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Sample records for bioassembly asymmetry proximity

  1. Nanocrystal Bioassembly: Asymmetry, Proximity, and Enzymatic Manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Claridge, Shelley A.

    2008-05-01

    Research at the interface between biomolecules and inorganic nanocrystals has resulted in a great number of new discoveries. In part this arises from the synergistic duality of the system: biomolecules may act as self-assembly agents for organizing inorganic nanocrystals into functional materials; alternatively, nanocrystals may act as microscopic or spectroscopic labels for elucidating the behavior of complex biomolecular systems. However, success in either of these functions relies heavily uponthe ability to control the conjugation and assembly processes.In the work presented here, we first design a branched DNA scaffold which allows hybridization of DNA-nanocrystal monoconjugates to form discrete assemblies. Importantly, the asymmetry of the branched scaffold allows the formation of asymmetric2assemblies of nanocrystals. In the context of a self-assembled device, this can be considered a step toward the ability to engineer functionally distinct inputs and outputs.Next we develop an anion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography purification method which allows large gold nanocrystals attached to single strands of very short DNA to be purified. When two such complementary conjugates are hybridized, the large nanocrystals are brought into close proximity, allowing their plasmon resonances to couple. Such plasmon-coupled constructs are of interest both as optical interconnects for nanoscale devices and as `plasmon ruler? biomolecular probes.We then present an enzymatic ligation strategy for creating multi-nanoparticle building blocks for self-assembly. In constructing a nanoscale device, such a strategy would allow pre-assembly and purification of components; these constructs can also act as multi-label probes of single-stranded DNA conformational dynamics. Finally we demonstrate a simple proof-of-concept of a nanoparticle analog of the polymerase chain reaction.

  2. A Modified Method of Proximal Segment Alignment After Sagittal Split Ramus Osteotomy for Patients With Mandibular Asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Xia, James J.; Wang, Xudong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate a modified method of aligning the proximal segment after bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy (BSSO) in the treatment of patients with facial asymmetry. Patients and Methods Eleven patients with mandibular excess and facial asymmetries were enrolled in this prospective study. The surgery was planned according to a computer-aided surgical simulation protocol. In addition, the proximal segment on the hypoplastic side was intentionally flared out after the distal segment was rotationally set back. If the gap between the proximal and distal segments was too wide, then bone grafts were used. The surgery was completed according to the computerized plan. The proximal segment on the hypoplastic side was fixed with bicortical lag screws, and the proximal segment on the hyperplastic side was fixed with a 4-hole titanium miniplate. Postoperative evaluation was performed 6 months after surgery. Statistical analyses were performed. Results All surgeries were completed uneventfully. Of the 11 patients, 4 also underwent genioplasty and 3 underwent bone grafting to fill in the gap and smooth the anterior step. The physicians and patients were satisfied with the surgical outcomes. Only 1 patient underwent a secondary revision using an onlay hydroxyapatite implant. Results of statistical analyses showed that the computerized surgical plan could be accurately transferred to the patients at the time of surgery and the surgical outcomes achieved with this modified method were better than with the routine method of aligning the proximal and distal segments in maximal contact. Conclusion The present modified method of aligning the proximal segment for BSSO can effectively correct mandibular asymmetry and obviate a secondary revision surgery. PMID:26026710

  3. Asymmetry of Non-Volcanic Passive Margins Induced by the Proximity of a Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres-Martinez, M.; Perez-Gussinye, M.; Morgan, J. P.; Araujo, M. N.

    2015-12-01

    Symmetry of conjugated rifted margins is controlled by the rheology of the crust and the mantle, extension velocities and heterogeneities in the lithosphere. However, there is a lack of knowledge on how the feedbacks between these initial conditions influence the final architecture of passive margins and the polarity of the asymmetry. Here we focus on cratons as stiff heterogeneities which potentially induce asymmetry. For simplicity, we choose to address only non-volcanic rifted margins developed next to cratons, such as the Brazil-Congo and Australia-Antarctica margin pairs. In the South Atlantic case, where cratons are closer to the margins (north of Sao Francisco craton and north and south of Congo craton) the margins are narrow, while wide margins develop far away from cratons. Extreme asymmetry occurs where rifting takes place close to a craton in one margin (narrow) and a fold belt in the conjugate (wide). The same is observed for the Australia-Antarctic pair in the sector of Recherche basin, where the Australian margin is narrow next to the Yilgarn craton and widens towards the east as it lays further from the craton. We use numerical models in order to study how cratons induce asymmetry of conjugated rifted margins and affect the polarity of the asymmetry. We ran experiments with different lower crustal rheologies for a fold belt lithosphere in order to understand which rheologies 'naturally' result in asymmetric margins. We also ran experiments where a cratonic lithosphere is placed next to a fold belt lithosphere, and where rifting is initiated by a weak seed in the fold belt at different distances from the craton. We found that where some fold belt experiments result in symmetric margins, their equivalent experiments with craton result in asymmetric margins. Furthermore, strong- and intermediate-rheology experiments with cratons showcase narrow margins in the craton side and wide margins on the fold belt side. We also observe that the distance from the

  4. Asymmetry in cricket song: female preference and proximate mechanism of discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Hirtenlehner, Stefan; Küng, Saskia; Kainz, Franz; Römer, Heiner

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Subtle random deviations from perfect symmetry in bilateral traits are suggested to signal reduced phenotypic and genetic quality of a sender, but little is known about the related receiver mechanisms for discriminating symmetrical from asymmetrical traits. Here, we investigated these mechanisms in behavioural and neurophysiological experiments in the Mediterranean field cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus. A downward frequency modulation at the end of each syllable in the calling song has been suggested to indicate morphological asymmetry in sound radiating structures between left and right forewings. Even under ideal laboratory conditions on a trackball system, female crickets only discriminated between songs of symmetrical and asymmetrical males in two-choice experiments at carrier frequencies of 4.4 kHz and a large modulation depth of 600 and 800 Hz. Under these conditions they preferred the pure-tone calling songs over the modulated (asymmetrical) alternative, whereas no preference was observed at carrier frequencies of 4.9 and 5.2 kHz. These preferences correlate well with the responses of a pair of identified auditory interneurons (AN1), known for their importance in female phonotaxis. The AN1 interneuron is tuned to an average frequency of 4.9 kHz, and the roll-off towards lower and higher frequencies determines the magnitude of responses to pure-tone and frequency-modulated calling songs. The difference in response magnitude between the two neurons appears to drive the decision of females towards the song alternatives. We discuss the relevance of song differences based on asymmetry in the morphology of song-producing structures under natural conditions. PMID:23470661

  5. Asymmetry in cricket song: female preference and proximate mechanism of discrimination.

    PubMed

    Hirtenlehner, Stefan; Küng, Saskia; Kainz, Franz; Römer, Heiner

    2013-06-01

    Subtle random deviations from perfect symmetry in bilateral traits are suggested to signal reduced phenotypic and genetic quality of a sender, but little is known about the related receiver mechanisms for discriminating symmetrical from asymmetrical traits. Here, we investigated these mechanisms in behavioural and neurophysiological experiments in the Mediterranean field cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus. A downward frequency modulation at the end of each syllable in the calling song has been suggested to indicate morphological asymmetry in sound radiating structures between left and right forewings. Even under ideal laboratory conditions on a trackball system, female crickets only discriminated between songs of symmetrical and asymmetrical males in two-choice experiments at carrier frequencies of 4.4 kHz and a large modulation depth of 600 and 800 Hz. Under these conditions they preferred the pure-tone calling songs over the modulated (asymmetrical) alternative, whereas no preference was observed at carrier frequencies of 4.9 and 5.2 kHz. These preferences correlate well with the responses of a pair of identified auditory interneurons (AN1), known for their importance in female phonotaxis. The AN1 interneuron is tuned to an average frequency of 4.9 kHz, and the roll-off towards lower and higher frequencies determines the magnitude of responses to pure-tone and frequency-modulated calling songs. The difference in response magnitude between the two neurons appears to drive the decision of females towards the song alternatives. We discuss the relevance of song differences based on asymmetry in the morphology of song-producing structures under natural conditions.

  6. Proximal Nephron

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Jia L.; Li, Xiao C.

    2013-01-01

    The kidney plays a fundamental role in maintaining body salt and fluid balance and blood pressure homeostasis through the actions of its proximal and distal tubular segments of nephrons. However, proximal tubules are well recognized to exert a more prominent role than distal counterparts. Proximal tubules are responsible for reabsorbing approximately 65% of filtered load and most, if not all, of filtered amino acids, glucose, solutes, and low molecular weight proteins. Proximal tubules also play a key role in regulating acid-base balance by reabsorbing approximately 80% of filtered bicarbonate. The purpose of this review article is to provide a comprehensive overview of new insights and perspectives into current understanding of proximal tubules of nephrons, with an emphasis on the ultrastructure, molecular biology, cellular and integrative physiology, and the underlying signaling transduction mechanisms. The review is divided into three closely related sections. The first section focuses on the classification of nephrons and recent perspectives on the potential role of nephron numbers in human health and diseases. The second section reviews recent research on the structural and biochemical basis of proximal tubular function. The final section provides a comprehensive overview of new insights and perspectives in the physiological regulation of proximal tubular transport by vasoactive hormones. In the latter section, attention is particularly paid to new insights and perspectives learnt from recent cloning of transporters, development of transgenic animals with knockout or knockin of a particular gene of interest, and mapping of signaling pathways using microarrays and/or physiological proteomic approaches. PMID:23897681

  7. Proximity fuze

    DOEpatents

    Harrison, Thomas R.

    1989-08-22

    A proximity fuze system includes an optical ranging apparatus, a detonation circuit controlled by the optical ranging apparatus, and an explosive charge detonated by the detonation cirtcuit. The optical ranging apparatus includes a pulsed laser light source for generating target ranging light pulses and optical reference light pulses. A single lens directs ranging pulses to a target and collects reflected light from the target. An optical fiber bundle is used for delaying the optical reference pulses to correspond to a predetermined distance from the target. The optical ranging apparatus includes circuitry for providing a first signal depending upon the light pulses reflected from the target, a second signal depending upon the light pulses from the optical delay fiber bundle, and an output signal when the first and second signals coincide with each other. The output signal occurs when the distance from the target is equal to the predetermined distance form the target. Additional circuitry distinguishes pulses reflected from the target from background solar radiation.

  8. Proximity fuze

    DOEpatents

    Harrison, T.R.

    1987-07-10

    A proximity fuze system includes an optical ranging apparatus, a detonation circuit controlled by the optical ranging apparatus, and an explosive charge detonated by the detonation circuit. The optical ranging apparatus includes a pulsed laser light source for generating target ranging light pulses and optical reference light pulses. A single lens directs ranging pulses to a target and collects reflected light from the target. An optical fiber bundle is used for delaying the optical reference pulses to correspond to a predetermined distance from the target. The optical ranging apparatus includes circuitry for providing a first signal depending upon the light pulses reflected from the target, a second signal depending upon the light pulses from the optical delay fiber bundle, and an output signal when the first and second signals coincide with each other. The output signal occurs when the distance from the target is equal to the predetermined distance from the target. Additional circuitry distinguishes pulses reflected from the target from background solar radiation. 3 figs.

  9. Hemispheric Asymmetries in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewandowski, Lawrence

    1982-01-01

    Hemispheric specialization tasks were given to different-aged boys. Asymmetries were demonstrated on manual, visual, and auditory tasks; however, the degree of asymmetries did not change across age groups. There appears to be a dissociation between visual and auditory perceptual asymmetries. (Author/RD)

  10. Asymmetry of Blinking

    PubMed Central

    Kassem, Iris S.; Evinger, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Too investigate asymmetry in eyelid movements with blinking, the stability of the asymmetry, and its modifiability in normal humans. Methods Differences in the start time and amplitude between the two eyelids were assessed for voluntary blinks and reflex blinks evoked by supraorbital trigeminal nerve stimulation. These variables were also measured before and up to 18 months after 2 hours of unilateral upper lid restraint. Results With voluntary blinks, one eyelid consistently began to close earlier and made a larger eyelid movement than the other eyelid. Stimulation of the supraorbital branch of the trigeminal nerve evoked relatively larger amplitude blinks in one eyelid that correlated with the asymmetries of voluntary blinks. There was a continuum of eyelid asymmetry across all subjects that was stable and independent of other biological asymmetries, such as handedness. Briefly reducing eyelid mobility created a long-lasting change in eyelid asymmetry with blinking. Conclusions Eyelid asymmetry results from differences in the excitability of motoneurons in the left and right facial motor nuclei and does not appear to involve asymmetries in cortical inputs to the brain stem. Because adaptive processes modify the motoneuron excitability that creates eyelid asymmetry, these processes may underlie changes in blinking associated with facial palsy and may play a role in the development of disorders that affect one side of the face, such as hemifacial spasm. PMID:16384962

  11. Asymmetries at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Bartos, Pavol

    2014-10-28

    In this report, we summarize the latest results of the top-quark pair production asymmetry and present the new result of bottom-quark pair production asymmetry. By looking at the results obtained by the CDF experiment, one can see a discrepancy in both $t\\bar{t}$ inclusive and lepton-based measurements. The D0 results of the $t\\bar{t}$ production asymmetry are compatible with the standard-model predictions as well as with the CDF results. The CDF measurement of $b\\bar{b}$ production asymmetry presents consistency with both zero and with the standard-model predictions.

  12. Fluctuating Asymmetry and Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Timothy C.

    2007-01-01

    The general factor of mental ability ("g") may reflect general biological fitness. If so, "g"-loaded measures such as Raven's progressive matrices should be related to morphological measures of fitness such as fluctuating asymmetry (FA: left-right asymmetry of a set of typically left-right symmetrical body traits such as finger lengths). This…

  13. Proximal Tibial Bone Graft

    MedlinePlus

    ... Complications Potential problems after a PTBG include infection, fracture of the proximal tibia and pain related to the procedure. Frequently Asked Questions If proximal tibial bone graft is taken from my knee, will this prevent me from being able to ...

  14. Asymmetry through time dependency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantzaris, Alexander V.; Higham, Desmond J.

    2016-03-01

    Given a single network of interactions, asymmetry arises when the links are directed. For example, if protein A upregulates protein B and protein B upregulates protein C, then (in the absence of any further relationships between them) A may affect C but not vice versa. This type of imbalance is reflected in the associated adjacency matrix, which will lack symmetry. A different type of imbalance can arise when interactions appear and disappear over time. If A meets B today and B meets C tomorrow, then (in the absence of any further relationships between them) A may pass a message or disease to C, but not vice versa. Hence, even when each interaction is a two-way exchange, the effect of time ordering can introduce asymmetry. This observation is very closely related to the fact that matrix multiplication is not commutative. In this work, we describe a method that has been designed to reveal asymmetry in static networks and show how it may be combined with a measure that summarizes the potential information flow between nodes in the temporal case. This results in a new method that quantifies the asymmetry arising through time ordering. We show by example that the new tool can be used to visualize and quantify the amount of asymmetry caused by the arrow of time.

  15. Nuclear asymmetry enthalpy

    SciTech Connect

    Sobotka, L. G.

    2011-07-15

    Recent work has sought to extract the asymmetry energy at very low density from observables in heavy-ion collisions. The logic employed starts from the assumption that the fragment yields are determined by a minimization of the Helmholtz free energy. As volume is in reality unconstrained, nor can a single freeze-out volume be expected, the physical relevance of the Helmholtz free energy must be questioned. If, for example, the identical logic were used, but the Gibbs free energy was the more relevant quantity to minimize, it would be the asymmetry enthalpy that would be extracted. The purpose of this report is to provide one measure of the difference between the asymmetry energy and enthalpy.

  16. Electroweak asymmetries from SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Bellodi, G.

    2002-06-01

    We present a summary of the results on electroweak asymmetries performed by the SLD experiment at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). Most of these results are final and are based, unless otherwise stated, on the full 1993-1998 data set of approximately 550,000 hadronic decays of Z{sup 0} bosons, produced with an average electron beam polarization of 73%.

  17. Proximal humerus fractures.

    PubMed

    Price, Matthew C; Horn, Pamela L; Latshaw, James C

    2013-01-01

    Proximal humerus fractures are among the most common fractures associated with osteoporosis. With an aging population, incidence of these fractures will only increase. The proximal humerus not only forms the lateral portion of the shoulder articulation but also has significant associations with musculoskeletal and neurovascular structures. As a result, fractures of the proximal humerus can significantly impact not only the function of the shoulder joint, but the health and function of the entire upper extremity as well. Understanding of these fractures, the management options, and associated nursing care, can help reduce morbidity rate and improve functional outcomes.

  18. Bulk Topological Proximity Effect.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Timothy H; Ishizuka, Hiroaki; Balents, Leon; Hughes, Taylor L

    2016-02-26

    Existing proximity effects stem from systems with a local order parameter, such as a local magnetic moment or a local superconducting pairing amplitude. Here, we demonstrate that despite lacking a local order parameter, topological phases also may give rise to a proximity effect of a distinctively inverted nature. We focus on a general construction in which a topological phase is extensively coupled to a second system, and we argue that, in many cases, the inverse topological order will be induced on the second system. To support our arguments, we rigorously establish this "bulk topological proximity effect" for all gapped free-fermion topological phases and representative integrable models of interacting topological phases. We present a terrace construction which illustrates the phenomenological consequences of this proximity effect. Finally, we discuss generalizations beyond our framework, including how intrinsic topological order may also exhibit this effect.

  19. Lunar asymmetry and palaeomagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1980-10-01

    A model is proposed for the early lunar evolution which accounts for the compositional asymmetry between the nearside and farside of the moon and the natural remanent magnetism of lunar rocks. According to the model, the preferred gravitational energy state consisted of an asymmetric accumulation of a liquid iron alloy (Fe-Ni and a small amount of sulfur) which displaces upwards the cold primordial undifferentiated core. The resulting depth asymmetry of the outer partially molten zone leads eventually to the subcrustal accumulation of light magnesium-rich pyroxenes and olivine, preferentially in one hemisphere, sufficient to explain the offset and also indirectly providing a possible explanation for the nearside concentration of KREEP and mass basalt. Slow downward migration of iron releases gravitational energy sufficient for convection and dynamo generation in an iron layer for about a billion years.

  20. A Justifiable Asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Brudney, Daniel; Siegler, Mark

    2015-01-01

    It is a clinician's cliché that a physician only challenges a patient's capacity to make a treatment decision if that decision is not what the physician wants. Agreement is proof of decisional capacity; disagreement is proof or at least evidence of capacity's absence. It is assumed that this asymmetry cannot be justified, that the asymmetry must be a form of physicians' paternalism. Instead what is at issue when patient and physician disagree are usually two laudable impulses. The first is physicians' commitment to patients' well-being: physicians have a professional obligation as well as, ideally, a personal commitment to take care of patients--to do their best to bring about a positive medical outcome. The second impulse is common to much of human life, namely, the urge to find and to understand the source of our disagreements with one another. In this article we argue that, jointly, these impulses justify the asymmetry with regard to examining patients' capacity. PMID:26132055

  1. Proximal fifth metatarsal fractures.

    PubMed

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2013-01-01

    The most common fracture of the foot is a fracture of the proximal fifth metatarsal. In general, there are 3 types of fractures involving the proximal fifth metatarsal area, including a proximal diaphyseal stress fracture, a Jones fracture, and an avulsion fracture of the tuberosity. Some fractures of the fifth metatarsal heal without difficulty, whereas some have the potential for nonunion or delayed healing. Each fracture has some variation in the anatomical location on the fifth metatarsal, the mechanism of injury, the radiographic findings, and the treatment plan. Avulsion fractures of the tuberosity often heal without difficulty, yet fractures distal to the area of insertion of the peroneus brevis tendon are prone to nonunion and delayed healing (). Differential diagnosis of a fifth metatarsal midfoot injury includes ankle sprains, midfoot sprains, plantar facial ruptures, peroneus tendon ruptures, and other foot fractures.

  2. Capacitive proximity sensor

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31

    A proximity sensor based on a closed field circuit is disclosed. The circuit comprises a ring oscillator using a symmetrical array of plates that creates an oscillating displacement current. The displacement current varies as a function of the proximity of objects to the plate array. Preferably the plates are in the form of a group of three pair of symmetric plates having a common center, arranged in a hexagonal pattern with opposing plates linked as a pair. The sensor produces logic level pulses suitable for interfacing with a computer or process controller. The proximity sensor can be incorporated into a load cell, a differential pressure gauge, or a device for measuring the consistency of a characteristic of a material where a variation in the consistency causes the dielectric constant of the material to change. 14 figs.

  3. Capacitive proximity sensor

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A proximity sensor based on a closed field circuit. The circuit comprises a ring oscillator using a symmetrical array of plates that creates an oscillating displacement current. The displacement current varies as a function of the proximity of objects to the plate array. Preferably the plates are in the form of a group of three pair of symmetric plates having a common center, arranged in a hexagonal pattern with opposing plates linked as a pair. The sensor produces logic level pulses suitable for interfacing with a computer or process controller. The proximity sensor can be incorporated into a load cell, a differential pressure gauge, or a device for measuring the consistency of a characteristic of a material where a variation in the consistency causes the dielectric constant of the material to change.

  4. Unusual proximal tibiofibular synostosis.

    PubMed

    Takai, S; Yoshino, N; Hirasawa, Y

    1999-01-01

    Proximal tibiofibular synostosis without multiple hereditary exostosis is extremely rare and only 7 cases have been reported in the literature. All of the previously reported cases accompanied deformities such as distal positioning of the proximal tibiofibular joint, leg length discrepancy, bowing of the fibula, and valgus deformity of the knee. The present case of a 24-year-old man had neither a history of trauma nor deformity around the knee. Therefore, it was suggested that this type of synostosis occurred after epiphyseal plate closure. PMID:10741527

  5. Facial asymmetry: a current review

    PubMed Central

    Thiesen, Guilherme; Gribel, Bruno Frazão; Freitas, Maria Perpétua Mota

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The term "asymmetry" is used to make reference to dissimilarity between homologous elements, altering the balance between structures. Facial asymmetry is common in the overall population and is often presented subclinically. Nevertheless, on occasion, significant facial asymmetry results not only in functional, but also esthetic issues. Under these conditions, its etiology should be carefully investigated in order to achieve an adequate treatment plan. Facial asymmetry assessment comprises patient's first interview, extra- as well as intraoral clinical examination, and supplementary imaging examination. Subsequent asymmetry treatment depends on patient's age, the etiology of the condition and on the degree of disharmony, and might include from asymmetrical orthodontic mechanics to orthognathic surgery. Thus, the present study aims at addressing important aspects to be considered by the orthodontist reaching an accurate diagnosis and treatment plan of facial asymmetry, in addition to reporting treatment of some patients carriers of such challenging disharmony. PMID:26691977

  6. White matter microstructure asymmetry: effects of volume asymmetry on fractional anisotropy asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Takao, H; Hayashi, N; Ohtomo, K

    2013-02-12

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) provides information regarding white matter microstructure; however, macroscopic fiber architectures can affect DTI measures. A larger brain (fiber tract) has a 'relatively' smaller voxel size, and the voxels are less likely to contain more than one fiber orientation and more likely to have higher fractional anisotropy (FA). Previous DTI studies report left-to-right differences in the white matter; however, these may reflect true microscopic differences or be caused purely by volume differences. Using tract-based spatial statistics, we investigated left-to-right differences in white matter microstructure across the whole brain. Voxel-wise analysis revealed a large number of white matter volume asymmetries, including leftward asymmetry of the arcuate fasciculus and cingulum. In many white matter regions, FA asymmetry was positively correlated with volume asymmetry. Voxel-wise analysis with adjustment for volume asymmetry revealed many white matter FA asymmetries, including leftward asymmetry of the arcuate fasciculus and cingulum. The voxel-wise analysis showed a reduced number of regions with significant FA asymmetry compared with analysis performed without adjustment for volume asymmetry; however, the overall trend of the results was unchanged. The results of the present study suggest that these FA asymmetries are not caused by volume differences and reflect microscopic differences in the white matter.

  7. XQL and Proximal Nodes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baeza-Yates, Ricardo; Navarro, Gonzalo

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of models that have been developed to structure text documents for information retrieval focuses on XML and its proposed query language XQL. Considers efficiency of the query engine and shows that an already existing model, Proximal Nodes, can be used as an efficient query engine behind an XQL front-end. (Author/LRW)

  8. Traumatic proximal tibiofibular dislocation.

    PubMed

    Burgos, J; Alvarez-Montero, R; Gonzalez-Herranz, P; Rapariz, J M

    1997-01-01

    Proximal tibiofibular dislocation is an exceptional lesion. Rarer still is its presentation in childhood. We describe the clinical case of a 6-year-old boy, the victim of a road accident. He had a tibiofibular dislocation associated with a metaphyseal fracture of the tibia.

  9. Proximate Analysis of Coal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donahue, Craig J.; Rais, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    This lab experiment illustrates the use of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) to perform proximate analysis on a series of coal samples of different rank. Peat and coke are also examined. A total of four exercises are described. These are dry exercises as students interpret previously recorded scans. The weight percent moisture, volatile matter,…

  10. Subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pascoe, M. K.; Low, P. A.; Windebank, A. J.; Litchy, W. J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical, electrophysiologic, autonomic, and neuropathologic characteristics and the natural history of subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy and its response to immunotherapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: For the 12-year period from 1983 to 1995, we conducted a retrospective review of medical records of Mayo Clinic patients with diabetes who had subacute onset and progression of proximal weakness. The responses of treated versus untreated patients were compared statistically. RESULTS: During the designated study period, 44 patients with subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy were encountered. Most patients were middle-aged or elderly, and no sex preponderance was noted. The proximal muscle weakness often was associated with reduced or absent lower extremity reflexes. Associated weight loss was a common finding. Frequently, patients had some evidence of demyelination on nerve conduction studies, but it invariably was accompanied by concomitant axonal degeneration. The cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration was usually increased. Diffuse and substantial autonomic failure was generally present. In most cases, a sural nerve biopsy specimen suggested demyelination, although evidence of an inflammatory infiltrate was less common. Of 12 patients who received treatment (with prednisone, intravenous immune globulin, or plasma exchange), 9 had improvement of their conditions, but 17 of 29 untreated patients (59%) with follow-up also eventually had improvement, albeit at a much slower rate. Improvement was usually incomplete. CONCLUSION: We suggest that the entity of subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy is an extensive and severe variant of bilateral lumbosacral radiculoplexopathy, with some features suggestive of an immune-mediated cause. It differs from chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy in that most cases have a more restricted distribution and seem to be monophasic and self-limiting. The efficacy of immunotherapy is unproved

  11. Lip asymmetry and smile aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Batwa, Waeil; McDonald, Fraser; Cash, Alex

    2013-11-01

    Objective : To determine if lip asymmetry can affect lip aesthetics. Setting and Participants : A group of dentists (n = 40) and cleft patients (n = 40) were recruited from the dental hospital and cleft service. Interventions : Still photographic digital images of lips and teeth were manipulated to produce a computerized gradient of smile appearance with different degrees of upper-lip vertical asymmetry. These five photographs (with 0 mm representing "symmetry," and 1, 2, 2.5, and 3 mm, asymmetries) were assessed by participants using a 5-point Likert scale. Statistics : Descriptive statistics in addition to chi-square test were used to analyze the data. In order to satisfy the requirement of the chi-square test, the five smile ratings were reduced to three. Results : Lip asymmetry did affect relative smile aesthetics, as determined by dentists and cleft patients. Both the dentists and cleft patients rated the 0-mm photograph more attractive than the 2.5-mm and 3-mm smiles (P < .05). The 0-, 1-, and 2-mm smiles were indistinguishable for both dentists and cleft patients. Conclusion : Lip asymmetry affects smile aesthetics. However, cleft patients and dentists were tolerant of minor asymmetries. This suggests that small degrees of lip asymmetry do not affect relative smile aesthetics as much as large degrees of lip asymmetry (2.5 mm or more).

  12. Facial asymmetry in ocular torticollis.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Mohammad Reza; Khorrami Nejad, Masoud; Askarizadeh, Farshad; Pour, Fatemeh Farahbakhsh; Ranjbar Pazooki, Mahsa; Moeinitabar, Mohamad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Torticollis can arise from nonocular (usually musculoskeletal) and ocular conditions. Some facial asymmetries are correlated with a history of early onset ocular torticollis supported by the presence of torticollis on reviewing childhood photographs. When present in an adult, this type of facial asymmetry with an origin of ocular torticollis should help to confirm the chronicity of the defect and prevent unnecessary neurologic evaluation in patients with an uncertain history. Assessment of facial asymmetry consists of a patient history, physical examination, and medical imaging. Medical imaging and facial morphometry are helpful for objective diagnosis and measurement of the facial asymmetry, as well as for treatment planning. The facial asymmetry in congenital superior oblique palsy is typically manifested by midfacial hemihypoplasia on the side opposite the palsied muscle, with deviation of the nose and mouth toward the hypoplastic side. Correcting torticollis through strabismus surgery before a critical developmental age may prevent the development of irreversible facial asymmetry. Mild facial asymmetry associated with congenital torticollis has been reported to resolve with continued growth after early surgery, but if asymmetry is severe or is not treated in the appropriate time, it might remain even with continued growth after surgery.

  13. Measurements of W Charge Asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Holzbauer, J. L.

    2015-10-06

    We discuss W boson and lepton charge asymmetry measurements from W decays in the electron channel, which were made using 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ of RunII data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The electron charge asymmetry is presented as a function of pseudo-rapidity out to |$\\eta$| $\\le$ 3.2, in five symmetric and asymmetric kinematic bins of electron transverse momentum and the missing transverse energy of the event. We also give the W charge asymmetry as a function of W boson rapidity. The asymmetries are compared with next-to-leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations. These charge asymmetry measurements will allow more accurate determinations of the proton parton distribution functions and are the most precise to date.

  14. Proximal Point Methods Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boikanyo, Oganeditse A.; Moroşanu, Gheorghe

    2011-09-01

    The proximal point methods have been widely used in the last decades to approximate the solutions of nonlinear equations associated with monotone operators. Inspired by the iterative procedure defined by B. Martinet (1970), R.T. Rockafellar introduced in 1976 the so-called proximal point algorithm (PPA) for a general maximal monotone operator. The sequence generated by this iterative method is weakly convergent under appropriate conditions, but not necessarily strongly convergent, as proved by O. Güler (1991). This fact explains the introduction of different modified versions of the PPA which generate strongly convergent sequences under appropriate conditions, including the contraction-PPA defined by H.K. Xu in 2002. Here we discuss Xu's modified PPA as well as some of its generalizations. Special attention is paid to the computational errors, in particular the original Rockafellar summability assumption is replaced by the condition that the error sequence converges to zero strongly.

  15. Proximity Networks and Epidemics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guclu, Hasan; Toroczkai, Zoltán

    2007-03-01

    We presented the basis of a framework to account for the dynamics of contacts in epidemic processes, through the notion of dynamic proximity graphs. By varying the integration time-parameter T, which is the period of infectivity one can give a simple account for some of the differences in the observed contact networks for different diseases, such as smallpox, or AIDS. Our simplistic model also seems to shed some light on the shape of the degree distribution of the measured people-people contact network from the EPISIM data. We certainly do not claim that the simplistic graph integration model above is a good model for dynamic contact graphs. It only contains the essential ingredients for such processes to produce a qualitative agreement with some observations. We expect that further refinements and extensions to this picture, in particular deriving the link-probabilities in the dynamic proximity graph from more realistic contact dynamics should improve the agreement between models and data.

  16. Visual field asymmetries in visual evoked responses

    PubMed Central

    Hagler, Donald J.

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral responses to visual stimuli exhibit visual field asymmetries, but cortical folding and the close proximity of visual cortical areas make electrophysiological comparisons between different stimulus locations problematic. Retinotopy-constrained source estimation (RCSE) uses distributed dipole models simultaneously constrained by multiple stimulus locations to provide separation between individual visual areas that is not possible with conventional source estimation methods. Magnetoencephalography and RCSE were used to estimate time courses of activity in V1, V2, V3, and V3A. Responses to left and right hemifield stimuli were not significantly different. Peak latencies for peripheral stimuli were significantly shorter than those for perifoveal stimuli in V1, V2, and V3A, likely related to the greater proportion of magnocellular input to V1 in the periphery. Consistent with previous results, sensor magnitudes for lower field stimuli were about twice as large as for upper field, which is only partially explained by the proximity to sensors for lower field cortical sources in V1, V2, and V3. V3A exhibited both latency and amplitude differences for upper and lower field responses. There were no differences for V3, consistent with previous suggestions that dorsal and ventral V3 are two halves of a single visual area, rather than distinct areas V3 and VP. PMID:25527151

  17. Dental arch asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zubair, Nabil Muhsen

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study was conducted to assess the dental arch asymmetry in a Yemeni sample aged (18-25) years. Materials and Methods: The investigation involved clinical examination of 1479 adults; only 253 (129 females, 124 males) out of the total sample were selected to fulfill the criteria for the study sample. Study models were constructed and evaluated to measure mandibular arch dimensions. Three linear distances were utilized on each side on the dental arch: Incisal-canine distance, canine-molar distance and incisal-molar distance, which represent the dental arch segmental measurements. Results: When applying “t-test” at P < 0.05, no significant differences were found between the right and left canine-molar, incisal-canine and incisal-molar distances in both dental arches for both sexes. The greater variation (0.30 mm) was observed between right and left canine-molar distance in the maxillary dental arch in male and the smaller (0.04 mm) in the mandibular dental arch between the right and left canine-molar distance in females. Conclusion: The findings of the present study revealed a symmetrical pattern of dental arches, since the right and left sides showed no statistically significant difference. In general, it can be observed that the measurements related to the central incisors and canines have the widest range of reading and give the impression that the location of central incisor and canines to each other and to other teeth is the strongest factor in determining the dental arch asymmetry. PMID:24966774

  18. Quantifying asymmetry: ratios and alternatives.

    PubMed

    Franks, Erin M; Cabo, Luis L

    2014-08-01

    Traditionally, the study of metric skeletal asymmetry has relied largely on univariate analyses, utilizing ratio transformations when the goal is comparing asymmetries in skeletal elements or populations of dissimilar dimensions. Under this approach, raw asymmetries are divided by a size marker, such as a bilateral average, in an attempt to produce size-free asymmetry indices. Henceforth, this will be referred to as "controlling for size" (see Smith: Curr Anthropol 46 (2005) 249-273). Ratios obtained in this manner often require further transformations to interpret the meaning and sources of asymmetry. This model frequently ignores the fundamental assumption of ratios: the relationship between the variables entered in the ratio must be isometric. Violations of this assumption can obscure existing asymmetries and render spurious results. In this study, we examined the performance of the classic indices in detecting and portraying the asymmetry patterns in four human appendicular bones and explored potential methodological alternatives. Examination of the ratio model revealed that it does not fulfill its intended goals in the bones examined, as the numerator and denominator are independent in all cases. The ratios also introduced strong biases in the comparisons between different elements and variables, generating spurious asymmetry patterns. Multivariate analyses strongly suggest that any transformation to control for overall size or variable range must be conducted before, rather than after, calculating the asymmetries. A combination of exploratory multivariate techniques, such as Principal Components Analysis, and confirmatory linear methods, such as regression and analysis of covariance, appear as a promising and powerful alternative to the use of ratios. PMID:24842694

  19. Proximate Composition Analysis.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The proximate composition of foods includes moisture, ash, lipid, protein and carbohydrate contents. These food components may be of interest in the food industry for product development, quality control (QC) or regulatory purposes. Analyses used may be rapid methods for QC or more accurate but time-consuming official methods. Sample collection and preparation must be considered carefully to ensure analysis of a homogeneous and representative sample, and to obtain accurate results. Estimation methods of moisture content, ash value, crude lipid, total carbohydrates, starch, total free amino acids and total proteins are put together in a lucid manner.

  20. Proximity networks and epidemics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toroczkai, Zoltán; Guclu, Hasan

    2007-05-01

    Disease spread in most biological populations requires the proximity of agents. In populations where the individuals have spatial mobility, the contact graph is generated by the “collision dynamics” of the agents, and thus the evolution of epidemics couples directly to the spatial dynamics of the population. We first briefly review the properties and the methodology of an agent-based simulation (EPISIMS) to model disease spread in realistic urban dynamic contact networks. Using the data generated by this simulation, we introduce the notion of dynamic proximity networks which takes into account the relevant time-scales for disease spread: contact duration, infectivity period, and rate of contact creation. This approach promises to be a good candidate for a unified treatment of epidemic types that are driven by agent collision dynamics. In particular, using a simple model, we show that it can account for the observed qualitative differences between the degree distributions of contact graphs of diseases with short infectivity period (such as air-transmitted diseases) or long infectivity periods (such as HIV).

  1. Echosonography with proximity sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaisiam, W.; Laithong, T.; Meekhun, S.; Chaiwathyothin, N.; Thanlarp, P.; Danworaphong, S.

    2013-03-01

    We propose the use of a commercial ultrasonic proximity sensor kit for profiling an altitude-varying surface by employing echosonography. The proximity sensor kit, two identical transducers together with its dedicated operating circuit, is used as a profiler for the construction of an image. Ultrasonic pulses are emitted from one of the transducers and received by the other. The time duration between the pulses allows us to determine the traveling distance of each pulse. In the experiment, the circuit is used with the addition of two copper wires for directing the outgoing and incoming signals to an oscilloscope. The time of flight of ultrasonic pulses can thus be determined. Square grids of 5 × 5 cm2 are made from fishing lines, forming pixels in the image. The grids are designed to hold the detection unit in place, about 30 cm above a flat surface. The surface to be imaged is constructed to be height varying and placed on the flat surface underneath the grids. Our result shows that an image of the profiled surface can be created by varying the location of the detection unit along the grid. We also investigate the deviation in relation to the time of flight of the ultrasonic pulse. Such an experiment should be valuable for conveying the concept of ultrasonic imaging to physical and medical science undergraduate students. Due to its simplicity, the setup could be made in any undergraduate laboratory relatively inexpensively and it requires no complex parts. The results illustrate the concept of echosonography.

  2. Hemispheric Asymmetries: The Comparative View

    PubMed Central

    Ocklenburg, Sebastian; Güntürkün, Onur

    2012-01-01

    Hemispheric asymmetries play an important role in almost all cognitive functions. For more than a century, they were considered to be uniquely human but now an increasing number of findings in all vertebrate classes make it likely that we inherited our asymmetries from common ancestors. Thus, studying animal models could provide unique insights into the mechanisms of lateralization. We outline three such avenues of research by providing an overview of experiments on left–right differences in the connectivity of sensory systems, the embryonic determinants of brain asymmetries, and the genetics of lateralization. All these lines of studies could provide a wealth of insights into our own asymmetries that should and will be exploited by future analyses. PMID:22303295

  3. [Dreams and interhemispheric asymmetry].

    PubMed

    Korabel'nikova, E A; Golubev, V L

    2001-01-01

    The dreams of 103 children and adolescents, aged 10-17 years, have been studied. The test group included 78 patients with neurotic disorders; control one consisted of 25 healthy subjects. Dream features, which were common for those with preferentially left asymmetry profile both in patients as well as in healthy subjects, were: less expressed novelty factor and frequent appearance of rare phenomena, such as "déjà vu in wakefulness", reality, "mixed" (overlapped) dreams, prolonged dreams in repeat sleep, frequent changes of personages and scenes of action. Left-hander dream peculiarities, being detected only in neurotic patients but not in healthy subjects, emerged as lucid phenomena deficit, "dream in dreams" and "dream reminiscence in dream" syndrome, which have been found only in left-handers. Right and left hemispheres seem to contribute in different ways to a dream formation. In authors believe that the left hemisphere seems to provide dream origin while the right hemisphere provides dream vividness, figurativeness and affective activation level. PMID:11811128

  4. Asymmetry of the heliosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Suess, S.T.; Hathaway, D.H.; Dressler, A.J.

    1987-09-01

    The outflowing solar wind interacts with the local interstellar medium to form the heliospheric cavity within which the solar wind is supersonic. Because the interstellar medium is moving with respect to the Sun, and because the solar wind has a latitude dependence, the heliosphere is asymmetric. The flow of the interstellar medium past the heliosphere produces an asymmetry because of the Bernoulli effect, which draws the heliosphere out in a direction orthogonal to the upstream-downstream axis, and because of a viscous interaction, which draws out the heliosphere downstream. We consider a variety of cases and find the effects to be significant with, typically, the upstream direction having a heliospheric dimension that is 2/3 the downstream dimension. Suggestions have been put forth to the effect that a spacecraft penetration of the heliospheric shock wave may be imminent. Because one of the most distant spacecraft is moving roughly in the upstream direction relative to the interstellar flow, and the other is moving in the downstream direction, the distance to their encounters with the heliospheric shock may differ by as much as 40 AU. Copyright American Geophyscial Union 1987

  5. [Dreams and interhemispheric asymmetry].

    PubMed

    Korabel'nikova, E A; Golubev, V L

    2001-01-01

    The dreams of 103 children and adolescents, aged 10-17 years, have been studied. The test group included 78 patients with neurotic disorders; control one consisted of 25 healthy subjects. Dream features, which were common for those with preferentially left asymmetry profile both in patients as well as in healthy subjects, were: less expressed novelty factor and frequent appearance of rare phenomena, such as "déjà vu in wakefulness", reality, "mixed" (overlapped) dreams, prolonged dreams in repeat sleep, frequent changes of personages and scenes of action. Left-hander dream peculiarities, being detected only in neurotic patients but not in healthy subjects, emerged as lucid phenomena deficit, "dream in dreams" and "dream reminiscence in dream" syndrome, which have been found only in left-handers. Right and left hemispheres seem to contribute in different ways to a dream formation. In authors believe that the left hemisphere seems to provide dream origin while the right hemisphere provides dream vividness, figurativeness and affective activation level.

  6. Asymmetries during molluscan embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    van den Biggelaar, J A

    1991-01-01

    In some molluscan species the unfertilized egg is symmetrical around its centre. The maturation divisions provide the egg with an axial symmetry with an animal-vegetal asymmetry. During the first two cleavages the egg loses its axial symmetry by the formation of unequal quadrants. The size differences may be very pronounced in species where the first two cleavages are accompanied by the formation of a polar lobe or where the first two cleavages are very unequal. There are some molluscan species in which at first glance the four quadrants appear equal. Exact measurements of the relative volumes have shown that the spiral character of the cleavages gives rise to minor differences between the quadrants. During further division this difference is limited to the vegetal macromeres; other corresponding blastomeres in the four quadrants are mutually equal. Therefore the absolute difference between the macromeres increases after each division. The size difference between the macromeres predisposes the biggest macromere to attain a central position and to become induced to develop the stem cell of the mesoderm. The bilateral symmetry is later lost by the counterclockwise rotation through 180 degrees of the visceral mass in relation to the head and foot. PMID:1802639

  7. Cerebral Asymmetry in Insomnia Sufferers

    PubMed Central

    St-Jean, Geneviève; Turcotte, Isabelle; Bastien, Célyne H.

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral asymmetry is used to describe the differences in electroencephalographic activity between regions of the brain. The objective of this study was to document frontal, central, and parietal asymmetry in psychophysiological (Psy-I) and paradoxical (Para-I) insomnia sufferers as well as good sleeper (GS) controls, and to compare their patterns of asymmetry to others already found in anxiety and depression. Additionally, asymmetry variations between nights were assessed. Participants were 17 Psy-I, 14 Para-I, and 19 GS (mean age = 40 years, SD = 9.4). They completed three nights of polysomnography (PSG) recordings following a clinical evaluation in a sleep laboratory. All sleep cycles of Nights 2 and 3 were retained for power spectral analysis. The absolute activity in frequency bands (0.00–125.00 Hz) was computed at multiple frontal, central, and parietal sites in rapid eye movement and non-rapid eye movement sleep to provide cerebral asymmetry measures. Mixed model ANOVAs were computed to assess differences between groups and nights. Correlations were performed with asymmetry and symptoms of depression and anxiety from self-reported questionnaires. Over the course of the two nights, Para-I tended to present hypoactivation of their left frontal region but hyperactivation of their right one compared with GS. As for Psy-I, they presented increased activation of their right parietal region compared with Para-I. Asymmetry at frontal, central, and parietal region differed between nights. On a more disrupted night of sleep, Psy-I had increased activity in their right parietal region while Para-I presented a decrease in cerebral activity in the right central region on their less disrupted night of sleep. Anxious and depressive symptoms did not correlate with asymmetry at any region. Therefore, Psy-I and Para-I present unique patterns of cerebral asymmetry that do not relate to depression or anxiety, and asymmetry varies between nights, maybe as a

  8. Some Properties of Fuzzy Soft Proximity Spaces

    PubMed Central

    Demir, İzzettin; Özbakır, Oya Bedre

    2015-01-01

    We study the fuzzy soft proximity spaces in Katsaras's sense. First, we show how a fuzzy soft topology is derived from a fuzzy soft proximity. Also, we define the notion of fuzzy soft δ-neighborhood in the fuzzy soft proximity space which offers an alternative approach to the study of fuzzy soft proximity spaces. Later, we obtain the initial fuzzy soft proximity determined by a family of fuzzy soft proximities. Finally, we investigate relationship between fuzzy soft proximities and proximities. PMID:25793224

  9. Functional chiral asymmetry in descending thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    Frazin, L J; Lanza, G; Vonesh, M; Khasho, F; Spitzzeri, C; McGee, S; Mehlman, D; Chandran, K B; Talano, J; McPherson, D

    1990-12-01

    To determine whether rotational blood flow or chiral asymmetry exists in the human descending thoracic aorta, we established the ability of color Doppler ultrasound to detect rotational flow in a tornado tube model of a vortex descending fluid column. In a model of the human aortic arch with a pulse duplicator, color Doppler was then used to demonstrate that rotational flow occurs first in the transverse arch and then in the proximal descending thoracic aorta. With the use of color Doppler esophageal echocardiography, 53 patients (age range, 25-78 years; mean age, 56.4 years) were prospectively examined for rotational flow in the descending thoracic aorta. At 10 cm superior to retro-left ventricular position, 22 of 38 patients (58%) revealed rotational flow with obvious diastolic counterclockwise rotation but less obvious systolic clockwise rotation. At 5 cm superior to retro-left ventricular position, 29 of 46 patients (63%) revealed rotational flow with a tendency toward systolic clockwise and diastolic counterclockwise rotation. At the retro-left ventricular position, 47 of 53 patients (89%) revealed rotational flow, usually of a clockwise direction, occurring in systole. Our data suggest that aortic flow is not purely pulsatile and axial but has a rotational component. Rotational flow begins in the aortic arch and is carried through to the descending thoracic aorta, where flow is chirally asymmetric with systolic clockwise and diastolic counterclockwise components. These data demonstrate an aortic rotational flow component that may have physiological implications for organ perfusion. PMID:2242523

  10. Lepton asymmetry and the cosmic QCD transition

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Dominik J.; Stuke, Maik E-mail: mstuke@physik.uni-bielefeld.de

    2009-11-01

    We study the influence of lepton asymmetries on the evolution of the early Universe. The lepton asymmetry l is poorly constrained by observations and might be orders of magnitudes larger than the observed baryon asymmetry b ≅ 10{sup −10}, |l|/b ≤ 2 × 10{sup 8}. We find that lepton asymmetries that are large compared to the tiny baryon asymmetry, can influence the dynamics of the QCD phase transition significantly. The cosmic trajectory in the μ{sub B}−T phase diagram of strongly interacting matter becomes a function of lepton (flavour) asymmetry. For tiny or vanishing baryon and lepton asymmetries lattice QCD simulations show that the cosmic QCD transition is a rapid crossover. However, for large lepton asymmetry, the order of the cosmic transition remains unknown.

  11. Patterns of fluctuating asymmetry in developing primary feathers: a test of the compensational growth hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Aparicio, J. M.

    1998-01-01

    The study of asymmetry ontogeny may reveal the mechanisms controlling the development of bilaterally symmetrical characters and the causes of asymmetry. In birds, flight feather asymmetries appear to increase at the beginning of growth and decrease at the end of their development. It has been proposed that such a pattern could be proximately caused by a developmental mechanism of compensational growth between the left and right wings, which should act to restore trait symmetry at the end of growth. In this study, I tested the hypothesis of the existence of a mechanism of compensational growth by performing an experiment, which consisted of provoking small asymmetries in the seventh primary feathers of house sparrows (Passer domesticus) by inducing the two feathers (one each side) to moult two days apart. On each side, the feathers grew in a similar way, independently of the growth of the other side. Feather length asymmetries were shortened with the advance of growth. However, the differences in time of growth persisted throughout development. These results do not support the existence of a mechanism of compensational growth. Primary feathers' asymmetries could decrease at the end of growth because the growth of the two feathers follows a programmed trajectory, which tends towards a certain maximum potential size.

  12. A Global Gait Asymmetry Index.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Silvia; Resende, Renan A; Clansey, Adam C; Deluzio, Kevin J; Selbie, W Scott; Veloso, António P

    2016-04-01

    High levels of gait asymmetry are associated with many pathologies. Our long-term goal is to improve gait symmetry through real-time biofeedback of a symmetry index. Symmetry is often reported as a single metric or a collective signature of multiple discrete measures. While this is useful for assessment, incorporating multiple feedback metrics presents too much information for most subjects to use as visual feedback for gait retraining. The aim of this article was to develop a global gait asymmetry (GGA) score that could be used as a biofeedback metric for gait retraining and to test the effectiveness of the GGA for classifying artificially-induced asymmetry. Eighteen participants (11 males; age 26.9 y [SD = 7.7]; height 1.8 m [SD = 0.1]; body mass 72.7 kg [SD = 8.9]) walked on a treadmill in 3 symmetry conditions, induced by wearing custom-made sandals: a symmetric condition (identical sandals) and 2 asymmetric conditions (different sandals). The GGA score was calculated, based on several joint angles, and compared between conditions. Significant differences were found among all conditions (P < .001), meaning that the GGA score is sensitive to different levels of asymmetry, and may be useful for rehabilitation and assessment.

  13. A Global Gait Asymmetry Index.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Silvia; Resende, Renan A; Clansey, Adam C; Deluzio, Kevin J; Selbie, W Scott; Veloso, António P

    2016-04-01

    High levels of gait asymmetry are associated with many pathologies. Our long-term goal is to improve gait symmetry through real-time biofeedback of a symmetry index. Symmetry is often reported as a single metric or a collective signature of multiple discrete measures. While this is useful for assessment, incorporating multiple feedback metrics presents too much information for most subjects to use as visual feedback for gait retraining. The aim of this article was to develop a global gait asymmetry (GGA) score that could be used as a biofeedback metric for gait retraining and to test the effectiveness of the GGA for classifying artificially-induced asymmetry. Eighteen participants (11 males; age 26.9 y [SD = 7.7]; height 1.8 m [SD = 0.1]; body mass 72.7 kg [SD = 8.9]) walked on a treadmill in 3 symmetry conditions, induced by wearing custom-made sandals: a symmetric condition (identical sandals) and 2 asymmetric conditions (different sandals). The GGA score was calculated, based on several joint angles, and compared between conditions. Significant differences were found among all conditions (P < .001), meaning that the GGA score is sensitive to different levels of asymmetry, and may be useful for rehabilitation and assessment. PMID:26502455

  14. From symmetry to asymmetry: Phylogenetic patterns of asymmetry variation in animals and their evolutionary significance

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, A. Richard

    1996-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses of asymmetry variation offer a powerful tool for exploring the interplay between ontogeny and evolution because (i) conspicuous asymmetries exist in many higher metazoans with widely varying modes of development, (ii) patterns of bilateral variation within species may identify genetically and environmentally triggered asymmetries, and (iii) asymmetries arising at different times during development may be more sensitive to internal cytoplasmic inhomogeneities compared to external environmental stimuli. Using four broadly comparable asymmetry states (symmetry, antisymmetry, dextral, and sinistral), and two stages at which asymmetry appears developmentally (larval and postlarval), I evaluated relations between ontogenetic and phylogenetic patterns of asymmetry variation. Among 140 inferred phylogenetic transitions between asymmetry states, recorded from 11 classes in five phyla, directional asymmetry (dextral or sinistral) evolved directly from symmetrical ancestors proportionally more frequently among larval asymmetries. In contrast, antisymmetry, either as an end state or as a transitional stage preceding directional asymmetry, was confined primarily to postlarval asymmetries. The ontogenetic origin of asymmetry thus significantly influences its subsequent evolution. Furthermore, because antisymmetry typically signals an environmentally triggered asymmetry, the phylogenetic transition from antisymmetry to directional asymmetry suggests that many cases of laterally fixed asymmetries evolved via genetic assimilation. PMID:8962039

  15. Permeability Asymmetry in Composite Porous Ceramic Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurcharov, I. M.; Laguntsov, N. I.; Uvarov, V. I.; Kurchatova, O. V.

    The results from the investigation of transport characteristics and gas transport asymmetry in bilayer composite membranes are submitted. These membranes are produced by SHS method. Asymmetric effect and hysteresis of permeability in nanoporous membranes are detected. It's shown, that permeability ratio (asymmetry value of permeability) increases up to several times. The asymmetry of permeability usually decreases monotonically with the pressure decrease.

  16. Hirayama Disease with Proximal Involvement.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinil; Kim, Yuntae; Kim, Sooa; Oh, Kiyoung

    2016-10-01

    Hirayama disease is a slowly progressing benign motor neuron disease that affects the distal upper limb. A 29-year-old man visited the hospital with a 1-year history of weakened left proximal upper limb. He was diagnosed with Hirayama disease 9 years ago, while there was no further progression of the muscle weakness afterward. Atrophy and weakness was detected in proximal upper limb muscles. Magnetic resonance imaging and somatosensory evoked potentials were normal. Needle electromyography showed abnormal findings in proximal upper limb muscles. Our patient had Hirayama disease involving the proximal portion through secondary progression. Clinical manifestation and accurate electromyography may be useful for diagnosis. Rare cases with progression patterns as described here are helpful and have clinical meaning for clinicians. PMID:27550499

  17. Hirayama Disease with Proximal Involvement

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hirayama disease is a slowly progressing benign motor neuron disease that affects the distal upper limb. A 29-year-old man visited the hospital with a 1-year history of weakened left proximal upper limb. He was diagnosed with Hirayama disease 9 years ago, while there was no further progression of the muscle weakness afterward. Atrophy and weakness was detected in proximal upper limb muscles. Magnetic resonance imaging and somatosensory evoked potentials were normal. Needle electromyography showed abnormal findings in proximal upper limb muscles. Our patient had Hirayama disease involving the proximal portion through secondary progression. Clinical manifestation and accurate electromyography may be useful for diagnosis. Rare cases with progression patterns as described here are helpful and have clinical meaning for clinicians. PMID:27550499

  18. Tools for proximal soil sensing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proximal soil sensing (i.e. near-surface geophysical methods) are used to study soil phenomena across spatial scales. Geophysical methods exploit contrasts in physical properties (dielectric permittivity, apparent electrical conductivity or resistivity, magnetic susceptibility) to indirectly measur...

  19. Geometric asymmetry driven Janus micromotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guanjia; Pumera, Martin

    2014-09-01

    The production and application of nano-/micromotors is of great importance. In order for the motors to work, asymmetry in their chemical composition or physical geometry must be present if no external asymmetric field is applied. In this paper, we present a ``coconut'' micromotor made of platinum through the partial or complete etching of the silica templates. It was shown that although both the inner and outer surfaces are made of the same material (Pt), motion of the structure can be observed as the convex surface is capable of generating oxygen bubbles. This finding shows that not only the chemical asymmetry of the micromotor, but also its geometric asymmetry can lead to fast propulsion of the motor. Moreover, a considerably higher velocity can be seen for partially etched coconut structures than the velocities of Janus or fully etched, shell-like motors. These findings will have great importance on the design of future micromotors.The production and application of nano-/micromotors is of great importance. In order for the motors to work, asymmetry in their chemical composition or physical geometry must be present if no external asymmetric field is applied. In this paper, we present a ``coconut'' micromotor made of platinum through the partial or complete etching of the silica templates. It was shown that although both the inner and outer surfaces are made of the same material (Pt), motion of the structure can be observed as the convex surface is capable of generating oxygen bubbles. This finding shows that not only the chemical asymmetry of the micromotor, but also its geometric asymmetry can lead to fast propulsion of the motor. Moreover, a considerably higher velocity can be seen for partially etched coconut structures than the velocities of Janus or fully etched, shell-like motors. These findings will have great importance on the design of future micromotors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional SEM images, data analysis, Videos S

  20. Proximal trisomy 1q in a girl with developmental delay and minor anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Furforo, L. |; Rittler, M.; Slavutsky, I.R.

    1996-09-06

    We report on a girl with developmental delay, macrocephaly, facial asymmetry, small downturned palpebral fissures, high and narrow palate, micrognathia, short neck, a heart defect, and unilateral renal agenesis. Cytogenetic analysis showed a proximal tandem duplication of the long arm of chromosome one (1q12{r_arrow}q21.3). This abnormality was suggested by G-and C-banding but it was specifically characterized by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Clinical findings in our patient are compared with those of the literature in an attempt to delineate the phenotype in patients with proximal 1q duplication. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Significance of postshunt ventricular asymmetries.

    PubMed

    Linder, M; Diehl, J T; Sklar, F H

    1981-08-01

    Ventricular asymmetries after shunt surgery were studied. Right and left ventricular areas from pre-and postoperative computerized tomography scans were measured with a computer digitizing technique, and the respective areas were expressed as a ratio. Measurements were made from the scans of 15 hydrocephalic children selected at random. Ages at surgery ranged from 1 to 101 weeks. The results indicate a significantly greater decrease in ventricular size on the side of the ventricular shunt catheter. Multiple regression analysis showed no relationship between the magnitude of change in ventricular size and either the patients' age orn the time intervals between surgery and follow-up scans. Possible mechanisms for these postshunt ventricular asymmetries are discussed.

  2. Lean Mass Asymmetry Influences Force and Power Asymmetry During Jumping in Collegiate Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Bell, David R.; Sanfilippo, Jennifer L.; Binkley, Neil; Heiderscheit, Bryan C.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to: (1) examine how asymmetry in lower extremity lean mass influenced force and power asymmetry during jumping, (2) determine how power and force asymmetry affected jump height, and (3) report normative values in collegiate athletes. Force and power were assessed from each limb using bilateral force plates during a countermovement jump in 167 Division 1 athletes (mass=85.7±20.3kg, age=20.0±1.2years, 103M/64F). Lean mass of the pelvis, thigh, and shank was assessed via dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Percent asymmetry was calculated for lean mass at each region (pelvis, thigh, and shank) as well as force and power. Forward stepwise regressions were performed to determine the influence of lean mass asymmetry on force and power asymmetry. Thigh and shank lean mass asymmetry explained 20% of the variance in force asymmetry (R2=0.20, P<0.001), while lean mass asymmetry of the pelvis, thigh and shank explained 25% of the variance in power asymmetry (R2=0.25, P<0.001). Jump height was compared across level of force and power asymmetry (P>0.05) and greater than 10% asymmetry in power tended to decrease performance (effect size>1.0). Ninety-five percent of this population (2.5th to 97.5th percentile) displayed force asymmetry between −11.8 to 16.8% and a power asymmetry between −9.9 to 11.5%. A small percentage (<4%) of these athletes displayed more than 15% asymmetry between limbs. These results demonstrate that lean mass asymmetry in the lower extremity is at least partially responsible for asymmetries in force and power. However, a large percentage remains unexplained by lean mass asymmetry. PMID:24402449

  3. Lean mass asymmetry influences force and power asymmetry during jumping in collegiate athletes.

    PubMed

    Bell, David R; Sanfilippo, Jennifer L; Binkley, Neil; Heiderscheit, Bryan C

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to (a) examine how asymmetry in lower extremity lean mass influenced force and power asymmetry during jumping, (b) determine how power and force asymmetry affected jump height, and (c) report normative values in collegiate athletes. Force and power were assessed from each limb using bilateral force plates during a countermovement jump in 167 division 1 athletes (mass = 85.7 ± 20.3 kg, age = 20.0 ± 1.2 years; 103 men and 64 women). Lean mass of the pelvis, thigh, and shank was assessed using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Percent asymmetry was calculated for lean mass at each region (pelvis, thigh, and shank) as well as force and power. Forward stepwise regressions were performed to determine the influence of lean mass asymmetry on force and power asymmetry. Thigh and shank lean mass asymmetry explained 20% of the variance in force asymmetry (R = 0.20, p < 0.001), whereas lean mass asymmetry of the pelvis, thigh, and shank explained 25% of the variance in power asymmetry (R = 0.25, p < 0.001). Jump height was compared across level of force and power asymmetry (p > 0.05) and greater than 10% asymmetry in power tended to decrease the performance (effect size >1.0). Ninety-five percent of this population (2.5th to 97.5th percentile) displayed force asymmetry between -11.8 and 16.8% and a power asymmetry between -9.9 and 11.5%. A small percentage (<4%) of these athletes displayed more than 15% asymmetry between limbs. These results demonstrate that lean mass asymmetry in the lower extremity is at least partially responsible for asymmetries in force and power. However, a large percentage remains unexplained by lean mass asymmetry.

  4. [Management of proximal ureteral stones].

    PubMed

    Lechevallier, E; Taxer, O; Saussine, C

    2008-12-01

    Proximal ureteral stone less than 4-6mm may initially be treated by surveillance. Generally, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) is the first line treatment for proximal ureteral stones, specially for stones less than 1cm. For stones greater than 1cm, the results of ureteroscopy (URS) are better than the results of ESWL and in these cases URS may be an option. In case of failure of ESWL, URS can be proposed. URS can be the first line treatment in case of severe ureteral obstruction with no urinary infection. Proximal ureteroscopy must be careful because severe complications are not infrequent. Open surgery has very rare indication. Metabolic check-up and annually follow-up with at least a renal imaging at three months are recommended.

  5. Cubesat Proximity Operations Demonstration (CPOD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villa, Marco; Martinez, Andres; Petro, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The CubeSat Proximity Operations Demonstration (CPOD) project will demonstrate rendezvous, proximity operations and docking (RPOD) using two 3-unit (3U) CubeSats. Each CubeSat is a satellite with the dimensions 4 inches x 4 inches x 13 inches (10 centimeters x 10 centimeters x 33 centimeters) and weighing approximately 11 pounds (5 kilograms). This flight demonstration will validate and characterize many new miniature low-power proximity operations technologies applicable to future missions. This mission will advance the state of the art in nanosatellite attitude determination,navigation and control systems, in addition to demonstrating relative navigation capabilities.The two CPOD satellites are scheduled to be launched together to low-Earth orbit no earlier than Dec. 1, 2015.

  6. Proximal Rectus Femoris Avulsion Repair.

    PubMed

    Dean, Chase S; Arbeloa-Gutierrez, Lucas; Chahla, Jorge; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia

    2016-06-01

    Proximal rectus femoris tendon avulsions are rare and occur mostly in male athletes. Currently, the standard of care for complete tendinous avulsions of the direct arm of the rectus femoris is nonoperative treatment. However, surgical repair may be considered in high-level athletes who have a high demand for repetitive hip flexion performed in an explosive manner or in patients in whom nonoperative treatment has failed. The purpose of this technical note is to describe the method for surgical repair of the proximal direct arm of the rectus femoris to its origin at the anterior inferior iliac spine using suture anchors. PMID:27656376

  7. Dentofacial Asymmetries: Challenging Diagnosis and Treatment Planning

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Manish; Agrawal, Jiwan Asha; Nanjannawar, Lalita; Fulari, Sangamesh; Kagi, Vishwal

    2015-01-01

    Dentofacial asymmetry is quite common and when sufficiently severe can require surgical orthodontic intervention. Asymmetries can be classified according to the structures involved into skeletal, dental and functional. In diagnosing asymmetries, a thorough clinical examination and radiographic survey are essential to determine the extent of soft tissue, skeletal, dental and functional involvement. Dental asymmetries, as well as a variety of functional deviations, can be managed orthodontically, whereas significant structural facial asymmetries require a comprehensive orthodontic and orthognathic management. With less severe dental, skeletal and soft tissue deviations the advisability of treatment should be carefully considered. The following article also contains a case report highlighting the importance of proper diagnosis in treatment plan for management of dentofacial asymmetry. PMID:26229387

  8. WIMP abundance and lepton (flavour) asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Stuke, Maik; Schwarz, Dominik J.; Starkman, Glenn E-mail: dschwarz@physik.uni-bielefeld.de

    2012-03-01

    We investigate how large lepton asymmetries affect the evolution of the early universe at times before big bang nucleosynthesis and in particular how they influence the relic density of WIMP dark matter. In comparison to the standard calculation of the relic WIMP abundance we find a decrease, depending on the lepton flavour asymmetry. We find an effect of up to 20 per cent for lepton flavour asymmetries l{sub f} = O(0.1)

  9. Congenital craniofacial asymmetry: early treatment.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, L A; Schut, L; Rosen, H M

    1981-01-01

    Congenital craniofacial asymmetry has two dominant causes: isolated synostosis and craniofacial clefts. Treatment considerations in these problems differ from those with isolated cranial or isolated facial defects. Isolated cranial defects are most frequently treated by the neurosurgeon with craniectomy alone. Isolated facial asymmetry when congenital in origin usually manifests as hemifacial microsomia and based on our experience with 40 such patients, is best treated in later childhood. Treatment timing of craniofacial asymmetry varies with the cause, but is best done in the first two years of life. Nasofrontal encephaloceles are usually best treated in the first few weeks of life; synostosis syndromes are treated at six months of age after the facial sutures have had time to stabilize sufficiently for adequate dissection and mobilization; and other craniofacial clefts at approximately two years of age following descent of the teeth and better homeostatic capability of the patient. Based on our series of 58 patients, 40 treated with isolated synostosis at less than one year of age, eight at more than one year of age, and ten patients with craniofacial clefts, the guidelines for timing and methods of treatment have evolved. Liberal use of craniectomy bone with expected regrowth is possible in the first year of life, and more limited use in the second year of life. This bone is used to hold the repositioned orbit, augment hypoplastic zygomas, and reconstruct noses, or for other uses. In isolated synostosis, repositioning provides a form of immediate catch-up growth then proceeds normally. In craniofacial clefts, repositioning puts structures into normal relations and growth likewise proceeds normally. The isolated synostosis syndromes treated at a later age are done with more difficulty, though may be effectively cared for. Complications other than incomplete structural correction have been nonexistent in the group two years of age and less.

  10. Quantum speed limits, coherence, and asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvian, Iman; Spekkens, Robert W.; Zanardi, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    The resource theory of asymmetry is a framework for classifying and quantifying the symmetry-breaking properties of both states and operations relative to a given symmetry. In the special case where the symmetry is the set of translations generated by a fixed observable, asymmetry can be interpreted as coherence relative to the observable eigenbasis, and the resource theory of asymmetry provides a framework to study this notion of coherence. We here show that this notion of coherence naturally arises in the context of quantum speed limits. Indeed, the very concept of speed of evolution, i.e., the inverse of the minimum time it takes the system to evolve to another (partially) distinguishable state, is a measure of asymmetry relative to the time translations generated by the system Hamiltonian. Furthermore, the celebrated Mandelstam-Tamm and Margolus-Levitin speed limits can be interpreted as upper bounds on this measure of asymmetry by functions which are themselves measures of asymmetry in the special case of pure states. Using measures of asymmetry that are not restricted to pure states, such as the Wigner-Yanase skew information, we obtain extensions of the Mandelstam-Tamm bound which are significantly tighter in the case of mixed states. We also clarify some confusions in the literature about coherence and asymmetry, and show that measures of coherence are a proper subset of measures of asymmetry.

  11. On perturbative azimuthal asymmetry at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Rezaeian, A. H.

    2008-10-13

    We investigate the azimuthal asymmetry of partons and photons produced at the initial stage of nuclear collisions at the RHIC energy originating from quark-nucleus collisions. In our approach, the azimuthal asymmetry results from the correlation between color dipole orientation and impact parameter of the collision. The asymmetry is sensitive to the rapid variation of the nuclear density at the nuclear periphery. We either introduce the color-dipole orientation into the improved Born approximation, or model the dipole partial amplitude which satisfies available DIS data. We conclude that the azimuthal asymmetry coming from these mechanisms can be sizable.

  12. Measuring Asymmetry in Time-Stamped Phylogenies.

    PubMed

    Dearlove, Bethany L; Frost, Simon D W

    2015-07-01

    Previous work has shown that asymmetry in viral phylogenies may be indicative of heterogeneity in transmission, for example due to acute HIV infection or the presence of 'core groups' with higher contact rates. Hence, evidence of asymmetry may provide clues to underlying population structure, even when direct information on, for example, stage of infection or contact rates, are missing. However, current tests of phylogenetic asymmetry (a) suffer from false positives when the tips of the phylogeny are sampled at different times and (b) only test for global asymmetry, and hence suffer from false negatives when asymmetry is localised to part of a phylogeny. We present a simple permutation-based approach for testing for asymmetry in a phylogeny, where we compare the observed phylogeny with random phylogenies with the same sampling and coalescence times, to reduce the false positive rate. We also demonstrate how profiles of measures of asymmetry calculated over a range of evolutionary times in the phylogeny can be used to identify local asymmetry. In combination with different metrics of asymmetry, this combined approach offers detailed insights of how phylogenies reconstructed from real viral datasets may deviate from the simplistic assumptions of commonly used coalescent and birth-death process models.

  13. UV Observations of Hemispheric Asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, R. K.; Paxton, L. J.; Wolven, B. C.; Zhang, Y.; Romeo, G.

    2015-12-01

    Asymmetry in the auroral patterns can be an important diagnostic for understanding the dynamics of solar wind interaction with the magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere system (e.g., Newel and Meng, 1998; Fillingrim et al., 2005). Molecular nitrogen emission in the UV Lyman-Birge-Hopfield bands can be used to determine energy flux and electron mean energy (Sotirelis, et al, 2013) and thereby Hall and Pederson integrated conductances (Gjerloev, et al., 2014). UV imagery provided by the 4 SSUSI instruments on the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F16-F19 spacecraft provide two dimensional maps of this emission at different local times. Often there are near simultaneous observations of both poles by some combination of the satellites. (see figure 1) The SSUSI auroral data products are well suited to this study, as they have the following features.: - dayglow has been subtracted on dayside aurora - electron energy flux and mean energy are pre-calculated - individual arcs have been identified through image processing. In order to intercompare data from multiple satellites, we must first ensure that the instrument calibrations are consistent. In this work we show that the instruments are consistently calibrated, and that results generated from the SSUSI data products can be trusted. Several examples of storm time asymmetries captured by the SSUSI instruments will be discussed. Fillingim, M. O., G. K. Parks, H. U. Frey, T. J. Immel, and S. B. Mende (2005), Hemispheric asymmetry of the afternoon electron aurora, Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L03113, doi:10.1029/2004GL021635. Gjerloev, J., Schaefer, R., Paxton, L, and Zhang, Y. (2014), A comprehensive empirical model of the ionospheric conductivity derived from SSUSI/GUVI, SuperMAG and SuperDARN data, SM51G-4339, Fall 2014 AGU meeting, San Francisco. Newell, P. T., and C.-I. Meng (1988), Hemispherical asymmetry in cusp precipitation near solstices, J. Geophys. Res., 93(A4), 2643-2648, doi:10.1029/JA093iA04p02643

  14. Jet vectoring through nozzle asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roh, Chris; Rosakis, Alexandros; Gharib, Morteza

    2015-11-01

    Previously, we explored the functionality of a tri-leaflet anal valve of a dragonfly larva. We saw that the dragonfly larva is capable of controlling the three leaflets independently to asymmetrically open the nozzle. Such control resulted in vectoring of the jet in various directions. To further understand the effect of asymmetric nozzle orifice, we tested jet flow through circular asymmetric nozzles. We report the relationship between nozzle asymmetry and redirecting of the jet at various Reynolds numbers. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CBET-1511414; additional support by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1144469.

  15. Driven shielding capacitive proximity sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor); McConnell, Robert L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A capacitive proximity sensing element, backed by a reflector driven at the same voltage as and in phase with the sensor, is used to reflect the field lines away from a grounded robot arm towards an intruding object, thus dramatically increasing the sensor's range and sensitivity.

  16. Geographic Proximity and Enrollment Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zammuto, Raymond F.

    The use of a measure of geographic proximity to help explain enrollment competition among postsecondary institutions was investigated. The measure, the number of miles between institutions, was obtained by determining the longitude and latitude coordinates for about 99% of the schools in the Higher Education General Information System universe.…

  17. Agonistic asymmetries and the foraging ecology of Bald Eagles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knight, Richard L.; Skagen, Susan Knight

    1988-01-01

    We investigated the effects of both asymmetries and differing food levels on contest outcomes of wintering Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) feeding on chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) carcasses. Large eagles, regardless of age, were more successful in pirating than smaller eagles. Small pirating eagles were usually unsuccessful unless they were adults attempting to supplant other small eagles. Feeding eagles were more successful in defeating pirating eagles according to (1) whether their heads were up to prior to a pirating attempt, (2) how long their heads had been up, and (3) whether they displayed. During periods of food scarcity pirating eagles were less successful, a fact attributed in a proximate sense to the increase incidence of retaliation by feeding birds. When food was scarce and eagles had a choice between scavenging the pirating, they chose to scavenge more often. Body size appears to be an important factor in determining social dominance and influencing differences in foraging modes of wintering Bald Eagles.

  18. Chiral asymmetry in spiral galaxies?

    PubMed

    Kondepudi, D K; Durand, D J

    2001-07-01

    Spiral galaxies are chiral entities when coupled with the direction of their recession velocity. As viewed from the Earth, the S-shaped and Z-shaped spiral galaxies are two chiral forms. What is the nature of chiral symmetry in spiral galaxies? In the Carnegie Atlas of Galaxies that lists photographs of a total of 1,168 galaxies, we found 540 galaxies, classified as normal or barred spirals, that are clearly identifiable as S- or Z- type. The recession velocities for 538 of these galaxies could be obtained from this atlas and other sources. A statistical analysis of this sample reveals no overall asymmetry but there is a significant asymmetry in certain subclasses: dominance of S-type galaxies in the Sb class of normal spiral galaxies and a dominance of Z-type in the SBb class of barred spiral galaxies. Both S- and Z-type galaxies seem to have similar velocity distribution, indicating no spatial segregation of the two chiral forms.

  19. Whistled Turkish alters language asymmetries.

    PubMed

    Güntürkün, Onur; Güntürkün, Monika; Hahn, Constanze

    2015-08-17

    Whistled languages represent an experiment of nature to test the widely accepted view that language comprehension is to some extent governed by the left hemisphere in a rather input-invariant manner. Indeed, left-hemisphere superiority has been reported for atonal and tonal languages, click consonants, writing and sign languages. The right hemisphere is specialized to encode acoustic properties like spectral cues, pitch, and melodic lines and plays a role for prosodic communicative cues. Would left hemisphere language superiority change when subjects had to encode a language that is constituted by acoustic properties for which the right hemisphere is specialized? Whistled Turkish uses the full lexical and syntactic information of vocal Turkish, and transforms this into whistles to transport complex conversations with constrained whistled articulations over long distances. We tested the comprehension of vocally vs. whistled identical lexical information in native whistle-speaking people of mountainous Northeast Turkey. We discovered that whistled language comprehension relies on symmetric hemispheric contributions, associated with a decrease of left and a relative increase of right hemispheric encoding mechanisms. Our results demonstrate that a language that places high demands on right-hemisphere typical acoustical encoding creates a radical change in language asymmetries. Thus, language asymmetry patterns are in an important way shaped by the physical properties of the lexical input. PMID:26294179

  20. Asymmetry in bicycle ergometer pedalling.

    PubMed

    Daly, D J; Cavanagh, P R

    1976-01-01

    The effects of changes in speed and resistance setting on the bilateral symmetry of work output on the bicycle ergometer were studied. The cranks of a Monarch bicycle ergometer were instrumented with foil strain gauges and the bridge outputs were integrated on-line and analyzed by a program running in a Hewlett Packard 2115A computer. Twenty male subjects performed three thirty-second trials at each of nine speed and resistance combinations. Indices of asymmetry from 66-178 were found using kicking dominance (n = 20) and 56-135 using a strength dominance classification (n = 13). Day to day reliability of the index of asymmetry was found to be only 0.47; within day reliability was 0.87 for day one and 0.79 for day two. No significant effects for speed or resistance changes were shown on either day for the strength dominant subjects. When kicking dominance was considered main effects were encountered on both days for speed although there was no clear directional trend. The findings of these experiments have important implications for studies where measurements are made on the lower extremity during cycle ergometer exercise, and for competitive cyclists engaged in endurance competition.

  1. Asymmetry in the epithalamus of vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    L. CONCHA, MIGUEL; W. WILSON, STEPHEN

    2001-01-01

    The epithalamus is a major subdivision of the diencephalon constituted by the habenular nuclei and pineal complex. Structural asymmetries in this region are widespread amongst vertebrates and involve differences in size, neuronal organisation, neurochemistry and connectivity. In species that possess a photoreceptive parapineal organ, this structure projects asymmetrically to the left habenula, and in teleosts it is also situated on the left side of the brain. Asymmetries in size between the left and right sides of the habenula are often associated with asymmetries in neuronal organisation, although these two types of asymmetry follow different evolutionary courses. While the former is more conspicuous in fishes (with the exception of teleosts), asymmetries in neuronal organisation are more robust in amphibia and reptiles. Connectivity of the parapineal organ with the left habenula is not always coupled with asymmetries in habenular size and/or neuronal organisation suggesting that, at least in some species, assignment of parapineal and habenular asymmetries may be independent events. The evolutionary origins of epithalamic structures are uncertain but asymmetry in this region is likely to have existed at the origin of the vertebrate, perhaps even the chordate, lineage. In at least some extant vertebrate species, epithalamic asymmetries are established early in development, suggesting a genetic regulation of asymmetry. In some cases, epigenetic factors such as hormones also influence the development of sexually dimorphic habenular asymmetries. Although the genetic and developmental mechanisms by which neuroanatomical asymmetries are established remain obscure, some clues regarding the mechanisms underlying laterality decisions have recently come from studies in zebrafish. The Nodal signalling pathway regulates laterality by biasing an otherwise stochastic laterality decision to the left side of the epithalamus. This genetic mechanism ensures a consistency of

  2. Scintillation Monitoring Using Asymmetry Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, Muhammad Mubasshir; Mahrous, Ayman; Abdallah, Amr; Notarpietro, Riccardo

    Variation in electron density can have significant effect on GNSS signals in terms of propagation delay. Ionospheric scintillation can be caused by rapid change of such delay, specifically, when they last for a longer period of time. Ionospheric irregularities that account for scintillation may vary significantly in spatial range and drift with the background plasma at speeds of 45 to 130 m/sec. These patchy irregularities may occur several times during night, e.g. in equatorial region, with the patches move through the ray paths of the GNSS satellite signals. These irregularities are often characterized as either ‘large scale’ (which can be as large as several hundred km in East-West direction and many times that in the North-South direction) or ‘small scale’ (which can be as small as 1m). These small scale irregularities are regarded as the main cause of scintillation [1,2]. In normal solar activity conditions, the mid-latitude ionosphere is not much disturbed. However, during severe magnetic storms, the aurora oval extends towards the equator and the equator anomaly region may stretched towards poles extending the scintillation phenomena more typically associated with those regions into mid-latitudes. In such stormy conditions, the predicted TEC may deviate largely from the true value of the TEC both at low and mid-latitudes due to which GNSS applications may be strongly degraded. This work is an attempt to analyze ionospheric scintillation (S4 index) using ionospheric asymmetry index [3]. The asymmetry index is based on trans-ionospheric propagation between GPS and LEO satellites in a radio occultation (RO) scenario, using background ionospheric data provided by MIDAS [4]. We attempted to simulate one of the recent geomagnetic storms (NOAA scale G4) occurred over low/mid-latitudes. The storm started on 26 September 2011 at UT 18:00 and lasted until early hours of 27 September 2011. The scintillation data for the storm was taken from an ionospheric

  3. beta. -decay asymmetry of the free neutron

    SciTech Connect

    Bopp, P.; Dubbers, D.; Klemt, E.; Last, J.; Schuetze, H.; Weibler, W.; Freedman, S.J.; Schaerpf, O.

    1983-01-01

    The ..beta..-decay of polarized neutrons has been studied with the new superconducting spectrometer PERKEO at the ILL. The energy dependence of the ..beta..-decay asymmetry has been measured for the first time. From the measured ..beta..-asymmetry parameter we obtain a new value for the ratio of weak coupling constants g/sub A//g/sub V/. 11 references.

  4. Asymmetry and Performance: Toward a Neurodevelopmental Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boles, David B.; Barth, Joan M.; Merrill, Edward C.

    2008-01-01

    Hemispheric asymmetry implies the existence of developmental influences that affect one hemisphere more than the other. However, those influences are poorly understood. One simple view is that asymmetry may exist because of a relationship between a mental process' degree of lateralization and how well it functions. Data scaling issues have largely…

  5. Atypical Alpha Asymmetry in Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, T. Sigi; Smalley, Susan L.; Hanada, Grant; Macion, James; McCracken, James T.; McGough, James J.; Loo, Sandra K.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: A growing body of literature suggests atypical cerebral asymmetry and interhemispheric interaction in ADHD. A common means of assessing lateralized brain function in clinical populations has been to examine the relative proportion of EEG alpha activity (8-12 Hz) in each hemisphere (i.e., alpha asymmetry). Increased rightward alpha…

  6. The evolution and genetics of cerebral asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Corballis, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    Handedness and cerebral asymmetry are commonly assumed to be uniquely human, and even defining characteristics of our species. This is increasingly refuted by the evidence of behavioural asymmetries in non-human species. Although complex manual skill and language are indeed unique to our species and are represented asymmetrically in the brain, some non-human asymmetries appear to be precursors, and others are shared between humans and non-humans. In all behavioural and cerebral asymmetries so far investigated, a minority of individuals reverse or negate the dominant asymmetry, suggesting that such asymmetries are best understood in the context of the overriding bilateral symmetry of the brain and body, and a trade-off between the relative advantages and disadvantages of symmetry and asymmetry. Genetic models of handedness, for example, typically postulate a gene with two alleles, one disposing towards right-handedness and the other imposing no directional influence. There is as yet no convincing evidence as to the location of this putative gene, suggesting that several genes may be involved, or that the gene may be monomorphic with variations due to environmental or epigenetic influences. Nevertheless, it is suggested that, in behavioural, neurological and evolutionary terms, it may be more profitable to examine the degree rather than the direction of asymmetry. PMID:19064358

  7. Visual Search Asymmetry with Uncertain Targets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saiki, Jun; Koike, Takahiko; Takahashi, Kohske; Inoue, Tomoko

    2005-01-01

    The underlying mechanism of search asymmetry is still unknown. Many computational models postulate top-down selection of target-defining features as a crucial factor. This feature selection account implies, and other theories implicitly assume, that predefined target identity is necessary for search asymmetry. The authors tested the validity of…

  8. Foot anomalies and proximal symphalangism.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Lauren; McCaul, Janet; Irwin, Greg J; Huntley, James S

    2012-09-01

    We report the case of a 2-week-old girl born at term (by vaginal delivery and without antenatal or perinatal events) who was referred as having "bilateral talipes and bilateral proximal symphalangism of little and ring fingers." The "talipes" was atypical with marked equinus and varus, but no cavus or adductus of the midfoot. Her mother had both symphalangism (absence of proximal interphalangeal joints) of middle, ring, and little fingers bilaterally and fixed pes planus with a rigid fixed hindfoot-and these deformities had also been present from birth. The maternal grandmother was similarly affected. However, the neonatal subject has an unaffected older sibling; maternal siblings are also unaffected. The three affected people did not have other obvious musculoskeletal abnormalities. Because of the coalitions, the child's atypical talipes was managed by a modified Kite's procedure. Symphalangism-coalition syndromes may be associated with conductive deafness because of fusion of the auditory ossicles.

  9. Fractures of the proximal humerus.

    PubMed

    Brorson, Stig

    2013-10-01

    Fractures of the proximal humerus have been diagnosed and managed since the earliest known surgical texts. For more than four millennia the preferred treatment was forceful traction, closed reduction, and immobilization with linen soaked in combinations of oil, honey, alum, wine, or cerate. The bandages were further supported by splints made of wood or coarse grass. Healing was expected in forty days. Different fracture patterns have been discussed and classified since Ancient Greece. Current classification of proximal humeral fractures mainly relies on the classifications proposed by Charles Neer and the AO/OTA classification. Since the late 1980's it has been known that intra- and inter-observer variation was high within the two systems. I conducted a series of observer studies to qualify the disagreement further and to study to what extent improvement of agreement could be obtained. No clinically significant differences in observer agreement were found at different levels of clinical experience, by reducing the number of categories, or by adding high quality radiographs, CT or 3D CT scans. A consistently low agreement on the Neer classification within and between untrained orthopaedic doctors was found. However, we also found that inter-observer agreement on treatment recommendation was higher than the agreement on the Neer classification. In a randomized trial we found that agreement could improve significantly by training of doctors, especially among specialists. However, classification of proximal humeral fractures remains a challenge for the conduct, reporting, and interpretation of clinical trials. The evidence for the benefits of surgery in complex fractures of the proximal humerus is weak. In three systematic reviews I studied the outcome after locking plate osteosynthesis or reverse arthroplasty in complex fractures patterns. No randomized trials or well-conducted comparative studies were identified. High failure rates suggest that the use of these

  10. Micropower RF material proximity sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1998-01-01

    A level detector or proximity detector for materials capable of sensing through plastic container walls or encapsulating materials is of the sensor. Thus, it can be used in corrosive environments, as well as in a wide variety of applications. An antenna has a characteristic impedance which depends on the materials in proximity to the antenna. An RF oscillator, which includes the antenna and is based on a single transistor in a Colpitt's configuration, produces an oscillating signal. A detector is coupled to the oscillator which signals changes in the oscillating signal caused by changes in the materials in proximity to the antenna. The oscillator is turned on and off at a pulse repetition frequency with a low duty cycle to conserve power. The antenna consists of a straight monopole about one-quarter wavelength long at the nominal frequency of the oscillator. The antenna may be horizontally disposed on a container and very accurately detects the fill level within the container as the material inside the container reaches the level of the antenna.

  11. Micropower RF material proximity sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1998-11-10

    A level detector or proximity detector for materials capable of sensing through plastic container walls or encapsulating materials is disclosed. Thus, it can be used in corrosive environments, as well as in a wide variety of applications. An antenna has a characteristic impedance which depends on the materials in proximity to the antenna. An RF oscillator, which includes the antenna and is based on a single transistor in a Colpitt`s configuration, produces an oscillating signal. A detector is coupled to the oscillator which signals changes in the oscillating signal caused by changes in the materials in proximity to the antenna. The oscillator is turned on and off at a pulse repetition frequency with a low duty cycle to conserve power. The antenna consists of a straight monopole about one-quarter wavelength long at the nominal frequency of the oscillator. The antenna may be horizontally disposed on a container and very accurately detects the fill level within the container as the material inside the container reaches the level of the antenna. 5 figs.

  12. Plating of proximal humeral fractures.

    PubMed

    Martetschläger, Frank; Siebenlist, Sebastian; Weier, Michael; Sandmann, Gunther; Ahrens, Philipp; Braun, Karl; Elser, Florian; Stöckle, Ulrich; Freude, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    The optimal treatment for proximal humeral fractures is controversial. Few data exist concerning the influence of the surgical approach on the outcome. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcomes of proximal humeral fractures treated with locking plate fixation through a deltopectoral vs an anterolateral deltoid-splitting approach. Of 86 patients who met the inclusion criteria, 70 were available for follow-up examination. Thirty-three patients were treated through a deltopectoral approach and 37 through an anterolateral deltoid-splitting approach. In all cases, open reduction and internal fixation with a PHILOS locking plate (Synthes, Umkirch, Germany) was performed. Clinical follow-up included evaluation of pain, shoulder mobility, and strength. Constant score and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) score were assessed. A clinical neurological examination of the axillary nerve was also performed. Consolidation, reduction, and appearance of head necrosis were evaluated radiographically. After a mean follow-up of 33 months, Constant scores, DASH scores, and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores showed no significant differences between the groups. Clinical neurologic examination of the axillary nerve revealed no obvious damage to the nerve in either group. Deltopectoral and anterolateral detoid-splitting approaches for plate fixation of proximal humeral fractures are safe and provide similar clinical outcomes. The results of this study suggest that the approach can be chosen according to surgeon preference.

  13. Asymmetry in zeta Auriage chromospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, I. A.

    1988-01-01

    Asymmetry in the ultraviolet spectra of zeta-Aur, similar to that reported in optical observations, was studied using IUE data. A plot of the integrated flux of zeta Aurigae from 1625 to 1675 A as a function of absolute phase shows no significant difference between the ingress and egress phases. A plot of the integrated flux from 1625 to 1675 A for 22 Vul as a function of absolute phase for both ingress and egress confirms that the atmospheric eclipse is asymmetric in 22 Vul. The eclipse in 22 Vul begins symmetrically but departs from symmetry at a phase greater than 0.05. The pronounced dip at ingress suggests a feature in the chromosphere.

  14. Collins Asymmetry at Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Feng

    2008-01-17

    We study the Collins effect in the azimuthal asymmetricdistribution of hadrons inside a high energy jet in the single transversepolarized proton proton scattering. From the detailed analysis ofone-gluon and two-gluon exchange diagrams contributions, the Collinsfunction is found the same as that in the semi-inclusive deep inelasticscattering and e+e- annihilations. The eikonal propagators in thesediagrams do not contribute to the phase needed for the Collins-typesingle spin asymmetry, and the universality is derived as a result of theWard identity. We argue that this conclusion depends on the momentum flowof the exchanged gluon and the kinematic constraints in the fragmentationprocess, and is generic and model-independent.

  15. Asymmetry effects in fragment production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Manpreet; Kaur, Varinderjit

    2016-05-01

    The production of different fragments has been studied by taking into account the mass asymmetry of the reaction and employing the momentum dependent interactions. Two different set of asymmetric reactions have been analyzed while keeping Atotal fixed using soft momentum dependent equation of state. Our results indicate that the impact of momentum dependent interactions is different in lighter projectile systems as compared to heavier ones. The comparative analysis of IQMD simulations with the experimental data in case of heavier projectile and lighter target system for the reaction of 197Au+27Al (η = 0.7) at E = 600 MeV/nucleon shows that with the inclusion of MDI we are able, upto some extent, to reproduce the experimental universality of rise and fall of intermediate mass fragments (IMFs).

  16. Proximate and polyphenolic characterization of cranberry pomace

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The proximate composition and identification and quantification of polyphenolic compounds in dried cranberry pomace were determined. Proximate analysis was conducted based on AOAC methods for moisture, protein, fat, and ash. Total carbohydrates were determined by the difference method. Polyphenolic ...

  17. Abnormal Asymmetry of Brain Connectivity in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Ribolsi, Michele; Daskalakis, Zafiris J.; Siracusano, Alberto; Koch, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a growing body of data has revealed that beyond a dysfunction of connectivity among different brain areas in schizophrenia patients (SCZ), there is also an abnormal asymmetry of functional connectivity compared with healthy subjects. The loss of the cerebral torque and the abnormalities of gyrification, with an increased or more complex cortical folding in the right hemisphere may provide an anatomical basis for such aberrant connectivity in SCZ. Furthermore, diffusion tensor imaging studies have shown a significant reduction of leftward asymmetry in some key white-matter tracts in SCZ. In this paper, we review the studies that investigated both structural brain asymmetry and asymmetry of functional connectivity in healthy subjects and SCZ. From an analysis of the existing literature on this topic, we can hypothesize an overall generally attenuated asymmetry of functional connectivity in SCZ compared to healthy controls. Such attenuated asymmetry increases with the duration of the disease and correlates with psychotic symptoms. Finally, we hypothesize that structural deficits across the corpus callosum may contribute to the abnormal asymmetry of intra-hemispheric connectivity in schizophrenia. PMID:25566030

  18. Evaluating asymmetry in prosthetic gait with step-length asymmetry alone is flawed.

    PubMed

    Roerdink, Melvyn; Roeles, Sanne; van der Pas, Sanne C H; Bosboom, Otelie; Beek, Peter J

    2012-03-01

    Prosthetic gait is often asymmetric in step length, but the direction of this asymmetry varies inconsistently across amputees. This situation is akin to that seen in stroke patients, where step-length asymmetry has been shown to be the additive result of asymmetries in trunk progression and asymmetries in forward foot placement relative to the trunk. The present study examined the validity of this notion in three trans-tibial and seven trans-femoral amputees wearing a unilateral prosthesis while walking over a walkway at a comfortable and slower-than-comfortable speed. The latter manipulation was added to examine the expectation that the magnitude of the trunk-progression asymmetry - attributable to a weaker propulsion generating capacity on the prosthetic side - would be smaller when walking slower because of the diminished propulsion demands. Step length, forward foot placement relative to the trunk, and trunk progression of prosthetic and non-prosthetic steps, as well as asymmetries therein, were quantified. The direction of step-length and forward foot placement asymmetries varied inconsistently across (but consistently within) participants. As expected, step-length asymmetry depended on the combination of asymmetries in forward foot placement and trunk progression, with a smaller contribution of trunk-progression asymmetry at slow speed. These results extend our previous finding for hemiplegic patients that an analysis of gait asymmetry in terms of step length alone is flawed to prosthetic gait, implying that knowledge of asymmetries in trunk progression and forward foot placement relative to the trunk is required to help elucidate the contribution of underlying impairments (viz. propulsion generating capacity) and adopted compensations on prosthetic gait asymmetry.

  19. Relic Density of Neutrinos with Primordial Asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Pastor, Sergio; Pinto, Teguayco; Raffelt, Georg G.

    2009-06-19

    We study flavor oscillations in the early Universe, assuming primordial neutrino-antineutrino asymmetries. Including collisions and pair processes in the kinetic equations, we not only estimate the degree of flavor equilibration, but for the first time also kinetic equilibration among neutrinos and with the ambient plasma. Typically, the restrictive big-bang nucleosynthesis bound on the nu{sub e}nu{sub e} asymmetry indeed applies to all flavors as claimed in the previous literature, but fine-tuned initial asymmetries always allow for a large surviving neutrino excess radiation that may show up in precision cosmological data.

  20. Relic density of neutrinos with primordial asymmetries.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Sergio; Pinto, Teguayco; Raffelt, Georg G

    2009-06-19

    We study flavor oscillations in the early Universe, assuming primordial neutrino-antineutrino asymmetries. Including collisions and pair processes in the kinetic equations, we not only estimate the degree of flavor equilibration, but for the first time also kinetic equilibration among neutrinos and with the ambient plasma. Typically, the restrictive big-bang nucleosynthesis bound on the nu_{e}nu[over]_{e} asymmetry indeed applies to all flavors as claimed in the previous literature, but fine-tuned initial asymmetries always allow for a large surviving neutrino excess radiation that may show up in precision cosmological data. PMID:19658994

  1. Management of Asymmetry After Breast Reduction.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Onelio

    2016-04-01

    Breast reduction surgery has achieved one of the highest patient satisfaction rates among plastic surgery procedures. Most of the complications encountered are usually minor and related to wound healing. Revision surgery to address these problems is common and usually consists of scar revisions. Postoperative breast asymmetry of a mild degree is also common; however, postoperative asymmetry severe enough to warrant surgical revision is a rare event, occurring in less than 1% of cases. Postmammaplasty revision surgery needs to be individualized. The asymmetry could be the result of nipple malposition or it could consist of a volume or shape discrepancy between the breast mounds.

  2. Management of Asymmetry After Breast Reduction.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Onelio

    2016-04-01

    Breast reduction surgery has achieved one of the highest patient satisfaction rates among plastic surgery procedures. Most of the complications encountered are usually minor and related to wound healing. Revision surgery to address these problems is common and usually consists of scar revisions. Postoperative breast asymmetry of a mild degree is also common; however, postoperative asymmetry severe enough to warrant surgical revision is a rare event, occurring in less than 1% of cases. Postmammaplasty revision surgery needs to be individualized. The asymmetry could be the result of nipple malposition or it could consist of a volume or shape discrepancy between the breast mounds. PMID:27012796

  3. Proximal Biceps in Overhead Athletes.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Peter N; Verma, Nikhil N

    2016-01-01

    The proximal long head of the biceps tendon and its attachment at the superior glenoid tubercle and labrum are subject to a spectrum of disorders in overhead athletes. Biceps disorders are commonly characterized by intermittent anterior or deep-seated shoulder pain exacerbated by activity. Diagnosis is reached via various physical examination maneuvers; MRI can be uncertain. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications, targeted ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injections, and supervised physical therapy are the mainstays of nonoperative treatment. Operative treatment, which remains controversial, provides reliable pain relief, restoration of function for activities of daily living, and low complication rates, but return to play can be unpredictable.

  4. Biomass proximate analysis using thermogravimetry.

    PubMed

    García, Roberto; Pizarro, Consuelo; Lavín, Antonio G; Bueno, Julio L

    2013-07-01

    This work proposes a 25 min-last thermogravimetric method as a tool to determine biomass sample's proximate analysis data (moisture, ash, volatile matter and fixed carbon contents) just by direct measure of weight changes on each sample's TG chart. Compared with international standards commonly used to that aim, TG is a faster and easier to develop technique. Obtained results were satisfactory, with AEE under 6% for moisture and volatile matter, close to 10% for fixed carbon determination and AAD of 1.6 points for ash content.

  5. The HTV Proximity Communication System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Motoyuki; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Tetsuo

    2002-01-01

    National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) is developing the H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) as an unmanned logistic support vehicle for the International Space Station (ISS). The HTV, which is launched by the H-IIA rocket, transports both pressurized and un-pressurized cargoes to the ISS, reloads disposal items from the ISS and performs destructive reentry over ocean area. NASDA plans the first flight of HTV in 2005 for demonstration. The HTV will contribute the ISS assembly and logistic re-supply operations with international commonality. For unmanned vehicle operation, communication link is critical with commanding and control, especially in proximity region to the ISS. As for the HTV operation, NASDA is developing dedicated communication system installed on the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) of the ISS, which is called the Proximity Communication System (PROX). The HTV receives commands and transmits telemetry data through the PROX in its proximity operation to the ISS. To achieve this, the PROX can communicate with the HTV on its nominal trajectory within 23km of the ISS. Especially within 3km of the ISS, the PROX has capability to perform omni-directional communication to the HTV. The PROX also has GPS receiver and send GPS data to the HTV to support the HTV navigation for relative GPS navigation used in "far" range (500m away from the ISS). In addition to the above fundamental functions, the PROX has a capability of range and range-rate measurement between the ISS and the HTV by the pseudo noise (PN) code epoch and the Doppler shift frequency. This provides a reference data independent of "main" navigation methods (rendezvous sensor navigation or GPS navigation) of the HTV. The PROX also assists the ISS crew with its commanding device, called the Hardware Command Panel (HCP), to issue time-dependent safety-related critical commands for HTV berthing/un-berthing operation. When a failure occurs somewhere on "communication path" from the PROX Base Band

  6. Proximal bodies in hypersonic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Deiterding, Ralf; Laurence, Stuart J; Hornung, Hans G

    2007-01-01

    Hypersonic flows involving two or more bodies travelling in close proximity to one another are encountered in several important situations, both natural and man-made. The present work seeks to investigate one aspect of the resulting flow problem by exploring the forces experienced by a secondary body when it is within the domain of influence of a primary body travelling at hypersonic speeds. An analytical methodology based on the blast wave analogy is developed and used to predict the secondary force coefficients for simple geometries in both two and three dimensions. When the secondary body is entirely inside the primary shocked region, the nature of the lateral force coefficient is found to depend strongly on the relative size of the two bodies. For two spheres, the methodology predicts that the secondary body will experience an exclusively attractive lateral force if the secondary diameter is larger than one-sixth the primary diameter. The analytical results are compared with those from numerical simulations and reasonable agreement is observed if an appropriate normalization for the lateral displacement is used. Results from a series of experiments in the T5 hypervelocity shock tunnel are also presented and compared with perfect-gas numerical simulations, with good agreement. A new force-measurement technique for short-duration hypersonic facilities, enabling the experimental simulation of the proximal bodies problem, is described. This technique provides two independent means of measurement, and the agreement observed between the two gives a further degree of confidence in the results obtained.

  7. Protein Neighbors and Proximity Proteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Johanna S.; Li, Xue-Wen; Perrett, Sarah; Lilley, Kathryn S.; Jackson, Antony P.

    2015-01-01

    Within cells, proteins can co-assemble into functionally integrated and spatially restricted multicomponent complexes. Often, the affinities between individual proteins are relatively weak, and proteins within such clusters may interact only indirectly with many of their other protein neighbors. This makes proteomic characterization difficult using methods such as immunoprecipitation or cross-linking. Recently, several groups have described the use of enzyme-catalyzed proximity labeling reagents that covalently tag the neighbors of a targeted protein with a small molecule such as fluorescein or biotin. The modified proteins can then be isolated by standard pulldown methods and identified by mass spectrometry. Here we will describe the techniques as well as their similarities and differences. We discuss their applications both to study protein assemblies and to provide a new way for characterizing organelle proteomes. We stress the importance of proteomic quantitation and independent target validation in such experiments. Furthermore, we suggest that there are biophysical and cell-biological principles that dictate the appropriateness of enzyme-catalyzed proximity labeling methods to address particular biological questions of interest. PMID:26355100

  8. Ash Aggregates in Proximal Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porritt, L. A.; Russell, K.

    2012-12-01

    Ash aggregates are thought to have formed within and been deposited by the eruption column and plume and dilute density currents and their associated ash clouds. Moist, turbulent ash clouds are considered critical to ash aggregate formation by facilitating both collision and adhesion of particles. Consequently, they are most commonly found in distal deposits. Proximal deposits containing ash aggregates are less commonly observed but do occur. Here we describe two occurrences of vent proximal ash aggregate-rich deposits; the first within a kimberlite pipe where coated ash pellets and accretionary lapilli are found within the intra-vent sequence; and the second in a glaciovolcanic setting where cored pellets (armoured lapilli) occur within <1 km of the vent. The deposits within the A418 pipe, Diavik Diamond Mine, Canada, are the residual deposits within the conduit and vent of the volcano and are characterised by an abundance of ash aggregates. Coated ash pellets are dominant but are followed in abundance by ash pellets, accretionary lapilli and rare cored pellets. The coated ash pellets typically range from 1 - 5 mm in diameter and have core to rim ratios of approximately 10:1. The formation and preservation of these aggregates elucidates the style and nature of the explosive phase of kimberlite eruption at A418 (and other pipes?). First, these pyroclasts dictate the intensity of the kimberlite eruption; it must be energetic enough to cause intense fragmentation of the kimberlite to produce a substantial volume of very fine ash (<62 μm). Secondly, the ash aggregates indicate the involvement of moisture coupled with the presence of dilute expanded eruption clouds. The structure and distribution of these deposits throughout the kimberlite conduit demand that aggregation and deposition operate entirely within the confines of the vent; this indicates that aggregation is a rapid process. Ash aggregates within glaciovolcanic sequences are also rarely documented. The

  9. Associative asymmetry of compound words.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Jeremy B; Boulton, Kathy L; Gagné, Christina L

    2014-07-01

    Early verbal-memory researchers assumed participants represent memory of a pair of unrelated items with 2 independent, separately modifiable, directional associations. However, memory for pairs of unrelated words (A-B) exhibits associative symmetry: a near-perfect correlation between accuracy on forward (A →?) and backward (?← B) cued recall. This was viewed as arguing against the independent-associations hypothesis and in favor of the hypothesis that associations are remembered as holistic units. Here we test the Holistic Representation hypothesis further by examining cued recall of compound words. If we suppose preexisting words are more unitized than novel associations, the Holistic Representation hypothesis predicts compound words (e.g., ROSE BUD) will have a higher forward-backward correlation than novel compounds (e.g., BRIEF TAX). We report the opposite finding: Compound words, as well as noncompound words, exhibited less associative symmetry than novel compounds. This challenges the Holistic Representation account of associative symmetry. Moreover, preexperimental associates (positional family size) influenced associative symmetry-but asymmetrically: Increasing family size of the last constituent increasing decoupled forward and backward recall, but family size of the 1st constituent had no such effect. In short, highly practiced, meaningful associations exhibit associative asymmetry, suggesting associative symmetry is not diagnostic of holistic representations but, rather, is a characteristic of ad hoc associations. With additional learning, symmetric associations may be replaced by directional, independently modifiable associations as verbal associations become embedded within a rich knowledge structure.

  10. Di-hadron asymmetry and interplay between transversity induced asymmetries in hadron leptoproduction at COMPASS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sbrizzai, Giulio

    2016-02-01

    New results on the transverse spin azimuthal asymmetries in semi-inclusive DIS reactions extracted by the COMPASS Collaboration from the data collected with a transversely polarised proton target are presented. A noticeable similarity between the Collins asymmetry and the dihadron asymmetry, already been observed and reported, triggered a more deep investigation on the angular correlations and the relevant kinematical variables. The resulting phenomenological analysis of the transversity induced asymmetries, presented in this talk, allows to establish quantitative relationships, providing strong indication that the underlying fragmentation mechanisms are all driven by a common physical process.

  11. Case report: treatment of dental asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Bergamini, A; Melsen, B

    1995-01-01

    The treatment of dental asymmetries often comprises several treatment alternatives. This case report describes the treatment alternatives for an asymmetry generated secondary to surgical removal of an odontoma that included the germ of the lower left lateral incisor. The opening of the space was chosen based on the patient's wish. The asymmetrical biomechanical force system used for the correction of the midline is presented as free-body diagram. PMID:7486238

  12. Baryon asymmetry, inflation and squeezed states

    SciTech Connect

    Bambah, Bindu A. . E-mail: bbsp@uohyd.ernet.in; Chaitanya, K.V.S. Shiv; Mukku, C.

    2007-04-15

    We use the general formalism of squeezed rotated states to calculate baryon asymmetry in the wake of inflation through parametric amplification. We base our analysis on a B and CP violating Lagrangian in an isotropically expanding universe. The B and CP violating terms originate from the coupling of complex fields with non-zero baryon number to a complex background inflaton field. We show that a differential amplification of particle and antiparticle modes gives rise to baryon asymmetry.

  13. Asymmetries of solar oscillation line profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Jefferies, S. M.; Harvey, J. W.; Osaki, Y.; Pomerantz, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    Asymmetries of the power spectral line profiles of solar global p-modes are detected in full-disk intensity observations of the Ca II K Fraunhofer line. The asymmetry is a strong function of temporal frequency being strongest at the lowest frequencies observed and vanishing near the peak of the power distribution. The variation with spherical harmonic degree is small. The asymmetry is interpreted in terms of a model in which the solar oscillation cavity is compared to a Fabry-Perot interferometer with the source slightly outside the cavity. A phase difference between an outward direct wave and a corresponding inward wave that passes through the cavity gives rise to the asymmetry. The asymmetry is different in velocity and intensity observations. Neglecting the asymmetry when modeling the power spectrum can lead to systematic errors in the measurement of mode frequencies of as much as 10 exp -4 of the mode frequency. The present observations and interpretation locate the source of the oscillations to be approximately 60 km beneath the photosphere, the shallowest position suggested to date.

  14. Poloidal asymmetries in edge transport barriersa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, R. M.; Theiler, C.; Lipschultz, B.; Hutchinson, I. H.; Reinke, M. L.; Whyte, D.; Hughes, J. W.; Catto, P.; Landreman, M.; Ernst, D.; Chang, C. S.; Hager, R.; Hubbard, A.; Ennever, P.; Walk, J. R.

    2015-05-01

    Measurements of impurities in Alcator C-Mod indicate that in the pedestal region, significant poloidal asymmetries can exist in the impurity density, ion temperature, and main ion density. In light of the observation that ion temperature and electrostatic potential are not constant on a flux surface [Theiler et al., Nucl. Fusion 54, 083017 (2014)], a technique based on total pressure conservation to align profiles measured at separate poloidal locations is presented and applied. Gyrokinetic neoclassical simulations with XGCa support the observed large poloidal variations in ion temperature and density, and that the total pressure is approximately constant on a flux surface. With the updated alignment technique, the observed in-out asymmetry in impurity density is reduced from previous publishing [Churchill et al., Nucl. Fusion 53, 122002 (2013)], but remains substantial ( n z , H / n z , L ˜ 6 ). Candidate asymmetry drivers are explored, showing that neither non-uniform impurity sources nor localized fluctuation-driven transport are able to explain satisfactorily the impurity density asymmetry. Since impurity density asymmetries are only present in plasmas with strong electron density gradients, and radial transport timescales become comparable to parallel transport timescales in the pedestal region, it is suggested that global transport effects relating to the strong electron density gradients in the pedestal are the main driver for the pedestal in-out impurity density asymmetry.

  15. Broca's area: nomenclature, anatomy, typology and asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Keller, Simon S; Crow, Timothy; Foundas, Anne; Amunts, Katrin; Roberts, Neil

    2009-04-01

    In this review, we (i) describe the nomenclature of Broca's area and show how the circumscribed definition of Broca's area is disassociated from Broca's aphasia, (ii) describe in detail how the gross anatomy of Broca's area varies between people, and how the definitions vary between studies, (iii) attempt to reconcile the findings of structural asymmetry of Broca's area with the differences in methodological approaches, (iv) consider the functional significance of cytoarchitectonic definitions of Broca's area, and (v) critically elucidate the significance of circumscribed regions of cortex for language lateralisation and language development. Contrary to what has previously been reported in the literature, asymmetry of Broca's area has not been reproducibly demonstrated, particularly on a gross morphological level. This may be due to major inconsistencies in methodology (including different anatomical boundaries, measurement techniques and samples studied) or that the sulcal contours defining Broca's area are so naturally variable between people making a standard definition difficult. Cytoarchitectonic analyses more often than not report leftward asymmetry of some component of area 44 and/or area 45. If a structural asymmetry of Broca's area does exist, it is variable, which differs from that of the functional asymmetry of language, which is more consistent. One reason for this might be that the link between cellular architecture, connectivity and language function still remains to be elucidated. There is currently no convincing explanation to associate asymmetry of Broca's area with the lateralisation of language.

  16. Proximity effect correction sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zepka, Alex; Zimmermann, Rainer; Hoppe, Wolfgang; Schulz, Martin

    2010-05-01

    Determining the quality of a proximity effect correction (PEC) is often done via 1-dimensional measurements such as: CD deviations from target, corner rounding, or line-end shortening. An alternative approach would compare the entire perimeter of the exposed shape and its original design. Unfortunately, this is not a viable solution as there is a practical limit to the number of metrology measurements that can be done in a reasonable amount of time. In this paper we make use of simulated results and introduce a method which may be considered complementary to the standard way of PEC qualification. It compares simulated contours with the target layout via a Boolean XOR operation with the area of the XOR differences providing a direct measure of how close a corrected layout approximates the target.

  17. Proximity and emergency department use

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, Patrick; Courteau, Josiane; Vanasse, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine if geographic proximity to an emergency department (ED) is related to ED use in a metropolitan population of patients with cardiovascular risk factors. Design Population-based, retrospective cohort study. Setting The census metropolitan area of Montreal, Que. Participants Cohort of 99 400 patients with diabetes, hypertension, or dyslipidemia in 2007 without a history of cardiovascular disease. Each patient was spatially referred to 1 of 5857 dissemination areas (DAs). Main outcome measures Annual number of visits to an ED with respect to the distance between the centroid of a patient’s DA and the closest ED, controlling for age, sex, comorbidities, and neighbourhood immigration, social, and material characteristics. Multilevel logistic and negative binomial regressions were used to determine if the proximity to the closest ED was related to ED use, frequent ED use (≥ 4 visits in a year), and number of ED visits. Results A total of 25 889 (26.0%) patients in the cohort visited an ED at least once during a 1-year period, among which 4563 (4.6%) were frequent users with at least 4 visits. These frequent users were responsible for 28 249 (45.5%) of all 62 021 visits to EDs. The distance between a DA and its closest ED was significantly and negatively correlated with ED use (P < .001), even after controlling for confounding variables. Patients living in a DA close to an ED were also more likely to be frequent users, but the extent of use among them (range from 4 to 82 ED visits) was not related to the distance to the closest ED. Conclusion These results suggest that patients at risk of cardiovascular disease living in a metropolitan area are more likely to seek a medical encounter at the ED if they live closer to it. PMID:26505061

  18. Competition asymmetry with taxon divergence.

    PubMed

    Barnes, David K A

    2003-03-22

    Most organisms experience competition for resources, probably most of the time. As the structure and requirements of closely related species are generally liable to be more similar than in distantly linked species, Darwin suggested that the potential for competition was greater in the former. Since that time, studies have concentrated on interactions of either conspecifics or congeneric species. Shared critical resources, which organisms compete for, are generally mates, food and space (for access to the former). Whilst mates are valued only within species, in that the definition of a species requires it so, both food and space have the potential to be shared by very different organisms. It is now clear that vertebrates may compete with remotely related species: e.g. with squid for krill and with insects for nectar or seeds. Diamond suggested that (i) mutual aggression, (ii) displacement and (iii) evolutionary change in morphology would be increasingly asymmetric with competitor dissimilarity. Thus, with increasing taxonomic distance between two competitors (A and B), increasing aggression is exhibited between them and, increasingly, one consistently displaces the other. Here, Darwin's suggestion and Diamond's first two theories are tested across a taxonomic spectrum for the first time to the best of the author's knowledge. The proportion of spatial competitors in two different marine invertebrate groups demonstrating mutual aggression and displacement increases with taxon divergence (Nei's genetic identity). Congenerics were twice as likely to fight as conspecifics, and confamilial competitors were three times as likely to fight as conspecifics. This relationship seems robust to taxonomic and environmental variability. Competitors do not need to be as distant as birds and bees for complete asymmetry, a different family seems sufficient.

  19. Asymmetric magnetic proximity effect in a Pd/Co/Pd trilayer system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Ok; Song, Kyung Mee; Choi, Yongseong; Min, Byoung-Chul; Kim, Jae-Sung; Choi, Jun Woo; Lee, Dong Ryeol

    2016-01-01

    In spintronic devices consisting of ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic systems, the ferromagnet-induced magnetic moment in the adjacent nonmagnetic material significantly influences the spin transport properties. In this study, such magnetic proximity effect in a Pd/Co/Pd trilayer system is investigated by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and x-ray resonant magnetic reflectivity, which enables magnetic characterizations with element and depth resolution. We observe that the total Pd magnetic moments induced at the top Co/Pd interface are significantly larger than the Pd moments at the bottom Pd/Co interface, whereas transmission electron microscopy and reflectivity analysis indicate the two interfaces are nearly identical structurally. Such asymmetry in magnetic proximity effects could be important for understanding spin transport characteristics in ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic systems and its potential application to spin devices. PMID:27151368

  20. Asymmetric magnetic proximity effect in a Pd/Co/Pd trilayer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Ok; Song, Kyung Mee; Choi, Yongseong; Min, Byoung-Chul; Kim, Jae-Sung; Choi, Jun Woo; Lee, Dong Ryeol

    2016-05-01

    In spintronic devices consisting of ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic systems, the ferromagnet-induced magnetic moment in the adjacent nonmagnetic material significantly influences the spin transport properties. In this study, such magnetic proximity effect in a Pd/Co/Pd trilayer system is investigated by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and x-ray resonant magnetic reflectivity, which enables magnetic characterizations with element and depth resolution. We observe that the total Pd magnetic moments induced at the top Co/Pd interface are significantly larger than the Pd moments at the bottom Pd/Co interface, whereas transmission electron microscopy and reflectivity analysis indicate the two interfaces are nearly identical structurally. Such asymmetry in magnetic proximity effects could be important for understanding spin transport characteristics in ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic systems and its potential application to spin devices.

  1. Asymmetric magnetic proximity effect in a Pd/Co/Pd trilayer system

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Ok; Song, Kyung Mee; Choi, Yongseong; Min, Byoung-Chul; Kim, Jae-Sung; Choi, Jun Woo; Lee, Dong Ryeol

    2016-01-01

    In spintronic devices consisting of ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic systems, the ferromagnet-induced magnetic moment in the adjacent nonmagnetic material significantly influences the spin transport properties. In this study, such magnetic proximity effect in a Pd/Co/Pd trilayer system is investigated by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and x-ray resonant magnetic reflectivity, which enables magnetic characterizations with element and depth resolution. We observe that the total Pd magnetic moments induced at the top Co/Pd interface are significantly larger than the Pd moments at the bottom Pd/Co interface, whereas transmission electron microscopy and reflectivity analysis indicate the two interfaces are nearly identical structurally. Such asymmetry in magnetic proximity effects could be important for understanding spin transport characteristics in ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic systems and its potential application to spin devices. PMID:27151368

  2. Asymmetric magnetic proximity effect in a Pd/Co/Pd trilayer system

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, Dong -Ok; Song, Kyung Mee; Choi, Yongseong; Min, Byoung -Chul; Kim, Jae -Sung; Choi, Jun Woo; Lee, Dong Ryeol

    2016-05-06

    In spintronic devices consisting of ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic systems, the ferromagnet-induced magnetic moment in the adjacent nonmagnetic material significantly influences the spin transport properties. In this study, such magnetic proximity effect in a Pd/Co/Pd trilayer system is investigated by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and x-ray resonant magnetic reflectivity, which enables magnetic characterizations with element and depth resolution. We observe that the total Pd magnetic moments induced at the top Co/Pd interface are significantly larger than the Pd moments at the bottom Pd/Co interface, whereas transmission electron microscopy and reflectivity analysis indicate the two interfaces are nearly identical structurally. Furthermore, such asymmetry inmore » magnetic proximity effects could be important for understanding spin transport characteristics in ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic systems and its potential application to spin devices.« less

  3. Analytical formulation of lunar cratering asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nan; Zhou, Ji-Lin

    2016-10-01

    Context. The cratering asymmetry of a bombarded satellite is related to both its orbit and impactors. The inner solar system impactor populations, that is, the main-belt asteroids (MBAs) and the near-Earth objects (NEOs), have dominated during the late heavy bombardment (LHB) and ever since, respectively. Aims: We formulate the lunar cratering distribution and verify the cratering asymmetries generated by the MBAs as well as the NEOs. Methods: Based on a planar model that excludes the terrestrial and lunar gravitations on the impactors and assuming the impactor encounter speed with Earth venc is higher than the lunar orbital speed vM, we rigorously integrated the lunar cratering distribution, and derived its approximation to the first order of vM/venc. Numerical simulations of lunar bombardment by the MBAs during the LHB were performed with an Earth-Moon distance aM = 20-60 Earth radii in five cases. Results: The analytical model directly proves the existence of a leading/trailing asymmetry and the absence of near/far asymmetry. The approximate form of the leading/trailing asymmetry is (1 + A1cosβ), which decreases as the apex distance β increases. The numerical simulations show evidence of a pole/equator asymmetry as well as the leading/trailing asymmetry, and the former is empirically described as (1 + A2cos2ϕ), which decreases as the latitude modulus | ϕ | increases. The amplitudes A1,2 are reliable measurements of asymmetries. Our analysis explicitly indicates the quantitative relations between cratering distribution and bombardment conditions (impactor properties and the lunar orbital status) like A1 ∝ vM/venc, resulting in a method for reproducing the bombardment conditions through measuring the asymmetry. Mutual confirmation between analytical model and numerical simulations is found in terms of the cratering distribution and its variation with aM. Estimates of A1 for crater density distributions generated by the MBAs and the NEOs are 0.101-0.159 and 0

  4. Quantum asymmetry between time and space

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    An asymmetry exists between time and space in the sense that physical systems inevitably evolve over time, whereas there is no corresponding ubiquitous translation over space. The asymmetry, which is presumed to be elemental, is represented by equations of motion and conservation laws that operate differently over time and space. If, however, the asymmetry was found to be due to deeper causes, this conventional view of time evolution would need reworking. Here we show, using a sum-over-paths formalism, that a violation of time reversal (T) symmetry might be such a cause. If T symmetry is obeyed, then the formalism treats time and space symmetrically such that states of matter are localized both in space and in time. In this case, equations of motion and conservation laws are undefined or inapplicable. However, if T symmetry is violated, then the same sum over paths formalism yields states that are localized in space and distributed without bound over time, creating an asymmetry between time and space. Moreover, the states satisfy an equation of motion (the Schrödinger equation) and conservation laws apply. This suggests that the time–space asymmetry is not elemental as currently presumed, and that T violation may have a deep connection with time evolution. PMID:26997899

  5. Toroidal current asymmetry in tokamak disruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, H. R.

    2014-10-15

    It was discovered on JET that disruptions were accompanied by toroidal asymmetry of the toroidal plasma current I{sub ϕ}. It was found that the toroidal current asymmetry was proportional to the vertical current moment asymmetry with positive sign for an upward vertical displacement event (VDE) and negative sign for a downward VDE. It was observed that greater displacement leads to greater measured I{sub ϕ} asymmetry. Here, it is shown that this is essentially a kinematic effect produced by a VDE interacting with three dimensional MHD perturbations. The relation of toroidal current asymmetry and vertical current moment is calculated analytically and is verified by numerical simulations. It is shown analytically that the toroidal variation of the toroidal plasma current is accompanied by an equal and opposite variation of the toroidal current flowing in a thin wall surrounding the plasma. These currents are connected by 3D halo current, which is π/2 radians out of phase with the n = 1 toroidal current variations.

  6. Corrections to quark asymmetries at LEP

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, A.; Monig, K.; /DESY, Zeuthen

    2004-11-01

    The most precise measurement of the weak mixing angle sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub eff}{sup l} at LEP is from the forward-backward asymmetry e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} b{bar b} at the Z-pole. In this note the QED and electroweak radiative corrections to obtain the pole asymmetry from the measured asymmetry for b- and c-quarks have been calculated using ZFITTER, which has been amended to allow a consistent treatment of partial two-loop corrections for the b-quark final asymmetries. A total correction of {delta}A{sub FB}{sup b} = 0.0019 {+-} 0.0002 and {delta}A{sub FB}{sup c} = 0.0064 {+-} 0.0001 has been found, where the remaining theoretical uncertainty is much too small to explain the apparent discrepancy between sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub eff}{sup l} obtained from A{sub FB}{sup b} and from the left-right asymmetry at SLD.

  7. Range gated strip proximity sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1996-01-01

    A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance.

  8. Range gated strip proximity sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-12-03

    A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance. 6 figs.

  9. Proximal Priority Laser Therapy: PPLT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohshiro, Toshio

    2004-09-01

    The author has, in the past, classified treatment methods for pain geometrically as point, line, two-dimensional, three-dimensional treatment and has used these over the years. However as a practitioner of western medicine, the author originally treated pain only directed at the painful site, and encountered cases where local treatment did not suffice. The author proved with SPECT and the Rand Phantom that treating the neck which is the midpoint of the brain, the center of the nervous system and the heart, the center of circulation, increased cerebral blood flow and also that laser emitted to neck will reach the spinal chord no matter from where on the neck the laser is emitted. From such research and 25 years of clinical experience, the author has created an anatomy based, systemic treatment method called the Proximal Priority Laser Therapy (PPLT) where not only the cerebral cortex, spinal chord and peripheral nerves are treated but also the tracts of blood vessels and lymph ducts are treated as well. Treatment method and cases are presented herein.

  10. Probing lepton asymmetry with 21 cm fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Kohri, Kazunori; Oyama, Yoshihiko; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Takahashi, Tomo E-mail: oyamayo@post.kek.jp E-mail: tomot@cc.saga-u.ac.jp

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the issue of how accurately we can constrain the lepton number asymmetry ξ{sub ν}=μ{sub ν}/T{sub ν} in the Universe by using future observations of 21 cm line fluctuations and cosmic microwave background (CMB). We find that combinations of the 21 cm line and the CMB observations can constrain the lepton asymmetry better than big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). Additionally, we also discuss constraints on ξ{sub ν} in the presence of some extra radiation, and show that the 21 cm line observations can substantially improve the constraints obtained by CMB alone, and allow us to distinguish the effects of the lepton asymmetry from the ones of extra radiation.

  11. Azimuthal Asymmetries in Meson Electroproduction at HERMES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasch, Delia

    2003-07-01

    The measurement of single-spin azimuthal asymmetries for pseudoscalar meson production in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of 27.6 GeV electrons off a longitudinally polarised hydrogen and deuterium target is reported by the HERMES experiment. A significant target-spin asymmetry amplitude in the azimuthal distribution of charged and neutral pions and positively charged kaons relative to the lepton scattering plane has been observed. The dependence on the relevant kinematic variables which are the Bjorken variable x, the meson fractional energy z and the meson transverse momentum P⊥ has been investigated as well. The results are compared to predictions of model calculations which are base on a fragmentation function that varies with the transverse polarisation of the struck quark. In addition, data from the measurement of a single beam-spin azimuthal asymmetry in the electroproduction of positive pions in semi-inclusive and semi-exclusive deep-inelastic scattering will be presented.

  12. Proximal Participation: A Pathway into Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Selena

    2013-01-01

    In a longitudinal case study of apprentices, the term proximal participation was coined to describe the entry process of young people, with unclear career destinations, into the trade of baking. This article unravels the significance of proximal participation in the decision-making processes of young people who enter a trade through initial…

  13. Grouping by proximity in haptic contour detection.

    PubMed

    Overvliet, Krista E; Krampe, Ralf Th; Wagemans, Johan

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the applicability of the Gestalt principle of perceptual grouping by proximity in the haptic modality. To do so, we investigated the influence of element proximity on haptic contour detection. In the course of four sessions ten participants performed a haptic contour detection task in which they freely explored a haptic random dot display that contained a contour in 50% of the trials. A contour was defined by a higher density of elements (raised dots), relative to the background surface. Proximity of the contour elements as well as the average proximity of background elements was systematically varied. We hypothesized that if proximity of contour elements influences haptic contour detection, detection will be more likely when contour elements are in closer proximity. This should be irrespective of the ratio with the proximity of the background elements. Results showed indeed that the closer the contour elements were, the higher the detection rates. Moreover, this was the case independent of the contour/background ratio. We conclude that the Gestalt law of proximity applies to haptic contour detection.

  14. Proximate Sources of Collective Teacher Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Curt M.; Forsyth, Patrick B.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Recent scholarship has augmented Bandura's theory underlying efficacy formation by pointing to more proximate sources of efficacy information involved in forming collective teacher efficacy. These proximate sources of efficacy information theoretically shape a teacher's perception of the teaching context, operationalizing the difficulty…

  15. Footwear Decreases Gait Asymmetry during Running

    PubMed Central

    Hoerzer, Stefan; Federolf, Peter A.; Maurer, Christian; Baltich, Jennifer; Nigg, Benno M.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research on elderly people has suggested that footwear may improve neuromuscular control of motion. If footwear does in fact improve neuromuscular control, then such an influence might already be present in young, healthy adults. A feature that is often used to assess neuromuscular control of motion is the level of gait asymmetry. The objectives of the study were (a) to develop a comprehensive asymmetry index (CAI) that is capable of detecting gait asymmetry changes caused by external boundary conditions such as footwear, and (b) to use the CAI to investigate whether footwear influences gait asymmetry during running in a healthy, young cohort. Kinematic and kinetic data were collected for both legs of 15 subjects performing five barefoot and five shod over-ground running trials. Thirty continuous gait variables including ground reaction forces and variables of the hip, knee, and ankle joints were computed for each leg. For each individual, the differences between the variables for the right and left leg were calculated. Using this data, a principal component analysis was conducted to obtain the CAI. This study had two main outcomes. First, a sensitivity analysis suggested that the CAI had an improved sensitivity for detecting changes in gait asymmetry caused by external boundary conditions. The CAI may, therefore, have important clinical applications such as monitoring the progress of neuromuscular diseases (e.g. stroke or cerebral palsy). Second, the mean CAI for shod running (131.2 ± 48.5; mean ± standard deviation) was significantly lower (p = 0.041) than the CAI for barefoot running (155.7 ± 39.5). This finding suggests that in healthy, young adults gait asymmetry is reduced when running in shoes compared to running barefoot, which may be a result of improved neuromuscular control caused by changes in the afferent sensory feedback. PMID:26488484

  16. [Robot-assisted coelioscopic proximal tubal reanastomosis].

    PubMed

    Carbonnel, M; Roulot, A; Fay, S; Ayoubi, J-M

    2013-01-01

    We report two cases of robot-assisted coelioscopic proximal tubal reanastomosis after proximal tubal ligature. Patients were aged 43 and 34 years respectively and had previously undergone proximal tubal ligation by coagulation section at 37 years of age for the first patient, and by Filshie clip at 24 years for the second one. Both had regular menstrual cycles and their ovarian reserve was good. Their partners were presenting with normal sperm criteria. Proximal tubal reanastomosis was carried out in September 2010 by robotic coelioscopy with five extramucous vicryl 5-0 stitches on each tube and positive blue testing. Total durations of the interventions were 200 and 220minutes respectively. Postoperative outcomes were simple and patients had spontaneous pregnancy at 4 and 2.5 months respectively. Both pregnancies show normal progress currently. This is a contribution to literature data meant to determine the role of robotics in proximal tubal reanastomosis. PMID:22521989

  17. Nanoscale and proximity effects on low-dimensional helical magnetic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandratskii, Leonid; Fisher, J.; Park, S.; Ouazi, S.; Sander, D.; Kirschner, J.

    We combine symmetry arguments, first-principles calculations and spin-resolved STS measurements to study a 2D helical magnet of some nm extension in proximity to ferromagnetic Co and vacuum regions. Considering the prototypical helical 2D system, an Fe bilayer with intrinsic helical spin structure (1), we report a non-uniform distortion of the spin helix which depends on the lateral extension of the bilayer and on the proximity to either Co or vacuum. The proximity effect manifests itself in different modifications of the magnetic and electronic structures of Fe in vicinity of the interfaces with Co and vacuum. These nanosize and proximity effects have not been discussed before. We demonstrate that, in contrast to an ideal helix of infinite length, the lack of symmetry of the nm-long distorted Fe spin helix, induces an energy dependence of the direction of the electronic magnetization which is revealed in the measured energy dependence of the spin-asymmetry of the differential tunneling conductance. (1) Phark, S. H.; Fischer, J. A.; Corbetta, M.; Sander, D.; Nakamura, K. & Kirschner, J. Reduced-dimensionality-induced helimagnetism in iron nanoislands Nat Commun 5 (2014) 5183.

  18. Particle-antiparticle asymmetries from annihilations.

    PubMed

    Baldes, Iason; Bell, Nicole F; Petraki, Kalliopi; Volkas, Raymond R

    2014-10-31

    An extensively studied mechanism to create particle-antiparticle asymmetries is the out-of-equilibrium and CP violating decay of a heavy particle. We, instead, examine how asymmetries can arise purely from 2→2 annihilations rather than from the usual 1→2 decays and inverse decays. We review the general conditions on the reaction rates that arise from S-matrix unitarity and CPT invariance, and show how these are implemented in the context of a simple toy model. We formulate the Boltzmann equations for this model, and present an example solution. PMID:25396359

  19. Single hadron transverse spin asymmetries from COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Bradamante, Franco

    2007-06-13

    Transverse spin physics is an important part of the scientific programme of the COMPASS experiment at CERN. The analysis of the data taken with the target polarized orthogonally to the 160 GeV/c muon beam momentum has allowed to measure for the first time the Collins and Sivers asymmetries of the deuteron. Both for the positive and the negative hadrons produced in semi-inclusive DIS the measured asymmetries are small and, within errors, compatible with zero. New results for {pi}{+-} ans K{+-} are presented here.

  20. Particle-antiparticle asymmetries from annihilations.

    PubMed

    Baldes, Iason; Bell, Nicole F; Petraki, Kalliopi; Volkas, Raymond R

    2014-10-31

    An extensively studied mechanism to create particle-antiparticle asymmetries is the out-of-equilibrium and CP violating decay of a heavy particle. We, instead, examine how asymmetries can arise purely from 2→2 annihilations rather than from the usual 1→2 decays and inverse decays. We review the general conditions on the reaction rates that arise from S-matrix unitarity and CPT invariance, and show how these are implemented in the context of a simple toy model. We formulate the Boltzmann equations for this model, and present an example solution.

  1. Asymmetry in olfactory generalization and the inclusion criterion in ants.

    PubMed

    Bos, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Animals constantly face the challenge of extracting important information out of their environment, and for many animals much of this information is chemical in nature. The ability to discriminate and generalize between chemical stimuli is extremely important and is commonly thought to depend mostly on the structural similarity between the different stimuli. However, we previously provided evidence that in the carpenter ant Camponotus aethiops, generalization not only depends on structural similarity, but also on the animal's previous training experience. When individual ants were conditioned to substance A, they generalized toward a mixture of A and B. However, when trained to substance B, they did not generalize toward this mixture, resulting in asymmetrical generalization. This asymmetry followed an inclusion criterion, where the ants consistently generalized from a molecule with a long carbon chain to molecules with a shorter chain, but not the other way around. Here I will review the evidence for the inclusion criterion, describe possible proximate mechanisms underlying this phenomenon as well as discuss its potential adaptive significance.

  2. MLT1 links cytoskeletal asymmetry to organelle placement in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Mittelmeier, Telsa M.; Thompson, Mark D.; Lamb, Mary Rose; Lin, Huawen; Dieckmann, Carol L.

    2015-01-01

    Asymmetric placement of the photosensory eyespot organelle in Chlamydomonas is patterned by mother-daughter differences between the two basal bodies, which template the anterior flagella. Each basal body is associated with two bundled microtubule rootlets, one with two microtubules and one with four, forming a cruciate pattern. In wild type cells, the single eyespot is positioned at the equator in close proximity to the plus end of the daughter rootlet comprising four microtubules, the D4. Here we identify mutations in two linked loci, MLT1 and MLT2, which cause multiple eyespots. Antiserum raised against MLT1 localized the protein along the D4 rootlet microtubules, from the basal bodies to the eyespot. MLT1 associates immediately with the new D4 as it extends during cell division, before microtubule acetylation. MLT1 is a low-complexity protein of over 300,000 daltons. The expression or stability of MLT1 is dependent on MLT2, predicted to encode a second large, low-complexity protein. MLT1 was not restricted to the D4 rootlet in cells with the vfl2-220 mutation in the gene encoding the basal body-associated protein centrin. The cumulative data highlight the role of mother-daughter basal body differences in establishing asymmetry in associated rootlets, and suggest that eyespot components are directed to the correct location by MLT1 on the D4 microtubules. PMID:25809438

  3. MLT1 links cytoskeletal asymmetry to organelle placement in chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Mittelmeier, Telsa M; Thompson, Mark D; Lamb, Mary Rose; Lin, Huawen; Dieckmann, Carol L

    2015-03-01

    Asymmetric placement of the photosensory eyespot organelle in Chlamydomonas is patterned by mother-daughter differences between the two basal bodies, which template the anterior flagella. Each basal body is associated with two bundled microtubule rootlets, one with two microtubules and one with four, forming a cruciate pattern. In wild-type cells, the single eyespot is positioned at the equator in close proximity to the plus end of the daughter rootlet comprising four microtubules, the D4. Here we identify mutations in two linked loci, MLT1 and MLT2, which cause multiple eyespots. Antiserum raised against MLT1 localized the protein along the D4 rootlet microtubules, from the basal bodies to the eyespot. MLT1 associates immediately with the new D4 as it extends during cell division, before microtubule acetylation. MLT1 is a low-complexity protein of over 300,000 Daltons. The expression or stability of MLT1 is dependent on MLT2, predicted to encode a second large, low-complexity protein. MLT1 was not restricted to the D4 rootlet in cells with the vfl2-220 mutation in the gene encoding the basal body-associated protein centrin. The cumulative data highlight the role of mother-daughter basal body differences in establishing asymmetry in associated rootlets, and suggest that eyespot components are directed to the correct location by MLT1 on the D4 microtubules. PMID:25809438

  4. Asymmetry in olfactory generalization and the inclusion criterion in ants.

    PubMed

    Bos, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Animals constantly face the challenge of extracting important information out of their environment, and for many animals much of this information is chemical in nature. The ability to discriminate and generalize between chemical stimuli is extremely important and is commonly thought to depend mostly on the structural similarity between the different stimuli. However, we previously provided evidence that in the carpenter ant Camponotus aethiops, generalization not only depends on structural similarity, but also on the animal's previous training experience. When individual ants were conditioned to substance A, they generalized toward a mixture of A and B. However, when trained to substance B, they did not generalize toward this mixture, resulting in asymmetrical generalization. This asymmetry followed an inclusion criterion, where the ants consistently generalized from a molecule with a long carbon chain to molecules with a shorter chain, but not the other way around. Here I will review the evidence for the inclusion criterion, describe possible proximate mechanisms underlying this phenomenon as well as discuss its potential adaptive significance. PMID:25346797

  5. Search Asymmetry, Sustained Attention, and Response Inhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Hugh; Russell, Paul N.; Helton, William S.

    2011-01-01

    In the present experiment, we used search asymmetry to test whether the sustained attention to response task is a better measure of response inhibition or sustained attention. Participants performed feature present and feature absent target detection tasks using either a sustained attention to response task (SART; high Go low No-Go) or a…

  6. Asymmetry of selected Fraunhofer lines, 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostyk, R. I.; Orlova, T. V.

    1973-01-01

    The profiles of 20 Fraunhofer lines at the center of the solar disk and near the limb (cos theta = 0.44) were obtained, using the double-pass system. After correcting for the influence of the apparatus, the line profiles were investigated for the asymmetry run.

  7. Phonological and Phonetic Asymmetries of Cw Combinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suh, Yunju

    2009-01-01

    This thesis investigates the relationship between the phonological distribution of Cw combinations, and the acoustic/perceptual distinctiveness between syllables with plain C onsets and with Cw combination onsets. Distributional asymmetries of Cw combinations discussed in this thesis include the avoidance of Cw combinations in the labial consonant…

  8. On the nature of the baryon asymmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1984-01-01

    Whether the baryon asymmetry in the universe is a locally varying or universally fixed number is examined with focus on the existence of a possible matter antimatter domain structure in the universe arising from a GUT with spontaneous CP symmetry breaking. Theoretical considerations and observational data and astrophysical tests relating to this fundamental question are reviewed.

  9. Asymmetry of free-space optical links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucouvalas, Anthony C.

    1995-12-01

    The concept of asymmetry in free space optical links is discussed. Simple equations describing the minimum carrier sense distance, the minimum and maximum distance of reliable link, and maximum interference distance are derived. Examples from the recently drafted IRDA specification for IR links are given. A solution is presented to the parity variation problem by controlling the field of view of such transceivers.

  10. Infant Frontal Asymmetry Predicts Child Emotional Availability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Licata, Maria; Paulus, Markus; Kühn-Popp, Nina; Meinhardt, Jorg; Sodian, Beate

    2015-01-01

    While factors influencing maternal emotional availability (EA) have been well investigated, little is known about the development of child EA. The present longitudinal study investigated the role of frontal brain asymmetry in young children with regard to child EA (child responsiveness and involvement) in mother-child interaction in a sample of 28…

  11. Sources of Local Time Asymmetries in Magnetodiscs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arridge, C. S.; Kane, M.; Sergis, N.; Khurana, K. K.; Jackman, C. M.

    2015-04-01

    The rapidly rotating magnetospheres at Jupiter and Saturn contain a near-equatorial thin current sheet over most local times known as the magnetodisc, resembling a wrapped-up magnetotail. The Pioneer, Voyager, Ulysses, Galileo, Cassini and New Horizons spacecraft at Jupiter and Saturn have provided extensive datasets from which to observationally identify local time asymmetries in these magnetodiscs. Imaging in the infrared and ultraviolet from ground- and space-based instruments have also revealed the presence of local time asymmetries in the aurora which therefore must map to local time asymmetries in the magnetosphere. Asymmetries are found in (i) the configuration of the magnetic field and magnetospheric currents, where a thicker disc is found in the noon and dusk sectors; (ii) plasma flows where the plasma flow has local time-dependent radial components; (iii) a thicker plasma sheet in the dusk sector. Many of these features are also reproduced in global MHD simulations. Several models have been developed to interpret these various observations and typically fall into two groups: ones which invoke coupling with the solar wind (via reconnection or viscous processes) and ones which invoke internal rotational processes operating inside an asymmetrical external boundary. In this paper we review these observational in situ findings, review the models which seek to explain them, and highlight open questions and directions for future work.

  12. [Hand Preference: Cognitive Development, Asymmetry, and Consistency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bathurst, Kay; And Others

    Reported are results of three studies: (1) Hand Preference Consistency during Infancy and Preschool Years (K. Bathurst and A. W. Gottfried), (2) Asymmetry of Verbal Processing: Influence of Family Handedness (K. Bathurst and D. W. Kee), (3) Consistency of Hand Preference and Cognitive Development in Young Children (K. Bathurst and A. W.…

  13. Neutron contribution to nuclear DVCS asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Vadim Guzey

    2008-01-22

    Using a simple model for nuclear GPDs, we study the role of the neutron contribution to nuclear DVCS observables. As an example, we use the beam-spin asymmetry $A_{LU}^A$ measured in coherent and incoherent DVCS on a wide range of nuclear targets in the HERMES and JLab kinematics. We find that at small values of the momentum transfer $t$, $A_{LU}^A$ is dominated by the coherent-enriched contribution, which enhances $A_{LU}^A$ compared to the free proton asymmetry $A_{LU}^p$, $A_{LU}^A(\\phi)/A_{LU}^p(\\phi)=1.8-2.2$. At large values of $t$, the nuclear asymmetry is dominated by the incoherent contribution and $A_{LU}^A/(\\phi)A_{LU}^p(\\phi)=0.66-0.74$. The deviation of $A_{LU}^A(\\phi)/A_{LU}^p(\\phi)$ from unity at large $t$ is a result of the neutron contribution, which gives a possibility to constain neutron GPDs in incoherent nuclear DVCS. A similar trend is expected for other DVCS asymmetries.

  14. Phase asymmetry of heart rate variability signal.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, C K; Khandoker, A H; Palaniswami, M

    2015-02-01

    Heart rate asymmetry (HRA) is considered as a physiological phenomenon in healthy subjects. In this article, we propose a novel HRA index, Slope Index (SI), to quantify phase asymmetry of heart rate variability (HRV) system. We assessed the performance of proposed index in comparison with conventional (Guzik's Index (GI) and Porta's Index (PI)) HRA indices. As illustrative examples, we used two case studies: (i) differentiate physiologic RR series from synthetic RR series; and (ii) discriminate arrhythmia subjects from Healthy using beat-to-beat heart rate time series. The results showed that SI is a superior parameter than GI and PI for both case studies with maximum ROC area of 0.84 and 0.82 respectively. In contrast, GI and PI had ROC areas {0.78, 0.61} and {0.50, 0.56} in two case studies respectively. We also performed surrogate analysis to show that phase asymmetry is caused by a physiologic phenomena rather than a random nature of the signal. In conclusion, quantification of phase asymmetry of HRV provides additional information on HRA, which might have a potential clinical use to discriminate pathological HRV in future.

  15. Asymmetry parameter of peaked Fano line shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meierott, S.; Hotz, T.; Néel, N.; Kröger, J.

    2016-10-01

    The spectroscopic line shape of electronic and vibrational excitations is ubiquitously described by a Fano profile. In the case of nearly symmetric and peaked Fano line shapes, the fit of the conventional Fano function to experimental data leads to difficulties in unambiguously extracting the asymmetry parameter, which may vary over orders of magnitude without degrading the quality of the fit. Moreover, the extracted asymmetry parameter depends on initially guessed values. Using the spectroscopic signature of the single-Co Kondo effect on Au(110) the ambiguity of the extracted asymmetry parameter is traced to the highly symmetric resonance profile combined with the inevitable scattering of experimental data. An improved parameterization of the conventional Fano function is suggested that enables the nonlinear optimization in a reduced parameter space. In addition, the presence of a global minimum in the sum of squared residuals and thus the independence of start parameters may conveniently be identified in a two-dimensional plot. An angular representation of the asymmetry parameter is suggested in order to reliably determine uncertainty margins via linear error propagation.

  16. CP and charge asymmetries at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Morello, Michael; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa

    2007-11-01

    We present CDF results on the branching fractions and time-integrated direct CP asymmetries for B0 and B0s decay modes into pairs of charmless charged hadrons (pions or kaons). We report also the first observation of B0s->DsK mode and the measurement of its branching fraction.

  17. The Energy of Substituted Ethanes. Asymmetry Orbitals

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Lionel; Hoffmann, Roald; Otto, Peter

    1973-01-01

    The leading terms in the energy of a general substituted ethane are derived in explicit form as a function of the torsional angle θ, the substituent electronegativities, and their mutual overlaps. The energy is found to be the sum of all four overlaps between pairs of asymmetry orbitals, and satisfies the requisite symmetry properties. PMID:16592060

  18. Auxin asymmetry during gravitropism by tomato hypocotyls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, M. A.; Pickard, B. G.

    1989-01-01

    Gravitropic asymmetry of auxin was observed in hypocotyls of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) soon after horizontal placement: the ratio of apically supplied [3H]IAA collected from the lower sides to that from the upper sides was about 1.4 between 5 and 10 minutes. This was adequately early to account for the beginning of curvature. The auxin asymmetry ratio rose to about 2.5 between 20 and 25 minutes, and to 3.5 during the main phase of curvature. This compares reasonably well with the roughly 3.9 ratio for elongation on the lower side to elongation on the upper side that is the basis for the curvature. These data extend evidence that the Went-Cholodny theory for the mediation of tropisms is valid for dicot stems. Also consistent with the theory, an auxin asymmetry ratio of 2.5 was observed when wrong-way gravitropic curvature developed following application of a high level of auxin. In addition to reversing the asymmetry of elongation, the large supplement of auxin resulted in lower net elongation. Previous data established that ethylene is not involved in this decrease of growth as a function of increasing level of auxin.

  19. Parallel Processing in Visual Search Asymmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dosher, Barbara Anne; Han, Songmei; Lu, Zhong-Lin

    2004-01-01

    The difficulty of visual search may depend on assignment of the same visual elements as targets and distractors-search asymmetry. Easy C-in-O searches and difficult O-in-C searches are often associated with parallel and serial search, respectively. Here, the time course of visual search was measured for both tasks with speed-accuracy methods. The…

  20. Spin-Azimuthal Asymmetries in DIS at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Avakian, Harut

    2003-01-01

    We present latest measurements of beam and target single-spin asymmetries in the single pion electroproduction in the DIS. In addition to significant target single-spin asymmetries the CLAS detector at Jlab also measures a significant beam-spin asymmetry when the analysis is restricted to events for which the pion carries a large fraction of the virtual photon momentum.

  1. The area asymmetry in bipolar magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, T. T.

    2012-03-01

    Context. The area asymmetry between the preceding and following regions of opposite magnetic polarity in a bipolar sunspot group has been known since the studies of Hale and his colleagues in the early 20th century. This area asymmetry, however, has not yet been investigated quantitatively using magnetograms. Aims: We quantitatively define the area asymmetry of bipolar magnetic fields in the photosphere of active regions on the Sun, and investigate correlations between the area asymmetry and other parameters. Methods: We selected 138 bipolar regions including eleven recurrent regions from magnetograms observed by the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) from 23 April 1996 to 2 September 2001. These regions are on the southern hemisphere and around the solar meridian. The area asymmetry (A), tilt angle (θ), and magnetic orientation (M) are investigated separately in the preceding and following polarities of the respective active regions. Results: It is found that in 37% (51/138) of our events the preceding polarity regions have larger areas than the following polarity regions. The ratio of the area of the preceding and following polarity regions become close to be unity in four recurrent active regions. In the other four regions, the area ratios do not change, and in three regions, the area ratios become far from unity. Conclusions: Our results quantitatively confirmed our impression that areas of the preceding polarities are lower than those of the following polarities in many bipolar magnetic regions. Table 3 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/539/A13

  2. Promoting proximal formative assessment with relational discourse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherr, Rachel E.; Close, Hunter G.; McKagan, Sarah B.

    2012-02-01

    The practice of proximal formative assessment - the continual, responsive attention to students' developing understanding as it is expressed in real time - depends on students' sharing their ideas with instructors and on teachers' attending to them. Rogerian psychology presents an account of the conditions under which proximal formative assessment may be promoted or inhibited: (1) Normal classroom conditions, characterized by evaluation and attention to learning targets, may present threats to students' sense of their own competence and value, causing them to conceal their ideas and reducing the potential for proximal formative assessment. (2) In contrast, discourse patterns characterized by positive anticipation and attention to learner ideas increase the potential for proximal formative assessment and promote self-directed learning. We present an analysis methodology based on these principles and demonstrate its utility for understanding episodes of university physics instruction.

  3. Fast optical proximity correction: analytical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shioiri, Satomi; Tanabe, Hiroyoshi

    1995-05-01

    In automating optical proximity correction, calculation speed becomes important. In this paper we present a novel method for calculating proximity corrected features analytically. The calculation will take only several times the amount it takes to calculate intensity of one point on wafer. Therefore, the calculation will become extremely faster than conventional repetitive aerial image calculations. This method is applied to a simple periodic pattern. The simulated results show great improvement on linearity after correction and have proved the effectiveness of this analytical method.

  4. [Proximity, intimacy and promiscuity in care].

    PubMed

    Flicourt, Nadia

    2015-04-01

    Lying at the heart of the intimacy of the other person, the nature of care supposes that the caregiver identifies the components resulting from the proximity and the invasion of the patient's personal space, where perceptions and representations give rise to reactive emotions and behaviour. Between modesty and nudity, proximity and promiscuity, caregivers have to adjust their approach of proper care, limiting the risks of intrusion. PMID:26043630

  5. Proximity sensor system development. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Haley, D.C.; Pigoski, T.M.

    1998-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation (LMERC) and Merritt Systems, Inc. (MSI) entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) for the development and demonstration of a compact, modular proximity sensing system suitable for application to a wide class of manipulator systems operated in support of environmental restoration and waste management activities. In teleoperated modes, proximity sensing provides the manipulator operator continuous information regarding the proximity of the manipulator to objects in the workspace. In teleoperated and robotic modes, proximity sensing provides added safety through the implementation of active whole arm collision avoidance capabilities. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), managed by LMERC for the United States Department of Energy (DOE), has developed an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) design for the electronics required to support a modular whole arm proximity sensing system based on the use of capacitive sensors developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The use of ASIC technology greatly reduces the size of the electronics required to support the selected sensor types allowing deployment of many small sensor nodes over a large area of the manipulator surface to provide maximum sensor coverage. The ASIC design also provides a communication interface to support sensor commands from and sensor data transmission to a distributed processing system which allows modular implementation and operation of the sensor system. MSI is a commercial small business specializing in proximity sensing systems based upon infrared and acoustic sensors.

  6. Locking plates in proximal humerus fractures.

    PubMed

    Strohm, P C; Helwig, P; Konrad, G; Südkamp, N P

    2007-12-01

    It is well known that proximal humerus fractures are among the three most frequent fracture types. Epidemiological invetsigations show that in people elder than 60 years the fracture of the proximal humerus is more frequent than fractures of the hip region (17). Over the last decades several techniques have been applied for treatment of proximal humerus fractures. Widely accepted is the initiation of a conservative treatment regimen for undisplaced fractures, however, the standard treatment for displaced fractures, especially three and four part fractures, is still the center of scientific debate. Many different implants have been tested and investigated, thus demonstrating lack of sufficient results. Over the last years the development of angle stable, locking implants started and clinical studies demonstrated encouraging results. In our clinic the locking proximal humerus plate and the PHILOS plate advanced to the implant of choice for treatment of displaced proximal humerus fractures. There are still cases of implant failure and humerus head necrosis, but most of these complications were caused by the fracture type and not an implant specific problem. However the overall results with these new implants are encouraging. Key words: locking plates, proximal humerus fracture, humerus, humerus fracture, PHILOS, PHP.

  7. Three-dimensional assessment of facial asymmetry: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Akhil, Gopi; Senthil Kumar, Kullampalayam Palanisamy; Raja, Subramani; Janardhanan, Kumaresan

    2015-01-01

    For patients with facial asymmetry, complete and precise diagnosis, and surgical treatments to correct the underlying cause of the asymmetry are significant. Conventional diagnostic radiographs (submento-vertex projections, posteroanterior radiography) have limitations in asymmetry diagnosis due to two-dimensional assessments of three-dimensional (3D) images. The advent of 3D images has greatly reduced the magnification and projection errors that are common in conventional radiographs making it as a precise diagnostic aid for assessment of facial asymmetry. Thus, this article attempts to review the newly introduced 3D tools in the diagnosis of more complex facial asymmetries. PMID:26538893

  8. Is there an association between skeletal asymmetry and tooth absence?

    PubMed Central

    Thiesen, Guilherme; Gribel, Bruno Frazão; Pereira, Keila Cristina Rausch; Freitas, Maria Perpetua Mota

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Facial skeletal asymmetry is commonly found in humans and its main characteristic is menton deviation. The literature suggests that occlusal and masticatory problems arising from tooth absence could be related to the development of such asymmetries. Objective: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to estimate the prevalence of mandibular skeletal asymmetries and to investigate its association with posterior tooth absences. Methods: Tomographic images of 952 individuals aged from 18 to 75 years old were used. Asymmetry was the analyzed outcome, and it was categorized into three groups according to gnathion displacement in relation to the midsagittal plane (relative symmetry, moderate asymmetry, and severe asymmetry). Patients were sorted by the presence of all posterior teeth, unilateral posterior tooth absence, or bilateral posterior tooth absence. Chi-square test with a significance level of 5% was used to verify the association between posterior tooth absence and asymmetry. Results: Results show relative symmetry present in 55.3% of the sample, as well as the prevalence of 27.3% for moderate mandibular asymmetry and 17.4% for severe asymmetry. Moderate and severe mandibular asymmetries occurred in a higher proportion in patients with unilateral posterior tooth absence. However, there was no statistically significant difference between the analyzed groups (p = 0.691). Conclusions: In this study, mandibular asymmetries did not present any association with the absence of teeth on the posterior area of the arch. PMID:27653267

  9. Mandibular asymmetry in patients with the crouzon or apert syndrome.

    PubMed

    Elmi, P; Reitsma, J H; Buschang, P H; Wolvius, E B; Ongkosuwito, E M

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to describe directional and fluctuating mandibular asymmetry over time in children with Crouzon or Apert syndrome. Mandibular asymmetry of children between 7.5 and 14 years of age with Crouzon syndrome (n = 35) and Apert syndrome (n = 24) were compared with controls (n = 327). From panoramic radiographs, mandibular directional and fluctuating asymmetry was determined for the three groups. Multilevel statistical techniques were used to describe mandibular asymmetry changes over time. Patients with Crouzon and Apert syndromes showed statistically significant more fluctuating asymmetry for mandibular measures than did controls. Between the Crouzon and Apert syndromes groups, no statistical differences were found in directional and fluctuating asymmetry. The control group showed statistically significantly more directional asymmetry than did patients with Crouzon or Apert syndrome. The controls showed no change over time for the directional asymmetry of condylar-ramal height; however, the directional asymmetry of the gonial angle increased. Patients with Crouzon syndrome showed side dominance for only condylar-ramal height; whereas, patients with Apert syndrome did not show dominance for any of the measurements. Apert and Crouzon syndromes showed developmental instability, in contrast to the controls. No statistically significant longitudinal differences were found for either the directional or the fluctuating asymmetry between Crouzon and Apert syndromes. Findings for fluctuating and directional asymmetry for both syndromes may indicate an inability to cope with genetic and environmental stress during development and treatment, compared with untreated nonsyndromic individuals. PMID:24878346

  10. Bilateral asymmetry of the humerus during growth and development.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Amanda

    2011-08-01

    The development of handedness throughout growth can be investigated by using bilateral asymmetry of the humerus as a proxy for this trait. A large skeletal sample of nonadults from English archaeological sites was examined using standard metric techniques to assess when right-sided asymmetry first appears in the human skeleton. Results of this work indicate a change in directional asymmetry during growth and development, with infants and young children exhibiting no significant asymmetry and older children and adolescents demonstrating right-sidedness. This trend is consistent with what has been observed in previous studies of upper limb asymmetry in skeletal material and behaviorally in living children, adding further strength to the premise that biomechanical forces strongly influence bilateral asymmetry in the upper limb bones. Variability in the magnitude of asymmetry between different features of the humerus was also noted. This characteristic can be explained by differing degrees of genetic canalization, with length and articular dimensions being more strongly canalized than diaphyseal properties.

  11. Predictions of the poloidal asymmetries and transport frequencies in KSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, C. Lee, S. G.; Terzolo, L.; Stacey, W. M.

    2014-01-15

    The extended neoclassical rotation theory formulated in Miller flux surface geometry enables unprecedented neoclassical calculations of the poloidal asymmetries in density, rotation velocities, electrostatic potential along the flux surfaces, and of the inertial (Reynolds stress) and gyroviscous transport frequencies, which are strong functions of these asymmetries. This paper presents such calculations of the poloidal asymmetries and non-negligible inertial and gyroviscous transport frequencies in two KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) [Kwon et al., Nucl. Fusion 51, 094006 (2011)] Neutral Beam Injection H-mode discharges. The in-out asymmetries in the velocities are an order of magnitude larger than their up-down asymmetries. The magnitudes of the predicted inertial and gyroviscous transport frequencies depend on the magnitudes of the density and velocity asymmetries. The neoclassically predicted density asymmetries are shown to correspond with the reported measurements in tokamaks and the predicted carbon toroidal velocities agree very well with the measurements in KSTAR.

  12. Collider-independent tt forward-backward asymmetries.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Juste, A

    2012-11-21

    We introduce the forward-backward asymmetries A(u), A(d) corresponding to uū, dd → tt production, respectively, at hadron colliders. These are collider and center-of-mass independent observables, directly related to the forward-backward and charge asymmetries measured at the Tevatron and the LHC, respectively. We discuss how to extract these asymmetries from data. Because these asymmetries are collider independent, their measurement at these two colliders could elucidate the nature of the anomalous forward-backward asymmetry measured at the Tevatron. Our framework also shows in a model independent fashion that a positive Tevatron asymmetry exceeding the standard model expectation is compatible with the small asymmetry measured at the LHC.

  13. The Epigenesis of Planum Temporale Asymmetry in Twins

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Mark A.; Leonard, Christiana M.; Molloy, Elizabeth A.; Blumenthal, Jonathan; Zijdenbos, Alex; Giedd, Jay N.

    2009-01-01

    Variation in hemispheric asymmetry of the planum temporale (PT) has been related to verbal ability. The degree to which genetic and environmental factors mediate PT asymmetry is not known. This study examined the heritability for planar asymmetry in 12 dizygotic (DZ) and 27 monozygotic (MZ) male twin pairs who were between 6 and 16 years of age. There was weak but positive evidence for heritability of planar asymmetry. Co-twin similarity for planar asymmetry and Sylvian fissure morphology increased when excluding twins discordant for writing hand and when excluding twins exhibiting birth weight differences >20% from the analyses. Birth weight differences were also related to twin differences in total cerebral volume, but not central sulcus asymmetry. These results suggest that exogenous perinatal factors affect the epigenesis of planar asymmetry development. PMID:12050086

  14. Maturation of rat proximal tubule chloride permeability.

    PubMed

    Baum, Michel; Quigley, Raymond

    2005-12-01

    We have previously shown that neonate rabbit tubules have a lower chloride permeability but comparable mannitol permeability compared with adult proximal tubules. The surprising finding of lower chloride permeability in neonate proximals compared with adults impacts net chloride transport in this segment, which reabsorbs 60% of the filtered chloride in adults. However, this maturational difference in chloride permeability may not be applicable to other species. The present in vitro microperfusion study directly examined the chloride and mannitol permeability using in vitro perfused rat proximal tubules during postnatal maturation. Whereas there was no maturational change in mannitol permeability, chloride permeability was 6.3 +/- 1.3 x 10(-5) cm/s in neonate rat proximal convoluted tubule and 16.1 +/- 2.3 x 10(-5) cm/s in adult rat proximal convoluted tubule (P < 0.01). There was also a maturational increase in chloride permeability in the rat proximal straight tubule (5.1 +/- 0.6 x 10(-5) cm/s vs. 9.3 +/- 0.6 x 10(-5) cm/s, P < 0.01). There was no maturational change in bicarbonate-to-chloride permeabilities (P(HCO3)/P(Cl)) in the rat proximal straight tubules (PST) and proximal convoluted tubules (PCT) or in the sodium-to-chloride permeability (P(Na)/P(Cl)) in the proximal straight tubule; however, there was a significant maturational decrease in proximal convoluted tubule P(Na)/P(Cl) with postnatal development (1.31 +/- 0.12 in neonates vs. 0.75 +/- 0.06 in adults, P < 0.001). There was no difference in the transepithelial resistance measured by current injection and cable analysis in the PCT, but there was a maturational decrease in the PST (7.2 +/- 0.8 vs. 4.6 +/- 0.1 ohms x cm2, P < 0.05). These studies demonstrate there are maturational changes in the rat paracellular pathway that impact net NaCl transport during development. PMID:16051720

  15. GDH Integral on the Proton from Asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Yelena Prok

    2004-05-01

    Inclusive double spin electron asymmetries have been measured by scattering polarized electrons off the solid polarized {sup 15}NH{sub 3} target in Hall B of Jefferson Lab in 2000-2001. The virtual photon asymmetry A{sub 1} (x), the longitudinal spin structure function, g{sub 1} (x, Q{sup 2}), and the first moment, {Gamma}{sub 1}{sup p}, have been evaluated for a kinematic range of 0.05 {ge} Q{sup 2} {ge} 4.5 GeV{sup 2}. The extracted results complement the existing data in the resonance region, extending it to lower and higher Q{sup 2} regions. The results are important in the study of Q{sup 2} evolution of nucleon structure from the hadronic to partonic degrees of freedom.

  16. Dark matter assimilation into the baryon asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    D'Eramo, Francesco; Fei, Lin; Thaler, Jesse E-mail: lfei@mit.edu

    2012-03-01

    Pure singlets are typically disfavored as dark matter candidates, since they generically have a thermal relic abundance larger than the observed value. In this paper, we propose a new dark matter mechanism called {sup a}ssimilation{sup ,} which takes advantage of the baryon asymmetry of the universe to generate the correct relic abundance of singlet dark matter. Through assimilation, dark matter itself is efficiently destroyed, but dark matter number is stored in new quasi-stable heavy states which carry the baryon asymmetry. The subsequent annihilation and late-time decay of these heavy states yields (symmetric) dark matter as well as (asymmetric) standard model baryons. We study in detail the case of pure bino dark matter by augmenting the minimal supersymmetric standard model with vector-like chiral multiplets. In the parameter range where this mechanism is effective, the LHC can discover long-lived charged particles which were responsible for assimilating dark matter.

  17. Single spin asymmetries in electroproduction at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Harut Avakian; Latifa Elouadrhiri

    2004-06-02

    We present measurements of spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive processes in hard scattering kinematics using a 5.7 GeV electron beam and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at JLab. Scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons of an unpolarized liquid-hydrogen and off a polarized NH{sub 3} targets was studied over a wide range of kinematics. Non-zero single-beam and single-target spin asymmetries have been observed in semi-inclusive pion production in hard-scattering kinematics (Q{sup 2} > 1.2 GeV{sup 2}, W{sup 4} > 4 GeV{sup 2}). Systematic studies of factorization of x and z dependences have been done for different spin-dependent and spin-independent observables. No significant x/z dependence has been observed within statistical uncertainties, which is consistent with factorization of hard scattering and fragmentation processes.

  18. CLAS: Double-Pion Beam Asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen Strauch

    2005-10-01

    Beam-helicity asymmetries for the gamma+p -> pi+ + pi- + p reaction have been measured for center-of-mass energies between 1.35 GeV and 2.30 GeV at Jefferson Lab with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer using circularly polarized tagged photons. The beam-helicity asymmetries vary with kinematics and exhibit strong sensitivity to the dynamics of the reaction, as demonstrated in the comparison of the data with results of various phenomenological model calculations. These models currently do not provide an adequate description of the data over the entire kinematic range covered in this experiment. Additional polarization observables are accessible in an upcoming experiment at Jefferson Lab with polarized beam and target.

  19. Beam-Spin Asymmetry Measurement at CLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghasyan, M.

    2009-08-01

    Beam Single Spin Asymmetries in single neutral semi-inclusive pion electroproduction off an unpolarized hydrogen target in the deep inelastic scattering regime (Q2>1 GeV2, W2>4 GeV2) have been measured using a polarized electron beam of 5.776 GeV with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). The measured kinematical dependences are compared with published data and existing theoretical predictions.

  20. Effects of asymmetry in string fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Balazs, N.L. ); Csoergoe, T.; Lukacs, B.; Zimanyi, J. )

    1991-06-01

    The general solution of the one flavor integral equation for string fragmentation is presented and is approximated by a finite sum. The N pion phase space distribution is calculated for the emission points; thence the hadronic fragmentation function, the number density, and the energy density vs. rapidity are obtained. The authors discuss the effects of the left-right asymmetry embedded into the integral equation, and present numerical results based on the Lund fragmentation function.

  1. Inflationary power asymmetry from primordial domain walls

    SciTech Connect

    Jazayeri, Sadra; Akrami, Yashar; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Solomon, Adam R.; Wang, Yi E-mail: yashar.akrami@astro.uio.no E-mail: a.r.solomon@damtp.cam.ac.uk

    2014-11-01

    We study the asymmetric primordial fluctuations in a model of inflation in which translational invariance is broken by a domain wall. We calculate the corrections to the power spectrum of curvature perturbations; they are anisotropic and contain dipole, quadrupole, and higher multipoles with non-trivial scale-dependent amplitudes. Inspired by observations of these multipole asymmetries in terms of two-point correlations and variance in real space, we demonstrate that this model can explain the observed anomalous power asymmetry of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky, including its characteristic feature that the dipole dominates over higher multipoles. We test the viability of the model and place approximate constraints on its parameters by using observational values of dipole, quadrupole, and octopole amplitudes of the asymmetry measured by a local-variance estimator. We find that a configuration of the model in which the CMB sphere does not intersect the domain wall during inflation provides a good fit to the data. We further derive analytic expressions for the corrections to the CMB temperature covariance matrix, or angular power spectra, which can be used in future statistical analysis of the model in spherical harmonic space.

  2. Functional brain asymmetry, handedness and menarcheal age.

    PubMed

    Nikolova, P; Stoyanov, Z; Negrev, N

    1994-12-01

    Functional brain asymmetry influences many functions of the organism; the neuroendocrine axis is one that has received insufficient attention. In this study we set us as the goal of studying the link between functional brain asymmetry and menarcheal age in females with left versus right manual dominance. The appearance of the first menarche was used as a natural model of functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. 1695 females, aged between 16 and 25 years, were interviewed by questionnaire about manual dominance and menarcheal age. 182 women were selected and divided into 2 groups: all left-handers (n = 91), and a control group of 91 right-handers. We found a significantly lower average age of menarcheal appearance in the left-handers' age of 12.09 +/- 0.16 years compared to the right-handers' age of 13.32 +/- 0.12 years (p < 0.001). The earliest menarcheal age in left-handers was 8 years and the peak of appearance at age 13 (in 30.76% of the cases). In right-handers these values were 10 and 14 years (in 40.60% of the cases), respectively. The data allow us to accept the existence of a link between functional brain asymmetry and menarche, which causes earlier activation of the HPG axis in left-handed females.

  3. Structural connectivity asymmetry in the neonatal brain.

    PubMed

    Ratnarajah, Nagulan; Rifkin-Graboi, Anne; Fortier, Marielle V; Chong, Yap Seng; Kwek, Kenneth; Saw, Seang-Mei; Godfrey, Keith M; Gluckman, Peter D; Meaney, Michael J; Qiu, Anqi

    2013-07-15

    Asymmetry of the neonatal brain is not yet understood at the level of structural connectivity. We utilized DTI deterministic tractography and structural network analysis based on graph theory to determine the pattern of structural connectivity asymmetry in 124 normal neonates. We tracted white matter axonal pathways characterizing interregional connections among brain regions and inferred asymmetry in left and right anatomical network properties. Our findings revealed that in neonates, small-world characteristics were exhibited, but did not differ between the two hemispheres, suggesting that neighboring brain regions connect tightly with each other, and that one region is only a few paths away from any other region within each hemisphere. Moreover, the neonatal brain showed greater structural efficiency in the left hemisphere than that in the right. In neonates, brain regions involved in motor, language, and memory functions play crucial roles in efficient communication in the left hemisphere, while brain regions involved in emotional processes play crucial roles in efficient communication in the right hemisphere. These findings suggest that even at birth, the topology of each cerebral hemisphere is organized in an efficient and compact manner that maps onto asymmetric functional specializations seen in adults, implying lateralized brain functions in infancy. PMID:23501049

  4. Proximal Junctional Kyphosis: Diagnosis, Pathogenesis, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jaewon

    2016-01-01

    Proximal junctional kyphosis (PJK) is a common radiographic finding after long spinal fusion. A number of studies on the causes, risk factors, prevention, and treatment of PJK have been conducted. However, no clear definition of PJK has been established. In this paper, we aimed to clarify the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of PJK by reviewing relevant papers that have been published to date. A literature search was conducted on PubMed using "proximal junctional", "proximal junctional kyphosis", and "proximal junctional failure" as search keywords. Only studies that were published in English were included in this study. The incidence of PJK ranges from 5% to 46%, and it has been reported that 66% of cases occur 3 months after surgery and approximately 80% occur within 18 months. A number of studies have reported that there is no significantly different clinical outcome between PJK patients and non-PJK patients. One study showed that PJK patients expressed more pain than non-PJK patients. However, recent studies focused on proximal junctional failure (PJF), which is accepted as a severe form of PJK. PJF showed significant adverse impact in clinical aspect such as pain, neurologic deficit, ambulatory difficulties, and social isolation. Numerous previous studies have identified various risk factors and reported on the treatment and prevention of PJK. Based on these studies, we determined the clinical significance and impact of PJK. In addition, it is important to find a strategic approach to the proper treatment of PJK. PMID:27340542

  5. Evidence for joint moment asymmetry in healthy populations during gait.

    PubMed

    Lathrop-Lambach, Rebecca L; Asay, Jessica L; Jamison, Steve T; Pan, Xueliang; Schmitt, Laura C; Blazek, Katerina; Siston, Robert A; Andriacchi, Thomas P; Chaudhari, Ajit M W

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the presence and prevalence of asymmetry in lower extremity joint moments within and across healthy populations during overground walking. Bilateral gait data from several studies performed at two institutions were pooled from 182 healthy, pain-free subjects. Four distinct populations were identified based on age, activity level and body mass index. Mean peak external joint moments were calculated from three to six trials of level overground walking at self-selected speed for each subject. Right and left limb moments were reclassified as "greater" or "lesser" moment for each subject to prevent obscuring absolute asymmetry due to averaging over positive and negative asymmetries across subjects. A clinically relevant asymmetry measure was calculated from the peak joint moments with an initial chosen cutoff value of 10%. Confidence intervals for the proportion of subjects with greater than 10% asymmetry between limbs were estimated based on the binomial distribution. We found a high amount of asymmetry between the limbs in healthy populations. More than half of our overall population exceeded 10% asymmetry in peak hip and knee flexion and adduction moments. Group medians exceeded 10% asymmetry for all variables in all populations. This may have important implications on gait evaluations, particularly clinical evaluations or research studies where asymmetry is used as an outcome. Additional research is necessary to determine acceptable levels of joint moment asymmetry during gait and to determine whether asymmetrical joint moments influence the development of symptomatic pathology or success of lower extremity rehabilitation. PMID:25035185

  6. Proximity assays for sensitive quantification of proteins.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Christina; Ruff, David; Kirvell, Sara; Johnson, Gemma; Dhillon, Harvinder S; Bustin, Stephen A

    2015-06-01

    Proximity assays are immunohistochemical tools that utilise two or more DNA-tagged aptamers or antibodies binding in close proximity to the same protein or protein complex. Amplification by PCR or isothermal methods and hybridisation of a labelled probe to its DNA target generates a signal that enables sensitive and robust detection of proteins, protein modifications or protein-protein interactions. Assays can be carried out in homogeneous or solid phase formats and in situ assays can visualise single protein molecules or complexes with high spatial accuracy. These properties highlight the potential of proximity assays in research, diagnostic, pharmacological and many other applications that require sensitive, specific and accurate assessments of protein expression. PMID:27077033

  7. Proximity assays for sensitive quantification of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Christina; Ruff, David; Kirvell, Sara; Johnson, Gemma; Dhillon, Harvinder S.; Bustin, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Proximity assays are immunohistochemical tools that utilise two or more DNA-tagged aptamers or antibodies binding in close proximity to the same protein or protein complex. Amplification by PCR or isothermal methods and hybridisation of a labelled probe to its DNA target generates a signal that enables sensitive and robust detection of proteins, protein modifications or protein–protein interactions. Assays can be carried out in homogeneous or solid phase formats and in situ assays can visualise single protein molecules or complexes with high spatial accuracy. These properties highlight the potential of proximity assays in research, diagnostic, pharmacological and many other applications that require sensitive, specific and accurate assessments of protein expression. PMID:27077033

  8. Existence and convergence of best proximity points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldred, A. Anthony; Veeramani, P.

    2006-11-01

    Consider a self map T defined on the union of two subsets A and B of a metric space and satisfying T(A)[subset of or equal to]B and T(B)[subset of or equal to]A. We give some contraction type existence results for a best proximity point, that is, a point x such that d(x,Tx)=dist(A,B). We also give an algorithm to find a best proximity point for the map T in the setting of a uniformly convex Banach space.

  9. Rare decays and CP asymmetries in charged B decays

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, N.G.

    1991-01-01

    The theory of loop induced rare decays and the rate asymmetry due to CP violation in charged B Decays in reviewed. After considering b {yields} s{gamma} and b {yields} se{sup +}e{sup {minus}} decays, the asymmetries for pure penguin process are estimated first. A larger asymmetry can result in those modes where a tree diagram and a penguin diagram interfere, however these estimates are necessarily model dependent. Estimates of Cabbibo suppressed penguins are also considered.

  10. CPT violation and particle-antiparticle asymmetry in cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgov, A. D.

    2010-04-15

    General features of generation of the cosmological charge asymmetry in CPT noninvariant world are discussed. If the effects of CPT violationmanifest themselves only inmass differences of particles and antiparticles, the baryon asymmetry of the Universe hardly can be explained solely by breaking of CPT invariance. However, CPT noninvariant theories may lead to a new effect of distorting the usual equilibrium distributions. If this takes place, CPT violation may explain the baryon asymmetry of the Universe.

  11. Hemispheric Asymmetries of the Subauroral Ion Drifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, F.; Zhang, X.; Wang, W.; Chen, B.

    2015-12-01

    A large database of subauroral ion drifts (SAID) events from DMSP observations from 1987 to 2012 is used to systematically investigate the features of SAID. SAID occurs mostly at ~ 62° / -60° magnetic latitude (MLAT) and ~ 2215 / 2245 magnetic local time (MLT) for geomagnetically quiet conditions and at ~ 58°/ -56° MLAT and ~ 2215 / 2245 MLT for geomagnetically disturbed conditions in the North Hemisphere (NH) / South Hemisphere (SH), respectively. Significant north-south asymmetries in SAID occurrence, shape, and geomagnetic activity variations are found in this statistical study. The latitudinal width of a SAID is larger in the NH than in the SH. An interesting finding of this work is that the SAID occurrence probability peaks have a ~ 180° difference in longitude between the two hemispheres in the geographic coordinates for both geomagnetically quiet and disturbed conditions. The SAID width peaks in almost the same geomagnetic meridian zone with a geomagnetic longitude of ~ 80°-120° in both hemispheres. Significant hemispheric asymmetries and spike signatures with sharpe dips are found in all the latitudinal profiles of the horizontal velocities of SAIDs.The SAID is highly correlated to geomagnetic activity, indicating that the location and evolution of the SAID might be influenced by global geomagnetic activity, auroral dynamics, and the dynamics of ring currents. The hemispheric asymmetries of SAID may possibly be related with the differences of the hemispheric power, the cross-polar cap potential, and the density of region-2 field-aligned currents in the two hemispheres. Detailed investigations will be presented in future.

  12. Goal-Proximity Decision-Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veksler, Vladislav D.; Gray, Wayne D.; Schoelles, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Reinforcement learning (RL) models of decision-making cannot account for human decisions in the absence of prior reward or punishment. We propose a mechanism for choosing among available options based on goal-option association strengths, where association strengths between objects represent previously experienced object proximity. The proposed…

  13. Current status of proximal gastric vagotomy.

    PubMed Central

    Schirmer, B D

    1989-01-01

    Proximal gastric vagotomy is nearing its twentieth year in clinical use as an operation for peptic ulcer disease. No other acid-reducing operation has undergone as much scrutiny or study. At this time, the evidence of such studies and long-term follow-up strongly supports the use of proximal gastric vagotomy as the treatment of choice for chronic duodenal ulcer in patients who have failed medical therapy. Its application in treating the complications of peptic ulcer disease, which recently have come to represent an increasingly greater percentage of all operations done for peptic ulcer disease, is well-tested. However, initial series suggest that it should probably occupy a prominent role in treating some of these complications, particularly in selected patients, in the future. The operation has the well-documented ability to reduce gastric acid production, not inhibit gastric bicarbonate production, and also minimally inhibit gastric motility. The combination of these physiologic results after proximal gastric vagotomy, along with preservation of the normal antropyloroduodenal mechanism of gastrointestinal control, serve to allow patients with proximal gastric vagotomy the improved benefits of significantly fewer severe gastrointestinal side effects than are seen after other operations for peptic ulcer disease. PMID:2644897

  14. [Novel treatment possibilities for proximal caries].

    PubMed

    Meyer-Lueckel, Hendrik; Fejerskov, Ole; Paris, Sebastian

    2009-01-01

    So far approaches for caries treatment follow a dichotomized scheme: Non invasive options of primary and secondary prevention are contrasted to invasive treatment of caries lesions. Depending on the treatment philosophy of dentists and dental schools an early or late invasive treatment threshold is recommended. Sealing of proximal lesions as done in pit and fissures has only been established in some dental schools, so far. Moreover, infiltration of the enamel part of lesions could close the gap between preventive and invasive measures. Most of these novel treatment options for proximal surfaces are currently in the last stages of product development. With respect to the good clinical results of proximal sealing with conventional sealants, this regimen seems already be recommendable to hamper further lesion progression in clinical practice. Caries infiltration of lesions situated on proximal and other smooth surfaces might even be a more promising approach, if clinical studies corroborate the recent in vitro findings. All these novel limited invasive strategies might be suitable to complete the current dichotomized way of caries treatment.

  15. Laparoscopic Proximal Gastrectomy With Gastric Tube Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Norio; Toujigamori, Manabu; Shiroshita, Hidefumi; Etoh, Tsuyoshi; Inomata, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: There is no standardized method of reconstruction in laparoscopic proximal gastrectomy (LPG). We present a novel technique of reconstruction with a long, narrow gastric tube in LPG for early gastric cancer (EGC). Methods: During the laparoscopic procedure, the upper part of the stomach is fully mobilized with perigastric and suprapancreatic lymphadenectomy, and then the abdominal esophagus is transected. After a minilaparotomy is created, the entire stomach is pulled outside. A long, narrow gastric tube (20 cm long, 3 cm wide) is created with a linear stapler. The proximal part of the gastric tube is formed into a cobra head shape for esophagogastric tube anastomosis, which is then performed with a 45-mm linear stapler under laparoscopic view. The end of the esophagus is fixed on the gastric tube to prevent postoperative esophageal reflux. Results: Thirteen patients with early proximal gastric cancer underwent the procedure. The mean operative time was 283 min, and median blood loss was 63 ml. There were no conversions to open surgery, and no intraoperative complications. Conclusion: This new technique of reconstruction after LPG is simple and feasible. The procedure has the potential of becoming a standard reconstruction technique after LPG for proximal EGC. PMID:27547027

  16. Vortices in normal part of proximity system

    SciTech Connect

    Kogan, V. G.

    2015-05-26

    It is shown that the order parameter Δ induced in the normal part of superconductor-normal-superconductor proximity system is modulated in the magnetic field differently from vortices in bulk superconductors. Whereas Δ turns zero at vortex centers, the magnetic structure of these vortices differs from that of Abrikosov's.

  17. Single transverse spin asymmetry of prompt photon production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamberg, Leonard; Kang, Zhong-Bo

    2012-11-01

    We study the single transverse spin asymmetry of prompt photon production in high energy proton-proton scattering. We include the contributions from both the direct and fragmentation photons. While the asymmetry for direct photon production receives only the Sivers type of contribution, the asymmetry for fragmentation photons receives both the Sivers and Collins types of contributions. We make a model calculation for quark-to-photon Collins function, which is then used to estimate the Collins asymmetry for fragmentation photons. We find that the Collins asymmetry for fragmentation photons is very small, thus the single transverse spin asymmetry of prompt photon production is mainly coming from the Sivers asymmetry in direct and fragmentation photons. We make predictions for the prompt photon spin asymmetry at RHIC energy, and emphasize the importance of such a measurement. The asymmetry of prompt photon production can provide a good measurement for the important twist-three quark-gluon correlation function, which is urgently needed in order to resolve the "sign mismatch" puzzle.

  18. [Asymmetry of antennal grooming in the cockroach (Periplaneta americana)].

    PubMed

    2014-07-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the key features of antennal grooming of male American cockroaches in neutral circumstances. It was shown for the first time that the right antenna was cleaned significantly more often than the left one, which indicates the presence of functional asymmetry of antennal grooming in this insect species. At the same time, no statistically significant asymmetry was found for grooming of antennal bases and legs. Morphological asymmetries of antennae and legs and/or brain lateralization are the plausible sources of observed behavioral asymmetry in antennal grooming.

  19. Charge asymmetry in charmed-meson photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhnoy, A. V. Likhoded, A. K.

    2006-01-15

    Within the perturbative-recombination model, the charge asymmetries in the D*{sup +}-D*{sup -}, D*{sup 0}-D*{sup 0}, and D{sup +}{sub s}-D{sup -}{sub s} yields are estimated under the kinematical conditions of the COMPASS experiment. Corrections that arise owing to the mass of a light quark in a charmed meson are taken into account. The yield of D{sup +}{sub s} mesons is predicted to be large in relation to the yield of D{sup -}{sub s} mesons.

  20. Asymmetries in gamma scattering by Fe-57.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. Y.; Goodman, C. D.

    1972-01-01

    Experiments were conducted with a setup in which a Co-57 single-line source was driven by a constant-acceleration motor. The 14.4-keV gamma rays emitted from the iron foil scatterer were detected by a proportional counter filled with krypton and carbon dioxide. The interference for individual Zeeman hyperfine transitions in a magnetic field was calculated. It was found that beside the cos phi angular dependence of line shape asymmetry, there exists a sin phi intensity dependence for some of the hyperfine transitions.

  1. Asymmetry in ferroelectric polymer laminate composites

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, B.A.; Scheinbeim, J.I.; Su, Ji

    1996-10-01

    Studies of the ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties of composite bilaminates of poly(vinylidene fluoride) and nylon 11 films have shown that the properties of the bilaminates cannot be understood solely in terms of the properties of the individual components. Further, the properties of films which are polarized with the positive voltage on the nylon 11 side are different from those having the positive voltage on the poly(vinylidene fluoride) side. This asymmetry is interpreted as resulting from a region of space charge trapped at the interface between the two layers.

  2. Top Quark Production Asymmetries AFBt and AFBl

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Berger, Edmond L.; Cao, Qing-Hong; Chen, Chuan-Ren; Yu, Jiang-Hao; Zhang, Hao

    2012-02-14

    A large forward-backward asymmetry is seen in both the top quark rapidity distribution AFBt and in the rapidity distribution of charged leptons AFBl from top quarks produced at the Tevatron. We study the kinematic and dynamic aspects of the relationship of the two observables arising from the spin correlation between the charged lepton and the top quark with different polarization states. We emphasize the value of both measurements, and we conclude that a new physics model which produces more right-handed than left-handed top quarks is favored by the present data.

  3. Semantic Asymmetries Are Modulated by Phonological Asymmetries: Evidence from the Disambiguation of Homophonic versus Heterophonic Homographs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peleg, Orna; Eviatar, Zohar

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated cerebral asymmetries in accessing multiple meanings of two types of homographs: homophonic homographs (e.g., "bank") and heterophonic homographs (e.g., "tear"). Participants read homographs preceded by either a biasing or a non-biasing sentential context and performed a lexical decision on lateralized targets…

  4. Factors affecting proximal tubular reabsorption during development

    SciTech Connect

    Kaskel, F.J.; Kumar, A.M.; Lockhart, E.A.; Evan, A.; Spitzer, A.

    1987-01-01

    Studies performed in several animal species have demonstrated that glomerulotubular balance is maintained throughout development despite the many changes that occur in the factors known to control it. In an attempt to understand the nature of this phenomenon the authors quantified the magnitude and described the profile of these changes in guinea pigs. The changes in physical forces were assessed from measurements of hydrostatic and oncotic pressures, whereas those in the permeability characteristics of the proximal tubule epithelium were estimated from permanence to radioactivity-labelled macromolecules of graded radii, histologic measurements of the intercellular channels, and measurements of end-proximal ratio of tubular fluid-to-plasma osmolality (TF/P/sub osm/). Between 1 and 50 days of age the net pressure for reabsorption increased from 15.0 to 30.9 mmHg with the major change occurring during the first 2-3 wk of postnatal life. The urinary recovery of (/sup 3/H)inulin, (/sup 14/C)sucrose, and (/sup 14/C)creatinine, injected in the early segment of proximal tubules did not vary with age. The urinary recovery of (/sup 14/C)mannitol increased from 92% at birth to 100% at 49 days of age. The length of the zonulae occludens and the width of the intercellular channels did not change during this period. The findings support the hypothesis that during early postnatal life glomerulotubular balance is made possible by a high permeability of the proximal tubule, which compensates for the low net reabsorptive pressure. As the animal matures and the proximal tubule epithelium becomes tighter, for glomerulotubular balance to be maintained, an increase in the number of intercellular channels and in the active transport of sodium need to be postulated.

  5. Proximal femoral focal deficiency of the fetus - early 3D/4D prenatal ultrasound diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kudla, Marek J; Beczkowska-Kielek, Aleksandra; Kutta, Katarzyna; Partyka-Lasota, Justyna

    2016-09-01

    Proximal Femoral Focal Deficiency (PFFD) is a rare congenital syndrome of unknown etiology. Additional disorders can be present up to 70% of PFFD cases. Management (including termination) depends on the severity of the malformation. We present a case of a 32-year-old woman referred for routine ultrasound examination in the 12th week of pregnancy. Detailed 3D/4D evaluation revealed asymmetry of lower limbs and diagnosis of isolated PFFD was established. Parents were fully informed and decided to continue the pregnancy. We stress here the importance of early 3D/4D ultrasound diagnosis. Our paper presents the earliest case where the diagnosis of PFFD was established with 3D/4D ultrasound. PMID:27622419

  6. Cholesterol Asymmetry in Synaptic Plasma Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Wood, W. Gibson; Igbavboa, Urule; Müller, Walter E.; Eckert, Gunter P.

    2010-01-01

    Lipids are essential for the structural and functional integrity of membranes. Membrane lipids are not randomly distributed but are localized in different domains. A common characteristic of these membrane domains is their association with cholesterol. Lipid rafts and caveolae are examples of cholesterol enriched domains, which have attracted keen interest. However, two other important cholesterol domains are the exofacial and cytofacial leaflets of the plasma membrane. The two leaflets that make up the bilayer differ in their fluidity, electrical charge, lipid distribution, and active sites of certain proteins. The synaptic plasma membrane (SPM) cytofacial leaflet contains over 85% of the total SPM cholesterol as compared with the exofacial leaflet. This asymmetric distribution of cholesterol is not fixed or immobile but can be modified by different conditions in vivo: 1) chronic ethanol consumption; 2) statins; 3) aging; and 4) apoE isoform. Several potential candidates have been proposed as mechanisms involved in regulation of SPM cholesterol asymmetry: apoE, low-density-lipoprotein receptor, sterol carrier protein-2, fatty acid binding proteins, polyunsaturated fatty acids, p-glycoprotein and caveolin-1. This review examines cholesterol asymmetry in SPM, potential mechanisms of regulation and impact on membrane structure and function. PMID:21214553

  7. Westward drift, rift asymmetry and continental uplift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doglioni, C.; Carminati, E.; Bonatti, E.

    2003-04-01

    Although not predicted by classic plate tectonics theory, the topography of ocean ridges and rifts show a distinct asymmetry, when depth is plotted both vs. distance from the ridge and square root of the age of the oceanic crust. The eastern sides of the East Pacific Rise, of the mid Atlantic ridge, of the NW Indian ridge are in average more elevated than the conjugate flank to the west and eastern sides show slower subsidence rates. A similar asymmetry can be observed across the Red Sea and Baikal rifts. We suggest that depleted and lighter asthenosphere generated by partial melting below the ocean ridges shifts 'eastward' relative to the lithosphere, determining a density deficit below the eastern flank. The 'eastward' migration of the lighter Atlantic asthenosphere under the African continent, could eventually have contributed to the anomalous post-rift uplift of Africa and explain the anomalously higher topography of Africa with respect to other continents. This model suggests that the 'westward' drift of the lithosphere relative to the underlying mantle might be a global phenomenon and not just a mean delay.

  8. Line profile asymmetries in chromospherically active stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Robert C.; Bopp, Bernard W.; Strassmeier, Klaus G.; Granados, Arno F.; Henry, Gregory W.; Hall, Douglas S.

    1992-01-01

    A powerful, new probe of chromospheric activity, cross-correlation, has been developed and applied to a variety of stars. In this particular application, an entire CCD spectrum of an active star is correlated with the spectrum of a narrow-line, inactive star of similar spectral type and luminosity class. Using a number of strong lines in this manner enables the detection of absorption profile asymmetries at moderate resolution (lambda/Delta lambda about 40,000) and S/N 150:1. This technique has been applied to 14 systems mostly RS CVn's, with 10 not greater than nu sin i not greater than 50 km/s and P not less than 7 d. Distortions were detected for the first time in five systems: Sigma Gem, IM Peg, GX Lib, UV Crb, and Zeta And. Detailed modeling, incorporating both spectral line profiles and broad-band photometry, is applied to Sigma Gem. Profile asymmetries for this star are fitted by two high-latitude spots covering 5 percent of the stellar surface. The derived spot temperature of 3400 K is lower than found in previous studies. In addition, two well-known systems have been studied: HD 199178 and V711 Tau. Polar spots are found on both.

  9. A Search for Hemispheric Asymmetry on Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, C. M.; Storrs, A. D.

    2004-12-01

    We will present reconstructed images of Neptune's largest satellite Triton as part of an investigation of hemispheric asymmetry. The images we observed from the Hubble Space Telescope in July of 1997, using the Wide Field/Planetary Camera. The images were taken in several filters: F439W, F555W, and F791W. Image restoration was performed using the MISTRAL program (Mugnier, Fusco, and Conan 2003). We present the ratio between the filters to determine if there is any hemispheric color asymmetry at this time. The photometry of Triton appears normal in this data although Hicks and Buratti (2004) observe Triton to be anomalously red in August of 1997. References: Hicks, M.D., and Buratti, B.J. (2004): "The Spectral Variability of Triton from 1997-2000", Icarus 171 pp. 210-218 Mugnier, L.M., T. Fusco, and J.-M. Conan, 2003. "MISTRAL: a Myopic Edge-Preserving Image Restoration Method. Applicaton to Astronomical Adaptive Optics Corrected Long-Exposure Images." JOSA A (submitted)

  10. Amygdala kindling modifies interhemispheric dopaminergic asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Mintz, M; Tomer, R; Houpt, S; Herberg, L J

    1987-04-01

    Brain dopamine is known to retard the development of kindled seizures, but it is uncertain whether kindling affects dopamine function. In the present study, rats were screened for cerebral dominance by recording their preferred direction of rotation when injected with d-amphetamine. Bipolar stimulating electrodes were then implanted in the amygdaloid complex of either the dominant or nondominant hemisphere (i.e., respectively, contra- and ipsilateral to the preferred direction of rotation; the dominant hemisphere identified in this way has been shown to contain higher concentrations of dopamine than the nondominant hemisphere). Kindling stimulation (or sham-kindling, in control rats) was applied through the electrodes two or three times daily for 21 days, and the rats were reassessed for amphetamine- and apomorphine-induced rotation, during and after the course of treatment. Kindling of the originally dominant hemisphere caused a diminution of rotational asymmetry as measured in tests 2 to 3 h after stimulation sessions, and in some rats led to a reversal in the preferred direction of amphetamine-induced rotation. Kindling of the nondominant hemisphere tended to accentuate the original amphetamine-induced asymmetry. The direction of rotation induced by a direct postsynaptic DA-receptor agonist (apomorphine) was not significantly affected by kindling of either hemisphere. It appears that kindling stimulation brings about a relatively inferior level of DA function on the stimulated vs. the nonstimulated side of the brain, and that this process depends mainly on changes occurring at a presynaptic level.

  11. Gait asymmetry: composite scores for mechanical analyses of sprint running.

    PubMed

    Exell, T A; Gittoes, M J R; Irwin, G; Kerwin, D G

    2012-04-01

    Gait asymmetry analyses are beneficial from clinical, coaching and technology perspectives. Quantifying overall athlete asymmetry would be useful in allowing comparisons between participants, or between asymmetry and other factors, such as sprint running performance. The aim of this study was to develop composite kinematic and kinetic asymmetry scores to quantify athlete asymmetry during maximal speed sprint running. Eight male sprint trained athletes (age 22±5 years, mass 74.0±8.7 kg and stature 1.79±0.07 m) participated in this study. Synchronised sagittal plane kinematic and kinetic data were collected via a CODA motion analysis system, synchronised to two Kistler force plates. Bilateral, lower limb data were collected during the maximal velocity phase of sprint running (velocity=9.05±0.37 ms(-1)). Kinematic and kinetic composite asymmetry scores were developed using the previously established symmetry angle for discrete variables associated with successful sprint performance and comparisons of continuous joint power data. Unlike previous studies quantifying gait asymmetry, the scores incorporated intra-limb variability by excluding variables from the composite scores that did not display significantly larger (p<0.05) asymmetry than intra-limb variability. The variables that contributed to the composite scores and the magnitude of asymmetry observed for each measure varied on an individual participant basis. The new composite scores indicated the inter-participant differences that exist in asymmetry during sprint running and may serve to allow comparisons between overall athlete asymmetry with other important factors such as performance.

  12. Performance and Near-Wake Flow field of A Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Operating in Free surface Proximity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Arindam; Kolekar, Nitin

    2015-11-01

    The current experimental investigation aims at understanding the effect of free surface proximity and associated blockage on near-wake flow-field and performance of a three bladed horizontal axis marine hydrokinetic turbine. Experiments were conducted on a 0.14m radius, three bladed constant chord turbine in a 0.61m ×0.61m test section water channel. The turbine was subjected to various rotational speeds, flow speeds and depths of immersion. Experimental data was acquired through a submerged in-line thrust-torque sensor that was corrected to an unblocked dataset with a blockage correction using measured thrust data. A detailed comparison is presented between blocked and unblocked datasets to identify influence of Reynolds number and free surface proximity on blockage effects. The percent change in Cp was found to be dependent on flow velocity, rotational speed and free surface to blade tip clearance. Further, flow visualization using a stereoscopic particle image velocimetry was carried out in the near-wake region of turbine to understand the mechanism responsible for variation of Cp with rotational speed and free surface proximity. Results revealed presence of slower wake at higher rotational velocities and increased asymmetry in the wake at high free surface proximity.

  13. Identification of Foot Pathologies Based on Plantar Pressure Asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Wafai, Linah; Zayegh, Aladin; Woulfe, John; Aziz, Syed Mahfuzul; Begg, Rezaul

    2015-08-18

    Foot pathologies can negatively influence foot function, consequently impairing gait during daily activity, and severely impacting an individual's quality of life. These pathologies are often painful and correspond with high or abnormal plantar pressure, which can result in asymmetry in the pressure distribution between the two feet. There is currently no general consensus on the presence of asymmetry in able-bodied gait, and plantar pressure analysis during gait is in dire need of a standardized method to quantify asymmetry. This paper investigates the use of plantar pressure asymmetry for pathological gait diagnosis. The results of this study involving plantar pressure analysis in fifty one participants (31 healthy and 20 with foot pathologies) support the presence of plantar pressure asymmetry in normal gait. A higher level of asymmetry was detected at the majority of the regions in the feet of the pathological population, including statistically significant differences in the plantar pressure asymmetry in two regions of the foot, metatarsophalangeal joint 3 (MPJ3) and the lateral heel. Quantification of plantar pressure asymmetry may prove to be useful for the identification and diagnosis of various foot pathologies.

  14. Identification of Foot Pathologies Based on Plantar Pressure Asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Wafai, Linah; Zayegh, Aladin; Woulfe, John; Aziz, Syed Mahfuzul; Begg, Rezaul

    2015-01-01

    Foot pathologies can negatively influence foot function, consequently impairing gait during daily activity, and severely impacting an individual’s quality of life. These pathologies are often painful and correspond with high or abnormal plantar pressure, which can result in asymmetry in the pressure distribution between the two feet. There is currently no general consensus on the presence of asymmetry in able-bodied gait, and plantar pressure analysis during gait is in dire need of a standardized method to quantify asymmetry. This paper investigates the use of plantar pressure asymmetry for pathological gait diagnosis. The results of this study involving plantar pressure analysis in fifty one participants (31 healthy and 20 with foot pathologies) support the presence of plantar pressure asymmetry in normal gait. A higher level of asymmetry was detected at the majority of the regions in the feet of the pathological population, including statistically significant differences in the plantar pressure asymmetry in two regions of the foot, metatarsophalangeal joint 3 (MPJ3) and the lateral heel. Quantification of plantar pressure asymmetry may prove to be useful for the identification and diagnosis of various foot pathologies. PMID:26295239

  15. Asymmetry of White Matter Pathways in Developing Human Brains.

    PubMed

    Song, Jae W; Mitchell, Paul D; Kolasinski, James; Ellen Grant, P; Galaburda, Albert M; Takahashi, Emi

    2015-09-01

    Little is known about the emergence of structural asymmetry of white matter tracts during early brain development. We examined whether and when asymmetry in diffusion parameters of limbic and association white matter pathways emerged in humans in 23 brains ranging from 15 gestational weeks (GW) up to 3 years of age (11 ex vivo and 12 in vivo cases) using high-angular resolution diffusion imaging tractography. Age-related development of laterality was not observed in a limbic connectional pathway (cingulum bundle or fornix). Among the studied cortico-cortical association pathways (inferior longitudinal fasciculus [ILF], inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, and arcuate fasciculus), only the ILF showed development of age-related laterality emerging as early as the second trimester. Comparisons of ages older and younger than 40 GW revealed a leftward asymmetry in the cingulum bundle volume and a rightward asymmetry in apparent diffusion coefficient and leftward asymmetry in fractional anisotropy in the ILF in ages older than 40 GW. These results suggest that morphometric asymmetry in cortical areas precedes the emergence of white matter pathway asymmetry. Future correlative studies will investigate whether such asymmetry is anatomically/genetically driven or associated with functional stimulation.

  16. Fluctuating Asymmetry and General Intelligence: No Genetic or Phenotypic Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Wendy; Segal, Nancy L.; Bouchard, Thomas J., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Fluctuating asymmetry (FA) is the non-pathological left-right asymmetry of body traits that are usually left-right symmetrical, such as eye breadths and elbow to wrist lengths in humans, but which can be affected by developmental stressors. It is generally considered throughout biology to be an indicator of developmental instability and thus of…

  17. Asymmetries for the Visual Expression and Perception of Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholls, Michael E. R.; Searle, Dara A.

    2006-01-01

    This study explored asymmetries for movement, expression and perception of visual speech. Sixteen dextral models were videoed as they articulated: "bat," "cat," "fat," and "sat." Measurements revealed that the right side of the mouth was opened wider and for a longer period than the left. The asymmetry was accentuated at the beginning and ends of…

  18. Asymmetries of Knowledge and Epistemic Change in Social Gaming Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piirainen-Marsh, Arja; Tainio, Liisa

    2014-01-01

    While a growing number of studies investigate the role of knowledge and interactional management of knowledge asymmetries in conversation analysis, the epistemic organization of multilingual and second language interactions is still largely unexplored. This article addresses this issue by investigating how knowledge asymmetries and changing…

  19. Disentangling the Relationship between Hemispheric Asymmetry and Cognitive Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirnstein, Marco; Leask, Stuart; Rose, Jonas; Hausmann, Markus

    2010-01-01

    It is widely believed that advantages of hemispheric asymmetries originated in better cognitive processing, hence it is often implied that the relationship between hemispheric asymmetry and cognitive performance is linearly positive: the higher the degree of lateralization in a specific cognitive domain, the better the performance in a…

  20. Challenging Postural Tasks Increase Asymmetry in Patients with Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Beretta, Victor Spiandor; Gobbi, Lilian Teresa Bucken; Lirani-Silva, Ellen; Simieli, Lucas; Orcioli-Silva, Diego; Barbieri, Fabio Augusto

    2015-01-01

    The unilateral predominance of Parkinson's disease (PD) symptoms suggests that balance control could be asymmetrical during static tasks. Although studies have shown that balance control asymmetries exist in patients with PD, these analyses were performed using only simple bipedal standing tasks. Challenging postural tasks, such as unipedal or tandem standing, could exacerbate balance control asymmetries. To address this, we studied the impact of challenging standing tasks on postural control asymmetry in patients with PD. Twenty patients with PD and twenty neurologically healthy individuals (control group) participated in this study. Participants performed three 30s trials for each postural task: bipedal, tandem adapted and unipedal standing. The center of pressure parameter was calculated for both limbs in each of these conditions, and the asymmetry between limbs was assessed using the symmetric index. A significant effect of condition was observed, with unipedal standing and tandem standing showing greater asymmetry than bipedal standing for the mediolateral root mean square (RMS) and area of sway parameters, respectively. In addition, a group*condition interaction indicated that, only for patients with PD, the unipedal condition showed greater asymmetry in the mediolateral RMS and area of sway than the bipedal condition and the tandem condition showed greater asymmetry in the area of sway than the bipedal condition. Patients with PD exhibited greater asymmetry while performing tasks requiring postural control when compared to neurologically healthy individuals, especially for challenging tasks such as tandem and unipedal standing.

  1. A Hemispheric Asymmetry for the Unconscious Perception of Emotion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Stephen D.; Bulman-Fleming, M. Barbara

    2004-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that hemispheric asymmetries for conscious visual perception do not lead to asymmetries for unconscious visual perception. These studies utilized emotionally neutral items as stimuli. The current research utilized both emotionally negative and neutral stimuli to assess hemispheric differences for conscious and…

  2. Information Asymmetries as Trade Barriers: ISO 9000 Increases International Commerce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potoski, Matthew; Prakash, Aseem

    2009-01-01

    Spatial, cultural, and linguistic barriers create information asymmetries between buyers and sellers that impede international trade. The International Organization for Standardization's ISO 9000 program is designed to reduce these information asymmetries by providing assurance about the product quality of firms that receive its certification.…

  3. On reducing information asymmetry in U.S. health care.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Oswald A J; Kesavan, Ram; Bernacchi, Michael D

    2013-01-01

    Information asymmetry is a significant issue facing the U.S. health care system. In this article, we investigate some methods of reducing this asymmetry. We trace the information asymmetry using the "wicked problem" of the health care distribution system. An information asymmetry reduction method requiring joint responsibilities among health care stakeholders is developed. It is argued that information asymmetry is a contributor to enormous health care inflation. Hence, any reduction in such asymmetry will reduce health care costs. Concepts from both signaling and corrective justice theories are integrated in this article to help reduce the information asymmetry that exists in the U.S. health care system. Getting health care costs in line with other "advanced" nations, is the long-term solution to the wicked problem that currently exists in the U.S. health care system. There is an immediate need for a centralized health care database with adequate provisions for individual privacy. Both processes as well as an outcome-based control system are essential for reducing information asymmetries in the U.S. health care system.

  4. Robustness of asymmetry and coherence of quantum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piani, Marco; Cianciaruso, Marco; Bromley, Thomas R.; Napoli, Carmine; Johnston, Nathaniel; Adesso, Gerardo

    2016-04-01

    Quantum states may exhibit asymmetry with respect to the action of a given group. Such an asymmetry of states can be considered a resource in applications such as quantum metrology, and it is a concept that encompasses quantum coherence as a special case. We introduce explicitly and study the robustness of asymmetry, a quantifier of asymmetry of states that we prove to have many attractive properties, including efficient numerical computability via semidefinite programming and an operational interpretation in a channel discrimination context. We also introduce the notion of asymmetry witnesses, whose measurement in a laboratory detects the presence of asymmetry. We prove that properly constrained asymmetry witnesses provide lower bounds to the robustness of asymmetry, which is shown to be a directly measurable quantity itself. We then focus our attention on coherence witnesses and the robustness of coherence, for which we prove a number of additional results; these include an analysis of its specific relevance in phase discrimination and quantum metrology, an analytical calculation of its value for a relevant class of quantum states, and tight bounds that relate it to another previously defined coherence monotone.

  5. Pulsar Kicks via Chiral Asymmetry of Magnetized Stellar Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shovkovy, I.

    2015-11-01

    Unusual chiral properties of the ground state of relativistic matter in a strong magnetic field are briefly reviewed. The main emphasis is placed on the dynamical generation of the chiral asymmetry in dense stellar matter. The corresponding asymmetry provides a natural mechanism for the strong pulsar kicks.

  6. Juvenile xanthogranuloma of the proximal nail fold.

    PubMed

    Piraccini, Bianca Maria; Fanti, Pier Alessandro; Iorizzo, Matilde; Tosti, Antonella

    2003-01-01

    An 18-month-old Caucasian boy presented with a firm 0.5 mm nodule, pink-red in color, with a yellow hue and some telangiectases on the surface, localized on the right thumbnail. The nodule involved all of the proximal nail fold and covered the proximal third of the nail. Pathology showed a dense dermal infiltrate of histiocytes, some of which had foamy nuclei, and multinucleated Touton giant cells. The lesion progressively decreased in size and had completely disappeared after 3 years. Periodic follow-up was important not only to monitor evolution of the juvenile xanthogranuloma, but also to avoid excessive growth of the lesion with possible definitive nail matrix damage.

  7. Painful Spastic Hip Dislocation: Proximal Femoral Resection

    PubMed Central

    Albiñana, Javier; Gonzalez-Moran, Gaspar

    2002-01-01

    The dislocated hip in a non-ambulatory child with spastic paresis tends to be a painful interference to sleep, sitting upright, and perineal care. Proximal femoral resection-interposition arthroplasty is one method of treatment for this condition. We reviewed eight hips, two bilateral cases, with a mean follow-up of 30 months. Clinical improvement was observed in all except one case, with respect to pain relief and sitting tolerance. Some proximal migration was observed in three cases, despite routine post-operative skeletal traction in all cases and careful soft tissue interposition. One case showed significant heterotopic ossification which restricted prolonged sitting. This patient needed some occasional medication for pain. PMID:12180614

  8. Children's memory and proximity to violence.

    PubMed

    Pynoos, R S; Nader, K

    1989-03-01

    The study examined 133 school-age children's memory of a sniper attack at their elementary school. Researchers analyzed the role that spatial representation, memory markers, inner plans of action, and strategies of recall played in the memory process. In recalling the event, exposed children reduced their degree of life threat, while nonexposed children increased their proximity to the violence. Clinical and forensic implications are discussed.

  9. Endoscopic proximal hamstring repair and ischial bursectomy.

    PubMed

    Dierckman, Brian D; Guanche, Carlos A

    2012-12-01

    With the significant increase in use of the arthroscope around the hip have come several less invasive techniques to manage pathologies around this joint. This technical note with a video details one such technique that allows for the endoscopic management of proximal hamstring tears and chronic ischial bursitis, which until now have been managed exclusively with much larger open approaches. This procedure allows for complete exposure of the posterior aspect of the hip in a safe, minimally invasive fashion. PMID:23766996

  10. Proximal Sciatic Nerve Intraneural Ganglion Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Karin R.; Wilson, Dianne; Boland, Michael; Fee, Dominic B.

    2009-01-01

    Intraneural ganglion cysts are nonneoplastic, mucinous cysts within the epineurium of peripheral nerves which usually involve the peroneal nerve at the knee. A 37-year-old female presented with progressive left buttock and posterior thigh pain. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a sciatic nerve mass at the sacral notch which was subsequently revealed to be an intraneural ganglion cyst. An intraneural ganglion cyst confined to the proximal sciatic nerve has only been reported once prior to 2009. PMID:20069041

  11. Proximal tibial fracture following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Krause, Heike; Dunleavy, Kim

    2011-09-01

    The patient was a 74-year-old man, with a history of total knee arthoplasty 14 years earlier, after having sustained a pathological fracture of the proximal diaphysis of the left tibia following a fall. Given the unstable nature of the fracture and the severe osteolysis noted below the total knee arthroplasty, surgical management 1 day after the fall entailed packing cancellous bone graft into the defect and realigning the fracture. PMID:21885911

  12. Transverse Stress Fracture of the Proximal Patella

    PubMed Central

    Atsumi, Satoru; Arai, Yuji; Kato, Ko; Nishimura, Akinobu; Nakazora, Shigeto; Nakagawa, Shuji; Ikoma, Kazuya; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Sudo, Akihiro; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Among stress fractures associated with sports activities, patellar stress fracture is rare. Regarding patella stress fractures, so far only distal transverse or lateral longitudinal fractures have been reported, but there are no reports of transverse fractures occurring in the proximal patella. We describe an extremely rare case of transverse stress fracture of proximal patella in a 9-year-old athlete. A 9-year old boy, who participated in sports (sprints and Kendo) presented with left knee pain without any external injury. In plain radiographs, a fracture line was observed in the proximal 1/3 of the left patella, and a patella stress fracture was diagnosed. For treatment, because 7 months of conservative therapy showed no improvement, internal fixation was carried out using Acutrak screws, and bone union was thus achieved. Three months after the operation, he was able to return to his previous level of athletic sports activity. Regarding the mechanism of onset, it is believed that the causes are longitudinal traction force and patellofemoral contact pressure. On the other hand, the contact region of the patella with the femur changes with the flexion angle of the knee. In the current case, the fracture occurred at a site where the patella was in contact with the femur at a flexion angle of >90°, so it is believed that it occurred as a clinical condition from being subjected to repeated longitudinal traction force and patellofemoral contact pressure at a flexion angle of >90°, during the sports activities of sprints and Kendo. The nonunion of the transverse stress fracture of his proximal patella was successfully treated with internal fixation using Acutrak screws. PMID:26871789

  13. Large proximal ureteral stones: Ideal treatment modality?

    PubMed Central

    Kadyan, B.; Sabale, V.; Mane, D.; Satav, V.; Mulay, A.; Thakur, N.; Kankalia, S. P.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Ideal treatment modality for patients with large impacted proximal ureteral stone remains controversial. We compared laparoscopic transperitoneal ureterolithotomy (Lap-TPUL) and semirigid ureteroscopy for large proximal ureteric stones to evaluate their efficacy and safety. Patients and Methods: From November 2012 to December 2014, we enrolled 122 patients with large (≥1.5 cm) proximal ureteral stone in the study. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: Group A (60 patients), retrograde ureteroscopic lithotripsy using a semirigid ureteroscope; Group B (62 patients), transperitoneal LU (Lap-TPUL). Results: The overall stone-free rate was 71.6% and 93.5% for Group A and Group B respectively (P = 0.008). Auxiliary procedure rate was higher in Group A than in Group B (27.3% vs. 5.6%). The complication rate was 11.2% in Group B versus 25% in Group A. Mean procedure time was higher in laparoscopy group as compared to ureterorenoscopy (URS) groups (84.07 ± 16.80 vs. 62.82 ± 12.71 min). Hospital stay was 4.16 ± 0.67 days in laparoscopy group and 1.18 ± 0.38 days in URS group (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Laparoscopic transperitoneal ureterolithotomy is a minimally invasive, safe and effective treatment modality and should be recommended to all patients of impacted large proximal stones, which are not amenable to URS or extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy or as a primary modality of choice especially if patient is otherwise candidate for open surgery. PMID:27141190

  14. Bilateral Brodie's abscess at the proximal tibia.

    PubMed

    Buldu, Halil; Bilen, Fikri Erkal; Eralp, Levent; Kocaoglu, Mehmet

    2012-08-01

    Brodie's abscess is a form of subacute osteomyelitis, which typically involves the metaphyses of the long tubular bones, particularly in the tibia. The diagnosis is usually made incidentally, as there are no accompanying symptoms or laboratory studies. Bilateral involvement at the proximal tibia is unusual. However, orthopaedic surgeons should be aware of this entity, as it may present without symptoms. Checking the contralateral limb for concomitant Brodie's abscess is recommended.

  15. Human proximal tubule cells form functional microtissues.

    PubMed

    Prange, Jenny A; Bieri, Manuela; Segerer, Stephan; Burger, Charlotte; Kaech, Andres; Moritz, Wolfgang; Devuyst, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    The epithelial cells lining the proximal tubules of the kidney mediate complex transport processes and are particularly vulnerable to drug toxicity. Drug toxicity studies are classically based on two-dimensional cultures of immortalized proximal tubular cells. Such immortalized cells are dedifferentiated, and lose transport properties (including saturable endocytic uptake) encountered in vivo. Generating differentiated, organotypic human microtissues would potentially alleviate these limitations and facilitate drug toxicity studies. Here, we describe the generation and characterization of kidney microtissues from immortalized (HK-2) and primary (HRPTEpiC) human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells under well-defined conditions. Microtissue cultures were done in hanging drop GravityPLUS™ culture plates and were characterized for morphology, proliferation and differentiation markers, and by monitoring the endocytic uptake of albumin. Kidney microtissues were successfully obtained by co-culturing HK-2 or HRPTEpiC cells with fibroblasts. The HK-2 microtissues formed highly proliferative, but dedifferentiated microtissues within 10 days of culture, while co-culture with fibroblasts yielded spherical structures already after 2 days. Low passage HRPTEpiC microtissues (mono- and co-culture) were less proliferative and expressed tissue-specific differentiation markers. Electron microscopy evidenced epithelial differentiation markers including microvilli, tight junctions, endosomes, and lysosomes in the co-cultured HRPTEpiC microtissues. The co-cultured HRPTEpiC microtissues showed specific uptake of albumin that could be inhibited by cadmium and gentamycin. In conclusion, we established a reliable hanging drop protocol to obtain functional kidney microtissues with proximal tubular epithelial cell lines. These microtissues could be used for high-throughput drug and toxicology screenings, with endocytosis as a functional readout. PMID:26676951

  16. MUON DECAY ASYMMETRIES FROM KOL YIELDS POM+M-DECAYS.

    SciTech Connect

    DIWAN, M.V.; MA, H.; TRUEMAN, T.L.

    2001-06-12

    We have examined the decay K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0} {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup -} in which the branching ratio, the muon energy asymmetry and the muon decay asymmetry could be measured. In particular, we find that within the Standard Model the longitudinal polarization (PL) of the muon is proportional to the direct CP violating amplitude. On the other hand the energy asymmetry and the out-of-plane polarization (P{sub N}) depend on both indirect and direct CP violating amplitudes. Although the branching ratio is small and difficult to measure because of background, the asymmetries could be large {Omicron}(1) in the Standard Model. A combined analysis of the energy asymmetry, P{sub L} and P{sub N} could be used to separate indirect, CPV, direct CPV, and CP conserving contributions to the decay.

  17. Extrapolation technique pitfalls in asymmetry measurements at colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colletti, Katrina; Hong, Ziqing; Toback, David; Wilson, Jonathan S.

    2016-09-01

    Asymmetry measurements are common in collider experiments and can sensitively probe particle properties. Typically, data can only be measured in a finite region covered by the detector, so an extrapolation from the visible asymmetry to the inclusive asymmetry is necessary. Often a constant multiplicative factor is advantageous for the extrapolation and this factor can be readily determined using simulation methods. However, there is a potential, avoidable pitfall involved in the determination of this factor when the asymmetry in the simulated data sample is small. We find that to obtain a reliable estimate of the extrapolation factor, the number of simulated events required rises as the inverse square of the simulated asymmetry; this can mean that an unexpectedly large sample size is required when determining the extrapolation factor.

  18. Asymmetry and modulation of spike timing in electrically coupled neurons.

    PubMed

    Sevetson, Jessica; Haas, Julie S

    2015-03-15

    Electrical coupling mediates interactions between neurons of the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN), which play a critical role in regulating thalamocortical and corticothalamic communication by inhibiting thalamic relay cells. Accumulating evidence has shown that asymmetry of electrical synapses is a fundamental and dynamic property, but the effect of asymmetry on coupled networks is unexplored. Recording from patched pairs in rat brain slices, we investigate asymmetry in the subthreshold regime and show that electrical synapses can exert powerful effects on the spike times of coupled neighbors. Electrical synaptic signaling modulates spike timing by 10-20 ms, in an effect that also exhibits asymmetry. Furthermore, we show through modeling that coupling asymmetry expands the set of outputs for pairs of coupled neurons through enhanced regions of synchrony and reversals of spike order. These results highlight the power and specificity of signaling exerted by electrical synapses, which contribute to information flow across the brain.

  19. Forward-backward asymmetry in top quark-antiquark production

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orbaker, D.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; et. al.

    2011-12-12

    We present a measurement of forward-backward asymmetry in top quark-antiquark production in proton-antiproton collisions in the final state containing a lepton and at least four jets. Using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb{sup -1}, collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, we measure the t{bar t} forward-backward asymmetry to be (9.2 {+-} 3.7)% at the reconstruction level. When corrected for detector acceptance and resolution, the asymmetry is found to be (19.6 {+-} 6.5)%. We also measure a corrected asymmetry based on the lepton from a top quark decay, found to be (15.2 {+-} 4.0)%. The results are compared to predictions based on the next-to-leading-order QCD generator mc@nlo. The sensitivity of the measured and predicted asymmetries to the modeling of gluon radiation is discussed.

  20. Transverse single-spin asymmetries: Challenges and recent progress

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, Andreas; Pitonyak, Daniel; Schafer, Andreas; Schlegel, Marc; Vogelsang, Werner; Zhou, Jian

    2014-11-25

    In this study, transverse single-spin asymmetries are among the most intriguing observables in hadronic physics. Though such asymmetries were already measured for the first time about four decades ago, their origin is still under debate. Here we consider transverse single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive lepton–nucleon scattering, in nucleon–nucleon scattering, and in inclusive lepton–nucleon scattering. It is argued that, according to recent work, the single-spin asymmetries for those three processes may be simultaneously described in perturbative QCD, where the re-scattering of the active partons plays a crucial role. A comparison of single-spin asymmetries in different reactions can also shed light on the universality of transverse momentum dependent parton correlation functions. In particular, we discuss what existing data may tell us about the predicted process dependence of the Sivers function.

  1. Transverse single-spin asymmetries: Challenges and recent progress

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Metz, Andreas; Pitonyak, Daniel; Schafer, Andreas; Schlegel, Marc; Vogelsang, Werner; Zhou, Jian

    2014-11-25

    In this study, transverse single-spin asymmetries are among the most intriguing observables in hadronic physics. Though such asymmetries were already measured for the first time about four decades ago, their origin is still under debate. Here we consider transverse single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive lepton–nucleon scattering, in nucleon–nucleon scattering, and in inclusive lepton–nucleon scattering. It is argued that, according to recent work, the single-spin asymmetries for those three processes may be simultaneously described in perturbative QCD, where the re-scattering of the active partons plays a crucial role. A comparison of single-spin asymmetries in different reactions can also shed light on themore » universality of transverse momentum dependent parton correlation functions. In particular, we discuss what existing data may tell us about the predicted process dependence of the Sivers function.« less

  2. Mathematical Modeling of Sub-Cellular Asymmetry of Fat-Dachsous Heterodimer for Generation of Planar Cell Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Sinha, Pradip

    2014-01-01

    Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) is an evolutionarily conserved characteristic of animal tissues marked by coordinated polarization of cells or structures in the plane of a tissue. In insect wing epithelium, for instance, PCP is characterized by en masse orientation of hairs orthogonal to its apical-basal axis and pointing along the proximal-distal axis of the organ. Directional cue for PCP has been proposed to be generated by complex sets of interactions amongst three proteins - Fat (Ft), Dachsous (Ds) and Four-jointed (Fj). Ft and Ds are two atypical cadherins, which are phosphorylated by Fj, a Golgi kinase. Ft and Ds from adjacent cells bind heterophilically via their tandem cadherin repeats, and their binding affinities are regulated by Fj. Further, in the wing epithelium, sub-cellular levels of Ft-Ds heterodimers are seen to be elevated at the distal edges of individual cells, prefiguring their PCP. Mechanisms generating this sub-cellular asymmetry of Ft-Ds heterodimer in proximal and distal edges of cells, however, have not been resolved yet. Using a mathematical modeling approach, here we provide a framework for generation of this sub-cellular asymmetry of Ft-Ds heterodimer. First, we explain how the known interactions within Ft-Ds-Fj system translate into sub-cellular asymmetry of Ft-Ds heterodimer. Second, we show that this asymmetric localization of Ft-Ds heterodimer is lost when tissue-level gradient of Fj is flattened, or when phosphorylation of Ft by Fj is abolished, but not when tissue-level gradient of Ds is flattened or when phosphorylation of Ds is abrogated. Finally, we show that distal enrichment of Ds also amplifies Ft-Ds asymmetry. These observations reveal that gradient of Fj expression, phosphorylation of Ft by Fj and sub-cellular distal accumulation of Ds are three critical elements required for generating sub-cellular asymmetry of Ft-Ds heterodimer. Our model integrates the known experimental data and presents testable predictions for future

  3. Bilateral, atraumatic, proximal tibiofibular joint instability.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Troy D; Shaer, James A; Little, Jill E

    2011-01-01

    Dislocation of the tibiofibular joint is rare and usually results from a traumatic event. Only 1 case of atraumatic proximal tibiofibular joint instability in a 14-year-old girl has been reported in the literature, however this condition might occur more frequently than once thought. A wide range of treatment options exist for tibiofibular dislocations. Currently, the first choice is a conservative approach, and when this fails, surgical means such as resection of the fibula head, arthrodesis, and reconstruction are considered. However, no consensus exists on the most effective treatment. This article reports a unique case of bilateral, atraumatic, proximal tibia and fibular joint instability involving a 30-year-old man with a 20-year history of pain and laxity in the right knee. The patient had no trauma to his knees; he reported 2 immediate family members with similar complaints, which suggests that this case is likely congenital. After conservative approaches proved to be ineffective, the patient underwent capsular reconstruction using free autologous gracilis tendon. At 6-month postoperative follow-up, the patient was pain free with no locking and instability. He then underwent surgery on the left knee. At 1-year follow-up after the second surgery, the patient had no symptoms or restrictions in mobility. We provide an alternative surgical approach to arthrodesis and resection for the treatment of chronic proximal tibiofibular instability. In the treatment of chronic tibiofibular instability, we believe that reconstruction of the tibiofibular joint is a safe and effective choice.

  4. Management of proximal humerus fractures in adults

    PubMed Central

    Vachtsevanos, Leonidas; Hayden, Lydia; Desai, Aravind S; Dramis, Asterios

    2014-01-01

    The majority of proximal humerus fractures are low-energy osteoporotic injuries in the elderly and their incidence is increasing in the light of an ageing population. The diversity of fracture patterns encountered renders objective classification of prognostic value challenging. Non-operative management has been associated with good functional outcomes in stable, minimally displaced and certain types of displaced fractures. Absolute indications for surgery are infrequent and comprise compound, pathological, multi-fragmentary head-splitting fractures and fracture dislocations, as well as those associated with neurovascular injury. A constantly expanding range of reconstructive and replacement options however has been extending the indications for surgical management of complex proximal humerus fractures. As a result, management decisions are becoming increasingly complicated, in an attempt to provide the best possible treatment for each individual patient, that will successfully address their specific fracture configuration, comorbidities and functional expectations. Our aim was to review the management options available for the full range of proximal humerus fractures in adults, along with their specific advantages, disadvantages and outcomes. PMID:25405098

  5. Trajectories in Close Proximity to Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheeres, D. J.

    2000-01-01

    Spacecraft motion in close proximity to irregularly shaped, rotating bodies such as asteroids presents a unique dynamical environment as compared to most space missions. There are several fundamental novelties in this environment that spacecraft must deal with. These include the possibility of orbital instabilities that can act over very short time spans (on the order of hours for some systems), possible non-uniform rotation of the central gravity field, divergence of traditional gravity field representations when close to the asteroid surface, dominance of perturbing forces, an extremely large asteroid model parameter space that must be prepared for in the absence of reliable information, and the possibility of employing new and novel trajectory control techniques such as hovering and repeated landings on the asteroid surface. An overview of how these novelties impact the space of feasible close proximity operations and how different asteroid model properties will affect their implementation is given. In so doing, four fundamental types of close proximity operations will be defined. Listed in order of increasing technical difficulty these are: (1) close, stable orbits; (2) low-altitude flyovers; (3) landing trajectories; and (4) hovering trajectories. The feasibility and difficulty of implementing these operations will vary as a function of the asteroid shape, size, density, and rotation properties, and as a function of the spacecraft navigation capability. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Management of proximal humerus fractures in adults.

    PubMed

    Vachtsevanos, Leonidas; Hayden, Lydia; Desai, Aravind S; Dramis, Asterios

    2014-11-18

    The majority of proximal humerus fractures are low-energy osteoporotic injuries in the elderly and their incidence is increasing in the light of an ageing population. The diversity of fracture patterns encountered renders objective classification of prognostic value challenging. Non-operative management has been associated with good functional outcomes in stable, minimally displaced and certain types of displaced fractures. Absolute indications for surgery are infrequent and comprise compound, pathological, multi-fragmentary head-splitting fractures and fracture dislocations, as well as those associated with neurovascular injury. A constantly expanding range of reconstructive and replacement options however has been extending the indications for surgical management of complex proximal humerus fractures. As a result, management decisions are becoming increasingly complicated, in an attempt to provide the best possible treatment for each individual patient, that will successfully address their specific fracture configuration, comorbidities and functional expectations. Our aim was to review the management options available for the full range of proximal humerus fractures in adults, along with their specific advantages, disadvantages and outcomes.

  7. Proximal myopathy: diagnostic approach and initial management.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Ernest; Wimalaratna, Sunil

    2013-08-01

    Proximal myopathy presents as symmetrical weakness of proximal upper and/or lower limbs. There is a broad range of underlying causes including drugs, alcohol, thyroid disease, osteomalacia, idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM), hereditary myopathies, malignancy, infections and sarcoidosis. Clinical assessment should aim to distinguish proximal myopathy from other conditions that can present similarly, identify patients who need prompt attention, like those with cardiac, respiratory or pharyngeal muscle involvement, and determine underlying cause of myopathy. Initial evaluation should include simple tests, like creatine kinase, thyroid function and (25)OH vitamin D levels, but further evaluation including neurophysiological studies, muscle imaging and muscle biopsy should be considered for patients in whom no toxic, metabolic or endocrine cause is found, and in those with clinical features suggestive of inflammatory or hereditary myopathy. Additionally, screening for malignancy and testing for anti-Jo1 antibody is indicated for selected patients with IIM. Management depends on underlying cause, and includes measures, such as removal of offending agent, correction of endocrine or metabolic problem, corticosteroids and immunosuppressive therapy for IIM, and physical therapy, rehabilitation and genetic counselling for muscular dystrophies.

  8. Salicylate-induced proximal tubular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Tsimihodimos, Vasilis; Psychogios, Nikolaos; Kakaidi, Varvara; Bairaktari, Eleni; Elisaf, Moses

    2007-09-01

    We describe the case of a 17-year-old girl who was admitted to our clinic for drug poisoning. Twelve hours after the ingestion of 25 tablets of aspirin (12.5 g of acetylsalicylic acid), the patient had a generalized proximal tubular dysfunction characterized by glucosuria (in the face of normal serum glucose levels), proteinuria, and uric acid wasting. Further characterization of the tubular dysfunction using high-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the urine showed a pattern consistent with proximal tubular injury. An important characteristic of the salicylate-induced proximal tubular dysfunction in our patient was its rapid reversibility. A trend toward normalization of fractional excretion values of electrolytes was observed 2 days after ingestion. Determination of serum and urine metabolites and spectroscopy of urine 15 days later showed no evidence of tubular dysfunction. The mechanisms potentially implicated in the pathogenesis of salicylate-induced Fanconi syndrome are discussed and a brief review of the relevant literature is provided. PMID:17720526

  9. Links between soil modelling and proximal sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitkenhead, Matt; McBratney, Alex; Minasny, Budiman

    2015-04-01

    Proximal sensing of soils can provide valuable information for soil modelling, by providing baseline data and validating model predictions through direct observation of soil characteristics. A wide range of soil parameters can be estimated using proximal sensing of soils (PSS), often simultaneously using single hand-held systems, of which there are many types. The benefits for soil modelling include direct observation of modelled parameters, rapid assessment in field conditions and digital data acquisition, making the transfer of information to soil models relatively straightforward. This is an active area of development, with research into improved methods of field-based capture of soil parameters directly relevant for soil modelling. A number of challenges exist, including the removal of or accounting for the effects of field conditions (e.g. soil moisture and structure), and the development of libraries of data that will allow calibration models to be produced. We present an overview of PSS as it relates to soil modelling, including equipment types, calibration approaches, cloud-based processing, soil parameters and processes estimated using PSS, and opportunities and challenges for the future. We also identify and discuss the possibilities for integration of modelling and proximal sensing within precision agriculture/precision land management.

  10. Gene teams with relaxed proximity constraint.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun; Choi, Jeong-Hyeon; Yang, Jiong

    2005-01-01

    Functionally related genes co-evolve, probably due to the strong selection pressure in evolution. Thus we expect that they are present in multiple genomes. Physical proximity among genes, known as gene team, is a very useful concept to discover functionally related genes in multiple genomes. However, there are also many gene sets that do not preserve physical proximity. In this paper, we generalized the gene team model, that looks for gene clusters in a physically clustered form, to multiple genome cases with relaxed constraint. We propose a novel hybrid pattern model that combines the set and the sequential pattern models. Our model searches for gene clusters with and/or without physical proximity constraint. This model is implemented and tested with 97 genomes (120 replicons). The result was analyzed to show the usefulness of our model. Especially, analysis of gene clusters that belong to B. subtilis and E. coli demonstrated that our model predicted many experimentally verified operons and functionally related clusters. Our program is fast enough to provide a sevice on the web at http://platcom. informatics.indiana.edu/platcom/. Users can select any combination of 97 genomes to predict gene teams.

  11. Optical system for proximity operations in aerospace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong-Liang; Liu, Xiao-Chun; Lu, Huan-Zhang

    2008-12-01

    Satellite serving offers a potential for extending the life of satellites and reducing launching and operating costs. Proximity operations are necessary for purpose of satellite serving. As the primary measurement system, optical system can provide the information of relative navigation in near field. The paper has two main contributions. Firstly, we summarize use of optical systems for guidance and navigation in the missions of proximity operations in aerospace. Their characteristics vary from the manned missions, which are performed by astronauts on-orbit, through semi-autonomous missions, wherein human operators on the ground segment issue high level directives and sensor-guided systems on the space segment guide the execution, to the full-autonomous missions, which are executed using unmanned space robotic systems. It comes to light that future space operations will be more autonomous. Secondly, we present a concept and framework of a vision system for satellite proximity operations, which is semi-autonomous and can treat with uncooperative satellites. The vision system uses visible and infrared sensors synchronously to acquire images, which solves the problem of data integrity introduced by ambient illumination and direct sunlight for visible sensor. The vision system uses natural features on the satellite surfaces instead of artificial markers for its operation, computes relative motion and structure of the target, and tracks features in image sequences. Selected algorithms of the system have been characterized in ground environment; they are undergoing systematic sets of adaptation for space.

  12. Facial asymmetry and genetic ancestry in Latin American admixed populations.

    PubMed

    Quinto-Sánchez, Mirsha; Adhikari, Kaustubh; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Cintas, Celia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio Cesar; Ramallo, Virginia; Castillo, Lucia; Farrera, Arodi; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, Williams; Fuentes, Macarena; Everardo, Paola; de Avila, Francisco; Gomez-Valdés, Jorge; Hünemeier, Tábita; Gibbon, Shara; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Rosique, Javier; Bortolini, Maria Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Bedoya, Gabriel; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; González-José, Rolando

    2015-05-01

    Fluctuating and directional asymmetry are aspects of morphological variation widely used to infer environmental and genetic factors affecting facial phenotypes. However, the genetic basis and environmental determinants of both asymmetry types is far from being completely known. The analysis of facial asymmetries in admixed individuals can be of help to characterize the impact of a genome's heterozygosity on the developmental basis of both fluctuating and directional asymmetries. Here we characterize the association between genetic ancestry and individual asymmetry on a sample of Latin-American admixed populations. To do so, three-dimensional (3D) facial shape attributes were explored on a sample of 4,104 volunteers aged between 18 and 85 years. Individual ancestry and heterozygosity was estimated using more than 730,000 genome-wide markers. Multivariate techniques applied to geometric morphometric data were used to evaluate the magnitude and significance of directional and fluctuating asymmetry (FA), as well as correlations and multiple regressions aimed to estimate the relationship between facial FA scores and heterozygosity and a set of covariates. Results indicate that directional and FA are both significant, the former being the strongest expression of asymmetry in this sample. In addition, our analyses suggest that there are some specific patterns of facial asymmetries characterizing the different ancestry groups. Finally, we find that more heterozygous individuals exhibit lower levels of asymmetry. Our results highlight the importance of including ancestry-admixture estimators, especially when the analyses are aimed to compare levels of asymmetries on groups differing on socioeconomic levels, as a proxy to estimate developmental noise. PMID:25582401

  13. Single-Spin Asymmetries at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Avakian, Harutyun

    2003-05-01

    Single spin asymmetries (SSA) are crucial tools in the study of the spin structure of hadrons in pion electroproduction, since they are directly related to some hot topics,including transverse polarization distribution functions, fragmentation of polarized quarks and generalized parton distribution functions. At low beam energies, when the virtual photon has a relatively large angle with respect to the initial spin direction, the measured single-target spin-dependent sin φ moment in the cross section for the longitudinally polarized target contain contributions from the target spin components, both longitudinal and transverse with respect to the photon direction.This contribution presents preliminary results from Jefferson Lab's CLAS detector on beam and target SSA in pion azimuthal distributions in one particle inclusive electroproduction in the DIS regime (Q2 > 1GeV 2,W > 2GeV ) off a polarized NH3 target.

  14. Slonczewski windmill with dissipation and asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazaliy, Yaroslaw

    2009-03-01

    J. Slonczewski invented spin-transfer effect in layered systems in 1996. Among his first predictions was the regime of the ``windmill motion'' of a perfectly symmetric spin valve. In this regime magnetizations of the layers rotate in a fixed plane keeping the angle between them constant. Since ``windmill'' was predicted to happen in the case of zero magnetic anisotropy, while in most experimental setups the anisotropy is significant, the phenomenon was not a subject of much research. However, the behavior of the magnetically isotropic device is related to the interesting question of current induced ferromagnetism and is worth more attention. Here we study the windmill regime in the presence of dissipation, exchange interaction, and layer asymmetry. It is shown that the windmill rotation is almost always destroyed by those effects, except for a narrow interval of electric current, determined by the parameters of the device.

  15. Dark Atoms: Asymmetry and Direct Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, David E.; Krnjaic, Gordan Z.; Rehermann, Keith R.; Wells, Christopher M.

    2011-10-01

    We present a simple UV completion of Atomic Dark Matter (aDM) in which heavy right-handed neutrinos decay to induce both dark and lepton number densities. This model addresses several outstanding cosmological problems: the matter/anti-matter asymmetry, the dark matter abundance, the number of light degrees of freedom in the early universe, and the smoothing of small-scale structure. Additionally, this realization of aDM may reconcile the CoGeNT excess with recently published null results and predicts a signal in the CRESST Oxygen band. We also find that, due to unscreened long-range interactions, the residual un recombined dark ions settle into a diffuse isothermal halo.

  16. On the matter-antimatter asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, W. A.

    2015-08-01

    Although the big bang should have produced equal amounts of matter and antimatter, there is evidence that the universe does not contain significant amounts of antimatter. The usual explanations for this matter-antimatter asymmetry involve finding causes for Sakharov’s three conditions to be satisfied. However, if the composite photon theory is correct, antimatter galaxies should appear to us as dark matter, neither emitting light (that we can detect) or reflecting ordinary light. Thus the presence of antimatter galaxies may be harder to detect than previously thought. The large clumps of dark matter that have been observed by weak gravitation lensing could be clusters of antimatter galaxies. “Dark photons,” that are hypothesized to cause self-interactions between dark matter particles, are identified as antiphotons in the composite photon theory. The possibility of a patchwork universe, that had been previously excluded, is also re-examined.

  17. Time-reversal asymmetry in financial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X. F.; Chen, T. T.; Zheng, B.

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the large-fluctuation dynamics in financial markets, based on the minute-to-minute and daily data of the Chinese Indices and the German DAX. The dynamic relaxation both before and after the large fluctuations is characterized by a power law, and the exponents p± usually vary with the strength of the large fluctuations. The large-fluctuation dynamics is time-reversal symmetric at the time scale in minutes, while asymmetric at the daily time scale. Careful analysis reveals that the time-reversal asymmetry is mainly induced by external forces. It is also the external forces which drive the financial system to a non-stationary state. Different characteristics of the Chinese and German stock markets are uncovered.

  18. Z Boson Asymmetry Measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, B.

    2014-01-01

    We present measurements of the forward-backward asymmetry (A_fb) in dilepton pair decays of Z bosons produced in ppbar collisions using the full Tevatron dataset. The CDF experiment extracts a value for the effective weak mixing angle parameter sin^{2}\\theta^{l}_{eff} of 0.2315 +/- 0.0010 from the A_fb distribution of dimuon events in 9.2 fb^{-1} of integrated luminosity. From dielectron events in 9.7 fb^{-1} of data, the D0 experiment finds sin^{2}\\theta^{l}_{eff} = 0.23106 +/- 0.00053, the world's most precise measurement of sin^{2}\\theta^{l}_{eff} from hadron colliders and with light quark couplings.

  19. Single transverse-spin asymmetry in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Yuji

    2014-09-01

    So far large single transverse-spin asymmetries (SSA) have been observed in many high-energy processes such as semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering and proton-proton collisions. Since the conventional parton model and perturbative QCD can not accomodate such large SSAs, the framework for QCD hard processes had to be extended to understand the mechanism of SSA. In this extended frameworks of QCD, intrinsic transverse momentum of partons and the multi-parton (quark-gluon and pure-gluonic) correlations in the hadrons, which were absent in the conventional framework, play a crucial role to cause SSAs, and well-defined formulation of these effects has been a big challenge for QCD theorists. Study on these effects has greatly promoted our understanding on QCD dynamics and hadron structure. In this talk, I will present an overview on these theoretical activity, emphasizing the important role of the Drell-Yan process.

  20. Analytical parametrization of fusion barriers using proximity potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutt, Ishwar; Puri, Rajeev K.

    2010-06-01

    Using the three versions of proximity potentials, namely proximity 1977, proximity 1988, and proximity 2000, we present a pocket formula for fusion barrier heights and positions. This was achieved by analyzing as many as 400 reactions with mass between 15 and 296. Our parametrized formula can reproduced the exact barrier heights and positions within an accuracy of ±1%. A comparison with the experimental data is also in good agreement.

  1. Proximity and Interactive Learning in University-Firm Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thune, Taran

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses the question of whether proximity is always necessary for interactive learning, as proposed by recent European innovation theory. Recent research has provided a refined conceptualization of proximity, but there is little empirically-based knowledge about the actual role that proximity plays in relationships intended to foster…

  2. Magnetic fields and chiral asymmetry in the early hot universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sydorenko, Maksym; Tomalak, Oleksandr; Shtanov, Yuri

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we study analytically the process of external generation and subsequent free evolution of the lepton chiral asymmetry and helical magnetic fields in the early hot universe. This process is known to be affected by the Abelian anomaly of the electroweak gauge interactions. As a consequence, chiral asymmetry in the fermion distribution generates magnetic fields of non-zero helicity, and vice versa. We take into account the presence of thermal bath, which serves as a seed for the development of instability in magnetic field in the presence of externally generated lepton chiral asymmetry. The developed helical magnetic field and lepton chiral asymmetry support each other, considerably prolonging their mutual existence, in the process of `inverse cascade' transferring magnetic-field power from small to large spatial scales. For cosmologically interesting initial conditions, the chiral asymmetry and the energy density of helical magnetic field are shown to evolve by scaling laws, effectively depending on a single combined variable. In this case, the late-time asymptotics of the conformal chiral chemical potential reproduces the universal scaling law previously found in the literature for the system under consideration. This regime is terminated at lower temperatures because of scattering of electrons with chirality change, which exponentially washes out chiral asymmetry. We derive an expression for the termination temperature as a function of the chiral asymmetry and energy density of helical magnetic field.

  3. Evaluation of Limb Load Asymmetry Using Two New Mathematical Models

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Senthil NS; Omar, Baharudin; Joseph, Leonard H.; Htwe, Ohnmar; Jagannathan, K.; Hamdan, Nor M Y; Rajalakshmi, D.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative measurement of limb loading is important in orthopedic and neurological rehabilitation. In current practice, mathematical models such as Symmetry index (SI), Symmetry ratio (SR), and Symmetry angle (SA) are used to quantify limb loading asymmetry. Literatures have identified certain limitations with the above mathematical models. Hence this study presents two new mathematical models Modified symmetry index (MSI) and Limb loading error (LLE) that would address these limitations. Furthermore, the current mathematical models were compared against the new model with the goal of achieving a better model. This study uses hypothetical data to simulate an algorithmic preliminary computational measure to perform with all numerical possibilities of even and uneven limb loading that can occur in human legs. Descriptive statistics are used to interpret the limb loading patterns: symmetry, asymmetry and maximum asymmetry. The five mathematical models were similar in analyzing symmetry between limbs. However, for asymmetry and maximum asymmetry data, the SA and SR values do not give any meaningful interpretation, and SI gives an inflated value. The MSI and LLE are direct, easy to interpret and identify the loading patterns with the side of asymmetry. The new models are notable as they quantify the amount and side of asymmetry under different loading patterns. PMID:25716372

  4. Unilateral Condylar Hyperplasia: A 3-Dimensional Quantification of Asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Maal, Thomas J. J.; Bergé, Stefaan J.; Becking, Alfred G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Objective quantifications of facial asymmetry in patients with Unilateral Condylar Hyperplasia (UCH) have not yet been described in literature. The aim of this study was to objectively quantify soft-tissue asymmetry in patients with UCH and to compare the findings with a control group using a new method. Material and Methods Thirty 3D photographs of patients diagnosed with UCH were compared with 30 3D photographs of healthy controls. As UCH presents particularly in the mandible, a new method was used to isolate the lower part of the face to evaluate asymmetry of this part separately. The new method was validated by two observers using 3D photographs of five patients and five controls. Results A significant difference (0.79 mm) between patients and controls whole face asymmetry was found. Intra- and inter-observer differences of 0.011 mm (−0.034–0.011) and 0.017 mm (−0.007–0.042) respectively were found. These differences are irrelevant in clinical practice. Conclusion After objective quantification, a significant difference was identified in soft-tissue asymmetry between patients with UCH and controls. The method used to isolate mandibular asymmetry was found to be valid and a suitable tool to evaluate facial asymmetry. PMID:23544063

  5. Shifting brain asymmetry: the link between meditation and structural lateralization.

    PubMed

    Kurth, Florian; MacKenzie-Graham, Allan; Toga, Arthur W; Luders, Eileen

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have revealed an increased fractional anisotropy and greater thickness in the anterior parts of the corpus callosum in meditation practitioners compared with control subjects. Altered callosal features may be associated with an altered inter-hemispheric integration and the degree of brain asymmetry may also be shifted in meditation practitioners. Therefore, we investigated differences in gray matter asymmetry as well as correlations between gray matter asymmetry and years of meditation practice in 50 long-term meditators and 50 controls. We detected a decreased rightward asymmetry in the precuneus in meditators compared with controls. In addition, we observed that a stronger leftward asymmetry near the posterior intraparietal sulcus was positively associated with the number of meditation practice years. In a further exploratory analysis, we observed that a stronger rightward asymmetry in the pregenual cingulate cortex was negatively associated with the number of practice years. The group difference within the precuneus, as well as the positive correlations with meditation years in the pregenual cingulate cortex, suggests an adaptation of the default mode network in meditators. The positive correlation between meditation practice years and asymmetry near the posterior intraparietal sulcus may suggest that meditation is accompanied by changes in attention processing.

  6. Learned control of slow potential interhemispheric asymmetry in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Gruzelier, J; Hardman, E; Wild, J; Zaman, R

    1999-12-01

    We report on the feasibility of teaching 16 (DSM-IV) schizophrenic patients, subdivided by syndrome, self-regulation of interhemispheric asymmetry having demonstrated efficient learning of interhemispheric control in normal subjects. Reversal of asymmetry may be important to treatment and recovery in schizophrenia for following improvement on neuroleptic drugs functional hemispheric asymmetries have reversed, with directions of reversal and pre-existing asymmetry dependent on syndrome. Asymmetry reversal in animals, manifested by spatial turning tendencies, has been used as a marker of neuroleptic action and involves striatal dopamine under reciprocal hemispheric control. We gave as feedback the left right asymmetry in slow potential negativity recorded from the sensory motor strip (C3,4). Feedback took the form of a rocket on a screen which rose or fell with leftward or rightward shifts in negativity. Patients were able to learn control (P < 0.01). In those patients with lesser ability this was due to inability to sustain concentration throughout the session rather than slow initial learning. Active syndrome patients were better able to shift negativity rightward and withdrawn patients leftward, directions associated with drug reversal of functional asymmetry and symptom recovery for each syndrome. Accordingly our demonstration that many symptomatic schizophrenic patients are capable of learning control opens the door to electrocortical operant conditioning training in schizophrenia with therapeutic regimens.

  7. Breast asymmetry pattern in women with idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Norma I; Korchin, Leo

    2013-01-01

    Breast asymmetry is frequent in women with idiopathic scoliosis. To understand the pattern of breast asymmetry in these women a clinical study was performed in which 54 female patients with idiopathic scoliosis were evaluated. The information recorded for each patient included: age, weight, height, scoliosis type, Cobb angle, breast measurements, and presence of rib cage asymmetry. Breast volume was calculated using anatomic measurements (anthropomorphic method). The mean age of the group was 25 +/- 7 years. A right convex thoracic curve occurred in 85%, with a mean Cobb angle of 32 +/- 15 degrees. Our study indicated that women with idiopathic scoliosis consistently presented breast asymmetry that followed a predictable pattern. The breast on the side of the convex thoracic scoliosis curve is always smaller in volume (mean difference 59 +/- 39 mi). The affected side also presents a smaller areola, a higher position of the nipple (mean difference 2.2 +/- 1.3 cm) and a higher position of the inframammary fold (mean difference 2.1 +/- 1.4 cm) when compared to the opposite breast. Though the asymmetry is predictable, the degree to which the patient presents these changes does not correlate with the severity of the scoliosis (Cobb angle). We believe that the severity of the asymmetry is a result of the difference between the hypoplastic breast and the normal breasts. In women with very large opposite breasts the asymmetry appears to be worse.

  8. Hα LINE PROFILE ASYMMETRIES AND THE CHROMOSPHERIC FLARE VELOCITY FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Kuridze, D.; Mathioudakis, M.; Kennedy, M.; Keenan, F. P.; Simões, P. J. A.; Voort, L. Rouppe van der; Fletcher, L.; Carlsson, M.; Jafarzadeh, S.; Allred, J. C.; Kowalski, A. F.; Graham, D.

    2015-11-10

    The asymmetries observed in the line profiles of solar flares can provide important diagnostics of the properties and dynamics of the flaring atmosphere. In this paper the evolution of the Hα and Ca ii λ8542 lines are studied using high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution ground-based observations of an M1.1 flare obtained with the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope. The temporal evolution of the Hα line profiles from the flare kernel shows excess emission in the red wing (red asymmetry) before flare maximum and excess in the blue wing (blue asymmetry) after maximum. However, the Ca ii λ8542 line does not follow the same pattern, showing only a weak red asymmetry during the flare. RADYN simulations are used to synthesize spectral line profiles for the flaring atmosphere, and good agreement is found with the observations. We show that the red asymmetry observed in Hα is not necessarily associated with plasma downflows, and the blue asymmetry may not be related to plasma upflows. Indeed, we conclude that the steep velocity gradients in the flaring chromosphere modify the wavelength of the central reversal in the Hα line profile. The shift in the wavelength of maximum opacity to shorter and longer wavelengths generates the red and blue asymmetries, respectively.

  9. Scintillation proximity assay using polymeric membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, R.K.

    1992-01-01

    Liquid scintillation counting (LSC) is typically used to quantify electron emitting isotopes. In LSC, radioactive samples are dissolved in an organic fluor solution (scintillation cocktail) to ensure that the label is close enough to the fluor molecules to be detected. Although efficient, scintillation cocktail is neither specific or selective for samples labeled with the same radioisotope. Scintillation cocktail is flammable posing significant health risks to the user and is expensive to purchase and discard. Scintillation Proximity Assay (SPA) is a radioanalytical technique where only those radiochemical entities (RCE's) bound to fluor containing matrices are detected. Only bound RCE's are in close enough proximity the entrapped fluor molecules to induce scintillations. Unbound radioligands are too far removed from the fluor molecules to be detected. The research in this dissertation focused on the development and evaluation of fluor-containing membranes (scintillation proximity membranes, SP membranes) to be used for specific radioanalytical techniques without using scintillation cocktail. Polysulfone and PVC SP membranes prepared in our laboratory were investigated for radioimmunossay (RIA) where only bound radioligand is detected, thereby eliminating the separation step impeding the automation of RIA. These SP membranes performed RIA where the results were nearly identical to commercial SP microbeads. SP membranes functionalized with quaternary ammonium hydroxide moieties were able to trap and quantify [sup 14]CO[sub 2] without using liquid scintillation cocktail. RCE's bound in the pore structure of SP membranes are intimate with the entrapped fluor providing the geometry needed for high detection efficiencies. Absorbent SP membranes were used in radiation surveys and were shown to be as effective as conventional survey techniques using filter paper and scintillation cocktail.

  10. Delayed homicides and the proximate cause.

    PubMed

    Lin, Peter; Gill, James R

    2009-12-01

    Delayed homicides result from complications of remote injuries inflicted by "the hands of another." The investigation of delayed homicides may be a challenge due to a number of factors including: failure to report the death to the proper authorities, lack of ready and adequate documentation of the original injury and circumstances, and jurisdictional differences between the places of injury and death. The certification of these deaths also requires the demonstration of a pathophysiologic link between the remote injury and death. In sorting through these issues, it is helpful to rely upon the definition of the proximate cause of death. Over a 2-year period in New York City, there were 1211 deaths certified as homicide of which 42 were due to injuries sustained greater than 1 year before death. The survival interval ranged from 1.3 to 43.2 years. The most common immediate causes of death were: infections (22), seizures (7), and intestinal obstructions/hernias (6). Common patterns of complications included infection following a gunshot wound of the spinal cord, seizure disorder due to blunt head trauma, and intestinal obstruction/hernia due to adhesions from an abdominal stab wound. Spinal cord injuries resulted in paraplegia in 14 instances and quadriplegia in 8. The mean survival interval for paraplegics was 20.3 years and 14.8 years for quadriplegics; infections were a frequent immediate cause of death in both groups, particularly infections due to chronic bladder catheterization. The definition of proximate cause originated with civil law cases and was later applied to death certification as the proximate cause of death. The gradual extinction of the "year and a day rule" for the limitation of bringing homicide charges in delayed deaths may result in more of these deaths going to trial. Medical examiners/coroners must be able to explain the reasoning behind these death certifications and maintain consistent standards for the certification of all delayed deaths due

  11. Hand Replantation with Proximal Row Carpectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Keun; Lee, Hang-Ho; Park, Ji-Kang; Kim, Joo-Yong; Dhawan, Vikas

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to present our operative technique and postoperative results of the hand replantation with proximal row carpectomy in cases of complete amputation at the level of wrist joint. From May 2003 to April 2005, five patients suffered from complete amputation of the hand due to industrial trauma. Amputation level was radiocarpal joint in three cases and midcarpal joint in two cases. Three cases represented guillotine type and two cases with local crush type injuries. All were men and the mean age was 26.6 years. The mean follow-up period was 26.8 months. At the time of replantation, the wrist joint was stabilized with transarticular fixation using three to four Kirschner’s wires after performing proximal row carpectomy. Postoperatively, functional results such as muscle strength, range of motion of the wrist and fingers, and sensory recovery were assessed according to Chen’s criteria. Joint width and arthritic changes of the radio-capitate joint were evaluated with radiologic tools. According to Chen’s criteria, the overall results in five cases were classified as grade II. Intrinsic muscle power of hands was found to be grade 4. The mean grip and pinch powers were 41% and 45%, respectively, compared to contralateral hand. The mean arc of flexion–extension of wrist was 53°. Total mean active motion of fingers was 215 degrees. Static two-point discrimination of fingertip ranged from 8 to 13 mm. On the follow-up, computerized tomography showed well-preserved radio-capitate joint space without any arthritic changes. While performing hand replantation after amputation at the radiocarpal or midcarpal level, proximal row carpectomy is a useful procedure to preserve joint motion of the wrist in selected cases. PMID:18855073

  12. Characterization of glucose transport by cultured rabbit kidney proximal convoluted and proximal straight tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Del Valle, Pedro L; Trifillis, Anna; Ruegg, Charles E; Kane, Andrew S

    2002-04-01

    Rabbit kidney proximal convoluted tubule (RPCT) and proximal straight tubule (RPST) cells were independently isolated and cultured. The kinetics of the sodium-dependent glucose transport was characterized by determining the uptake of the glucose analog alpha-methylglucopyranoside. Cell culture and assay conditions used in these experiments were based on previous experiments conducted on the renal cell line derived from the whole kidney of the Yorkshire pig (LLC-PK1). Results indicated the presence of two distinct sodium-dependent glucose transporters in rabbit renal cells: a relatively high-capacity, low-affinity transporter (V(max) = 2.28 +/- 0.099 nmoles/mg protein min, Km = 4.1 +/- 0.27 mM) in RPCT cells and a low-capacity, high-affinity transporter (V(max) = 0.45 +/- 0.076 nmoles/mg protein min, K(m) = 1.7 +/- 0.43 mM) in RPST cells. A relatively high-capacity, low-affinity transporter (V(max) = 1.68 +/- 0.215 nmoles/mg protein min, Km = 4.9 +/- 0.23 mM) was characterized in LLC-PK1 cells. Phlorizin inhibited the uptake of alpha-methylglucopyranoside in proximal convoluted, proximal straight, and LLC-PK1 cells by 90, 50, and 90%, respectively. Sodium-dependent glucose transport in all three cell types was specific for hexoses. These data are consistent with the kinetic heterogeneity of sodium-dependent glucose transport in the S1-S2 and S3 segments of the mammalian renal proximal tubule. The RPCT-RPST cultured cell model is novel, and this is the first report of sodium-dependent glucose transport characterization in primary cultures of proximal straight tubule cells. Our results support the use of cultured monolayers of RPCT and RPST cells as a model system to evaluate segment-specific differences in these renal cell types.

  13. Impacted valgus fractures of the proximal humerus.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Fabiano Rebouças; Takesian, Fernando Hovaguim; Bezerra, Luiz Eduardo Pimentel; Filho, Rômulo Brasil; Júnior, Antonio Carlos Tenor; da Costa, Miguel Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Impacted valgus fractures of the proximal humerus are considered to be a special type fracture, since impaction of the humeral head on the metaphysis with maintenance of the posteromedial periosteum improves the prognosis regarding occurrences of avascular necrosis. This characteristic can also facilitate the reduction maneuver and increase the consolidation rate of these fractures, even in more complex cases. The studies included were obtained by searching the Bireme, Medline, PubMed, Cochrane Library and Google Scholar databases for those published between 1991 and 2013. The objective of this study was to identify the most common definitions, classifications and treatment methods used for these fractures in the orthopedic medical literature.

  14. Ewing's sarcoma of proximal humeral epiphysis.

    PubMed

    Esmaili, Heydar Ali; Niknejad, Mohammad Taghi; Mohajeri, Shiva

    2015-02-01

    Ewing's sarcoma is one of the most common primary bone tumors of childhood. The tumor is almost always metaphyseal or diaphyseal, within long bones. In children, lesions of the epiphysis are often benign, with the most common diagnosis being chondroblastoma. Rarely, 1%-2% of Ewing sarcomas may involve epiphysis. We present a case of Ewing's sarcoma of the proximal humeral epiphysis in a 13-year-old boy. This case adds to previously reported cases of epiphyseal Ewing sarcoma and suggests that the diagnosis should be considered for pediatric epiphyseal lesions. PMID:25644805

  15. Fractures of the proximal humeral epiphysis.

    PubMed

    Burgos-Flores, J; Gonzalez-Herranz, P; Lopez-Mondejar, J A; Ocete-Guzman, J G; Amaya-Alarcón, S

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-two patients with marked displacement of a fracture of the proximal humeral epiphysis have been treated with closed or open reduction and fixation by Kirschner wires. At an average follow-up of 6.8 years there have been good functional results in almost all patients (91.1), with better results in patients under 13 years of age particularly with less residual displacement or angulation. Since there is a greater occurrence of residual deformity and symmetria and limitation of motion in older patients, a more aggressive approach to correct the initial displacement and angulation is warranted in those over the age of 13 years.

  16. Unilateral Isolated Proximal Femoral Focal Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Doğer, Emek; Köpük, Şule Y.; Çakıroğlu, Yiğit; Çakır, Özgür; Yücesoy, Gülseren

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To discuss a patient with a prenatal diagnosis of unilateral isolated femoral focal deficiency. Case. Antenatal diagnosis of unilateral isolated femoral focal deficiency was made at 20 weeks of gestation. The length of left femur was shorter than the right, and fetal femur length was below the fifth percentile. Proximal femoral focal deficiency was diagnosed. After delivery, the diagnosis was confirmed with skeletal radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging. In prenatal ultrasonographic examination, the early recognition and exclusion of skeletal dysplasias is important; moreover, treatment plans should be initiated, and valuable information should be provided to the family. PMID:23984135

  17. Proximal monomelic amyotrophy of the upper limb.

    PubMed

    Amir, D; Magora, A; Vatine, J J

    1987-07-01

    A 30-year-old patient of Central European origin, suffering from monomelic amyotrophy, is presented. The disease was characterized by proximal weakness of one upper limb, mainly of the shoulder girdle, accompanied by atrophy. The electrodiagnostic examination revealed signs of partial denervation in the presence of normal motor and sensory conduction. The disease, which is probably of the anterior horn cells, had a benign course and good prognosis, as evident from repeated examinations during a follow-up of eight years. PMID:3606370

  18. Impacted valgus fractures of the proximal humerus☆

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Fabiano Rebouças; Takesian, Fernando Hovaguim; Bezerra, Luiz Eduardo Pimentel; Filho, Rômulo Brasil; Júnior, Antonio Carlos Tenor; da Costa, Miguel Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Impacted valgus fractures of the proximal humerus are considered to be a special type fracture, since impaction of the humeral head on the metaphysis with maintenance of the posteromedial periosteum improves the prognosis regarding occurrences of avascular necrosis. This characteristic can also facilitate the reduction maneuver and increase the consolidation rate of these fractures, even in more complex cases. The studies included were obtained by searching the Bireme, Medline, PubMed, Cochrane Library and Google Scholar databases for those published between 1991 and 2013. The objective of this study was to identify the most common definitions, classifications and treatment methods used for these fractures in the orthopedic medical literature. PMID:27069878

  19. Functional asymmetry of posture and body system regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boloban, V. N.; Otsupok, A. P.

    1980-01-01

    The manifestation of functional asymmetry during the regulation of an athlete's posture and a system of bodies and its effect on the execution of individual and group acrobatic exercises were studied. Functional asymmetry of posture regulation was recorded in acrobats during the execution of individual and group exercises. It was shown that stability is maintained at the expense of bending and twisting motions. It is important to consider whether the functional asymmetry of posture regulation is left or right sided in making up pairs and groups of acrobats.

  20. Lepton asymmetry in the primordial gravitational wave spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Yamaguchi, Masahide; Yokoyama, Jun'Ichi

    2007-04-15

    Effects of neutrino free streaming are evaluated on the primordial spectrum of gravitational radiation taking both neutrino chemical potential and masses into account. The former or the lepton asymmetry induces two competitive effects, namely, to increase anisotropic stress, which damps the gravitational wave more, and to delay the matter-radiation equality time, which reduces the damping. The latter effect is more prominent and a large lepton asymmetry would reduce the damping. We may thereby be able to measure the magnitude of lepton asymmetry from the primordial gravitational wave spectrum.

  1. Asymmetry in children with cerebral palsy and oral structure.

    PubMed

    Haberfellner, H; Richter, M

    1980-12-01

    Twenty-six children with cerebral palsy were examined with respect to structural asymmetry of the mouth. In 19 children there were clear cut correlations between symmetry/asymmetry of voluntary function and the oral findings. Patients with symmetrical patterns of movements had symmetrical dentition, while in those with asymmetrical function the favoured side corresponded to the side with structural changes. Apparent exceptions to this rule in 7 children could be resolved in 6 by analysis of their complex case histories. Fifty normal controls showed oral asymmetries of nearly identical frequency and magnitude. In this respect there is no difference between the normal and handicapped group.

  2. Poloidal rotation, density asymmetries and momentum confinement in tokamak experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, W.M.; Jackson, D.R.

    1992-08-01

    Poloidal rotation speeds and density asymmetries are calculated for the deuterium and dominant carbon (oxygen) impurity ions in discharges in ASDEX, DIII, ISX-B, JET, and TFTR for which {upsilon}{sub {phi}} {approximately} {upsilon}{sub th} for the ions. These poloidal rotation speeds and density asymmetries are used to evaluate the neoclassical gyroviscous model for the momentum confinement time. The rather good agreement with experimental momentum confinement times obtained over this wide range of plasma parameters provides a measure of confidence in the calculated density asymmetries and poloidal rotation, as well as arguing for a neoclassical explanation for momentum confinement in tokamaks.

  3. Carbon nanotube proximity influences rice DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katti, Dinesh R.; Sharma, Anurag; Pradhan, Shashindra Man; Katti, Kalpana S.

    2015-07-01

    The uptake of carbon nanotubes (CNT) influences the output of plants, potentially through interactions between the DNA and CNTs. However, little is known about the changes in the plant DNA due to CNT proximity. We report changes in rice plant DNA in the proximity of single walled CNT (SWCNT) using molecular dynamics simulations. The DNA experiences breaking and forming of hydrogen bonds due to unzipping of Watson-Crick (WC) nucleobase pairs and wrapping onto SWCNT. The number of hydrogen bonds between water and DNA nucleobases decreases due to the presence of SWCNT. A higher number of guanine-cytosine (Gua-Cyt) WC hydrogen bonds break as compared to adenine-thymine (Ade-Thy), which suggests that Gua and Cyt bases play a dominant role in DNA-SWCNT interactions. We also find that changes to non-WC nucleobase pairs and van der Waals attractive interactions between WC nucleobase pairs and SWCNT cause significant changes in the conformation of the DNA.

  4. Testing simple indices of habitat proximity.

    PubMed

    Winfree, Rachael; Dushoff, Jonathan; Crone, Elizabeth E; Schultz, Cheryl B; Budny, Robert V; Williams, Neal M; Kremen, Claire

    2005-06-01

    Simple measures of habitat proximity made primarily on the basis of land cover are widely used in the ecological literature to infer habitat connectivity, or the potential for animal movement among resource patches. However, such indices rarely have been tested against observations of animal movement or against more detailed biological models. We developed a priori expectations as to the types of study systems and organisms for which various habitat proximity indices would be best suited. We then used data from three study systems and four species to test which, if any, of the indices were good predictors of population-level responses. Our a priori expectations about index performance were not upheld. The indices that consider both habitat area and distance from the focal patch were highly correlated with each other, suggesting that they do index similar quantities. However, none of the indices performed well in predicting population response variables. The results suggest that the pattern of habitat cover alone may be insufficient to predict the process of animal movement.

  5. Fast proximity algorithm for MAP ECT reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Si; Krol, Andrzej; Shen, Lixin; Xu, Yuesheng

    2012-03-01

    We arrived at the fixed-point formulation of the total variation maximum a posteriori (MAP) regularized emission computed tomography (ECT) reconstruction problem and we proposed an iterative alternating scheme to numerically calculate the fixed point. We theoretically proved that our algorithm converges to unique solutions. Because the obtained algorithm exhibits slow convergence speed, we further developed the proximity algorithm in the transformed image space, i.e. the preconditioned proximity algorithm. We used the bias-noise curve method to select optimal regularization hyperparameters for both our algorithm and expectation maximization with total variation regularization (EM-TV). We showed in the numerical experiments that our proposed algorithms, with an appropriately selected preconditioner, outperformed conventional EM-TV algorithm in many critical aspects, such as comparatively very low noise and bias for Shepp-Logan phantom. This has major ramification for nuclear medicine because clinical implementation of our preconditioned fixed-point algorithms might result in very significant radiation dose reduction in the medical applications of emission tomography.

  6. Proximal intentional neglect: a case study.

    PubMed Central

    Gold, M; Shuren, J; Heilman, K M

    1994-01-01

    Although neglect has been demonstrated in the horizontal, vertical, and radial planes of space and has been attributed to sensory-attentional, motor-intentional, and representational deficits, motor intentional neglect in the radial plane has not been previously described. A patient who had a right parietal infarct was tested with a modified cancellation task that uses a fixed window, thereby controlling attentional demands and allowing one to dissociate between intentional and representational neglect. This patient showed proximal (radial) intentional neglect (a failure to move towards or in proximal space). Unlike controls whose search times decreased with increasing window size, our patient showed no change in search time as a function of window size. This pattern of behaviour suggests that the patient's search strategy does not incorporate factors such as the relation between a fixed target space and a variably sized aperture, but rather was based on the allocation of a certain amount of resources for a fixed period of time after which, regardless of performance, the patient would stop searching. PMID:7964818

  7. Updated Classification System for Proximal Humeral Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Guix, José M. Mora; Pedrós, Juan Sala; Serrano, Alejandro Castaño

    2009-01-01

    Proximal humeral fractures can restrict daily activities and, therefore, deserve efficient diagnoses that minimize complications and sequels. For good diagnosis and treatment, patient characteristics, variability in the forms of the fractures presented, and the technical difficulties in achieving fair results with surgical treatment should all be taken into account. Current classification systems for these fractures are based on anatomical and pathological principles, and not on systematic image reading. These fractures can appear in many different forms, with many characteristics that must be identified. However, many current classification systems lack good reliability, both inter-observer and intra-observer for different image types. A new approach to image reading, following a well-designed set and sequence of variables to check, is needed. We previously reported such an image reading system. In the present study, we report a classification system based on this image reading system. Here we define 21 fracture characteristics and apply them along with classical Codman approaches to classify fractures. We base this novel classification system for classifying proximal humeral fractures on a review of scientific literature and improvements to our image reading protocol. Patient status, fracture characteristics and surgeon circumstances have been important issues in developing this system. PMID:19574487

  8. An improved proximity force approximation for electrostatics

    SciTech Connect

    Fosco, Cesar D.; Lombardo, Fernando C.; Mazzitelli, Francisco D.

    2012-08-15

    A quite straightforward approximation for the electrostatic interaction between two perfectly conducting surfaces suggests itself when the distance between them is much smaller than the characteristic lengths associated with their shapes. Indeed, in the so called 'proximity force approximation' the electrostatic force is evaluated by first dividing each surface into a set of small flat patches, and then adding up the forces due two opposite pairs, the contributions of which are approximated as due to pairs of parallel planes. This approximation has been widely and successfully applied in different contexts, ranging from nuclear physics to Casimir effect calculations. We present here an improvement on this approximation, based on a derivative expansion for the electrostatic energy contained between the surfaces. The results obtained could be useful for discussing the geometric dependence of the electrostatic force, and also as a convenient benchmark for numerical analyses of the tip-sample electrostatic interaction in atomic force microscopes. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proximity force approximation (PFA) has been widely used in different areas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The PFA can be improved using a derivative expansion in the shape of the surfaces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use the improved PFA to compute electrostatic forces between conductors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The results can be used as an analytic benchmark for numerical calculations in AFM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insight is provided for people who use the PFA to compute nuclear and Casimir forces.

  9. Proximate determinants of fertility in peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Tey, Nai Peng; Ng, Sor Tho; Yew, Siew Yong

    2012-05-01

    The continuing decline in fertility despite a contraction in contraceptive use in Peninsular Malaysia since the mid-1980s has triggered considerable interest in the reasons behind this phenomenon, such as increase in abortion, sterility, and out-of-wedlock pregnancy. Fertility decline has been attributed to rapid socioeconomic development, which can only influence fertility through the intermediate variables. Application of vital statistics, population census, and survey data of Peninsular Malaysia on Bongaarts's model vindicates that marriage postponement and contraceptive use are the 2 most important proximate determinants of fertility, but the effects are not uniform across the ethnic groups. For instance, the predicted total fertility rate for Chinese and Malays are 2.9 and 1.6, respectively, compared with the observed level of 3.0 and 1.9. Postpartum infecundability and abortion also play a part in explaining ethnic fertility differentials. The fertility inhibiting effects of these proximate determinants have significant implications on reproductive health and future population growth. PMID:21490114

  10. Obesity and Supermarket Access: Proximity or Price?

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Anju; Hurvitz, Philip M.; Monsivais, Pablo; Moudon, Anne V

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We examined whether physical proximity to supermarkets or supermarket price was more strongly associated with obesity risk. Methods. The Seattle Obesity Study (SOS) collected and geocoded data on home addresses and food shopping destinations for a representative sample of adult residents of King County, Washington. Supermarkets were stratified into 3 price levels based on average cost of the market basket. Sociodemographic and health data were obtained from a telephone survey. Modified Poisson regression was used to test the associations between obesity and supermarket variables. Results. Only 1 in 7 respondents reported shopping at the nearest supermarket. The risk of obesity was not associated with street network distances between home and the nearest supermarket or the supermarket that SOS participants reported as their primary food source. The type of supermarket, by price, was found to be inversely and significantly associated with obesity rates, even after adjusting for individual-level sociodemographic and lifestyle variables, and proximity measures (adjusted relative risk = 0.34; 95% confidence interval = 0.19, 0.63) Conclusions. Improving physical access to supermarkets may be one strategy to deal with the obesity epidemic; improving economic access to healthy foods is another. PMID:22698052

  11. Proximal interphalangeal joint dislocations without fractures.

    PubMed

    Vicar, A J

    1988-02-01

    Injuries to the proximal interphalangeal joint are extremely common. An understanding of the complex anatomy of this joint is essential for diagnosis and treatment of proximal interphalangeal joint sprains and dislocations. Lateral injuries are among the commonest injuries in the hand. These are often stable after reduction, requiring only closed treatment. Occasionally, however, the collateral ligament can be trapped in the joint and require open reduction. Dorsal dislocations represent the most common dislocation in the hand. These, too, are usually stable after reduction and can be treated by closed methods. On occasion, however, these dislocations will be open or irreducible by closed means, requiring surgical intervention and repair of damaged structures. Complex rotary dislocations are exactly that: complex. An exact understanding of the damaged structures and causes of irreducibility frequently makes this an injury often requiring open reduction and selective repair of damaged soft tissue structures. Fortunately, prompt diagnosis, reduction, and institution of appropriate treatment can usually afford the patient good function after these injuries. It must be noted that stiffness is more common than instability, and active range-of-motion exercises instituted at the proper time are essential. These joints will often remain permanently thicker after injury in spite of optimal care, and tenderness and soreness with use may persist for 6 to 12 months.

  12. Disentangling the Effects of Attentional and Amplitude Asymmetries on Relative Phase Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Poel, Harjo J.; Peper, C. E.; Beek, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    Attentional asymmetry in rhythmic interlimb coordination induces an asymmetry in relative phase dynamics, allegedly reflecting an asymmetry in coupling strength. However, relative phase asymmetries may also be engendered by an attention-induced difference between the amplitudes (and hence the preferred frequencies) of the limb movements. The…

  13. The small scale power asymmetry in the cosmic microwave background

    SciTech Connect

    Flender, Samuel; Hotchkiss, Shaun E-mail: shaun.hotchkiss@helsinki.fi

    2013-09-01

    We investigate the hemispherical power asymmetry in the cosmic microwave background on small angular scales. We find an anomalously high asymmetry in the multipole range l = 601−2048, with a naive statistical significance of 6.5σ. However, we show that this extreme anomaly is simply a coincidence of three other effects, relativistic power modulation, edge effects from the mask applied, and inter-scale correlations. After correcting for all of these effects, the significance level drops to ∼ 1σ, i.e., there is no anomalous intrinsic asymmetry in the small angular scales. Using this null result, we derive a constraint on a potential dipolar modulation amplitude, A(k) < 0.0045 on the ∼ 10 Mpc-scale, at 95% C.L. This new constraint must be satisfied by any theoretical model attempting to explain the hemispherical asymmetry at large angular scales.

  14. Fluctuating asymmetry as an indicator of mercury exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, L.A. |; Newman, M.C.; Mulvey, M.

    1995-12-31

    Developmental stability is the ability of a developing organism to produce a consistent phenotype in a given environment. It provides a simple method of detecting stressed populations and monitoring their recovery. Laboratory experiments have documented the effect of environmental stress on developmental stability as demonstrated by amounts of fluctuating asymmetry. Fluctuating asymmetry assesses the amount of deviation from perfect bilateral symmetry in traits that would normally be symmetrical. Fluctuating asymmetry was examined for chironomid larvae (Chironomus plumosus) collected from a mercury contaminated lake. Larvae were collected from a gradient of mercury concentrations ranging from 2.6--106 mg/kg (DW). Numerous characters were examined for evidence of fluctuating asymmetry and for their utility as indicators of chronic mercury stress.

  15. Flare asymmetry as seen in offband H-alpha filtergrams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, F.

    1983-01-01

    Narrow-band H-alpha filtergrams at + or - 1 A and + or - 2 A from the line center were used to study the asymmetry of flares. Of the 60 flares studied, 92% show red asymmetry while 5% show blue asymmetry. Typically, the filtergrams show a striking dominance of the red wing over the blue wing from onset until late in the decay phase. The difference in intensity of the flare emissions is further augmented by the extensiveness of the emission area in the brighter wing. New kernel-like emissions were often found many minutes after the flare maximum. Spatially, they are displaced from the previous kernels. The late emissions show the same asymmetry as that of the earlier part of the flare.

  16. Birth order and fluctuating asymmetry: a first look.

    PubMed Central

    Lalumière, M L; Harris, G T; Rice, M E

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that maternal immunoreactivity to male-specific features of the foetus can increase developmental instability. We predicted that the participants' number of older brothers would be positively related to the fluctuating asymmetry of ten bilateral morphological traits. The participants were 40 adult male psychiatric patients and 31 adult male hospital employees. Consistent with the hypothesis, the participants' number of older brothers--but not number of older sisters, younger brothers or younger sisters--was positively associated with fluctuating asymmetry. The patients had significantly larger fluctuating asymmetry scores and tended to have more older brothers than the employees, but the positive relationship between the number of older brothers and fluctuating asymmetry was observed in both groups. PMID:10643079

  17. Cell polarity determinants establish asymmetry in MEN signaling

    PubMed Central

    Monje-Casas, Fernando; Amon, Angelika

    2009-01-01

    Summary Components of the Mitotic Exit Network (MEN), a signaling pathway that triggers exit from mitosis, localize to the spindle pole body (SPB) that migrates into the daughter cell during anaphase but are largely absent from the SPB that remains in the mother cell. Through the analysis of one of the determinants of this asymmetry, Bfa1, we find that the machinery responsible for establishing cell polarity and cytoplasmic microtubules collaborate to establish MEN asymmetry. In cells defective in the Cdc42 signaling pathway or the formin Bni1, Bfa1 localizes to both SPBs. The quantitative analysis of Bfa1 localization further shows that Bfa1 can associate with both SPBs in a transient and highly dynamic fashion, but the protein is stabilized on the SPB that migrates into the daughter cell during anaphase through microtubule – bud cortex interactions. Our results indicate that mother – daughter cell asymmetry determinants establish MEN signaling asymmetry through microtubule – bud cortex interactions. PMID:19154724

  18. Cerebral blood flow asymmetries in headache-free migraineurs

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, S.R.; Welch, K.M.; Ewing, J.R.; Joseph, R.; D'Andrea, G.

    1987-11-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) asymmetries were studied in controls and patients with common and classic/complicated migraine using /sup 133/Xe inhalation with 8 homologously situated external collimators over each cerebral hemisphere. Migraine patients as a group more frequently had posterior rCBF asymmetries than controls (p less than 0.03). Although there were no differences in the number of anterior rCBF asymmetries, migraine patients had 2 or more asymmetric probe pairs more often than controls (p less than 0.02). The posterior rCBF asymmetries, consistent with the site of activation of many migraine attacks, may be related to more labile control of the cerebral circulation.

  19. Frustration driven stock market dynamics: Leverage effect and asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlgren, Peter Toke Heden; Jensen, Mogens H.; Simonsen, Ingve; Donangelo, Raul; Sneppen, Kim

    2007-09-01

    By applying inverse statistics to financial data it has recently been found from empirical studies that indices exhibit a pronounced gain-loss asymmetry [M.H. Jensen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83 (1999) 76; I. Simonsen, M.H. Jensen, A. Johansen, Eur. Phys. J. B 27 (2002) 583; M.H. Jensen, A. Johansen, I. Simonsen, Physica A 324 (2003) 338]. This gain-loss asymmetry appears to have some similarities with the stylized fact leverage effect and we investigate if they could be of same origin. For this purpose we introduce the Frustration Governed Market model which includes correlations in time between a model index and its individual stocks. It is shown that the model reproduces very well the empirical findings with respect to gain-loss asymmetry and leverage. In special cases, however, the model may produce leverage without a pronounced gain-loss asymmetry.

  20. Condylar hyperplasia and facial asymmetry: report of five cases.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Divya; Dhasmana, Satish; Kamboj, Mala; Gambhir, Gautam

    2011-03-01

    Condylar hyperplasia of mandible is overdevelopment of condyle, unilaterally or bilaterally, leading to facial asymmetry, mandibular deviation, malocclusion and articular dysfunction. This is a series of five such patients managed at our centre. PMID:22379321

  1. Impurity poloidal asymmetries and plasma rotation in the PDX Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brau, K.

    Vertical poloidal asymmetries of carbon and oxygen in the PDX Tokamak were monitored under a variety of discharge conditions in circular plasmas. Near the edge of the plasma and in the region beyond the limiter, the asymmetries appear to be caused by local impurity recycling, variations in the length of the emitting region, and effects due to vertical ion drifts. In the case of C V impurities, the sign and magnitude of the asymmetry is in qualitative agreement with the predictions of a quasi-neoclassical fluid model of impurity transport. A two dimensional computer code is used to simulate different models of poloidal asymmetries, including: (1) poloidally asymmetric source function, (2) charge exchange recombination with neutral hydrogen, (3) poloidally asymmetric electron ensity and temperature profiles, (4) poloidally varying anomalous radial diffusion coefficient, and (5) the quasi-neoclassical fluid model.

  2. Amplitude and polarization asymmetries in a ring laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, L. L.; Buholz, N. E.

    1971-01-01

    Asymmetric amplitude effects between the oppositely directed traveling waves in a He-Ne ring laser are analyzed both theoretically and experimentally. These effects make it possible to detect angular orientations of an inner-cavity bar with respect to the plane of the ring cavity. The amplitude asymmetries occur when a birefringent bar is placed in the three-mirror ring cavity, and an axial magnetic field is applied to the active medium. A simplified theoretical analysis is performed by using a first order perturbation theory to derive an expression for the polarization of the active medium, and a set of self-consistent equations are derived to predict threshold conditions. Polarization asymmetries between the oppositely directed waves are also predicted. Amplitude asymmetries similar in nature to those predicted at threshold occur when the laser is operating in 12-15 free-running modes, and polarization asymmetry occurs simultaneously.

  3. Poloidal rotation, density asymmetries and momentum confinement in tokamak experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, W.M.; Jackson, D.R.

    1992-08-01

    Poloidal rotation speeds and density asymmetries are calculated for the deuterium and dominant carbon (oxygen) impurity ions in discharges in ASDEX, DIII, ISX-B, JET, and TFTR for which [upsilon][sub [phi

  4. Sibling temperaments, conflict, warmth, and role asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Stoneman, Z; Brody, G H

    1993-12-01

    The association between sibling temperament combinations (activity and adaptability) and qualitative aspects of the sibling relationship were examined, including in-home observations of sibling positivity/warmth, negativity/conflict, social engagement, and role asymmetry and older sibling perceptions of warmth/closeness, conflict, and status/power. The sample consisted of 67 same-gender, school-aged sibling pairs. Highest levels of negativity/conflict occurred when both siblings were high in activity and when the older sibling was rated as more active than the younger. Conflict was lowest when both siblings were low in activity. Warmth/positivity was greatest when both children were similar in activity level. Siblings were more socially engaged when the older sibling was more adaptable than the younger. Perceived status/power was greatest when younger siblings were low in adaptability. When between-temperament-dimension relationships were examined, observed conflict was greatest when older siblings were high in activity and younger siblings were nonadaptable. Gender and age-related findings are also reported. Findings highlight the importance of identifying the complex ways in which varying dimensions of sibling temperaments combine to influence specific aspects of the sibling relationship.

  5. Inter-hemispheric asymmetry of Pedersen conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Y.; Lu, Y.; Sheng, C.; Yue, X.

    2015-12-01

    Ionospheric conductance is very important to the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling in the high latitude region, since it connects the polar cap potential with the currents. Meanwhile, the altitudinal distribution of Pederson conductance gives us a rough idea about the altitudinal distribution of Joule heating at high latitudes. Based on the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) satellites observations of electron density profiles from 2009-2014, Pedersen conductivity has been calculated. A climatologic study of the height-integrated Pedersen conductivities in both E (100-150 km) and F (150-600 km) regions and their ratio in different seasons, solar and geomagnetic conditions have been conducted. A significant inter-hemispheric asymmetry is identified in the seasonal variation. Meanwhile, the conductance in both regions and the conductance ratio show a strong dependence on F10.7 and Ap indices. This result will strongly help our understanding of the inter-hemispheric difference in the high-latitude electrodynamics.

  6. Solar Asymmetry and the Interplanetary Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgieva, Katya; Kirov, Boian; Javaraiah, Javaraiah

    The way in which solar activity affects a number of terrestrial phenomena has been shown to depend on solar activity asymmetry. An important mediator between the Sun and the Earth is the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) which is an extension of the large-scale coronal field. The behavior of the B coefficient of the solar differential rotation is particularly important with relation to the dynamo theory of the solar magnetic field. We use Bn and Bs coefficients of solar differential rotation in the Northern and Southern solar hemispheres respectively derived by Mt Wilson Doppler shift measurements of photospheric line for 1967-1994 and from the Greenwich Photoheliospheric Results from 1881 to 1976 and compare them to the IMF parameters at Earth's orbit measured directly since the beginning of the satellite era and for the earlier period - to the aa index of geomagnetic activity related to the IMF. In the period 1881-1912 more active is the Southern solar hemisphere in 1913-1966 - the Northern hemisphere and since 1967 - again the Southern hemisphere. We show that in all three periods the dominant periodicity in the IMF is the dominant periodicity of the differential rotation of the more active solar hemisphere.

  7. Lepton asymmetry from mixing and oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartavtsev, A.; Millington, P.; Vogel, H.

    2016-06-01

    We show how the two physically-distinct sources of CP -asymmetry relevant to scenarios of leptogenesis: (i) resonant mixing and (ii) oscillations between different flavours can be unambiguously identified within the Kadanoff-Baym formalism. These contributions are isolated by analyzing the spectral structure of the non-equilibrium propagators without relying on the definition of particle number densities. The mixing source is associated with the usual mass shells, whereas the oscillation source is identified with a third intermediate shell. In addition, we identify terms lying on the oscillation shell that can be interpreted as the destructive interference between mixing and oscillation. We confirm that identical shell structure is obtained in both the Heisenberg- and interaction-picture realizations of the Kadanoff-Baym formalism. In so doing, we illustrate the self-consistency and complementarity of these two approaches. The interaction-picture approach in particular has the advantage that it may be used to analyze all forms of mass spectra from quasi-degenerate through to hierarchical.

  8. Asymmetry of normal mandibular condylar shape.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Miani, A; Sigurtà, D

    1997-01-01

    Morphological studies of the facial skeleton in human beings are usually made from radiographs (frontal and lateral projections and orthopantomographs). The conventional linear and angular measurements provide quantitative information only about size, and fail to define the shape and form of the skeletal features and their variations. Mathematical methods such as the Fourier series allow a correct quantitative analysis of the shape and its variations. The outlines of the mandibular condyles in the orthopantomographs of 20 men and 20 women (mean age 29 years) were traced and digitized. All subjects had a good dentition, no temporomandibular joint problems, and were referred to a dental surgery for periodontal problems. A Fourier analysis of the outlines was performed. Fourier coefficients and reconstructed outlines were compared to analyze the condylar symmetry of shape on an intra- and intersubject basis. A significant condylar asymmetry for shape as distinct from size was found on an intrasubject basis, i.e. the left and right condyles of a single individual had a different shape with a large interindividual variability. Conversely, the mean condyle shape of the male and female groups was symmetric.

  9. Hemispheric Asymmetries in Mercury’s Exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Carl; Baumgardner, J.; Mendillo, M.

    2012-10-01

    Observations of Mercury’s sodium tail by Potter and Killen (2008) frequently show enhanced emission in the northern lobe. Anderson et al. (2011) have established that Mercury’s magnetic dipole is offset from the planet’s center by .2 RM to the north, while approximately aligned with the spin axis. Such a configuration produces an asymmetry in the magnetosphere cusp whereby more plasma has direct access to the planet’s southern hemisphere than in the north (Winslow et al., 2012). Using time-dependent, 3-D simulations, we demonstrate that ion precipitation, enlarged in the south, can actually result in the observed profiles across the tail, which are typically brighter to the north. Additionally, sources located at high latitude cusp footprints at on the dayside were unable match the observed width of the asymmetric profiles across the tail. Instead, our simulations provide evidence for sources near the dawn terminator at lower latitudes, resulting from the accumulation of sodium during the night. Desorption, rather than ion sputtering, is determined to be the responsible mechanism for this sodium population’s release and escape from the planet surface.

  10. Value, obligation and the asymmetry question.

    PubMed

    Tooley, Michael

    1998-04-01

    Is there a prima facie obligation to produce additional individuals whose lives would be worth living? In his paper 'Is it good to make happy people?', Stuart Rachels argues not only that there is, but, also, that precisely as much weight should be assigned to the quality of life that would be enjoyed by such potential persons, if they were to be actualized, as to the quality of life enjoyed by actually existing persons. In response, I shall argue, first, that Rachels' view is exposed to very serious objections, and secondly, that his arguments in support of his position involve a crucial assumption, which cannot be sustained, concerning the relation between, on the one hand, propositions about good-making and bad-making properties, and, on the other, propositions about right-making and wrong-making ones. I shall then argue that there is a very plausible position concerning the conditions under which an action can be morally wrong which entails the following asymmetry: there is a prima facie obligation not to bring into existence individuals whose lives are not worth living, but there is no corresponding obligation to create additional individuals whose lives would be worth living.

  11. Impact of rheological layering on rift asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaquet, Yoann; Schmalholz, Stefan M.; Duretz, Thibault

    2015-04-01

    Although numerous models of rift formation have been proposed, what triggers asymmetry of rifted margins remains unclear. Parametrized material softening is often employed to induce asymmetric fault patterns in numerical models. Here, we use thermo-mechanical finite element models that allow softening via thermal weakening. We investigate the importance of lithosphere rheology and mechanical layering on rift morphology. The numerical code is based on the MILAMIN solver and uses the Triangle mesh generator. Our model configuration consists of a visco-elasto-platic layered lithosphere comprising either (1) only one brittle-ductile transition (in the mantle) or (2) three brittle-ductile transitions (one in the upper crust, one in the lower crust and one in the mantle). We perform then two sets of simulations characterized by low and high extensional strain rates (5*10-15 s-1, 2*10-14 s-1). The results show that the extension of a lithosphere comprising only one brittle-ductile transition produces a symmetric 'neck' type rift. The upper and lower crusts are thinned until the lithospheric mantle is exhumed to the seafloor. A lithosphere containing three brittle-ductile transitions favors strain localization. Shear zones at different horizontal locations and generated in the brittle levels of the lithosphere get connected by the weak ductile layers. The results suggest that rheological layering of the lithosphere can be a reason for the generation of asymmetric rifting and subsequent rift morphology.

  12. On facial asymmetry and self-perception.

    PubMed

    Lu, Stephen M; Bartlett, Scott P

    2014-06-01

    Self-perception has been an enduring human concern since ancient times and remains a significant component of the preoperative and postoperative consultation. Despite modern technological attempts to reproduce the first-hand experience, there is no perfect substitute for human, stereoscopic, three-dimensional vision in evaluating appearance. Nowadays, however, the primary tools available to a patient for examining his or her own appearance, particularly the face, are photographs and mirrors. Patients are often unaware of how cameras and photographs can distort and degrade image quality, leading to an inaccurate representation of true appearance. Everyone knows that mirrors reverse an image, left and right, and most people recognize their own natural facial asymmetry at some level. However, few realize that emotions are not only expressed unequally by the left and right sides of the face but also perceived unequally by others. The impact and effect of this "facedness" is completely reversed by mirrors, potentially creating a significant discrepancy between what a patient perceives of himself or herself and what the surgeon or other third party sees. This article ties together the diverse threads leading to this problem and suggests several ways of mitigating the issue through technology and patient counseling.

  13. Collins Fragmentation and the Single Transverse Spin Asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Feng; Zhou, Jian

    2009-03-26

    We study the Collins mechanism for the single transverse spin asymmetry in the collinear factorization approach. The correspondent twist-three fragmentation function is identified. We show that the Collins function calculated in this approach is universal.We further examine its contribution to the single transverse spin asymmetry of semi-inclusive hadron production in deep inelastic scattering and demonstrate that the transverse momentum dependent and twist-three collinear approaches are consistent in the intermediate transverse momentum region where both apply.

  14. Tuning piezoresistive transduction in nanomechanical resonators by geometrical asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Llobet, J.; Sansa, M.; Lorenzoni, M.; Pérez-Murano, F.; Borrisé, X.; San Paulo, A.

    2015-08-17

    The effect of geometrical asymmetries on the piezoresistive transduction in suspended double clamped beam nanomechanical resonators is investigated. Tapered silicon nano-beams, fabricated using a fast and flexible prototyping method, are employed to determine how the asymmetry affects the transduced piezoresistive signal for different mechanical resonant modes. This effect is attributed to the modulation of the strain in pre-strained double clamped beams, and it is confirmed by means of finite element simulations.

  15. Unpolarized Azimuthal Asymmetries from the COMPASS Experiment at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Joosten, Rainer

    2009-12-17

    Azimuthal asymmetries in unpolarized SIDIS can be used to probe the transverse momentum of the quarks inside the nucleon. Furthermore, they give access to the so-far unmeasured Boer-Mulders function. In this contribution, results on these asymmetries, extracted separately for positive and negative hadrons, from the COMPASS data taken with a 160 GeV/c {mu}{sup +} beam on a deuteron target will be reported and compared to theoretical predictions.

  16. Time-integrated charge asymmetries at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Cheu, E.; /Arizona U.

    2006-10-01

    We have measured the time-integrated charge asymmetries in dimuon events and semileptonic B{sub s} decays. These results are the most precise semileptonic charge asymmetries in B decays to date. We combine these results with measurements from the decay B{sub s} {yields} J/{psi}{phi} to determine the CP-violating phase {phi}{sub s}. They find {phi}{sub s} = -0.56{sub -0.41}{sup +0.44}.

  17. Craniofacial Asymmetry in Adults With Neglected Congenital Muscular Torticollis

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Kil-Yong; Min, Kyung-Jay; Woo, Jieun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the craniofacial asymmetry in adults with neglected congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) by quantitative assessment based on craniofacial three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT). Methods Preoperative craniofacial asymmetry was measured by 3D-CT for 31 CMT subjects ≥18 years of age who visited a tertiary medical center and underwent 3D-CT between January 2009 and December 2013. The relationship between the age and the severity of craniofacial asymmetry was analyzed in reference to anteroposterior length asymmetry of the frontal bone and zygomatic arch, vertical and lateral displacements of the facial landmarks, and mandibular axis rotation. Results The age at CT was 27.71±7.02 years (range, 18-44 years). All intra-class correlation coefficients were higher than 0.7, suggesting good inter-rater reliability (p<0.05) of all the measurements. The frontal and the zygomatic length ratio (i.e., the anteroposterior length asymmetry on the axial plane) was 1.06±0.03 and 1.07±0.03, respectively, which was increased significantly with age in the linear regression analysis (r2=0.176, p=0.019 and r2=0.188, p=0.015, respectively). The vertical or lateral displacement of the facial landmarks and rotation of the mandibular axis did not significantly correlate with age (p>0.05). Conclusion Craniofacial asymmetry of neglected CMT became more severe with age in terms of anteroposterior length asymmetry of the ipsilateral frontal bone and zygomatic arch on the axial plane even after growth cessation. This finding may enhance the understanding of therapeutic strategies for craniofacial asymmetry in adults with neglected CMT. PMID:26161351

  18. The validity of individual frontal alpha asymmetry EEG neurofeedback.

    PubMed

    Quaedflieg, C W E M; Smulders, F T Y; Meyer, T; Peeters, F; Merckelbach, H; Smeets, T

    2016-01-01

    Frontal asymmetry in alpha oscillations is assumed to be associated with psychopathology and individual differences in emotional responding. Brain-activity-based feedback is a promising tool for the modulation of cortical activity. Here, we validated a neurofeedback protocol designed to change relative frontal asymmetry based on individual alpha peak frequencies, including real-time average referencing and eye-correction. Participants (N = 60) were randomly assigned to a right, left or placebo neurofeedback group. Results show a difference in trainability between groups, with a linear change in frontal alpha asymmetry over time for the right neurofeedback group during rest. Moreover, the asymmetry changes in the right group were frequency and location specific, even though trainability did not persist at 1 week and 1 month follow-ups. On the behavioral level, subjective stress on the second test day was reduced in the left and placebo neurofeedback groups, but not in the right neurofeedback group. We found individual differences in trainability that were dependent on training group, with participants in the right neurofeedback group being more likely to change their frontal asymmetry in the desired direction. Individual differences in trainability were also reflected in the ability to change frontal asymmetry during the feedback.

  19. Gaussian quantum steering and its asymmetry in curved spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jieci; Cao, Haixin; Jing, Jiliang; Fan, Heng

    2016-06-01

    We study Gaussian quantum steering and its asymmetry in the background of a Schwarzschild black hole. We present a Gaussian channel description of quantum state evolution under the influence of Hawking radiation. We find that thermal noise introduced by the Hawking effect will destroy the steerability between an inertial observer Alice and an accelerated observer Bob who hovers outside the event horizon, while it generates steerability between Bob and a hypothetical observer anti-Bob inside the event horizon. Unlike entanglement behaviors in curved spacetime, here the steering from Alice to Bob suffers from a "sudden death" and the steering from anti-Bob to Bob experiences a "sudden birth" with increasing Hawking temperature. We also find that the Gaussian steering is always asymmetric and the maximum steering asymmetry cannot exceed ln 2 , which means the state never evolves to an extremal asymmetry state. Furthermore, we obtain the parameter settings that maximize steering asymmetry and find that (i) s =arccosh cosh/2r 1 -sinh2r is the critical point of steering asymmetry and (ii) the attainment of maximal steering asymmetry indicates the transition between one-way steerability and both-way steerability for the two-mode Gaussian state under the influence of Hawking radiation.

  20. North-south asymmetries in magnetospheric and ionospheric plasma circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haaland, S.; Foerster, M.; Laundal, K.; McCracken, K. G.; Maes, L.; Lybekk, B.; Pedersen, A.

    2015-12-01

    Interaction between the solar wind and the dayside terrestrial magnetopause causes a transfer of energy and momentum from the solar wind to the magnetosphere. Consequently, a large scale circulation - the Dungey cycle - is set up in the magnetosphere. Since the magnetosphere is magnetically connected to the ionosphere, a corresponding circulation of plasma is also set up in the high-latitude ionosphere. Influences from external drivers, in particular the orientation of the radial component of the interplanetary magnetic field as well as daily and seasonal variations in the Earth's tilt angle are known to set up temporal north-south asymmetries in the magnetospheric and ionospheric plasma circulation. There are also persistent north-south asymmetries, which cannot easily be explained by the influence of external drivers. In this presentation, we show examples of such asymmetries in ionospheric convection and asymmetries in magnetospheric lobe density, presumably related to hemispheric asymmetries in ion outflow. We infer that these persistent asymmetries are mainly caused by differences in the strength and configuration of the geomagnetic field between the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. Since the ionosphere is magnetically connected to the magnetosphere, this difference will also be reflected in the magnetosphere in the form of different feedback from the two hemispheres.

  1. Characterization of Asymmetry in Magnetoacoustic Emission Burst by Numerical Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, M.; Fulton, J. P.; Wincheski, B.; DeNale, R.

    1991-01-01

    It has been well known that the pattern of the magnetoacoustic emission (MAE) burst observed during the sweep over one half-cycle of the hysteresis loop becomes asymmetric depending on the strength of the magnetic domain wall-defect interaction and the state of residual stresses in a ferromagnet. The ascending asymmetry due to the former has been observed at a very low frequency (.7 Hz) of applied AC magnetic field at a given amplitude. The descending asymmetry due to uniaxial compressive stress has been typically observed at the AC applied magnetic field frequency of 20 Hz. The physical interpretation of both types of asymmetry has been well established. It is, however, necessary to perform investigations of the dependence of asymmetry on externally controlled parameters such as the amplitude and frequency of the AC applied magnetic fields. The purpose of the present study is therefore to devise a mathematical means that describes the degree of asymmetry of the MAE burst and apply this scheme to investigate the AC magnetic field amplitude dependence of the asymmetry.

  2. Ecology: the proximate cause of frog declines?

    PubMed

    Di Rosa, Ines; Simoncelli, Francesca; Fagotti, Anna; Pascolini, Rita

    2007-05-31

    Pounds et al. argue that global warming contributes to amphibian declines by encouraging outbreaks of the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. Although our findings agree with the climate-linked epidemic hypothesis, this pathogen is probably not the only proximate factor in such cases: in the Trasimeno Lake area of Umbria in central Italy, for example, the water frog Rana lessonae first declined in the late 1990s, yet chytridiomycosis was not observed until 2003 (refs 5, 6). Here we show that the chytrid was common there throughout 1999-2002, in a previously unknown form that did not cause disease. We therefore think that the focus by Pounds et al. on a single pathogen is hard to justify because the host-parasite ecology is at present so poorly understood.

  3. Parallel Proximity Detection for Computer Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinman, Jeffrey S. (Inventor); Wieland, Frederick P. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention discloses a system for performing proximity detection in computer simulations on parallel processing architectures utilizing a distribution list which includes movers and sensor coverages which check in and out of grids. Each mover maintains a list of sensors that detect the mover's motion as the mover and sensor coverages check in and out of the grids. Fuzzy grids are included by fuzzy resolution parameters to allow movers and sensor coverages to check in and out of grids without computing exact grid crossings. The movers check in and out of grids while moving sensors periodically inform the grids of their coverage. In addition, a lookahead function is also included for providing a generalized capability without making any limiting assumptions about the particular application to which it is applied. The lookahead function is initiated so that risk-free synchronization strategies never roll back grid events. The lookahead function adds fixed delays as events are scheduled for objects on other nodes.

  4. Parallel Proximity Detection for Computer Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinman, Jeffrey S. (Inventor); Wieland, Frederick P. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention discloses a system for performing proximity detection in computer simulations on parallel processing architectures utilizing a distribution list which includes movers and sensor coverages which check in and out of grids. Each mover maintains a list of sensors that detect the mover's motion as the mover and sensor coverages check in and out of the grids. Fuzzy grids are includes by fuzzy resolution parameters to allow movers and sensor coverages to check in and out of grids without computing exact grid crossings. The movers check in and out of grids while moving sensors periodically inform the grids of their coverage. In addition, a lookahead function is also included for providing a generalized capability without making any limiting assumptions about the particular application to which it is applied. The lookahead function is initiated so that risk-free synchronization strategies never roll back grid events. The lookahead function adds fixed delays as events are scheduled for objects on other nodes.

  5. [Ophthalmologists in the proximity of Adolf Hitler].

    PubMed

    Rohrbach, J M

    2012-10-01

    Adolf Hitler met or at least knew about 5 ophthalmologists. The chair of ophthalmology in Berlin, Walther Löhlein, personally examined Hitler's eyes at least two times. The chair of ophthalmology in Breslau, Walter Dieter, developed "air raid protection spectacles" with the aid of high representatives of the NS-system and probably Adolf Hitler himself. Heinrich Wilhelm Kranz became rector of the universities of Giessen and Frankfurt/Main. He was known as a very strict advocate of the NS-race hygiene. Werner Zabel made plans for Hitler's diet and tried to interfere with Hitler's medical treatment. Finally, Hellmuth Unger was an influential representative of the medical press and a famous writer. Three of his novels with medical topics were made into a film which Hitler probably saw. Hitler had, so to say, a small "ophthalmological proximity" which, however, did not play a significant role for himself or the NS-state. PMID:22664943

  6. [Ophthalmologists in the proximity of Adolf Hitler].

    PubMed

    Rohrbach, J M

    2012-10-01

    Adolf Hitler met or at least knew about 5 ophthalmologists. The chair of ophthalmology in Berlin, Walther Löhlein, personally examined Hitler's eyes at least two times. The chair of ophthalmology in Breslau, Walter Dieter, developed "air raid protection spectacles" with the aid of high representatives of the NS-system and probably Adolf Hitler himself. Heinrich Wilhelm Kranz became rector of the universities of Giessen and Frankfurt/Main. He was known as a very strict advocate of the NS-race hygiene. Werner Zabel made plans for Hitler's diet and tried to interfere with Hitler's medical treatment. Finally, Hellmuth Unger was an influential representative of the medical press and a famous writer. Three of his novels with medical topics were made into a film which Hitler probably saw. Hitler had, so to say, a small "ophthalmological proximity" which, however, did not play a significant role for himself or the NS-state.

  7. Novel superconducting proximized heterostructures for ultrafast photodetection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepe, G. P.; Parlato, L.; Marrocco, N.; Pagliarulo, V.; Peluso, G.; Barone, A.; Tafuri, F.; Uccio, U. Scotti di; Miletto, F.; Radovic, M.; Pan, D.; Sobolewski, Roman

    2009-11-01

    Weak ferromagnet/superconductor (F/S) proximity bilayers have been fabricated and characterized for basic physics studies concerning the ultrafast carrier dynamics in layered materials. The normalized reflectivity change (Δ R/ R) as a function of the time delay between the pump and the probe laser beams has been measured in F/S heterostructures formed by a low critical temperature superconductor (Nb) with a NiCu overlayer, and a high Tc superconductor (YBCO) covered by Au/NiCu and manganite (LSMO) overlayers. The attention is mainly focused to the investigation of nonequilibrium excitation dynamics inside different bilayers in the low temperature region. The presence of the weak ferromagnetic overlayer produces faster optical relaxation times with respect to sole superconducting films. The results are promising in view of potential applications as ultrafast kinetic inductance superconducting photodetectors as confirmed by preliminary time-resolved photoimpedance experiments on both Nb and NiCu(21 nm)/Nb(70 nm) samples.

  8. Protein structure alignment beyond spatial proximity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Ma, Jianzhu; Peng, Jian; Xu, Jinbo

    2013-01-01

    Protein structure alignment is a fundamental problem in computational structure biology. Many programs have been developed for automatic protein structure alignment, but most of them align two protein structures purely based upon geometric similarity without considering evolutionary and functional relationship. As such, these programs may generate structure alignments which are not very biologically meaningful from the evolutionary perspective. This paper presents a novel method DeepAlign for automatic pairwise protein structure alignment. DeepAlign aligns two protein structures using not only spatial proximity of equivalent residues (after rigid-body superposition), but also evolutionary relationship and hydrogen-bonding similarity. Experimental results show that DeepAlign can generate structure alignments much more consistent with manually-curated alignments than other automatic tools especially when proteins under consideration are remote homologs. These results imply that in addition to geometric similarity, evolutionary information and hydrogen-bonding similarity are essential to aligning two protein structures.

  9. Proximity to mining industry and cancer mortality.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Navarro, Pablo; García-Pérez, Javier; Ramis, Rebeca; Boldo, Elena; López-Abente, Gonzalo

    2012-10-01

    Mining installations are releasing toxic substances into the environment which could pose a health problem to populations in their vicinity. We sought to investigate whether there might be excess cancer-related mortality in populations residing in towns lying in the vicinity of Spanish mining industries governed by the Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control Directive, and the European Pollutant Release and Transfer Register Regulation, according to the type of extraction method used. An ecologic study was designed to examine municipal mortality due to 32 types of cancer, across the period 1997 through 2006. Population exposure to pollution was estimated on the basis of distance from town of residence to pollution source. Poisson regression models, using the Bayesian conditional autoregressive model proposed by Besag, York and Molliè and Integrated Nested Laplace Approximations for Bayesian inference, were used: to analyze risk of dying from cancer in a 5-kilometer zone around mining installations; effect of type of industrial activity; and to conduct individual analyses within a 50-kilometer radius of each installation. Excess mortality (relative risk, 95% credible interval) of colorectal cancer (1.097, 1.041-1.157), lung cancer (1.066, 1.009-1.126) specifically related with proximity to opencast coal mining, bladder cancer (1.106, 1.016-1.203) and leukemia (1.093, 1.003-1.191) related with other opencast mining installations, was detected among the overall population in the vicinity of mining installations. Other tumors also associated in the stratified analysis by type of mine, were: thyroid, gallbladder and liver cancers (underground coal installations); brain cancer (opencast coal mining); stomach cancer (coal and other opencast mining installations); and myeloma (underground mining installations). The results suggested an association between risk of dying due to digestive, respiratory, hematologic and thyroid cancers and proximity to Spanish mining

  10. European Starlings Are Capable of Discriminating Subtle Size Asymmetries in Paired Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Swaddle, John P; Johnson, Charles W

    2007-01-01

    Small deviations from bilateral symmetry (fluctuating asymmetries) are cues to fitness differences in some animals. Therefore, researchers have considered whether animals use these small asymmetries as visual cues to determine appropriate behavioral responses (e.g., mate preferences). However, there have been few systematic studies of animals' abilities to visually discriminate such minor asymmetries. If the asymmetries cannot be discriminated, fluctuating asymmetry can not be a visual cue. Here, we report an investigation of European starlings' (Sturnus vulgaris) abilities to discriminate small size asymmetries. We trained starlings, through operant conditioning in a free-flight aviary, to discriminate achromatic, symmetric paired stimuli from size-matched asymmetric stimuli. By starting the learning process with a large asymmetry and progressing through sequential trials of decreasing asymmetry, we elucidated a behavioral limit to asymmetry discrimination. We found that starlings are capable of discriminating a 10% size asymmetry. There was weaker evidence for discrimination of 5% asymmetry but no evidence for signal discrimination at 2.5% size asymmetry. This level of asymmetry discrimination suggests that many size asymmetry cues in nature can be discriminated by birds. At each level of asymmetry discrimination, we also tested whether starlings could generalize their learned symmetry preference to unreinforced novel images. Consistent with previous findings, we found that starlings could generalize their symmetry preferences. PMID:17345950

  11. Up-down Asymmetries in Speed Perception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Peter; Stone, Leland S.

    1997-01-01

    We compared speed matches for pairs of stimuli that moved in opposite directions (upward and downward). Stimuli were elliptical patches (2 deg horizontally by 1 deg vertically) of horizontal sinusoidal gratings of spatial. frequency 2 cycles/deg. Two sequential 380 msec reveal presentations were compared. One of each pair of gratings (the standard) moved at 4 Hz (2 deg/sec), the other (the test) moved at a rate determined by a simple up-down staircase. The point of subjectively equal speed was calculated from the average of the last eight reversals. The task was to fixate a central point and to determine which one of the pair appeared to move faster. Eight of 10 observers perceived the upward drifting grating as moving faster than a grating moving downward but otherwise identical. on average (N = 10), when the standard moved downward, it was matched by a test moving upward at 94.7+/-1.7(SE)% of the standard speed, and when the standard moved upward it was matched by a test moving downward at 105.1+/-2.3(SE)% of the standard speed. Extending this paradigm over a range of spatial (1.5 to 13.5 c/d) and temporal (1.5 to 13.5 Hz) frequencies, preliminary results (N = 4) suggest that, under the conditions of our experiment, upward matter is seen as faster than downward for speeds greater than approx.1 deg/sec, but the effect appears to reverse at speeds below approx.1 deg/sec with downward motion perceived as faster. Given that an up-down asymmetry has been observed for the optokinetic response, both perceptual and oculomotor contributions to this phenomenon deserve exploration.

  12. Arterial tree asymmetry reduces cerebral pulsatility.

    PubMed

    Vrselja, Zvonimir; Brkic, Hrvoje; Curic, Goran

    2015-11-01

    With each heartbeat, pressure wave (PW) propagates from aorta toward periphery. In cerebral circulation, at the level of circle of Willis (CW), four arteries and four PWs converge. Since the interference is an elemental property of the wave, PWs interfere at the level of CW. We hypothesize that the asymmetry of brain-supplying arteries (that join to form CW) creates phase difference between the four PWs that interfere at the level of CW and reduce downstream cerebral pulsatility. To best of our knowledge, the data about the sequence of PWs' arrival into the cerebral circulation is lacking. Evident imperfect bilateral symmetry of the vessels results with different path length of brain-supplying arteries, hence, PWs should arrive into the head at different times. The probabilistic calculation shows that asynchronous arrival is more probable than synchronous. The importance of PWs for the cerebral circulation is highlighted by the observation that barotrauma protection mechanisms are more influenced by the crest of PW (pulse pressure) than by the mean arterial pressure. In addition, an increased arterial pulsatility is associated with several brain pathologies. We created simple computational models of four converging arteries and found that asynchronous arrival of the PWs results with lower maximum pressure, slower rate of pressure amplification and lower downstream pulsatility. In analogy, the asynchronous arrival of the pressure waves into the cerebral circulation should decrease blood flow pulsatility and lower transmission of kinetic energy on arterial wall. We conclude that asynchronous arrival of PWs into the cerebral circulation influences cerebral hemodynamics and represents a physiological necessity.

  13. Fixation of proximal humeral prostheses and rotational micromotion.

    PubMed

    Harris, T E; Jobe, C M; Dai, Q G

    2000-01-01

    Twenty pairs of cadaveric humeri were used to compare the rotational stability of proximal humeral prostheses fixed by proximal cementation with the stability offered by press fit or full cementation. For each proximally cemented specimen, only the upper portion of the prosthesis was coated with cement. For the fully cemented specimens, a cement restrictor was used just distal to the prosthesis, and a finger-packing technique was used to fill the proximal humeral medullary canal. Torque was applied to the Morse taper of the prostheses, and rotational micromotion was measured at the level of the osteotomy. In each of 11 pairs of cadaveric humeri, one side was press fit and the contralateral side was proximally cemented; in each of 9 pairs, proximal cementation was compared with full cementation. Proximally cemented prostheses' micromotion was significantly less than that of press-fit prostheses (P = .0016). There was no difference in micromotion between proximal cementation and full cementation (P = .82). Proximal cementation increased initial fixation over press fit. Full cementation did not increase rotational stability.

  14. Vaccination Rates are Associated With Functional Proximity But Not Base Proximity of Vaccination Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Beshears, John; Choi, James J.; Laibson, David I.; Madrian, Brigitte C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Routine annual influenza vaccinations are recommended for persons 6 months of age and older, but less than half of US adults get vaccinated. Many employers offer employees free influenza vaccinations at workplace clinics, but even then take-up is low. Objective: To determine whether employees are significantly more likely to get vaccinated if they have a higher probability of walking by the clinic for reasons other than vaccination. Method: We obtained data from an employer with a free workplace influenza vaccination clinic. Using each employee’s building entry/exit swipe card data, we test whether functional proximity—the likelihood that the employee walks by the clinic for reasons other than vaccination—predicts whether the employee gets vaccinated at the clinic. We also test whether base proximity—the inverse of walking distance from the employee’s desk to the clinic—predicts vaccination probability. Participants: A total of 1801 employees of a health benefits administrator that held a free workplace influenza vaccination clinic. Results: A 2 SD increase in functional proximity is associated with a 6.4 percentage point increase in the probability of vaccination (total vaccination rate at company=40%), even though the average employee’s desk is only 166 meters from the clinic. Base proximity does not predict vaccination probability. Conclusions and Relevance: Minor changes in the environment can have substantial effects on the probability of vaccination. If these results generalize, health systems should emphasize functional proximity over base proximity when locating preventive health services. PMID:27177295

  15. Loss of tubular creatinine secretion as the only sign of tubular proximal cell dysfunction in light chain proximal tubulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Stehlé, Thomas; Vignon, Marguerite; Flamant, Martin; Figueres, Marie-Lucile; Rabant, Marion; Rodenas, Anita; Noël, Laure-Hélène; Arnulf, Bertrand; Vidal-Petiot, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Light chain proximal tubulopathy (LCPT) is a rare disease, characterized by cytoplasmic inclusions of light chain (usually kappa) immunoglobulins. Clinical presentation is usually a Fanconi syndrome. The proximal tubular dysfunction can be incomplete, and exceptional cases of LCPT without any tubular dysfunction have even been described. Here, we report a case of LCPT in which the only sign of proximal tubulopathy is the absence of secretion of creatinine, as assessed by the simultaneous measurement of renal clearance of creatinine and 51CrEDTA. The loss of tubular creatinine secretion as a sign of tubular proximal cell dysfunction ought to be identified in patients with light chain proximal tubulopathy as it leads to a clinically relevant underestimation of GFR by the creatinine-derived equations. The prevalence and prognostic significance of this particular proximal tubular damage in LCPT remain to be determined. PMID:27367983

  16. Proximity Operations and Docking Sensor Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T.; Bryan, Thomas C.; Brewster, Linda L.; Lee, James E.

    2009-01-01

    The Next Generation Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (NGAVGS) has been under development for the last three years as a long-range proximity operations and docking sensor for use in an Automated Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D) system. The first autonomous rendezvous and docking in the history of the U.S. Space Program was successfully accomplished by Orbital Express, using the Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (AVGS) as the primary docking sensor. That flight proved that the United States now has a mature and flight proven sensor technology for supporting Crew Exploration Vehicles (CEV) and Commercial Orbital Transport Systems (COTS) Automated Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D). NASA video sensors have worked well in the past: the AVGS used on the Demonstration of Autonomous Rendezvous Technology (DART) mission operated successfully in spot mode out to 2 km, and the first generation rendezvous and docking sensor, the Video Guidance Sensor (VGS), was developed and successfully flown on Space Shuttle flights in 1997 and 1998. 12 Parts obsolescence issues prevent the construction of more AVGS units, and the next generation sensor was updated to allow it to support the CEV and COTS programs. The flight proven AR&D sensor has been redesigned to update parts and add additional capabilities for CEV and COTS with the development of the Next Generation AVGS at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The obsolete imager and processor are being replaced with new radiation tolerant parts. In addition, new capabilities include greater sensor range, auto ranging capability, and real-time video output. This paper presents some sensor hardware trades, use of highly integrated laser components, and addresses the needs of future vehicles that may rendezvous and dock with the International Space Station (ISS) and other Constellation vehicles. It also discusses approaches for upgrading AVGS to address parts obsolescence, and concepts for minimizing the sensor footprint, weight, and power requirements

  17. Asymmetry in grasp force matching and sense of effort.

    PubMed

    Adamo, Diane E; Scotland, Samantha; Martin, Bernard J

    2012-03-01

    While asymmetries in upper limb force matching have been observed, the mechanisms underlying asymmetry in the sense of effort have not been conceptualized. The aim of this study was to investigate asymmetries in the perception and reproduction of grasp force. Forty-two young adults, 22 right-handed (RH) and 20 left-handed (LH), were, respectively, divided into three groups according to differences between their right and left-hand strength (left stronger than right, right stronger than left and right & left equivalent). A reference force, representing 20% of the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) produced by the right or left hand, was matched with same hand (Ipsilateral Remembered--IR) or opposite (Contralateral Remembered--CR) hand. The matching relative error was 92% (for RH) and 46% (for LH) greater in the CR than IR condition. Asymmetries in matching were significant for RH participants only in the CR condition and were dependent on right/left differences in hand strength as shown by the constant error (CE). For this RH population, right-hand overshoot of the left-hand reference and left-hand undershoot of the right-hand reference were significant when the right hand was stronger than the left. Asymmetry remained significant when CE was normalized (%MVC). Asymmetry was reduced when the strength of each hand was equivalent or when the left hand was stronger than the right. These findings suggest that effort perception is asymmetric in RH but not in LH individuals. The hand x strength interaction indicates that asymmetry in force matching is a consequence of both a difference in the respective cortical representations and motor components, which confer a different "gain" (input-output relationship) to each system. The similarity with position sense asymmetry suggests that the gain concept may be generalized to describe some functional/performance differences between the two hand/hemisphere systems. The more symmetrical performance of the LH than RH group

  18. Disentangling the relationship between hemispheric asymmetry and cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Hirnstein, Marco; Leask, Stuart; Rose, Jonas; Hausmann, Markus

    2010-07-01

    It is widely believed that advantages of hemispheric asymmetries originated in better cognitive processing, hence it is often implied that the relationship between hemispheric asymmetry and cognitive performance is linearly positive: the higher the degree of lateralization in a specific cognitive domain, the better the performance in a corresponding task. Yet, the empirical evidence for this notion is mixed and the statistical methods to analyze this relationship have been criticized. The present study therefore investigated the relationship between hemispheric asymmetries and cognitive performance in two behavioral tasks (a left-lateralized word-matching task and a right-lateralized face-decision task) in 230 participants (140 women, 90 men) by using two different approaches. Both methods correspondingly revealed that a relationship between hemispheric asymmetries and cognitive performance does exist. Contrary to a positive (linear) relationship however, the data could be best described by an inverted U-shaped curve. Although the optimal degree of lateralization seemed to be task-specific, a slight or moderate degree of hemispheric asymmetry achieved best cognitive performance in all tasks. Moreover, performances deteriorated towards extreme ends of lateralization (i.e., participants with either extreme left or right hemispheric biases). Taken together, the present study provides evidence against the notion that higher lateralization is related to enhanced cognitive performance.

  19. Forward-backward asymmetry in top quark-antiquark production

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2011-12-12

    We present a measurement of forward-backward asymmetry in top quark-antiquark production in proton-antiproton collisions in the final state containing a lepton and at least four jets. Using a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb-1, collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, we measure the t{bar t} forward-backward asymmetry to be (9.2 ± 3.7)% at the reconstruction level. When corrected for detector acceptance and resolution, the asymmetry is found to be (19.6 ± 6.5)%. We also measure a corrected asymmetry based on the lepton from a top quark decay, found to be (15.2 ± 4.0)%. The results are compared to predictions based on the next-to-leading-order QCD generator mc@nlo. The sensitivity of the measured and predicted asymmetries to the modeling of gluon radiation is discussed.

  20. Abnormality of EEG alpha asymmetry in female adolescent suicide attempters.

    PubMed

    Graae, F; Tenke, C; Bruder, G; Rotheram, M J; Piacentini, J; Castro-Blanco, D; Leite, P; Towey, J

    1996-10-15

    Abnormal electroencephalographic (EEG) activity has been associated with various psychiatric disorders and behaviors, including depression, suicide, and aggression. We examined quantitative resting EEG in Hispanic female adolescent suicide attempters and matched normal controls. Computerized EEG measures were recorded at 11 scalp sites during eyes open and eyes closed periods from 16 suicide attempters and 22 normal controls. Suicide attempters differed from normal controls in alpha asymmetry. Normal adolescents had greater alpha (less activation) over right than left hemisphere, whereas suicidal adolescents had a nonsignificant asymmetry in the opposite direction. Nondepressed attempters were distinguished from depressed attempters in that they accounted for the preponderance of abnormal asymmetry, particularly in posterior regions. Alpha asymmetry over posterior regions was related to ratings of suicidal intent, but not depression severity. The alpha asymmetry in suicidal adolescents resembled that seen for depressed adults in its abnormal direction, but not in its regional distribution. Findings for suicidal adolescents are discussed in terms of a hypothesis of reduced left posterior activation, which is not related to depression but to suicidal or aggressive behavior. PMID:8894062

  1. Frobenius-norm-based measures of quantum coherence and asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yao; Dong, G. H.; Xiao, Xing; Sun, C. P.

    2016-01-01

    We formulate the Frobenius-norm-based measures for quantum coherence and asymmetry respectively. In contrast to the resource theory of coherence and asymmetry, we construct a natural measure of quantum coherence inspired from optical coherence theory while the group theoretical approach is employed to quantify the asymmetry of quantum states. Besides their simple structures and explicit physical meanings, we observe that these quantities are intimately related to the purity (or linear entropy) of the corresponding quantum states. Remarkably, we demonstrate that the proposed coherence quantifier is not only a measure of mixedness, but also an intrinsic (basis-independent) quantification of quantum coherence contained in quantum states, which can also be viewed as a normalized version of Brukner-Zeilinger invariant information. In our context, the asymmetry of N-qubit quantum systems is considered under local independent and collective transformations. In- triguingly, it is illustrated that the collective effect has a significant impact on the asymmetry measure, and quantum correlation between subsystems plays a non-negligible role in this circumstance. PMID:27558009

  2. Evaluation of mandibular contour in patients with significant facial asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Fang, J-J; Tu, Y-H; Wong, T-Y; Liu, J-K; Zhang, Y-X; Leong, I-F; Chen, K-C

    2016-07-01

    Most previous studies on facial asymmetry have not specifically differentiated mandible deviation from structural asymmetry of the mandible. The purpose of this study was to assess the symmetry of the mandible by examining its contour in a cohort of patients with significant facial asymmetry. Eleven cases of facial asymmetry with chin deviation ≥10mm were enrolled. A voxel-paired median plane (optimal symmetry plane, OSP) and two landmark-based median planes were generated. The OSP was created by computing the best pairing of the bony voxels on the two sides. One side of the mandibular contour was mirrored onto the other side using the test plane. The contour differences were measured by distance and by area ratio. They were examined both in frontal and frontal downward inclined view. The contour symmetry of the mandible was that revealed by the plane that presented the best symmetry. The results showed that the OSP worked best in bisecting the contour into two symmetrical halves. Contour analysis showed relatively small discrepancies between the two sides. In conclusion, the mandibles retained an acceptable contour symmetry despite the presence of significant mandibular deviations. It is suggested that proper mandibular alignment be the primary objective in the correction of facial asymmetry.

  3. Frobenius-norm-based measures of quantum coherence and asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yao; Dong, G. H.; Xiao, Xing; Sun, C. P.

    2016-08-01

    We formulate the Frobenius-norm-based measures for quantum coherence and asymmetry respectively. In contrast to the resource theory of coherence and asymmetry, we construct a natural measure of quantum coherence inspired from optical coherence theory while the group theoretical approach is employed to quantify the asymmetry of quantum states. Besides their simple structures and explicit physical meanings, we observe that these quantities are intimately related to the purity (or linear entropy) of the corresponding quantum states. Remarkably, we demonstrate that the proposed coherence quantifier is not only a measure of mixedness, but also an intrinsic (basis-independent) quantification of quantum coherence contained in quantum states, which can also be viewed as a normalized version of Brukner-Zeilinger invariant information. In our context, the asymmetry of N-qubit quantum systems is considered under local independent and collective transformations. In- triguingly, it is illustrated that the collective effect has a significant impact on the asymmetry measure, and quantum correlation between subsystems plays a non-negligible role in this circumstance.

  4. Prefrontal Asymmetry and Parent-Rated Temperament in Infants

    PubMed Central

    LoBue, Vanessa; Coan, James A.; Thrasher, Cat; DeLoache, Judy S.

    2011-01-01

    Indicators of temperament appear early in infancy and remain relatively stable over time. Despite a great deal of interest in biological indices of temperament, most studies of infant temperament rely on parental reports or behavioral tasks. Thus, the extent to which commonly used temperament measures relate to potential biological indicators of infant temperament is still relatively unknown. The current experiment examines the relationship between a common parental report measure of temperament – the Infant Behavior Questionnaire – Revised (IBQ-R) – and measures of frontal EEG asymmetry in infants. We examined associations between the subscales of the IBQ-R and frontal EEG asymmetry scores recorded during a combined series of neutral attentional and putatively emotional recording conditions in infants between 7 and 9 months of age. We predicted that approach-related subscales of the IBQ-R (e.g., Approach, Soothability) would be related to greater left prefrontal asymmetry, while withdrawal-related subscales (e.g., Distress to Limitations, Fear, Falling Reactivity, Perceptual Sensitivity) would be related to greater right prefrontal asymmetry. In the mid- and lateral-frontal regions, Approach, Distress to Limitations, Fear, Soothability, and Perceptual Sensitivity were generally associated with greater left frontal activation (rs≥.23, ps<0.05), while only Falling Reactivity was associated with greater right frontal activation (rs≤−.44, ps<0.05). Results suggest that variability in frontal EEG asymmetry is robustly associated with parental report measures of temperament in infancy. PMID:21829482

  5. EEG Asymmetry and ERN: Behavioral Outcomes in Preschoolers

    PubMed Central

    Begnoche, J. Patrick; Brooker, Rebecca J.; Vess, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Research has documented reciprocal influences between approach-related and inhibition-related neural activity in adults. However, associations between neural systems of approach and inhibition have not been tested in children. It is thus unclear whether these links are present early in life and whether associations between neural systems of approach and inhibition have long-term behavioral consequences. To address these gaps in the literature, we used electroencephalography (EEG) to examine associations between approach-related neural activity (i.e., hemispheric asymmetry) and inhibition-related neural activity (i.e., error-related negativity [ERN]) in preschool-aged children. Furthermore, we explored whether interactions between asymmetry and ERN predicted social inhibition, a precursor to anxiety problems, or symptoms of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) six months later. Similar to research on adults, greater left asymmetry (i.e., greater approach-related neural activity) was correlated with reduced ERN amplitude (i.e., weaker inhibition-related neural activity). The interactive effect of asymmetry and ERN amplitude did not predict ADHD symptoms, but did predict social inhibition. When ERN was greater, less left asymmetry was associated with higher levels of social inhibition. Results were most prominent at parietal EEG sites. Implications for understanding the development of the overlap in neural systems of approach and inhibition are discussed. PMID:27223612

  6. Evaluation of mandibular contour in patients with significant facial asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Fang, J-J; Tu, Y-H; Wong, T-Y; Liu, J-K; Zhang, Y-X; Leong, I-F; Chen, K-C

    2016-07-01

    Most previous studies on facial asymmetry have not specifically differentiated mandible deviation from structural asymmetry of the mandible. The purpose of this study was to assess the symmetry of the mandible by examining its contour in a cohort of patients with significant facial asymmetry. Eleven cases of facial asymmetry with chin deviation ≥10mm were enrolled. A voxel-paired median plane (optimal symmetry plane, OSP) and two landmark-based median planes were generated. The OSP was created by computing the best pairing of the bony voxels on the two sides. One side of the mandibular contour was mirrored onto the other side using the test plane. The contour differences were measured by distance and by area ratio. They were examined both in frontal and frontal downward inclined view. The contour symmetry of the mandible was that revealed by the plane that presented the best symmetry. The results showed that the OSP worked best in bisecting the contour into two symmetrical halves. Contour analysis showed relatively small discrepancies between the two sides. In conclusion, the mandibles retained an acceptable contour symmetry despite the presence of significant mandibular deviations. It is suggested that proper mandibular alignment be the primary objective in the correction of facial asymmetry. PMID:26976218

  7. EEG Asymmetry and ERN: Behavioral Outcomes in Preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Begnoche, J Patrick; Brooker, Rebecca J; Vess, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Research has documented reciprocal influences between approach-related and inhibition-related neural activity in adults. However, associations between neural systems of approach and inhibition have not been tested in children. It is thus unclear whether these links are present early in life and whether associations between neural systems of approach and inhibition have long-term behavioral consequences. To address these gaps in the literature, we used electroencephalography (EEG) to examine associations between approach-related neural activity (i.e., hemispheric asymmetry) and inhibition-related neural activity (i.e., error-related negativity [ERN]) in preschool-aged children. Furthermore, we explored whether interactions between asymmetry and ERN predicted social inhibition, a precursor to anxiety problems, or symptoms of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) six months later. Similar to research on adults, greater left asymmetry (i.e., greater approach-related neural activity) was correlated with reduced ERN amplitude (i.e., weaker inhibition-related neural activity). The interactive effect of asymmetry and ERN amplitude did not predict ADHD symptoms, but did predict social inhibition. When ERN was greater, less left asymmetry was associated with higher levels of social inhibition. Results were most prominent at parietal EEG sites. Implications for understanding the development of the overlap in neural systems of approach and inhibition are discussed. PMID:27223612

  8. Frobenius-norm-based measures of quantum coherence and asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yao; Dong, G H; Xiao, Xing; Sun, C P

    2016-08-25

    We formulate the Frobenius-norm-based measures for quantum coherence and asymmetry respectively. In contrast to the resource theory of coherence and asymmetry, we construct a natural measure of quantum coherence inspired from optical coherence theory while the group theoretical approach is employed to quantify the asymmetry of quantum states. Besides their simple structures and explicit physical meanings, we observe that these quantities are intimately related to the purity (or linear entropy) of the corresponding quantum states. Remarkably, we demonstrate that the proposed coherence quantifier is not only a measure of mixedness, but also an intrinsic (basis-independent) quantification of quantum coherence contained in quantum states, which can also be viewed as a normalized version of Brukner-Zeilinger invariant information. In our context, the asymmetry of N-qubit quantum systems is considered under local independent and collective transformations. In- triguingly, it is illustrated that the collective effect has a significant impact on the asymmetry measure, and quantum correlation between subsystems plays a non-negligible role in this circumstance.

  9. Forward-backward asymmetry in top quark-antiquark production

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2011-12-12

    We present a measurement of forward-backward asymmetry in top quark-antiquark production in proton-antiproton collisions in the final state containing a lepton and at least four jets. Using a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb-1, collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, we measure the t{bar t} forward-backward asymmetry to be (9.2 ± 3.7)% at the reconstruction level. When corrected for detector acceptance and resolution, the asymmetry is found to be (19.6 ± 6.5)%. We also measure a corrected asymmetry based on the lepton from a top quark decay, found to be (15.2 ± 4.0)%.more » The results are compared to predictions based on the next-to-leading-order QCD generator mc@nlo. The sensitivity of the measured and predicted asymmetries to the modeling of gluon radiation is discussed.« less

  10. Measurement of Z{sup 0} lepton coupling asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Smy, M.B.

    1997-07-01

    Polarized Z{sup 0}`s from e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions at the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) have been used to determine the asymmetry parameters A{sub e}, A{sub {mu}} and A{sub {tau}} from the leptonic decay channels. This is the first direct measurement of A{sub {mu}}. The data have been gathered by the SLC Large Detector (SLD) with the electron polarization averaging 63% during the 1993 data taking period and 77% in 1994-95. A maximum likelihood procedure as well as cross section asymmetries was used to measure the asymmetry parameters from the differential cross sections for equal luminosities of left- and right-handed electron beams. The polarization-dependent muon-pair distributions give A{sub {mu}} = 0.102 {+-}0.034 and the tau-pairs give A{sub {tau}} = 0.195 {+-}0.034. The initial state electronic couplings in all three leptonic channels as well as the final state angular distribution in the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} final state measure A{sub e} to be A{sub e} = 0.152{+-}0.012. Assuming lepton universality and defining a global leptonic asymmetry parameter A{sub e-{mu}-{tau}} = 0.151{+-}0.011. This global leptonic asymmetry value translates directly into sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W}{sup eff}=0.2310{+-}0.0014 at the Z{sup 0} pole.

  11. Atypical EEG Beta Asymmetry in Adults with ADHD1

    PubMed Central

    Hale, T. Sigi; Smalley, Susan L.; Walshaw, Patricia D.; Hanada, Grant; Macion, James; McCracken, James T.; McGough, James J.; Loo, Sandra K.

    2010-01-01

    Background Abnormal brain laterality (ABL) is well established in ADHD. However, its clinical specificity and association to cognitive and clinical symptoms is not yet understood. Previous studies indicate increased right hemisphere (RH) contribution in both ADHD and reading impaired samples. The current study investigates whether this ABL characteristic occurs in adults with ADHD absent comorbid language impairment. Methods EEG beta asymmetry was compared in 35 adult ADHD subjects and 104 controls during rest and active cognition. Group differences in beta asymmetry were then further evaluated for association to linguistic and attentional abilities, as well as association to beta asymmetry measures across different brain regions. Results Adults with ADHD showed pronounced rightward beta asymmetry (p = .00001) in inferior parietal regions (P8-P7) during a continuous performance task (CPT) that could not be attributed to linguistic ability. Among ADHD subjects only, greater rightward beta asymmetry at this measure was correlated with better CPT performance. Furthermore, this measure showed a lack of normal association (i.e., observed in controls) to left-biased processing in temporal-parietal (TP8-TP7) brain regions important for higher order language functions. Conclusion Adult ADHD involves abnormally increased right-biased contribution to CPT processing that could not be attributed to poor language ability. This appears to also involve abnormal recruitment of LH linguistic processing regions and represents an alternative, albeit less effective, CPT processing strategy. These findings suggest different pathophysiologic mechanisms likely underlie RH biased processing in ADHD and reading impaired samples. PMID:20705076

  12. Ambiguities and Asymmetries in Consent and Refusal: Reply to Manson.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, Rob

    2016-06-01

    John Harris claims that is it 'palpable nonsense' to suggest that 'a child (or anyone) might competently consent to a treatment but not be competent to refuse it.' In 'Transitional Paternalism: How Shared Normative Powers Give Rise to the Asymmetry of Adolescent Consent and Refusal' Neil Manson aims to explain away the apparent oddness of this asymmetry of consent and refusal, by appealing to the idea of shared normative powers, presenting joint bank accounts as an example. In this article, I will argue that Manson's account fails to explain away the oddness. Rather, I will argue that there are ambiguities to which Manson has not paid sufficient attention. In fact, as odd as it may sound, I argue that Manson actually agrees with Harris (at least in relation to the asymmetry of competence). He fails to recognize that he agrees with Harris because he is not careful enough to distinguish between different asymmetries, which I have labelled the asymmetries of choice, permissibility and competence.

  13. Frobenius-norm-based measures of quantum coherence and asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yao; Dong, G H; Xiao, Xing; Sun, C P

    2016-01-01

    We formulate the Frobenius-norm-based measures for quantum coherence and asymmetry respectively. In contrast to the resource theory of coherence and asymmetry, we construct a natural measure of quantum coherence inspired from optical coherence theory while the group theoretical approach is employed to quantify the asymmetry of quantum states. Besides their simple structures and explicit physical meanings, we observe that these quantities are intimately related to the purity (or linear entropy) of the corresponding quantum states. Remarkably, we demonstrate that the proposed coherence quantifier is not only a measure of mixedness, but also an intrinsic (basis-independent) quantification of quantum coherence contained in quantum states, which can also be viewed as a normalized version of Brukner-Zeilinger invariant information. In our context, the asymmetry of N-qubit quantum systems is considered under local independent and collective transformations. In- triguingly, it is illustrated that the collective effect has a significant impact on the asymmetry measure, and quantum correlation between subsystems plays a non-negligible role in this circumstance. PMID:27558009

  14. Flavor asymmetry of sea quarks in the unquenched quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Santopinto, E.; Bijker, R.

    2010-12-15

    The flavor asymmetry of the nucleon sea is studied in the framework of the unquenched quark model in which the effects of quark-antiquark pairs (uu-bar, dd-bar, and ss-bar) are taken into account via a microscopic, QCD-inspired, quark-antiquark creation mechanism. The inclusion of the qq-bar pairs leads to an excess of d-bar over u-bar, in agreement with the experimental data for the proton. In addition, the results for the flavor asymmetry of all ground-state octet and decuplet baryons are presented. The isospin symmetry leads to simple relations among the flavor asymmetries of octet and decuplet baryons. The flavor asymmetry of the {Sigma}{sup +} hyperon is predicted to be very similar to that of the proton and much larger than that for the {Xi}{sup 0} hyperon. A comparison with other approaches shows large differences in the predictions for the flavor asymmetries of the hyperons.

  15. Interactive orbital proximity operations planning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunwald, Arthur J.; Ellis, Stephen R.

    1989-01-01

    An interactive, graphical proximity operations planning system was developed which allows on-site design of efficient, complex, multiburn maneuvers in the dynamic multispacecraft environment about the space station. Maneuvering takes place in, as well as out of, the orbital plane. The difficulty in planning such missions results from the unusual and counterintuitive character of relative orbital motion trajectories and complex operational constraints, which are both time varying and highly dependent on the mission scenario. This difficulty is greatly overcome by visualizing the relative trajectories and the relative constraints in an easily interpretable, graphical format, which provides the operator with immediate feedback on design actions. The display shows a perspective bird's-eye view of the space station and co-orbiting spacecraft on the background of the station's orbital plane. The operator has control over two modes of operation: (1) a viewing system mode, which enables him or her to explore the spatial situation about the space station and thus choose and frame in on areas of interest; and (2) a trajectory design mode, which allows the interactive editing of a series of way-points and maneuvering burns to obtain a trajectory which complies with all operational constraints. Through a graphical interactive process, the operator will continue to modify the trajectory design until all operational constraints are met. The effectiveness of this display format in complex trajectory design is presently being evaluated in an ongoing experimental program.

  16. Anatomic Reconstruction of the Proximal Tibiofibular Joint.

    PubMed

    Warner, Brent T; Moulton, Samuel G; Cram, Tyler R; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-02-01

    Proximal tibiofibular joint (PTFJ) instability can be easily missed or confused for other, more common lateral knee pathologies such as meniscal tears, fibular collateral ligament injury, biceps femoris pathology, or iliotibial band syndrome. Because of this confusion, some authors believe that PTFJ instability is more common than initially appreciated. Patients with PTFJ subluxation may have no history of inciting trauma or injury, and it is not uncommon for these patients to have bilateral symptoms and generalized ligamentous laxity. Currently, the optimal surgical treatment for patients with chronic PTFJ instability is unknown. Historically, a variety of surgical treatments have been reported. Initially, joint arthrodesis and fibular head resection were recommended. More recently, temporary screw fixation, nonanatomic reconstruction with strips of the biceps femoris tendon or iliotibial band, and reconstruction with free hamstring autograft have been described. The purpose of this report is to present our surgical technique for treatment of chronic PTFJ instability using an anatomic reconstruction of the posterior ligamentous structures of the PTFJ with a semitendinosus autograft. PMID:27274455

  17. Proximity Resonance and Localized Surface Plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Heller, Eric

    2014-03-01

    The collective excitation of conduction electrons in subwavelength nanostructures is known as Localized Surface Plasmon(LSP)[1]. Such plasmon modes has been intensively studied using noble nanoparticles . More recently, the possibility of building terahertz metamaterials supporting such LSP modes has been explored in graphene microribbons and microdisks. Unlike Surface Plasmon Polaritons(SPPs) at metal-insulator interface, LSP can be directly excited by light illumination and holds promise for applications in ultrasensitive biosensing, nano-optical tweezers and improved photovoltaic devices. In this paper, we consider the interaction of two LSPs in the weak coupling regime and show how an effect similar to the proximity resonance in the quantum scattering theory) gives rise to an asymmetric(quadrupole) mode with increased damping rate. The existence of this asymmetric mode relies on a small phase retardation between the two LSPs. This phase retardation, though small, is key to both increased damping rate for the asymmetric mode and reduced damping rate for the symmetric mode. When this small phase retardation is removed by changing the polarization of the exciting light,we show that the asymmetric mode can not be excited and the symmetric mode shows increased damping.

  18. Interactive orbital proximity operations planning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunwald, Arthur J.; Ellis, Stephen R.

    1988-01-01

    An interactive graphical proximity operations planning system was developed, which allows on-site design of efficient, complex, multiburn maneuvers in a dynamic multispacecraft environment. Maneuvering takes place in and out of the orbital plane. The difficulty in planning such missions results from the unusual and counterintuitive character of orbital dynamics and complex time-varying operational constraints. This difficulty is greatly overcome by visualizing the relative trajectories and the relevant constraints in an easily interpretable graphical format, which provides the operator with immediate feedback on design actions. The display shows a perspective bird's-eye view of a Space Station and co-orbiting spacecraft on the background of the Station's orbital plane. The operator has control over the two modes of operation: a viewing system mode, which enables the exporation of the spatial situation about the Space Station and thus the ability to choose and zoom in on areas of interest; and a trajectory design mode, which allows the interactive editing of a series of way points and maneuvering burns to obtain a trajectory that complies with all operational constraints. A first version of this display was completed. An experimental program is planned in which operators will carry out a series of design missions which vary in complexity and constraints.

  19. Effects of thrust reversing in ground proximity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, P. B.; Hughes, R. V.

    1987-01-01

    The changes in stability and control characteristics encountered by a thrust reversing aircraft during its final approach, landing, and ground roll are described. These changes include a strong pitch-up accompanied by the loss of horizontal tail and aileron control effectiveness. The magnitude of reverser induced changes in ground effect are much larger than corresponding changes in free air. Some unexpected unsteady motions exhibited in wind tunnel by an aircraft model with reversers operating in ground proximity are also described. The cause of this oscillatory behavior was determined to be an unsteady interaction between the wall jets formed by impingement of reverser jets on the ground and the on-coming free stream. Time histories of rolling moments measured by the wind tunnel balance or support system were removed and frequencies were scaled by Strouhal number to full scale. Corrected time series were used to simulate the motion of a fighter aircraft with thrust reversers in ground effect. The simulation predicted large roll angles and nose down attitude at touchdown. Some phenomena of jet attachment to solid surfaces are discussed and areas for future research are recommended.

  20. Semiconductor detectors with proximity signal readout

    SciTech Connect

    Asztalos, Stephen J.

    2014-01-30

    Semiconductor-based radiation detectors are routinely used for the detection, imaging, and spectroscopy of x-rays, gamma rays, and charged particles for applications in the areas of nuclear and medical physics, astrophysics, environmental remediation, nuclear nonproliferation, and homeland security. Detectors used for imaging and particle tracking are more complex in that they typically must also measure the location of the radiation interaction in addition to the deposited energy. In such detectors, the position measurement is often achieved by dividing or segmenting the electrodes into many strips or pixels and then reading out the signals from all of the electrode segments. Fine electrode segmentation is problematic for many of the standard semiconductor detector technologies. Clearly there is a need for a semiconductor-based radiation detector technology that can achieve fine position resolution while maintaining the excellent energy resolution intrinsic to semiconductor detectors, can be fabricated through simple processes, does not require complex electrical interconnections to the detector, and can reduce the number of required channels of readout electronics. Proximity electrode signal readout (PESR), in which the electrodes are not in physical contact with the detector surface, satisfies this need.

  1. Ranging/tracking system for proximity operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nilsen, P.; Udalov, S.

    1982-01-01

    The hardware development and testing phase of a hand held radar for the ranging and tracking for Shuttle proximity operations are considered. The radar is to measure range to a 3 sigma accuracy of 1 m (3.28 ft) to a maximum range of 1850 m (6000 ft) and velocity to a 3 sigma accuracy of 0.03 m/s (0.1 ft/s). Size and weight are similar to hand held radars, frequently seen in use by motorcycle police officers. Meeting these goals for a target in free space was very difficult to obtain in the testing program; however, at a range of approximately 700 m, the 3 sigma range error was found to be 0.96 m. It is felt that much of this error is due to clutter in the test environment. As an example of the velocity accuracy, at a range of 450 m, a 3 sigma velocity error of 0.02 m/s was measured. The principles of the radar and recommended changes to its design are given. Analyses performed in support of the design process, the actual circuit diagrams, and the software listing are included.

  2. Scintillation Proximity Assay of Arginine Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiang; Xie, Nan; Feng, You; Zheng, Y. George

    2011-01-01

    Methylation of arginine residues, catalyzed by protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), is one important protein post-translational modification involved in epigenetic regulation of gene expression. A fast and effective assay for PRMT can provide valuable information for dissecting the biological functions of PRMTs, as well as for screening small-molecule inhibitors of arginine methylation. Currently, among the methods used for PRMT activity measurement, many contain laborious separation procedures, which restrict the applications of these assays for high-throughput screening (HTS) in drug discovery. The authors report here a mix-and-measure method to measure PRMT activity based on the principle of scintillation proximity assay (SPA). In this assay, 3H-AdoMet was used as methyl donor, and biotin-modified histone H4 peptide served as a methylation substrate. Following the methylation reaction catalyzed by PRMTs, streptavidin-coated SPA beads were added to the reaction solution, and SPA signals were detected by a MicroBeta scintillation counter. No separation step is needed, which simplifies the assay procedure and greatly enhances the assay speed. Particularly, the miniaturization and robustness suggest that this method is suited for HTS of PRMT inhibitors. PMID:21821785

  3. Proximal spinal muscular atrophy: current orthopedic perspective

    PubMed Central

    Haaker, Gerrit; Fujak, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a hereditary neuromuscular disease of lower motor neurons that is caused by a defective “survival motor neuron” (SMN) protein that is mainly associated with proximal progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. Although SMA involves a wide range of disease severity and a high mortality and morbidity rate, recent advances in multidisciplinary supportive care have enhanced quality of life and life expectancy. Active research for possible treatment options has become possible since the disease-causing gene defect was identified in 1995. Nevertheless, a causal therapy is not available at present, and therapeutic management of SMA remains challenging; the prolonged survival is increasing, especially orthopedic, respiratory and nutritive problems. This review focuses on orthopedic management of the disease, with discussion of key aspects that include scoliosis, muscular contractures, hip joint disorders, fractures, technical devices, and a comparative approach of conservative and surgical treatment. Also emphasized are associated complications including respiratory involvement, perioperative care and anesthesia, nutrition problems, and rehabilitation. The SMA disease course can be greatly improved with adequate therapy with established orthopedic procedures in a multidisciplinary therapeutic approach. PMID:24399883

  4. Dynamic proximity of spatio-temporal sequences.

    PubMed

    Horn, David; Dror, Gideon; Quenet, Brigitte

    2004-09-01

    Recurrent networks can generate spatio-temporal neural sequences of very large cycles, having an apparent random behavior. Nonetheless a proximity measure between these sequences may be defined through comparison of the synaptic weight matrices that generate them. Following the dynamic neural filter (DNF) formalism we demonstrate this concept by comparing teacher and student recurrent networks of binary neurons. We show that large sequences, providing a training set well exceeding the Cover limit, allow for good determination of the synaptic matrices. Alternatively, assuming the matrices to be known, very fast determination of the biases can be achieved. Thus, a spatio-temporal sequence may be regarded as spatio-temporal encoding of the bias vector. We introduce a linear support vector machine (SVM) variant of the DNF in order to specify an optimal weight matrix. This approach allows us to deal with noise. Spatio-temporal sequences generated by different DNFs with the same number of neurons may be compared by calculating correlations of the synaptic matrices of the reconstructed DNFs. Other types of spatio-temporal sequences need the introduction of hidden neurons, and/or the use of a kernel variant of the SVM approach. The latter is being defined as a recurrent support vector network (RSVN).

  5. Proximate and elemental analysis of infant formula.

    PubMed

    Tanner, J T

    1982-11-01

    The Nutrient Surveillance Branch has been conducting a survey of infant formula products for Fiscal Year 1981. Each product has been carefully analyzed and the results compared to the label declaration and the minimum-maximum limits specified by the American Academy of Pediatrics' Committee on Nutrition (CON/AAP). Proximate and elemental analyses were made. Protein, fat, ash, and total solids (moisture) were determined by AOAC methods. Osmolality, density, and fatty acids (linoleic) were also determined. Carbohydrates were calculated by difference and caloric content was calculated by using the general Atwater factors. Elemental analysis for Ca, P, Mg, Fe, Zn, Cu, Mn, Na, and K were performed by induction coupled plasma absorption spectroscopy. Chloride was assayed by potentiometric titration with AgNO3. A summary of the findings from the infant formula survey have been compared with CON/AAP recommendations. In general, there were only a few exceptions where the label claims and the CON/AAP requirements were not met. However, in none of these cases was the difference considered to be of public health significance.

  6. Proximity Navigation of Highly Constrained Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarritt, S.; Swartwout, M.

    2007-01-01

    Bandit is a 3-kg automated spacecraft in development at Washington University in St. Louis. Bandit's primary mission is to demonstrate proximity navigation, including docking, around a 25-kg student-built host spacecraft. However, because of extreme constraints in mass, power and volume, traditional sensing and actuation methods are not available. In particular, Bandit carries only 8 fixed-magnitude cold-gas thrusters to control its 6 DOF motion. Bandit lacks true inertial sensing, and the ability to sense position relative to the host has error bounds that approach the size of the Bandit itself. Some of the navigation problems are addressed through an extremely robust, error-tolerant soft dock. In addition, we have identified a control methodology that performs well in this constrained environment: behavior-based velocity potential functions, which use a minimum-seeking method similar to Lyapunov functions. We have also adapted the discrete Kalman filter for use on Bandit for position estimation and have developed a similar measurement vs. propagation weighting algorithm for attitude estimation. This paper provides an overview of Bandit and describes the control and estimation approach. Results using our 6DOF flight simulator are provided, demonstrating that these methods show promise for flight use.

  7. Work on the Interplay Among h+, h‑ and Hadron Pair Transverse Spin Asymmetries in SIDIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradamante, Franco

    2016-02-01

    In the fragmentation of a transversely polarized quark a left-right asymmetry, the Collins asymmetry, is expected for each hadron produced in the process μN → μ‧h+h‑X. Similarly, an asymmetry is also expected for the hadron pair, the dihadron asymmetry. Both asymmetries have been measured to be different from zero on transversely polarised proton targets and have allowed for first extractions of the transversity distributions. From the high statistics COMPASS data we have further investigated these asymmetries getting strong indications that the two mechanisms are driven by a common physical process.

  8. Proximate and ultimate causes of punishment and strong reciprocity.

    PubMed

    Barclay, Pat

    2012-02-01

    While admirable, Guala's discussion of reciprocity suffers from a confusion between proximate causes (psychological mechanisms triggering behaviour) and ultimate causes (evolved function of those psychological mechanisms). Because much work on "strong reciprocity" commits this error, I clarify the difference between proximate and ultimate causes of cooperation and punishment. I also caution against hasty rejections of "wide readings" of experimental evidence.

  9. Analysis of pattern density on process proximity compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sunwook; Lo, Fred; Yang, Tien-Chu; Yang, Ta-Hong; Chen, Kuang-Chao; Lu, Chih-Yuan

    2007-03-01

    The challenges of ever-smaller CD (Critical Dimension) budget for advanced memory product requires tight ACLV (Across-Chip Line-width Variation) control. In addition to the lithographic MOPC (Model-based Optical Proximity Correction) for DCD (photo CD) control, the process correction for etch proximity effect can no longer be ignored. To meet on our requirement on final CD accuracy for critical layer, a set of test pattern, that represents memory array in one of our critical layers, has been generated for both photo and etch process characterizations. Through the combination of different pattern-coverage areas in the test mask and wafer map design, various local (chip-level) pattern densities of 40%~70% and global (wafer-level) pattern densities of 35%~65% were achieved for optical and etch proximity study. The key contributors to the process proximity effect were identified and voluminous data has been extracted from the memory block like patterns for statistical analysis. The photo and etch proximity effects were hence modeled as function of memory block separation, local pattern density as well as global pattern density. Finally, the respective photo and etch proximity effects through model-based proximity correction and rule-based proximity correction were applied in a multi-step flow to products.

  10. On Asymmetry of Hydrogen Spectral Lines in Nonequlibrium Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Demura, A. V.; Demchenko, G. V.; Nikolic, D.

    2008-10-22

    The Standard Theory (ST) of hydrogen spectral lines Stark broadening is applied within many-body approach to detailed description of profile asymmetry simultaneously accounting for the quadrupole interaction, quadratic Stark effect shifts and corrections to oscillator strengths. The influence of electronic collision shifts and impact widths, trivial asymmetry, the Boltzmann and dipole intensity scaling factors are studied as well. The consistent inclusion of the latter two factors in ST frames requests the line contour redefinition to avoid divergence. It is demonstrated that the asymmetry of hydrogen spectral lines is the many-parametric sensitive function of broadening mechanisms. The comparison with the precision experiment on stabilized arc data for H{sub {beta}} line has shown good coincidence within assumption of nonequilibrium between electrons and heavy neutral particles.

  11. [Palatine tonsil lymphoma in children with tonsillar asymmetry. Case report].

    PubMed

    Cuestas, Giselle; Martínez Font, Agustín; Demarchi, María Victoria; Martínez Corvalán, María Pía; García Rivello, Hernán; Morandi, Ana; Razetti, Juan; Boccio, Carlos

    2015-08-01

    Tonsil malignancy is uncommon in children. Tonsillar asymmetry is usually secondary to a benign process, either inflammatory conditions, differences in the tonsillar fossa depth or anterior pillar asymmetry. However, it may indicate a serious underlying disorder such as lymphoma. Lymphoma is the most common childhood malignancy in the head and neck. Approximately, 15% of the cases affect the Waldeyer's ring. The most common clinical manifestations of palatine tonsils lymphoma are unilateral tonsillar hypertrophy, alteration in the appearance of the mucosa and ipsilateral cervical lymphadenopathy. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are of great importance in the prognosis. We present a case of palatine tonsil lymphoma in a child with tonsillar asymmetry and we emphasize the importance of the examination of the oral cavity and the neck to identify suspicious alterations compatible with tonsillar lymphoma.

  12. W Lepton Charge Asymmetry - Test of Structure Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Qun

    1996-05-01

    The lepton charge asymmetry as a function of lepton rapidity |y_l| has been measured at √s=1.8 TeV, using the W decays to electrons and muons recorded by the CDF detector during the 1992-93 run (≈ 20 pb-1 of integrated luminosity), and the 1994-95 run (≈ 90 pb-1). The asymmetry is sensitive to the ratio of the d to u quark momentum distributions in the proton. The measurement probes the quark distributions to x<0.01 at Q^2 ≈ M_W^2, where nonperturbative effects are minimal. These precise data provide discrimination between sets of modern parton distributions. It is found that the most recent parton distributions, which included the 1992-93 W asymmetry data in their fits (MRSA and CTEQ3M) are in better agreement with the more precise data from the 1994-95 run.

  13. Pion Asymmetries due to Hyperon Decays in the Qweak Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elledge, Jacob

    2015-10-01

    The Qweak experiment took place at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility between 2010 and 2012. In the experiment an electron beam was directed onto a liquid hydrogen target. The purpose of the Qweak experiment is to investigate the weak interaction between the proton and the electron. The experiment determined the proton's weak charge by measuring the asymmetry in elastic scattering when changing the helicity of the incoming electron beam 960 times per second. Under different kinematic conditions the experiment investigated inelastic scattering with pions in the final state, a background for the elastic scattering measurement. In this inelastic measurement, a false asymmetry due to parity-violating hyperon decays must be determined. Using the results of a simulation written in Geant4, I have been able to isolate the cross sections for samples of opposite helicities. By combining this cross section with the signal of detected pions from hyperon decay, I was able to isolate the expected false asymmetry.

  14. Investors’ risk attitudes and stock price fluctuation asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Li, Honggang

    2011-05-01

    Price rise/fall asymmetry, which indicates enduring but modest rises and sudden short-term falls, is a ubiquitous phenomenon in stock markets throughout the world. Instead of the widely used time series method, we adopt inverse statistics from turbulence to analyze this asymmetry. To explore its underlying mechanism, we build a multi-agent model with two kinds of investors, which are specifically referred to as fundamentalists and chartists. Inspired by Kahneman and Tversky’s claim regarding peoples’ asymmetric psychological responses to the equivalent levels of gains and losses, we assume that investors take different risk attitudes to gains and losses and adopt different trading strategies. The simulation results of the model developed herein are consistent with empirical work, which may support our conjecture that investors’ asymmetric risk attitudes might be one origin of rise/fall asymmetry.

  15. Relationship between facial asymmetry and judging trustworthiness in faces.

    PubMed

    Zaidel, D W; Bava, S; Reis, V A

    2003-07-01

    Nonverbal facial signals provide valuable information for successful social interactions. Previous findings showed left-right facial asymmetry in attractiveness, smiling, and health in faces, and here we investigated the asymmetrical status of trustworthiness. Pairs of left-left and right-right faces from 38 photographs were viewed by participants who judged which member of the pair looked the most trustworthy. The results were compared to attractiveness and smiling judgements (Zaidel, Chen, & German, 1995). We found that trustworthiness was more related to attractiveness than to smiling in the women's faces, but no significant asymmetry for trustworthiness was found; in the men's faces, trustworthiness was neither related to attractiveness nor to smiling, nor was there a significant asymmetry. Taken together, trustworthiness as a facial display is complex; even when it appears to confirm the "halo effect", its expression is not strongly left-right asymmetrical in contrast to attractiveness or smiling. PMID:15513223

  16. [Palatine tonsil lymphoma in children with tonsillar asymmetry. Case report].

    PubMed

    Cuestas, Giselle; Martínez Font, Agustín; Demarchi, María Victoria; Martínez Corvalán, María Pía; García Rivello, Hernán; Morandi, Ana; Razetti, Juan; Boccio, Carlos

    2015-08-01

    Tonsil malignancy is uncommon in children. Tonsillar asymmetry is usually secondary to a benign process, either inflammatory conditions, differences in the tonsillar fossa depth or anterior pillar asymmetry. However, it may indicate a serious underlying disorder such as lymphoma. Lymphoma is the most common childhood malignancy in the head and neck. Approximately, 15% of the cases affect the Waldeyer's ring. The most common clinical manifestations of palatine tonsils lymphoma are unilateral tonsillar hypertrophy, alteration in the appearance of the mucosa and ipsilateral cervical lymphadenopathy. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are of great importance in the prognosis. We present a case of palatine tonsil lymphoma in a child with tonsillar asymmetry and we emphasize the importance of the examination of the oral cavity and the neck to identify suspicious alterations compatible with tonsillar lymphoma. PMID:26172022

  17. Bessel-Weighted Asymmetries in Semi Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    D. Boer, L. Gamberg, B.U. Musch, A. Prokudin

    2011-10-01

    The concept of weighted asymmetries is revisited for semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering. We consider the cross section in Fourier space, conjugate to the outgoing hadron's transverse momentum, where convolutions of transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions and fragmentation functions become simple products. Individual asymmetric terms in the cross section can be projected out by means of a generalized set of weights involving Bessel functions. Advantages of employing these Bessel weights are that they suppress (divergent) contributions from high transverse momentum and that soft factors cancel in (Bessel-) weighted asymmetries. Also, the resulting compact expressions immediately connect to previous work on evolution equations for transverse momentum dependent parton distribution and fragmentation functions and to quantities accessible in lattice QCD. Bessel weighted asymmetries are thus model independent observables that augment the description and our understanding of correlations of spin and momentum in nucleon structure.

  18. Inverse statistics in economics: the gain-loss asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Mogens H.; Johansen, Anders; Simonsen, Ingve

    2003-06-01

    Inverse statistics in economics is considered. We argue that the natural candidate for such statistics is the investment horizons distribution. This distribution of waiting times needed to achieve a predefined level of return is obtained from (often detrended) historic asset prices. Such a distribution typically goes through a maximum at a time called the optimal investment horizon, τ ρ∗, since this defines the most likely waiting time for obtaining a given return ρ. By considering equal positive and negative levels of return, we report on a quantitative gain-loss asymmetry most pronounced for short horizons. It is argued that this asymmetry reflects the market dynamics and we speculate over the origin of this asymmetry.

  19. Line asymmetry in the Seyfert Galaxy NGC 3783

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, J. M.; Bautista, Manuel; Kallman, Timothy

    2005-01-01

    We have reanalyzed the 900 ks Chandra X-ray spectrum of NGC 3783, finding evidence on the asymmetry of the spectral absorption lines. The lines are fitted with a parametric expression that results from an analytical treatment of radiatively driven winds. The line asymmetry distribution derived from the spectrum is consistent with a non-spherical outflow with a finite optical depth. Within this scenario, our model explains the observed correlations between the line velocity shifts and the ionization parameter and between the line velocity shift and the line asymmetry. The present results may provide a framework for detailed testing of models for the dynamic and physical properties of warm absorber in Seyfert galaxies.

  20. Take your seats: leftward asymmetry in classroom seating choice.

    PubMed

    Harms, Victoria L; Poon, Lisa J O; Smith, Austen K; Elias, Lorin J

    2015-01-01

    Despite an overall body symmetry, human behavior is full of examples of asymmetry, from writing or gesturing to kissing and cradling. Prior research has revealed that theatre patrons show a bias towards sitting on the right side of a movie theatre. Two competing theories have attempted to explain this seating asymmetry: one posits that expectation of processing demand drives the bias; the other posits that basic motor asymmetries drive the bias. To test these theories we assessed the real-world classroom seating choices of university students using photographs. A bias for students to choose seats on the left side of the classroom was observed, in contrast to the right side bias observed in theatre seating studies. These results provide evidence in support of a processing-expectation bias. PMID:26347639

  1. Load Asymmetry Observed During Orion Main Parachute Inflation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Aaron L.; Taylor, Thomas; Olson, Leah

    2011-01-01

    The Crew Exploration Vehicle Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) has flight tested the first two generations of the Orion parachute program. Three of the second generation tests instrumented the dispersion bridles of the Main parachute with a Tension Measuring System. The goal of this load measurement was to better understand load asymmetry during the inflation process of a cluster of Main parachutes. The CPAS Main parachutes exhibit inflations that are much less symmetric than current parachute literature and design guides would indicate. This paper will examine loads data gathered on three cluster tests, quantify the degree of asymmetry observed, and contrast the results with published design guides. Additionally, the measured loads data will be correlated with videos of the parachute inflation to make inferences about the shape of the parachute and the relative load asymmetry. The goal of this inquiry and test program is to open a dialogue regarding asymmetrical parachute inflation load factors.

  2. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering Beam-Spin Asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    F.X. Girod; R.A. Niyazov

    2008-01-24

    The beam spin asymmetries in the hard exclusive electroproduction of photons on the proton (ep -> epg) were measured over a wide kinematic range and with high statistical accuracy. These asymmetries result from the interference of the Bethe-Heitler process and of deeply virtual Compton scattering. Over the whole kinematic range (x_B from 0.11 to 0.58, Q^2 from 1 to 4.8 GeV^2, -t from 0.09 to 1.8 GeV^2), the azimuthal dependence of the asymmetries is compatible with expectations from leading-twist dominance, A = a*sin(phi)/[1+c*cos(phi)]. This extensive set of data can thus be used to constrain significantly the generalized parton distributions of the nucleon in the valence quark sector.

  3. On the Mechanics of Functional Asymmetry in Bipedal Walking

    PubMed Central

    Dhaher, Yasin Y.; Degani, Amir; Lynch, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses two symmetrical models, the passive compass-gait biped and a five-link 3D biped, to computationally investigate the cause and function of gait asymmetry. We show that for a range of slope angles during passive 2D walking and mass distributions during controlled 3D walking, these models have asymmetric walking patterns between the left and right legs due to the phenomenon of spontaneous symmetry-breaking. In both cases a stable asymmetric family of gaits emerges from a symmetric family of gaits as the total energy increases (e.g., fast speeds). The ground reaction forces of each leg reflect different roles, roughly corresponding to support, propulsion, and motion control as proposed by the hypothesis of functional asymmetry in able-bodied human walking. These results suggest that body mechanics, independent of neurophysiological mechanisms such as leg dominance, may contribute to able-bodied gait asymmetry. PMID:22328168

  4. Genetic basis of human left-right asymmetry disorders.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hao; Xia, Hong; Deng, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Humans and other vertebrates exhibit left-right (LR) asymmetric arrangement of the internal organs, and failure to establish normal LR asymmetry leads to internal laterality disorders, including situs inversus and heterotaxy. Situs inversus is complete mirror-imaged arrangement of the internal organs along LR axis, whereas heterotaxy is abnormal arrangement of the internal thoraco-abdominal organs across LR axis of the body, most of which are associated with complex cardiovascular malformations. Both disorders are genetically heterogeneous with reduced penetrance, presumably because of monogenic, polygenic or multifactorial causes. Research in genetics of LR asymmetry disorders has been extremely prolific over the past 17 years, and a series of loci and disease genes involved in situs inversus and heterotaxy have been described. The review highlights the classification, chromosomal abnormalities, pathogenic genes and the possible mechanism of human LR asymmetry disorders. PMID:26258520

  5. Reconciliation of mass-asymmetry systematics for incomplete fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Pushpendra P.; Yadav, Abhishek; Sharma, Vijay R.; Kumar, R.; Sharma, Manoj K.; Singh, B. P.; Singh, R. P.; Muralithar, S.; Bhowmik, R. K.; Prasad, R.; AMU-IUAC Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The onset and strength of incomplete fusion (ICF) has been studied in the framework of Morgenstern's mass-asymmetry systematics. The fraction of ICF has been deduced in 12C+169Tm system at energies ranging from 1.02Vb to 1.64Vb (Vb = 54.94 MeV from the analysis of excitation functions (EFs). It has been found that the ICF starts influencing complete fusion at noticeably lower, β-values (i.e., 0.025 or 2. 5% of c) than that proposed by Morgenstern (i.e., ≈ 6% of c). The fraction of ICF increases with entrance channel mass-asymmetry for individual projectiles, termed as projectile dependent mass-asymmetry (ProMass-) systematics. The proposed ProMass- systematics has withstood all tests that have been done for fairly large number of systems to verify its validness.

  6. Molecular interactions between albumin and proximal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Brunskill, N J

    1998-01-01

    In glomerular diseases the filtration of excess proteins into the proximal tubule, together with their subsequent reabsorption may represent an important pathological mechanism underlying progressive renal scarring. The most prominent protein in glomerular filtrate, albumin, is reabsorbed by receptor-mediated endocytosis by proximal tubular cells. It binds both to scavenger-type receptors and to megalin in the proximal tubule. Some of these receptors appear to be shared with other cell types, particularly endothelial cells. The endocytic uptake of albumin is subjected to complex hormonal and enzymatic regulation. In addition to being reabsorbed in the proximal tubule, albumin may act as a signalling molecule in these cells, and may induce the expression of numerous pro-inflammatory genes. Modulation of the interaction of albumin with proximal tubular cells may eventually prove to be of therapeutic importance in the treatment of renal diseases. PMID:9807019

  7. Mechanisms of albumin uptake by proximal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Brunskill, N

    2001-01-01

    The likely role of albumin in the induction tubulo-interstitial injury in proteinuria has stimulated considerable interest in the entry of albumin into the proximal tubule and its subsequent uptake by proximal tubular cells. Currently, there is considerable controversy over the degree of glomerular permeability to albumin. After filtration, however, albumin binds to megalin and cubulin, two giant receptors in the apical membrane of proximal tubular cells. Albumin is subsequently re-absorbed by proximal tubular cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis, a process subject to complex regulation. The interaction of albumin with proximal tubule cells also leads to the generation of intracellular signals. The understanding of these pathways may provide important insights into the pathogenesis of renal scarring in proteinuria. PMID:11158855

  8. Vortex asymmetry on conical forebodies at high angles of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taligoski, Jordan L.

    Vortex asymmetry on axisymmetric forebodies at high angles of attack results in side forces and yawing moments even in symmetrical flight. This can adversely affect the yaw control characteristics of a flight vehicle and limit maneuverability. The mechanisms responsible for vortex asymmetry and the nature of instabilities causing ow asymmetry are still not well understood. Few studies suggest the role of random micro-imperfections in the nose apex region as a cause of vortex asymmetry; however there is a lack of understanding about mechanisms by which these random imperfections result in a side force variation with the roll orientation. The present study involving experiments over a wide range of test conditions and high-fidelity simulations is an attempt to provide an insight to this complex phenomenon. Experiments were carried out on a 12° semi-apex angle cone at high angles of attack at low speeds. Measurements include forces and moments using a six-component strain gauge balance and Particle Image Velocimetry to obtain quantitative flow field characteristics. A high fidelity LES Navier-Stokes solver was utilized to investigate and understand vortex asymmetry phenomenon on the same configuration at a Reynolds number of 100,000 and free stream Mach number of 0.3. Flow field characteristics are assessed with the introduction of multiple random imperfections near the tip of the conical body. Results show that slender cones at high angles of attack display bistable variation of the side force and yawing moments with roll orientation. Vortex asymmetry is initiated very close to the cone tip due to the presence of micro-imperfections on the cone surface, and develop into asymmetric vortex sheet downstream along the conical body. The strength of the fully developed vortex moving away from the surface is nearly double of the vortex residing close to the surface, leading to large magnitude side forces and yawing moments.

  9. New Views on Strand Asymmetry in Insect Mitochondrial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shu-Jun; Shi, Min; Chen, Xue-Xin; Sharkey, Michael J.; van Achterberg, Cornelis; Ye, Gong-Yin; He, Jun-Hua

    2010-01-01

    Strand asymmetry in nucleotide composition is a remarkable feature of animal mitochondrial genomes. Understanding the mutation processes that shape strand asymmetry is essential for comprehensive knowledge of genome evolution, demographical population history and accurate phylogenetic inference. Previous studies found that the relative contributions of different substitution types to strand asymmetry are associated with replication alone or both replication and transcription. However, the relative contributions of replication and transcription to strand asymmetry remain unclear. Here we conducted a broad survey of strand asymmetry across 120 insect mitochondrial genomes, with special reference to the correlation between the signs of skew values and replication orientation/gene direction. The results show that the sign of GC skew on entire mitochondrial genomes is reversed in all species of three distantly related families of insects, Philopteridae (Phthiraptera), Aleyrodidae (Hemiptera) and Braconidae (Hymenoptera); the replication-related elements in the A+T-rich regions of these species are inverted, confirming that reversal of strand asymmetry (GC skew) was caused by inversion of replication origin; and finally, the sign of GC skew value is associated with replication orientation but not with gene direction, while that of AT skew value varies with gene direction, replication and codon positions used in analyses. These findings show that deaminations during replication and other mutations contribute more than selection on amino acid sequences to strand compositions of G and C, and that the replication process has a stronger affect on A and T content than does transcription. Our results may contribute to genome-wide studies of replication and transcription mechanisms. PMID:20856815

  10. Band Structure Asymmetry of Bilayer Graphene Revealed by Infrared Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.Q.; Henriksen, E.A.; Jiang, Z.; Hao, Zhao; Martin, Michael C.; Kim, P.; Stormer, H.L.; Basov, Dimitri N.

    2008-12-10

    We report on infrared spectroscopy of bilayer graphene integrated in gated structures. We observe a significant asymmetry in the optical conductivity upon electrostatic doping of electrons and holes. We show that this finding arises from a marked asymmetry between the valence and conduction bands, which is mainly due to the inequivalence of the two sublattices within the graphene layer and the next-nearest-neighbor interlayer coupling. From the conductivity data, the energy difference of the two sublattices and the interlayer coupling energy are directly determined.

  11. Asymmetry and Basic Pathways in Sleep-Stage Transitions.

    PubMed

    Lo, Chung-Chuan; Bartsch, Ronny P; Ivanov, Plamen Ch

    2013-04-01

    We study dynamical aspects of sleep micro-architecture. We find that sleep dynamics exhibits a high degree of asymmetry, and that the entire class of sleep-stage transition pathways underlying the complexity of sleep dynamics throughout the night can be characterized by two independent asymmetric transition paths. These basic pathways remain stable under sleep disorders, even though the degree of asymmetry is significantly reduced. Our findings indicate an intriguing temporal organization in sleep dynamics at short time scales that is typical for physical systems exhibiting self-organized criticality (SOC). PMID:24653582

  12. Baryon asymmetry from hypermagnetic helicity in dilaton hypercharge electromagnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Bamba, Kazuharu

    2006-12-15

    The generation of the baryon asymmetry of the Universe from the hypermagnetic helicity, the physical interpretation of which is given in terms of hypermagnetic knots, is studied in inflationary cosmology, taking into account the breaking of the conformal invariance of hypercharge electromagnetic fields through both a coupling with the dilaton and with a pseudoscalar field. It is shown that, if the electroweak phase transition is strongly first order and the present amplitude of the generated magnetic fields on the horizon scale is sufficiently large, a baryon asymmetry with a sufficient magnitude to account for the observed baryon-to-entropy ratio can be generated.

  13. CP violation and the development of cosmological baryon asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Senjanovic, G.

    1980-01-01

    A discussion of the origin of the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry of the universe is presented in the context of the standard cosmological model. Except in the case of the minimal SU(5) theory, it is possible that grand unified theories predict the right order of magnitude for the ratio of baryon to photon number. The question of CP violation is addressed in detail and it is shown that, tied up with symmetry nonrestoration at high temperature, the soft CP violation does remain at T approx. = 10/sup 15/ GeV as to lead to the creation of baryon asymmetry in the very early universe.

  14. Correlation between strand asymmetry and phylogeny in mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Barral P, J; Cantini, L; Hasmy, A; Jiménez, J; Marcano, A

    2005-10-21

    An evolutionary distance is introduced in order to propose an efficient and feasible procedure for phylogeny studies. Our analysis are based on the strand asymmetry property of mitochondrial DNA, but can be applied to other genomes. Comparison of our results with those reported in conventional phylogenetic trees, gives confidence about our approximation. Our findings support the hypotheses about the origin of the skew and its dependence upon evolutionary pressures, and improves previous efforts on using the strand asymmetry property of genomes for phylogeny inference. For the evolutionary distance introduced here, we observe that the more adequate technique for tree reconstructions correspond to an average link method which employs a sequential clustering algorithm.

  15. Electroweak radiative corrections to polarized Mo/ller scattering asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnecki, Andrzej; Marciano, William J.

    1996-02-01

    One loop electroweak radiative corrections to left-right parity-violating Mo/ller scattering (e-e--->e-e-) asymmetries are presented. They reduce the standard model (tree level) prediction by 40+/-3% where the main shift and uncertainty stem from hadronic vacuum polarization loops. A similar reduction also occurs for the electron-electron atomic parity-violating interaction. That effect can be attributed to an increase of sin2θW(q2) by 3% in running from q2=m2Z to 0. The sensitivity of the asymmetry to ``new physics'' is also discussed.

  16. Asymmetry and basic pathways in sleep-stage transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Chung-Chuan; Bartsch, Ronny P.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2013-04-01

    We study dynamical aspects of sleep micro-architecture. We find that sleep dynamics exhibits a high degree of asymmetry, and that the entire class of sleep-stage transition pathways underlying the complexity of sleep dynamics throughout the night can be characterized by two independent asymmetric transition paths. These basic pathways remain stable under sleep disorders, even though the degree of asymmetry is significantly reduced. Our findings demonstrate an intriguing temporal organization in sleep micro-architecture at short time scales that is typical for physical systems exhibiting self-organized criticality (SOC), and indicates nonequilibrium critical dynamics in brain activity during sleep.

  17. COMPASS results on collins and sivers asymmetries for charged hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The study of transverse spin and transverse momentum effects is an important part of the scientific program of COMPASS, a fixed target experiment at the CERN SPS taking data since 2002. The studies are carried on by measuring the hadrons produced in deep inelastic scattering (DIS) of 160 GeV/ c muons off different targets. Among the possible asymmetries in the hadron azimuthal distributions, particularly interesting are the Collins and Sivers asymmetries which the COMPASS Collaboration has measured using transversely polarised deuteron and proton targets. Here new results for charged pions and kaons obtained from the 2010 run with a transversely polarised proton target are presented for the first time.

  18. Interactive orbital proximity operations planning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunwald, Arthur J.; Ellis, Stephen R.

    1990-01-01

    An interactive graphical planning system for on-site planning of proximity operations in the congested multispacecraft environment about the space station is presented. The system shows the astronaut a bird's eye perspective of the space station, the orbital plane, and the co-orbiting spacecraft. The system operates in two operational modes: (1) a viewpoint mode, in which the astronaut is able to move the viewpoint around in the orbital plane to range in on areas of interest; and (2) a trajectory design mode, in which the trajectory is planned. Trajectory design involves the composition of a set of waypoints which result in a fuel-optimal trajectory which satisfies all operational constraints, such as departure and arrival constraints, plume impingement constraints, and structural constraints. The main purpose of the system is to present the trajectory and the constraints in an easily interpretable graphical format. Through a graphical interactive process, the trajectory waypoints are edited until all operational constraints are satisfied. A series of experiments was conducted to evaluate the system. Eight airline pilots with no prior background in orbital mechanics participated in the experiments. Subject training included a stand-alone training session of about 6 hours duration, in which the subjects became familiar with orbital mechanics concepts and performed a series of exercises to familiarize themselves with the control and display features of the system. They then carried out a series of production runs in which 90 different trajectory design situations were randomly addressed. The purpose of these experiments was to investigate how the planning time, planning efforts, and fuel expenditures were affected by the planning difficulty. Some results of these experiments are presented.

  19. Coupled water transport by rat proximal tubule.

    PubMed

    Green, R; Giebisch, G; Unwin, R; Weinstein, A M

    1991-12-01

    Simultaneous microperfusion of proximal tubules and peritubular capillaries in kidneys of rats anesthetized with Inactin was used to examine water reabsorption by this epithelium. Osmolality of the luminal solution was varied with changes in NaCl concentration and by the addition of raffinose. Capillary perfusates contained either low (2 g/dl) or high (16 g/dl) concentrations of albumin. We used low-bicarbonate perfusates for both lumen and capillary so that we might apply the nonequilibrium thermodynamic model of transport for a single solute (NaCl) to interpret our observations. Linear regression with the volume flux equation Jv = -Lp delta II - Lp sigma delta C + Jav (where Jv is volume flux, Lp is hydraulic conductance, delta II is oncotic force, sigma is osmotic reflection coefficient, delta C is salt concentration difference, and Jav is the component of Jv not attributed to transepithelial hydrostatic or osmotic forces) revealed a tubule water permeability (Pf = 0.11 +/- 0.01 cm/s) and a sigma (0.74 +/- 0.08) in agreement with previous determinations. These transport parameters were unaffected by changes in peritubular protein. We also found that Jav was substantial, approximately three-fourths of the rate of isotonic transport under these perfusion conditions. Further, this component of water transport nearly doubled with the transition from low- to high-protein peritubular capillary perfusion. When expressed as a capacity for water reabsorption against an osmotic gradient, the salt concentration differences required to null volume flux were 13.2 +/- 2.4 and 29.4 +/- 4.0 mosmol/kgH2O under low and high peritubular protein. Our data suggest that this protein effect is, most likely, an increase in solute transport by the tubule epithelial cells. PMID:1750518

  20. Asymmetry in elite rowers: effect of ergometer design and stroke rate.

    PubMed

    Fohanno, Vincent; Nordez, Antoine; Smith, Richard; Colloud, Floren

    2015-09-01

    Between limb movement asymmetries and foot force production asymmetries are thought to be detrimental for both rower's performance and risk of injury, particularly when rowing frequently on ergometers. Several ergometers with different designs can be used by rowers as part of their indoor training. Hence, this study aimed to compare asymmetries in lower limb joint kinematics and foot force production with respect to ergometer design and rowing intensity. A new symmetry index was proposed to assess these asymmetries in elite rowers during a test on three ergometers. Additionally, the asymmetry in lower limb length was assessed to investigate its relationship with kinematic and kinetic asymmetries. Parameters describing medium (5-10%) or high (>10%) asymmetries were compared between rowing ergometers and intensities. Results indicated medium asymmetries for the ankle joint angle and hip-knee joint accelerations and high asymmetries for the resultant force and the ankle joint acceleration associated with a low inter-stroke variability. Kinetic asymmetry was neither correlated to kinematic asymmetry nor with lower limb length asymmetry. The use of a mobile ergometer led to higher joint acceleration asymmetries. Further studies are necessary to investigate the relation between these findings and muscular adaptations that may increase the risk of lower-back injury. PMID:26266336

  1. Geometric effects resulting from the asymmetry of dipping fault: Hanging wall/ footwall effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Xie, Li-Li; Hu, Jin-Jun

    2008-05-01

    Root-mean-square distance D rms with characteristic of weighted-average is introduced in this article firstly. D rms can be used to capture the general proximity of a site to a dipping fault plane comparing with the rupture distance D rup and the seismogenic distance D seis. Then, using D rup, D seis and D rms, the hanging wall/footwall effects on the peak ground acceleration (PGA) during the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake are evaluated by regression analysis. The logarithm residual shows that the PGA on hanging wall is much greater than that on footwall at the same D rup or D seis when the D rup or D seis is used as site-to-source distance measure. In contrast, there is no significant difference between the PGA on hanging wall and that on footwall at the same D rms when D rms is used. This result confirms that the hanging wall/footwall effect is mainly a geometric effect caused by the asymmetry of dipping fault. Therefore, the hanging wall/footwall effect on the near-fault ground motions can be ignored in the future attenuation analysis if the root-mean-square distance D rms is used as the site-to-source distance measure.

  2. On the relationship between sequential faulting, margin asymmetry and highly thinned continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brune, Sascha; Heine, Christian; Pérez-Gussinyé, Marta; Sobolev, Stephan

    2014-05-01

    Atlantic is an ideal test bed for the hypothesis of velocity-dependent margin width since rifting was fast in the south, but slow in the northern part. As predicted by our numerical models, the maximum present-day margin width increases almost linearly from the conjugate Equatorial margin segments to the Florianopolis/Walvis ridge. Even though the polarity of the magma-poor South Atlantic margins alternates, the asymmetry and the width of the wider margin are in very good agreement with our simulations. The described rift evolution has three fundamental implications: (1) It implies sustained transfer of material across the extensional plate boundary thereby predicting that large portions of a wide margin originate from its conjugate side. (2) Migration of the deformation locus causes faulting in the distal parts of the margin to postdate that of the proximal parts by as much as 10 million years. This means that syn-rift and post-rift phase are location-dependent. (3) Lateral movement of the rift centre generates drastically different peak heat flow and subsidence histories at the proximal and the distal margin.

  3. Superconducting proximity effect in three-dimensional topological insulators in the presence of a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burset, Pablo; Lu, Bo; Tkachov, Grigory; Tanaka, Yukio; Hankiewicz, Ewelina M.; Trauzettel, Björn

    2015-11-01

    The proximity-induced pair potential in a topological insulator-superconductor hybrid features an interesting superposition of a conventional spin-singlet component from the superconductor and a spin-triplet one induced by the surface state of the topological insulator. This singlet-triplet superposition can be altered by the presence of a magnetic field. We study the interplay between topological order and superconducting correlations performing a symmetry analysis of the induced pair potential, using Green functions techniques to theoretically describe ballistic junctions between superconductors and topological insulators under magnetic fields. We relate a change in the conductance from a gapped profile into one with a zero-energy peak with the transition into a topologically nontrivial regime where the odd-frequency triplet pairing becomes the dominant component in the pair potential. The nontrivial regime, which provides a signature of odd-frequency triplet superconductivity, is reached for an out-of-plane effective magnetization with strength comparable to the chemical potential of the superconductor or for an in-plane one, parallel to the normal-superconductor interface, with strength of the order of the superconducting gap. Strikingly, in the latter case, a misalignment with the interface yields an asymmetry with the energy in the conductance unless the total contribution of the topological surface state is considered.

  4. Effect of Wrist Angle on Median Nerve Appearance at the Proximal Carpal Tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Ping Yeap; Muraki, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of wrist angle, sex, and handedness on the changes in the median nerve cross-sectional area (MNCSA) and median nerve diameters, namely longitudinal diameter (D1) and vertical diameter (D2). Ultrasound examination was conducted to examine the median nerve at the proximal carpal tunnel in both dominant and nondominant hands of men (n = 27) and women (n = 26). A total of seven wrist angles were examined: neutral; 15°, 30°, and 45° extension; and 15°, 30°, and 45° flexion. Our results indicated sexual dimorphism and bilateral asymmetry of MNCSA, D1 and D2 measurements. MNCSA was significantly reduced when the wrist angle changed from neutral to flexion or extension positions. At flexion positions, D1 was significantly smaller than that at neutral. In contrast, at extension positions, D2 was significantly smaller than that at neutral. In conclusion, this study showed that MNCSA decreased as the wrist angle changed from neutral to flexion or extension positions in both dominant and nondominant hands of both sexes, whereas deformation of the median nerve differed between wrist flexion and extension. PMID:25658422

  5. Effect of wrist angle on median nerve appearance at the proximal carpal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Loh, Ping Yeap; Muraki, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of wrist angle, sex, and handedness on the changes in the median nerve cross-sectional area (MNCSA) and median nerve diameters, namely longitudinal diameter (D1) and vertical diameter (D2). Ultrasound examination was conducted to examine the median nerve at the proximal carpal tunnel in both dominant and nondominant hands of men (n = 27) and women (n = 26). A total of seven wrist angles were examined: neutral; 15°, 30°, and 45° extension; and 15°, 30°, and 45° flexion. Our results indicated sexual dimorphism and bilateral asymmetry of MNCSA, D1 and D2 measurements. MNCSA was significantly reduced when the wrist angle changed from neutral to flexion or extension positions. At flexion positions, D1 was significantly smaller than that at neutral. In contrast, at extension positions, D2 was significantly smaller than that at neutral. In conclusion, this study showed that MNCSA decreased as the wrist angle changed from neutral to flexion or extension positions in both dominant and nondominant hands of both sexes, whereas deformation of the median nerve differed between wrist flexion and extension.

  6. Neurogenic regulation of proximal bicarbonate and chloride reabsorption.

    PubMed

    Cogan, M G

    1986-01-01

    Although a change in renal nerve activity is known to alter proximal reabsorption, it is unclear whether reabsorption of NaHCO3 or NaCl or both are affected. Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 10) were studied using free-flow micropuncture techniques during euvolemia and following acute ipsilateral denervation. Glomerular filtration rate and single nephron glomerular filtration rate were stable. Absolute proximal bicarbonate reabsorption fell following denervation (933 +/- 40 to 817 +/- 30 pmol/min) with a parallel reduction in chloride reabsorption (1,643 +/- 116 to 1,341 +/- 129 peq/min). Urinary sodium, potassium, bicarbonate, and chloride excretion all increased significantly. To further assess the physiological significance of neurogenic modulation of proximal transport, other rats (n = 6) were subjected to acute unilateral nephrectomy (AUN). There is evidence that AUN induces a contralateral natriuresis (renorenal reflex) at least partially by causing inhibition of efferent renal nerve traffic. AUN caused significant changes in proximal NaHCO3 and NaCl reabsorption as well as in whole kidney electrolyte excretion in the same pattern as had denervation. Prior denervation of the remaining kidney prevented the proximal and whole kidney response to AUN (n = 6). In conclusion, depression of renal nerve activity inhibits both NaHCO3 and NaCl reabsorption in the rat superficial proximal convoluted tubule. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that changes in renal nerve activity modify whole kidney electrolyte excretion under physiological conditions at least partially by regulating proximal transport.

  7. Structural hemispheric asymmetries in the human precentral gyrus hand representation.

    PubMed

    Rose, S; Rowland, T; Pannek, K; Baumann, F; Coulthard, A; McCombe, P; Henderson, R

    2012-05-17

    The superior region of the precentral gyrus (preCG) is known to be actively involved with hand function and has been proposed as a possible neural correlate of handedness. To test this hypothesis, we used a combined voxel-based morphometric (VBM) asymmetry analysis of structural MRI, along with diffusion MRI (dMRI) tractography to investigate laterality indices of corticomotor white matter (WM) pathways, based on measures of fractional anisotropy (FA). The relationship between measures of motor performance and FA laterality indices was also investigated. In a cohort of 14 right-handed healthy participants, the VBM asymmetry analysis revealed an area within the preCG associated with hand representation. The tractography analysis revealed that this region possessed a number of major WM intrahemispheric connections to the brain stem, thalamus, cerebellum, postcentral, caudal middle and superior frontal, and superior and inferior parietal corticomotor regions. Within the corticospinal tracts, we found FA was significantly higher in the left hemisphere compared with the right. Furthermore, significant correlations were found between FA asymmetry measures projecting from this region, namely corticospinal tracts and those connecting the postcentral gyri, with grip strength and finger-tapping performance, respectively. A number of the motor pathways projecting from this region also exhibited leftward asymmetry of FA distributions. The findings from this study highlight the role of the left motor cortex in skilled motor performance and provide a framework for the study of the relationship between handedness and preCG hand representation in larger normative populations. PMID:22433295

  8. Asymmetry within social groups: division of labour and intergroup competition.

    PubMed

    Barker, J L; Loope, K J; Reeve, H K

    2016-03-01

    Social animals vary in their ability to compete with group members over shared resources and also vary in their cooperative efforts to produce these resources. Competition among groups can promote within-group cooperation, but many existing models of intergroup cooperation do not explicitly account for observations that group members invest differentially in cooperation and that there are often within-group competitive or power asymmetries. We present a game theoretic model of intergroup competition that investigates how such asymmetries affect within-group cooperation. In this model, group members adopt one of two roles, with relative competitive efficiency and the number of individuals varying between roles. Players in each role make simultaneous, coevolving decisions. The model predicts that although intergroup competition increases cooperative contributions to group resources by both roles, contributions are predominantly from individuals in the less competitively efficient role, whereas individuals in the more competitively efficient role generally gain the larger share of these resources. When asymmetry in relative competitive efficiency is greater, a group's per capita cooperation (averaged across both roles) is higher, due to increased cooperation from the competitively inferior individuals. For extreme asymmetry in relative competitive efficiency, per capita cooperation is highest in groups with a single competitively superior individual and many competitively inferior individuals, because the latter acquiesce and invest in cooperation rather than within-group competition. These predictions are consistent with observed features of many societies, such as monogynous Hymenoptera with many workers and caste dimorphism.

  9. Effects Of Spatial Disturbances On Asymmetries Of Vortexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degani, David; Schiff, Lewis B.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes computational study of effects of small spatial disturbances on asymmetries in vortexes downstream of slender bodies of revolution in flows at large angle of attack. Flow phenomena affect stability and maneuvering characteristics of missiles and aircraft. Understanding phenomena helps answer questions as how precisely symmetrical aerodynamic body should be, and how roughness, bumps, or other imperfections affect maneuvering characteristics.

  10. Baryon Asymmetry of the Universe (1/2)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    In two lectures, the following topics will be discussed: (1) Why baryon asymmetry is a problem at all (2) Review of the Sakharov's conditions (3) Why old models based on GUT did not work (4) Electroweak baryogenesis (5) Leptogenesis (6) Connections to the near-future experiments

  11. Impact of Stratospheric Ozone Zonal Asymmetries on the Tropospheric Circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweedy, Olga; Waugh, Darryn; Li, Feng; Oman, Luke

    2015-01-01

    The depletion and recovery of Antarctic ozone plays a major role in changes of Southern Hemisphere (SH) tropospheric climate. Recent studies indicate that the lack of polar ozone asymmetries in chemistry climate models (CCM) leads to a weaker and warmer Antarctic vortex, and smaller trends in the tropospheric mid-latitude jet and the surface pressure. However, the tropospheric response to ozone asymmetries is not well understood. In this study we report on a series of integrations of the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry Climate Model (GEOS CCM) to further examine the effect of zonal asymmetries on the state of the stratosphere and troposphere. Integrations with the full, interactive stratospheric chemistry are compared against identical simulations using the same CCM except that (1) the monthly mean zonal mean stratospheric ozone from first simulation is prescribed and (2) ozone is relaxed to the monthly mean zonal mean ozone on a three day time scale. To analyze the tropospheric response to ozone asymmetries, we examine trends and quantify the differences in temperatures, zonal wind and surface pressure among the integrations.

  12. Auxin Asymmetry during Gravitropism by Tomato Hypocotyls 1

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Marcia A.; Pickard, Barbara G.

    1989-01-01

    Gravitropic asymmetry of auxin was observed in hypocotyls of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) soon after horizontal placement: the ratio of apically supplied [3H]IAA collected from the lower sides to that from the upper sides was about 1.4 between 5 and 10 minutes. This was adequately early to account for the beginning of curvature. The auxin asymmetry ratio rose to about 2.5 between 20 and 25 minutes, and to 3.5 during the main phase of curvature. This compares reasonably well with the roughly 3.9 ratio for elongation on the lower side to elongation on the upper side that is the basis for the curvature. These data extend evidence that the Went-Cholodny theory for the mediation of tropisms is valid for dicot stems. Also consistent with the theory, an auxin asymmetry ratio of 2.5 was observed when wrong-way gravitropic curvature developed following application of a high level of auxin. In addition to reversing the asymmetry of elongation, the large supplement of auxin resulted in lower net elongation. Previous data established that ethylene is not involved in this decrease of growth as a function of increasing level of auxin. PMID:11537450

  13. Evidence for an anomalous like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Abolins, Maris A.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Aguilo, Ernest; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; /Northeastern U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF

    2010-05-01

    We measure the charge asymmetry A of like-sign dimuon events in 6.1 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions recorded with the DO detector at a center of mass energy sqrt s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider.

  14. Testing Pomeron flavour symmetry with diffractive W charge asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuinard, A.; Royon, C.; Staszewski, R.

    2016-04-01

    This study focuses on hard diffractive events produced in proton-proton collision at LHC exhibiting one intact proton in the final state which can be tagged by forward detectors. We report prospective results on the W boson charge asymmetry measured for such events, which allow to constrain the quark diffractive density functions in the Pomeron.

  15. Baryon Asymmetry of the Universe (2/2)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    In two lectures, the following topics will be discussed: (1) Why baryon asymmetry is a problem at all (2) Review of the Sakharov's conditions (3) Why old models based on GUT did not work (4) Electroweak baryogenesis (5) Leptogenesis (6) Connections to the near-future experiments

  16. The Matter-Antimatter Asymmetry of the Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    I will give here an overview of the present observational and theoretical situation regarding the question of the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the universe and the related question of the existence of antimatter on a cosmological scale. I will also give a simple discussion of the role of CP (charge conjugation parity) violation in this subject.

  17. Baryon Asymmetry of the Universe (2/2)

    SciTech Connect

    2010-05-26

    In two lectures, the following topics will be discussed: (1) Why baryon asymmetry is a problem at all (2) Review of the Sakharov's conditions (3) Why old models based on GUT did not work (4) Electroweak baryogenesis (5) Leptogenesis (6) Connections to the near-future experiments

  18. Baryon Asymmetry of the Universe (1/2)

    SciTech Connect

    2010-05-26

    In two lectures, the following topics will be discussed: (1) Why baryon asymmetry is a problem at all (2) Review of the Sakharov's conditions (3) Why old models based on GUT did not work (4) Electroweak baryogenesis (5) Leptogenesis (6) Connections to the near-future experiments

  19. Asymmetries in Second Language Acquisition Data: A Response to Birdsong.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felix, Sascha; Zobl, Helmut

    1994-01-01

    Responds to Birdsong's analysis of the authors' positions and data on asymmetries in SLA. The writers address the conceptual disagreements, theoretical positions, "indeterminacy" problem, and disagreements over evidence. The conclusion addresses the role of subjects' ability to detect ungrammatical sentences within the broader context of SLA…

  20. Spatial asymmetries in connectivity influence colonization-extinction dynamics.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Miguel A; Fletcher, Robert J; Tremblay, Raymond L; Meléndez-Ackerman, Elvia J

    2015-10-01

    Movement has broad implications for many areas of biology, including evolution, community and population ecology. Movement is crucial in metapopulation ecology because it facilitates colonization and reduces the likelihood of local extinction via rescue effects. Most metapopulation modeling approaches describe connectivity using pair-wise Euclidean distances resulting in the simplifying assumption of a symmetric connectivity pattern. Yet, assuming symmetric connectivity when populations show net asymmetric movement patterns may result in biased estimates of colonization and extinction, and may alter interpretations of the dynamics and conclusions regarding the viability of metapopulations. Here, we use a 10-year time series on a wind-dispersed orchid Lepanthes rupestris that anchors its roots in patches of moss growing on trees or boulders along streams, to test for the role of connectivity asymmetries in explaining the colonization-extinction dynamics of this orchid in a network of 975 patches. We expected that wind direction could highly alter dispersal direction in this orchid. To account for this potential asymmetry, we modified the connectivity measure traditionally used in metapopulation models to allow for asymmetric effective distances between patches and subsequently estimated colonization and extinction probabilities using a dynamic occupancy modeling approach. Asymmetric movement was prevalent in the L. rupestris metapopulation and incorporating potential dispersal asymmetries resulted in higher colonization estimates in larger patches and more accurate models. Accounting for dispersal asymmetries may reveal connectivity effects where they were previously assumed to be negligible and may provide more reliable conclusions regarding the role of connectivity in patch dynamics. PMID:26054613

  1. Preschoolers' Mental Rotation: Sex Differences in Hemispheric Asymmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahn, Nicola; Jansen, Petra; Heil, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Mental rotation performance has been found to produce one of the largest sex differences in cognition accompanied by sex differences in functional cerebral asymmetry. Although sex differences in mental rotation performance can be reliably demonstrated as early as age 5 years old, that is, long before puberty, no data exist as to whether…

  2. Dopamine Transporter Genotype Predicts Attentional Asymmetry in Healthy Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Daniel P.; O'Connell, Redmond G.; Nathan, Pradeep J.; Bellgrove, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    A number of recent studies suggest that DNA variation in the dopamine transporter gene (DAT1) influences spatial attention asymmetry in clinical populations such as ADHD, but confirmation in non-clinical samples is required. Since non-spatial factors such as attentional load have been shown to influence spatial biases in clinical conditions, here…

  3. Salivary Alpha Amylase-Cortisol Asymmetry in Maltreated Youth

    PubMed Central

    Gordis, Elana B.; Granger, Douglas A.; Susman, Elizabeth J.; Trickett, Penelope K.

    2008-01-01

    Background Maltreatment represents a major stressor in the lives of many youth. Given the known effects of stress exposure on subsequent biological stress response systems, researchers have been interested in the effects of maltreatment on the functioning of these systems. Experimental studies reveal that previous exposure to stress affects the symmetry between components of the physiological stress response to subsequent stress. The present study examined asymmetry between salivary alpha amylase (sAA), a sympathetic indicator, and cortisol reactivity to a social stressor among maltreated and comparison youth age 9 to 14 years. Consistent with earlier studies suggesting that stress leads to asymmetry between hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and sympathetic nervous system activity, we expected that maltreated youth would exhibit greater sAA-cortisol asymmetry than would comparison youth. Methods Forty-seven maltreated and 37 comparison youth visited the lab and engaged in a social stress protocol. We collected 2 saliva samples before the stressor and 4 after, at 0 minutes post stress and every 10 minutes for 30 minutes. Results Maltreatment status moderated the relation between sAA and cortisol activity in response to the stressor. Comparison youth showed significant links between the sAA and cortisol responses; maltreated youth had no significant associations between responses in the two biomarkers. Conclusion The data were consistent with sAA-cortisol asymmetry among maltreated youth. Further research should seek to replicate this finding and investigate its implication for developmental trajectories. PMID:17945232

  4. Fleischer-Mannel Analysis for Direct CP Asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, Heath B

    2001-04-24

    We apply the method of Fleischer and Mannel to extract information on sin {alpha} in the charged B system. Hadronic contributions are fixed through appeal to data allowing one to cleanly interpret the CP asymmetry without assuming dominance of the top quark penguin contribution.

  5. Polarization asymmetry zero in heavy quark photoproduction and leptoproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Schmidt, Ivan

    1998-03-01

    We demonstrate two novel features of the sea-quark contributions to the polarized structure functions and photoproduction cross sections, a zero sum rule and a zero crossing point of the polarization asymmetry, which can be traced directly to the dynamics of the perturbative tree-graph gluon-splitting contributions. In particular, we show that the Born contribution of massive quarks arising from photon-gluon fusion gives zero contribution to the logarithmic integral over the polarization asymmetry ∫dν/νΔσ(ν,Q2) for any photon virtuality. The vanishing of this integral in the Bjorken scaling limit then implies a zero gluon-splitting Born contribution to the Gourdin-Ellis-Jaffe sum rule for polarized structure functions from massive sea quarks. The vanishing of the polarization asymmetry at or near the canonical position predicted by perturbative QCD provides an important tool for verifying the dominance of the photon-gluon fusion contribution to charm photoproduction and for validating the effectiveness of this process as a measure of the gluon polarization ΔG(x,Q2) in the nucleon. The displacement of the asymmetry zero from its canonical position is sensitive to the virtuality of the gluon in the photon-gluon fusion subprocess, and it can provide a measure of intrinsic and higher-order sea quark contributions. © 1998

  6. A New Measure Of Bivariate Asymmetry And Its Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Flavio Henn; Kolev, Nikolai Valtchev

    2008-11-06

    In this paper we propose a new measure of bivariate asymmetry, based on conditional correlation coefficients. A decomposition of the Pearson correlation coefficient in terms of its conditional versions is studied and an example of application of the proposed measure is given.

  7. Phase Asymmetries in Normophonic Speakers: Visual Judgments and Objective Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonilha, Heather Shaw; Deliyski, Dimitar D.; Gerlach, Terri Treman

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To ascertain the amount of phase asymmetry of the vocal fold vibration in normophonic speakers via visualization techniques and compare findings for habitual and pressed phonations. Method: Fifty-two normophonic speakers underwent stroboscopy and high-speed videoendoscopy (HSV). The HSV images were further processed into 4 visual…

  8. Parity-violating electroweak asymmetry in {rvec e} p scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Konrad Aniol; David Armstrong; Todd Averett; Maud Baylac; Etienne Burtin; John Calarco; Gordon Cates; Christian Cavata; Zhengwei Chai; C. Chang; Jian-Ping Chen; Eugene Chudakov; Evaristo Cisbani; Marius Coman; Daniel Dale; Alexandre Deur; Pibero Djawotho; Martin Epstein; Stephanie Escoffier; Lars Ewell; Nicolas Falletto; John Finn; Kevin Fissum; A.Fleck; Bernard Frois; Salvatore Frullani; Haiyan Gao; Franco Garibaldi; Ashot Gasparian; G.Gerstner; Ronald Gilman; Oleksandr Glamazdin; Javier Gomez; Viktor Gorbenko; Jens-Ole Hansen; F. Hersman; Douglas Higinbotham; Richard Holmes; Maurik Holtrop; Thomas Humensky; Sebastien Incerti; Mauro Iodice; Cornelis de Jager; David Jardillier; Xiaodong Jiang; Mark Jones; J.Jorda; Christophe Jutier; Kahl; James Kelly; Donghee Kim; Min Kim; Minsuk Kim; Ioannis Kominis; Edgar Kooijman; Kevin Kramer; Krishna Kumar; Michael Kuss; John LeRose; Raffaele De Leo; M.Leuschner; David Lhuillier; Meihua Liang; Nilanga Liyanage; R.Lourie; Richard Madey; Sergey Malov; Demetrius Margaziotis; Frederic Marie; Pete Markowitz; Jacques Martino; Peter Mastromarino; Kathy McCormick; Justin McIntyre; Zein-Eddine Meziani; Robert Michaels; Brian Milbrath; Gerald Miller; Joseph Mitchell; Ludyvine Morand; Damien Neyret; Charles Perdrisat; Gerassimos Petratos; Roman Pomatsalyuk; John Price; David Prout; Vina Punjabi; Thierry Pussieux; Gilles Quemener; Ronald Ransome; David Relyea; Yves Roblin; Julie Roche; Gary Rutledge; Paul Rutt; Marat Rvachev; Franck Sabatie; Arunava Saha; Paul Souder; Marcus Spradlin; Steffen Strauch; Riad Suleiman; Jeffrey Templon; Tatsuo Terasawa; J.Thompson; Raphael Tieulent; Luminita Todor; Baris Tonguc; Paul Ulmer; Guido Urciuoli; Branislav Vlahovic; Krishni Wijesooriya; R.Wilson; Bogdan Wojtsekhowski; Rhett Woo; Wang Xu; Imran Younus; C. Zhang

    2004-02-01

    We have measured the parity-violating electroweak asymmetry in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from protons. Significant contributions to this asymmetry could arise from the contributions of strange form factors in the nucleon. The measured asymmetry is A = -15.05 {+-} 0.98(stat) {+-} 0.56(syst) ppm at the kinematic point <{theta}{sub lab}> = 12.3{sup o} and = 0.477 (GeV/c){sup 2}. Based on these data as well as data on electromagnetic form factors, we extract the linear combination of strange form factors G{sub E}{sup s} + 0.392G{sub M}{sup s} = 0.014 {+-} 0.020 {+-} 0.010 where the first error arises from this experiment and the second arises from the electromagnetic form factor data. This paper provides a full description of the special experimental techniques employed for precisely measuring the small asymmetry, including the first use of a strained GaAs crystal and a laser-Compton polarimeter in a fixed target parity-violation experiment.

  9. Tectonic asymmetry of the earth and other planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pushcharovskiy, Y. M.; Kozlov, V. V.; Sulidi-Kondratyev, Y. D.

    1978-01-01

    The structures of Earth, Mars, Venus, and the Moon are examined and compared. Global tectonic characteristics are presented for each. A comparison of the tectonics reveals the structural asymetry of these planets and the moon. Tectonic asymmetry information for the group is used to interpret certain aspects of the earth's geological past.

  10. Memory Asymmetry of Forward and Backward Associations in Recognition Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Jiongjiong; Zhao, Peng; Zhu, Zijian; Mecklinger, Axel; Fang, Zhiyong; Li, Han

    2013-01-01

    There is an intensive debate on whether memory for serial order is symmetric. The objective of this study was to explore whether associative asymmetry is modulated by memory task (recognition vs. cued recall). Participants were asked to memorize word triples (Experiments 1-2) or pairs (Experiments 3-6) during the study phase. They then recalled…

  11. Teaching Parents How to Prevent Acquired Cranial Asymmetry in Infants.

    PubMed

    Lennartsson, Freda; Nordin, Per; Wennergren, Göran

    2016-01-01

    Acquired cranial asymmetry is prevalent in infants today. This is largely attributed to the supine sleep position recommended for infant safety. The condition can become permanent, so prevention and early detection are important. A prevention project was initiated where guidelines for Swedish child health nurses were developed, tested in a pilot study, revised, and then incorporated into a short cranial asymmetry prevention program for nurses. The program included detailed information on what to teach parents of newborns. An intervention study was initiated where one group of nurses was taught according to the program and the other group followed the standard recommendations. The aim of this survey was to compare intervention and control group parents' responses regarding the cranial asymmetry prevention information that they had received from their nurses during their infant's first four months. Participants included 272 parents (180 intervention group, 92 control group) at 26 child health centers. A checklist was distributed to parents in conjunction with infants' four month health checkup. A significantly higher percentage of intervention group parents were aware of regular recommendations - alternate direction of the infant's head when putting the child to bed (82%: 64%, p=0.001), which pillow to use (92%: 80%, p=0.01), and when to remove the pillow (48%: 31%, p=0.006) - and five newly introduced recommendations compared to controls. Results indicate that educating child health nurses on prevention of cranial asymmetry works to increase parental awareness of what to do and how to do it safely.

  12. [Management of Chinese materia medica market based on information asymmetry].

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang; Wang, Nuo; Guo, Lan-Ping; Wang, Yong-Yan; Huang, Lu-Qi; Liu, Jin-Xin

    2013-12-01

    Pharmaceutical market is a typical market with information asymmetry, and which can lead to "lemons" problem. In all developed countries, firms must receive regulatory approval to market a pharmaceutical product. Such administrative department including SFDA, EMA, FDA and so on. Chinese materia medica is a special part of pharmaceutical market in China. The management of Chinese materia medica is a special challenge in China.

  13. Age-Related Differences in Bilateral Asymmetry in Cycling Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Ting; Jensen, Jody L.

    2012-01-01

    Bilateral asymmetry, a form of limb laterality in the context of moving two limbs, emerges in childhood. Children and adults show lateral preference in tasks that involve the upper and lower limbs. The importance of research in limb laterality is the insight it could provide about lateralized functions of the cerebral hemispheres. Analyzing…

  14. Foot force production and asymmetries in elite rowers.

    PubMed

    Buckeridge, Erica M; Bull, Anthony M J; McGregor, Alison H

    2014-03-01

    The rowing stroke is a leg-driven action, in which forces developed by the lower limbs provide a large proportion of power delivered to the oars. In terms of both performance and injury, it is important to initiate each stroke with powerful and symmetrical loading of the foot stretchers. The aims of this study were to assess the reliability of foot force measured by footplates developed for the Concept2 indoor ergometer and to examine the magnitude and symmetry of bilateral foot forces in different groups of rowers. Five heavyweight female scullers, six heavyweight female sweep rowers, and six lightweight male (LWM) rowers performed an incremental step test on the Concept2 ergometer. Vertical, horizontal, and resultant forces were recorded bilaterally, and asymmetries were quantified using the absolute symmetry index. Foot force was measured with high consistency (coefficient of multiple determination > 0.976 +/- 0.010). Relative resultant, vertical, and horizontal forces were largest in LWM rowers, whilst average foot forces significantly increased across stroke rates for all three groups of rowers. Asymmetries ranged from 5.3% for average resultant force to 28.9% for timing of peak vertical force. Asymmetries were not sensitive to stroke rate or rowing group, however, large inter-subject variability in asymmetries was evident.

  15. Prevention of Potential Falls of Elderly Healthy Women: Gait Asymmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seo, Jung-suk; Kim, Sukwon

    2014-01-01

    The study attempted to see if exercise training would alleviate gait asymmetry between nondominant and dominant legs, thus, eliminate the likelihood of slips. The present study provided 18 older adults exercise training for eight weeks and evaluated kinematics and ground reaction forces (GRFs) in both legs. Participants were randomly assigned to…

  16. Symmetry and asymmetry in electrodynamics from Rowland to Einstein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hon, Giora; Goldstein, Bernard R.

    Halfway through the paper in which he laid down the foundations for the theory of special relativity, Einstein concludes that "the asymmetry mentioned in the Introduction … disappears." Making asymmetry disappear has proved to be one of Einstein's many significant moves in his annus mirabilis of 1905. This elimination of asymmetry has led many commentators to claim that Einstein was motivated by either an aesthetic or an epistemic argument which gives priority to symmetry over asymmetry. Following closely the development of electrodynamics in the period from 1880 to 1905 and the usage of the related terms reciprocity and symmetry, we suggest a different way of understanding Einstein's motivation and the path he took. In contrast to the received view, we argue that Einstein responded to a debate in the literature on electrodynamics and that he was concerned neither with an aesthetic nor with an epistemic argument; rather, his reasoning was physical in the best sense, and most original. We will show that by providing a new perspective on the relation between electricity and magnetism, Einstein succeeded in bringing the discussion of symmetry in electrodynamics to an end.

  17. Alpha Asymmetry in Infants at Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabard-Durnam, Laurel; Tierney, Adrienne L.; Vogel-Farley, Vanessa; Tager-Flusberg, Helen; Nelson, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    An emerging focus of research on autism spectrum disorder (ASD) targets the identification of early-developing ASD endophenotypes using infant siblings of affected children. One potential neural endophenotype is resting frontal electroencephalogram (EEG) alpha asymmetry, a metric of hemispheric organization. Here, we examined the development of…

  18. "Does Degree of Asymmetry Relate to Performance?" A Critical Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boles, David B.; Barth, Joan M.

    2011-01-01

    In a recent paper, Chiarello, Welcome, Halderman, and Leonard (2009) reported positive correlations between word-related visual field asymmetries and reading performance. They argued that strong word processing lateralization represents a more optimal brain organization for reading acquisition. Their empirical results contrasted sharply with those…

  19. North-south asymmetry of the interplanetary magnetic helicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Charles W.; Bieber, John W.

    1995-01-01

    Previous analyses of the north-south asymmetry of the interplanetary magnetic helicity have used the omnitape dataset and have shown that there exists a persistent and statistically significant asymmetry in the handedness of the magnetic fluctuations at 1 AU. This asymmetry is concentrated in fluctuations with spacecraft frame frequencies less than 10-5 Hz (periods greater than 30 hours) at 1 AU. Attempts to extend these analyses to include data collected in the outer heliosphere require that we consider spacecraft frame periods many times greater than 30 hours. This raises interesting questions regarding homogeneity and stationarity of the datasets at this scale and brings into question the possible breakdown of the computed correlation functions due to the sector structure of the solar wind. The likely geometry of magnetic fluctuations in the outer heliosphere provides yet another complication in the analysis. These issues will be discussed in detail and the latest results from our studies of the Voyager 1 & 2 and Pioneer 10 & 11 datasets will be presented. The analysis of Pioneer-Venus Orbiter observations will be shown as well. The potential asymmetry between the magnetic helicity of the two hemispheres has significant and measurable implications for cosmic ray propagation in the heliosphere and these implications will be reviewed in light of the new results.

  20. Left-right asymmetry: cilia and calcium revisited.

    PubMed

    Blum, Martin; Vick, Philipp

    2015-03-01

    Leftward flow generated by motile cilia is known to underlie left-right asymmetry in vertebrate embryos. A new study now links intraciliary calcium oscillations to cilia motility and the downstream nodal signaling cascade that drives left-sided development. PMID:25734272

  1. Effect of track asymmetry and curvature on shingle writing scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Li, Shaoping; Bai, Daniel; Mendez, Hector; Pan, Tao; Han, Dehua; Mao, Sining

    2011-04-01

    Written transition curvature in perpendicular magnetic recording is generally understood to result in increased transition jitter noise and degraded signal to noise ratio or byte error rate (BER) performance. For the shingle writing scheme, asymmetry or curvature in written tracks is considered inherent due to the erasure and track edge writing characteristics. It is proposed that such a track asymmetry is more prominent at high track density/smaller track pitch recording conditions. In this report we present spin stand experimental results to study the effect of the possible track asymmetry or curvature by shingle writing and reading back in different skews. By comparing shingle writing BER bathtub profiles in different writing skew conditions 0°, +/-2°, +/-4°, +/-6°, the effect of varying shingle track asymmetry and curvature is analyzed via subsequent skewed reading process. The shingle writing BER bathtub profiles as well as the read back amplitude cross track profile are generally symmetric upon one sided erasure at different track pitches. We found that the 0° skew writing and reading process provides both the maximum BER and amplitude.

  2. Interreligious Dialogue in Schools: Beyond Asymmetry and Categorisation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riitaoja, Anna-Leena; Dervin, Fred

    2014-01-01

    Interreligious dialogue is a central objective in European and UNESCO policy and research documents, in which educational institutions are seen as central places for dialogue. In this article, we discuss this type of dialogue under the conditions of asymmetry and categorisation in two Finnish schools. Finnish education has often been lauded for…

  3. Fluctuating asymmetry and wing size of Argia tinctipennis Selys (Zygoptera: Coenagrionidae) in relation to riparian forest preservation status.

    PubMed

    Pinto, N S; Juen, L; Cabette, H S R; De Marco, P

    2012-06-01

    Effects of riparian vegetation removal on body size and wing fluctuating asymmetry (FA) of Argia tinctipennis Selys (Odonata: Coenagrionidae) were studied in the River Suiá-Miçú basin, which is part of the Xingu basin in Brazilian Amazonia. A total of 70 specimens (n = 33 from preserved and n = 37 from degraded areas) was measured. Five wing measures of each wing (totalizing ten measured characters) were taken. Preserved and degraded points presented non-overlapped variations of a Habitat Integrity Index, supporting the environmental differentiation between these two categories. FA increases in degraded areas approximately four times for the width between the nodus and proximal portion of the pterostigma of forewings (FW), two times for the width of the wing in the region of nodus of FW, and approximately 1.7 times for the number of postnodal cells of FW. The increase is almost five times for the width between the nodus and the proximal portion of the pterostigma of hind wings (HW), three times for the number of postnodal cells of HW, and approximately 1.6 times the width between quadrangle and nodus of HW. Individuals of preserved sites were nearly 3.3% larger than for degraded sites, based on mean hind wing length. Our results supports that the development of A. tinctipennis in degraded areas is affected by riparian vegetation removal and may reflect in wing FA variations. Consequently, these FA measures may be a useful tool for bioassessment using Odonata insects as a model. PMID:23950041

  4. Open reduction and internal fixation of proximal humerus fractures.

    PubMed

    Drosdowech, Darren S; Faber, Kenneth J; Athwal, George S

    2008-10-01

    Open reduction of proximal humeral fractures has the advantage of providing direct control over each fracture fragment and permitting anatomic reduction and fixation with advanced devices. Modern fixed-angle locking plates designed specifically for proximal humerus fractures have allowed the expansion of surgical indications permitting surgeons to address more complicated fractures. Advanced preoperative imaging and fluoroscopy allow a better understanding of fracture patterns and permit the surgeon to use this knowledge intraoperatively. Research is required to further validate fracture classification systems, to develop surgical guidelines for decision making, and to compare the outcomes of the various treatments options for proximal humerus fractures.

  5. Split biceps femoris tendon reconstruction for proximal tibiofibular joint instability.

    PubMed

    Mena, H; Brautigan, B; Johnson, D L

    2001-07-01

    Recurrent instability of the proximal tibiofibular joint is an infrequently diagnosed abnormality. We present a new technique for reconstructing the joint using a split biceps femoris tendon passed through a bone tunnel in both the proximal tibial metaphysis and fibular head. The case report is also presented. The procedure offers an anatomic reconstruction and firm stabilization. It allows normal motion of the proximal tibiofibular joint and preserves the normal mechanics of the ankle. This procedure is an excellent alternative to resection of the fibular head, transarticular arthrodesis, or pseudoarthrosis focus at the fibular head.

  6. Forewing asymmetries during auditory avoidance in flying locusts

    PubMed

    Dawson; Dawson-Scully; Robert; RobertsonÝ

    1997-01-01

    Flying locusts orient to sounds in their environment. Sounds similar to those produced by echolocating bats cause a flying locust to change its flight path. We used high-speed cinematography and videography to study changes in body posture and wing kinematics of tethered locusts in response to stimulation with bat-like sounds. Locusts showed both negative and positive phonotaxis to this stimulus. Within a few wingbeats of stimulus onset (between 126 and 226ms), locusts deflected their abdomens to one side, and the angle of the left and right forewings with respect to the dorsal­ventral body axis became asymmetrical during the downstroke. This forewing asymmetry, in which the forewing on the inside of the turn became more depressed, ranged from 20 to 45° (37±9.7°, mean ± s.d.) and was correlated with the direction and magnitude of abdomen deflection, a measure of steering in tethered, flying locusts. Hindwing stroke angle asymmetries were minimal or non-existent after stimulation. Coincident with changes in forewing asymmetry and abdomen deflection was a decrease in stroke amplitude (19±6.5°) of the forewing on the inside of the attempted turn. Motor patterns from forewing first basalar (M97) muscles showed an asymmetry in the timing of left and right depressor activation that ranged from 10.4 to 1.6ms (4.23±2.85ms). The number of spikes per depressor burst increased to a maximum of three spikes in the muscle on the inside of the attempted turn, and depressor frequency (wingbeat frequency) increased by approximately 2Hz (2.17±0.26Hz). We suggest that the asymmetry in forewing first basalar activity is causally related to the asymmetry in the timing of the initiation of the downstroke, resulting in an asymmetry in the ranges of the stroke angles of the forewings, which would impart a roll torque to the locust. This would augment the steering torques generated by concurrent changes in the angle of attack of the fore- and hindwings and changes in abdomen

  7. Communication Apprehension and Resting Alpha Range Asymmetry in the Anterior Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beatty, Michael J.; Heisel, Alan D.; Lewis, Robert J.; Pence, Michelle E.; Reinhart, Amber; Tian, Yan

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we examined the relationship between trait-like communication apprehension (CA) and resting alpha range asymmetry in the anterior cortex (AC). Although theory and research in cognitive neuroscience suggest that asymmetry in the AC constitutes a relatively stable, inborn, substrate of emotion, some studies indicate that asymmetry can…

  8. AN AZIMUTHAL ASYMMETRY IN THE LkHα 330 DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Isella, Andrea; Carpenter, John M.; Ricci, Luca; Pérez, Laura M.; Andrews, Sean; Rosenfeld, Katherine

    2013-09-20

    Theory predicts that giant planets and low mass stellar companions shape circumstellar disks by opening annular gaps in the gas and dust spatial distribution. For more than a decade it has been debated whether this is the dominant process that leads to the formation of transitional disks. In this paper, we present millimeter-wave interferometric observations of the transitional disk around the young intermediate mass star LkHα 330. These observations reveal a lopsided ring in the 1.3 mm dust thermal emission characterized by a radius of about 100 AU and an azimuthal intensity variation of a factor of two. By comparing the observations with a Gaussian parametric model, we find that the observed asymmetry is consistent with a circular arc, that extends azimuthally by about 90° and emits about 1/3 of the total continuum flux at 1.3 mm. Hydrodynamic simulations show that this structure is similar to the azimuthal asymmetries in the disk surface density that might be produced by the dynamical interaction with unseen low mass companions orbiting within 70 AU from the central star. We argue that such asymmetries might lead to azimuthal variations in the millimeter-wave dust opacity and in the dust temperature, which will also affect the millimeter-wave continuum emission. Alternative explanations for the observed asymmetry that do not require the presence of companions cannot be ruled out with the existing data. Further observations of both the dust and molecular gas emission are required to derive firm conclusions on the origin of the asymmetry observed in the LkHα 330 disk.

  9. Impact parameter dependent potentials and transverse single spin asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhalholy, Tareq

    Using the Eikonal approximation, we study single spin azimuthal asymmetry in elastic and in-elastic lepton-nucleon scattering for the case of transversely polarized nucleons with unpolarized lepton beam. We follow two different approaches to evaluate the asymmetry. In the first approach we utilize the convolution theory of Fourier transforms to express the nucleon potential that appears in the Coulomb phase formula in terms of the nucleon's Dirac and Pauli form factors in the nucleon current density for transversely polarized nucleons. In the second approach, we explicitly evaluate the potential due to transversely polarized nucleons in impact parameter space. The result shows that this potential is asymmetric about an axis normal to the transverse plane; a result that is consistent with the fact that the nucleon charge density (or the unpolarized impact parameter dependent parton distribution function) is transversely distorted for transverse nucleon polarization, which is not the case for longitudinal polarization of the nucleon. To further confirm this fact, we calculate the average transverse momentum experienced by the scattered electron. This quantity is zero considering scattering from a classical dipole moment while our results show a non-zero average transverse momentum even for scattering from a neutron; there we get a negative value for the average momentum, and a positive one (and larger in magnitude) for the case of a proton. The sign of the average transverse momentum is directly related to the sign of the single spin asymmetry, where it is negative in the case of a neutron target and positive for a proton. The expansion of the Eikonal amplitude reveals that the asymmetry is due to the interference of the one and two photon exchange Eikonal amplitudes. In both of the above mentioned approaches, we evaluate the one and two photon exchange amplitudes, from which the asymmetry is found for different parametrizations of the form factors.

  10. Light-operated proximity detector with linear output

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, M.L.; McNeilly, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    A light-operated proximity detector is described in which reflected light intensity from a surface whose proximity to the detector is to be gauged is translated directly into a signal proportional to the distance of the detector from the surface. A phototransistor is used to sense the reflected light and is connected in a detector circuit which maintains the phtotransistor in a saturated state. A negative feedback arrangement using an operational amplifier connected between the collector and emitter of the transistor provides an output at the output of the amplifier which is linearly proportional to the proximity of the surface to the detector containing the transistor. This direct proportional conversion is true even though the light intensity is varying with the proximity in proportion to the square of the inverse of the distance. The detector may be used for measuring the distance remotely from any target surface.

  11. Light-operated proximity detector with linear output

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Marc L.; McNeilly, David R.

    1985-01-01

    A light-operated proximity detector is described in which reflected light intensity from a surface whose proximity to the detector is to be gauged is translated directly into a signal proportional to the distance of the detector from the surface. A phototransistor is used to sense the reflected light and is connected in a detector circuit which maintains the phototransistor in a saturated state. A negative feedback arrangement using an operational amplifier connected between the collector and emitter of the transistor provides an output at the output of the amplifier which is linearly proportional to the proximity of the surface to the detector containing the transistor. This direct proportional conversion is true even though the light intensity is varying with the proximity in proportion to the square of the inverse of the distance. The detector may be used for measuring the distance remotely from any target surface.

  12. Proximity superconductivity in ballistic graphene at high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prance, J. R.; Ben Shalom, M.; Zhu, M. J.; Fal'Ko, V. I.; Mishchenko, A.; Kretinin, A. V.; Novoselov, K. S.; Woods, C. R.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Geim, A. K.

    We present measurements of the superconducting proximity effect in graphene-based Josephson junctions with a mean free path of several microns, which exceeds the junctions' length. The junctions exhibit low contact resistance and large supercurrents. We observe Fabry-Pérot oscillations in the normal-state resistance and the critical current of the junctions. The proximity effect is mostly suppressed in magnetic fields of <10 mT showing the conventional Fraunhofer interference pattern; however, unexpectedly, a weak proximity effect survives in magnetic fields as high as 1 T. Superconducting states randomly appear and disappear as a function of field and carrier concentration, and each exhibits a supercurrent carrying capacity close to the universal limit of e Δ/h where Δ is the superconducting gap of the contacts. We attribute the high-field supercurrent to mesoscopic Andreev states that persist near graphene edges. Our work reveals new proximity regimes that can be controlled by quantum confinement and cyclotron motion.

  13. Existence of best proximity pairs and equilibrium pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Won Kyu; Lee, Kyoung Hee

    2006-04-01

    In this paper, using the fixed point theorem for Kakutani factorizable multifunctions, we shall prove new existence theorems of best proximity pairs and equilibrium pairs for free abstract economies, which include the previous fixed point theorems and equilibrium existence theorems.

  14. Challenger's RMS arm grasps SPAS-01 during proximity operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Challenger's remote manipulator system (RMS) arm grasps Shuttle pallet satellite (SPAS-01) during proximity operations. The frame shows a number of reflections on the window, located overhead in the aft flight deck.

  15. Proportional proximity sensing for telerobots using Coherent Laser Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vazquez, Sixto L.; Goode, Plesent W.; Slotwinski, Anthony R.

    1992-01-01

    The ability of a telerobotic manipulator to operate in confined spaces while avoiding unwanted collisions is enhanced by the accurate sensing of its proximate environment. To achieve the fidelity required for precise manipulator control, a proportional proximity sensor system with a sufficiently large measurement envelope is required. Current proximity sensors provide a binary indication of the presence of obstacles within a small envelope with coarse or no proportional measurement of their location. A proportional proximity sensor system configured as a Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (FMCW) Coherent Laser Radar (CLR) using a semiconductor laser as the energy source is described and analyzed. The source and reflected energies mix coherently to generate a radio frequency (RF) signal whose frequency is proportional to the range. The system is tested for accuracy, range, depth of range, speed, and sensitivity and the results are presented. Techniques to derive orientation information and an application to telerobotic control are also described.

  16. 1. General view to southwest showing proximity of house to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. General view to southwest showing proximity of house to bridge and north elevation of house. - Locke Avenue Bridge, Bridge Tender's House, East side of Locke Avenue, 12 feet south of Locke Avenue Bridge, Swedesboro, Gloucester County, NJ

  17. View to northeast, showing west elevation and south side. Proximity ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View to northeast, showing west elevation and south side. Proximity of fence of adjacent subdivision precluded photography of north side. - Drew-Sherwood Farm, Barn, 7927 Elk Grove Boulevard, Elk Grove, Sacramento County, CA

  18. Evaluation and management of pediatric proximal humerus fractures.

    PubMed

    Popkin, Charles A; Levine, William N; Ahmad, Christopher S

    2015-02-01

    In the pediatric population, sports participation, falls, and motor vehicle accidents can result in proximal humerus fractures. Because the proximal humeral growth plate is responsible for up to 80% of the growth of the humerus, the remodeling of these fractures in children is tremendous. Most of these injuries can be treated with a sling or hanging arm cast, although older children with decreased remodeling capacity may require surgery. Special considerations should be taken for management of proximal humerus fractures that occur in the context of Little League shoulder, lesser tuerosity avulsion fractures, fracture-dislocations, birth fractures, and fractures associated with cysts. Most pediatric patients with proximal humerus fractures have favorable results, and complications are infrequent.

  19. Interracial Ratios and Proximity in Dormitories: Attitudes of University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Don C.

    1974-01-01

    A survey technique was used to investigate black and white undergraduate students' attitudes toward the minimum number of one's own race needed for comfort in dormitory residency and the relationship of proximity of one's race toward this number. (MLB)

  20. Analysis on the characteristics of pulsed laser proximity fuze's echo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kun; Chen, Huimin

    2011-06-01

    With the rapid development of semiconductor technology and laser technology, a kind of proximity fuze named pulsed laser proximity fuze has been applied. Compared with other fuzes, pulsed laser proximity fuze has high ranging precision and strong resistance to artificial active interference. It is an important development tendency of proximity fuze. The paper analyze the characteristic of target echo of laser signal, and then make theoretical analysis and calculation on the laser signal transmission in the smog. Firstly, use the pulse width of 10ns semiconductor laser fuze to do typical targets experiment, to get the echo information of target distance is 5m; then to do smog interference experiment, by comparing the pulse width amplitude and backscattering signal amplitude of laser fuze in simulation and experiment, analyzing the effect of anti-clutter, providing the evidence for the subsequent of circuit of signal amplification and processing.

  1. Proximal row carpectomy with or without postoperative immobilisation.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, R; Degreef, I; De Smet, L

    2008-12-01

    Previously published reports have shown good results after proximal row carpectomy in all cases that had a postoperative immobilisation period from 1 to 4 weeks. Immobilisation is thought to be necessary because of the risk of postoperative subluxation of the carpus and for pain relief. There is, however, no evidence of its value. The results in 13 patients who underwent proximal row carpectomy without postoperative immobilisation were compared with those in 25 patients who underwent proximal row carpectomy with postoperative immobilisation for 4 weeks. After a mean follow-up period of 27 months, no significant differences were found for pain, range of motion or return to work between the two groups. We conclude that postoperative immobilisation is not necessary after proximal row carpectomy.

  2. [Merle D'Aubigne's oblique proximal femoral osteotomy. Surgical technique].

    PubMed

    López Sosa, Francisco H; Valentín-Guerrero, Santiago; Miranda-López, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    Proximal femoral osteotomy with the technique described by Merle D'AubignC and Valliant was used in the treatment of adult patients with osteoarthritis or idiopathic avascular necrosis. Dr. Antonio Flores applied this technique to children with subluxation and acetabular dysplasia, identified with exaggerated anteversion and valgus of the proximal femur. He reported correction of the deformity in 75% of patients. The purpose of this paper is to describe the technique, its indications and complications.

  3. Four year Evaluation of Proximal Resin Infiltration in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Kuscu, Ozgur Onder; Hysi, Dorian

    2015-01-01

    Aim Resin infiltration of proximal lesions is a new approach to stopping caries progression. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate four-year efficacy of proximal infiltrates in adolescents. Materials and methods In ten adolescents, a total of 21 proximal infiltrates (ICON® (DMG, Germany) were applied to initial proximal lesions of permanent incisors and premolars according to the manufacturer’s instruction. The clinical quality of resin infiltration was assessed at 1 week, 1, 2, 3 and 4 years after the treatment and the evaluation of the therapeutic effect was analyzed by radiographs. Results Ten patients were followed up clinically for four years. The majority of the infiltrated lesions were located on permanent incisors. Teeth which were proximally infiltrated did not exhibit dental plaque and gingival bleeding in most cases. At annual recalls, plaque scores remained constant. The gingival status remained steady and no differences in tooth shape and contour were detected. Discoloration was detected in four teeth (19%) in 1st year recall and was constant at annual intervals. The radiographic evaluation of the bitewing radiographs showed no progression in 21 lesions (100%) from baseline to the 4-year recall. Overall oral hygiene of the patients was satisfactory. Conclusion In conclusion, proximal infiltration is an effective prophylactic measure in adolescents.

  4. Four year Evaluation of Proximal Resin Infiltration in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Kuscu, Ozgur Onder; Hysi, Dorian

    2015-01-01

    Aim Resin infiltration of proximal lesions is a new approach to stopping caries progression. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate four-year efficacy of proximal infiltrates in adolescents. Materials and methods In ten adolescents, a total of 21 proximal infiltrates (ICON® (DMG, Germany) were applied to initial proximal lesions of permanent incisors and premolars according to the manufacturer’s instruction. The clinical quality of resin infiltration was assessed at 1 week, 1, 2, 3 and 4 years after the treatment and the evaluation of the therapeutic effect was analyzed by radiographs. Results Ten patients were followed up clinically for four years. The majority of the infiltrated lesions were located on permanent incisors. Teeth which were proximally infiltrated did not exhibit dental plaque and gingival bleeding in most cases. At annual recalls, plaque scores remained constant. The gingival status remained steady and no differences in tooth shape and contour were detected. Discoloration was detected in four teeth (19%) in 1st year recall and was constant at annual intervals. The radiographic evaluation of the bitewing radiographs showed no progression in 21 lesions (100%) from baseline to the 4-year recall. Overall oral hygiene of the patients was satisfactory. Conclusion In conclusion, proximal infiltration is an effective prophylactic measure in adolescents. PMID:27688414

  5. Design and Clinical Application of Proximal Humerus Memory Connector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shuo-Gui; Zhang, Chun-Cai

    2011-02-01

    Treatment for comminuted proximal humerus fractures and nonunions are a substantial challenge for orthopedic surgeons. Plate and screw fixation does not provide enough stability to allow patients to begin functional exercises early after surgery. Using shape memory material nickel titanium alloy, we designed a new device for treating severe comminuted proximal humerus fractures that accommodates for the anatomical features of the proximal humerus. Twenty-two cases of comminuted fracture, malunion, and nonunion of the proximal humerus were treated with the proximal humeral memory connector (PHMC). No external fixation was needed after the operation and patients began active shoulder exercises an average of 8 days after the operation. Follow-up evaluation (mean 18.5 months) revealed that bone healing with lamellar bone formation occurred an average of 3.6 months after surgery for the fracture cases and 4.5 months after surgery for the nonunion cases. Average shoulder function was 88.5 according to the criteria of Michael Reese. PHMC is an effective new device to treat comminuted proximal humerus fractures and nonunions. The use of this device may reduce the need for shoulder joint arthroplasty.

  6. Psychological responses to the proximity of climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brügger, Adrian; Dessai, Suraje; Devine-Wright, Patrick; Morton, Thomas A.; Pidgeon, Nicholas F.

    2015-12-01

    A frequent suggestion to increase individuals' willingness to take action on climate change and to support relevant policies is to highlight its proximal consequences, that is, those that are close in space and time. But previous studies that have tested this proximizing approach have not revealed the expected positive effects on individual action and support for addressing climate change. We present three lines of psychological reasoning that provide compelling arguments as to why highlighting proximal impacts of climate change might not be as effective a way to increase individual mitigation and adaptation efforts as is often assumed. Our contextualization of the proximizing approach within established psychological research suggests that, depending on the particular theoretical perspective one takes on this issue, and on specific individual characteristics suggested by these perspectives, proximizing can bring about the intended positive effects, can have no (visible) effect or can even backfire. Thus, the effects of proximizing are much more complex than is commonly assumed. Revealing this complexity contributes to a refined theoretical understanding of the role that psychological distance plays in the context of climate change and opens up further avenues for future research and for interventions.

  7. Forensic and Anthropological Application of Body Asymmetry: A Comment on Gutnik et al. (2015).

    PubMed

    Krishan, Kewal; Kanchan, Tanuj

    2016-04-01

    The present communication describes the application of bilateral asymmetry in forensic casework and anthropological research. Bilateral asymmetry is normal in the human body. The body's asymmetry is attributable to genetic and environmental (evolutionary) reasons. Handedness is a factor related to bilateral asymmetry. Gutnik et al. (2015) supported previous research, showing that the dominant side of the body is stronger than the other side due to additional stress and strain, and thus has augmented musculature and increased mass. The note is intended to elaborate on the applications of body asymmetry in forensic and anthropological practice.

  8. A Cervical Hemi-Contusion Spinal Cord Injury Model for the Investigation of Novel Therapeutics Targeting Proximal and Distal Forelimb Functional Recovery.

    PubMed

    Mondello, Sarah E; Sunshine, Michael D; Fischedick, Amanda E; Moritz, Chet T; Horner, Philip J

    2015-12-15

    Cervical spinal cord contusion is the most common human spinal cord injury, yet few rodent models replicate the pathophysiological and functional sequela of this injury. Here, we modified an electromechanical injury device and characterized the behavioral and histological changes occurring in response to a lateralized C4 contusion injury in rats. A key feature of the model includes a non-injurious touch phase where the spinal cord surface is dimpled with a consistent starting force. Animals were either left intact as a control, received a non-injury-producing touch on the surface of the cord ("sham"), or received a 0.6 mm or a 0.8 mm displacement injury. Rats were then tested on the forelimb asymmetry use test, CatWalk, and the Irvine, Beatties, and Bresnahan (IBB) cereal manipulation task to assess proximal and distal upper limb function for 12 weeks. Injuries of moderate (0.6 mm) and large (0.8 mm) displacement showed consistent differences in forelimb asymmetry, metrics of the CatWalk, and sub-scores of the IBB. Overall findings indicated long lasting proximal and distal upper limb deficits following 0.8 mm injury but transient proximal with prolonged distal limb deficits following 0.6 mm injury. Significant differences in loss of ipsilateral unmyelinated and myelinated white matter was detected between injury severities. Demyelination was primarily localized to the dorsolateral region of the hemicord and extended further rostral following 0.8 mm injury. These findings establish the C4 hemi-contusion injury as a consistent, graded model for testing novel treatments targeting forelimb functional recovery.

  9. High-angle-of-attack yawing moment asymmetry of the X-31 aircraft from flight test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobleigh, Brent R.

    1994-01-01

    Significant yawing moment asymmetries were encountered during the high-angle-of-attack envelope expansion of the two X-31 aircraft. These asymmetries led to position saturations of the thrust vector vanes and trailing-edge flaps during some of the dynamic stability axis rolling maneuvers at high angles of attack. This slowed the high-angle-of-attack envelope expansion and resulted in maneuver restrictions. Several aerodynamic modifications were made to the X-31 forebody with the goal of minimizing the asymmetry. A method for determining the yawing moment asymmetry from flight data was developed and an analysis of the various configuration changes completed. The baseline aircraft were found to have significant asymmetries above 45 deg angle of attack with the largest asymmetry typically occurring around 60 deg angle of attack. Applying symmetrical boundary layer transition strips along the forebody sides increased the magnitude of the asymmetry and widened the angle-of-attack range over which the largest asymmetry acted. Installing longitudinal forebody strakes and rounding the sharp nose of the aircraft caused the yawing moment asymmetry magnitude to be reduced. The transition strips and strakes made the asymmetry characteristic of the aircraft more repeatable than the clean forebody configuration. Although no geometric differences between the aircraft were known, ship 2 consistently had larger yawing moment asymmetries than ship 1.

  10. Hemispheric asymmetries of functional connectivity and grey matter volume in the default mode network.

    PubMed

    Saenger, Victor M; Barrios, Fernando A; Martínez-Gudiño, María L; Alcauter, Sarael

    2012-06-01

    Resting state networks such as the default mode network have been widely reported. Although a plethora of information on its functional relevance has been generated, little is known about lateralization or hemisphere asymmetry within the DMN. We used high-resolution resting state fMRI and T1 3D data to investigate such asymmetries in two groups of healthy subjects, one right-handed and one left-handed. Independent component analysis and the dual regression approach were carried out to identify functional asymmetries, while voxel-based morphometry was used to identify structural asymmetries in grey matter volume within the DMN. Greater leftward functional connectivity was observed in the posterior cingulate gyrus (PCG) for both groups. Leftward functional asymmetry was observed in the thalamus and rightward functional asymmetries were observed in the middle frontal and middle/superior temporal gyrus in the right-handed group. Rightward asymmetries in grey matter volume were observed in the posterior portion of the PCG for both groups. The right-handed group exhibited leftward structural asymmetries in the anterior portion of the PCG and in the middle frontal and posterior portion of the middle temporal gyrus, while rightward asymmetries were observed in the posterior portion of the PCG and anterior portions of temporal regions. These results suggest that functional connectivity and grey matter volume are not equally distributed between hemispheres within the DMN, and that functional asymmetries are not always reflected or determined by structural asymmetries.

  11. Ejecta emplacement: from distal to proximal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemieva, N.

    2008-09-01

    Introduction Most part of impact ejecta is deposited ballistically at some distance from a crater, defined by ejection velocity V and ejection angle α: d=v2sinα/g. In case of giant impacts, planetary curvature should be taken into account [1]. Combined with ejecta scaling [2], these relations allow to define ejecta thickness as a function of distance. Ejecta from large craters are deposited at velocity high enough to mobilize substrate material and to thicken ejecta deposits [3]. Ballistic approximation is valid for airless bodies (if impact vaporization is not vast) or for proximal ejecta of large impact craters, where ejecta mass per unit area is substantially greater than the mass of involved vapor/atmosphere (M-ratio). Deposition of distal ejecta, in which ejecta mass is negligible compared to the atmosphere, may be also treated in a simplified manner, i.e. as 1) passive motion of ejected particles within an impact plume and 2) later, as sedimentation of particles in undisturbed atmosphere (equilibrium between gravity and drag). In all intermediate M-ratio values, impact ejecta move like a surge, i.e. dilute suspension current in which particles are carried in turbulent flows under the influence of gravity. Surges are well-known for near-surface explosive tests, described in detail for volcanic explosions (Plinian column collapse, phreato-magmatic eruption, lateral blast), and found in ejecta from the Chicxulub [4] and the Ries [5]. Important aspects of surge transport include its ability to deposit ejecta over a larger area than that typical of continuous ballistic ejecta and to create multiple ejecta layers. Numerical model Two-phase hydrodynamics. Surges should be modeled in the frame of two-phase hydrodynamics, i.e. interaction between solid/molten particles and atmospheric gas/impact vapor should be taken into account. There are two techniques of solving equations for dust particle motion in a gas flow. The first one describes solid/molten particles as a

  12. Damage asymmetry from hydro-geomorphic signals along the trifurcation area of the San- Jacinto Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wechsler, N.; Rockwell, T. K.; Ben-Zion, Y.

    2007-12-01

    An important earthquake research topic is the question of whether there are geological controls on rupture propagation direction. A persistent preferred propagation direction should produce asymmetric damage structure that is recorded in the volume of rock surrounding a fault, and there may be geomorphic manifestations on active faults that can be recognized and analyzed in a quantitative fashion. The San-Jacinto Fault (SJF) is one of the most active faults in southern California, with well expressed geomorphology, a fast geologic slip rate, and a strong GPS strain signal. We use standard morphometric analysis to detect the damage asymmetry across a part of the SJF in the trifurcation area where the Clark, Coyote-Creek and Buck-Ridge segments meet. The analysis is done at two scales: 1. Small scale DEM with 30m per pixel resolution derived from SRTM data. 2. Large scale DEM with 1m per pixel resolution derived from LIDAR data, covering the fault at ~1 km width. The geomorphic analysis is done using the GIS software ArcMap and the TauDEM tool box. We compare several morphometric parameters (drainage density, stream frequency, texture ratio, bifurcation ratio, ruggedness number, hypsometric integral) for drainages on both sides of the fault. North of the trifurcation point, the north-east side of the fault is more damaged, in agreement with Dor el at (2006) and Lewis et al (2005), but south of the trifurcation the situation is reversed. A number of factors can affect the results of the morphometric analysis, including the proximity of several fault strands, a restraining bend on the main strand, and different lithologies on the two sides of the fault. The current results are not conclusive since the morphometric analysis depends on various additional factors, such as different slopes, rates of erosion, vegetation, etc., that were only partially accounted for. Nevertheless, these preliminary results on reversed damage asymmetry suggest that large earthquakes on the

  13. Measurement of parity-violating asymmetry in electron-deuteron inelastic scattering

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, D.; Pan, K.; Subedi, R.; Ahmed, Z.; Allada, K.; Aniol, K. A.; Armstrong, D. S.; Arrington, J.; Bellini, V.; Beminiwattha, R.; et al

    2015-04-01

    The parity-violating asymmetries between a longitudinally-polarized electron beam and an unpolarized deuterium target have been measured recently. The measurement covered two kinematic points in the deep inelastic scattering region and five in the nucleon resonance region. We provide here details of the experimental setup, data analysis, and results on all asymmetry measurements including parity-violating electron asymmetries and those of inclusive pion production and beam-normal asymmetries. The parity-violating deep-inelastic asymmetries were used to extract the electron-quark weak effective couplings, and the resonance asymmetries provided the first evidence for quark-hadron duality in electroweak observables. These electron asymmetries and their interpretation were publishedmore » earlier, but are presented here in more detail.« less

  14. Measurement of parity-violating asymmetry in electron-deuteron inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, D.; Pan, K.; Subedi, R.; Ahmed, Z.; Allada, K.; Aniol, K. A.; Armstrong, D. S.; Arrington, J.; Bellini, V.; Beminiwattha, R.; Benesch, J.; Benmokhtar, F.; Bertozzi, W.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, J.-P.; Chudakov, E.; Cisbani, E.; Dalton, M. M.; de Jager, C. W.; De Leo, R.; Deconinck, W.; Deng, X.; Deur, A.; Dutta, C.; Fassi, L. El; Erler, J.; Flay, D.; Franklin, G. B.; Friend, M.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Gilad, S.; Giusa, A.; Glamazdin, A.; Golge, S.; Grimm, K.; Hafidi, K.; Hansen, J.-O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmes, R.; Holmstrom, T.; Holt, R. J.; Huang, J.; Hyde, C. E.; Jen, C. M.; Jones, D.; Kang, Hoyoung; King, P. M.; Kowalski, S.; Kumar, K. S.; Lee, J. H.; LeRose, J. J.; Liyanage, N.; Long, E.; McNulty, D.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Meddi, F.; Meekins, D. G.; Mercado, L.; Meziani, Z.-E.; Michaels, R.; Mihovilovic, M.; Muangma, N.; Mesick, K. E.; Nanda, S.; Narayan, A.; Nelyubin, V.; Nuruzzaman, none; Oh, Y.; Parno, D.; Paschke, K. D.; Phillips, S. K.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Quinn, B.; Rakhman, A.; Reimer, P. E.; Rider, K.; Riordan, S.; Roche, J.; Rubin, J.; Russo, G.; Saenboonruang, K.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Shahinyan, A.; Silwal, R.; Sirca, S.; Souder, P. A.; Suleiman, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Sutera, C. M.; Tobias, W. A.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Waidyawansa, B.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Ye, L.; Zhao, B.; Zheng, X.

    2015-04-01

    The parity-violating asymmetries between a longitudinally-polarized electron beam and an unpolarized deuterium target have been measured recently. The measurement covered two kinematic points in the deep inelastic scattering region and five in the nucleon resonance region. We provide here details of the experimental setup, data analysis, and results on all asymmetry measurements including parity-violating electron asymmetries and those of inclusive pion production and beam-normal asymmetries. The parity-violating deep-inelastic asymmetries were used to extract the electron-quark weak effective couplings, and the resonance asymmetries provided the first evidence for quark-hadron duality in electroweak observables. These electron asymmetries and their interpretation were published earlier, but are presented here in more detail.

  15. Bottom-quark forward-backward asymmetry in the standard model and beyond.

    PubMed

    Grinstein, Benjamín; Murphy, Christopher W

    2013-08-01

    We computed the bottom-quark forward-backward asymmetry at the Tevatron in the standard model (SM) and for several new physics scenarios. Near the Z pole, the SM bottom asymmetry is dominated by tree level exchanges of electroweak gauge bosons. While above the Z pole, next-to-leading order QCD dominates the SM asymmetry as was the case with the top-quark forward-backward asymmetry. Light new physics, M(NP)≲150  GeV, can cause significant deviations from the SM prediction for the bottom asymmetry. The bottom asymmetry can be used to distinguish between competing new physics (NP) explanations of the top asymmetry based on how the NP interferes with s-channel gluon and Z exchange.

  16. Mapping the Stability of Human Brain Asymmetry across Five Sex-Chromosome Aneuploidies

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Amy; Clasen, Liv; Lee, Nancy Raitano; Wallace, Gregory L.; Lalonde, Francois; Blumenthal, Jonathan; Giedd, Jay N.

    2015-01-01

    The human brain displays stereotyped and early emerging patterns of cortical asymmetry in health. It is unclear if these asymmetries are highly sensitive to genetic and environmental variation or fundamental features of the brain that can survive severe developmental perturbations. To address this question, we mapped cortical thickness (CT) asymmetry in a group of genetically defined disorders known to impact CT development. Participants included 137 youth with one of five sex-chromosome aneuploidies [SCAs; XXX (n = 28), XXY (n = 58), XYY (n = 26), XXYY (n = 20), and XXXXY (n = 5)], and 169 age-matched typically developing controls (80 female). In controls, we replicated previously reported rightward inferior frontal and leftward lateral parietal CT asymmetry. These opposing frontoparietal CT asymmetries were broadly preserved in all five SCA groups. However, we also detected foci of shifting CT asymmetry with aneuploidy, which fell almost exclusively within regions of significant CT asymmetry in controls. Specifically, X-chromosome aneuploidy accentuated normative rightward inferior frontal asymmetries, while Y-chromosome aneuploidy reversed normative rightward medial prefrontal and lateral temporal asymmetries. These findings indicate that (1) the stereotyped normative pattern of opposing frontoparietal CT asymmetry arises from developmental mechanisms that can withstand gross chromosomal aneuploidy and (2) X and Y chromosomes can exert focal, nonoverlapping and directionally opposed influences on CT asymmetry within cortical regions of significant asymmetry in health. Our study attests to the resilience of developmental mechanisms that support the global patterning of CT asymmetry in humans, and motivates future research into the molecular bases and functional consequences of sex chromosome dosage effects on CT asymmetry. PMID:25568109

  17. Mapping the stability of human brain asymmetry across five sex-chromosome aneuploidies.

    PubMed

    Lin, Amy; Clasen, Liv; Lee, Nancy Raitano; Wallace, Gregory L; Lalonde, Francois; Blumenthal, Jonathan; Giedd, Jay N; Raznahan, Armin

    2015-01-01

    The human brain displays stereotyped and early emerging patterns of cortical asymmetry in health. It is unclear if these asymmetries are highly sensitive to genetic and environmental variation or fundamental features of the brain that can survive severe developmental perturbations. To address this question, we mapped cortical thickness (CT) asymmetry in a group of genetically defined disorders known to impact CT development. Participants included 137 youth with one of five sex-chromosome aneuploidies [SCAs; XXX (n = 28), XXY (n = 58), XYY (n = 26), XXYY (n = 20), and XXXXY (n = 5)], and 169 age-matched typically developing controls (80 female). In controls, we replicated previously reported rightward inferior frontal and leftward lateral parietal CT asymmetry. These opposing frontoparietal CT asymmetries were broadly preserved in all five SCA groups. However, we also detected foci of shifting CT asymmetry with aneuploidy, which fell almost exclusively within regions of significant CT asymmetry in controls. Specifically, X-chromosome aneuploidy accentuated normative rightward inferior frontal asymmetries, while Y-chromosome aneuploidy reversed normative rightward medial prefrontal and lateral temporal asymmetries. These findings indicate that (1) the stereotyped normative pattern of opposing frontoparietal CT asymmetry arises from developmental mechanisms that can withstand gross chromosomal aneuploidy and (2) X and Y chromosomes can exert focal, nonoverlapping and directionally opposed influences on CT asymmetry within cortical regions of significant asymmetry in health. Our study attests to the resilience of developmental mechanisms that support the global patterning of CT asymmetry in humans, and motivates future research into the molecular bases and functional consequences of sex chromosome dosage effects on CT asymmetry.

  18. Induced spectral gap and pairing correlations from superconducting proximity effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Ching-Kai; Cole, William S.; Das Sarma, S.

    2016-09-01

    We theoretically consider superconducting proximity effect, using the Bogoliubov-de Gennes (BdG) theory, in heterostructure sandwich-type geometries involving a normal s -wave superconductor and a nonsuperconducting material with the proximity effect being driven by Cooper pairs tunneling from the superconducting slab to the nonsuperconducting slab. Applications of the superconducting proximity effect may rely on an induced spectral gap or induced pairing correlations without any spectral gap. We clarify that in a nonsuperconducting material the induced spectral gap and pairing correlations are independent physical quantities arising from the proximity effect. This is a crucial issue in proposals to create topological superconductivity through the proximity effect. Heterostructures of three-dimensional topological insulator (TI) slabs on conventional s -wave superconductor (SC) substrates provide a platform, with proximity-induced topological superconductivity expected to be observed on the "naked" top surface of a thin TI slab. We theoretically study the induced superconducting gap on this naked surface. In addition, we compare against the induced spectral gap in heterostructures of SC with a normal metal or a semiconductor with strong spin-orbit coupling and a Zeeman splitting potential (another promising platform for topological superconductivity). We find that for any model for the non-SC metal (including metallic TI) the induced spectral gap on the naked surface decays as L-3 as the thickness (L ) of the non-SC slab is increased in contrast to the slower 1 /L decay of the pairing correlations. Our distinction between proximity-induced spectral gap (with its faster spatial decay) and pairing correlation (with its slower spatial decay) has important implications for the currently active search for topological superconductivity and Majorana fermions in various superconducting heterostructures.

  19. Anthropometry of love: height and gender asymmetries in interethnic marriages.

    PubMed

    Belot, Michèle; Fidrmuc, Jan

    2010-12-01

    Both in the UK and in the US, we observe puzzling gender asymmetries in the propensity to outmarry: Black men are more likely to have white spouses than Black women, but the opposite is true for Chinese: Chinese men are half less likely to be married to a White person than Chinese women. We argue that differences in height distributions, combined with a simple preference for the husband to be taller than the wife, can help explain these ethnic-specific gender asymmetries. Blacks are taller than Asians, and we argue that this significantly affects their marriage prospects with whites. We provide empirical support for this hypothesis using data from the Millennium Cohort Study. Specifically, we find that ethnic differences in propensity to intermarry with Whites shrink when we control for the proportion of suitable partners with respect to height.

  20. Measurement of CP asymmetries and polarisation fractions in decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Belogurov, S.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casanova Mohr, R.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gastaldi, U.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Geraci, A.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lowdon, P.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A.-B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Sterpka, F.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viana Barbosa, J. V.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilschut, H. W.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.

    2015-07-01

    An angular analysis of the decay is performed using pp collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1 .0 fb-1 collected by the LHCb experiment at a centre-of-mass energy TeV. A combined angular and mass analysis separates six helicity amplitudes and allows the measurement of the longitudinal polarisation fraction f L = 0 .201 ± 0 .057 (stat .) ± 0 .040 (syst .) for the decay. A large scalar contribution from the K {0/∗}(1430) and K {0/∗}(800) resonances is found, allowing the determination of additional CP asymmetries. Triple product and direct CP asymmetries are determined to be compatible with the Standard Model expectations. The branching fraction is measured to be (10 .8 ± 2 .1 (stat .) ± 1 .4 (syst .) ± 0 .6 ( f d /f s )) × 10-6. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Dynamics of the Disruption Halo Current Toroidal Asymmetry in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    S.P. Gerhardt

    2012-09-27

    This paper describes the dynamics of disruption halo current non-axisymmetries in the lower divertor of the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono, et al. Nuclear Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. While. The halo currents typically have a strongly asymmetric structure where they enter the divertor floor, and this asymmetry has been observed to complete up to 7 toroidal revolutions over the duration of the halo current pulse. However, the rotation speed and toroidal extend of the asymmetry can vary significantly during the pulse. The rotation speed, halo current pulse duration, and total number of revolutions tend to be smaller in cases with large halo currents. The halo current pattern is observed to become toroidally symmetric at the end of the halo current pulse. It is proposed that this symmeterization is due to the loss of most or all of the closed field line geometry in the final phase of the vertical displacement event.

  2. Asymmetries in the cerebral dimensions and fissures of the dog.

    PubMed

    Tan, U; Calişkan, S

    1987-02-01

    The surface dimensions and fissures of the right and left cerebral hemispheres were compared in dogs. The right hemisphere was significantly larger in length and height than the left hemisphere; there was no significant difference in the width of the right and left hemispheres. The mean length of the cruciate sulcus did not significantly differ on the right and left sides except individual for asymmetries. The difference in the mean length of the right and left Sylvian fissures was not significant, but the right Sylvian fissure was significantly lower than the left. The base of the right planum temporale tended to be larger than the left. These anatomical asymmetries did not correlate with paw preference. The data are consistent with notion that asymmetrical patterns cannot be a distinctive feature of the human brain.

  3. Parameterization of asymmetry in magnetoacoustic emission by numerical processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birt, E. A.; Yost, W. T.; Denale, R.; Grainger, J. L.

    1992-01-01

    Two methods for processing the digitized waveform data obtained from magnetoacoustic emission measurements on a high-strength steel are investigated. Two different techniques to obtain an asymmetry parameter are presented. It is shown that the variation in this asymmetry parameter from five embrittled samples and one unembrittled steel sample can be related to the impact toughness and is not dependent on the magnetic field strength. This technique is nondestructive and is shown to determine the normalized impact toughness of a high-strength steel to better than 14 percent in the decade of interest. A comparison of a magnetoacoustic emission burst and pickup coil output from an unembrittled steel sample and an embrittled sample is illustrated.

  4. Faculae and east-west asymmetry of sunspot area.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, C.; Haurwitz, M. W.

    1972-01-01

    Asymmetry of sunspot area with respect to the central meridian is found to depend strongly on the location of the spot group in its chromospheric facula or plage. The usual area excess for spots in the eastern half of the disk is reversed for the relatively rare spot groups situated in the following part of the plage. Qualitatively, the observed asymmetries can be explained by supposing that the apparent area of the spot is decreased by overlying bright facula, especially west of central meridian where the spot (in the usual preceding position) is viewed through the relatively bright and extensive follower part of the plage. Since both facula and spot effects are seen along the same line of sight, optical depth must change slowly with geometric depth, that is, in the active region the atmosphere is relatively transparent.

  5. Merlin/ERM proteins establish cortical asymmetry and centrosome position

    PubMed Central

    Hebert, Alan M.; DuBoff, Brian; Casaletto, Jessica B.; Gladden, Andrew B.; McClatchey, Andrea I.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to generate asymmetry at the cell cortex underlies cell polarization and asymmetric cell division. Here we demonstrate a novel role for the tumor suppressor Merlin and closely related ERM proteins (Ezrin, Radixin, and Moesin) in generating cortical asymmetry in the absence of external cues. Our data reveal that Merlin functions to restrict the cortical distribution of the actin regulator Ezrin, which in turn positions the interphase centrosome in single epithelial cells and three-dimensional organotypic cultures. In the absence of Merlin, ectopic cortical Ezrin yields mispositioned centrosomes, misoriented spindles, and aberrant epithelial architecture. Furthermore, in tumor cells with centrosome amplification, the failure to restrict cortical Ezrin abolishes centrosome clustering, yielding multipolar mitoses. These data uncover fundamental roles for Merlin/ERM proteins in spatiotemporally organizing the cell cortex and suggest that Merlin's role in restricting cortical Ezrin may contribute to tumorigenesis by disrupting cell polarity, spindle orientation, and, potentially, genome stability. PMID:23249734

  6. Cold fission description with constant and varying mass asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, S. B.; Rodríguez, O.; Tavares, O. A. P.; Gonçalves, M.; García, F.; Guzmán, F.

    1998-05-01

    Different descriptions for varying the mass asymmetry in the fragmentation process are used to calculate the cold fission barrier penetrability. The relevance of the appropriate choice for both the description of the prescission phase and inertia coefficient to unify alpha decay, cluster radioactivity, and spontaneous cold fission processes in the same theoretical framework is explicitly shown. We calculate the half-life of all possible partition modes of nuclei of A>200 following the most recent Mass Table by Audi and Wapstra. It is shown that if one uses the description in which the mass asymmetry is maintained constant during the fragmentation process, the experimental half-life values and mass yield of 234U cold fission are satisfactorily reproduced.

  7. Asymmetry and irregularity border as discrimination factor between melanocytic lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sbrissa, David; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Salvio, Ana Gabriela; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvadori; Costa, Luciano Da Fontoura; Travieso, Gonzalo

    2015-06-01

    Image processing tools have been widely used in systems supporting medical diagnosis. The use of mobile devices for the diagnosis of melanoma can assist doctors and improve their diagnosis of a melanocytic lesion. This study proposes a method of image analysis for melanoma discrimination from other types of melanocytic lesions, such as regular and atypical nevi. The process is based on extracting features related with asymmetry and border irregularity. It were collected 104 images, from medical database of two years. The images were obtained with standard digital cameras without lighting and scale control. Metrics relating to the characteristics of shape, asymmetry and curvature of the contour were extracted from segmented images. Linear Discriminant Analysis was performed for dimensionality reduction and data visualization. Segmentation results showed good efficiency in the process, with approximately 88:5% accuracy. Validation results presents sensibility and specificity 85% and 70% for melanoma detection, respectively.

  8. Longitudinal target-spin asymmetries for deeply virtual Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Seder, E.; Biselli, A.; Pisano, S.; Niccolai, S.; Smith, G. D.; Joo, K.; Adhikari, K.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bono, J.; Boiarinov, S.; Bosted, P.; Briscoe, W.; Brock, J.; Brooks, W. K.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Carlin, C.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crabb, D.; Crede, V.; D’Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Fradi, A.; Garillon, B.; Garçon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hirlinger Saylor, N.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jo, H. S.; Joosten, S.; Keith, C. D.; Keller, D.; Khachatryan, G.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meekins, D. G.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R.; Moody, C. I.; Moutarde, H.; Movsisyan, A.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Phelps, W.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Senderovich, I.; Simonyan, A.; Skorodumina, I.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Tian, Y.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zonta, I.

    2015-01-22

    A measurement of the electroproduction of photons off protons in the deeply inelastic regime was performed at Jefferson Lab using a nearly 6-GeV electron beam, a longitudinally polarized proton target and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Target-spin asymmetries for ep → e'p'y events, which arise from the interference of the deeply virtual Compton scattering and the Bethe-Heitler processes, were extracted over the widest kinematics in Q2, xB, t and Φ, for 166 four-dimensional bins. In the framework of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs), at leading twist the t dependence of these asymmetries provides insight on the spatial distribution of the axial charge of the proton, which appears to be concentrated in its center. In conclusion, these results bring important and necessary constraints for the existing parametrizations of chiral-even GPDs.

  9. Molecular and functional asymmetry at a vertebrate electrical synapse

    PubMed Central

    Rash, John R.; Curti, Sebastian; Vanderpool, Kimberly G. V.; Kamasawa, Naomi; Nannapaneni, Srikant; Palacios-Prado, Nicolas; Flores, Carmen E.; Yasumura, Thomas; O’Brien, John; Lynn, Bruce D.; Bukauskas, Feliksas; Nagy, James I.; Pereda, Alberto E.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Electrical synapses are abundant in the vertebrate brain, but their functional and molecular complexity are still poorly understood. We report here that electrical synapses between auditory afferents and goldfish Mauthner cells are constructed by apposition of hemichannels formed by two homologs of mammalian connexin36 (Cx36), and that while Cx35 is restricted to presynaptic hemiplaques, Cx34.7 is restricted to postsynaptic hemiplaques, forming heterotypic junctions. This molecular asymmetry is associated with rectification of electrical transmission that may act to promote cooperativity between auditory afferents. Our data suggest that in similarity to pre- and postsynaptic sites at chemical synapses, one side in electrical synapses should not necessarily be considered the mirror image of the other. While asymmetry based on the presence of two Cx36 homologs is restricted to teleost fish, it might also be based on differences in posttranslational modifications of individual connexins or in the complement of gap junction-associated proteins. PMID:24012008

  10. W-charge asymmetry at CDF, tests of structure functions

    SciTech Connect

    Budd, H.S.

    1994-09-01

    The charge asymmetry of W-bosons produced in p{bar p} collisions has been measured using 19,039 W {yields} e{nu} and W {yields} {mu}{nu} decays recorded by the CDF detector during the 1992-93 Tevatron collider run. The asymmetry is sensitive to the slope of the proton`s d/u quark distribution ratio down to x < 0.01 at Q{sup 2} {approx} M{sub W}{sup 2}, where nonperturbative QCD effects are minimal. Of recent parton distribution functions, those of Martin, Roberts and Stirling are favored over those of the CTEQ collaboration. This difference is seen even though both sets agree, at the level of the nuclear shadowing corrections, with the recent NMC measurements of F{sub 2}{sup {mu}n}/F{sub 2}{sup {mu}p}.

  11. W-charge asymmetry at CDF, tests of structure functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budd, H. S.

    1994-09-01

    The charge asymmetry of W-bosons produced in p(bar p) collisions has been measured using 19,039 W (yields) e(nu) and W (yields) (mu)(nu) decays recorded by the CDF detector during the 1992-93 Tevatron collider run. The asymmetry is sensitive to the slope of the proton's d/u quark distribution ratio down to x less than 0.01 at Q(sup 2) (approx) M(sub W, sup 2), where nonperturbative QCD effects are minimal. Of recent parton distribution functions, those of Martin, Roberts and Stirling are favored over those of the CTEQ collaboration. This difference is seen even though both sets agree, at the level of the nuclear shadowing corrections, with the recent NMC measurements of F(sub 2, sup (mu)n)/F(sub 2, sup (mu)p).

  12. Parton Charge Symmetry Violation: Electromagnetic Effects and W Production Asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    J.T. Londergan; D.P. Murdock; A.W. Thomas

    2006-04-14

    Recent phenomenological work has examined two different ways of including charge symmetry violation in parton distribution functions. First, a global phenomenological fit to high energy data has included charge symmetry breaking terms, leading to limits on the magnitude of parton charge symmetry breaking. In a second approach, two groups have included the coupling of partons to photons in the QCD evolution equations. One possible experiment that could search for isospin violation in parton distributions is a measurement of the asymmetry in W production at a collider. In this work we include both of the postulated sources of parton charge symmetry violation. We show that, given charge symmetry violation of a magnitude consistent with existing high energy data, the expected W production asymmetries would be quite small, generally less than one percent.

  13. LONGITUDINAL GLUON POLARIZATION IN RHIC DOUBLE-SPIN ASYMMETRIES.

    SciTech Connect

    JAGER,B.; STRATMANN,M.; KRETZER,S.; VOGELSANG,W.

    2004-04-14

    The longitudinally polarized gluon density is probed sensitively in hard collisions of polarized protons under the condition that the dominant dynamics are perturbative and of leading twist origin. First data have recently been presented by PHENIX on the double-spin asymmetry A{sub LL}{sup {pi}} for {pi}{sup 0} production at moderate transverse momentum p {perpendicular} {approx_equal} 1 {divided_by} 4 GeV and central rapidity. By means of a systematic investigation of the relevant degrees of freedom we show that the perturbative QCD framework at leading power in p{perpendicular} produces an asymmetry that is basically positive definite in this kinematic range, i.e. A{sub LL}{sup {pi}} {approx}> {Omicron}(-10{sup -3}).

  14. Photoresponse asymmetry of CdZnTe crystals

    SciTech Connect

    But, A. V. Mygal, V. P.; Phomin, A. S.

    2011-02-15

    It is shown that transformation of photoelectric characteristics of sensors based on Cd{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te (x = 0.05-0.15) crystals into parametric spectral I({lambda})-dI/d{lambda}, kinetic I(t)-dI/dt, and dynamic U-I({Delta}y){sub f,{lambda}} signatures (I({lambda}) is the photocurrent, U is the voltage, f is the frequency, t is the time, and y is the coordinate) makes it possible to reveal integrative photoresponse features caused by the photoresponse asymmetry and nonlinearity. Indices of asymmetry and balance of dynamic and energy photoinduced states are suggested; these indices represent systematically the effect of multiscale fields on photoelectronic processes. Using these indices, the ranges of external effects at which systematic features of photoresponse of sensors are minimal or maximal are determined, which makes it possible to increase the efficiency of purposeful selection and treatment of sensors.

  15. CMB dipole asymmetry from a fast roll phase

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumdar, Anupam; Wang, Lingfei

    2013-10-01

    The observed CMB (cosmic microwave background) dipole asymmetry cannot be explained by a single field model of inflation - it inevitably requires more than one field where one of the fields is responsible for amplifying the super-Hubble fluctuations beyond the pivot scale. Furthermore the current constraints on f{sub NL} and τ{sub NL} require that such an amplification cannot produce large non-Gaussianity. In this paper we propose a model to explain this dipole asymmetry from a spectator field, which is responsible for generating all the curvature perturbations, but has a temporary fast roll phase before the Hubble exit of the pivot scale. The current data prefers spectator scenario because it leaves no isocurvature perturbations. The spectator model will also satisfy the well-known constraints arising from quasars, and the quadrupole and octupole of the CMB.

  16. Fluctuating asymmetry and parasitism in six New Zealand insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Darren F.; Thomas, Frédéric; Poulin, Robert

    1998-10-01

    Positive associations between parasitic infections and developmental instability are often reported in the literature. In some cases, developmentally unstable individuals are of lower genetic quality and more prone to infection, whereas in other cases, parasites appear to directly cause developmental instability. We determined whether parasitism correlated with fluctuating asymmetry in femur length, a measure of developmental instability, in two species of cockroaches harbouring benign nematodes, and four species of grasshoppers infected with harmful gregarine protozoans. We found no evidence that the more asymmetrical individuals were more heavily parasitized, in either of the six insect species. These results provide several exceptions to the pattern generally reported in the recent literature, and suggest that, at least among insects, fluctuating asymmetry and parasitism are not always associated.

  17. Anthropometry of love: height and gender asymmetries in interethnic marriages.

    PubMed

    Belot, Michèle; Fidrmuc, Jan

    2010-12-01

    Both in the UK and in the US, we observe puzzling gender asymmetries in the propensity to outmarry: Black men are more likely to have white spouses than Black women, but the opposite is true for Chinese: Chinese men are half less likely to be married to a White person than Chinese women. We argue that differences in height distributions, combined with a simple preference for the husband to be taller than the wife, can help explain these ethnic-specific gender asymmetries. Blacks are taller than Asians, and we argue that this significantly affects their marriage prospects with whites. We provide empirical support for this hypothesis using data from the Millennium Cohort Study. Specifically, we find that ethnic differences in propensity to intermarry with Whites shrink when we control for the proportion of suitable partners with respect to height. PMID:21036112

  18. Longitudinal target-spin asymmetries for deeply virtual Compton scattering

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Seder, E.; Biselli, A.; Pisano, S.; Niccolai, S.; Smith, G. D.; Joo, K.; Adhikari, K.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; et al

    2015-01-22

    A measurement of the electroproduction of photons off protons in the deeply inelastic regime was performed at Jefferson Lab using a nearly 6-GeV electron beam, a longitudinally polarized proton target and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Target-spin asymmetries for ep → e'p'y events, which arise from the interference of the deeply virtual Compton scattering and the Bethe-Heitler processes, were extracted over the widest kinematics in Q2, xB, t and Φ, for 166 four-dimensional bins. In the framework of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs), at leading twist the t dependence of these asymmetries provides insight on the spatial distribution of the axialmore » charge of the proton, which appears to be concentrated in its center. In conclusion, these results bring important and necessary constraints for the existing parametrizations of chiral-even GPDs.« less

  19. Background check for anomalous like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Gronau, Michael; Rosner, Jonathan L.

    2010-10-01

    The D0 Collaboration has reported an excess of roughly 1% of {mu}{sup -{mu}-} pairs over {mu}{sup +{mu}+} pairs in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy {radical}(s)=1.96 GeV at the Fermilab Tevatron, when known backgrounds are subtracted. This excess, if ascribed to CP violation in meson-antimeson mixing of nonstrange or strange neutral B mesons, is about 40 times that expected in the standard model. We propose a null test, based on a tight restriction on the muon impact parameter b, to confirm that this excess is indeed due to B mesons. If the asymmetry is due to anomalous CP violation in B{sub s}-B{sub s} mixing, then a tight restriction on b would increase by a factor 2 the net asymmetry from neutral B mixing, while the sample of dimuons from neutral B decays will be reduced significantly relative to background events.

  20. Edge charge asymmetry in top pair production at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Bo; Wang, You-Kai; Zhou, Zhong-Qiu; Zhu, Shou-Hua

    2011-03-01

    In this brief report, we propose a new definition of charge asymmetry in top pair production at the LHC, namely, the edge charge asymmetry (ECA). ECA utilizes the information of drifting direction only for single top (or antitop) with hadronic decay. Therefore, ECA can be free from the uncertainty arising from the missing neutrino in the tt¯ event reconstruction. Moreover, rapidity Y of top (or antitop) is required to be greater than a critical value YC in order to suppress the symmetric tt¯ events mainly due to the gluon-gluon fusion process. In this paper, ECA is calculated up to next-to-leading order QCD in the standard model and the choice of the optimal YC is investigated.