15

    The synthesis and characterization of the first air-stable tellurium-containing ligand-protected gold nanoparticles (NPs) are reported. Although the synthesis largely followed the well-known Brust two-phase approach, the starting ligand was dioctyl ditelluride rather than alkanetellurol, which is an analogue of the widely used alkanethiol. Dioctyl ditelluride was used because alkanetellurol is unstable. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra, as well as infrared spectra (IR) of the formed Au NPs, indicated that the Te-Te bond in the starting ligand was broken but the octyl group was intact. This was further corroborated by the solid-state 125Te NMR spectrum that displayed a very broad and significantly downfield-shifted peak, indicating that tellurium was directly bound to the Au core. Furthermore, the O 1s and Te 3d XPS spectra of the Au NPs indicated that the capping ligands were octanetelluroxide. An average particle size of 2.7 nm diameter as measured by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) corresponded to an Au607 core. A two-step weight loss of approximately 22.2% in total was observed in the thermogravimetric analysis, which indicated about 53% ligand monolayer coverage (i.e., Au607(Te(=O)C8H17)133). Additionally, dioctyl ditelluride demonstrated an intriguing reductive power that led to a more sophisticated chemistry of forming the air-stable octanetelluroxide-protected gold NPs. It has been found that (1) when the ratio of Au to Te was about 1.5 a colorless intermediate state similar to Au(I)-SR (the intermediate state widely accepted in the synthesis of thiolate-protected Au NPs) could be obtained and (2) this kind of intermediate state played a key role in the formation of stable Au NPs.

  5. One-step green synthesis and characterization of leaf extract-mediated biocompatible silver and gold nanoparticles from Memecylon umbellatum.

    PubMed

    Arunachalam, Kantha D; Annamalai, Sathesh Kumar; Hari, Shanmugasundaram

    2013-01-01

    In this experiment, green-synthesized silver and gold nanoparticles were produced rapidly by treating silver and gold ions with an extract of Memecylon umbellatum leaf. The reaction process was simple and easy to handle, and was monitored using ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. The effect of the phytochemicals present in M. umbellatum, including saponins, phenolic compounds, phytosterols, and quinones, on formation of stable silver and gold nanoparticles was investigated by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The morphology and crystalline phase of the nanoparticles were determined by transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The results indicate that the saponins, phytosterols, and phenolic compounds present in the plant extract play a major role in formation of silver and gold nanoparticles in their respective ions in solution. The characteristics of the nanoparticles formed suggest application of silver and gold nanoparticles as chemical sensors in the future. Given the simple and eco-friendly approach for synthesis, these nanoparticles could easily be commercialized for large-scale production.

  6. Nano-imprint gold grating as refractive index sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumari, Sudha; Mohapatra, Saswat; Moirangthem, Rakesh S.

    2016-05-01

    Large scale of fabrication of plasmonic nanostructures has been a challenging task due to time consuming process and requirement of expensive nanofabrication tools such as electron beam lithography system, focused ion beam system, and extreme UV photolithography system. Here, we present a cost-effective fabrication technique so called soft nanoimprinting to fabricate nanostructures on the larger sample area. In our fabrication process, a commercially available optical DVD disc was used as a template which was imprinted on a polymer glass substrate to prepare 1D polymer nano-grating. A homemade nanoimprinting setup was used in this fabrication process. Further, a label-free refractive index sensor was developed by utilizing the properties of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of a gold coated 1D polymer nano-grating. Refractive index sensing was tested by exposing different solutions of glycerol-water mixture on the surface of gold nano-grating. The calculated bulk refractive index sensitivity was found to be 751nm/RIU. We believed that our proposed SPR sensor could be a promising candidate for developing low-cost refractive index sensor with high sensitivity on a large scale.

  7. The optical nonlinearity of gold nanoparticles prepared by bioreduction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balbuena Ortega, A.; Arroyo Carrasco, M. L.; Gayou, V. L.; Orduña Díaz, A.; Delgado Macuil, R.; Rojas López, Marlon

    2013-11-01

    Nonlinear optical and electronic properties of nanosized metal particles have drawn considerable attention because of their strong and size-dependent plasmon resonance absorption. In a metal nanoparticle system such as gold dispersed in a transparent matrix, an absorption peak due to surface plasmon resonance is usually observed in the visible spectral region. Metal nanoparticles are of special interest as nonlinear materials for optical switching and computing because of their relatively large third-order nonlinearity (χ3) and ultrafast response time. The purpose of this study was to analyze the nonlinear optical properties of biosynthesized gold nanoparticles. The samples were prepared by biosynthesis method using yeast extract as reducing agent and the nonlinear optical properties of the nanoparticles were investigated using a single beam Z-scan technique with a beam power of 20 mW and operated at wavelength of 514 nm. The reaction between metal ions and yeast extracts were monitored by UV-visible spectra of Au nanoparticles in aqueous solution with different pH (3-6). The surface plasmon peak position was shifted from 528 nm to 573 nm, according to of pH variation 4 to 6. The average particle size was calculated by the absorption peak position using the Fernig method, from 42 to 103 nm. The z-scan curves showed a negative nonlocal nonlinear refractive index with a magnitude dependent on the nanoparticle size.

  8. 33 CFR 13.01-10 - Gold and silver bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gold and silver bars. 13.01-10... DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-10 Gold and silver bars. No person shall receive more than one Gold Lifesaving Medal and...

  9. 33 CFR 13.01-10 - Gold and silver bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gold and silver bars. 13.01-10... DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-10 Gold and silver bars. No person shall receive more than one Gold Lifesaving Medal and...

  10. 33 CFR 13.01-10 - Gold and silver bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Gold and silver bars. 13.01-10... DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-10 Gold and silver bars. No person shall receive more than one Gold Lifesaving Medal and...

  11. 33 CFR 13.01-10 - Gold and silver bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gold and silver bars. 13.01-10... DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-10 Gold and silver bars. No person shall receive more than one Gold Lifesaving Medal and...

  12. 33 CFR 13.01-10 - Gold and silver bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gold and silver bars. 13.01-10... DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-10 Gold and silver bars. No person shall receive more than one Gold Lifesaving Medal and...

  13. 16 CFR 23.4 - Misrepresentation as to gold content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Misrepresentation as to gold content. 23.4... JEWELRY, PRECIOUS METALS, AND PEWTER INDUSTRIES § 23.4 Misrepresentation as to gold content. (a) It is unfair or deceptive to misrepresent the presence of gold or gold alloy in an industry product, or...

  14. 16 CFR 23.4 - Misrepresentation as to gold content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Misrepresentation as to gold content. 23.4... JEWELRY, PRECIOUS METALS, AND PEWTER INDUSTRIES § 23.4 Misrepresentation as to gold content. (a) It is unfair or deceptive to misrepresent the presence of gold or gold alloy in an industry product, or...

  15. 16 CFR 23.4 - Misrepresentation as to gold content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Misrepresentation as to gold content. 23.4... JEWELRY, PRECIOUS METALS, AND PEWTER INDUSTRIES § 23.4 Misrepresentation as to gold content. (a) It is unfair or deceptive to misrepresent the presence of gold or gold alloy in an industry product, or...

  16. 16 CFR 23.4 - Misrepresentation as to gold content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Misrepresentation as to gold content. 23.4... JEWELRY, PRECIOUS METALS, AND PEWTER INDUSTRIES § 23.4 Misrepresentation as to gold content. (a) It is unfair or deceptive to misrepresent the presence of gold or gold alloy in an industry product, or...

  17. 16 CFR 23.4 - Misrepresentation as to gold content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Misrepresentation as to gold content. 23.4... JEWELRY, PRECIOUS METALS, AND PEWTER INDUSTRIES § 23.4 Misrepresentation as to gold content. (a) It is unfair or deceptive to misrepresent the presence of gold or gold alloy in an industry product, or...

  18. Colloidal-gold electrosensor measuring device

    DOEpatents

    Wegner, S.; Harpold, M.A.; McCaffrey, T.M.; Morris, S.E.; Wojciechowski, M.; Zhao, J.; Henkens, R.W.; Naser, N.; O`Daly, J.P.

    1995-11-21

    The present invention provides a new device for use in measuring lead levels in biological and environmental samples. Using square wave coulometry and colloidal gold particles impregnated on carbon electrodes, the present invention provides a rapid, reliable, portable and inexpensive means of detecting low lead levels. The colloidal gold modified electrodes have microelectrode array characteristics and produce significantly higher stripping detection signals for lead than are produced at bulk gold electrode surfaces. The method is effective in determining levels of lead down to at least 5 {micro}g/dL in blood samples as small as 10 {micro}L. 9 figs.

  19. Colloidal-gold electrosensor measuring device

    DOEpatents

    Wegner, Steven; Harpold, Michael A.; McCaffrey, Terence M.; Morris, Susan E.; Wojciechowski, Marek; Zhao, Junguo; Henkens, Robert W.; Naser, Najih; O'Daly, John P.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention provides a new device for use in measuring lead levels in biological and environmental samples. Using square wave coulometry and colloidal gold particles impregnated on carbon electrodes, the present invention provides a rapid, reliable, portable and inexpensive means of detecting low lead levels. The colloidal gold modified electrodes have microelectrode array characteristics and produce significantly higher stripping detection signals for lead than are produced at bulk gold electrode surfaces. The method is effective in determining levels of lead down to at least 5 .mu.g/dL in blood samples as small as 10 .mu.L.

  20. Designing hollow nano gold golf balls.

    PubMed

    Landon, Preston B; Mo, Alexander H; Zhang, Chen; Emerson, Chris D; Printz, Adam D; Gomez, Alan F; DeLaTorre, Christopher J; Colburn, David A M; Anzenberg, Paula; Eliceiri, Matthew; O'Connell, Connor; Lal, Ratnesh

    2014-07-09

    Hollow/porous nanoparticles, including nanocarriers, nanoshells, and mesoporous materials have applications in catalysis, photonics, biosensing, and delivery of theranostic agents. Using a hierarchical template synthesis scheme, we have synthesized a nanocarrier mimicking a golf ball, consisting of (i) solid silica core with a pitted gold surface and (ii) a hollow/porous gold shell without silica. The template consisted of 100 nm polystyrene beads attached to a larger silica core. Selective gold plating of the core followed by removal of the polystyrene beads produced a golf ball-like nanostructure with 100 nm pits. Dissolution of the silica core produced a hollow/porous golf ball-like nanostructure.

  1. Gold nanoparticles extraction from dielectric scattering background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Xin; Wang, Jingxin

    2014-11-01

    The unique advantages such as brightness, non-photobleaching, good bio-compatibility make gold nanoparticles desirable labels and play important roles in biotech and related research and applications. Distinguishing gold nanoparticles from other dielectric scattering particles is of more importance, especially in bio-tracing and imaging. The enhancement image results from the localized surface plasmon resonance associated with gold nanopartilces makes themselves distinguishable from other dielectric particles, based on which, we propose a dual-wavelength detection method by employing a high sensitive cross-polarization microscopy.

  2. Electrochemical control of creep in nanoporous gold

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Xing-Long; Jin, Hai-Jun

    2013-11-11

    We have investigated the mechanical stability of nanoporous gold (npg) in an electrochemical environment, using in situ dilatometry and compression experiments. It is demonstrated that the gold nano-ligaments creep under the action of surface stress which leads to spontaneous volume contractions in macroscopic npg samples. The creep of npg, under or without external forces, can be controlled electrochemically. The creep rate increases with increasing potential in double-layer potential region, and deceases to almost zero when the gold surface is adsorbed with oxygen. Surprisingly, we also noticed a correlation between creep and surface diffusivity, which links the deformation of nanocrystals to mobility of surface atoms.

  3. Electrically Conductive Polyimide Films Containing Gold Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caplan, Maggie L.; Stoakley, Diane M.; St. Clair, Anne K.

    1994-01-01

    Polyimide films exhibiting high thermo-oxidative stability and including electrically conductive surface layers containing gold made by casting process. Many variations of basic process conditions, ingredients, and sequence of operations possible, and not all resulting versions of process yield electrically conductive films. Gold-containing layer formed on film surface during cure. These metallic gold-containing polyimides used in film and coating applications requiring electrical conductivity, high reflectivity, exceptional thermal stability, and/or mechanical integrity. They also find commercial potential in areas ranging from thin films for satellite antennas to decorative coatings and packaging.

  4. Gold deposit styles and placer gold characterisation in northern and east-central Madagascar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pitfield, Peter E. J; Styles, Michael T.; Taylor, Cliff D.; Key, Roger M.; Bauer,; Ralison, A

    2009-01-01

    Microchemical characterisation of bedrock and placer gold grains from six gold districts within the Archaean domains and intervening Neoproterozoic Anaboriana-Manampotsy belt of northern and east-central Madagascar show few opaque inclusions (e.g pyrrhotite, Bi tellurides) but wide range of Ag contents (40wt%). Some districts exhibit multiple source populations of grains. The ‘greenstone belt’ terranes have an orogenic gold signature locally with an intrusion-related to epithermal overprint. Proterozoic metasediments with felsic to ultramafic bodies yield dominantly intrusion-related gold. A high proportion of secondary gold (<0.5wt% Ag) is related to recycling of paleoplacers and erosion of post-Gondwana planation surfaces and indicates that some mesothermal gold systems were already partially to wholly removed by erosion by the PermoTriassic.

  5. Bio-fabrication of gold nanoparticles using aqueous extract of red tomato and its use as a colorimetric sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barman, Gadadhar; Maiti, Swarnali; Laha, Jayasree Konar

    2013-04-01

    In this work, we report a green method for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles (GNP) using the aqueous extract of red tomato ( Lycopersicon esculentum). We believe that citric acid and ascorbic acid present in tomato juice are responsible for the reduction of gold ions. This biosynthesized GNP in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate has been used as a colorimetric sensor to detect and estimate the pesticide, methyl parathion. The GNP in the presence of methyl parathion shows a new peak at 400 nm due to the formation of 4-nitrophenolate ion by catalytic hydrolysis of methyl parathion in alkaline medium. A calibration curve between the absorption coefficients of the 400-nm peak versus the concentration of the pesticide allows the quantitative estimation of the 4-nitrophenolate ion, thereby enabling indirect estimation of methyl parathion present in the system.

  6. Gold nanoparticle localization at the core surface by using thermosensitive core-shell particles as a template.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Daisuke; Kawaguchi, Haruma

    2005-12-06

    We report novel thermosensitive hybrid core-shell particles via in situ gold nanoparticle formation using thermosensitive core-shell particles as a template. This method for the in situ synthesis of gold nanoparticles with microgel interiors offers the advantage of eliminating or significantly reducing particle aggregation. In addition, by using thermosensitive microgel structures in which the shell has thermosensitive and gel properties in water--whereas the core itself is a water-insoluble polymer--we were able to synthesize the gold nanoparticles only at the surface of the core, which had reactive sites to bind metal ions. After the gold nanoparticles were synthesized, electroless gold plating was carried out to control the thickness of the gold nanoshells. The dispersions of the obtained hybrid particles were characterized by dynamic light scattering and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, and the dried particles were also observed by electron microscopy. Adaptation of the technique shown here will create a number of applications as optical, electronic, and biomedical functional materials.

  7. Coulomb-driven energy boost of heavy ions for laser-plasma acceleration.

    PubMed

    Braenzel, J; Andreev, A A; Platonov, K; Klingsporn, M; Ehrentraut, L; Sandner, W; Schnürer, M

    2015-03-27

    An unprecedented increase of kinetic energy of laser accelerated heavy ions is demonstrated. Ultrathin gold foils have been irradiated by an ultrashort laser pulse at a peak intensity of 8×10^{19}  W/  cm^{2}. Highly charged gold ions with kinetic energies up to >200  MeV and a bandwidth limited energy distribution have been reached by using 1.3 J laser energy on target. 1D and 2D particle in cell simulations show how a spatial dependence on the ion's ionization leads to an enhancement of the accelerating electrical field. Our theoretical model considers a spatial distribution of the ionization inside the thin target, leading to a field enhancement for the heavy ions by Coulomb explosion. It is capable of explaining the energy boost of highly charged ions, enabling a higher efficiency for the laser-driven heavy ion acceleration.

  8. Enhancing the reactivity of gold: Nanostructured Au(111) adsorbs CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, F. M.; Hrbek, J.; Ma, S.; Park, J. B.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Stacchiola, D. J.; Senanayake, S. D.

    2016-08-01

    Low-coordinated sites are surface defects whose presence can transform a surface of inert or noble metal such as Au into an active catalyst. Starting with a well-ordered Au(111) surface we prepared by ion sputtering gold surfaces modified by pits, used microscopy (STM) for their structural characterization and CO spectroscopy (IRAS and NEXAFS) for probing reactivity of surface defects. In contrast to the Au(111) surface CO adsorbs readily on the pitted surfaces bonding to low-coordinated sites identified as step atoms forming {111} and {100} microfacets. Pitted nanostructured surfaces can serve as interesting and easily prepared models of catalytic surfaces with defined defects that offer an attractive alternative to vicinal surfaces or nanoparticles commonly employed in catalysis science.

  9. Thumb Imprint Based Detection of Hyperbilirubinemia Using Luminescent Gold Nanoclusters

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Srestha; Sahoo, Amaresh Kumar; Paul, Anumita; Chattopadhyay, Arun

    2016-01-01

    Early and easy detection of diseases, using point-of-care and inexpensive devices, not only provides option for early treatment but also reduces the risk of propagation. Herein we report the fabrication of a robust film based luminescence indicator of bilirubin, which can indicate hyperbilirubinemia through the thumb imprint of the patient. The UV-light induced luminescence intensity of the film, made out of chitosan stabilised gold (Au) nanoclusters, which was effectively quenched in the presence of Cu2+ ions, recovered in the presence of bilirubin from skin or blood serum. Moreover, the sensitivity of detection of bilirubin was tuneable with the amount of Cu2+ added, thereby facilitating the detection of the desired concentration range of bilirubin. PMID:27976728

  10. Thumb Imprint Based Detection of Hyperbilirubinemia Using Luminescent Gold Nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Srestha; Sahoo, Amaresh Kumar; Paul, Anumita; Chattopadhyay, Arun

    2016-12-01

    Early and easy detection of diseases, using point-of-care and inexpensive devices, not only provides option for early treatment but also reduces the risk of propagation. Herein we report the fabrication of a robust film based luminescence indicator of bilirubin, which can indicate hyperbilirubinemia through the thumb imprint of the patient. The UV-light induced luminescence intensity of the film, made out of chitosan stabilised gold (Au) nanoclusters, which was effectively quenched in the presence of Cu2+ ions, recovered in the presence of bilirubin from skin or blood serum. Moreover, the sensitivity of detection of bilirubin was tuneable with the amount of Cu2+ added, thereby facilitating the detection of the desired concentration range of bilirubin.

  11. Tuning the characteristics of electrochemically fabricated gold nanowires.

    PubMed

    Karim, S; Ensinger, W; Cornelius, T W; Khan, E U; Neumann, R

    2008-11-01

    We have developed different electrochemical procedures for the production of gold nanowires with variable and controllable crystallographic and morphological properties using etched ion track templates. The texture of the nanowires is tuned by the variation of the electrodeposition parameters. Potentiostatic plating at low overvoltage provides strongly (110) textured wires for diameters below 100 nm. With the increase in diameter above 100 nm, this texture decreases and the signal from ({111} planes becomes more pronounced. Under reverse pulse deposition conditions, (100) textured wires are generated. The growth mechanism is discussed in detail in terms of the surface energy minimum principle. In addition, wires are shaped in a reliable way from cylindrical to conical geometry by engineering the pore structure in the template.

  12. Size evolution of gold nanoparticles in a millifluidic reactor.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuehao; Sanampudi, Ashwin; Raji Reddy, Vanga; Biswas, Sanchita; Nandakumar, Krishnaswamy; Yemane, Dawit; Goettert, Jost; Kumar, Challa S S R

    2012-01-16

    The size evolution of gold nanoparticles in a millifluidic reactor is investigated using spatially resolved transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The experimental data is supported by numerical simulations, carried out to study the residence-time distribution (RTD) of tracers that have the same properties as Au ions. Size and size distribution of the particles within the channels are influenced by the mixing zones as well as the RTD. However, the Au nanoparticles obtained show a broader size distribution even at the shortest investigated residence time of 3.53 s, indicating that in addition to surface growth reaction kinetics also plays an important role. The comparison of time resolved particle growth within the millifluidic channel with flask-based reactions reveals that the particle size can be controlled better within millifluidic channels. Overall, the results indicate potential opportunities to utilize easy to fabricate millifluidic reactors for the synthesis of nanoparticles, as well as as for carrying out time resolved kinetic studies.

  13. Electrochemical measurements on a droplet using gold microelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenabi, Amin; Souri, Asma; Rastkhadiv, Ali

    2016-03-01

    Facile methods of ion recognition are important for the fabrication of electronic tongue systems. In this work, we demonstrate performing pulsed conductometry on microliter electrolyte droplets dropped on gold microelectrodes vapor deposited on soda lime glass slides. A droplet is dropped between two microelectrodes when a voltage waveform from a preprogramed power supply is applied on them. The temporal variation of the electric current passing through the droplet is recorded, digitized and stored. The obtained data are compared with the database formed out of the previous experiences for the classification of the sample electrolytes. It is shown that the shape of the voltage waveform is the important parameter of the process. We devised a method for the optimization of the voltage waveform profile for obtaining the maximum of discriminating information from the recorded current variations.

  14. Gold and gold-iron oxide magnetic glyconanoparticles: synthesis, characterization and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Jesús M; Alcántara, David; Eaton, Peter; Crespo, Patricia; Rojas, Teresa C; Fernandez, Asunción; Hernando, Antonio; Penadés, Soledad

    2006-07-06

    The preparation, characterization and the magnetic properties of gold and gold-iron oxide glyconanoparticles (GNPs) are described. Glyconanoparticles were prepared in a single step procedure in the presence of aqueous solution of thiol functionalized neoglycoconjugates and either gold salts or both gold and iron salts. Neoglycoconjugates of lactose and maltose disaccharides with different linkers were used. Iron-free gold or gold-iron oxide GNPs with controlled gold-iron ratios were obtained. The average core-size diameters are in the range of 1.5-2.5 nm. The GNPs are fully characterized by (1)H NMR spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and UV-vis and X-ray absorption (XAS) spectroscopies. Inductive plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP) and elemental analysis gave the average number of neoglycoconjugates per cluster. The magnetic properties were measured in a SQUID magnetometer. The most remarkable results was the observation of a permanent magnetism up to room temperature in the iron-free gold GNPs, that was not present in the corresponding gold-iron oxide GNPs.

  15. Structural controls on Carlin-type gold mineralization in the gold bar district, Eureka County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yigit, O.; Nelson, E.P.; Hitzman, M.W.; Hofstra, A.H.

    2003-01-01

    The Gold Bar district in the southern Roberts Mountains, 48 km northwest of Eureka, Nevada, contains one main deposit (Gold Bar), five satellite deposits, and other resources. Approximately 0.5 Moz of gold have been recovered from a resource of 1,639,000 oz of gold in Carlin-type gold deposits in lower plate, miogeoclinal carbonate rocks below the Roberts Mountains thrust. Host rocks are unit 2 of the Upper Member of the Devonian Denay Formation and the Bartine Member of the McColley Canyon Formation. Spatial and temporal relations between structures and gold mineralization indicate that both pre-Tertiary and Tertiary structures were important controls on gold mineralization. Gold mineralization occurs primarily along high-angle Tertiary normal faults, some of which are reactivated reverse faults of Paleozoic or Mesozoic age. Most deposits are localized at the intersection of northwest- and northeast-striking faults. Alteration includes decalcification, and to a lesser extent, silicification along high-angle faults. Jasperoid (pervasive silicification), which formed along most faults and in some strata-bound zones, accounts for a small portion of the ore in every deposit. In the Gold Canyon deposit, a high-grade jasperoid pipe formed along a Tertiary normal fault which was localized along a zone of overturned fault-propagation folds and thrust faults of Paleozoic or Mesozoic age.

  16. Electrical immunosensor based on a submicron-gap interdigitated electrode and gold enhancement.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Junhyoung; Lee, Tae Han; Li, Taihua; Heo, Kwang; Hong, Seunghun; Ko, Jeongheon; Kim, Yongsam; Shin, Yong-Beom; Kim, Min-Gon

    2011-08-15

    We demonstrated that the detection of human interleukin 5 (IL5) with a higher sensitivity than the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was possible using mass-producible submicron-gap interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) combined with signal amplification by a gold nanoparticle (AuNP) and gold enhancement. IDEs, facing comb-shape electrodes, can act as simple and miniaturized devices for immunoassay. An IDE with a gap size of 400nm was fabricated by a stepper photolithography process and was applied for the immunoassay of human IL5. A biotinylated anti-human IL5 was immobilized on the streptavidin-modified IDE, and biotin-bovine serum albumin (BSA) and BSA were added sequentially to reduce non-specific binding between the streptavidin-immobilized IDE surface and other proteins. The immunoassay procedure included three main steps: the reaction of human IL5 to form antigen-antibody complexes, the binding of AuNP conjugation with an antibody against human IL5 for the sandwich immunoassay, and gold enhancement for electrical signal amplification. The measurement of electrical current at each step showed that the gold enhancement step was very critical in detection of the concentration of human IL5. Analysis by scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed that close to 1μm particles were formed from 10nm AuNP by the gold enhancement reaction using gold ions and hydroxylamine. Under optimized conditions, human IL5 could be analyzed at 1pgmL(-1) with a wide dynamic range (from 10(-3) to 100ngmL(-1) concentrations).

  17. Critical View on Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy Using the Ferri/Ferrocyanide Redox Couple at Gold Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Stephan; Su, Qiang; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, Cristina; Nöll, Gilbert

    2016-04-19

    Electrochemical or faradaic impedance spectroscopy (EIS) using the ferri/ferrocyanide couple as a redox probe at gold working electrodes was evaluated with respect to its ability to monitor consecutive surface modification steps. As a model reaction, the reversible hybridization and dehybridization of DNA was studied. Thiol-modified single stranded DNA (ssDNA, 20 bases, capture probe) was chemisorbed to a gold electrode and treated with a solution of short thiols to release nonspecifically adsorbed DNA before hybridization with complementary ssDNA (20 bases, target) was carried out. Reversible dehybridization was achieved by intense rinsing with pure water. The experimental procedures were optimized by kinetic surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) measurements to maximize the increase in reflectivity or decrease in frequency upon hybridization before hybridization/dehybridization was also monitored by EIS. In contrast to SPR and QCM-D, repeatable EIS measurements were not possible at first. Combined SPR/EIS and QCM-D/EIS measurements revealed that during EIS the gold surface is seriously damaged due to the presence of CN(-) ions, which are released from the ferri/ferrocyanide redox probe. Even at optimized experimental conditions, etching the gold electrodes could not be completely suppressed and the repeatability of the EIS measurements was limited. In three out of four experimental runs, only two hybridization/dehybridization steps could be monitored reversibly by EIS. Thereafter etching the gold electrode significantly contributed to the EIS spectra whereas the QCM-D response was still repeatable. Hence great care has to be taken when this technique is used to monitor surface modification at gold electrodes.

  18. Enhancement of the high-order harmonic generation from the gold plume using the time-resolved plasma spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ganeev, Rashid A.; Elouga Bom, Luc B.; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki

    2007-10-01

    We present systematic time-resolved investigations of plasma conditions for achieving the maximum cutoff and maximum conversion efficiency of high-order harmonic generation from gold plasma within the plateau. We analyzed harmonic generation under different laser-plasma conditions. We also performed simulations to calculate the ionization state of the gold plasma, the free electron density, and singly charged ion density at different prepulse intensities. By optimizing the plasma conditions, we observed a harmonic cutoff at the 53rd order ({lambda}=15.09 nm). We estimate the conversion efficiency of the harmonics within the plateau region to be 2x10{sup -6}.

  19. Emergency Response to Gold King Mine Release

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Description of August 5, 2015 release of contaminated waters from the Gold King Mine into Cement Creek and the Animas River, and the resulting emergency response remediation efforts, including monitoring of affected waterways.

  20. Novel Catalysis by Gold: A Modern Alchemy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruta, Masatake

    Gold has long been neglected as a catalyst because of its chemical inertness. However, when gold is deposited as nanoparticles on carbon and polymer materials as well as on base metal oxides and hydroxides, it exhibits unique catalytic properties for many reactions such as CO oxidation at a temperature as low as 200 K, gas phase direct epoxidation of propylene, and aerobic oxidation of glucose to gluconic acid. The structure-catalytic activity correlations are discussed with emphasis on the contact structure, support selection, and the size control of gold particles. Gold clusters with diameters smaller than 2 nm are expected to exhibit novel properties in catalysis, optics, and electronics depending on the size (number of atoms), shape, and the electronic and chemical interaction with the support materials. The above achievements and attempts can be regarded as a modern alchemy that creates valuables by means of the noblest element with little practical use.

  1. Anatomy of gold catalysts: facts and myths

    PubMed Central

    Ranieri, Beatrice; Escofet, Imma

    2015-01-01

    This review article covers the main types of gold(i) complexes used as precatalysts under homogeneous conditions in organic synthesis and discusses the different ways of catalyst activation as well as ligand, silver, and anion effects. PMID:26055272

  2. Aqueous Black Colloids of Reticular Nanostructured Gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanca, S. E.; Fritzsche, W.; Dellith, J.; Froehlich, F.; Undisz, A.; Deckert, V.; Krafft, C.; Popp, J.

    2015-01-01

    Since ancient times, noble gold has continuously contributed to several aspects of life from medicine to electronics. It perpetually reveals its new features. We report the finding of a unique form of gold, reticular nanostructured gold (RNG), as an aqueous black colloid, for which we present a one-step synthesis. The reticules consist of gold crystals that interconnect to form compact strands. RNG exhibits high conductivity and low reflection, and these features, coupled with the high specific surface area of the material, could prove valuable for applications in electronics and catalysis. Due to high absorption throughout the visible and infrared domain, RNG has the potential to be applied in the construction of sensitive solar cells or as a substrate for Raman spectroscopy.

  3. Extended-gate FET-based enzyme sensor with ferrocenyl-alkanethiol modified gold sensing electrode.

    PubMed

    Ishige, Yu; Shimoda, Maki; Kamahori, Masao

    2009-01-01

    We developed a field-effect transistor (FET)-based enzyme sensor that detects an enzyme-catalyzed redox-reaction event as an interfacial potential change on an 11-ferrocenyl-1-undecanethiol (11-FUT) modified gold electrode. While the sensitivity of ion-sensitive FET (ISFET)-based enzyme sensors that detect an enzyme-catalyzed reaction as a local pH change are strongly affected by the buffer conditions such as pH and buffer capacity, the sensitivity of the proposed FET-based enzyme sensor is not affected by them in principle. The FET-based enzyme sensor consists of a detection part, which is an extended-gate FET sensor with an 11-FUT immobilized gold electrode, and an enzyme reaction part. The FET sensor detected the redox reaction of hexacyanoferrate ions, which are standard redox reagents of an enzymatic assay in blood tests, as a change in the interfacial potential of the 11-FUT modified gold electrode in accordance with the Nernstian response at a slope of 59 mV/decade at 25 degrees C. Also, the FET sensor had a dynamic range of more than five orders and showed no sensitivity to pH. A FET-based enzyme sensor for measuring cholesterol level was constructed by adding an enzyme reaction part, which contained cholesterol dehydrogenase and hexacyanoferrate (II)/(III) ions, on the 11-FUT modified gold electrode. Since the sensitivity of the FET sensor based on potentiometric detection was independent of the sample volume, the sample volume was easily reduced to 2.5 microL while maintaining the sensitivity. The FET-based enzyme sensor successfully detected a serum cholesterol level from 33 to 233 mg/dL at the Nernstian slope of 57 mV/decade.

  4. ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Bell, W.A. Jr.; Love, L.O.; Prater, W.K.

    1958-01-28

    An ion source is presented capable of producing ions of elements which vaporize only at exceedingly high temperatures, i.e.,--1500 degrees to 3000 deg C. The ion source utilizes beams of electrons focused into a first chamber housing the material to be ionized to heat the material and thereby cause it to vaporize. An adjacent second chamber receives the vaporized material through an interconnecting passage, and ionization of the vaporized material occurs in this chamber. The ionization action is produced by an arc discharge sustained between a second clectron emitting filament and the walls of the chamber which are at different potentials. The resultant ionized material egresses from a passageway in the second chamber. Using this device, materials which in the past could not be processed in mass spectometers may be satisfactorily ionized for such applications.

  5. Radiochemical separation of gold by amalgam exchange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruch, R.R.

    1970-01-01

    A rapid and simple method for the radiochemical separation of gold after neutron activation. The technique is based on treatment with a dilute indium-gold amalgam, both chemical reduction and isotopic exchange being involved. The counting efficiency for 198Au in small volumes of the amalgam is good. Few interferences occur and the method is applicable to clays, rocks, salts and metals. The possibility of determining silver, platinum and palladium by a similar method is mentioned. ?? 1970.

  6. Silver and gold-catalyzed multicomponent reactions

    PubMed Central

    Abbiati, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Summary Silver and gold salts and complexes mainly act as soft and carbophilic Lewis acids even if their use as σ-activators has been rarely reported. Recently, transformations involving Au(I)/Au(III)-redox catalytic systems have been reported in the literature. In this review we highlight all these aspects of silver and gold-mediated processes and their application in multicomponent reactions. PMID:24605168

  7. U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY ALASKAN GOLD PROJECT.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Antweiler, John C.; Cathrall, John; Tripp, Richard

    1984-01-01

    The United States Geological Survey has begun a state-wide study of Alaskan gold deposits. The immediate goals are to determine the relationship of gold in placer deposits to possible primary sources, to determine how nuggets form, to contribute to existing knowledge of principles for prospecting for placer deposits, and determine if minerals associated with placer deposits might suggest important deposits of other metals. The project started in 1982 with a study of placer mines in the Brooks Range.

  8. Size Selective Green Synthesis of Silver and Gold Nanoparticles: Enhanced Antibacterial Efficacy of Resveratrol Capped Silver Sol.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Shashi P; Roy, Mainak; Mukherjee, Poulomi; Das, Laboni; Neogy, Suman; Srivastava, Dinesh; Adhikari, Soumyakanti

    2016-03-01

    In view of potential biomedical application of the noble metal nanoparticles, we report a size controlled yet simple and green synthesis of resveratrol stabilized silver and gold nanoparticles having low polydispersity of size. Here, resveratrol plays two simultaneous roles, reducing the metal ions and providing efficient capping of the small nanoparticles. This gives rise to specific size of silver and gold nanoparticles at specific ratios of metal to resveratrol. The particles have been characterized by XRD and transmission electron microscopy. The nanoparticle sols are stable for months. The UV Visible absorption spectra of the silver sol show the plasmon peak of spherical nanoparticles, presence of which is further reflected in the TEM images. Size of the silver particles obtained is in between 11 to 21 nm depending on the ratio of resveratrol to metal ion used. Resveratrol capped silver nanoparticles exhibit high antibacterial activity against Gram negative wild type E coli BW (25113). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of nano-silver against the bacterium has been estimated to be 6.48 μg/ml, which is significantly lower than that reported in some earlier as well as recent publications. Reaction of gold ions with resveratrol, on the other hand, produces gold nanoparticles of sizes varying from 7 to 29 nm at different ratios of resveratrol to the metal ions. Particles with higher size and aspect ratio are formed at lower concentration of the capping agent whereas particles with very small size and pseudo-spherical morphology are formed at higher capping concentration. Difference in the formation kinetics of silver and gold nanoparticles has been attributed to the different growth mechanisms in the two cases. Possible modes of anchorage of resveratrol to silver nanoparticles have been investigated using surface enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERS) which shows that the silver nanoparticles are capped by resveratrol molecule primarily through O

  9. Effective PEGylation of gold nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, F.; Friedrich, W.; Hoppe, K.; Vossmeyer, T.; Weller, H.; Lange, H.

    2016-03-01

    Standard procedures to coat gold nanorods (AuNR) with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based ligands are not reliable and high PEG-grafting densities are not achieved. In this work, the ligand exchange of AuNR with PEGMUA, a tailored PEG-ligand bearing a C10 alkylene spacer, is studied. PEGMUA provides AuNR with very high stability against oxidative etching with cyanide. This etching reaction is utilized to study the ligand exchange in detail. Ligand exchange is faster, less ligand consuming and more reproducible with assisting chloroform extraction. Compared to PEG ligands commonly used, PEGMUA provides much higher colloidal and chemical stability. Further analyses based on NMR-, IR- and UV/Vis-spectroscopy reveal that significantly higher PEG-grafting densities, up to ~3 nm-2, are obtained with PEGMUA. This demonstrates how the molecular structure of the PEG ligand can be used to dramatically improve the ligand exchange and to synthesize PEGylated AuNR with high chemical and colloidal stability and high PEG grafting densities. Such AuNR are especially interesting for applications in nanomedicine.Standard procedures to coat gold nanorods (AuNR) with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based ligands are not reliable and high PEG-grafting densities are not achieved. In this work, the ligand exchange of AuNR with PEGMUA, a tailored PEG-ligand bearing a C10 alkylene spacer, is studied. PEGMUA provides AuNR with very high stability against oxidative etching with cyanide. This etching reaction is utilized to study the ligand exchange in detail. Ligand exchange is faster, less ligand consuming and more reproducible with assisting chloroform extraction. Compared to PEG ligands commonly used, PEGMUA provides much higher colloidal and chemical stability. Further analyses based on NMR-, IR- and UV/Vis-spectroscopy reveal that significantly higher PEG-grafting densities, up to ~3 nm-2, are obtained with PEGMUA. This demonstrates how the molecular structure of the PEG ligand can be used to

  10. The gold rush 1925-35.

    PubMed

    Keers, R Y

    1980-12-01

    Although from the time of Koch onwards there had been desultory experiments with a variety of gold preparations in the management of pulmonary tuberculosis, gold as a recognised and accepted treatment did not emerge until 1925. In that year Holger Mollgaard of Copenhagen introduced sanocrysin, a double thiosulphate of gold and sodium, with which he had conducted an extensive series of animal experiments. The results of these were considered to justify its use in clinical practice and two physicians, Secher and Faber, undeterred by its toxicity, reported enthusiastically in its favour. Other Danish physicians followed but, alarmed by violent reactions, modified the dosage, an example followed by British workers. Encouraging results continued to be reported although each series contained a significant proportion of failures, and toxicity remained high. The first properly planned and fully controlled clinical trial took place in the United States and produced a report which was wholly adverse and which sounded the death knell of gold therapy throughout America. Until 1934-35 gold was used extensively in Europe but thereafter there was a sudden and largely universal cessation of interest and within a few years gold, introduced with such éclat and carrying so many high hopes, had vanished from the therapy of tuberculosis even though, at that point, no better alternative was available.

  11. Gold mobility during Palaeoarchaean submarine alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Axel; Pitcairn, Iain; Wilson, Allan

    2017-03-01

    Seafloor alteration provides large amounts of solutes to the hydrosphere. In order to investigate gold mobility during water-rock interaction prior to 3-billion-years ago, low detection limit analysis of Au concentrations was carried out on rocks from marine alteration zones. Stratiform zones recording low-temperature (≤150 °C) seafloor alteration are a characteristic feature of greenstone belts older than 3.0 Ga. Hydrothermal processes were operating on, and immediately below, the seafloor, giving rise to extensive silicification of sub-seafloor volcanic rocks and silicification of seafloor sediments. In order to investigate gold mobility during silicification, unaltered and variably silicified volcanic rocks and associated cherts from Palaeoarchaean greenstone successions (c. 3.4 Ga) of South Africa were analyzed. Results show mobility of gold during silicification of mafic/ultramafic rocks and transfer to the Archaean ocean. Some gold was incorporated into carbonaceous marine sediments overlying the alteration zones. A combination of pervasive silicification, rarity of black shales, and low gold content in komatiites can explain the low mineralization potential of Palaeoarchaean greenstone belts for orogenic gold deposits.

  12. Effects of metal nanoparticles on the secondary ion yields of a model alkane molecule upon atomic and polyatomic projectiles in secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wehbe, Nimer; Heile, Andreas; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F; Bertrand, Patrick; Delcorte, Arnaud

    2008-08-15

    A model alkane molecule, triacontane, is used to assess the effects of condensed gold and silver nanoparticles on the molecular ion yields upon atomic (Ga(+) and In(+)) and polyatomic (C60(+) and Bi3(+)) ion bombardment in metal-assisted secondary ion mass spectrometry (MetA-SIMS). Molecular films spin-coated on silicon were metallized using a sputter-coater system, in order to deposit controlled quantities of gold and silver on the surface (from 0 to 15 nm equivalent thickness). The effects of gold and silver islets condensed on triacontane are also compared to the situation of thin triacontane overlayers on metallic substrates (gold and silver). The results focus primarily on the measured yields of quasi-molecular ions, such as (M - H)(+) and (2M - 2H)(+), and metal-cationized molecules, such as (M + Au)(+) and (M + Ag)(+), as a function of the quantity of metal on the surface. They confirm the absence of a simple rule to explain the secondary ion yield improvement in MetA-SIMS. The behavior is strongly dependent on the specific projectile/metal couple used for the experiment. Under atomic bombardment (Ga(+), In(+)), the characteristic ion yields an increase with the gold dose up to approximately 6 nm equivalent thickness. The yield enhancement factor between gold-metallized and pristine samples can be as large as approximately 70 (for (M - H)(+) under Ga(+) bombardment; 10 nm of Au). In contrast, with cluster projectiles such as Bi3(+) and C60(+), the presence of gold and silver leads to a dramatic molecular ion yield decrease. Cluster projectiles prove to be beneficial for triacontane overlayers spin-coated on silicon or metal substrates (Au, Ag) but not in the situation of MetA-SIMS. The fundamental difference of behavior between atomic and cluster primary ions is tentatively explained by arguments involving the different energy deposition mechanisms of these projectiles. Our results also show that Au and Ag nanoparticles do not induce the same behavior in Met

  13. [Sunrise gold foil jacket crown].

    PubMed

    Lecardonnel, A

    1989-09-01

    This technique permits the preparation of ceramic jacket crowns made on Sunrise laminated precious metal alloy. The Sunrise foil is gold-colored, made of 99% of precious metals and is 50 microns thick. The die is prepared in order to display a moderate and regular undercut beyond the cervical limit. The margin will be underlined with a red pencil. The Sunrise foil is cut according to predetermined templates. Then the foil is applied without burnishing, according to the technique of jacket crowns on platinum foil only by finger pressure. The double folding on closure is preferably done distally or mesially. Then, the metal base is disinserted, sandblasted with 100 microns aluminum oxide, replaced on its die, and placed in a rubber casing before being placed in the isostatic press, to be subjected to a pressure of 2,000 TSI (14 kg par cm2). Sunrise's orange color reinforces rather subtetly the overall color, making these reconstructions particularly esthetic. The color of the Sunrise metal does not require, therefore a too thick opaque. Any ceramic intended to be fired on a metal base, may be used in respecting its firing protocol. Sunrise, as any other technique of this type, require a careful preparation with a shoulder that has a rounded gingivoaxial line angle. Bridges may be built on the "thimbles" crowns, fitted on Sunrise cores, the pontics being made as a ceramo-metal framework.

  14. Gold Nanoparticle Mediated Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Joao Paulo Mattos; Figueroa, Elizabeth Raquel; Drezek, Rebekah Anna

    2013-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in the field of cancer immunotherapy, where the goal is to activate or modulate the body’s immune response against cancer. However, current immunotherapy approaches exhibit limitations of safety and efficacy due to systemic delivery. In this context, the use of nanotechnology for the delivery of cancer vaccines and immune adjuvants presents a number of advantages such as targeted delivery to immune cells, enhanced therapeutic effect, and reduced adverse outcomes. Recently, gold nanoparticles (AuNP) have been explored as immunotherapy carriers, creating new AuNP applications that merit a critical overview. This review highlights recent advances in the development of AuNP mediated immunotherapies that harness AuNP biodistribution, optical properties and their ability to deliver macromolecules such as peptides and oligonucleotides. It has been demonstrated that the use of AuNP carriers can improve the delivery and safety of immunotherapy agents, and that AuNP immunotherapies are well suited for synergistic combination therapy with existing cancer therapies like photothermal ablation. PMID:24103304

  15. Curcumin: the Indian solid gold.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Bharat B; Sundaram, Chitra; Malani, Nikita; Ichikawa, Haruyo

    2007-01-01

    Turmeric, derived from the plant Curcuma longa, is a gold-colored spice commonly used in the Indian subcontinent, not only for health care but also for the preservation of food and as a yellow dye for textiles. Curcumin, which gives the yellow color to turmeric, was first isolated almost two centuries ago, and its structure as diferuloylmethane was determined in 1910. Since the time of Ayurveda (1900 Bc) numerous therapeutic activities have been assigned to turmeric for a wide variety of diseases and conditions, including those of the skin, pulmonary, and gastrointestinal systems, aches, pains, wounds, sprains, and liver disorders. Extensive research within the last half century has proven that most of these activities, once associated with turmeric, are due to curcumin. Curcumin has been shown to exhibit antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, and anticancer activities and thus has a potential against various malignant diseases, diabetes, allergies, arthritis, Alzheimer's disease, and other chronic illnesses. These effects are mediated through the regulation of various transcription factors, growth factors, inflammatory cytokines, protein kinases, and other enzymes. Curcumin exhibits activities similar to recently discovered tumor necrosis factor blockers (e.g., HUMIRA, REMICADE, and ENBREL), a vascular endothelial cell growth factor blocker (e.g., AVASTIN), human epidermal growth factor receptor blockers (e.g., ERBITUX, ERLOTINIB, and GEFTINIB), and a HER2 blocker (e.g., HERCEPTIN). Considering the recent scientific bandwagon that multitargeted therapy is better than monotargeted therapy for most diseases, curcumin can be considered an ideal "Spice for Life".

  16. Statistical Analyses of Second Indoor Bio-Release Field Evaluation Study at Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Amidan, Brett G.; Pulsipher, Brent A.; Matzke, Brett D.

    2009-12-17

    In September 2008 a large-scale testing operation (referred to as the INL-2 test) was performed within a two-story building (PBF-632) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The report “Operational Observations on the INL-2 Experiment” defines the seven objectives for this test and discusses the results and conclusions. This is further discussed in the introduction of this report. The INL-2 test consisted of five tests (events) in which a floor (level) of the building was contaminated with the harmless biological warfare agent simulant Bg and samples were taken in most, if not all, of the rooms on the contaminated floor. After the sampling, the building was decontaminated, and the next test performed. Judgmental samples and probabilistic samples were determined and taken during each test. Vacuum, wipe, and swab samples were taken within each room. The purpose of this report is to study an additional four topics that were not within the scope of the original report. These topics are: 1) assess the quantitative assumptions about the data being normally or log-normally distributed; 2) evaluate differences and quantify the sample to sample variability within a room and across the rooms; 3) perform geostatistical types of analyses to study spatial correlations; and 4) quantify the differences observed between surface types and sampling methods for each scenario and study the consistency across the scenarios. The following four paragraphs summarize the results of each of the four additional analyses. All samples after decontamination came back negative. Because of this, it was not appropriate to determine if these clearance samples were normally distributed. As Table 1 shows, the characterization data consists of values between and inclusive of 0 and 100 CFU/cm2 (100 was the value assigned when the number is too numerous to count). The 100 values are generally much bigger than the rest of the data, causing the data to be right skewed. There are also a significant number of zeros. Using QQ plots these data characteristics show a lack of normality from the data after contamination. Normality is improved when looking at log(CFU/cm2). Variance component analysis (VCA) and analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to estimate the amount of variance due to each source and to determine which sources of variability were statistically significant. In general, the sampling methods interacted with the across event variability and with the across room variability. For this reason, it was decided to do analyses for each sampling method, individually. The between event variability and between room variability were significant for each method, except for the between event variability for the swabs. For both the wipes and vacuums, the within room standard deviation was much larger (26.9 for wipes and 7.086 for vacuums) than the between event standard deviation (6.552 for wipes and 1.348 for vacuums) and the between room standard deviation (6.783 for wipes and 1.040 for vacuums). Swabs between room standard deviation was 0.151, while both the within room and between event standard deviations are less than 0.10 (all measurements in CFU/cm2).

  17. Microfabricated Surface-Electrode Ion Trap for Scalable Quantum Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidelin, S.; Chiaverini, J.; Reichle, R.; Bollinger, J. J.; Leibfried, D.; Britton, J.; Wesenberg, J. H.; Blakestad, R. B.; Epstein, R. J.; Hume, D. B.; Itano, W. M.; Jost, J. D.; Langer, C.; Ozeri, R.; Shiga, N.; Wineland, D. J.

    2006-06-01

    Individual laser-cooled Mg+24 ions are confined in a linear Paul trap with a novel geometry where gold electrodes are located in a single plane and the ions are trapped 40μm above this plane. The relatively simple trap design and fabrication procedure are important for large-scale quantum information processing (QIP) using ions. Measured ion motional frequencies are compared to simulations. Measurements of ion recooling after cooling is temporarily suspended yield a heating rate of approximately 5 motional quanta per millisecond for a trap frequency of 2.83 MHz, sufficiently low to be useful for QIP.

  18. Selective detection and recovery of gold at tannin-immobilized non-conducting electrode.

    PubMed

    Banu, Khaleda; Shimura, Takayoshi; Sadeghi, Saman

    2015-01-01

    A tannin-immobilized glassy carbon electrode (TIGC) was prepared via electrochemical oxidation of the naturally occurring polyphenolic mimosa tannin, which generated a non-conducting polymeric film (NCPF) on the electrode surface. The fouling of the electrode surface by the electropolymerized film was evaluated by monitoring the electrode response of ferricyanide ions as a redox marker. The NCPF was permselective to HAuCl4, and the electrochemical reduction of HAuCl4 to metallic gold at the TIGC electrode was evaluated by recording the reduction current during cyclic voltammetry measurement. In the mixed electrolyte containing HAuCl4 along with FeCl3 and/or CuCl2, the NCPF remained selective toward the electrochemical reduction of HAuCl4 into the metallic state. The chemical reduction of HAuCl4 into metallic gold was also observed when the NCPF was inserted into an acidic gold solution overnight. The adsorption capacity of Au(III) on tannin-immobilized carbon fiber was 29±1.45 mg g(-1) at 60°C. In the presence of excess Cu(II) and Fe(III), tannin-immobilized NCPF proved to be an excellent candidate for the selective detection and recovery of gold through both electrochemical and chemical processes.

  19. Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using Capsicum annuum var. grossum pulp extract and its catalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chun-Gang; Huo, Can; Yu, Shuixin; Gui, Bing

    2017-01-01

    Biological synthesis approach has been regarded as a green, eco-friendly and cost effective method for nanoparticles preparation without any toxic solvents and hazardous bi-products during the process. This present study reported a facile and rapid biosynthesis method for gold nanoparticles (GNPs) from Capsicum annuum var. grossum pulp extract in a single-pot process. The aqueous pulp extract was used as biotic reducing agent for gold nanoparticle growing. Various shapes (triangle, hexagonal, and quasi-spherical shapes) were observed within range of 6-37 nm. The UV-Vis spectra showed surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peak for the formed GNPs at 560 nm after 10 min incubation at room temperature. The possible influences of extract amount, gold ion concentration, incubation time, reaction temperature and solution pH were evaluated to obtain the optimized synthesis conditions. The effects of the experimental factors on NPs synthesis process were also discussed. The produced gold nanoparticles were characterized by transform electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray (EDS) and Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The results demonstrated that the as-obtained GNPs were well dispersed and stable with good catalytic activity. Biomolecules in the aqueous extract were responsible for the capping and stabilization of GNPs.

  20. Electrochemiluminescent detection of Pb2+ by graphene/gold nanoparticles and CdSe quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Liping; Guo, Linqing; Li, Jiao; Kang, Tianfang; Cheng, Shuiyuan

    2016-12-01

    A highly sensitive electrochemiluminescent detection method for lead ions (Pb(II)) was fabricated based on the distance-dependent quenching of the electrochemiluminescence from CdSe quantum dots by nanocomposites of graphene and gold nanoparticles. Graphene/gold nanoparticles were electrochemically deposited onto a glassy carbon electrode through the constant potential method. Thiol-labeled DNA was then assembled on the surface of the electrode via gold-sulfur bonding, following which the amino-labeled terminal of the DNA was linked to carboxylated CdSe quantum dots by the formation of amide bonds. The 27-base aptamer was designed with two different domains: the immobilization and detection sequences. The immobilization sequence was paired with 12 complementary bases and immobilized on the gold electrode; the single-stranded detection sequence, rich in G bases, formed a G-quadruplex (G4) structure in the presence of Pb2+. The formation of G4 shortens the distance between the CdSe quantum dots and the Au electrode, which decreases the electrochemiluminescent intensity in a linear fashion, proportional to the concentration of Pb(II). The linear range of the sensor was 10-10 to 10-8 mol/L (R = 0.9819) with a detection limit of 10-10 mol/L. This sensor detected Pb(II) in real water samples with satisfactory results.