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Sample records for bioavailable testosterone levels

  1. Low free and bioavailable testosterone levels may predict pathologically-proven high-risk prostate cancer: a prospective, clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Bayar, Göksel; Şirin, Hakan; Aydın, Mustafa; Özağarı, Ayşim; Tanrıverdi, Orhan; Kadıhasanoğlu, Mustafa; Kendirci, Muammer

    2017-09-01

    To determine the predictive value of free and bioavailable testosterone levels on the detection of high-grade prostate cancer proven by histopathological examination of transrectal prostate biopsy specimens. A total of 405 patients who underwent transrectal prostate biopsy due to high prostatic specific antigen (PSA) (>2.5 ng/mL) and/or abnormal findings at digital rectal examination were included in this study. Blood free and bioavailable testosterone levels were calculated by the formula recommended by International Society for the Study of the Aging Male (ISSAM). The patients were stratified according to the D'Amico classification based on PSA levels and histological outcomes of prostate biopsies as benign, low, intermediate and high-risk prostate cancer. Patients were also divided into five groups according to the percentage of cancerous cores. Prostate cancer was detected in 160 of 405 (39.5%) patients. Total, free and bioavailable testosterone levels did not differ significantly between the patients with benign or malign histology. However, mean free (6.2 vs. 5.2 ng/dL, p=0.02) and bioavailable (151 vs. 125 ng/dL, p=0.001) testosterone levels were found to be significantly different in men with low-intermediate and high-risk prostate cancer. Moreover, a significant correlation was found between free, and bioavailable testosterone levels and percentage of cores with cancer (p=0.002 for free and p=0.016 for bioavailable testosterone, respectively). This prospective clinical study demonstrates that reduced levels of calculated blood free and bioavailable testosterone levels are associated with an increased risk of high-grade prostate cancer. Based on these findings blood free and bioavailable testosterone levels may be be thought to be an adjunctive factor in the prediction of high-risk prostate cancer.

  2. Monitoring testosterone levels in testosterone-treated men.

    PubMed

    Winters, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Dose adjustment with transdermal testosterone preparations should recognize the variability of serum total testosterone levels between applications and over the course of 24 h. Dose adjustments are also made difficult by between-laboratory assay variability. Low SHBG with obesity and diabetes lowers the total testosterone level, and free or bioavailable testosterone may prove to be a better choice for monitoring the progress and dosing of testosterone-treated men with adult onset hypogonadism.

  3. Associations Between Longitudinal Changes in Serum Estrogen, Testosterone, and Bioavailable Testosterone and Changes in Benign Urologic Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    St. Sauver, Jennifer L.; Jacobson, Debra J.; McGree, Michaela E.; Girman, Cynthia J.; Klee, George G.; Lieber, Michael M.; Jacobsen, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Some men have rapid increases in benign prostatic enlargement and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), and it is not clear how sex steroid hormones contribute to the rates of change in these urologic outcomes. Therefore, the authors conducted a population-based cohort study of 648 men residing in Olmsted County, Minnesota, from 1990 to 2007, to examine associations between baseline sex steroid hormones, the rate of change in these hormones, and the rates of change in LUTS, maximum urinary flow rate, and prostate volume. Annual changes in hormone levels and urologic outcomes were calculated using mixed-effects regression models. Associations between hormone variables and rates of change in urologic outcomes were assessed with linear regression models. Higher baseline estradiol levels and rapid declines in estradiol over time were associated with rapid increases in LUTS and rapid decreases in maximum flow rate. Lower baseline bioavailable testosterone levels and more rapid declines in bioavailable testosterone were associated with more rapid increases in prostate volume. These results suggest that both absolute sex steroid hormone levels and the rates at which the levels change may be important in the development of urologic conditions in aging men. PMID:21367876

  4. Testosterone increases bioavailability of carotenoids: Insights into the honesty of sexual signaling

    PubMed Central

    Blas, J.; Pérez-Rodríguez, L.; Bortolotti, G. R.; Viñuela, J.; Marchant, T. A.

    2006-01-01

    Androgens and carotenoids play a fundamental role in the expression of secondary sex traits in animals that communicate information on individual quality. In birds, androgens regulate song, aggression, and a variety of sexual ornaments and displays, whereas carotenoids are responsible for the red, yellow, and orange colors of the integument. Parallel, but independent, research lines suggest that the evolutionary stability of each signaling system stems from tradeoffs with immune function: androgens can be immunosuppressive, and carotenoids diverted to coloration prevent their use as immunostimulants. Despite strong similarities in the patterns of sex, age and seasonal variation, social function, and proximate control, there has been little success at integrating potential links between the two signaling systems. These parallel patterns led us to hypothesize that testosterone increases the bioavailability of circulating carotenoids. To test this hypothesis, we manipulated testosterone levels of red-legged partridges Alectoris rufa while monitoring carotenoids, color, and immune function. Testosterone treatment increased the concentration of carotenoids in plasma and liver by >20%. Plasma carotenoids were in turn responsible for individual differences in coloration and immune response. Our results provide experimental evidence for a link between testosterone levels and immunoenhancing carotenoids that (i) reconciles conflicting evidence for the immunosuppressive nature of androgens, (ii) provides physiological grounds for a connection between two of the main signaling systems in animals, (iii) explains how these signaling systems can be evolutionary stable and honest, and (iv) may explain the high prevalence of sexual dimorphism in carotenoid-based coloration in animals. PMID:17121984

  5. Bioavailable Testosterone Linearly Declines Over A Wide Age Spectrum in Men and Women From The Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Elisa; An, Yang; Gonzalez-Freire, Marta; Zoli, Marco; Maggio, Marcello; Studenski, Stephanie A; Egan, Josephine M; Chia, Chee W; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2016-09-01

    Age-related changes in testosterone levels in older persons and especially in women have not been fully explored. The objective of this study was to describe age-related trajectories of total testosterone (TT), ammonium sulfate precipitation-measured bioavailable testosterone (mBT), and sex hormone-binding glycoprotein (SHBG) in men and women from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging, with special focus on the oldest adults. Participants included 788 White men and women aged 30-96 years with excellent representation of old and oldest old, who reported not taking medications known to interfere with testosterone. Longitudinal data were included when available. TT, mBT, and SHBG were assayed. Age-related trajectories of mBT were compared with those obtained using calculated bioavailable testosterone (cBT). Generalized least square models were performed to describe age-related trajectories of TT, mBT, and SHBG in men and women. mBT linearly declines over the life span and even at older ages in both sexes. In men, TT remains quite stable until the age of 70 years and then declines at older ages, whereas in women TT progressively declines in premenopausal years and slightly increases at older ages. Differences in age-related trajectories between total and bioavailable testosterone are only partially explained by age changes in SHBG, whose levels increases at accelerated rates in old persons. Noteworthy, although mBT and cBT highly correlated with one another, mBT is a much stronger correlate of chronological age than cBT. In both men and women, mBT linearly declines over the life span and even at old ages. Its relationship with age-related phenotypes should be further investigated. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Gerontological Society of America 2016.

  6. A multi-institutional observational study of testosterone levels after testosterone pellet (Testopel(®)) insertion.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Andrew R; Khera, Mohit; Goldstein, Irwin; Hellstrom, Wayne J G; Morgentaler, Abraham; Levine, Laurence A

    2012-02-01

    Implantable testosterone pellets were approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 1972 for the treatment of testosterone deficiency syndrome (TDS). Clinical use of this testosterone delivery modality has been limited until its recent reintroduction (Testopel(®) , Slate Pharmaceuticals, Durham, NC, USA). Six academic institutions collaborated and combined their databases to more fully characterize serum testosterone levels after the pellet implantations. To assess the time-dependent serum testosterone levels after subcutaneous testosterone pellets in clinical practice for the treatment of TDS. Data were retrospectively pooled and analyzed from data in six academic institutions. Variables included patient age, total testosterone concentrations before and after implantation, the number of testosterone pellets implanted, and the time from implantation to measurement of serum testosterone concentrations. Three hundred eighty men undergoing 702 insertions were included for analysis using JMP (version 4.0.4; SAS Institute, Cary, NC, USA). Main outcome measures were postimplantation total testosterone levels and investigator-reported adverse events. Testosterone levels as a function of the number of pellets implanted and time from implantation were assessed. Implantation of six to ≥10 testosterone pellets (450 to ≥750 mg) increased total testosterone into the therapeutic range at 1 month postimplantation and sustained therapeutic levels (>300) for 4-6 months. Higher pellet numbers (10-12 pellets) were associated with higher, more consistent, and longer maintenance of testosterone levels within the therapeutic range. Four extrusions and three hematomas were reported early in our experience; other investigator-reported adverse events were generally mild to moderate in nature and transient in duration. No subjects required analgesics. Testosterone pellets (Testopel(®) , Slate Pharmaceuticals) provide sustained levels of testosterone for at least 4 months and up to 6

  7. The significance of biological variation in the diagnosis of testosterone deficiency, and consideration of the relevance of total, free and bioavailable testosterone determinations.

    PubMed

    Collier, Christine P; Morales, Alvaro; Clark, Albert; Lam, Miu; Wynne-Edwards, Katherine; Black, Angela

    2010-06-01

    The diagnosis of testosterone deficiency syndrome is based on clinical manifestations and documentation of low testosterone. Which biochemical tests to use and the importance of morning sampling are still controversial. Biological variation (including interindividual and intraindividual biological variation) must be considered when interpreting individual results as it determines the usefulness of reference intervals and the change (reference change value) necessary for a significant difference between results. A total of 87 healthy men (50 to 70+ years old) provided blood in the morning of the first day, and 4 weeks later in the morning and afternoon. Samples were frozen (-70C) and analyzed in the same run for serum testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin and albumin, and bioavailable testosterone and free testosterone were calculated. Serum testosterone was lower in the afternoon by 1.5 nmol/l (43 ng/dl, p <0.05), with larger changes observed with higher morning values. However, this diurnal effect was dwarfed by the normal biological variation observed for repeat morning samples (serum testosterone +/- 4 nmol/l [115 ng/dl]). Between day intra-individual biological variation for morning serum testosterone was 18.7% while within day intra-individual biological variation was 12.9%. A change of 52% (reference change value) is necessary between serial morning results to confirm a significant difference. The biological variation parameters of calculated bioavailable testosterone and calculated free testosterone confer no advantage over total testosterone. Marked individuality of serum testosterone is evident even in healthy men. Because intraindividual biological variation is less than interindividual biological variation, reference intervals are marginally useful. The homeostatic set point of a patient could decrease by half and still be within the reference interval. Prospective establishment of an individual's baseline over repeated measurements or symptoms

  8. Covariation of change in bioavailable testosterone and adiposity in midlife women.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Imke; Powell, Lynda H; Jasielec, Mateusz S; Kazlauskaite, Rasa

    2015-02-01

    To determine whether menopause-related changes in reproductive hormones were associated with change in adiposity and whether these relationships were independent of important covariates. Annual assessments of adiposity measures [computed tomography-assessed visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (SAT) and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry-assessed total body fat (TBF)] over 4 years from an ancillary study at the Chicago site of the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) were paired with reproductive hormones collected by SWAN. Included were 243 women (44% African American, 56% Caucasian) who were eligible participants in a population-based cohort with a 72% participation rate. VAT increased by 3.8% annually, and SAT increased by 1.8% per year. Change in bioavailable testosterone was significantly positively associated with changes both in VAT and in SAT but was not related to change in total body fat. The associations were independent of age, race, physical activity, smoking, baseline TBF, baseline bioavailable testosterone, and change in TBF. Change in estradiol was unrelated to changes in any adiposity measure. Bioavailable testosterone may play an important role in menopause-related redistribution of visceral and subcutaneous fat in the central abdominal region. © 2014 The Obesity Society.

  9. Andropause or male menopause? Rationale for testosterone replacement therapy in older men with low testosterone levels.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Glenn R

    2013-01-01

    To provide rationale for testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) in older men with low testosterone levels and symptoms consistent with testosterone deficiency. The relevant literature was reviewed using PubMed. Cross-sectional and longitudinal population-based studies indicate that total and free testosterone levels fall with aging, and they may be accompanied by symptoms consistent with androgen deficiency. Testosterone treatment of younger men with very low testosterone levels and hypothalamic, pituitary, or testicular disease is associated with improvements in symptoms, body composition, bone density, and hematocrit/hemoglobin. Studies evaluating testosterone treatment of older men with low testosterone levels are limited, but they suggest some increase in fat free mass, some decrease in fat mass, and some increase in bone density of the lumbar spine and femoral neck. The Testosterone Trial should provide definitive information regarding the potential benefits of TRT in men ≥65 years of age. If efficacy is confirmed, we will still need more information regarding the risks of TRT in older men.

  10. Second to fourth digit ratio, adult testosterone level and testosterone deficiency.

    PubMed

    García-Cruz, Eduardo; Huguet, Jorge; Piqueras, Marta; Ribal, María J; Alcaraz, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The ratio of the second and fourth finger lengths (2D/4D) is related to intrauterine exposure to testosterone. The relationship between 2D/4D and adult hormonal pattern is controversial. The aim of our study was to determine if there was a relationship between adult serum testosterone levels and the 2D/4D ratio. We prospectively recruited 204 consecutive patients referred for transrectal prostate biopsy between January 2008 and June 2009. The same physician performed clinical examinations, 2D/4D measurements and the transrectal biopsy in all cases. Cut-off points of 231 and 346 ng/dL testosterone (8 and 12 nmol/L) were used. 2D/4D determination was done with a vernier calliper on the left hand. The hormonal profile (testosterone and sexual hormone binding globulin) of the patients was determined between 7.00 am and 11.00 am. Age, weight, height, body mass index, toxic habits, digital rectal examination, prostate-specific antigen and 2D and 4D measurements were recorded prospectively. The mean age was 67 ± 7 years and the mean testosterone level was 413 ± 18 ng/dL (14.33 ± 0.62 nmol/L). The percentages of patients with testosterone <231 ng/dL (8 nmol/L) and testosterone <346 ng/dL (12 nmol/L) were 6.1 and 30.6 respectively. Univariate analysis showed that low 2D/4D ratios were related to higher levels of testosterone (B=-741.98; β=-0.165, P= 0.045) and also with low prevalence of biochemical hypogonadism (testosterone <346 ng/dL). Mean 2D/4D ratio in patients with testosterone >346 ng/dL was lower than in patients with testosterone <346 ng/dL (2D/4D 0.97 ± 0.037 vs 0.99 ± 0.043 depending on their hormonal status, P= 0.05). High 2D/4D ratio was associated with low testosterone serum levels (P= 0.046). The 2D/4D ratio is related to adult testosterone levels and the presence of testosterone deficiency syndrome. Patients with high 2D/4D ratios have lower testosterone levels and higher risk of testosterone deficiency syndrome. © 2011 THE AUTHORS. BJU INTERNATIONAL

  11. Physiological levels of testosterone kill salmonid leukocytes in vitro

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slater, C.H.; Schreck, C.B.

    1997-01-01

    Adult spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) elaborate high plasma concentrations of testosterone during sexual maturation, and these levels of testosterone have been shown to reduce the salmonid immune response in vitro. Our search for the mechanism of testosterone's immunosuppressive action has led to the characterization of an androgen receptor in salmonid leukocytes. In the present study we examined the specific effects that testosterone had on salmonid leukocytes. Direct counts of viable leukocytes after incubation with and without physiological levels of testosterone demonstrate a significant loss of leukocytes in cultures exposed to testosterone. At least 5 days of contact with testosterone was required to produce significant immunosuppression and addition of a 'conditioned media' (supernatant from proliferating lymphocytes not exposed to testosterone) did not reverse the immunosuppressive effects of testosterone. These data lead us to conclude that testosterone may exert its immunosuppressive effects by direct action on salmonid leukocytes, through the androgen receptor described, and that this action leads to the death of a significant number of these leukocytes.

  12. Postnatal testosterone levels and temperament in early infancy.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Gerianne M; Saenz, Janet

    2011-12-01

    Recent research showing associations between behavior and postnatal testosterone levels in male infants has suggested that the transient activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in early infancy may influence the expression of gender phenotypes in later development (i.e., the postnatal hormone hypothesis). As a further test of the relationship between postnatal hormones and behavior in infancy, we measured digit ratios and salivary testosterone in 76 male and female infants (3-4 months of age) and parents completed the Infant Behavior Questionnaire-Revised, a well-established measure of temperament in the first year of life. Consistent with our earlier findings, there were no significant sex differences in salivary testosterone levels and testosterone levels were unrelated to measures of behavior in female infants. However, in male infants, higher androgen levels predicted greater Negative Affectivity. Further examination of the four scales contributing to the measure of Negative Affectivity showed testosterone levels were a significant predictor of scores on the Distress to Limitations scale, but not of scores on Fear, Sadness, or Reactivity scales. This sex-specific association between salivary testosterone and behavior in infants is consistent with animal research showing higher prenatal androgens associated with typical male development lower the threshold of sensitivity to endogenous testosterone in postnatal life. In sum, these data provide additional support for the postnatal hormone hypothesis and suggest postnatal testosterone levels may influence the development of emotional regulation in male infants.

  13. Serum Testosterone Levels in Sex Offenders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurnani, Prem D.; Dwyer, Margretta

    1986-01-01

    Reports that with the increase in diagnosis of offenders across the nation, physicians and psychiatric personnel need to be aware of low testosterone as a possible indicator of hypo-sexuality and possible concurrent offending behavior. (Author/ABB)

  14. Serum Testosterone Levels in Sex Offenders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurnani, Prem D.; Dwyer, Margretta

    1986-01-01

    Reports that with the increase in diagnosis of offenders across the nation, physicians and psychiatric personnel need to be aware of low testosterone as a possible indicator of hypo-sexuality and possible concurrent offending behavior. (Author/ABB)

  15. An exploration of testosterone levels in patients with bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wooderson, Sarah C.; Gallagher, Peter; Watson, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Background Testosterone influences well-being, mood and cognition and may play a role in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder. Aim To examine testosterone levels in patients with bipolar disorder compared with healthy controls. Method We examined baseline total testosterone levels and current depression scores in male and female patients with bipolar disorder and mild to moderate depression and healthy controls. Results A significant interaction between diagnosis and gender was observed (F(2,97)=9.791, P=0.002). Testosterone levels were significantly lower for male patients with bipolar disorder compared with male controls (P=0.001). Women with bipolar disorder had significantly higher testosterone levels than female controls (P=0.03). Conclusions Disturbances in testosterone levels may represent an important neurobiological abnormality in bipolar disorder and may differ by gender. If these findings are confirmed, the use of gender appropriate treatment strategies for the normalisation of testosterone levels in bipolar disorder depression should be further explored. Declaration of interest None. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2015. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence. PMID:27703738

  16. The effect of food composition on serum testosterone levels after oral administration of Andriol® Testocaps®

    PubMed Central

    Schnabel, Peter G; Bagchus, Wilma; Lass, Holger; Thomsen, Torben; Geurts, T B Paul

    2007-01-01

    Objective Andriol® Testocaps® is a new oral formulation of testosterone undecanoate (TU) for treatment of hypogonadism. As TU is taken up by the intestinal lymphatic system, both the presence and the composition of food influence the absorption. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of food composition on the pharmacokinetics of oral TU. Design An open-label, single-centre, four-way crossover study. With a washout period of 6–7 days, 80 mg TU was administered in the morning 5 min after consuming each of four different meals in a randomized order (A: 230 kcal, 0·6 g lipid; B: 220 kcal, 5 g lipid; C: 474 kcal, 19 g lipid; D: 837 kcal, 44 g lipid). Patients Twenty-four postmenopausal volunteers. Measurements Serial blood samples were collected until 24 h after dosing to determine testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). Results The bioavailability of testosterone after a low-calorie meal containing 0·6 g lipid or 5 g lipid was relatively low, the area under the concentration–time curve (AUC0–tlast) for testosterone being 30·7 and 43·5 nmol h/l, respectively. The bioavailability of testosterone after a meal containing 19 g lipid was considerably higher (AUC0–tlast = 146 nmol h/l), whereas increasing the lipid content to 44 g lipid did not further increase the bioavailability of testosterone (AUC0–tlast = 154 nmol h/l). Conclusion Approximately 19 g of lipid per meal efficiently increases absorption of testosterone from oral TU. Therefore, coadministration with a normal rather than a fatty meal is sufficient to increase serum testosterone levels when using oral TU. PMID:17371478

  17. The efficacy, bioavailability and safety of a novel hydroalcoholic testosterone gel 2% in hypogonadal men: results from phase II open-label studies.

    PubMed

    Efros, M; Carrara, D; Neijber, A

    2016-08-01

    Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and safety of a novel hydroalcoholic testosterone gel 2% (TG) were evaluated in phase II sequential dose escalation studies using 3 application sites (thigh, abdomen and shoulder/upper arm) and 2 application methods. Hypogonadal men (n = 40), 18-75 years, with serum testosterone <300 ng dl(-1) were included in both studies. Study 1 evaluated hand-applied multiple doses of TG 1.25, 2.50 and 3.75 ml (23, 46 and 70 mg of testosterone, respectively), once daily for 10 days to shoulder/upper arm. Study 2 evaluated applicator-applied (TG 1.25, 2.50 and 3.75 ml) versus hand-applied (TG 2.5 ml) doses, once daily for 7 days to shoulder/upper arm. Primary endpoint for both studies was responder rate (Cave testosterone levels between 298 and 1050 ng dl(-1) ). In Study 1 following multiple applications, >70% participants in each group were responders. Dose-dependent increase was observed in PK values for total testosterone, free testosterone and DHT. In Study 2, responder rate was dose proportional: 16.7%, 50.0% and 77.8% responders in TG 1.25, 2.50 and 3.75 ml groups respectively. The bioavailability was highest for the shoulder application. There was a significant improvement in almost all the domains of sexual functioning. Applicator-application was preferred over hand-application by majority of the participants. TG was found to be safe and well tolerated in hypogonadal men.

  18. Association between Peyronie disease and low serum testosterone levels: detection and therapeutic considerations.

    PubMed

    Cavallini, Giorgio; Biagiotti, Giulio; Lo Giudice, Cristoforo

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to find a link between Peyronie disease (PD) and bioavailable testosterone (bT)/free testosterone (fT) blood levels. Subjects with no erectile dysfunction were prospectively studied with respect to 3 parameters: differences in bT/fT between 106 PD patients and 99 healthy controls; differences in plaque area, penile curvature, and pain between 54 PD patients with low bT/fT and 52 PD patients with normal bT/fT; and differences in intraplaque verapamil efficacy between 20 hypogonadal PD patients supplemented with testosterone and 23 hypogonadal PD patients administered a placebo. Medical history, objective examination, and dynamic duplex scanning of the penis, both before and 8 months after the end of the therapy (ie, at the end of the study period), were used to assess PD. Testosterone supplementation was carried out with testosterone buccal adhesive patches 2 × 30 mg/d for the entire study period. bT and fT were significantly lower in PD patients than in control patients. The plaque area was significantly higher in PD patients with low bT/fT than in patients with normal bT/fT. No significant difference emerged when pain or penile deformity were examined. Plaque area and penile curvature improved to a greater extent when intraplaque verapamil injections were associated with testosterone administration than when associated with a placebo. Men with PD had lower bT/fT than healthy controls. In these patients, supplementation with testosterone improved the efficacy of intraplaque verapamil. Plaque area and penile curvature were more severe in hypogonadal PD.

  19. Testosterone levels and fecundity in the hermaphroditic aquatic snail Lymnaea stagnalis exposed to testosterone and endocrine disruptors.

    PubMed

    Giusti, Arnaud; Ducrot, Virginie; Joaquim-Justo, Célia; Lagadic, Laurent

    2013-08-01

    Endocrine disruptors are known to alter endogenous free and esterified levels of androgenic and estrogenic steroid hormones in aquatic mollusks. The origin of steroids in these animals, however, remains controversial. In the present study, free and esterified testosterone concentrations were measured in the hermaphroditic aquatic gastropod Lymnaea stagnalis exposed to molecules known for their androgenic (testosterone and tributyltin), anti-androgenic (cyproterone-acetate), and estrogenic (chlordecone) properties, by reference to their mode of action in vertebrates. In parallel, snail oviposition and fecundity were followed over a 21-d exposure period. Testosterone exposure resulted in increased esterified testosterone levels, whereas free testosterone concentrations remained stable. In contrast, cyproterone-acetate significantly increased the free form of testosterone with no changes in the esterified form, whereas chlordecone showed a tendency to reduce (though not significantly) esterified testosterone concentrations without changing free testosterone levels. Finally, tributyltin did not alter testosterone homeostasis. The production of egg clutches and eggs was significantly reduced only in the snails exposed to the highest concentrations of chlordecone (19.6 µg/L) and tributyltin (94.2 ng Sn/L). Overall, the present study demonstrates that uptake of testosterone from the exposure medium occurs in L. stagnalis. Moreover, it shows that cyproterone-acetate and, to a lesser extent, chlordecone can alter endogenous testosterone levels in this freshwater snail. However, the relationship between hormonal changes and snail reproduction has not been established. Environ Toxicol Chem 2013;32:1740-1745. © 2013 SETAC.

  20. Sex-Specific Associations between Umbilical Cord Blood Testosterone Levels and Language Delay in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehouse, Andrew J. O.; Mattes, Eugen; Maybery, Murray T.; Sawyer, Michael G.; Jacoby, Peter; Keelan, Jeffrey A.; Hickey, Martha

    2012-01-01

    Background: Preliminary evidence suggests that prenatal testosterone exposure may be associated with language delay. However, no study has examined a large sample of children at multiple time-points. Methods: Umbilical cord blood samples were obtained at 861 births and analysed for bioavailable testosterone (BioT) concentrations. When…

  1. Sex-Specific Associations between Umbilical Cord Blood Testosterone Levels and Language Delay in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehouse, Andrew J. O.; Mattes, Eugen; Maybery, Murray T.; Sawyer, Michael G.; Jacoby, Peter; Keelan, Jeffrey A.; Hickey, Martha

    2012-01-01

    Background: Preliminary evidence suggests that prenatal testosterone exposure may be associated with language delay. However, no study has examined a large sample of children at multiple time-points. Methods: Umbilical cord blood samples were obtained at 861 births and analysed for bioavailable testosterone (BioT) concentrations. When…

  2. Defining 'relative' androgen deficiency in aging men: how should testosterone be measured and what are the relationships between androgen levels and physical, sexual and emotional health?

    PubMed

    Haren, M T; Morley, J E; Chapman, I M; O'Loughlin, P D; Wittert, G A

    2002-03-01

    In men, bioavailable and free testosterone levels decline by about 1.0 and 1.2% per year, respectively, after the age of 40. The definition of clinically relevant androgen deficiency in the aging male remains uncertain. Clinical features common to both aging and androgen deficiency include decreased muscle mass and strength, and increased fatigue, increased fat mass, loss of libido, erectile dysfunction, impaired cognitive function and depression. It is, however, difficult to separate the effect on plasma testosterone of concomitant disease, compared with the effects of a decrease in testosterone levels alone. Testosterone supplementation has been shown to be effective in improving many of the clinical features of androgen deficiency in the older male, and is safe, at least in the short term. The maximum benefit occurs in those men with the lowest testosterone levels.

  3. Effects of chrysin on urinary testosterone levels in human males.

    PubMed

    Gambelunghe, Cristiana; Rossi, Ruggero; Sommavilla, Marco; Ferranti, Chiara; Rossi, Riccardo; Ciculi, Chiara; Gizzi, Stefania; Micheletti, Alessandra; Rufini, Stefano

    2003-01-01

    The equilibrium of sexual hormones in both sexes is controlled in vertebrates by the enzyme aromatase, a member of the cytochrome P450 superfamily, which catalyzes the conversion of androstenedione and testosterone into estrone and estradiol, respectively. Flavonoids are diphenolic compounds present in whole grains, legumes, fruits, and vegetables that are strongly implicated as protective in coronary heart disease, stroke, and cancer. One flavonoid, chrysin, found in high concentrations in honey and propolis, has been shown to be an inhibitor of aromatase enzyme activity. These foods are often used as supplements, particulary by sportsmen for their energetic and antioxidant properties. The aim of this study was to verify if daily treatment for 21 days with propolis and honey, containing chrysin, would modify urinary concentrations of testosterone in volunteer male subjects. In fact, aromatase inhibition by chrysin could block the conversion of androgens into estrogens with a consequent increase of testosterone, eventually measurable in urine samples. The obtained data did not show alterations of the levels of testosterone in the volunteers after 7, 14, and 21 days of treatment in comparison with baseline values and compared with measurements on the control subjects at the same time. In conclusion, the use of these foods for 21 days at the doses usually taken as oral supplementation does not have effects on the equilibrium of testosterone in human males.

  4. Serum testosterone levels in non-dosed females after secondary exposure to 1.62% testosterone gel: effects of clothing barrier on testosterone absorption.

    PubMed

    Stahlman, Jodi; Britto, Margaret; Fitzpatrick, Sherahe; McWhirter, Cecilia; Testino, Samuel A; Brennan, John J; Zumbrunnen, Troy L

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate secondary exposure of testosterone transferred to females from a male partner, dosed with 1.62% testosterone gel after direct skin-to-skin contact with the application site, and to investigate the effect of wearing a t-shirt on testosterone transfer. Across three studies, a total of 72 healthy males applied 5.0 g 1.62% testosterone gel to their abdomen alone, upper arms/shoulders alone, or a combination of their upper arms/shoulders and abdomen (single dose or once daily for 7 days). Male-female contact occurred 2 or 12 hours after testosterone gel application, with males either wearing or not wearing a t-shirt. There were 15 minutes of supervised contact with the application site between the male and his female partner. Blood samples were collected over a 24 hour period in females for assessment of serum testosterone levels at baseline and after contact. Pharmacokinetic parameters included C(max) (maximum serum concentration), AUC(0-24) (area under the serum concentration-time curve from 0-24 hours), and C(av) (time-averaged concentration over the 24-hour period post-contact). Subjects were monitored for adverse events. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION NCT NUMBERS: Study 1 was not registered (first subject enrolled 8 March 2007); Study 2: 00998933; Study 3, 01130298. Testosterone levels (C(av) and C(max)) in females increased 86-185% from baseline after direct abdominal skin contact, although C(av) levels remained within female eugonadal range. Testosterone concentrations returned to baseline within 48 hours after last skin contact. A t-shirt barrier reduced testosterone transfer by approximately 40-48% when 5.0 g of testosterone gel was applied to the abdomen alone. A t-shirt barrier prevented transfer when 5.0 g of testosterone gel was applied to the upper arms and shoulders or to a combination of the upper arms and shoulders and the abdomen (C(max) and C(av) increased by approximately 5-11%). No major safety events were observed during the studies

  5. Levels of FSH, LH and testosterone, and sperm DNA fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Wdowiak, Artur; Raczkiewicz, Dorota; Stasiak, Magdalena; Bojar, Iwona

    2014-01-01

    Having an offspring is the most important human biological goal, which is necessary for survival of the human species. Lack of offspring is a phenomenon concerning approximately 15% of married couples in Poland. In a half of the cases, a causative agent is the male factor infertility problem. There is evidence that certain male fertility problems are related with disorders of the process of spermatogenesis. The course of normal spermatogenesis depends on proper pituitary secretion of folliculostimulin (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), as well as testicular secretion of testosterone. It is considered that in approximately 20% of patients with idiopathic infertility an elevated level of sperm DNA fragmentation may be the cause of failure in reproduction. The objective of the present study was determination of the relationship between FSH, LH and testosterone levels, and the occurrence of sperm DNA fragmentation. The present study was conducted in the year 2012 in the Non-Public Health Care Unit 'Ovum Reproduction and Andrology' in Lublin, and covered 186 men treated for infertility. For inclusion into the study group we qualified males aged 25-35, who have been treated for infertility for more than 1 year, with no pathological features observed in the female partner. The structure of sperm chromatin was evaluated using the technique of flow cytometry-Sperm Chromatin Structure assay (SCSA). The result of the examination was a sperm DNA Fragmentation Index (DFI), i.e., the percentage of sperm with DNA lesions (DNA fragmentation). A morning blood sample (5 mL volume) was obtained and sent to an authorized laboratory to assess serum levels of testosterone, LH and FSH. An intensified sperm DNA fragmentation co-occurred with both extremely low and extremely high levels of FSH and LH. Sperm DNA fragmentation was negatively correlated with testosterone level.

  6. Effects of morphine on testosterone levels in rat C6 glioma cells: modulation by anastrozole.

    PubMed

    Ceccarelli, Ilaria; Rossi, Antonella; Maddalena, Melinda; Weber, Elisabetta; Aloisi, Anna Maria

    2009-10-01

    Rat C6 glioma cells are commonly used to investigate the functions of glial cells. To evaluate the presence of testosterone and its metabolism in rat C6 glioma cells, we cultured them in media with or without the addition of testosterone propionate and anastrozole, a blocker of aromatase, the enzyme needed to transform testosterone into estradiol. The same procedure was repeated with morphine (10 and 100 microM), known to decrease testosterone levels in the brain (in rats) and plasma (in rats and humans). Confluent cells were exposed to the test media for 48 h and then collected. Cell pellets were used to determine testosterone by radioimmunoassay. The C6 cells contained detectable levels of testosterone and the levels increased with the addition of testosterone to the medium. Aromatase blockage by anastrozole increased cellular levels of testosterone regardless of the addition of exogenous testosterone. Both concentrations of morphine dose-dependently decreased testosterone levels in the C6 cells; this effect was also present with the contemporary administration of anastrozole. Our findings show that testosterone is present in rat C6 glioma cells and can be metabolized by aromatase. Moreover, the presence of morphine in the culture medium strongly decreased testosterone, demonstrating that the glia would be a target of the morphine-induced hypogonadal effect.

  7. "Low Testosterone Levels in Body Fluids Are Associated With Chronic Periodontitis".

    PubMed

    Kellesarian, Sergio Varela; Malmstrom, Hans; Abduljabbar, Tariq; Vohra, Fahim; Kellesarian, Tammy Varela; Javed, Fawad; Romanos, Georgios E

    2017-03-01

    There is a debate over the association between low testosterone levels in body fluids and the occurrence of chronic periodontitis (CP). The aim of the present systematic review was to assess whether low testosterone levels in body fluids reflect CP. In order to identify studies relevant to the focus question: "Is there a relationship between low testosterone levels in body fluids and CP?" an electronic search without time or language restrictions was conducted up to June 2016 in indexed databases using different keywords: periodontitis, chronic periodontitis, periodontal diseases, testosterone, and gonadal steroid hormones. A total of eight studies were included in the present systematic review. The number of study participants ranged from 24 to 1,838 male individuals with ages ranging from 15 to 95 years. Seven studies measured testosterone levels in serum, two studies in saliva, and one study in gingiva. Four studies reported a negative association between serum testosterone levels and CP. Two studies reported a positive association between decreased testosterone levels in serum and CP. Increased levels of salivary testosterone among patients with CP were reported in one study; whereas one study reported no significant difference in the concentration of salivary testosterone between patients with and without CP. One study identified significant increase in the metabolism of testosterone in the gingiva of patients with CP. Within the limits of the evidence available, the relationship between low testosterone levels and CP remains debatable and further longitudinal studies and control trials are needed.

  8. Isolation of compounds from bleached kraft mill recovery condensates associated with reduced levels of testosterone in mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus).

    PubMed

    Hewitt, L Mark; Smyth, Shirley Anne M; Dubé, Monique G; Gilman, Christine I; MacLatchy, Deborah L

    2002-07-01

    Previous studies have identified chemical recovery condensates as a primary source of hormonally active substances within a Canadian bleached kraft pulp mill. Although reverse osmosis treatment of condensates raises the exposure threshold that alters circulating levels of testosterone in mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus), the responsible chemicals have not been characterized. In this study, a solid-phase extraction (SPE) method was developed to isolate chemical recovery condensate extractives for evaluation of hormonal activity. Condensates generated during softwood and hardwood pulp production were investigated for their relative potential to affect both circulating and gonadal production of sex steroids in mummichog. Mummichog were exposed to whole condensates, extracts from suspended particulates (> 1 microm), two fractions from SPE, and residual condensates after SPE. The distribution of bioactivity among condensate fractions was similar for both wood furnishes. In both sexes, significant depressions in circulating testosterone and in in vitro gonadal testosterone production were associated with exposure to whole condensates, particulate extracts, one SPE fraction, and residual material after SPE. An optimized SPE method subsequently demonstrated complete recovery of polar, bioavailable chemicals that reduced testosterone levels in both sexes. Characterizations of active fractions by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) showed the presence of extractives with molecular masses > or = 240 amu possessing functionalities consistent with lignin degradation products. This study provides the first isolation of chemicals derived from pulp production associated with impaired reproductive performance in fish.

  9. Serum testosterone levels after medical or surgical androgen deprivation: a comprehensive review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    Androgens and the androgen receptor play a role in the progression of prostate cancer. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is a mainstay in the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer. ADT is expected to reduce serum testosterone levels from a normal level of about 500 to 600 ng/dl (17.3-20.8 nmol) down to castration levels. Traditionally, castration was considered to be achieved if testosterone levels were lowered to a threshold of 50 ng/dl (1.73 nmol/l), a definition determined more by measurement methods derived from the use of old assay methods than by evidence. Serum testosterone levels in three-quarter patients after surgical castration drop to less than 20 ng/dl (0.69 nmol/l). Ineffective suppression of testosterone is currently poorly recognized and may possibly have an effect of prostate cancer mortality. Persistent levels of serum testosterone after castration are mainly derived from adrenal androgens. Furthermore, the arrival of new therapies targeting androgen synthesis and androgen receptor activity has renewed interest on serum testosterone. This review discusses the biosynthetic pathway for androgen synthesis in humans and provides a comprehensive review of serum testosterone levels after surgical or medical castration. This review assesses serum testosterone levels after surgical castration and different pharmacologic castration in patients with prostate cancer under ADT, and ineffective testosterone suppression. The author proposes methods to better lower serum testosterone levels during ADT.

  10. Salivary testosterone levels in men at a U.S. sex club.

    PubMed

    Escasa, Michelle J; Casey, Jacqueline F; Gray, Peter B

    2011-10-01

    Vertebrate males commonly experience elevations in testosterone levels in response to sexual stimuli, such as presentation of a novel mating partner. Some previous human studies have shown that watching erotic movies increases testosterone levels in males although studies measuring testosterone changes during actual sexual intercourse or masturbation have yielded mixed results. Small sample sizes, "unnatural" lab-based settings, and invasive techniques may help account for mixed human findings. Here, we investigated salivary testosterone levels in men watching (n = 26) versus participating (n = 18) in sexual activity at a large U.S. sex club. The present study entailed minimally invasive sample collection (measuring testosterone in saliva), a naturalistic setting, and a larger number of subjects than previous work to test three hypotheses related to men's testosterone responses to sexual stimuli. Subjects averaged 40 years of age and participated between 11:00 pm and 2:10 am. Consistent with expectations, results revealed that testosterone levels increased 36% among men during a visit to the sex club, with the magnitude of testosterone change significantly greater among participants (72%) compared with observers (11%). Contrary to expectation, men's testosterone changes were unrelated to their age. These findings were generally consistent with vertebrate studies indicating elevated male testosterone in response to sexual stimuli, but also point out the importance of study context since participation in sexual behavior had a stronger effect on testosterone increases in this study but unlike some previous human lab-based studies.

  11. Neither testosterone levels nor aggression decrease when the male Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) displays paternal behavior.

    PubMed

    Juana, Luis; Bárbara, Vázquez-Gaytán; Martín, Martínez-Torres; Agustín, Carmona; Guillermo, Ramos-Blancas; Guadalupe, Ortíz

    2010-03-01

    The first studies that correlated mammalian paternal behavior and testosterone levels indicated that the concentration of this steroid hormone decreases when males exhibit paternal care. However, recent studies have also shown that testosterone levels do not decrease when males display paternal behavior. In this study, we measured testosterone levels in plasma throughout the reproductive cycle of the Mongolian gerbil. Testosterone concentrations were correlated with paternal care as well as aggression. We also examined whether there is a trade-off between paternal behavior and aggression in this mammal. Our results show that Mongolian gerbil testosterone levels do not decrease when the males give paternal care. Likewise, male Mongolian gerbils exhibit high levels of aggression while displaying paternal behavior, indicating that there is no trade-off between aggression and paternal behavior. More studies are needed to determine whether testosterone is involved in the regulation of paternal behavior in this rodent.

  12. Enhanced transdermal bioavailability of testosterone propionate via surfactant-modified ethosomes

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Shu; Chen, Zaixing; Yang, Liqun; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Danhua; Guo, Jing; Guan, Yanmin; Li, Jianxin

    2013-01-01

    The current investigation aimed to evaluate the transdermal potential of novel testosterone propionate (TP) ethosomes and liposomes prepared by surfactant modification. The effect of hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide and cremophor EL-35 on the particle size and zeta potential of the prepared vesicles was investigated. The entrapment efficiency and stability, as well as in vitro and in vivo skin permeation, were studied with the various techniques, such as differential scanning calorimetry, confocal laser scanning microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and so on. The results indicated that the ethosomes were defined as spherical, unilamellar structures with low polydispersity (0.100 ± 0.015) and nanometric size (156.5 ± 3.5 nm). The entrapment efficiency of TP in ethosomal and liposomal carriers was 92.7% ± 3.7% and 64.7% ± 2.1%, respectively. The stability profile of the prepared TP ethosomal system assessed for 120 days revealed very low aggregation and very low growth in vesicular size. TP ethosomes also provided an enhanced transdermal flux of 37.85 ± 2.8 μg/cm2/hour and a decreased lag time of 0.18 hours across mouse skin. The skin permeation efficiency of the TP ethosomes as further assessed by confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed enhanced permeation of rhodamine red-loaded formulations to the deeper layers of the skin (260 μm) than that of the liposomal formation (120 μm). PMID:23990718

  13. Enhanced transdermal bioavailability of testosterone propionate via surfactant-modified ethosomes.

    PubMed

    Meng, Shu; Chen, Zaixing; Yang, Liqun; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Danhua; Guo, Jing; Guan, Yanmin; Li, Jianxin

    2013-01-01

    The current investigation aimed to evaluate the transdermal potential of novel testosterone propionate (TP) ethosomes and liposomes prepared by surfactant modification. The effect of hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide and cremophor EL-35 on the particle size and zeta potential of the prepared vesicles was investigated. The entrapment efficiency and stability, as well as in vitro and in vivo skin permeation, were studied with the various techniques, such as differential scanning calorimetry, confocal laser scanning microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and so on. The results indicated that the ethosomes were defined as spherical, unilamellar structures with low polydispersity (0.100 ± 0.015) and nanometric size (156.5 ± 3.5 nm). The entrapment efficiency of TP in ethosomal and liposomal carriers was 92.7% ± 3.7% and 64.7% ± 2.1%, respectively. The stability profile of the prepared TP ethosomal system assessed for 120 days revealed very low aggregation and very low growth in vesicular size. TP ethosomes also provided an enhanced transdermal flux of 37.85 ± 2.8 μg/cm(2)/hour and a decreased lag time of 0.18 hours across mouse skin. The skin permeation efficiency of the TP ethosomes as further assessed by confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed enhanced permeation of rhodamine red-loaded formulations to the deeper layers of the skin (260 μm) than that of the liposomal formation (120 μm).

  14. Maternal personality and reproductive ambition in women is associated with salivary testosterone levels.

    PubMed

    Deady, D K; Smith, M J Law; Sharp, M A; Al-Dujaili, E A S

    2006-01-01

    Previous research has linked testosterone levels with sex-specific personality traits within women. The present study investigates the relation between salivary testosterone levels and specifically maternal personality traits in healthy adult women. Twenty-seven young women completed the Bem Sex Role Inventory (BSRI). Additional questions were asked about maternal personality (importance of having children, self-rated maternal/broodiness), reproductive ambition (ideal number of children, ideal own age at first child) and career orientation (importance of having career). Higher circulating testosterone levels were associated with lower scores on measures of maternal personality and reproductive ambition. There was no relation of career orientation with testosterone. A median split on BSRI masculinity revealed high scorers had higher testosterone levels than low scorers. There was no relation of BSRI femininity with testosterone. Results suggest maternal tendencies may be partly androgen driven.

  15. Endogenous testosterone level and testosterone supplementation therapy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Atlantis, Evan; Fahey, Paul; Cochrane, Belinda; Wittert, Gary; Smith, Sheree

    2013-01-01

    Objective Low testosterone level may be a reversible risk factor for functional disability and deterioration in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We sought to systematically assess the endogenous testosterone levels and effect of testosterone therapy on exercise capacity and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) outcomes in COPD patients, as well as to inform guidelines and practice. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources We searched PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Health Source Nursing and PsychINFO and the reference lists of retrieved articles published before May 2012. Inclusion criteria Observational studies on endogenous testosterone levels in people with chronic lung disease compared with controls, or randomised controlled trials (RCTs) on testosterone therapy for exercise capacity and/or HRQoL outcomes in COPD patients were eligible. Data extraction and analysis Data on the mean difference in endogenous total testosterone (TT) values, and the mean difference in exercise capacity and HRQoL values were extracted and pooled using random effects meta-analysis. Results Nine observational studies in 2918 men with COPD reported consistently lower levels of TT compared with controls (weighted mean difference was –3.21 nmol/L (95% CI −5.18 to −1.23)). Six RCTs in 287 participants yielded five studies on peak muscle strength and peak cardiorespiratory fitness outcomes (peak oxygen uptake (VO2) and workload) and three studies on HRQoL outcomes. Testosterone therapies significantly improved peak muscle strength (standardised mean difference (SMD) was 0.31 (95% CI 0.05 to 0.56)) and peak workload (SMD was 0.27 (95% CI 0.01 to 0.52)) compared with control conditions (all but one used placebo), but not peak VO2 (SMD was 0.21 (95% CI −0.15 to 0.56)) or HRQoL (SMD was –0.03 (95% CI −0.32 to 0.25)). Conclusions Men with COPD have clinically relevant lower than normal TT levels. Insufficient evidence from

  16. Endogenous testosterone level and testosterone supplementation therapy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Atlantis, Evan; Fahey, Paul; Cochrane, Belinda; Wittert, Gary; Smith, Sheree

    2013-08-13

    Low testosterone level may be a reversible risk factor for functional disability and deterioration in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We sought to systematically assess the endogenous testosterone levels and effect of testosterone therapy on exercise capacity and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) outcomes in COPD patients, as well as to inform guidelines and practice. Systematic review and meta-analysis. We searched PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Health Source Nursing and PsychINFO and the reference lists of retrieved articles published before May 2012. Observational studies on endogenous testosterone levels in people with chronic lung disease compared with controls, or randomised controlled trials (RCTs) on testosterone therapy for exercise capacity and/or HRQoL outcomes in COPD patients were eligible. Data on the mean difference in endogenous total testosterone (TT) values, and the mean difference in exercise capacity and HRQoL values were extracted and pooled using random effects meta-analysis. Nine observational studies in 2918 men with COPD reported consistently lower levels of TT compared with controls (weighted mean difference was -3.21 nmol/L (95% CI -5.18 to -1.23)). Six RCTs in 287 participants yielded five studies on peak muscle strength and peak cardiorespiratory fitness outcomes (peak oxygen uptake (VO2) and workload) and three studies on HRQoL outcomes. Testosterone therapies significantly improved peak muscle strength (standardised mean difference (SMD) was 0.31 (95% CI 0.05 to 0.56)) and peak workload (SMD was 0.27 (95% CI 0.01 to 0.52)) compared with control conditions (all but one used placebo), but not peak VO2 (SMD was 0.21 (95% CI -0.15 to 0.56)) or HRQoL (SMD was -0.03 (95% CI -0.32 to 0.25)). Men with COPD have clinically relevant lower than normal TT levels. Insufficient evidence from short-term studies in predominately male COPD patients suggests that testosterone therapy improves exercise

  17. Social modulation of testosterone levels in male black howlers (Alouatta pigra).

    PubMed

    Rangel-Negrín, Ariadna; Dias, Pedro A D; Chavira, Roberto; Canales-Espinosa, Domingo

    2011-01-01

    The influence of social factors on the modulation of male testosterone levels has been demonstrated among several vertebrate species. In addition to sexual activity, parental care and reproductive competition affect testosterone secretion. We examined variations in testosterone levels among male black howlers (Alouatta pigra) in various social contexts. Fecal samples were collected from nine males living in five different groups in the Mexican state of Campeche. The potential for intragroup and extragroup competition varied among the groups. The number of resident males living in the groups was the only variable that significantly explained variations in testosterone levels. Males living in unimale groups had higher testosterone levels; the highest testosterone levels were recorded for males that had experienced a shift from multimale to unimale group compositions. In this species, the probability of being challenged by extragroup males and evicted from the group during immigration events increases when males live in unimale groups. Therefore, our results suggest that male black howlers respond to competition for group membership by increasing their testosterone levels. In this context, testosterone secretion represents an anticipatory response to reproductive conflicts. Therefore, although males living in unimale groups have exclusive access to females, they face higher physiological costs associated with sustaining high testosterone levels for extended time periods.

  18. Testosterone levels in healthy men are related to amygdala reactivity and memory performance.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Sandra; Spalek, Klara; Rasch, Björn; Gschwind, Leo; Coynel, David; Fastenrath, Matthias; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; de Quervain, Dominique J-F

    2012-09-01

    Testosterone is a steroid hormone thought to influence both emotional and cognitive functions. It is unknown, however, if testosterone also affects the interaction between these two domains, such as the emotional arousal-induced enhancement of memory. Healthy subjects (N=234) encoded pictures taken from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS) during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and underwent a free recall test 10 min after memory encoding. We show that higher endogenous testosterone levels at encoding were associated with higher arousal ratings of neutral pictures in men. fMRI analysis revealed that higher testosterone levels were related to increased brain activation in the amygdala during encoding of neutral pictures. Moreover, endogenous testosterone levels were positively correlated with the number of freely recalled neutral pictures. No such relations were found in women. These findings point to a male-specific role for testosterone in enhancing memory by increasing the biological salience of incoming information.

  19. Correlation between serum testosterone level and concentrations of copper and zinc in hair tissue.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chung Soo; Choi, Jong Bo; Kim, Hae Jin; Park, Sat Byul

    2011-12-01

    Testosterone deficiency is associated with late-onset hypogonadism. Micronutrients including copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) influence testosterone synthesis. The association between micronutrient concentrations in hair tissue and serum testosterone was studied in Korean men. The subjects were 88 men 40-60 years of age who visited the health promotion center and an outpatient clinic of family medicine at a university hospital from March 2006 to February 2008. Population sociological features of the subjects were acquired by self-administered surveys and interview, height and weight were measured, serum total testosterone was determined in the morning, and Cu and Zn were quantified from hair tissue collected in the morning. Subjects with normal testosterone group had a significantly higher Zn level compared to low testosterone group (P = 0.003). Significant negative correlations were evident between total testosterone and Cu level (r = -0.252, P = 0.022), and the Cu/Zn ratio (r = -0.288, P = 0.008). Normal testosterone is associated with a higher Zn level. Decreased serum testosterone is significantly associated with a high level of Cu and elevated Cu/Zn ratio in hair tissue.

  20. Relations between Prenatal Testosterone Levels and Cognitive Abilities at 4 Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finegan, Jo-Anne K.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Compared children's cognitive abilities at four years and their prenatal amniotic fluid testosterone levels. For girls, prenatal testosterone levels were related in a curvilinear manner to language comprehension and classification abilities, and inversely related to counting and knowledge of number facts. For boys, no relationships were found. (BC)

  1. Relations between Prenatal Testosterone Levels and Cognitive Abilities at 4 Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finegan, Jo-Anne K.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Compared children's cognitive abilities at four years and their prenatal amniotic fluid testosterone levels. For girls, prenatal testosterone levels were related in a curvilinear manner to language comprehension and classification abilities, and inversely related to counting and knowledge of number facts. For boys, no relationships were found. (BC)

  2. Effect of anticonvulsants on plasma testosterone and sex hormone binding globulin levels.

    PubMed Central

    Barragry, J M; Makin, H L; Trafford, D J; Scott, D F

    1978-01-01

    Plasma sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) and testosterone levels were measured in 29 patients with epilepsy (16 men and 13 women), most of them on chronic therapy with anticonvulsant drugs. Sex hormone binding globulin concentrations were increased in both sexes and testosterone levels in male patients. It is postulated that anticonvulsants may induce hepatic synthesis of SHBG. PMID:569688

  3. Supplementation with vitamin D does not increase serum testosterone levels in healthy males.

    PubMed

    Jorde, R; Grimnes, G; Hutchinson, M S; Kjærgaard, M; Kamycheva, E; Svartberg, J

    2013-09-01

    Cross-sectional studies indicate a positive relation between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and testosterone. It is not known if this relation is causal, which in theory could be in both directions. A cross-sectional population based study was designed with pooled data from 3 vitamin D randomized clinical trials (RCTs) performed in Tromsø with weight reduction, insulin sensitivity, and depression scores as endpoints, and one testosterone RCT in subjects with low serum testosterone (<11.0 nmol/l) and with body composition as endpoint. Serum 25(OH)D and androgens were measured in 893 males in the cross-sectional part, at baseline and after 6-12 months of supplementation with vitamin D 20 000 IU-40 000 IU per week vs. placebo in the vitamin D RCTs (n=282), and at baseline and after one year treatment with testosterone undecanoate 1 000 mg or placebo injections (at baseline and after 6, 16, 28, and 40 weeks) in the testosterone RCT (n=37). In the cross-sectional study, serum 25(OH)D was found to be a significant and positive predictor of serum testosterone. In the vitamin D RCTs, no significant effect on serum total or free testosterone levels was seen, and in the testosterone RCT no significant effect on serum 25(OH)D was seen. This was unchanged in sub-analyses in subjects with low serum 25(OH)D (or testosterone) levels. In conclusion, in subjects without significant vitamin D deficiency, there is no increase in serum testosterone after high dose vitamin D supplementation. Similarly, in subjects with moderately low serum testosterone levels, substitution with testosterone does not increase serum 25(OH)D.

  4. Effects of Eurycoma longifolia on Testosterone Level and Bone Structure in an Aged Orchidectomised Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Tajul Ariff, Abdul Shukor; Soelaiman, Ima Nirwana; Pramanik, J; Shuid, Ahmad Nazrun

    2012-01-01

    Testosterone replacement is the choice of treatment in androgen-deficient osteoporosis. However, long-term use of testosterone is potentially carcinogenic. Eurycoma longifolia (EL) has been reported to enhance testosterone level and prevent bone calcium loss but there is a paucity of research regarding its effect on the bone structural parameters. This study was conducted to explore the bone structural changes following EL treatment in normal and androgen-deficient osteoporosis rat model. Thirty-six male Sprague-Dawley rats aged 12 months were divided into normal control, normal rat supplemented with EL, sham-operated, orchidectomised-control, orchidectomised with testosterone replacement, and orchidectomised with EL supplementation groups. Testosterone serum was measured both before and after the completion of the treatment. After 6 weeks of the treatment, the femora were processed for bone histomorphometry. Testosterone replacement was able to raise the testosterone level and restore the bone volume of orchidectomised rats. EL supplementation failed to emulate both these testosterone actions. The inability of EL to do so may be related to the absence of testes in the androgen deficient osteoporosis model for EL to stimulate testosterone production.

  5. Effects of Eurycoma longifolia on Testosterone Level and Bone Structure in an Aged Orchidectomised Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Tajul Ariff, Abdul Shukor; Soelaiman, Ima Nirwana; Pramanik, J.; Shuid, Ahmad Nazrun

    2012-01-01

    Testosterone replacement is the choice of treatment in androgen-deficient osteoporosis. However, long-term use of testosterone is potentially carcinogenic. Eurycoma longifolia (EL) has been reported to enhance testosterone level and prevent bone calcium loss but there is a paucity of research regarding its effect on the bone structural parameters. This study was conducted to explore the bone structural changes following EL treatment in normal and androgen-deficient osteoporosis rat model. Thirty-six male Sprague-Dawley rats aged 12 months were divided into normal control, normal rat supplemented with EL, sham-operated, orchidectomised-control, orchidectomised with testosterone replacement, and orchidectomised with EL supplementation groups. Testosterone serum was measured both before and after the completion of the treatment. After 6 weeks of the treatment, the femora were processed for bone histomorphometry. Testosterone replacement was able to raise the testosterone level and restore the bone volume of orchidectomised rats. EL supplementation failed to emulate both these testosterone actions. The inability of EL to do so may be related to the absence of testes in the androgen deficient osteoporosis model for EL to stimulate testosterone production. PMID:22966245

  6. Migration is associated with lower total, but not free testosterone levels in South Asian men.

    PubMed

    Heald, A H; Patel, J; Anderson, S G; Vyas, A; Rudenski, A; Hughes, E; Panja, N C; Ullah, A; Prabhakaran, D; Reddy, S; Durrington, P; Gibson, J M; Laing, I; Bhatnagar, D; Cruickshank, J K

    2007-11-01

    Serum testosterone measurement is an integral part of the endocrine assessment of men. Little is known about its variation in relation to migration. We examined within a South Asian group the effect of migration to the UK on androgen levels. Circulating testosterone and SHBG concentrations were measured in 97 Gujarati men resident in India and in 79 men from the same villages of origin living in Birmingham, UK. Free testosterone was calculated by Vermeulen's method. Insulin sensitivity (HOMA-S) was determined from paired fasting plasma intact insulin and glucose values. Circulating testosterone was significantly lower in UK Gujarati men (17.2 nmol/l [15.7-18.7]) vs. Indian Gujarati men (21.7 [20.0-23.5]) (P = 0.0002) (age-adjusted median [95% CI]). There was no difference by migration status in circulating free testosterone. Sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels were lower in UK migrants (16.8 nmol/l [15.5-18.1]) than in nonmigrants (21.9 nmol/l [20.5-23.3]) (P < 0.0001). Testosterone level correlated positively with insulin sensitivity (HOMA-S) (rho 0.16, P = 0.04). In multivariate analysis, total testosterone was independently and positively associated with logSHBG (normalized beta (beta) = 0.29, P = 0.002) and independently and negatively with waist circumference (beta = -0.19, P = 0.04), in a model also including height, age, migration status, leptin and fasting insulin. Lower circulating testosterone in UK Gujarati men and its association with markers of insulin sensitivity suggest a profound influence of body composition change with migration on testosterone levels. The lower SHBG in this group restores parity in free testosterone. Account should be taken of SHBG in interpreting testosterone levels in men, as well as in women.

  7. Testosterone levels in healthy men and the relation to behavioural and physical characteristics: facts and constructs.

    PubMed

    Zitzmann, M; Nieschlag, E

    2001-03-01

    This review summarises the correlations between testosterone levels and male physical appearance and behaviour. Methodological shortcomings concerning the measurement of testosterone could limit the value of these findings. In addition, testosterone measured in body fluids represents only one step in the cascade of action from production to biological effect, and could therefore provide only a limited view of the complexity of physiological events. Testosterone levels are influenced by conditions that are partly controlled or initiated by the hormone itself, but also by circumstances beyond hormonal or individual control. Different kinds of behaviour are not only subject to influence by environment, but also androgens can reinforce the particular kind of conduct and the behavioural impact can wield negative or positive feedback on testosterone secretion. Therefore, both generalisation and individualisation of study results will lead to doubtful conclusions and prejudices. Results of such studies must be viewed with caution, and over-simplification as well as over-interpretation should be avoided.

  8. Total Testosterone and Calculated Estimates for Free and Bioavailable Testosterone: Influence of Age and Body Mass Index and Establishment of Sex-Specific Reference Ranges.

    PubMed

    Deutschbein, T; Mann, K; Petersenn, S

    2015-10-01

    Measurement of sex steroids is required to evaluate gonadal function, but normative data are lacking (especially for estimates of physiologically active testosterone). Using modern immunoassays, this study established sex-specific reference ranges (2.5% and 97.5% percentiles) for total testosterone (TOT), bioactive testosterone Vermeulen (BTV), free androgen index (FAI), free testosterone Sartorius (FTS), free testosterone Vermeulen (FTV), and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). In the comparative study, subjects were grouped by age (18-30; 31-50; >50 years), BMI (<25; 25-30; >30 kg/m(2)), and sex. Study participants were selected in such a way that each group comprised 12 subjects (e.g., 12 males between 18 and 30 years with a BMI of <25 kg/m(2), and so on), resulting in a total of 216 controls (108 males, 108 females; age: 40.3 ± 1.0; BMI: 27.8 ± 0.4). Multiple stepwise regression analyses were performed (covariates: age, BMI, sex), and sex-specific reference ranges were applied to 50 males (age: 46.1 ± 2.3; BMI: 27.4 ± 0.7) with suspected hypogonadism. Regression analysis identified the strongest predictor of each parameter apart from sex, resulting in age-specific (males: FAI, SHBG, BTV, FTV; females: TOT, FTS, SHBG), BMI-specific (males: TOT, FTS; females: FAI, BTV, FTV) and overall cutoffs for both sexes. In male patients, overall agreement between the results derived from the estimates (i.e., BTV, FTS, FTV) was high (with discordant results in only 4%). In summary, if both the endocrine workup and the clinical presentation were taken into account, the newly established reference ranges allowed reliable identification of hypogonadal males. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Testosterone replacement therapy for older men

    PubMed Central

    Borst, Stephen E; Mulligan, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Despite intensive research on testosterone therapy for older men, important questions remain unanswered. The evidence clearly indicates that many older men display a partial androgen deficiency. In older men, low circulating testosterone is correlated with low muscle strength, with high adiposity, with insulin resistance and with poor cognitive performance. Testosterone replacement in older men has produced benefits, but not consistently so. The inconsistency may arise from differences in the dose and duration of testosterone treatment, as well as selection of the target population. Generally, studies reporting anabolic responses to testosterone have employed higher doses of testosterone for longer treatment periods and have targeted older men whose baseline circulating bioavailable testosterone levels were low. Most studies of testosterone replacement have reported anabolic that are modest compared to what can be achieved with resistance exercise training. However, several strategies currently under evaluation have the potential to produce greater anabolic effects and to do so in a safe manner. At this time, testosterone therapy can not be recommended for the general population of older men. Older men who are hypogonadal are at greater risk for the catabolic effects associated with a number of acute and chronic medical conditions. Future research is likely to reveal benefits of testosterone therapy for some of these special populations. Testosterone therapy produces a number of adverse effects, including worsening of sleep apnea, gynecomastia, polycythemia and elevation of PSA. Efficacy and adverse effects should be assessed frequently throughout the course of therapy. PMID:18225456

  10. Paternal behavior and testosterone plasma levels in the Volcano Mouse Neotomodon alstoni (Rodentia: Muridae).

    PubMed

    Luis, Juana; Ramírez, Lorena; Carmona, Agustín; Ortiz, Guadalupe; Delgado, Jesús; Cárdenas, René

    2009-01-01

    Paternal behavior and testosterone plasma levels in the Volcano Mouse Neotomodon alstoni (Rodentia: Muridae). Although initially it was thought that testosterone inhibited the display of paternal behavior in males of rodents, it has been shown that in some species high testosterone levels are needed for exhibition of paternal care. In captivity, males of Volcano Mouse (Neotomodon alstoni) provide pups the same care provided by the mother, with the exception of suckling. Here we measured plasmatic testosterone concentrations 10 days after mating, five and 20 days postpartum, and 10 days after males were isolated from their families in order to determine possible changes in this hormone, associated to the presence and age of pups. Males of Volcano Mouse exhibited paternal behavior when their testosterone levels were relatively high. Although levels of this hormone did not change with the presence or pups age, males that invested more time in huddling showed higher testosterone levels. It is possible that in the Volcano Mouse testosterone modulates paternal behavior indirectly, as in the California mouse.

  11. Prediction of Long-term Post-operative Testosterone Replacement Requirement Based on the Pre-operative Tumor Volume and Testosterone Level in Pituitary Macroadenoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheng-Chi; Chen, Chung-Ming; Lee, Shih-Tseng; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Pai, Ping-Ching; Toh, Cheng-Hong; Chuang, Chi-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Non-functioning pituitary macroadenomas (NFPAs) are the most prevalent pituitary macroadenomas. One common symptom of NFPA is hypogonadism, which may require long-term hormone replacement. This study was designed to clarify the association between the pre-operative tumor volume, pre-operative testosterone level, intraoperative resection status and the need of long-term post-operative testosterone replacement. Between 2004 and 2012, 45 male patients with NFPAs were enrolled in this prospective study. All patients underwent transsphenoidal surgery. Hypogonadism was defined as total serum testosterone levels of <2.4 ng/mL. The tumor volume was calculated based on the pre- and post-operative magnetic resonance images. We prescribed testosterone to patients with defined hypogonadism or clinical symptoms of hypogonadism. Hormone replacement for longer than 1 year was considered as long-term therapy. The need for long-term post-operative testosterone replacement was significantly associated with larger pre-operative tumor volume (p = 0.0067), and lower pre-operative testosterone level (p = 0.0101). There was no significant difference between the gross total tumor resection and subtotal resection groups (p = 0.1059). The pre-operative tumor volume and testosterone level impact post-operative hypogonadism. By measuring the tumor volume and the testosterone level and by performing adequate tumor resection, surgeons will be able to predict post-operative hypogonadism and the need for long-term hormone replacement. PMID:26537232

  12. Prediction of Long-term Post-operative Testosterone Replacement Requirement Based on the Pre-operative Tumor Volume and Testosterone Level in Pituitary Macroadenoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheng-Chi; Chen, Chung-Ming; Lee, Shih-Tseng; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Pai, Ping-Ching; Toh, Cheng-Hong; Chuang, Chi-Cheng

    2015-11-05

    Non-functioning pituitary macroadenomas (NFPAs) are the most prevalent pituitary macroadenomas. One common symptom of NFPA is hypogonadism, which may require long-term hormone replacement. This study was designed to clarify the association between the pre-operative tumor volume, pre-operative testosterone level, intraoperative resection status and the need of long-term post-operative testosterone replacement. Between 2004 and 2012, 45 male patients with NFPAs were enrolled in this prospective study. All patients underwent transsphenoidal surgery. Hypogonadism was defined as total serum testosterone levels of <2.4 ng/mL. The tumor volume was calculated based on the pre- and post-operative magnetic resonance images. We prescribed testosterone to patients with defined hypogonadism or clinical symptoms of hypogonadism. Hormone replacement for longer than 1 year was considered as long-term therapy. The need for long-term post-operative testosterone replacement was significantly associated with larger pre-operative tumor volume (p = 0.0067), and lower pre-operative testosterone level (p = 0.0101). There was no significant difference between the gross total tumor resection and subtotal resection groups (p = 0.1059). The pre-operative tumor volume and testosterone level impact post-operative hypogonadism. By measuring the tumor volume and the testosterone level and by performing adequate tumor resection, surgeons will be able to predict post-operative hypogonadism and the need for long-term hormone replacement.

  13. Effect of Exogenous Testosterone, Finasteride, and Castration on Serum Level of Thyroxin

    PubMed Central

    Zarei, Fatemeh; Yousofvand, Namdar; Khazaei, Mozafar; Ghanbari, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Background: The secretion of thyroxin (T4) as the main hormone of thyroid gland is regulated by androgens. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of testosterone and finasteride administration and castration on serum levels of T4 and to show the effect of this regulation on total body weight, weight of testis, and the weight of prostate. Methods: Male adult rats (n = 32) were divided into 4 groups (n = 8): Group 1 (control), Group 2 (castration), Group 3 (finasteride: 20 mg/kg/day) and Group 4 (testosterone: 5 mg/kg/day). At the end of the study (35 days), serum level of thyroxin, body weight, weight of testis, and prostate were determined. Results: The data showed that the body weight increased in castrated (P = 0.04) and decreased in testosterone (P = 0.00) groups but did not differ in finasteride (P>0.05) group. There were not any differences in the weight of testis among control, finasteride, and testosterone groups but the weight of prostate increased in testosterone group (P = 0.00) and decreased in castrated (P = 0.03) and finasteride groups (P = 0.04). In addition, the serum level of T4 (nmo/ml) decreased in the three groups: finasteride (P = 0.03), testosterone (P = 0.04), and castrated (P = 0.00). Conclusion: Testosterone in both high and low levels decreased the amount of T4 with a time-dependent manner. PMID:23999719

  14. Effect of exogenous testosterone, finasteride, and castration on serum level of thyroxin.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Fatemeh; Yousofvand, Namdar; Khazaei, Mozafar; Ghanbari, Ali

    2013-01-01

    The secretion of thyroxin (T4) as the main hormone of thyroid gland is regulated by androgens. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of testosterone and finasteride administration and castration on serum levels of T4 and to show the effect of this regulation on total body weight, weight of testis, and the weight of prostate. Male adult rats (n = 32) were divided into 4 groups (n = 8): Group 1 (control), Group 2 (castration), Group 3 (finasteride: 20 mg/kg/day) and Group 4 (testosterone: 5 mg/kg/day). At the end of the study (35 days), serum level of thyroxin, body weight, weight of testis, and prostate were determined. The data showed that the body weight increased in castrated (P = 0.04) and decreased in testosterone (P = 0.00) groups but did not differ in finasteride (P>0.05) group. There were not any differences in the weight of testis among control, finasteride, and testosterone groups but the weight of prostate increased in testosterone group (P = 0.00) and decreased in castrated (P = 0.03) and finasteride groups (P = 0.04). In addition, the serum level of T4 (nmo/ml) decreased in the three groups: finasteride (P = 0.03), testosterone (P = 0.04), and castrated (P = 0.00). Testosterone in both high and low levels decreased the amount of T4 with a time-dependent manner.

  15. Serum Testosterone Levels and Mortality in Men With CKD Stages 3–4

    PubMed Central

    Khurana, Kiranpreet K.; Navaneethan, Sankar D.; Arrigain, Susana; Schold, Jesse D.; Nally, Joseph V.; Shoskes, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypogonadism in men (total testosterone level < 350 ng/dL) is associated with higher risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality in men on dialysis. We evaluated the association of hypogonadism with all-cause mortality in men with non–dialysis-dependent CKD. Study Design Retrospective, cohort study. Setting & Participants 2419 men with CKD stages 3–4 (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR], 15–59 mL/min/1.73 m2) who had total testosterone measured for-cause between January 1, 2005 and October 31, 2011 at a tertiary care center in Cleveland, Ohio. Predictors Total testosterone measured using an immunoassay measurement in 3 forms: a) categorized as low or testosterone replacement therapy versus normal, b) continuous log testosterone, and c) quintiles (100–226, 227–305, 306–392, 393–511, 512–3153 ng/dL). Outcomes Factors associated with low total testosterone, and association between low total testosterone and all-cause mortality were evaluated using logistic regression, Cox proportional hazard models, and Kaplan-Meier survival curves. Results Hypogonadism was found in 1288/2419 (53%) of men. In a multivariable logistic regression analysis, African American ethnicity and higher eGFR were associated with lower odds of having hypogonadism. Diabetes and higher body mass index were associated with higher odds of having hypogonadism. 357/2419 (15%) patients died during a median follow up of 2.3 years. In the multivariate Cox model, testosterone <350 ng/dL or testosterone replacement therapy were not associated with mortality. In a multivariable model also adjusted for testosterone supplementation, higher log testosterone was associated with significantly lower mortality (HR per 1 log unit, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.55–0.89). When compared to the highest quintile, the second lowest quintile of testosterone was associated with higher mortality (HR, 1.53; 95% CI, 1.09–2.16). Limitations Single center study, timing of testosterone testing, lack of

  16. Testosterone Levels in Pre-Menopausal Women are Associated With Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Midlife.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Monika; Wellons, Melissa; Cedars, Marcelle I; VanWagner, Lisa; Gunderson, Erica P; Ajmera, Veeral; Torchen, Laura; Siscovick, David; Carr, J Jeffrey; Terry, James G; Rinella, Mary; Lewis, Cora E; Terrault, Norah

    2017-05-01

    Young women with hyperandrogenism have high risk of metabolic co-morbidities, including increased risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Whether testosterone (the predominant androgen) is associated with NAFLD independent of metabolic co-factors is unclear. Additionally, whether testosterone confers increased risk of NAFLD in women without hyperandrogenism is unknown. Among women in the prospective population-based multicenter Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study, we assessed whether free testosterone levels measured at Year 2 (1987-1988) were associated with prevalent NAFLD at Year 25 (2010-2011) (n=1052). NAFLD was defined using noncontrast abdominal CT scan with liver attenuation≤40 Hounsfield units after excluding other causes of hepatic fat. The association of free testosterone with prevalent NAFLD was assessed by logistic regression. Increasing quintiles of free testosterone were associated with prevalent NAFLD at Year 25 (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 1.25, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04-1.50, P=0.015), independent of insulin resistance, body mass index, waist circumference, and serum lipids. Importantly, the association persisted among n=955 women without androgen excess (AOR 1.27, 95% CI 1.05-1.53, P=0.016). Visceral adipose tissue (VAT) volume partially mediated the association of free testosterone with NAFLD (mediating effect 41.0%, 95% CI 22-119%). Increasing free testosterone is associated with prevalent NAFLD in middle age, even in women without androgen excess. Visceral adiposity appears to play an important role in the relationship between testosterone and NAFLD in women. Testosterone may provide a potential novel target for NAFLD therapeutics, and future studies in pre-menopausal women should consider the importance of testosterone as a risk factor for NAFLD.

  17. Low Serum Testosterone Level Predisposes to Artificial Urinary Sphincter Cuff Erosion.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Matthias D; Morey, Allen F; Sheth, Kunj; Tausch, Timothy J; Siegel, Jordan; Cordon, Billy H; Bury, Matthew I; Cheng, Earl Y; Sharma, Arun K; Gonzalez, Chris M; Kaplan, William E; Kavoussi, Nicholas L; Klein, Alexandra; Roehrborn, Claus G

    2016-11-01

    To examine the association between decreased serum testosterone levels and artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) cuff erosion. We evaluated serum testosterone levels in 53 consecutive patients. Low testosterone was defined as <280 ng/dL and found in 30/53 patients (56.6%). Chi-square and Student t tests, Kaplan-Meier analysis, binary logistic regression, and Cox regression analysis were used to determine statistical significance. Nearly all men with AUS cuff erosions had low serum testosterone (18/20, 90.0%) compared to those without erosions (12/33, 36.4%, P < .001). Mean time to erosion was 1.70 years (0.83-6.86); mean follow-up was 2.76 years (0.34-7.92). Low testosterone had a hazard ratio of 7.15 for erosion in a Cox regression analysis (95% confidence interval 1.64-31.17, P = .009) and Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated decreased erosion-free follow-up (log-rank P = .002). Low testosterone was the sole independent risk factor for erosion in a multivariable model including coronary artery disease and radiation (odds ratio 15.78; 95% confidence interval 2.77-89.92, P = .002). Notably, history of prior AUS, radiation, androgen ablation therapy, or concomitant penile implant did not confound risk of cuff erosion in men with low testosterone levels. Men with low testosterone levels are at a significantly higher risk to experience AUS cuff erosion. Appropriate counseling before AUS implantation is warranted and it is unclear whether testosterone resupplementation will mitigate this risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Basal serum testosterone levels correlate with ovarian reserve and ovarian response in cycling women undergoing in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shan; Li, Yubin; Long, Lingli; Luo, Canqiao; Mai, Qingyun

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the association between basal serum testosterone levels and in vitro fertilization (IVF) parameters in cycling women. A retrospective cohort study was performed at a clinical IVF center, and 495 women with regular menstruation were enrolled. Serum testosterone levels were measured before the start of IVF treatment cycle. We found that basal serum testosterone levels were negatively associated with female age and FSH/LH ratios. In contrast, we found a positive correlation between serum testosterone levels and the number of oocytes and available embryos. However, there was no significant association between testosterone levels and pregnancy outcome. Our results suggest that basal serum testosterone levels were significantly related to certain classic indicators of ovarian reserve, such as age and FSH/LH ratios. Increased testosterone levels improved ovarian response in cycling women, but they fail to predict pregnancy and miscarriage rate.

  19. Provider and Site-Level Determinants of Testosterone Prescribing in the Veterans Healthcare System.

    PubMed

    Jasuja, Guneet K; Bhasin, Shalender; Rose, Adam J; Reisman, Joel I; Hanlon, Joseph T; Miller, Donald R; Morreale, Anthony P; Pogach, Leonard M; Cunningham, Francesca E; Park, Angela; Wiener, Renda S; Gifford, Allen L; Berlowitz, Dan R

    2017-09-01

    Testosterone prescribing rates have increased substantially in the past decade. However, little is known about the context within which such prescriptions occur. We evaluated provider- and site-level determinants of receipt of testosterone and of guideline-concordant testosterone prescribing. This study was cross-sectional in design. This study was conducted at the Veterans Health Administration (VA). Study participants were a national cohort of male patients who had received at least one outpatient prescription within the VA during fiscal year (FY) 2008 to FY 2012. A total of 38,648 providers and 130 stations were associated with these patients. This study measured receipt of testosterone and guideline-concordant testosterone prescribing. Providers ranging in age from 31 to 60 years, with less experience in the VA [all adjusted odds ratio (AOR), <2; P < 0.01] and credentialed as medical doctors in endocrinology (AOR, 3.88; P < 0.01) and urology (AOR, 1.48; P < 0.01) were more likely to prescribe testosterone compared with older providers, providers of longer VA tenure, and primary care providers, respectively. Sites located in the West compared with the Northeast [AOR, 1.75; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.45-2.11] and care received at a community-based outpatient clinic compared with a medical center (AOR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.20-1.24) also predicted testosterone use. Although they were more likely to prescribe testosterone, endocrinologists were also more likely to obtain an appropriate workup before prescribing compared with primary care providers (AOR, 2.14; 95% CI, 1.54-2.97). Our results highlight the opportunity to intervene at both the provider and the site levels to improve testosterone prescribing. This study also provides a useful example of how to examine contributions to prescribing variation at different levels of the health care system.

  20. Serum testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin and total calcium levels predict the calcaneal speed of sound in men.

    PubMed

    Chin, Kok-Yong; Soelaiman, Ima-Nirwana; Mohamed, Isa Naina; Ngah, Wan Zurinah Wan

    2012-08-01

    Variations in sex hormones and the calcium balance can influence bone health in men. The present study aimed to examine the relationship between the calcaneal speed of sound and biochemical determinants of bone mass, such as sex hormones, parathyroid hormones and serum calcium. Data from 549 subjects from the Malaysian Aging Male Study, which included Malay and Chinese men aged 20 years and older residing in the Klang Valley, were used for analysis. The subjects' calcaneal speed of sound was measured, and their blood was collected for biochemical analysis. Two sets of multiple regression models were generated for the total/bioavailable testosterone and estradiol to avoid multicollinearity. The multiple regression results revealed that bioavailable testosterone and serum total calcium were significant predictors of the calcaneal speed of sound in the adjusted model. After adjustment for ethnicity and body mass index, only bioavailable testosterone remained significant; the total serum calcium was marginally insignificant. In a separate model, the total testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin were significant predictors, whereas the total serum calcium was marginally insignificant. After adjustment for ethnicity and body mass index (BMI), the significance persisted for total testosterone and SHBG. After further adjustment for age, none of the serum biochemical determinants was a significant predictor of the calcaneal speed of sound. There is a significant age-dependent relationship between the calcaneal speed of sound and total testosterone, bioavailable testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin in Chinese and Malay men in Malaysia. The relationship between total serum calcium and calcaneal speed of sound is ethnicity-dependent.

  1. Total Testosterone Levels and the Effect of Sildenafil on Type 2 Diabetics with Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hadeed, Nabeel Najib Fadhil; Thanoon, Imad Abdul-Jabar; Al-Mukhtar, Samir Burhanaldin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Hypotestosteronemia has been reported in approximately half of type 2 diabetic men in general. This study aims to assess serum total testosterone levels in type 2 diabetics with erectile dysfunction and to correlate the degree of improvement between sildenafil citrate and testosterone levels. Methods A cross sectional and prospective comparative interventional study was conducted at the Diabetic Clinic of Assalam Teaching Hospital in Mosul, during the period from January 1, 2009 through to December 31, 2011. The study enrolled 120 type 2 diabetic males with erectile dysfunction who were analyzed with regard to age, duration of diabetes, duration and severity of erectile dysfunction, serum total testosteron levels and the degree of response to sildenafil citrate in terms of testosterone levels. The data were statistically analyzed using the independent two-sample Student t test, χ2 test and Pearson correlation test. A p-value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Thirty six percent of type 2 diabetic males with erectile dysfunction were found to have low serum testosterone levels. The hypotestosteronemic and normotestosteronemic subgroups were not significantly different in terms of mean age, duration of diabetes, reduction of libido, and reduction in erectile function. The rate and the degree of improvement of erection by sildenafil in the normo-and-hypotestosteronemic respondents were not significantly different, but the degree of improvement by sildenafil was significantly correlated to testosterone levels among the hypotestosteronemic group. Conclusion Hypotestosteronemia was found in 36% of type 2 diabetic males with erectile dysfunction. The degree of improvement of erectile dysfunction by sildenafil was directly proportional to the serum testosterone levels among the hypotestosteronemic group. Therapeutic supplement with testosterone preparation in the hypotestosteronemic diabetics with erectile dysfunction may improve their

  2. Influence of Altered Mass Loading on Testosterone Levels and Testicular Mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Tommy J.; Ortiz, R. M.; Wade, C. E.; Hargens, Alan R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Effects of altered load on testosterone levels and testicular mass in mammals are not well defined. Two separate studies (loading;centrifuged; +2G(sub z) and unloading;hindlimb suspension;HLS) were conducted to provide a better understanding of the effects of mass loading on testosterone levels and testicular mass. Daily urine samples were collected, and testicular mass measured at the end of the study. +2G(sub z): Sprague-Dawley rats (230-250 g) were centrifuged for 12 days at +2G(sub z): 8 centrifuged (EC) and 8 off centrifuge controls (OCC). EC had lower body mass, however relative testicular mass was greater. EC exhibited an increase in excreted testosterone levels between days 2 (T2) and 6 (T6), and returned to baseline at T9. HLS: To assess the effects of unloading Sprague-Dawley rats (125-150 g) were studied for 12 days: 10 suspended (Exp) and 10 ambulatory (Ctl). Exp had lower body mass during the study, with reduced absolute and relative testicular mass. Exp demonstrated lower excreted testosterone levels from T5-T12. Conclusions: Loading appears to stimulate anabolism, as opposed to unloading, as indicated by greater relative testicular mass and excreted testosterone levels. Reported changes in muscle mass during loading and unloading coincide with similar changes in excreted testosterone levels.

  3. Social factors increase fecal testosterone levels in wild male gray-cheeked mangabeys (Lophocebus albigena).

    PubMed

    Arlet, Małgorzata E; Kaasik, Ants; Molleman, Freerk; Isbell, Lynne; Carey, James R; Mänd, Raivo

    2011-04-01

    Testosterone can be expected to play a significant role in mediating behavior and life history in social animals, but the number of species with data from the wild is still too small to make generalizations. We investigated the influence of social factors (social status, aggression, and reproductive females) and environmental variation (rainfall and temperature) on fecal testosterone concentrations in wild male gray-cheeked mangabeys (Lophocebus albigena) living in five groups in Kibale National Park, Uganda. This species is phylogenetically closely related to baboons, but is arboreal, with multi-male, multi-female groups rarely exceeding 20 individuals. We analyzed 358 fecal samples from 21 adult males. We found that the highest-ranking males had the highest testosterone concentrations while immigrant males had the lowest testosterone concentrations. Aggression was not correlated with testosterone levels. The presence of females with sexual swellings at their most tumescent stage increased testosterone concentrations in all males. Finally, individuals tended to have lower testosterone when the temperature was higher.

  4. High levels of testosterone inhibit ovarian follicle development by repressing the FSH signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Cui, Yu-qian; Zhao, Han; Liu, Hong-bin; Zhao, Shi-dou; Gao, Yuan; Mu, Xiao-li; Gao, Fei; Chen, Zi-jiang

    2015-10-01

    The effect of high concentrations of testosterone on ovarian follicle development was investigated. Primary follicles and granulosa cells were cultured in vitro in media supplemented with a testosterone concentration gradient. The combined effects of testosterone and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) on follicular growth and granulosa cell gonadotropin receptor mRNA expression were also investigated. Follicle growth in the presence of high testosterone concentrations was promoted at early stages (days 1-7), but inhibited at later stage (days 7-14) of in vitro culture. Interestingly, testosterone-induced follicle development arrest was rescued by treatment with high concentrations of FSH (400 mIU/mL). In addition, in cultured granulosa cells, high testosterone concentrations induced cell proliferation, and increased the mRNA expression level of FSH receptor (FSHR), and luteinized hormone/choriogonadotropin receptor. It was concluded that high concentrations of testosterone inhibited follicle development, most likely through regulation of the FSH signaling pathway, although independently from FSHR downregulation. These findings are an important step in further understanding the pathogenesis of polycystic ovary syndrome.

  5. Can testosterone level be a good predictor of late-onset hypogonadism?

    PubMed

    Heidari, R; Sajadi, H; Pourmand, A; Pourmand, G

    2015-05-01

    Androgens are essential for the development and growth of the genitalia. They regulate the erectile physiology by multiple mechanisms. Several studies have examined associations among sex hormones' serum levels, erectile function and sex drive. We sought to identify a protocol for using testosterone in men with erectile dysfunction and late-onset hypogonadism (LOH). During a 16-month period, men with erectile dysfunction who presented to the andrology clinic were selected. They underwent a complete physical examination and filled out the International Index of Erectile Function-5 questionnaire. Serum luteinising hormone (LH) and testosterone levels were evaluated. Patients received a single intramuscular injection of 250 mg testosterone. Thereafter, serum levels of LH and testosterone were measured 3 weeks later. The mean age was 53 years old. After treating patients with testosterone, 45 (94%) showed improvement in LOH symptoms including libido, loss of energy, irritability and quality of life. The mean International Index of Erectile Function was 9 and 13.1, prior to and after treatment respectively. Mean serum testosterone levels before and after treatment were 4.2 and 4.1 ng ml(-1) respectively (P = 0.849). Mean serum LH revealed a significant decrease after the study (P = 0.004) (6.12 and 5.1 ng ml(-1) , before and after the study respectively). Our findings suggested that testosterone replacement therapy improves libido and LOH symptoms in individuals with almost normal or lower limit normal value of serum testosterone levels. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. Do Sex Offenders Have Higher Levels of Testosterone? Results From a Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jennifer S; Gravel, Jason

    2016-03-21

    The purpose of the current study is to review the available scientific evidence on the relationship between testosterone and sexual aggression. A systematic search for all primary studies comparing basal testosterone levels in sex offenders and non-sex offenders was undertaken across 20 electronic databases using an explicit search strategy and inclusion/exclusion criteria. A total of seven studies were identified and 11 effect sizes were computed; effects were pooled using both fixed and random effects meta-analysis models. Although individual study findings present a mix of results wherein sex offenders have higher or lower baseline levels of testosterone than non-sex offenders, pooled results indicate no overall difference between groups. Moderators of the analyses suggest possibly lower rates of testosterone in child molesters than controls; however, results are dependent on study weighting. Limitations, policy implications with respect to chemical castration laws, and future directions for research are discussed.

  7. Investigation of Associations Between Exposures to Pesticides and Testosterone Levels in Thai Farmers.

    PubMed

    Panuwet, Parinya; Ladva, Chandresh; Barr, Dana Boyd; Prapamontol, Tippawan; Meeker, John D; D'Souza, Priya Esilda; Maldonado, Héctor; Ryan, P Barry; Robson, Mark G

    2017-09-13

    We conducted a cross-sectional study to assess the relationship between pesticide exposures and testosterone levels in 133 male Thai farmers. Urine and serum samples were collected concurrently from participants. Urine was analyzed for levels of specific- and non-specific metabolites of organophosphates (OPs), pyrethroids, select herbicides, and fungicides. Serum was analyzed for total and free testosterone. Linear regression analyses revealed significant negative relationships between total testosterone and the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) after controlling for covariates (e.g., age, BMI, smoking status). Positive significant associations were found between some OP pesticides and total testosterone. Due to the small sample size and the observational nature of the study, future investigation is needed to confirm our results and to elucidate the biological mechanisms.

  8. Relationships of Polychlorinated Biphenyls and Dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p’-DDE) with Testosterone Levels in Adolescent Males

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Mia V.; Deane, Glenn D.; Nelder, Kyrie R.; DeCaprio, Anthony P.; Jacobs, Agnes

    2013-01-01

    Background: Concern persists over endocrine-disrupting effects of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) on human growth and sexual maturation. Potential effects of toxicant exposures on testosterone levels during puberty are not well characterized. Objectives: In this study we evaluated the relationship between toxicants [polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p´-DDE), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and lead] and testosterone levels among 127 Akwesasne Mohawk males 10 to < 17 years of age with documented toxicant exposures. Methods: Data were collected between February 1996 and January 2000. Fasting blood specimens were collected before breakfast by trained Akwesasne Mohawk staff. Multivariable regression models were used to estimates associations between toxicants and serum testosterone, adjusted for other toxicants, Tanner stage, and potential confounders. Results: The sum of 16 PCB congeners (Σ16PCBs) that were detected in ≥ 50% of the population was significantly and negatively associated with serum testosterone levels, such that a 10% change in exposure was associated with a 5.6% decrease in testosterone (95% CI: –10.8, –0.5%). Of the 16 congeners, the more persistent ones (Σ8PerPCBs) were related to testosterone, whereas the less persistent ones, possibly reflecting more recent exposure, were not. When PCB congeners were subgrouped, the association was significant for the sum of eight more persistent PCBs (5.7% decrease; 95% CI: –11, –0.4%), and stronger than the sum of six less persistent congeners (3.1% decrease; 95% CI: –7.2, 0.9%). p,p´-DDE was positively but not significantly associated with serum testosterone (5.2% increase with a 10% increase in exposure; 95% CI: –0.5, 10.9%). Neither lead nor HCB was significantly associated with testosterone levels. Conclusions: Exposure to PCBs, particularly the more highly persistent congeners, may negatively influence testosterone levels among adolescent males. The

  9. Association of testosterone levels and future suicide attempts in females with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Sher, Leo; Grunebaum, Michael F; Sullivan, Gregory M; Burke, Ainsley K; Cooper, Thomas B; Mann, J John; Oquendo, Maria A

    2014-09-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that testosterone may play a role in the pathophysiology of mood disorders in females. This is the first prospective study to examine whether blood testosterone levels predict suicide attempts in females with bipolar disorder. Females with a DSM-IV diagnosis of a bipolar disorder in a depressive or mixed episode with at least one past suicide attempt were enrolled. Demographic and clinical parameters were assessed and recorded. Plasma testosterone was assayed using a double antibody radioimmunoassay procedure. Patients were followed up prospectively for up to 2.5 years. At baseline, testosterone levels positively correlated with the number of previous major depressive episodes and suicide attempts. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis found that higher baseline testosterone levels predicted suicide attempts during the follow-up period. A limitation of the study is that the sample size is modest. Another limitation is that we did not have a bipolar nonattempter or healthy volunteer control group for comparison. Testosterone levels may predict suicidal behavior in women with bipolar disorder. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Is preference for ovulatory female's faces associated with men's testosterone levels?

    PubMed

    Bobst, Cora; Lobmaier, Janek S

    2014-08-01

    Women's ovulation is perceivable with different senses. Already subtle face shape differences are enough to trigger men's preference for the ovulatory female. The aim of the present study is to investigate if men's testosterone level can be linked to their preference for the ovulatory female. Thirty-nine heterosexual participants were shown face pairs of which one of them was transformed to the shape of a prototype face of a woman in her luteal cycle phase and the other was transformed to the shape of a prototype face of an ovulatory woman. Participants were asked to choose the face which they perceived as being more attractive (attractiveness task), or the woman with whom they would have better chances to get a date (dating task). In both tasks, the ovulatory female was chosen more often. Testosterone was not predictive for the chosen face; regardless of testosterone level men preferred the ovulatory woman. However testosterone predicted how confident the men were with their choice. Men with lower testosterone levels were more confident with their choice than men with higher testosterone levels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Serum testosterone levels and excessive erythrocytosis during the process of adaptation to high altitudes

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Gustavo F

    2013-01-01

    Populations living at high altitudes (HAs), particularly in the Peruvian Andes, are characterized by a mixture of subjects with erythrocytosis (16 g dl−121 g dl−1). Elevated haemoglobin values (EE) are associated with chronic mountain sickness, a condition reflecting the lack of adaptation to HA. According to current data, native men from regions of HA are not adequately adapted to live at such altitudes if they have elevated serum testosterone levels. This seems to be due to an increased conversion of dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) to testosterone. Men with erythrocytosis at HAs show higher serum androstenedione levels and a lower testosterone/androstenedione ratio than men with EE, suggesting reduced 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17beta-HSD) activity. Lower 17beta-HSD activity via Δ4-steroid production in men with erythrocytosis at HA may protect against elevated serum testosterone levels, thus preventing EE. The higher conversion of DHEAS to testosterone in subjects with EE indicates increased 17beta-HSD activity via the Δ5-pathway. Currently, there are various situations in which people live (human biodiversity) with low or high haemoglobin levels at HA. Antiquity could be an important adaptation component for life at HA, and testosterone seems to participate in this process. PMID:23524530

  12. A herbal medicine, saikokaryukotsuboreito, improves serum testosterone levels and affects sexual behavior in old male mice.

    PubMed

    Zang, Zhi Jun; Ji, Su Yun; Dong, Wang; Zhang, Ya Nan; Zhang, Er Hong; Bin, Zhang

    2015-06-01

    Late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) is a clinical syndrome characterized with aging and declined serum testosterone levels. Sexual symptoms are also essential for the diagnosis of LOH. Testosterone replacement therapy is used widely to treat LOH. However, the side effects of it should not be ignored, such as fluid retention, hypertension and spermatogenic suppression. Therefore, alternate treatment modalities have been pursued. Herbal medicines used widely in China have achieved satisfying results with little side effects. Nonetheless, there are few pharmacological researches on them. In this study, 24-month-old mice were used as LOH animal models to explore the pharmacological effects of a herbal medicine, saikokaryukotsuboreito (SKRBT), on serum testosterone levels and sexual functions. Furthermore, the expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein, a kind of rate-limiting enzyme of testosterone synthesis, was also examined. As a result, SKRBT improved the serum testosterone levels of these mice at a dose of 300 and 450 mg/kg. Multiple measures of sexual behavior were enhanced. The expression of StAR was also increased. Therefore, this study suggested that SKRBT can improve the serum testosterone levels by activating the expression of StAR and might be a viable option to treat sexual symptoms caused by LOH.

  13. Free and bioavailable fractions of sex steroids may influence bones in young men, depending on age and oestradiol level.

    PubMed

    Szyska-Skrobot, Dorota; Marchlewska, Katarzyna; Walczak-Jędrzejowska, Renata; Oszukowska, Elżbieta; Filipiak, Eliza; Kula, Piotr; Mężyk, Ryszard; Kowalska, Aldona; Jaszewski, Ryszard; Słowikowska-Hilczer, Jolanta; Kula, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Longitudinal bone growth ceases by the end of puberty, and it is thought to be a result, in both sexes, of increased pubertal oestrogen serum concentrations. Since peak bone mass is achieved by the third decade of life or later, the aim of this study was to relate sex steroid hormones and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels to bone quality in men during their third and fourth decades of life. Eighty men, healthy volunteers aged between 18 and 39 years, were subjected to an interviewer-administered questionnaire, body mass index (BMI) measurement, blood sample and calcaneal quantitative ultrasound (QUS) (Hologic-SAHARA). Blood was assessed for testosterone (T), oestradiol (E2), dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), SHBG, luteinising hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH). Free and bioavailable T and E2 levels were calculated knowing SHBG and albumin levels. While T, E2, DHEAS, LH and FSH levels were not related, free and bioavailable fractions of T and E2 were positively associated with QUS readings. SHBG level was associated negatively. After dichotomisation for age, the associations remained significant only for younger subjects (18-30 years, n = 47). After adjustment for other co-variants, only SHBG in younger subjects retained its negative association with QUS. Older subjects (31-39 years, n = 33) revealed higher BMI and lower serum concentrations of total (-17 %), free (-18.5%) and bioavailable (-22.5%) levels of E2 than younger subjects. Free and bioavailable fractions of sex steroids may influence bones in young men, depending on age and E2 level.

  14. Fathers have lower salivary testosterone levels than unmarried men and married non-fathers in Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Peter B; Jeffrey Yang, Chi-Fu; Pope, Harrison G

    2005-01-01

    A growing body of evidence, almost entirely from North America, has found that male testosterone levels are positively associated with mating effort (male–male competition and mate-seeking behaviour), while lower testosterone levels have been associated with affiliative pair bonding and paternal care. To expand the cross-cultural scope of this research, here we investigate variation in salivary testosterone levels among Chinese men in relation to marital and parenting variables. One hundred and twenty-six men drawn from a Beijing university setting between the ages of 21 and 38 completed a questionnaire and provided both morning and late afternoon saliva samples from which testosterone levels were measured. The 66 unmarried men had slightly higher levels of testosterone than the 30 married non-fathers, but this difference was not statistically significant. However, the 30 fathers exhibited significantly lower testosterone levels than both unmarried men and married non-fathers. Among married non-fathers, marital relationship quality was not significantly related to testosterone levels. Among married fathers, men with children aged less than 4 years of age did not have lower testosterone levels than men with older children. These data are the first outside of North America to show lower testosterone levels among fathers, and lend support to the theoretical view that male testosterone levels differ according to mating and parenting effort. PMID:16543176

  15. The relationship between serum total testosterone and free testosterone levels with serum hemoglobin and hematocrit levels: a study in 1221 men.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yu Seob; You, Jae Hyung; Cha, Jai Seong; Park, Jong Kwan

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the relationship between serum total testosterone (TT) and free testosterone (FT) levels in men with anemia. We reviewed the records of 1221 subjects between March 2009 and December 2014. All the subjects' blood samples were drawn for TT and FT assays. Their serum hemoglobin (Hb) and serum hematocrit (Hct) levels were measured. The primary objective of our study was to investigate the association between TT and FT levels with Hb and Hct levels. The mean age was 59.82 ± 12.71 years. The mean TT and FT levels were 4.54 ± 2.02 ng/mL and 10.63 ± 3.69 pg/mL, respectively. The mean Hb and Hct levels were 14.72 ± 1.34 g/dL and 43.11 ± 3.75%, respectively. Subjects with low TT (<2.35 ng/mL) had low Hb and Hct levels (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, respectively). TT was positively associated with FT, Hb, and Hct. TT and FT levels were significantly lower in older men. Subjects with low TT and FT levels had low Hb and Hct levels. This suggests that TT and FT play a significant role in erythropoiesis. Testosterone replacement therapy may be effective in men with hypogonadism to reduce the incidence of anemia.

  16. The putative effects of D-Aspartic acid on blood testosterone levels: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Roshanzamir, Farzad; Safavi, Seyyed Morteza

    2017-01-01

    Background: D-Aspartic acid (D-Asp) is in invertebrate and vertebrate neuroendocrine tissues, where it carries out important physiological functions. Recently, it has been reported that D-Asp is involved in the synthesis and release of testosterone and is assumed can be used as a testosterone booster for infertile men, and by athletes to increase muscle mass and strength. Objective: The aim of this review is to summarize available evidence related to the effects of D-Asp on serum testosterone levels. Materials and Methods: We conducted a systematic review of all type studies, which evaluated the effect of the D-Asp on blood testosterone including published papers until October 2015, using PubMed, ISI Web of Science, ProQuest and Scopus database. Results: With 396 retrieved records, 23 animal studies and 4 human studies were included. In vivo and in vitro animal studies revealed the effect of D-Asp depending on species, sex and organ-specific. Our results showed that exogenous D-Asp enhances testosterone levels in male animal’s studies, whereas studies in human yielded inconsistent results. The evidence for this association in man is still sparse, mostly because of limited number and poor quality studies. Conclusion: There is an urgent need for more and well-designed human clinical trials with larger sample sizes and longer duration to investigate putative effects of D-Asp on testosterone concentrations. PMID:28280794

  17. Low testosterone levels and unimpaired melatonin secretion in young males with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Robeva, R; Kirilov, G; Tomova, A; Kumanov, P

    2006-12-01

    The interrelations between testosterone, insulin and melatonin levels in males with metabolic syndrome (MS) are still not clarified, especially in young age groups. The aim of the present study was to compare the testosterone serum levels in young men with MS to those in healthy controls, and to determine the possible changes in their melatonin rhythm, as well as the relation between melatonin, insulin and lipid profile. Fasting insulin and testosterone concentrations were measured in 10 healthy nonobese and 10 MS patients. Blood samples for melatonin, insulin and luteinizing hormone (LH) were collected at 19.00, 03.00 and 11.00 hours. A significant difference was found between the testosterone levels in controls and patients. Luteinizing hormone levels in both groups were similar, however, higher night LH levels in MS patients were observed. No changes in the melatonin concentrations of the two groups were found. In conclusion, total testosterone levels were significantly lower in young men with MS compared with healthy age-matched controls. Mild hypoandrogenia in hyperinsulinaemic patients was not related with changes in their melatonin levels. No alterations in the endogenous melatonin rhythm of the MS patients were found.

  18. A Pilot Study on BMI, Serum Testosterone and Estradiol Levels in Allergic Male Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lokaj-Berisha, Violeta; Gacaferri-Lumezi, Besa; Berisha, Naser; Gashi-Hoxha, Sanije

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The dramatic increase in the prevalence of high body mass index (BMI) increases the prevalence of allergic diseases, both in adults and children and obesity is associated with hypogonadism in adult males. AIM: We aimed to evaluate the effect of high body mass index on plasma concentrations of testosterone and estradiol in young pubertal and adult males with allergic diseases. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Morning fasting blood samples were obtained form 51 allergic patients and 6 healthy volunteer males between the ages 11-57 years (Mean 26.9, DS ± 11.9 years). Total testosterone, estradiol, FSH and LH concentrations were measured by radioimmunoassay. All participants were subjected to skin prick tests with test kit G aeroallergens, and BMI was calculated according to the body weight divided by the square of height (kg/m2). RESULTS: Low levels of testosterone and high levels of estradiol were associated with high BMI only in patients with asthma/rhinitis, but not in asthma patients. Allergic dermatitis/urticaria group along with healthy controls were overweight but within normal ranges for total testosterone and estradiol concentrations. Patients with allergic rhinitis were within normal ranges for BMI, total testosterone and estradiol concentrations. CONCLUSION: High BMI is not always associated with low levels of testosterone and high levels of estradiol in our patients with allergic diseases, but low levels of testosterone are present in patients with asthma and asthma/rhinitis although not among patients with rhinitis only. Our results should be confirmed in a larger group of participants. PMID:27275293

  19. Testosterone Therapies.

    PubMed

    Khera, Mohit

    2016-05-01

    There are numerous testosterone formulations now available, and patients and clinicians should take into account the "4 Cs": cost, compliance, convenience, and concentration levels. Testosterone is a natural contraceptive and should not be used in men trying to achieve a pregnancy. All testosterone gels and solutions have an increased risk of transference, and there should be increased caution when in contact with children and pregnant women.

  20. Maternal and female fetal testosterone levels are associated with maternal age and gestational weight gain.

    PubMed

    Kallak, Theodora Kunovac; Hellgren, Charlotte; Skalkidou, Alkistis; Sandelin-Francke, Lotta; Ubhayasekhera, Kumari; Bergquist, Jonas; Axelsson, Ove; Comasco, Erika; Campbell, Rebecca E; Sundström Poromaa, Inger

    2017-10-01

    Prenatal androgen exposure has been suggested to play a role in polycystic ovary syndrome. Given the limited information on what maternal characteristics influence maternal testosterone levels, and the even less explored routes by which female fetus androgen exposure would occur, the aim of this study was to investigate the impact of maternal age, BMI, weight gain, depressed mood and aromatase SNPs on testosterone levels in maternal serum and amniotic fluid of female fetuses. Blood samples from pregnant women (n = 216) obtained in gestational weeks 35-39, and pre-labor amniotic fluid samples from female fetuses (n = 56), taken at planned Caesarean section or in conjunction with amniotomy for induction of labor, were analyzed. Maternal serum testosterone and amniotic fluid testosterone and cortisol were measured by tandem mass spectrometry. Multiparity (β = -0.28, P < 0.001), self-rated depression (β = 0.26, P < 0.001) and weight gain (β = 0.18, P < 0.05) were independent explanatory factors for the maternal total testosterone levels. Maternal age (β = -0.34, P < 0.001), weight gain (β = 0.19, P < 0.05) and amniotic fluid cortisol levels (β = 0.44, P < 0.001) were independent explanatory factors of amniotic fluid testosterone in female fetuses, explaining 64.3% of the variability in amniotic fluid testosterone. Young maternal age and excessive maternal weight gain may increase the prenatal androgen exposure of female fetuses. Further studies are needed to explore this finding. © 2017 The authors.

  1. Spine and total body bone mineral density and serum testosterone levels in male athletes.

    PubMed

    Smith, R; Rutherford, O M

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of intense endurance vs strengthening exercise on bone mass and serum testosterone levels in male athletes. Bone mineral density (BMD) of the total body and spine and serum testosterone levels were measured in male rowers (n = 12), triathletes (n = 8) and sedentary controls (n = 13). The total body scan also gave values for percentage body fat and regional bone densities. Calcium intake and physical activity levels were measured by questionnaire. The rowers had significantly higher BMD in the spine and total body than the triathletes (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05 respectively) and sedentary controls (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05). There were no differences between the triathletes and controls. Serum testosterone levels were significantly lower in the triathletes than in the controls (P < 0.05); there was no significant difference between the rowers and controls. All groups fell within the normal range for testosterone. In a step-wise multiple regression, including age, body mass, height, calcium intake and activity, no single factor had a significant effect on spine BMD. Body mass had a significant effect on total body BMD and could account for the differences between the groups. A significant positive correlation was found between calcium intake and total body BMD. The heavy weight training typical of rowing training seemed to result in significant bone accretion. The low testosterone levels in the triathletes may have negated any positive effect of the increased exercise on BMD.

  2. The effect of mad honey on testosterone levels of male rats.

    PubMed

    Tatli, O; Karaca, Y; Turkmen, S; Gulgen, G S; Sahin, A; Eryigit, U; Fazli, O; Karaguzel, E; Mentese, A; Orem, A; Cansu, A; Turedi, S; Gunduz, A

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the effect of mad honey on sexual performance. In traditional medicine in Turkey, mad honey is used to improve appetite, to heighten mental alertness, to reduce joint pain, to eliminate gastrointestinal system pains and to increase sexual performance. In this experimental animal study eighteen Sprague Dawley male rats were randomized into three groups, a control group, a normal honey group and a mad honey group. Rats in the treatment groups were given a daily dose of 80 mg/kg normal honey or mad honey throughout the 30-day study period. Total testosterone, free testosterone, FSH, LH, estradiol, and progesterone levels were subsequently investigated from blood sera on day 30. Comparison of blood total testosterone levels among the groups revealed significantly higher levels in the mad honey group compared to the normal honey and control groups (p = 0.006, p = 0.00). Free testosterone levels were also significantly higher in the mad honey group than in the normal honey and control groups (p = 0.023, p = 0.01). No statistically significant differences were determined for other hormonal measurements. This study revealed a significant increase in both total and free testosterone levels in mad-honey group (Tab. 1, Fig. 2, Ref. 16).

  3. Circulating testosterone and inhibin levels at different ages in the male beluga (Delphinapterus leucas).

    PubMed

    Katsumata, Etsuko; Ueda, Yoko; Arai, Kazutoshi; Katsumata, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Miori; Watanabe, Gen; Taya, Kazuyoshi

    2012-03-01

    This study is the first report on circulating testosterone and inhibin levels in a species of whales, the beluga. Circulating testosterone and immunoreactive (ir-) inhibin levels in two captive male belugas ("Nack", originally from Canada and "Duke", from the Okhotsk Sea) were measured every month for 9 years between 1995 and 2003. Assuming that clearly increased testosterone levels in the circulation indicates that the belugas had reached sexual maturity, at the ages of 10 ("Nack") and 11 years old ("Duke"). Their testosterone levels before the significant increase (pre-pubertal) were 0.42 ± 0.07 ng/ml (n=18) and 0.35 ± 0.10 ng/ml (n=18) and, those of after the increase (maturity) were 1.65 ± 0.14 ng/m l (n=74) and 2.06 ± 0.14 ng/ml (n=74). Circulating ir-inhibin levels before sexual maturity were 0.78 ± 0.04 ng/ml (n=18) and 0.64 ± 0.04 ng/ml (n=15) and, after sexual maturity were 0.52 ± 0.02 ng/ml (n=56) and 0.43 ± 0.02 ng/ml (n=67). Seasonal changes were observed in the testosterone levels after sexual maturity and the levels increased during March and April in Canadian origin "Nack", and peaked in February in Okhotsk origin "Duke". Circulating ir-inhibin level gradually decreased as they aged. A negative correlation between the circulating testosterone and ir-inhibin was observed. No seasonal changes were observed in the ir-inhibin levels after sexual maturity. These data will surely correspond to clarification of endocrinology and the successful reproduction of the beluga.

  4. Effects of methotrexate on serum testosterone level in sleep deprived male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Akindele, O O; Kunle-Alabi, O T; Oghenetega, B O; Adeyemi, D H; Raji, Y

    2015-06-01

    Sleep deprivation has been reported to decrease testosterone levels but the mechanism remains unclear. Studies have shown that sleep deprivation increases interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β), a pro-inflammatory cytokine and that increased IL-1β levels cause reductions in Leydig cell production of testosterone. This study was therefore designed to determine the effects of methotrexate, an IL-1β blocker on serum testosterone levels in sleep deprived male Wistar rats. Twenty male Wistar rats were randomly assigned into four groups (n = 5); group I (Control) received the vehicle (1% tween 80 solution); group II (methotrexate) received 0.5 mg/kg body weight methotrexate; group III (SD) was sleep deprived and received the vehicle; group IV (SD+Methotrexate) was sleep deprived and received 0.5 mg/kg body weight methotrexate. Sleep deprivation was induced using the modified multiple platform technique for 14 days. Treatments were administered twice weekly by oral gavage for 14 days. Blood was collected on day 14 and serum was obtained for analyses of testosterone, LH and FSH levels. IL-1β level and histology of the testis were also determined. Data were expressed as Mean ± SEM and analysed using ANOVA. p < 0.05 was considered significant. Serum testosterone levels were significantly decreased while testicular IL-1β was increased in SD and SD+Methotrexate compared with Control. FSH and LH levels were not significantly different among the groups. Results of this study suggest that reduction in serum testosterone level in sleep deprived rats is not dependent on increased level of IL-1β.

  5. Effects of Testosterone Administration for 3 Years on Subclinical Atherosclerosis Progression in Older Men With Low or Low-Normal Testosterone Levels: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Basaria, Shehzad; Harman, S Mitchell; Travison, Thomas G; Hodis, Howard; Tsitouras, Panayiotis; Budoff, Matthew; Pencina, Karol M; Vita, Joseph; Dzekov, Connie; Mazer, Norman A; Coviello, Andrea D; Knapp, Philip E; Hally, Kathleen; Pinjic, Emma; Yan, Mingzhu; Storer, Thomas W; Bhasin, Shalender

    2015-08-11

    Testosterone use in older men is increasing, but its long-term effects on progression of atherosclerosis are unknown. To determine the effect of testosterone administration on subclinical atherosclerosis progression in older men with low or low-normal testosterone levels. Testosterone's Effects on Atherosclerosis Progression in Aging Men (TEAAM) was a placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel-group randomized trial involving 308 men 60 years or older with low or low-normal testosterone levels (100-400 ng/dL; free testosterone <50 pg/mL), recruited at 3 US centers. Recruitment took place between September 2004 and February 2009; the last participant completed the study in May 2012. One hundred fifty-six participants were randomized to receive 7.5 g of 1% testosterone and 152 were randomized to receive placebo gel packets daily for 3 years. The dose was adjusted to achieve testosterone levels between 500 and 900 ng/dL. Coprimary outcomes included common carotid artery intima-media thickness and coronary artery calcium; secondary outcomes included sexual function and health-related quality of life. Baseline characteristics were similar between groups: patients were a mean age of 67.6 years; 42% had hypertension; 15%, diabetes; 15%, cardiovascular disease; and 27%, obesity. The rate of change in intima-media thickness was 0.010 mm/year in the placebo group and 0.012 mm/year in the testosterone group (mean difference adjusted for age and trial site, 0.0002 mm/year; 95% CI, -0.003 to 0.003, P = .89). The rate of change in the coronary artery calcium score was 41.4 Agatston units/year in the placebo group and 31.4 Agatston units/year in the testosterone group (adjusted mean difference, -10.8 Agatston units/year; 95% CI, -45.7 to 24.2; P = .54). Changes in intima-media thickness or calcium scores were not associated with change in testosterone levels among individuals assigned to receive testosterone. Sexual desire, erectile function, overall sexual function

  6. Comparison of Serum Cortisol and Testosterone Levels in Acute and Chronic Central Serous Chorioretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Natung, Tanie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare the levels of serum cortisol and testosterone in acute and chronic central serous chorio-retinopathy (CSC). Methods Serum cortisol and testosterone levels in 30 patients with either acute or chronic CSC were evaluated using chemiluminescent immunoassay. Results The mean age was 42.43 ± 6.37 years (range, 32 to 56 years). The mean 8:00 to 9.00 a.m. serum cortisol level was 12.61 ± 4.74 µg/dL (range, 6.58 to 27.42 µg/dL). The mean serum testosterone level was 5.88 ± 1.57 ng/dL (range, 2.81 to 9.94 ng/dL). The mean visual acuity was 20 / 65.07 ± 40.56 (range, 20 / 25 to 20 / 200). There was no statistically significant difference in the mean levels of serum cortisol and testosterone between the acute and chronic cases (p > 0.05), but there was a statistically significant difference in the mean presenting visual acuity in the two groups (p < 0.05). Conclusions All except one patient in the acute group had normal levels of serum cortisol. Testosterone levels were within the normal range in both the acute and chronic cases of CSC. There is unlikely to be any statistically significant difference in the mean levels of serum cortisol and testosterone between the acute and chronic cases, but there may be a statistically significant difference in the mean presenting visual acuity in these groups. PMID:26635454

  7. Right-left digit ratio (2D:4D) predicts free testosterone levels associated with a physical challenge.

    PubMed

    Kilduff, Liam; Cook, Christian J; Bennett, Mark; Crewther, Blair; Bracken, Richard Michael; Manning, John

    2013-01-01

    There is evidence that the digit ratio (2D:4D) is a negative correlate of prenatal levels of testosterone, but there is no association between 2D:4D and the circulating levels of both total and free testosterone. Sports provide a physical challenge and participants often show increased levels of free testosterone immediately preceding and during competition. We tested this hypothesis of a link between 2D:4D and testosterone under challenge in 79 professional rugby players using the following procedures; (i) 25 players were physically challenged using a repeated sprint agility test, and saliva samples were assayed for testosterone immediately preceding the repeated sprint agility test (time 1) and 5 minutes (time 2) and 20 minutes after completion of the repeated sprint ability (time 3); (ii) 54 players were also tested for salivary testosterone in an unchallenged condition. We found that right-left 2D:4D was significantly and negatively related to testosterone concentrations at times 1, 2 and 3 following the repeated sprint agility test (P < 0.05) and there was no association between the 2D:4D and basal testosterone levels in the unchallenged group. We suggest that low right-left 2D:4D is a predictive marker of free testosterone responsiveness when trained men are physically challenged, and that this association is programmed by the action of prenatal testosterone.

  8. How do we love? Romantic love style in men is related to lower testosterone levels.

    PubMed

    Babková Durdiaková, J; Celec, P; Koborová, I; Sedláčková, T; Minárik, G; Ostatníková, D

    2017-09-22

    Testosterone has been widely investigated in associations with many aspects of social interactions, emotions and behavior. No research has been conducted on its contribution to the variability of love styles in human. The aim of this paper was to uncover the possible relationship between not only the actual plasma testosterone levels, but also the prenatal testosterone level (expressed as 2D:4D ratio) and the sensitivity of androgen receptor and love typology in young healthy men. There are six love styles which are primary including Eros (passionate romantic love), Ludus (playful) and Storge (friendly) and secondary love consisting of Mania (obsessive), Pragma (practical realistic) and Agape (altruistic). Our results pointed out that low testosterone concentrations are associated with higher score for Eros, Ludus, Pragma, Mania love style. No significant association was proved for other tested parameters of androgenicity (2D:4D, sensitivity of androgen receptor) and love style after correction was applied. Different attitudes and behavior in relationships do have a biological foundation related to endogenous testosterone levels in plasma. Future studies should address questions about the family and social background of participants to differentiate here between moral rules or/and social-conventional rules.

  9. Are Men’s Perceptions of Sexually Dimorphic Vocal Characteristics Related to Their Testosterone Levels?

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Amanda C.; Wincenciak, Joanna; Fisher, Claire I.; Pisanski, Katarzyna; Feinberg, David R.; DeBruine, Lisa M.; Jones, Benedict C.

    2016-01-01

    Feminine physical characteristics in women are positively correlated with markers of their mate quality. Previous research on men’s judgments of women’s facial attractiveness suggests that men show stronger preferences for feminine characteristics in women’s faces when their own testosterone levels are relatively high. Such results could reflect stronger preferences for high quality mates when mating motivation is strong and/or following success in male-male competition. Given these findings, the current study investigated whether a similar effect of testosterone occurs for men’s preferences for feminine characteristics in women’s voices. Men’s preferences for feminized versus masculinized versions of women’s and men’s voices were assessed in five weekly test sessions and saliva samples were collected in each test session. Analyses showed no relationship between men’s voice preferences and their testosterone levels. Men’s tendency to perceive masculinized men’s and women’s voices as more dominant was also unrelated to their testosterone levels. Together, the results of the current study suggest that testosterone-linked changes in responses to sexually dimorphic characteristics previously reported for men's perceptions of faces do not occur for men's perceptions of voices. PMID:27875569

  10. Serum testosterone level predicts the effective time of androgen deprivation therapy in metastatic prostate cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Dai, Bo; Ye, Ding-Wei

    2017-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is the standard of care for patients with metastatic prostate cancer. However, whether serum testosterone levels, using a cut-off point of 50 ng dl−1, are related to the effective time of ADT in newly diagnosed prostate cancer patients remains controversial. Moreover, recent studies have shown that some patients may benefit from the addition of upfront docetaxel chemotherapy. To date, no studies have been able to distinguish patients who will benefit from the combination of ADT and docetaxel chemotherapy. This study included 206 patients who were diagnosed with metastatic prostate cancer and showed progression to castrate-resistance prostate cancer (CRPC). Serum testosterone levels were measured prospectively after ADT for 1, 3, and 6 months. The endpoint was the time to CRPC. In univariate and multivariate analyses, testosterone levels <50 ng dl−1 were not associated with the effective time of ADT. Receiver operating characteristic and univariate analysis showed that testosterone levels of ≤25 ng dl−1 after the first month of ADT offered the best overall sensitivity and specificity for prediction of a longer time to CRPC (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.46; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.08–1.96; P = 0.013). Our results show that serum testosterone level of 25 ng dl−1 plays a prognostic role in prostate cancer patients receiving ADT. A testosterone value of 25 ng dl−1 after the first month of ADT can distinguish patients who benefit from ADT effectiveness for only a short time. These patients may need to receive ADT and concurrent docetaxel chemotherapy. PMID:26975487

  11. Serum testosterone level predicts the effective time of androgen deprivation therapy in metastatic prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Dai, Bo; Ye, Ding-Wei

    2017-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is the standard of care for patients with metastatic prostate cancer. However, whether serum testosterone levels, using a cut-off point of 50 ng dl-1 , are related to the effective time of ADT in newly diagnosed prostate cancer patients remains controversial. Moreover, recent studies have shown that some patients may benefit from the addition of upfront docetaxel chemotherapy. To date, no studies have been able to distinguish patients who will benefit from the combination of ADT and docetaxel chemotherapy. This study included 206 patients who were diagnosed with metastatic prostate cancer and showed progression to castrate-resistance prostate cancer (CRPC). Serum testosterone levels were measured prospectively after ADT for 1, 3, and 6 months. The endpoint was the time to CRPC. In univariate and multivariate analyses, testosterone levels <50 ng dl-1 were not associated with the effective time of ADT. Receiver operating characteristic and univariate analysis showed that testosterone levels of ≤25 ng dl-1 after the first month of ADT offered the best overall sensitivity and specificity for prediction of a longer time to CRPC (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.46; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.08-1.96; P = 0.013). Our results show that serum testosterone level of 25 ng dl-1 plays a prognostic role in prostate cancer patients receiving ADT. A testosterone value of 25 ng dl-1 after the first month of ADT can distinguish patients who benefit from ADT effectiveness for only a short time. These patients may need to receive ADT and concurrent docetaxel chemotherapy.

  12. Effect of altered reproductive function and lowered testosterone levels on bone density in male endurance athletes

    PubMed Central

    Bennell, Kim L; Brukner, Peter D; Malcolm, Susan A

    1996-01-01

    The effect of intense physical activity on female reproductive hormones is well recognised1–3 and there is evidence that menstrual disturbances associated with hypo-oestrogenism adversely affect bone density especially at the lumbar spine.4 5 Physical activity can also have a range of effects on male reproductive function depending upon the intensity and duration of the activity and the fitness of the individual.6 In particular, endurance training may be associated with reductions in circulating testosterone levels. Since testosterone has important anabolic roles, alterations in reproductive hormone profiles may have detrimental skeletal consequences similar to those seen in females with menstrual disturbances. The aim of this brief review is to present the limited literature on the relation between bone density and testosterone levels in male endurance athletes. PMID:8889111

  13. Effectiveness of the GnRH agonist Deslorelin as a tool to decrease levels of circulating testosterone in zebra finches.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Karagh; Wilson, David A; Burton, Mark; Slaugh, Shayla; Dunning, Jeffery L; Prather, Jonathan F

    2015-10-01

    Songbirds are widely used in studies of the neurobiology underlying learning, memory and performance of the sounds used in vocal communication. Development and activity of neurons in many brain sites implicated in those behaviors are closely related to levels of circulating testosterone. Approaches to understand the effects of testosterone in songbirds are presently limited to testosterone implants, which elevate testosterone levels to supraphysiological values, or castration, which eliminates gonadal production of testosterone. Previous studies in mammals indicate that GnRH agonists may be an effective tool to reduce testosterone within that range of extremes and without invasive surgery. To evaluate the effectiveness of the GnRH agonist Deslorelin as a tool to modulate levels of testosterone in songbirds, we recorded the effects of Deslorelin in adult male zebra finches. We recorded songs, body mass and blood testosterone levels pre-treatment, then we gave each bird a small subcutaneous implant of Deslorelin. We measured blood plasma testosterone levels weekly and recorded song behavior and gross morphology of brain, testes and heart at the end of each experiment. Testosterone levels were reduced at the 5mg/kg dose, and the very slight song changes we observed at that dose were like those reported for castrated zebra finches. As expected, there were no changes in the number of cells in androgen-sensitive brain structures. Suppression of testosterone at the 5mg/kg dose was reversible through implant removal. Thus, Deslorelin is a new tool to transiently suppress testosterone levels without the invasiveness and undesirable aftereffects of surgical castration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Rosuvastatin decreases testosterone levels but not sexual function in men with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ching Jung; Huang, Bin

    2016-10-01

    Statins may decrease serum testosterone levels via decreasing cholesterol, a precursor to testosterone. This case series studied the effects of rosuvastatin on free testosterone levels and sexual function in men with type 2 diabetes. We enrolled 151 men with type 2 diabetes and hypercholesterolemia. Biochemical assessments included serum total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein, triglyceride, prolactin, thyroid-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, total testosterone and serum sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). All parameters were measured before statin treatment, after 6months of statin treatment, and 6months after discontinuing statin treatment. The Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM) was also administered at these times. Serum TC and LDL levels were high before statin therapy, decreased after six months of statin therapy, and increased significantly six months after discontinuing statin therapy (198.1±28.1mg/dl vs. 147.1±22.8mg/dl vs. 205.2±25.6mg/dl, p-value<0.001; 121.3±20.6mg/dl vs. 75.4±20.4mg/dl vs.124.9±20mg/dl, p-value<0.001). However, serum free testosterone levels calculated from total testosterone and SHBG calculated by formula were higher before statin therapy, obviously decreased after six months of statin therapy, and subsequently increased six months after discontinuing statin therapy (22.4±3.1ng/ml vs. 20.9±2.8ng/ml vs. 22.6±2.6ng/ml p value=0.006). SHIM scores did not obviously differ among the three stages (16.3±4.8 vs. 16.0±4.9 vs. 16.3±5.0 p=0.944). After adjustment for age, serum free testosterone levels correlated with SHIM scores and LDL (r=0.39, p=<0.001; r=0.26, p=0.02, respectively). SHIM scores did not correlate with TC or LDL. Rosuvastatin reduces free testosterone levels but does not influence sexual function in men with type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Paternal behavior increases testosterone levels in offspring of the California mouse.

    PubMed

    Becker, Elizabeth A; Moore, Brett M; Auger, Catherine; Marler, Catherine A

    2010-08-01

    Paternal care during early development influences pup survivorship in the monogamous and biparental California mouse, Peromyscus californicus. Moreover, paternal pup retrievals impact development of adult offspring aggression and the neuropeptide vasopressin, yet little is known about the underlying mechanisms of these developmental changes. Because testosterone can increase arginine vasopressin and aggression, we hypothesized that paternal pup retrievals increase testosterone levels in prepubertal male P. californicus pups. Male pups were assigned to one of three groups: hormonal baseline, nonretrieval control, or retrieval. On postnatal days 18-21, all pups and the mother were removed from the cage, and the focal male pup was placed either outside of the nest to elicit paternal retrievals (retrieval group) or in the nest to discourage paternal retrievals (nonretrieval group). Testosterone was elevated at 45-min, but not 90-min, post-manipulation in retrieved compared to nonretrieved pups. Moreover, there was a significant positive correlation between pup retrievals and testosterone in the 45-min group. This rapid testosterone rise in response to paternal retrievals may facilitate an increase in aggression and vasopressin in adult offspring. Therefore, this period of development previously viewed as hormonally quiescent may be more active in response to paternal behavior than previously thought.

  16. The association between erectile dysfunction, depressive symptoms and testosterone levels among middle-aged men.

    PubMed

    Suija, Kadri; Kerkelä, Marja; Rajala, Ulla; Jokelainen, Jari; Laakso, Mauri; Härkönen, Pirjo; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Timonen, Markku

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between erectile dysfunction and depressive symptoms and testosterone levels among middle-aged men at the community level. The study population consisted of 614 men born in 1945 and living in the city of Oulu, Finland. Erectile dysfunction was assessed by the erectile function domain of the International Index of Erectile Function questionnaire and depressive symptoms by the Beck Depression Inventory. Blood samples were collected to measure testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin level. After adjusting for confounders, erectile dysfunction was statistically significantly associated with depressive symptoms (risk ratio (RR) 1.66, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.29-2.15), as well as with obesity (RR 1.72, 95% CI 1.12-2.62). Neither total nor free testosterone level was associated with erectile dysfunction among our study group. Depressive symptoms rather than testosterone levels should be taken into consideration while treating middle-aged men with erectile problems at the community level. © 2014 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  17. Heritability and cross-sex genetic correlations of early-life circulating testosterone levels in a wild mammal.

    PubMed

    Pavitt, Alyson T; Walling, Craig A; Pemberton, Josephine M; Kruuk, Loeske E B

    2014-11-01

    Testosterone is an important hormone that has been shown to have sex-specific links to fitness in numerous species. Although testosterone concentrations vary substantially between individuals in a population, little is known about its heritable genetic basis or between-sex genetic correlations that determine its evolutionary potential. We found circulating neonatal testosterone levels to be both heritable (0.160 ± 0.064 s.e.) and correlated between the sexes (0.942 ± 0.648 s.e.) in wild red deer calves (Cervus elaphus). This may have important evolutionary implications if, as in adults, the sexes have divergent optima for circulating testosterone levels.

  18. Microvesicles Correlated with Components of Metabolic Syndrome in Men with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Lowered Testosterone Levels But Were Unaltered by Testosterone Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Velling Magnussen, Line; Nielsen, Morten Hjuler; Nielsen, Tine Bo; Højlund, Kurt; Andersen, Marianne Skovsager; Handberg, Aase

    2017-01-01

    Aims. To investigate how circulating microvesicle phenotypes correlate with insulin sensitivity, body composition, plasma lipids, and hepatic fat accumulation. We hypothesized that changes elicited by testosterone replacement therapy are reflected in levels of microvesicles. Methods. Thirty-nine type 2 diabetic males with lowered testosterone levels were assigned to either testosterone replacement therapy or placebo and evaluated at baseline and after 24 weeks. Microvesicles were analysed by flow cytometry and defined as lactadherin-binding particles within the 0.1–1.0 μm gate. Microvesicles of platelet, monocyte, and endothelial cell origin were identified by cell-specific markers and their expression of CD36 was investigated. Results. Triglycerides correlated positively with all investigated microvesicle phenotypes in this study (p < 0.05), and indicators of hepatic fat accumulation, alanine aminotransferase, and gamma glutamyltransferase correlated with platelet and endothelial microvesicles and CD36-expressing microvesicles from platelets and monocytes (p < 0.05). BMI, waist circumference, and fat percentage correlated with CD36-expressing monocyte microvesicles (p < 0.05), while insulin sensitivity did not correlate with any microvesicle phenotypes. Microvesicle levels were unaffected by testosterone therapy. Conclusions. Metabolic syndrome components and hepatic fat accumulation correlated with microvesicle phenotypes, supporting the involvement of especially CD36 on monocytes in metabolic syndrome pathogenesis. Although testosterone therapy improved body composition measures, microvesicle phenotype levels were unaffected. This trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01560546). PMID:28168203

  19. Microvesicles Correlated with Components of Metabolic Syndrome in Men with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Lowered Testosterone Levels But Were Unaltered by Testosterone Therapy.

    PubMed

    Botha, Jaco; Velling Magnussen, Line; Nielsen, Morten Hjuler; Nielsen, Tine Bo; Højlund, Kurt; Andersen, Marianne Skovsager; Handberg, Aase

    2017-01-01

    Aims. To investigate how circulating microvesicle phenotypes correlate with insulin sensitivity, body composition, plasma lipids, and hepatic fat accumulation. We hypothesized that changes elicited by testosterone replacement therapy are reflected in levels of microvesicles. Methods. Thirty-nine type 2 diabetic males with lowered testosterone levels were assigned to either testosterone replacement therapy or placebo and evaluated at baseline and after 24 weeks. Microvesicles were analysed by flow cytometry and defined as lactadherin-binding particles within the 0.1-1.0 μm gate. Microvesicles of platelet, monocyte, and endothelial cell origin were identified by cell-specific markers and their expression of CD36 was investigated. Results. Triglycerides correlated positively with all investigated microvesicle phenotypes in this study (p < 0.05), and indicators of hepatic fat accumulation, alanine aminotransferase, and gamma glutamyltransferase correlated with platelet and endothelial microvesicles and CD36-expressing microvesicles from platelets and monocytes (p < 0.05). BMI, waist circumference, and fat percentage correlated with CD36-expressing monocyte microvesicles (p < 0.05), while insulin sensitivity did not correlate with any microvesicle phenotypes. Microvesicle levels were unaffected by testosterone therapy. Conclusions. Metabolic syndrome components and hepatic fat accumulation correlated with microvesicle phenotypes, supporting the involvement of especially CD36 on monocytes in metabolic syndrome pathogenesis. Although testosterone therapy improved body composition measures, microvesicle phenotype levels were unaffected. This trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01560546).

  20. Association between 25(OH)-vitamin D and testosterone levels: Evidence from men with chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Barbonetti, Arcangelo; Vassallo, Maria Rosaria C; Felzani, Giorgio; Francavilla, Sandro; Francavilla, Felice

    2016-05-01

    As an independent linear association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and testosterone levels is controversial, this study aimed to explore this topic in men with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI), who exhibit a high prevalence of both androgen and vitamin D deficiency. Forty-nine men with chronic SCI consecutively admitted to a rehabilitation program underwent clinical/biochemical evaluations. Deficiency of 25(OH)D (<20 ng/mL) was found in 36 patients (73.5%). They exhibited significantly lower total testosterone and free testosterone levels, higher parathyroid hormone (PTH) and HOMA-IR, a poorer functional independence degree, and were engaged in poorer weekly leisure time physical activity (LTPA). Significant correlates of 25(OH)D levels were: total testosterone, free testosterone, PTH, functional independence degree and weekly LTPA. At the linear regression models, lower 25(OH)D levels were associated with both lower total and free testosterone after adjustment for age, smoking, alcohol consumption, comorbidities and HOMA-IR. However, after full adjustment, also including functional independence degree, BMI and LTPA, only the association of lower 25(OH)D with lower free testosterone was still significant. In men with SCI, 25(OH)D correlates with total and free testosterone and exhibits an independent linear association with free testosterone. Regardless of this independent link, hypovitaminosis D and androgen deficiency are markers of poor health, sharing common risk factors to take into account in the rehabilitative approach to patients with SCI.

  1. High serum testosterone levels during postpartum period are associated with postpartum depression.

    PubMed

    Aswathi, A; Rajendiren, Soundravally; Nimesh, Archana; Philip, R Ravi; Kattimani, Shivanand; Jayalakshmi, D; Ananthanarayanan, P H; Dhiman, Pooja

    2015-10-01

    In view of the reported cases of mood disorders that occur in mothers following childbirth and believing that sex steroid hormones contribute to mood and behavioral changes, this study has been aimed to explore the role of sex steroid hormones as an etiological factor for postpartum depression (PPD). This study was conducted at JIPMER, Puducherry, India between January 2010 and 2011. 103 women were recruited in the study after childbirth, out of which 62 women who were believed to be suffering from PPD were categorized as cases and the remaining 41 with no mood changes as controls, using Edinburgh Postpartum Depression Scale (EPDS) (cases had EPDS score ≥10 at 24-28h, controls had score <10 at 24-48h postpartum). The hormones estimated in these two groups included estradiol, progesterone and testosterone, and their levels were compared between these two groups. A significantly high testosterone levels were observed in cases with PPD at 24-28h when compared to controls. Estradiol and progesterone levels did not show significant difference between cases and controls. ROC analysis done at 24-28h showed that testosterone levels beyond 42.71ng/mL predict the development of PPD with 79% sensitivity, 63% specificity, 68% positive predictive value, 74% negative predictive value with AUC being 0.708. This study shows that there is an association between persistent high serum testosterone level in women following childbirth and PPD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Association between testosterone levels and the metabolic syndrome in adult men.

    PubMed

    Grosman, Halina; Rosales, Mónica; Fabre, Bibiana; Nolazco, Carlos; Mazza, Osvaldo; Berg, Gabriela; Mesch, Viviana

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the relationship between testosterone levels and the metabolic syndrome (MS) in men older than 45 years. Six hundred and sixty men (45-70 years) selected from 2906 participants of a population screening for prostate cancer were included in this study. Testosterone and the components of MS were assessed in all men. MS was diagnosed according to NCEP-ATP III criteria. Triglycerides (TG)/HDL-cholesterol (chol) index was calculated. The presence of MS was inversely associated with testosterone (χ2, p < 0.001), independently of age (OR 0.802, CI 95%: 0.724-0.887, p < 0.0001). Hypertension was the most frequent abnormality observed followed by elevated TG and waist circumference (WC). Testosterone correlated positively with HDL-chol (r: 0.14, p < 0.0001) and negatively with body mass index (BMI)(r: -0.29, p < 0.0001), WC (r: -0.26, p < 0.0001), TG (r: -0.20, p < 0.0001), TG/HDL-chol (r: -0.20, p < 0.0001), glucose (r: -0.11, p = 0.005) and MS score (r: -0.23, p < 0.0001). Our results show that in men older than 45 years, as long as testosterone levels decline, the prevalence of MS increases, independently of age. The correlations found between testosterone and four of the five components of MS, as well as with BMI and TG/HDL-chol ratio, a surrogate marker of insulin resistance, suggest considering male hypogonadism as a determinant of developmental abnormalities typical of MS.

  3. Correlation between Male Social Status, Testosterone Levels, and Parasitism in a Dimorphic Polygynous Mammal

    PubMed Central

    Negro, Sandra S.; Caudron, Abigail K.; Dubois, Michel; Delahaut, Philippe; Gemmell, Neil J.

    2010-01-01

    Life history trade-offs have often been assumed to be the consequence of restrictions in the availability of critical resources such as energy and nutrients, which necessitate the differential allocation of resources to costly traits. Here, we examined endocrine (testosterone) and health (parasite burdens) parameters in territorial and non-territorial New Zealand fur seal males. We documented intra-sexual differences in sexual behaviours, testosterone levels, and parasitism that suggest a trade-off exists between reproductive success and physical health, particularly susceptibility to helminths and acanthocephalans, in males displaying different mating tactics (i.e., territorial and non-territorial tactics). Levels of testosterone were higher in territorial males and correlated positively with reproductive effort (i.e., intra- and inter-sexual interactions). However, these territorial males also exhibited high levels of parasitic infection, which may impair survival in the long-term. Our study, while limited in sample size, provides preliminary evidence for a link between male mating tactics, testosterone levels and parasite loads, and potential effects on reproductive success and life history that should be explored further. PMID:20856933

  4. Circularly polarized, sinusoidal, 50 Hz magnetic field exposure does not influence plasma testosterone levels of rats.

    PubMed

    Kato, M; Honma, K; Shigemitsu, T; Shiga, Y

    1994-01-01

    We exposed rats to circularly polarized 50 Hz magnetic fields to determine if plasma testosterone concentration was affected. Previous experiments indicate that magnetic fields suppress the nighttime rise in melatonin, suggesting that other neuroendocrine changes might occur as well. Male Wistar-King rats were exposed almost continuously for 6 weeks to magnetic flux densities of 1, 5, or 50 microT. Blood samples were obtained by decapitation at 12:00 h and 24:00 h. Plasma testosterone concentration showed a significant day-night difference, with a higher level at 12:00 h when studied in July and December, but night difference, with a higher level at 12:00 h when studied in July and December, but the day-night difference disappeared when concentrations were studied in April. In three experiments, magnetic field exposure had no statistically significant effect on plasma testosterone levels compared with the sham-exposed groups. These findings indicate that 6 weeks of nearly continuous exposure to circularly polarized, 50 Hz magnetic fields did not change plasma testosterone concentration in rats.

  5. Serum testosterone as a biomarker for second prostatic biopsy in men with negative first biopsy for prostatic cancer and PSA>4ng/mL, or with PIN biopsy result

    PubMed Central

    Fiamegos, Alexandros; Varkarakis, John; Kontraros, Michael; Karagiannis, Andreas; Chrisofos, Michael; Barbalias, Dimitrios; Deliveliotis, Charalampos

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Data from animal, clinical and prevention studies support the role of androgens in prostate cancer growth, proliferation and progression. Results of serum based epidemiologic studies in humans, however, have been inconclusive. The present study aims to define whether serum testosterone can be used as a predictor of a positive second biopsy in males considered for re-biopsy. Material and Methods: The study included 320 men who underwent a prostatic biopsy in our department from October 2011 until June 2012. Total testosterone, free testosterone, bioavailable testosterone and prostate pathology were evaluated in all cases. Patients undergoing a second biopsy were identified and biopsy results were statistically analyzed. Results: Forty men (12.5%) were assessed with a second biopsy. The diagnosis of the second biopsy was High Grade Intraepithelial Neoplasia in 14 patients (35%) and Prostate Cancer in 12 patients (30%). The comparison of prostatic volume, total testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin, free testosterone, bioavailable testosterone and albumin showed that patients with cancer of the prostate had significantly greater levels of free testosterone (p=0.043) and bioavailable T (p=0.049). Conclusion: In our study, higher free testosterone and bioavailable testosterone levels were associated with a cancer diagnosis at re-biopsy. Our results indicate a possible role for free and bioavailable testosterone in predicting the presence of prostate cancer in patients considered for re-biopsy. PMID:27532110

  6. The relationship between lipocalin-2 and free testosterone levels in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Özgür; Temur, Muzaffer; Calan, Mehmet; Kume, Tuncay; Özbay, Pelin Özün; Karakulak, Murat; Yapucu, Saadet

    2017-01-01

    Lipocalin-2 is an adipokine that is mainly produced from adipocytes and macrophages. Data related to PCOS and other obesity-associated disorders have shown divergent results. Here, we studied lipocalin-2 concentrations in women with PCOS and in healthy women, and investigated the potential contributors underlying lipocalin association with PCOS. Forty-four women with PCOS and 47 age- and BMI-matched healthy women were enrolled. Fasting serum glucose, insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and free testosterone levels were measured. The body fat percentage was measured by bioelectrical impedance. Lipocalin-2 concentrations were significantly higher in the PCOS group than in the control group (55.74 ± 17.54 ng/mL vs. 36.46 ± 19.62 ng/mL, p = 0.011). There was a correlation between lipocalin-2 levels and free testosterone. In a multiple regression model, the body fat percentage, HOMA-IR, and hs-CRP were not associated with lipocalin-2. However, only free testosterone was associated with lipocalin-2. A "lipocalin-2 = 11.214 + (1.943 × free-testosterone)" equation was obtained. Serum lipocalin-2 levels were higher in women with PCOS, and only free testosterone was associated with lipocalin-2. Lipocalin-2 levels and their influencing factors have discrepant results in both PCOS and other obesity- or insulin resistance-related metabolic disorders. Thus, the potential role of lipocalin-2 in PCOS should be clarified. (Endokrynol Pol 2017; 68 (1): 7-12).

  7. Testosterone Therapy in Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... softness of the testicles Size of the penis Measurement of testosterone levels Generally, blood levels of testosterone ... levels may be different in different laboratories. Morning measurement (when levels are highest) is recommended. Illness, malnutrition, ...

  8. Relation of urinary stone disease with androgenetic alopecia and serum testosterone levels.

    PubMed

    Polat, Emre Can; Ozcan, Levent; Otunctemur, Alper; Ozbek, Emin

    2016-10-01

    We aimed to investigate the relationship among urinary stone disease, androgenetic alopecia (AGA), and serum testosterone (T) levels. Between January 2008 and November 2015, we retrospectively investigated the biochemical parameters and anthropometric characteristics (height and weight) of 200 patients who had urinary tract stones. For the control group, we selected at random 168 participants who had no history of urolithiasis. Demographic data, such as participants' age, body mass index (BMI), hypertension (HT), diabetes mellitus (DM), baldness pattern, and serum T level were recorded. All participants were male, over 18 and under 60 years of age. We determined that risk of urolithiasis increased 1.3-fold in patients with vertex pattern alopecia and 2.1-fold in patients with total alopecia compared with those with no hair loss. In the severe balding Groups (Group III and Group IV), presence of testosterone deficiency was more frequent in patients with urinary stone disease (P = 0.041, OR = 2.38). Although in the non- balding and mild balding Groups (Group I and Group II), presence of testosterone deficiency was also more frequent in patients with urinary stone disease, a statistically significant difference was not seen. Significantly, we found that the presence of testosterone deficiency was more frequent in patients with urinary stone disease and who had severe AGA.

  9. Wide variability in laboratory reference values for serum testosterone.

    PubMed

    Lazarou, Stephen; Reyes-Vallejo, Luis; Morgentaler, Abraham

    2006-11-01

    The laboratory determination of testosterone levels consistent with a diagnosis of hypogonadism is complicated by the availability of multiple testosterone assays and varying reference ranges. To assess current laboratory practices regarding availability of testosterone assays and use of reference values. A telephone survey of 12 academic, 12 community medical laboratories, and one national laboratory. Types of androgen assays offered and determination of reference values. All of the academic and eight of the community centers performed total testosterone testing. Free testosterone was performed in-house by six of the 12 academic and one community center. Testing for bioavailable testosterone, free androgen index, and percent free testosterone was performed in-house by no more than two centers. There were eight and four different assays used for total and free testosterone, respectively. One national laboratory offered equilibrium dialysis measurement of free testosterone. Of the 25 labs, there were 17 and 13 different sets of reference values for total and free testosterone, respectively. The low reference value for total testosterone ranged from 130 to 450 ng/dL (350% difference), and the upper value ranged from 486 to 1,593 ng/dL (325% difference). Age-adjusted reference values were applied in four centers for total testosterone and in seven labs for free testosterone. All reference values were based on a standard statistical model without regard for clinical aspects of hypogonadism. Twenty-three of the 25 lab directors responded that clinically relevant testosterone reference ranges would be preferable to current standards. Laboratory reference values for testosterone vary widely, and are established without clinical considerations.

  10. Testosterone levels and cognitive functioning in women with polycystic ovary syndrome and in healthy young women.

    PubMed

    Schattmann, Linda; Sherwin, Barbara B

    2007-05-01

    We investigated the possible influence of testosterone (T) on cognitive functioning in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), an endocrine disorder associated with elevated levels of free testosterone (free T). Performance on a battery of neuropsychological tests in 29 women with elevated free T levels due to PCOS was compared to the performance of 22 age- and education-matched, healthy control women with free T levels in the normal female range. Women with PCOS had significantly higher levels of free T (estimated by the free androgen index) and demonstrated significantly worse performance on tests of verbal fluency, verbal memory, manual dexterity, and visuospatial working memory than the healthy control women. No differences between the groups were found on tests of mental rotation, spatial visualization, spatial perception, or perceptual speed. These results suggest that, in women, elevations in free T may be associated with poorer performance on cognitive tasks that tend to show a female advantage.

  11. Association Between Serum Levels of Testosterone and Estradiol With Meibomian Gland Assessments in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Ablamowicz, Anna F.; Nichols, Jason J.; Nichols, Kelly K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aims of this analysis were to determine if there is an association between serum levels of testosterone and estradiol with meibomian gland (MG) morphology and lipid layer thickness. Methods The data used for this analysis were collected from postmenopausal women with and without dry eye disease. Meibography was used to assess MG dropout on the central two-thirds of the eyelid and biomicroscopy was used for assessing MG expressibility and meibum quality. Venous blood samples were drawn for serum hormone level analysis. The Kruskal-Wallis test and Spearman correlations were used for statistical analysis. Results One hundred ninety-eight postmenopausal women with an average age of 61.2 (±9.1) years were included in this analysis. Testosterone levels showed significant differences between MG dropout grades 1 and 4 (P = 0.002) and grades 2 and 4 (P = 0.01), whereas estradiol levels were different based on MG dropout (P = 0.53). No significant correlations were found between testosterone (r = 0.10, P = 0.17) or estradiol (r = 0.05, P = 0.45) and lipid layer thickness. Conclusions Testosterone levels were increased with MG dropout, which was significant between the mild and severe dropout groups, whereas no significant differences were found with estradiol and any MG assessment. Although the literature suggests an association of serum hormone levels and pathogenesis of dry eye disease in postmenopausal women, analysis of active sex steroid precursors and local tissue hormone levels may prove more useful. PMID:26830366

  12. Moderating effects of salivary testosterone levels on associations between job demand and psychological stress response in Japanese medical workers.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, Kumi; Miwa, Machiko; Taniguchi, Toshiyo; Tsuchiya, Masao; Kawakami, Norito

    2016-06-10

    Levels of job stress have been shown to be inversely associated with testosterone levels, but some inconsistent results have been documented. We investigated the moderating effects of testosterone levels on associations between job stress-factors and psychological stress responses in Japanese medical workers. The participants were 63 medical staff (20 males and 43 women; mean age: 30.6 years; SD=7.3) in Okayama, Japan. Their job-stress levels and psychological stress responses were evaluated using self-administered questionnaires, and their salivary testosterone collected. Multiple regression analyses showed that job demand was positively associated with stress responses in men and women. An interaction between testosterone and support from colleagues had a significant effect on depression and anxiety for women. In women with lower testosterone levels, a reducing effect of support from colleagues on depression and anxiety was intensified. In women with higher testosterone levels, depression and anxiety levels were identical regardless of support from colleagues. Testosterone may function as a moderator between perceived work environment and psychological stress responses for female medical workers.

  13. Nucleus accumbens response to rewards and testosterone levels are related to alcohol use in adolescents and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Braams, Barbara R.; Peper, Jiska S.; van der Heide, Dianne; Peters, Sabine; Crone, Eveline A.

    2016-01-01

    During adolescence there is a normative increase in risk-taking behavior, which is reflected in, for example, increases in alcohol consumption. Prior research has demonstrated a link between testosterone and alcohol consumption, and between testosterone and neural responses to rewards. Yet, no study to date tested how testosterone levels and neural responses to rewards relate to and predict individual differences in alcohol use. The current study aimed to investigate this by assessing alcohol use, testosterone levels and neural responses to rewards in adolescents (12–17 years old) and young adults (18–26 years old). Participants were measured twice with a two-year interval between testing sessions. Cross-sectional analysis showed that at the second time point higher neural activity to rewards, but not testosterone levels, explained significant variance above age in reported alcohol use. Predictive analyses showed that, higher testosterone level at the first time point, but not neural activity to rewards at the first time point, was predictive of more alcohol use at the second time point. These results suggest that neural responses to rewards are correlated with current alcohol consumption, and that testosterone level is predictive of future alcohol consumption. These results are interpreted in the context of trajectory models of adolescent development. PMID:26771250

  14. Nucleus accumbens response to rewards and testosterone levels are related to alcohol use in adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Braams, Barbara R; Peper, Jiska S; van der Heide, Dianne; Peters, Sabine; Crone, Eveline A

    2016-02-01

    During adolescence there is a normative increase in risk-taking behavior, which is reflected in, for example, increases in alcohol consumption. Prior research has demonstrated a link between testosterone and alcohol consumption, and between testosterone and neural responses to rewards. Yet, no study to date tested how testosterone levels and neural responses to rewards relate to and predict individual differences in alcohol use. The current study aimed to investigate this by assessing alcohol use, testosterone levels and neural responses to rewards in adolescents (12-17 years old) and young adults (18-26 years old). Participants were measured twice with a two-year interval between testing sessions. Cross-sectional analysis showed that at the second time point higher neural activity to rewards, but not testosterone levels, explained significant variance above age in reported alcohol use. Predictive analyses showed that, higher testosterone level at the first time point, but not neural activity to rewards at the first time point, was predictive of more alcohol use at the second time point. These results suggest that neural responses to rewards are correlated with current alcohol consumption, and that testosterone level is predictive of future alcohol consumption. These results are interpreted in the context of trajectory models of adolescent development.

  15. Relationship of serum testosterone levels with cognitive function in chronic antipsychotic-treated male patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Xiao, Wenhuan; Sha, Weiwei; Xian, Kangwen; Tang, Xiaowei; Zhang, Xiaobin

    2015-09-01

    Some evidence suggests that testosterone might be involved in the cognitive impairments of schizophrenia. We assessed major cognitive domains and serum testosterone levels in male long-term inpatients with schizophrenia. This study aimed to test whether testosterone in serum was abnormal in patients, and whether it was related to the cognitive impairment of schizophrenia. Serum testosterone levels in male schizophrenics (n = 80) and normal controls (n = 40) were measured by immunoassay. All patients were assessed for performance on executive functions, sustaining and focusing of attention, memory functions, and verbal fluency using the Digit Cancellation Test (DCT), Semantic Fluency Test, Spatial Span (SS), Trail Making Test, part A (TMT-A), Block Design, and Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test. Serum testosterone levels in schizophrenic patients were similar to control subjects (P > 0.05). We found that serum testosterone levels were significantly correlated with total time taken (in seconds) in the DCT (r = 0.261, P < 0.05) and SS score (r = -0.240, P < 0.05) in schizophrenic patients. Moreover, backward linear regression revealed that testosterone levels significantly predicted performance in DCT (β = 0.240, P = 0.028) and SS score (β = -0.207, P = 0.047) in patients. Our findings suggest that there is no significant difference in serum testosterone levels between groups, and that serum testosterone levels are associated with the spatial memory and attention deficits in chronic antipsychotic-treated male patients with schizophrenia. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate associated with insulin resistance and lower testosterone levels in a young population.

    PubMed

    Chen, Szu-Ying; Hwang, Jing-Shiang; Sung, Fung-Chang; Lin, Chien-Yu; Hsieh, Chia-Jung; Chen, Pau-Chung; Su, Ta-Chen

    2017-06-01

    Phthalates are commonly used as plasticizers and are reported to associate with testicular dysfunction or insulin resistance in different studies, but the concurrent relationship between phthalate exposure, testosterone levels, and insulin resistance in the young population is not well understood. We recruited 786 subjects aged 12-30 years from a population-based sample of Taiwanese adolescents and young adults from 2006 to 2008. Generalized additive models were used to evaluate glucose homeostasis and testicular function in relation to seven urinary phthalate metabolites among adolescents (aged 12-20) and young adults (aged 20-30) in Taiwan. We observed a trend toward a decrease in male testosterone and an increase in urinary mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP) levels across four quartiles of homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). After adjusting for potential covariates, generalized additive models further showed that log-transformed insulin and HOMA-IR were raised by 0.055 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.027-0.082] and 0.056 (95% CI, 0.027-0.084), respectively, with a one-unit increase in log-transformed MEHP in young adults. In male adults (aged 22-30), the log-testosterone levels were reduced by 0.018 (95% CI, 0.001-0.036), with a one-unit of increase in log-transformed MEHP. Such relationships were not observed in adolescents. In conclusion, this study demonstrated age-related associations of urinary MEHP metabolites with impaired metabolic homeostasis of glucose that were only observed in young adults. In addition, MEHP exposure was concurrently associated with lower testosterone levels in young, male adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Serum testosterone as a biomarker for second prostatic biopsy in men with negative first biopsy for prostatic cancer and PSA>4ng/mL, or with PIN biopsy result.

    PubMed

    Fiamegos, Alexandros; Varkarakis, John; Kontraros, Michael; Karagiannis, Andreas; Chrisofos, Michael; Barbalias, Dimitrios; Deliveliotis, Charalampos

    2016-01-01

    Data from animal, clinical and prevention studies support the role of androgens in prostate cancer growth, proliferation and progression. Results of serum based epidemiologic studies in humans, however, have been inconclusive. The present study aims to define whether serum testosterone can be used as a predictor of a posi¬tive second biopsy in males considered for re-biopsy. The study included 320 men who underwent a prostatic biopsy in our department from October 2011 until June 2012. Total testosterone, free testos¬terone, bioavailable testosterone and prostate pathology were evaluated in all cases. Patients undergoing a second biopsy were identified and biopsy results were statistically analyzed. Forty men (12.5%) were assessed with a second biopsy. The diagnosis of the second biopsy was High Grade Intraepithelial Neoplasia in 14 patients (35%) and Prostate Cancer in 12 patients (30%). The comparison of prostatic volume, total testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin, free testosterone, bioavailable testosterone and albumin showed that patients with cancer of the prostate had significantly greater levels of free testosterone (p=0.043) and bioavailable T (p=0.049). In our study, higher free testosterone and bioavailable testosterone levels were associated with a cancer diagnosis at re-biopsy. Our results indicate a possible role for free and bioavailable testosterone in predicting the presence of prostate cancer in patients considered for re-biopsy. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  18. Natesto™ , a novel testosterone nasal gel, normalizes androgen levels in hypogonadal men.

    PubMed

    Rogol, A D; Tkachenko, N; Bryson, N

    2016-01-01

    Advantages of testosterone nasal gel include ease of administration, low dose, and no risk of secondary transference. The efficacy and safety of testosterone nasal gel was evaluated in hypogonadal males. The ninety-day, randomized, open-label, dose-ranging study, included potential dose titration and sequential safety extensions to 1 year. At 39 US outpatient sites, 306 men (mean age 54.4 years) with two fasting morning total serum testosterone levels <300 ng/dL were randomized (n = 228, b.i.d. dosing; n = 78, t.i.d. dosing). Natesto(™) Testosterone Nasal Gel was self-administered, using a multiple-dose dispenser, as two or three daily doses (5.5 mg per nostril, 11.0 mg single dose). Total daily doses were 22 mg or 33 mg. The primary endpoint was the Percentage of patients with Day-90 serum total testosterone average concentration (C(avg)) value within the eugonadal range (≥300 ng/dL, ≤1050 ng/dL). At Day 90, 200/273 subjects (73%; 95% CI 68, 79) in the intent-to-treat (ITT) population and 180/237 subjects (76%; 71, 81) in the per-protocol (PP) population were in the normal range. Also, in the normal range were 68% (61, 74) of ITT subjects and 70% (63, 77) of PP subjects in the titration arm, as well as, 90% (83, 97) of ITT subjects and 91% (84, 98) of PP subjects in the fixed-dose arm. Natesto(™) 11 mg b.i.d. or 11 mg t.i.d. restores normal serum total testosterone levels in most hypogonadal men. Erectile function, mood, body composition, and bone mineral density improved from baseline. Treatment was well tolerated; adverse event rates were low. Adverse event discontinuation rates were 2.1% (b.i.d.) and 3.7% (t.i.d.). This study lacked a placebo or an active comparator control which limited the ability to adequately assess some measures.

  19. Testosterone enhances functional recovery after stroke through promotion of antioxidant defenses, BDNF levels and neurogenesis in male rats.

    PubMed

    Fanaei, Hamed; Karimian, Seyed Morteza; Sadeghipour, Hamid Reza; Hassanzade, Gholamreza; Kasaeian, Amir; Attari, Fatemeh; Khayat, Samira; Ramezani, Vahid; Javadimehr, Mani

    2014-04-16

    It is reported that circulating testosterone levels decrease after cerebral ischemia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of testosterone on oxidative stress, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels, neurogenesis, histological damage and sensorimotor recovery in a castrated male rat model of focal cerebral ischemia. Animals were divided into four groups. For all animals, castrations were conducted 7 days before transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) was done and cerebral ischemia was induced. The first group served as sham. Second was MCAO group and received vehicle only, third was MCAO group that was post-treated with testosterone and the fourth was MCAO group post-treated with testosterone and flutamide. Treatment only with testosterone significantly weakened oxidative stress and increased BDNF levels and sensorimotor recovery during a 10 days period. Rats receiving testosterone demonstrated a significant reduction in infarct volume and a significant increase in neurogenesis on 10th day after focal cerebral ischemia. Our results for the first time showed a potential advantageous effect of testosterone after cerebral ischemia in male rats, which was probably mediated by promoting antioxidant defenses, BDNF levels and neurogenesis.

  20. Differences in neonatal exposure to estradiol or testosterone on ovarian function and hormonal levels.

    PubMed

    Marcondes, Rodrigo R; Carvalho, Kátia C; Duarte, Daniele C; Garcia, Natália; Amaral, Vinícius C; Simões, Manuel J; Lo Turco, Edson G; Soares, José M; Baracat, Edmund C; Maciel, Gustavo A R

    2015-02-01

    Exposure to an excess of androgen or estrogen can induce changes in reproductive function in adult animals that resemble polycystic ovary syndrome in humans. However, considerable differences exist among several types of animal models. Little is known about the molecular features of steroidogenesis and folliculogenesis in the ovaries of rats exposed to different sex steroids as neonates. Here, we evaluated the impact of androgen and estrogen exposure on the ovaries of adult female rats during their neonatal period in the gene expression of Lhr and Cyp17a1, two key players of steroidogenesis. We also assessed hormone levels, folliculogenesis and the theca-interstitial cell population. The study was performed on the second postnatal day in thirty female Wistar rats that were sorted into the following three intervention groups: testosterone, estradiol and vehicle (control group). The animals were euthanized 90 days after birth. The main outcomes were hormone serum levels, ovary histomorphometry and gene expression of Lhr and Cyp17a1 as analyzed via quantitative real-time PCR. We found that exposure to excess testosterone in early life increased the LH and testosterone serum levels, the LH/FSH ratio, ovarian theca-interstitial area and gene expression of Lhr and Cyp17a1 in adult rats. Estrogen induced an increase in the ovarian theca-interstitial area, the secondary follicle population and gene expression of Lhr and Cyp17a1. All animals exposed to the sex steroids presented with closed vaginas. Our data suggest that testosterone resulted in more pronounced reproductive changes than did estrogen exposure. Our results might provide some insight into the role of different hormones on reproductive development and on the heterogeneity of clinical manifestations of conditions such as polycystic ovary syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Changes in Testosterone Levels and Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin Levels in Extremely Obese Men after Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Laichuthai, Nitchakarn; Suwannasrisuk, Preaw; Houngngam, Natnicha; Udomsawaengsup, Suthep; Snabboon, Thiti

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Obesity is a risk factor for hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in men. Weight loss has been shown to improve hypogonadism in obese men. This study evaluated the early changes in sex hormones profile after bariatric surgery. Methods. This is a prospective study including 29 morbidly obese men. Main outcomes were changes in serum levels of total testosterone (TT), free testosterone (cFT), SHBG, estradiol, adiponectin, and leptin at 1 and 6 months after surgery. Results. The mean age of patients was 31 ± 8 years and the mean BMI was 56.8 ± 11.7 kg/m2. Fifteen patients underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and 14 patients underwent sleeve gastrectomy. At baseline, 22 patients (75.9%) had either low TT levels (<10.4 nmol/L) or low cFT levels (<225 pmol/L). Total testosterone and SHBG levels increased significantly at 1 month after surgery (p ≤ 0.001). At 6 months after surgery, TT and cFT increased significantly (p ≤ 0.001) and 22 patients (75.9%) had normalized TT and cFT levels. There were no changes in estradiol levels at either 1 month or 6 months after surgery. Conclusions. Increases in TT and SHBG levels occurred early at 1 month after bariatric surgery while improvements in cFT levels were observed at 6 months after bariatric surgery. PMID:27725831

  2. Postnatal testosterone levels and disorder relevant behavior in the second year of life.

    PubMed

    Saenz, Janet; Alexander, Gerianne M

    2013-09-01

    The objective of the current study was to investigate the relationship between testosterone collected at 3-4 months of age and sex-linked disorder-relevant behaviors in the second year of life. Eighty-four children participated at 3-4 (when salivary testosterone levels were obtained and second to fourth digit ratios were measured) and 18-24 months of age (when behavioral ratings of aggression and verbal ability were coded from two 8-min play sessions). Parents also completed the Brief Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment, and the four subscales (Internalizing, Externalizing, Dysregulation, and Autism Spectrum Disorder) were used to indicate child specific problems. Greater postnatal testosterone levels in early infancy were predictive of more male-typical behaviors in the second year of life (i.e., more autism spectrum behaviors, less time vocalizing, and more Internalizing Problems). These results support the hypothesis that early infancy may be another critical period for the development of gender-linked behavior.

  3. Parental care, loss of paternity and circulating levels of testosterone and corticosterone in a socially monogamous song bird

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In biparental birds testosterone levels of males are typically high during the mating phase and decrease during the parental phase. Testosterone implants may enhance mating behaviors, increase the likelihood of males to engage in extra-pair mating behavior and may reduce paternal care. Thus, sex steroids such as testosterone influence reproductive behaviors. Little is known, however, as to whether the more subtle differences in physiological concentrations of testosterone that occur between individuals are related to differences in paternal care, extra-pair behavior, and genetic paternity between those males. Here, we investigate these relationships in the male black redstart (Phoenicurus ochruros), a socially monogamous songbird with a low breeding synchrony. We used nestling provisioning as a proxy for parental care behavior and genetic paternity loss as a proxy for the efficiency of mate-guarding. Results There was no relationship between nestling provisioning and paternity loss of males. Baseline and gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH)-induced levels of testosterone, but not baseline corticosterone, were significantly higher during the mating than during the provisioning phase. Males fed more often when temperatures decreased and fed less when they sang more, but we found no correlation between parental behavior and baseline or GnRH-induced testosterone, and baseline corticosterone – both measured during either the mating or the parental phase. However, males that experienced loss of paternity had lower levels of testosterone during the provisioning phase than males that did not lose paternity. Further, males that lost paternity also expressed higher baseline levels of corticosterone. Conclusions Physiological differences in testosterone or baseline corticosterone were not related to differences in parental care, suggesting that the variation of testosterone within a physiological range may not relate to the degree of paternal care in this

  4. The curvelinear correlations between the total testosterone levels and fluid intelligence in men and women.

    PubMed

    Tan, U; Tan, M

    1998-05-01

    The relationship between serum total testosterone (T) level and the fluid intelligence (Cattell's Culture Fair Intelligence Test) was studied in men and women. There was no significant difference between IQs of men and women. There was an inverse curvelinear relationship between IQ and T in women. The same was found also in men, but the declining part of the regression line at high T levels was not as pronounced as in women. It is concluded that T may be related to IQ, even in subjects exhibiting no sex difference in IQ tests; too low or too high T levels may be disadvantages for the fluid intelligence, especially in women.

  5. Salivary Testosterone Levels Under Psychological Stress and Its Relationship with Rumination and Five Personality Traits in Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Afrisham, Reza; Sadegh-Nejadi, Sahar; SoliemaniFar, Omid; Kooti, Wesam; Ashtary-Larky, Damoon; Alamiri, Fatima; Najjar-Asl, Sedigheh; Khaneh-Keshi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the salivary testosterone levels under psychological stress and its relationship with rumination and five personality traits in medical students. Methods A total of 58 medical students, who wanted to participate in the final exam, were selected by simple random sampling. Two months before the exam, in the basal conditions, the NEO Inventory short form, and the Emotional Control Questionnaire (ECQ) were completed. Saliva samples were taken from students in both the basal conditions and under exam stress. Salivary testosterone was measured by ELISA. Data was analyzed using multivariate analysis of variance with repeated measures, paired samples t-test, Pearson correlation and stepwise regression analysis. Results Salivary testosterone level of men showed a significant increase under exam stress (p<0.05). However, a non-significant although substantial reduction observed in women. A significant correlation was found between extroversion (r=-0.33) and openness to experience (r=0.30) with salivary testosterone (p<0.05). Extraversion, aggression control and emotional inhibition predicted 28% of variance of salivary testosterone under stress. Conclusion Salivary testosterone reactivity to stress can be determined by sexual differences, personality traits, and emotional control variables which may decrease or increase stress effects on biological responses, especially the salivary testosterone. PMID:27909455

  6. Salivary Testosterone Levels Under Psychological Stress and Its Relationship with Rumination and Five Personality Traits in Medical Students.

    PubMed

    Afrisham, Reza; Sadegh-Nejadi, Sahar; SoliemaniFar, Omid; Kooti, Wesam; Ashtary-Larky, Damoon; Alamiri, Fatima; Aberomand, Mohammad; Najjar-Asl, Sedigheh; Khaneh-Keshi, Ali

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the salivary testosterone levels under psychological stress and its relationship with rumination and five personality traits in medical students. A total of 58 medical students, who wanted to participate in the final exam, were selected by simple random sampling. Two months before the exam, in the basal conditions, the NEO Inventory short form, and the Emotional Control Questionnaire (ECQ) were completed. Saliva samples were taken from students in both the basal conditions and under exam stress. Salivary testosterone was measured by ELISA. Data was analyzed using multivariate analysis of variance with repeated measures, paired samples t-test, Pearson correlation and stepwise regression analysis. Salivary testosterone level of men showed a significant increase under exam stress (p<0.05). However, a non-significant although substantial reduction observed in women. A significant correlation was found between extroversion (r=-0.33) and openness to experience (r=0.30) with salivary testosterone (p<0.05). Extraversion, aggression control and emotional inhibition predicted 28% of variance of salivary testosterone under stress. Salivary testosterone reactivity to stress can be determined by sexual differences, personality traits, and emotional control variables which may decrease or increase stress effects on biological responses, especially the salivary testosterone.

  7. Testosterone level and the effect of levodopa and agonists in early Parkinson disease: results from the INSPECT cohort.

    PubMed

    Okun, Michael S; Wu, Samuel S; Jennings, Dana; Marek, Kenneth; Rodriguez, Ramon L; Fernandez, Hubert H

    2014-01-01

    To determine if testosterone levels are influenced by dopaminergic therapy in Parkinson disease (PD) patients. Testosterone level has been reported to be low in patients with PD and other neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we sought to determine whether dopaminergic therapy (i.e. levodopa and dopamine agonist) influenced testosterone levels. We used a cohort of consecutive male patients from the INSPECT trial--a multi-center, prospective, study that primarily investigated the effects of short-term treatment with pramipexole or levodopa on [(123)I] B-CIT SPECT imaging in early PD. Testosterone levels were drawn on consenting male subjects with early PD who enrolled in the INSPECT trial at three study visits (baseline, 12 weeks post-treatment, and 8-12 weeks post-washout). Subjects were randomized to: no treatment, pramipexole (up to 3 mg) or levodopa (up to 600 mg). Testosterone levels were obtained twice (prior to 10 AM) and averaged for each of three study visits. Thirty two male patients participated in this sub-study and there were no significant differences in disease characteristics in the 3 groups at baseline. Twenty-nine patients completed the follow-up visits and were suitable for analysis. There were statistically significant differences in the change in free testosterone level, increased in both the levodopa group and pramipexole group but decreased in the untreated group at 12-weeks post-treatment. There were no significant differences in the changes of UPDRS total or motor scores, although there was a strong trend toward improvement in motor scores. The testosterone level persisted in its increase only in the pramipexole group at the end of the washout period. These preliminary data support the premise that dopaminergic medications do not reduce testosterone levels in early PD patients.

  8. Prostate size correlates with fasting blood glucose in non-diabetic benign prostatic hyperplasia patients with normal testosterone levels.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won Tae; Yun, Seok Joong; Choi, Young Deuk; Kim, Gi-Young; Moon, Sung-Kwon; Choi, Yung Hyun; Kim, Isaac Yi; Kim, Wun-Jae

    2011-09-01

    We evaluated the correlations between BMI, fasting glucose, insulin, testosterone level, insulin resistance, and prostate size in non-diabetic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) patients with normal testosterone levels. Data from 212 non-diabetic BPH patients with normal testosterone levels, who underwent transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) due to medical treatment failure, were evaluated retrospectively. Patients with prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels of ≥ 3 ng/mL underwent multicore transrectal prostate biopsy before TURP to rule out prostate cancer. Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) or serum testosterone levels of < 3.50 ng/mL were excluded from analysis. Correlations between clinical and laboratory parameters were determined. Prostate size correlated positively with age (r = 0.227, P < 0.001), PSA (r = 0.510, P < 0.001), and fasting glucose level (r = 0.186, P = 0.007), but not with BMI, testosterone, insulin level, or insulin resistance (each P > 0.05). Testosterone level inversely correlated with BMI (r = -0.327, P < 0.001), insulin level (r = -0.207, P = 0.003), and insulin resistance (r = -0.221, P = 0.001), but not with age, prostate size, PSA, or fasting glucose level (each P > 0.05). Upon multiple adjusted linear regression analysis, prostate size correlated with elevated PSA (P < 0.001) and increased fasting glucose levels (P = 0.023). In non-DM BPH patients with normal testosterone levels, fasting glucose level is an independent risk factor for prostate hyperplasia.

  9. Decrease in plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels at puberty in boys with delayed adolescence: correlation with plasma testosterone levels

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkland, R.T.; Keenan, B.S.; Probstfield, J.L.; Patsch, W.; Lin, T.L.; Clayton, G.W.; Insull, W. Jr.

    1987-01-23

    A three-phase study tested the hypothesis that the decrease in the high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) level observed in boys at puberty is related to an increase in the plasma testosterone concentration. In phase I, 57 boys aged 10 to 17 years were categorized into four pubertal stages based on clinical parameters and plasma testosterone levels. These four groups showed increasing plasma testosterone values and decreasing HDL-C levels. In phase II, 14 boys with delayed adolescence were treated with testosterone enanthate. Plasma testosterone levels during therapy were in the adult male range. Levels of HDL-C decreased by a mean of 7.4 mg/dL (0.20 mmol/L) and 13.7 mg/dL (0.35 mmol/L), respectively, after the first two doses. In phase III, 13 boys with delayed adolescence demonstrated increasing plasma testosterone levels and decreasing HDL-C levels during spontaneous puberty. Levels of HDL-C and apolipoprotein A-1 were correlated during induced and spontaneous puberty. Testosterone should be considered a significant determinant of plasma HDL-C levels during pubertal development.

  10. Effects of crude kerosene on testosterone levels, aggression and toxicity in rat.

    PubMed

    Njoroge, Rachel W; Macharia, Benson N; Sawe, Dinah J; Maiyoh, Geoffrey K

    2015-01-01

    The use of crude kerosene as a dietary supplement in boarding schools has been a common practice in east Africa and other countries for many years, with the belief of it reducing the sex drive (libido) at the pubertal stage. There is however no scientific basis for this belief. The present study aimed at using a rat animal model to investigate the effects of crude kerosene on serum testosterone levels, aggression and its possible toxic effects. Fifteen male albino rats of approximately similar age and average weights were put into three groups of five animals each; the control group (placebo), low kerosene dose (10 μl/day) group and high kerosene dose (300 μl/day) group. ELISA was used to determine the serum testosterone levels. During treatment, changes in aggression were observed and noted. Liver toxicity was determined using enzyme assays, total protein and albumin while renal toxicity was monitored using serum creatinine levels. A full hemogram was conducted to determine hematological effects. Various tissue biopsies were obtained and examined using histopathological techniques for evidence of toxicity. Contrary to the common belief, our findings showed an overall increase of serum testosterone levels of up to 66% in the low dose and 75% in the high dose groups, with an increasing trend by the end of the study. The high dose group showed significantly increased levels of white blood cells (WBC) (p = 0.036), red blood cells (RBC) (p = 0.025), hematocrit (HCT) (p = 0.03), red cell distribution width (p = 0.028) and platelets (p = 0.017). The histological results of the stomach indicated chronic gastritis.

  11. Testosterone and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, John

    1994-01-01

    Studies comparing aggressive and nonaggressive prisoners show higher testosterone levels among the former. While there is limited evidence for a strong association between aggressiveness and testosterone during adolescence, other studies indicate that testosterone levels are responsive to influences from the social environment, particularly those…

  12. Testosterone and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, John

    1994-01-01

    Studies comparing aggressive and nonaggressive prisoners show higher testosterone levels among the former. While there is limited evidence for a strong association between aggressiveness and testosterone during adolescence, other studies indicate that testosterone levels are responsive to influences from the social environment, particularly those…

  13. Levels of estradiol and testosterone are altered in Chinese men with sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wu, F; Chen, T; Mao, S; Jiang, H; Ding, Q; Xu, G

    2016-09-01

    An estimated 20-30% of adult men have at least one manifestation of sexual dysfunction, the most common of which are premature ejaculation (PE) and erectile dysfunction (ED). Emerging evidence has suggested an association between the regulation of hormones with the processes of erection and ejaculation. In this study, we aim to investigate the relationship between sexual dysfunction, namely, PE and ED, and the levels and ratios of estradiol to testosterone in Chinese men. A retrospective case-control study was performed involving 878 male patients aged from 18 to 74 years (mean: 36 years). The ratio of estradiol to testosterone was significantly higher for subjects with ED (7.45 ± 3.09 × 10(-3) ; p < 0.001), and combined PE and ED (6.66 ± 3.05 × 10(-3) ; p = 0.032) compared with that of the control group (6.01 ± 2.61 × 10(-3) ). The ratio was also significantly higher for ED patients when compared with PE patients (5.26 ± 2.18 × 10(-3) ; p < 0.001). Furthermore, compared with the control group, subjects with PE had similar levels of estradiol (95.47 ± 37.86 pmol/L vs. 94.12 ± 32.32 pmol/L; p = 0.678) but significantly higher levels of testosterone (18.66 ± 6.03 nmol/L vs. 16.82 ± 4.93 nmol/L; p < 0.001). This contrasted with the ED group, which showed similar levels of testosterone (16.96 ± 5.86 nmol/L vs. 16.82 ± 4.93 nmol/L; p = 0.773) and significantly higher levels of estradiol (116.88 ± 40.81 pmol/L vs. 94.12 ± 32.32 pmol/L; p < 0.001) compared with control. Subjects with combined ED and PE also had a significantly higher level of estradiol (104.98 ± 43.99 pmol/L vs. 94.12 ± 32.32 pmol/L; p = 0.014) and similar levels of testosterone (17.30 ± 7.23 nmol/L vs. 16.82 ± 4.93 nmol/L; p = 0.503) compared with control. In conclusion, this study involving Chinese males with sexual dysfunction reports, for the first time, that there is an association between sexual dysfunction

  14. Assays of Serum Testosterone.

    PubMed

    Herati, Amin S; Cengiz, Cenk; Lamb, Dolores J

    2016-05-01

    The diagnosis of male hypogonadism depends on an assessment of the clinical signs and symptoms of hypogonadism and serum testosterone level. Current clinical laboratory testosterone assay platforms include immunoassays and mass spectrometry. Despite significant advances to improve the accuracy and precision of the currently available assays, limited comparability exists between assays at the lower and upper extremes of the testosterone range. Because of this lack of comparability, there is no current gold standard assay for the assessment of total testosterone levels.

  15. Association among metabolic syndrome, testosterone level and severity of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Hsin-Chih; Wang, Chii-Jye; Lee, Yung-Chin; Hsiao, Hsi-Lin; Wu, Wen-Jeng; Chou, Yii-Her; Huang, Chun-Hsiung

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of metabolic syndrome (MS) and serum testosterone in patients with erectile dysfunction (ED) and their possible association. A total of 103 men with ED were enrolled. The International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaire was used to assess erectile condition. MS was defined according to the criteria formulated by the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III) and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). The mean age of the study population was 57.5 +/- 10.7 years, with an average IIEF of 14.7 +/- 6.7. The age and prevalence of MS using the NCEP ATP III criteria, but not the IDF criteria, were significantly different between mild and moderate/severe ED patients (p = 0.031 and 0.009, respectively). The percentage of hypertension (78.6% vs. 36.2%; p < 0.001) and raised fasting glucose levels (46.4% vs. 19.1%; p = 0.004) were significantly higher in the moderate/severe ED group, and both differences remained significant in multivariate analysis (p = 0.001 and 0.042, respectively). In addition, serum testosterone levels were significantly lower in ED patients with MS (p = 0.002). In summary, the presence of MS is associated with more severe ED. Among the components of MS, elevated blood pressure and fasting blood glucose were independent risk factors. NCEP ATP III criteria seem to correlate better with the degree of ED than the IDF definition. Our results also indicate that MS is associated with a lower testosterone level in patients with ED.

  16. Low Testosterone Level and Risk of Alzheimer's Disease in the Elderly Men: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wenshan; Du, Na; Liu, Ying; Fan, Xinyi; Wang, Yunyang; Jia, Xiujuan; Hou, Xu; Wang, Bin

    2016-05-01

    Sex steroids can positively affect the brain function, and low levels of sex steroids may be associated with worse cognitive function in the elderly men. However, previous studies reported contrary findings on the relationship between testosterone level and risk of Alzheimer's disease in the elderly men. The objective of this study was to comprehensively assess the relationship between low testosterone level and Alzheimer's disease risk in the elderly men using a meta-analysis. Only prospective cohort studies assessing the influence of low testosterone level on Alzheimer's disease risk in elderly men were considered eligible. Relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were pooled to assess the risk of Alzheimer's disease in elderly men with low testosterone level. Seven prospective cohort studies with a total of 5251 elderly men and 240 cases of Alzheimer's disease were included into the meta-analysis. There was moderate degree of heterogeneity among those included studies (I(2) = 47.2%). Meta-analysis using random effect model showed that low plasma testosterone level was significantly associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease in elderly men (random RR = 1.48, 95% CI 1.12-1.96, P = 0.006). Sensitivity analysis by omitting one study by turns showed that there was no obvious change in the pooled risk estimates, and all pooled RRs were statistically significant. This meta-analysis supports that low plasma testosterone level is significantly associated with increased risk of Alzheimer's disease in the elderly men. Low testosterone level is a risk factor of worse cognitive function in the elderly men.

  17. Associations of Maternal and Infant Testosterone and Cortisol Levels With Maternal Depressive Symptoms and Infant Socioemotional Problems.

    PubMed

    Cho, June; Su, Xiaogang; Phillips, Vivien; Holditch-Davis, Diane

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the associations of testosterone and cortisol levels with maternal depressive symptoms and infant socioemotional (SE) problems that are influenced by infant gender. A total of 62 mothers and their very-low-birth weight (VLBW) infants were recruited from a neonatal intensive care unit at a tertiary medical center in the southeast United States. Data were collected at three time points (before 40 weeks' postmenstrual age [PMA] and at 3 months and 6 months of age corrected for prematurity). Measures included infant medical record review, maternal interview, biochemical assays of salivary hormone levels in mother-VLBWinfant pairs, and standard questionnaires. Generalized estimating equations with separate analyses for boys and girls showed that maternal testosterone level was negatively associated with depressive symptoms in mothers of boys, whereas infant testosterone level was negatively associated with maternal report of infant SE problems in girls after controlling for characteristics of mothers and infants and number of days post birth of saliva collection. Not surprisingly, the SE problems were positively associated with a number of medical complications. Mothers with more depressive symptoms reported that their infants had more SE problems. Mothers with higher testosterone levels reported that girls, but not boys, had fewer SE problems. In summary, high levels of testosterone could have a protective role for maternal depressive symptoms and infant SE problems. Future research need to be directed toward clinical application of these preliminary results.

  18. Association of sex hormones with sexual function, vitality, and physical function of symptomatic older men with low testosterone levels at baseline in the testosterone trials.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Glenn R; Stephens-Shields, Alisa J; Rosen, Raymond C; Wang, Christina; Ellenberg, Susan S; Matsumoto, Alvin M; Bhasin, Shalender; Molitch, Mark E; Farrar, John T; Cella, David; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Cauley, Jane A; Cifelli, Denise; Crandall, Jill P; Ensrud, Kristine E; Fluharty, Laura; Gill, Thomas M; Lewis, Cora E; Pahor, Marco; Resnick, Susan M; Storer, Thomas W; Swerdloff, Ronald S; Anton, Stephen; Basaria, Shehzad; Diem, Susan; Tabatabaie, Vafa; Hou, Xiaoling; Snyder, Peter J

    2015-03-01

    The prevalence of sexual dysfunction, low vitality, and poor physical function increases with aging, as does the prevalence of low total and free testosterone (TT and FT) levels. However, the relationship between sex hormones and age-related alterations in older men is not clear. To test the hypotheses that baseline serum TT, FT, estradiol (E2), and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) levels are independently associated with sexual function, vitality, and physical function in older symptomatic men with low testosterone levels participating in the Testosterone Trials (TTrials). Cross-sectional study of baseline measures in the TTrials. The study was conducted at 12 sites in the United States. The 788 TTrials participants were ≥ 65 years and had evidence of sexual dysfunction, diminished vitality, and/or mobility disability, and an average of two TT < 275 ng/dL. None. Question 4 of Psychosocial Daily Questionnaire (PDQ-Q4), the FACIT-Fatigue Scale, and the 6-minute walk test. Baseline serum TT and FT, but not E2 or SHBG levels had small, but statistically significant associations with validated measures of sexual desire, erectile function, and sexual activity. None of these hormones was significantly associated within or across trials with FACIT-Fatigue, PHQ-9 Depression or Physical Function-10 scores, or gait speed. FT and TT levels were consistently, independently, and positively associated, albeit to a small degree, with measures of sexual desire, erectile function, and sexual activity, but not with measures of vitality or physical function in symptomatic older men with low T who qualified for the TTrials.

  19. Prenatal exposure to pesticides disrupts testicular histoarchitecture and alters testosterone levels in male Caiman latirostris.

    PubMed

    Rey, Florencia; González, Marianela; Zayas, Marcelo A; Stoker, Cora; Durando, Milena; Luque, Enrique H; Muñoz-de-Toro, Mónica

    2009-07-01

    The increased use of agrochemical pesticides, such as atrazine (ATZ) and endosulfan (END), may have a significant impact on ecosystem health and biodiversity. The aim of this study was to investigate the consequences of in ovum exposure to ATZ and END on Caiman latirostris gonadal histo-functional features. Caiman eggs were collected from environmentally pristine areas and incubated in controlled conditions at male producing temperature (33 degrees C). At stage 20 of embryonic development, the sensitive stage for gonadal sex determination, eggs were exposed to one dose of either END or ATZ. Gonadal histo-morphology was examined in caiman hatchlings and serum levels of testosterone were measured. Regardless of treatment condition, all eggs incubated at 33 degrees C resulted in male hatchlings. Tortuous seminiferous tubules with increased perimeter, disrupted distribution of peritubular myoid cells (desmin positive), and emptied tubular lumens characterized the testes of pesticide-exposed caiman. An imbalance between proliferative activity and cell death was observed in the testes of caiman exposed to the higher doses of END, mainly due to a high frequency of apoptosis in intratubular cells. This altered cell turnover was associated with decreased testosterone levels. Prenatal exposure to only one dose of END and ATZ disrupted neonatal male gonadal histo-functional features. Alterations described here could have detrimental effects on the sexual maturation of the caiman and, ultimately, on the success of male caiman reproduction.

  20. Territorial aggression, body weight, carbohydrate metabolism and testosterone levels of wild rats maintained in laboratory colonies.

    PubMed

    Lucion, A B; De-Almeida, R M; Da-Silva, R S

    1996-12-01

    Aggressive territorial behavior was studied in 15 colonies of wild rats (Rattus norvegicus), each consisting of 2 males and 1 female. One of the males attacked an intruder rat more frequently and had a higher body weight than the less aggressive one. In another experiment, male and female rats were raised in colonies from weaning to adulthood. Animals were weighed every 7 days until 90 days of age when plasma testosterone was measured in males, and plasma glucose, hepatic and muscle glycogen were measured in both males and females. THe heavier (and thus possibly dominant) males in the colonies of 3 males and 1 female also had a higher body weight than males raised with females, but without any male partner. In this long-term social relationship there were no significant differences in carbohydrate metabolism among the animals. The differential growth rate among males was established around the period of sexual maturity. Moreover, when adult, heavier males had higher plasma testosterone levels compared to the other members of the colony and also to males that had no other competitive male partner. This higher androgenic hormone level may be one of the causal factors involved in the weight increase of the dominant male in the colony.

  1. Potentially predictive and manipulable blood serum correlates of aging in the healthy human male: progressive decreases in bioavailable testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, and the ratio of insulin-like growth factor 1 to growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Morley, J E; Kaiser, F; Raum, W J; Perry, H M; Flood, J F; Jensen, J; Silver, A J; Roberts, E

    1997-07-08

    A cross-sectional survey was made in 56 exceptionally healthy males, ranging in age from 20 to 84 years. Measurements were made of selected steroidal components and peptidic hormones in blood serum, and cognitive and physical tests were performed. Of those blood serum variables that gave highly significant negative correlations with age (r > -0.6), bioavailable testosterone (BT), dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), and the ratio of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) to growth hormone (GH) showed a stepwise pattern of age-related changes most closely resembling those of the age steps themselves. Of these, BT correlated best with significantly age-correlated cognitive and physical measures. Because DHEAS correlated well with BT and considerably less well than BT with the cognitive and physical measures, it seems likely that BT and/or substances to which BT gives rise in tissues play a more direct role in whatever processes are rate-limiting in the functions measured and that DHEAS relates more indirectly to these functions. The high correlation of IGF-1/GH with age, its relatively low correlation with BT, and the patterns of correlations of IGF-1/GH and BT with significantly age-correlated cognitive and physical measures suggest that the GH-IGF-1 axis and BT play independent roles in affecting these functions. Serial determinations made after oral ingestion of pregnenolone and data from the literature suggest there is interdependence of steroid metabolic systems with those operational in control of interrelations in the GH-IGF-1 axis. Longitudinal concurrent measurements of serum levels of BT, DHEAS, and IGF-1/GH together with detailed studies of their correlations with age-correlated functional measures may be useful in detecting early age-related dysregulations and may be helpful in devising ameliorative approaches.

  2. Potentially predictive and manipulable blood serum correlates of aging in the healthy human male: Progressive decreases in bioavailable testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, and the ratio of insulin-like growth factor 1 to growth hormone

    PubMed Central

    Morley, John E.; Kaiser, Fran; Raum, William J.; Perry, H. Mitchell; Flood, James F.; Jensen, Judy; Silver, Andrew J.; Roberts, Eugene

    1997-01-01

    A cross-sectional survey was made in 56 exceptionally healthy males, ranging in age from 20 to 84 years. Measurements were made of selected steroidal components and peptidic hormones in blood serum, and cognitive and physical tests were performed. Of those blood serum variables that gave highly significant negative correlations with age (r > −0.6), bioavailable testosterone (BT), dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), and the ratio of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) to growth hormone (GH) showed a stepwise pattern of age-related changes most closely resembling those of the age steps themselves. Of these, BT correlated best with significantly age-correlated cognitive and physical measures. Because DHEAS correlated well with BT and considerably less well than BT with the cognitive and physical measures, it seems likely that BT and/or substances to which BT gives rise in tissues play a more direct role in whatever processes are rate-limiting in the functions measured and that DHEAS relates more indirectly to these functions. The high correlation of IGF-1/GH with age, its relatively low correlation with BT, and the patterns of correlations of IGF-1/GH and BT with significantly age-correlated cognitive and physical measures suggest that the GH–IGF-1 axis and BT play independent roles in affecting these functions. Serial determinations made after oral ingestion of pregnenolone and data from the literature suggest there is interdependence of steroid metabolic systems with those operational in control of interrelations in the GH–IGF-1 axis. Longitudinal concurrent measurements of serum levels of BT, DHEAS, and IGF-1/GH together with detailed studies of their correlations with age-correlated functional measures may be useful in detecting early age-related dysregulations and may be helpful in devising ameliorative approaches. PMID:9207127

  3. Social behavior and patterns of testosterone and glucocorticoid levels differ between male chacma and Guinea baboons.

    PubMed

    Kalbitzer, Urs; Heistermann, Michael; Cheney, Dorothy; Seyfarth, Robert; Fischer, Julia

    2015-09-01

    In multi-male, multi-female groups of mammals, males usually compete aggressively over access to females. However, species vary in the intensity of male contest competition, which has been linked to differences in testosterone and glucocorticoid profiles. Chacma (Papio ursinus) and Guinea (P. papio) baboons constitute an intriguing model to examine variation in male competition and male endocrine correlates, because of the differences in their social systems. Chacma baboons live in stable female-bonded groups with linear male dominance hierarchies and a high male mating skew, whereas Guinea baboons live in male-bonded, multi-level societies. We recorded male behavior and assayed testosterone (fT) and glucocorticoid metabolite (fGC) levels from fecal samples in one population of each species. Male chacma baboons were more frequently involved in agonistic interactions, and dominance relationships were more consistent than in Guinea baboons, where we could not detect linear hierarchies. Notably, male chacma baboons were also more aggressive towards females, indicating an overall higher aggressiveness in this species. In contrast, male Guinea baboons showed higher levels of affiliative interactions and spatial tolerance. High-ranking and consorting male chacma baboons showed elevated fGC levels and also tended to show elevated fT levels, but there was no effect of consortship in Guinea baboons. Agonism was not related to hormone levels in either species. Thus, predictors of fT and fGC levels in Guinea baboons seem to differ from chacma baboons. Our results support the view that different social systems create differential selection pressures for male aggression, reflected by different hormone profiles.

  4. The activity of satellite cells and myonuclei following 8 weeks of strength training in young men with suppressed testosterone levels.

    PubMed

    Kvorning, T; Kadi, F; Schjerling, P; Andersen, M; Brixen, K; Suetta, C; Madsen, K

    2015-03-01

    To investigate how suppression of endogenous testosterone during an 8-week strength training period influences the activity of satellite cells and myonuclei. Twenty-two moderately trained young men participated in this randomized, placebo-controlled, and double-blinded intervention study. The participants were randomized to treatment with a GnRH analogue, goserelin (n = 12), which suppresses testosterone or placebo (n = 10) for 12 weeks. The strength training period of 8 weeks started after 4 weeks of treatment and included exercises for all major muscles. Biopsies were obtained from the mid-portion of the vastus lateralis muscle. Testosterone resting level in goserelin was 10-20 times lower compared with placebo, and the training-induced increase in the level of testosterone was abolished in goserelin. Training increased satellite cells number in type II fibres by 20% in placebo and by 52% in goserelin (P < 0.01), whereas the myonuclear number significantly increased by 12% in type II fibres in placebo and remained unchanged in goserelin (P < 0.05). No changes in satellite cells and myonuclei were seen in type I fibres in either group. Data from the microarray analysis indicated that low testosterone affects the bone morphogenetic proteins signalling, which might regulate proliferation vs. differentiation of satellite cells. Eight weeks of strength training enhances the myonuclear number in type II fibres, and this is largely blocked by the suppression of testosterone. The data indicate that low testosterone levels could reduce the differentiation of satellite cells to myonuclei via the bone morphogenetic proteins signalling pathway, resulting in reduced increases in lean leg mass. © 2014 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. [Leptin correlates with distribution of fatty tissue and plasma levels of insulin, testosterone and tumor necrosis factor alpha in perimenopausal women with increased testosterone level and central location of body fat].

    PubMed

    Milewicz, Tomasz; Krzysiek, Józef; Janczak-Saif, Agnieszka; Sztefko, Krystyna

    2006-01-01

    The evaluation of the influence of testosterone and fat tissue distribution on the serum leptin levels in perimenopausal women. 93 perimenopausal women without HRT (age: 51.0 +/- 8.8 yrs, FSH: 68.0 +/- 49.4 IU/l, estradiol: 38.3 +/- 37.0 ng/1) were divided into group A - 63 women with serum testosterone level < 0.6 ng/ml and group B--30 women with serum testosterone > or = 0.6 ng/ml. Each group was later divided according to WHR into subgroup I (AI and BI) (WHR < 0.8) and II (AII and BII) (WHR > or = 0.8). Basic fasting serum levels of LH, FSH, PRL, estradiol, insulin, hGH, IGF-I, IGFBP-1, IGFBP-3, leptin, testosterone, DHEAS TNF-alpha and SHBG were measured by RIA kits. Total cholesterol, HDL and LDL cholesterol, as well as triglycerides plasma levels were measured. Statistical evaluation was carried out by ANOVA and linear regression. BMI, WHR and plasma DHEAS level were higher in group B vs. group A. The lowest hGH, HDL-cholesterol and the highest TNF-alpha levels were found in group BII. The relations leptin/BMI and leptin/body mass were found in each group. The inverse relation between leptin and IGFBP-1 was found in groups A and B. In group A the inverse relations leptin/HDL-cholesterol and leptin/ DHEAS were observed. In group B the direct leptin/testosterone and inverse leptin/IGF-I relations were found. In group AI the inverse leptin/DHEAS relation remained, while in group AII inverse leptin/HDL-cholesterol relation remained and reverse leptin/IGFBP-1 relation was significant. The direct leptin/testosterone, leptin/WHR and inverse leptin/TNF-alpha links were observed in group BII. The serum leptin level was linked to WHR, serum testosterone, insulin, TNF-alpha levels only in groups of perimenopausal women with such cardiovascular risk factors as high WHR, overweight, high serum TNF-alpha and testosterone levels.

  6. Pre-GnRH and GnRH-induced testosterone levels do not vary across behavioral contexts: A role for individual variation.

    PubMed

    Ambardar, Medhavi; Grindstaff, Jennifer L

    2017-05-15

    Hormones can facilitate the expression of behavior, but relatively few studies have considered individual variation and repeatability in hormone-behavior relationships. Repeated measures of hormones are valuable because repeatability in hormone levels might be a mechanism that drives repeatability in behavior ("personality"). Testosterone is predicted to promote territorial aggression and suppress parental behaviors. In our population of eastern bluebirds (Sialia sialis), parental care and nest defense aggression toward a heterospecific are repeatable. We tested the hypothesis that repeatability of testosterone levels within individuals underlies repeatable behaviors observed in our population. We measured nestling provisioning and aggressive nest defense against a heterospecific. After behavioral observations we captured either the male or female bluebird, and determined initial testosterone levels and maximum capacity of the gonads to secrete testosterone by injecting gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). We found among-individual variation in initial testosterone levels for males and females. Individual males were repeatable in both initial and GnRH-induced testosterone levels across behavioral contexts, while individual females were repeatable in GnRH-induced testosterone levels. However, testosterone levels were not significantly related to parental or nest defense behaviors, suggesting that repeatable testosterone levels may not drive repeatable parental and heterospecific nest defense behaviors in this population. The absence of a relationship between testosterone and parental and heterospecific nest defense behaviors might be due to among-individual variation in testosterone levels. Considering the sources of variation in testosterone levels may reveal why some populations exhibit high individual variation in hormone levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Alternatives to testosterone replacement: testosterone restoration.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The European Male Aging Study has demonstrated that the hypogonadism of male aging is predominantly secondary. Theoretically with appropriate stimulation from the pituitary, the aging testis should be able to produce eugonadal levels of testosterone. The strategies for the treatment of late onset hypogonadism (LOH) have focused on replacement with exogenous testosterone versus restoration of endogenous production. The purpose of this article is to review existing peer-reviewed literature supporting the concept of restoration of endogenous testosterone in the treatment of LOH.

  8. Serum estradiol, progesterone, testosterone, FSH and LH levels in postmenopausal women with Alzheimer's dementia.

    PubMed

    Tsolaki, Magdalini; Grammaticos, Philip; Karanasou, Chrysanthi; Balaris, Vassilios; Kapoukranidou, Dorothea; Kalpidis, Ioannis; Petsanis, Kostas; Dedousi, Eleni

    2005-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that estrogen replacement therapy lowers the risk of Alzheimer's dementia (AD) among postmenopausal women. Other studies have evaluated serum levels of sex hormones and gonadotropins in women with AD. Estrogens (E(1) and E(2)), luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicular stimulating hormone (FSH), dihydroepiandrosterone and sex hormone binding albumin, which normally responds to circulating testosterone, have been investigated by others using the same protocol in postmenopausal women with AD, older than 65 years. Others have studied in elderly women with AD, also using one protocol, fewer sex hormones and/or gonadotropins. We have studied the serum levels of estradiol, progesterone, testosterone, LH and FSH in the same serum sample of postmenopausal women with AD and other dementias and compared them to a group of controls. We are not aware of a similar study in the literature. All patients were diagnosed on clinical grounds and screened by the mini mental score examination (MMSE). Forty eight women had AD (Group A), mean age 72 years and age range 60-84 years, s even had other types of dementia (Group B), mean age 63.5 years and age range 53-74 years and 33 women had no cognitive impairment and were studied as controls (Group C). Group C women had mean age of 65 years and their age ranged between 55-73 years. Estradiol, progesterone and testosterone were measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA), while FSH and LH by radioimmunometric assay (IRMA). Our results showed that estradiol was significantly lower in Group A as compared to Group C (P=0.04). There was no significant difference in the levels of the other four hormones in the three Groups as studied by the Mann-Whitney U and the Pearson's statistical test. Our results were not influenced by differences due to sex, age, ethnic group or education since these factors were either similar or comparable in all Groups studied. All but two of the subjects, with mild alcoholism, smoking, increased

  9. Alteration in plasma testosterone levels in male mice lacking soluble epoxide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Luria, Ayala; Morisseau, Christophe; Tsai, Hsing-Ju; Yang, Jun; Inceoglu, Bora; De Taeye, Bart; Watkins, Steven M; Wiest, Michelle M; German, J Bruce; Hammock, Bruce D

    2009-08-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (Ephx2, sEH) is a bifunctional enzyme with COOH-terminal hydrolase and NH(2)-terminal phosphatase activities. sEH converts epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) to dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs), and the phosphatase activity is suggested to be involved in cholesterol metabolism. EETs participate in a wide range of biological functions, including regulation of vascular tone, renal tubular transport, cardiac contractility, and inflammation. Inhibition of sEH is a potential approach for enhancing the biological activity of EETs. Therefore, disruption of sEH activity is becoming an attractive therapeutic target for both cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases. To define the physiological role of sEH, we characterized a knockout mouse colony lacking expression of the Ephx2 gene. Lack of sEH enzyme is characterized by elevation of EET to DHET ratios in both the linoleate and arachidonate series in plasma and tissues of both female and male mice. In male mice, this lack of expression was also associated with decreased plasma testosterone levels, sperm count, and testicular size. However, this genotype was still able to sire litters. Plasma cholesterol levels also declined in this genotype. Behavior tests such as anxiety-like behavior and hedonic response were also examined in Ephx2-null and WT mice, as all can be related to hormonal changes. Null mice showed a level of anxiety with a decreased hedonic response. In conclusion, this study provides a broad biochemical, physiological, and behavioral characterization of the Ephx2-null mouse colony and suggests a mechanism by which sEH and its substrates may regulate circulating levels of testosterone through cholesterol biosynthesis and metabolism.

  10. Changes in the sexual behavior and testosterone levels of male rats in response to daily interactions with estrus females

    PubMed Central

    Shulman, Leanne M.; Spritzer, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    Male rat sexual behavior has been intensively studied over the past 100 years, but few studies have examined how sexual behavior changes over the course of several days of interactions. In this experiment, adult male rats (n = 12) were given daily access to estrus females for 30 min per day for 15 consecutive days and control males did not interact with females. Ovariectomized females were induced into estrus with hormonal injections, and males interacted with a different female each day. The amount of sexual activity (mounts, intromissions, and ejaculations) was found to cycle with a period of approximately 4 days in most male rats. Additionally, blood was collected every other day following sexual interactions to assess serum testosterone levels. Testosterone was found to peak on the first day of interaction and then fell back to near the level of control rats that did not interact with females. Following the initial peak, testosterone concentrations fluctuated less in males exposed to females than in controls. Sexual activity was not found to predict testosterone concentration. We conclude that when male rats have daily sexual interactions, sexual behavior tends to show cyclic changes and testosterone is significantly elevated only on the first day of interactions. PMID:24813700

  11. Anti-GnRH antibodies can induce castrate levels of testosterone in patients with advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Simms, M S; Scholfield, D P; Jacobs, E; Michaeli, D; Broome, P; Humphreys, J E; Bishop, M C

    2000-01-01

    D17DT consists of the GnRH decapeptide linked to diphtheria toxoid. The aim of this pilot study was to assess the tolerance of D17DT and the production of anti-GnRH antibodies from two doses, 30 and 100 μg, in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer. Twelve patients with histologically proven prostate cancer in whom hormonal therapy was indicated were recruited. Patients received either 30 or 100 μg given intramuscularly on three separate occasions over six weeks. Patients were followed up and blood was taken for estimation of serum testosterone, PSA and anti-GnRH antibody titre. Overall the drug was well tolerated. In 5 patients a significant reduction in serum testosterone and PSA was seen. Castrate levels of testosterone were achieved in 4 and maintained for up to 9 months. Patients with the highest antibody titre had the best response in terms of testosterone suppression. This study shows that it is possible to immunize a patient with prostate cancer against GnRH to induce castrate levels of testosterone. This state appears to be reversible. This novel form of immunotherapy may have advantages over conventional forms of hormonal therapy and further studies are warranted in order to try and increase the proportion of responders. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10945488

  12. Free testosterone: clinical utility and important analytical aspects of measurement.

    PubMed

    Shea, Jennifer L; Wong, Pui-Yuen; Chen, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Testosterone, the most abundant androgen in men, is a steroid hormone that is synthesized predominantly by the testes. In women, minor amounts are synthesized in the ovaries. Androgen precursors are also produced and secreted from the adrenal glands in both sexes, where they undergo peripheral conversion to testosterone. Circulating concentrations are approximately 15-25 times higher in adult men compared to women. Maintenance of these levels is necessary for development and maintenance of secondary sexual characteristics, libido, growth, prevention of osteoporosis, and most importantly in men, spermatogenesis. Most testosterone circulates tightly bound to sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) or weakly bound to albumin. A minor amount circulates as free testosterone, and it is believed that this is the metabolically active fraction. Measurement of free testosterone is important in the diagnosis of many diseases, most importantly disorders of androgen deficiency in men (i.e., hypogonadism) and androgen excess in women (i.e., polycystic ovary syndrome and hirsutism). Many methodologies are available for free testosterone measurement including the reference methods (equilibrium dialysis and ultrafiltration), analog immunoassay, and calculated free testosterone based on measurement of total testosterone, SHBG, and albumin. Moreover, measurement of bioavailable testosterone, a combination of albumin-bound and free testosterone, also has clinical utility and can be measured by selective protein precipitation or calculation. In this review, the advantages and limitations of each of these methods will be discussed in the context of clinical utility and implementation into a routine hospital laboratory. Furthermore, up and coming methodologies for free testosterone measurement, including liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, will also be discussed.

  13. Analysis of seminal plasma from brown bear (Ursus arctos) during the breeding season: Its relationship with testosterone levels.

    PubMed

    Anel-López, L; Ortega-Ferrusola, C; Martínez-Rodríguez, C; Álvarez, M; Borragán, S; Chamorro, C; Peña, F J; Anel, L; de Paz, P

    2017-01-01

    Seminal plasma (SP) plays an important role in the motility, viability and maintenance of the fertilizing capacity of mammalian spermatozoa. This study is the first on brown bear (Ursus arctos) SP components, and has two main objectives: 1) to define the SP composition in bear ejaculate and 2) to identify variations in SP composition in relation to high and low levels of testosterone in serum during the breeding season. Forty-eight sperm samples from 30 sexually mature male brown bears (Ursus arctos) were obtained by electroejaculation, and their serum testosterone levels were assessed to sort the animals into 2 groups (high and low testosterone levels, threshold 5 ng/dl). The biochemical and protein compositions of the SP samples were assessed, and sperm motility was analyzed. We found that lactate dehydrogenase was significantly higher in the low-serum-testosterone samples, while concentrations of lipase and Mg+ values were significantly higher in the high-serum-testosterone samples. In contrast, sperm motility did not significantly differ (P>0.05) between the testosterone level groups (total motility: 74.42.8% in the high-level group vs. 77.1±4.7% in the low-level group). A reference digital model was constructed since there is no information for this wild species. To do this, all gel images were added in a binary multidimensional image and thirty-three spots were identified as the most-repeated spots. An analysis of these proteins was done by qualitative equivalency (isoelectric point and molecular weight) with published data for a bull. SP protein composition was compared between bears with high and low serum testosterone, and three proteins (binder of sperm and two enzymes not identified in the reference bull) showed significant (P<0.05) quantitative differences. We conclude that male bears with high or low serum testosterone levels differs only in some properties of their SP, differences in enzyme LDIP2, energy source LACT2, one protein (similar to BSP1

  14. Ignoring the challenge? Male black redstarts (Phoenicurus ochruros) do not increase testosterone levels during territorial conflicts but they do so in response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Apfelbeck, Beate; Goymann, Wolfgang

    2011-11-07

    Competition elevates plasma testosterone in a wide variety of vertebrates, including humans. The 'challenge hypothesis' proposes that seasonal peaks in testosterone during breeding are caused by social challenges from other males. However, during experimentally induced male-male conflicts, testosterone increases only in a minority of songbird species tested so far. Why is this so? Comparative evidence suggests that species with a short breeding season may not elevate testosterone levels during territory defence. These species may even be limited in their physiological capability to increase testosterone levels, which can be tested by injecting birds with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). We studied two populations of black redstarts that differ in breeding altitude, morphology and the length of their breeding season. Unexpectedly, males of neither population increased testosterone in response to a simulated territorial intrusion, but injections with GnRH resulted in a major elevation of testosterone. Thus, black redstarts would have been capable of mounting a testosterone response during the male-male challenge. Our data show, for the first time, that the absence of an androgen response to male-male challenges is not owing to physiological limitations to increase testosterone. Furthermore, in contrast to comparative evidence between species, populations of black redstarts with a long breeding season do not show the expected elevation in testosterone during male-male challenges.

  15. Ignoring the challenge? Male black redstarts (Phoenicurus ochruros) do not increase testosterone levels during territorial conflicts but they do so in response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone

    PubMed Central

    Apfelbeck, Beate; Goymann, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Competition elevates plasma testosterone in a wide variety of vertebrates, including humans. The ‘challenge hypothesis’ proposes that seasonal peaks in testosterone during breeding are caused by social challenges from other males. However, during experimentally induced male–male conflicts, testosterone increases only in a minority of songbird species tested so far. Why is this so? Comparative evidence suggests that species with a short breeding season may not elevate testosterone levels during territory defence. These species may even be limited in their physiological capability to increase testosterone levels, which can be tested by injecting birds with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). We studied two populations of black redstarts that differ in breeding altitude, morphology and the length of their breeding season. Unexpectedly, males of neither population increased testosterone in response to a simulated territorial intrusion, but injections with GnRH resulted in a major elevation of testosterone. Thus, black redstarts would have been capable of mounting a testosterone response during the male–male challenge. Our data show, for the first time, that the absence of an androgen response to male–male challenges is not owing to physiological limitations to increase testosterone. Furthermore, in contrast to comparative evidence between species, populations of black redstarts with a long breeding season do not show the expected elevation in testosterone during male–male challenges. PMID:21325321

  16. Men with elevated testosterone levels show more affiliative behaviours during interactions with women

    PubMed Central

    van der Meij, Leander; Almela, Mercedes; Buunk, Abraham P.; Fawcett, Tim W.; Salvador, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    Testosterone (T) is thought to play a key role in male–male competition and courtship in many vertebrates, but its precise effects are unclear. We explored whether courtship behaviour in humans is modulated and preceded by changes in T. Pairs of healthy male students first competed in a non-physical contest in which their T levels became elevated. Each participant then had a short, informal interaction with either an unfamiliar man or woman. The sex of the stimulus person did not affect the participants' behaviour overall. However, in interactions with women, those men who had experienced a greater T increase during the contest subsequently showed more interest in the woman, engaged in more self-presentation, smiled more and made more eye contact. No such effects were seen in interactions with other men. This is the first study to provide direct evidence that elevating T during male–male competition is followed by increased affiliative behaviour towards women. PMID:21632627

  17. Experimental increase of testosterone levels in free-ranging juvenile male African striped mice (Rhabdomys pumilio) induces physiological, morphological, and behavioral changes.

    PubMed

    Raynaud, Julien; Müller, Karin; Schradin, Carsten

    2012-08-01

    Testosterone influences sexual differentiation in early development, and activates sexual maturation and sex-related behavior in males during puberty. Testosterone can also influence the expression of male alternative reproductive tactics, by either organizational effects (fixed tactics) or by activational effects (plastic tactics). However, the roles of testosterone in sexual maturation and at the same time the expression of alternative reproductive tactics have been little investigated experimentally, and studies of free-ranging mammals are lacking. We conducted a field experiment in free-ranging juvenile African striped mice (Rhabdomys pumilio), a species with alternative reproductive tactics. Juvenile male striped mice reaching puberty can remain in their family as philopatric group-living males with low testosterone levels, or they can disperse and become solitary living roamers with much higher testosterone levels. We tested whether experimentally increased testosterone levels in non-scrotal juvenile males induces puberty and leads to the expression of the roaming tactic. Testosterone-treated males received the hormone for 15days by silastic implants which were empty in control-treated males. When compared to control-treated males, testosterone-treated males had higher testosterone levels, lower corticosterone levels, and became scrotal with descended testes. Testosterone-treated males also had larger testes, larger epididymides, and showed indication of spermatogenesis. Testosterone-treated males did not become solitary-living roamers, but had larger home ranges than control males. We conclude that testosterone can induce sexual maturation and causes juvenile males to increase their home ranges, maybe to search for dispersal opportunities.

  18. Housing with females increases testosterone and cortisol levels in captive groups of black-handed spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi).

    PubMed

    Cerda-Molina, A L; Hernández-López, L; Díaz-Díaz, G; Mejía-Varas, F; Chavira, R; Mondragón-Ceballos, R

    2012-01-01

    The black-handed spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi) is a seasonal reproducer that requires a seclusiveness to copulate and has a fusion-fission social system. These features impose important restrictions to achieve reproduction of captive animals. We investigated if group composition in captive spider monkeys has any endocrine effects. We compared testosterone and cortisol concentrations during the mating season in all-male and multifemale-multimale groups to study if the former condition impairs reproductive potential and increases stress. Concentrations of testosterone and cortisol of males living with females were higher than those of all-male groups. In the multifemale-multimale condition, dominant males had the highest levels of testosterone, while the youngest males showed the highest concentrations of cortisol. Results show that males adjust well to isosexual grouping, this being an appropriate condition to keep animals when controlled reproduction is sought.

  19. An update on the hypothesis that one cause of autism is high intrauterine levels of testosterone of maternal origin.

    PubMed

    James, William H

    2014-08-21

    Baron-Cohen's hypothesis that autism is caused by exposure to high intrauterine testosterone levels is considered in the context of (1) my hormonal hypothesis of sex ratio and (2) the notion of multifactorial inheritance. This yields the suggestions that (1) female cases of autism may be the product of (high genetic loading+moderate environmental exposure) and male cases of (high environmental exposure+moderate genetic loading), (2) one environmental agent is intrauterine testosterone and (3) the mother is the major source of that testosterone. These suggestions may help to explain most of the major established epidemiological risk factors for autism. These include various forms of pathology associated with psychological and/or physical stress. Stress of many sorts promotes the secretion of adrenal androgens in women. The three suggestions above may also explain some recently described features of autism including the psychological, behavioural and neuroanatomical differences between male and female cases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Testosterone affects language areas of the adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Andreas; Kranz, Georg S; Sladky, Ronald; Kaufmann, Ulrike; Ganger, Sebastian; Hummer, Allan; Seiger, Rene; Spies, Marie; Vanicek, Thomas; Winkler, Dietmar; Kasper, Siegfried; Windischberger, Christian; Swaab, Dick F; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2016-05-01

    Although the sex steroid hormone testosterone is integrally involved in the development of language processing, ethical considerations mostly limit investigations to single hormone administrations. To circumvent this issue we assessed the influence of continuous high-dose hormone application in adult female-to-male transsexuals. Subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging before and after 4 weeks of testosterone treatment, with each scan including structural, diffusion weighted and functional imaging. Voxel-based morphometry analysis showed decreased gray matter volume with increasing levels of bioavailable testosterone exclusively in Broca's and Wernicke's areas. Particularly, this may link known sex differences in language performance to the influence of testosterone on relevant brain regions. Using probabilistic tractography, we further observed that longitudinal changes in testosterone negatively predicted changes in mean diffusivity of the corresponding structural connection passing through the extreme capsule. Considering a related increase in myelin staining in rodents, this potentially reflects a strengthening of the fiber tract particularly involved in language comprehension. Finally, functional images at resting-state were evaluated, showing increased functional connectivity between the two brain regions with increasing testosterone levels. These findings suggest testosterone-dependent neuroplastic adaptations in adulthood within language-specific brain regions and connections. Importantly, deteriorations in gray matter volume seem to be compensated by enhancement of corresponding structural and functional connectivity. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1738-1748, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Investigation of antioxidant vitamins (A, E and C) and selenium levels in chickens receiving estrogen or testosterone.

    PubMed

    Halifeoglu, Ihsan; Karatas, Fikret; Canatan, Halit; Colak, Ramiz; Karadas, Erkan

    2003-06-01

    In the present study estrogen or testosterone was administered to broiler chickens (6 weeks old) for 5 weeks and levels of antioxidant vitamins (A, E and C) and selenium (Se) were determined. In animals who received estrogen, vitamins A, E, C and Se levels were 0.70 +/- 0.19, 11.0 +/- 2.45, 20.0 +/- 5.17 and 130.0 +/- 25.0 microg l(-1), respectively. Vitamins A, E, C and Se levels in the testosterone-administered group were found to be 0.54 +/- 0.16, 9.9 +/- 1.96, 18.0 +/- 5.18 and 100.0 +/- 18.0 microg l(-1), respectively. Vitamins A, E, C and Se levels were found to be significantly increased in the estrogen-administered group compared to the controls (p < 0.01, p < 0.01, p < 0.05, p < 0.05, respectively). Although all parameters were increased in testosterone-treated animals, only increases in vitamins A and E were found to be statistically significant (p < 0.01, p < 0.01, respectively). Based on the present findings, estrogen and testosterone show direct antioxidant effects by increasing the activities of some enzymes and they also cause an increase in antioxidant vitamin levels and hence indirectly also contribute to antioxidant capacity. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Reduction of calprotectin and phosphate during testosterone therapy in aging men: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, L; Christensen, L L; Pedersen, S M; Andersen, M

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the effect of testosterone treatment on biomarkers calprotectin, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), soluble Klotho, phosphate, calcium, parathyroid hormone, creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate. Randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study. Odense Androgen Study-the effect of Testim and training in hypogonadal men. Men aged 60-78 years old with a low normal concentration of free of bioavailable testosterone <7.3 nmol/L and waist circumference >94 cm recruited from 2008 to 2009 (N = 48) by advertisement. Participants were randomized to receive 5-10 g gel/50-100 mg testosterone (Testim(®), Ipsen, France) or 5-10 g gel/placebo. The plasma levels of calprotectin and phosphate were significantly reduced in the group receiving testosterone therapy (gel) compared to the placebo group (p < 0.05). Testosterone treatment did not have any significant effect on plasma levels of FGF23 or soluble Klotho. The reduction in phosphate levels was inversely associated with bioavailable testosterone. Compared to the placebo group, 6 months of testosterone therapy (gel) reduced calprotectin and phosphate levels suggesting decreased inflammation and decreased cardiovascular risk.

  3. The association between physiologic testosterone levels, lean mass, and fat mass in a nationally representative sample of men in the United States.

    PubMed

    Mouser, J Grant; Loprinzi, Paul D; Loenneke, Jeremy P

    2016-11-01

    Testosterone deficiency leads to increased muscle loss with aging and increased fat mass. Supraphysiologic levels cause an increase in muscle mass and decrease in fat mass. The difference in lean and fat mass across physiologic levels of testosterone has been under examined in men.

  4. The Effect of Testosterone Replacement Therapy on Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Levels in Men Being Treated for Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Kang, De-Ying; Li, Hong-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Testosterone replacement therapy is used for the treatment of age-related male hypogonadism, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a primary screening tool for prostate cancer. The systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to determine the effect of testosterone replacement therapy on PSA levels. Medline, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and Google Scholar databases were searched until February 28, 2014, and inclusion criteria were as follows: randomized controlled trial; intervention group received testosterone/androgen replacement therapy; control group did not receive treatment; and no history of prostate cancer. The primary outcome was change of PSA level between before and after treatment. Secondary outcomes were elevated PSA level after treatment, and the number of patients who developed prostate cancer. After initially identifying 511 articles, 15 studies with a total of 739 patients that received testosterone replacement and 385 controls were included. The duration of treatment ranged from 3 to 12 months. Patients treated with testosterone tended to have higher PSA levels, and thus a greater change than those that received control treatments (difference in means of PSA levels = 0.154, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.069 to 0.238, P < 0.001). The difference in means of PSA levels were significant higher for patients that received testosterone intramuscularly (IM) than controls (difference in means of PSA levels = 0.271, 95% CI 0.117–0.425, P = 0.001). Elevated PSA levels after treatment were similar between patients that received treatment and controls (odds ratio [OR] = 1.02, 95% CI 0.48–2.20, P = 0.953). Only 3 studies provided data with respect to the development of prostate cancer, and rates were similar between those that received treatment and controls. Testosterone replacement therapy does not increase PSA levels in men being treated for hypogonadism, except when it is given IM and even the increase with IM administration

  5. Dehydroepiandrosterone Supplementation Combined with Whole-Body Vibration Training Affects Testosterone Level and Body Composition in Mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Chyuan; Chen, Yi-Ming; Huang, Chi-Chang; Tzeng, Yen-Dun

    2016-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), the most abundant sex steroid, is primarily secreted by the adrenal gland and a precursor hormone used by athletes for performance enhancement. Whole-body vibration (WBV) is a well-known light-resistance exercise by automatic adaptations to rapid and repeated oscillations from a vibrating platform, which is also a simple and convenient exercise for older adults. However, the potential effects of DHEA supplementation combined with WBV training on to body composition, exercise performance, and hormone regulation are currently unclear. The objective of the study is to investigate the effects of DHEA supplementation combined with WBV training on body composition, exercise performance, and physical fatigue-related biochemical responses and testosterone content in young-adult C57BL/6 mice. In this study, male C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups (n = 8 per group) for 6-weeks treatment: sedentary controls with vehicle (SC), DHEA supplementation (DHEA, 10.2 mg/kg), WBV training (WBV; 5.6 Hz, 2 mm, 0.13 g), and WBV training with DHEA supplementation (WBV+DHEA; WBV: 5.6 Hz, 2 mm, 0.13 g and DHEA: 10.2 mg/kg). Exercise performance was evaluated by forelimb grip strength and exhaustive swimming time, as well as changes in body composition and anti-fatigue levels of serum lactate, ammonia, glucose, creatine kinase (CK), and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) after a 15-min swimming exercise. In addition, the biochemical parameters and the testosterone content were measured at the end of the experiment. Six-week DHEA supplementation alone significantly increased mice body weight (BW), muscle weight, testosterone level, and glycogen contents (liver and muscle) when compared with SC group. DHEA supplementation alone had no negative impact on all tissue and biochemical profiles, but could not improve exercise performance. However, WBV+DHEA supplementation also significantly decreased BW, testosterone level and glycogen content of liver, as well as serum

  6. Dehydroepiandrosterone Supplementation Combined with Whole-Body Vibration Training Affects Testosterone Level and Body Composition in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Chyuan; Chen, Yi-Ming; Huang, Chi-Chang; Tzeng, Yen-Dun

    2016-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), the most abundant sex steroid, is primarily secreted by the adrenal gland and a precursor hormone used by athletes for performance enhancement. Whole-body vibration (WBV) is a well-known light-resistance exercise by automatic adaptations to rapid and repeated oscillations from a vibrating platform, which is also a simple and convenient exercise for older adults. However, the potential effects of DHEA supplementation combined with WBV training on to body composition, exercise performance, and hormone regulation are currently unclear. The objective of the study is to investigate the effects of DHEA supplementation combined with WBV training on body composition, exercise performance, and physical fatigue-related biochemical responses and testosterone content in young-adult C57BL/6 mice. In this study, male C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups (n = 8 per group) for 6-weeks treatment: sedentary controls with vehicle (SC), DHEA supplementation (DHEA, 10.2 mg/kg), WBV training (WBV; 5.6 Hz, 2 mm, 0.13 g), and WBV training with DHEA supplementation (WBV+DHEA; WBV: 5.6 Hz, 2 mm, 0.13 g and DHEA: 10.2 mg/kg). Exercise performance was evaluated by forelimb grip strength and exhaustive swimming time, as well as changes in body composition and anti-fatigue levels of serum lactate, ammonia, glucose, creatine kinase (CK), and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) after a 15-min swimming exercise. In addition, the biochemical parameters and the testosterone content were measured at the end of the experiment. Six-week DHEA supplementation alone significantly increased mice body weight (BW), muscle weight, testosterone level, and glycogen contents (liver and muscle) when compared with SC group. DHEA supplementation alone had no negative impact on all tissue and biochemical profiles, but could not improve exercise performance. However, WBV+DHEA supplementation also significantly decreased BW, testosterone level and glycogen content of liver, as well as serum

  7. Seasonal changes in testosterone and corticosterone levels in four social classes of a desert dwelling sociable rodent.

    PubMed

    Schradin, Carsten

    2008-04-01

    Animals have to adjust their physiology to seasonal changes, in response to variation in food availability, social tactics and reproduction. I compared basal corticosterone and testosterone levels in free ranging striped mouse from a desert habitat, comparing between the sexes, breeding and philopatric non-breeding individuals, and between the breeding and the non-breeding season. I expected differences between breeders and non-breeders and between seasons with high and low food availability. Basal serum corticosterone was measured from 132 different individuals and serum testosterone from 176 different individuals of free living striped mice. Corticosterone and testosterone levels were independent of age, body weight and not influenced by carrying a transmitter. The levels of corticosterone and testosterone declined by approximately 50% from the breeding to the non-breeding season in breeding females as well as non-breeding males and females. In contrast, breeding males showed much lower corticosterone levels during the breeding season than all other classes, and were the only class that showed an increase of corticosterone from the breeding to the non-breeding season. As a result, breeding males had similar corticosterone levels as other social classes during the non-breeding season. During the breeding season, breeding males had much higher testosterone levels than other classes, which decreased significantly from the breeding to the non-breeding season. My results support the prediction that corticosterone decreases during periods of low food abundance. Variation in the pattern of hormonal secretion in striped mice might assist them to cope with seasonal changes in energy demand in a desert habitat.

  8. Simultaneous Measurement of Serum Chemical Castration Agents and Testosterone Levels Using Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ko, Dae-Hyun; Lee, Kyunghoon; Jeon, Sun-Hee; Song, Sang Hoon; Yun, Yeo-Min; Chun, Sail; Kim, Hee Seung; Kim, Jin Young; In, Moon Kyo; Song, Junghan

    2016-05-01

    Chemical castration involves administration of drugs to prevent pathological sexual behavior, reduce abnormal sexual drive and treat hormone-dependent cancers. Various drugs have been used for chemical castration; however, substantial interindividual variability and side effects are often observed. In this study, we proposed a useful monitoring method for the application of chemical castration agents using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS-MS). Testosterone, cyproterone acetate, medroxyprogesterone, goserelin acetate, leuprolide acetate and triptorelin acetate were analyzed by UPLC-MS-MS. The target drugs were extracted from serum samples by double protein precipitation using methanol. Testosterone-1,2-d2 and buserelin acetate were used as internal standards. Parameters of analytical performance were evaluated, including imprecision, linearity, ion suppression and detection capabilities. Testosterone measurements were compared with the results of immunoassays. Serum specimens from 51 subjects who underwent chemical castration were analyzed. All drugs and testosterone were well extracted and separated using our method. The method was essentially free from potential interferences and ion suppression. Within-run and between-run imprecision values were <15%. The lower limits of quantification were 0.125 and 0.5-1.0 ng/mL for testosterone and other drugs, respectively. Good correlations with pre-existing immunoassays for testosterone measurement were observed. Sera from subjects who underwent androgen deprivation therapy showed variable levels of drugs. We successfully developed a UPLC-MS-MS-based monitoring method for chemical castration. The performance of our method was generally acceptable. This method may provide a novel monitoring strategy for chemical castration to enhance expected effects while reducing unwanted side effects. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions

  9. Female major histocompatibility complex type affects male testosterone levels and sperm number in the horse (Equus caballus)

    PubMed Central

    Burger, D.; Dolivo, G.; Marti, E.; Sieme, H.; Wedekind, C.

    2015-01-01

    Odours of vertebrates often contain information about the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), and are used in kin recognition, mate choice or female investment in pregnancy. It is, however, still unclear whether MHC-linked signals can also affect male reproductive strategies. We used horses (Equus caballus) to study this question under experimental conditions. Twelve stallions were individually exposed either to an unfamiliar MHC-similar mare and then to an unfamiliar MHC-dissimilar mare, or vice versa. Each exposure lasted over a period of four weeks. Peripheral blood testosterone levels were determined weekly. Three ejaculates each were collected in the week after exposure to both mares (i.e. in the ninth week) to determine mean sperm number and sperm velocity. We found high testosterone levels when stallions were kept close to MHC-dissimilar mares and significantly lower ones when kept close to MHC-similar mares. Mean sperm number per ejaculate (but not sperm velocity) was positively correlated to mean testosterone levels and also affected by the order of presentation of mares: sperm numbers were higher if MHC-dissimilar mares were presented last than if MHC-similar mares were presented last. We conclude that MHC-linked signals influence testosterone secretion and semen characteristics, two indicators of male reproductive strategies. PMID:25904670

  10. Female major histocompatibility complex type affects male testosterone levels and sperm number in the horse (Equus caballus).

    PubMed

    Burger, D; Dolivo, G; Marti, E; Sieme, H; Wedekind, C

    2015-05-22

    Odours of vertebrates often contain information about the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), and are used in kin recognition, mate choice or female investment in pregnancy. It is, however, still unclear whether MHC-linked signals can also affect male reproductive strategies. We used horses (Equus caballus) to study this question under experimental conditions. Twelve stallions were individually exposed either to an unfamiliar MHC-similar mare and then to an unfamiliar MHC-dissimilar mare, or vice versa. Each exposure lasted over a period of four weeks. Peripheral blood testosterone levels were determined weekly. Three ejaculates each were collected in the week after exposure to both mares (i.e. in the ninth week) to determine mean sperm number and sperm velocity. We found high testosterone levels when stallions were kept close to MHC-dissimilar mares and significantly lower ones when kept close to MHC-similar mares. Mean sperm number per ejaculate (but not sperm velocity) was positively correlated to mean testosterone levels and also affected by the order of presentation of mares: sperm numbers were higher if MHC-dissimilar mares were presented last than if MHC-similar mares were presented last. We conclude that MHC-linked signals influence testosterone secretion and semen characteristics, two indicators of male reproductive strategies.

  11. Reactive oxygen species: players in the cardiovascular effects of testosterone.

    PubMed

    Tostes, Rita C; Carneiro, Fernando S; Carvalho, Maria Helena C; Reckelhoff, Jane F

    2016-01-01

    Androgens are essential for the development and maintenance of male reproductive tissues and sexual function and for overall health and well being. Testosterone, the predominant and most important androgen, not only affects the male reproductive system, but also influences the activity of many other organs. In the cardiovascular system, the actions of testosterone are still controversial, its effects ranging from protective to deleterious. While early studies showed that testosterone replacement therapy exerted beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease, some recent safety studies point to a positive association between endogenous and supraphysiological levels of androgens/testosterone and cardiovascular disease risk. Among the possible mechanisms involved in the actions of testosterone on the cardiovascular system, indirect actions (changes in the lipid profile, insulin sensitivity, and hemostatic mechanisms, modulation of the sympathetic nervous system and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system), as well as direct actions (modulatory effects on proinflammatory enzymes, on the generation of reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide bioavailability, and on vasoconstrictor signaling pathways) have been reported. This mini-review focuses on evidence indicating that testosterone has prooxidative actions that may contribute to its deleterious actions in the cardiovascular system. The controversial effects of testosterone on ROS generation and oxidant status, both prooxidant and antioxidant, in the cardiovascular system and in cells and tissues of other systems are reviewed. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Reactive oxygen species: players in the cardiovascular effects of testosterone

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Fernando S.; Carvalho, Maria Helena C.; Reckelhoff, Jane F.

    2015-01-01

    Androgens are essential for the development and maintenance of male reproductive tissues and sexual function and for overall health and well being. Testosterone, the predominant and most important androgen, not only affects the male reproductive system, but also influences the activity of many other organs. In the cardiovascular system, the actions of testosterone are still controversial, its effects ranging from protective to deleterious. While early studies showed that testosterone replacement therapy exerted beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease, some recent safety studies point to a positive association between endogenous and supraphysiological levels of androgens/testosterone and cardiovascular disease risk. Among the possible mechanisms involved in the actions of testosterone on the cardiovascular system, indirect actions (changes in the lipid profile, insulin sensitivity, and hemostatic mechanisms, modulation of the sympathetic nervous system and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system), as well as direct actions (modulatory effects on proinflammatory enzymes, on the generation of reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide bioavailability, and on vasoconstrictor signaling pathways) have been reported. This mini-review focuses on evidence indicating that testosterone has prooxidative actions that may contribute to its deleterious actions in the cardiovascular system. The controversial effects of testosterone on ROS generation and oxidant status, both prooxidant and antioxidant, in the cardiovascular system and in cells and tissues of other systems are reviewed. PMID:26538238

  13. Salivary testosterone levels are unrelated to handedness or cerebral lateralization for language.

    PubMed

    Papadatou-Pastou, Marietta; Martin, Maryanne; Mohr, Christine

    2017-03-01

    Behavioural and cerebral lateralization are thought to be controlled, at least in part, by prenatal testosterone (T) levels, explaining why sex differences are found in both laterality traits. The present study investigated hormonal effects on laterality using adult salivary T levels, to explore the adequacy of competing theories: the Geschwind, Behan and Galaburda, the callosal, and the sexual differentiation hypotheses. Sixty participants (15 right-handers and 15 left-handers of each sex) participated. Behavioural lateralization was studied by means of hand preference tests (i.e., the Edinburgh Handedness Inventory and the Quantification of Hand Preference test) and a hand skill test (i.e., the Peg-Moving test) whereas cerebral lateralization for language was studied using the Consonant-Vowel Dichotic Listening test and the Visual Half-Field Lexical Decision test. Salivary T and cortisol (C) concentrations were measured by luminescence immunoassay. Canonical correlations did not reveal significant relationships between T levels and measures of hand preference, hand skill, or language laterality. Thus, our findings add to the growing literature showing no relationship between T concentrations with behavioural or cerebral lateralization. It is claimed that prenatal T is not a major determinant of individual variability in either behavioural or cerebral lateralization.

  14. Influence of different dietary zinc levels on cashmere growth, plasma testosterone level and zinc status in male Liaoning Cashmere goats.

    PubMed

    Liu, H Y; Sun, M H; Yang, G Q; Jia, C L; Zhang, M; Zhu, Y J; Zhang, Y

    2015-10-01

    The experiment was conducted to investigate the influence of different levels of zinc (Zn) on cashmere growth, plasma testosterone and Zn profile in male Cashmere goats. Twenty-eight male Liaoning Cashmere goats, 3 years old and body weight at 56.2 ± 2.45 kg, were assigned to four groups. The animals were fed a basal diet containing of 45.9 mg Zn/kg dry matter (DM) basis and supplemented with 0, 20, 40 or 80 mg Zn (reagent grade ZnSO₄ ·7H₂ O) per kg DM for 90 days. There was no significant effect on growth and diameter of cashmere fibre for Zn supplemented in diets. However, the length and growth rate of wool were improved (p < 0.05) with dietary Zn. The length and growth rate of wool were higher (p < 0.05) for the groups supplemented with 40 or 80 mg Zn/kg DM compared with that of 20 mg Zn/kg DM treatment group. Plasma testosterone concentration was increased for Zn supplemented in diets, and the testosterone concentration was higher (p < 0.05) in goats fed on the diet supplemented with 40 or 80 mg Zn/kg DM compared with those fed on basal diet. Plasma Zn concentrations increased (p < 0.05) with increasing dietary Zn and supplemented with 40 and 80 mg Zn/kg DM groups improved plasma Zn concentration (p < 0.05) more than 20 mg Zn/kg DM group. Fibre Zn content was higher (p < 0.05) in groups supplemented with 40 or 80 mg Zn/kg DM compared with control group, but no difference between Zn-supplemented groups (p > 0.05). The activity of plasma alkaline phosphatase was increased (p < 0.05) due to dietary Zn supplementation; however, no difference was found between supplemented treatment groups (p > 0.05). In conclusion, Zn content (45.9 mg Zn/kg DM) in control diet was insufficient for optimal wool growth performance, and we recommended the level of dietary Zn for such goats is 86 mg/kg DM during the breeding season and cashmere fibre growing period. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  15. [Low-dose desmopressin (DDAVP) and blood levels of FSH, LH and testosterone in men].

    PubMed

    García-Pascual, I J; Rozán Flores, M A

    1996-03-01

    The effect of desmopressin (DDAVP) administration (2.5 micrograms/12 hours) on serum concentrations of FSH, LH and testosterone was studied in six men. No significant changes were observed in serum concentrations of FSH and LH after 9 days with DDAVP therapy. Nevertheless, serum concentrations of testosterone after 12 hours of DDAVP administration were significantly higher than basal concentrations. Three hours after the administration of DDAVP, serum testosterone concentrations decreased significantly. The conclusion reached was that low doses of desmopressin do not change serum concentrations of FSH and LH, but serum concentration of testosterone is decreased within three hours after the administration, although an increase is observed 12 hours later possibly due to a "rebound effect". Desmopressin would therefore directly act upon human testicle.

  16. Establishing the Biological Relevance of Dipentyl Phthalate Reductions in Fetal Rat Testosterone Production and Plasma and Testis Testosterone Levels

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phthalate esters (PEs) constitute a large class of compounds that are used for many consumer product applications. Many of the C2-C7 di-ortho PEs reduce fetal testicular hormone and gene expression levels in rats resulting in adverse effects seen later in life but it appears that...

  17. Establishing the Biological Relevance of Dipentyl Phthalate Reductions in Fetal Rat Testosterone Production and Plasma and Testis Testosterone Levels

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phthalate esters (PEs) constitute a large class of compounds that are used for many consumer product applications. Many of the C2-C7 di-ortho PEs reduce fetal testicular hormone and gene expression levels in rats resulting in adverse effects seen later in life but it appears that...

  18. Paternal retrievals increase testosterone levels in both male and female California mouse (Peromyscus californicus) offspring.

    PubMed

    Chary, Mamatha C; Cruz, Jayson P; Bardi, Massimo; Becker, Elizabeth A

    2015-07-01

    The importance of maternal care on offspring development has received considerable attention, although more recently, researchers have begun to focus on the significance of paternal contributions. In the monogamous and bi-parental California mouse, fathers provide high levels of care, and therefore serve as a model system for studying paternal effects on behavior and underlying neuroendocrine mechanisms. Paternal retrievals in this species influence long term changes in brain (expression of arginine vasopressin-AVP) and behavior (aggression and parenting) in adult male offspring. Further, paternal retrievals induce a transient increase in testosterone (T) in male offspring, which is thought to mediate the relationship between paternal retrievals and AVP expression. Although the father-son relationship has been well characterized, few studies have examined father-daughter interactions. In California mice, paternal retrievals increase aggression in female offspring. Although T has been implicated in the regulation of female aggression, it remains unclear whether T may underlie long-term changes in female offspring aggression in response to paternal retrievals. In the current study, we examined the influence of paternal retrievals on T in both male and female offspring. Retrievals were manipulated experimentally by displacement of the pup and trunk blood was collected from retrieved, non-retrieved, and non-manipulated (baseline) pups. We found that fathers expressed similar levels of retrievals towards sons and daughters, and that T levels were elevated in retrieved, as compared to non-retrieved offspring. Similar to what has been previously described in male offspring and replicated here, female offspring that were retrieved had higher T levels than non-retrieved females. Neither females nor males experienced a change in corticosterone levels in response to retrievals suggesting offspring do not mount a stress response to paternal care. Therefore, our data suggest

  19. PFOS (perfluorooctanesulfonate) in serum is negatively associated with testosterone levels, but not with semen quality, in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Joensen, Ulla Nordström; Veyrand, Bruno; Antignac, Jean-Philippe; Blomberg Jensen, Martin; Petersen, Jørgen Holm; Marchand, Philippe; Skakkebæk, Niels Erik; Andersson, Anna-Maria; Le Bizec, Bruno; Jørgensen, Niels

    2013-03-01

    Is exposure to perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) associated with testicular function (reproductive hormone levels and semen quality) in healthy men? PFOS levels were significantly negatively associated with serum testosterone (total and calculated free), but not with any other reproductive hormones or semen quality. In animals, some PFCs have endocrine disrupting potential, but few studies have investigated PFCs in relation to human testicular function. Previously, we and others have observed a negative association between serum PFC levels and sperm morphology. The potential associations with reproductive hormones remain largely unresolved. A cross-sectional study of 247 men was conducted during 2008-2009. Healthy men from the general population, median age of 19 years, gave serum and semen samples. Serum samples were analysed for total testosterone (T), estradiol (E), sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and inhibin-B and 14 PFCs, including perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS). Semen samples were analysed according to the WHO criteria. PFOS levels were negatively associated with testosterone (T), calculated free testosterone (FT), free androgen index (FAI) and ratios of T/LH, FAI/LH and FT/LH. Other PFCs were found at lower levels than PFOS and did not exhibit the same associations. PFC levels were not significantly associated with semen quality. PFOS levels in these samples collected in 2008-2009 were lower than in our previous study of men participating in 2003. Results were robust to adjustment for relevant confounders; however, the possibility of chance associations due to multiple testing or effects of uncontrolled confounding cannot be ruled out. Our previous findings of decreased sperm morphology in the most highly PFC exposed men were not replicated, possibly due to a lack of highly exposed individuals; however, a recent independent study also did corroborate such an inverse association. The negative

  20. Compounded Testosterone Troches TO OPTIMIZE HEALTH AND THE TESTOSTERONE CONTROVERSY.

    PubMed

    Guth, Michael A S

    2015-01-01

    As men age, testosterone levels progressively fall and inflammatory biomarkers increase. The gradual decline in testosterone production with aging, known as andropause, is common and may have deleterious effects on men including decreased overall well-being, increased sarcopenia, increased risk of cardiovascular disease, reduced sexual function, and bone loss. Therefore, it comes as no surprise that an increasing number of men worldwide have begun requesting testosterone replacement therapy from their physicians. Occasionally, physicians discourage male patients from getting testosterone replacement therapy based on a few recent studies indicating the therapy causes cardiovascular events, including myocardial infarctions. Yet, an extensive review of the testosterone replacement therapy literature reveals that the majority of clinical studies show that properly administered testosterone replacement therapy, in which estradiol and dihydrotestosterone levels are also controlled, has no adverse effects on myocardial infarction risk. The current state-of-the-art in testosterone replacement therapy comprises compounded testosterone troches; an aromatase inhibitor, such as generic Anastrazole, to control estradiol levels; and a 5α-reductase inhibitor, such as beneric Dutasteride or Finasteride, to control dihydrotestosterone. Compounded testosterone troches easily raise serum testosterone levels to the optimal range, are highly cost effective at $82 for a 180-day supply, and provide affordable access to testosterone replacement therapy to millions of men requesting it. Yet, the Blue Cross Blue Shield-associated firms have largely denied requests for coverage of compounded medications, including testosterone troches. Despite data demonstrating strong links between testosterone deficiency and significant comorbid conditions (including Type 2 diabetes and other metabolic syndrome diseases) as well as the health benefits of testosterone replacement therapy, some physian have

  1. Establishing the “Biological Relevance” of Dipentyl Phthalate Reductions in Fetal Rat Testosterone Production and Plasma and Testis Testosterone Levels

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Leon Earl; Furr, Johnathan; Tatum-Gibbs, Katoria R.; Lambright, Christy; Sampson, Hunter; Hannas, Bethany R.; Wilson, Vickie S.; Hotchkiss, Andrew; Foster, Paul M. D.

    2016-01-01

    Phthalate esters (PEs) constitute a large class of compounds that are used for many consumer product applications. Many of the C2–C7 di-ortho PEs reduce fetal testicular hormone and gene expression levels in rats resulting in adverse effects seen later in life but it appears that relatively large reductions in fetal testosterone (T) levels and testis gene expression may be required to adversely affect reproductive development (Hannas, B. R., Lambright, C. S., Furr, J., Evans, N., Foster, P. M., Gray, E. L., and Wilson, V. S. (2012). Genomic biomarkers of phthalate-induced male reproductive developmental toxicity: a targeted RT-PCR array approach for defining relative potency. Toxicol. Sci. 125, 544–557). The objectives of this study were (1) to model the relationships between changes in fetal male rat plasma testosterone (PT), T levels in the testis (TT), T production (PROD), and testis gene expression with the reproductive malformation rates, and (2) to quantify the “biologically relevant reductions” (BRRs) in fetal T necessary to induce adverse effects in the offspring. In the fetal experiment, Harlan Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed with dipentyl phthalate (DPeP) at 0, 11, 33, 100, and 300 mg/kg/day from gestational days (GD) 14–18 and fetal testicular T, PT levels, and T Prod and gene expression were assessed on GD 18. In the postnatal experiment, rats were dosed with DPeP from GD 8–18 and reproductive development was monitored through adulthood. The dose-response curves for TT levels (ED50 = 53 mg/kg) and T PROD (ED50 = 45 mg/kg) were similar, whereas PT was reduced at ED50 = 19 mg/kg. When the reductions in TPROD and Insl3 mRNA were compared with the postnatal effects of in utero DPeP, dose-related reproductive alterations were noted when T PROD and Insl3 mRNA were reduced by >45% and 42%, respectively. The determination of BRR levels may enable risk assessors to utilize fetal endocrine data to help establish points of departure for

  2. Testosterone as a marker of coronary artery disease severity in middle aged males.

    PubMed

    Gururani, Kunal; Jose, John; George, Paul V

    2016-12-01

    Historically, higher levels of serum testosterone were presumed deleterious to the cardiovascular system. In the last two decades, studies have suggested that low testosterone levels are associated with increased prevalence of risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), including dyslipidemia and diabetes. This is a cross sectional study. The aim of our study was to determine the relationship between serum testosterone levels and angiographic severity of coronary artery disease (CAD). Serum testosterone levels were also correlated with flow mediated dilation of brachial artery (BAFMD) - an indicator of endothelial function. Consecutive male patients, aged 40-60 years, admitted for coronary angiography (CAG) with symptoms suggestive of CAD, were included in the study. Out of the 92 patients included in the study, 32 patients had normal coronaries and 60 had CAD on coronary angiography. Severity of CAD was determined by Gensini coronary score. The group with CAD had significantly lower levels of total serum testosterone (363±147.1 vs 532.09±150.5ng/dl, p<0.001), free testosterone (7.1215±3.012 vs 10.4419±2.75ng/dl, p<0.001) and bioavailable testosterone (166.17±64.810 vs 247.94±62.504ng/dl, p<0.001) when compared to controls. Adjusting for the traditional risk factors for CAD, a multiple linear regression analysis showed that low testosterone was an independent predictor of severity of CAD (β=-0.007, p<0.001). This study also showed that levels of total, free and bioavailable testosterone correlated positively with BAFMD %. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Moderating effects of salivary testosterone levels on associations between job demand and psychological stress response in Japanese medical workers

    PubMed Central

    HIROKAWA, Kumi; MIWA, Machiko; TANIGUCHI, Toshiyo; TSUCHIYA, Masao; KAWAKAMI, Norito

    2015-01-01

    Levels of job stress have been shown to be inversely associated with testosterone levels, but some inconsistent results have been documented. We investigated the moderating effects of testosterone levels on associations between job stress-factors and psychological stress responses in Japanese medical workers. The participants were 63 medical staff (20 males and 43 women; mean age: 30.6 years; SD=7.3) in Okayama, Japan. Their job-stress levels and psychological stress responses were evaluated using self-administered questionnaires, and their salivary testosterone collected. Multiple regression analyses showed that job demand was positively associated with stress responses in men and women. An interaction between testosterone and support from colleagues had a significant effect on depression and anxiety for women. In women with lower testosterone levels, a reducing effect of support from colleagues on depression and anxiety was intensified. In women with higher testosterone levels, depression and anxiety levels were identical regardless of support from colleagues. Testosterone may function as a moderator between perceived work environment and psychological stress responses for female medical workers. PMID:26632120

  4. Prospective association of low serum total testosterone levels with health care utilization and costs in a population-based cohort of men.

    PubMed

    Haring, R; Baumeister, S E; Völzke, H; Kohlmann, T; Marschall, P; Flessa, S; Nauck, M; Wallaschofski, H

    2010-12-01

    Despite the burgeoning interest in the field of andrology, no studies have specifically addressed the impact of serum testosterone levels on healthcare utilization and costs. We analysed data from the population-based cohort Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP), Germany, to assess the association of serum testosterone levels with self-reported health care utilization and costs at baseline and at 5 years follow up. Study sample comprised 2023 men at baseline, of whom 1530 men were repeatedly examined. Low and high serum testosterone levels, defined according to the age-specific 10th and 90th percentile, were compared with reference subjects with serum testosterone levels ≥10th -≤90th percentile. Two-part econometric models were applied adjusting for socio-economic and medical confounders. Cross-sectional models revealed higher numbers of outpatient visits and higher costs for both, men with low (+19.1 and +19.9%, respectively) and high serum testosterone levels (+25.3 and +30.2%, respectively), whereas number of inpatient days and costs were not associated with serum testosterone levels. Adjustment for age, educational level, income, waist circumference, smoking status, physical activity and alcohol consumption did not considerably alter the results. Longitudinal models revealed a significant association of low serum testosterone levels with increased number of follow-up outpatient visits (age-adjusted: +28.6%) and costs (+38.0%) only. Low and high serum testosterone levels were associated with increased short-term outpatient health care costs, whereas low serum testosterone levels appear to be predictive of long-term outpatient health care costs. Cost-effectiveness studies of available treatments are necessary to identify benefits for physicians, patients and health care system as a whole. © 2010 The Authors. International Journal of Andrology © 2010 European Academy of Andrology.

  5. Left ventricular filling pressure in male patients with type 2 diabetes and normal versus low total testosterone levels.

    PubMed

    Tinetti, Matias; Gysel, Michael; Farias, Javier; Ferrer, Mariano; Lombardero, Martin; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure is a common complication of diabetes characterized by an elevation in left ventricular filling pressures (LVF) that often develops in the absence of clinical symptoms. Diastolic dysfunction in the setting of low total testosterone (LTT) occurs through changes in the regulation of peripheral hemodynamics. LTT is highly prevalent among individuals with type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to compare LVF in male diabetic patients with no structural heart disease and normal serum testosterone levels vs. those with LTT. Type 2 diabetic patients were assessed using tissue Doppler imaging to evaluate LVF and other conventional parameters of diastolic function. The E/e' ratio was used to estimate LVF through the ratio of peak passive trans-mitral left ventricular inflow velocity to the peak passive inflow velocity at the lateral mitral annulus. Patients were assigned to one of two groups based upon their total testosterone levels. Group A consisted of low (< 3.5 ng/mL) testosterone levels and group B consisted of normal (> 3.5 ng/mL) testosterone levels. A total of 148 male patients were included: group A--47 (32%) patients; group B--101 (68%) patients, respectively. Mean age was 58 ± 5.8 years and mean time of diabetes evolution was 7 ± 3.1 years. There were no significant differences between the groups regarding age, duration of diabetes evolution, hypertension, weight, heart rate, body mass index, and echocardiographic parameters. The E/e' ratio for group A was 8.05 ± 1.9 vs. 6.1 ± 1.7 for group B (p < 0.0001). The E/A ratio was 0.94 ± 0.10 vs. 1.19 ± 0.12 (p = 0.01), deceleration time 242 ± 7.4 ms vs. 205 ± 9 ms (p = 0.026) and systolic pulmonary artery pressure 27 ± ± 2.2 mm Hg vs. 22 ± 1.7 mm Hg (p = 0.11). Patients with type 2 diabetes and LTT have a higher E/e' ratio demonstrating a pre-clinical increase in LVF when compared to similar patients with normal testosterone levels. This finding is independent of time of diabetes evolution

  6. Significant increase of salivary testosterone levels after single therapeutic transdermal administration of testosterone: suitability as a potential screening parameter in doping control.

    PubMed

    Thieme, Detlef; Rautenberg, Claudia; Grosse, Joachim; Schoenfelder, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The legally defensible proof of the abuse of endogenous steroids in sports is currently based on carbon isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), i.e. a comparison between (13)C/(12)C ratios of diagnostic precursors and metabolites of testosterone. The application of this technique requires a chromatographic baseline separation of respective steroids prior to IRMS detection and hence laborious sample pre-processing of the urinary steroid extracts including clean up by solid-phase extraction and/or liquid chromatography. Consequently, an efficient pre-selection of suspicious control urine samples is essential for appropriate follow up confirmation by IRMS and effective doping control. Two single transdermal administration studies of testosterone (50 mg Testogel® and Testopatch® at 3.8 mg in 16 h, respectively) were conducted and resulting profiles of salivary testosterone and urinary steroid profiles and corresponding carbon isotope ratios were determined. Conventional doping control markers (testosterone/epitestosterone ratio, threshold concentrations of androsterone, etiocholanolone, or androstanediols) did not approach or exceed critical thresholds. In contrast to these moderate variations, the testosterone concentration in oral fluid increased from basal values (30-142 pg/mg) to peak concentrations above 1000 pg/mg. It is likely that this significant increase in oral fluid is due to a pulsatile elevation of free (protein unbound) circulating testosterone after transdermal administration and may be assumed to represent a more diagnostic marker for transdermal testosterone administration.

  7. Time-related increase in urinary testosterone levels and stable semen analysis parameters after bariatric surgery in men.

    PubMed

    Legro, Richard S; Kunselman, Allen R; Meadows, Juliana W; Kesner, James S; Krieg, Edward F; Rogers, Ann M; Cooney, Robert N

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this prospective cohort study was to determine the time-course in androgen and semen parameters in men after weight loss associated with bariatric surgery. Six men aged 18-40 years, meeting National Institutes of Health bariatric surgery guidelines, were followed between 2005 and 2008. Study visits took place at baseline, then 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery. All men underwent Roux-en-y gastric bypass (RYGB). At each visit, biometric, questionnaire, serum, and urinary specimens and seman analysis were collected. Urinary integrated total testosterone levels increased significantly (P < 0.0001) by 3 months after surgery, and remained elevated throughout the study. Circulating testosterone levels were also higher at 1 and 6 months after surgery, compared with baseline. Serum sex hormone-binding globulin levels were significantly elevated at all time points after surgery (P < 0.01 to P = 0.02). After RYGB surgery, no significant changes occurred in urinary oestrogen metabolites (oestrone 3-glucuronide), serum oestradiol levels, serial semen parameters or male sexual function by questionnaire. A threshold of weight loss is necessary to improve male reproductive function by reversing male hypogonadism, manifested as increased testosterone levels. Further serial semen analyses showed normal ranges for most parameters despite massive weight loss.

  8. Associations of Maternal Testosterone and Cortisol Levels With Health Outcomes of Mothers and Their Very-Low-Birthweight Infants.

    PubMed

    Cho, June; Su, Xiaogang; Holditch-Davis, Diane

    2017-07-01

    Although the roles of testosterone and cortisol in various health problems have been extensively investigated, little is known about their associations with health outcomes in mothers and their very-low-birthweight (VLBW) infants when maternal testosterone and cortisol are examined together during the postpartum period. The 101 mother-VLBW infant pairs were recruited from the neonatal intensive care unit of a tertiary medical center in the southeastern United States. Demographic information, pregnancy and labor complications of mothers, and health and growth outcomes of infants were obtained from medical records and interviews with mothers. Maternal salivary testosterone and cortisol levels were determined using enzyme immunoassay. Linear regression showed that mothers who were older and had a larger body mass index experienced more pregnancy complications, whereas mothers who were single and had a cesarean section experienced more labor complications. Generalized linear models showed that mothers with high cortisol levels had more antepartum hemorrhage, whereas infants of mothers with high cortisol levels had fewer neurological insults and shorter hospitalizations than other infants. More mothers experienced premature prolonged rupture of membranes (PPROM) than chorioamnionitis, and maternal medical complications were negatively associated with infant health outcomes except PPROM, which was positively associated with infant outcomes. High maternal cortisol levels were associated with maternal health problems during pregnancy. Beneficial effects of PPROM and high maternal cortisol levels on infant health outcomes were important findings, and understanding the mechanisms of these relationships may be of practical value for clinicians and researchers.

  9. Evaluation of Serum Testosterone, Progesterone, Seminal Antisperm Antibody, and Fructose Levels among Jordanian Males with a History of Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Al-Daghistani, Hala I.; Hamad, Abdul-Wahab R.; Abdel-Dayem, Muna; Al-Swaifi, Mohammad; Abu Zaid, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    Due to the biochemical complexity of seminal fluid, we attempt to study the possible correlation between fructose, which is secreted under the effect of androgen hormone, and autoimmunity, which might play a role in varicocele associated infertility, in reducing sperm motility. Seminal fructose, antisperm antibodies (ASAs) and blood steroids hormones (testosterone and progesterone) levels were measured in 66 infertile males with varicocele and 84 without varicocele referred for fertility treatment. Seminal analysis was performed with biochemical measurements of seminal fructose and mixed agglutination reaction (MAR) for ASA. Serum levels of progesterone and testosterone were estimated using a competitive chemoluminescent enzyme immunoassay. The mean values for serum testosterone were 380.74 ± 24.331, 365.9 ± 16.55, and 367.5 ± 21.8 ng/dl, progesterone 0.325 ± 0.243, 0.341 ± 0.022, and 0.357 ± 0.0306 ng/ml, and seminal plasma fructose 359.6 ± 26.75, 315.6 ± 13.08, and 332.08 ± 24.38 mg/dl in males with varicocele, without varicocele, and fertile males, respectively. A significant high level of testosterone was observed within varicocele group (P = .001). This result showed that testosterone may play a role as an infertility determinant in subjects with varicocele. ASA was detected in 18 (26.47%) of cases with varicocele, 20 (38.46%) without varicocele, and in 16 (32.0%) fertile men. Cases with ASAs associated with low sperm motility morphology. An inverse correlation between sperm-bound antibodies and viscosity has been shown (P = .017). ASA showed some significant inverse relations with ages, durations of infertility, and viscosity (P < .05). In addition, a significant correlation was observed between ASA positive seminal plasma and testosterone concentration among infertile cases (with or without varicocele) and fertile (P < .05). Our results suggest a relationship between testicular steroid hormone levels with autoimmunity and sperm antibodies

  10. Testosterone affects language areas of the adult human brain

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Andreas; Kranz, Georg S.; Sladky, Ronald; Kaufmann, Ulrike; Ganger, Sebastian; Hummer, Allan; Seiger, Rene; Spies, Marie; Vanicek, Thomas; Winkler, Dietmar; Kasper, Siegfried; Windischberger, Christian; Swaab, Dick F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although the sex steroid hormone testosterone is integrally involved in the development of language processing, ethical considerations mostly limit investigations to single hormone administrations. To circumvent this issue we assessed the influence of continuous high‐dose hormone application in adult female‐to‐male transsexuals. Subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging before and after 4 weeks of testosterone treatment, with each scan including structural, diffusion weighted and functional imaging. Voxel‐based morphometry analysis showed decreased gray matter volume with increasing levels of bioavailable testosterone exclusively in Broca's and Wernicke's areas. Particularly, this may link known sex differences in language performance to the influence of testosterone on relevant brain regions. Using probabilistic tractography, we further observed that longitudinal changes in testosterone negatively predicted changes in mean diffusivity of the corresponding structural connection passing through the extreme capsule. Considering a related increase in myelin staining in rodents, this potentially reflects a strengthening of the fiber tract particularly involved in language comprehension. Finally, functional images at resting‐state were evaluated, showing increased functional connectivity between the two brain regions with increasing testosterone levels. These findings suggest testosterone‐dependent neuroplastic adaptations in adulthood within language‐specific brain regions and connections. Importantly, deteriorations in gray matter volume seem to be compensated by enhancement of corresponding structural and functional connectivity. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1738–1748, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26876303

  11. Sleep Duration and Disturbances Were Associated With Testosterone Level, Muscle Mass, and Muscle Strength--A Cross-Sectional Study in 1274 Older Men.

    PubMed

    Auyeung, Tung Wai; Kwok, Timothy; Leung, Jason; Lee, Jenny Shun Wah; Ohlsson, Claes; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Wing, Yun Kwok; Woo, Jean

    2015-07-01

    Testosterone level follows a circadian rhythm. However, whether sleep duration and disturbances can affect testosterone level, muscle mass, and strength remains unknown. To examine the relationship of sleep duration and disturbances to testosterone level, muscle mass, muscle strength, and walking speed. We recruited 1274 community-dwelling men older than 65 years of age. Their early morning testosterone level was assayed by mass spectrometry. A sleep questionnaire was administered to enquire about their reported sleep duration, prolonged sleep latency (>0.5 hour), and subjective insomnia complaint. Muscle mass was measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Testosterone level, muscle mass, handgrip strength, and walking speed were tested against sleep duration and disturbances. Testosterone increased with increasing sleep duration up to 9.9 hours, after which it decreased, giving rise to an inverted U-shaped relationship (P for quadratic trend <.05). A similar inverted U-shaped relationship occurred between sleep duration and muscle mass and function. Earlier go-to-bed time, despite being associated with a higher testosterone level (P < .05), was associated with weaker grip strength (P < .05). Earlier wake-up time was associated with higher muscle mass (P < .05) but neither grip strength nor walking speed. Neither prolonged sleep latency nor insomnia was associated with testosterone levels. However, prolonged sleep latency was associated with lower muscle mass (P < .05), weaker grip strength (P < .05), and slower walking speed (P < .001). Insomnia, on the other hand was associated with weaker grip strength (P < .05) and slower walking speed (P < .001) but not muscle mass. Sleep duration and disturbances can affect testosterone level, muscle mass, and its function. Whether optimization of sleep can ameliorate age-associated decline in sex hormone and muscle performance warrants further studies. Copyright © 2015 AMDA - The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care

  12. Early follicular testosterone level predicts preference for masculinity in male faces - but not for women taking hormonal contraception.

    PubMed

    Bobst, Cora; Sauter, Sabine; Foppa, Andrina; Lobmaier, Janek S

    2014-03-01

    It has been shown that women's preference for masculinity in male faces changes across the menstrual cycle. Preference for masculinity is stronger when conception probability is high than when it is low. These findings have been linked to cyclic fluctuations of hormone levels. The purpose of the present study is to further investigate the link between gonadal steroids (i.e. testosterone, estradiol, and progesterone) and masculinity preference in women, while holding the cycle phase constant. Sixty-two female participants were tested in their early follicular cycle phase, when conception probability is low. Participants were shown face pairs and where asked to choose the more attractive face. Face pairs consisted of a masculinized and feminized version of the same face. For naturally cycling women we found a positive relationship between saliva testosterone levels and masculinity preference, but there was no link between any hormones and masculinity preference for women taking hormonal contraception. We conclude that in naturally cycling women early follicular testosterone levels are associated with masculinity preference. However, these hormonal links were not found for women with artificially modified hormonal levels, that is, for women taking hormonal contraception.

  13. Elevated testosterone levels in a racing horse due to an XY testicular disorder of sexual development.

    PubMed

    Dierks, Claudia; Sieme, Harald; Piechotta, Marion; Lehner, Stephanie; Merkt, Jan Carlos; Uphaus, Hubert; Klug, Erich; Distl, Ottmar

    2015-01-01

    A female thoroughbred successful in horse racing was positively tested for high testosterone values. This horse neither showed stallion-like-behaviour nor signs of ambiguous external genitalia. The karyotype of this horse was 2n = 64,XY and the sex-determining region of Y (SRY) PCR was positive. Hair samples tested for naturally testosterone revealed values normal for stallions, and tests for eight synthetic testosterone esters remained negative. The phenotype, ultrasonographic examination, hormone status, cytogenetic evaluation and molecular diagnostics lead to the diagnosis of an XY testicular disorder of sexual development (DSD) due to a complete androgen insensitivity syndrome. To our knowledge this is the first report about a thoroughbred in racing sports with an XY testicular disorder of sexual development. To date, intersex racing horses have never been described in thoroughbreds or a regulation for intersexes in regard to horse races has been issued.

  14. Prediabetes Is Associated with an Increased Risk of Testosterone Deficiency, Independent of Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chen-Hsun; Yu, Hong-Jeng; Wang, Chih-Yuan; Jaw, Fu-Shan; Hsieh, Ju-Ton; Liao, Wan-Chung; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Liu, Shih-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Objective The association between type 2 diabetes and low testosterone has been well recognized. However, testosterone levels in men with prediabetes have been rarely reported. We aimed to investigate whether prediabetes was associated with an increased risk of testosterone deficiency. Methods This study included 1,306 men whose sex hormones was measured during a medical examination. Serum total testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin were measured; free and bioavailable testosterone concentrations were calculated by Vermeulen’s formula. Prediabetes was defined by impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired postprandial glucose (IPG), or glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) 5.7%-6.4%. Logistic regression was performed to obtain the odds ratios (OR) for subnormal total testosterone (<300 ng/dL) or free testosterone (<6 ng/dL) in prediabetic and diabetic men compared with normoglycemic individuals, while adjusting for age, BMI, waist circumference, and metabolic syndrome (MetS). Results Normoglycemia, prediabetes, and diabetes were diagnosed in 577 (44.2%), 543 (41.6%), and 186 (14.2%) men, respectively. Prediabetes was associated with an increased risk of subnormal total testosterone compared to normoglycemic individuals (age-adjusted OR=1.87; 95%CI=1.38-2.54). The risk remained significant in all multivariate analyses. After adjusting for MetS, the OR in prediabetic men equals that of diabetic patients (1.49 versus 1.50). IFG, IPG, and HbA1c 5.7%-6.4% were all associated with an increased risk of testosterone deficiency, with different levels of significance in multivariate analyses. However, neither prediabetes nor diabetes was associated with subnormal free testosterone in multivariate analyses. Conclusions Prediabetes is associated with an increased risk of testosterone deficiency, independent of obesity and MetS. After adjusting for MetS, the risk equals that of diabetes. Our data suggest that testosterone should be measured routinely in men with prediabetes. PMID

  15. Urinary testosterone-metabolite levels and dominance rank in male and female bonobos (Pan paniscus).

    PubMed

    Sannen, Adinda; Van Elsacker, Linda; Heistermann, Michael; Eens, Marcel

    2004-04-01

    The correlation between testosterone (T) and dominance rank may vary among species, and is expected to become stronger as the importance of aggressive competition for rank increases. However, it may also vary among social situations within a species, showing a stronger correlation during socially unstable periods. Knowledge on this topic in great apes, especially in females, is scant. This study presents the first data on the relationship between T and dominance rank in both sexes of the bonobo ( Pan paniscus). For each period (four socially unstable and two stable ones), linear rank orders were determined and subsequently correlated with the accompanying mean urinary T-metabolite concentrations (measured as immunoreactive 5alpha-androstan-17alpha-ol-3-one). No correlation between these two variables was found for either sex among individuals during socially unstable or stable periods. Also, within an individual over the six periods, no relationship of T with rank could be demonstrated. These results suggest that either the outcomes of aggressions have no influence on T levels, or such clear outcomes appear insufficiently frequent to affect T levels over longer periods. Even during the unstable periods, the rate of aggressions was not higher than during stable periods, suggesting that frequencies of aggression have little effect on rank. Further analyses indeed demonstrated no correlation between frequencies of overall aggressions or any type of aggressive behavior separately, or rank. Perhaps factors other than the frequency of displayed aggressions alone have a marked influence on a bonobo's rank, for example, coalition partners. Overall, in bonobos, T apparently does not form a physiological reflection of social status.

  16. Genetic effects on serum testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin in men: a Korean twin and family study.

    PubMed

    Sung, Joohon; Song, Yun-Mi

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a community-based cross-sectional study to evaluate the role of genetics in determining the individual difference in total testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin levels. Study participants comprised 730 Korean men consisting of 142 pairs of monozygotic twins, 191 pairs of siblings, and 259 father-offspring pairs from 270 families who participated in the Healthy Twin study. Serum concentration of total testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin were measured by chemiluminescence immunoassay, and free testosterone and bioavailable testosterone were calculated using Vermeulen's method. Quantitative genetic analysis based on a variance decomposition model showed that the heritability of total testosterone, free testosterone, bioavailable testosterone, and sex hormone-binding globulin were 0.56, 0.45, 0.44, and 0.69, respectively after accounting for age and body mass index. Proportions of variance explained by age and body mass index varied across different traits, from 8% for total testosterone to 31% for sex hormone-binding globulin. Bivariate analysis showed a high degree of additive genetic correlation (ρG = 0.67) and a moderate degree of individual-specific environmental correlation (ρE = 0.42) between total testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin. The findings confirmed the important role of genetics in determining the individually different levels of testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin during adulthood in Korean men as found in non-Asian populations, which may suggest that common biologic control for determining testosterone level directly or indirectly through binding protein are largely shared among different populations.

  17. Changes in Men's Salivary Testosterone and Cortisol Levels, and in Sexual Desire after Smelling Female Axillary and Vulvar Scents.

    PubMed

    Cerda-Molina, Ana Lilia; Hernández-López, Leonor; de la O, Claudio E; Chavira-Ramírez, Roberto; Mondragón-Ceballos, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have shown that a woman's vaginal or axillary odors convey information on her attractivity. Yet, whether such scents induce psychoneuroendocrinological changes in perceivers is still controversial. We studied if smelling axillary and vulvar odors collected in the periovulatory and late luteal phases of young women modify salivary testosterone and cortisol levels, as well as sexual desire in men. Forty-five women and 115 men, all of them college students and unacquainted with each other, participated in the study. Female odors were collected on pads affixed to the axilla and on panty protectors both worn the entire night before experiments. Men provided five saliva samples, a basal one before the smelling procedure, and four more 15, 30, 60, and 75 min after exposure to odors. Immediately after smelling the odor source, men answered a questionnaire rating hedonic qualities of scents, and after providing the last saliva sample they answered questionnaire on sexual desire. We found that periovulatory axillary and vulvar odors increased testosterone and cortisol levels, with vulvar scents producing a more prolonged effect. Luteal axilla odors decreased testosterone and cortisol levels, while luteal vulva odors increased cortisol. Periovulatory axilla and vulva scents accounted for a general increase of interest in sex. These odors were also rated as more pleasant and familiar, while luteal vulvar odors were perceived as intense and unpleasant.

  18. Effect of Lepidium meyenii (MACA) on sexual desire and its absent relationship with serum testosterone levels in adult healthy men.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, G F; Córdova, A; Vega, K; Chung, A; Villena, A; Góñez, C; Castillo, S

    2002-12-01

    This study was a 12-week double blind placebo-controlled, randomized, parallel trial in which active treatment with different doses of Maca Gelatinizada was compared with placebo. The study aimed to demonstrate if effect of Maca on subjective report of sexual desire was because of effect on mood or serum testosterone levels. Men aged 21-56 years received Maca in one of two doses: 1,500 mg or 3,000 mg or placebo. Self-perception on sexual desire, score for Hamilton test for depression, and Hamilton test for anxiety were measured at 4, 8 and 12 weeks of treatment. An improvement in sexual desire was observed with Maca since 8 weeks of treatment. Serum testosterone and oestradiol levels were not different in men treated with Maca and in those treated with placebo (P:NS). Logistic regression analysis showed that Maca has an independent effect on sexual desire at 8 and 12 weeks of treatment, and this effect is not because of changes in either Hamilton scores for depression or anxiety or serum testosterone and oestradiol levels. In conclusion, treatment with Maca improved sexual desire.

  19. Testosterone and Occupational Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dabbs, James M., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Archival data on 4,462 military veterans linked higher levels of serum testosterone to lower-status occupations. A structural equation model was supported in which higher testosterone, mediated through lower intellectual ability, greater antisocial behavior, and lower education, leads away from white-collar occupations. Contains 49 references.…

  20. Testosterone and Occupational Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dabbs, James M., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Archival data on 4,462 military veterans linked higher levels of serum testosterone to lower-status occupations. A structural equation model was supported in which higher testosterone, mediated through lower intellectual ability, greater antisocial behavior, and lower education, leads away from white-collar occupations. Contains 49 references.…

  1. Prevalence of low testosterone levels in men with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Al Hayek, Ayman A.; Khader, Yousef S.; Jafal, Sahar; Khawaja, Nahla; Robert, Asirvatham A.; Ajlouni, Kamel

    2013-01-01

    Background: A high prevalence of low serum testosterone (LST) in men with type 2 diabetes have been reported worldwide. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and associated factors of LST in men with type 2 diabetes. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study, conducted among 1,089 men (aged 30-70 years) with type 2 diabetes who consecutively attended a major diabetes center in Amman, Jordan, between August 2008 and February 2009. The patients’ demographic characteristics were collected using a prestructured questionnaire. Duration of diabetes, smoking habits, presence of retinopathy, neuropathy, and nephropathy were collected from the medical records. All participants were asked to complete the Androgen Deficiency in Ageing Male (ADAM) questionnaire. Venous blood sample was collected to test for total testosterone (TT), free testosterone (FT), sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), prolactin (PRL), serum lipids, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). LST was defined as TT <3 ng/ml. Results: Overall, 36.5% of patients with diabetes had TT level <3 ng/ml and 29% had symptoms of androgen deficiency. Of those with serum testosterone level <3 ng/ml, 80.2% had symptoms of androgen deficiency, 16.9% had primary hypogonadism (HG), and 83.1% had secondary HG. Univariate analysis showed a significant relationship between age, income, education, body mass index (BMI), smoking, duration of diabetes, diabetic nephropathy, diabetic neuropathy, and HbA1c. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated age, income, BMI, and diabetic neuropathy as the independent risk factors of LST. Conclusions: The prevalence of LST among men with type 2 diabetes is high. Age, income, BMI, and diabetic neuropathy were found to be the independent risk factors for LST. PMID:24672276

  2. Prevalence of low testosterone levels in men with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Al Hayek, Ayman A; Khader, Yousef S; Jafal, Sahar; Khawaja, Nahla; Robert, Asirvatham A; Ajlouni, Kamel

    2013-09-01

    A high prevalence of low serum testosterone (LST) in men with type 2 diabetes have been reported worldwide. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and associated factors of LST in men with type 2 diabetes. This was a cross-sectional study, conducted among 1,089 men (aged 30-70 years) with type 2 diabetes who consecutively attended a major diabetes center in Amman, Jordan, between August 2008 and February 2009. The patients' demographic characteristics were collected using a prestructured questionnaire. Duration of diabetes, smoking habits, presence of retinopathy, neuropathy, and nephropathy were collected from the medical records. All participants were asked to complete the Androgen Deficiency in Ageing Male (ADAM) questionnaire. Venous blood sample was collected to test for total testosterone (TT), free testosterone (FT), sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), prolactin (PRL), serum lipids, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). LST was defined as TT <3 ng/ml. Overall, 36.5% of patients with diabetes had TT level <3 ng/ml and 29% had symptoms of androgen deficiency. Of those with serum testosterone level <3 ng/ml, 80.2% had symptoms of androgen deficiency, 16.9% had primary hypogonadism (HG), and 83.1% had secondary HG. Univariate analysis showed a significant relationship between age, income, education, body mass index (BMI), smoking, duration of diabetes, diabetic nephropathy, diabetic neuropathy, and HbA1c. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated age, income, BMI, and diabetic neuropathy as the independent risk factors of LST. The prevalence of LST among men with type 2 diabetes is high. Age, income, BMI, and diabetic neuropathy were found to be the independent risk factors for LST.

  3. Age-related changes in urinary testosterone levels suggest differences in puberty onset and divergent life history strategies in bonobos and chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Behringer, V; Deschner, T; Deimel, C; Stevens, J M G; Hohmann, G

    2014-08-01

    Research on age-related changes in morphology, social behavior, and cognition suggests that the development of bonobos (Pan paniscus) is delayed in comparison to chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). However, there is also evidence for earlier reproductive maturation in bonobos. Since developmental changes such as reproductive maturation are induced by a number of endocrine processes, changes in hormone levels are indicators of different developmental stages. Age-related changes in testosterone excretion are an indirect marker for the onset of puberty in human and non-human primates. In this study we investigated patterns of urinary testosterone levels in male and female bonobos and chimpanzees to determine the onset of puberty. In contrast to other studies, we found that both species experience age-related changes in urinary testosterone levels. Older individuals of both sexes had significantly higher urinary testosterone levels than younger individuals, indicating that bonobos and chimpanzees experience juvenile pause. The males of both species showed a similar pattern of age-related changes in urinary testosterone levels, with a sharp increase in levels around the age of eight years. This suggests that species-differences in aggression and male mate competition evolved independently of developmental changes in testosterone levels. Females showed a similar pattern of age-related urinary testosterone increase. However, in female bonobos the onset was about three years earlier than in female chimpanzees. The earlier rise of urinary testosterone levels in female bonobos is in line with reports of their younger age of dispersal, and suggests that female bonobos experience puberty at a younger age than female chimpanzees. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. S-testosterone decrease after a mixed meal in healthy men independent of SHBG and gonadotrophin levels.

    PubMed

    Lehtihet, M; Arver, S; Bartuseviciene, I; Pousette, A

    2012-12-01

    Reproducible and accurate assessment of serum testosterone (S-T), S-LH and S-SHBG is of crucial importance for assessment of testicular endocrine function and diagnosis of hypogonadism and investigating male health in a broader sense. Testosterone secretion has a circadian rhythm with the highest component in the morning and is influenced by a series of factors including physical activity, mental stress and nutrition. For diagnostic purposes, analysis of morning samples is recommended and reference values are generally based on samples drawn between 7 and 10 am. In the literature, there are also indications that food intake can influence serum levels but fasting has not been a standard procedure. To carefully address the influence of food intake, we analysed S-testosterone, S-LH and S-SHBG after an overnight fasting compared to samples taken after a standard meal of 550 kcal. We found no change in S-LH or S-SHBG but a decline of S-T of 30% from 60 to 120 min after food intake compared to samples taken in the fasting state. This decline may give false low S-T values and overestimate the number of men with suspected hypogonadism. Until the mechanism behind this effect has been explored, we suggest that assessment of S-T for diagnostic purposes should be collected in the morning after an overnight fasting. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Testosterone regulates levels of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator, adenylate cyclase, and cAMP in the seminal vesicles of orchidectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Ramli, Nur Siti Khadijah; Giribabu, Nelli; Muniandy, Sekaran; Salleh, Naguib

    2016-01-15

    Secretions of chloride (Cl(-))- and bicarbonate (HCO3(-))-rich fluid by the seminal vesicles could involve cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR), which activity can be stimulated by cAMP generated from the reaction involving adenylate cyclase (AC). In this study, we investigated levels of CFTR, AC, and cAMP in the seminal vesicles under testosterone influence. Orchidectomized adult male rats received 7-day treatment with 125 or 250 μg/kg/day of testosterone with or without flutamide or finasteride. At the end of the treatment, animals were sacrificed and seminal vesicles were harvested for analyses of CFTR and AC protein expression level by Western blotting. Distribution of CFTR and AC in seminal vesicles was observed by immunohistochemistry. Levels of cAMP and dihydrotestosterone in seminal vesicle homogenates were measured by ELISA. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator, AC, and cAMP levels increased with increasing doses of testosterone (P < 0.05 compared to nontreated orchidectomized rats). Cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator and AC were expressed at the apical membrane of the epithelium lining the seminal vesicle lumen with higher expression levels observed in testosterone-treated rats than in non-treated orchidectomized rats (P < 0.05). The inhibitory effects of flutamide or finasteride on these parameters were greater in 250 μg/kg/day testosterone-treated rats than their effects in 125 μg/kg/day testosterone-treated rats. Higher dihydrotestosterone levels were observed in seminal vesicle homogenates after treatment with 250 μg/kg/day than with 125 μg/kg/day of testosterone (P < 0.05). Increased levels of CFTR, AC, and cAMP in seminal vesicles might contribute toward an increase in Cl(-) and HCO3(-) concentrations in the seminal fluid as reported under testosterone influence.

  6. Changes in testosterone and dihydrotestosterone levels in male rat accessory sex organs, serum, and seminal fluid after castration: establishment of a new highly sensitive simultaneous androgen measurement method.

    PubMed

    Kashiwagi, Bunzo; Shibata, Yasuhiro; Ono, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Ryota; Honma, Seijiro; Suzuki, Kazuhiro

    2005-01-01

    It is known that abnormal androgen dynamics in the tissues is a cause of androgen-dependent disorders. Investigation of tissue androgen levels could provide a clue to the elucidation of disorders. However, it is difficult to measure a trace amount of androgen in the tissues. We established a highly sensitive simultaneous quantification method of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), which play the most important roles in the body among androgenic steroids in trace amounts, and investigated time course changes in testosterone and DHT levels in male accessory sex organs, serum, and seminal fluid after castration in rat models. In addition, changes in the testosterone/DHT ratio of male accessory sex organs and seminal fluid were observed. The simultaneous testosterone and DHT measurement method established by us was validated. Intra-assay variation and interassay precision and accuracy were all within +/-20%, and the quantification limits of testosterone and DHT were both 15.6 pg/g. With the use of this method, the testosterone and DHT levels in the prostate, seminal vesicles, and serum immediately after castration were similar to those previously reported. The testosterone and DHT levels were 350 pg/g and 605 pg/g, respectively; which showed dominance of DHT in seminal fluid, although it was not as marked as that in the male accessory sex organs. Androgens decreased with time after castration in the accessory sex organs, serum, and seminal fluid. In the prostate and seminal vesicles, testosterone and DHT decreased to about 50% and about 2% of the normal levels, respectively, 72 hours after castration. The serum levels were under the quantification limits 6 hours after castration and thereafter. In seminal fluid, the testosterone and DHT levels decreased to 49% and 35% of normal levels, respectively, 72 hours after castration. The testosterone/DHT ratio in the male accessory sex organs was lower in the prostate (0.06) than in the seminal vesicles (0

  7. Testosterone and musical talent.

    PubMed

    Hassler, M

    1991-01-01

    Two recently published hypotheses on the biological basis of special talents are discussed in relation to experimental data obtained from musical composers, instrumentalists, painters, and non-musicians, and from adolescent boys and girls with different levels of musical capacities. Both hypotheses assign an important influence to prenatal testosterone effects on the developing brain. Geschwind and Galaburda (1985) predict that subjects with special talents may have anomalous hemispheric dominance for verbal material. This was confirmed experimentally in adolescents and in adults using a dichotic listening task to assess functional lateralization. Hassler and Nieschlag (1989) expect musicians of both sexes to be psychologically androgynous and to have current testosterone levels that differ from sex-typed males and females. Salivary testosterone was measured in adults and in adolescents. Creative musical behavior was associated with very low testosterone values in males, and with high testosterone levels in females. Sexual activity level and motivation did not differ between males with testosterone levels less than or equal to 200 pmol/l and those with greater than 220 pmol/l. We tentatively suggest from our data that, among a complex interaction of biological and social factors, an optimal testosterone range may exist for the expression of creative musical behavior. Exceeding the range in the course of adolescence may be detrimental for musical creativity in boys.

  8. The ball's in your court: testosterone 101.

    PubMed

    Horn, T; Cooper, S

    1997-11-01

    Testosterone, a hormone, plays several important functions in nutrition, libido, and the development of masculine traits. Studies have shown that testosterone levels in both men and women with HIV and AIDS are generally very low. The definition of normal testosterone is broad and determining when a person has low levels is difficult since individuals have different testosterone baselines. Testosterone replacement therapy, available for men but not for women yet, is used to increase body mass and prevent wasting. Testosterone is available in several forms, including a patch, and the advantages of each form are discussed. Testosterone level tests are readily available and are generally covered by insurance and Medicaid.

  9. Peculiar observations in measuring testosterone in women treated with oral contraceptives supplemented with dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA).

    PubMed

    Heijboer, Annemieke C; Zimmerman, Yvette; de Boer, Theo; Coelingh Bennink, Herjan; Blankenstein, Marinus A

    2014-03-20

    Total testosterone is considered to be decreased during the use of combined oral contraceptives. There is, however, considerable concern about the quality of testosterone assays, especially at low levels. We aimed to confirm testosterone levels measured by direct radioimmunoassay in a recent clinical trial with a state-of-the-art LC-MSMS method. Surplus specimens with known testosterone levels collected during the study (Clinical Trial Registration number ISRCTN06414473) were reanalyzed with an LC-MSMS method. This method was compared to another LC-MSMS method that had shown to concur excellently to a reference method. Follow-up experiments were designed to explain the results. In contrast to our expectation, LC-MSMS measurements did not corroborate the data obtained by radioimmunoassay. Subsequent experiments showed that this could be attributed to a strong dependency of the radioimmunoassay on SHBG. Testosterone results (n = 198) obtained by direct radioimmunoassay showed a negative correlation to SHBG levels (r = -0.676; p<0.001). By contrast, testosterone results obtained by LC-MSMS were not related to SHBG (r = 0.100; NS). In conclusion, our results indicate that total testosterone measurements during oral contraceptive use are unreliable when performed with assays sensitive to the SHBG concentration. The discrepancy with the literature can most likely be explained by the sensitivity of the immunoassay used to SHBG. Given the sharp increase in SHBG during the use of many oral contraceptives, total testosterone may not decrease, whereas its bioavailability, estimated by free testosterone levels, will be diminished. Studies aiming at restoration of testosterone homeostasis during oral contraception need to take this into account. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Do evolutionary life-history trade-offs influence prostate cancer risk? a review of population variation in testosterone levels and prostate cancer disparities

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado, Louis Calistro

    2013-01-01

    An accumulation of evidence suggests that increased exposure to androgens is associated with prostate cancer risk. The unrestricted energy budget that is typical of Western diets represents a novel departure from the conditions in which men's steroid physiology evolved and is capable of supporting distinctly elevated testosterone levels. Although nutritional constraints likely underlie divergent patterns of testosterone secretion between Westernized and non-Western men, considerable variability exists in men's testosterone levels and prostate cancer rates within Westernized populations. Here, I use evolutionary life history theory as a framework to examine prostate cancer risk. Life history theory posits trade-offs between investment in early reproduction and long-term survival. One corollary of life history theory is the ‘challenge hypothesis’, which predicts that males augment testosterone levels in response to intrasexual competition occurring within reproductive contexts. Understanding men's evolved steroid physiology may contribute toward understanding susceptibility to prostate cancer. Among well-nourished populations of Westerners, men's testosterone levels already represent an outlier of cross-cultural variation. I hypothesize that Westernized men in aggressive social environments, characterized by intense male–male competition, will further augment testosterone production aggravating prostate cancer risk. PMID:23396824

  11. Do evolutionary life-history trade-offs influence prostate cancer risk? a review of population variation in testosterone levels and prostate cancer disparities.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Louis Calistro

    2013-01-01

    An accumulation of evidence suggests that increased exposure to androgens is associated with prostate cancer risk. The unrestricted energy budget that is typical of Western diets represents a novel departure from the conditions in which men's steroid physiology evolved and is capable of supporting distinctly elevated testosterone levels. Although nutritional constraints likely underlie divergent patterns of testosterone secretion between Westernized and non-Western men, considerable variability exists in men's testosterone levels and prostate cancer rates within Westernized populations. Here, I use evolutionary life history theory as a framework to examine prostate cancer risk. Life history theory posits trade-offs between investment in early reproduction and long-term survival. One corollary of life history theory is the 'challenge hypothesis', which predicts that males augment testosterone levels in response to intrasexual competition occurring within reproductive contexts. Understanding men's evolved steroid physiology may contribute toward understanding susceptibility to prostate cancer. Among well-nourished populations of Westerners, men's testosterone levels already represent an outlier of cross-cultural variation. I hypothesize that Westernized men in aggressive social environments, characterized by intense male-male competition, will further augment testosterone production aggravating prostate cancer risk.

  12. Endogenous Estradiol and Testosterone may Predispose toward Atherogenic Lipid Profile, but Higher Blood Level of Testosterone is Associated with Lower Number of Stenoses in the Coronary Arteries of Men with Coronary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wranicz, Jerzy Krzysztof; Cygankiewicz, Iwona; Kula, Piotr; Walczak-Jedrzejowska, Renata; Slowikowska-Hilczer, Jolanta; Kula, Krzysztof

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the correlations between blood levels of sex steroid hormones and blood lipid profile or the degree of coronary artery stenosis in men with coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods: 111 men with stable CAD, aged 36-73 yrs, unselected for the coexisting clinical coronary risk factors were prospectively studied. Degree of coronary stenosis was assessed angiographically using different indices. Total cholesterol (T-Ch), high density lipoproteins cholesterol (HDL-Ch), low density lipoproteins cholesterol (LDL-Ch), triglicerydes (TG), testosterone, estradiol, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S), and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) were measured in the blood. Free testosterone index (FTI) was calculated. Results: A positive, significant correlations were found between blood concentrations of estradiol and T-Ch (r=0.29, p<0.01) or LDL-Ch (r=0.34, p<0.005) as well as between FTI and blood LDL-Ch (r=0.23, p<0.05). Blood level of estradiol negatively correlated with HDL-Ch/T-Ch ratio (r=-0.21, p<0.05). While blood levels of T-Ch correlated positively with 3 out of 5 applied here indices of coronary stenosis, blood LDL-Ch with two of them. In turn, blood level of testosterone negatively correlated with one index of coronary stenosis (r=-0.26, p<0.05). Conclusion: In men with CAD, plasma estradiol concentrations are predictive for T-Ch, LDL-Ch and HDL-Ch/TCh ratio, and FTI for LDL-Ch. Regression analyses indicated that while sex steroid hormones may predispose toward atherogenic lipid profile and are predictive for the number and degree of coronary artery stenosis, higher blood level of total testosterone was associated with the lower number of stenosis in the coronary arteries. Hence, endogenous testosterone may have beneficial effect on coronary arteries. PMID:23674975

  13. Effect of sexual excitation on testosterone and nitric oxide levels of water buffalo bulls (Bubalus bubalis) with different categories of sexual behavior and their correlation with each other.

    PubMed

    Swelum, Ayman Abdel-Aziz; Saadeldin, Islam M; Zaher, Hany A; Alsharifi, Sawsan A M; Alowaimer, Abdullah N

    2017-06-01

    We studied the effect of sexual excitation on serum testosterone and nitric oxide (NO) levels in water buffalo bulls with different categories of sexual behavior and their correlation with each other. Buffalo bulls were classified according to their sexual behavior (including reaction time, sexual aggressiveness and mating ability): acceptable (good to excellent) (n=5), fair (n=5), and unacceptable (poor) (n=5) sexual behavior. Blood samples were collected from all animals immediately before and after sexual teasing and/or mounting to estimate the testosterone and NO levels using a commercial radioimmunoassay kit and Griess reaction test, respectively. Comparisons among groups were evaluated using a mixed-design analysis of variance. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated to determine the relationship between testosterone and NO levels before and after sexual excitation besides sexual behavior. The level of testosterone before sexual excitation was higher (p≤0.05) in bulls with acceptable and fair sexual behavior than in bulls with unacceptable sexual behavior (0.86±0.01, 0.69±0.02, and 0.29±0.02ng/mL, respectively). The level of NO was higher (p≤0.05) in bulls with acceptable and fair sexual behavior than in bulls with unacceptable sexual behavior (8.00±0.03, 7.66±0.19, and 6.29±0.33μM, respectively). Sexual excitation significantly (p<0.05) increase testosterone and NO levels in bulls with acceptable (1.45±0.01ng/mL and 19.04±0.32μM, respectively) or fair (0.92±0.02ng/mL and 14.95±0.34μM, respectively) sexual behavior, but not in bulls with unacceptable sexual behavior. The unacceptable sexual behavior bulls had significantly lower testosterone and NO levels than the other bulls. There was a strong correlation and association between serum testosterone and NO levels besides sexual behavior of buffalo bulls. In conclusion, the alteration in the testosterone and NO levels after sexual excitation depends on the sexual behavior category

  14. Testosterone therapy in men with androgen deficiency syndromes: an Endocrine Society clinical practice guideline.

    PubMed

    Bhasin, Shalender; Cunningham, Glenn R; Hayes, Frances J; Matsumoto, Alvin M; Snyder, Peter J; Swerdloff, Ronald S; Montori, Victor M

    2010-06-01

    Our objective was to update the guidelines for the evaluation and treatment of androgen deficiency syndromes in adult men published previously in 2006. The Task Force was composed of a chair, selected by the Clinical Guidelines Subcommittee of The Endocrine Society, five additional experts, a methodologist, and a medical writer. The Task Force received no corporate funding or remuneration. We recommend making a diagnosis of androgen deficiency only in men with consistent symptoms and signs and unequivocally low serum testosterone levels. We suggest the measurement of morning total testosterone level by a reliable assay as the initial diagnostic test. We recommend confirmation of the diagnosis by repeating the measurement of morning total testosterone and, in some men in whom total testosterone is near the lower limit of normal or in whom SHBG abnormality is suspected by measurement of free or bioavailable testosterone level, using validated assays. We recommend testosterone therapy for men with symptomatic androgen deficiency to induce and maintain secondary sex characteristics and to improve their sexual function, sense of well-being, muscle mass and strength, and bone mineral density. We recommend against starting testosterone therapy in patients with breast or prostate cancer, a palpable prostate nodule or induration or prostate-specific antigen greater than 4 ng/ml or greater than 3 ng/ml in men at high risk for prostate cancer such as African-Americans or men with first-degree relatives with prostate cancer without further urological evaluation, hematocrit greater than 50%, untreated severe obstructive sleep apnea, severe lower urinary tract symptoms with International Prostate Symptom Score above 19, or uncontrolled or poorly controlled heart failure. When testosterone therapy is instituted, we suggest aiming at achieving testosterone levels during treatment in the mid-normal range with any of the approved formulations, chosen on the basis of the patient

  15. The perinatal effects of maternal caffeine intake on fetal and neonatal brain levels of testosterone, estradiol, and dihydrotestosterone in rats.

    PubMed

    Karaismailoglu, S; Tuncer, M; Bayrak, S; Erdogan, G; Ergun, E L; Erdem, A

    2017-08-01

    Testosterone, estradiol, and dihydrotestosterone are the main sex steroid hormones responsible for the organization and sexual differentiation of brain structures during early development. The hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis, adrenal cells, and gonads play a key role in the production of sex steroids and express adenosine receptors. Caffeine is a non-selective adenosine antagonist; therefore, it can modulate metabolic pathways in these tissues. Besides, the proportion of pregnant women that consume caffeine is ∼60%. That is why the relationship between maternal caffeine consumption and fetal development is important. Therefore, we aimed to investigate this modulatory effect of maternal caffeine consumption on sex steroids in the fetal and neonatal brain tissues. Pregnant rats were treated with a low (0.3 g/L) or high (0.8 g/L) dose of caffeine in their drinking water during pregnancy and lactation. The testosterone, estradiol, and dihydrotestosterone levels in the frontal cortex and hypothalamus were measured using radioimmunoassay at embryonic day 19 (E19), birth (PN0), and postnatal day 4 (PN4). The administration of low-dose caffeine increased the body weight in PN4 male and female rats and anogenital index in PN4 males. The administration of high-dose caffeine decreased the adrenal weight in E19 male rats and increased testosterone levels in the frontal cortex of E19 female rats and the hypothalamus of PN0 male rats. Maternal caffeine intake during pregnancy affects sex steroid levels in the frontal cortex and hypothalamus of the offspring. This concentration changes of the sex steroids in the brain may influence behavioral and neuroendocrine functions at some point in adult life.

  16. Low serum total testosterone level as a predictor of upstaging and upgrading in low-risk prostate cancer patients meeting the inclusion criteria for active surveillance.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Matteo; Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Bruzzese, Dario; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Perdonà, Sisto; Autorino, Riccardo; Cantiello, Francesco; La Rocca, Roberto; Busetto, Gian Maria; Cimmino, Amelia; Buonerba, Carlo; Battaglia, Michele; Damiano, Rocco; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Mirone, Vincenzo; Terracciano, Daniela

    2017-03-14

    Active surveillance (AS) is currently a widely accepted treatment option for men with clinically localized prostate cancer (PCa). Several reports have highlighted the association of low serum testosterone levels with high-grade, high-stage PCa. However, the impact of serum testosterone as a predictor of progression in men with low-risk PCa has been little assessed.In this study, we evaluated the association of circulating testosterone concentrations with a staging/grading reclassification in a cohort of low-risk PCa patients meeting the inclusion criteria for the AS protocol but opting for radical prostatectomy.Radical prostatectomy (RP) was performed in 338 patients, eligible for AS according to the following criteria: clinical stage T2a or less, PSA<10ng/ml, two or fewer cancer cores, Gleason score (GS)≤6 and PSA density<0.2 ng/mL/cc. Reclassification was defined as upstaging (stage>pT2) and upgrading (GS≥7; primary Gleason pattern 4) disease. Unfavorable disease was defined as the occurrence of pathological stage>pT2 and predominant Gleason score 4. Total testosterone was measured before surgery.Low serum testosterone levels (<300 ng/dL) were significantly associated with upgrading, upstaging, unfavorable disease and positive surgical margins. The addition of testosterone to a base model, including age, PSA, PSA density, clinical stage and positive cancer involvement in cores, showed a significant independent influence of this variable on upstaging, upgrading and unfavorable disease.In conclusion, our results support the idea that total testosterone should be a selection criterion for inclusion of low-risk PCa patients in AS programs and suggest that testosterone level less than 300 ng/dL should be considered a discouraging factor when a close AS program is considered as treatment option.

  17. The male menopause and mood: testosterone decline and depression in the aging male--is there a link?

    PubMed

    Margolese, H C

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study was to review the literature on the hormonal changes that occur in aging males in order to determine if testosterone declines in relation to depressed mood and if testosterone might prove useful in treatment of depression. Pertinent articles were identified through a MEDLINE search from 1966 to 1999 and by careful review of the bibliographies of articles most relevant to the topic. There is a moderate decline of total testosterone and more significant decline of bioavailable testosterone in aging males. Elderly males who are depressed appear to have the lowest testosterone levels. In eugonadal males, testosterone replacement does not have a significant effect on mood; in hypogonadal males, some studies show an effect whereas others do not. In several small studies of depressed hypogonadal males, testosterone was effective in alleviating depression. Major side effects of testosterone include increased hematocrit and potential effects on the prostate and lipid metabolism. Testosterone replacement as primary or adjuvant treatment of depression may prove useful in elderly, hypogonadal males who fail to respond to conventional antidepressants. Further studies are needed to confirm these initial impressions.

  18. Bio-availability of iron from spinach (Spanicia oleracea) cultivated in soil fortified with graded levels of iron.

    PubMed

    Reddy, N S; Malewar, V G

    1992-10-01

    In vitro availability of iron along with ascorbic acid, oxalic acid and phosphorus contents of two varieties of spinach (Pusa Jyoti and Allgreen) cultivated in soil with different levels of added iron was determined. Addition of graded levels of iron to soil markedly increased the total iron and phosphorus contents and significantly decreased the bio-availability of iron, ascorbic acid and oxalic acid contents of spinach. Ascorbic acid and oxalic acid contents markedly exerted a positive influence while phosphorus exerted a negative influence on the bio-availability of iron.

  19. Gestational and lactational exposure to di-isobutyl phthalate via diet in maternal mice decreases testosterone levels in male offspring.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyang; Sheng, Nan; Cui, Ruina; Zhang, Hongxia; Wang, Jianshe; Dai, Jiayin

    2017-04-01

    Phthalates are a large family of ubiquitous environmental chemicals suspected of being endocrine disruptors, with exposure to these chemicals during prenatal and postnatal development possibly resulting in reproductive disorders. Di-isobutyl phthalate (DiBP) is widely used in consumer and industrial products, and although its exposure in the general population has increased in recent years, the mechanisms behind DiBP-induced reproductive disorders in male offspring remain unclear. Here, pregnant mice were exposed to 0 or 450 mg/kg bw/day DiBP via diet from gestation day (GD) 0 to GD21. Until postnatal day 21 (PD21), half of the exposed pups were also exposed to DiBP by lactation (TT), while the rest were not (TC). Half of each group were sacrificed on PD21, with the remaining mice fed a normal diet until PD80 (TCC and TTC, respectively). Reproductive toxicological parameters such as relative organ weights and testosterone levels were determined in male offspring on PD21 and PD80 and sperm quality was tested on PD80. Maternal exposure (pregnancy and lactation) led to decreased serum and testis testosterone concentrations, accompanied by decreased expression of 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD) and cytochrome P450 family 11 subfamily A member 1 (CYP11A1) in PD21 pups and PD80 adults. Furthermore, the TTC group showed decreased epididymis sperm concentration and motility. Taken together, DiBP exposure in early life (prenatal and postnatal) impaired male reproductive function in later life, possibly by interfering with testosterone levels and CYP11A1, which might be a major steroidogenic enzyme targeted by DiBP or other phthalates.

  20. The interaction of serum testosterone levels and androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism on the risk of erectile dysfunction in aging Taiwanese men.

    PubMed

    Liu, C C; Lee, Y C; Tsai, V F S; Cheng, K H; Wu, W J; Bao, B Y; Huang, C N; Yeh, H C; Tsai, C C; Wang, C J; Huang, S P

    2015-09-01

    Testosterone has been found to play important roles in men's sexual function. However, the effects of testosterone can be modulated by androgen receptor (AR) CAG repeat polymorphism. It could also contribute to the risk of erectile dysfunction (ED). The aim of this study is to evaluate the interaction of serum testosterone levels and AR CAG repeat polymorphism on the risk of ED in aging Taiwanese men. This cross-sectional data of Taiwanese men older than 40 years were collected from a free health screening held between August 2010 and August 2011 in Kaohsiung city, Taiwan. All participants completed a health questionnaires included five-item version of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) and the International Prostate Symptoms Score, received a detailed physical examination and provided 20 cm3 whole blood samples for biochemical and genetic evaluation. The IIEF-5 was used to evaluate ED. Serum albumin, total testosterone (TT), and sex hormone-binding globulin levels were measured. Free testosterone level was calculated. AR gene CAG repeat polymorphism was determined by direct sequencing. Finally, 478 men with the mean age of 55.7 ± 4.8 years were included. When TT levels were above 330 ng/dL, the effect of testosterone level on erectile function seemed to reach a plateau and a significantly negative correlation between AR CAG repeat length and the score of IIEF-5 was found (r = -0.119, p = 0.034). After adjusting for other covariates, the longer AR CAG repeat length was still an independent risk factor for ED in subjects with TT above 330 ng/dL (p = 0.006), but not in TT of 330 ng/dL or below. In conclusion, both serum testosterone levels and AR CAG repeat polymorphism can influence erectile function concomitantly. In subjects with normal TT concentration, those with longer AR CAG repeat lengths have a higher risk of developing ED.

  1. Serum androgen levels in black, Hispanic, and white men.

    PubMed

    Litman, Heather J; Bhasin, Shalender; Link, Carol L; Araujo, Andre B; McKinlay, John B

    2006-11-01

    Racial/ethnic differences in androgen levels could account for differences in prostate cancer risk, body composition, and bone loss. The objective of the study was to investigate racial/ethnic variations in testosterone, bioavailable testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), SHBG, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) levels. The Boston Area Community Health (BACH) Survey was a multistage stratified cluster random sample, recruiting from 2002 to 2005. The study was a community-based sample of Boston. Participants included black, Hispanic, or white individuals, aged 30-79 yr, competent to sign informed consent and literate in English/Spanish. Of 2301 men recruited, 1899 provided blood samples (538 black, 651 Hispanic, 710 white). Intervention consisted of data obtained during in-person at-home interview, conducted by a bilingual phlebotomist/interviewer. Testosterone, bioavailable testosterone, DHT, DHT to testosterone ratio, SHBG, and DHEAS were measured. With or without adjustment for covariates, there were no significant differences in testosterone, bioavailable testosterone, or SHBG levels by race/ethnicity. DHEAS levels differed by race/ethnicity before covariate adjustment; after adjustment this difference was attenuated. Before adjustment, DHT and DHT to testosterone ratios did not significantly differ by racial/ethnic group. After adjustment, there was evidence of racial/ethnic differences in DHT (P = 0.047) and DHT to testosterone (P = 0.038) levels. Black men had higher DHT levels and DHT to testosterone ratios than white and Hispanic men. Because there are no racial/ethnic differences in testosterone levels, normative ranges need not be adjusted by race/ethnicity for androgen deficiency diagnosis for men aged 30-79 yr. Further investigation is needed to determine whether differences in DHT levels and DHT to testosterone ratio can help explain racial/ethnic variations in prostate cancer incidence, body composition, and bone mass.

  2. Scent marking, dominance and serum testosterone levels in male domestic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Lourdes; Bautista, Amando; Martínez-Gómez, Margarita; Nicolás, Leticia; Hudson, Robyn

    2008-06-09

    The European rabbit, both in its wild and domesticated forms, has been a pioneer species in the study of mammalian chemical communication, and illustrates well the difficulty of understanding the functional significance of these often complex signals. Here we investigate the performance of one of the rabbit's most conspicuous chemical signaling behaviors, chin marking (chinning), and the hypothesis that this expresses social dominance. In tests of 21 chinchilla-strain sexually mature males we predicted 1) that animals would show marked and stable individual differences in the frequency of chinning, 2) that these differences would correlate with behaviors associated with dominance such as intrasexual mounting, and 3) that individual differences in the frequency of chinning and dominance-related behaviors would correlate with individual differences in a commonly used physiological indicator of dominance, concentration of serum testosterone. Supporting these predictions and consistent with previous reports, animals showed large and stable individual differences in the frequency of chinning which correlated with the behavioral indicators of dominance and less strongly, with serum testosterone. As our animals had been kept in single cages and without direct contact with other males since weaning, these findings raise the question as to how and when during development such differences among individuals arise. We are currently investigating the possible relation between pups' intrauterine position, postnatal competition among littermates for milk and thermally advantageous positions in the litter huddle, and later differences in indicators of dominance such as those reported here.

  3. Is there a relationship between the performance in a chronometric mental-rotations test and salivary testosterone and estradiol levels in children aged 9-14 years?

    PubMed

    Quaiser-Pohl, Claudia; Jansen, Petra; Lehmann, Jennifer; Kudielka, Brigitte M

    2016-01-01

    The consistent gender differences favoring males in some spatial abilities like mental rotation have raised the question of whether testosterone or other gonadal hormones contribute to these differences--especially because such gender differences seem to appear mainly from the age of puberty on. Studies generally suggest that spatial ability is facilitated by moderately high testosterone levels (i.e., levels that are relatively high for females and relatively low for males). However, the role of sex steroids for mental-rotation performance of (pre-) pubertal children has not been the focus of research, yet. In our study, the relationships between different aspects of mental-rotation performance (accuracy, reaction time, rotation speed) and salivary testosterone and estradiol levels were investigated. Subjects were 109 children (51 boys and 58 girls) aged between 9 and 14 years (M = 11.41, SD = 1.74). They performed a chronometric mental-rotations test, in which the stimuli consisted of three-dimensional drawings of Shepard and Metzler cube figures. In addition, saliva samples were gathered for the analysis of free testosterone and estradiol levels. Results showed a significant gender difference in reaction time and rotational speed in favor of boys, and a significant age, but no gender difference in testosterone and estradiol levels. We found no significant relationships between hormonal levels and any measure of mental-rotation performance.

  4. [Testosterone therapy].

    PubMed

    Diemer, T; Hauptmann, A; Wagenlehner, F M E

    2016-04-01

    Hormone replacement therapy with testosterone has become well-established over the course of time. The initial substantial concerns with respect to complications and potential adverse events, particularly in older patients, were proven to be unfounded over time. Testosterone therapy has therefore gradually become a regular treatment modality in urological practice. It has also been shown to represent a valuable tool as supportive treatment for patients with erectile dysfunction and hypogonadism. A variety of testosterone preparations are available for treatment. Recent pharmaceutical developments have greatly improved the practicability and ease of administration for patients. Several guidelines have been developed that provide clearly formulated standards and instructions for indications, contraindications, application, risk factors and monitoring of testosterone therapy. Adverse events affecting the cardiovascular system and especially diseases of the prostate gland are of great importance, thus making the urologist the primary partner in the treatment of patients with testosterone deficiency.

  5. 1H NMR Metabolomics: A New Molecular Level Tool for Assessment of Organic Contaminant Bioavailability to Earthworms in Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKelvie, J. R.; Wolfe, D. M.; Celejewski, M. A.; Simpson, A. J.; Simpson, M. J.

    2009-05-01

    extractable using cyclodextrin. Hence, while cyclodextrin extraction may serve as a good proxy for microbial bioavailability, our results suggest that it may not serve as a good proxy for earthworm bioavailability. 1H NMR metabolomics therefore offers considerable promise as a novel, molecular-level method to directly monitor earthworm bioavailability of potentially toxic and persistent compounds in the environment.

  6. Free testosterone level correlated with the metabolic abnormalities dependent on central obesity in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dong, Z; Chen, X; Li, L; Huang, J; Yin, Q; Yang, D

    2012-06-01

    Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have increased risks of developing metabolic abnormalities compared with the women without PCOS. Hyperandrogenemia is one of the most important characteristics of PCOS. However, the correlations between hyperandrogenemia and metabolic disorders are uncertain. To elucidate the relationship between androgen indices and metabolic abnormalities in Chinese women with PCOS. A retrospective analysis of the anthropometric and biochemical records of 408 women with PCOS. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) was 15.7% in women with PCOS. No association existed between total testosterone (TT) and metabolic profile. Free testosterone (FT) correlated with most of the metabolic variables by unadjusted correlation analyses. The women with elevated FT levels exhibited more unfavorable metabolic profiles compared with the women with normal FT levels. After adjusting for the confounding factors by multivariate logistic regression analysis, the women with elevated FT levels had higher prevalence of central obesity than the women with normal FT levels (odds ratio [OR] 2.346, p=0.042). Women with reduced sex hormone-binding globulin levels were more likely to have central obesity, overweight, raised fasting glucose, insulin resistance, and raised diastolic blood pressure. Raised dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) level was associated with a lower probability of having central obesity (OR 0.293, p=0.001) and overweight (OR 0.47, p=0.023). FT has closer association with metabolic parameters than TT. FT can involve in the development of metabolic disorders dependent on central obesity. Raised DHEAS level can reduce the risks of central obesity and overweight. © J. A. Barth Verlag in Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. An Overview of Testosterone Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, O Danny; Tillman, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Millions of men, as a result of the natural aging process, injury, illness, and medical therapies, experience a decline in testosterone levels that necessitate a need for testosterone supplementation therapy (TST). The signs and symptoms of testosterone decline may occur gradually, and low testosterone levels may be misdiagnosed as other medical conditions. Over the past two decades, there has been an increase in testing of testosterone levels and the use of TST. With so many men now on TST, it is essential for health care professionals to know the signs and symptoms, the causes of testosterone decline, how testosterone deficiency is diagnosed, what pathological changes are associated with testosterone decline, and the benefits and risks of TST. In addition, health care providers need to be aware of the various forms of testosterone available as well as the advantages and disadvantages of each. This article provides a brief overview of testosterone deficiency, TST treatment options and guidelines, and the risks and benefits associated with of TST.

  8. Association between serum testosterone levels, body mass index (BMI) and insulin in male patients with schizophrenia treated with atypical antipsychotics--olanzapine or risperidone.

    PubMed

    Konarzewska, Beata; Galińska-Skok, Beata; Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Łazarczyk-Kirejczyk, Joanna; Malus, Aleksandra; Simonienko, Katarzyna; Szulc, Agata

    2014-01-01

    A sufficient amount of testosterone (T) is essential for adequate sexual functioning but also for cognitive and psychological well-being. Most recent studies have demonstrated that higher BMI and other symptoms of metabolic syndrome are associated with alterations in sex steroid hormone concentrations. Although, neuroleptics are known to cause a significant and sustained weight excess, the relationships between body mass index and the level of testosterone in psychiatric patients have not been thoroughly studied. The main purpose of the present study was to examine the correlations between testosterone, estradiol BMI, and insulin in male patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and treated with olanzapine or risperidone. The study included 78 males diagnosed with schizophrenia according to the DSM-IV diagnostic classification hospitalized in psychiatric inpatient units (42 on risperidone and 36 on olanzapine). The initial and final evaluation of testosterone (T), estradiol, prolactin (PRL) and insulin serum levels were performed at week 3 and 8 after the onset of the new treatment, respectively. At week 3, the mean serum prolactin was markedly higher, whereas testosterone level was lower in risperidone patients compared to those treated with olanzapine. T level was negatively affected by the studied medication (risperidone), increased prolactin and a higher BMI. At week 8, the mean serum prolactin level was markedly higher in risperidone patients. Higher values of BMI and serum insulin were the most prominent factors independently associated with decreased plasma testosterone levels at that measurement point. Individual changes of T level between week 3 and 8 were positively correlated with the corresponding changes in estradiol levels. T serum levels appear to be independently linked with BMI, insulin and prolactin in both investigated neuroleptics. Further research is needed to elucidate the relationship between reproductive hormones and metabolic parameters in

  9. Low Serum Testosterone Levels Are Associated with Elevated Urinary Mandelic Acid, and Strontium Levels in Adult Men According to the US 2011–2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Héroux, Paul; Zhang, Qunwei; Jiang, Zhao-Yan; Gu, Aihua

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known regarding the effects of environmental exposure of chemicals on androgenic system in the general population. We studied 5,107 subjects included in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2011–2012). Methods Urinary, serum, and blood levels of 15 subclasses comprising 110 individual chemicals were analyzed for their association with serum testosterone levels. The subjects were divided into high and low testosterone groups according to the median testosterone concentration (374.51 ng/dL). Odds ratios (ORs) of individual chemicals in association with testosterone were estimated using logistic regression after adjusting for age, ethnicity, cotinine, body mass index, creatinine, alcohol, and the poverty income ratio. Results Adjusted ORs for the highest versus lowest quartiles of exposure were 2.12 (95% CI: 1.07, 4.21; Ptrend = 0.044), 1.84 (95% CI: 1.02, 3.34; Ptrend = 0.018) for the association between urinary mandelic acid, and strontium quartiles with low testosterone concentrations in adult men, respectively. However, no association was observed for the remaining chemicals with testosterone. Conclusions The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data suggest that elevations in urinary mandelic acid, and strontium levels are negatively related to low serum testosterone levels in adult men. PMID:25996772

  10. Controversies in testosterone replacement therapy: testosterone and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kathleen; Miner, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The role of testosterone in the cardiovascular (CV) health of men is controversial. Data suggest that both the condition and treatment of clinical hypogonadism is associated with decreased CV mortality; however, two recent studies suggest that hypogonadal subjects treated with testosterone replacement therapy have a higher incidence of new CV events. There has been increased media attention concerning the risk of CV disease in men treated with testosterone. Until date, there are no long-term prospective studies to determine safety. Literature spanning over the past 30 years has suggested that not only is there a possible increased CV risk in men with low levels of testosterone, but the benefits from testosterone therapy may even lower this risk. We review here the recent studies that have garnered such intense scrutiny. This article is intended as a thorough review of testosterone levels and CV risk, providing the clinician with the facts needed to make informed clinical decisions in managing patients with clinical hypogonadism.

  11. Diet exposure to technical hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) affects testes and circulating testosterone and thyroxine levels in American kestrels (Falco sparverius).

    PubMed

    Marteinson, Sarah C; Kimmins, Sarah; Letcher, Robert J; Palace, Vince P; Bird, David M; Ritchie, Ian J; Fernie, Kim J

    2011-11-01

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is a high-production-volume, brominated flame-retardant that is used in items such as polystyrene foams. HBCD has been detected in the environment, wildlife tissues and in humans globally with some of the highest recorded levels in predatory birds. This study examined the effects of exposure to environmentally relevant levels of HBCD on the reproductive physiology of captive male American kestrels (Falco sparverius), a predatory bird. Two sets of males were used: one group not housed with females (unpaired: nc=12, nHBCD=10) and the second group housed with females (breeding: nc=10, nHBCD=20). All treatment birds were exposed to 0.51 μg HBCD/g kestrel/day technical HBCD, and controls to safflower oil only, injected into their food during seasonal testicular development. Unpaired males were exposed for 3 weeks and euthanized for testicular analysis. Breeding males were exposed for 3 weeks prior to pairing and throughout the courtship period. The HBCD-exposed unpaired males had heavier testes (p≤0.017) and a trend towards more seminiferous tubules containing elongated spermatids (p=0.052). There was also a moderate increase in plasma testosterone concentrations (p=0.056) compared to controls. In breeding males, testosterone levels increased during courtship to culminate in higher levels than controls by the time the first egg was laid (p=0.010) and circulating free and total T4 was reduced throughout. The number of sperm cells reaching the perivitelline layer of the first egg for breeding males did not differ between the two groups. This study is the first report that HBCD exposure at environmentally relevant levels alters reproductive physiology in male birds and suggests that birds may be more sensitive to HBCD than mammals.

  12. Associations between Salivary Testosterone Levels, Androgen-Related Genetic Polymorphisms, and Self-Estimated Ejaculation Latency Time.

    PubMed

    Jern, Patrick; Westberg, Lars; Ankarberg-Lindgren, Carina; Johansson, Ada; Gunst, Annika; Sandnabba, N Kenneth; Santtila, Pekka

    2014-08-01

    Recently, testosterone (T) has been shown to be associated with premature ejaculation (PE) symptoms in the literature. Furthermore, studies suggest that the etiology of PE is partly under genetic control. The aim of this study was to reassess findings suggesting an association between testosterone (T) and a key symptom of PE, ejaculation latency time (ELT), as well as exploratively investigating associations between six androgen-related genetic polymorphisms and ELT. Statistical analyses were performed on a population-based sample of 1,429 Finnish men aged 18-45 years (M = 26.9, SD = 4.7). Genotype information was available for 1,345-1,429 of these (depending on the polymorphism), and salivary T samples were available from 384 men. Two androgen receptor gene-linked, two 5-alpha-reductase type 2-gene-linked, and two sex hormone-binding globuline gene-linked polymorphisms were genotyped. Ejaculatory function was assessed using self-reported ELT. We found no association between salivary T levels and ELT. We found a nominally significant association between a 5-alpha-reductase type 2-gene-linked polymorphism (rs2208532) and ELT, but this association did not remain significant after correction for multiple testing. One single nucleotide polymorphism in the sex hormone-binding globulin gene (rs1799941) moderated (significantly after correction for multiple testing) the association between salivary T and ELT, so that A:A genotype carriers had significantly lower salivary T levels as a function of increasing ELT compared with other genotype groups. We were unable to find support for the hypothesis suggesting an association between T levels and ELT, possibly because of the low number of phenotypically extreme cases (the sample used in the present study was population based). Our results concerning genetic associations should be interpreted with caution until replication studies have been conducted. Jern P, Westberg L, Ankarberg-Lindgren C, Johansson A, Gunst A, Sandnabba NK

  13. Maternal corticosterone but not testosterone level is associated with the ratio of second-to-fourth digit length (2D:4D) in field vole offspring (Microtus agrestis).

    PubMed

    Lilley, Thomas; Laaksonen, Toni; Huitu, Otso; Helle, Samuli

    2010-03-30

    The steroid environment encountered by a foetus can strongly affect its post-natal physiology and behaviour. It has been proposed that steroid concentrations experienced in utero could be estimated from adults by measuring their second-to-fourth digit length ratio (2D:4D). However, there is still little direct evidence that intra-uterine steroid levels affect individual 2D:4D. We examined whether maternal pre-pregnancy testosterone and corticosterone levels (as estimates of intra-uterine testosterone and corticosterone exposure) affected the 2D:4D of pups in non-domesticated field voles (Microtus agrestis), measured by X-rays at the age of weaning (21 days). Furthermore, for the first time in a non-human species, we studied whether testosterone and corticosterone levels correlated with 2D:4D in adult females. We found that the maternal pre-pregnancy level of testosterone was not associated with offspring 2D:4D in either the left or the right paw. Instead, maternal pre-pregnancy corticosterone level was positively correlated with offspring 2D:4D in the right paw, but unrelated to 2D:4D in the left paw. In addition, the 2D:4D of adult females was not associated with either their circulating testosterone or corticosterone levels. Our results suggest that in field voles maternally administered testosterone is not a major determinant of offspring 2D:4D, whereas maternal stress appears to account for some of the variation in the 2D:4D of their offspring. (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Bioavailability of caesium-137 from chernozem soils with high and low levels of radioactive contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paramonova, Tatiana; Shamshurina, Eugenia; Machaeva, Ekaterina; Belyaev, Vladimir

    2014-05-01

    Bioavailability of Cs-137 in "soil-plant" system of radioactively contaminated terrestrial ecosystems is the most important factor in the understanding of ecological situation. There are many factors affecting the features of Cs-137 biogeochemical cycle: period since an accident, type and intensity of radioactive fallout, general properties of landscape and the specifics of soil and plant covers, etc. In order to evaluate the importance of soil contamination level for the process of Cs-137 translocation from soil to plant the research in forest-steppe areas of Russia with similar natural properties, but contrasting high (Tula region) and low (Kursk region) levels of radioactive Chernobyl fallout (about 25 years after accident) was conducted. Soil cover of both sites is presented by chernozems with bulk density 1.1-1.2 g/cm3, 6-7% humus and neutral pH 6.5-7.2; plant cover under investigation consist of dry and wet meadows with bioproductivity 1.6-2.5 kg/m2 and 85-90% of biomass concentrated underground, that is typical for Russian forest-steppe landscapes. At the same time levels of soil regional contamination with Cs-137 differ by an order - 620-710 Bq/kg (210-250 kBq/m2) in Tula region and 30-55 Bq/kg (10-20 kBq/m2) in Kursk region. At a higher level of soil radioactive contamination specific activity of Cs-137 in vegetation of meadows is noticeably increased (103-160 Bq/kg in Tula region versus 12-14 Bq/kg in Kursk region) with correlation coefficient r 0.87. Increasing of Cs-137 in the underground parts of plants plays a decisive role in this process, while the specific radionuclide's activity in the aboveground parts of different sites is almost invariant (and ubiquitously roots contain 2-5 times more Cs-137 than shoots). The values of transfer factors for Cs-137 (the ratio of the specific Cs-137 activities in the plant tissue and in the soil) at various levels of soil radioactive contamination vary within a relatively narrow range 0.1-0.4, that confirms the

  15. Testosterone Buccal

    MedlinePlus

    ... left and right of the two front teeth). Alternate sides at every dose so that you never ... thoughts or beliefs that have no basis in reality). People who use higher doses of testosterone than ...

  16. Validation of a radioimmunoassay for measuring testosterone concentrations in plasma samples of the subterranean rodent Ctenomys talarum: outstandingly elevated levels in the wild and the effect of captivity.

    PubMed

    Vera, Federico; Zenuto, Roxana Rita; Antenucci, Carlos Daniel; Busso, Juan Manuel; Marín, Raúl Héctor

    2011-11-01

    We validated the Coat-a-Count radioimmunoassay (RIA) kit for measuring testosterone in plasma samples of the subterranean rodent Ctenomys talarum and evaluated testosterone levels in free-living and captive individuals. The performance of the assay was evaluated by the assessment of parallelism, accuracy and precision. Moreover, the high specificity of the assay antibody was confirmed by high-pressure liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detector, followed by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Results indicated that plasma samples have to be treated with heat and diluted before the RIA for the optimization of the assay. Plasma testosterone concentrations in free-living animals were outstandingly elevated (up to 329 ng/mL), which are among the highest ever reported for mammals. On the other hand, captivity produced a 14-fold decrease in plasma testosterone concentrations, emphasizing that very significant changes in the endocrine milieu may occur in wild animals kept under laboratory conditions. Our results place tuco-tucos as an interesting model for the study of androgen regulation in mammals, suggesting that target tissues may have low sensitivity to the testosterone signal and agree with a scenario of elevated levels of sex hormone-binding globulin in plasma.

  17. Additive benefit of higher testosterone levels and vitamin D plus calcium supplementation in regard to fall risk reduction among older men and women

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Both testosterone and vitamin D levels affect muscle and thus may also affect risk of falling. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between sex hormone levels and the risk of falling in older men and women. 199 men and 246 women age 65 or older living at home followed for 3 years...

  18. Effects of peppermint teas on plasma testosterone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and luteinizing hormone levels and testicular tissue in rats.

    PubMed

    Akdogan, Mehmet; Ozguner, Meltem; Kocak, Ahmet; Oncu, Meral; Cicek, Ekrem

    2004-08-01

    To justify the effects of Mentha piperita labiatae and Mentha spicata labiatae herbal teas on plasma total testosterone, luteinizing hormone, and follicle-stimulating hormone levels and testicular histologic features. We performed this study because of major complaints in our area from men about the adverse effects of these herbs on male reproductive function. The experimental study included 48 male Wistar albino rats (body weight 200 to 250 g). The rats were randomized into four groups of 12 rats each. The control group was given commercial drinking water, and the experimental groups were given 20 g/L M. piperita tea, 20 g/L M. spicata tea, or 40 g/L M. spicata tea. The follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone levels had increased and total testosterone levels had decreased in the experimental groups compared with the control group; the differences were statistically significant. Also, the Johnsen testicular biopsy scores were significantly different statistically between the experimental groups and the control group. Although the mean seminiferous tubular diameter of the experimental groups was relatively greater than in the control group, the difference was not statistically significant. The only effects of M. piperita on testicular tissue was segmental maturation arrest in the seminiferous tubules; however, the effects of M. spicata extended from maturation arrest to diffuse germ cell aplasia in relation to the dose. Despite the beneficial effects of M. piperita and M. spicata in digestion, we should also be aware of the toxic effects when the herbs are not used in the recommended fashion or at the recommended dose.

  19. Spermatogenesis and plasma testosterone levels in Western Australian burrowing desert frogs, Cyclorana platycephala, Cyclorana maini, and Neobatrachus sutor, during aestivation.

    PubMed

    Shalan, A G; Bradshaw, S D; Withers, P C; Thompson, G; Bayomy, M F F; Bradshaw, F J; Stewart, T

    2004-03-01

    Changes in testis size, histological status, and plasma levels of testosterone were monitored for males of three species of Western Australian desert frogs, Cyclorana maini, Cyclorana platycephala, and Neobatrachus sutor during aestivation. The frogs were induced to burrow and form cocoons soon after their capture and then disinterred at intervals in order to monitor changes in reproductive activity of the testes. All stages of spermatogenesis were evident in active frogs, which were collected a few days following rain from breeding choruses. Relative testis mass declined gradually in all species during the first 7 months of aestivation and then increased significantly at 16-19 months in the two species for which extended data were available (C. maini and N. sutor). A decrease in the number of sperm bundles 2-4 months after cocooning was associated with an initial increase in the number of free spermatazoa in all three species, which then returned to the levels seen in active animals after 7 months. Increases in the number of primary and secondary spermatogonia were most evident in C. platycephala after 4-7 months of aestivation, but early stages of spermatocytogenesis were evident in all species after 7 months of aestivation, especially in individuals that contained neither sperm bundles nor mature spermatazoa. Changes in plasma testosterone levels correlated significantly with variations in the diameter of the seminiferous tubules and the GSI, suggesting that this hormone plays a major role in controlling testicular recrudescence in aestivating, cocooned, desert frogs. Data from this study show that, in the absence of any external cues, testicular recrudescence is evident after approximately one year of aestivation in desert frogs which prepares them to breed again, once rain falls.

  20. The changes of serum testosterone level and hepatic microsome enzyme activity of crucian carp (Carassius carassius) exposed to a sublethal dosage of pentachlorophenol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Yin, Daqiang; Kong, Fanxiang

    2008-10-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP), which was reported to be a typical persistent organic pollutant and environmental endocrine disruptor, may cause threat to aquatic species. In this study, serum testosterone concentration, activity of liver microsome ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) and glutathione S-transferases (GST) of crucian carp (Carassius carassius) exposed to PCP for 7 and 15 d, respectively, were examined. The results showed that testosterone concentration was induced remarkably after 7 d (P<0.05), and the testosterone concentrations in 15 d treatment crucian carp were higher than those in 7 d treatment. It was found that there were significant effects on activities of EROD and GST after crucian carp were exposed to PCP for 7 and 15 d (P<0.05), compared to the controls. EROD and GST activities increased with increase in PCP concentration and also with increase in time on exposure. The results indicated that serum testosterone, EROD and GST were sensitive endpoints to PCP. PCP may have endocrine disrupting activities and may affect the reproductive success of this species. It is possible that the changes of hepatic microsome enzyme activities may result in alterations of serum testosterone levels in crucian carp.

  1. Seasonal and inter-individual variation in testosterone levels in badgers Meles meles: evidence for the existence of two endocrinological phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Buesching, Christina Dagmar; Heistermann, Michael; Macdonald, David W

    2009-09-01

    Elevated testosterone levels can lower condition and increase parasites. We analysed testosterone in 84 blood samples of wild European badgers Meles meles collected at regular intervals (winter = mating season; spring = end of mating season; summer = minor mating peak; autumn = reproductive quiescence), and related variation to body condition, subcaudal gland secretion, parasite burden, and bite wounding. All males showed elevated levels in winter and low levels in autumn. In neither season did testosterone correlate with fitness-related parameters. However, two different endocrinological phenotypes existed in spring and summer. Whilst some males lowered their testosterone to levels comparable to autumnal quiescence (Type 1), others maintained elevated levels comparable to those during winter (Type 2). In spring and summer high levels were correlated with lower body condition and increased parasite burden, and Type 2 males tended to suffer higher mortality rates than Type 1. No animals older than 6 years adopted phenotype 2, indicating that males either switch phenotypes with age or that Type 2 results in lower life expectancy, evidencing the costs of male reproduction in badgers.

  2. Endogenous and exogenous testosterone and the risk of prostate cancer and increased prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Peter; Koechlin, Alice; Bota, Maria; d'Onofrio, Alberto; Zaridze, David G; Perrin, Paul; Fitzpatrick, John; Burnett, Arthur L; Boniol, Mathieu

    2016-11-01

    To review and quantify the association between endogenous and exogenous testosterone and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and prostate cancer. Literature searches were performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Prospective cohort studies that reported data on the associations between endogenous testosterone and prostate cancer, and placebo-controlled randomized trials of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) that reported data on PSA and/or prostate cancer cases were retained. Meta-analyses were performed using random-effects models, with tests for publication bias and heterogeneity. Twenty estimates were included in a meta-analysis, which produced a summary relative risk (SRR) of prostate cancer for an increase of 5 nmol/L of testosterone of 0.99 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.96, 1.02) without heterogeneity (I² = 0%). Based on 26 trials, the overall difference in PSA levels after onset of use of TRT was 0.10 ng/mL (-0.28, 0.48). Results were similar when conducting heterogeneity analyses by mode of administration, region, age at baseline, baseline testosterone, trial duration, type of patients and type of TRT. The SRR of prostate cancer as an adverse effect from 11 TRT trials was 0.87 (95% CI 0.30; 2.50). Results were consistent across studies. Prostate cancer appears to be unrelated to endogenous testosterone levels. TRT for symptomatic hypogonadism does not appear to increase PSA levels nor the risk of prostate cancer development. The current data are reassuring, although some caution is essential until multiple studies with longer follow-up are available. © 2016 The Authors BJU International © 2016 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Testosterone regulation of androgen receptor levels in the uropygial gland of quails (Coturnix coturnix): a further proof for the androgen dependency of the uropygial gland.

    PubMed

    Amet, Y; Abalain, J H; Daniel, J Y; Di Stefano, S; Floch, H H

    1986-05-01

    In castrated quails supplemented with testosterone by a chronically implanted silastic capsule, removal of the implant resulted in the gradual disappearance of the androgen receptors in both cloacal and uropygial glands. However, after a 7-day time span, the receptors reappeared in both glands but did not reach the original level of implanted birds. On the other hand, the photostimulation of intact birds induced an increase of the receptor content of their uropygial and cloacal glands when compared to sexually quiescent birds. These results show that, the concentration of the androgen receptors of the uropygial and cloacal glands of adult male quails is partly controlled by testosterone. By comparison with the mechanism of the action of testosterone in mammal target organs, our results add weight to the androgen dependency of quails uropygial glands (a sebaceous like organ).

  4. Facial Width-To-Height Ratio (fWHR) Is Not Associated with Adolescent Testosterone Levels

    PubMed Central

    Hodges-Simeon, Carolyn R.; Hanson Sobraske, Katherine N.; Samore, Theodore; Gurven, Michael; Gaulin, Steven J. C.

    2016-01-01

    Facial width-to-height ratio (fWHR) has been proposed as a sexually dimorphic signal in humans that develops under the influence of pubertal testosterone (T); however, no studies have examined the association between fWHR and T during the phase in which facial growth is canalized—adolescence. In a sample of adolescent Tsimane males, we evaluate the relationship between T, known T-derived traits (i.e. strength and voice pitch), and craniofacial measurements. If fWHR variation derives from T’s effect on craniofacial growth during adolescence, several predictions should be supported: 1) fWHR should increase with age as T increases, 2) fWHR should reflect adolescent T (rather than adult T per se), 3) fWHR should exhibit velocity changes during adolescence in parallel with the pubertal spurt in T, 4) fWHR should correlate with T after controlling for age and other potential confounds, and 5) fWHR should show strong associations with other T-derived traits. Only prediction 4 was observed. Additionally, we examined three alternative facial masculinity ratios: facial width/lower face height, cheekbone prominence, and facial width/full face height. In contrast to fWHR, all three alternative measures show a strong age-related trend and are associated with both T and T-dependent traits. Overall, our results question the status of fWHR as a sexually-selected signal of pubertal T and T-linked traits. PMID:27078636

  5. Does Cosleeping Contribute to Lower Testosterone Levels in Fathers? Evidence from the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Gettler, Lee T.; McKenna, James J.; McDade, Thomas W.; Agustin, Sonny S.; Kuzawa, Christopher W.

    2012-01-01

    Because cross-species evidence suggests that high testosterone (T) may interfere with paternal investment, the relationships between men's transition to parenting and changes in their T are of growing interest. Studies of human males suggest that fathers who provide childcare often have lower T than uninvolved fathers, but no studies to date have evaluated how nighttime sleep proximity between fathers and their offspring may affect T. Using data collected in 2005 and 2009 from a sample of men (n = 362; age 26.0 ± 0.3 years in 2009) residing in metropolitan Cebu, Philippines, we evaluated fathers' T based on whether they slept on the same surface as their children (same surface cosleepers), slept on a different surface but in the same room (roomsharers), or slept separately from their children (solitary sleepers). A large majority (92%) of fathers in this sample reported practicing same surface cosleeping. Compared to fathers who slept solitarily, same surface cosleeping fathers had significantly lower evening (PM) T and also showed a greater diurnal decline in T from waking to evening (both p<0.05). Among men who were not fathers at baseline (2005), fathers who were cosleepers at follow-up (2009) experienced a significantly greater longitudinal decline in PM T over the 4.5-year study period (p<0.01) compared to solitary sleeping fathers. Among these same men, baseline T did not predict fathers' sleeping arrangements at follow-up (p>0.2). These results are consistent with previous findings indicating that daytime father-child interaction contributes to lower T among fathers. Our findings specifically suggest that close sleep proximity between fathers and their offspring results in greater longitudinal decreases in T as men transition to fatherhood and lower PM T overall compared to solitary sleeping fathers. PMID:22957016

  6. Role of free testosterone levels in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer receiving second-line therapy

    PubMed Central

    von Klot, Christoph A.; Kuczyk, Markus A.; Boeker, Alena; Reuter, Christoph; Imkamp, Florian; Herrmann, Thomas R.W.; Tezval, Hossein; Kramer, Mario W.; Perner, Sven; Merseburger, Axel S.

    2017-01-01

    A range of new treatment options has recently become available for patients with advanced metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone is continued when performing chemotherapy or androgen deprivation with new second-generation therapeutic agents such as enzalutamide or abiraterone acetate. Despite the fact that free testosterone (FT) is the biologically active form, it is common practice that androgen suppression is monitored via total testosterone levels only. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of FT as a prognostic biomarker for cancer-specific survival (CSS) and its feasibility as an ADT monitoring biomarker in patients with mCRPC for the first time. The requirement for continued ADT in mCRPC patients is discussed within the basis of the current literature. A total of 34 patients with continuous measurements of FT levels and mCRPC status underwent therapy with docetaxel, abiraterone acetate, enzalutamide, cabozantinib, carboplatin or cabazitaxel. Data were obtained from the Departments of Urology and Urological Oncology, Hannover Medical School (Hannover, Germany) between March 2009 and April 2014. A cutoff point of 0.5 pg/ml was used to discriminate between patients according to FT levels. Statistical evaluation of CSS was performed by applying Kaplan Meier survival estimates, multivariate Cox regression analyses and log-rank tests. The median age of all 34 patients was 72 years (range, 51–86 years). The mean follow-up interval was 16.1 months (range, 0.7–55.6 months). Despite the fact that all patients were undergoing androgen deprivation, the mean serum FT levels for each patient varied; the mean FT concentration in the cohort was 0.328 pg/ml, ranging from 0.01–9.1 pg/ml. A notable difference with regard to CSS was observed for patients with regard to serum FT concentration; CSS was significantly longer for patients with a serum FT level below

  7. Urinary testosterone levels of wild male bonobos (Pan paniscus) in the Lomako Forest, Democratic Republic of Congo.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Andrew J; Hohmann, Gottfried

    2005-01-01

    We collected urine samples from seven male bonobos (Pan paniscus) in the Eyengo community, Lomako Forest, Democratic Republic of Congo, and assayed them for testosterone (T). T levels averaged 525 pmol/mg Cr in adult males, and 309 pmol/mg Cr in subadult males. We collected hormonal and behavioral data during a period of relative social instability following the recent arrival of two immigrant males. In concordance with predictions derived from the challenge hypothesis [Wingfield et al., American Naturalist 136:829-846, 1990], which relates T to levels of reproductive aggression, the alpha male had the highest circulating levels of T. When we removed the two recent immigrant males from the analysis, there was a significant positive correlation between T levels and dominance rank for the long-term resident males (n=5, P=0.001, r2=0.98). These are the first data on T levels in wild bonobos, and the results suggest that further study of the relationship between T levels and social context in this species could inform current models relating hormones and aggression in wild apes. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Effect of voluntary exercise on the expression of IGF-I and androgen receptor in three rat skeletal muscles and on serum IGF-I and testosterone levels.

    PubMed

    Matsakas, A; Nikolaidis, M G; Kokalas, N; Mougios, V; Diel, P

    2004-10-01

    The effects of anabolic agents and training on skeletal muscle are believed to be mediated by a variety of growth and transcription factors. Among these regulatory proteins, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and androgen receptor (AR) play a crucial role. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of wheel running on IGF-I and AR mRNA expression in three distinct rat skeletal muscles (i.e., gastrocnemius, vastus lateralis, and soleus), as well as on the serum levels of IGF-I and testosterone. Twenty male Wistar rats were housed in cages with free access to running wheels for 12 weeks, while nine rats served as controls. Analysis of the mRNA expression of IGF-I and AR using real time RT-PCR revealed no significant differences between the trained and untrained rats in any of the muscles studied. Enzyme immunoassay showed significantly lower serum levels of IGF-I and testosterone in the trained compared to the untrained animals. These results suggest that chronic exercise in wheels does not affect IGF-I and AR mRNA levels in rat skeletal muscle, while decreasing the circulating levels of two anabolic factors, i.e., IGF-I and testosterone. It is concluded that IGF-I, AR and testosterone seem to play a marginal role during the adaptation process of rat skeletal muscle to long-term wheel running.

  9. Effect of red maca (Lepidium meyenii) on prostate zinc levels in rats with testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, C; Leiva-Revilla, J; Rubio, J; Gasco, M; Gonzales, G F

    2012-05-01

    Lepidium meyenii (maca) is a plant that grows exclusively above 4000 m in the Peruvian central Andes. Red maca (RM) extract significantly reduced prostate size in rats with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) induced by testosterone enanthate (TE). Zinc is an important regulator of prostate function. This study aimed to determine the effect of RM on prostate zinc levels in rats with BPH induced by TE. Also, the study attempted to determine the best marker for the effect of RM on sex accessory glands. Rats treated with RM extract from day 1 to day 14 reversed the effect of TE administration on prostate weight and zinc levels. However, RM administered from day 7 to day 14 did not reduce the effect of TE on all studied variables. Finasteride (FN) reduced prostate, seminal vesicle and preputial gland weights in rats treated with TE. Although RM and FN reduced prostate zinc levels, the greatest effect was observed in TE-treated rats with RM from day 1 to day 14. In addition, prostate weight and zinc levels showed the higher diagnosis values than preputial and seminal vesicle weights. In conclusion, RM administered from day 1 to day 14 reduced prostate size and zinc levels in rats where prostatic hyperplasia was induced with TE. Also, this experimental model could be used as accurately assay to determine the effect of maca obtained under different conditions and/or the effect of different products based on maca.

  10. Testosterone replacement therapy and prostate health.

    PubMed

    Polackwich, A Scott; Ostrowski, Kevin A; Hedges, Jason C

    2012-12-01

    There is an emerging evolution in the understanding of the relationship between the prostate and testosterone. It has long been generally believed that with testosterone replacement therapy (TRT), increasing serum testosterone levels led to prostatic growth and worsening of voiding dysfunction and associated complications. A new theory, the Saturation Model of Testosterone and its effect on the Prostate has gained attention. This theory suggests that the prostate's response to increasing levels of serum testosterone reaches a limit beyond which there is minimal effect. This model predicts that testosterone replacement therapy occurs above this saturation point, and replacing testosterone to eugonadal levels should not worsen prostate related benign disease. We evaluated the recent published data, with an emphasis on clinical studies done within the last 3 years, for the effects of testosterone supplementation on benign prostatic disease.

  11. The effect of testosterone replacement therapy on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels in men being treated for hypogonadism: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kang, De-Ying; Li, Hong-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone replacement therapy is used for the treatment of age-related male hypogonadism, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a primary screening tool for prostate cancer. The systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to determine the effect of testosterone replacement therapy on PSA levels.Medline, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and Google Scholar databases were searched until February 28, 2014, and inclusion criteria were as follows: randomized controlled trial; intervention group received testosterone/androgen replacement therapy; control group did not receive treatment; and no history of prostate cancer. The primary outcome was change of PSA level between before and after treatment. Secondary outcomes were elevated PSA level after treatment, and the number of patients who developed prostate cancer.After initially identifying 511 articles, 15 studies with a total of 739 patients that received testosterone replacement and 385 controls were included. The duration of treatment ranged from 3 to 12 months. Patients treated with testosterone tended to have higher PSA levels, and thus a greater change than those that received control treatments (difference in means of PSA levels = 0.154, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.069 to 0.238, P < 0.001). The difference in means of PSA levels were significant higher for patients that received testosterone intramuscularly (IM) than controls (difference in means of PSA levels = 0.271, 95% CI 0.117-0.425, P = 0.001). Elevated PSA levels after treatment were similar between patients that received treatment and controls (odds ratio [OR] = 1.02, 95% CI 0.48-2.20, P = 0.953). Only 3 studies provided data with respect to the development of prostate cancer, and rates were similar between those that received treatment and controls.Testosterone replacement therapy does not increase PSA levels in men being treated for hypogonadism, except when it is given IM and even the increase with IM administration is minimal.

  12. Differences in testosterone, androstenone, and skatole levels in plasma and fat between pubertal purebred Duroc and Landrace boars in response to human chorionic gonadotrophin stimulation.

    PubMed

    Oskam, I C; Lervik, S; Tajet, H; Dahl, E; Ropstad, E; Andresen, Ø

    2010-10-01

    The concentrations of the boar taint compounds androstenone and skatole in plasma and fat, together with those of testosterone in plasma, were investigated in pubertal purebred Duroc and Landrace boars following stimulation with human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG). Higher initial levels of androstenone and testosterone were found in Duroc than Landrace boars. Duroc boars, which were approximately ten days older than the Landrace boars, also showed a more advanced stage of spermatogenesis than Landrace boars. While Landrace boars had the highest skatole levels. Following stimulation with hCG the relative increases in testosterone, androstenone, and skatole concentrations were highest in Landrace boars. The level of androstenone in fat three days after hCG stimulation exceeded 1 microg/g fat in all stimulated boars. The decreases in plasma levels of androstenone and testosterone on Days 2 and 3 after hCG stimulation were more pronounced in Landrace than Duroc boars. However, unlike the plasma androstenone and testosterone levels, the plasma concentrations of skatole did not decrease on Days 2 and 3 following stimulation, but remained elevated on Day 3. These results indicate that the lower levels of testicular steroids in Landrace boars compared with Duroc boars was not due to a lower production capacity, but more likely to a faster disappearance of steroids in Landrace boars. In the present study, age, live weight, and testicular development did not significantly contribute to the variation in fat androstenone. The present data and previous reports on candidate genes related to androstenone biosynthesis and metabolism suggests that future selection against factors associated with boar taint remains a possible solution for the problem of boar taint in the swine industry.

  13. Fetal Testosterone, Socio-Emotional Engagement and Language Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrant, Brad M.; Mattes, Eugen; Keelan, Jeff A.; Hickey, Martha; Whitehouse, Andrew J. O.

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the relations among fetal testosterone, child socio-emotional engagement and language development in a sample of 467 children (235 boys) from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study. Bioavailable testosterone concentration measured in umbilical cord blood taken at birth was found to be significantly…

  14. Fetal Testosterone, Socio-Emotional Engagement and Language Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrant, Brad M.; Mattes, Eugen; Keelan, Jeff A.; Hickey, Martha; Whitehouse, Andrew J. O.

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the relations among fetal testosterone, child socio-emotional engagement and language development in a sample of 467 children (235 boys) from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study. Bioavailable testosterone concentration measured in umbilical cord blood taken at birth was found to be significantly…

  15. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) assay for simultaneous measurement of salivary testosterone and cortisol in healthy men for utilization in the diagnosis of late-onset hypogonadism in males.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Futoshi; Koh, Eitetsu; Yamamoto, Kenrou; Sugimoto, Kazuhiro; Sin, Ho-Su; Maeda, Yuji; Honma, Seijiro; Namiki, Mikio

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that late-onset hypogonadism in males can cause a variety of symptoms, and the differential diagnosis is relatively difficult, including psychological disorders, stress, and mood disturbances. The level of serum cortisol can be measured to reflect a patient's level of stress. Salivary hormones facilitate the evaluation of physiological hormonal actions based on free hormone assay. For the simultaneous measurement of testosterone and cortisol levels in saliva, we validate a sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) assay. Concerning accuracy and precision, the lower limit of quantification of salivary testosterone and cortisol were established as 5 and 10 pg/mL, respectively. Testosterone and cortisol in saliva is stable for 2 days, 14 days, and 28 days at room temperature, refrigeration and frozen, respectively. Freezing and thawing for 3 cycles and stimulation of salivation with gum chewing do not alter the measured values of testosterone and cortisol. Total, bioavailable, and free serum testosterone showed slight diurnal changes, but total and bioavailable serum cortisol showed marked diurnal changes. Salivary testosterone levels negatively correlate with age, regardless of the time of saliva collection (r=0.64, p<0.05). However, there is no relationship between salivary cortisol and age (r=0033, p>0.05). LC-MS/MS allows rapid, simultaneous, sensitive, and accurate quantification of testosterone and cortisol in saliva for the diagnosis late-onset hypogonadism or other hormone related disease.

  16. Vocal and territorial behavior in the Smith frog (Hypsiboas faber): relationships with plasma levels of corticosterone and testosterone.

    PubMed

    de Assis, Vania Regina; Navas, Carlos Arturo; Mendonça, Mary T; Gomes, Fernando Ribeiro

    2012-11-01

    The possible trade-off between the roles of glucocorticoids as facilitators of energy substrate mobilization and neural inhibitors of sexual behavior during breeding season is under debate. We studied the relationship between calling and territorial behavior with plasma levels of corticosterone (CORT) and plasma levels of testosterone (T) across the breeding season of Hypsiboas faber, a large and territorial Neotropical treefrog. We investigated these relationships through focal observations of males calling naturally, followed by blood sampling for hormonal radioimmunoassay. We additionally used an experimental approach, which consisted of broadcasting recorded advertisement calls for 10 min to simulate an invasion in the territory of the focal subjects, followed by behavioral observation and blood sampling for hormonal radioimmunoassay. Results showed a pattern of co-variation between CORT and T across the breeding season. Furthermore, individual variation in CORT and T was related to different aspects of behavior: individuals with higher CORT showed higher calling rates, and individuals with higher steroid levels, mainly T, showed higher responsivity to social stimulation by other males in the chorus. Experimental simulation of territorial intrusion by using playback of advertisement calls of this species did not elicit consistent changes in agonistic behavior and CORT, but decreased T in focal males. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Does hierarchy stability influence testosterone and cortisol levels of bearded capuchin monkeys (Sapajus libidinosus) adult males? A comparison between two wild groups.

    PubMed

    Mendonça-Furtado, Olívia; Edaes, Mariana; Palme, Rupert; Rodrigues, Agatha; Siqueira, José; Izar, Patrícia

    2014-11-01

    Testosterone and cortisol are hormones expected to play a major role in competitive behaviours (i.e. aggression), and are related to rank and hierarchical stability. Through a non-invasive technique, we analyzed faecal testosterone (FTM(1)) and cortisol (FCM(2)) metabolites of dominant and subordinate males from two wild groups of bearded capuchin monkeys. One group had a stable dominance hierarchy while the other had an unstable hierarchy, with a marked conflict period related to a male take-over. In the unstable hierarchy group (1) the dominant male had higher FTM peaks than subordinates, and (2) basal FTM levels were higher than in the stable group. These findings are in accordance with the Challenge Hypothesis and rank-based predictions, and confirm that in Sapajus libidinosus hierarchy stability, social status, aggression rates and testosterone are closely related. Dominants of both groups had higher basal and peak FCM levels, suggesting that in S. libidinosus the dominant male has a higher allostatic load than subordinates, related to his role in protection against predators, intragroup appeasement, and control of food sources. Finally, we suggest that males of S. libidinosus are resistant to testosterone suppression by cortisol, because in the unstable group in spite of an increase in FCM there was also an increase in FTM during the conflict period. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neotropical Behaviour. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Six weeks of conditioning exercise increases total, but not free testosterone in lifelong sedentary aging men.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Lawrence D; Sculthorpe, Nicholas; Herbert, Peter; Baker, Julien S; Spagna, Roberto; Grace, Fergal M

    2015-01-01

    Advancing age is associated with a gradual decline in circulating androgens, and the putative role of exercise training on systemic androgens remains to be adequately defined. The present investigation examined the impact of 6 weeks of supervised exercise training on resting levels of systemic hormones in a cohort of lifelong sedentary men [SED (n = 28), 62.5 ± 5.3 years], compared with a positive control group of age-matched lifelong exercisers [LE (n = 20), 60.4 ± 4.7 years, >30 years training history]. Blood hormones were sampled pre- and post-intervention from an antecubital forearm vein and analysed using electrochemiluminescent immunoassay. Cardiorespiratory fitness ([Formula: see text]) was determined via indirect calorimetry during an incremental cycle test to volitional exhaustion. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed a lack of significant change in any parameter amongst LE, whilst SED experienced a significant exercise-induced improvement in cardiorespiratory fitness and total testosterone (all p < 0.05). Concurrent increases in sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG; p < 0.05) resulted in a lack of change to either bioavailable or calculated free testosterone (p > 0.05) amongst SED. Although resting levels of systemic total testosterone increased in response to 6 weeks of exercise training, increases in SHBG negated any potential relationship between calculated-free or bioavailable testosterone. These findings indicate that increases in bioavailable testosterone fraction are not required for cardiorespiratory fitness improvements in aging men.

  19. Blockage of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors decreases testosterone levels and enhances postnatal neuronal apoptosis in the preoptic area of male rats.

    PubMed

    Hsu, C; Hsieh, Y L; Yang, R C; Hsu, H K

    2000-05-01

    Sexual dimorphism has been found in the preoptic area of the hypothalamus (POA), a major site of glutamate actions via N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. The sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area (SDN-POA) of male rats exhibits about seven-fold greater nuclear volume than that of females. A naturally occurring neonatal neuronal apoptosis, that can be prevented by testosterone, may contribute to this sexual difference in SDN-POA nuclear volume. Since activation of NMDA receptors in the POA induces GnRH secretion, it may be involved in both elevation of serum testosterone and prevention of neuronal death in the SDN-POA. In the present study, protein expression of NMDA receptors in the POA of male and female fetuses was quantified on the day preceding the fetal testosterone peak (embryonic day 16; ED 16). Rats were then distributed in four groups: (1) untreated males, (2) untreated females, (3) males pretreated with MK-801 (a noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist), and (4) females pretreated with MK-801. Serum levels of testosterone were estimated on the afternoon of ED 18. Expression of Bcl-2 and Bax, as well as neuronal apoptosis in SDN-POA, were observed on postnatal day 8. The results showed that (1) expression of NMDA receptors in the POA of male fetuses was higher than that of females on ED 16; (2) levels of testosterone were lower in MK-801 pretreated male fetuses than in intact males on ED 18; (3) expression of Bcl-2 in the POA of MK-801 pretreated male rats was significantly less than that of control males; (4) the apoptotic incidence in the SDN-POA of MK-801 pretreated male rats was significantly greater than in control males, while there was no significant difference in apoptotic incidence in the SDN-POA between MK-801 pretreated and intact females. These results suggest that the NMDA receptor is highly expressed in prenatal male fetuses, and that it might play an important role in the elevation of testosterone levels. Moreover, activation

  20. Testosterone and Men's Marriages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Alan; Dabbs, James M., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Among 4,462 former servicemen surveyed, testosterone levels were positively related to not marrying and marital instability, and negatively related to every aspect of marital quality examined. Findings are analyzed in relation to three sociological theories of marital success based on socioeconomic status (educational attainment, income, and…

  1. Testosterone and Men's Marriages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Alan; Dabbs, James M., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Among 4,462 former servicemen surveyed, testosterone levels were positively related to not marrying and marital instability, and negatively related to every aspect of marital quality examined. Findings are analyzed in relation to three sociological theories of marital success based on socioeconomic status (educational attainment, income, and…

  2. Nandrolone decanoate interferes with testosterone biosynthesis altering blood-testis barrier components.

    PubMed

    Barone, Rosario; Pitruzzella, Alessandro; Marino Gammazza, Antonella; Rappa, Francesca; Salerno, Monica; Barone, Fulvio; Sangiorgi, Claudia; D'Amico, Daniela; Locorotondo, Nicola; Di Gaudio, Francesca; Cipolloni, Luigi; Di Felice, Valentina; Schiavone, Stefania; Rapisarda, Venerando; Sani, Gabriele; Tambo, Amos; Cappello, Francesco; Turillazzi, Emanuela; Pomara, Cristoforo

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether nandrolone decanoate (ND) use affects testosterone production and testicular morphology in a model of trained and sedentary mice. A group of mice underwent endurance training while another set led a sedentary lifestyle and were freely mobile within cages. All experimental groups were treated with either ND or peanut oil at different doses for 6 weeks. Testosterone serum levels were measured via liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Western blot analysis and quantitative real-time PCR were utilized to determine gene and protein expression levels of the primary enzymes implicated in testosterone biosynthesis and gene expression levels of the blood-testis barrier (BTB) components. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence were conducted for testicular morphological evaluation. The study demonstrated that moderate to high doses of ND induced a diminished serum testosterone level and altered the expression level of the key steroidogenic enzymes involved in testosterone biosynthesis. At the morphological level, ND induced degradation of the BTB by targeting the tight junction protein-1 (TJP1). ND stimulation deregulated metalloproteinase-9, metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and the tissue inhibitor of MMP-2. Moreover, ND administration resulted in a mislocalization of mucin-1. In conclusion, ND abuse induces a decline in testosterone production that is unable to regulate the internalization and redistribution of TJP1 and may induce the deregulation of other BTB constituents via the inhibition of MMP-2. ND may well be considered as both a potential inducer of male infertility and a potential risk factor to a low endogenous bioavailable testosterone. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  3. Polymorphism in the Alternative Donor Site of the Cryptic Exon of LHCGR: Functional Consequences and Associations with Testosterone Level

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Han, Bing; Zhu, Wenjiao; Cheng, Tong; Fan, Mengxia; Wu, Jiajun; Yang, Ying; Zhu, Hui; Si, Jiqiang; Lyu, Qifeng; Chai, Weiran; Zhao, Shuangxia; Song, Huaidong; Kuang, Yanping; Qiao, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Selective splicing is a feature of luteinizing hormone receptor (LHCGR). A cryptic exon (LHCGR-exon 6A) was found to be derived from alternative splicing in intron 6 of the LHCGR gene, which including two transcripts LHCGR-exon 6A-long and LHCGR-exon 6A-short. We addressed the functional consequences of SNP rs68073206, located at the +5 position of an alternative 5′ splice donor site, and observed its association with male infertility in the subjects with azoospermia, oligoasthenozoospermia and normozoospermia. The translation product of splicing variant LHCGR-exon 6A was expressed in the cytoplasm and exhibited no affinity with [125I]-hCG. No dominant negative effect was observed in cells co-expressed with LHCGR-exon 6A and wild-type LHCGR. The long transcript (LHCGR-exon 6A-long) was significantly elevated in the granulosa cells with G/G genotypes, which could be reproduced in vitro by mini-gene construct transfection. Genotyping analysis showed no association between rs68073206 and male infertility. However, this polymorphism was significantly associated with testosterone levels in normozoospermic subjects (n = 210). In conclusion, SNP rs68073206 in the splicing site of the cryptic exon 6A of the LHCGR gene affect the splicing pattern in the gene, which may play a role in the modulation of the LHCGR sensitivity in the gonads. PMID:28367994

  4. Sex Differences in the Association between Serum Levels of Testosterone and Frailty in an Elderly Population: The Toledo Study for Healthy Aging

    PubMed Central

    Carcaillon, Laure; Blanco, Carmen; Alonso-Bouzón, Cristina; Alfaro-Acha, Ana; Garcia-García, Francisco-José; Rodriguez-Mañas, Leocadio

    2012-01-01

    Background Age-associated decline in testosterone levels represent one of the potential mechanisms involved in the development of frailty. Although this association has been widely reported in older men, very few data are available in women. We studied the association between testosterone and frailty in women and assessed sex differences in this relationship. Methods We used cross-sectional data from the Toledo Study for Healthy Aging, a population-based cohort study of Spanish elderly. Frailty was defined according to Fried's approach. Multivariate odds-ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) associated with total (TT) and free testosterone (FT) levels were estimated using polytomous logistic regression. Results In women, there was a U-shaped relationship between FT levels and frailty (p for FT2 = 0.03). In addition, very low levels of FT were observed in women with ≥4 frailty criteria (age-adjusted geometric means = 0.13 versus 0.37 in subjects with <4 components, p = 0.010). The association of FT with frailty appeared confined to obese women (p-value for interaction = 0.05).In men, the risk of frailty levels linearly decreased with testosterone (adjusted OR for frailty = 2.9 (95%CI, 1.6–5.1) and 1.6 (95%CI, 1.0–2.5), for 1 SD decrease in TT and FT, respectively). TT and FT showed association with most of frailty criteria. No interaction was found with BMI. Conclusion There is a relationship between circulating levels of FT and frailty in older women. This relation seems to be modulated by BMI. The relevance and the nature of the association of FT levels and frailty are sex-specific, suggesting that different biological mechanisms may be involved. PMID:22403651

  5. Potential role of pre- and postnatal testosterone levels in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: is there a sex difference?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liang-Jen; Chou, Miao-Chun; Chou, Wen-Jiun; Lee, Min-Jing; Lee, Sheng-Yu; Lin, Pao-Yen; Lee, Yi-Hsuan; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Yen, Cheng-Fang

    2017-01-01

    Objective Both prenatal testosterone (T) exposure and postnatal T levels have been associated with developing neural circuitry and behavioral systems. This study examined the potential correlation between pre- and postnatal T levels and behavioral and neurocognitive profiles of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Methods Two hundred ADHD patients with a mean age of 8.7±2.0 years (158 boys and 42 girls) were recruited. The ratio of the length of the right index finger (2D) to that of the right ring finger (4D) (2D/4D ratio) served as a surrogate of prenatal T exposure, and postnatal T was determined using salivary T concentration. Behavioral symptoms were evaluated using the Swanson, Nolan, and Pelham – Version IV Scale for ADHD (SNAP-IV). Neurocognitive function was assessed using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children – Fourth Edition (WISC-IV) and Conners’ Continuous Performance Test (CPT). Results Lower 2D/4D ratios were associated with comorbid disruptive behavior disorders (t=2.15, P=0.033) in all participants. Among the boys with ADHD, neither 2D/4D ratios nor salivary T levels were associated with behavioral symptoms or neurocognitive function. Among the girls with ADHD, the salivary T level was positively correlated with the Perceptual Reasoning Index of the WISC-IV (r=0.48, P=0.001) and the Confidence Index (r=0.37, P=0.017) and Omission Errors of the CPT (r=0.62, P<0.001). Conclusion Findings suggest that a higher prenatal T exposure is associated with a greater risk of developing disruptive behavior disorders, and T may exert differential neurocognitive effects between boys and girls with ADHD. However, the neurobiological mechanisms of T involved in the pathogenesis of ADHD warrant further investigation. PMID:28553119

  6. Potential role of pre- and postnatal testosterone levels in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: is there a sex difference?

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang-Jen; Chou, Miao-Chun; Chou, Wen-Jiun; Lee, Min-Jing; Lee, Sheng-Yu; Lin, Pao-Yen; Lee, Yi-Hsuan; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Yen, Cheng-Fang

    2017-01-01

    Both prenatal testosterone (T) exposure and postnatal T levels have been associated with developing neural circuitry and behavioral systems. This study examined the potential correlation between pre- and postnatal T levels and behavioral and neurocognitive profiles of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Two hundred ADHD patients with a mean age of 8.7±2.0 years (158 boys and 42 girls) were recruited. The ratio of the length of the right index finger (2D) to that of the right ring finger (4D) (2D/4D ratio) served as a surrogate of prenatal T exposure, and postnatal T was determined using salivary T concentration. Behavioral symptoms were evaluated using the Swanson, Nolan, and Pelham - Version IV Scale for ADHD (SNAP-IV). Neurocognitive function was assessed using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children - Fourth Edition (WISC-IV) and Conners' Continuous Performance Test (CPT). Lower 2D/4D ratios were associated with comorbid disruptive behavior disorders (t=2.15, P=0.033) in all participants. Among the boys with ADHD, neither 2D/4D ratios nor salivary T levels were associated with behavioral symptoms or neurocognitive function. Among the girls with ADHD, the salivary T level was positively correlated with the Perceptual Reasoning Index of the WISC-IV (r=0.48, P=0.001) and the Confidence Index (r=0.37, P=0.017) and Omission Errors of the CPT (r=0.62, P<0.001). Findings suggest that a higher prenatal T exposure is associated with a greater risk of developing disruptive behavior disorders, and T may exert differential neurocognitive effects between boys and girls with ADHD. However, the neurobiological mechanisms of T involved in the pathogenesis of ADHD warrant further investigation.

  7. Immunoreactive luteinizing hormone, estradiol, progesterone, testosterone, and androstenedione levels during the breeding season and anestrus in Siberian tigers.

    PubMed

    Seal, U S; Plotka, E D; Smith, J D; Wright, F H; Reindl, N J; Taylor, R S; Seal, M F

    1985-03-01

    Seasonal analysis of 1239 captive births of Siberian tigers (Panthera tigris altaica) indicated a peak in April to June (P less than 0.001). Studies on seven animals in Minnesota indicated that behavioral heat cycles and ovarian follicular phase cycles began in late January and ceased in early June. Behavioral observation of 12 heat cycles in four tigers yielded an estrous length of 5.3 +/- 0.2 days and an interestrous interval of 25.0 +/- 1.3 days. Hormone assays on weekly blood samples (N = 180) from three female tigers indicated 16 cycles in two breeding seasons. Peak estradiol-17 beta levels were 46.7 +/- 6.0 pg/ml (N = 17) and interestrous concentrations were 8.7 +/- 0.66 pg/ml (N = 28) during the breeding season. Anestrous estradiol levels were 4.2 +/- 0.5 pg/ml (N = 70). The interestrous interval between estradiol peaks was 24.9 +/- 1.3 days (N = 9) with two outliers of 42 days. Serum progesterone concentrations from February to June were 1.2 +/- 0.15 ng/ml (N = 32), providing no evidence for ovulation or corpus luteum formation. Luteinizing hormone (LH) levels were 0.56 +/- 0.04 ng/ml (N = 180). Serum testosterone (r=0.71, P less than 0.001) and androstenedione levels (r=0.75, P less than 0.001) were correlated with estradiol during the breeding season. The duration of anestrus was 8 mo in two of these tigers. The interval was shortened in one tiger by exposure to a 16L:8D photoperiod. The Siberian tiger appears to be a polyestrous seasonal breeder and an induced ovulator whose breeding season may be synchronized by photoperiod.

  8. Antimüllerian hormone levels decrease in female-to-male transsexuals using testosterone as cross-sex therapy.

    PubMed

    Caanen, Mirte R; Soleman, Remi S; Kuijper, Esther A M; Kreukels, Baudewijntje P C; De Roo, Chloë; Tilleman, Kelly; De Sutter, Petra; van Trotsenburg, Mick A A; Broekmans, Frank J; Lambalk, Cornelis B

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the effect of hormonal androgenic treatment on antimüllerian hormone (AMH) serum levels in female-to-male (FtM) transsexuals. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with elevated AMH levels. Some hypothesize that the high AMH level is a consequence of androgen-induced excessive development of small antral follicles. However, this role of androgens is not yet clear. Observational, prospective, cohort study. Tertiary academic medical center. Twenty-two FtM transsexuals, healthy native females receiving cross-sex hormone therapy/androgenic treatment. Androgenic treatment with testosterone (T) and an aromatase inhibitor while endogenous hormone secretion was suppressed with the use of a GnRH agonist. Hormone concentrations were measured before and after androgenic treatment (administration of T and aromatase inhibitor). Measured hormones: AMH, inhibin B, T, androstenedione, DHEAS, E2, SHBG, LH, and FSH. AMH concentrations were significantly lower after androgenic treatment (4.4 ± 4.4 μg/L vs. 1.4 ± 2.1 μg/L). Androgenic treatment resulted in a strong suppression of AMH secretion over a relative short period of 16 weeks. Our data underscore the likely important role of androgens in the dynamics of folliculogenesis. It challenges the idea that androgens induce high AMH levels, which is gaining more interest nowadays as an important particular PCOS feature. This strong decline furthermore indicates that AMH must be interpreted in the context of other reproductive endocrine conditions. NTR2493. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The Level of Testosterone, Vitamin D, and Irregular Menstruation More Important than Omega-3 in Non-Symptomatic Women Will Define the Fate of Multiple Scleroses in Future.

    PubMed

    Tavakol, Shima; Shakibapour, Sahar; Bidgoli, Sepideh Arbabi

    2016-12-13

    Multiple sclerosis is one of the most salient degenerative disorders of CNS with dysregulated immune process that resulted in axonal damage and demyelination. In the present investigation, the serum level of testosterone was assessed in women who were struggling with multiple sclerosis (MS). Also, the level of omega-3, vitamin D, and the irregular menstruation in women 5 years before the onset MS symptoms were surveyed. Although the levels of omega-3 and vitamin D in women MS patients were non-significant and significantly less than the healthy ones, they were significantly less in the whole population of MS patients. However, the MS patients more experienced more irregular menstruation some years before the onset of MS with the low level of testosterone. Based on the presented findings, it might be said that the vitamin D intake has significant protective role in women and men MS patients unlike the omega-3 that had significant protective role just in men. However, vitamin D metabolism encoding genes of CYP27B1 and CYP24A1 and predicting MS risk gene of HLA-DRB1*15:01 define its fate as well. Besides, vitamin D intake, through the proliferation decrement of pro-inflammatory cells, decreases of pro-inflammatory markers (IL-6, TNF-α, INF-γ) and auto-immune pathways have potential role in recovery of irregular menstruation in women with the low level of testosterone as a red warning factor of MS development. The low level of testosterone and vitamin D consumption increase the neural damage and pro-inflammatory pathways in MS patients, and the difference among the investigations is related to the long-standing history of MS that influences severity of damage to the neural cells and biomolecules and complicate its recovery.

  10. Testosterone therapy in erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Shabsigh, R

    2004-12-01

    Studies in animals have indicated that the nitric oxide erectile pathway is testosterone-dependent. Castration induces erectile dysfunction and a reduction in nitric oxide synthase-stained nerves in erectile tissue. Furthermore, castration adversely affects penile hemodynamics and smooth muscle content, leading to veno-occlusive dysfunction. Testosterone replenishment reverses these physiological, biochemical and structural changes. Several clinical studies have demonstrated the benefits of a combination of testosterone and sildenafil. A recently published, multicenter study evaluated the safety and efficacy of testosterone gel 1% (Testogel; Schering AG, Germany/AndroGel; Solvay Pharmaceuticals) vs. placebo gel in conjunction with sildenafil, in producing an erectile response in hypogonadal men who did not respond to treatment with sildenafil alone for erectile dysfunction. The selection criteria required subjects to have had erectile dysfunction for at least 3 months, to be non-responsive to 100 mg sildenafil and to have low testosterone levels (< 400 ng/dl). The primary efficacy measurement was the mean change from baseline in the Erectile Function domain of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF). Secondary outcome measures included the mean change from baseline in the other domains and the total sum of the IIEF. Subjects were randomized to receive either testosterone gel + sildenafil, or placebo gel + sildenafil for 12 weeks. Testosterone therapy with testosterone gel improved the erectile response to sildenafil. Therefore, testosterone therapy may be considered for the treatment of erectile dysfunction in men with low to low-normal testosterone levels, who have failed prior treatment with sildenafil alone. Consequently, it is important to screen for hypogonadism in men who fail PDE5 inhibitors.

  11. Former Abusers of Anabolic Androgenic Steroids Exhibit Decreased Testosterone Levels and Hypogonadal Symptoms Years after Cessation: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Selmer, Christian; Østergren, Peter Busch; Pedersen, Karen Boje; Schou, Morten; Gustafsson, Finn; Faber, Jens; Juul, Anders; Kistorp, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Aims Abuse of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) is highly prevalent among male recreational athletes. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of AAS abuse on reproductive hormone levels and symptoms suggestive of hypogonadism in current and former AAS abusers. Methods This study had a cross-sectional case-control design and involved 37 current AAS abusers, 33 former AAS abusers (mean (95%CI) elapsed duration since AAS cessation: 2.5 (1.7; 3.7) years) and 30 healthy control participants. All participants were aged 18–50 years and were involved in recreational strength training. Reproductive hormones (FSH, LH, testosterone, inhibin B and anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH)) were measured using morning blood samples. Symptoms of hypogonadism (depressive symptoms, fatigue, decreased libido and erectile dysfunction) were recorded systematically. Results Former AAS abusers exhibited significantly lower median (25th –75th percentiles) total and free testosterone levels than control participants (total testosterone: 14.4 (11.9–17.7) nmol/l vs. 18.8 (16.6–22.0) nmol/l) (P < 0.01). Overall, 27.2% (13.3; 45.5) of former AAS abusers exhibited plasma total testosterone levels below the lower reference limit (12.1 nmol/l) whereas no control participants exhibited testosterone below this limit (P < 0.01). Gonadotropins were significantly suppressed, and inhibin B and AMH were significantly decreased in current AAS abusers compared with former AAS abusers and control participants (P < 0.01). The group of former AAS abusers had higher proportions of participants with depressive symptoms ((24.2%) (11.1; 42.2)), erectile dysfunction ((27.3%) (13.3; 45.6)) and decreased libido ((40.1%) (23.2; 57.0)) than the other two groups (trend analyses: P < 0.05). Conclusions Former AAS abusers exhibited significantly lower plasma testosterone levels and higher frequencies of symptoms suggestive of hypogonadism than healthy control participants years after AAS cessation

  12. Finasteride, not tamsulosin, increases severity of erectile dysfunction and decreases testosterone levels in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Traish, Abdulmaged M; Haider, Karim Sultan; Doros, Gheorghe; Haider, Ahmad

    2015-09-01

    5α-reductase inhibitors (5α-RIs) (finasteride and dutasteride) have been proven useful in treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) related to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). However, these inhibitors exert undesirable sexual side effects and, in some cases, these effects are persistent. There is considerable disagreement with regard to whether the adverse side effects resolve with continuous treatment. To investigate the long-term adverse effects of finasteride treatment in men with BPH on erectile function and to compare these adverse effects in men treated with the α1-adrenergic receptor blocker, tamsolusin. In this retrospective registry study, a cohort of 470 men aged between 47 and 68 years (mean 57.78±4.81) were treated with finasteride (5 mg/day). A second cohort of 230 men aged between 52 and 72 years (mean 62.62±4.65) were treated with tamsulosin (0.4 mg). All men were followed up for 45 months. At intervals of 3 months and at each visit, plasma testosterone (T) levels and the international index of erectile function (IIEF-EF) questionnaire scores were determined. Long-term treatment with finasteride therapy is associated with worsening of erectile dysfunction (ED) as shown by the significant decrease in the IIEF-EF scores in men treated with finasteride. No worsening of ED was observed in men treated with tamsulosin. The increase in ED due to finasteride did not resolve with continued treatment with finasteride. Most importantly, long-term finasteride therapy resulted in reduction in total T levels, contributing to a state of hypogonadism. On the contrary, no changes in T levels were noted in men treated with tamsolusin. Our findings suggest that in men with BPH, long-term finasteride therapy but not tamsulosin results in worsening of ED and reduces total T concentrations. Clinicians are urged to discuss the impact of 5α-RIs therapy on sexual function with their patients before commencing this therapy.

  13. Efficacy of Furosap(TM), a novel Trigonella foenum-graecum seed extract, in Enhancing Testosterone Level and Improving Sperm Profile in Male Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Anuj; Verma, Narsingh; Swaroop, Anand; Bagchi, Manashi; Preuss, Harry G; Tiwari, Kiran; Bagchi, Debasis

    2017-01-01

    Background: Dietary fiber rich fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) seeds have exhibited cardioprotective, hypolipidemic and other health benefits. Furosap (FS), an innovative, patented, 20% protodioscin-enriched extract was developed in our laboratory from fenugreek seeds. This study examined the free and total testosterone levels, sperm profile and morphology, sexual health, mood and mental alertness, and broad spectrum safety parameters of FS in 50 male volunteers following supplementation over a period of 12 weeks. Methods: Institutional Review Board (IRB) and other regulatory approvals were obtained for our study. This one-arm, open-labelled, multi-center study was conducted in 50 male volunteers (age: 35 to 65 years) over a period of 12 weeks to determine the efficacy of FS (500 mg/day/subject) on free and total testosterone levels, sperm profile, sperm morphology, libido and sexual health, mood and mental alertness, and broad spectrum safety parameters. Results: Free testosterone levels were improved up to 46% in 90% of the study population. 85.4% of the study population showed improvements in sperm counts. Sperm morphology improved in 14.6% of volunteers. Majority of the subjects enrolled in the study demonstrated improvements in mental alertness and mood. Furthermore, cardiovascular health and libido were significantly improved. Extensive safety parameters were evaluated which included blood chemistry data. No significant changes were observed in serum lipid function, cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL and LDL levels, hemogram (CBC), hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity. Conclusion: Overall, the results demonstrate that FS, enriched in 20% protodioscin, is safe and effective in attenuating testosterone levels, healthy sperm profile, mental alertness, cardiovascular health and overall performance in human subjects.

  14. Efficacy of FurosapTM, a novel Trigonella foenum-graecum seed extract, in Enhancing Testosterone Level and Improving Sperm Profile in Male Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, Anuj; Verma, Narsingh; Swaroop, Anand; Bagchi, Manashi; Preuss, Harry G.; Tiwari, Kiran; Bagchi, Debasis

    2017-01-01

    Background: Dietary fiber rich fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) seeds have exhibited cardioprotective, hypolipidemic and other health benefits. Furosap (FS), an innovative, patented, 20% protodioscin-enriched extract was developed in our laboratory from fenugreek seeds. This study examined the free and total testosterone levels, sperm profile and morphology, sexual health, mood and mental alertness, and broad spectrum safety parameters of FS in 50 male volunteers following supplementation over a period of 12 weeks. Methods: Institutional Review Board (IRB) and other regulatory approvals were obtained for our study. This one-arm, open-labelled, multi-center study was conducted in 50 male volunteers (age: 35 to 65 years) over a period of 12 weeks to determine the efficacy of FS (500 mg/day/subject) on free and total testosterone levels, sperm profile, sperm morphology, libido and sexual health, mood and mental alertness, and broad spectrum safety parameters. Results: Free testosterone levels were improved up to 46% in 90% of the study population. 85.4% of the study population showed improvements in sperm counts. Sperm morphology improved in 14.6% of volunteers. Majority of the subjects enrolled in the study demonstrated improvements in mental alertness and mood. Furthermore, cardiovascular health and libido were significantly improved. Extensive safety parameters were evaluated which included blood chemistry data. No significant changes were observed in serum lipid function, cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL and LDL levels, hemogram (CBC), hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity. Conclusion: Overall, the results demonstrate that FS, enriched in 20% protodioscin, is safe and effective in attenuating testosterone levels, healthy sperm profile, mental alertness, cardiovascular health and overall performance in human subjects. PMID:28138310

  15. Ascorbic acid treatment elevates follicle stimulating hormone and testosterone plasma levels and enhances sperm quality in albino Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Okon, Uduak Akpan; Utuk, Ikponoabasi Ibanga

    2016-01-01

    Background: Infertility issues have been linked to the effect of oxidative reaction in the reproductive system. This study evaluated the effect of ascorbic acid, on fertility parameters of male albino Wistar rats was studied. Materials and Methods: Eighteen albino Wistar rats weighed between 178 g and 241 g were used, randomly assigned into three groups. Group 1 was the control group; oral gavaged 5 ml of distilled water; Groups 2 and 3 were administered medium dose (250 mg/kg) and high dose of ascorbic acid (400 mg/kg), respectively; twice daily for 21 days. Blood samples were obtained by cardiac puncture, and blood serum was obtained for hormonal assay, and the testes were harvested for sperm analysis. Results: Follicle stimulating hormone levels significantly increased in the high-dose group as compared to both the control and medium dose groups. Luteinizing hormone levels in the medium dose group decreased significantly as compared to the control group. Testosterone significantly increased in both the medium- and high-dose groups as compared to the control group. Sperm motility increased significantly in the high-dose group as compared to both control and medium-dose groups. Percentage sperm concentration decreased significantly in the medium-dose group when compared to the control and increased significantly in the high-dose group as compared to the medium-dose group. For percentage normal morphology, there was a dose-dependent increase in the test groups when compared to control group. Conclusion: These results are indicative of a positive influence of ascorbic acid on male fertility modulators and may therefore, serve as a potential adjuvant treatment for male infertility cases. PMID:27185976

  16. Factors affecting the bioavailability of soy isoflavones in humans after ingestion of physiologically relevant levels from different soy foods.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, Aedin; Brown, Jonathan E; Hawdon, Anne; Faughnan, Marian S; King, Laurence J; Millward, Joe; Zimmer-Nechemias, Linda; Wolfe, Brian; Setchell, Kenneth D R

    2006-01-01

    The precise role that isoflavones play in the health-related effects of soy foods, and their potential for adverse effects are controversial. This may be due in part to a lack of basic knowledge regarding their bioavailability and metabolism, particularly as it relates to the soy source. To date, there is little information concerning possible differences in the bioavailability of isoflavones derived from natural soy foods consumed at physiologically relevant intakes and whether age- or gender-related differences influence that bioavailability. In the current study of healthy adults [premenopausal (n = 21) and postmenopausal (n = 17) women and a group of men (n = 21)], we examined the effect of age, gender, and the food matrix on the bioavailability of isoflavones for both the aglycon and glucoside forms that are naturally present in 3 different soy foods, soy milk, textured vegetable protein, and tempeh. The study was designed as a random crossover trial so that all individuals received each of the 3 foods. The dose of isoflavones administered to each individual as a single bolus dose was 0.44 mg/kg body weight. Pharmacokinetic parameters were normalized to mg of each isoflavone ingested per kilogram body weight to account for differences in daidzein and genistein content between the diets. Serum isoflavone concentrations in all individuals and groups increased rapidly after the ingestion of each soy food; as expected, genistein concentrations exceeded daidzein concentrations in serum. In this small study, gender differences in peak concentrations of daidzein were observed, with higher levels attained in women. Consumption of tempeh (mainly isoflavone aglycon) resulted in higher serum peak levels of both daidzein (P < 0.001) and genistein (P < 0.01) and the associated area under the curve (P < 0.001 and P < 0.03, respectively) compared with textured vegetable protein (predominantly isoflavone glucosides). However, soy milk was absorbed faster and peak levels of

  17. Changes in Men’s Salivary Testosterone and Cortisol Levels, and in Sexual Desire after Smelling Female Axillary and Vulvar Scents

    PubMed Central

    Cerda-Molina, Ana Lilia; Hernández-López, Leonor; de la O, Claudio E.; Chavira-Ramírez, Roberto; Mondragón-Ceballos, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have shown that a woman’s vaginal or axillary odors convey information on her attractivity. Yet, whether such scents induce psychoneuroendocrinological changes in perceivers is still controversial. We studied if smelling axillary and vulvar odors collected in the periovulatory and late luteal phases of young women modify salivary testosterone and cortisol levels, as well as sexual desire in men. Forty-five women and 115 men, all of them college students and unacquainted with each other, participated in the study. Female odors were collected on pads affixed to the axilla and on panty protectors both worn the entire night before experiments. Men provided five saliva samples, a basal one before the smelling procedure, and four more 15, 30, 60, and 75 min after exposure to odors. Immediately after smelling the odor source, men answered a questionnaire rating hedonic qualities of scents, and after providing the last saliva sample they answered questionnaire on sexual desire. We found that periovulatory axillary and vulvar odors increased testosterone and cortisol levels, with vulvar scents producing a more prolonged effect. Luteal axilla odors decreased testosterone and cortisol levels, while luteal vulva odors increased cortisol. Periovulatory axilla and vulva scents accounted for a general increase of interest in sex. These odors were also rated as more pleasant and familiar, while luteal vulvar odors were perceived as intense and unpleasant. PMID:24194730

  18. [Testosterone and atherosclerosis in males during andropause].

    PubMed

    Medraś, M; Jankowska, E

    1999-04-01

    Nowadays besides the commonly accepted atherogenic risk factors a special emphasis is laid on the significance of testosterone in atherogenesis in men which physiologic deficit during "andropause" is able to promote this pathology. An elevated estradiol:testosterone ratio seems to be an independent risk factor of atheromatous heart complications. There is a proved positive correlation between free testosterone, total testosterone, dihydrotestosterone and HDL-cholesterol, apoA1 apolipoprotein. The relationship between LDL-cholesterol, VLDL-cholesterol, total cholesterol and total and free testosterone seems to be unanimous, but in certain studies the beneficial influence of testosterone on the mentioned lipids has been observed. The discussed hormone is also functionally connected with coagulation and fibrynolisis; a positive correlation was found between endogenous testosterone and tPA-Fx and a negative correlation between testosterone and PAI-1, fibrinogen, D-dimers, alpha 2-antiplasmin. Testosterone is a functional regulator of the vascular tonus and influences on reological properties of microcirculation (the application of testosterone infusion into canine coronary arteries causes the dilatation of main and the small vessels, through NO syntetase induction and ATP-dependent K(+)- channel activation). A statistically significant positive correlation between testosterone and insulin has been stated (an elevated oestradiol:testosterone ratio is connected with the insulin resistance). Additionally a negative relationship between testosterone and android obesity has been observed. Although nowadays there are more and more facts proving the benefits of the retaining the proper testosterone levels in aging men, the final influence of the testosterone supplementary therapy on atherogenesis is not solved.

  19. Early sexual maturity in local boars of Northeastern India: age-related changes in testicular growth, epididymal sperm characteristics and peripheral testosterone levels.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, A; Bujarbaruah, K M; Kadirvel, G; Khargharia, G; Sarma, Rumi G; Goswami, J; Basumatary, Rantu; Palaniappan, Kavitha; Bardoloi, R K

    2011-03-01

    The present study reports the age related changes in the peripheral testosterone levels, testicular and epididymal growth and development and cauda epididymal spermiogram in local pigs of Northeastern India, which attain sexual maturity around 3 months of age. Local boars (n = 20) were castrated at monthly intervals from 2 to 6 months of age (4 boars per month) to study the testicular growth and development and the epididymal spermiogram. Blood samples, collected from local boars (n = 6) at monthly intervals from 2 to 6 months of age, were analyzed for testosterone levels by radioimmunoassay. Compared to Hampshire boars, significantly (P < 0.05) high testosterone levels were observed in the local boars as early as 2 months of age. The mean (± SEM) level of testosterone in the local boars at 2, 3 and 4 months of age was 11.89 ± 1.52, 20.45 ± 1.33 and 20.38 ± 2.0 ngml(-1), respectively. Though there was consistently significant (P < 0.05) difference in the body weight between Hampshire and local pigs, the same was not observed in case of testicular weight except at 3 and 6 months of age. In line with the above observation, the testis:body weight ratio (gram testis per kg body weight) was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in the local boars compared to the Hampshire boars at any time of observation, which ranged from 0.8 to 1.0 in case of Hampshire and from 2.3 to 3.0 in local boars. The sperm concentration in the cauda epididymal fluid of local boars at 2, 3 and 6 months of age was 2255 ± 186.6, 3685 ± 103.8 and 4325 ± 146.2 million/ml, respectively and the sperm motility, viability and total abnormality was 73.3, 75.2 and 6.2%, respectively at 3 months of age. Taken together, the testosterone level, testicular growth and development and epididymal spermiogram indicate the trait of early sexual maturity in the local pigs as compared to Hampshire.

  20. LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis of testosterone at sub-picogram levels using a novel derivatization reagent.

    PubMed

    Star-Weinstock, Michal; Williamson, Brian L; Dey, Subhakar; Pillai, Sasi; Purkayastha, Subhasish

    2012-11-06

    Testosterone analysis by LC-MS/MS is becoming the analytical method of choice over immunoassays due to its specificity and accuracy. However, neutral steroid hormones possess poor ionization efficiency in MS/MS, resulting in insufficient sensitivity for analyzing samples with trace concentrations of the hormones. The method presented here utilizes a derivatization step involving a novel, permanently charged, quaternary aminooxy (QAO) reagent or MS-tag that reacts to the ketone functionality of testosterone and significantly enhances its ESI-MS/MS sensitivity. This derivatization method enabled quantitation of total testosterone in human serum (200 μL) with a lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) of 1 pg/mL (3.47 pmol/L), total testosterone in dried blood spots (8-10 μL) with a LLOQ of 40 pg/mL, and free testosterone in serum ultrafiltrate (400 μL) with a LLOQ of 0.5 pg/mL. The linearity of each of the high sensitivity applications was maintained over a broad dynamic range of 1-5000 pg/mL for the serum samples and 40-10,000 pg/mL for the dried blood spots (DBS) with R(2) >0.998. The %CV at the LLOQ was <15 for all applications. The QAO derivatization and sample preparation workflows are quick, simple, and robust. Comparison of the derivatization method with an LC-ESI-MS/MS nonderivatization method yielded high correlation and agreement. The derivatization reagent is universal and reacts with other compounds containing ketone or aldehyde functionality.

  1. Lack of effects of a lyposterolic extract of Serenoa repens on plasma levels of testosterone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and luteinizing hormone.

    PubMed

    Casarosa, C; Cosci di Coscio, M; Fratta, M

    1988-01-01

    Twenty men, aged 50 to 75 years (mean, 67 years), suffering from benign prostatic hypertrophy received 160 mg of a lyposterolic extract of Serenoa repens, twice daily for 30 days. Before and at the end of treatment, plasma levels of testosterone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and luteinizing hormone were determined. No changes in plasma hormone levels occurred as a result of treatment. It is concluded that Serenoa extract, which is useful in the treatment of benign prostatic hypertrophy, does not act via systemic changes of hormone levels.

  2. Testosterone administration in women with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Miller, K K; Grieco, K A; Klibanski, A

    2005-03-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is complicated by severe bone loss, cognitive function deficits, and a high prevalence of major depression. We hypothesized that bone formation would increase and depressive symptoms and spatial cognition would improve with short-term physiological testosterone administration. We randomized 33 women with AN and relative testosterone deficiency to transdermal testosterone (Intrinsa, Procter and Gamble Pharmaceuticals, Cincinnati, OH), 150 mug, 300 mug, or placebo, for 3 wk. At baseline, free testosterone correlated with L4 bone density (r = 0.51, P < 0.001), body mass index (r = 0.39, P = 0.02), depressive symptoms (r = -0.44, P = 0.02), and spatial cognition (r = 0.45, P = 0.04). C-terminal propeptide of type 1 collagen levels were higher during testosterone administration than placebo (P = 0.03). The change in propeptide of type 1 collagen correlated with change in free testosterone over 3 wk (r = 0.50, P = 0.02). Osteocalcin and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase did not change. Depressed patients receiving testosterone improved from severely depressed to moderately depressed; the placebo group was unchanged (P = 0.02). Spatial cognition improved in the testosterone group, compared with placebo (P = 0.0015). Therefore, short-term low-dose testosterone may improve depressive symptoms and spatial cognition in women with AN. Low-dose testosterone may also prevent decreased bone formation in AN, but because testosterone did not affect all markers of bone formation studied, further data are needed.

  3. The effect of combined oral contraception on testosterone levels in healthy women: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Y.; Eijkemans, M.J.C.; Coelingh Bennink, H.J.T.; Blankenstein, M.A.; Fauser, B.C.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Combined oral contraceptives (COCs) reduce levels of androgen, especially testosterone (T), by inhibiting ovarian and adrenal androgen synthesis and by increasing levels of sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG). Although this suppressive effect has been investigated by numerous studies over many years, to our knowledge no systematic review concerning this issue had been performed. This systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the effect of COCs on concentrations of total T, free T and SHBG in healthy women and to evaluate differences between the various types of COCs (e.g. estrogen dose, type of progestin) and the assays used to assess total T and free T. METHODS A review of the literature was performed using database searches (MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Central Register of Clinical Trials) and all publications (from inception date until July 2012) investigating the effect of COCs on androgen levels in healthy women were considered eligible for selection. Three reviewers were involved in study selection, data extraction and critical appraisal. For the meta-analysis, data on total T, free T and SHBG were extracted and combined using random effects analysis. Additional subgroup analyses were performed to evaluate differences between the various types of COCs (e.g. estrogen dose, type of progestin) and the assays used to assess total T or free T. RESULTS A total of 151 records were identified by systematic review and 42 studies with a total of 1495 healthy young women (age range: 18–40 years) were included in the meta-analysis. All included studies were experimental studies and 21 were non-comparative. Pooling of the results derived from all the included papers showed that total T levels significantly decreased during COC use [mean difference (MD) (95% confidence interval, CI) −0.49 nmol/l (−0.55, −0.42); P < 0.001]. Significantly lower levels of free T were also found [relative change (95% CI) 0.39 (0.35, 0.43); P < 0

  4. Comparison of the Effects of Resistance Exercise Orders on Number of Repetitions, Serum IGF-1, Testosterone and Cortisol Levels in Normal-Weight and Obese Men

    PubMed Central

    Sheikholeslami-Vatani, Dariush; Ahmadi, Slahadin; Salavati, Rashad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Exercise order affects repetition performance and acute hormonal responses to resistance training (RT) programs. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effects of two different resistance exercise orders (REO) on number of repetitions and serum Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1), testosterone and cortisol levels in normal-weight and obese men. Materials and Methods: 25 untrained college-aged men were assigned to either obese (n = 11) or normal-weight (n = 15) groups. Subjects performed two REO protocols in 2 exercise groups. In the first group subjects began with large-muscle group and progressed to small-muscle group (Protocol A), while in the other group subjects performed the same exercise but in reverse sequence (Protocol B). Each activity was performed in 3 consecutive sets of 10 repetitions maximum to near fatigue. Results: REOs did not affect number of repetitions in none of the groups. The average rating of perceived exertion was higher for protocol B in both groups. IGF-1 and testosterone increased immediately post exercise for both protocols and in both groups, however immediately post exercise increase in IGF-1 and testosterone were lower in obese group. Cortisol response to REO was weaker in obese group. Conclusions: Performing large muscle group exercises first in RE training and progressing to small muscle group produced greater anabolic hormonal response relative to reverse sequence in normal-weight young adult men. Anabolic hormonal response to REOs was blunted in the obese group. PMID:27217934

  5. Protective effect of royal jelly on the sperm parameters and testosterone level and lipid peroxidation in adult mice treated with oxymetholone

    PubMed Central

    Zahmatkesh, Ensieh; Najafi, Gholamreza; Nejati, Vahid; Heidari, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Objectives : The aim of the present study was to evaluate protective effect of royal jelly on sperm parameters, testosterone level, and malondialdehyde (MDA) production in mice. Materials and Methods: Thirty-two adult male NMRI mice weighing 30±2 g were used. All the animals were divided into 4 groups. Control group: received saline 0.1 ml/mouse/day orally for 30 days. Royal jelly group (RJ): received royal jelly at dose of 100 mg/kg daily for 30 days orally. Oxymetholone group: the received Oxymetholone (OX) at dose of 5 mg/kg daily for 30 days orally. Royal jelly+Oxymetholone group: received royal jelly at dose of 100 mg/kg/day orally concomitant with OX administration. Sperm count, sperm motility, viability, maturity, and DNA integrity were analyzed. Furthermore, serum testosterone and MDA concentrations were determined. Results: In Oxymetholone group, sperm count, motility as well as testosterone concentration reduced significantly (p<0.05), while significant (p<0.05) increases in immature sperm, sperm with DNA damaged, and MDA concentration were announced in Oxymetholone group in comparison with control group and Royal jelly+Oxymetholone group. RJ caused partially amelioration in all of the above- mentioned parameters in Royal Jelly+Oxymetholone group. Conclusion: In conclusion, RJ may be used in combination with OX to improve OX-induced oxidative stress and male infertility. PMID:25050300

  6. Controversies in testosterone replacement therapy: testosterone and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Kathleen; Miner, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The role of testosterone in the cardiovascular (CV) health of men is controversial. Data suggest that both the condition and treatment of clinical hypogonadism is associated with decreased CV mortality; however, two recent studies suggest that hypogonadal subjects treated with testosterone replacement therapy have a higher incidence of new CV events. There has been increased media attention concerning the risk of CV disease in men treated with testosterone. Until date, there are no long-term prospective studies to determine safety. Literature spanning over the past 30 years has suggested that not only is there a possible increased CV risk in men with low levels of testosterone, but the benefits from testosterone therapy may even lower this risk. We review here the recent studies that have garnered such intense scrutiny. This article is intended as a thorough review of testosterone levels and CV risk, providing the clinician with the facts needed to make informed clinical decisions in managing patients with clinical hypogonadism. PMID:25652628

  7. Effects of PCBs on plasma enzymes, testosterone level, and hepatic xenobiotic metabolism in the grey partridge, perdix perdlx

    SciTech Connect

    Abiola, F. ); Lorgue, G.; Riviere, J.L. ); Benoit, E. ); Soyez, D. )

    1989-09-01

    The hepatic cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenase (MO) system functions in oxidative biotransformation of a wide variety of both endogenous and exogenous (xenobiotic) compounds in many animal species. However, most of the previous studies were carried out with a narrow range of species and investigations on wild species are lacking. In this report, the authors describe the effects of a commercial mixture of PCBs (DP5) on the hepatic MO activities of the grey partridge (Perdix perdix). To more thoroughly investigate the inducing effects of DP5, they used two series of homologous substrates, alkylresorufins and alkoxycoumarins, and an endogenous compound, testosterone, which were shown in mammals to differentiate between different forms of cytochrome P-450. Furthermore, to more carefully assess the effects of DP5, they also measured the activity of two plasma marker enzymes, alanine transpeptidase (ALAT) and gamma-glutamyl transferase (gamma-GT), and the plasmatic concentration of testosterone.

  8. The effect of boron supplementation on lean body mass, plasma testosterone levels, and strength in male bodybuilders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrando, A. A.; Green, N. R.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of boron supplementation was investigated in 19 male bodybuilders ages 20-27 years. Ten were given a 2.5-mg boron supplement while 9 were given a placebo every day for 7 weeks. Plasma total and free testosterone, plasma boron, lean body mass, and strength measurements were determined on Days 1 and 49 of the study. Plasma boron values were significantly (p < 0.05) different as the experimental group increased from (+/- SD) 20.1 +/- 7.7 ppb pretest to 32.6 +/- 27.6 ppb posttest, while the control group mean decreased from 15.1 +/- 14.4 ppb pretest to 6.3 +/- 5.5 ppb posttest. Analysis of variance indicated no significant effect of boron supplementation on any of the dependent variables. Both groups demonstrated significant increases in total testosterone, lean body mass, 1-RM squat, and 1-RM bench press. The findings suggest that 7 weeks of bodybuilding can increase total testosterone, lean body mass, and strength in lesser trained bodybuilders, and that boron supplementation had no effect on these measures.

  9. The effect of boron supplementation on lean body mass, plasma testosterone levels, and strength in male bodybuilders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrando, A. A.; Green, N. R.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of boron supplementation was investigated in 19 male bodybuilders ages 20-27 years. Ten were given a 2.5-mg boron supplement while 9 were given a placebo every day for 7 weeks. Plasma total and free testosterone, plasma boron, lean body mass, and strength measurements were determined on Days 1 and 49 of the study. Plasma boron values were significantly (p < 0.05) different as the experimental group increased from (+/- SD) 20.1 +/- 7.7 ppb pretest to 32.6 +/- 27.6 ppb posttest, while the control group mean decreased from 15.1 +/- 14.4 ppb pretest to 6.3 +/- 5.5 ppb posttest. Analysis of variance indicated no significant effect of boron supplementation on any of the dependent variables. Both groups demonstrated significant increases in total testosterone, lean body mass, 1-RM squat, and 1-RM bench press. The findings suggest that 7 weeks of bodybuilding can increase total testosterone, lean body mass, and strength in lesser trained bodybuilders, and that boron supplementation had no effect on these measures.

  10. Gender moderates the relationship between testosterone and marital interaction.

    PubMed

    Cohan, Catherine L; Booth, Alan; Granger, Douglas A

    2003-03-01

    Higher testosterone levels are related to assertiveness and dominance. Given the relevance of those behavioral correlates to spouses' daily transactions, links between testosterone levels and marital interaction were explored among 92 newlywed couples. Marital problem-solving and social support transactions were assessed, and saliva was collected and assayed for testosterone. Whether marital behavior was related to husbands' and wives' testosterone levels was examined. The link between spouses' testosterone and their behavior was contingent on the partner's testosterone levels. Husbands exhibited more adaptive problem-solving behaviors and social support provision when husbands and wives were concordant for lower testosterone levels. In contrast, wives exhibited more adaptive support provision when spouses had discordant testosterone levels such that wives had higher levels and husbands had lower levels.

  11. Suppression of human spermatogenesis by testosterone implants.

    PubMed

    Handelsman, D J; Conway, A J; Boylan, L M

    1992-11-01

    Hormonally induced azoospermia is an effective, reversible form of male contraception; however, some men treated with weekly im testosterone enanthate (TE) injections fail to become azoospermic. As weekly injections cause widely fluctuating and supraphysiological testosterone levels, we tested the hypothesis that more stable, physiological testosterone levels would consistently produce azoospermia. Using a depot testosterone formulation which provides stable, physiological range testosterone levels for up to 6 months, we studied nine men before and after insertion of six 200 mg testosterone implants under the abdominal wall skin and compared the results with 38 men treated in a previous study with weekly im injections of 200 mg TE. Testosterone implants suppressed sperm output to near-azoospermia between the second to fourth postimplant months returning to normal by the sixth postimplant month. The fall in sperm output at the first month was greater after testosterone implants than TE injections (58% vs. 17%, P = 0.011) but similar proportions of men became azoospermic (5/9 vs. 25/38) or severely oligozoospermic (< 1 million/ml; 9/9 vs. 37/38). Plasma testosterone and estradiol levels remained mostly within the eugonadal range after implants but were markedly supraphysiological during TE injections. Both treatments suppressed immunoreactive LH and FSH to undetectable levels by ultrasensitive fluoroimmunoassay. Sex hormone-binding globulin levels were decreased and PRL levels increased by TE injections but neither was changed by testosterone implants. Prostate-specific antigen demonstrated a small rise of marginal significance (P = 0.065) after testosterone implants. Fewer men experienced acne after implants (0/9 vs. 25/38, p = 0.0004). Therefore a depot testosterone preparation with quasi-zero-order release demonstrates higher dose efficiency with similar (but not uniform) efficacy at inducing azoospermia but may cause fewer androgenic side-effects than weekly TE

  12. Association between free testosterone levels and anal human papillomavirus types 16/18 infections in a cohort of men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hilary K; Brown, Todd T; Li, Xiuhong; Young, Stephen; Cranston, Ross D; D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Jacobson, Lisa P; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Seaberg, Eric C; Margolick, Joseph B; Jenkins, Frank J; Moran, Matthew G; Chua, Kristofer; Bolan, Robert K; Detels, Roger; Wiley, Dorothy J

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 cause invasive cervical cancer and most invasive anal cancers (IACs). Overall, IAC rates are highest among men who have sex with men (MSM), especially MSM with HIV infection. Testosterone is prescribed for men showing hypogonadism and HIV-related wasting. While there are direct and indirect physiological effects of testosterone in males, its role in anal HPV16/18 infections in men is unknown. Free testosterone (FT) was measured in serum from 340 Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) participants who were tested for anal HPV16/18-DNA approximately 36 months later. The effect of log10-transformed current FT level on anal HPV16/18 prevalence was modeled using Poisson regression with robust error variance. Multivariate models controlled for other HPV types, cumulative years of exogenous testosterone use, race, age, lifetime number of receptive anal intercourse partnerships, body mass index, tobacco smoking, HIV-infection and CD4+ T-cell counts among HIV-infected, and blood draw timing. Participants were, on average, 60 (+5.4) years of age, White (86%), and HIV-uninfected (56%); Twenty-four percent tested positive for anal HPV16 and/or 18-DNA (HPV16 prevalence=17.1%, HPV18=9.1%). In adjusted analysis, each half-log10 increase of FT was associated with a 1.9-fold (95% Confidence Interval: 1.11, 3.24) higher HPV16/18 prevalence. Additionally, other Group 1 high-risk HPVs were associated with a 1.56-fold (1.03, 2.37) higher HPV16/18 prevalence. Traditional risk factors for HPV16/18 infection (age, tobacco smoking; lifetime number of sexual partners, including the number of receptive anal intercourse partnerships within 24 months preceding HPV testing) were poorly correlated with one another and not statistically significantly associated with higher prevalence of HPV16/18 infection in unadjusted and adjusted analyses. Higher free testosterone was associated with increased HPV16/18 prevalence measured approximately three years later

  13. Association between Free Testosterone Levels and Anal Human Papillomavirus Types 16/18 Infections in a Cohort of Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Hilary K.; Brown, Todd T.; Li, Xiuhong; Young, Stephen; Cranston, Ross D.; D’Souza, Gypsyamber; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Seaberg, Eric C.; Margolick, Joseph B.; Jenkins, Frank J.; Moran, Matthew G.; Chua, Kristofer; Bolan, Robert K.; Detels, Roger; Wiley, Dorothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 cause invasive cervical cancer and most invasive anal cancers (IACs). Overall, IAC rates are highest among men who have sex with men (MSM), especially MSM with HIV infection. Testosterone is prescribed for men showing hypogonadism and HIV-related wasting. While there are direct and indirect physiological effects of testosterone in males, its role in anal HPV16/18 infections in men is unknown. Methods Free testosterone (FT) was measured in serum from 340 Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) participants who were tested for anal HPV16/18-DNA approximately 36 months later. The effect of log10-transformed current FT level on anal HPV16/18 prevalence was modeled using Poisson regression with robust error variance. Multivariate models controlled for other HPV types, cumulative years of exogenous testosterone use, race, age, lifetime number of receptive anal intercourse partnerships, body mass index, tobacco smoking, HIV-infection and CD4+ T-cell counts among HIV-infected, and blood draw timing. Results Participants were, on average, 60 (+5.4) years of age, White (86%), and HIV-uninfected (56%); Twenty-four percent tested positive for anal HPV16 and/or 18-DNA (HPV16 prevalence=17.1%, HPV18=9.1%). In adjusted analysis, each half-log10 increase of FT was associated with a 1.9-fold (95% Confidence Interval: 1.11, 3.24) higher HPV16/18 prevalence. Additionally, other Group 1 high-risk HPVs were associated with a 1.56-fold (1.03, 2.37) higher HPV16/18 prevalence. Traditional risk factors for HPV16/18 infection (age, tobacco smoking; lifetime number of sexual partners, including the number of receptive anal intercourse partnerships within 24 months preceding HPV testing) were poorly correlated with one another and not statistically significantly associated with higher prevalence of HPV16/18 infection in unadjusted and adjusted analyses. Conclusions Higher free testosterone was associated with increased HPV16/18 prevalence

  14. Prenatal testosterone and stuttering.

    PubMed

    Montag, Christian; Bleek, Benjamin; Breuer, Svenja; Prüss, Holger; Richardt, Kirsten; Cook, Susanne; Yaruss, J Scott; Reuter, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of stuttering is much higher in males compared to females. The biological underpinnings of this skewed sex-ratio is poorly understood, but it has often been speculated that sex hormones could play an important role. The present study investigated a potential link between prenatal testosterone and stuttering. Here, an indirect indicator of prenatal testosterone levels, the Digit Ratio (2D:4D) of the hand, was used. As numerous studies have shown, hands with more "male" characteristics (putatively representing greater prenatal testosterone levels) are characterized by a longer ring finger compared to the index finger (represented as a lower 2D:4D ratio) in the general population. We searched for differences in the 2D:4D ratios between 38 persons who stutter and 36 persons who do not stutter. In a second step, we investigated potential links between the 2D:4D ratio and the multifaceted symptomatology of stuttering, as measured by the Overall Assessment of the Speaker's Experience of Stuttering (OASES), in a larger sample of 44 adults who stutter. In the first step, no significant differences in the 2D:4D were observed between individuals who stutter and individuals who do not stutter. In the second step, 2D:4D correlated negatively with higher scores of the OASES (representing higher negative experiences due to stuttering), and this effect was more pronounced for female persons who stutter. The findings indicate for the first time that prenatal testosterone may influence individual differences in psychosocial impact of this speech disorder. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Testosterone perturbs epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Kao, J S; Garg, A; Mao-Qiang, M; Crumrine, D; Ghadially, R; Feingold, K R; Elias, P M

    2001-03-01

    Although there are no known gender-related differences in permeability barrier function in adults, estrogens accelerate whereas testosterone retards barrier development in fetal skin, and male fetuses demonstrate slower barrier development than female littermates. Moreover, prenatal administration of the androgen receptor antagonist, flutamide, equalizes developmental rates in male and female fetuses. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of changes in testosterone on barrier homeostasis in adult murine and human skin. Hypogonadal mice (whether by castration or by treatment with systemic flutamide) displayed significantly faster barrier recovery at 3, 6, and 12 h than did controls, and testosterone replacement slowed barrier recovery in castrated mice. Moreover, testosterone directly effects the skin, as topical flutamide also accelerated barrier recovery in normal male mice. These findings appear to be of physiologic significance, since prepubertal male mice (age 5 wk) displayed accelerated barrier recovery in comparison with adult postpubertal (11 wk) males. These studies also appear to be relevant for humans, as a hypopituitary human subject demonstrated repeated changes in barrier recovery in parallel with peaks and nadirs in serum testosterone levels during intermittent testosterone replacement. Mechanistic studies showed that differences in epidermal lipid synthesis do not account for the testosterone-induced functional alterations. Instead, epidermal lamellar body (LB) formation and secretion both decrease, resulting in decreased extracellular lamellar bilayers in testosterone-replete animals. These studies demonstrate that fluctuations in testosterone modulate barrier function, and that testosterone repletion can have negative consequences for permeability barrier homeostasis.

  16. Testosterone Undecanoate-Schering AG.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    Schering AG is developing a formulation of testosterone undecanoate [Nebido] for the treatment of testosterone deficiency or hypogonadism. This deficiency can lead to decreased muscle mass, impaired muscle function, osteoporosis, reduced sexual function and mental degeneration. Schering claims that its new formulation provides superior control of blood levels of the drug and permits a longer period of application. Nebido requires only four injections per year, and represents a major improvement for men with testosterone deficiency. Schering AG received approval of its testosterone undecanoate formulation in its first European country, Finland, in November 2003 for the treatment of hypogonadism in men. In July 2004, Schering's testosterone undecanoate formulation completed approval of the European mutual recognition procedure. This approval clears the way for marketing the product (as Nebido) in the large pharmaceutical markets like Germany, France and the UK. The initial phase of the product launch will occur in Finland in October 2004, and in Germany in November 2004. Other European countries will follow in 2005, and following receipt of approval, it will be introduced in the first Latin American and Asian countries. In its 2002 Annual Report, Schering predicted that testosterone undecanoate has the potential to reach peak sales of euro 100 million, 3 years after launch-launch in Europe was at the time anticipated in 2004.

  17. Effect of aqueous and hydro-alcoholic extracts of lettuce (Lactuca sativa) seed on testosterone level and spermatogenesis in NMRI mice

    PubMed Central

    Ahangarpour, Akram; Oroojan, Ali Akbar; Radan, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Background: One of the considerable uses of lettuce (Lactuca sativa) seed in traditional medicine has been to reduce semen, sperm and sexuality. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of aqueous and hydro-alcoholic extracts of lettuce seed on testosterone level and spermatogenesis. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study 24 adult male NMRI mice weighing 20-25gr were purchased. Animals were randomly divided into 4 groups: controls, hydro-alcoholic (200 mg/kg) and aqueous extracts (50, 100mg/kg). The extracts were injected intraperitoneally once a day for 10 consecutive days. 2 weeks after the last injection, the mice were anaesthetized by ether and after laparatomy blood was collected from the heart to determine testosterone by ELISA assay kit. Then testis and cauda epididymis of all animals were removed for analyzing testis morphology and sperm count and viability. Results: Testis weight in hydro-alcoholic and aqueous extracts 100 mg/kg (p=0.001) and aqueous extract 50 mg/kg (p=0.008) groups was increased. Sperm viability in hydro-alcoholic (p=0.001) and aqueous extracts 50 (p=0.026), 100 mg/kg (p=0.045) groups was decreased, Also the results showed a significant decrease in sperm count in hydro-alcoholic (p=0.035) and aqueous extracts 50 mg/kg (p=0.006) groups in comparison with control group. Also there was a significant increase in serum level of testosterone in aqueous extract 50 mg/kg group in comparison with control (p=0.002) hydro-alcoholic (p=0.001) and aqueous extracts 100 mg/kg (p=0.003) groups. Conclusion: Present results demonstrated that hydro-alcoholic and aqueous 50 mg/kg extracts of lettuce seed have antispermatogenic effects, also aqueous extract 50 mg/kg increased serum level of testosterone in mice. Therefore we can suggest that lettuce seed could be a potential contraceptive agent. This article extracted from M.Sc. student research project. (Ali Akbar Oroojan) PMID:24799863

  18. Effect of aqueous and hydro-alcoholic extracts of lettuce (Lactuca sativa) seed on testosterone level and spermatogenesis in NMRI mice.

    PubMed

    Ahangarpour, Akram; Oroojan, Ali Akbar; Radan, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    One of the considerable uses of lettuce (Lactuca sativa) seed in traditional medicine has been to reduce semen, sperm and sexuality. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of aqueous and hydro-alcoholic extracts of lettuce seed on testosterone level and spermatogenesis. In this experimental study 24 adult male NMRI mice weighing 20-25gr were purchased. Animals were randomly divided into 4 groups: controls, hydro-alcoholic (200 mg/kg) and aqueous extracts (50, 100mg/kg). The extracts were injected intraperitoneally once a day for 10 consecutive days. 2 weeks after the last injection, the mice were anaesthetized by ether and after laparatomy blood was collected from the heart to determine testosterone by ELISA assay kit. Then testis and cauda epididymis of all animals were removed for analyzing testis morphology and sperm count and viability. Testis weight in hydro-alcoholic and aqueous extracts 100 mg/kg (p=0.001) and aqueous extract 50 mg/kg (p=0.008) groups was increased. Sperm viability in hydro-alcoholic (p=0.001) and aqueous extracts 50 (p=0.026), 100 mg/kg (p=0.045) groups was decreased, Also the results showed a significant decrease in sperm count in hydro-alcoholic (p=0.035) and aqueous extracts 50 mg/kg (p=0.006) groups in comparison with control group. Also there was a significant increase in serum level of testosterone in aqueous extract 50 mg/kg group in comparison with control (p=0.002) hydro-alcoholic (p=0.001) and aqueous extracts 100 mg/kg (p=0.003) groups. Present results demonstrated that hydro-alcoholic and aqueous 50 mg/kg extracts of lettuce seed have antispermatogenic effects, also aqueous extract 50 mg/kg increased serum level of testosterone in mice. Therefore we can suggest that lettuce seed could be a potential contraceptive agent. This article extracted from M.Sc. student research project. (Ali Akbar Oroojan).

  19. Assessing bioavailability levels of metals in effluent-affected rivers: effect of Fe(III) and chelating agents on the distribution of metal speciation.

    PubMed

    Han, Shuping; Naito, Wataru; Masunaga, Shigeki

    To assess the effects of Fe(III) and anthropogenic ligands on the bioavailability of Ni, Cu, Zn, and Pb, concentrations of bioavailable metals were measured by the DGT (diffusive gradients in thin films) method in some urban rivers, and were compared with concentrations calculated by a chemical equilibrium model (WHAM 7.0). Assuming that dissolved Fe(III) (<0.45 μm membrane filtered) was in equilibrium with colloidal iron oxide, the WHAM 7.0 model estimated that bioavailable concentrations of Ni, Cu, and Zn were slightly higher than the corresponding values estimated assuming that dissolved Fe(III) was absent. In contrast, lower levels of free Pb were predicted by the WHAM 7.0 model when dissolved Fe(III) was included. Estimates showed that most of the dissolved Pb was present as colloidal iron-Pb complex. Ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) concentrations at sampling sites were predicted from the relationship between EDTA and the calculated bioavailable concentration of Zn. When both colloidal iron and predicted EDTA concentrations were included in the WHAM 7.0 calculations, dissolved metals showed a strong tendency to form EDTA complexes, in the order Ni > Cu > Zn > Pb. With the inclusion of EDTA, bioavailable concentrations of Ni, Cu, and Zn predicted by WHAM 7.0 were different from those predicted considering only humic substances and colloidal iron.

  20. Testosterone Regulates Bone Response to Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Steffens, J. P.; Herrera, B. S.; Coimbra, L. S.; Stephens, D. N.; Rossa, C.; Spolidorio, L. C.; Kantarci, A.; Van Dyke, T. E.

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the alveolar bone response to testosterone and the impact of Resolvin D2 (RvD2) on testosterone-induced osteoblast function. For the in vivo characterization, 60 male adult rats were used. Treatments established sub-physiologic (L), normal (N), or supra-physiologic (H) concentrations of testosterone. Forty rats were subjected to orchiectomy; 20 rats received periodical testosterone injections while 20 rats received testicular sham-operation. Four weeks after the surgeries, 10 rats in each group received a subgingival ligature around the lower first molars to induce experimental periodontal inflammation and bone loss. In parallel, osteoblasts were differentiated from neonatal mice calvariae and treated with various doses of testosterone for 48 h. Cell lysates and conditioned media were used for the determination of alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, RANKL, and osteoprotegerin. Micro-computed tomography linear analysis demonstrated that bone loss was significantly increased for both L and H groups compared to animals with normal levels of testosterone. Gingival IL-1β expression was increased in the L group (p < 0.05). Ten nM testosterone significantly decreased osteocalcin, RANKL, and OPG levels in osteoblasts; 100 nM significantly increased the RANKL:OPG ratio. RvD2 partially reversed the impact of 10 nM testosterone on osteocalcin, RANKL, and OPG. These findings suggest that both L and H testosterone levels increase inflammatory bone loss in male rats. While low testosterone predominantly increases the inflammatory response, high testosterone promotes a higher osteoblast-derived RANKL:OPG ratio. The proresolving mediator RvD2 ameliorates testosterone-derived downregulation of osteocalcin, RANKL, and OPG in primary murine osteoblasts suggesting a direct role of inflammation in osteoblast function. PMID:24526374

  1. Effects of dutasteride on lower urinary tract symptoms: a prospective analysis based on changes in testosterone/dihydrotestosterone levels and total prostatic volume reduction.

    PubMed

    Shigehara, Kazuyoshi; Miyagi, Tohru; Nakashima, Takao; Izumi, Koji; Kitagawa, Yasuhide; Mizokami, Atsushi; Koh, Eitetsu; Shimamura, Masayoshi; Namiki, Mikio

    2016-06-01

    This study analyzed the effects of dutasteride on lower urinary tract symptoms based on the association between changes in the total testosterone (TT)/dihydrotestosterone (DHT) levels and total prostate volume (TPV) reduction. Sixty participants diagnosed with benign prostatic hyperplasia were given 0.5 mg of dutasteride daily for 52 weeks. Measures of TT and DHT levels, TPV and uroflowmetry were obtained before and after dutasteride treatment. Forty-three patients demonstrated a TPV reduction of ≥5% (Group 1), whereas the remaining 17 patients demonstrated a TPV reduction of <5% (Group 2). DHT suppression and DHT/TT ratio at baseline were significantly higher in Group 1 than Group 2. International Prostate Symptom Scores (IPSS) and uroflowmetry were significantly improved in both groups. In Group 2, nine patients demonstrated some improvement in IPSS (Group 2A), whereas eight did not (Group 2B). The rate of TT increase and improvement in voiding symptoms were significantly higher in Group 2A than Group 2B. Dutasteride-induced TPV reduction is dependent on individual 5-α reductase inhibitor activity. Some patients demonstrating smaller dutasteride-induced TPV reduction may experience an improvement in voiding symptoms owing to an increased level of testosterone.

  2. Herbal modulation of drug bioavailability: enhancement of rifampicin levels in plasma by herbal products and a flavonoid glycoside derived from Cuminum cyminum.

    PubMed

    Sachin, B S; Sharma, S C; Sethi, S; Tasduq, S A; Tikoo, M K; Tikoo, A K; Satti, N K; Gupta, B D; Suri, K A; Johri, R K; Qazi, G N

    2007-02-01

    The bioavailability of rifampicin (RIF) in a fixed dose combination (FDC) used for the treatment of tuberculosis remains an area of clinical concern and several pharmaceutical alternatives are being explored to overcome this problem. The present study presents a pharmacological approach in which the bioavailability of a drug may be modulated by utilizing the herb-drug synergism. The pharmacokinetic interaction of some herbal products and a pure molecule isolated from Cuminum cyminum with RIF is shown in this paper. An aqueous extract derived from cumin seeds produced a significant enhancement of RIF levels in rat plasma. This activity was found to be due to a flavonoid glycoside, 3',5-dihydroxyflavone 7-O-beta-D-galacturonide 4'-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (CC-I). CC-I enhanced the Cmax by 35% and AUC by 53% of RIF. The altered bioavailability profile of RIF could be attributed to a permeation enhancing effect of this glycoside.

  3. Variation in fecal testosterone levels, inter-male aggression, dominance rank and age during mating and post-mating periods in wild adult male ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta).

    PubMed

    Gould, L; Ziegler, T E

    2007-12-01

    In primate species exhibiting seasonal reproduction, patterns of testosterone excretion in adult males are variable: in some species, peaks correlate with female receptivity periods and heightened male-male aggression over access to estrous females, in others, neither heightened aggression nor marked elevations in testosterone have been noted. In this study, we examined mean fecal testosterone ( f T) levels and intermale aggression in wild adult male ring-tailed lemurs residing in three groups at Beza Mahafaly Reserve, Madagascar. Results obtained from mating and post-mating season 2003 were compared to test Wingfield et al. [1990. Am Nat 136:829-846] "challenge hypothesis", which predicts a strong positive relationship between male testosterone levels and male-male competition for access to receptive females during breeding season. f T levels and rates of intermale aggression were significantly higher during mating season compared to the post-mating period. Mean f T levels and aggression rates were also higher in the first half of the mating season compared with the second half. Number of males in a group affected rates of intermale agonism, but not mean f T levels. The highest-ranking males in two of the groups exhibited higher mean f T levels than did lower-ranking males, and young males exhibited lower f T levels compared to prime-aged and old males. In the post-mating period, mean male f T levels did not differ between groups, nor were there rank or age effects. Thus, although male testosterone levels rose in relation to mating and heightened male-male aggression, f T levels fell to baseline breeding levels shortly after the early mating period, and to baseline non-breeding levels immediately after mating season had ended, offsetting the high cost of maintaining both high testosterone and high levels of male-male aggression in the early breeding period. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Effect of different levels and sources of zinc supplementation on quantitative and qualitative semen attributes and serum testosterone level in crossbred cattle (Bos indicus x Bos taurus) bulls.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nishant; Verma, Ramesh Prashad; Singh, Lallan Prasad; Varshney, Vijay Prakash; Dass, Ram Sharan

    2006-01-01

    An experiment was conducted on 16 crossbred bulls (about 2 years of age, 316.2+/-0.77 kg average body weight), divided into groups I, II, III and IV to study the effect of different levels of Zn supplementation from inorganic and organic sources on semen quality. The animals in the first 3 groups were supplemented with 0, 35 and 70 ppm Zn from Zn sulfate, respectively and the animals in-group IV were supplemented with 35 ppm Zn as Zn propionate. Semen collection and evaluation was done in the first month (to assess semen quality at the start of the experiment) and 7th, 8th and 9th month of experimental feeding to evaluate the effect of supplemental Zn on semen attributes. We gave 6 months for Zn feeding, so that 3 sperm cycles of spermatogenesis had passed and the collected semen reflected the complete effect of Zn supplementation. Six ejaculates from each bull were collected and evaluated for semen quantitative (ejaculate volume, sperm concentration and sperm number per ejaculate) and qualitative characteristics (semen pH, mass motility, individual motility, sperm livability percent and abnormal sperm percent, percent intact acrosome, bovine cervical mucus penetration test, hypo-osmotic sperm swelling test) and activity of seminal plasma enzymes i.e., alkaline phosphatase, acid phosphatase, GOT and GPT. Testosterone level in the blood serum of crossbred bulls was also estimated. Mean values of semen quantitative and qualitative characteristics at the start of the experiment were statistically non significant (P > 0.05) in all the crossbred cattle bulls, however, there were statistically significant differences among the bulls of different groups after 6 months of zinc supplementation. Mean ejaculate volume (mL) was 2.37, 4.70, 5.86 and 6.38, respectively in groups I to IV, indicating a statistically significant (P < 0.05) higher semen volume in Zn-supplemented groups as compared to the control group of bulls. Similarly, sperm concentration (million.mL(-1)), live

  5. Short-chain carboxylic acids from gray catbird (Dumetella carolinensis) uropygial secretions vary with testosterone levels and photoperiod.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Rebecca J; Levin, Tera C; Owen, Jennifer C; Garvin, Mary C

    2010-07-01

    The uropygial gland of birds produces secretions that are important in maintaining the health and structural integrity of feathers. Non-volatile components of uropygial secretions are believed to serve a number of functions including waterproofing and conditioning the feathers. Volatile components have been characterized in fewer species, but are particularly interesting because of their potential importance in olfactory interactions within and across species. We used solid-phase microextraction headspace sampling with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to detect and identify volatiles in uropygial secretions of gray catbirds (Dumetella carolinensis), a North American migratory bird. We consistently detected the following carboxylic acids: acetic, propanoic, 2-methylpropanoic, butanoic, and 3-methylbutanoic. We tested for the effect of lengthened photoperiod and/or exogenous testosterone on volatile signal strength and found a negative effect of lengthened photoperiod on the signal strength of propanoic, 2-methylpropanoic, and butanoic acids, suggesting a trade-off between their production and heightened night-time activity associated with lengthened photoperiod. Signal strength of propanoic and 2-methylpropanoic acids was lower in birds treated with exogenous testosterone than in birds treated with placebos. Sex did not affect signal strength of any of the volatile compounds. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Caged Gammarus fossarum (Crustacea) as a robust tool for the characterization of bioavailable contamination levels in continental waters: towards the determination of threshold values.

    PubMed

    Besse, Jean-Philippe; Coquery, Marina; Lopes, Christelle; Chaumot, Arnaud; Budzinski, Hélène; Labadie, Pierre; Geffard, Olivier

    2013-02-01

    We investigated the suitability of an active biomonitoring approach, using the ecologically relevant species Gammarus fossarum, to assess trends of bioavailable contamination in continental waters. Gammarids were translocated into cages at 27 sites, in the Rhône-Alpes region (France) during early autumn 2009. Study sites were chosen to represent different physico-chemical characteristics and various anthropic pressures. Biotic factors such as sex, weight and food availability were controlled in order to provide robust and comparable results. After one week of exposure, concentrations of 11 metals/metalloids (Cd, Pb, Hg, Ni, Zn, Cr, Co, Cu, As, Se and Ag) and 38 hydrophobic organic substances including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorobiphenyles (PCBs), pentabromodiphenylethers (PBDEs) and organochlorine pesticides, were measured in gammarids. All metals except Ag, and 33 organic substances among 38 were quantified in G. fossarum, showing that this species is relevant for chemical biomonitoring. The control of biotic factors allowed a robust and direct inter-site comparison of the bioavailable contamination levels. Overall, our results show the interest and robustness of the proposed methodological approach for assessing trends of bioavailable contamination, notably for metals and hydrophobic organic contaminants, in continental waters. Furthermore, we built threshold values of bioavailable contamination in gammarids, above which measured concentrations are expected to reveal a bioavailable contamination at the sampling site. Two ways to define such values were investigated, a statistical approach and a model fit. Threshold values were determined for almost all the substances investigated in this study and similar values were generally derived from the two approaches. Then, levels of contaminants measured in G. fossarum at the 27 study sites were compared to the threshold values obtained using the model fit. These threshold values could serve as a

  7. Exposure to developing females induces polyuria, polydipsia, and altered urinary levels of creatinine, 17beta-estradiol, and testosterone in adult male mice (Mus musculus).

    PubMed

    deCatanzaro, Denys; Khan, Ayesha; Berger, Robert G; Lewis, Elaine

    2009-01-01

    Novel male mice can accelerate reproductive maturation in proximal developing females, an effect mediated by the chemistry of the males' urine. Exogenous estrogens can similarly accelerate female sexual development. In Experiment 1, adult male mice were housed across wire grid from either empty compartments or those containing post-weanling females. Proximity of females caused males to urinate more, progressively over days of exposure, with most urination directed towards females' compartments. Male urine collected after 5 days in these conditions was analyzed by enzyme immunoassay for 17beta-estradiol, testosterone, and creatinine. Urinary creatinine of isolated males significantly exceeded that of female-exposed males. Unadjusted urinary steroids also trended toward higher levels in isolates, but creatinine-adjusted estradiol and testosterone of female-exposed males significantly exceeded that of isolated males. In Experiment 2, measurement of water consumption indicated significantly greater drinking by female-exposed as opposed to isolated males. In Experiment 3, males were housed in isolation or beside post-weanling intact (sham-operated) females, ovariectomized females, or intact (sham-operated) males. Male water consumption was elevated in all conditions involving social contact. Urinary creatinine was significantly lower in female-exposed males compared to isolated controls, while unadjusted testosterone was significantly lower in males in all social conditions. Again, creatinine-adjusted estradiol in female-exposed males significantly exceeded that of isolates. These data indicate that adult males drink and urinate more, have more dilute urine, and have a higher ratio of estradiol to creatinine when they are near developing females. These dynamics increase females' exposure to urinary steroids and other urinary constituents that can hasten sexual maturity.

  8. Testosterone treatment of hypogonadal men participating in competitive sports.

    PubMed

    Gooren, L J; Behre, H M

    2008-06-01

    Testosterone has a steeply dose-dependent effect on muscle mass and strength irrespective of gonadal status. So, for reasons of fairness, people who engage in competitive sports should not administer exogenous testosterone raising their blood testosterone levels beyond the range of normal. There is a ban on exogenous androgens for men and women in sports, but an exception has been made for men with androgen deficiency due to pituitary or testicular disease. Men who receive testosterone administration for the indication hypogonadism have an interest in the use of testosterone preparations generating blood testosterone levels within the normal range of healthy, eugonadal men. On the grounds of a positive correlation between blood testosterone concentrations muscle and volume/strength, they are best served with a parenteral testosterone preparation, rather than transdermal testosterone, but they should not run the risk of being excluded from competition because of supraphysiological testosterone levels. The latter is a realistic risk with the traditional parenteral testosterone esters. The new parenteral testosterone undecanoate preparation offers much better perspectives. Its pharmacokinetics have been investigated in detail and there is a fair degree of predictability of resulting blood testosterone levels with use of this preparation.

  9. Delivering enhanced testosterone replacement therapy through nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Ferrati, Silvia; Nicolov, Eugenia; Bansal, Shyam; Zabre, Erika; Geninatti, Thomas; Ziemys, Arturas; Hudson, Lee; Ferrari, Mauro; Goodall, Randal; Khera, Mohit; Palapattu, Ganesh; Grattoni, Alessandro

    2015-02-18

    Primary or secondary hypogonadism results in a range of signs and symptoms that compromise quality of life and requires life-long testosterone replacement therapy. In this study, an implantable nanochannel system is investigated as an alternative delivery strategy for the long-term sustained and constant release of testosterone. In vitro release tests are performed using a dissolution set up, with testosterone and testosterone:2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (TES:HPCD) 1:1 and 1:2 molar ratio complexes release from the implantable nanochannel system and quantify by HPLC. 1:2 TES:HPCD complex stably achieve 10-15 times higher testosterone solubility with 25-30 times higher in vitro release. Bioactivity of delivered testosterone is verified by LNCaP/LUC cell luminescence. In vivo evaluation of testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH), and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) levels by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and multiplex assay is performed in castrated Sprague-Dawley rats over 30 d. Animals are treated with the nanochannel implants or degradable testosterone pellets. The 1:2 TES:HPCD nanochannel implant exhibits sustained and clinically relevant in vivo release kinetics and attains physiologically stable plasma levels of testosterone, LH, and FSH. In conclusion, it is demonstrated that by providing long-term steady release 1:2 TES:HPCD nanochannel implants may represent a major breakthrough for the treatment of male hypogonadism. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Testosterone and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Glenn R

    2015-01-01

    Controversies surround the usefulness of identifying patients with the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Many of the components are accepted risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although the MetS as defined includes many men with insulin resistance, insulin resistance is not universal. The low total testosterone (TT) and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels in these men are best explained by the hyperinsulinism and increased inflammatory cytokines that accompany obesity and increased waist circumference. It is informative that low SHBG levels predict future development of the MetS. Evidence is strong relating low TT levels to CVD in men with and without the MetS; however, the relationship may not be causal. The recommendations of the International Diabetes Federation for managing the MetS include cardiovascular risk assessment, lifestyle changes in diet, exercise, weight reduction and treatment of individual components of the MetS. Unfortunately, it is uncommon to see patients with the MetS lose and maintain a 10% weight loss. Recent reports showing testosterone treatment induced dramatic changes in weight, waist circumference, insulin sensitivity, hemoglobin A1c levels and improvements in each of the components of the MetS are intriguing. While some observational studies have reported that testosterone replacement therapy increases cardiovascular events, the Food and Drug Administration in the United States has reviewed these reports and found them to be seriously flawed. Large, randomized, placebo-controlled trials are needed to provide more definitive data regarding the efficacy and safety of this treatment in middle and older men with the MetS and low TT levels.

  11. Testosterone and metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Glenn R

    2015-01-01

    Controversies surround the usefulness of identifying patients with the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Many of the components are accepted risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although the MetS as defined includes many men with insulin resistance, insulin resistance is not universal. The low total testosterone (TT) and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels in these men are best explained by the hyperinsulinism and increased inflammatory cytokines that accompany obesity and increased waist circumference. It is informative that low SHBG levels predict future development of the MetS. Evidence is strong relating low TT levels to CVD in men with and without the MetS; however, the relationship may not be causal. The recommendations of the International Diabetes Federation for managing the MetS include cardiovascular risk assessment, lifestyle changes in diet, exercise, weight reduction and treatment of individual components of the MetS. Unfortunately, it is uncommon to see patients with the MetS lose and maintain a 10% weight loss. Recent reports showing testosterone treatment induced dramatic changes in weight, waist circumference, insulin sensitivity, hemoglobin A1c levels and improvements in each of the components of the MetS are intriguing. While some observational studies have reported that testosterone replacement therapy increases cardiovascular events, the Food and Drug Administration in the United States has reviewed these reports and found them to be seriously flawed. Large, randomized, placebo-controlled trials are needed to provide more definitive data regarding the efficacy and safety of this treatment in middle and older men with the MetS and low TT levels. PMID:25652634

  12. The influence of testosterone in the brain of the male rat on levels of serotonin (5-HT) and hydroxyindole-acetic acid (5-HIAA).

    PubMed

    Martinez-Conde, E; Leret, M L; Diaz, S

    1985-01-01

    There were two groups of rats: one was injected with testosterone propionate (10 mg/kg) every 7 days starting from weaning (23 days old); the other group had gonadectomy on the same day. The levels of 5-HT and 5-HIAA were measured by spectrofluorometry. The concentrations of 5-HT in the diencephalon of the testosterone propionate injected rats decreased significantly at 45 days, tending to become reestablished at 60 days; the rest of the brain followed the same pattern, but was less pronounced. The concentrations of 5-HIAA in the diencephalon and the rest of the brain decrease throughout postnatal development, although the differences are not significant. The castrated rats showed a marked increase at 45 days and later decreased at 60 days without recovering their initial values, in both brain areas. 5-HIAA concentrations were similar to those found in the injected animals. These facts can have various interpretations: early modifications in the brain, feed-back regulation mechanisms at the level of the hypothalamus, decrease in the release of the amine or reduction of its catabolism.

  13. High testosterone levels and sensitivity to acute stress in perpetrators of domestic violence with low cognitive flexibility and impairments in their emotional decoding process: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Romero-Martínez, Angel; Lila, Marisol; Sariñana-González, Patricia; González-Bono, Esperanza; Moya-Albiol, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Hormonal and neuropsychological impairment in intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetrators could play a role in domestic violence. For characterizing whether there is a specific psychobiological response to stress, participants who had previously been jailed for IPV and controls were compared for testosterone and cortisol levels, tested for 2D:4D ratio (as an indicator of masculinization), and given several trait questionnaires and neuropsychological tests related to executive functions and theory of mind. After performing the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), IPV perpetrators experienced decreases in salivary testosterone (T) levels, a moderate worsening of mood, slight anxiety, and a salivary cortisol (C) level increase. Moreover, high basal T was related with high levels of anger and anxiety and worse mood. However, that basal mood does not significantly alter T levels in response to stress. Nonetheless, controls experienced smaller changes in T and larger changes in C and psychological mood. With respect to neuropsychological and cognitive empathic features, IPV perpetrators showed poorer executive performance and emotional recognition than controls. In addition, deficits in both neuropsychological domains were positively associated. Regarding emotional empathy, IPV perpetrators showed higher levels of personal distress than controls. The 2D:4D ratio was lower in IPV perpetrators than in controls. Moreover, only in the former a smaller 2D:4D ratio was related to large increases in T in response to stress and poor emotional recognition. Together with social aspects involved in IPV, differences in psychobiological variables and their relationships could play a relevant role in the onset and perpetuation of violent behavior. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Relationship Between Testosterone and Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Rajfer, Jacob

    2000-01-01

    Although erectile function is clearly androgen dependent, is it just as clear at what level of testosterone erectile dysfunction (ED) begins? Does the decline in testosterone that occurs with aging always produce ED? Are exogenous androgens the answer to ED? The answers range from clear to complex. PMID:16985751

  15. Andropause. Testosterone replacement therapy for aging men.

    PubMed Central

    Bain, J.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the rationale for treating symptomatic aging men whose testosterone levels are mildly reduced or low-normal with testosterone replacement therapy. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Large-scale multicentre prospective studies on the value of treating andropausal men with hormone therapy do not exist because the whole area of hormone therapy is barely 10 years old. Evidence presented is based on physiologic studies, particularly studies in which treatment has been assessed. These were largely uncontrolled open studies. Studies to date report positive responses to testosterone treatment with very few serious side effects. MAIN MESSAGE: Physicians should consider hypoandrogenism if male patients complain of loss of libido, erectile dysfunction, weakness, fatigue, lethargy, loss of motivation, or mood swings. Less obvious associations with reduced levels of testosterone are anemia and osteoporosis. The main cause of reduced testosterone production is primary gonadal insufficiency, but secondary causes, such as hypothalamic-pituitary disease, should be considered. Evidence shows that most men treated with testosterone will feel better about themselves and their lives. CONCLUSION: Andropause is a term of convenience describing a complex of symptoms in aging men who have low testosterone levels. Physicians should be aware of its existence, should consider ordering tests for men who have symptoms, and should treat carefully selected patients whose serum testosterone levels are low. PMID:11212438

  16. Testosterone suppresses oxidative stress in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Marin, Douglas Popp; Bolin, Anaysa Paola; dos Santos, Rita de Cassia Macedo; Curi, Rui; Otton, Rosemari

    2010-07-01

    The in vitro effect of testosterone on human neutrophil function was investigated. Blood neutrophils from healthy male subjects were isolated and treated with 10 nM, 0.1 and 10 microM testosterone for 24 h. As compared with untreated cells, the testosterone treatment produced a significant decrease of superoxide production as indicated by the measurement of extra- and intracellular superoxide content. An increment in the production of nitric oxide was observed at 0.1 and 10 microM testosterone concentrations, whereas no effect was found for 10 nM. Intracellular calcium mobilization was significantly increased at 10 nM, whereas it was reduced at 10 microM testosterone. There was an increase in phagocytic capacity at 10 nM and a decrease of microbicidal activity in neutrophils treated with testosterone at 10 microM. Glutathione reductase activity was increased by testosterone treatment, whereas no effect was observed in other antioxidant enzyme activities. An increase in the content of thiol groups was observed at all testosterone concentrations. Lipid peroxidation in neutrophils evaluated by levels of TBARS was decreased at 10 nM and 0.1 microM testosterone. These results indicate the antioxidant properties of testosterone in neutrophils as suggested by reduction of superoxide anion production, and lipid peroxidation, and by the increase in nitric oxide production, glutathione reductase activity and the content of thiol groups. Therefore, the plasma levels of testosterone are important regulators of neutrophil function and so of the inflammatory response.

  17. Effects of in vivo testosterone manipulation on ovarian morphology, follicular development, and follicle yolk testosterone in the homing pigeon.

    PubMed

    Goerlich, Vivian C; Dijkstra, Cor; Groothuis, Ton G G

    2010-07-01

    To date, our understanding of the function of testosterone in female reproductive physiology is only marginal although there are indications that testosterone is involved in modulating follicular recruitment, growth, atresia, and ovulation. Studies elevating testosterone in breeding female birds have, in most instances, found detrimental effects, such as delayed clutch initiation or decreased clutch size. In our previous study, testosterone treatment of female homing pigeons delayed clutch initiation without diminishing fecundity. In this study, we explore whether the observed effect might have been caused by testosterone influencing follicle maturation or ovulation. We implanted mature female pigeons with testosterone prior to pairing, which resulted in constant elevation of circulating testosterone concentrations within the physiological range. We killed females after they had laid the first egg and measured ovarian and follicular development. Ovarian mass and pre-hierarchical yolky follicles were not affected by the treatment; however, testosterone females produced smaller and lighter preovulatory follicles. High plasma testosterone levels at oviposition or a strong temporal increase in testosterone were negatively related to mass and diameter of second follicles. We proposed that sustained elevation of testosterone delays follicular maturation, potentially via negative feedback on the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis. Furthermore, to gain better insight into the regulation of yolk hormone acquisition, we measured testosterone concentrations in the preovulatory follicles. We found no differences between treatment groups but follicle yolk contained much higher levels of testosterone than yolk of un-incubated eggs, suggesting that hormone measurements performed after oviposition do not correctly reflect maternal allocation.

  18. [Testosterone deficiency, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Miró, Mercè; Chillarón, Juan J; Pedro-Botet, Juan

    2016-01-15

    Testosterone deficiency in adult age is associated with a decrease in libido, energy, hematocrit, muscle mass and bone mineral density, as well as with depression. More recently, testosterone deficiency has also been associated with various components of the metabolic syndrome, which in turn is associated with a five-fold increase in the risk of cardiovascular disease. Low testosterone levels are associated with increased insulin resistance, increase in fat mass, low HDL cholesterol, higher triglyceride levels and hypertension. Testosterone replacement therapy in patients with testosterone deficiency and type 2 diabetes mellitus and/or metabolic syndrome has shown reductions in insulin resistance, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglycerides and improvement in glycemic control and anthropometric parameters.

  19. Effects of varicocelectomy on serum testosterone

    PubMed Central

    Whelan, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Varicocele is most often surgically repaired due to male infertility, however, has recently been linked to low serum testosterone. This paper serves to review the current literature regarding varicocele and its subsequent repair on serum testosterone. Twenty-eight human studies were identified with fifteen showing improved serum testosterone after repair. The majority of the studies that demonstrated improvement had preoperative testosterone levels that were low or below normal. Additionally, multiple well-designed studies with control groups not undergoing surgical repair demonstrated significant difference between groups. This improvement was less observed in studies with normal preoperative serum testosterone. A majority of these patients studied were presenting for infertility. It remains to be determined if these findings can be reproduced in men without infertility. The findings suggest that microsurgical varicocele repair can improve serum testosterone in men with low levels preoperatively in appropriately counseled men. It remains to be seen whether varicocele repair can help prevent the development of low testosterone in the future or which patients are at risk of developing low testosterone due to varicocele. PMID:28078218

  20. Efficacy of triptorelin pamoate 11.25 mg administered subcutaneously for achieving medical castration levels of testosterone in patients with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Lebret, Thiery; Rouanne, Mathieu; Hublarov, Oleg; Jinga, Viorel; Petkova, Lidiya; Kotsev, Rumen; Sinescu, Ioanel; Dutailly, Pascale

    2015-06-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists are widely used as androgen deprivation therapy in many men with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists are delivered by intramuscular injection every 1, 3 or 6 months, but in some patients subcutaneous injection may be more appropriate. This study assessed the efficacy and safety profile of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist, triptorelin pamoate, when administered by the subcutaneous route. In this multicentre, open-label, single-arm study, androgen deprivation therapy-naïve men with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer received the gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist triptorelin pamoate 11.25 mg (3-month formulation) by the subcutaneous route twice (at baseline and 13 weeks later). The co-primary efficacy endpoints were the proportion of patients with a castration level of serum testosterone (<50 ng/dl) after 4 weeks, and of these, those still castrated after 26 weeks. Of the 126 treated patients, 123 [97.6%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 93.2-99.5)] were castrated 4 weeks after the first subcutaneous injection, and 115/119 patients (96.6%; 95% CI: 91.6-99.1) castrated at 4 weeks maintained castration at 26 weeks. Median prostate-specific antigen levels were reduced by 64.2 and 96.0% at 4 and 26 weeks, respectively. The probability of maintaining a testosterone level <20 ng/dl up to 26 weeks was 90.0% (95% CI: 85.0-95.0). The most frequently occurring treatment-related adverse events were typical of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist treatment (hot flushes, increased weight, erectile dysfunction and hyperhidrosis). This study demonstrates that triptorelin pamoate 11.25 mg administered by the subcutaneous route every 3 months is as efficacious and well tolerated as administration via the intramuscular route in men with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer.

  1. Efficacy of triptorelin pamoate 11.25 mg administered subcutaneously for achieving medical castration levels of testosterone in patients with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rouanne, Mathieu; Hublarov, Oleg; Jinga, Viorel; Petkova, Lidiya; Kotsev, Rumen; Sinescu, Ioanel; Dutailly, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists are widely used as androgen deprivation therapy in many men with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists are delivered by intramuscular injection every 1, 3 or 6 months, but in some patients subcutaneous injection may be more appropriate. This study assessed the efficacy and safety profile of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist, triptorelin pamoate, when administered by the subcutaneous route. Methods: In this multicentre, open-label, single-arm study, androgen deprivation therapy-naïve men with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer received the gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist triptorelin pamoate 11.25 mg (3-month formulation) by the subcutaneous route twice (at baseline and 13 weeks later). The co-primary efficacy endpoints were the proportion of patients with a castration level of serum testosterone (<50 ng/dl) after 4 weeks, and of these, those still castrated after 26 weeks. Results: Of the 126 treated patients, 123 [97.6%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 93.2–99.5)] were castrated 4 weeks after the first subcutaneous injection, and 115/119 patients (96.6%; 95% CI: 91.6–99.1) castrated at 4 weeks maintained castration at 26 weeks. Median prostate-specific antigen levels were reduced by 64.2 and 96.0% at 4 and 26 weeks, respectively. The probability of maintaining a testosterone level <20 ng/dl up to 26 weeks was 90.0% (95% CI: 85.0–95.0). The most frequently occurring treatment-related adverse events were typical of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist treatment (hot flushes, increased weight, erectile dysfunction and hyperhidrosis). Conclusions: This study demonstrates that triptorelin pamoate 11.25 mg administered by the subcutaneous route every 3 months is as efficacious and well tolerated as administration via the intramuscular route in men with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:26161143

  2. Serum Testosterone Kinetics After Brachytherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Lief, Jonathan H.; Allen, Zachariah A.; Wallner, Kent E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate temporal changes in testosterone after prostate brachytherapy and investigate the potential impact of these changes on response to treatment. Methods and Materials: Between January 2008 and March 2009, 221 consecutive patients underwent Pd-103 brachytherapy without androgen deprivation for clinically localized prostate cancer. Prebrachytherapy prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and serum testosterone were obtained for each patient. Repeat levels were obtained 3 months after brachytherapy and at least every 6 months thereafter. Multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters were evaluated to determine an association with temporal testosterone changes. In addition, analysis was conducted to determine if there was an association between testosterone changes and treatment outcomes or the occurrence of a PSA spike. Results: There was no significant difference in serum testosterone over time after implant (p = 0.57). 29% of men experienced an increase {>=}25%, 23% of men experienced a decrease {>=}25%, and the remaining 48% of men had no notable change in testosterone over time. There was no difference in testosterone trends between men who received external beam radiotherapy and those who did not (p = 0.12). On multivariate analysis, preimplant testosterone was the only variable that consistently predicted for changes in testosterone over time. Men with higher than average testosterone tended to experience drop in testosterone (p < 0.001), whereas men with average or below average baseline testosterone had no significant change. There was no association between men who experienced PSA spike and testosterone temporal trends (p = 0.50) nor between initial PSA response and testosterone trends (p = 0.21). Conclusion: Prostate brachytherapy does not appear to impact serum testosterone over time. Changes in serum testosterone do not appear to be associated with PSA spike phenomena nor with initial PSA response to treatment; therefore, PSA response

  3. Salivary and plasma free testosterone and androstenedione levels in women using oral contraceptives containing desogestrel or levonorgestrel.

    PubMed

    Swinkels, L M; Meulenberg, P M; Ross, H A; Benraad, T J

    1988-07-01

    The effect of oral contraceptives (OC) containing a combination of ethinyloestradiol (EE2) and either desogestrel (Dg/EE2) or levonorgestrel (Lg/EE2) on plasma concentrations of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), total testosterone (T), free T, total androstenedione (A), free A and on salivary T and A concentrations have been studied. SHBG concentrations were higher in the Dg/EE2 group than in the Lg/EE2 group. Total T, measured by RIA with prior extraction and chromatography, is also higher in the Dg/EE2 group. Per cent free T was lower in the Dg/EE2 group. Plasma free T and free A concentrations were the same in both groups. However, free T and free A were significantly lower in the OC-groups than in controls. In contrast, by direct assay, no difference in total T was observed between the OC-groups. Since the per cent free T was lower in the Dg/EE2 group, it would be concluded that free T in the Dg/EE2 group is lower than in the Lg/EE2 group. Salivary free T and free A concentrations did not differ between control and OC-groups. There was good correlation between salivary and free hormone concentrations within each group. We conclude that the concentrations of androgens in saliva do not necessarily directly reflect their free concentrations in plasma.

  4. Umbilical Cord Blood Testosterone and Childhood Internalizing and Externalizing Behavior: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Monique; Whitehouse, Andrew J. O.; Jacoby, Peter; Mattes, Eugen; Sawyer, Michael G.; Keelan, Jeffrey A.; Hickey, Martha

    2013-01-01

    Antenatal testosterone exposure influences fetal neurodevelopment and gender-role behavior in postnatal life and may contribute to differences in developmental psychopathology during childhood. We prospectively measured the associations between umbilical cord blood testosterone levels at birth and childhood behavioral development in both males and females from a large population based sample. The study comprised 430 females and 429 males from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study where umbilical cord blood had been collected. Total testosterone concentrations were determined by mass spectrometry and bioavailable testosterone (BioT) levels were calculated. At two, five, eight and ten years of age, the participants completed the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). Linear regression models were used to analyse the relationship between BioT concentrations (in quartiles) and CBCL scores (total, internalizing, externalizing and selected syndrome). Boys had higher mean CBCL T-scores than girls across all ages of follow-up. There was no significant relationship between cord blood BioT quartiles and CBCL total, internalizing and externalizing T-scores at age two or five to ten combined. In the syndrome score analyses, higher BioT quartiles were associated with significantly lower scores for attention problems for boys at age five, eight and ten, and greater withdrawal symptoms in pre-school girls (age five). We did not identify a consistent relationship between antenatal testosterone exposure and total, internalizing or externalizing behavioral difficulties in childhood. Higher umbilical cord BioT levels were associated with lower scores for attention problems in boys up to 10 years and more withdrawn behavior in 5-year-old girls; however, these findings were not consistent across ages and require further investigation in a larger sample. PMID:23573225

  5. Experiment K-6-16. Morphological examination of rat testes. The effect of Cosmos 1887 flight on spermatogonial population and testosterone level in rat testes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philpott, D. E.; Kato, K.; Stevenson, J.; Vasques, M.; Sapp, W.; Williams, C.; Popova, I. A.; Serova, L. V.

    1990-01-01

    Testes from rats flown on Cosmos 1887 for twelve and a half days were compared to basal control, synchronous control and vivarium maintained rats. When the mean weights of flight testes, normalized for weight/100 gms, were compared to the vivarium controls they were 6.7 percent lighter. Although the flight testes were lighter than the synchronous, the difference is not significant. Counts of spermatogonial cells from 5 animals in each group revealed a 4 percent decrease in flight compared to vivarium controls. In both cases the t-Test significance was less than 0.02. The serum testosterone levels of all animals (flight, synchronous and vivarium) were significantly below the basal controls.

  6. Simultaneous administration of fluoxetine and simvastatin ameliorates lipid profile, improves brain level of neurotransmitters, and increases bioavailability of simvastatin.

    PubMed

    Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman K; Ullah, Zabih; Al Masoudi, Aqeel Salman; Ahmad, Ishtiaque

    2017-01-01

    Simvastatin (STT), a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor, is widely prescribed for dyslipidemia, whereas fluoxetine (FLX) is the first-choice drug for the treatment of depression and anxiety. A recent report suggests that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors can interact with the cytochrome P450 3A4 substrate, and another one suggests that STT enhances the antidepressant activity of FLX. However, the data are inconclusive. The present study was designed to explore the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic consequences of coadministration of STT and FLX in experimental animals. For this, Wistar rats weighing 250±10 g were divided into four groups, including control, STT (40 mg/kg/day), FLX (20 mg/kg/day), and STT+FLX group, respectively. After the dosing period of 4 weeks, the animals were sacrificed, and the blood and brain samples were collected for the analysis of STT, simvastatin acid (STA), FLX, total cholesterol, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), 5-hydroxytryptamine, dopamine, and hydroxy indole acetic acid. It was found that the coadministration resulted in a significant increase in the bioavailability of STT in the plasma (41.8%) and brain (68.7%) compared to administration of STT alone (p<0.05). The maximum drug concentration (Cmax) of STT was also found to be increased significantly in the plasma and brain compared to that achieved after monotherapy (p<0.05). However, STT failed to improve the pharmacokinetics of FLX up to a significant level. The results of this study showed that the combined regimen significantly reduced the level of cholesterol and triglyceride and increased the level of HDL when compared to STT monotherapy. Furthermore, the coadministration of STT with FLX led to an elevated level of neurotransmitters in the brain (p<0.05). FLX increased the concentration of STT in the plasma and brain. The coadministration of these drugs also led to an improved lipid profile. However, in the long-term, this

  7. Simultaneous administration of fluoxetine and simvastatin ameliorates lipid profile, improves brain level of neurotransmitters, and increases bioavailability of simvastatin

    PubMed Central

    Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman K; Ullah, Zabih; Al Masoudi, Aqeel Salman; Ahmad, Ishtiaque

    2017-01-01

    Simvastatin (STT), a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor, is widely prescribed for dyslipidemia, whereas fluoxetine (FLX) is the first-choice drug for the treatment of depression and anxiety. A recent report suggests that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors can interact with the cytochrome P450 3A4 substrate, and another one suggests that STT enhances the antidepressant activity of FLX. However, the data are inconclusive. The present study was designed to explore the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic consequences of coadministration of STT and FLX in experimental animals. For this, Wistar rats weighing 250±10 g were divided into four groups, including control, STT (40 mg/kg/day), FLX (20 mg/kg/day), and STT+FLX group, respectively. After the dosing period of 4 weeks, the animals were sacrificed, and the blood and brain samples were collected for the analysis of STT, simvastatin acid (STA), FLX, total cholesterol, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), 5-hydroxytryptamine, dopamine, and hydroxy indole acetic acid. It was found that the coadministration resulted in a significant increase in the bioavailability of STT in the plasma (41.8%) and brain (68.7%) compared to administration of STT alone (p<0.05). The maximum drug concentration (Cmax) of STT was also found to be increased significantly in the plasma and brain compared to that achieved after monotherapy (p<0.05). However, STT failed to improve the pharmacokinetics of FLX up to a significant level. The results of this study showed that the combined regimen significantly reduced the level of cholesterol and triglyceride and increased the level of HDL when compared to STT monotherapy. Furthermore, the coadministration of STT with FLX led to an elevated level of neurotransmitters in the brain (p<0.05). FLX increased the concentration of STT in the plasma and brain. The coadministration of these drugs also led to an improved lipid profile. However, in the long-term, this

  8. Design and End Points of Clinical Trials for Patients With Progressive Prostate Cancer and Castrate Levels of Testosterone: Recommendations of the Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials Working Group

    PubMed Central

    Scher, Howard I.; Halabi, Susan; Tannock, Ian; Morris, Michael; Sternberg, Cora N.; Carducci, Michael A.; Eisenberger, Mario A.; Higano, Celestia; Bubley, Glenn J.; Dreicer, Robert; Petrylak, Daniel; Kantoff, Philip; Basch, Ethan; Kelly, William Kevin; Figg, William D.; Small, Eric J.; Beer, Tomasz M.; Wilding, George; Martin, Alison; Hussain, Maha

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To update eligibility and outcome measures in trials that evaluate systemic treatment for patients with progressive prostate cancer and castrate levels of testosterone. Methods A committee of investigators experienced in conducting trials for prostate cancer defined new consensus criteria by reviewing previous criteria, Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST), and emerging trial data. Results The Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials Working Group (PCWG2) recommends a two-objective paradigm: (1) controlling, relieving, or eliminating disease manifestations that are present when treatment is initiated and (2) preventing or delaying disease manifestations expected to occur. Prostate cancers progressing despite castrate levels of testosterone are considered castration resistant and not hormone refractory. Eligibility is defined using standard disease assessments to authenticate disease progression, prior treatment, distinct clinical subtypes, and predictive models. Outcomes are reported independently for prostate-specific antigen (PSA), imaging, and clinical measures, avoiding grouped categorizations such as complete or partial response. In most trials, early changes in PSA and/or pain are not acted on without other evidence of disease progression, and treatment should be continued for at least 12 weeks to ensure adequate drug exposure. Bone scans are reported as “new lesions” or “no new lesions,” changes in soft-tissue disease assessed by RECIST, and pain using validated scales. Defining eligibility for prevent/delay end points requires attention to estimated event frequency and/or random assignment to a control group. Conclusion PCWG2 recommends increasing emphasis on time-to-event end points (ie, failure to progress) as decision aids in proceeding from phase II to phase III trials. Recommendations will evolve as data are generated on the utility of intermediate end points to predict clinical benefit. PMID:18309951

  9. Serum Testosterone Concentrations and Urinary Bisphenol A, Benzophenone-3, Triclosan, and Paraben Levels in Male and Female Children and Adolescents: NHANES 2011–2012

    PubMed Central

    Scinicariello, Franco; Buser, Melanie C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Exposure to environmental phenols (e.g., bisphenol A, benzophenone-3, and triclosan) and parabens is widespread in the population. Many of these chemicals have been shown to have anti-androgenic effects both in vitro and in vivo. Objective: We examined the association of bisphenol A (BPA), benzophenone-3 (BP-3), triclosan (TCS), and parabens with serum total testosterone (TT) levels in child and adolescent participants (ages 6–19 years) in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2011–2012. Methods: We performed multivariable linear regression to estimate associations between natural log–transformed serum TT and quartiles of urinary BPA, BP-3, TCS, and parabens in male and female children (ages 6–11 years) and adolescents (ages 12–19 years). Results: BP-3 and BPA were associated with significantly lower TT in male adolescents, and BPA was associated with significantly higher TT in female adolescents. TT was not consistently associated with TCS or total parabens in children or adolescents of either sex. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first study to report an association of both BP-3 and BPA with serum TT in adolescents. Associations between BPA and TT differed according to sex in adolescents, with inverse associations in boys and positive associations in girls. BP-3 was associated with significantly lower TT in adolescent boys only. However, because of the limitations inherent to the cross-sectional study design, further studies are needed to confirm and elucidate on our findings. Citation: Scinicariello F, Buser MC. 2016. Serum testosterone concentrations and urinary bisphenol A, benzophenone-3, triclosan, and paraben levels in male and female children and adolescents: NHANES 2011–2012. Environ Health Perspect 124:1898–1904; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP150 PMID:27383665

  10. Analysis of level A in vitro-in vivo correlations for an extended-release formulation with limited bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Kakhi, Maziar; Marroum, Patrick; Chittenden, Jason

    2013-07-01

    A two-stage, numerical deconvolution approach was employed to develop level A in vitro-in vivo correlations using data for three formulations of an extended-release oral dosage form. The in vitro dissolution data for all formulations exhibited near-complete dissolution within the time frame of the test. The pharmacokinetic concentration-time profiles for 16 subjects in a cross-over study demonstrated notably limited bioavailability for the slowest formulation. These data were used as the basis for the IVIVC model development. Two models were identified that satisfied the nominal requirements for a conclusive internal predictability of the IVIVC, provided that all three formulations were used as internal datasets. These were a simple linear model with absorption cut-off and a piecewise-linear variable absorption scale model. A subsequent cross-validation of the models' robustness indicated that neither model predicted satisfactorily the pharmacokinetic characteristics of all formulations in a conclusive manner. The piecewise-linear variable absorption scale model provided the most accurate results, particularly with respect to the prediction of the slowest formulation's pharmacokinetic metrics. But this latter model also involved additional free parameters compared with the simple linear model with absorption cut-off. It is argued that more complex IVIVC models with extra parameterization require comprehensive validation to ascertain the accuracy and robustness of the model. In order to achieve this, it is necessary to ensure a complete suite of supporting datasets for internal and external validation, irrespective of the mathematical approach used subsequently to develop the IVIVC. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Testosterone ethosomes for enhanced transdermal delivery.

    PubMed

    Ainbinder, Denize; Touitou, Elka

    2005-01-01

    Physiological decrease in testosterone levels in men with age causes various changes with clinical significance. Recent testosterone replacement therapy is based mainly on transdermal nonpatch delivery systems. These products have the drawback of application on extremely large areas to achieve required hormone blood levels. The objective of the present study was to design and test a testosterone nonpatch formulation using ethosomes for enhanced transdermal absorption. The ethosomal formulation was characterized by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering for structure and size distribution and by ultracentrifugation for entrapment capacity. To evaluate the feasibility of this delivery system to enhance testosterone permeation through the skin, first the systemic absorption in rats was compared with a currently used gel (AndroGel). Further, theoretical estimation of testosterone blood concentration following ethosomal application in men was made. For this purpose, in vitro permeation experiments through human skin were performed to establish testosterone skin permeation values. In the design of these experiments, testosterone solubility in various solutions was measured and the effect of the receiver medium on the skin barrier function was assessed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Theoretical estimation shows that testosterone human plasma concentration value in the upper part of the physiological range could be achieved by application of the ethosomal formulation on an area of 40 cm(2). This area is about 10 times smaller than required with current nonpatch formulations. Our work shows that the ethosomal formulation could enhance testosterone systemic absorption and also be used for designing new products that could solve the weaknesses of the current testosterone replacement therapies.

  12. Low-level laser therapy to recovery testicular degeneration in rams: effects on seminal characteristics, scrotal temperature, plasma testosterone concentration, and testes histopathology.

    PubMed

    Alves, Maíra Bianchi Rodrigues; de Arruda, Rubens Paes; Batissaco, Leonardo; Florez-Rodriguez, Shirley Andrea; de Oliveira, Bruna Marcele Martins; Torres, Mariana Andrade; Ravagnani, Gisele Mouro; Lançoni, Renata; de Almeida, Tamie Guibu; Storillo, Vanessa Martins; Vellone, Vinicius Silva; Franci, Celso Rodrigues; Thomé, Helder Esteves; Canella, Carolina Luz; De Andrade, André Furugen Cesar; Celeghini, Eneiva Carla Carvalho

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficiency of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) to recovery testicular degeneration in rams. In the first study, rams were induced to testicular degeneration by scrotal insulation, and then, they were treated using LLLT at 28 J/cm(2) (INS28) or 56 J/cm(2) (INS56) energy densities. Sperm kinetics, morphology, and membranes integrity as well as proportion of lumen area in seminiferous tubule were assessed. In the second study, rams were submitted or not to scrotal insulation and treated or not by the best protocol of LLLT defined by experiment 1 (INS28). In this study were evaluated sperm kinetics, morphology, membranes integrity, ROS production, and DNA integrity. Testosterone serum concentration and proportion of lumen area in seminiferous tubule were also analyzed. Insulation was effective in promoting sperm injuries in both experiments. Biostimulatory effect was observed in experiment 1: INS28 presented smaller proportion of lumen area (P = 0.0001) and less degeneration degree (P = 0.0002). However, in experiment 2, there was no difference between the groups (P = 0.17). In addition, LLLT did not improve sperm quality, and there was a decreasing for total and progressive motility (P = 0.02) and integrity of sperm membranes (P = 0.01) in LLLT-treated groups. Moreover, testosterone concentration was not improved by LLLT (P = 0.37). Stimulation of aerobic phosphorylation by LLLT may have led to a deregulated increase in ROS leading to sperm damages. Thus, LLLT at energy of 28 J/cm(2) (808 nm of wavelength and 30 mW of power output) can induce sperm damages and increase the quantity of cells in seminiferous tubule in rams.

  13. Contemporary perspective and management of testosterone deficiency: Modifiable factors and variable management.

    PubMed

    Hisasue, Shin-ichi

    2015-12-01

    Testosterone deficiency can occur in males of all ages. In adult males, it is induced by endogenous testosterone decline through aging and other modifiable factors. Recent publications suggested the importance of the magnitude of longitudinal decline of testosterone from baseline. The baseline level and the longitudinal decline have individual variability influenced by individual factors including digit ratio, CAG repeat of the androgen receptor and sirtuin activity. Regarding treatment for testosterone deficiency, testosterone replacement therapy is the gold standard for the management of testosterone-deficient patients, and it improves three domains of testosterone deficiency symptoms, such as the physical, psychological and sexual domain. Recent reports suggested the importance of modifiable factors in the testosterone decline in addition to aging. Therefore, it might be responsible for the prevention of testosterone deficiency symptoms to maintain testosterone secretion taking account of the modifiable factors. The present article reviews the literature, and introduces contemporary perspectives and management of testosterone deficiency.

  14. BIOAVAILABILITY: SCIENCE AND ACCEPTANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reducing risk from elevated levels of soil Pb involves removal, covering, or dilution by mixing with uncontaminated soil. Understanding that soil lead bioavailability is related to metal speciation and that in situ remediation techniques can alter metal speciation EPA's Na...

  15. Testosterone therapy in men with testosterone deficiency: Are we beyond the point of no return?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Although testosterone therapy in men with testosterone deficiency was introduced in the early 1940s, utilization of this effective treatment approach in hypogonadal men is met with considerable skepticism and resistance. Indeed, for decades, the fear that testosterone may cause prostate cancer has hampered clinical progress in this field. Nevertheless, even after considerable knowledge was acquired that this fear is unsubstantiated, many in the medical community remain hesitant to utilize this therapeutic approach to treat men with hypogonadism. As the fears concerning prostate cancer have subsided, a new controversy regarding use of testosterone therapy and increase in cardiovascular disease was introduced. Although the new controversy was based on one ill-fated clinical trial, one meta-analysis with studies that utilized unapproved formulation in men with liver cirrhosis, and two retrospective studies with suspect or nonvalidated statistical methodologies and database contaminations, the flames of such controversy were fanned by the lay press and academics alike. In this review we discuss the adverse effect of testosterone deficiency and highlight the numerous proven benefits of testosterone therapy on men's health and debunk the myth that testosterone therapy increases cardiovascular risk. Ultimately, we believe that there is considerable scientific and clinical evidence to suggest that testosterone therapy is safe and effective with restoration of physiological levels in men with testosterone deficiency, irrespective of its etiology. PMID:27847912

  16. Erythrocyte fatty acid composition does not influence levels of free, bioavailable, and total 25-hydroxy vitamin D.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Martin; Nilsson, Ingela; Brudin, Lars; Von, Siv-Ping; Wanby, Pär

    2017-02-01

    In vitro, mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids (FAs) may decrease the binding affinity of vitamin D metabolites for vitamin D-binding protein, which in turn may influence their bioavailability. FAs incorporated as phospholipids in erythrocyte (ery-) cell membranes reflect dietary intake. The purpose of this study was to investigate ery-FA composition in relation to markers for vitamin D. In healthy females (age 22.6 ± 2.0 years) total 25(OH)D was measured by LC-MS/MS (n = 78), free 25(OH)D with ELISA (n = 64 of 78), and bioavailable 25(OH)D was calculated. Analysis of ery-FA composition was by gas chromatography (n = 56 of 78). A strong correlation between total 25(OH)D and free 25(OH)D was seen (r = .66, p < .001), and between total-25(OH)D and bioavailable 25(OH)D (r = .68, p < .001). No correlations between 25(OH)D fractions and specific fatty acids were found, and in particular, no associations with mono- and poly-unsaturated FA compositions. All 25(OH)D fractions were correlated with leptin (total 25(OH)D (r = -.33, p < .003); bioavailable 25(OH)D (r = -.47, p < .001); free 25(OH)D (r = -.44, p < .001). Associations were found between PTH and total 25(OH)D (r = -.35, p = .002) and weaker between bioavailable 25(OH)D (r = -.35, p = .040) and free 25(OH)D (r = -.28, p = .079). All fractions of 25(OH)D appear to correlate in a similar way to PTH, BMI and body fat (leptin). No association was found between ery-FA composition and free/bioavailable 25(OH)D. It is unlikely that FAs are a strong uncoupling factor of DBP-bound 25(OH)D.

  17. Testosterone-mediated increase in 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone content, nuclear androgen receptor levels, and cell division in an androgen-independent prostate carcinoma of Noble rats.

    PubMed

    Ho, S M; Leav, I; Damassa, D; Kwan, P W; Merk, F B; Seto, H S

    1988-02-01

    An androgen-independent, transplantable prostate carcinoma line (AIT), originally derived from the dorsolateral prostate (DLP) of Noble rat, was implanted into orchiectomized Noble rats and its response to androgen stimulation was studied and compared to that of the regenerating DLP tissue in sexually ablated rats. AIT tumors carried in castrated hosts displayed a high basal level of proliferative activity (mitotic index (MI), 15.0 +/- 0.5) while DLP tissue in untreated castrates exhibited no proliferative activity. Following androgen stimulation by testosterone capsule implantation into host rats, the AIT responded with a marked increase in cell proliferation; MI values doubled to 30.0 +/- 2.9 on Day 5 following androgen stimulation. This androgen-induced increase in MI values was coincident with elevations in nuclear androgen receptor (20-fold increase) and 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone content (3-fold increase) in the tumor. However, by Day 10 following androgen treatment, indices of cell proliferation in the AIT declined to pre-androgen-stimulated levels (MI, 14.8 +/- 1.9) despite the continued elevations in nuclear androgen receptor and tissue 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone contents. Parallel changes in MI were also observed in the normal regenerating DLP following androgen stimulation. MI values in this tissue increased from nondetectable levels to 38.1 +/- 4.7 on Day 5 but declined to relatively low levels (4.5 +/- 0.9) by Day 10 following androgen replacement. Taken together these findings led us to conclude that the AIT carried in castrates is capable of responding to testosterone in a manner similar to that observed for androgen-stimulated DLP of sexually ablated rats. Thus, in both the neoplastic and regenerating tissues, the initial response to androgen is characterized by a marked enhancement of cell proliferation which was correlated with an increase in androgen receptor and 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone content. However, like its tissue of origin, the AIT

  18. Testosterone and cardiovascular disease in men

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Paul D; Channer, Kevin S

    2012-01-01

    Despite regional variations in the prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD), men are consistently more at risk of developing and dying from CAD than women, and the gender-specific effects of sex hormones are implicated in this inequality. This ‘Perspectives' article reviews the current evidence regarding the cardiovascular effects of testosterone in men including an examination of the age-related decline in testosterone, the relationship between testosterone levels and coronary disease, coronary risk factors and mortality. We also review the vaso-active effects of testosterone, and discuss how these have been used in men with heart failure and angina. We discuss the ‘cause' versus ‘effect' controversy, regarding low testosterone levels in men with coronary heart disease, as well as concerns over the use of testosterone replacement therapy in middle aged and elderly men. The article concludes with a discussion regarding the future direction for work in this interesting area, including the relative merits of screening for, and treating hypogonadism with testosterone replacement therapy in men with heart disease. PMID:22522504

  19. Testosterone and aggressive behavior in man.

    PubMed

    Batrinos, Menelaos L

    2012-01-01

    Atavistic residues of aggressive behavior prevailing in animal life, determined by testosterone, remain attenuated in man and suppressed through familial and social inhibitions. However, it still manifests itself in various intensities and forms from; thoughts, anger, verbal aggressiveness, competition, dominance behavior, to physical violence. Testosterone plays a significant role in the arousal of these behavioral manifestations in the brain centers involved in aggression and on the development of the muscular system that enables their realization. There is evidence that testosterone levels are higher in individuals with aggressive behavior, such as prisoners who have committed violent crimes. Several field studies have also shown that testosterone levels increase during the aggressive phases of sports games. In more sensitive laboratory paradigms, it has been observed that participant's testosterone rises in the winners of; competitions, dominance trials or in confrontations with factitious opponents. Aggressive behavior arises in the brain through interplay between subcortical structures in the amygdala and the hypothalamus in which emotions are born and the prefrontal cognitive centers where emotions are perceived and controlled. The action of testosterone on the brain begins in the embryonic stage. Earlier in development at the DNA level, the number of CAG repeats in the androgen receptor gene seems to play a role in the expression of aggressive behavior. Neuroimaging techniques in adult males have shown that testosterone activates the amygdala enhancing its emotional activity and its resistance to prefrontal restraining control. This effect is opposed by the action of cortisol which facilitates prefrontal area cognitive control on impulsive tendencies aroused in the subcortical structures. The degree of impulsivity is regulated by serotonin inhibiting receptors, and with the intervention of this neurotransmitter the major agents of the neuroendocrine

  20. Effect of Exercise Training and Testosterone Replacement on Skeletal Muscle Wasting in Patients With Heart Failure With Testosterone Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Marcelo R; Sayegh, Ana L C; Bacurau, Aline V N; Arap, Marco A; Brum, Patrícia C; Pereira, Rosa M R; Takayama, Liliam; Barretto, Antônio C P; Negrão, Carlos E; Alves, Maria Janieire de Nazaré Nunes

    2016-05-01

    To examine whether combined testosterone replacement and exercise training (ET) therapies would potentiate the beneficial effects of isolated therapies on neurovascular control and muscle wasting in patients with heart failure (HF) with testosterone deficiency. From January 10, 2010, through July 25, 2013, 39 male patients with HF, New York Heart Association functional class III, total testosterone level less than 249 ng/dL (to convert to nmol/L, multiply by .03467), and free testosterone level less than 131 pmol/L were randomized to training (4-month cycloergometer training), testosterone (intramuscular injection of testosterone undecylate for 4 months), and training + testosterone groups. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity was measured using microneurography, forearm blood flow using plethysmography, body composition using dual X-ray absorptiometry, and functional capacity using cardiopulmonary test. Skeletal muscle biopsy was performed in the vastus lateralis. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity decreased in ET groups (training, P<.01; training + testosterone, P<.01), whereas no changes were observed in the testosterone group (P=.89). Forearm blood flow was similar in all groups. Lean mass increased in ET groups (training, P<.01; training + testosterone, P<.01), whereas lean mass decreased in the testosterone group (P<.01). The response of cross-sectional area of type I (P<.01) and type II (P<.05) fibers increased in the training + testosterone group as compared with the isolated testosterone group. Our findings provide evidence for a superior effect of combined ET and testosterone replacement therapies on muscle sympathetic nerve activity, muscle wasting, and functional capacity in patients with HF with testosterone deficiency. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Testosterone and bone: indications and limitations].

    PubMed

    Stoll, Delphine; Puder, Jardena J; Lamy, Olivier

    2011-06-15

    Osteoporosis incidence increases exponentially with age in men and hypogonadism represents a risk factor. Sex steroids levels are correlated to bone mineral density and to fracture prevalence. Most studies demonstrate an improvement in bone mineral density in men with hypogonadism as a result of testosterone therapy. Nevertheless there are no data evaluating the effect of testosterone therapy on fractures in men. Approximately 20% of men older than 60 have a total testosterone level lower than the lower limit of the reference range but there is no true consensus on the definition of hypogonadism in older men. In older men we recommend to treat only if total morning testosterone levels are < 8 nmol/l or even < 6,9 nmol/l on several occasions in the absence of any reversible illness and if there is no contraindication for treatment.

  2. Gender differences in financial risk aversion and career choices are affected by testosterone

    PubMed Central

    Sapienza, Paola; Zingales, Luigi; Maestripieri, Dario

    2009-01-01

    Women are generally more risk averse than men. We investigated whether between- and within-gender variation in financial risk aversion was accounted for by variation in salivary concentrations of testosterone and in markers of prenatal testosterone exposure in a sample of >500 MBA students. Higher levels of circulating testosterone were associated with lower risk aversion among women, but not among men. At comparably low concentrations of salivary testosterone, however, the gender difference in risk aversion disappeared, suggesting that testosterone has nonlinear effects on risk aversion regardless of gender. A similar relationship between risk aversion and testosterone was also found using markers of prenatal testosterone exposure. Finally, both testosterone levels and risk aversion predicted career choices after graduation: Individuals high in testosterone and low in risk aversion were more likely to choose risky careers in finance. These results suggest that testosterone has both organizational and activational effects on risk-sensitive financial decisions and long-term career choices. PMID:19706398

  3. Exogenous Testosterone, Finasteride and Castration Effects on Testosterone, Insulin, Zinc and Chromium in Adult Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yousofvand, Namdar; Zarei, Fatemeh; Ghanbari, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although effects of trace elements on secretion of sex steroids and insulin have been studied, the effects of these hormones on serum level of trace elements have been rarely investigated. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of testosterone and finasteride administration and castration on serum levels of testosterone, insulin, zinc and chromium. Methods: Male adult rats (n = 32) were divided into 4 groups (n = 8). Group 1, control; Group 2, castration, castration was done at the first day of the study; Group 3, finasteride (20 mg/kg/day, dissolved in drinking water) and Group 4, testosterone (5 mg/kg/day, i.p.). At the end of the period of the study (35 days), serum testosterone, insulin, zinc and chromium levels were determined in the blood samples collected directly from the right atrium of the heart of the animals. Results: The data indicated that the serum levels of testosterone, insulin and zinc were significantly increased (P<0.01) in testosterone-administrated and finasteride groups, but the level of chromium was decreased in both groups (P<0.01). Castrated group had the lowest serum levels of testosterone, insulin and zinc (P<0.05). Also, the levels of serum chromium in this group were increased. Conclusion: The study demonstrates that testosterone and finasteride increases insulin and zinc levels and decreases chromium levels in the serum of male adult rats. According to these data, it seems that testosterone may affect glucose cycle through effect on serum insulin levels and trace elements such as zinc and chromium. PMID:23279835

  4. Exogenous testosterone, finasteride and castration effects on testosterone, insulin, zinc and chromium in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Yousofvand, Namdar; Zarei, Fatemeh; Ghanbari, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Although effects of trace elements on secretion of sex steroids and insulin have been studied, the effects of these hormones on serum level of trace elements have been rarely investigated. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of testosterone and finasteride administration and castration on serum levels of testosterone, insulin, zinc and chromium. Male adult rats (n = 32) were divided into 4 groups (n = 8). Group 1, control; Group 2, castration, castration was done at the first day of the study; Group 3, finasteride (20 mg/kg/day, dissolved in drinking water) and Group 4, testosterone (5 mg/kg/day, i.p.). At the end of the period of the study (35 days), serum testosterone, insulin, zinc and chromium levels were determined in the blood samples collected directly from the right atrium of the heart of the animals. The data indicated that the serum levels of testosterone, insulin and zinc were significantly increased (P<0.01) in testosterone-administrated and finasteride groups, but the level of chromium was decreased in both groups (P<0.01). Castrated group had the lowest serum levels of testosterone, insulin and zinc (P<0.05). Also, the levels of serum chromium in this group were increased. The study demonstrates that testosterone and finasteride increases insulin and zinc levels and decreases chromium levels in the serum of male adult rats. According to these data, it seems that testosterone may affect glucose cycle through effect on serum insulin levels and trace elements such as zinc and chromium.

  5. Reexamination of Testosterone, Dihydrotestosterone, Estradiol and Estrone Levels across the Menstrual Cycle and in Postmenopausal Women Measured by Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Rothman, Micol S.; Carlson, Nichole E.; Xu, Mei; Wang, Christina; Swerdloff, Ronald; Lee, Paul; Goh, Victor H.H.; Ridgway, E. Chester; Wierman, Margaret E.

    2010-01-01

    Measuring serum androgen levels in women has been challenging due to limitations in method accuracy, precision sensitivity and specificity at low hormone levels. The clinical significance of changes in sex steroids across the menstrual cycle and lifespan has remained controversial, in part due to these limitations. We used validated liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry(LC-MS/MS) assays to determine testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) along with estradiol (E2) and estrone (E1) levels across the menstrual cycle of 31 healthy premenopausal females and in 19 postmenopausal females. Samples were obtained in ovulatory women in the early follicular phase (EFP), midcycle and mid luteal phase (MLP). Overall, the levels of T, DHT, E2 and E1 in premenopausal women measured by LCMS/MS were lower overall than previously reported with immunoassays. In premenopausal women, serum T, Free T, E2, E1 and SHBG levels peaked at midcycle and remained higher in the MLP, whereas DHT did not change. In postmenopausal women, T, free T, SHBG and DHT were significantly lower than in premenopausal women, concomitant with declines in E2 and E1. These data support the hypothesis that the changes in T and DHT that occur across the cycle may reflect changes in SHBG and estrogen, whereas in menopause, androgen levels decrease. LC-MS/MS may provide more accurate and precise measurement of sex steroid hormones than prior immunoassay methods and can be useful to assess the clinical significance of changes in T, DHT, E2 and E1 levels in females. PMID:21070796

  6. Testosterone and Social Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Alan; Granger, Douglas A.; Mazur, Allan; Kivlighan, Katie T.

    2006-01-01

    Popular perceptions of the effect of testosterone on "manly" behavior are inaccurate. We need to move away from such simplistic notions by treating testosterone as one component along with other physiological, psychological and sociological variables in interactive and reciprocal models of behavior. Several hormones can now be measured in saliva,…

  7. Testosterone and Social Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Alan; Granger, Douglas A.; Mazur, Allan; Kivlighan, Katie T.

    2006-01-01

    Popular perceptions of the effect of testosterone on "manly" behavior are inaccurate. We need to move away from such simplistic notions by treating testosterone as one component along with other physiological, psychological and sociological variables in interactive and reciprocal models of behavior. Several hormones can now be measured in saliva,…

  8. Testosterone and reproductive effort in male primates.

    PubMed

    Muller, Martin N

    2016-09-08

    Considerable evidence suggests that the steroid hormone testosterone mediates major life-history trade-offs in vertebrates, promoting mating effort at the expense of parenting effort or survival. Observations from a range of wild primates support the "Challenge Hypothesis," which posits that variation in male testosterone is more closely associated with aggressive mating competition than with reproductive physiology. In both seasonally and non-seasonally breeding species, males increase testosterone production primarily when competing for fecund females. In species where males compete to maintain long-term access to females, testosterone increases when males are threatened with losing access to females, rather than during mating periods. And when male status is linked to mating success, and dependent on aggression, high-ranking males normally maintain higher testosterone levels than subordinates, particularly when dominance hierarchies are unstable. Trade-offs between parenting effort and mating effort appear to be weak in most primates, because direct investment in the form of infant transport and provisioning is rare. Instead, infant protection is the primary form of paternal investment in the order. Testosterone does not inhibit this form of investment, which relies on male aggression. Testosterone has a wide range of effects in primates that plausibly function to support male competitive behavior. These include psychological effects related to dominance striving, analgesic effects, and effects on the development and maintenance of the armaments and adornments that males employ in mating competition.

  9. Effects of Testosterone Treatment in Older Men.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Peter J; Bhasin, Shalender; Cunningham, Glenn R; Matsumoto, Alvin M; Stephens-Shields, Alisa J; Cauley, Jane A; Gill, Thomas M; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Swerdloff, Ronald S; Wang, Christina; Ensrud, Kristine E; Lewis, Cora E; Farrar, John T; Cella, David; Rosen, Raymond C; Pahor, Marco; Crandall, Jill P; Molitch, Mark E; Cifelli, Denise; Dougar, Darlene; Fluharty, Laura; Resnick, Susan M; Storer, Thomas W; Anton, Stephen; Basaria, Shehzad; Diem, Susan J; Hou, Xiaoling; Mohler, Emile R; Parsons, J Kellogg; Wenger, Nanette K; Zeldow, Bret; Landis, J Richard; Ellenberg, Susan S

    2016-02-18

    Serum testosterone concentrations decrease as men age, but benefits of raising testosterone levels in older men have not been established. We assigned 790 men 65 years of age or older with a serum testosterone concentration of less than 275 ng per deciliter and symptoms suggesting hypoandrogenism to receive either testosterone gel or placebo gel for 1 year. Each man participated in one or more of three trials--the Sexual Function Trial, the Physical Function Trial, and the Vitality Trial. The primary outcome of each of the individual trials was also evaluated in all participants. Testosterone treatment increased serum testosterone levels to the mid-normal range for men 19 to 40 years of age. The increase in testosterone levels was associated with significantly increased sexual activity, as assessed by the Psychosexual Daily Questionnaire (P<0.001), as well as significantly increased sexual desire and erectile function. The percentage of men who had an increase of at least 50 m in the 6-minute walking distance did not differ significantly between the two study groups in the Physical Function Trial but did differ significantly when men in all three trials were included (20.5% of men who received testosterone vs. 12.6% of men who received placebo, P=0.003). Testosterone had no significant benefit with respect to vitality, as assessed by the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue scale, but men who received testosterone reported slightly better mood and lower severity of depressive symptoms than those who received placebo. The rates of adverse events were similar in the two groups. In symptomatic men 65 years of age or older, raising testosterone concentrations for 1 year from moderately low to the mid-normal range for men 19 to 40 years of age had a moderate benefit with respect to sexual function and some benefit with respect to mood and depressive symptoms but no benefit with respect to vitality or walking distance. The number of participants was

  10. Effects of Testosterone Treatment in Older Men

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, P.J.; Bhasin, S.; Cunningham, G.R.; Matsumoto, A.M.; Stephens-Shields, A.J.; Cauley, J.A.; Gill, T.M.; Barrett-Connor, E.; Swerdloff, R.S.; Wang, C.; Ensrud, K.E.; Lewis, C.E.; Farrar, J.T.; Cella, D.; Rosen, R.C.; Pahor, M.; Crandall, J.P.; Molitch, M.E.; Cifelli, D.; Dougar, D.; Fluharty, L.; Resnick, S.M.; Storer, T.W.; Anton, S.; Basaria, S.; Diem, S.J.; Hou, X.; Mohler, E.R.; Parsons, J.K.; Wenger, N.K.; Zeldow, B.; Landis, J.R.; Ellenberg, S.S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Serum testosterone concentrations decrease as men age, but benefits of raising testosterone levels in older men have not been established. METHODS We assigned 790 men 65 years of age or older with a serum testosterone concentration of less than 275 ng per deciliter and symptoms suggesting hypoandrogenism to receive either testosterone gel or placebo gel for 1 year. Each man participated in one or more of three trials — the Sexual Function Trial, the Physical Function Trial, and the Vitality Trial. The primary outcome of each of the individual trials was also evaluated in all participants. RESULTS Testosterone treatment increased serum testosterone levels to the mid-normal range for men 19 to 40 years of age. The increase in testosterone levels was associated with significantly increased sexual activity, as assessed by the Psychosexual Daily Questionnaire (P<0.001), as well as significantly increased sexual desire and erectile function. The percentage of men who had an increase of at least 50 m in the 6-minute walking distance did not differ significantly between the two study groups in the Physical Function Trial but did differ significantly when men in all three trials were included (20.5% of men who received testosterone vs. 12.6% of men who received placebo, P=0.003). Testosterone had no significant benefit with respect to vitality, as assessed by the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy–Fatigue scale, but men who received testosterone reported slightly better mood and lower severity of depressive symptoms than those who received placebo. The rates of adverse events were similar in the two groups. CONCLUSIONS In symptomatic men 65 years of age or older, raising testosterone concentrations for 1 year from moderately low to the mid-normal range for men 19 to 40 years of age had a moderate benefit with respect to sexual function and some benefit with respect to mood and depressive symptoms but no benefit with respect to vitality or

  11. Diagnosing and managing low serum testosterone.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Ana Marcella; Mulkey, Zachary; Lado-Abeal, Joaquin; Yarbrough, Shannon

    2014-10-01

    Measuring testosterone levels became easier in the 1970s, and it wasn't long before levels were being checked in men across all age groups. At that time, several authors reported an age-associated decline of serum testosterone levels beginning in the fourth or fifth decades of life. Other studies found that the decline in testosterone with age might be more related to comorbidities that develop in many aging men. Aggressive marketing campaigns by pharmaceutical companies have led to increased awareness of this topic, and primary care physicians are seeing more patients who are concerned about "low T." Unfortunately, testosterone replacement therapy has not been straightforward. Many men with low testosterone levels have no symptoms, and many men with symptoms who receive treatment and reach goal testosterone levels have no improvement in their symptoms. The actual prevalence of hypogonadism has been estimated to be 39% in men aged 45 years or older presenting to primary care offices in the United States. As the US population ages, this number is likely to increase. This article, targeted to primary care physicians, reviews the concept of late-onset hypogonadism, describes how to determine the patients who might benefit from therapy, and offers recommendations regarding the workup and initiation of treatment.

  12. Testosterone/estradiol ratio, is it useful in the diagnosis of erectile dysfunction and low sexual desire?

    PubMed

    Castelló-Porcar, A M; Martínez-Jabaloyas, J M

    2016-12-01

    Erectile dysfunction and low sexual desire are multifactorial diseases. The decrease in testosterone levels is one of the causes, but the effect of estradiol is not well known. Moreover, study has shown that the testosterone/estradiol ratio has more influence over sexuality than does estradiol alone. The aim of the study was to determine whether the balance between testosterone and estradiol has any relation to some aspects of sexual function. It was an ambispective study of 230 patients with urological problems unrelated to sexuality. They underwent a detailed history and hormone study including total, free, bioavailable testosterone and estradiol. They completed the Sexual Health Inventory for Men and questions 11 and 12 of the IIEF15 were used to assess impairment in sexual desire. The T/E ratio was calculated, and the relationship between the different parameters and erectile function and sexual desire were studied by univariate and multivariate analysis. The mean age was 66.32 ± 8.17 years. The percentage of patients with erectile dysfunction was 60.9% (7% severe, 14.3% moderate, 12.6% mild to moderate and 27% mild) and decreased sexual desire was 46.5%. Age, free and biodisponible testosteron were the only variables with a positive linear association with erectile dysfunction and decreased sexual desire. Age was the only independent variable for both, erectile dysfunction and sexual desire, in the multiple linear regression. There was no association between a testosterone/estradiol imbalance and an alteration in erectile function and sexual desire. Consequently, in the clinical study of these patients, it is not necessary to request estradiol in the laboratory analyses.

  13. Association of Testosterone and Sex Hormone–Binding Globulin With Metabolic Syndrome and Insulin Resistance in Men

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chaoyang; Ford, Earl S.; Li, Benyi; Giles, Wayne H.; Liu, Simin

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We sought to assess the associations of testosterones and sex hormone–binding globulin (SHBG) with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in men. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We defined metabolic syndrome according to the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults. Among men aged ≥20 years who participated in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n = 1,226), the Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate the prevalence ratio and 95% CI of metabolic syndrome according to circulating concentrations of testosterones and SHBG. RESULTS After adjustment for age, race/ethnicity, smoking status, alcohol intake, physical activity level, LDL cholesterol, C-reactive protein, and insulin resistance, men in the first quartile (lowest) (prevalence ratio 2.16 [95% CI 1.53–3.06]) and second quartile of total testosterone (2.51 [1.86–3.37]) were more likely to have metabolic syndrome than men in the fourth quartile (highest, referent group) (P < 0.001 for linear trend). Similarly, men in the first quartile of SHBG (2.17 [1.32–3.56]) were more likely to have metabolic syndrome than men in the fourth quartile (P = 0.02 for linear trend). No significant associations of calculated free testosterone (P = 0.31 for linear trend) and bioavailable testosterone (P = 0.11 for linear trend) with metabolic syndrome were detected after adjustment for all possible confounders. CONCLUSIONS Low concentrations of total testosterone and SHBG were strongly associated with increased likelihood of having metabolic syndrome, independent of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and insulin resistance. PMID:20368409

  14. Cerebral laterality for language is related to adult salivary testosterone levels but not digit ratio (2D:4D) in men: A functional transcranial Doppler ultrasound study.

    PubMed

    Papadatou-Pastou, Marietta; Martin, Maryanne

    2017-03-01

    The adequacy of three competing theories of hormonal effects on cerebral laterality are compared using functional transcranial Doppler sonography (fTCD). Thirty-three adult males participated in the study (21 left-handers). Cerebral lateralization was measured by fTCD using an extensively validated word generation task. Adult salivary testosterone (T) and cortisol (C) concentrations were measured by luminescence immunoassay and prenatal T exposure was indirectly estimated by the somatic marker of 2nd to 4th digit length ratio (2D:4D). A significant quadratic relationship between degree of cerebral laterality for language and adult T concentrations was observed, with enhanced T levels for strong left hemisphere dominance and strong right hemisphere dominance. No systematic effects on laterality were found for cortisol or 2D:4D. Findings suggest that higher levels of T are associated with a relatively attenuated degree of interhemispheric sharing of linguistic information, providing support for the callosal and the sexual differentiation hypotheses rather than the Geschwind, Behan and Galaburda (GBG) hypothesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. ALPK1 affects testosterone mediated regulation of proinflammatory cytokines production.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Tzer-Min; Yeh, Kun-Tu; Hsu, Hui-Ting; Chiang, Shang-Lun; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Huang, Chung-Ming; Tu, Hung-Pin; Liu, Chiu-Shong; Ko, Ying-Chin

    2015-11-01

    Alpha-protein kinase 1, also known as alpha-kinase 1 (ALPK1), is associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD), myocardial infarction, gout and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). In addition to having an inductive effect on the proinflammatory cytokines in monocytic THP1 cells, ALPK1 is expressed abundantly in the mouse testes. Low testosterone levels are commonly associated with arthritis, CKD, type 2 DM, cardiovascular disease and inflammation. The testosterone's anti-inflammatory effect has been demonstrated to reduce proinflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules. In this study, we found that ALPK1 transgenic mice showed lower levels of testosterone in both the testes and the serum. Decreasing endogenous ALPK1 enhanced testosterone levels and transcripts of testosterone-regulated genes (P450scc, 3beta-HSD, P450C17, 17beta-HSD, StAR, and INSL3) in TM3 Leydig cells. In contrast, increasing testosterone decreased ALPK1 in both TM3 and monocytic THP1 cells. This decrease was accompanied by a reduction of the proinflammatory cytokines. Increased ALPK1 levels attenuated the testosterone effects in THP1 cells. Finally, we also found that ALPK1 increased the release of TNF-alpha and TGF-beta1 in the human embryonic kidney 293 cells, while testosterone inhibited ALPK1 in the primary kidney cells. Taken together, this data suggests that the balance between ALPK1 and testosterone plays a critical role in the testosterone-mediated inhibition of proinflammatory cytokines.

  16. Sex Hormone Binding Globulin Modifies Testosterone Action and Metabolism in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Huika; Pham, Thy; McWhinney, Brett C; Ungerer, Jacobus P; Pretorius, Carel J; Richard, Derek J; Mortimer, Robin H; d'Emden, Michael C; Richard, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) is the major serum carrier of sex hormones. However, growing evidence suggests that SHBG is internalised and plays a role in regulating intracellular hormone action. This study was to determine whether SHBG plays a role in testosterone uptake, metabolism, and action in the androgen sensitive LNCaP prostate cancer cell line. Internalisation of SHBG and testosterone, the effects of SHBG on testosterone uptake, metabolism, regulation of androgen responsive genes, and cell growth were assessed. LNCaP cells internalised SHBG by a testosterone independent process. Testosterone was rapidly taken up and effluxed as testosterone-glucuronide; however this effect was reduced by the presence of SHBG. Addition of SHBG, rather than reducing testosterone bioavailability, further increased testosterone-induced expression of prostate specific antigen and enhanced testosterone-induced reduction of androgen receptor mRNA expression. Following 38 hours of testosterone treatment cell morphology changed and growth declined; however, cotreatment with SHBG abrogated these inhibitory effects. These findings clearly demonstrate that internalised SHBG plays an important regulatory and intracellular role in modifying testosterone action and this has important implications for the role of SHBG in health and disease.

  17. Sex Hormone Binding Globulin Modifies Testosterone Action and Metabolism in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huika; Ungerer, Jacobus P.; Pretorius, Carel J.; Mortimer, Robin H.; d'Emden, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) is the major serum carrier of sex hormones. However, growing evidence suggests that SHBG is internalised and plays a role in regulating intracellular hormone action. This study was to determine whether SHBG plays a role in testosterone uptake, metabolism, and action in the androgen sensitive LNCaP prostate cancer cell line. Internalisation of SHBG and testosterone, the effects of SHBG on testosterone uptake, metabolism, regulation of androgen responsive genes, and cell growth were assessed. LNCaP cells internalised SHBG by a testosterone independent process. Testosterone was rapidly taken up and effluxed as testosterone-glucuronide; however this effect was reduced by the presence of SHBG. Addition of SHBG, rather than reducing testosterone bioavailability, further increased testosterone-induced expression of prostate specific antigen and enhanced testosterone-induced reduction of androgen receptor mRNA expression. Following 38 hours of testosterone treatment cell morphology changed and growth declined; however, cotreatment with SHBG abrogated these inhibitory effects. These findings clearly demonstrate that internalised SHBG plays an important regulatory and intracellular role in modifying testosterone action and this has important implications for the role of SHBG in health and disease. PMID:27990161

  18. Effects of dutasteride on serum free-testosterone and clinical significance of testosterone changes.

    PubMed

    Enatsu, N; Miyake, H; Haraguchi, T; Chiba, K; Fujisawa, M

    2016-12-01

    Sixty-two patients with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) who were being treated with dutasteride participated in this study. Prostate volume, uroflowmetry, blood tests, the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) and International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) were determined before and 1, 3 and 12 months after the treatment with dutasteride. Patients were divided into two groups based on changes in serum testosterone after 1 month: Group A (>20% increase; n = 33) or Group B (<20% increase; n = 29). Serum free-testosterone levels were 20.4% higher after 1 month and remained constant thereafter. When Groups A and B were compared, baseline free-testosterone levels were significantly lower in Group A, IPSS QOL was significantly better in Group A at 3 and 12 months, and no significant differences were observed in uroflowmetry, prostate volume, IPSS or IIEF-5. A univariate analysis identified serum free-testosterone levels and the IPSS storage symptom subscore as significant factors influencing IPSS QOL at 12 months, and only the IPSS storage symptom subscore appeared to be independently related to IPSS QOL. These results indicate that dutasteride increases serum free-testosterone levels in BPH patients, particularly with low baseline free-testosterone levels, and the increase in free-testosterone may have further add-on impacts on their urinary tract symptoms.

  19. Blood Cadmium Level Associates with Lower Testosterone and Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin in Chinese men: from SPECT-China Study, 2014.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi; Wang, Ningjian; Nie, Xiaomin; Han, Bing; Li, Qin; Chen, Yi; Zhai, Hualing; Zhu, Chunfang; Chen, Yingchao; Xia, Fangzhen; Lu, Meng; Lin, Dongping; Lu, Yingli

    2016-05-01

    Cadmium is a widespread environmental pollutant. We aimed to determine whether blood cadmium level (BCL) associates with reproductive hormones in a cross-sectional study. Our data were from SPECT-China. We selected 5690 participants (2286 men and 3404 women), aged 18 years and older, among whom 1589 were postmenopausal women. BCL, blood lead level, total testosterone (TT), estradiol (E2), sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), luteinizing hormone, and follicle-stimulating hormone were measured. Results showed that BCL was significantly higher in men (median 1.90 μg/L) than that in women (median 1.56 μg/L). The median level of cadmium in postmenopausal women was 1.40 μg/L. In men, BCL was negatively correlated with TT (Spearmen coefficient = -0.057, P < 0.01) and SHBG (Spearmen coefficient = -0.098, P < 0.01), but in postmenopausal women, this correlation was not observed. In linear regression, after full adjustment for blood lead level, age, body mass index, residence area, economic status, and smoking, TT and SHBG were still negatively associated with BCL in men. Additionally, the association between BCL and TT levels was modified by BMI group (P for interaction = 0.041). However, from base model to fully adjusted model, BCL was not associated with TT and E2 in postmenopausal women. In conclusion, men had higher BCL than women in China, and BCL was associated with TT and SHBG in Chinese men, which may have important implications for male reproductive health. Concerted efforts are warranted to reduce adult cadmium exposure.

  20. The DSL analog free testosterone assay: serum levels are not related to sex hormone-binding globulin in normative data throughout childhood and adolescence.

    PubMed

    Kratzsch, J; Keller, E; Hoepffner, W; Müller, G; Reich, A; Meyer, K; Kiess, W

    2001-01-01

    In this study we tested the performance of easy-to-use and rapid, commercially available immunoassays to measure free testosterone (fT) and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG). We asked whether fT and SHBG serum levels are age-dependent and whether or not there is a gender dependence of fT and SHBG in this age group. Finally, by measuring fT and SHBG in sera of a cohort of healthy children and adolescents using commercially available immunoassays, we established normative data for fT and SHBG in this age group: in boys fT levels increased significantly (r=0.83, p<0.0001) from 0.63 pmol/l (median) in the age group below 5 years to 56.9 pmol/l in the age group 16-20 years. In girls fT levels also increased with age (r=0.66, p<0.0001): from 0.72 pmol/l (median) in the age group below 5 years to 3.34 pmol/l in the age group 16-20 years. In contrast, SHBG serum concentrations significantly decreased with age in boys (r=-0.62, p<0.0001) but remained constant in girls (r=0.04, n.s.). Importantly, fT values were independent of SHBG levels as determined by our methods. In conclusion, fT can be measured in an acceptable quality using the DSL analog tracer-based immunoassay and normative data are now available. In addition, SHBG levels in healthy children and adolescents are also given and may permit for studies of pathophysiologic states in this age group.

  1. Bioavailability and microbial adaptation to elevated levels of uranium in an acid, organic topsoil forming on an old mine spoil.

    PubMed

    Joner, Erik Jautris; Munier-Lamy, Colette; Gouget, Barbara

    2007-08-01

    An old mine spoil at a 19th-century mining site with considerable residues of uranium (400-800 mg U/kg) was investigated with respect to U concentrations in soil and plants and tolerance to U in the soil microbial community in order to describe the bioavailability of U. Measurements of soil fractions representing water-soluble U, easily exchangeable U, and U bound to humified organic matter showed that all fractions contained elevated concentrations of U. Plant U concentrations were only 10 times higher at the mine spoil site compared to the reference site (3 mg U/kg vs 0.3 mg U/kg), while the most easily available soil fractions contained 0.18 to 0.86 mg U/kg soil at the mine spoil. An ecotoxicity bioassay using incorporation of [3H]thymidine into the indigenous microbial communities of the two soils in the presence of increasing U concentrations showed that microorganisms at the mining site were sensitive to U but also that they had acquired a substantial tolerance toward U (EC50, the effective concentration reducing activity by 50% of UO2-citrate was approximately 120 microM as compared to 30 microM in the reference soil). In the assay, more than 40% of the microbial activity was maintained in the presence of 1 mM UO2-citrate versus 3% in the reference soil. We conclude that U-enriched mining waste can contain sufficiently elevated concentrations of bioavailable U to affect indigenous microorganisms and that bioavailable U imposes a selection pressure that favors the development of a highly uranium-tolerant microbial community, while plant uptake of U remains low.

  2. Effects of climate on the thermoregulatory responses of male buffalo ( Bubalus-bubalis) calves supplemented with different levels of testosterone and TDN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangwar, P. C.

    1982-03-01

    The present work was undertaken to study the changes in the thermoregulatory responses due to changing climate, androgen and TDN percent in 12 buffalo male calves from 4 months of age for a period of two years. The results obtained were: (1) The amplitudes of the diurnal cycles in rectal temperature (Tre) in each month of the experiment were very similar but longer in summer months as compared to winter months, (2) The correlation between Tre and ambient temperature (Ta) was high in all months. (3) Buffalo calves without testosterone supplementation on 70% TDN showed maximum rise in Tre by 0.076 0‡C per degree of ambient temperature, indicating more strain, (4) Highest respiratory frequencies occurred at 10:00 h during summer months. Subgroup 2 of group 1 showed the maximum rise by 311% in respiratory frequency in summer over winter due to least acclimatization, (5) The mean daily increase by 9.94‡C in ambient temperature doubled the respiratory frequency of male buffalo calves from January to April, and (6) Androgen therapy and higher TDN percent level helped the male buffalo calves to adjust better and sooner than the other calves to changing climates.

  3. Regulation of NUCB2/nesfatin-1 production in rat's stomach and adipose tissue is dependent on age, testosterone levels and lactating status.

    PubMed

    Senin, Lucia L; Al-Massadi, Omar; Barja-Fernandez, Silvia; Folgueira, Cintia; Castelao, Cecilia; Tovar, Sulay A; Leis, Rosaura; Lago, Francisca; Baltar, Javier; Baamonde, Ivan; Dieguez, Carlos; Casanueva, Felipe F; Seoane, Luisa M

    2015-08-15

    Nesfatin-1, which is derived from the NEFA/nucleobindin 2 (NUCB2) precursor, was recently identified as an anorexigenic peptide that is produced in several tissues including the hypothalamus. Currently, no data exist regarding the regulation of NUCB2/nesfatin-1 production in peripheral tissues, such as gastric mucosa and adipose tissue, through different periods of development. The aim of the present work was to study the variations on circulating levels, mRNA expression and tissue content in gastric mucosa and adipose tissue of NUCB2/nesfatin-1 with age and specially in two clue periods of maturation, weaning and puberty. The weaning period affected NUCB2/nesfatin-1 production in gastric tissue. The testosterone changes associated with the initiation of puberty regulated NUCB2/nesfatin-1 production via adipose tissue and gastric NUCB2/nesfatin-1 production. In conclusion, the production of NUCB2/nesfatin-1 by the stomach and adipose tissue fluctuates with age to regulate energy homeostasis during different states of development.

  4. A glyphosate-based herbicide induces necrosis and apoptosis in mature rat testicular cells in vitro, and testosterone decrease at lower levels.

    PubMed

    Clair, Emilie; Mesnage, Robin; Travert, Carine; Séralini, Gilles-Éric

    2012-03-01

    The major herbicide used worldwide, Roundup, is a glyphosate-based pesticide with adjuvants. Glyphosate, its active ingredient in plants and its main metabolite (AMPA) are among the first contaminants of surface waters. Roundup is being used increasingly in particular on genetically modified plants grown for food and feed that contain its residues. Here we tested glyphosate and its formulation on mature rat fresh testicular cells from 1 to 10000ppm, thus from the range in some human urine and in environment to agricultural levels. We show that from 1 to 48h of Roundup exposure Leydig cells are damaged. Within 24-48h this formulation is also toxic on the other cells, mainly by necrosis, by contrast to glyphosate alone which is essentially toxic on Sertoli cells. Later, it also induces apoptosis at higher doses in germ cells and in Sertoli/germ cells co-cultures. At lower non toxic concentrations of Roundup and glyphosate (1ppm), the main endocrine disruption is a testosterone decrease by 35%. The pesticide has thus an endocrine impact at very low environmental doses, but only a high contamination appears to provoke an acute rat testicular toxicity. This does not anticipate the chronic toxicity which is insufficiently tested, and only with glyphosate in regulatory tests. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A Giant Ovarian Cyst in a Neonate with Classical 21-Hydroxylase Deficiency with Very High Testosterone Levels Demonstrating a High-Dose Hook Effect

    PubMed Central

    Güran, Tülay; Yeşil, Gözde; Güran, Ömer; Cesur, Suna; Bosnalı, Oktav; Celayir, Ayşenur; Topçuoğlu, Sevilay; Bereket, Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a group of disorders affecting the adrenal steroid synthesis. The most common form, 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21-OHD), leads to decreased production of cortisol and aldosterone with increased androgen secretion. In classic CAH, glucocorticoid treatment can be life-saving and serves to bring the symptoms under control. However, the treatment challenge is to effectively control the excess androgen effect by using the lowest possible glucocorticoid dose. Previous studies suggested a relationship between ovarian cyst formation and adrenal androgen excess, but neonatal large ovarian cysts have been very rarely reported in newborns with CAH. Here, we present the unique case of a neonate with classical 21-OHD who underwent surgery for a giant (10x8x7 cm) unilateral solitary ovarian follicular cyst on the 2nd postnatal day. Hormonal evaluation of the patient revealed high-dose hook effect for serum testosterone levels for the first time by a two-site immunoradiometric assay. Possible mechanisms by which androgen excess may cause ovarian cyst formation are discussed. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:22664361

  6. FATHERHOOD, PAIRBONDING AND TESTOSTERONE IN THE PHILIPPINES

    PubMed Central

    Kuzawa, Christopher W.; Gettler, Lee; Muller, Martin N.; McDade, Thomas W.; Feranil, Alan B.

    2009-01-01

    In species with a high level of paternal care, including humans, testosterone (T) is believed to help mediate the trade-off between parenting and mating effort. This hypothesis is supported by the observation of lower T in pairbonded men or fathers compared to single, non-fathers; however, prior work has highlighted population variation in the association between T and pairbonding or fatherhood status. Here we evaluate this hypothesis in a large (n=890), representative birth cohort of young men (age range 20.5–22.5 years) living in Cebu City, the Philippines. Bioavailable T was measured in saliva collected prior to bed and immediately upon waking the following morning. Plasma T and luteinizing hormone (LH) were measured in morning plasma samples. In this sample, 20% of men were pairbonded, defined as living with a partner or married, 13% were fathers, and roughly half of fathers reported involvement in childcare. Pairbonded men had significantly lower T at both times of day. Unlike in other populations, this relationship was accounted for entirely by fatherhood status: among the large sub-sample of non-fathers, mean T was nearly identical among pairbonded and single men. There was a strong association between self-reported involvement in childcare and lower evening T, supporting the idea that the evening nadir in T is related to social interactions across the day. Similar relationships were found for total plasma T and LH, suggesting that these relationships are coordinated by centrally-mediated changes in LH secretion. The relatively modest T difference in relation to fatherhood at Cebu, in comparison to other studies, may reflect a lower level of paternal involvement in childcare activities in this population. Our findings using a large, well-characterized birth cohort support the hypothesized role of T as mediator of mating and parenting effort in humans, while contributing evidence for cultural variation in the relative importance of pairbonding and fathering

  7. Digit ratio (2D:4D) and salivary testosterone, oestradiol and cortisol levels under challenge: Evidence for prenatal effects on adult endocrine responses.

    PubMed

    Crewther, Blair; Cook, Christian; Kilduff, Liam; Manning, John

    2015-08-01

    Digit ratio (2D:4D) is a marker for prenatal sex steroids and a correlate of sporting performance. This association may exist because low 2D:4D is linked to high prenatal levels of testosterone (T) and low oestrogens (E). It was recently suggested that low 2D:4D, and particularly low right-left 2D:4D (or Dr-l), is a marker for T changes in response to physical and aggressive challenges. If correct, this link may in part explain the association between 2D:4D and sports performance. We tested this hypothesis in adults. Three experimental treatments were completed using a randomised, cross-over design; (i) cycle sprints plus an aggressive video (S+V), (ii) aggressive video plus cycle sprints (V+S), and (iii) a control session. 24 healthy adults (12 men and 12 women). Salivary T, oestradiol (E2) and cortisol (C) levels were measured on six occasions across each session and pooled for analysis. The S+V treatment was associated with a rise in T and C levels, and Dr-l was significantly and negatively correlated with T and E2 with these effects confined to men. The right 2D:4D and Dr-l were also negatively correlated with the T/C ratio and Dr-l negatively related to the E2/C ratio in men during the S+V treatment. We suggest that the hormonal responses to a challenge are programmed by prenatal levels of T and E with possible links to sporting performance in adulthood. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Similar eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid plasma levels achieved with fish oil or krill oil in a randomized double-blind four-week bioavailability study.

    PubMed

    Yurko-Mauro, Karin; Kralovec, Jaroslav; Bailey-Hall, Eileen; Smeberg, Vanessa; Stark, Jeffrey G; Salem, Norman

    2015-09-02

    Long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3-PUFA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) provide multiple health benefits for heart, brain and eyes. However, consumption of fatty fish, the main source of LC n-3-PUFAs is low in Western countries. Intakes of LC n-3-PUFA can be increased by taking dietary supplements, such as fish oil, algal oil, or krill oil. Recently, conflicting information was published on the relative bioavailability of these omega-3 supplements. A few studies suggested that the phospholipid form (krill) is better absorbed than the fish oil ethyl ester (EE) or triglyceride (TG) forms. Yet studies did not match the doses administered nor the concentrations of DHA and EPA per supplement across such comparisons, leading to questionable conclusions. This study was designed to compare the oral bioavailability of the same dose of both EPA and DHA in fish oil-EE vs. fish oil-TG vs. krill oil in plasma at the end of a four-week supplementation. Sixty-six healthy adults (n = 22/arm) were enrolled in a double blind, randomized, three-treatment, multi-dose, parallel study. Subjects were supplemented with a 1.3 g/d dose of EPA + DHA (approximately 816 mg/d EPA + 522 mg/d DHA, regardless of formulation) for 28 consecutive days, as either fish oil-EE, fish oil-TG or krill oil capsules (6 caps/day). Plasma and red blood cell (RBC) samples were collected at baseline (pre-dose on Day 1) and at 4, 8, 12, 48, 72, 336, and 672 h. Total plasma EPA + DHA levels at Week 4 (Hour 672) were measured as the primary endpoint. No significant differences in total plasma EPA + DHA at 672 h were observed between fish oil-EE (mean = 90.9 ± 41 ug/mL), fish oil-TG (mean = 108 ± 40 ug/mL), and krill oil (mean = 118.5 ± 48 ug/mL), p = 0.052 and bioavailability differed by < 24 % between the groups. Additionally, DHA + EPA levels were not significantly different in RBCs among the 3 formulations, p = 0.19, providing comparable omega-3 indexes. Similar

  9. Testosterone-Related Cortical Maturation Across Childhood and Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuong-Vi; McCracken, James; Ducharme, Simon; Botteron, Kelly N.; Mahabir, Megan; Johnson, Wendy; Israel, Mimi; Evans, Alan C.; Karama, Sherif

    2013-01-01

    Neuroendocrine theories of brain development hold testosterone as the predominant factor mediating sex-specific cortical growth and the ensuing lateralization of hemispheric function. However, studies to date have focussed on prenatal testosterone rather than pubertal changes in testosterone. Yet, animal studies have shown a high density of androgen-sensitive receptors in multiple key cortical areas, and puberty is known to coincide with both a significant rise in testosterone and the emergence of behavioral sex differences, suggesting peripubertal influences of testosterone on brain development. Here, we used linear mixed models to examine sex-specific cortical maturation associated with changes in testosterone levels in a longitudinal sample of developmentally healthy children and adolescents. A significant “sex by age by testosterone” interaction on cortical thickness (CTh) involving widespread areas of the developing brain was found. Testosterone levels were associated with CTh changes in regions of the left hemisphere in males and of the right hemisphere in females. In both sexes, the relationship between testosterone and CTh varied across the age span. These findings show the association between testosterone and CTh to be complex, highly dynamic, and to vary, depending on sex and age; they also suggest sex-related hemispheric lateralization effects of testosterone in humans. PMID:22617851

  10. The effect of human chorionic gonadotropin-based hormonal therapy on intratesticular testosterone levels and spermatogonial DNA synthesis in men with non-obstructive azoospermia.

    PubMed

    Shinjo, E; Shiraishi, K; Matsuyama, H

    2013-11-01

    The use of hormonal therapy in men with non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) is controversial because no information is available on how it affects intratesticular testosterone (ITT) levels and spermatogenic cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the ITT level and spermatogonial DNA synthesis, as determined by proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression, before and after human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-based hormonal therapy in men with NOA. Twenty patients who failed sperm retrieval procedures using microdissection testicular sperm extraction (micro-TESE) were enrolled in hCG-based hormonal therapy prior to a second micro-TESE. The patients' ITT levels were determined from testicular fluid obtained during the micro-TESE. Spermatogonial PCNA expression was determined by immunohistochemical analysis, and the PCNA labelling index (PCNA-LI) was calculated. During the second micro-TESE, spermatozoa were successfully retrieved from three (15%) of the men who had been treated with hormonal therapy. PCNA-positive cells were predominantly in the spermatogonia and primary spermatocytes, and PCNA-LI was significantly increased after the hormonal therapy. A significant increase in the ITT levels before and after the hormonal therapy (p < 0.0001, 273.6 ± 134.4 and 1348.1 ± 505.4 ng/mL respectively). The sperm-positive group showed a significantly lower basal ITT level compared with the sperm-negative group (p < 0.05). There was a marked increase in the PCNA-LI levels of men treated with both recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone and hCG. In addition, there was a significant negative association between the increase in PCNA-LI and basal ITT levels at the initial micro-TESE (p < 0.05), but not the stimulated ITT level at the second micro-TESE. HCG-based hormonal therapy significantly raises the ITT level and stimulates spermatogonial DNA synthesis, potentially improving spermatogenesis. ITT optimization plays, at least in part, an

  11. Changes in plasma testosterone levels and brain AVT cell number during the breeding season in the green treefrog.

    PubMed

    O'Bryant, Erin L; Wilczynski, Walter

    2010-01-01

    We exposed groups of adult male green treefrogs, Hyla cinerea, to acoustic stimuli (natural chorus or random tones) for seven consecutive nights at three time points during their natural breeding season (May, July, and September) and assessed seasonal changes in plasma androgen levels and number of arginine vasotocin (AVT) immunoreactive cells in the brain over this time period. We also tested whether social cues altered either androgens or AVT-ir cell number or size at each time point. Finally, we analyzed how these factors related to calling behavior. Data were collected over two breeding seasons. Call rate (calls/h) was assessed during the stimulus time (i.e. 'evoked calling') and during the remainder of the day ('spontaneous calling'). Plasma hormone levels were measured at the end of the acoustic treatment when brains were collected for immunocytochemistry. Circulating androgen levels declined over the breeding season. Males exposed to chorus sounds, however, had higher androgen levels than males exposed to tones. AVT-ir cell number increased across the breeding season in the nucleus accumbens but not the amygdala, anterior preoptic area, or magnocellular preoptic area, and soma size decreased in the nucleus accumbens as cell number increased. Social stimulation had no significant influence on either AVT-ir cell measure. Evoked call rate was higher in males exposed to natural chorus sounds compared to those exposed to random tones, but did not change during the season. In contrast, spontaneous call rate was higher at the beginning of the breeding season compared to the end, and unlike evoked calling was correlated with circulating androgen levels across all treatments and time points. AVT-ir soma size was positively correlated with both evoked and spontaneous calling. These results suggest that social exposure can prolong the elevation of gonadal hormones in the bloodstream, thus mitigating or slowing the seasonal decline of such hormones. In contrast, social

  12. Diagnosis and management of testosterone deficiency

    PubMed Central

    McBride, James A; Carson, Culley C; Coward, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone supplementation therapy (TST) use has dramatically increased over the past decade, due to the availability of newer agents, aggressive marketing, and an increasing incidence of testosterone deficiency (TD). Despite the increase in TST, a degree of ambiguity remains as to the exact diagnostic criteria of TD, and administration and monitoring of TST. One explanation for this phenomenon is the complex role testosterone plays in multiple physiologic pathways. Numerous medical co-morbidities and medications can alter testosterone levels resulting in a wide range of nonspecific clinical signs and symptoms of TD. The diagnosis is also challenging due to the lack of a definitive serum total testosterone level that reliably correlates with symptoms. This observation is particularly true in the aging male and is exacerbated by inconsistencies between different laboratory assays. Several prominent medical societies have developed guideline statements to clarify the diagnosis, but they differ from each other and with expert opinion in several ways. Aside from diagnostic dilemmas, there are numerous subtle advantages and disadvantages of the various testosterone agents to appreciate. The available TST agents have changed significantly over the past decade similar to the trends in the diagnosis of TD. Therefore, as the usage of TST increases, clinicians will be challenged to maintain an up-to-date understanding of TD and TST. The purpose of this review is to provide a clear description of the current strategies for diagnosis and management of TD. PMID:25532575

  13. Diagnosis and management of testosterone deficiency.

    PubMed

    McBride, James A; Carson, Culley C; Coward, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone supplementation therapy (TST) use has dramatically increased over the past decade, due to the availability of newer agents, aggressive marketing, and an increasing incidence of testosterone deficiency (TD). Despite the increase in TST, a degree of ambiguity remains as to the exact diagnostic criteria of TD, and administration and monitoring of TST. One explanation for this phenomenon is the complex role testosterone plays in multiple physiologic pathways. Numerous medical co-morbidities and medications can alter testosterone levels resulting in a wide range of nonspecific clinical signs and symptoms of TD. The diagnosis is also challenging due to the lack of a definitive serum total testosterone level that reliably correlates with symptoms. This observation is particularly true in the aging male and is exacerbated by inconsistencies between different laboratory assays. Several prominent medical societies have developed guideline statements to clarify the diagnosis, but they differ from each other and with expert opinion in several ways. Aside from diagnostic dilemmas, there are numerous subtle advantages and disadvantages of the various testosterone agents to appreciate. The available TST agents have changed significantly over the past decade similar to the trends in the diagnosis of TD. Therefore, as the usage of TST increases, clinicians will be challenged to maintain an up-to-date understanding of TD and TST. The purpose of this review is to provide a clear description of the current strategies for diagnosis and management of TD.

  14. The nanochannel delivery system for constant testosterone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Ferrati, Silvia; Nicolov, Eugenia; Zabre, Erika; Geninatti, Thomas; Shirkey, Beverly A; Hudson, Lee; Hosali, Sharath; Crawley, Michael; Khera, Mohit; Palapattu, Ganesh; Grattoni, Alessandro

    2015-06-01

    The goal of testosterone replacement is to provide long-term physiological supplementation at sufficient levels to mitigate the symptoms of hypogonadism. The objective of this work is to determine if the implantable nanochannel delivery system (nDS) can present an alternative delivery strategy for the long-term sustained and constant release of testosterone. A formulation of common testosterone esters (F1) was developed to enable nanochannel delivery of the low water soluble hormone. In vivo evaluation of testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) levels by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and a multiplex assay, respectively, in castrated Sprague-Dawley rats implanted with nDS-F1 implants or polymeric pellets was performed over a 6-month period. The percent of testosterone concentrations observed that fell within the normal range of testosterone levels for each animal was calculated and used to compare the study groups. Sustain release of testosterone in vivo for over 6 months. The subcutaneous release of F1 from nDS implants exhibited sustained in vivo release kinetics and attained stable clinically relevant plasma testosterone levels. Plasma LH and FSH levels were significantly diminished in nDS-F1 implant-treated animals, confirming biological activity of the released testosterone. In conclusion, we demonstrate that nDS-F1 implants represents a novel approach for the treatment of male hypogonadism. Further studies will be performed in view of translating the technology to clinical use. © 2015 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  15. Sexual Health: Testosterone Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Testosterone helps maintain men's: Bone density Fat distribution Muscle strength and mass Facial and body hair Red blood ... changes are possible, including increased body fat, reduced muscle bulk and strength, and decreased bone density. Swollen or tender breasts ( ...

  16. Testosterone, cortisol, and psychopathic traits in men and women.

    PubMed

    Welker, Keith M; Lozoya, Elianna; Campbell, Jocelyn A; Neumann, Craig S; Carré, Justin M

    2014-04-22

    Cortisol and testosterone are theorized to independently and jointly influence antisocial behaviors. The current research examined the independent and interactive effects of baseline testosterone and cortisol on individual differences in psychopathic traits in a relatively large non-clinical sample (N=237). Participants completed the Self-Report Psychopathy - Short Form (SRP; Paulhus, Neumann, & Hare, in press) and provided saliva samples. Analyses indicated that testosterone and cortisol were positively correlated with psychopathic traits in men, but beyond these effects, cortisol moderated the relationship between testosterone and psychopathy in men. The relationship between testosterone and psychopathy within men was positive when cortisol levels were high, but negative when cortisol levels were low. These results have implications for work surrounding the dual hormone hypothesis and suggest that nonclinical variability in psychopathy can be predicted by baseline testosterone and cortisol. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cognitive effects of testosterone and finasteride administration in older hypogonadal men.

    PubMed

    Borst, Stephen E; Yarrow, Joshua F; Fernandez, Carmen; Conover, Christine F; Ye, Fan; Meuleman, John R; Morrow, Matthew; Zou, Baiming; Shuster, Jonathan J

    2014-01-01

    Serum concentrations of neuroactive androgens decline in older men and, in some studies, low testosterone is associated with decreased cognitive function and incidence of depression. Existing studies evaluating the effect of testosterone administration on cognition in older men have been largely inconclusive, with some studies reporting minor to moderate cognitive benefit, while others indicate no cognitive effect. Our objective was to assess the cognitive effects of treating older hypogonadal men for 1 year with a supraphysiological dose of testosterone, either alone or in combination with finasteride (a type II 5α-reductase inhibitor), in order to determine whether testosterone produces cognitive benefit and whether suppressed dihydrotestosterone influences cognition. Sixty men aged ≥ 60 years with a serum testosterone concentration of ≤ 300 ng/dL or bioavailable testosterone ≤ 70 ng/dL and no evidence of cognitive impairment received testosterone-enanthate (125 mg/week) versus vehicle, paired with finasteride (5 mg/day) versus placebo using a 2×2 factorial design. Testosterone caused a small decrease in depressive symptoms as assessed by the Geriatric Depression Scale and a moderate increase in visuospatial memory as assessed by performance on a recall trial of the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test. Finasteride caused a small increase in performance on the Benton Judgment of Line Orientation test. In total, major improvements in cognition were not observed either with testosterone or finasteride. Further studies are warranted to determine if testosterone replacement may improve cognition in other domains.

  18. Cognitive effects of testosterone and finasteride administration in older hypogonadal men

    PubMed Central

    Borst, Stephen E; Yarrow, Joshua F; Fernandez, Carmen; Conover, Christine F; Ye, Fan; Meuleman, John R; Morrow, Matthew; Zou, Baiming; Shuster, Jonathan J

    2014-01-01

    Serum concentrations of neuroactive androgens decline in older men and, in some studies, low testosterone is associated with decreased cognitive function and incidence of depression. Existing studies evaluating the effect of testosterone administration on cognition in older men have been largely inconclusive, with some studies reporting minor to moderate cognitive benefit, while others indicate no cognitive effect. Our objective was to assess the cognitive effects of treating older hypogonadal men for 1 year with a supraphysiological dose of testosterone, either alone or in combination with finasteride (a type II 5α-reductase inhibitor), in order to determine whether testosterone produces cognitive benefit and whether suppressed dihydrotestosterone influences cognition. Sixty men aged ≥60 years with a serum testosterone concentration of ≤300 ng/dL or bioavailable testosterone ≤70 ng/dL and no evidence of cognitive impairment received testosterone-enanthate (125 mg/week) versus vehicle, paired with finasteride (5 mg/day) versus placebo using a 2×2 factorial design. Testosterone caused a small decrease in depressive symptoms as assessed by the Geriatric Depression Scale and a moderate increase in visuospatial memory as assessed by performance on a recall trial of the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test. Finasteride caused a small increase in performance on the Benton Judgment of Line Orientation test. In total, major improvements in cognition were not observed either with testosterone or finasteride. Further studies are warranted to determine if testosterone replacement may improve cognition in other domains. PMID:25143719

  19. Effects of testosterone and resistance training in men with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Casaburi, Richard; Bhasin, Shalender; Cosentino, Louis; Porszasz, Janos; Somfay, Attila; Lewis, Michael I; Fournier, Mario; Storer, Thomas W

    2004-10-15

    Dysfunction of the muscles of ambulation contributes to exercise intolerance in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Men with COPD have high prevalence of low testosterone levels, which may contribute to muscle weakness. We determined effects of testosterone supplementation (100 mg of testosterone enanthate injected weekly) with or without resistance training (45 minutes three times weekly) on body composition and muscle function in 47 men with COPD (mean FEV(1) = 40% predicted) and low testosterone levels (mean = 320 ng/dl). Subjects were randomized to 10 weeks of placebo injections + no training, testosterone injections + no training, placebo injections + resistance training, or testosterone injections + resistance training. Testosterone injections yielded a mean increase of 271 ng/dl in the nadir serum testosterone concentration (to the middle of the normal range for young men). The lean body mass (by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) increase averaged 2.3 kg with testosterone alone and 3.3 kg with combined testosterone and resistance training (p < 0.001). Increase in one-repetition maximum leg press strength averaged 17.2% with testosterone alone, 17.4% with resistance training alone, and 26.8% with testosterone + resistance training (p < 0.001). Interventions were well tolerated with no abnormalities in safety measures. Further studies are required to determine long-term benefits of adding testosterone supplementation and resistance training to rehabilitative programs for carefully screened men with COPD and low testosterone levels.

  20. Testosterone, thrombophilia, and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Glueck, Charles J; Richardson-Royer, Caitlin; Schultz, Reiker; Burger, Tim; Labitue, Fanta; Riaz, Muhammad K; Padda, Jagjit; Bowe, Dedrick; Goldenberg, Naila; Wang, Ping

    2014-01-01

    We describe thrombosis, deep venous thrombosis (DVT) pulmonary embolism (PE; n = 9) and hip-knee osteonecrosis (n = 5) that developed after testosterone therapy (median 11 months) in 14 previously healthy patients (13 men and 1 woman; 13 Caucasian and 1 African American), with no antecedent thrombosis and previously undiagnosed thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis. Of the 14 patients, 3 were found to be factor V Leiden heterozygotes, 3 had high factor VIII, 3 had plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 4G4G homozygosity, 2 had high factor XI, 2 had high homocysteine, 1 had low antithrombin III, 1 had the lupus anticoagulant, 1 had high anticardiolipin antibody Immunoglobulin G, and 1 had no clotting abnormalities. In 4 men with thrombophilia, DVT-PE recurred when testosterone was continued despite therapeutic international normalized ratio on warfarin. In 60 men on testosterone, 20 (33%) had high estradiol (E2 >42.6 pg/mL). When exogenous testosterone is aromatized to E2, and E2-induced thrombophilia is superimposed on thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis, thrombosis occurs. The DVT-PE and osteonecrosis after starting testosterone are associated with previously undiagnosed thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis. Thrombophilia should be ruled out before administration of exogenous testosterone.

  1. Fetal testosterone and empathy.

    PubMed

    Knickmeyer, Rebecca; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Raggatt, Peter; Taylor, Kevin; Hackett, Gerald

    2006-03-01

    In animals, fetal testosterone (fT) plays a central role in organizing the brain and in later social behavior. In humans, exposure to atypical levels of prenatal androgens may result in masculine behavior and ability patterns. Normal inter-individual variation in fT levels has also been correlated with later sex-typed behavior. In the current study, 38 children (24 male, 14 female), whose fT was analyzed in amniotic fluid, were followed up at age 4. They were asked to describe cartoons with 2 moving triangles whose interactions with each other suggested social relationships and psychological motivations. Females used more mental and affective state terms to describe the cartoons than males. fT was not associated with the frequency of mental or affective state terms. Females also used more intentional propositions than males. fT was negatively correlated with the frequency of intentional propositions, taking sex differences into account. fT was also negatively correlated with the frequency of intentional propositions when males were examined separately. Males used more neutral propositions than females. fT was directly correlated with the frequency of neutral propositions, taking sex differences into account. This relationship was not seen when males and females were examined separately. These findings implicate fT in human social development. The relevance of our findings to the 'extreme male brain' theory of autism is also discussed.

  2. Biotransformation of testosterone and testosterone heptanoate by four filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Sabrieh; Mohajeri, Maryam; Habibi, Zohreh

    2014-12-01

    The microbial transformations of testosterone and testosterone heptanoate by four fungi: Absidia griseolla var. igachii PTCC 5260, Acremonium chrysogenu PTCC 5271, Fusarium fujikuroi PTCC 5144, and Fusarium solani complex PTCC 5285 were investigated for the first time. Incubation of testosterone heptanoate with F. fujikuroi and F. solani yielded three metabolites, which were isolated and characterized as testosterone, androst-4-ene-3,17-dione, and 6β-hydroxy testosterone. 6β-Hydroxy testosterone was the major metabolite obtained from testosterone heptanoate biotransformation by two fungal species. A. griseolla and A. chrysogenu produced 14α-hydroxy testosterone as major metabolite, together with testosterone and 6β-hydroxy testosterone in lower yields. The biotransformation of testosterone by F. fujikuroi and A. griseolla was also investigated in order to examine the influence of the ester group on the course of transformation. Androst-4-ene-3,17-dione was only identified in the biotransformation of testosterone by F. fujikuroi. The same product was observed in incubation of testosterone by A. griseolla, together with 14α-hydroxy testosterone in very low yield. Furthermore, time course study was also carried out in order to examine the formation of metabolites as a function of time, which was determined by HPLC. The structures of compounds were determined by their comprehensive spectroscopic analysis and comparison with literature data.

  3. Effects of gendered behavior on testosterone in women and men.

    PubMed

    van Anders, Sari M; Steiger, Jeffrey; Goldey, Katherine L

    2015-11-10

    Testosterone is typically understood to contribute to maleness and masculinity, although it also responds to behaviors such as competition. Competition is crucial to evolution and may increase testosterone but also is selectively discouraged for women and encouraged for men via gender norms. We conducted an experiment to test how gender norms might modulate testosterone as mediated by two possible gender→testosterone pathways. Using a novel experimental design, participants (trained actors) performed a specific type of competition (wielding power) in stereotypically masculine vs. feminine ways. We hypothesized in H1 (stereotyped behavior) that wielding power increases testosterone regardless of how it is performed, vs. H2 (stereotyped performance), that wielding power performed in masculine but not feminine ways increases testosterone. We found that wielding power increased testosterone in women compared with a control, regardless of whether it was performed in gender-stereotyped masculine or feminine ways. Results supported H1 over H2: stereotyped behavior but not performance modulated testosterone. These results also supported theory that competition modulates testosterone over masculinity. Our findings thus support a gender→testosterone pathway mediated by competitive behavior. Accordingly, cultural pushes for men to wield power and women to avoid doing so may partially explain, in addition to heritable factors, why testosterone levels tend to be higher in men than in women: A lifetime of gender socialization could contribute to "sex differences" in testosterone. Our experiment opens up new questions of gender→testosterone pathways, highlighting the potential of examining nature/nurture interactions and effects of socialization on human biology.

  4. Effects of gendered behavior on testosterone in women and men

    PubMed Central

    van Anders, Sari M.; Steiger, Jeffrey; Goldey, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone is typically understood to contribute to maleness and masculinity, although it also responds to behaviors such as competition. Competition is crucial to evolution and may increase testosterone but also is selectively discouraged for women and encouraged for men via gender norms. We conducted an experiment to test how gender norms might modulate testosterone as mediated by two possible gender→testosterone pathways. Using a novel experimental design, participants (trained actors) performed a specific type of competition (wielding power) in stereotypically masculine vs. feminine ways. We hypothesized in H1 (stereotyped behavior) that wielding power increases testosterone regardless of how it is performed, vs. H2 (stereotyped performance), that wielding power performed in masculine but not feminine ways increases testosterone. We found that wielding power increased testosterone in women compared with a control, regardless of whether it was performed in gender-stereotyped masculine or feminine ways. Results supported H1 over H2: stereotyped behavior but not performance modulated testosterone. These results also supported theory that competition modulates testosterone over masculinity. Our findings thus support a gender→testosterone pathway mediated by competitive behavior. Accordingly, cultural pushes for men to wield power and women to avoid doing so may partially explain, in addition to heritable factors, why testosterone levels tend to be higher in men than in women: A lifetime of gender socialization could contribute to “sex differences” in testosterone. Our experiment opens up new questions of gender→testosterone pathways, highlighting the potential of examining nature/nurture interactions and effects of socialization on human biology. PMID:26504229

  5. Effect of finasteride on serum levels of androstenedione, testosterone and their 5α-reduced metabolites in men at risk for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Stanczyk, Frank Z; Azen, Colleen G; Pike, Malcolm C

    2013-11-01

    Studies show that treatment of men with 5α-reductase inhibitors such as finasteride is effective for the primary prevention of prostate cancer. Although it is known that finasteride treatment suppresses serum levels of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and its distal metabolite, 5α-androstane-3α,17β-diol glucuronide (3α-diol G), and increases serum testosterone (T) levels, little is known about its effect on other precursors and metabolites of DHT, as well as on the relationship of these androgens to prostate specific antigen (PSA), a marker of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia. The present study provides new data on the effect of finasteride on precursors and metabolites of DHT. Fifty-three men, ages 57-79 years, with elevated PSA levels (>4ng/ml), were randomized to treatment with finasteride (5mg/day) or observation (controls) for 12 months. Blood samples were obtained at baseline, 1, 3, 6 and 12 months for measurement of PSA, androstenedione (A), T, DHT, 3α-diol G, androsterone glucuronide (ADT G) and DHT sulfate (DHT S) in serum by validated, highly specific radioimmunoassays. Statistical analysis was carried out using mixed model ANOVA and t-tests. In the control group, PSA and androgen levels were unchanged throughout the 12 months of treatment. In the finasteride group, PSA, DHT, DHT S, 3α-diol G and ADT G decreased from baseline to 1 month by 23.2%, 78.7%, 71.0%, 75.7% and 43.0%, respectively. The change in PSA decreased further to 46.1% and 55.1% at 3 and 12 months of treatment, respectively, whereas the decrease in androgens observed at 1 month did not change by more than 6.9% for DHT, DHT S and 3α-diol G in the subsequent months of sampling. However, the decline in ADT G was only 22.2% at month 3, and remained essentially at this level after that time. In contrast, T and A increased significantly from baseline, and the increase in A of approximately 34.5% was about 1.9 times the increase in T (approximately 18.3%). The present data suggest that either

  6. Modulation of pain sensation by stress-related testosterone and cortisol.

    PubMed

    Choi, J C; Chung, M I; Lee, Y D

    2012-10-01

    Stress increases cortisol and decreases testosterone. It is not known whether pain is affected by stress-related testosterone. Therefore, we investigated whether stress can affect pain perception by decreasing testosterone and increasing cortisol. Pain thresholds, pain and anxiety ratings and salivary testosterone and cortisol levels were measured in 46 healthy men during resting and stressful conditions. Pain was induced by electrical stimulation. Stress was induced by having participants perform a medical test. Stress significantly increased anxiety ratings and salivary cortisol levels, but decreased salivary testosterone levels. Stress also increased pain ratings and decreased pain thresholds. During stress, cortisol levels were negatively correlated with pain thresholds and testosterone levels were positively correlated with pain thresholds. Results indicated that testosterone can decrease and cortisol can increase pain induced by electrical stimulation, suggesting that acute clinical pain may be relieved by controlling stress and managing consequent stress-related testosterone and cortisol.

  7. Assessment of trace metals contamination level, bioavailability and toxicity in sediments from Dakar coast and Saint Louis estuary in Senegal, West Africa.

    PubMed

    Diop, Cheikh; Dewaelé, Dorothée; Cazier, Fabrice; Diouf, Amadou; Ouddane, Baghdad

    2015-11-01

    Trace metals have the potential to associate with sediments that have been recognised as significant source of contamination for the benthic environment. The current study aims assessing the trace metals contamination level in sediments from Dakar coast and Saint Louis estuary, and to examine their bioavailability to predict potential toxicity of sediments. Surface sediment samples were collected between June 2012 and January 2013 in three sampling periods from eight stations. Trace metals were analysed using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer. Geoaccumulation indexes (Igeo) showed strong pollution by Cd, Cr, Cu and Pb confirmed by enrichment factor (EF) suggesting that these metals derived from anthropogenic sources. Toxicity indexes exceeded one in several sites suggesting the potential effects on sediment-dwelling organisms, which may constitute a risk to populations' health. However, seasonal variability of metal bioavailability was noted, revealing the best period to monitor metal contamination. From an ecotoxicological point of view, concentrations of Cd, Cr, Cu and Pb were above the effects range low threshold limit of the sediment quality guidelines for adverse biological effects. In addition, with Pb concentrations above the effect range medium values in some sites, biological effects may occur.

  8. FETAL TESTOSTERONE LEVELS ARE DIFFERENTIALLY AFFECTED IN MALE SPRAGUE DAWLEY AND WISTAR RATS AFTER IN UTERO EXPOSURE TO DIETHYLHEXYL PHTHALATE: A DOSE RESPONSE STUDY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to phthalate esters during sexual differentiation disrupts testosterone resulting in malformations of androgen-dependent tissues. We have found that gubernacular lesions are more prevalent in in utero diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP)-treated Wistar male than in the SD rat o...

  9. FETAL TESTOSTERONE LEVELS ARE DIFFERENTIALLY AFFECTED IN MALE SPRAGUE DAWLEY AND WISTAR RATS AFTER IN UTERO EXPOSURE TO DIETHYLHEXYL PHTHALATE: A DOSE RESPONSE STUDY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to phthalate esters during sexual differentiation disrupts testosterone resulting in malformations of androgen-dependent tissues. We have found that gubernacular lesions are more prevalent in in utero diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP)-treated Wistar male than in the SD rat o...

  10. Plasma levels, metabolic clearance rates, and rates of secretion of testosterone and estradiol-l7 beta in the silver eel (Anguilla anguilla L. )

    SciTech Connect

    Querat, B.; Hardy, A.; Leloup-Hatey, J.

    1985-09-01

    Testosterone (T) and 17 beta-estradiol (E2) plasma levels and metabolic clearance rates (MCR) were measured to investigate their ovarian production in immature silver eel. The dynamics of T and E2 metabolism were studied in catheterized eels using single injections of 0.2 to 0.5 microCi /sup 3/H-labeled steroid. The distribution volumes, biological half-life and MCR of nonconjugated tracers were calculated on the basis of a two-compartment model. At the end of the experiments, radioactivity was measured in different organs and tissues to localize the site of T and E2 catabolism. The volume of the inner compartment was 3.4% for T and E2. The outer compartment was larger for T (6.4%) than that for E2 (4.3%). The biological half-life was three to four times shorter for T (14.5 hr) than that for E2 (48.5 hr). The MCR for T (1.71 ml/kg body wt/hr) was higher than for E2 (0.51 ml/kg body wt/hr). Plasma levels were determined, using radioimmunoassay, on samples taken before injections of radiolabeled steroid. Free or protein-bound hormone levels were 0.12 and 0.31 ng/ml for T and E2, respectively. Conjugated T and E2 levels were, respectively, 0.13 and 0.23 ng/ml. Production rates were determined as the product of the MCR and the plasma concentration of the nonconjugated hormone. No significant differences were observed between the production rates of T and E2 (0.24 ng/kg body wt/hr). The liver was the principal site of metabolism for both hormones, which were excreted via the enterohepatic route. E2 injection gave rise to no metabolite in the plasma whereas after T injection a metabolite was produced, the concentration of which increased as a function of time. Its chromatographic properties were different from that of E2 or androstenedione, suggesting that no significant peripheral aromatization or 17-oxidoreduction occurs in the immature silver eel.

  11. Erythrocytosis Following Testosterone Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ohlander, Samuel J; Varghese, Bibin; Pastuszak, Alexander W

    2017-05-16

    A rapid increase in awareness of androgen deficiency has led to substantial increases in prescribing of testosterone therapy (TTh), with benefits of improvements in mood, libido, bone density, muscle mass, body composition, energy, and cognition. However, TTh can be limited by its side effects, particularly erythrocytosis. This review examines the literature on testosterone-induced erythrocytosis and polycythemia. To review the available literature on testosterone-induced erythrocytosis, discuss possible mechanisms for pathophysiology, determine the significance of formulation, and elucidate potential thromboembolic risk. A literature review was performed using PubMed for articles addressing TTh, erythrocytosis, and polycythemia. Mechanism, pharmacologic contribution, and risk of testosterone-induced erythrocytosis. For men undergoing TTh, the risk of developing erythrocytosis compared with controls is well established, with short-acting injectable formulations having the highest associated incidence. Potential mechanisms explaining the relation between TTh and erythrocytosis include the role of hepcidin, iron sequestration and turnover, erythropoietin production, bone marrow stimulation, and genetic factors. High blood viscosity increases the risk for potential vascular complications involving the coronary, cerebrovascular, and peripheral vascular circulations, although there is limited evidence supporting a relation between TTh and vascular complications. Short-acting injectable testosterone is associated with greater risk of erythrocytosis compared with other formulations. The mechanism of the pathophysiology and its role on thromboembolic events remain unclear, although some data support an increased risk of cardiovascular events resulting from testosterone-induced erythrocytosis. Ohlander SJ, Varghese B, Pastuszak AW. Erythrocytosis Following Testosterone Therapy. Sex Med Rev 2017;X:XXX-XXX. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Sexual Medicine

  12. Carbohydrate bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Englyst, Klaus N; Englyst, Hans N

    2005-07-01

    There is consensus that carbohydrate foods, in the form of fruit, vegetables and whole-grain products, are beneficial to health. However, there are strong indications that highly processed, fibre-depleted, and consequently rapidly digestible, energy-dense carbohydrate food products can lead to over-consumption and obesity-related diseases. Greater attention needs to be given to carbohydrate bioavailability, which is determined by the chemical identity and physical form of food. The objective of the present concept article is to provide a rational basis for the nutritional characterisation of dietary carbohydrates. Based on the properties of carbohydrate foods identified to be of specific relevance to health, we propose a classification and measurement scheme that divides dietary carbohydrates into glycaemic carbohydrates (digested and absorbed in the small intestine) and non-glycaemic carbohydrates (enter the large intestine). The glycaemic carbohydrates are characterised by sugar type, and by the likely rate of digestion described by in vitro measurements for rapidly available glucose and slowly available glucose. The main type of non-glycaemic carbohydrates is the plant cell-wall NSP, which is a marker of the natural fibre-rich diet recognised as beneficial to health. Other non-glycaemic carbohydrates include resistant starch and the resistant short-chain carbohydrates (non-digestible oligosaccharides), which should be measured and researched in their own right. The proposed classification and measurement scheme is complementary to the dietary fibre and glycaemic index concepts in the promotion of healthy diets with low energy density required for combating obesity-related diseases.

  13. Testosterone and social and reproductive behaviour in Aphelocoma jays.

    PubMed

    Vleck; Brown

    1999-11-01

    When there is a direct relationship between testosterone level and payoff in reproductive success through aggression, testosterone levels should be elevated. Elevated testosterone, however, has fitness costs, particularly a decreased tendency to display parental care. Thus the pattern of testosterone secretion in males should vary with the social and mating system. Western scrub-jays, Aphelocoma californica woodhouseii, form monogamous pairs on territories during the breeding season. Mexican jays, A. ultramarina, live in large, stable groups and up to five females within a group attempt nesting each spring. In both species, testosterone levels rose rapidly in March and peak levels did not differ. Elevated testosterone levels were only observed for about 3 weeks in the monogamous western scrub-jay, but were observed into May in Mexican jays, a reflection of prolonged opportunity for males to mate with multiple females and continual interaction with other competing males. In Mexican jays, nonbreeding yearlings had lower testosterone levels than all other age groups. Testosterone in males owning nests did not differ from that in other adult males, many of whom engage in extrapair fertilizations. Testosterone was elevated throughout the incubation phase, but was significantly lower when chicks were present in any nest in the group. Nearly all birds in the group fed all chicks. These observations support the hypothesis that testosterone is elevated when male-male competition is frequent and mating opportunities depend on the outcome of that competition, and testosterone is decreased when the necessity for parental or alloparental care would make its effects deleterious. Copyright 1999 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour.

  14. The role of testosterone in trichloroethylene penetration in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, K.; Abdel-Rahman, M.S. )

    1991-02-01

    Sex differences are known to exist in the metabolism and bioavailability of trichloroethylene (TCE). This study revealed that dermal penetration of ({sup 14}C)TCE in vitro was twofold greater in untreated female than in untreated male Sprague-Dawley rats. Since testosterone has been shown to mediate a wide variety of sex differences, its role in dermal penetration of ({sup 14}C)TCE was investigated. Penetration was measured by using an in vitro evaporation-penetration cell with a 10-hour collection period. Depriving male rats of testosterone (by castration) resulted in increased values for total penetration, area under the curve (AUC), and penetration slopes compared to those found in the female control group. Administration of testosterone to female animals produced values for total penetration, AUC, and penetration slopes significantly lower than those of the female control group.

  15. An open label, dose response study to determine the effect of a dietary supplement on dihydrotestosterone, testosterone and estradiol levels in healthy males

    PubMed Central

    Angwafor, Fru; Anderson, Mark L

    2008-01-01

    Background Maintaining endogenous testosterone (T) levels as men age may slow the symptoms of sarcopenia, andropause and decline in physical performance. Drugs inhibiting the enzyme 5α-reductase (5AR) produce increased blood levels of T and decreased levels of dihydrotestosterone (DHT). However, symptoms of gynecomastia have been reported due to the aromatase (AER) enzyme converting excess T to estradiol (ES). The carotenoid astaxanthin (AX) from Haematococcus pluvialis, Saw Palmetto berry lipid extract (SPLE) from Serenoa repens and the precise combination of these dietary supplements, Alphastat® (Mytosterone(™)), have been reported to have inhibitory effects on both 5AR and AER in-vitro. Concomitant regulation of both enzymes in-vivo would cause DHT and ES blood levels to decrease and T levels to increase. The purpose of this clinical study was to determine if patented Alphastat® (Mytosterone(™)) could produce these effects in a dose dependent manner. Methods To investigate this clinically, 42 healthy males ages 37 to 70 years were divided into two groups of twenty-one and dosed with either 800 mg/day or 2000 mg/day of Alphastat® (Mytosterone(™)) for fourteen days. Blood samples were collected on days 0, 3, 7 and 14 and assayed for T, DHT and ES. Body weight and blood pressure data were collected prior to blood collection. One-way, repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA-RM) was performed at a significance level of alpha = 0.05 to determine differences from baseline within each group. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA-2) was performed after baseline subtraction, at a significance level of alpha = 0.05 to determine differences between dose groups. Results are expressed as means ± SEM. Results ANOVA-RM showed significant within group increases in serum total T and significant decreases in serum DHT from baseline in both dose groups at a significance level of alpha = 0.05. Significant decreases in serum ES are reported for the 2000 mg/day dose

  16. Risks of testosterone replacement therapy in ageing men.

    PubMed

    Tan, R S; Salazar, J A

    2004-11-01

    Testosterone has been available to practitioners for several decades. However, testosterone prescriptions have increased in recent years partly because of the introduction of newer delivery systems that are topical and have good bioavailability. In the US alone, approximately 2 million prescriptions for testosterone were written in 2002. This represents a 30% increase from 2001 and a 170% increase from 1999. There has also been a 500% increase in prescription sales in the past 10 years. The rise in prescriptions may be in part due to the increasing recognition of hypogonadism in ageing males or andropause. Treatment relating to hypogonadism has relieved symptoms and improved the quality of life of many individuals. Epidemiological studies point toward an association with increased morbidity and mortality, with low testosterone states in ageing males. For example, there is a higher prevalence of depression, coronary heart disease, osteoporosis, fracture rates, frailty and even dementia with low testosterone states. Recently, there have been some concerns raised regarding the long-term safety of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) from the Institute of Medicine. Current evidence suggests no causal relationship between prostate cancer and physiological dosing of testosterone, especially with careful selection and monitoring of patients. Cardiovascular risks have, overall, been neutral, although suggestions have been made that there are positive vasodilatory properties with testosterone. Mild eythrocytosis can be a common side effect of TRT, but thromboembolic events have rarely been reported in the literature. This paper addresses the evidence to date regarding the safety aspects of TRT. The medical-legal implications of TRT for men at this point in time is also discussed.

  17. Sludge organics bioavailability

    SciTech Connect

    Eiceman, G.E.; Bellin, C.A.; Ryan, J.A.; O'Connor, G.A.

    1991-01-01

    Concern over the bioavailability of toxic organics that can occur in municipal sludges threatens routine land application of sludge. Available data, however, show that concentrations of priority organics in normal sludges are low. Sludges applied at agronomic rates yield chemical concentrations in soil-sludge mixtures 50 to 100 fold lower. Plant uptake at these pollutant concentrations (and at much higher concentrations) is minimal. Chemicals are either (1) accumulated at extremely low levels (PCBs), (2) possibly accumulated, but then rapidly metabolized within plants to extremely low levels (DEHP), or (3) likely degraded so rapidly in soil that only minor contamination occurs (PCP and 2,4-DNP).

  18. Effect of Testosterone Replacement Therapy on Cognitive Performance and Depression in Men with Testosterone Deficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hyun Jin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to evaluate the effect of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) on cognitive function and depression in men with testosterone deficiency syndrome. Materials and Methods We carried out a prospective, placebo-controlled trial involving 106 men with total testosterone levels <3.3 ng/mL and symptoms of hypogonadism. Based on whether the patients received TRT (injection with 1,000 mg testosterone undecanoate) or a placebo (advice to modify lifestyle), the study population was divided into a TRT group (n=54) and a control group (n=52). Results The age among patients in the TRT and control groups was 56.7±12.6 years and 57.8±11.4 years, respectively (p> 0.05). At baseline, no significant differences between the TRT and control groups were noted regarding serum testosterone or prostate-specific antigen levels, or regarding the scores for aging symptoms (Aging Males' Symptoms scale), erectile function (5-item International Index of Erectile Function questionnaire), cognitive function (Korean Mini-Mental State Examination), and depression (Beck Depression Inventory). At 8 months after intervention total serum testosterone levels and erectile function scores had significantly increased (p<0.05), whereas the scores for aging symptoms and depression had significantly decreased (p<0.05) in the TRT group; no significant improvement in any parameters was noted for the control group. Notably, significant improvement in cognitive function was noted among patients with cognitive impairment at baseline (cognitive function score <25) who received TRT. Conclusions TRT may be considered in men with testosterone deficiency syndrome if low testosterone levels are associated with depression or cognitive impairment. PMID:28053949

  19. Testosterone, territoriality, and the 'home advantage'.

    PubMed

    Neave, Nick; Wolfson, Sandy

    2003-02-01

    The consistently better performance seen by teams in various sporting contexts when playing at home is referred to as the 'home advantage'. Various explanations have been put forward to account for this robust phenomenon, though none has yet focussed on possible hormonal factors. In an initial study, we showed that salivary testosterone levels in soccer players were significantly higher before a home game than an away game.In a second study involving a different group of soccer players, this finding was replicated over two home games, two away games, and three training sessions. Perceived rivalry of the opposing team was important as testosterone levels were higher before playing an 'extreme' rival than a 'moderate' rival. Self-reported measures of mood in both studies were not linked to testosterone level. The present results corroborate and extend earlier findings on the relationships between testosterone, territoriality, and dominance in human competitive encounters and further suggest an important role for testosterone in the home advantage seen in various team sports.

  20. Testosterone replacement therapy in obese males.

    PubMed

    Drewa, Tomasz; Olszewska-Słonina, Dorota; Chlosta, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    Controversy surrounds testosterone replacement therapy in obese ageing due to no generally accepted lower limits of normal testosterone level and high prevalence of hypogonadal symptoms in the ageing male population and the non-specific nature of these symptoms. Late onset hypogonadism is a clinical and biochemical syndrome associated with advancing age, often coexisting with obesity and metabolic syndrome. High fat and carbohydrates (fructose) consumption is responsible for development of obesity and metabolic syndrome which is one of risk factors for hypogonadism in older men. High fructose intake has been shown to cause dyslipidemia and to impair hepatic insulin sensitivity. Obesity and lack of physical activity negatively influence testosterone level. Low testosterone level should be regarded as an effect of obesity, but reverse relationship has not been proved yet. The management of late-onset hypogonadism symptoms has to be treated by a change of a life style and prevented with healthy nutrition and physical activity. The question related to rational indications for testosterone replacement therapy in obese males seems to be still actual.

  1. Outcomes of long-term testosterone replacement in older hypogonadal males: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Hajjar, R R; Kaiser, F E; Morley, J E

    1997-11-01

    To determine the complications, toxicities, and compliance of long term testosterone replacement in hypogonadal males, we retrospectively assessed 45 elderly hypogonadal men receiving testosterone replacement therapy and 27 hypogonadal men taking testosterone. Hypogonadism was defined as a bioavailable testosterone serum concentration of 72 ng/dL or less. Both groups received baseline physical examinations and blood tests. The testosterone-treated group received 200 mg testosterone enanthate or cypionate im every 2 weeks, and follow-up examinations and blood samplings were performed every 3 months. The control group had a single follow-up blood test and physical examination. There was no significant difference in the initial blood tests in the two groups. At 2 yr follow-up, only the hematocrit showed a statistically significant increase in the testosterone-treated group compared to the control group (P < 0.001). A decrease in the urea nitrogen to creatinine ratio and an increase in the prostate-specific antigen concentration was not statistically significant. Eleven (24%) of the testosterone-treated subjects developed polycythemia sufficient to require phlebotomy or the temporary withholding of testosterone, one third of which occurred less than 1 yr after starting testosterone treatment. There was no significant difference in the incidence of new illness in the two groups during the 2-yr follow-up. Although self-assessment of libido was dramatically improved in the testosterone-treated group (P < 0.0001), approximately one third of the subjects discontinued therapy. In conclusion, testosterone replacement therapy appears to be well tolerated by over 84% of the subjects. Long term testosterone replacement to date appears to be a safe and effective means of treating hypogonadal elderly males, provided that frequent follow-up blood tests and examinations are performed.

  2. Testosterone Trajectories and Reference Ranges in a Large Longitudinal Sample of Male Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Khairullah, Ammar; Cousino Klein, Laura; Ingle, Suzanne M.; May, Margaret T.; Whetzel, Courtney A.; Susman, Elizabeth J.; Paus, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Pubertal dynamics plays an important role in physical and psychological development of children and adolescents. We aim to provide reference ranges of plasma testosterone in a large longitudinal sample. Furthermore, we describe a measure of testosterone trajectories during adolescence that can be used in future investigations of development. Methods We carried out longitudinal measurements of plasma testosterone in 2,216 samples obtained from 513 males (9 to 17 years of age) from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. We used integration of a model fitted to each participant’s testosterone trajectory to calculate a measure of average exposure to testosterone over adolescence. We pooled these data with corresponding values reported in the literature to provide a reference range of testosterone levels in males between the ages of 6 and 19 years. Results The average values of total testosterone in the ALSPAC sample range from 0.82 nmol/L (Standard Deviation [SD]: 0.09) at 9 years of age to 16.5 (SD: 2.65) nmol/L at 17 years of age; these values are congruent with other reports in the literature. The average exposure to testosterone is associated with different features of testosterone trajectories such as Peak Testosterone Change, Age at Peak Testosterone Change, and Testosterone at 17 years of age as well as the timing of the growth spurt during puberty. Conclusions The average exposure to testosterone is a useful measure for future investigations using testosterone trajectories to examine pubertal dynamics. PMID:25268961

  3. Tissue engineered testicular prostheses with prolonged testosterone release.

    PubMed

    Raya-Rivera, Atlantida M; Baez, Carlos; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J

    2008-08-01

    Bilateral anorchia, either congenital or acquired, often requires testicular prostheses placement and testosterone supplementation. Several types of testosterone compounds and various modes of hormone delivery are currently used clinically, however, their pharmacokinetic properties are not ideal. In this study, we explored the possibility of creating hormone releasing testicular prostheses that could continuously supply and maintain physiologic levels of testosterone in vivo over time. Chondrocytes, harvested from bovine articular cartilage, were seeded on testicular shaped polymer scaffolds at a concentration of 100 x 10(6) ml(-1). The scaffolds were maintained in a bioreactor for 4 weeks to form cartilage tissue. Subsequently, testosterone enanthate (100 microg) was injected into the central hollow space of each testicular prosthesis, and maintained for 40 weeks in culture. A sample of the medium was collected every 2 days for testosterone assays. Another group of ex vivo engineered testicular prostheses was implanted into the scrotal space of castrated athymic mice (n = 10). Intratesticular injection of testosterone enanthate was made into each prosthesis at a concentration of 100 microg. Control groups consisted of animals with castration only (n = 8) and sham operations (n = 5). Testosterone levels were measured prior and 2 weeks after castration, 1 day after testosterone administration, and weekly up to 14 weeks. The engineered testicular prostheses were retrieved at sacrifice for histomorphological and immunocytochemical analyses. Milky white cartilage testicular protheses were formed by 4 weeks. The ex vivo prostheses showed an initial burst effect of testosterone followed by a broad plateau for 16 weeks (>500 ng/dl) and a decreased level of testosterone until 40 weeks. The testosterone levels were physiologic throughout 40 weeks and the entire testosterone released was calculated as 60% of the injected volume. The circulating testosterone levels in the

  4. Testosterone therapy improves erectile function and libido in hypogonadal men.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Paul J; Kohn, Taylor P; Pastuszak, Alexander W; Khera, Mohit

    2017-11-01

    Erectile dysfunction and decreased libido are common complaints in the older male population. Recent studies have elucidated the role testosterone therapy (TTh) can play in men with low testosterone levels. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of these findings and the utility of TTh. We specifically examine the role of TTh on erectile function, coadministration with phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, and libido. Recent publications suggest that TTh improves mild erectile dysfunction, though may be less useful in men with more severe erectile dysfunction. In men unresponsive to phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors and with mild erectile dysfunction, TTh can further improve erectile function. TTh has also shown consistent benefit in improving libido in men with low testosterone levels at baseline, with no additional improvements once testosterone levels are normalized. The available literature supports a role for TTh in men with low testosterone levels, erectile dysfunction, and low libido, with symptomatic improvement in these men.

  5. The long-term efficacy and safety of a testosterone mucoadhesive buccal tablet in testosterone-deficient men.

    PubMed

    Dinsmore, Wallace W; Wyllie, Michael G

    2012-07-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Striant® SR is the only available buccal delivery system for testosterone replacement therapy. Previous pharmacokinetic studies have shown that Striant SR effectively produces physiological serum testosterone levels in hypogonadal men. Efficacy and safety data from previously unpublished studies over 2 years of continuous use indicate that Striant SR is effective long term in maintaining serum testosterone within a physiological range, is well tolerated and has a high level of patient acceptance. Striant® sustained-release (SR) is a mucoadhesive buccal tablet (30 mg testosterone, The Urology Company) that adheres to the gum surface in the mouth providing controlled- and sustained-release of testosterone over a 12-h dosing period, offering a unique and rational method of testosterone delivery. Striant SR is indicated for testosterone-replacement therapy (TRT) for male hypogonadism when testosterone deficiency has been confirmed by clinical features and biochemical tests. Pharmacokinetic studies have shown that testosterone is released from Striant SR in a manner similar to the normal daily rhythm of endogenous testosterone secretion, with serum levels rising rapidly after insertion and peak levels reached by the second 12-hourly dose with no accumulation over time. In clinical trials involving hypogonadal men receiving Striant SR for up to 2 years, mean serum testosterone levels have always remained within the normal range. Striant SR is well tolerated, with gum-related disorders (such as irritation, inflammation and gingivitis) and taste perversion being the most commonly reported adverse events, reported by 5.6-16.3% and 3.0-4.1% of patients, respectively. Once patients have become accustomed to it, Striant SR has a high level of patient acceptance. In a long-term study, 90% of patients rated the twice-daily dosing as acceptable, just under half preferred it to other forms of TRT that they have used and

  6. Methadone induces testosterone suppression in patients with opioid addiction

    PubMed Central

    Bawor, Monica; Dennis, Brittany B.; Samaan, M. Constantine; Plater, Carolyn; Worster, Andrew; Varenbut, Michael; Daiter, Jeff; Marsh, David C.; Desai, Dipika; Steiner, Meir; Anglin, Rebecca; Coote, Margaret; Pare, Guillaume; Thabane, Lehana; Samaan, Zainab

    2014-01-01

    Sex hormones may have a role in the pathophysiology of substance use disorders, as demonstrated by the association between testosterone and addictive behaviour in opioid dependence. Although opioid use has been found to suppress testosterone levels in men and women, the extent of this effect and how it relates to methadone treatment for opioid dependence is unclear. The present multi-centre cross-sectional study consecutively recruited 231 patients with opioid dependence from methadone clinics across Ontario, Canada between June and December of 2011. We obtained demographic details, substance use, psychiatric history, and blood and urine samples from enrolled subjects. The control group included 783 non-opioid using adults recruited from a primary care setting in Ontario, Canada. Average testosterone level in men receiving methadone treatment was significantly lower than controls. No effect of opioids including methadone on testosterone level in women was found and testosterone did not fluctuate significantly between menstrual cycle phases. In methadone patients, testosterone level was significantly associated with methadone dose in men only. We recommend that testosterone levels be checked in men prior and during methadone and other opioid therapy, in order to detect and treat testosterone deficiency associated with opioids and lead to successful methadone treatment outcomes. PMID:25155550

  7. Baldness, benign prostate hyperplasia, prostate cancer and androgen levels.

    PubMed

    Faydaci, Gökhan; Bilal, Eryildirim; Necmettin, Penpegül; Fatih, Tarhan; Asuman, Orçun; Uğur, Kuyumcuoğlu

    2008-12-01

    We evaluated the pattern of baldness and serum androgen levels in patients with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer. BPH, prostate cancer and androgenic alopecia (AA) were somehow androgen dependent and affect large population of elderly men. A total of 152 patients, 108 patients with BPH and 44 patients with prostate cancer were included in the study. We measured serum total, free and bioavailable testosterone, FSH, LH, prolactin, estradiol, albumin and SHBG levels. Baldness classification was based on Norwood's classification and we categorised baldness as vertex and frontal baldness. The frequency of AA in BPH and prostate cancer groups were not different. We looked for some correlation between the two groups with respect to AA and hormone levels. We did not find any correlation between AA and total testosterone, free testosterone, bioavailable testosterone or SHBG levels in both groups. This prospective study with selected small group of patients showed that there is no difference of male pattern baldness in BPH and prostate cancer patients and also there is no correlation between pattern of baldness and serum androgen levels.

  8. Pharmacokinetics of testosterone cream applied to scrotal skin.

    PubMed

    Iyer, R; Mok, S F; Savkovic, S; Turner, L; Fraser, G; Desai, R; Jayadev, V; Conway, A J; Handelsman, D J

    2017-03-23

    Scrotal skin is thin and has high steroid permeability, but the pharmacokinetics of testosterone via the scrotal skin route has not been studied in detail. The aim of this study was to define the pharmacokinetics of testosterone delivered via the scrotal skin route. The study was a single-center, three-phase cross-over pharmacokinetic study of three single doses (12.5, 25, 50 mg) of testosterone cream administered in random sequence on different days with at least 2 days between doses to healthy eugonadal volunteers with endogenous testosterone suppressed by administration of nandrolone decanoate. Serum testosterone, DHT and estradiol concentrations were measured by liquid chromatograpy, mass spectrometry in extracts of serum taken before and for 16 h after administration of each of the three doses of testosterone cream to the scrotal skin. Testosterone administration onto the scrotal skin produced a swift (peak 1.9-2.8 h), dose-dependent (p < 0.0001) increase in serum testosterone with the 25 mg dose maintaining physiological levels for 16 h. Serum DHT displayed a time- (p < 0.0001), but not dose-dependent, increase in concentration reaching a peak concentration of 1.2 ng/mL (4.1 nm) at 4.9 h which was delayed by 2 h after peak serum testosterone. There were no significant changes in serum estradiol over time after testosterone administration. We conclude that testosterone administration to scrotal skin is well tolerated and produces dose-dependent peak serum testosterone concentration with a much lower dose relative to the non-scrotal transdermal route.