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Sample records for bioavailable testosterone levels

  1. Testosterone and Bioavailable Testosterone Help to Distinguish between Mild Cushing’s Syndrome and Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Pall, M. E.; Lao, M. C.; Patel, S. S.; Lee, M. L.; Ghods, D. E.; Chandler, D. W.; Friedman, T. C.

    2010-01-01

    Women with Cushing’s syndrome (CS) and polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) may present with similar symptoms. Subjects with mild CS lack clinical stigmata of classical CS and often have normal laboratory tests measuring hypercortisolism. Thus, distinguishing mild CS from PCOS may be difficult. We hypothesized that either total testosterone (TT) or bioavailable testosterone (BT) levels or the calculation of the free androgen index (FAI) would be low in patients with mild CS and elevated in patients with PCOS, and could help differentiate the two conditions. TT, BT, and FAI were measured in a group of 20 patients of reproductive age with mild CS and 20 PCOS patients matched for age and BMI. We used receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves to assess the sensitivity and specificity of these measurements for the diagnosis of CS. TT (p<0.0001), BT (p=0.02), and FAI (p=0.003) were significantly elevated in PCOS patients compared to mild CS patients. Sex hormone-binding globulin was similar in both groups. The optimal cut-point for TT was 1.39 nmol/L, yielding a sensitivity of 95 % and a specificity of 70%. The cut-point for BT was 0.24 nmol/L, resulting in a sensitivity of 75 % and a specificity of 80%. The cut-point for FAI was 5.7, with a sensitivity of 88 % and a specificity of 60 %. We conclude that TT levels may be useful to discriminate between mild CS and PCOS. In patients with signs and symptoms consistent with CS and PCOS, a TT level of <1.39nmol/L warrants a workup for CS. PMID:18819057

  2. Male prolactinomas presenting with normal testosterone levels.

    PubMed

    Shimon, Ilan; Benbassat, Carlos

    2014-06-01

    In men harboring prolactinoma the most common symptoms are related to hypogonadism, including decreased libido, erectile dysfunction, and gynecomastia. These men characteristically present with elevated serum prolactin (PRL) levels, suppressed gonadotropins, and low testosterone levels. We studied a group of 11 unique men with prolactinomas presenting with testosterone levels within the normal range (≥2.6 ng/ml; cohort A), and compared them to 11 prolactinoma men with borderline baseline testosterone (2.1-2.5 ng/ml; cohort B) and to a cohort of 34 prolactinoma patients with low testosterone levels (≤2 ng/ml; cohort C). Mean testosterone levels at presentation were 3.91 ± 0.9 ng/ml in cohort A (range, 2.6-5.2 ng/ml), 2.44 ± 0.16 ng/ml in cohort B and 0.96 ± 0.6 in cohort C (p < 0.001). Mean baseline PRL levels were >20 times above normal in cohort A compared to >100 times above normal in cohorts B and C. Symptoms of hypogonadism were present in 55, 64 and 76% of men in groups A, B and C, respectively. There was a trend towards a larger tumor size in the low testosterone group (p = 0.06). Visual fields defects at presentation were more prevalent in this cohort (C). With cabergoline, testosterone level increased from 3.91 to 6.42 ng/ml (Δ = 2.51 ng/ml) in cohort A, from 2.44 to 5.63 ng/ml (Δ = 3.19 ng/ml) in cohort B, and from 0.96 to 3.30 ng/ml (Δ = 2.34 ng/ml) in cohort C (p < 0.05 for each group). Symptoms of hypogonadism improved following treatment in 83% of symptomatic men in cohort A. Normal testosterone does not exclude the likelihood of prolactinoma in men. When treated with cabergoline, testosterone levels in these men can increase higher within the normal range together with clinical improvement. PMID:23756784

  3. Covariation of Change in Bioavailable Testosterone and Adiposity in Midlife Women

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine whether menopause-related changes in reproductive hormones are associated with change in adiposity and whether these relationships are independent of important covariates. Design and Methods Annual assessments of adiposity measures [CT-assessed visceral adipose tissue (VAT), subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (SAT), and DXA-assessed total body fat (TBF)] over 4 years from an ancillary study at the Chicago site of the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) were paired with reproductive hormones collected by SWAN. Included were 243 women (44% African American, 56% Caucasian), who were eligible participants in a population-based cohort with a 72% participation rate. Results VAT increased by 3.8% annually, and SAT increased by 1.8% per year. Change in bioavailable testosterone was significantly positively associated with changes both inVAT and in SAT but was not related to change in total body fat. The associations were independent of age, race, physical activity, smoking, baseline TBF, baseline bioavailable testosterone, and change in TBF. Change in estradiol were unrelated to changes in any adiposity measure. Conclusion Bioavailable testosterone may play an important role in menopause-related redistribution of visceral and subcutaneous fat in the central abdominal region. PMID:25557490

  4. Physiological levels of testosterone kill salmonid leukocytes in vitro

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slater, C.H.; Schreck, C.B.

    1997-01-01

    Adult spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) elaborate high plasma concentrations of testosterone during sexual maturation, and these levels of testosterone have been shown to reduce the salmonid immune response in vitro. Our search for the mechanism of testosterone's immunosuppressive action has led to the characterization of an androgen receptor in salmonid leukocytes. In the present study we examined the specific effects that testosterone had on salmonid leukocytes. Direct counts of viable leukocytes after incubation with and without physiological levels of testosterone demonstrate a significant loss of leukocytes in cultures exposed to testosterone. At least 5 days of contact with testosterone was required to produce significant immunosuppression and addition of a 'conditioned media' (supernatant from proliferating lymphocytes not exposed to testosterone) did not reverse the immunosuppressive effects of testosterone. These data lead us to conclude that testosterone may exert its immunosuppressive effects by direct action on salmonid leukocytes, through the androgen receptor described, and that this action leads to the death of a significant number of these leukocytes.

  5. Environmental and genetic contributors to salivary testosterone levels in infants.

    PubMed

    Xia, Kai; Yu, Yang; Ahn, Mihye; Zhu, Hongtu; Zou, Fei; Gilmore, John H; Knickmeyer, Rebecca C

    2014-01-01

    Transient activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in early infancy plays an important role in male genital development and sexual differentiation of the brain, but factors contributing to individual variation in testosterone levels during this period are poorly understood. We measured salivary testosterone levels in 222 infants (119 males, 103 females, 108 singletons, 114 twins) between 2.70 and 4.80 months of age. We tested 16 major demographic and medical history variables for effects on inter-individual variation in salivary testosterone. Using the subset of twins, we estimated genetic and environmental contributions to salivary testosterone levels. Finally, we tested single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within ±5 kb of genes involved in testosterone synthesis, transport, signaling, and metabolism for associations with salivary testosterone using univariate tests and random forest (RF) analysis. We report an association between 5 min APGAR scores and salivary testosterone levels in males. Twin modeling indicated that individual variability in testosterone levels was primarily explained by environmental factors. Regarding genetic variation, univariate tests did not reveal any variants significantly associated with salivary testosterone after adjusting for false discovery rate. The top hit in males was rs10923844, an SNP of unknown function located downstream of HSD3B1 and HSD3B2. The top hits in females were two SNPs located upstream of ESR1 (rs3407085 and rs2295190). RF analysis, which reflects joint and conditional effects of multiple variants, indicated that genes involved in regulation of reproductive function, particularly LHCGR, are related to salivary testosterone levels in male infants, as are genes involved in cholesterol production, transport, and removal, while genes involved in estrogen signaling are related to salivary testosterone levels in female infants.

  6. Environmental and Genetic Contributors to Salivary Testosterone Levels in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Kai; Yu, Yang; Ahn, Mihye; Zhu, Hongtu; Zou, Fei; Gilmore, John H.; Knickmeyer, Rebecca C.

    2014-01-01

    Transient activation of the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal axis in early infancy plays an important role in male genital development and sexual differentiation of the brain, but factors contributing to individual variation in testosterone levels during this period are poorly understood. We measured salivary testosterone levels in 222 infants (119 males, 103 females, 108 singletons, 114 twins) between 2.70 and 4.80 months of age. We tested 16 major demographic and medical history variables for effects on inter-individual variation in salivary testosterone. Using the subset of twins, we estimated genetic and environmental contributions to salivary testosterone levels. Finally, we tested single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within ±5 kb of genes involved in testosterone synthesis, transport, signaling, and metabolism for associations with salivary testosterone using univariate tests and random forest (RF) analysis. We report an association between 5 min APGAR scores and salivary testosterone levels in males. Twin modeling indicated that individual variability in testosterone levels was primarily explained by environmental factors. Regarding genetic variation, univariate tests did not reveal any variants significantly associated with salivary testosterone after adjusting for false discovery rate. The top hit in males was rs10923844, an SNP of unknown function located downstream of HSD3B1 and HSD3B2. The top hits in females were two SNPs located upstream of ESR1 (rs3407085 and rs2295190). RF analysis, which reflects joint and conditional effects of multiple variants, indicated that genes involved in regulation of reproductive function, particularly LHCGR, are related to salivary testosterone levels in male infants, as are genes involved in cholesterol production, transport, and removal, while genes involved in estrogen signaling are related to salivary testosterone levels in female infants. PMID:25400620

  7. Postnatal testosterone levels and temperament in early infancy.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Gerianne M; Saenz, Janet

    2011-12-01

    Recent research showing associations between behavior and postnatal testosterone levels in male infants has suggested that the transient activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in early infancy may influence the expression of gender phenotypes in later development (i.e., the postnatal hormone hypothesis). As a further test of the relationship between postnatal hormones and behavior in infancy, we measured digit ratios and salivary testosterone in 76 male and female infants (3-4 months of age) and parents completed the Infant Behavior Questionnaire-Revised, a well-established measure of temperament in the first year of life. Consistent with our earlier findings, there were no significant sex differences in salivary testosterone levels and testosterone levels were unrelated to measures of behavior in female infants. However, in male infants, higher androgen levels predicted greater Negative Affectivity. Further examination of the four scales contributing to the measure of Negative Affectivity showed testosterone levels were a significant predictor of scores on the Distress to Limitations scale, but not of scores on Fear, Sadness, or Reactivity scales. This sex-specific association between salivary testosterone and behavior in infants is consistent with animal research showing higher prenatal androgens associated with typical male development lower the threshold of sensitivity to endogenous testosterone in postnatal life. In sum, these data provide additional support for the postnatal hormone hypothesis and suggest postnatal testosterone levels may influence the development of emotional regulation in male infants.

  8. An exploration of testosterone levels in patients with bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wooderson, Sarah C.; Gallagher, Peter; Watson, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Background Testosterone influences well-being, mood and cognition and may play a role in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder. Aim To examine testosterone levels in patients with bipolar disorder compared with healthy controls. Method We examined baseline total testosterone levels and current depression scores in male and female patients with bipolar disorder and mild to moderate depression and healthy controls. Results A significant interaction between diagnosis and gender was observed (F(2,97)=9.791, P=0.002). Testosterone levels were significantly lower for male patients with bipolar disorder compared with male controls (P=0.001). Women with bipolar disorder had significantly higher testosterone levels than female controls (P=0.03). Conclusions Disturbances in testosterone levels may represent an important neurobiological abnormality in bipolar disorder and may differ by gender. If these findings are confirmed, the use of gender appropriate treatment strategies for the normalisation of testosterone levels in bipolar disorder depression should be further explored. Declaration of interest None. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2015. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence. PMID:27703738

  9. High serum zinc and serum testosterone levels were associated with excessive erythrocytosis in men at high altitudes.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Gustavo F; Tapia, Vilma; Gasco, Manuel; Rubio, Julio; Gonzales-Castañeda, Cynthia

    2011-12-01

    Chronic mountain sickness (CMS), a lack of adaptation to altitude characterized by excessive erythrocytosis (EE), is a health problem associated with life at high altitude. The erythropoietic process is regulated by both erythropoietin and testosterone. Zinc (Zn) is known to be related with testosterone and hemoglobin levels; meanwhile, nitric oxide was also associated with adaptation to high altitude. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship of hemoglobin and CMS score with serum levels of zinc, total testosterone (TT), calculated free testosterone (cFT), bioavailable testosterone (BAT), hemoglobin, and nitric oxide in men at high altitude with or without EE. Men residing in Lima (150 m) and Cerro de Pasco (4,340 m), Peru, were divided into three groups: (1) low altitude, (2) high altitude without EE (hemoglobin < 21 g/dl), and (3) high altitude with EE (hemoglobin ≥ 21 g/dl). Adjusted multivariable regression models showed that serum testosterone (total or free) and Zn levels were independently correlated with increased hemoglobin levels. Similarly, hemoglobin was positively related with signs/symptoms of CMS; however, both increased the serum Zn and the nitric oxide levels correlated with reduced risk for signs/symptoms of CMS. In conclusion, higher serum testosterone levels and Zn levels were associated with EE, and low scores of signs/symptoms of CMS were associated with higher Zn and nitric oxide levels.

  10. ACTN3 GENOTYPE IS ASSOCIATED WITH TESTOSTERONE LEVELS OF ATHLETES

    PubMed Central

    Donnikov, A.E.; Trofimov, D.Y.

    2014-01-01

    α-Actinin-3 (ACTN3) has been proposed to regulate skeletal muscle differentiation and hypertrophy through its interaction with the signalling protein calcineurin. Since the inhibition of calcineurin potentiates the production of testosterone, we hypothesized that α-actinin-3 deficiency (predicted from the ACTN3 XX genotype) may influence serum levels of testosterone of athletes. Objective: To investigate the association of ACTN3 gene R577X polymorphism with resting testosterone levels in athletes. Methods: A total of 209 elite Russian athletes from different sports (119 males, 90 females) were genotyped for ACTN3 gene R577X polymorphism by real-time PCR. Resting testosterone was examined in serum of athletes using enzyme immunoassay. Results: The mean testosterone levels were significantly higher in both males and females with the ACTN3 R allele than in XX homozygotes (males: RR: 24.9 (5.7), RX: 21.8 (5.5), XX: 18.6 (4.9) ng · mL-1, P = 0.0071; females: RR: 1.43 (0.6), RX: 1.21 (0.71), XX: 0.79 (0.66) ng · mL-1, P = 0.0167). Conclusions: We found that the ACTN3 R allele was associated with high levels of testosterone in athletes, and this may explain, in part, the association between the ACTN3 RR genotype, skeletal muscle hypertrophy and power athlete status. PMID:24899773

  11. Testosterone Deficiency - Establishing A Biochemical Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Krakowsky, Yonah

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone deficiency is a common and often unrecognized disorder impacting the lives of many men. Symptoms related to low testosterone are relatively non-specific and clinicians must therefore ensure that a patients’ symptomatology is supported by a biochemical profile suggestive of testosterone deficiency. There are many options available to determine a patient’s testosterone level and laboratories will vary in the type of biochemical assessment they provide. In assessing patients with suspected low testosterone, the presence of symptoms and a low total testosterone is usually sufficient to initiate therapy. In equivocal cases, measurement of free or bioavailable testosterone with a reliable assay can further clarify the clinical picture. By understanding the differences between total, free and bioavailable testosterone, and the accuracy and reliability of their measurement, clinicians can better interpret their patients’ biochemical testosterone profile.

  12. Sex-Specific Associations between Umbilical Cord Blood Testosterone Levels and Language Delay in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehouse, Andrew J. O.; Mattes, Eugen; Maybery, Murray T.; Sawyer, Michael G.; Jacoby, Peter; Keelan, Jeffrey A.; Hickey, Martha

    2012-01-01

    Background: Preliminary evidence suggests that prenatal testosterone exposure may be associated with language delay. However, no study has examined a large sample of children at multiple time-points. Methods: Umbilical cord blood samples were obtained at 861 births and analysed for bioavailable testosterone (BioT) concentrations. When…

  13. Testosterone levels and mental rotation performance in Chinese men.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chi-Fu Jeffrey; Hooven, Carole K; Boynes, Matthew; Gray, Peter B; Pope, Harrison G

    2007-03-01

    Males achieve markedly higher scores than females on mental rotation tests (MRTs). Therefore, it might be hypothesized that, within groups of males, testosterone levels modulate MRT performance. However, studies of this relationship have yielded inconsistent results. Notably, a recent study of 28 American men, using the computerized Shepard and Metzler MRT (SM), found significant associations between salivary testosterone levels and the intercepts of the functions relating response time and error rate to the angular disparity between comparison objects. Conversely, a study of 35 British men, using the same methodology, found no such associations. We attempted a cross-cultural replication of these studies, in which we obtained salivary testosterone levels, together with performance measures on the SM, from 92 heterosexual right-handed men, aged 21-38, in Beijing, China. We hypothesized that Chinese men might perform more slowly and carefully than Western men on this test (which imposes no time limitations), but that associations of testosterone levels with performance, if real, should nevertheless be detectable across cultures. We found that the Chinese men indeed displayed significantly longer response times than the American men, although the Chinese men were equally accurate. Interestingly, testosterone was significantly associated with the slope of the response time function in Chinese men, whereas the earlier American study had found that testosterone was associated with the intercept, but not the slope, of this function. These observations suggest that differing cultural values regarding speed and accuracy may influence MRT performance--and that these values must be considered in future studies of testosterone and MRT measures.

  14. Testosterone levels and mental rotation performance in Chinese men.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chi-Fu Jeffrey; Hooven, Carole K; Boynes, Matthew; Gray, Peter B; Pope, Harrison G

    2007-03-01

    Males achieve markedly higher scores than females on mental rotation tests (MRTs). Therefore, it might be hypothesized that, within groups of males, testosterone levels modulate MRT performance. However, studies of this relationship have yielded inconsistent results. Notably, a recent study of 28 American men, using the computerized Shepard and Metzler MRT (SM), found significant associations between salivary testosterone levels and the intercepts of the functions relating response time and error rate to the angular disparity between comparison objects. Conversely, a study of 35 British men, using the same methodology, found no such associations. We attempted a cross-cultural replication of these studies, in which we obtained salivary testosterone levels, together with performance measures on the SM, from 92 heterosexual right-handed men, aged 21-38, in Beijing, China. We hypothesized that Chinese men might perform more slowly and carefully than Western men on this test (which imposes no time limitations), but that associations of testosterone levels with performance, if real, should nevertheless be detectable across cultures. We found that the Chinese men indeed displayed significantly longer response times than the American men, although the Chinese men were equally accurate. Interestingly, testosterone was significantly associated with the slope of the response time function in Chinese men, whereas the earlier American study had found that testosterone was associated with the intercept, but not the slope, of this function. These observations suggest that differing cultural values regarding speed and accuracy may influence MRT performance--and that these values must be considered in future studies of testosterone and MRT measures. PMID:17292367

  15. Delivery of testosterone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Asjad; Brothwood, Theresa; Bouloux, Pierre

    2003-10-01

    Optimal testosterone replacement therapy remains a considerable challenge for the estimated five out of 1000 men in the general community with androgen deficiency. Oral delivery is not possible due to rapid first pass metabolism and short half-life. Testosterone derivatives have been developed to enhance intrinsic androgenic potency, prolong duration of action, or improve oral bioavailability of synthetic androgens. Structural modification of testosterone include 17 beta-esterification, 17 alpha-alkylation, 1-methylation, addition of a 19-normethyl group, and 7 alpha-methylation. Currently, oral (testosterone undecanoate), transcutaneous (Andropatch, Virormone, Testoderm (ALZA Corp), Testogel), sublingual (testosterone cyclodextrin), intramuscular (Sustanon, Primoteston Depot), and fused crystalline testosterone pellet preparations are available for clinical use. Transbuccal testosterone systems have also been developed for clinical use and require twice daily application. Suspensions of biodegradable microspheres consisting of a polyglycolide-lactide matrix laden with testosterone can deliver stable, physiological levels of testosterone for 2 to 3 months. Micronized testosterone has low oral bioavailability requiring high daily doses. 7 alpha-Methyl 19-nortestosterone, a potent, synthetic androgen free of hepatotoxicity, has tissue-specific selectivity, being susceptible to aromatization but not 5 alpha-reduction, thereby potentially avoiding intraprostatic androgen amplification. PMID:14649214

  16. Stimulation of calcitonin secretory capacity by increased serum levels of testosterone in men treated with tamoxifen.

    PubMed

    Schopman, W; Slager, E; Hackeng, W H; Mulder, H

    1987-12-01

    Previous studies have suggested that sex steroids, including both oestrogen and testosterone, influence calcitonin secretion. However, a negative effect of gonadotrophins on calcitonin has not been excluded. Twelve men with infertility and low-normal serum levels of testosterone were studied before and during tamoxifen therapy. Increases in the serum levels of LH, FSH, testosterone and calcitonin were observed after treatment. Our findings suggest that testosterone has a direct influence on calcitonin secretion. PMID:3123401

  17. Strength Training and Testosterone Treatment Have Opposing Effects on Migration Inhibitor Factor Levels in Ageing Men

    PubMed Central

    Glintborg, D.; Christensen, L. L.; Kvorning, T.; Larsen, R.; Brixen, K.; Hougaard, D. M.; Richelsen, B.; Bruun, J. M.; Andersen, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background. The beneficial effects of testosterone treatment (TT) are debated. Methods. Double-blinded, placebo-controlled study of six months TT (gel) in 54 men aged 60–78 with bioavailable testosterone (BioT) <7.3 nmol/L and waist >94 cm randomized to TT (50–100 mg/day, n = 20), placebo (n = 18), or strength training (ST) (n = 16) for 24 weeks. Moreover, the ST group was randomized to TT (n = 7) or placebo (n = 9) after 12 weeks. Outcomes. Chemokines (MIF, MCP-1, and MIP-1α) and lean body mass (LBM), total, central, extremity, visceral, and subcutaneous (SAT) fat mass established by DXA and MRI. Results. From 0 to 24 weeks, MIF and SAT decreased during ST + placebo versus placebo, whereas BioT and LBM were unchanged. TT decreased fat mass (total, central, extremity, and SAT) and increased BioT and LBM versus placebo. MIF levels increased during TT versus ST + placebo. ST + TT decreased fat mass (total, central, and extremity) and increased BioT and LBM versus placebo. From 12 to 24 weeks, MCP-1 levels increased during TT versus placebo and MCP-1 levels decreased during ST + placebo versus placebo. Conclusion. ST + placebo was associated with decreased MIF levels suggesting decreased inflammatory activity. TT may be associated with increased inflammatory activity. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00700024. PMID:24089589

  18. Salivary testosterone levels in men at a U.S. sex club.

    PubMed

    Escasa, Michelle J; Casey, Jacqueline F; Gray, Peter B

    2011-10-01

    Vertebrate males commonly experience elevations in testosterone levels in response to sexual stimuli, such as presentation of a novel mating partner. Some previous human studies have shown that watching erotic movies increases testosterone levels in males although studies measuring testosterone changes during actual sexual intercourse or masturbation have yielded mixed results. Small sample sizes, "unnatural" lab-based settings, and invasive techniques may help account for mixed human findings. Here, we investigated salivary testosterone levels in men watching (n = 26) versus participating (n = 18) in sexual activity at a large U.S. sex club. The present study entailed minimally invasive sample collection (measuring testosterone in saliva), a naturalistic setting, and a larger number of subjects than previous work to test three hypotheses related to men's testosterone responses to sexual stimuli. Subjects averaged 40 years of age and participated between 11:00 pm and 2:10 am. Consistent with expectations, results revealed that testosterone levels increased 36% among men during a visit to the sex club, with the magnitude of testosterone change significantly greater among participants (72%) compared with observers (11%). Contrary to expectation, men's testosterone changes were unrelated to their age. These findings were generally consistent with vertebrate studies indicating elevated male testosterone in response to sexual stimuli, but also point out the importance of study context since participation in sexual behavior had a stronger effect on testosterone increases in this study but unlike some previous human lab-based studies. PMID:21165688

  19. Neither testosterone levels nor aggression decrease when the male Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) displays paternal behavior.

    PubMed

    Juana, Luis; Bárbara, Vázquez-Gaytán; Martín, Martínez-Torres; Agustín, Carmona; Guillermo, Ramos-Blancas; Guadalupe, Ortíz

    2010-03-01

    The first studies that correlated mammalian paternal behavior and testosterone levels indicated that the concentration of this steroid hormone decreases when males exhibit paternal care. However, recent studies have also shown that testosterone levels do not decrease when males display paternal behavior. In this study, we measured testosterone levels in plasma throughout the reproductive cycle of the Mongolian gerbil. Testosterone concentrations were correlated with paternal care as well as aggression. We also examined whether there is a trade-off between paternal behavior and aggression in this mammal. Our results show that Mongolian gerbil testosterone levels do not decrease when the males give paternal care. Likewise, male Mongolian gerbils exhibit high levels of aggression while displaying paternal behavior, indicating that there is no trade-off between aggression and paternal behavior. More studies are needed to determine whether testosterone is involved in the regulation of paternal behavior in this rodent.

  20. Enhanced transdermal bioavailability of testosterone propionate via surfactant-modified ethosomes

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Shu; Chen, Zaixing; Yang, Liqun; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Danhua; Guo, Jing; Guan, Yanmin; Li, Jianxin

    2013-01-01

    The current investigation aimed to evaluate the transdermal potential of novel testosterone propionate (TP) ethosomes and liposomes prepared by surfactant modification. The effect of hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide and cremophor EL-35 on the particle size and zeta potential of the prepared vesicles was investigated. The entrapment efficiency and stability, as well as in vitro and in vivo skin permeation, were studied with the various techniques, such as differential scanning calorimetry, confocal laser scanning microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and so on. The results indicated that the ethosomes were defined as spherical, unilamellar structures with low polydispersity (0.100 ± 0.015) and nanometric size (156.5 ± 3.5 nm). The entrapment efficiency of TP in ethosomal and liposomal carriers was 92.7% ± 3.7% and 64.7% ± 2.1%, respectively. The stability profile of the prepared TP ethosomal system assessed for 120 days revealed very low aggregation and very low growth in vesicular size. TP ethosomes also provided an enhanced transdermal flux of 37.85 ± 2.8 μg/cm2/hour and a decreased lag time of 0.18 hours across mouse skin. The skin permeation efficiency of the TP ethosomes as further assessed by confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed enhanced permeation of rhodamine red-loaded formulations to the deeper layers of the skin (260 μm) than that of the liposomal formation (120 μm). PMID:23990718

  1. Enhanced transdermal bioavailability of testosterone propionate via surfactant-modified ethosomes.

    PubMed

    Meng, Shu; Chen, Zaixing; Yang, Liqun; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Danhua; Guo, Jing; Guan, Yanmin; Li, Jianxin

    2013-01-01

    The current investigation aimed to evaluate the transdermal potential of novel testosterone propionate (TP) ethosomes and liposomes prepared by surfactant modification. The effect of hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide and cremophor EL-35 on the particle size and zeta potential of the prepared vesicles was investigated. The entrapment efficiency and stability, as well as in vitro and in vivo skin permeation, were studied with the various techniques, such as differential scanning calorimetry, confocal laser scanning microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and so on. The results indicated that the ethosomes were defined as spherical, unilamellar structures with low polydispersity (0.100 ± 0.015) and nanometric size (156.5 ± 3.5 nm). The entrapment efficiency of TP in ethosomal and liposomal carriers was 92.7% ± 3.7% and 64.7% ± 2.1%, respectively. The stability profile of the prepared TP ethosomal system assessed for 120 days revealed very low aggregation and very low growth in vesicular size. TP ethosomes also provided an enhanced transdermal flux of 37.85 ± 2.8 μg/cm(2)/hour and a decreased lag time of 0.18 hours across mouse skin. The skin permeation efficiency of the TP ethosomes as further assessed by confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed enhanced permeation of rhodamine red-loaded formulations to the deeper layers of the skin (260 μm) than that of the liposomal formation (120 μm).

  2. Enhanced transdermal bioavailability of testosterone propionate via surfactant-modified ethosomes.

    PubMed

    Meng, Shu; Chen, Zaixing; Yang, Liqun; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Danhua; Guo, Jing; Guan, Yanmin; Li, Jianxin

    2013-01-01

    The current investigation aimed to evaluate the transdermal potential of novel testosterone propionate (TP) ethosomes and liposomes prepared by surfactant modification. The effect of hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide and cremophor EL-35 on the particle size and zeta potential of the prepared vesicles was investigated. The entrapment efficiency and stability, as well as in vitro and in vivo skin permeation, were studied with the various techniques, such as differential scanning calorimetry, confocal laser scanning microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and so on. The results indicated that the ethosomes were defined as spherical, unilamellar structures with low polydispersity (0.100 ± 0.015) and nanometric size (156.5 ± 3.5 nm). The entrapment efficiency of TP in ethosomal and liposomal carriers was 92.7% ± 3.7% and 64.7% ± 2.1%, respectively. The stability profile of the prepared TP ethosomal system assessed for 120 days revealed very low aggregation and very low growth in vesicular size. TP ethosomes also provided an enhanced transdermal flux of 37.85 ± 2.8 μg/cm(2)/hour and a decreased lag time of 0.18 hours across mouse skin. The skin permeation efficiency of the TP ethosomes as further assessed by confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed enhanced permeation of rhodamine red-loaded formulations to the deeper layers of the skin (260 μm) than that of the liposomal formation (120 μm). PMID:23990718

  3. Association of testosterone and BDNF serum levels with craving during alcohol withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Heberlein, Annemarie; Lenz, Bernd; Opfermann, Birgitt; Gröschl, Michael; Janke, Eva; Stange, Katrin; Groh, Adrian; Kornhuber, Johannes; Frieling, Helge; Bleich, Stefan; Hillemacher, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies show associations between testosterone and brain-derived neurotrophic growth factor (BDNF) serum levels. BDNF and testosterone have been independently reported to influence alcohol consumption. Therefore, we aimed to investigate a possible interplay of testosterone and BDNF contributing to alcohol dependence. Regarding possible interplay of testosterone and BDNF and the activity of the hypothalamic pituitary axis (HPA), we included cortisol serum levels in our research. We investigated testosterone and BDNF serum levels in a sample of 99 male alcohol-dependent patients during alcohol withdrawal (day 1, 7, and 14) and compared them to a healthy male control group (n = 17). The testosterone serum levels were significantly (p < 0.001) higher in the patients' group than in the control group and decreased significantly during alcohol withdrawal (p < 0.001). The decrease of testosterone serum levels during alcohol withdrawal (days 1-7) was significantly associated with the BDNF serum levels (day 1: p = 0.008). In a subgroup of patients showing high cortisol serum levels (putatively mirroring high HPA activity), we found a significant association of BDNF and testosterone as well as with alcohol craving measured by the Obsessive and Compulsive Drinking Scale (OCDS). Our data suggest a possible association of BDNF and testosterone serum levels, which may be relevant for the symptomatology of alcohol dependence. Further studies are needed to clarify our results. PMID:27514572

  4. Relations between Prenatal Testosterone Levels and Cognitive Abilities at 4 Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finegan, Jo-Anne K.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Compared children's cognitive abilities at four years and their prenatal amniotic fluid testosterone levels. For girls, prenatal testosterone levels were related in a curvilinear manner to language comprehension and classification abilities, and inversely related to counting and knowledge of number facts. For boys, no relationships were found. (BC)

  5. Endogenous testosterone levels are associated with neural activity in men with schizophrenia during facial emotion processing.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ellen; Weickert, Cynthia Shannon; Lenroot, Rhoshel; Catts, Stanley V; Vercammen, Ans; White, Christopher; Gur, Raquel E; Weickert, Thomas W

    2015-06-01

    Growing evidence suggests that testosterone may play a role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia given that testosterone has been linked to cognition and negative symptoms in schizophrenia. Here, we determine the extent to which serum testosterone levels are related to neural activity in affective processing circuitry in men with schizophrenia. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure blood-oxygen-level-dependent signal changes as 32 healthy controls and 26 people with schizophrenia performed a facial emotion identification task. Whole brain analyses were performed to determine regions of differential activity between groups during processing of angry versus non-threatening faces. A follow-up ROI analysis using a regression model in a subset of 16 healthy men and 16 men with schizophrenia was used to determine the extent to which serum testosterone levels were related to neural activity. Healthy controls displayed significantly greater activation than people with schizophrenia in the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). There was no significant difference in circulating testosterone levels between healthy men and men with schizophrenia. Regression analyses between activation in the IFG and circulating testosterone levels revealed a significant positive correlation in men with schizophrenia (r=.63, p=.01) and no significant relationship in healthy men. This study provides the first evidence that circulating serum testosterone levels are related to IFG activation during emotion face processing in men with schizophrenia but not in healthy men, which suggests that testosterone levels modulate neural processes relevant to facial emotion processing that may interfere with social functioning in men with schizophrenia.

  6. Effects of Eurycoma longifolia on Testosterone Level and Bone Structure in an Aged Orchidectomised Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Tajul Ariff, Abdul Shukor; Soelaiman, Ima Nirwana; Pramanik, J.; Shuid, Ahmad Nazrun

    2012-01-01

    Testosterone replacement is the choice of treatment in androgen-deficient osteoporosis. However, long-term use of testosterone is potentially carcinogenic. Eurycoma longifolia (EL) has been reported to enhance testosterone level and prevent bone calcium loss but there is a paucity of research regarding its effect on the bone structural parameters. This study was conducted to explore the bone structural changes following EL treatment in normal and androgen-deficient osteoporosis rat model. Thirty-six male Sprague-Dawley rats aged 12 months were divided into normal control, normal rat supplemented with EL, sham-operated, orchidectomised-control, orchidectomised with testosterone replacement, and orchidectomised with EL supplementation groups. Testosterone serum was measured both before and after the completion of the treatment. After 6 weeks of the treatment, the femora were processed for bone histomorphometry. Testosterone replacement was able to raise the testosterone level and restore the bone volume of orchidectomised rats. EL supplementation failed to emulate both these testosterone actions. The inability of EL to do so may be related to the absence of testes in the androgen deficient osteoporosis model for EL to stimulate testosterone production. PMID:22966245

  7. Testosterone substitution normalizes elevated serum leptin levels in hypogonadal men.

    PubMed

    Jockenhövel, F; Blum, W F; Vogel, E; Englaro, P; Müller-Wieland, D; Reinwein, D; Rascher, W; Krone, W

    1997-08-01

    The ob gene product leptin (OB) is a feedback signal from the adipocyte to the hypothalamus and is involved in regulation of food intake and energy expenditure in rodents. A major determinant of serum OB levels is fat mass. Several studies suggest that men have lower OB levels than women even after adjustment for percent body fat. We, therefore, investigated the influence of testosterone (T) substitution in hypogonadal men on serum OB levels. Hypogonadal men with T levels of 3.6 nmol/L or less and off substitution therapy for at least 3 months were assigned to two treatment groups: testosterone enanthate (TE; 250 mg, i.m., every 21 days; n = 10) or a single s.c. implantation of 1200 mg crystalline T (TPEL; n = 12). Blood samples for determination of T, 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), sex hormone-binding globulin, and 17 beta-estradiol were obtained before therapy and then every 21 days until day 189 and at follow-up visits on days 246 and 300. Serum OB levels were assessed on days 0, 42, 84, 126, 168, and 300. OB levels were referred to a normal range for men based on the analysis of OB levels in 393 adult men. Substitution with T led to a large rise in T and DHT in both groups compared to baseline values (average T, days 21-189: TE, 14.33 +/- 2.63 nmol/L; TPEL, 24.98 +/- 1.64; average DHT, days 21-189: TE, 4.20 +/- 0.57 nmol/L; TPEL, 5.11 +/- 0.56; P < or = 0.05). Concomitantly, 17 beta-estradiol increased in both groups, and sex hormone-binding globulin levels were significantly decreased. At baseline, serum OB levels in hypogonadal men were 3-fold elevated compared to those in normal men (12.39 +/- 2.93 micrograms/L vs. 4.28 +/- 0.52; P < 0.01) and not different between groups (TE, 13.7 +/- 5.6; TPEL, 11.3 +/- 2.9 micrograms/L). This elevation was retained after adjustment for body mass index in the normal control group [TE, 1.45 +/- 0.51 SD score (P < 0.0001); TPEL, 0.98 +/- 0.35 SD score (P < 0.0008)]. During T substitution serum OB was completely

  8. Determinants of testosterone levels in human male obesity.

    PubMed

    Bekaert, Marlies; Van Nieuwenhove, Yves; Calders, Patrick; Cuvelier, Claude A; Batens, Arsène-Hélène; Kaufman, Jean-Marc; Ouwens, D Margriet; Ruige, Johannes B

    2015-09-01

    Testosterone (T) levels are decreased in obese men, but the underlying causes are incompletely understood. Our objective was to explore the relation between low (free) T levels and male obesity, by evaluating metabolic parameters, subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) aromatase expression, and parameters of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. We recruited 57 morbidly obese men [33 had type 2 diabetes (DM2)] and 25 normal-weight men undergoing abdominal surgery. Fourteen obese men also attended a follow-up, 2 years after gastric bypass surgery (GBS). Circulating T levels were quantified by LC-MS/MS, whereas free T levels were measured using serum equilibrium dialysis and sex hormone-binding globulin, luteinizing hormone, and follicle-stimulating hormone by immunoassay. SAT biopsies were used to determine adipocyte cell size and aromatase expression by real-time PCR. Total and free T levels were decreased in obese males versus controls, with a further decrease in obese men with DM2 versus obese men without DM2. There were no differences in aromatase expression among the study groups, and sex steroids did not correlate with aromatase expression. Pearson analysis revealed an inverse association between (free) T and SAT cell size, triglycerides, and HOMA-IR. Multivariate analysis confirmed the inverse association between (free) T and SAT cell size (β = -0.321, P = 0.037 and β = -0.441, P = 0.011, respectively), independent of age, triglycerides, HOMA-IR, obesity, or diabetes. T levels were normalized 2 years after GBS. These data suggest that SAT cell size rather than SAT aromatase expression or parameters of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis is related to low T in male obesity, which points to adipose cell size-related metabolic changes as a major trigger in decreased T levels.

  9. Prediction of Long-term Post-operative Testosterone Replacement Requirement Based on the Pre-operative Tumor Volume and Testosterone Level in Pituitary Macroadenoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheng-Chi; Chen, Chung-Ming; Lee, Shih-Tseng; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Pai, Ping-Ching; Toh, Cheng-Hong; Chuang, Chi-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Non-functioning pituitary macroadenomas (NFPAs) are the most prevalent pituitary macroadenomas. One common symptom of NFPA is hypogonadism, which may require long-term hormone replacement. This study was designed to clarify the association between the pre-operative tumor volume, pre-operative testosterone level, intraoperative resection status and the need of long-term post-operative testosterone replacement. Between 2004 and 2012, 45 male patients with NFPAs were enrolled in this prospective study. All patients underwent transsphenoidal surgery. Hypogonadism was defined as total serum testosterone levels of <2.4 ng/mL. The tumor volume was calculated based on the pre- and post-operative magnetic resonance images. We prescribed testosterone to patients with defined hypogonadism or clinical symptoms of hypogonadism. Hormone replacement for longer than 1 year was considered as long-term therapy. The need for long-term post-operative testosterone replacement was significantly associated with larger pre-operative tumor volume (p = 0.0067), and lower pre-operative testosterone level (p = 0.0101). There was no significant difference between the gross total tumor resection and subtotal resection groups (p = 0.1059). The pre-operative tumor volume and testosterone level impact post-operative hypogonadism. By measuring the tumor volume and the testosterone level and by performing adequate tumor resection, surgeons will be able to predict post-operative hypogonadism and the need for long-term hormone replacement. PMID:26537232

  10. Effects of prolonged physical exercise and fasting upon plasma testosterone level in rats.

    PubMed

    Guezennec, C Y; Ferre, P; Serrurier, B; Merino, D; Pesquies, P C

    1982-01-01

    Prolonged physical exercise and fasting in male rats were studied to determine the effect of these two treatments on plasma testosterone level. Blood and tissue samples were drawn after 1 h, 3 h, 5 h, and 7 h treadmill running, and after 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h of fasting. Both treatments resulted in a significant fall in plasma testosterone, plasma luteinizing hormone (LH), plasma Insulin (IRI) and in liver and muscle glycogen stores. In the course of these two treatments the injection of a supra maximal dose of Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (HCG) produced a rise in plasma testosterone similar to that in control rats. This indicates that the decrease of plasma LH may be responsible for the decrease in plasma testosterone, which is time-related with the decrease in glycogen stores. The possible metabolic role of the decrease in plasma testosterone is discussed. PMID:6889494

  11. Increasing testosterone levels and effects on cognitive functions in elderly men and women: a review.

    PubMed

    Hogervorst, E; Bandelow, S; Moffat, S D

    2005-10-01

    Low testosterone (T) levels may predispose to Alzheimer disease (AD), but it is unclear whether this is a co-morbid effect due to cachexia, subclinical hyperthyroidism or other co-morbidity. The biological plausibility for potential protective effects of T on brain functions is substantial. In addition, higher levels of gonadotropins found in older cases with AD suggest that low levels of T are not due to brain degeneration and that the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis is still intact. Men genetically at risk for AD were also already found to have lower levels of T. However, despite having lower levels of T, women do not show accelerated cognitive decline with age when compared to men. In addition, castration has not necessarily shown a decline in cognitive functions; some studies even found improvement of memory recall. Age may be an important factor when assessing optimal levels of T and several studies suggest that free or bioavailable T may be a better marker than total T levels when investigating associations of androgen activity with cognitive function. Small-scale T intervention trials in elderly men with and without dementia suggest that some cognitive deficits may be reversed, at least in part, by short term T supplementation. Age and prior hypogonadism may play an important role in therapy success and these factors should be investigated in more detail in future large scale randomized controlled studies. For elderly women, T treatment does not seem to have additional benefits over estrogen treatment for postmenopausal complaints and cognitive decline and may increase cardiovascular disease.

  12. Effect of Exogenous Testosterone, Finasteride, and Castration on Serum Level of Thyroxin

    PubMed Central

    Zarei, Fatemeh; Yousofvand, Namdar; Khazaei, Mozafar; Ghanbari, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Background: The secretion of thyroxin (T4) as the main hormone of thyroid gland is regulated by androgens. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of testosterone and finasteride administration and castration on serum levels of T4 and to show the effect of this regulation on total body weight, weight of testis, and the weight of prostate. Methods: Male adult rats (n = 32) were divided into 4 groups (n = 8): Group 1 (control), Group 2 (castration), Group 3 (finasteride: 20 mg/kg/day) and Group 4 (testosterone: 5 mg/kg/day). At the end of the study (35 days), serum level of thyroxin, body weight, weight of testis, and prostate were determined. Results: The data showed that the body weight increased in castrated (P = 0.04) and decreased in testosterone (P = 0.00) groups but did not differ in finasteride (P>0.05) group. There were not any differences in the weight of testis among control, finasteride, and testosterone groups but the weight of prostate increased in testosterone group (P = 0.00) and decreased in castrated (P = 0.03) and finasteride groups (P = 0.04). In addition, the serum level of T4 (nmo/ml) decreased in the three groups: finasteride (P = 0.03), testosterone (P = 0.04), and castrated (P = 0.00). Conclusion: Testosterone in both high and low levels decreased the amount of T4 with a time-dependent manner. PMID:23999719

  13. Associations between salivary testosterone and cortisol levels and neonatal health and growth outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Cho, June I.; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Su, Xiaogang; McCormick, Kenneth L.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Male vulnerability in health and growth outcomes has often been reported in very low birth weight (VLBW) preterm neonates. On the basis of gender-difference theories, possible associations were explored between the levels of postnatal salivary testosterone/cortisol and the outcomes of neonatal health/growth. Methods This study used an exploratory and comparative research design. One-hundred-one mother–VLBW preterm neonate pairs were recruited from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of a tertiary medical center in the Southeastern, US. Demographic information, health and growth variables of neonates, and pregnancy and labor variables of mothers were obtained from the medical record reviews and interviews of mothers. Saliva samples from each pair were collected between 9 and 60 days of age. The levels of testosterone and cortisol were determined by using an enzyme immunoassay methodology. Results Linear regression analysis showed that neonatal health problems were positively associated with the levels of postnatal salivary testosterone and cortisol, while growth delays were positively associated with the levels of postnatal salivary testosterone after adjusting for the characteristics of neonates and mothers and day of saliva sampling. The salivary levels of testosterone and cortisol were higher in neonates than in mothers. A positive correlation between the levels of testosterone and cortisol was found in neonates and in mothers. Conclusions The level of postnatal salivary testosterone is a more reliable marker in assessing neonatal health and growth outcomes compared to salivary cortisol. Further research on both testosterone and cortisol measurements at various stages during the neonatal period may elucidate further these associations. PMID:22633533

  14. Limited effect of testosterone treatment for erectile dysfunction caused by high-estrogen levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, T; Hotta, Y; Ohno, M; Maeda, Y; Kimura, K

    2013-01-01

    Some studies suggest that high-estrogen levels lead to erectile dysfunction (ED); high-estrogen levels are known to decrease testosterone levels. However, no study has examined whether testosterone replacement can improve the ED induced by high-estrogen levels. We investigated the effects of testosterone on ED caused by high-estrogen levels in rats. Rats were distributed in the following groups: (1) control (vehicle for 2 weeks), (2) the estrogen-treated group (ES; estradiol (3 μg kg(-1) day(-1)) for 2 weeks), and (3) the estrogen- and testosterone-treated group (ES+TE; estradiol (3 μg kg(-1) day(-1)) and testosterone (3 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) for 2 weeks). We measured smooth muscle function via isometric tension and erectile function by measuring the intracavernosal pressure on cavernous nerve stimulation. In the ES group, the contraction of the corpus cavernosum smooth muscle increased in response to noradrenalin, and its relaxation decreased in response to the nitric oxide donor, sodium nitroprusside. Further, the erectile function was significantly decreased. In the ES+TE group, neither smooth muscle function nor erectile function was significantly improved. In conclusion, a high-estrogen milieu affected erectile function in rats, and testosterone treatment did not improve the ED caused by high-estrogen levels.

  15. Relationships of Polychlorinated Biphenyls and Dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p’-DDE) with Testosterone Levels in Adolescent Males

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Mia V.; Deane, Glenn D.; Nelder, Kyrie R.; DeCaprio, Anthony P.; Jacobs, Agnes

    2013-01-01

    Background: Concern persists over endocrine-disrupting effects of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) on human growth and sexual maturation. Potential effects of toxicant exposures on testosterone levels during puberty are not well characterized. Objectives: In this study we evaluated the relationship between toxicants [polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p´-DDE), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and lead] and testosterone levels among 127 Akwesasne Mohawk males 10 to < 17 years of age with documented toxicant exposures. Methods: Data were collected between February 1996 and January 2000. Fasting blood specimens were collected before breakfast by trained Akwesasne Mohawk staff. Multivariable regression models were used to estimates associations between toxicants and serum testosterone, adjusted for other toxicants, Tanner stage, and potential confounders. Results: The sum of 16 PCB congeners (Σ16PCBs) that were detected in ≥ 50% of the population was significantly and negatively associated with serum testosterone levels, such that a 10% change in exposure was associated with a 5.6% decrease in testosterone (95% CI: –10.8, –0.5%). Of the 16 congeners, the more persistent ones (Σ8PerPCBs) were related to testosterone, whereas the less persistent ones, possibly reflecting more recent exposure, were not. When PCB congeners were subgrouped, the association was significant for the sum of eight more persistent PCBs (5.7% decrease; 95% CI: –11, –0.4%), and stronger than the sum of six less persistent congeners (3.1% decrease; 95% CI: –7.2, 0.9%). p,p´-DDE was positively but not significantly associated with serum testosterone (5.2% increase with a 10% increase in exposure; 95% CI: –0.5, 10.9%). Neither lead nor HCB was significantly associated with testosterone levels. Conclusions: Exposure to PCBs, particularly the more highly persistent congeners, may negatively influence testosterone levels among adolescent males. The

  16. Serum testosterone levels and excessive erythrocytosis during the process of adaptation to high altitudes

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Gustavo F

    2013-01-01

    Populations living at high altitudes (HAs), particularly in the Peruvian Andes, are characterized by a mixture of subjects with erythrocytosis (16 g dl−121 g dl−1). Elevated haemoglobin values (EE) are associated with chronic mountain sickness, a condition reflecting the lack of adaptation to HA. According to current data, native men from regions of HA are not adequately adapted to live at such altitudes if they have elevated serum testosterone levels. This seems to be due to an increased conversion of dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) to testosterone. Men with erythrocytosis at HAs show higher serum androstenedione levels and a lower testosterone/androstenedione ratio than men with EE, suggesting reduced 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17beta-HSD) activity. Lower 17beta-HSD activity via Δ4-steroid production in men with erythrocytosis at HA may protect against elevated serum testosterone levels, thus preventing EE. The higher conversion of DHEAS to testosterone in subjects with EE indicates increased 17beta-HSD activity via the Δ5-pathway. Currently, there are various situations in which people live (human biodiversity) with low or high haemoglobin levels at HA. Antiquity could be an important adaptation component for life at HA, and testosterone seems to participate in this process. PMID:23524530

  17. A herbal medicine, saikokaryukotsuboreito, improves serum testosterone levels and affects sexual behavior in old male mice.

    PubMed

    Zang, Zhi Jun; Ji, Su Yun; Dong, Wang; Zhang, Ya Nan; Zhang, Er Hong; Bin, Zhang

    2015-06-01

    Late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) is a clinical syndrome characterized with aging and declined serum testosterone levels. Sexual symptoms are also essential for the diagnosis of LOH. Testosterone replacement therapy is used widely to treat LOH. However, the side effects of it should not be ignored, such as fluid retention, hypertension and spermatogenic suppression. Therefore, alternate treatment modalities have been pursued. Herbal medicines used widely in China have achieved satisfying results with little side effects. Nonetheless, there are few pharmacological researches on them. In this study, 24-month-old mice were used as LOH animal models to explore the pharmacological effects of a herbal medicine, saikokaryukotsuboreito (SKRBT), on serum testosterone levels and sexual functions. Furthermore, the expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein, a kind of rate-limiting enzyme of testosterone synthesis, was also examined. As a result, SKRBT improved the serum testosterone levels of these mice at a dose of 300 and 450 mg/kg. Multiple measures of sexual behavior were enhanced. The expression of StAR was also increased. Therefore, this study suggested that SKRBT can improve the serum testosterone levels by activating the expression of StAR and might be a viable option to treat sexual symptoms caused by LOH.

  18. Mating season aggression and fecal testosterone levels in male ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta).

    PubMed

    Cavigelli, S A; Pereira, M E

    2000-05-01

    The challenge hypothesis (J. C. Wingfield, R. E. Hegner, B. G. Ball, and A. M. Duffy, 1990, Am. Nat. 136, 829-846) proposes that in birds, reptiles, and fish, "the frequency or intensity of reproductive aggression as an effect of T[estosterone] is strongest in situations of social instability, such as during the formation of dominance relationships, the establishment of territorial boundaries, or challenges by a conspecific male for a territory or access to mates" (p. 833). To determine the extension of this hypothesis to mammalian species, we tested predictions of the hypothesis in a nonpaternal, seasonal breeding, prosimian primate (ring-tailed lemurs, Lemur catta). Semi-free-ranging males were studied during periods of social stability (premating period) and instability (mating period). The annual mating season consists of several days during which males fight for access to promiscuous group females as each individually becomes sexually receptive for 1 day. Male rates of aggression were compared to fecal testosterone levels within premating and mating periods. In the premating period male rate of aggression was not significantly correlated with testosterone level. By contrast, during the mating season testosterone and aggression levels were positively and significantly correlated. However, on days just preceding estrus, male rate of aggression was not significantly correlated with testosterone, but on days of estrus, when aggressive challenges peaked sharply, testosterone and aggression were highly positively correlated. These results suggest that the challenge hypothesis applies to mammals as well as to birds, reptiles, and fish. In addition, elevations in testosterone were tightly circumscribed around days of estrus, suggesting a compromise between costs and benefits of elevated testosterone levels. PMID:10868488

  19. Seasonal and population variation in male testosterone levels in breeding orange-crowned warblers (Vermivora celata).

    PubMed

    Horton, Brent M; Yoon, Jongmin; Ghalambor, Cameron K; Moore, Ignacio T; Scott Sillett, T

    2010-09-15

    Comparative hormone studies can reveal how physiology underlies life history variation. Here, we examined seasonal variation in plasma testosterone concentration between populations of male orange-crowned warblers (Vermivora celata) breeding in Fairbanks, Alaska (V. c. celata) and on Santa Catalina Island, California (V. c. sordida). These populations face different ecological constraints and exhibit different life histories. Alaska birds have a short breeding season, low annual adult survival, and high reproductive rates. In contrast, Catalina Island birds exhibit high adult survival and low reproductive rates despite having a long breeding season. We examined seasonal variation in male testosterone concentrations as a potential mechanism underlying differences in male reproductive strategies between populations. From 2006 to 2008, we sampled males during the pre-incubation, incubation, and nestling stages. Alaska males exhibited a seasonal testosterone pattern typical of northern passerines: testosterone levels were high during pre-incubation and declined during incubation to low levels during nestling provisioning. Testosterone concentrations in Catalina Island males, however, did not vary consistently with breeding stage, remained elevated throughout the breeding season, and were higher than in Alaska males during the nestling stage. We hypothesize that in Alaska, where short seasons and high adult mortality limit breeding opportunities, the seasonal testosterone pattern facilitates high mating effort prior to incubation, but high parental investment during the nestling stage. On Catalina Island, elevated testosterone levels may reflect the extended mating opportunities and high population density facing males in this population. Our results suggest that population variation in seasonal testosterone patterns in orange-crowned warblers may be a function of differences in life history strategy and the social environment.

  20. Circulating testosterone and inhibin levels at different ages in the male beluga (Delphinapterus leucas).

    PubMed

    Katsumata, Etsuko; Ueda, Yoko; Arai, Kazutoshi; Katsumata, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Miori; Watanabe, Gen; Taya, Kazuyoshi

    2012-03-01

    This study is the first report on circulating testosterone and inhibin levels in a species of whales, the beluga. Circulating testosterone and immunoreactive (ir-) inhibin levels in two captive male belugas ("Nack", originally from Canada and "Duke", from the Okhotsk Sea) were measured every month for 9 years between 1995 and 2003. Assuming that clearly increased testosterone levels in the circulation indicates that the belugas had reached sexual maturity, at the ages of 10 ("Nack") and 11 years old ("Duke"). Their testosterone levels before the significant increase (pre-pubertal) were 0.42 ± 0.07 ng/ml (n=18) and 0.35 ± 0.10 ng/ml (n=18) and, those of after the increase (maturity) were 1.65 ± 0.14 ng/m l (n=74) and 2.06 ± 0.14 ng/ml (n=74). Circulating ir-inhibin levels before sexual maturity were 0.78 ± 0.04 ng/ml (n=18) and 0.64 ± 0.04 ng/ml (n=15) and, after sexual maturity were 0.52 ± 0.02 ng/ml (n=56) and 0.43 ± 0.02 ng/ml (n=67). Seasonal changes were observed in the testosterone levels after sexual maturity and the levels increased during March and April in Canadian origin "Nack", and peaked in February in Okhotsk origin "Duke". Circulating ir-inhibin level gradually decreased as they aged. A negative correlation between the circulating testosterone and ir-inhibin was observed. No seasonal changes were observed in the ir-inhibin levels after sexual maturity. These data will surely correspond to clarification of endocrinology and the successful reproduction of the beluga.

  1. Circulating testosterone and inhibin levels at different ages in the male beluga (Delphinapterus leucas).

    PubMed

    Katsumata, Etsuko; Ueda, Yoko; Arai, Kazutoshi; Katsumata, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Miori; Watanabe, Gen; Taya, Kazuyoshi

    2012-03-01

    This study is the first report on circulating testosterone and inhibin levels in a species of whales, the beluga. Circulating testosterone and immunoreactive (ir-) inhibin levels in two captive male belugas ("Nack", originally from Canada and "Duke", from the Okhotsk Sea) were measured every month for 9 years between 1995 and 2003. Assuming that clearly increased testosterone levels in the circulation indicates that the belugas had reached sexual maturity, at the ages of 10 ("Nack") and 11 years old ("Duke"). Their testosterone levels before the significant increase (pre-pubertal) were 0.42 ± 0.07 ng/ml (n=18) and 0.35 ± 0.10 ng/ml (n=18) and, those of after the increase (maturity) were 1.65 ± 0.14 ng/m l (n=74) and 2.06 ± 0.14 ng/ml (n=74). Circulating ir-inhibin levels before sexual maturity were 0.78 ± 0.04 ng/ml (n=18) and 0.64 ± 0.04 ng/ml (n=15) and, after sexual maturity were 0.52 ± 0.02 ng/ml (n=56) and 0.43 ± 0.02 ng/ml (n=67). Seasonal changes were observed in the testosterone levels after sexual maturity and the levels increased during March and April in Canadian origin "Nack", and peaked in February in Okhotsk origin "Duke". Circulating ir-inhibin level gradually decreased as they aged. A negative correlation between the circulating testosterone and ir-inhibin was observed. No seasonal changes were observed in the ir-inhibin levels after sexual maturity. These data will surely correspond to clarification of endocrinology and the successful reproduction of the beluga. PMID:21997236

  2. Comparison of Serum Cortisol and Testosterone Levels in Acute and Chronic Central Serous Chorioretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Natung, Tanie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare the levels of serum cortisol and testosterone in acute and chronic central serous chorio-retinopathy (CSC). Methods Serum cortisol and testosterone levels in 30 patients with either acute or chronic CSC were evaluated using chemiluminescent immunoassay. Results The mean age was 42.43 ± 6.37 years (range, 32 to 56 years). The mean 8:00 to 9.00 a.m. serum cortisol level was 12.61 ± 4.74 µg/dL (range, 6.58 to 27.42 µg/dL). The mean serum testosterone level was 5.88 ± 1.57 ng/dL (range, 2.81 to 9.94 ng/dL). The mean visual acuity was 20 / 65.07 ± 40.56 (range, 20 / 25 to 20 / 200). There was no statistically significant difference in the mean levels of serum cortisol and testosterone between the acute and chronic cases (p > 0.05), but there was a statistically significant difference in the mean presenting visual acuity in the two groups (p < 0.05). Conclusions All except one patient in the acute group had normal levels of serum cortisol. Testosterone levels were within the normal range in both the acute and chronic cases of CSC. There is unlikely to be any statistically significant difference in the mean levels of serum cortisol and testosterone between the acute and chronic cases, but there may be a statistically significant difference in the mean presenting visual acuity in these groups. PMID:26635454

  3. Right-left digit ratio (2D:4D) predicts free testosterone levels associated with a physical challenge.

    PubMed

    Kilduff, Liam; Cook, Christian J; Bennett, Mark; Crewther, Blair; Bracken, Richard Michael; Manning, John

    2013-01-01

    There is evidence that the digit ratio (2D:4D) is a negative correlate of prenatal levels of testosterone, but there is no association between 2D:4D and the circulating levels of both total and free testosterone. Sports provide a physical challenge and participants often show increased levels of free testosterone immediately preceding and during competition. We tested this hypothesis of a link between 2D:4D and testosterone under challenge in 79 professional rugby players using the following procedures; (i) 25 players were physically challenged using a repeated sprint agility test, and saliva samples were assayed for testosterone immediately preceding the repeated sprint agility test (time 1) and 5 minutes (time 2) and 20 minutes after completion of the repeated sprint ability (time 3); (ii) 54 players were also tested for salivary testosterone in an unchallenged condition. We found that right-left 2D:4D was significantly and negatively related to testosterone concentrations at times 1, 2 and 3 following the repeated sprint agility test (P < 0.05) and there was no association between the 2D:4D and basal testosterone levels in the unchallenged group. We suggest that low right-left 2D:4D is a predictive marker of free testosterone responsiveness when trained men are physically challenged, and that this association is programmed by the action of prenatal testosterone.

  4. Effect of altered reproductive function and lowered testosterone levels on bone density in male endurance athletes

    PubMed Central

    Bennell, Kim L; Brukner, Peter D; Malcolm, Susan A

    1996-01-01

    The effect of intense physical activity on female reproductive hormones is well recognised1–3 and there is evidence that menstrual disturbances associated with hypo-oestrogenism adversely affect bone density especially at the lumbar spine.4 5 Physical activity can also have a range of effects on male reproductive function depending upon the intensity and duration of the activity and the fitness of the individual.6 In particular, endurance training may be associated with reductions in circulating testosterone levels. Since testosterone has important anabolic roles, alterations in reproductive hormone profiles may have detrimental skeletal consequences similar to those seen in females with menstrual disturbances. The aim of this brief review is to present the limited literature on the relation between bone density and testosterone levels in male endurance athletes. PMID:8889111

  5. Establishing the "Biological Relevance" of Dipentyl Phthalate Reductions in Fetal Rat Testosterone Production and Plasma and Testis Testosterone Levels.

    PubMed

    Gray, Leon Earl; Furr, Johnathan; Tatum-Gibbs, Katoria R; Lambright, Christy; Sampson, Hunter; Hannas, Bethany R; Wilson, Vickie S; Hotchkiss, Andrew; Foster, Paul M D

    2016-01-01

    Phthalate esters (PEs) constitute a large class of compounds that are used for many consumer product applications. Many of the C2-C7 di-ortho PEs reduce fetal testicular hormone and gene expression levels in rats resulting in adverse effects seen later in life but it appears that relatively large reductions in fetal testosterone (T) levels and testis gene expression may be required to adversely affect reproductive development (Hannas, B. R., Lambright, C. S., Furr, J., Evans, N., Foster, P. M., Gray, E. L., and Wilson, V. S. (2012). Genomic biomarkers of phthalate-induced male reproductive developmental toxicity: a targeted RT-PCR array approach for defining relative potency. Toxicol. Sci. 125, 544-557). The objectives of this study were (1) to model the relationships between changes in fetal male rat plasma testosterone (PT), T levels in the testis (TT), T production (PROD), and testis gene expression with the reproductive malformation rates, and (2) to quantify the "biologically relevant reductions" (BRRs) in fetal T necessary to induce adverse effects in the offspring. In the fetal experiment, Harlan Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed with dipentyl phthalate (DPeP) at 0, 11, 33, 100, and 300 mg/kg/day from gestational days (GD) 14-18 and fetal testicular T, PT levels, and T Prod and gene expression were assessed on GD 18. In the postnatal experiment, rats were dosed with DPeP from GD 8-18 and reproductive development was monitored through adulthood. The dose-response curves for TT levels (ED(50) = 53 mg/kg) and T PROD (ED(50) = 45 mg/kg) were similar, whereas PT was reduced at ED50 = 19 mg/kg. When the reductions in TPROD and Insl3 mRNA were compared with the postnatal effects of in utero DPeP, dose-related reproductive alterations were noted when T PROD and Insl3 mRNA were reduced by >45% and 42%, respectively. The determination of BRR levels may enable risk assessors to utilize fetal endocrine data to help establish points of departure for

  6. High serum testosterone levels are associated with excessive erythrocytosis of chronic mountain sickness in men.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Gustavo F; Gasco, Manuel; Tapia, Vilma; Gonzales-Castañeda, Cynthia

    2009-06-01

    Chronic mountain sickness (CMS) is characterized by excessive erythrocytosis (EE) secondary to hypoventilation. Erythropoietin (Epo) and testosterone regulate erythrocyte production. Low thyroid hormone levels are also associated to hypoventilation. Hence, these hormones can play a role in etiopathogeny of EE. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effect of sexual and thyroid hormones and Epo in residents from Lima (150 m) and Cerro de Pasco (4,340 m), Peru, and the response to human chorionic gonadotrophin stimulation (hCG). Three groups, one at low altitude and two at high altitude [1 with hemoglobin values >16-21 g/dl and the second with Hb >or=21 g/dl (EE)], were studied. hCG was administered intramuscularly in a single dose (1,000 IU), and blood samples were obtained at 0, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h after injection. High-altitude natives present similar levels of gonadotropins and thyroid hormones but lower dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) levels (P < 0.01) and greater Epo (P < 0.01), 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone (P < 0.01), and testosterone levels (P < 0.01) than those at 150 m. Serum testosterone levels (524.13 +/- 55.91 microg/dl vs. 328.14 +/- 53.23 ng/dl, means +/- SE; P < 0.05) and testosterone/DHEAS ratios are higher (7.98 +/- 1.1 vs. 3.65 +/- 1.1; P < 0.01) and DHEAS levels lower in the EE group (83.85 +/- 14.60 microg/dl vs. 148.95 +/- 19.11 ug/dl; P < 0.05), whereas Epo was not further affected. Testosterone levels were highest and DHEAS levels lowest in the EE group at all times after hCG stimulation. In conclusion, high androgen activity could be involved in the etiopathogeny of CMS. This evidence provides an opportunity to develop new therapeutic strategies.

  7. Correlation between male social status, testosterone levels, and parasitism in a dimorphic polygynous mammal.

    PubMed

    Negro, Sandra S; Caudron, Abigail K; Dubois, Michel; Delahaut, Philippe; Gemmell, Neil J

    2010-01-01

    Life history trade-offs have often been assumed to be the consequence of restrictions in the availability of critical resources such as energy and nutrients, which necessitate the differential allocation of resources to costly traits. Here, we examined endocrine (testosterone) and health (parasite burdens) parameters in territorial and non-territorial New Zealand fur seal males. We documented intra-sexual differences in sexual behaviours, testosterone levels, and parasitism that suggest a trade-off exists between reproductive success and physical health, particularly susceptibility to helminths and acanthocephalans, in males displaying different mating tactics (i.e., territorial and non-territorial tactics). Levels of testosterone were higher in territorial males and correlated positively with reproductive effort (i.e., intra- and inter-sexual interactions). However, these territorial males also exhibited high levels of parasitic infection, which may impair survival in the long-term. Our study, while limited in sample size, provides preliminary evidence for a link between male mating tactics, testosterone levels and parasite loads, and potential effects on reproductive success and life history that should be explored further. PMID:20856933

  8. Sildenafil increases serum testosterone levels by a direct action on the testes.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, M; Bhasin, S; Travison, T G; Davda, M N; Stroh, H; Basaria, S

    2013-11-01

    Phosphodiesterase-5-inhibitors, such as sildenafil, increase intracavernosal cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels, which results in corporal smooth muscle relaxation and penile erection. Here, we determined the effects of sildenafil administration on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in men with erectile dysfunction and low testosterone levels. The Testosterone and Erectile Dysfunction trial (ClinicalTrials.gov # NCT00512707) initially administered an optimized dose of sildenafil to 140 men, aged 40-70 years with erectile dysfunction, low serum total testosterone (<11.4 nmol/L; 330 ng/dL) and/or free testosterone (<173 pmol/L; 50 pg/mL) over 3-7 weeks. Sex steroids and gonadotropins were measured at baseline and after sildenafil optimization in a longitudinal study without a separate control group. Serum testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and oestrogens were measured using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Administration of an optimized dose of sildenafil was associated with mean increases of 3.6 nmol/L (103 ng/dL; p < 0.001) and 110 pmol/L (31.7 pg/mL; p < 0.001) in total and free testosterone levels respectively. This was accompanied by parallel increases in serum DHT (0.17 nmol/L; 4.9 ng/dL; p < 0.001) and oestradiol (14 pmol/L; 3.7 pg/mL; p < 0.001) and significant suppression of luteinizing hormone (change -1.3 units/L; p = 0.003) levels, suggesting a direct effect at the testicular level. Androstenedione and oestrone increased by 1.3 nmol/L (38 ng/dL; p = 0.011) and 10.7 pmol/L (2.9 pg/mL; p = 0.012), respectively, supporting a possible effect of sildenafil on adrenal steroidogenesis. In conclusion, sildenafil administration was associated with increased testosterone levels likely ascribable to a direct effect on the testis.

  9. Testosterone levels in the blood plasma of male chicken-pheasant hybrids.

    PubMed

    Purohit, V D; Basrur, P K; Smith, V G

    1978-03-01

    Testosterone levels in the blood plasma of sterile male chicken-pheasant hybrids were compared with plasma testosterone levels of roosters and male pheasants, using radioimmunoassay. Mean values of testosterone in the roosters, male pheasants and chicken-pheasant hybrids during spring were 155.47 +/- 4.03, 24.29 +/- 1.55 and 0.68 +/- 0.05 ng./100 ml., respectively and the corresponding values for winter were 88.88 +/- 4.10, 0.61 +/- 0.04 and 0.76 +/- 0.07 ng./100 ml. The pheasant testes were inactive in winter but active in spring whereas the hybrid testes were inactive in winter and spring unlike those of roosters which were active during these seasons. The low levels of testosterone in hybrids during both seasons could be attributed to the impairment of steroid biosynthetic activity of the Leydig cells and may be causally related to the absence of secondary sexual characteristics and the interruption of spermatogenesis in chicken-pheasant hybrids.

  10. In vivo exposure of young adult male rats to methoxychlor reduces serum testosterone levels and ex vivo Leydig cell testosterone formation and cholesterol side-chain cleavage activity.

    PubMed

    Murono, Eisuke P; Derk, Raymond C; Akgul, Yucel

    2006-02-01

    Methoxychlor (MC) was developed as a replacement for the banned pesticide DDT. After in vivo administration, it is metabolized in the liver to 2,2-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (HPTE), which is proposed to be the active agent. Both MC and HPTE have been shown to exhibit weak estrogenic and antiandrogenic activities, and they are thought to exert their effects through estrogen and androgen receptors, respectively. Although in vitro studies using cultured rat Leydig cells have reported that HPTE inhibits both basal and hCG-stimulated testosterone formation, the response of circulating testosterone levels to in vivo MC has been more variable. Therefore, the current studies evaluated whether the daily in vivo administration of MC (0, 5, 40 and 200 mg/kg body weight) for a short duration (days 54-60 of age) by gavage altered serum testosterone levels and ex vivo Leydig cell testosterone formation in young adult male rats. These results demonstrate that both fluid-retained and fluid-expressed seminal vesicle weights declined to 44 and 60% of control, respectively, in the 200 mg/kg MC-exposed animals. Similarly, serum testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone levels declined to 41 and 45% of control, respectively, in the 200 mg/kg MC-exposed animals; however, serum LH and FSH levels were unaffected. Ex vivo Leydig cell basal testosterone formation over 4h declined to 49% of control in animals exposed to 200 mg/kg MC, and ex vivo Leydig cell P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage activity declined to 79 and 50% of control in animals exposed to 40 and 200 mg/kg of MC, respectively, supporting previous in vitro studies which demonstrated the sensitivity of this step to MC.

  11. Prenatal Hyperandrogenization Induces Metabolic and Endocrine Alterations Which Depend on the Levels of Testosterone Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Amalfi, Sabrina; Velez, Leandro Martín; Heber, María Florencia; Vighi, Susana; Ferreira, Silvana Rocío; Orozco, Adriana Vega; Pignataro, Omar; Motta, Alicia Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    Prenatal hyperandrogenism is able to induce polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in rats. The aim of the present study was to establish if the levels of prenatal testosterone may determine the extent of metabolic and endocrine alterations during the adult life. Pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were prenatally injected with either 2 or 5 mg free testosterone (groups T2 and T5 respectively) from day 16 to day 19 day of gestation. Female offspring from T2 and T5 displayed different phenotype of PCOS during adult life. Offspring from T2 showed hyperandrogenism, ovarian cysts and ovulatory cycles whereas those from T5 displayed hyperandrogenism, ovarian cysts and anovulatory cycles. Both group showed increased circulating glucose levels after the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT; an evaluation of insulin resistance). IPGTT was higher in T5 rats and directly correlated with body weight at prepubertal age. However, the decrease in the body weight at prepubertal age was compensated during adult life. Although both groups showed enhanced ovarian steroidogenesis, it appears that the molecular mechanisms involved were different. The higher dose of testosterone enhanced the expression of both the protein that regulates cholesterol availability (the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR)) and the protein expression of the transcriptional factor: peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma). Prenatal hyperandrogenization induced an anti-oxidant response that prevented a possible pro-oxidant status. The higher dose of testosterone induced a pro-inflammatory state in ovarian tissue mediated by increased levels of prostaglandin E (PG) and the protein expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2, the limiting enzyme of PGs synthesis). In summary, our data show that the levels of testosterone prenatally injected modulate the uterine environment and that this, in turn, would be responsible for the endocrine and metabolic abnormalities and the phenotype of PCOS

  12. [Association between the serum level of testosterone and other comorbidities in obstructive sleep apnea].

    PubMed

    Bercea, Raluca; Bercea, Bogdan; Mihăescu, Traian

    2012-01-01

    Testosterone seems to play a role in the pathophysiology of OSAS but the mechanisms are not yet well defined. Research of this relationship has focused on two main assumptions: first case support the emergence of OSAS or augmentation of OSAS severity in men treated with testosterone for symptomatic hypogonadism; the second hypothesis suggest that serum testosterone deficiency is due to hypoxia and microarousals generated by OSAS with direct impact on hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. The correlation between sleep apnea and androgenic disorders should be considered in the light of the intervention of many other factors which can act as confounding factors: age, obesity and other associated pathologies (chronic lung disease, smoking status). Many studies conducted so far on this interrelation (sleep apnea, endocrine system) have ignored these factors. In most cases CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) therapy revert low serum testosterone levels to normal levels. Depressive status and fatigue, as OSAS consequences associated with hypogonadism have been reported in the literature and may have clinically significant aspects due to summary effect, with notable improvement after CPAP therapy avoiding adverse effects of hormonal or antidepressant treatment. The clinical implications and major consequences of association between androgen dysfunction and sleep apnea syndrome require a correct management in the recognition and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome associated with comorbidities.

  13. Testosterone Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... of other conditions, such as polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) . ^ Back to top What does the test result ... are normally low. Increased testosterone levels can indicate: PCOS Ovarian or adrenal gland tumor Congenital adrenal hyperplasia ^ ...

  14. Serum testosterone as a biomarker for second prostatic biopsy in men with negative first biopsy for prostatic cancer and PSA>4ng/mL, or with PIN biopsy result

    PubMed Central

    Fiamegos, Alexandros; Varkarakis, John; Kontraros, Michael; Karagiannis, Andreas; Chrisofos, Michael; Barbalias, Dimitrios; Deliveliotis, Charalampos

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Data from animal, clinical and prevention studies support the role of androgens in prostate cancer growth, proliferation and progression. Results of serum based epidemiologic studies in humans, however, have been inconclusive. The present study aims to define whether serum testosterone can be used as a predictor of a positive second biopsy in males considered for re-biopsy. Material and Methods: The study included 320 men who underwent a prostatic biopsy in our department from October 2011 until June 2012. Total testosterone, free testosterone, bioavailable testosterone and prostate pathology were evaluated in all cases. Patients undergoing a second biopsy were identified and biopsy results were statistically analyzed. Results: Forty men (12.5%) were assessed with a second biopsy. The diagnosis of the second biopsy was High Grade Intraepithelial Neoplasia in 14 patients (35%) and Prostate Cancer in 12 patients (30%). The comparison of prostatic volume, total testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin, free testosterone, bioavailable testosterone and albumin showed that patients with cancer of the prostate had significantly greater levels of free testosterone (p=0.043) and bioavailable T (p=0.049). Conclusion: In our study, higher free testosterone and bioavailable testosterone levels were associated with a cancer diagnosis at re-biopsy. Our results indicate a possible role for free and bioavailable testosterone in predicting the presence of prostate cancer in patients considered for re-biopsy. PMID:27532110

  15. Association Between Serum Levels of Testosterone and Estradiol With Meibomian Gland Assessments in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Ablamowicz, Anna F.; Nichols, Jason J.; Nichols, Kelly K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aims of this analysis were to determine if there is an association between serum levels of testosterone and estradiol with meibomian gland (MG) morphology and lipid layer thickness. Methods The data used for this analysis were collected from postmenopausal women with and without dry eye disease. Meibography was used to assess MG dropout on the central two-thirds of the eyelid and biomicroscopy was used for assessing MG expressibility and meibum quality. Venous blood samples were drawn for serum hormone level analysis. The Kruskal-Wallis test and Spearman correlations were used for statistical analysis. Results One hundred ninety-eight postmenopausal women with an average age of 61.2 (±9.1) years were included in this analysis. Testosterone levels showed significant differences between MG dropout grades 1 and 4 (P = 0.002) and grades 2 and 4 (P = 0.01), whereas estradiol levels were different based on MG dropout (P = 0.53). No significant correlations were found between testosterone (r = 0.10, P = 0.17) or estradiol (r = 0.05, P = 0.45) and lipid layer thickness. Conclusions Testosterone levels were increased with MG dropout, which was significant between the mild and severe dropout groups, whereas no significant differences were found with estradiol and any MG assessment. Although the literature suggests an association of serum hormone levels and pathogenesis of dry eye disease in postmenopausal women, analysis of active sex steroid precursors and local tissue hormone levels may prove more useful. PMID:26830366

  16. Relationship between sperm count, serum gonadotropins and testosterone levels in normo-, oligo- and azoospermia.

    PubMed

    Lenau, H; Gorewoda, I; Niermann, H

    1980-01-01

    In 92 men with normozoospermia (greater than 40 X 10(6)/ml), 105 with slight oligozoospermia (greater than 10 X 10(6)/ml), 100 with severe oligozoospermia (less than 10 X 10(6)/ml) and 56 with azoospermia, serum testosterone, LH and FSH were measured radioimmunologically. With an increasing degree of reduction of spermatozoa, a decreasing testosterone level and increasing LH and FSH levels could be demonstrated. In normozoospermia, between 40 and 140 X 10(6)/ml, a direct correlation was found between FSH and sperm count, and, in the group between 40 and 100 X 10(6)/ml, a direct correlation between T and sperm count. A disturbed LH:T balance is often observed which beside decreased serum T levels demonstrates a testicular deficiency in androgen production.

  17. Moderating effects of salivary testosterone levels on associations between job demand and psychological stress response in Japanese medical workers.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, Kumi; Miwa, Machiko; Taniguchi, Toshiyo; Tsuchiya, Masao; Kawakami, Norito

    2016-06-10

    Levels of job stress have been shown to be inversely associated with testosterone levels, but some inconsistent results have been documented. We investigated the moderating effects of testosterone levels on associations between job stress-factors and psychological stress responses in Japanese medical workers. The participants were 63 medical staff (20 males and 43 women; mean age: 30.6 years; SD=7.3) in Okayama, Japan. Their job-stress levels and psychological stress responses were evaluated using self-administered questionnaires, and their salivary testosterone collected. Multiple regression analyses showed that job demand was positively associated with stress responses in men and women. An interaction between testosterone and support from colleagues had a significant effect on depression and anxiety for women. In women with lower testosterone levels, a reducing effect of support from colleagues on depression and anxiety was intensified. In women with higher testosterone levels, depression and anxiety levels were identical regardless of support from colleagues. Testosterone may function as a moderator between perceived work environment and psychological stress responses for female medical workers.

  18. Serum testosterone and gonadotropins levels in patients with premature ejaculation: A comparison with normal men

    PubMed Central

    Mohseni, Mohammad G.; Hosseini, Seyed Reza; Alizadeh, Farshid; Rangzan, Nazir

    2014-01-01

    Background: To investigate the role of testosterone (T) in the pathogenesis of ejaculatory symptoms, particularly premature ejaculation (PE). Materials and Methods: A total of 41 male patients with PE as well as 41 controls with no sexual dysfunction were recruited in this cross-sectional study. We used the stopwatch measurement to monitor the intravaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT). Patients with mean IELT values lower than 60 s were considered to have PE. Serum levels of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), prolactin (PRL), total testosterone (TT) and free testosterone (FT) were measured in patients as well as controls. Patients with thyroid dysfunction, hypogonadism, hypertension and dyslipidemia were excluded from the study. Results: The serum levels of FT and FSH were significantly higher in cases (P = 0.036 and 0.003, respectively). There was no significant difference between TT, LH and PRL levels of the two groups. Conclusion: Patients with PE have higher FT and FSH levels compared with normal men. The causative relationship between these entities and also the clinical importance of this finding has to be determined by more comprehensive studies. PMID:24592360

  19. Impact of season and social challenge on testosterone and corticosterone levels in a year-round territorial bird.

    PubMed

    Landys, Meta M; Goymann, Wolfgang; Schwabl, Ingrid; Trapschuh, Monika; Slagsvold, Tore

    2010-07-01

    Plasma testosterone increases during breeding in many male vertebrates and has long been implicated in the promotion of aggressive behaviors relating to territory and mate defense. Males of some species also defend territories outside of the breeding period. For example, the European nuthatch (Sitta europaea) defends an all-purpose territory throughout the year. To contribute to the growing literature regarding the hormonal correlates of non-breeding territoriality, we investigated the seasonal testosterone and corticosterone profile of male (and female) nuthatches and determined how observed hormone patterns relate to expression of territorial aggression. Given that non-breeding territoriality in the nuthatch relates to the reproductive context (i.e., defense of a future breeding site), we predicted that males would exhibit surges in plasma testosterone throughout the year. However, we found that males showed elevated testosterone levels only during breeding. Thus, testosterone of gonadal origin does not appear to be involved in the expression of non-breeding territoriality. Interestingly, territorial behaviors of male nuthatches were stronger in spring than in autumn, suggesting that in year-round territorial species, breeding-related testosterone elevations may upregulate male-male aggression above non-breeding levels. In females, plasma testosterone was largely undetectable. We also examined effects of simulated territorial intrusions (STIs) on testosterone and corticosterone levels of breeding males. We found that STIs did not elicit a testosterone response, but caused a dramatic increase in plasma corticosterone. These data support the hypothesis that corticosterone rather than testosterone may play a role in the support of behavior and/or physiology during acute territorial encounters in single-brooded species.

  20. Nucleus accumbens response to rewards and testosterone levels are related to alcohol use in adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Braams, Barbara R; Peper, Jiska S; van der Heide, Dianne; Peters, Sabine; Crone, Eveline A

    2016-02-01

    During adolescence there is a normative increase in risk-taking behavior, which is reflected in, for example, increases in alcohol consumption. Prior research has demonstrated a link between testosterone and alcohol consumption, and between testosterone and neural responses to rewards. Yet, no study to date tested how testosterone levels and neural responses to rewards relate to and predict individual differences in alcohol use. The current study aimed to investigate this by assessing alcohol use, testosterone levels and neural responses to rewards in adolescents (12-17 years old) and young adults (18-26 years old). Participants were measured twice with a two-year interval between testing sessions. Cross-sectional analysis showed that at the second time point higher neural activity to rewards, but not testosterone levels, explained significant variance above age in reported alcohol use. Predictive analyses showed that, higher testosterone level at the first time point, but not neural activity to rewards at the first time point, was predictive of more alcohol use at the second time point. These results suggest that neural responses to rewards are correlated with current alcohol consumption, and that testosterone level is predictive of future alcohol consumption. These results are interpreted in the context of trajectory models of adolescent development. PMID:26771250

  1. Nucleus accumbens response to rewards and testosterone levels are related to alcohol use in adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Braams, Barbara R; Peper, Jiska S; van der Heide, Dianne; Peters, Sabine; Crone, Eveline A

    2016-02-01

    During adolescence there is a normative increase in risk-taking behavior, which is reflected in, for example, increases in alcohol consumption. Prior research has demonstrated a link between testosterone and alcohol consumption, and between testosterone and neural responses to rewards. Yet, no study to date tested how testosterone levels and neural responses to rewards relate to and predict individual differences in alcohol use. The current study aimed to investigate this by assessing alcohol use, testosterone levels and neural responses to rewards in adolescents (12-17 years old) and young adults (18-26 years old). Participants were measured twice with a two-year interval between testing sessions. Cross-sectional analysis showed that at the second time point higher neural activity to rewards, but not testosterone levels, explained significant variance above age in reported alcohol use. Predictive analyses showed that, higher testosterone level at the first time point, but not neural activity to rewards at the first time point, was predictive of more alcohol use at the second time point. These results suggest that neural responses to rewards are correlated with current alcohol consumption, and that testosterone level is predictive of future alcohol consumption. These results are interpreted in the context of trajectory models of adolescent development.

  2. Nucleus accumbens response to rewards and testosterone levels are related to alcohol use in adolescents and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Braams, Barbara R.; Peper, Jiska S.; van der Heide, Dianne; Peters, Sabine; Crone, Eveline A.

    2016-01-01

    During adolescence there is a normative increase in risk-taking behavior, which is reflected in, for example, increases in alcohol consumption. Prior research has demonstrated a link between testosterone and alcohol consumption, and between testosterone and neural responses to rewards. Yet, no study to date tested how testosterone levels and neural responses to rewards relate to and predict individual differences in alcohol use. The current study aimed to investigate this by assessing alcohol use, testosterone levels and neural responses to rewards in adolescents (12–17 years old) and young adults (18–26 years old). Participants were measured twice with a two-year interval between testing sessions. Cross-sectional analysis showed that at the second time point higher neural activity to rewards, but not testosterone levels, explained significant variance above age in reported alcohol use. Predictive analyses showed that, higher testosterone level at the first time point, but not neural activity to rewards at the first time point, was predictive of more alcohol use at the second time point. These results suggest that neural responses to rewards are correlated with current alcohol consumption, and that testosterone level is predictive of future alcohol consumption. These results are interpreted in the context of trajectory models of adolescent development. PMID:26771250

  3. Testosterone, but not nonaromatizable dihydrotestosterone, improves working memory and alters nerve growth factor levels in aged male rats.

    PubMed

    Bimonte-Nelson, Heather A; Singleton, Rachel S; Nelson, Matthew E; Eckman, Christopher B; Barber, John; Scott, Tonetta Y; Granholm, Ann-Charlotte E

    2003-06-01

    Recent studies have suggested that testosterone levels are lower in men with Alzheimer's disease and that testosterone treatment improves cognition in older men. Since testosterone can be aromatized to estrogen, testosterone's effects could be due to conversion into estrogen. We treated aged male rats with either testosterone or dihydrotestosterone (DHT), the latter of which is not aromatized to estrogen, in order to determine whether these treatments improve spatial working and reference memory as assessed in the water radial arm maze. We also tested whether such effects are related to beta-amyloid levels in the hippocampus or neurotrophin levels in the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, frontal cortex, or striatum. Aged rats made more errors than young rats on all memory measures. Testosterone, but not DHT, improved working memory and decreased hippocampal NGF protein in aged rats, while having no effect on beta-amyloid. However, higher beta-amyloid levels were correlated with poorer working memory performance in young rats. Neurotrophin levels in entorhinal cortex were positively correlated with errors for all memory measures in androgen-treated rats. Similar to findings in human studies, in our study androgen treatment lowered circulating estradiol levels in aged rats, suggesting that androgen treatment exerts feedback to the hypothalamic pituitary axis and that conversion to estrogen may not be the underlying biological mechanism of testosterone's effects on memory and growth factor levels. The ratio of estradiol to testosterone, or the actions of the aromatase enzyme itself, may be responsible for the observed effects. These data support the hypothesis that testosterone therapy in aging men may provide positive effects on cognition and that neural regions that are linked to cognition, such as the hippocampus and/or entorhinal cortex, may be involved in such effects.

  4. High serum testosterone levels are associated with excessive erythrocytosis of chronic mountain sickness in men

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Gustavo F.; Gasco, Manuel; Tapia, Vilma; Gonzales-Castañeda, Cynthia

    2009-01-01

    Chronic mountain sickness (CMS) is characterized by excessive erythrocytosis (EE) secondary to hypoventilation. Erythropoietin (Epo) and testosterone regulate erythrocyte production. Low thyroid hormone levels are also associated to hypoventilation. Hence, these hormones can play a role in etiopathogeny of EE. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effect of sexual and thyroid hormones and Epo in residents from Lima (150 m) and Cerro de Pasco (4,340 m), Peru, and the response to human chorionic gonadotrophin stimulation (hCG). Three groups, one at low altitude and two at high altitude [1 with hemoglobin values >16–21 g/dl and the second with Hb ≥21 g/dl (EE)], were studied. hCG was administered intramuscularly in a single dose (1,000 IU), and blood samples were obtained at 0, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h after injection. High-altitude natives present similar levels of gonadotropins and thyroid hormones but lower dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) levels (P < 0.01) and greater Epo (P < 0.01), 17α-hydroxyprogesterone (P < 0.01), and testosterone levels (P < 0.01) than those at 150 m. Serum testosterone levels (524.13 ± 55.91 μg/dl vs. 328.14 ± 53.23 ng/dl, means ± SE; P < 0.05) and testosterone/DHEAS ratios are higher (7.98 ± 1.1 vs. 3.65 ± 1.1; P < 0.01) and DHEAS levels lower in the EE group (83.85 ± 14.60 μg/dl vs. 148.95 ± 19.11 ug/dl; P < 0.05), whereas Epo was not further affected. Testosterone levels were highest and DHEAS levels lowest in the EE group at all times after hCG stimulation. In conclusion, high androgen activity could be involved in the etiopathogeny of CMS. This evidence provides an opportunity to develop new therapeutic strategies. PMID:19318512

  5. Plasma levels of corticosterone and testosterone after sexual activity in male rats treated neonatally with clomipramine.

    PubMed

    Bonilla-Jaime, H; Retana-Márquez, S; Vazquez-Palacios, G; Velázquez-Moctezuma, J

    2003-07-01

    Neonatal treatment with clomipramine (CMI) in rats, induces alterations of pleasure-seeking behaviors during adulthood. Alterations of hormonal responses to stressful situations have also been reported. In this study, the levels of corticosterone and testosterone in response to sexual activity were assessed in rats treated neonatally with CMI. Male pups received subcutaneous injections of CMI (15 mg/kg, 0.1 ml), twice a day (09.00 hours and 18.00 hours) from 8 to 21 days of age. A control group received saline in the same number of injections. Four months after CMI treatment, subjects (Ss) were submitted to the forced swim test to verify the effect of CMI. Thereafter, they were tested to assess their spontaneous sexual activity. Plasma levels of corticosterone and testosterone were assessed under different conditions. Results of sexual behavior and the forced swim test corroborate the depressive-like effect of CMI. The sole presence of an estrogenized stimulus female caused an increase in plasma levels of testosterone in both control and CMI-treated Ss. The same was true for corticosterone; however, this increase was significantly lower in the CMI-treated group. There is a discrepancy between the normal hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) response and the decreased sexual behavior. The data suggest that CMI induces permanent changes in the reactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

  6. The effect of oestrogen administration on plasma testosterone, FSH and LH levels in patients with Klinefelter's syndrome and normal men.

    PubMed

    Smals, A G; Kloppenborg, P W; Lequin, R M; Benraad, T J

    1974-12-01

    The effect of varying doses of ethinyl estradiol (15, 30, and 150 mcg/day for 7 days) on plasma testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH), and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) was evaluated in 6 patients (ages 18-38) with Klinefelter's syndrome and compared with the results obtained in 6 eugonadal males (ages 26-41). Mean pretreatment testosterone levels in the Klinefelter patients were significantly (p less than .05) lower than in the eugonadal patients, whereas LH and FSH levels in the Klinefelter patients were significantly higher (p less than .05). 3 of the Klinefelter patients had normal testosterone levels and elevated FSH and LH levels. A dose-dependent decrease of FSH and testosterone followed the estrogen administration in all subjects, whereas the LH decrease was only dose-dependent in the Klinefelter patients. Despite a significant testosterone decrease (p less than .05) after 30 and 150 mcg estrogen, LH and FSH in the Klinefelter patients remained supranormal. 15 mcg decreased LH and testosterone in normal males but not in Klinefelter patients. When human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) was administered after 150 mcg estrogen/day for 7 days, testosterone decreased in the controls from 522 ng% to 111 ng% and in the Klinefelter patients from 324 to 141 ng%. It is concluded that small amounts of estrogens play a role in the pituitary-gonadal axis in normal males. In Klinefelter's syndrome the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal feedback is operative at a higher setting, comparable with that found in eugonadal males.

  7. Differences in neonatal exposure to estradiol or testosterone on ovarian function and hormonal levels.

    PubMed

    Marcondes, Rodrigo R; Carvalho, Kátia C; Duarte, Daniele C; Garcia, Natália; Amaral, Vinícius C; Simões, Manuel J; Lo Turco, Edson G; Soares, José M; Baracat, Edmund C; Maciel, Gustavo A R

    2015-02-01

    Exposure to an excess of androgen or estrogen can induce changes in reproductive function in adult animals that resemble polycystic ovary syndrome in humans. However, considerable differences exist among several types of animal models. Little is known about the molecular features of steroidogenesis and folliculogenesis in the ovaries of rats exposed to different sex steroids as neonates. Here, we evaluated the impact of androgen and estrogen exposure on the ovaries of adult female rats during their neonatal period in the gene expression of Lhr and Cyp17a1, two key players of steroidogenesis. We also assessed hormone levels, folliculogenesis and the theca-interstitial cell population. The study was performed on the second postnatal day in thirty female Wistar rats that were sorted into the following three intervention groups: testosterone, estradiol and vehicle (control group). The animals were euthanized 90 days after birth. The main outcomes were hormone serum levels, ovary histomorphometry and gene expression of Lhr and Cyp17a1 as analyzed via quantitative real-time PCR. We found that exposure to excess testosterone in early life increased the LH and testosterone serum levels, the LH/FSH ratio, ovarian theca-interstitial area and gene expression of Lhr and Cyp17a1 in adult rats. Estrogen induced an increase in the ovarian theca-interstitial area, the secondary follicle population and gene expression of Lhr and Cyp17a1. All animals exposed to the sex steroids presented with closed vaginas. Our data suggest that testosterone resulted in more pronounced reproductive changes than did estrogen exposure. Our results might provide some insight into the role of different hormones on reproductive development and on the heterogeneity of clinical manifestations of conditions such as polycystic ovary syndrome.

  8. Changes in Testosterone Levels and Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin Levels in Extremely Obese Men after Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Laichuthai, Nitchakarn; Suwannasrisuk, Preaw; Houngngam, Natnicha; Udomsawaengsup, Suthep; Snabboon, Thiti

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Obesity is a risk factor for hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in men. Weight loss has been shown to improve hypogonadism in obese men. This study evaluated the early changes in sex hormones profile after bariatric surgery. Methods. This is a prospective study including 29 morbidly obese men. Main outcomes were changes in serum levels of total testosterone (TT), free testosterone (cFT), SHBG, estradiol, adiponectin, and leptin at 1 and 6 months after surgery. Results. The mean age of patients was 31 ± 8 years and the mean BMI was 56.8 ± 11.7 kg/m2. Fifteen patients underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and 14 patients underwent sleeve gastrectomy. At baseline, 22 patients (75.9%) had either low TT levels (<10.4 nmol/L) or low cFT levels (<225 pmol/L). Total testosterone and SHBG levels increased significantly at 1 month after surgery (p ≤ 0.001). At 6 months after surgery, TT and cFT increased significantly (p ≤ 0.001) and 22 patients (75.9%) had normalized TT and cFT levels. There were no changes in estradiol levels at either 1 month or 6 months after surgery. Conclusions. Increases in TT and SHBG levels occurred early at 1 month after bariatric surgery while improvements in cFT levels were observed at 6 months after bariatric surgery. PMID:27725831

  9. Corticosterone and testosterone levels after chronic stress in an animal model of depression.

    PubMed

    Bonilla-Jaime, H; Retana-Marquez, S; Vazquez-Palacios, G; Velázquez-Moctezuma, J

    2003-01-01

    Neonatal administration of clomipramine (CMI) in rats induces behavioral changes during adulthood, such as impairments of pleasure-seeking behaviors. However, the endocrine changes induced by this treatment are controversial. In the present study, we analyzed the levels of corticosterone and testosterone in rats neonatally treated with CMI in response to chronic stress by repeated immersion in cold water. Results obtained in the forced swim test corroborated the effect of neonatal CMI administration, showing a significant increase in immobility time. The testosterone response to stress was similar in both control and CMI-treated rats. Concerning corticosterone, there was a significantly lower response to stress in CMI-treated rats. The data suggest that CMI induces permanent changes in the reactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, without affecting the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

  10. Parental care, loss of paternity and circulating levels of testosterone and corticosterone in a socially monogamous song bird

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In biparental birds testosterone levels of males are typically high during the mating phase and decrease during the parental phase. Testosterone implants may enhance mating behaviors, increase the likelihood of males to engage in extra-pair mating behavior and may reduce paternal care. Thus, sex steroids such as testosterone influence reproductive behaviors. Little is known, however, as to whether the more subtle differences in physiological concentrations of testosterone that occur between individuals are related to differences in paternal care, extra-pair behavior, and genetic paternity between those males. Here, we investigate these relationships in the male black redstart (Phoenicurus ochruros), a socially monogamous songbird with a low breeding synchrony. We used nestling provisioning as a proxy for parental care behavior and genetic paternity loss as a proxy for the efficiency of mate-guarding. Results There was no relationship between nestling provisioning and paternity loss of males. Baseline and gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH)-induced levels of testosterone, but not baseline corticosterone, were significantly higher during the mating than during the provisioning phase. Males fed more often when temperatures decreased and fed less when they sang more, but we found no correlation between parental behavior and baseline or GnRH-induced testosterone, and baseline corticosterone – both measured during either the mating or the parental phase. However, males that experienced loss of paternity had lower levels of testosterone during the provisioning phase than males that did not lose paternity. Further, males that lost paternity also expressed higher baseline levels of corticosterone. Conclusions Physiological differences in testosterone or baseline corticosterone were not related to differences in parental care, suggesting that the variation of testosterone within a physiological range may not relate to the degree of paternal care in this

  11. Effects of strongman training on salivary testosterone levels in a sample of trained men.

    PubMed

    Ghigiarelli, Jamie J; Sell, Katie M; Raddock, Jessica M; Taveras, Kurt

    2013-03-01

    Strongman exercises consist of multi-joint movements that incorporate large muscle mass groups and impose a substantial amount of neuromuscular stress. The purpose of this study was to examine salivary testosterone responses from 2 novel strongman training (ST) protocols in comparison with an established hypertrophic (H) protocol reported to acutely elevate testosterone levels. Sixteen men (24 ± 4.4 years, 181.2 ± 6.8 cm, and 95.3 ± 20.3 kg) volunteered to participate in this study. Subjects completed 3 protocols designed to ensure equal total volume (sets and repetitions), rest period, and intensity between the groups. Exercise sets were performed to failure. Exercise selection and intensity (3 sets × 10 repetitions at 75% 1 repetition maximum) were chosen as they reflected commonly prescribed resistance exercise protocols recognized to elicit a large acute hormonal response. In each of the protocols, subjects were required to perform 3 sets to muscle failure of 5 different exercises (tire flip, chain drag, farmers walk, keg carry, and atlas stone lift) with a 2-minute rest interval between sets and a 3-minute rest interval between exercises. Saliva samples were collected pre-exercise (PRE), immediate postexercise (PST), and 30 minutes postexercise (30PST). Delta scores indicated a significant difference between PRE and PST testosterone level within each group (p ≤ 0.05), with no significant difference between the groups. Testosterone levels spiked 136% (225.23 ± 148.01 pg·ml(-1)) for the H group, 74% (132.04 ± 98.09 pg·ml(-1)) for the ST group, and 54% (122.10 ± 140.67 pg·ml) for the mixed strongman/hypertrophy (XST) group. A significant difference for testosterone level occurred over time (PST to 30PST) for the H group p ≤ 0.05. In conclusion, ST elicits an acute endocrine response similar to a recognized H protocol when equated for duration and exercise intensity.

  12. Zinc Levels in Seminal Fluid in Infertile Males and its Relation with Serum Free Testosterone

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhari, Ajay Rajeshwar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The role of zinc is critical to reproduction potential. Seminal zinc is thought to be derived almost exclusively from prostatic secretions. Sperm motility is significantly influenced by zinc. Zinc deficiency has been linked with male sterility and subfertility. Aim To assess the influence of seminal plasma zinc on seminogram characteristics and whether endogenous testosterone affects the seminal levels of zinc. Materials and Methods The semen samples were obtained from 150 male partners of infertile couples who attended the Reproductive Biology Unit of the Department of Physiology, within the age 21-50 years and semen samples were analysed for the routine seminogram parameters. All the subjects were classified into two main groups, A- the subjects with normal ejaculates (n=62) and B- the subjects with abnormal ejaculates, who were further sub divided into the following groups: i) Asthenoteratozoospermics (n=43); ii) Oligoasthenoteratozoospermics (n=24); and iii) Azoospermics (n=21). The seminal plasma zinc was measured spectrophotometrically. The sample for serum free testosterone was sent to Thyrocare laboratory. Results The seminal plasma zinc was found to be significantly lower in the abnormal ejaculates than in the normal ejaculates. A statistically significant positive correlation was observed between the seminal plasma zinc and serum free testosterone (p<0.05, r=0.449). Statistically significant correlation was also found between seminal plasma zinc and all the seminogram parameters such as the sperm concentration, sperm motility and sperm morphology (p<0.05, r= 0.86, 0.87 and 0.86 respectively). Conclusion Low seminal plasma zinc might be a significant causative factor in impairing sperm functions and its dependence on endogenous free testosterone, is observed from a positive correlation between the two. PMID:27437207

  13. Cigarette smoking has a positive and independent effect on testosterone levels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Xiaobo; Liang, Jianbo; Liao, Ming; Zhang, Haiying; Qin, Xue; Mo, Linjian; Lv, Wenxin; Mo, Zengnan

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that testosterone levels are linked to a variety of diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, type-2 diabetes, the metabolic syndrome, erectile dysfunction, depression, stroke and osteoporosis. Since cigarette smoking is a major health problem and highly prevalent among men, several groups have studied the effects of cigarette smoking on testosterone levels in men. However, the results have been conflicting. Our objectives were to examine the association of cigarette smoking and serum levels of sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), total testosterone (TT) and free testosterone (FT) in a large male population. Data from 2,021 men (989 nonsmokers and 1,032 smokers), aged 20-69, were collected from the Fangchenggang Area Male Health and Examination survey using an in-person interview and self-administered questionnaires from September to December, 2009. We have found the following: (a) smokers had significantly higher TT and FT levels compared to nonsmokers, even after stratification as per age, BMI, triglycerides and alcohol consumption. (b) Both TT (r = -0.083, P <0.001) and FT (r = -0.271, P <0.001) levels were negatively correlated to the amount of tobacco exposure. (c) Smoking was an independent influencing factor for the levels of both TT (unadjusted OR = 1.64, 95% CI: 1.33-2.01, P <0.001; adjusted OR = 1.69, 95% CI: 1.34-2.13, P <0.001) and FT (unadjusted OR = 1.32, 95% CI: 1.08-1.61, P = 0.007; adjusted OR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1-1.61, P = 0.050) levels in multivariate logistic regression models before and after adjusting for age, BMI, fasting blood glucose, triglycerides, alcohol consumption and estradiol. (d) Smoking was not found to be an independent predictor of SHBG level after adjustment for confounders in multivariate regression model (P >0.05), although a positive association between increasing pack-years and SHBG level was observed (r = 0.174, P <0.001). More research is needed to elucidate the biological mechanisms and

  14. Testosterone level in men with type 2 diabetes mellitus and related metabolic effects: A review of current evidence.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Kitty Kit Ting; Luk, Andrea On Yan; So, Wing Yee; Ma, Ronald Ching Wan; Kong, Alice Pik Shan; Chow, Francis Chun Chung; Chan, Juliana Chung Ngor

    2015-03-01

    A significant proportion of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus have a low testosterone level relative to reference ranges based on healthy young men. Only a small number of these patients suffer from classical hypogonadism as a result of recognizable hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis pathology. The cut-off value of the serum testosterone level in men without obvious hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis pathology is controversial. It is unclear to what extent a low serum testosterone level causally leads to type 2 diabetes and/or the metabolic syndrome. From a theoretical standpoint, there can be complex interactions among the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, body composition and insulin resistance, which can be further influenced by intrinsic and extrinsic factors to give rise to metabolic syndrome, glucose intolerance, and low-grade inflammation to increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. Although a low serum testosterone level frequently coexists with cardiometabolic risk factors and might serve as a biomarker, more studies are required to clarify the causal, mediating or modifying roles of low serum testosterone level in the development of adverse clinical outcomes. Currently, there are insufficient randomized clinical trial data to evaluate the effects of testosterone replacement therapy on meaningful clinical outcomes. The risk-to-benefit ratio of testosterone therapy in high-risk subjects, such as those with type 2 diabetes, also requires elucidation. The present article aims to review the current evidence on low serum testosterone levels in patients with type 2 diabetes, and its implications on cardiovascular risk factors, metabolic syndrome and adverse clinical outcomes.

  15. Testosterone level in men with type 2 diabetes mellitus and related metabolic effects: A review of current evidence

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Kitty Kit Ting; Luk, Andrea On Yan; So, Wing Yee; Ma, Ronald Ching Wan; Kong, Alice Pik Shan; Chow, Francis Chun Chung; Chan, Juliana Chung Ngor

    2015-01-01

    A significant proportion of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus have a low testosterone level relative to reference ranges based on healthy young men. Only a small number of these patients suffer from classical hypogonadism as a result of recognizable hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal axis pathology. The cut-off value of the serum testosterone level in men without obvious hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal axis pathology is controversial. It is unclear to what extent a low serum testosterone level causally leads to type 2 diabetes and/or the metabolic syndrome. From a theoretical standpoint, there can be complex interactions among the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal axis, body composition and insulin resistance, which can be further influenced by intrinsic and extrinsic factors to give rise to metabolic syndrome, glucose intolerance, and low-grade inflammation to increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. Although a low serum testosterone level frequently coexists with cardiometabolic risk factors and might serve as a biomarker, more studies are required to clarify the causal, mediating or modifying roles of low serum testosterone level in the development of adverse clinical outcomes. Currently, there are insufficient randomized clinical trial data to evaluate the effects of testosterone replacement therapy on meaningful clinical outcomes. The risk-to-benefit ratio of testosterone therapy in high-risk subjects, such as those with type 2 diabetes, also requires elucidation. The present article aims to review the current evidence on low serum testosterone levels in patients with type 2 diabetes, and its implications on cardiovascular risk factors, metabolic syndrome and adverse clinical outcomes. PMID:25802717

  16. Decrease in plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels at puberty in boys with delayed adolescence: correlation with plasma testosterone levels

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkland, R.T.; Keenan, B.S.; Probstfield, J.L.; Patsch, W.; Lin, T.L.; Clayton, G.W.; Insull, W. Jr.

    1987-01-23

    A three-phase study tested the hypothesis that the decrease in the high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) level observed in boys at puberty is related to an increase in the plasma testosterone concentration. In phase I, 57 boys aged 10 to 17 years were categorized into four pubertal stages based on clinical parameters and plasma testosterone levels. These four groups showed increasing plasma testosterone values and decreasing HDL-C levels. In phase II, 14 boys with delayed adolescence were treated with testosterone enanthate. Plasma testosterone levels during therapy were in the adult male range. Levels of HDL-C decreased by a mean of 7.4 mg/dL (0.20 mmol/L) and 13.7 mg/dL (0.35 mmol/L), respectively, after the first two doses. In phase III, 13 boys with delayed adolescence demonstrated increasing plasma testosterone levels and decreasing HDL-C levels during spontaneous puberty. Levels of HDL-C and apolipoprotein A-1 were correlated during induced and spontaneous puberty. Testosterone should be considered a significant determinant of plasma HDL-C levels during pubertal development.

  17. Testosterone-induced increase of insulin-like growth factor I levels depends upon normal levels of growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Saggese, G; Cesaretti, G; Franchi, G; Startari, L

    1996-08-01

    Pubertal development is associated with a rise in plasma insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) levels that is related both to the increase in sex steroids and/or to the sex steroid-induced augmentation in endogenous growth hormone (GH) secretion. In order to investigate the relationship between IGF-I, GH and testosterone, we examined 42 male subjects with various clinical conditions (classical GH deficiency (CGHD, N = 5), non-classical GH deficiency (NCGHD, N = 7), short idiopathic stature (N = 6), nutritional obesity (N = 8), GH-treated CGHD (N = 4), GH-treated NCGHD (N = 5) and normal stature (N = 7)) in which , for evaluation of hypogonadism (i.e. the absence of one or both testes from the scrotal sac), human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) tests were performed. We measured IGF-I, total and free testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) by radioimmunoassays before and 48 and 96 h after the start of the test. The values of IGF-I were lower (0.001 < p < 0.005) in CGHD and NCGHD than in the other groups. In comparison to basal levels, IGF-I values increased (0.005 < p < 0.05) both 48 and 96 h after the start of the hCG test in short idiopathic and normal stature children and in GH-treated subjects with NCGHD, but only 96 h in subjects with untreated NCGHD and GH-treated CGHD. No difference was demonstrated in basal values of total testosterone among any of the groups, while basal free testosterone levels were higher (0.001 < p < 0.05) in GH-treated subjects with NCGHD than in all the other groups except nutritional obesity; furthermore, free testosterone was higher (p < 0.05) in nutritional obesity than in CGHD. The values of total and free testosterone obtained both 48 and 96 h after the start of the hCG test were higher (0.001 < p < 0.05) than basal values in all groups. The DHEAS values did not show any significant change during the hCG test. Basal values were higher (0.01 < p < 0.05) in nutritional obesity than in the other groups. Considering all

  18. Low Testosterone Level and Risk of Alzheimer's Disease in the Elderly Men: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wenshan; Du, Na; Liu, Ying; Fan, Xinyi; Wang, Yunyang; Jia, Xiujuan; Hou, Xu; Wang, Bin

    2016-05-01

    Sex steroids can positively affect the brain function, and low levels of sex steroids may be associated with worse cognitive function in the elderly men. However, previous studies reported contrary findings on the relationship between testosterone level and risk of Alzheimer's disease in the elderly men. The objective of this study was to comprehensively assess the relationship between low testosterone level and Alzheimer's disease risk in the elderly men using a meta-analysis. Only prospective cohort studies assessing the influence of low testosterone level on Alzheimer's disease risk in elderly men were considered eligible. Relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were pooled to assess the risk of Alzheimer's disease in elderly men with low testosterone level. Seven prospective cohort studies with a total of 5251 elderly men and 240 cases of Alzheimer's disease were included into the meta-analysis. There was moderate degree of heterogeneity among those included studies (I(2) = 47.2%). Meta-analysis using random effect model showed that low plasma testosterone level was significantly associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease in elderly men (random RR = 1.48, 95% CI 1.12-1.96, P = 0.006). Sensitivity analysis by omitting one study by turns showed that there was no obvious change in the pooled risk estimates, and all pooled RRs were statistically significant. This meta-analysis supports that low plasma testosterone level is significantly associated with increased risk of Alzheimer's disease in the elderly men. Low testosterone level is a risk factor of worse cognitive function in the elderly men.

  19. Low testosterone levels in patients with mild hypertension recovered after antidepressant therapy in a male climacterium clinic.

    PubMed

    Ishikura, Fuminobu; Asanuma, Toshihiko; Beppu, Shintaro

    2008-02-01

    Recently, middle-aged men who have begun frequently complaining of erectile dysfunction and nonspecific symptoms similar to those of postmenopausal women, visited a male climacterium clinic in Japan. Some patients, who were already taking antihypertensive medication, discontinued or reduced their dosages of antihypertensive medication after anti-depressant therapy. Forty-nine males over the age of 40 years were studied to evaluate the relationships between blood pressure, mental stress, and testosterone levels. The systemic blood pressure (sBP) of 24 patients was higher than the criteria for mild hypertension: 140/90 mmHg (HT group) at first visit. The sBP of the other 25 patients was normal (N group). The international index of erectile function (IIEF5) score (normal >21), self-rating depression scale (SDS) score (normal <40), and plasma testosterone levels were also evaluated before and after anti-depressant therapy without androgen replacement therapy. There were no significant differences between the groups in IIEF5 or SDS scores. The plasma testosterone levels in the HT group at first visit were significantly lower than those in the N group (230+/-77 vs. 343+/-92 ng/dL, p<0.001). After treatment, the IIEF5 scores were unchanged, whereas SDS scores were lower in both groups. Mean systemic blood pressure (mBP) in the HT group significantly decreased from 112+/-7 to 94+/-7 mmHg after treatment, concomitant with the disappearance of nonspecific complaints and the increase of testosterone levels. In the N group, however, neither mBP nor testosterone levels changed. Psychotherapy can ameliorate mild systemic hypertension in climacteric men with low testosterone levels. Mental stress might suppress the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis to decrease testosterone levels.

  20. Supercritical fluid extraction of methyltestosterone, nortestosterone and testosterone at low ppb levels from fortified bovine urine.

    PubMed

    Stolker, A A; van Ginkel, L A; Stephany, R W; Maxwell, R J; Parks, O W; Lightfield, A R

    1999-04-16

    A multi-residue supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) method is proposed for the isolation of nortestosterone, testosterone and methyltestosterone from bovine urine. Prior to SFE, bovine urine was hydrolyzed and then fortified with the three steroids at 100 ng/ml and 50 ng/ml each for HPLC analysis and 25 ng/ml and 12.5 ng/ml each for GC-MS analysis. The samples then were mixed with an adsorbent material, placed in an SFE extraction vessel prepacked with a 3-ml SPE column containing neutral alumina and the testosterones were extracted from the urine matrix using unmodified supercritical CO2 at 27.2 MPa and 40 degrees C. The steroids were retained in-line on the neutral alumina sorbent in the SPE column while co-extracted artifactial material was trapped off-line after CO2 decompression. After SFE, the SPE column was removed from the extraction vessel, and the trapped steroids were eluted from the neutral alumina sorbent with 3 ml of a methanol-water mixture. Eluates were used directly without post-SFE clean-up either for HPLC analysis (detection limit 50 ng/ml) or for GC-MS analysis (detection limit 5 ng/ml after steroid derivatization). The multi-residue SFE recoveries (n=6) for nortestosterone, testosterone and methyltestosterone from hydrolyzed bovine urine by GC-MS analysis were 90.8+/-6%, 93.9+/-3% and 92.5+/-5%, respectively for each steroid at the 12.5 ng fortification level.

  1. Association of Sex Hormones With Sexual Function, Vitality, and Physical Function of Symptomatic Older Men With Low Testosterone Levels at Baseline in the Testosterone Trials

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Glenn R.; Stephens-Shields, Alisa J.; Rosen, Raymond C.; Wang, Christina; Ellenberg, Susan S.; Matsumoto, Alvin M.; Bhasin, Shalender; Molitch, Mark E.; Farrar, John T.; Cella, David; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Cauley, Jane A.; Cifelli, Denise; Crandall, Jill P.; Ensrud, Kristine E.; Fluharty, Laura; Gill, Thomas M.; Lewis, Cora E.; Pahor, Marco; Resnick, Susan M.; Storer, Thomas W.; Swerdloff, Ronald S.; Anton, Stephen; Basaria, Shehzad; Diem, Susan; Tabatabaie, Vafa; Hou, Xiaoling

    2015-01-01

    Context: The prevalence of sexual dysfunction, low vitality, and poor physical function increases with aging, as does the prevalence of low total and free testosterone (TT and FT) levels. However, the relationship between sex hormones and age-related alterations in older men is not clear. Objective: To test the hypotheses that baseline serum TT, FT, estradiol (E2), and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) levels are independently associated with sexual function, vitality, and physical function in older symptomatic men with low testosterone levels participating in the Testosterone Trials (TTrials). Design: Cross-sectional study of baseline measures in the TTrials. Setting: The study was conducted at 12 sites in the United States. Participants: The 788 TTrials participants were ≥ 65 years and had evidence of sexual dysfunction, diminished vitality, and/or mobility disability, and an average of two TT < 275 ng/dL. Interventions: None. Main Outcome Measures: Question 4 of Psychosocial Daily Questionnaire (PDQ-Q4), the FACIT-Fatigue Scale, and the 6-minute walk test. Results: Baseline serum TT and FT, but not E2 or SHBG levels had small, but statistically significant associations with validated measures of sexual desire, erectile function, and sexual activity. None of these hormones was significantly associated within or across trials with FACIT-Fatigue, PHQ-9 Depression or Physical Function-10 scores, or gait speed. Conclusions: FT and TT levels were consistently, independently, and positively associated, albeit to a small degree, with measures of sexual desire, erectile function, and sexual activity, but not with measures of vitality or physical function in symptomatic older men with low T who qualified for the TTrials. PMID:25548978

  2. Sexual experience and plasma testosterone levels in male veterans after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Phelps, G; Brown, M; Chen, J; Dunn, M; Lloyd, E; Stefanick, M L; Davidson, J M; Perkash, I

    1983-02-01

    Fifty men with spinal cord injuries (SCI) were asked to complete a questionnaire concerning their sexuality before and after injury. Medical examination confirmed the location and completeness of the injury and extracted information about genitourologic status. The respondents rated sexuality highly as a concern in living, and a wide variety of sexual techniques were reported. A marked decrease in sexual activity, satisfaction, and feelings of sexual adequacy was reported after injury, as compared to retrospective "before injury" responses, lack of opportunity being reported as causative by 66% of the subjects and insufficient personal satisfaction by 59%. Seventy-five percent of the subjects experienced sexual arousal from genital stimulation, and several methods of eliciting erection were cited. Orgasm was described by a variety of terms. Significant differences were found between quadriplegic and paraplegic patients in answers to several items, though there was generally no difference between cervical and thoracic groups, which were more specifically broken down with respect to motor or sensory/complete or incomplete lesions. Plasma testosterone levels were found to fall well within the normal adult male range, as were levels of free testosterone and serum sex binding protein. The resulting information demonstrated more sexual concern among men with SCI than the literature previously indicated. PMID:6681699

  3. Alterations in male sexual behaviour, attractiveness and testosterone levels induced by an adult-onset calorie restriction regimen.

    PubMed

    Govic, Antonina; Levay, Elizabeth A; Hazi, Agnes; Penman, Jim; Kent, Stephen; Paolini, Antonio G

    2008-06-26

    Despite an abundance of research on calorie restriction (CR) altering gonadal and appetite regulating hormones, the sexual behavioural consequences of CR remain to be examined systematically. This study compared the sexual behaviour, partner preference, serum testosterone and leptin levels of male adult Hooded Wistar rats administered a CR (continuous 25%, 50% CR or a temporary restriction) with ad libitum fed controls. The temporary restriction (Previous CR) failed to alter sexual behaviour, partner preference and levels of testosterone and leptin. The moderately 25% CR males did not demonstrate an impairment in sexual behaviour but did demonstrate a reduced level of attractiveness to females in one measure of partner preference. Sexual performance was affected by a substantial CR, as the CR 50% group exhibited a longer latency to the first intromission, indicating alteration in sexual arousal. Females also consistently demonstrated a clear preference for the control group compared to the CR 50% group. These findings indicate a possible reduction in the overall reproductive potential of the substantially CR animals. Testosterone levels were equally suppressed by both the 25% and 50% CR, while leptin levels were only reduced in the CR 50% group. Leptin, rather than testosterone, may have influenced the impairment in sexual behaviour only demonstrated by the substantially CR animals. Testosterone, may, however, play a role in modulating the preference of control over CR males, as attractiveness was totally reduced by a substantial CR, and partially reduced by a moderate restricted regimen.

  4. Women's intercollegiate volleyball and tennis: effects of warm-up, competition, and practice on saliva levels of cortisol and testosterone.

    PubMed

    Edwards, David A; Kurlander, Lauren S

    2010-09-01

    In virtually all sports, participants "warm-up" prior to formal competition. Women athletes from a highly ranked varsity college volleyball team and, in a second study, a highly ranked varsity college tennis team gave saliva samples before warm-up, at mid-warm-up (volleyball) or after warm-up (tennis), and immediately after intercollegiate competition. For volleyball and tennis, warm-up was associated with a substantial elevation in saliva levels of testosterone which was carried over through the period of actual competition. Cortisol levels were relatively unchanged during warm-up, but typically rose during competition. Thus, as women prepare for athletic competition by warming up, testosterone levels rise in apparent anticipation of the coming contest and then remain high through the period of play. In volleyball and tennis, after-practice testosterone level was significantly higher than before-practice level, and practice session increases in testosterone (but not cortisol) were positively correlated with increases in testosterone during intercollegiate competition. When practice and competitive play share as yet undetermined key elements, individual differences in this endocrine response to "competition" appear stable across practice and intercollegiate competition.

  5. [Changing the content of testosterone in the blood of people of different level of fitness in terms of power load].

    PubMed

    Chernozub, A A

    2013-01-01

    In the work the results of the research aimed to determine the peculiarities of changes in the content of testosterone in the blood of people of different level of fitness under the influence of acute power load in the process of long trainings athleticism. The surveys were performed with the participation of 20 athletes age of 19-20 years, regularly engaged in athleticism over 3 years, and 20 young men of similar age are not contraindications to study with weights. A change in the level of ability, the morphometric parameters of the organism and the parameters of body composition was evaluated using the techniques of power testing, anthropometry and impedansometriya. Laboratory studies serum testosterone at rest and after the acute power load was carried out during 3 months of practice athleticism. The concentration of testosterone in the blood serum was determined by enzyme immunoassay. During the research it was established that despite the fairly low primary basal level of testosterone (9,89 nmol/l) in blood trained athletes, power load high intensity increase the content of the investigated hormone after a workout in comparison with the state of rest. Such positive dynamics of the level of testosterone in response to an acute power load is observed among non-trained young men. Simultaneously revealed that despite the high level of adaptation of trained athletes to power the load, there is almost identical to the positive dynamics of morphofunctional parameters of members of both groups.

  6. Social behavior and patterns of testosterone and glucocorticoid levels differ between male chacma and Guinea baboons.

    PubMed

    Kalbitzer, Urs; Heistermann, Michael; Cheney, Dorothy; Seyfarth, Robert; Fischer, Julia

    2015-09-01

    In multi-male, multi-female groups of mammals, males usually compete aggressively over access to females. However, species vary in the intensity of male contest competition, which has been linked to differences in testosterone and glucocorticoid profiles. Chacma (Papio ursinus) and Guinea (P. papio) baboons constitute an intriguing model to examine variation in male competition and male endocrine correlates, because of the differences in their social systems. Chacma baboons live in stable female-bonded groups with linear male dominance hierarchies and a high male mating skew, whereas Guinea baboons live in male-bonded, multi-level societies. We recorded male behavior and assayed testosterone (fT) and glucocorticoid metabolite (fGC) levels from fecal samples in one population of each species. Male chacma baboons were more frequently involved in agonistic interactions, and dominance relationships were more consistent than in Guinea baboons, where we could not detect linear hierarchies. Notably, male chacma baboons were also more aggressive towards females, indicating an overall higher aggressiveness in this species. In contrast, male Guinea baboons showed higher levels of affiliative interactions and spatial tolerance. High-ranking and consorting male chacma baboons showed elevated fGC levels and also tended to show elevated fT levels, but there was no effect of consortship in Guinea baboons. Agonism was not related to hormone levels in either species. Thus, predictors of fT and fGC levels in Guinea baboons seem to differ from chacma baboons. Our results support the view that different social systems create differential selection pressures for male aggression, reflected by different hormone profiles.

  7. Mild calorie restriction does not affect testosterone levels and testicular gene expression in mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Juliana S; Bonkowski, Michael S; França, Luiz R; Bartke, Andrzej

    2007-09-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis and the somatotropic axis are influenced by nutritional factors. Calorie restriction (CR) extends lifespan but suppresses both the HPG and the somatotropic axes. Since most CR studies use a fairly severe (40%-60%) reduction of calorie intake, we hypothesized that a milder CR (20%) might not be deleterious to reproduction in male mice. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated the effects of 20% CR on testicular testosterone content and on testicular expression of genes that are relevant to testicular function and reproductive competence, including insulin-like growth factor-I, cytochrome P450 aromatase (Cyp19a1), androgen receptor, luteinizing hormone receptor, follicle-stimulating hormone receptor, cytochrome P450c17 and 3-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/isomerase. To relate CR effects to the activity of the somatotropic axis, we have used growth hormone-resistant GHR knockout mice as well as transgenic mice overexpressing GH. Mild CR did not affect testosterone levels in testis homogenates and had little effect on expression of the examined genes in the reproductive organs. Altered activity of the GH/insulin-like growth factor-1 axis had a major impact on the parameters analyzed. The results also suggest that expression of several key genes involved in the control of testicular function is preserved under conditions of mild CR and encourage speculation that mild regimens of CR can produce longevity benefits without impairing reproduction.

  8. Alteration in plasma testosterone levels in male mice lacking soluble epoxide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Luria, Ayala; Morisseau, Christophe; Tsai, Hsing-Ju; Yang, Jun; Inceoglu, Bora; De Taeye, Bart; Watkins, Steven M; Wiest, Michelle M; German, J Bruce; Hammock, Bruce D

    2009-08-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (Ephx2, sEH) is a bifunctional enzyme with COOH-terminal hydrolase and NH(2)-terminal phosphatase activities. sEH converts epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) to dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs), and the phosphatase activity is suggested to be involved in cholesterol metabolism. EETs participate in a wide range of biological functions, including regulation of vascular tone, renal tubular transport, cardiac contractility, and inflammation. Inhibition of sEH is a potential approach for enhancing the biological activity of EETs. Therefore, disruption of sEH activity is becoming an attractive therapeutic target for both cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases. To define the physiological role of sEH, we characterized a knockout mouse colony lacking expression of the Ephx2 gene. Lack of sEH enzyme is characterized by elevation of EET to DHET ratios in both the linoleate and arachidonate series in plasma and tissues of both female and male mice. In male mice, this lack of expression was also associated with decreased plasma testosterone levels, sperm count, and testicular size. However, this genotype was still able to sire litters. Plasma cholesterol levels also declined in this genotype. Behavior tests such as anxiety-like behavior and hedonic response were also examined in Ephx2-null and WT mice, as all can be related to hormonal changes. Null mice showed a level of anxiety with a decreased hedonic response. In conclusion, this study provides a broad biochemical, physiological, and behavioral characterization of the Ephx2-null mouse colony and suggests a mechanism by which sEH and its substrates may regulate circulating levels of testosterone through cholesterol biosynthesis and metabolism. PMID:19458064

  9. Alteration in plasma testosterone levels in male mice lacking soluble epoxide hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Luria, Ayala; Morisseau, Christophe; Tsai, Hsing-Ju; Yang, Jun; Inceoglu, Bora; De Taeye, Bart; Watkins, Steven M.; Wiest, Michelle M.; German, J. Bruce; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2009-01-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (Ephx2, sEH) is a bifunctional enzyme with COOH-terminal hydrolase and NH2-terminal phosphatase activities. sEH converts epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) to dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs), and the phosphatase activity is suggested to be involved in cholesterol metabolism. EETs participate in a wide range of biological functions, including regulation of vascular tone, renal tubular transport, cardiac contractility, and inflammation. Inhibition of sEH is a potential approach for enhancing the biological activity of EETs. Therefore, disruption of sEH activity is becoming an attractive therapeutic target for both cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases. To define the physiological role of sEH, we characterized a knockout mouse colony lacking expression of the Ephx2 gene. Lack of sEH enzyme is characterized by elevation of EET to DHET ratios in both the linoleate and arachidonate series in plasma and tissues of both female and male mice. In male mice, this lack of expression was also associated with decreased plasma testosterone levels, sperm count, and testicular size. However, this genotype was still able to sire litters. Plasma cholesterol levels also declined in this genotype. Behavior tests such as anxiety-like behavior and hedonic response were also examined in Ephx2-null and WT mice, as all can be related to hormonal changes. Null mice showed a level of anxiety with a decreased hedonic response. In conclusion, this study provides a broad biochemical, physiological, and behavioral characterization of the Ephx2-null mouse colony and suggests a mechanism by which sEH and its substrates may regulate circulating levels of testosterone through cholesterol biosynthesis and metabolism. PMID:19458064

  10. Effects of paint thinner exposure on serum LH, FSH and testosterone levels and hypothalamic catecholamine contents in the male rat.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, B; Kutlu, S; Canpolat, S; Sandal, S; Ayar, A; Mogulkoc, R; Kelestimur, H

    2001-02-01

    We have investigated the effects of thinner inhalation on serum LH, FSH and testosterone levels together with changes in hypothalamic catecholaminergic system in the male rat. A control group inhaled normal air ventilation. The remaining animals were divided into two groups and exposed to paint thinner in a glassy cage for 15 or 30 d. Toluene concentration (the largest constituent in thinner, 66%) was set at 3000 ppm in the inhalation air. At the end, all animals were decapitated and blood samples obtained. Serum LH and FSH levels were measured by RIA and testosterone by enzyme immunoassay. Following removal of brains on dry ice, medial preoptic area, suprachiasmatic nucleus, median eminence and arcuate nucleus were isolated by micropunch technique. Noradrenaline, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG) and dopamine concentrations of these hypothalamic areas were determined by HPLC-ECD. Fifteen-day thinner inhalation significantly suppressed serum LH and testosterone levels in parallel (p<0.001) compared to control group values (LH: 0.77+/-0.07; testosterone: 2.67+/-0.39). Thirty-day exposure markedly decreased LH levels (p<0.001), but surprisingly had no significant effect on testosterone. Serum FSH levels were not significantly altered in either group. Thinner inhalation for 15 or 30 d did not cause any significant change in noradrenaline, DHPG or dopamine concentrations in the hypothalamic regions examined (except in the arcuate nucleus). These results suggest that paint thinner has an anti-gonadotropic effect and may cause long-term endocrine disturbances in the male. It is thought that the hypothalamic catecholaminergic system is not involved in thinner inhibition of LH and testosterone secretion. PMID:11217085

  11. Testosterone therapy--what, when and to whom?

    PubMed

    Jockenhövel, F

    2004-12-01

    Testosterone therapy has been used for more than 60 years in the treatment of male hypogonadism. The classical forms of hypogonadism are comprised of primary testicular failure or insufficient testicular stimulation due to the lack of pituitary gonadotropins. Typical causes of primary hypogonadism are Klinefelter's syndrome, anorchia or acquired disturbances of testicular function. Secondary hypogonadism is characterized by insufficient production of pituitary gonadotropins, due either to pituitary failure or defects at the hypothalamic level. It is unequivocally accepted in clinical practice that any male with inadequately low testosterone production for his age will require androgen therapy. In addition to the classical forms of hypogonadism, the past decade of research has clearly demonstrated that, with increasing age, many men will suffer from decreasing testosterone production. About 15-25% of men over the age of 50 years will experience serum testosterone levels well below the threshold considered normal for men between 20 and 40 years of age. Studies substituting testosterone in elderly men with low serum testosterone have shown that men with clinical symptoms identical to the symptomatology of classical hypogonadism will benefit most from such therapy. Therefore, it is the general consensus to treat men with age-related hypogonadism only when clinical symptoms are present that can be potentially corrected by testosterone administration. Until recently, intramuscular injections of esters, such as testosterone enanthate, have been the mainstay of testosterone therapy. The introduction of testosterone patches has not challenged this approach, since many users of patches suffer from moderate to severe skin reactions. Some oral testosterone formulations have proven to be problematic, as absorption can be variable, bioavailability is frequently poor, due to the first-pass effect of the liver, and frequent administration is often required. Oral testosterone

  12. Sperm production, testicular size, serum gonadotropins and testosterone levels in Merino and Corriedale breeds.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Abella, D; Becu-Villalobos, D; Lacau-Mengido, I M; Villegas, N; Bentancur, O

    1999-01-01

    The relationships between testis size, hormone secretion and sperm production were studied during the spring (December) and autumn (May) in rams of two breeds with different breeding seasons and body weights (Corriedale and Australian Merino) maintained on native pastures and under natural photoperiods in Uruguay. Blood samples were collected at 20-min intervals during a 260-360-min period in 13 rams (four Corriedale, nine Australian Merino) during the late spring and autumn. Rams were weighed and testis size was estimated by orchimetry at each time period. Sperm production was estimated during a 2-week period, 2 months before blood collection and during each week following every blood collection. There was no relationship between testicular size and sperm production measured at the same time, nor between live weight and sperm production. In contrast, testicular volume during the late spring was correlated with sperm production in the autumn (r = 0.65; P = 0.02). The autumn serum LH was higher in Corriedale than in Merino rams. LH pulsatility was unaffected by season, but LH pulse frequency tended to be higher in Corriedale than in Merino rams, particularly in the late spring (2.37 versus 1.56 pulses/6 h; P = 0.08). Serum testosterone concentration was similar in both breeds and seasons. FSH levels were higher in the late spring than in the autumn in both breeds (Corriedale: 2.83 +/- 0.48 versus 2.17 +/- 0.24 ng x mL(-1); Merino: 2.23 +/- 0.24 versus 1.88 +/- 0.17 ng x mL(-1)). FSH and testosterone concentrations during the late spring were positively correlated with autumn sperm production (P = 0.07 and P = 0.03, respectively). In conclusion, the present experiment suggests that LH secretion is not a good parameter for the prediction of sperm production. In contrast, in our conditions (breeds and native pastures) testicular size and testosterone or FSH concentrations from the late spring may be used to predict sperm production in the autumn. PMID:10619169

  13. An update on the hypothesis that one cause of autism is high intrauterine levels of testosterone of maternal origin.

    PubMed

    James, William H

    2014-08-21

    Baron-Cohen's hypothesis that autism is caused by exposure to high intrauterine testosterone levels is considered in the context of (1) my hormonal hypothesis of sex ratio and (2) the notion of multifactorial inheritance. This yields the suggestions that (1) female cases of autism may be the product of (high genetic loading+moderate environmental exposure) and male cases of (high environmental exposure+moderate genetic loading), (2) one environmental agent is intrauterine testosterone and (3) the mother is the major source of that testosterone. These suggestions may help to explain most of the major established epidemiological risk factors for autism. These include various forms of pathology associated with psychological and/or physical stress. Stress of many sorts promotes the secretion of adrenal androgens in women. The three suggestions above may also explain some recently described features of autism including the psychological, behavioural and neuroanatomical differences between male and female cases.

  14. Advances in testosterone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Gooren, Louis J G

    2009-01-01

    The major goal of androgen substitution is to replace testosterone at levels as close to physiological concentrations as is possible. The mainstay of testosterone susbstitution are parenteral testosterone esters (enanthate and cypionate) to be administered every 2-3 weeks. A major disadvantage is the strongly fluctuating levels of plasma testosterone which are at least 50% of the time not in the physiological range. A significant improvement is parenteral testosterone undecanoate producing normal plasma testosterone for 12 weeks. Subcutaneous testosterone implants provide the patient, depending on the dose of implants, with normal plasma testosterone for 3-6 months. Its use is, however, not widespread. Oral testosterone undecanoate dissolved in oil bypasses the liver via its lymphatic absorption, but resulting plasma levels are erratic. Transdermal testosterone preparations have already been available for two decades. Transdermal testosterone gel produces attractive pharmocokinetic serum testosterone profiles and offers greater flexibility in dosing. Transdermal gel has been recommended in elderly males. In case of complications its use can be discontinued immediately. Oromucosal testosterone preparations are being developed. Testosterone replacement is usually of long duration, and patient compliance is of utmost importance. Therefore, the patient must be involved in the selection of the type of testosterone preparation. PMID:19011287

  15. Diazepam binding inhibitor (DBI) reduces testosterone and estradiol levels in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dong, Erbo; Matsumoto, Kinzo; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2002-02-01

    Diazepam binding inhibitor (DBI) is a putative endogenous ligand capable of binding to the central type benzodiazepine (BZD) receptor located on the GABAA receptor and the peripheral type BZD receptor on the mitochondrial outer membrane. We examined the effects of an intracerebroventricular injection of DBI on the serum levels of the gonadal hormones, testosterone and estradiol, respectively, in male and female mice. DBI (0.3-10 nmol/mouse, i.c.v.) significantly reduced the levels of both gonadal hormones in a dose-dependent manner. The decrease in the gonadal hormone levels became evident at 1 hr and lasted for at least 4 hrs after the DBI injection. The effects of DBI (3 nmol/mouse, i.c.v.) in male and female mice were completely attenuated by the coadministration of flumazenil (66 nmol/mouse), a selective antagonist for the central type BZD receptor. These results suggest that DBI acts as an endogenous modulator to regulate the levels of gonadal hormones in vivo, and that the DBI-induced decrease in gonadal hormone levels is mediated by down regulation of the GABAergic system, implicated in gonadotropin-releasing systems and/or the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

  16. The Effect of Testosterone Replacement Therapy on Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Levels in Men Being Treated for Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Kang, De-Ying; Li, Hong-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Testosterone replacement therapy is used for the treatment of age-related male hypogonadism, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a primary screening tool for prostate cancer. The systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to determine the effect of testosterone replacement therapy on PSA levels. Medline, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and Google Scholar databases were searched until February 28, 2014, and inclusion criteria were as follows: randomized controlled trial; intervention group received testosterone/androgen replacement therapy; control group did not receive treatment; and no history of prostate cancer. The primary outcome was change of PSA level between before and after treatment. Secondary outcomes were elevated PSA level after treatment, and the number of patients who developed prostate cancer. After initially identifying 511 articles, 15 studies with a total of 739 patients that received testosterone replacement and 385 controls were included. The duration of treatment ranged from 3 to 12 months. Patients treated with testosterone tended to have higher PSA levels, and thus a greater change than those that received control treatments (difference in means of PSA levels = 0.154, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.069 to 0.238, P < 0.001). The difference in means of PSA levels were significant higher for patients that received testosterone intramuscularly (IM) than controls (difference in means of PSA levels = 0.271, 95% CI 0.117–0.425, P = 0.001). Elevated PSA levels after treatment were similar between patients that received treatment and controls (odds ratio [OR] = 1.02, 95% CI 0.48–2.20, P = 0.953). Only 3 studies provided data with respect to the development of prostate cancer, and rates were similar between those that received treatment and controls. Testosterone replacement therapy does not increase PSA levels in men being treated for hypogonadism, except when it is given IM and even the increase with IM administration

  17. Dehydroepiandrosterone Supplementation Combined with Whole-Body Vibration Training Affects Testosterone Level and Body Composition in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Chyuan; Chen, Yi-Ming; Huang, Chi-Chang; Tzeng, Yen-Dun

    2016-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), the most abundant sex steroid, is primarily secreted by the adrenal gland and a precursor hormone used by athletes for performance enhancement. Whole-body vibration (WBV) is a well-known light-resistance exercise by automatic adaptations to rapid and repeated oscillations from a vibrating platform, which is also a simple and convenient exercise for older adults. However, the potential effects of DHEA supplementation combined with WBV training on to body composition, exercise performance, and hormone regulation are currently unclear. The objective of the study is to investigate the effects of DHEA supplementation combined with WBV training on body composition, exercise performance, and physical fatigue-related biochemical responses and testosterone content in young-adult C57BL/6 mice. In this study, male C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups (n = 8 per group) for 6-weeks treatment: sedentary controls with vehicle (SC), DHEA supplementation (DHEA, 10.2 mg/kg), WBV training (WBV; 5.6 Hz, 2 mm, 0.13 g), and WBV training with DHEA supplementation (WBV+DHEA; WBV: 5.6 Hz, 2 mm, 0.13 g and DHEA: 10.2 mg/kg). Exercise performance was evaluated by forelimb grip strength and exhaustive swimming time, as well as changes in body composition and anti-fatigue levels of serum lactate, ammonia, glucose, creatine kinase (CK), and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) after a 15-min swimming exercise. In addition, the biochemical parameters and the testosterone content were measured at the end of the experiment. Six-week DHEA supplementation alone significantly increased mice body weight (BW), muscle weight, testosterone level, and glycogen contents (liver and muscle) when compared with SC group. DHEA supplementation alone had no negative impact on all tissue and biochemical profiles, but could not improve exercise performance. However, WBV+DHEA supplementation also significantly decreased BW, testosterone level and glycogen content of liver, as well as serum

  18. Female presence affects male behavior and testosterone levels in the European starling (Sturnus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Pinxten, Rianne; de Ridder, Elke; Eens, Marcel

    2003-08-01

    In this study, we confronted individually housed male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) with a female conspecific for 60 min to study the consequences on behavior and plasma testosterone (T) concentrations. Control males experienced a similar procedure, the only difference being that they were tested in the absence of a female. Female presence significantly affected both behavior and plasma T levels of male starlings. Experimental males spent significantly more time singing in the nest box and flew significantly more into the nest box with green nesting material during female presentations than during control periods. Control males never showed these mate attraction behaviors. In total 5 of the 16 experimental males did not respond behaviorally to the female stimulus bird (NR males). In contrast to T levels of control males, plasma T concentrations of both experimental males that did respond to the female (R males) and of NR males (which only perceived the female stimulus) were positively influenced by female presentation. The time spent singing in the nest box by experimental males (R and NR males combined) during female presence tended to be positively correlated with changes in plasma T levels. Finally, before introduction of a female, plasma T levels of R males were significantly higher than those of NR males indicating that individually housed males respond to the presence of a female conspecific by increasing their mate attraction behaviors only when a threshold plasma T concentration has been reached. PMID:13129481

  19. Reduced testosterone levels in cluster headache: a stress-related phenomenon?

    PubMed

    Facchinetti, F; Nappi, G; Cicoli, C; Micieli, G; Ruspa, M; Bono, G; Genazzani, A R

    1986-03-01

    The circadian changes in testosterone (T) and cortisol secretion and morning luteinizing hormone (LH) levels were evaluated in nine episodic cluster headache (CH) patients in active phase and in seven healthy volunteers, with collection of blood samples every 2 h for 24 h. CH showed a significant reduction of the 24-h integrated mean T value (mesor) (4.4 + 1.1 ng/ml; chi +/- SD) in comparison with controls (6.6 +/- 0.8 ng/ml) (P less than 0.01). Both groups had plasma T circadian rhythm with peak values in early morning, but in CH single cosinor analysis showed its absence in three out of nine CH patients. The rhythm showed an acrophase delay of 101 min in CH. Both patients and controls had a significant circadian rhythm of plasma cortisol concentration. CH patients, however, showed an acrophase delay of 106 min and significantly increased concentrations from 1200 h to 2000 h. Morning LH values were similar in the two groups. The reduced secretion of plasma T in CH patients in the active phase coexisted with an acrophase delay of its circadian rhythm. A similar delay was found in 24-h plasma cortisol levels. We suggest that stress accompanying attack expectancy in the active phase is the mechanism behind the elevated plasma cortisol levels. This in turn could reduce T concentrations, acting at the testicular level. These disturbances in internal chronoorganization support the hypothesis that cluster headache is basically a dyschronic disorder.

  20. Female major histocompatibility complex type affects male testosterone levels and sperm number in the horse (Equus caballus)

    PubMed Central

    Burger, D.; Dolivo, G.; Marti, E.; Sieme, H.; Wedekind, C.

    2015-01-01

    Odours of vertebrates often contain information about the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), and are used in kin recognition, mate choice or female investment in pregnancy. It is, however, still unclear whether MHC-linked signals can also affect male reproductive strategies. We used horses (Equus caballus) to study this question under experimental conditions. Twelve stallions were individually exposed either to an unfamiliar MHC-similar mare and then to an unfamiliar MHC-dissimilar mare, or vice versa. Each exposure lasted over a period of four weeks. Peripheral blood testosterone levels were determined weekly. Three ejaculates each were collected in the week after exposure to both mares (i.e. in the ninth week) to determine mean sperm number and sperm velocity. We found high testosterone levels when stallions were kept close to MHC-dissimilar mares and significantly lower ones when kept close to MHC-similar mares. Mean sperm number per ejaculate (but not sperm velocity) was positively correlated to mean testosterone levels and also affected by the order of presentation of mares: sperm numbers were higher if MHC-dissimilar mares were presented last than if MHC-similar mares were presented last. We conclude that MHC-linked signals influence testosterone secretion and semen characteristics, two indicators of male reproductive strategies. PMID:25904670

  1. Reactive oxygen species: players in the cardiovascular effects of testosterone.

    PubMed

    Tostes, Rita C; Carneiro, Fernando S; Carvalho, Maria Helena C; Reckelhoff, Jane F

    2016-01-01

    Androgens are essential for the development and maintenance of male reproductive tissues and sexual function and for overall health and well being. Testosterone, the predominant and most important androgen, not only affects the male reproductive system, but also influences the activity of many other organs. In the cardiovascular system, the actions of testosterone are still controversial, its effects ranging from protective to deleterious. While early studies showed that testosterone replacement therapy exerted beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease, some recent safety studies point to a positive association between endogenous and supraphysiological levels of androgens/testosterone and cardiovascular disease risk. Among the possible mechanisms involved in the actions of testosterone on the cardiovascular system, indirect actions (changes in the lipid profile, insulin sensitivity, and hemostatic mechanisms, modulation of the sympathetic nervous system and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system), as well as direct actions (modulatory effects on proinflammatory enzymes, on the generation of reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide bioavailability, and on vasoconstrictor signaling pathways) have been reported. This mini-review focuses on evidence indicating that testosterone has prooxidative actions that may contribute to its deleterious actions in the cardiovascular system. The controversial effects of testosterone on ROS generation and oxidant status, both prooxidant and antioxidant, in the cardiovascular system and in cells and tissues of other systems are reviewed.

  2. Reference ranges for urinary levels of testosterone and epitestosterone, which may reveal gonadal function, in a Korean male population.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ju-Yeon; Kwon, Woonyong; Suh, Sungill; Cheong, Jae Chul; In, Moon Kyo; Chung, Bong Chul; Kim, Jin Young; Choi, Man Ho

    2014-03-01

    Cannabis, or marijuana, the most commonly used illicit drug in the world, has been shown to be responsible for suppressing the production and secretion of androgens, particularly testosterone. However, despite such findings in animals, the chronic effects of marijuana use on human endocrine systems have proved to be inconsistent. Here, we investigated the reference ranges of urinary levels of testosterone (T) and epitestosterone (E) as well as their metabolic ratio of T/E in a Korean male population (n=337), which would enable an evaluation of abnormal changes in steroid metabolism induced by habitually administered cannabis. The T/E ratio was significantly decreased in the marijuana group (n=18), while the urinary testosterone concentrations were also tended to decrease. This study is the first to provide data for the reference values of two urinary androgens and T/E values among control Korean males, and, furthermore, suggests that the T/E ratio, though not testosterone levels, might be used to understand the suppression of human male gonadal function affected by smoking marijuana. PMID:24333796

  3. Influence of different dietary zinc levels on cashmere growth, plasma testosterone level and zinc status in male Liaoning Cashmere goats.

    PubMed

    Liu, H Y; Sun, M H; Yang, G Q; Jia, C L; Zhang, M; Zhu, Y J; Zhang, Y

    2015-10-01

    The experiment was conducted to investigate the influence of different levels of zinc (Zn) on cashmere growth, plasma testosterone and Zn profile in male Cashmere goats. Twenty-eight male Liaoning Cashmere goats, 3 years old and body weight at 56.2 ± 2.45 kg, were assigned to four groups. The animals were fed a basal diet containing of 45.9 mg Zn/kg dry matter (DM) basis and supplemented with 0, 20, 40 or 80 mg Zn (reagent grade ZnSO₄ ·7H₂ O) per kg DM for 90 days. There was no significant effect on growth and diameter of cashmere fibre for Zn supplemented in diets. However, the length and growth rate of wool were improved (p < 0.05) with dietary Zn. The length and growth rate of wool were higher (p < 0.05) for the groups supplemented with 40 or 80 mg Zn/kg DM compared with that of 20 mg Zn/kg DM treatment group. Plasma testosterone concentration was increased for Zn supplemented in diets, and the testosterone concentration was higher (p < 0.05) in goats fed on the diet supplemented with 40 or 80 mg Zn/kg DM compared with those fed on basal diet. Plasma Zn concentrations increased (p < 0.05) with increasing dietary Zn and supplemented with 40 and 80 mg Zn/kg DM groups improved plasma Zn concentration (p < 0.05) more than 20 mg Zn/kg DM group. Fibre Zn content was higher (p < 0.05) in groups supplemented with 40 or 80 mg Zn/kg DM compared with control group, but no difference between Zn-supplemented groups (p > 0.05). The activity of plasma alkaline phosphatase was increased (p < 0.05) due to dietary Zn supplementation; however, no difference was found between supplemented treatment groups (p > 0.05). In conclusion, Zn content (45.9 mg Zn/kg DM) in control diet was insufficient for optimal wool growth performance, and we recommended the level of dietary Zn for such goats is 86 mg/kg DM during the breeding season and cashmere fibre growing period.

  4. Establishing the Biological Relevance of Dipentyl Phthalate Reductions in Fetal Rat Testosterone Production and Plasma and Testis Testosterone Levels

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phthalate esters (PEs) constitute a large class of compounds that are used for many consumer product applications. Many of the C2-C7 di-ortho PEs reduce fetal testicular hormone and gene expression levels in rats resulting in adverse effects seen later in life but it appears that...

  5. Serum Testosterone Levels and Symptom-Based Depression Subtypes in Men

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Stephanie; grosse Holtforth, Martin; Hengartner, Michael P.; Müller, Mario; Aleksandrowicz, Aleksandra A.; Rössler, Wulf; Ajdacic-Gross, Vladeta

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this preliminary study was to further clarify the association between testosterone (T) levels and depression by investigating symptom-based depression subtypes in a sample of 64 men. The data were taken from the ZInEP epidemiology survey. Gonadal hormones of a melancholic (n  = 25) and an atypical (n = 14) depression subtype, derived from latent class analysis, were compared with those of healthy controls (n  = 18). Serum T was assayed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay procedure. Analysis of variance, analysis of covariance, non-parametrical tests, and generalized linear regression models were performed to examine group differences. The atypical depressive subtype showed significantly lower T levels compared with the melancholic depressives. While accumulative evidence indicates that, beyond psychosocial characteristics, the melancholic and atypical depressive subtypes are also distinguishable by biological correlates, the current study expanded this knowledge to include gonadal hormones. Further longitudinal research is warranted to disclose causality by linking the multiple processes in pathogenesis of depression. PMID:25999864

  6. Paternal retrievals increase testosterone levels in both male and female California mouse (Peromyscus californicus) offspring.

    PubMed

    Chary, Mamatha C; Cruz, Jayson P; Bardi, Massimo; Becker, Elizabeth A

    2015-07-01

    The importance of maternal care on offspring development has received considerable attention, although more recently, researchers have begun to focus on the significance of paternal contributions. In the monogamous and bi-parental California mouse, fathers provide high levels of care, and therefore serve as a model system for studying paternal effects on behavior and underlying neuroendocrine mechanisms. Paternal retrievals in this species influence long term changes in brain (expression of arginine vasopressin-AVP) and behavior (aggression and parenting) in adult male offspring. Further, paternal retrievals induce a transient increase in testosterone (T) in male offspring, which is thought to mediate the relationship between paternal retrievals and AVP expression. Although the father-son relationship has been well characterized, few studies have examined father-daughter interactions. In California mice, paternal retrievals increase aggression in female offspring. Although T has been implicated in the regulation of female aggression, it remains unclear whether T may underlie long-term changes in female offspring aggression in response to paternal retrievals. In the current study, we examined the influence of paternal retrievals on T in both male and female offspring. Retrievals were manipulated experimentally by displacement of the pup and trunk blood was collected from retrieved, non-retrieved, and non-manipulated (baseline) pups. We found that fathers expressed similar levels of retrievals towards sons and daughters, and that T levels were elevated in retrieved, as compared to non-retrieved offspring. Similar to what has been previously described in male offspring and replicated here, female offspring that were retrieved had higher T levels than non-retrieved females. Neither females nor males experienced a change in corticosterone levels in response to retrievals suggesting offspring do not mount a stress response to paternal care. Therefore, our data suggest

  7. Paternal retrievals increase testosterone levels in both male and female California mouse (Peromyscus californicus) offspring.

    PubMed

    Chary, Mamatha C; Cruz, Jayson P; Bardi, Massimo; Becker, Elizabeth A

    2015-07-01

    The importance of maternal care on offspring development has received considerable attention, although more recently, researchers have begun to focus on the significance of paternal contributions. In the monogamous and bi-parental California mouse, fathers provide high levels of care, and therefore serve as a model system for studying paternal effects on behavior and underlying neuroendocrine mechanisms. Paternal retrievals in this species influence long term changes in brain (expression of arginine vasopressin-AVP) and behavior (aggression and parenting) in adult male offspring. Further, paternal retrievals induce a transient increase in testosterone (T) in male offspring, which is thought to mediate the relationship between paternal retrievals and AVP expression. Although the father-son relationship has been well characterized, few studies have examined father-daughter interactions. In California mice, paternal retrievals increase aggression in female offspring. Although T has been implicated in the regulation of female aggression, it remains unclear whether T may underlie long-term changes in female offspring aggression in response to paternal retrievals. In the current study, we examined the influence of paternal retrievals on T in both male and female offspring. Retrievals were manipulated experimentally by displacement of the pup and trunk blood was collected from retrieved, non-retrieved, and non-manipulated (baseline) pups. We found that fathers expressed similar levels of retrievals towards sons and daughters, and that T levels were elevated in retrieved, as compared to non-retrieved offspring. Similar to what has been previously described in male offspring and replicated here, female offspring that were retrieved had higher T levels than non-retrieved females. Neither females nor males experienced a change in corticosterone levels in response to retrievals suggesting offspring do not mount a stress response to paternal care. Therefore, our data suggest

  8. Effect of testosterone undecanoate hormone on sperm and its level in the hemolymph of male mud spiny lobster, Panulirus polyphagus.

    PubMed

    Fatihah, S N; Safiah, J; Abol-Munafi, A B; Ikhwanuddin, M

    2014-07-01

    The present study aimed to determine the effect of testosterone undecanoate hormone on sperm quality (sperm viability) and sperm quantity (sperm counts) and its levels in the hemolymph of male mud spiny lobster, Panulirus polyphagus. Male P. polyphagus was injected laterally in fifth abdominal segment of pure hormone, Testosterone Undecanoate (TU) and ethanol at days 1, 8, 15, 22 and 29. Hemolymph of P. polyphagus was taken every two weeks and checked with Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to measure hormone levels. The mean sperm quality and quantity were increased due to increase the TU dose and TU levels also increase. The sperm quality, quantity and hormone levels were relevance each others. These findings indicate that TU injection should be evaluated as a practical way of improving sperm quality and quantity in commercial operations. PMID:26035945

  9. Compounded Testosterone Troches TO OPTIMIZE HEALTH AND THE TESTOSTERONE CONTROVERSY.

    PubMed

    Guth, Michael A S

    2015-01-01

    As men age, testosterone levels progressively fall and inflammatory biomarkers increase. The gradual decline in testosterone production with aging, known as andropause, is common and may have deleterious effects on men including decreased overall well-being, increased sarcopenia, increased risk of cardiovascular disease, reduced sexual function, and bone loss. Therefore, it comes as no surprise that an increasing number of men worldwide have begun requesting testosterone replacement therapy from their physicians. Occasionally, physicians discourage male patients from getting testosterone replacement therapy based on a few recent studies indicating the therapy causes cardiovascular events, including myocardial infarctions. Yet, an extensive review of the testosterone replacement therapy literature reveals that the majority of clinical studies show that properly administered testosterone replacement therapy, in which estradiol and dihydrotestosterone levels are also controlled, has no adverse effects on myocardial infarction risk. The current state-of-the-art in testosterone replacement therapy comprises compounded testosterone troches; an aromatase inhibitor, such as generic Anastrazole, to control estradiol levels; and a 5α-reductase inhibitor, such as beneric Dutasteride or Finasteride, to control dihydrotestosterone. Compounded testosterone troches easily raise serum testosterone levels to the optimal range, are highly cost effective at $82 for a 180-day supply, and provide affordable access to testosterone replacement therapy to millions of men requesting it. Yet, the Blue Cross Blue Shield-associated firms have largely denied requests for coverage of compounded medications, including testosterone troches. Despite data demonstrating strong links between testosterone deficiency and significant comorbid conditions (including Type 2 diabetes and other metabolic syndrome diseases) as well as the health benefits of testosterone replacement therapy, some physian have

  10. Effects of testosterone on the expression levels of AMH, VEGF and HIF-1α in mouse granulosa cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Shan-Feng; Zheng, Jin-Dan; Zhao, Chun-Bo; Zhang, Yi-Nan; Liu, Li-Li; Huang, Jian-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of testosterone on mouse granulosa cell morphology, and the expression levels of anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). Mouse granulosa cells were isolated and identified, and their morphology was examined using hematoxylin and eosin, F-actin, and follicle-stimulating hormone receptor staining. The mRNA expression levels of AMH, VEGF and HIF-1α were examined using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and their protein secretion levels were investigated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Testosterone treatment did not affect granulosa cell morphology; however, it significantly increased the mRNA expression levels of AMH and VEGF, and the protein secretion levels of AMH, VEGF and HIF-1α. These results suggested that testosterone was able to regulate the functions of granulosa cells by upregulating the expression levels of AMH, VEGF and HIF-1α. PMID:27446291

  11. Significant increase of salivary testosterone levels after single therapeutic transdermal administration of testosterone: suitability as a potential screening parameter in doping control.

    PubMed

    Thieme, Detlef; Rautenberg, Claudia; Grosse, Joachim; Schoenfelder, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The legally defensible proof of the abuse of endogenous steroids in sports is currently based on carbon isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), i.e. a comparison between (13)C/(12)C ratios of diagnostic precursors and metabolites of testosterone. The application of this technique requires a chromatographic baseline separation of respective steroids prior to IRMS detection and hence laborious sample pre-processing of the urinary steroid extracts including clean up by solid-phase extraction and/or liquid chromatography. Consequently, an efficient pre-selection of suspicious control urine samples is essential for appropriate follow up confirmation by IRMS and effective doping control. Two single transdermal administration studies of testosterone (50 mg Testogel® and Testopatch® at 3.8 mg in 16 h, respectively) were conducted and resulting profiles of salivary testosterone and urinary steroid profiles and corresponding carbon isotope ratios were determined. Conventional doping control markers (testosterone/epitestosterone ratio, threshold concentrations of androsterone, etiocholanolone, or androstanediols) did not approach or exceed critical thresholds. In contrast to these moderate variations, the testosterone concentration in oral fluid increased from basal values (30-142 pg/mg) to peak concentrations above 1000 pg/mg. It is likely that this significant increase in oral fluid is due to a pulsatile elevation of free (protein unbound) circulating testosterone after transdermal administration and may be assumed to represent a more diagnostic marker for transdermal testosterone administration.

  12. Moderating effects of salivary testosterone levels on associations between job demand and psychological stress response in Japanese medical workers

    PubMed Central

    HIROKAWA, Kumi; MIWA, Machiko; TANIGUCHI, Toshiyo; TSUCHIYA, Masao; KAWAKAMI, Norito

    2015-01-01

    Levels of job stress have been shown to be inversely associated with testosterone levels, but some inconsistent results have been documented. We investigated the moderating effects of testosterone levels on associations between job stress-factors and psychological stress responses in Japanese medical workers. The participants were 63 medical staff (20 males and 43 women; mean age: 30.6 years; SD=7.3) in Okayama, Japan. Their job-stress levels and psychological stress responses were evaluated using self-administered questionnaires, and their salivary testosterone collected. Multiple regression analyses showed that job demand was positively associated with stress responses in men and women. An interaction between testosterone and support from colleagues had a significant effect on depression and anxiety for women. In women with lower testosterone levels, a reducing effect of support from colleagues on depression and anxiety was intensified. In women with higher testosterone levels, depression and anxiety levels were identical regardless of support from colleagues. Testosterone may function as a moderator between perceived work environment and psychological stress responses for female medical workers. PMID:26632120

  13. Time Related Increase in Urinary Testosterone Levels and Stable Semen Analysis Parameters after Bariatric Surgery in Men

    PubMed Central

    Legro, Richard S; Kunselman, Allen R; Meadows, Juliana W; Kesner, James S; Krieg, Edward F; Rogers, Ann M; Cooney, Robert N

    2015-01-01

    We sought to determine the time-course in androgen and semen parameters in men after weight loss associated with bariatric surgery with a prospective cohort study of 6 male subjects, age 18-40 years, meeting NIH bariatric surgery guidelines, conducted in 2005-2008, with study visits at baseline, then 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery. All men had a Roux-en-y-Gastric-Bypass (RYGB) performed at Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center. We collected at each visit biometric, questionnaire, serum, and urinary specimens as well as a semen analysis. Urinary integrated total testosterone levels increased significantly by 3 months after surgery, and remained elevated throughout the study. Circulating testosterone levels were also higher at 1 and 6 months after surgery, compared to baseline. Serum SHBG levels were significantly elevated at all time points post-operatively. After RYGB surgery, there were no significant changes in urinary estrogen metabolites (estrone 3-glucuronide) or serum estradiol levels, serial semen parameters, or male sexual function by questionnaire. This study supports the idea that a threshold of weight loss is necessary to improve male reproductive function by reversing male hypogonadism, manifested as increased testosterone levels. Further serial semen analysis results showed normal ranges for most parameters despite massive weight loss. PMID:25498592

  14. Testosterone affects language areas of the adult human brain

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Andreas; Kranz, Georg S.; Sladky, Ronald; Kaufmann, Ulrike; Ganger, Sebastian; Hummer, Allan; Seiger, Rene; Spies, Marie; Vanicek, Thomas; Winkler, Dietmar; Kasper, Siegfried; Windischberger, Christian; Swaab, Dick F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although the sex steroid hormone testosterone is integrally involved in the development of language processing, ethical considerations mostly limit investigations to single hormone administrations. To circumvent this issue we assessed the influence of continuous high‐dose hormone application in adult female‐to‐male transsexuals. Subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging before and after 4 weeks of testosterone treatment, with each scan including structural, diffusion weighted and functional imaging. Voxel‐based morphometry analysis showed decreased gray matter volume with increasing levels of bioavailable testosterone exclusively in Broca's and Wernicke's areas. Particularly, this may link known sex differences in language performance to the influence of testosterone on relevant brain regions. Using probabilistic tractography, we further observed that longitudinal changes in testosterone negatively predicted changes in mean diffusivity of the corresponding structural connection passing through the extreme capsule. Considering a related increase in myelin staining in rodents, this potentially reflects a strengthening of the fiber tract particularly involved in language comprehension. Finally, functional images at resting‐state were evaluated, showing increased functional connectivity between the two brain regions with increasing testosterone levels. These findings suggest testosterone‐dependent neuroplastic adaptations in adulthood within language‐specific brain regions and connections. Importantly, deteriorations in gray matter volume seem to be compensated by enhancement of corresponding structural and functional connectivity. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1738–1748, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26876303

  15. Alternatives to testosterone replacement: testosterone restoration

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The European Male Aging Study has demonstrated that the hypogonadism of male aging is predominantly secondary. Theoretically with appropriate stimulation from the pituitary, the aging testis should be able to produce eugonadal levels of testosterone. The strategies for the treatment of late onset hypogonadism (LOH) have focused on replacement with exogenous testosterone versus restoration of endogenous production. The purpose of this article is to review existing peer-reviewed literature supporting the concept of restoration of endogenous testosterone in the treatment of LOH. PMID:25578932

  16. Testosterone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Testopel) are also used to stimulate puberty in males with delayed puberty. Testosterone enanthate (Delatestryl) injection may ... to the growth, development, and functioning of the male sexual organs and typical male characteristics. Testosterone injection ...

  17. Early follicular testosterone level predicts preference for masculinity in male faces - but not for women taking hormonal contraception.

    PubMed

    Bobst, Cora; Sauter, Sabine; Foppa, Andrina; Lobmaier, Janek S

    2014-03-01

    It has been shown that women's preference for masculinity in male faces changes across the menstrual cycle. Preference for masculinity is stronger when conception probability is high than when it is low. These findings have been linked to cyclic fluctuations of hormone levels. The purpose of the present study is to further investigate the link between gonadal steroids (i.e. testosterone, estradiol, and progesterone) and masculinity preference in women, while holding the cycle phase constant. Sixty-two female participants were tested in their early follicular cycle phase, when conception probability is low. Participants were shown face pairs and where asked to choose the more attractive face. Face pairs consisted of a masculinized and feminized version of the same face. For naturally cycling women we found a positive relationship between saliva testosterone levels and masculinity preference, but there was no link between any hormones and masculinity preference for women taking hormonal contraception. We conclude that in naturally cycling women early follicular testosterone levels are associated with masculinity preference. However, these hormonal links were not found for women with artificially modified hormonal levels, that is, for women taking hormonal contraception.

  18. Elevated testosterone levels in a racing horse due to an XY testicular disorder of sexual development.

    PubMed

    Dierks, Claudia; Sieme, Harald; Piechotta, Marion; Lehner, Stephanie; Merkt, Jan Carlos; Uphaus, Hubert; Klug, Erich; Distl, Ottmar

    2015-01-01

    A female thoroughbred successful in horse racing was positively tested for high testosterone values. This horse neither showed stallion-like-behaviour nor signs of ambiguous external genitalia. The karyotype of this horse was 2n = 64,XY and the sex-determining region of Y (SRY) PCR was positive. Hair samples tested for naturally testosterone revealed values normal for stallions, and tests for eight synthetic testosterone esters remained negative. The phenotype, ultrasonographic examination, hormone status, cytogenetic evaluation and molecular diagnostics lead to the diagnosis of an XY testicular disorder of sexual development (DSD) due to a complete androgen insensitivity syndrome. To our knowledge this is the first report about a thoroughbred in racing sports with an XY testicular disorder of sexual development. To date, intersex racing horses have never been described in thoroughbreds or a regulation for intersexes in regard to horse races has been issued. PMID:26281448

  19. Elevated testosterone levels in a racing horse due to an XY testicular disorder of sexual development.

    PubMed

    Dierks, Claudia; Sieme, Harald; Piechotta, Marion; Lehner, Stephanie; Merkt, Jan Carlos; Uphaus, Hubert; Klug, Erich; Distl, Ottmar

    2015-01-01

    A female thoroughbred successful in horse racing was positively tested for high testosterone values. This horse neither showed stallion-like-behaviour nor signs of ambiguous external genitalia. The karyotype of this horse was 2n = 64,XY and the sex-determining region of Y (SRY) PCR was positive. Hair samples tested for naturally testosterone revealed values normal for stallions, and tests for eight synthetic testosterone esters remained negative. The phenotype, ultrasonographic examination, hormone status, cytogenetic evaluation and molecular diagnostics lead to the diagnosis of an XY testicular disorder of sexual development (DSD) due to a complete androgen insensitivity syndrome. To our knowledge this is the first report about a thoroughbred in racing sports with an XY testicular disorder of sexual development. To date, intersex racing horses have never been described in thoroughbreds or a regulation for intersexes in regard to horse races has been issued.

  20. Urinary testosterone-metabolite levels and dominance rank in male and female bonobos (Pan paniscus).

    PubMed

    Sannen, Adinda; Van Elsacker, Linda; Heistermann, Michael; Eens, Marcel

    2004-04-01

    The correlation between testosterone (T) and dominance rank may vary among species, and is expected to become stronger as the importance of aggressive competition for rank increases. However, it may also vary among social situations within a species, showing a stronger correlation during socially unstable periods. Knowledge on this topic in great apes, especially in females, is scant. This study presents the first data on the relationship between T and dominance rank in both sexes of the bonobo ( Pan paniscus). For each period (four socially unstable and two stable ones), linear rank orders were determined and subsequently correlated with the accompanying mean urinary T-metabolite concentrations (measured as immunoreactive 5alpha-androstan-17alpha-ol-3-one). No correlation between these two variables was found for either sex among individuals during socially unstable or stable periods. Also, within an individual over the six periods, no relationship of T with rank could be demonstrated. These results suggest that either the outcomes of aggressions have no influence on T levels, or such clear outcomes appear insufficiently frequent to affect T levels over longer periods. Even during the unstable periods, the rate of aggressions was not higher than during stable periods, suggesting that frequencies of aggression have little effect on rank. Further analyses indeed demonstrated no correlation between frequencies of overall aggressions or any type of aggressive behavior separately, or rank. Perhaps factors other than the frequency of displayed aggressions alone have a marked influence on a bonobo's rank, for example, coalition partners. Overall, in bonobos, T apparently does not form a physiological reflection of social status.

  1. Genetic effects on serum testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin in men: a Korean twin and family study

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Joohon; Song, Yun-Mi

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a community-based cross-sectional study to evaluate the role of genetics in determining the individual difference in total testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin levels. Study participants comprised 730 Korean men consisting of 142 pairs of monozygotic twins, 191 pairs of siblings, and 259 father-offspring pairs from 270 families who participated in the Healthy Twin study. Serum concentration of total testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin were measured by chemiluminescence immunoassay, and free testosterone and bioavailable testosterone were calculated using Vermeulen's method. Quantitative genetic analysis based on a variance decomposition model showed that the heritability of total testosterone, free testosterone, bioavailable testosterone, and sex hormone-binding globulin were 0.56, 0.45, 0.44, and 0.69, respectively after accounting for age and body mass index. Proportions of variance explained by age and body mass index varied across different traits, from 8% for total testosterone to 31% for sex hormone-binding globulin. Bivariate analysis showed a high degree of additive genetic correlation (ρG = 0.67) and a moderate degree of individual-specific environmental correlation (ρE = 0.42) between total testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin. The findings confirmed the important role of genetics in determining the individually different levels of testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin during adulthood in Korean men as found in non-Asian populations, which may suggest that common biologic control for determining testosterone level directly or indirectly through binding protein are largely shared among different populations. PMID:26486061

  2. Psychological and behavioural effects of endogenous testosterone levels and anabolic-androgenic steroids among males. A review.

    PubMed

    Bahrke, M S; Yesalis, C E; Wright, J E

    1990-11-01

    The psychological and behavioural effects of endogenous testosterone levels and anabolic-androgenic steroids in males have been investigated for over 50 years in both clinical and nonmedical uses, including the influence of anabolic-androgenic steroids on the nervous system and neuromuscular expression as a mechanism for behavioural and ergogenic effects. The relationship between moods, behaviour and endogenous plasma testosterone levels, as well as anabolic steroids and corticosteroid administration has been studied, including psychological dependence, withdrawal effects, and major methodological issues. While a relationship between endogenous testosterone levels and aggressive behaviour has been observed in various animal species, it is less consistent in humans. It can be concluded that, although the use of exogenous anabolic-androgenic steroids may have psychological and behavioural effects in some patients and athletes, the effects are variable, transient upon discontinuation of the drugs, and appear to be related to type (17 alpha-alkalated rather than 17 beta-esterified), but not dose, of anabolic-androgenic steroids administered. The roles of genetic factors, medical history, environmental and peer influences, and individual expectations are likewise unclear. In general, the evidence at present is limited and much additional research will be necessary for a complete understanding of this relationship.

  3. Changes in Men's Salivary Testosterone and Cortisol Levels, and in Sexual Desire after Smelling Female Axillary and Vulvar Scents.

    PubMed

    Cerda-Molina, Ana Lilia; Hernández-López, Leonor; de la O, Claudio E; Chavira-Ramírez, Roberto; Mondragón-Ceballos, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have shown that a woman's vaginal or axillary odors convey information on her attractivity. Yet, whether such scents induce psychoneuroendocrinological changes in perceivers is still controversial. We studied if smelling axillary and vulvar odors collected in the periovulatory and late luteal phases of young women modify salivary testosterone and cortisol levels, as well as sexual desire in men. Forty-five women and 115 men, all of them college students and unacquainted with each other, participated in the study. Female odors were collected on pads affixed to the axilla and on panty protectors both worn the entire night before experiments. Men provided five saliva samples, a basal one before the smelling procedure, and four more 15, 30, 60, and 75 min after exposure to odors. Immediately after smelling the odor source, men answered a questionnaire rating hedonic qualities of scents, and after providing the last saliva sample they answered questionnaire on sexual desire. We found that periovulatory axillary and vulvar odors increased testosterone and cortisol levels, with vulvar scents producing a more prolonged effect. Luteal axilla odors decreased testosterone and cortisol levels, while luteal vulva odors increased cortisol. Periovulatory axilla and vulva scents accounted for a general increase of interest in sex. These odors were also rated as more pleasant and familiar, while luteal vulvar odors were perceived as intense and unpleasant. PMID:24194730

  4. Effect of Lepidium meyenii (MACA) on sexual desire and its absent relationship with serum testosterone levels in adult healthy men.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, G F; Córdova, A; Vega, K; Chung, A; Villena, A; Góñez, C; Castillo, S

    2002-12-01

    This study was a 12-week double blind placebo-controlled, randomized, parallel trial in which active treatment with different doses of Maca Gelatinizada was compared with placebo. The study aimed to demonstrate if effect of Maca on subjective report of sexual desire was because of effect on mood or serum testosterone levels. Men aged 21-56 years received Maca in one of two doses: 1,500 mg or 3,000 mg or placebo. Self-perception on sexual desire, score for Hamilton test for depression, and Hamilton test for anxiety were measured at 4, 8 and 12 weeks of treatment. An improvement in sexual desire was observed with Maca since 8 weeks of treatment. Serum testosterone and oestradiol levels were not different in men treated with Maca and in those treated with placebo (P:NS). Logistic regression analysis showed that Maca has an independent effect on sexual desire at 8 and 12 weeks of treatment, and this effect is not because of changes in either Hamilton scores for depression or anxiety or serum testosterone and oestradiol levels. In conclusion, treatment with Maca improved sexual desire.

  5. Testosterone and obesity.

    PubMed

    Kelly, D M; Jones, T H

    2015-07-01

    Testosterone is a key hormone in the pathology of metabolic diseases such as obesity. Low testosterone levels are associated with increased fat mass (particularly central adiposity) and reduced lean mass in males. These morphological features are linked to metabolic dysfunction, and testosterone deficiency is associated with energy imbalance, impaired glucose control, reduced insulin sensitivity and dyslipidaemia. A bidirectional relationship between testosterone and obesity underpins this association indicated by the hypogonadal-obesity cycle and evidence weight loss can lead to increased testosterone levels. Androgenic effects on enzymatic pathways of fatty acid metabolism, glucose control and energy utilization are apparent and often tissue specific with differential effects noted in different regional fat depots, muscle and liver to potentially explain the mechanisms of testosterone action. Testosterone replacement therapy demonstrates beneficial effects on measures of obesity that are partially explained by both direct metabolic actions on adipose and muscle and also potentially by increasing motivation, vigour and energy allowing obese individuals to engage in more active lifestyles. The degree of these beneficial effects may be dependent on the treatment modality with longer term administration often achieving greater improvements. Testosterone replacement may therefore potentially be an effective adjunctive treatment for weight management in obese men with concomitant hypogonadism. PMID:25982085

  6. Ex vivo bioadhesion and in vivo testosterone bioavailability study of different bioadhesive formulations based on starch-g-poly(acrylic acid) copolymers and starch/poly(acrylic acid) mixtures.

    PubMed

    Ameye, D; Voorspoels, J; Foreman, P; Tsai, J; Richardson, P; Geresh, S; Remon, J P

    2002-02-19

    Starch-g-poly(acrylic acid) copolymers or grafted starches synthesized by 60Co irradiation or chemical modification and co-freeze-dried starch/poly(acrylic acid) mixtures were evaluated on their ex vivo bioadhesion capacity. The buccal absorption of testosterone from a bioadhesive tablet formulated with the grafted starches or starch/poly(acrylic acid) mixtures was investigated. The results were compared to a reference formulation (physical mixture of 5% Carbopol 974P and 95% Drum Dried Waxy Maize). Rice starch-based irradiated grafted starches showed the best bioadhesion results. Partial neutralization of the acrylic acid with Ca(2+) ions resulted in significantly higher bioadhesion values compared to the reference. Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) partially neutralized maltodextrin-based irradiated grafted starches showed significantly higher bioadhesion values compared to the reference formulation. The chemically modified grafted starches showed significantly higher adhesion force values than for the reference tablet. None of the co-freeze-dried starch/poly(acrylic acid) mixtures showed significantly higher bioadhesion results than the reference (Bonferroni test, P<0.05). A chemically modified grafted starch could sustain the 3 ng/ml plasma testosterone target concentration during +/- 8 h (T(>3 ng/ml)). By lyophilization of a partially neutralized irradiated grafted starch, the in vivo adhesion time (22.0 +/- 7.2 h) and the T(>3 ng/ml) (13.5 +/- 1.3 h) could be increased. The absolute bioavailability of the lyophilized formulation approached the reference formulation. Some of the grafted starches showed to be promising buccal bioadhesive drug carriers for systemic delivery. PMID:11853929

  7. Age-related changes in urinary testosterone levels suggest differences in puberty onset and divergent life history strategies in bonobos and chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Behringer, V; Deschner, T; Deimel, C; Stevens, J M G; Hohmann, G

    2014-08-01

    Research on age-related changes in morphology, social behavior, and cognition suggests that the development of bonobos (Pan paniscus) is delayed in comparison to chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). However, there is also evidence for earlier reproductive maturation in bonobos. Since developmental changes such as reproductive maturation are induced by a number of endocrine processes, changes in hormone levels are indicators of different developmental stages. Age-related changes in testosterone excretion are an indirect marker for the onset of puberty in human and non-human primates. In this study we investigated patterns of urinary testosterone levels in male and female bonobos and chimpanzees to determine the onset of puberty. In contrast to other studies, we found that both species experience age-related changes in urinary testosterone levels. Older individuals of both sexes had significantly higher urinary testosterone levels than younger individuals, indicating that bonobos and chimpanzees experience juvenile pause. The males of both species showed a similar pattern of age-related changes in urinary testosterone levels, with a sharp increase in levels around the age of eight years. This suggests that species-differences in aggression and male mate competition evolved independently of developmental changes in testosterone levels. Females showed a similar pattern of age-related urinary testosterone increase. However, in female bonobos the onset was about three years earlier than in female chimpanzees. The earlier rise of urinary testosterone levels in female bonobos is in line with reports of their younger age of dispersal, and suggests that female bonobos experience puberty at a younger age than female chimpanzees. PMID:25086337

  8. Age-related changes in urinary testosterone levels suggest differences in puberty onset and divergent life history strategies in bonobos and chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Behringer, V; Deschner, T; Deimel, C; Stevens, J M G; Hohmann, G

    2014-08-01

    Research on age-related changes in morphology, social behavior, and cognition suggests that the development of bonobos (Pan paniscus) is delayed in comparison to chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). However, there is also evidence for earlier reproductive maturation in bonobos. Since developmental changes such as reproductive maturation are induced by a number of endocrine processes, changes in hormone levels are indicators of different developmental stages. Age-related changes in testosterone excretion are an indirect marker for the onset of puberty in human and non-human primates. In this study we investigated patterns of urinary testosterone levels in male and female bonobos and chimpanzees to determine the onset of puberty. In contrast to other studies, we found that both species experience age-related changes in urinary testosterone levels. Older individuals of both sexes had significantly higher urinary testosterone levels than younger individuals, indicating that bonobos and chimpanzees experience juvenile pause. The males of both species showed a similar pattern of age-related changes in urinary testosterone levels, with a sharp increase in levels around the age of eight years. This suggests that species-differences in aggression and male mate competition evolved independently of developmental changes in testosterone levels. Females showed a similar pattern of age-related urinary testosterone increase. However, in female bonobos the onset was about three years earlier than in female chimpanzees. The earlier rise of urinary testosterone levels in female bonobos is in line with reports of their younger age of dispersal, and suggests that female bonobos experience puberty at a younger age than female chimpanzees.

  9. Testosterone regulates levels of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator, adenylate cyclase, and cAMP in the seminal vesicles of orchidectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Ramli, Nur Siti Khadijah; Giribabu, Nelli; Muniandy, Sekaran; Salleh, Naguib

    2016-01-15

    Secretions of chloride (Cl(-))- and bicarbonate (HCO3(-))-rich fluid by the seminal vesicles could involve cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR), which activity can be stimulated by cAMP generated from the reaction involving adenylate cyclase (AC). In this study, we investigated levels of CFTR, AC, and cAMP in the seminal vesicles under testosterone influence. Orchidectomized adult male rats received 7-day treatment with 125 or 250 μg/kg/day of testosterone with or without flutamide or finasteride. At the end of the treatment, animals were sacrificed and seminal vesicles were harvested for analyses of CFTR and AC protein expression level by Western blotting. Distribution of CFTR and AC in seminal vesicles was observed by immunohistochemistry. Levels of cAMP and dihydrotestosterone in seminal vesicle homogenates were measured by ELISA. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator, AC, and cAMP levels increased with increasing doses of testosterone (P < 0.05 compared to nontreated orchidectomized rats). Cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator and AC were expressed at the apical membrane of the epithelium lining the seminal vesicle lumen with higher expression levels observed in testosterone-treated rats than in non-treated orchidectomized rats (P < 0.05). The inhibitory effects of flutamide or finasteride on these parameters were greater in 250 μg/kg/day testosterone-treated rats than their effects in 125 μg/kg/day testosterone-treated rats. Higher dihydrotestosterone levels were observed in seminal vesicle homogenates after treatment with 250 μg/kg/day than with 125 μg/kg/day of testosterone (P < 0.05). Increased levels of CFTR, AC, and cAMP in seminal vesicles might contribute toward an increase in Cl(-) and HCO3(-) concentrations in the seminal fluid as reported under testosterone influence.

  10. Testosterone regulates levels of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator, adenylate cyclase, and cAMP in the seminal vesicles of orchidectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Ramli, Nur Siti Khadijah; Giribabu, Nelli; Muniandy, Sekaran; Salleh, Naguib

    2016-01-15

    Secretions of chloride (Cl(-))- and bicarbonate (HCO3(-))-rich fluid by the seminal vesicles could involve cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR), which activity can be stimulated by cAMP generated from the reaction involving adenylate cyclase (AC). In this study, we investigated levels of CFTR, AC, and cAMP in the seminal vesicles under testosterone influence. Orchidectomized adult male rats received 7-day treatment with 125 or 250 μg/kg/day of testosterone with or without flutamide or finasteride. At the end of the treatment, animals were sacrificed and seminal vesicles were harvested for analyses of CFTR and AC protein expression level by Western blotting. Distribution of CFTR and AC in seminal vesicles was observed by immunohistochemistry. Levels of cAMP and dihydrotestosterone in seminal vesicle homogenates were measured by ELISA. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator, AC, and cAMP levels increased with increasing doses of testosterone (P < 0.05 compared to nontreated orchidectomized rats). Cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator and AC were expressed at the apical membrane of the epithelium lining the seminal vesicle lumen with higher expression levels observed in testosterone-treated rats than in non-treated orchidectomized rats (P < 0.05). The inhibitory effects of flutamide or finasteride on these parameters were greater in 250 μg/kg/day testosterone-treated rats than their effects in 125 μg/kg/day testosterone-treated rats. Higher dihydrotestosterone levels were observed in seminal vesicle homogenates after treatment with 250 μg/kg/day than with 125 μg/kg/day of testosterone (P < 0.05). Increased levels of CFTR, AC, and cAMP in seminal vesicles might contribute toward an increase in Cl(-) and HCO3(-) concentrations in the seminal fluid as reported under testosterone influence. PMID:26483308

  11. The ball's in your court: testosterone 101.

    PubMed

    Horn, T; Cooper, S

    1997-11-01

    Testosterone, a hormone, plays several important functions in nutrition, libido, and the development of masculine traits. Studies have shown that testosterone levels in both men and women with HIV and AIDS are generally very low. The definition of normal testosterone is broad and determining when a person has low levels is difficult since individuals have different testosterone baselines. Testosterone replacement therapy, available for men but not for women yet, is used to increase body mass and prevent wasting. Testosterone is available in several forms, including a patch, and the advantages of each form are discussed. Testosterone level tests are readily available and are generally covered by insurance and Medicaid. PMID:11365205

  12. In vitro bioavailability of iron from spinach (Spinacea oleracea) cultivated in soil fortified with graded levels of iron and zinc.

    PubMed

    Reddy, N S; Sondge, C V; Khan, T N

    1993-11-01

    A pot-culture experiment was conducted to assess the bioavailability of iron from spinach cultivated in soil fortified with graded levels of iron and zinc (FeSO4 x 7H2(0) and ZnSO4 x 7H2(0), respectively). Applications of varying levels of iron to soil increased the total iron and phosphorus contents and decreased the zinc content (P < 0.05). The effect of applying varying levels of zinc was the opposite of on the minerals in spinach. The ascorbic acid content was remarkably reduced with varying levels of iron and zinc. Higher levels of zinc and lower levels of iron in the soil increased the bioavailability of iron from spinach (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the interactions of 15 ppm zinc with 30 ppm iron significantly enhanced the bioavailability of iron, total iron and zinc contents.

  13. Decreased plasma gonadotropin and testosterone levels in arthritic rats: are corticosteroids involved?

    PubMed

    Rivier, C

    1995-05-01

    Infectious and inflammatory diseases are often accompanied by abnormal reproductive functions, and the present working hypothesis is that proteins (called cytokines or interleukins, ILs) released by activated immune cells are at least in part responsible for these neuroendocrine changes. In order to test this hypothesis, we need paradigms of immune pathologies in which concentrations of cytokines are increased, and those of hormones of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis are blunted. We chose a rodent model of arthritis, adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA), in which rats show elevated plasma IL-6 and decreased testosterone (T) concentrations. We describe here the first phase of our studies, in which we determined whether gonadotropin release was also altered, whether this change was responsible for the low T levels, and whether elevated corticosterone participated in the decreased activity of the HPG axis.AIA is induced by the intramuscular injection ofMycobacterium butyricum (MBB) into the tail base of the rat, with swelling of the limbs occurring 11-12 days later. We observed significant decreases in LH and FSH secretion of castrated AIA male rats, suggesting that altered gonadotropin output was independent of the gonads. The absence of significant alterations in GnRH gene expression in the hypothalamus of AIA rats, as well as only modest declines in pituitary responsiveness to GnRH, indicate that these mechanisms are not primarily responsible for the blunted gonadotropin concentrations. Intact AIA rats exhibited a dramatic decline in T levels, but no concimitant rise in LH concentrations. The observation that gonadotropin secretion does not increase despite significantly reduced T levels suggests the presence of an unidentified defect within the GnRH neuronal circuitry that prevents the gonadotrophs to respond to decreased steroid feedback. Testicular responsiveness to hCG was significantly blunted in AIA rats, and this decrease was not reversed by acute

  14. Serum testosterone levels in males are not associated with entrepreneurial behavior in two independent observational studies.

    PubMed

    van der Loos, Matthijs J H M; Haring, Robin; Rietveld, Cornelius A; Baumeister, Sebastian E; Groenen, Patrick J F; Hofman, Albert; de Jong, Frank H; Koellinger, Philipp D; Kohlmann, Thomas; Nauck, Matthias A; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André G; van Rooij, Frank J A; Wallaschofski, Henri; Thurik, A Roy

    2013-07-01

    Previous research has suggested a positive association between testosterone (T) and entrepreneurial behavior in males. However, this evidence was found in a study with a small sample size and has not been replicated. In the present study, we aimed to verify this association using two large, independent, population-based samples of males. We tested the association of T with entrepreneurial behavior, operationalized as self-employment, using data from the Rotterdam Study (N=587) and the Study of Health in Pomerania (N=1697). Total testosterone (TT) and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) were measured in the serum. Free testosterone (FT), non-SHBG-bound T (non-SHBG-T), and the TT/SHBG ratio were calculated and used as measures of bioactive serum T, in addition to TT adjusted for SHBG. Using logistic regression models, we found no significant associations between any of the serum T measures and self-employment in either of the samples. To our knowledge, this is the first large-scale study on the relationship between serum T and entrepreneurial behavior. PMID:23770427

  15. Levels of progesterone, testosterone, and estradiol, and androstenedione metabolism in the gonads of Lytechinus variegatus (Echinodermata:echinoidea).

    PubMed

    Wasson, K M; Gower, B A; Hines, G A; Watts, S A

    2000-06-01

    Levels of progesterone (P4), testosterone (T) and estradiol (E2) indicated significant variation among individual echinoids during the annual cycle, reflecting generally the variation in gamete development that can be observed among individuals. Testosterone and E2 levels in both the ovaries and testes were higher during the period of gonadal growth. Levels of all steroids were greatly reduced compared to those levels reported for asteroids. Differences in the levels of P4, T, and estrogens between asteroids and Lytechinus variegatus may be related to differences in gonad morphology and nutrient storage capacity between asteroids and echinoids. It was hypothesized that the low levels of steroids detected in L. variegatus reflect paracrine-like mechanisms in cell signaling as compared to endocrine-like mechanisms proposed to be involved in regulating gonad function in asteroids. Both the ovaries and testes of L. variegatus had the capacity to synthesize T and a variety of 5alpha-reduced androgens including 5alpha-androstane-3beta,17beta-diol and 5alpha-androstane-3alpha,17beta-diol (5alpha-adiols) from androstenedione (AD) in 8 h. Estrogen synthesis was not detected. The sex-specific pattern of accumulation of 5alpha-adiols in the ovaries and testes suggests that the 5alpha-adiols may affect processes related to reproduction in L. variegatus. PMID:11050687

  16. Testosterone and the metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Muraleedharan, Vakkat; Jones, T. Hugh

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome and testosterone deficiency in men are closely Linked. Epidemiological studies have shown that Low testosterone Levels are associated with obesity, insulin resistance and an adverse Lipid profile in men. Conversely in men with metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes have a high prevalence of hypogonadism. Metabolic syndrome and Low testosterone status are both independently associated with increased all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. Observational and experimental data suggest that physiological replacement of testosterone produces improvement in insulin resistance, obesity, dyslipidae-mia and sexual dysfunction along with improved quality of Life. However, there are no Long-term interventional studies to assess the effect of testosterone replacement on mortality in men with Low testosterone Levels. This article reviews the observational and interventional clinical data in relation to testosterone and metabolic syndrome. PMID:23148165

  17. The interaction of serum testosterone levels and androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism on the risk of erectile dysfunction in aging Taiwanese men.

    PubMed

    Liu, C C; Lee, Y C; Tsai, V F S; Cheng, K H; Wu, W J; Bao, B Y; Huang, C N; Yeh, H C; Tsai, C C; Wang, C J; Huang, S P

    2015-09-01

    Testosterone has been found to play important roles in men's sexual function. However, the effects of testosterone can be modulated by androgen receptor (AR) CAG repeat polymorphism. It could also contribute to the risk of erectile dysfunction (ED). The aim of this study is to evaluate the interaction of serum testosterone levels and AR CAG repeat polymorphism on the risk of ED in aging Taiwanese men. This cross-sectional data of Taiwanese men older than 40 years were collected from a free health screening held between August 2010 and August 2011 in Kaohsiung city, Taiwan. All participants completed a health questionnaires included five-item version of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) and the International Prostate Symptoms Score, received a detailed physical examination and provided 20 cm3 whole blood samples for biochemical and genetic evaluation. The IIEF-5 was used to evaluate ED. Serum albumin, total testosterone (TT), and sex hormone-binding globulin levels were measured. Free testosterone level was calculated. AR gene CAG repeat polymorphism was determined by direct sequencing. Finally, 478 men with the mean age of 55.7 ± 4.8 years were included. When TT levels were above 330 ng/dL, the effect of testosterone level on erectile function seemed to reach a plateau and a significantly negative correlation between AR CAG repeat length and the score of IIEF-5 was found (r = -0.119, p = 0.034). After adjusting for other covariates, the longer AR CAG repeat length was still an independent risk factor for ED in subjects with TT above 330 ng/dL (p = 0.006), but not in TT of 330 ng/dL or below. In conclusion, both serum testosterone levels and AR CAG repeat polymorphism can influence erectile function concomitantly. In subjects with normal TT concentration, those with longer AR CAG repeat lengths have a higher risk of developing ED.

  18. Is there a relationship between the performance in a chronometric mental-rotations test and salivary testosterone and estradiol levels in children aged 9-14 years?

    PubMed

    Quaiser-Pohl, Claudia; Jansen, Petra; Lehmann, Jennifer; Kudielka, Brigitte M

    2016-01-01

    The consistent gender differences favoring males in some spatial abilities like mental rotation have raised the question of whether testosterone or other gonadal hormones contribute to these differences--especially because such gender differences seem to appear mainly from the age of puberty on. Studies generally suggest that spatial ability is facilitated by moderately high testosterone levels (i.e., levels that are relatively high for females and relatively low for males). However, the role of sex steroids for mental-rotation performance of (pre-) pubertal children has not been the focus of research, yet. In our study, the relationships between different aspects of mental-rotation performance (accuracy, reaction time, rotation speed) and salivary testosterone and estradiol levels were investigated. Subjects were 109 children (51 boys and 58 girls) aged between 9 and 14 years (M = 11.41, SD = 1.74). They performed a chronometric mental-rotations test, in which the stimuli consisted of three-dimensional drawings of Shepard and Metzler cube figures. In addition, saliva samples were gathered for the analysis of free testosterone and estradiol levels. Results showed a significant gender difference in reaction time and rotational speed in favor of boys, and a significant age, but no gender difference in testosterone and estradiol levels. We found no significant relationships between hormonal levels and any measure of mental-rotation performance.

  19. Calorie restriction at increasing levels leads to augmented concentrations of corticosterone and decreasing concentrations of testosterone in rats.

    PubMed

    Levay, Elizabeth A; Tammer, Amanda H; Penman, Jim; Kent, Stephen; Paolini, Antonio G

    2010-05-01

    The influence of calorie restriction (CR) on increasing life span, enhancing immunocompetence, and reducing the incidence of age-related diseases is well established. Evidence points to the involvement of neuroendocrine alterations in these beneficial effects. Accordingly, we hypothesized that CR will result in significant alterations to the hormones investigated. Little attention has been directed toward ascertaining the doses of CR required to obtain such alterations and, indeed, whether a dose-response exists. Adult rats were subjected to 1 of 5 dietary regimens: control, CR12.5%, CR25%, CR37.5%, or CR50%. Rats were decapitated 3 weeks following the onset of restriction; and trunk blood was collected and assayed for concentrations of serum adrenocorticotropic hormone, corticosterone, and testosterone, as well as plasma concentrations of noradrenalin and adrenalin. No effect was found as a result of dietary manipulation for serum concentrations of adrenocorticotropic hormone. However, all doses of CR resulted in increased serum corticosterone in a dose-response trend. A dose-response was also observed for serum testosterone, with higher doses of CR associated with lower testosterone. Concentrations of noradrenalin were not found to be altered by any CR dose, although a trend toward a down-regulation at CR50% was observed. Plasma adrenalin displayed a biphasic distribution with reductions observed at CR25% and CR50%, although the down-regulations only attained statistical significance relative to the CR37.5% and not the control group. As well as reporting the effect of CR on multiple hormones within individual animals, these results go some way in determining the optimal levels of CR needed to induce neuroendocrinologic alterations.

  20. Testosterone and mortality.

    PubMed

    Muraleedharan, Vakkat; Jones, T Hugh

    2014-10-01

    Epidemiological studies have found that men with low or low normal endogenous testosterone are at an increased risk of mortality than those with higher levels. Cardiovascular disease accounts for the greater proportion of deaths in those with low testosterone. Cancer and respiratory deaths in some of the studies are also significantly more prevalent. Disease-specific studies have identified that there are higher mortality rates in men with cardiovascular, respiratory and renal diseases, type 2 diabetes and cancer with low testosterone. Obesity, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and inflammatory disorders are all associated with an increased prevalence of testosterone deficiency. Two major questions that arise from these findings are (1) is testosterone deficiency directly involved in the pathogenesis of these conditions and/or a contributory factor impairing the body's natural defences or is it merely a biomarker of ill health and the severity of underlying disease process? (2) Does testosterone replacement therapy retard disease progression and ultimately enhance the clinical prognosis and survival? This review will discuss the current state of knowledge and discuss whether or not there are any answers to either of these questions. There is convincing evidence that low testosterone is a biomarker for disease severity and mortality. Testosterone deficiency is associated with adverse effects on certain cardiovascular risk factors that when combined could potentially promote atherosclerosis. The issue of whether or not testosterone replacement therapy improves outcomes is controversial. Two retrospective studies in men with diagnosed hypogonadism with or without type 2 diabetes have reported significantly improved survival. PMID:25041142

  1. Effect of methanol extract of Basella alba L. (Basellaceae) on the fecundity and testosterone level in male rats exposed to flutamide in utero.

    PubMed

    Nantia, E A; Manfo, P F T; Beboy, N E; Travert, C; Carreau, S; Monsees, T K; Moundipa, P F

    2012-02-01

    We evaluated the effect of the methanol extract of Basella alba (MEBa) on testosterone level and fecundity/fertility in male rats exposed in utero to flutamide - an androgen receptor antagonist. For this purpose, 1.5- and 2.5 -month-old male rats exposed in utero to flutamide were treated with the MEBa (1 mg kg(-1) ) for 2 and 1 month respectively. Five days before the end of treatment, rats were housed with females to assess their fecundity/fertility. Thereafter, rats were sacrificed and blood collected for the quantification of testosterone. Flutamide-exposed male rats showed a decrease in their ano-genital distance (AGD, P < 0.05) and were infertile. In normal (methylcellulose-exposed) animals, MEBa provoked an increase in testosterone level in 1.5- (P < 0.008) and 2.5 -month-old rats (P < 0.01) concomitantly with the improvement in their fecundity by 25%. In flutamide-exposed male rats, MEBa increased testosterone level in 1.5 -month-old rats (P < 0.001) without any effect on their fecundity; while in 2.5- month-old rats, MEBa did not affect the testosterone level but improved fecundity (by 25%) and fertility (P < 0.001). This study demonstrated the positive effect of MEBa to enhance fecundity/fertility in normal male rats and in rats exposed to the antiandrogen flutamide during their foetal life.

  2. Low Serum Testosterone Levels Are Associated with Elevated Urinary Mandelic Acid, and Strontium Levels in Adult Men According to the US 2011–2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Héroux, Paul; Zhang, Qunwei; Jiang, Zhao-Yan; Gu, Aihua

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known regarding the effects of environmental exposure of chemicals on androgenic system in the general population. We studied 5,107 subjects included in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2011–2012). Methods Urinary, serum, and blood levels of 15 subclasses comprising 110 individual chemicals were analyzed for their association with serum testosterone levels. The subjects were divided into high and low testosterone groups according to the median testosterone concentration (374.51 ng/dL). Odds ratios (ORs) of individual chemicals in association with testosterone were estimated using logistic regression after adjusting for age, ethnicity, cotinine, body mass index, creatinine, alcohol, and the poverty income ratio. Results Adjusted ORs for the highest versus lowest quartiles of exposure were 2.12 (95% CI: 1.07, 4.21; Ptrend = 0.044), 1.84 (95% CI: 1.02, 3.34; Ptrend = 0.018) for the association between urinary mandelic acid, and strontium quartiles with low testosterone concentrations in adult men, respectively. However, no association was observed for the remaining chemicals with testosterone. Conclusions The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data suggest that elevations in urinary mandelic acid, and strontium levels are negatively related to low serum testosterone levels in adult men. PMID:25996772

  3. 1H NMR Metabolomics: A New Molecular Level Tool for Assessment of Organic Contaminant Bioavailability to Earthworms in Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKelvie, J. R.; Wolfe, D. M.; Celejewski, M. A.; Simpson, A. J.; Simpson, M. J.

    2009-05-01

    extractable using cyclodextrin. Hence, while cyclodextrin extraction may serve as a good proxy for microbial bioavailability, our results suggest that it may not serve as a good proxy for earthworm bioavailability. 1H NMR metabolomics therefore offers considerable promise as a novel, molecular-level method to directly monitor earthworm bioavailability of potentially toxic and persistent compounds in the environment.

  4. Diet exposure to technical hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) affects testes and circulating testosterone and thyroxine levels in American kestrels (Falco sparverius).

    PubMed

    Marteinson, Sarah C; Kimmins, Sarah; Letcher, Robert J; Palace, Vince P; Bird, David M; Ritchie, Ian J; Fernie, Kim J

    2011-11-01

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is a high-production-volume, brominated flame-retardant that is used in items such as polystyrene foams. HBCD has been detected in the environment, wildlife tissues and in humans globally with some of the highest recorded levels in predatory birds. This study examined the effects of exposure to environmentally relevant levels of HBCD on the reproductive physiology of captive male American kestrels (Falco sparverius), a predatory bird. Two sets of males were used: one group not housed with females (unpaired: nc=12, nHBCD=10) and the second group housed with females (breeding: nc=10, nHBCD=20). All treatment birds were exposed to 0.51 μg HBCD/g kestrel/day technical HBCD, and controls to safflower oil only, injected into their food during seasonal testicular development. Unpaired males were exposed for 3 weeks and euthanized for testicular analysis. Breeding males were exposed for 3 weeks prior to pairing and throughout the courtship period. The HBCD-exposed unpaired males had heavier testes (p≤0.017) and a trend towards more seminiferous tubules containing elongated spermatids (p=0.052). There was also a moderate increase in plasma testosterone concentrations (p=0.056) compared to controls. In breeding males, testosterone levels increased during courtship to culminate in higher levels than controls by the time the first egg was laid (p=0.010) and circulating free and total T4 was reduced throughout. The number of sperm cells reaching the perivitelline layer of the first egg for breeding males did not differ between the two groups. This study is the first report that HBCD exposure at environmentally relevant levels alters reproductive physiology in male birds and suggests that birds may be more sensitive to HBCD than mammals. PMID:21917248

  5. Testosterone Buccal

    MedlinePlus

    ... removed after 12 hours.You may brush your teeth; use mouthwash; use tobacco products; chew gum; eat; and drink alcoholic or nonalcoholic beverages while you are wearing a testosterone buccal system. ...

  6. Serum inhibin B in healthy pubertal and adolescent boys: relation to age, stage of puberty, and follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, testosterone, and estradiol levels.

    PubMed

    Andersson, A M; Juul, A; Petersen, J H; Müller, J; Groome, N P; Skakkebaek, N E

    1997-12-01

    Inhibin B levels were measured in serum from 400 healthy Danish prepubertal, pubertal, and adolescent males, aged 6-20 yr, in a cross-sectional study using a recently developed immunoassay that is specific for inhibin B, the physiologically important inhibin form in men. In addition, serum levels of FSH, LH, testosterone, and estradiol levels were measured. Serum levels of inhibin B, FSH, LH, testosterone, and estradiol all increased significantly between stages I and II of puberty. From stage II of puberty the inhibin B level was relatively constant, whereas the FSH level continued to increase between stages II and III. From stage III of puberty the FSH level was also relatively constant, although there was a nonsignificant trend of slightly decreased FSH levels at pubertal stage V compared to stage IV. The levels of serum LH, testosterone, and estradiol increased progressively throughout puberty. In prepubertal boys younger than 9 yr, there were no correlation between inhibin B and the other three hormones. In prepubertal boys older than 9 yr, a significant positive correlation was observed between inhibin B and FSH, LH, and testosterone. However, at this pubertal stage, each hormone correlated strongly with age, and when the effect of age was taken into account, only the partial correlation between inhibin B and LH/testosterone remained statistically significant. At stage II of puberty, the positive partial correlation between inhibin B and LH/testosterone was still present. At stage III of puberty, an negative partial correlation between inhibin B and FSH, LH, and estradiol was present, whereas no correlation between inhibin B and testosterone could be observed from stage III onward. The negative correlation between inhibin B and FSH persisted from stage III of puberty onward, whereas the correlation between inhibin B and LH and between inhibin B and estradiol was nonsignificant at stages IV and V of puberty. In conclusion, in boys, serum inhibin B levels

  7. Bioavailability of caesium-137 from chernozem soils with high and low levels of radioactive contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paramonova, Tatiana; Shamshurina, Eugenia; Machaeva, Ekaterina; Belyaev, Vladimir

    2014-05-01

    Bioavailability of Cs-137 in "soil-plant" system of radioactively contaminated terrestrial ecosystems is the most important factor in the understanding of ecological situation. There are many factors affecting the features of Cs-137 biogeochemical cycle: period since an accident, type and intensity of radioactive fallout, general properties of landscape and the specifics of soil and plant covers, etc. In order to evaluate the importance of soil contamination level for the process of Cs-137 translocation from soil to plant the research in forest-steppe areas of Russia with similar natural properties, but contrasting high (Tula region) and low (Kursk region) levels of radioactive Chernobyl fallout (about 25 years after accident) was conducted. Soil cover of both sites is presented by chernozems with bulk density 1.1-1.2 g/cm3, 6-7% humus and neutral pH 6.5-7.2; plant cover under investigation consist of dry and wet meadows with bioproductivity 1.6-2.5 kg/m2 and 85-90% of biomass concentrated underground, that is typical for Russian forest-steppe landscapes. At the same time levels of soil regional contamination with Cs-137 differ by an order - 620-710 Bq/kg (210-250 kBq/m2) in Tula region and 30-55 Bq/kg (10-20 kBq/m2) in Kursk region. At a higher level of soil radioactive contamination specific activity of Cs-137 in vegetation of meadows is noticeably increased (103-160 Bq/kg in Tula region versus 12-14 Bq/kg in Kursk region) with correlation coefficient r 0.87. Increasing of Cs-137 in the underground parts of plants plays a decisive role in this process, while the specific radionuclide's activity in the aboveground parts of different sites is almost invariant (and ubiquitously roots contain 2-5 times more Cs-137 than shoots). The values of transfer factors for Cs-137 (the ratio of the specific Cs-137 activities in the plant tissue and in the soil) at various levels of soil radioactive contamination vary within a relatively narrow range 0.1-0.4, that confirms the

  8. Role of Serum Follicle Stimulating Hormone, Luteinizing Hormone, Testosterone and Prolactin Levels in Azoospermic Male Partner of Subfertile Couple.

    PubMed

    Begum, N; Anwary, S A; Alfazzaman, M; Mahzabin, Z; Nahar, K; Rahman, M M; Mostafa, M A

    2016-04-01

    This cross sectional study was carried out in the Infertility Unit, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU) from January 2011 and June 2013. Eighty one (81) consecutive azoospermic male partner of married couple, aged 20-50 years with at least two years of subfertility and no known endocrinopathy and ejaculatory dysfunction were included in this study to find out their abnormal hormonal pattern. None of them had received any form of treatment within the last 3 months prior to hormonal evaluation. Men with hypertension, recent fever, chemo or radiation exposure were excluded from the study. Eight weeks interval two semen analyses were done in the Andrology Laboratory of above department following standard WHO guideline, 2004. Using standard ELISA technique, serum levels of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone and prolactin were measured/assayed/estimated. The results of this study demonstrated that 40 (49.4%) men had normal endocrine pattern against 51 (50.6%) with endocrinopathy. The former may be related to obstructive azoospermia, which needs further analyses. Both the increased FSH (>11.1mIU/ml) and LH (>7.6mIU/ml) were observed in 25 (30.9%) men, only elevated FSH (>11.1mIU/ml) in 9(11.1%), and only elevated LH (>7.6mIU/ml) in 7(8.6%). Low testosterone level (<270ng/dl) was observed in 11(13.6%), low TSH (<0.4μIU/ml) in 1(1.2%) and low prolactin (<2.5ng/dl) in 5(6.2%).

  9. Seasonal and inter-individual variation in testosterone levels in badgers Meles meles: evidence for the existence of two endocrinological phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Buesching, Christina Dagmar; Heistermann, Michael; Macdonald, David W

    2009-09-01

    Elevated testosterone levels can lower condition and increase parasites. We analysed testosterone in 84 blood samples of wild European badgers Meles meles collected at regular intervals (winter = mating season; spring = end of mating season; summer = minor mating peak; autumn = reproductive quiescence), and related variation to body condition, subcaudal gland secretion, parasite burden, and bite wounding. All males showed elevated levels in winter and low levels in autumn. In neither season did testosterone correlate with fitness-related parameters. However, two different endocrinological phenotypes existed in spring and summer. Whilst some males lowered their testosterone to levels comparable to autumnal quiescence (Type 1), others maintained elevated levels comparable to those during winter (Type 2). In spring and summer high levels were correlated with lower body condition and increased parasite burden, and Type 2 males tended to suffer higher mortality rates than Type 1. No animals older than 6 years adopted phenotype 2, indicating that males either switch phenotypes with age or that Type 2 results in lower life expectancy, evidencing the costs of male reproduction in badgers. PMID:19669151

  10. Seasonal and inter-individual variation in testosterone levels in badgers Meles meles: evidence for the existence of two endocrinological phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Buesching, Christina Dagmar; Heistermann, Michael; Macdonald, David W

    2009-09-01

    Elevated testosterone levels can lower condition and increase parasites. We analysed testosterone in 84 blood samples of wild European badgers Meles meles collected at regular intervals (winter = mating season; spring = end of mating season; summer = minor mating peak; autumn = reproductive quiescence), and related variation to body condition, subcaudal gland secretion, parasite burden, and bite wounding. All males showed elevated levels in winter and low levels in autumn. In neither season did testosterone correlate with fitness-related parameters. However, two different endocrinological phenotypes existed in spring and summer. Whilst some males lowered their testosterone to levels comparable to autumnal quiescence (Type 1), others maintained elevated levels comparable to those during winter (Type 2). In spring and summer high levels were correlated with lower body condition and increased parasite burden, and Type 2 males tended to suffer higher mortality rates than Type 1. No animals older than 6 years adopted phenotype 2, indicating that males either switch phenotypes with age or that Type 2 results in lower life expectancy, evidencing the costs of male reproduction in badgers.

  11. Effect of Khat (Catha edulis) Use on the Bioavailability, Plasma Levels and Antimalarial Activity of Chloroquine

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Faiza H.; Al-Habori, Molhem; Chance, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of khat (Catha edulis) on chloroquine (CQ) bioavailability in healthy Yemeni adults and its effect on CQ plasma levels and parasite clearance among malaria patients. Methods: This study took place between January and April 2007 in Bajil and Sana’a, Yemen. Two CQ doses (600 mg each) were given to 15 healthy males on separate occasions; the first dose was followed by a khat-chewing session (phase one) while controls abstained from khat-chewing for the second (phase two). Additionally, 103 patients with Plasmodium falciparum-induced malaria, including both regular khat chewers (n = 57) and non-khat chewers (n = 46), were treated with CQ (25 mg/kg) over three days. Pharmacokinetic parameters were analysed among both controls and malaria patients. Parasite clearance was also investigated for the latter group. Results: The mean area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) was 2,108.9 versus 2,797.4 ng/hour/mL, mean peak plasma concentration (Cmax) was 415.6 versus 508.7 ng/mL and mean time to reach Cmax was 3.8 versus 3.6 hours for controls in phase one versus phase two, respectively; both AUC and Cmax levels were significantly reduced by khat-chewing (P <0.050). For khat- versus non-khat-chewing malaria patients, mean plasma CQ concentrations were 266.4 ng/mL versus 427.5 ng/mL (P <0.001). Furthermore, CQ was effective in 71.7% and 75.4% of non-khat and khat-chewing malaria patients, respectively (P = 0.823). Conclusion: Khat-chewing was found to significantly reduce plasma CQ levels among healthy volunteers and malaria patients. While receiving CQ treatment, patients should be advised not to chew khat. PMID:27226909

  12. Facial Width-To-Height Ratio (fWHR) Is Not Associated with Adolescent Testosterone Levels

    PubMed Central

    Hodges-Simeon, Carolyn R.; Hanson Sobraske, Katherine N.; Samore, Theodore; Gurven, Michael; Gaulin, Steven J. C.

    2016-01-01

    Facial width-to-height ratio (fWHR) has been proposed as a sexually dimorphic signal in humans that develops under the influence of pubertal testosterone (T); however, no studies have examined the association between fWHR and T during the phase in which facial growth is canalized—adolescence. In a sample of adolescent Tsimane males, we evaluate the relationship between T, known T-derived traits (i.e. strength and voice pitch), and craniofacial measurements. If fWHR variation derives from T’s effect on craniofacial growth during adolescence, several predictions should be supported: 1) fWHR should increase with age as T increases, 2) fWHR should reflect adolescent T (rather than adult T per se), 3) fWHR should exhibit velocity changes during adolescence in parallel with the pubertal spurt in T, 4) fWHR should correlate with T after controlling for age and other potential confounds, and 5) fWHR should show strong associations with other T-derived traits. Only prediction 4 was observed. Additionally, we examined three alternative facial masculinity ratios: facial width/lower face height, cheekbone prominence, and facial width/full face height. In contrast to fWHR, all three alternative measures show a strong age-related trend and are associated with both T and T-dependent traits. Overall, our results question the status of fWHR as a sexually-selected signal of pubertal T and T-linked traits. PMID:27078636

  13. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone pulsatile administration restores luteinizing hormone pulsatility and normal testosterone levels in males with hyperprolactinemia.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, P; Lagoguey, M; Brailly, S; Schaison, G

    1985-02-01

    Hyperprolactinemia in men is frequently associated with hypogonadism. Normalization of serum PRL levels is generally associated with an increase in serum testosterone (T) to normal. To determine the mechanism of the inhibitory effect of hyperprolactinemia on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, we studied the effect of intermittent pulsatile GnRH administration on LH pulsatility and T levels in four men with prolactinomas. All patients had high PRL values (100-3000 ng/ml), low LH (mean +/- SEM, 2.2 +/- 0.1 mIU/ml), and low T values (2.3 +/- 0.3 ng/ml), with no other apparent abnormality of pituitary function. GnRH was administered iv using a pump delivering a bolus dose of 10 micrograms every 90 min for 12 days. No LH pulses were detected before treatment. Pulsatile GnRH administration resulted in a significant increase in basal LH levels (6.7 +/- 0.6 mIU/ml; P less than 0.001) and restored LH pulsatility. In addition, T levels increased significantly to normal values in all patients (7.8 +/- 0.4 ng/ml; P less than 0.001) and were normal or supranormal as long as the pump was in use, although PRL levels remained elevated. These data, therefore, suggest that hyperprolactinemia produces hypogonadism primarily by interfering with pulsatile GnRH release.

  14. The effect of testosterone replacement therapy on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels in men being treated for hypogonadism: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kang, De-Ying; Li, Hong-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone replacement therapy is used for the treatment of age-related male hypogonadism, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a primary screening tool for prostate cancer. The systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to determine the effect of testosterone replacement therapy on PSA levels.Medline, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and Google Scholar databases were searched until February 28, 2014, and inclusion criteria were as follows: randomized controlled trial; intervention group received testosterone/androgen replacement therapy; control group did not receive treatment; and no history of prostate cancer. The primary outcome was change of PSA level between before and after treatment. Secondary outcomes were elevated PSA level after treatment, and the number of patients who developed prostate cancer.After initially identifying 511 articles, 15 studies with a total of 739 patients that received testosterone replacement and 385 controls were included. The duration of treatment ranged from 3 to 12 months. Patients treated with testosterone tended to have higher PSA levels, and thus a greater change than those that received control treatments (difference in means of PSA levels = 0.154, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.069 to 0.238, P < 0.001). The difference in means of PSA levels were significant higher for patients that received testosterone intramuscularly (IM) than controls (difference in means of PSA levels = 0.271, 95% CI 0.117-0.425, P = 0.001). Elevated PSA levels after treatment were similar between patients that received treatment and controls (odds ratio [OR] = 1.02, 95% CI 0.48-2.20, P = 0.953). Only 3 studies provided data with respect to the development of prostate cancer, and rates were similar between those that received treatment and controls.Testosterone replacement therapy does not increase PSA levels in men being treated for hypogonadism, except when it is given IM and even the increase with IM administration is minimal

  15. Changes in the daily rhythm of serum testosterone levels following superior cervical sympathetic ganglionectomy in the cold-exposed rat: the role of the pineal.

    PubMed

    Peschke, E; Peschke, D; Peil, J; Rúzsás, C; Mess, B

    1988-01-01

    The effect superior cervical sympathetic ganglionectomy (Gx) exerted on the daily rhythm of serum testosterone levels was investigated in cold-exposed rats. Rhythmic changes in pineal and pituitary weights were also measured. 1. Exposure to cold (10 degrees C for 72 h) resulted in a significant decrease of serum testosterone level and in an increase of the pineal weight. 2. In neutral ambient temperature (24 degrees C) Gx, 30 d after operation, led to a moderate, statistically insignificant increase of serum testosterone levels and to decreased pineal weights (statistically significant). 3. The reactions provoked by cold exposure were counteracted by Gx. Testosterone levels, as well as the pineal weight, showed no remarkable change in the Gx, cold-exposed animals. 4. These results confirm our assumption that experimental manipulations of the pineal gland can provoke significant changes in the neuroendocrine system only under special loading circumstances, e.g., cold exposure. Sympathetic denervation of the pineal gland counteracts the cold-induced decrease of testosterone levels by counteracting the pineal antigonadotropic activity. 5. The empirical regression curves of the investigated parameters indicate that Gx or cold exposure provide a shift in the upper and lower limits of the daily rhythm. Partly inverted rhythms were also observed. 6. The presented results are discussed in relation to the parallel changes previously described in serum thyroxin, cholesterol, thyrotropin (TSH), and pituitary TSH levels. Thyroidal-gonadal interactions, as well as cold exposure as a stress-generating factor, have been considered in the possible explanation of the data herein reported. PMID:3367268

  16. Testosterone Levels Are Negatively Associated with Childlessness in Males, but Positively Related to Offspring Count in Fathers

    PubMed Central

    Pollet, Thomas V.; Cobey, Kelly D.; van der Meij, Leander

    2013-01-01

    Variation in testosterone (T) is thought to affect the allocation of effort between reproductive and parenting strategies. Here, using a large sample of elderly American men (n = 754) and women (n = 669) we examined the relationship between T and self-reported parenthood, as well as the relationship between T and number of reported children. Results supported previous findings from the literature, showing that fathers had lower T levels than men who report no children. Furthermore, we found that among fathers T levels were positively associated with the number of children a man reports close to the end of his lifespan. Results were maintained when controlling for a number of relevant factors such as time of T sampling, participant age, educational attainment, BMI, marital status and reported number of sex partners. In contrast, T was not associated with either motherhood or the number of children women had, suggesting that, at least in this sample, T does not influence the allocation of effort between reproductive and parenting strategies among women. Findings from this study contribute to the growing body of literature suggesting that, among men, pair bonding and paternal care are associated with lower T levels, while searching and acquiring sex partners is associated with higher T levels. PMID:23573228

  17. Effects of photoperiod, melatonin implants and castration on molting and on plasma thyroxine, testosterone and prolactin levels in the European badger (Meles meles).

    PubMed

    Maurel, D; Coutant, C; Boissin, J

    1989-01-01

    1. The seasonal molt, which lasts six months in the badger, begins in mid-July and ends at the beginning of winter. It occurs under natural long-day conditions, following the seasonal drop in plasma testosterone levels, concomitant with high levels of thyroxine and prolactin. 2. To examine the role of the different factors involved (day length, prolactin, thyroxine, testosterone), different groups of badgers, divided into subgroups of castrated or intact animals, were subjected to the influence of long days (20L: 4D), short days (4L:20D) or the effect of subcutaneous melatonin implants. 3. In all cases, castration resulted in a significantly earlier onset of molting 1-3 months, depending on the group, regardless of the experimental conditions (20L:4D, 4L:20D, melatonin). 4. However, molting started earliest in animals subjected to long days, irrespective of whether they were castrated or intact. 5. In the melatonin-implanted badgers, molting started either early (castrated animals), or late or not at all (intact animals). 6. Lastly, in castrated badgers subjected to experimental photoperiods (short days or long days) or melatonin implants, the period of molting was shortened from 6 months (intact outdoor animals) to 4 months. 7. The advance in shedding was always related to an early drop in testosterone (or an absence of testosterone in the castrated animals) and to a higher or earlier increase in thyroxine levels.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2570666

  18. Fetal Testosterone, Socio-Emotional Engagement and Language Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrant, Brad M.; Mattes, Eugen; Keelan, Jeff A.; Hickey, Martha; Whitehouse, Andrew J. O.

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the relations among fetal testosterone, child socio-emotional engagement and language development in a sample of 467 children (235 boys) from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study. Bioavailable testosterone concentration measured in umbilical cord blood taken at birth was found to be significantly…

  19. Blood testosterone in rats: correlation of the level of individual anxiety and its impairment after "death threat".

    PubMed

    Khonicheva, N M; Livanova, L M; Tsykunov, S G; Osipova, T A; Loriya, M V; Elbakidze, A G; Tikhonov, V P; Airapetyants, M G

    2008-11-01

    Studies of identical groups of male Wistar rats after preliminary selection to give groups including extreme behavioral types with low and high rankings on the anxiety scale showed that blood testosterone concentrations in intact rats (controls) correlated negatively with anxiety ranking, i.e., minimal hormone concentrations (no greater than 5 nM) corresponded to high levels of anxiety - with a predominance of passive defensive behavioral components on testing. Short-term exposure to a "death threat" situation (sight of a boa attacking and eating two individuals from the group of rats) impaired this correlational relationship in a manner comparable to the sequelae of chronic neuroticization by unavoidable pain stimulation. Impairments were manifest as scatter in measures in low-anxiety animals (3-21 nM). This characteristic, reflecting the multitude of adaptive pathways in the population in threat situations, distinguishes this type of action from neuroticization by unavoidable pain stimulation, which leveled out individual differences and decreased the hormone level.

  20. Testosterone Replacement Therapy and Prostate Cancer Incidence

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    While early studies demonstrated a positive association between testosterone and prostate cancer, evidence on the nature of the relationship has evolved with time and newer data. Studies examining links between baseline testosterone levels as well as testosterone therapy and incident prostate cancer, reveal a more complex relationship. Moreover, investigators have reported their initial experiences with supplementing testosterone in men with a history of both treated and untreated prostate cancer. PMID:26770932

  1. Gestational and lactational exposure to bisphenol AF in maternal rats increases testosterone levels in 23-day-old male offspring.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Sheng, Nan; Cui, Ruina; Feng, Yixing; Shao, Bing; Guo, Xuejiang; Zhang, Hongxia; Dai, Jiayin

    2016-11-01

    During prenatal and postnatal development, exposure to environmental chemicals with estrogenic activity, such as bisphenol AF (BPAF), may result in reproductive disorders. Currently, the mechanisms behind such disorders in male offspring induced by gestational and lactational exposure to BPAF remain poorly understood. Here, female rats from gestational day (GD) 3-19 were exposed to 100 mg BPAF/kg/day by oral gavage. On the day of birth (postnatal day (PD) 0), cross-fostering took place between treated and control litters, and cross-fostered mother rats were given BPAF 100 mg/kg/day during the postnatal period (PD 3 to PD 19). HPLC-MS/MS analysis showed that BPAF was transferred via cord blood and lactation, finally bio-accumulating in the offspring testes. Pups exposed to BPAF both prenatally and postnatally showed a significant increase in testis testosterone levels compared with that of the control, while all pups exposed to BPAF showed a significant decrease in testis inhibin B (INHB) levels. Compared with the control, RNA-seq revealed that 279 genes were significantly differentially expressed in the testes of pups exposed to BPAF both prenatally and postnatally, including genes involved in cell differentiation and meiosis. These results indicate that gestational and lactational exposure to BPAF in the mother can impair reproductive function in male offspring. PMID:27567155

  2. Gestational and lactational exposure to bisphenol AF in maternal rats increases testosterone levels in 23-day-old male offspring.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Sheng, Nan; Cui, Ruina; Feng, Yixing; Shao, Bing; Guo, Xuejiang; Zhang, Hongxia; Dai, Jiayin

    2016-11-01

    During prenatal and postnatal development, exposure to environmental chemicals with estrogenic activity, such as bisphenol AF (BPAF), may result in reproductive disorders. Currently, the mechanisms behind such disorders in male offspring induced by gestational and lactational exposure to BPAF remain poorly understood. Here, female rats from gestational day (GD) 3-19 were exposed to 100 mg BPAF/kg/day by oral gavage. On the day of birth (postnatal day (PD) 0), cross-fostering took place between treated and control litters, and cross-fostered mother rats were given BPAF 100 mg/kg/day during the postnatal period (PD 3 to PD 19). HPLC-MS/MS analysis showed that BPAF was transferred via cord blood and lactation, finally bio-accumulating in the offspring testes. Pups exposed to BPAF both prenatally and postnatally showed a significant increase in testis testosterone levels compared with that of the control, while all pups exposed to BPAF showed a significant decrease in testis inhibin B (INHB) levels. Compared with the control, RNA-seq revealed that 279 genes were significantly differentially expressed in the testes of pups exposed to BPAF both prenatally and postnatally, including genes involved in cell differentiation and meiosis. These results indicate that gestational and lactational exposure to BPAF in the mother can impair reproductive function in male offspring.

  3. Testosterone and Men's Marriages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Alan; Dabbs, James M., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Among 4,462 former servicemen surveyed, testosterone levels were positively related to not marrying and marital instability, and negatively related to every aspect of marital quality examined. Findings are analyzed in relation to three sociological theories of marital success based on socioeconomic status (educational attainment, income, and…

  4. Hydroxytyrosol in functional hydroxytyrosol-enriched biscuits is highly bioavailable and decreases oxidised low density lipoprotein levels in humans.

    PubMed

    Mateos, Raquel; Martínez-López, Sara; Baeza Arévalo, Gema; Amigo-Benavent, Miryam; Sarriá, Beatriz; Bravo-Clemente, Laura

    2016-08-15

    Hydroxytyrosol (HT) and its derivatives in olive oil protect low-density lipoproteins (LDL) against oxidation. Biscuits could be a convenient alternative to broaden consumers' choice of HT-rich foods, although the biscuit matrix could affect HT bioavailability. We performed a crossover, randomized, double-blind study to evaluate HT bioavailability in HT-enriched biscuits (HT-B) versus non-enriched biscuits (C-B), and the effects on oxidative postprandial status. On two separate days, 13 subjects consumed 30 g of C-B or HT-B (5.25mg HT) after overnight-fasting. Blood and urine were collected at different intervals and analysed by LC-MS-QToF. After HT-B consumption, plasma metabolites peaked between 0.5 and 1h and were extensively excreted in urine. HT-sulphate and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC)-sulphate were the main metabolites, followed by DOPAC and homovanillic acid (HVA). HT-glucuronide, DOPAC-glucuronide, HVA-glucuronide and HVA-sulphate were also detected. Postprandial oxidised-LDL concentrations decreased with HT-B. HT is a promising functional ingredient and, in biscuits, it is highly bioavailable and lowers postprandial oxidised-LDL levels. PMID:27006237

  5. Yolk testosterone affects growth and promotes individual-level consistency in behavioral lateralization of yellow-legged gull chicks.

    PubMed

    Possenti, Cristina Daniela; Romano, Andrea; Caprioli, Manuela; Rubolini, Diego; Spiezio, Caterina; Saino, Nicola; Parolini, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Behavioral lateralization is common in animals and may be expressed at the individual- and at the population-level. The ontogenetic processes that control lateralization, however, are largely unknown. Well-established sex-dependence in androgen physiology and sex-dependent variation in lateralization have led to the hypothesis that testosterone (T) has organizational effects on lateralization. The effects of T exposure in early life on lateralization can be efficiently investigated by manipulating T levels in the cleidoic eggs of birds, because the embryo is isolated from maternal and sibling physiological interference, but this approach has been adopted very rarely. In the yellow-legged gull (Larus michahellis) we increased yolk T concentration within the physiological limits and tested the effects on the direction of lateralization in two functionally fundamental behaviors (begging for parental care and escape to cover) of molecularly sexed hatchlings. We also speculated that T may intervene in regulating consistency, rather than direction of lateralization, and therefore tested if T affected the 'repeatability' of lateral preference in consecutive behavioral trials. T treatment had no effect on the direction of lateralization, but enhanced the consistency of lateral preference in escape responses. Sex did not predict lateralization. Neither behavior was lateralized at the population-level. We therefore showed for the first time in any species an effect of egg T on consistency in lateralization. The implications of the effect of T for the evolution of trade-offs in maternal allocation of egg hormones, and the evolutionary interpretations of findings from our studies on lateralization among unmanipulated birds are discussed. PMID:26836770

  6. Intramuscular depot formulations of leuprolide acetate suppress testosterone levels below a 20 ng/dL threshold: a retrospective analysis of two Phase III studies

    PubMed Central

    Spitz, Aaron; Gittelman, Marc; Karsh, Lawrence I; Dragnic, Sanja; Soliman, Ahmed M; Lele, Aditya; Gruca, Damian; Norton, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogs is a standard treatment for advanced prostate cancer. GnRH analog therapy can reduce testosterone to “castrate” levels, historically defined as <50 ng/dL. With the advent of newer assays, a lower threshold of <20 ng/dL has recently been proposed. We report the results of a retrospective analysis of two Phase III trials of 4- and 6-month depot microsphere formulations of leuprolide acetate (LA), a GnRH agonist that has previously demonstrated efficacy in testosterone suppression to <50 ng/dL in patients on ADT. This analysis investigates the ability of these LA formulations to suppress to ≤20 ng/dL levels. Methods In two of five AbbVie/Abbott clinical trials of microsphere formulations of LA for ADT, analytic technology permitting testosterone detection as low as 3 ng/dL was used and thus was selected for this analysis. Both trials were open-label, fixed-dose studies in prostate cancer patients, naïve to ADT. Patients received either 30 mg (4-month formulation; n=49) or 45 mg (6-month formulation; n=151) depot injections of LA microspheres. Treatment duration was up to 32 weeks for the 4-month formulation and 48 weeks for the 6-month formulation. The proportion of patients achieving the 20 ng/dL threshold was determined every 4 weeks. Results Pooled analysis showed that 152 of 193 (79%) of patients achieved serum testosterone levels of ≤20 ng/dL at 4 weeks, and sustained the improvement at week 24 (169/189, 89%). Additionally, in the 6-month study, 127/135 (94.1%) patients were suppressed to ≤20 ng/dL at 48 weeks. Conclusion Both 4- and 6-month intramuscular depot formulations of LA achieved and maintained mean serum testosterone levels ≤20 ng/dL in the vast majority of patients as early as 4 weeks following treatment initiation. Additional research on the clinical relevance of this lower testosterone threshold is warranted.

  7. Intramuscular depot formulations of leuprolide acetate suppress testosterone levels below a 20 ng/dL threshold: a retrospective analysis of two Phase III studies

    PubMed Central

    Spitz, Aaron; Gittelman, Marc; Karsh, Lawrence I; Dragnic, Sanja; Soliman, Ahmed M; Lele, Aditya; Gruca, Damian; Norton, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogs is a standard treatment for advanced prostate cancer. GnRH analog therapy can reduce testosterone to “castrate” levels, historically defined as <50 ng/dL. With the advent of newer assays, a lower threshold of <20 ng/dL has recently been proposed. We report the results of a retrospective analysis of two Phase III trials of 4- and 6-month depot microsphere formulations of leuprolide acetate (LA), a GnRH agonist that has previously demonstrated efficacy in testosterone suppression to <50 ng/dL in patients on ADT. This analysis investigates the ability of these LA formulations to suppress to ≤20 ng/dL levels. Methods In two of five AbbVie/Abbott clinical trials of microsphere formulations of LA for ADT, analytic technology permitting testosterone detection as low as 3 ng/dL was used and thus was selected for this analysis. Both trials were open-label, fixed-dose studies in prostate cancer patients, naïve to ADT. Patients received either 30 mg (4-month formulation; n=49) or 45 mg (6-month formulation; n=151) depot injections of LA microspheres. Treatment duration was up to 32 weeks for the 4-month formulation and 48 weeks for the 6-month formulation. The proportion of patients achieving the 20 ng/dL threshold was determined every 4 weeks. Results Pooled analysis showed that 152 of 193 (79%) of patients achieved serum testosterone levels of ≤20 ng/dL at 4 weeks, and sustained the improvement at week 24 (169/189, 89%). Additionally, in the 6-month study, 127/135 (94.1%) patients were suppressed to ≤20 ng/dL at 48 weeks. Conclusion Both 4- and 6-month intramuscular depot formulations of LA achieved and maintained mean serum testosterone levels ≤20 ng/dL in the vast majority of patients as early as 4 weeks following treatment initiation. Additional research on the clinical relevance of this lower testosterone threshold is warranted. PMID:27602344

  8. Former Abusers of Anabolic Androgenic Steroids Exhibit Decreased Testosterone Levels and Hypogonadal Symptoms Years after Cessation: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Selmer, Christian; Østergren, Peter Busch; Pedersen, Karen Boje; Schou, Morten; Gustafsson, Finn; Faber, Jens; Juul, Anders; Kistorp, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Aims Abuse of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) is highly prevalent among male recreational athletes. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of AAS abuse on reproductive hormone levels and symptoms suggestive of hypogonadism in current and former AAS abusers. Methods This study had a cross-sectional case-control design and involved 37 current AAS abusers, 33 former AAS abusers (mean (95%CI) elapsed duration since AAS cessation: 2.5 (1.7; 3.7) years) and 30 healthy control participants. All participants were aged 18–50 years and were involved in recreational strength training. Reproductive hormones (FSH, LH, testosterone, inhibin B and anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH)) were measured using morning blood samples. Symptoms of hypogonadism (depressive symptoms, fatigue, decreased libido and erectile dysfunction) were recorded systematically. Results Former AAS abusers exhibited significantly lower median (25th –75th percentiles) total and free testosterone levels than control participants (total testosterone: 14.4 (11.9–17.7) nmol/l vs. 18.8 (16.6–22.0) nmol/l) (P < 0.01). Overall, 27.2% (13.3; 45.5) of former AAS abusers exhibited plasma total testosterone levels below the lower reference limit (12.1 nmol/l) whereas no control participants exhibited testosterone below this limit (P < 0.01). Gonadotropins were significantly suppressed, and inhibin B and AMH were significantly decreased in current AAS abusers compared with former AAS abusers and control participants (P < 0.01). The group of former AAS abusers had higher proportions of participants with depressive symptoms ((24.2%) (11.1; 42.2)), erectile dysfunction ((27.3%) (13.3; 45.6)) and decreased libido ((40.1%) (23.2; 57.0)) than the other two groups (trend analyses: P < 0.05). Conclusions Former AAS abusers exhibited significantly lower plasma testosterone levels and higher frequencies of symptoms suggestive of hypogonadism than healthy control participants years after AAS cessation

  9. Changes in Men’s Salivary Testosterone and Cortisol Levels, and in Sexual Desire after Smelling Female Axillary and Vulvar Scents

    PubMed Central

    Cerda-Molina, Ana Lilia; Hernández-López, Leonor; de la O, Claudio E.; Chavira-Ramírez, Roberto; Mondragón-Ceballos, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have shown that a woman’s vaginal or axillary odors convey information on her attractivity. Yet, whether such scents induce psychoneuroendocrinological changes in perceivers is still controversial. We studied if smelling axillary and vulvar odors collected in the periovulatory and late luteal phases of young women modify salivary testosterone and cortisol levels, as well as sexual desire in men. Forty-five women and 115 men, all of them college students and unacquainted with each other, participated in the study. Female odors were collected on pads affixed to the axilla and on panty protectors both worn the entire night before experiments. Men provided five saliva samples, a basal one before the smelling procedure, and four more 15, 30, 60, and 75 min after exposure to odors. Immediately after smelling the odor source, men answered a questionnaire rating hedonic qualities of scents, and after providing the last saliva sample they answered questionnaire on sexual desire. We found that periovulatory axillary and vulvar odors increased testosterone and cortisol levels, with vulvar scents producing a more prolonged effect. Luteal axilla odors decreased testosterone and cortisol levels, while luteal vulva odors increased cortisol. Periovulatory axilla and vulva scents accounted for a general increase of interest in sex. These odors were also rated as more pleasant and familiar, while luteal vulvar odors were perceived as intense and unpleasant. PMID:24194730

  10. Effect of smoking on semen quality, FSH, testosterone level, and CAG repeat length in androgen receptor gene of infertile men in an Indian city.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Amrita; Chakraborty, Baidyanath; Mukhopadhay, Dyutiman; Pal, Manisha; Mukherjee, Sanjit; Banerjee, Samir; Chaudhuri, Keya

    2012-10-01

    This study was conducted as part of an epidemiological survey of 126 nonsmokers and 178 smokers, showing primary infertility residing around Kolkata region of Eastern India. Their lifestyle history including smoking habits along with semen and blood were collected. The study examined the association of cigarette smoking with the risk of infertility, by determining the semen quality, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone levels, and androgen receptor (AR)-CAG repeat length in a group of smokers compared with a control group (non smokers). Based on conventional WHO criteria, lower sperm motility (P < 0.001) and increased sperm morphological defects (P < 0.0001) were associated with smoking habits. Binary logistic regression analysis for the effect of smoking status on sperm DNA integrity demonstrated significant positive correlation (p = 0.006). Serum FSH and LH levels were higher for smokers compared with non-smokers while the testosterone level decreased significantly with the increasing smoking habit. The mean length of CAG repeats in AR gene was significantly higher for smokers with low testosterone compared to non-smokers. The study suggested that smoking is associated with altered semen quality, endocrine hormonal status, and number of CAG repeats in the AR gene.

  11. Serum Estradiol and Testosterone Levels in Kidney Stones Disease with and without Calcium Oxalate Components in Naturally Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Lili; Duan, Xiaolu; Zeng, Guohua

    2013-01-01

    Objective Epidemiological data reveal that the overall risk for kidney stones disease is lower for women compared to age-matched men. However, the beneficial effect for the female sex is lost upon menopause, a time corresponding to the onset of fall in estrogen levels. The aim of this study was to describe the serum estradiol (E2) and testosterone (T) characteristics of naturally postmenopausal women with kidney stones. Methods 113 naturally postmenopausal women with newly diagnosed kidney stones (aged 57.4±4.98 years) and 84 age frequency matched stone-free controls (56.9±4.56 years) were validly recruited in the case-control study. The odds ratios (ORs) for the associations between sex hormones and kidney stones were estimated with logistic regression models, adjusting for demographic data and medical history. Patients were also stratified analyzed according to stone components (calcium oxalate stones [COS]; non-calcium oxalate stones [NCOS]). Results Serum E2 (21.1 vs. 31.1 pg/ml) was significantly lower in kidney stones patients compared to controls. Post-hoc analysis demonstrated that this effect was driven by COS patients (p<0.001). According to tertiles of the E2 levels, a significant higher frequency of COS was seen in the lowest E2 group (p <0.001). Multiple logistic regression analysis identified E2 level as a strong factor that was independently associated with the risk for COS (per 1 SD increase, OR=0.951, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.919-0.985; highest: lowest tertile, OR=0.214, 95%CI = 0.069-0.665). However, serum T levels did not significantly differ among the groups. Conclusions Naturally postmenopausal women with higher remaining estradiol levels appear less likely to suffer from kidney calcium oxalate stones. However, no correlation was found between serum T level and kidney stones. These findings support the hypothesis that higher postmenopausal endogenous estrogens may protect against kidney stones with ageing. PMID:24086550

  12. Testosterone and disinhibited personality in healthy males.

    PubMed

    Aluja, Anton; García, Luis F; García, Óscar; Blanco, Eduardo

    2016-10-01

    The relationship among testosterone (T), free testosterone (FT), bioavailable testosterone (BT) and personality were studied in a sample of 105 healthy males (26.71±9.68years old). The possible effects of age and other hormones, such as luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), and albumin (ALB) were controlled. Personality was assessed by the novelty seeking scale of Cloninger's Temperament-Character Inventory (TCI), and a reduced version of the Zuckerman-Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire (ZKPQ). Main results show that there is a weak association among three measures of testosterone with novelty seeking, sociability and, to a lesser extent, with impulsive sensation seeking. Our data, as expected, confirmed previous results and also suggest that these relationships are strongly affected by the age variable. LH, FSH and SHBG hormones play no role in the reported relationships. PMID:27291990

  13. The effect of combined oral contraception on testosterone levels in healthy women: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Y.; Eijkemans, M.J.C.; Coelingh Bennink, H.J.T.; Blankenstein, M.A.; Fauser, B.C.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Combined oral contraceptives (COCs) reduce levels of androgen, especially testosterone (T), by inhibiting ovarian and adrenal androgen synthesis and by increasing levels of sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG). Although this suppressive effect has been investigated by numerous studies over many years, to our knowledge no systematic review concerning this issue had been performed. This systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the effect of COCs on concentrations of total T, free T and SHBG in healthy women and to evaluate differences between the various types of COCs (e.g. estrogen dose, type of progestin) and the assays used to assess total T and free T. METHODS A review of the literature was performed using database searches (MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Central Register of Clinical Trials) and all publications (from inception date until July 2012) investigating the effect of COCs on androgen levels in healthy women were considered eligible for selection. Three reviewers were involved in study selection, data extraction and critical appraisal. For the meta-analysis, data on total T, free T and SHBG were extracted and combined using random effects analysis. Additional subgroup analyses were performed to evaluate differences between the various types of COCs (e.g. estrogen dose, type of progestin) and the assays used to assess total T or free T. RESULTS A total of 151 records were identified by systematic review and 42 studies with a total of 1495 healthy young women (age range: 18–40 years) were included in the meta-analysis. All included studies were experimental studies and 21 were non-comparative. Pooling of the results derived from all the included papers showed that total T levels significantly decreased during COC use [mean difference (MD) (95% confidence interval, CI) −0.49 nmol/l (−0.55, −0.42); P < 0.001]. Significantly lower levels of free T were also found [relative change (95% CI) 0.39 (0.35, 0.43); P < 0

  14. Controversies in testosterone replacement therapy: testosterone and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Kathleen; Miner, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The role of testosterone in the cardiovascular (CV) health of men is controversial. Data suggest that both the condition and treatment of clinical hypogonadism is associated with decreased CV mortality; however, two recent studies suggest that hypogonadal subjects treated with testosterone replacement therapy have a higher incidence of new CV events. There has been increased media attention concerning the risk of CV disease in men treated with testosterone. Until date, there are no long-term prospective studies to determine safety. Literature spanning over the past 30 years has suggested that not only is there a possible increased CV risk in men with low levels of testosterone, but the benefits from testosterone therapy may even lower this risk. We review here the recent studies that have garnered such intense scrutiny. This article is intended as a thorough review of testosterone levels and CV risk, providing the clinician with the facts needed to make informed clinical decisions in managing patients with clinical hypogonadism. PMID:25652628

  15. [Level of prolactin, gonadotrophin, testosterone, and alpha fetoprotein in serum of blood donors with antibodies to hepatitis c virus (anti-HCV)].

    PubMed

    Rzeszowska, G; Jagiełło-Wójtowicz, E; Krawczuk, G; Baran, E; Bielec, D; Fijałka-Rymar, M; Surmaczyńska, B

    1993-01-01

    The study was aimed at the determination of serum levels of the investigated hormones (prolactin, gonadotrophins, testosterone and alpha-fetoprotein) in blood donors with antibodies to hepatitis C virus. The observed group consisted of 50 men of age between 22 and 47 years. The blood serum concentrations of hormones were determined by RIA method using the ready made reagent kits. No characteristic changes were observed in the serum hormones levels except for prolactin. Mean value of serum prolactin concentration was higher in blood donors than those in the control group. PMID:7688903

  16. Testosterone Concentrations and Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy in Men with Type 1 Diabetes in the Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications Study (EDIC)

    PubMed Central

    M.P.H., Catherine Kim M.D.; Pop-Busui, Rodica; Ph.D., M.D.; Ph.D., Barbara Braffett; Cleary M.S., Patricia A.; Ph.D., Ionut Bebu; M.D., Hunter Wessells; Orchard, Trevor; M.Med.Sci., M.D.; Sarma, Aruna V.; Group, Ph.D.for the DCCT/EDIC Research

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Previous studies have reported that lower testosterone concentrations are associated with cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN), a risk factor for cardiovascular events. However, no studies have examined this relationship in men with type 1 diabetes, who are at high risk for CAN. Aim To examine the associations between testosterone concentrations and measures of CAN in a large, well-characterized cohort of men with type 1 diabetes. Methods We conducted an analysis of men in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT), a randomized trial of intensive glucose control, and its observational follow-up the Epidemiology of Diabetes Intervention and Complications (EDIC) Study. Testosterone was measured by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry in stored samples from EDIC follow-up years 10 and 17. Regression models were used to assess the cross-sectional relationships between testosterone and CAN measures. Main Outcome Measures The main CAN measure from EDIC follow-up year 17 was a standardized composite of R-R variation with paced breathing < 15, or R-R variation 15-20 combined with either a Valsalva ratio ≤ 1.5 or a decrease in diastolic blood pressure > 10 mm Hg upon standing. Continuous R-R variation and Valsalva ratio were secondary outcome measures. Results Lower total and bioavailable testosterone concentrations at follow-up years 10 and 17 were not associated with the presence of CAN at year 17. In analyses using Valsalva ratio as a continuous measure, higher total (p=0.01) and bioavailable testosterone concentrations (p=0.005) were associated with a higher (more favorable) Valsalva ratio after adjustment for covariates including age, body mass index, smoking status, hypertension, and glycemic control. Conclusions Testosterone levels are not associated with CAN among men with type 1 diabetes. Although testosterone is associated with a higher Valsalva ratio, a more favorable indicator, the clinical significance of this association is not

  17. The effect of boron supplementation on lean body mass, plasma testosterone levels, and strength in male bodybuilders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrando, A. A.; Green, N. R.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of boron supplementation was investigated in 19 male bodybuilders ages 20-27 years. Ten were given a 2.5-mg boron supplement while 9 were given a placebo every day for 7 weeks. Plasma total and free testosterone, plasma boron, lean body mass, and strength measurements were determined on Days 1 and 49 of the study. Plasma boron values were significantly (p < 0.05) different as the experimental group increased from (+/- SD) 20.1 +/- 7.7 ppb pretest to 32.6 +/- 27.6 ppb posttest, while the control group mean decreased from 15.1 +/- 14.4 ppb pretest to 6.3 +/- 5.5 ppb posttest. Analysis of variance indicated no significant effect of boron supplementation on any of the dependent variables. Both groups demonstrated significant increases in total testosterone, lean body mass, 1-RM squat, and 1-RM bench press. The findings suggest that 7 weeks of bodybuilding can increase total testosterone, lean body mass, and strength in lesser trained bodybuilders, and that boron supplementation had no effect on these measures.

  18. Variation in levels of serum inhibin B, testosterone, estradiol, luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and sex hormone-binding globulin in monthly samples from healthy men during a 17-month period: possible effects of seasons.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Anna-Maria; Carlsen, Elisabeth; Petersen, Jørgen Holm; Skakkebaek, Niels Erik

    2003-02-01

    To obtain information on the scale of the intraindividual variation in testicular hormone, blood samples for inhibin B determination were collected monthly in 27 healthy male volunteers during a 17-month period. In addition, the traditional reproductive hormones FSH, LH, testosterone, estradiol, and SHBG were measured. The intraindividual variation in inhibin B over the study period was, on the average, 10%, corresponding to the assay variation of the inhibin B assay, indicating that most of the observed day to day variation in inhibin B levels in men could be explained by assay variation. A seasonal variation was observed in LH and testosterone levels, but not in the levels of the other hormones. The seasonal variation in testosterone levels could be explained by the variation in LH levels. The seasonal variation in LH levels seemed to be related to the mean air temperature during the month before blood sampling, but not to the length of daylight or the hours of sunshine. In conclusion, our data showed that day to day levels of inhibin B are relatively constant in men and do not seem to be influenced by seasonal factors. In contrast, we found a seasonal variation in LH and testosterone levels in men. The peak levels of both LH and testosterone were observed during June-July, with minimum levels present during winter-early spring. Air temperature, rather than light exposure, seems to be a possible climatic variable explaining the seasonal variation in LH levels.

  19. Association between Free Testosterone Levels and Anal Human Papillomavirus Types 16/18 Infections in a Cohort of Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Hilary K.; Brown, Todd T.; Li, Xiuhong; Young, Stephen; Cranston, Ross D.; D’Souza, Gypsyamber; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Seaberg, Eric C.; Margolick, Joseph B.; Jenkins, Frank J.; Moran, Matthew G.; Chua, Kristofer; Bolan, Robert K.; Detels, Roger; Wiley, Dorothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 cause invasive cervical cancer and most invasive anal cancers (IACs). Overall, IAC rates are highest among men who have sex with men (MSM), especially MSM with HIV infection. Testosterone is prescribed for men showing hypogonadism and HIV-related wasting. While there are direct and indirect physiological effects of testosterone in males, its role in anal HPV16/18 infections in men is unknown. Methods Free testosterone (FT) was measured in serum from 340 Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) participants who were tested for anal HPV16/18-DNA approximately 36 months later. The effect of log10-transformed current FT level on anal HPV16/18 prevalence was modeled using Poisson regression with robust error variance. Multivariate models controlled for other HPV types, cumulative years of exogenous testosterone use, race, age, lifetime number of receptive anal intercourse partnerships, body mass index, tobacco smoking, HIV-infection and CD4+ T-cell counts among HIV-infected, and blood draw timing. Results Participants were, on average, 60 (+5.4) years of age, White (86%), and HIV-uninfected (56%); Twenty-four percent tested positive for anal HPV16 and/or 18-DNA (HPV16 prevalence=17.1%, HPV18=9.1%). In adjusted analysis, each half-log10 increase of FT was associated with a 1.9-fold (95% Confidence Interval: 1.11, 3.24) higher HPV16/18 prevalence. Additionally, other Group 1 high-risk HPVs were associated with a 1.56-fold (1.03, 2.37) higher HPV16/18 prevalence. Traditional risk factors for HPV16/18 infection (age, tobacco smoking; lifetime number of sexual partners, including the number of receptive anal intercourse partnerships within 24 months preceding HPV testing) were poorly correlated with one another and not statistically significantly associated with higher prevalence of HPV16/18 infection in unadjusted and adjusted analyses. Conclusions Higher free testosterone was associated with increased HPV16/18 prevalence

  20. Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate inhibits testosterone level through disturbed hypothalamic-pituitary-testis axis and ERK-mediated 5α-Reductase 2.

    PubMed

    Ha, Mei; Guan, Xie; Wei, Li; Li, Peng; Yang, Min; Liu, Changjiang

    2016-09-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) has reproductive toxicity and can affect male reproductive development. In order to clarify adverse effects of DEHP on testicular physiology and testosterone production, Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were dosed daily with DEHP by gavage for 30days; TM3 cells (mouse Leydig cell line) were treated with DEHP for 24h after pretreatment with vitamin C or U0126. Results indicated that the hypothalamic-pituitary-testis (HPT) axis was disturbed and serum testosterone, LH and FSH levels were decreased following DEHP exposure. Histomorphological changes of rat testes were also observed, such as deformed seminiferous tubules, aggregated chromatin, multiple vacuoles, swollen mitochondria, apoptotic germ cells and Sertoli cells, as well as increased Leydig cell numbers. Moreover, DEHP caused oxidative stress in vivo and in vitro and then induced the ERK pathway, which was required to mediate 5α-Reductase 2 and scavenger receptor class B-1 (SRB1) levels. However, levels of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD), 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD), P450 17α-hydroxylase/17.20 lyase (P450c17), and P450 side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc) were not significantly altered after DEHP exposure. Taken together, DEHP-disturbed HPT axis and induced 5α-Reductase 2 contribute to the reduction of serum testosterone level. The activated ERK pathway is required to modulate expressions of 5α-Reductase 2 and SRB1. PMID:27155079

  1. Is testosterone influencing explosive performance?

    PubMed

    Cardinale, Marco; Stone, Michael H

    2006-02-01

    The primary objective of this study was to analyze the relationship between testosterone levels and vertical jumping performance in elite men and women athletes. The secondary objective was to verify whether testosterone levels and vertical jumping performance were different in men and women athletes and if those measurements were different between different athletic groups. Seventy (22 women and 48 men) elite athletes in track and field (sprinters), handball, volleyball, and soccer competing at national and international levels participated in the study. After 10 hours of fasting and 1 day of rest, blood samples were drawn from the antecubital vein for determining testosterone levels. Vertical jumping tests consisted of countermovement jumps conducted on a resistive platform connected to a digital timer. Resting testosterone levels in women were 9.5% of those of the men (respectively 0.62 +/- 0.06 ng.ml(-1) and 6.49 +/- 0.37 ng.ml(-1); p < 0.001). Countermovement jump performance was significantly different between women and men athletes, with women's jumping ability 86.3% of that of men (p < 0.001). A significant positive relationship was identified between testosterone levels and vertical jump performance when all data where considered (r = 0.61, p < 0.001, n = 70).

  2. Controversies in testosterone supplementation therapy.

    PubMed

    Khera, Mohit

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone has now become one of the most widely used medications throughout the world. The rapid growth of the testosterone market in the past 10 years is due to many factors. We currently have a worldwide aging population. In the US, the number of men 65 years old or older is increasing 2-3 times faster than the number of men younger than 65 years. In addition, poor general health and certain medical conditions such as diabetes/metabolic syndrome (MetS), cardiovascular disease (CVD), and osteoporosis have been associated with low serum testosterone levels. [1],[2],[3] There are now fewer concerns regarding the development of prostate cancer (PCa) after testosterone therapy, making it a more attractive treatment option. Finally, the introduction of different forms of testosterone supplementation therapy (TST) with increased promotion, marketing, and direct-to-consumer advertising is also driving market growth. As the demand for TST continues to grow, it is becoming more important for clinicians to understand how to diagnose and treat patients with low testosterone. PMID:25652639

  3. Testosterone regulates bone response to inflammation.

    PubMed

    Steffens, J P; Herrera, B S; Coimbra, L S; Stephens, D N; Rossa, C; Spolidorio, L C; Kantarci, A; Van Dyke, T E

    2014-03-01

    This study evaluated the alveolar bone response to testosterone and the impact of Resolvin D2 (RvD2) on testosterone-induced osteoblast function. For the in vivo characterization, 60 male adult rats were used. Treatments established sub-physiologic (L), normal (N), or supra-physiologic (H) concentrations of testosterone. Forty rats were subjected to orchiectomy; 20 rats received periodical testosterone injections while 20 rats received testicular sham-operation. Four weeks after the surgeries, 10 rats in each group received a subgingival ligature around the lower first molars to induce experimental periodontal inflammation and bone loss. In parallel, osteoblasts were differentiated from neonatal mice calvariae and treated with various doses of testosterone for 48 h. Cell lysates and conditioned media were used for the determination of alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, RANKL, and osteoprotegerin. Micro-computed tomography linear analysis demonstrated that bone loss was significantly increased for both L and H groups compared to animals with normal levels of testosterone. Gingival IL-1β expression was increased in the L group (p<0.05). Ten nM testosterone significantly decreased osteocalcin, RANKL, and OPG levels in osteoblasts; 100 nM significantly increased the RANKL:OPG ratio. RvD2 partially reversed the impact of 10 nM testosterone on osteocalcin, RANKL, and OPG. These findings suggest that both L and H testosterone levels increase inflammatory bone loss in male rats. While low testosterone predominantly increases the inflammatory response, high testosterone promotes a higher osteoblast-derived RANKL:OPG ratio. The proresolving mediator RvD2 ameliorates testosterone-derived downregulation of osteocalcin, RANKL, and OPG in primary murine osteoblasts suggesting a direct role of inflammation in osteoblast function.

  4. Effect of aqueous and hydro-alcoholic extracts of lettuce (Lactuca sativa) seed on testosterone level and spermatogenesis in NMRI mice

    PubMed Central

    Ahangarpour, Akram; Oroojan, Ali Akbar; Radan, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Background: One of the considerable uses of lettuce (Lactuca sativa) seed in traditional medicine has been to reduce semen, sperm and sexuality. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of aqueous and hydro-alcoholic extracts of lettuce seed on testosterone level and spermatogenesis. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study 24 adult male NMRI mice weighing 20-25gr were purchased. Animals were randomly divided into 4 groups: controls, hydro-alcoholic (200 mg/kg) and aqueous extracts (50, 100mg/kg). The extracts were injected intraperitoneally once a day for 10 consecutive days. 2 weeks after the last injection, the mice were anaesthetized by ether and after laparatomy blood was collected from the heart to determine testosterone by ELISA assay kit. Then testis and cauda epididymis of all animals were removed for analyzing testis morphology and sperm count and viability. Results: Testis weight in hydro-alcoholic and aqueous extracts 100 mg/kg (p=0.001) and aqueous extract 50 mg/kg (p=0.008) groups was increased. Sperm viability in hydro-alcoholic (p=0.001) and aqueous extracts 50 (p=0.026), 100 mg/kg (p=0.045) groups was decreased, Also the results showed a significant decrease in sperm count in hydro-alcoholic (p=0.035) and aqueous extracts 50 mg/kg (p=0.006) groups in comparison with control group. Also there was a significant increase in serum level of testosterone in aqueous extract 50 mg/kg group in comparison with control (p=0.002) hydro-alcoholic (p=0.001) and aqueous extracts 100 mg/kg (p=0.003) groups. Conclusion: Present results demonstrated that hydro-alcoholic and aqueous 50 mg/kg extracts of lettuce seed have antispermatogenic effects, also aqueous extract 50 mg/kg increased serum level of testosterone in mice. Therefore we can suggest that lettuce seed could be a potential contraceptive agent. This article extracted from M.Sc. student research project. (Ali Akbar Oroojan) PMID:24799863

  5. [Effects of castration and testosterone-replacement on hypothalamic and plasma luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone levels in the aged male rat].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z J; Ren, H M; Hu, H T; Ling, F D

    1992-06-01

    Hypothalamic and plasma luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) levels following orchidectomy (ORDX) and testosterone (T)-replacement were compared between young (2-3 months old) and aged (24-26 months old) male rats by radioimmunoassay. Plasma T level and hypothalamic LHRH content are markedly decreased in the aged rat as compared to those of the young rat, whereas plasma LHRH levels are similar in the two groups. Following ORDX and ORDX plus T-replacement, plasma T levels in both groups are about the same, whereas the rates of variation of hypothalamic and plasma LHRH levels in the aged rat are significantly lower than those in the young rat. These results suggest that the negative feedback mechanism of the hypothalamic LHRHergic system is impaired in the aged rat, which may be one of the important reasons causing age-dependent deterioration of the functional control of hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis.

  6. Effects of dutasteride on lower urinary tract symptoms: a prospective analysis based on changes in testosterone/dihydrotestosterone levels and total prostatic volume reduction.

    PubMed

    Shigehara, Kazuyoshi; Miyagi, Tohru; Nakashima, Takao; Izumi, Koji; Kitagawa, Yasuhide; Mizokami, Atsushi; Koh, Eitetsu; Shimamura, Masayoshi; Namiki, Mikio

    2016-06-01

    This study analyzed the effects of dutasteride on lower urinary tract symptoms based on the association between changes in the total testosterone (TT)/dihydrotestosterone (DHT) levels and total prostate volume (TPV) reduction. Sixty participants diagnosed with benign prostatic hyperplasia were given 0.5 mg of dutasteride daily for 52 weeks. Measures of TT and DHT levels, TPV and uroflowmetry were obtained before and after dutasteride treatment. Forty-three patients demonstrated a TPV reduction of ≥5% (Group 1), whereas the remaining 17 patients demonstrated a TPV reduction of <5% (Group 2). DHT suppression and DHT/TT ratio at baseline were significantly higher in Group 1 than Group 2. International Prostate Symptom Scores (IPSS) and uroflowmetry were significantly improved in both groups. In Group 2, nine patients demonstrated some improvement in IPSS (Group 2A), whereas eight did not (Group 2B). The rate of TT increase and improvement in voiding symptoms were significantly higher in Group 2A than Group 2B. Dutasteride-induced TPV reduction is dependent on individual 5-α reductase inhibitor activity. Some patients demonstrating smaller dutasteride-induced TPV reduction may experience an improvement in voiding symptoms owing to an increased level of testosterone. PMID:26890877

  7. Variation in fecal testosterone levels, inter-male aggression, dominance rank and age during mating and post-mating periods in wild adult male ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta).

    PubMed

    Gould, L; Ziegler, T E

    2007-12-01

    In primate species exhibiting seasonal reproduction, patterns of testosterone excretion in adult males are variable: in some species, peaks correlate with female receptivity periods and heightened male-male aggression over access to estrous females, in others, neither heightened aggression nor marked elevations in testosterone have been noted. In this study, we examined mean fecal testosterone ( f T) levels and intermale aggression in wild adult male ring-tailed lemurs residing in three groups at Beza Mahafaly Reserve, Madagascar. Results obtained from mating and post-mating season 2003 were compared to test Wingfield et al. [1990. Am Nat 136:829-846] "challenge hypothesis", which predicts a strong positive relationship between male testosterone levels and male-male competition for access to receptive females during breeding season. f T levels and rates of intermale aggression were significantly higher during mating season compared to the post-mating period. Mean f T levels and aggression rates were also higher in the first half of the mating season compared with the second half. Number of males in a group affected rates of intermale agonism, but not mean f T levels. The highest-ranking males in two of the groups exhibited higher mean f T levels than did lower-ranking males, and young males exhibited lower f T levels compared to prime-aged and old males. In the post-mating period, mean male f T levels did not differ between groups, nor were there rank or age effects. Thus, although male testosterone levels rose in relation to mating and heightened male-male aggression, f T levels fell to baseline breeding levels shortly after the early mating period, and to baseline non-breeding levels immediately after mating season had ended, offsetting the high cost of maintaining both high testosterone and high levels of male-male aggression in the early breeding period. PMID:17427976

  8. Testosterone and mood in aging men.

    PubMed

    Seidman, Stuart N; Weiser, Mark

    2013-03-01

    Age-associated hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis hypofunction, or partial androgen deficiency of the aging male, is thought to be responsible for various age-associated conditions such as reduced muscle and bone mass, mobility limitations, frailty, obesity, sleep apnea, cognitive impairment, sexual dysfunction, and depression. It has been difficult to establish consistent correlations between these symptoms and plasma testosterone levels in middle-aged men, but testosterone replacement does lead to improved muscle strength, bone density, and sexual function. This article focuses on the relationship between testosterone and mood in older men, and the treatment of age-related depression with exogenous testosterone.

  9. Assessing bioavailability levels of metals in effluent-affected rivers: effect of Fe(III) and chelating agents on the distribution of metal speciation.

    PubMed

    Han, Shuping; Naito, Wataru; Masunaga, Shigeki

    2016-01-01

    To assess the effects of Fe(III) and anthropogenic ligands on the bioavailability of Ni, Cu, Zn, and Pb, concentrations of bioavailable metals were measured by the DGT (diffusive gradients in thin films) method in some urban rivers, and were compared with concentrations calculated by a chemical equilibrium model (WHAM 7.0). Assuming that dissolved Fe(III) (<0.45 μm membrane filtered) was in equilibrium with colloidal iron oxide, the WHAM 7.0 model estimated that bioavailable concentrations of Ni, Cu, and Zn were slightly higher than the corresponding values estimated assuming that dissolved Fe(III) was absent. In contrast, lower levels of free Pb were predicted by the WHAM 7.0 model when dissolved Fe(III) was included. Estimates showed that most of the dissolved Pb was present as colloidal iron-Pb complex. Ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) concentrations at sampling sites were predicted from the relationship between EDTA and the calculated bioavailable concentration of Zn. When both colloidal iron and predicted EDTA concentrations were included in the WHAM 7.0 calculations, dissolved metals showed a strong tendency to form EDTA complexes, in the order Ni > Cu > Zn > Pb. With the inclusion of EDTA, bioavailable concentrations of Ni, Cu, and Zn predicted by WHAM 7.0 were different from those predicted considering only humic substances and colloidal iron. PMID:27533864

  10. Herbal modulation of drug bioavailability: enhancement of rifampicin levels in plasma by herbal products and a flavonoid glycoside derived from Cuminum cyminum.

    PubMed

    Sachin, B S; Sharma, S C; Sethi, S; Tasduq, S A; Tikoo, M K; Tikoo, A K; Satti, N K; Gupta, B D; Suri, K A; Johri, R K; Qazi, G N

    2007-02-01

    The bioavailability of rifampicin (RIF) in a fixed dose combination (FDC) used for the treatment of tuberculosis remains an area of clinical concern and several pharmaceutical alternatives are being explored to overcome this problem. The present study presents a pharmacological approach in which the bioavailability of a drug may be modulated by utilizing the herb-drug synergism. The pharmacokinetic interaction of some herbal products and a pure molecule isolated from Cuminum cyminum with RIF is shown in this paper. An aqueous extract derived from cumin seeds produced a significant enhancement of RIF levels in rat plasma. This activity was found to be due to a flavonoid glycoside, 3',5-dihydroxyflavone 7-O-beta-D-galacturonide 4'-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (CC-I). CC-I enhanced the Cmax by 35% and AUC by 53% of RIF. The altered bioavailability profile of RIF could be attributed to a permeation enhancing effect of this glycoside.

  11. Testosterone and depression in aging men.

    PubMed

    Seidman, S N; Walsh, B T

    1999-01-01

    In men, testosterone secretion affects neurobehavioral functions such as sexual arousal, aggression, emotional tone, and cognition. Beginning at approximately age 50, men secrete progressively lower amounts of testosterone; about 20% of men over age 60 have lower-than-normal levels. The psychiatric sequelae are poorly understood, yet there is evidence of an association with depressive symptoms. The authors reviewed 1) the physiology of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and its changes with age in men; and 2) the evidence linking testosterone level and major depression in men. Data on this relationship are derived from two types of studies: observational studies comparing testosterone levels and secretory patterns in depressed and non-depressed men, and treatment studies using exogenous androgens for male depression. The data suggest that some depressed older men may have state-dependent low testosterone levels and that some depressed men may improve with androgen treatment.

  12. Folate bioavailability.

    PubMed

    McNulty, Helene; Pentieva, Kristina

    2004-11-01

    The achievement of optimal folate status to prevent neural-tube defects, and possibly other diseases, is hindered by the well-recognised incomplete bioavailability of the natural folates found in foods compared with the synthetic vitamin, folic acid. Folate bioavailability from different foods is considered to be dependent on a number of factors, including the food matrix, the intestinal deconjugation of polyglutamyl folates, the instability of certain labile folates during digestion and the presence of certain dietary constituents that may enhance folate stability during digestion. There is conflicting evidence as to whether the extent of conjugation of polyglutamyl folate (in the absence of specific inhibitors of deconjugation in certain foods) is a limiting factor in folate bioavailability. Estimates of the extent of lower bioavailability of food folates compared with folic acid (relative bioavailability) show great variation, ranging anywhere between 10 and 98%, depending on the methodological approach used. The lack of accurate data on folate bioavailability from natural food sources is of particular concern in those countries in which there is no mandatory folic acid fortification, and therefore a greater reliance on natural food folates as a means to optimise status. Apart from the incomplete bioavailability of food folates, the poor stability of folates in foods (particularly green vegetables) under typical conditions of cooking can substantially reduce the amount of vitamin ingested and thereby be an additional factor limiting the ability of food folates to enhance folate status. A recent workshop convened by the Food Standards Agency concluded that gaining a better understanding of folate bioavailability in representative human diets is a high priority for future research.

  13. Low Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin Levels Associate with Prediabetes in Chinese Men Independent of Total Testosterone

    PubMed Central

    Han, Bing; Li, Qin; Chen, Yi; Zhu, Chunfang; Chen, Yingchao; Xia, Fangzhen; Cang, Zhen; Lu, Meng; Chen, Chi; Lin, Dongping; Lu, Yingli

    2016-01-01

    Objective The association ns between prediabetes and androgens have been rarely reported, especially in Chinese men. We aimed to investigate whether androgens were associated with the prevalence of prediabetes diagnosed with new American Diabetes Association criteria in Chinese men and then to assess which androgen value was the most relevant factor. Methods A total of 2654 men (52.6±13.4 years old) were selected. Serum total testosterone (TT), sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and free testosterone (FT) were measured. Covariance analysis of different androgen values were performed in age subgroups. Multinomial logistic regression was used for the association of TT, SHBG and FT with prediabetes and diabetes, as well as prediabetes in age subgroups. Results According to ADA new criteria, normoglycemia, prediabetes, and diabetes were diagnosed in 1405, 907 and 342 men, respectively. In covariance analysis, SHBG of prediabetes were found lower than that of normoglycemia but higher than that of diabetes (P <0.05). In multinomial logistic regression, serum TT and SHBG were inversely associated with prediabetes and diabetes. While, after full adjustment for age, residence area, economic status, waist circumference, metabolic factors, other two androgen values and HOMA-IR, only the associations of SHBG with prevalence of prediabetes and diabetes persisted statistically significant, especially in the elderly with prediabetes (all P for trend <0.05). Conclusions Serum androgen was inversely associated with prediabetes and diabetes in Chinese men. Low serum SHBG was the most relevant factor for prediabetes and diabetes. Whether it is an independent predictor for incident prediabetes in Chinese men needs further explorations. PMID:27583401

  14. Testosterone and benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, Thomas R; Chughtai, Bilal; Kaplan, Steven A

    2015-01-01

    The use of testosterone to treat the symptoms of late-onset hypogonadal men has increased recently due to patient and physician awareness. However, concerns regarding the effect of testosterone on the prostate, in particular any possible effect on the risk of prostate cancer have prompted further research in this regard. Surprisingly, numerous retrospective or small, randomized trials have pointed to a possible improvement in male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in patients treated with testosterone. The exact mechanism of this improvement is still debated but may have a close relationship to metabolic syndrome. For the clinician, the results of these studies are promising but do not constitute high levels of evidence. A thorough clinical examination (including history, examination and laboratory testing of testosterone) should be undertaken before considering the diagnosis of late-onset hypogonadism or instigating treatment for it. Warnings still remain on the testosterone supplement product labels regarding the risk of urinary retention and worsening LUTS, and these should be explained to patients. PMID:25337845

  15. [Testosterone deficiency, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Miró, Mercè; Chillarón, Juan J; Pedro-Botet, Juan

    2016-01-15

    Testosterone deficiency in adult age is associated with a decrease in libido, energy, hematocrit, muscle mass and bone mineral density, as well as with depression. More recently, testosterone deficiency has also been associated with various components of the metabolic syndrome, which in turn is associated with a five-fold increase in the risk of cardiovascular disease. Low testosterone levels are associated with increased insulin resistance, increase in fat mass, low HDL cholesterol, higher triglyceride levels and hypertension. Testosterone replacement therapy in patients with testosterone deficiency and type 2 diabetes mellitus and/or metabolic syndrome has shown reductions in insulin resistance, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglycerides and improvement in glycemic control and anthropometric parameters. PMID:26433309

  16. Serum Testosterone Kinetics After Brachytherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Lief, Jonathan H.; Allen, Zachariah A.; Wallner, Kent E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate temporal changes in testosterone after prostate brachytherapy and investigate the potential impact of these changes on response to treatment. Methods and Materials: Between January 2008 and March 2009, 221 consecutive patients underwent Pd-103 brachytherapy without androgen deprivation for clinically localized prostate cancer. Prebrachytherapy prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and serum testosterone were obtained for each patient. Repeat levels were obtained 3 months after brachytherapy and at least every 6 months thereafter. Multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters were evaluated to determine an association with temporal testosterone changes. In addition, analysis was conducted to determine if there was an association between testosterone changes and treatment outcomes or the occurrence of a PSA spike. Results: There was no significant difference in serum testosterone over time after implant (p = 0.57). 29% of men experienced an increase {>=}25%, 23% of men experienced a decrease {>=}25%, and the remaining 48% of men had no notable change in testosterone over time. There was no difference in testosterone trends between men who received external beam radiotherapy and those who did not (p = 0.12). On multivariate analysis, preimplant testosterone was the only variable that consistently predicted for changes in testosterone over time. Men with higher than average testosterone tended to experience drop in testosterone (p < 0.001), whereas men with average or below average baseline testosterone had no significant change. There was no association between men who experienced PSA spike and testosterone temporal trends (p = 0.50) nor between initial PSA response and testosterone trends (p = 0.21). Conclusion: Prostate brachytherapy does not appear to impact serum testosterone over time. Changes in serum testosterone do not appear to be associated with PSA spike phenomena nor with initial PSA response to treatment; therefore, PSA response

  17. What is the impact of low testosterone levels on the anatomical and behavioral repertoire of long-term enriched housing of male mice?

    PubMed

    Lima, F B; Spinelli de Oliveira, E

    2014-10-01

    Environmental enrichment is a strategy to improve animal welfare, providing brain plasticity with changes at cellular, molecular and behavioral levels. In order to test the long-term effects of enriched housing and the importance of testosterone levels for the expression of behavioral plasticity, 28 categories were assessed in 45 adult Swiss mice, subdivided in prepubertal castrated and non-castrated groups, maintained for seven months as three non-sibling mates. Enrichment consisted of introducing insets for gnawing, climbing and hiding. Tests of spontaneous exploration (barrier), territoriality (intruder) and hierarchical organization (group) were applied at once. Measurements of body weight and the relative weight of key organs were done at the end of the experiment. Mice kept in enriched cages, either castrated or non-castrated, showed more spontaneous exploration than those raised in standard cages. Non-castrated mice housed in structured cages had a lower frequency of attack in the resident-intruder test than the non-castrated standard caged mice, indicating a decrease in territoriality in the first group. Independent of the housing conditions, castrated mice showed reduction of offensive, defensive, and social contacts, as well as low frequency of attack in both agonistic tests. The well-known importance of testes to ensure the expression of aggressive and social contact behaviors was therefore not challenged by the enrichment condition. Behavioral repertoire at the home cage, performance in the group-test, and organometric measurements were not significantly different between the groups kept in enriched and non-enriched cages. Our results suggest that the experience in enriched environment does not increase aggressiveness in their routine in the home-cage nor negatively influence physiological parameters, independently of the testosterone level.

  18. Puberty and testosterone shape the corticospinal tract during male adolescence.

    PubMed

    Pangelinan, Melissa M; Leonard, Gabriel; Perron, Michel; Pike, G Bruce; Richer, Louis; Veillette, Suzanne; Pausova, Zdenka; Paus, Tomáš

    2016-03-01

    Some of the known sex differences in white matter emerge during adolescence. Here, we replicate and extend our previous findings of sex differences in the structure of the corticospinal tract (Perrin et al. 2009; Hervé et al. 2009). In a large normative sample of adolescents, we observed age × sex interactions in the signal intensity of T1-weighted (T1W) images (n = 941) and in magnetization transfer ratio (MTR; n = 761); both features were inversely associated with age in males but not in females. Moreover, we hypothesized that the age-related differences in CST structure exhibited by males would be mediated by differences in puberty stage and levels of bioavailable testosterone. We confirmed this prediction using mediation analysis with bootstrapping. These findings suggest that sex differences in the CST structure observed during male adolescence may be due to multiple processes associated with puberty, including (but not limited to) the rising levels of testosterone.

  19. Review of health risks of low testosterone and testosterone administration

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Huanguang; Sullivan, Charles T; McCoy, Sean C; Yarrow, Joshua F; Morrow, Matthew; Borst, Stephen E

    2015-01-01

    Hypogonadism is prevalent in older men and testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) for older hypogonadal men is a promising therapy. However, a number of important clinical concerns over TRT safety remain unsolved due to a lack of large-scale randomized clinical trials directly comparing the health risks of untreated hypogonadism vs long-term use of TRT. Meta-analyses of clinical trials of TRT as of 2010 have identified three major adverse events resulting from TRT: polycythemia, an increase in prostate-related events, and a slight reduction in serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. There are other purported health risks but their incidence can be neither confirmed nor denied based on the small number of subjects that have been studied to date. Furthermore, subsequent literature is equivocal with regard to the safety and utility of TRT and this topic has been subject to contentious debate. Since January 2014, the United States Food and Drug Administration has released two official announcements regarding the safety of TRT and clinical monitoring the risks in TRT users. Additionally, the health risks related to the clinical presentation of low or declining testosterone levels not been resolved in the current literature. Because TRT is prescribed in the context of putative risks resulting from reduced testosterone levels, we reviewed the epidemiology and reported risks of low testosterone levels. We also highlight the current information about TRT utilization, the risks most often claimed to be associated with TRT, and current or emerging alternatives to TRT. PMID:25879005

  20. Circulating LH, FSH, prolactin, testosterone, delta 4-androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and cortisol levels in the fetus in late gestation and in newborn male and female lambs.

    PubMed

    Savoie, S; Bourel, B; Hamel, R; Buithieu, M; Jéquier, J C; Bertrand, J; Saez, J M; Collu, R; Ducharme, J R

    1981-01-01

    Gonadotropins, prolactin (PRL), testosterone (T), delta 4-androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and cortisol (F) levels were determined from 14 days before birth to term in 3 female and 3 male ovine fetuses with a chronically implanted venous catheter, and in the same animals from birth to 72 h of age. In both sexes, plasma gonadotropins and androgens were low throughout the period of study while plasma F increased with gestational age. After birth, plasma gonadotropins and PRL tended to increase progressively with time while PRL concentrations were significantly higher in female than in male lambs. F and T concentrations decreased significantly within the first 12 and 6 h of postnatal life. Higher T values were again observed at 36 h in male lambs. These data indicate that the fetal hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis is relatively quiescent in the last 14 days of gestation but is activated within the first 72 h after birth.

  1. Experiment K-6-16. Morphological examination of rat testes. The effect of Cosmos 1887 flight on spermatogonial population and testosterone level in rat testes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philpott, D. E.; Kato, K.; Stevenson, J.; Vasques, M.; Sapp, W.; Williams, C.; Popova, I. A.; Serova, L. V.

    1990-01-01

    Testes from rats flown on Cosmos 1887 for twelve and a half days were compared to basal control, synchronous control and vivarium maintained rats. When the mean weights of flight testes, normalized for weight/100 gms, were compared to the vivarium controls they were 6.7 percent lighter. Although the flight testes were lighter than the synchronous, the difference is not significant. Counts of spermatogonial cells from 5 animals in each group revealed a 4 percent decrease in flight compared to vivarium controls. In both cases the t-Test significance was less than 0.02. The serum testosterone levels of all animals (flight, synchronous and vivarium) were significantly below the basal controls.

  2. Oral testosterone undecanoate (Andriol) supplement therapy improves the quality of life for men with testosterone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Park, N C; Yan, B Q; Chung, J M; Lee, K M

    2003-06-01

    In a single-blind, placebo-controlled study, the effects of a 3-month oral administration of 160 mg/day testosterone undecanoate (Andriol) on the quality of life of men with testosterone deficiency were evaluated. The subjects included ten men with primary hypogonadism and 29 with andropause with sexual dysfunction as the most common problem. The changes in subjective symptoms were evaluated by the PNUH QoL scoring system and the St. Louis University Questionnaire for androgen deficiency in aging males (ADAM). Digital rectal examination (DRE) was performed and serum testosterone, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and liver profile were monitored. Testosterone undecanoate treatment (n = 33) significantly improved sexual dysfunction and symptom scores of metabolic, cardiopulmonary, musculoskeletal and gastrointestinal functions compared to baseline and to placebo (n = 6). ADAM score also significantly improved after 3 months of treatment. Serum testosterone was significantly increased compared to pretreatment levels only in the testosterone undecanoate group. In the placebo group, no significant changes compared to baseline were found for testosterone levels and QoL questionnaires. No abnormal findings were detected on DRE or laboratory findings in either group. Adverse events, such as gastrointestinal problems and fatigue, were mild and self-limiting. It is concluded that androgen supplement therapy with oral testosterone undecanoate (Andriol) restores the quality of life through improvement of general body functions in men with testosterone deficiency. PMID:12898792

  3. Testosterone ethosomes for enhanced transdermal delivery.

    PubMed

    Ainbinder, Denize; Touitou, Elka

    2005-01-01

    Physiological decrease in testosterone levels in men with age causes various changes with clinical significance. Recent testosterone replacement therapy is based mainly on transdermal nonpatch delivery systems. These products have the drawback of application on extremely large areas to achieve required hormone blood levels. The objective of the present study was to design and test a testosterone nonpatch formulation using ethosomes for enhanced transdermal absorption. The ethosomal formulation was characterized by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering for structure and size distribution and by ultracentrifugation for entrapment capacity. To evaluate the feasibility of this delivery system to enhance testosterone permeation through the skin, first the systemic absorption in rats was compared with a currently used gel (AndroGel). Further, theoretical estimation of testosterone blood concentration following ethosomal application in men was made. For this purpose, in vitro permeation experiments through human skin were performed to establish testosterone skin permeation values. In the design of these experiments, testosterone solubility in various solutions was measured and the effect of the receiver medium on the skin barrier function was assessed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Theoretical estimation shows that testosterone human plasma concentration value in the upper part of the physiological range could be achieved by application of the ethosomal formulation on an area of 40 cm(2). This area is about 10 times smaller than required with current nonpatch formulations. Our work shows that the ethosomal formulation could enhance testosterone systemic absorption and also be used for designing new products that could solve the weaknesses of the current testosterone replacement therapies.

  4. Clinical Effect of Switching from a Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone Agonist to an Antagonist in Patients with Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer and Serum Testosterone Level ≥ 20 ng/dl

    PubMed Central

    Soga, Norihito; Kageyama, Takumi; Ogura, Yuji; Yamada, Tomomi; Hayashi, Norio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The efficacy of conversion from a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist to an antagonist was evaluated prospectively in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer. Materials and Methods From October 2012 to December 2014, 8 cases with a serum testosterone level ≥ 20 ng/dl during following androgen deprivation therapy were enrolled and received degarelix monthly. The primary end-pointgoal was to determine the effective prostate-specific antigen response rate. The secondary end-pointgoal was to assess the proportion of cases with a decrease in serum testosterone level to < 20 ng/ml. Results One patient achieved a complete response, with a prostate-specific antigen level of 0.02 ng/ml at the nadirend of the study. The effective response rate was 25.0% (2/8), and the proportion of cases with prostate-specific antigen decline was 62.5% (5/8). In 5/8 cases (5/8, 62.5%), serum testosterone levels declined to < 20 ng/dl. Conclusion Switching to a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone antagonist in patients with testosterone levels ≥ 20 ng/dl may be an option in sequential androgen deprivation therapy for some patients. PMID:26989369

  5. Testosterone and Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Kloner, Robert A; Carson, Culley; Dobs, Adrian; Kopecky, Stephen; Mohler, Emile R

    2016-02-01

    Testosterone (T) is the principal male sex hormone. As men age, T levels typically fall. Symptoms of low T include decreased libido, vasomotor instability, and decreased bone mineral density. Other symptoms may include depression, fatigue, erectile dysfunction, and reduced muscle strength/mass. Epidemiology studies show that low levels of T are associated with more atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, and cardiovascular events. However, treating hypogonadism in the aging male has resulted in discrepant results in regard to its effect on cardiovascular events. Emerging studies suggest that T may have a future role in treating heart failure, angina, and myocardial ischemia. A large, prospective, long-term study of T replacement, with a primary endpoint of a composite of adverse cardiovascular events including myocardial infarction, stroke, and/or cardiovascular death, is needed. The Food and Drug Administration recently put additional restrictions on T replacement therapy labeling and called for additional studies to determine its cardiac safety. PMID:26846952

  6. Low-level laser therapy to recovery testicular degeneration in rams: effects on seminal characteristics, scrotal temperature, plasma testosterone concentration, and testes histopathology.

    PubMed

    Alves, Maíra Bianchi Rodrigues; de Arruda, Rubens Paes; Batissaco, Leonardo; Florez-Rodriguez, Shirley Andrea; de Oliveira, Bruna Marcele Martins; Torres, Mariana Andrade; Ravagnani, Gisele Mouro; Lançoni, Renata; de Almeida, Tamie Guibu; Storillo, Vanessa Martins; Vellone, Vinicius Silva; Franci, Celso Rodrigues; Thomé, Helder Esteves; Canella, Carolina Luz; De Andrade, André Furugen Cesar; Celeghini, Eneiva Carla Carvalho

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficiency of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) to recovery testicular degeneration in rams. In the first study, rams were induced to testicular degeneration by scrotal insulation, and then, they were treated using LLLT at 28 J/cm(2) (INS28) or 56 J/cm(2) (INS56) energy densities. Sperm kinetics, morphology, and membranes integrity as well as proportion of lumen area in seminiferous tubule were assessed. In the second study, rams were submitted or not to scrotal insulation and treated or not by the best protocol of LLLT defined by experiment 1 (INS28). In this study were evaluated sperm kinetics, morphology, membranes integrity, ROS production, and DNA integrity. Testosterone serum concentration and proportion of lumen area in seminiferous tubule were also analyzed. Insulation was effective in promoting sperm injuries in both experiments. Biostimulatory effect was observed in experiment 1: INS28 presented smaller proportion of lumen area (P = 0.0001) and less degeneration degree (P = 0.0002). However, in experiment 2, there was no difference between the groups (P = 0.17). In addition, LLLT did not improve sperm quality, and there was a decreasing for total and progressive motility (P = 0.02) and integrity of sperm membranes (P = 0.01) in LLLT-treated groups. Moreover, testosterone concentration was not improved by LLLT (P = 0.37). Stimulation of aerobic phosphorylation by LLLT may have led to a deregulated increase in ROS leading to sperm damages. Thus, LLLT at energy of 28 J/cm(2) (808 nm of wavelength and 30 mW of power output) can induce sperm damages and increase the quantity of cells in seminiferous tubule in rams. PMID:26914685

  7. Contemporary perspective and management of testosterone deficiency: Modifiable factors and variable management.

    PubMed

    Hisasue, Shin-ichi

    2015-12-01

    Testosterone deficiency can occur in males of all ages. In adult males, it is induced by endogenous testosterone decline through aging and other modifiable factors. Recent publications suggested the importance of the magnitude of longitudinal decline of testosterone from baseline. The baseline level and the longitudinal decline have individual variability influenced by individual factors including digit ratio, CAG repeat of the androgen receptor and sirtuin activity. Regarding treatment for testosterone deficiency, testosterone replacement therapy is the gold standard for the management of testosterone-deficient patients, and it improves three domains of testosterone deficiency symptoms, such as the physical, psychological and sexual domain. Recent reports suggested the importance of modifiable factors in the testosterone decline in addition to aging. Therefore, it might be responsible for the prevention of testosterone deficiency symptoms to maintain testosterone secretion taking account of the modifiable factors. The present article reviews the literature, and introduces contemporary perspectives and management of testosterone deficiency.

  8. Testosterone supplementation: what and how to give.

    PubMed

    Jockenhövel, F

    2003-09-01

    Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated a gradual decrease of serum testosterone with aging in men. A considerable number of men will experience hypogonadal androgen levels, defined by the normal range for young men. Thus, in addition to the long-standing use of androgen replacement therapy in the classical forms of primary and secondary hypogonadism, age-associated testosterone deficiency has led to considerable developments in application modes for testosterone. Since oral preparations of testosterone are ineffective, due to the first-pass effect of the liver, or, in case of 17 alpha-alkylation, cause hepatotoxicity, intramuscular injection of long-acting esters, such as testosterone enanthate, have been the mainstay of testosterone therapy. However, the large fluctuations of serum testosterone levels cause unsatisfactory shifts of mood and sexual function in some men; combined with the frequent injections, this delivery mode is thus far from being ideal. In contrast, the transdermal testosterone patches are characterized by favorable pharmacokinetic behavior and have proven to be an effective mode of delivery. Safety data over 10 years indicate no negative effect on the prostate. Nevertheless, the scrotal testosterone patch system is hampered by the application site, which is not easily accepted by many subjects; the non-scrotal patch has a high rate of skin irritations. In view of the drawbacks of the currently available preparations, the most recent developments in testosterone supplementation appear to be highly promising agents. Androgen, which has been available in the United States since mid-2000, will be introduced this year in most European markets as Testogel, a hydroalcoholic gel containing 1% testosterone. Doses of 50-100 mg gel applied once daily on the skin deliver sufficient amounts of testosterone to restore normal hormonal values and to correct the signs and symptoms of hypogonadism. The gel has shown to be very effective and successful

  9. BIOAVAILABILITY: SCIENCE AND ACCEPTANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reducing risk from elevated levels of soil Pb involves removal, covering, or dilution by mixing with uncontaminated soil. Understanding that soil lead bioavailability is related to metal speciation and that in situ remediation techniques can alter metal speciation EPA's Na...

  10. Testosterone and cardiovascular disease in men

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Paul D; Channer, Kevin S

    2012-01-01

    Despite regional variations in the prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD), men are consistently more at risk of developing and dying from CAD than women, and the gender-specific effects of sex hormones are implicated in this inequality. This ‘Perspectives' article reviews the current evidence regarding the cardiovascular effects of testosterone in men including an examination of the age-related decline in testosterone, the relationship between testosterone levels and coronary disease, coronary risk factors and mortality. We also review the vaso-active effects of testosterone, and discuss how these have been used in men with heart failure and angina. We discuss the ‘cause' versus ‘effect' controversy, regarding low testosterone levels in men with coronary heart disease, as well as concerns over the use of testosterone replacement therapy in middle aged and elderly men. The article concludes with a discussion regarding the future direction for work in this interesting area, including the relative merits of screening for, and treating hypogonadism with testosterone replacement therapy in men with heart disease. PMID:22522504

  11. Testosterone and Aggressive Behavior in Man

    PubMed Central

    Batrinos, Menelaos L.

    2012-01-01

    Atavistic residues of aggressive behavior prevailing in animal life, determined by testosterone, remain attenuated in man and suppressed through familial and social inhibitions. However, it still manifests itself in various intensities and forms from; thoughts, anger, verbal aggressiveness, competition, dominance behavior, to physical violence. Testosterone plays a significant role in the arousal of these behavioral manifestations in the brain centers involved in aggression and on the development of the muscular system that enables their realization. There is evidence that testosterone levels are higher in individuals with aggressive behavior, such as prisoners who have committed violent crimes. Several field studies have also shown that testosterone levels increase during the aggressive phases of sports games. In more sensitive laboratory paradigms, it has been observed that participant’s testosterone rises in the winners of; competitions, dominance trials or in confrontations with factitious opponents. Aggressive behavior arises in the brain through interplay between subcortical structures in the amygdala and the hypothalamus in which emotions are born and the prefrontal cognitive centers where emotions are perceived and controlled. The action of testosterone on the brain begins in the embryonic stage. Earlier in development at the DNA level, the number of CAG repeats in the androgen receptor gene seems to play a role in the expression of aggressive behavior. Neuroimaging techniques in adult males have shown that testosterone activates the amygdala enhancing its emotional activity and its resistance to prefrontal restraining control. This effect is opposed by the action of cortisol which facilitates prefrontal area cognitive control on impulsive tendencies aroused in the subcortical structures. The degree of impulsivity is regulated by serotonin inhibiting receptors, and with the intervention of this neurotransmitter the major agents of the neuroendocrine

  12. Are testosterone levels and depression risk linked based on partnering and parenting? Evidence from a large population-representative study of U.S. men and women.

    PubMed

    Gettler, Lee T; Oka, Rahul C

    2016-08-01

    Partnered adults tend to have lower risks of depression than do single individuals, while parents are more commonly depressed than non-parents. Low testosterone men, and possibly women, are also at greater risk of depression. A large body of research has shown that partnered parents have lower testosterone than single non-parents in some cultural settings, including the U.S. Here, we drew on a large (n = 2438), U.S.-population representative cohort of reproductive aged adults (age: 38.1 years ± 11.1 SD) to test hypotheses regarding the intersections between partnering and parenting, testosterone, socio-demographic characteristics, and depression outcomes. Men and women's depression prevalence did not vary based on testosterone. Partnered fathers had lower testosterone than single (never married, divorced) non-fathers, but were less commonly depressed than those single non-fathers. Partnered mothers had reduced testosterone compared to never married and partnered non-mothers. Never married mothers had higher depression prevalence and elevated depressive symptomology compared to partnered mothers; these differences were largely accounted for by key health-related covariates (e.g. cigarette smoking, BMI). We found significant three-way-interactions between socioeconomic status (SES), testosterone, and parenting for adults' depression risks. High testosterone, high SES fathers had the lowest prevalence of mild depression, whereas low testosterone, low SES non-fathers had the highest. Compared to other mothers, low SES, low testosterone mothers had elevated prevalence of mild depression. Overall, low SES, high testosterone non-mothers had substantially elevated depression risks compared to other women. We suggest that psychobiological profiles (e.g. a male with low testosterone) can emerge through variable psychosomatic and psychosocial pathways and the net effect of those profiles for depression are influenced by the social (e.g. partnering and parenting status

  13. Are testosterone levels and depression risk linked based on partnering and parenting? Evidence from a large population-representative study of U.S. men and women.

    PubMed

    Gettler, Lee T; Oka, Rahul C

    2016-08-01

    Partnered adults tend to have lower risks of depression than do single individuals, while parents are more commonly depressed than non-parents. Low testosterone men, and possibly women, are also at greater risk of depression. A large body of research has shown that partnered parents have lower testosterone than single non-parents in some cultural settings, including the U.S. Here, we drew on a large (n = 2438), U.S.-population representative cohort of reproductive aged adults (age: 38.1 years ± 11.1 SD) to test hypotheses regarding the intersections between partnering and parenting, testosterone, socio-demographic characteristics, and depression outcomes. Men and women's depression prevalence did not vary based on testosterone. Partnered fathers had lower testosterone than single (never married, divorced) non-fathers, but were less commonly depressed than those single non-fathers. Partnered mothers had reduced testosterone compared to never married and partnered non-mothers. Never married mothers had higher depression prevalence and elevated depressive symptomology compared to partnered mothers; these differences were largely accounted for by key health-related covariates (e.g. cigarette smoking, BMI). We found significant three-way-interactions between socioeconomic status (SES), testosterone, and parenting for adults' depression risks. High testosterone, high SES fathers had the lowest prevalence of mild depression, whereas low testosterone, low SES non-fathers had the highest. Compared to other mothers, low SES, low testosterone mothers had elevated prevalence of mild depression. Overall, low SES, high testosterone non-mothers had substantially elevated depression risks compared to other women. We suggest that psychobiological profiles (e.g. a male with low testosterone) can emerge through variable psychosomatic and psychosocial pathways and the net effect of those profiles for depression are influenced by the social (e.g. partnering and parenting status

  14. Acute effects of unilateral sectioning the superior ovarian nerve of rats with unilateral ovariectomy on ovarian hormones (progesterone, testosterone and estradiol) levels vary during the estrous cycle

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The present study analyzed the participation of the left and right superior ovarian nerves (SON) in regulating progesterone, testosterone, and estradiol serum levels in unilaterally ovariectomized rats on each day of the estrous cycle. For this purpose, ovarian hormone concentrations in serum were measured in animals with either sham-surgery, unilateral ovariectomy (ULO), unilateral sectioning of the SON, or sectioning of the SON innervation of the in situ ovary in rats with ULO. This investigation results show that the right and left ovaries have different capacities to maintain normal hormone levels, that such capacity varies during the estrous cycle, and that it depends on the integrity of the SON innervation. In rats with only one ovary, the effects of ovarian denervation on hormone levels varied according to which ovary remained in situ, the specific hormone, and the day of the estrous cycle when treatment was performed. Present results support the idea that the ovaries send and receive neural information that is processed in the central nervous system and we propose that this information participates in controlling the secretion of gonadotropins related to the regulation of ovarian functions. PMID:21414235

  15. Testosterone and Social Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Alan; Granger, Douglas A.; Mazur, Allan; Kivlighan, Katie T.

    2006-01-01

    Popular perceptions of the effect of testosterone on "manly" behavior are inaccurate. We need to move away from such simplistic notions by treating testosterone as one component along with other physiological, psychological and sociological variables in interactive and reciprocal models of behavior. Several hormones can now be measured in saliva,…

  16. Sub-chronic testosterone treatment increases the levels of epithelial sodium channel (ENaC)-α, β and γ in the kidney of orchidectomized adult male Sprague–Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone has been reported to cause blood pressure to increase. However mechanisms that underlie the effect of this hormone on this physiological parameter are currently not well understood. The aims of this study were to investigate effects of testosterone on expression of α, β and γ-epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) proteins and messenger RNAs (mRNAs) in kidneys, the channel known to be involved in Na+ reabsorption, which subsequently can affect the blood pressure. Methods. Adult male Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats were orchidectomized fourteen days prior to receiving seven days treatment with testosterone propionate (125 µg/kg/day or 250 µg/kg/day) with or without flutamide (androgen receptor blocker) or finasteride (5α-reductase inhibitor). Following sacrifice, the kidneys were removed and were subjected for α, β and γ-ENaC protein and mRNA expression analyses by Western blotting and Real-time PCR (qPCR) respectively. The distribution of α, β and γ-ENaC proteins in kidneys were observed by immunofluorescence. Results. The α, β and γ-ENaC proteins and mRNA levels in kidneys were enhanced in rats which received testosterone-only treatment. In these rats, α, β and γ-ENaC proteins were distributed in the distal tubules and collecting ducts of the nephrons. Co-treatment with flutamide or finasteride resulted in the levels of α, β and γ-ENaC proteins and mRNAs in kidneys to decrease. In conclusions, increases in α, β and γ-ENaC protein and mRNA levels in kidneys mainly in the distal tubules and collecting ducts under testosterone influence might lead to enhance Na+ reabsorption which subsequently might cause an increase in blood pressure. PMID:27413634

  17. Sub-chronic testosterone treatment increases the levels of epithelial sodium channel (ENaC)-α, β and γ in the kidney of orchidectomized adult male Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Loh, Su Yi; Giribabu, Nelli; Salleh, Naguib

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone has been reported to cause blood pressure to increase. However mechanisms that underlie the effect of this hormone on this physiological parameter are currently not well understood. The aims of this study were to investigate effects of testosterone on expression of α, β and γ-epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) proteins and messenger RNAs (mRNAs) in kidneys, the channel known to be involved in Na(+) reabsorption, which subsequently can affect the blood pressure. Methods. Adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were orchidectomized fourteen days prior to receiving seven days treatment with testosterone propionate (125 µg/kg/day or 250 µg/kg/day) with or without flutamide (androgen receptor blocker) or finasteride (5α-reductase inhibitor). Following sacrifice, the kidneys were removed and were subjected for α, β and γ-ENaC protein and mRNA expression analyses by Western blotting and Real-time PCR (qPCR) respectively. The distribution of α, β and γ-ENaC proteins in kidneys were observed by immunofluorescence. Results. The α, β and γ-ENaC proteins and mRNA levels in kidneys were enhanced in rats which received testosterone-only treatment. In these rats, α, β and γ-ENaC proteins were distributed in the distal tubules and collecting ducts of the nephrons. Co-treatment with flutamide or finasteride resulted in the levels of α, β and γ-ENaC proteins and mRNAs in kidneys to decrease. In conclusions, increases in α, β and γ-ENaC protein and mRNA levels in kidneys mainly in the distal tubules and collecting ducts under testosterone influence might lead to enhance Na(+) reabsorption which subsequently might cause an increase in blood pressure. PMID:27413634

  18. Testosterone for the aging male; current evidence and recommended practice

    PubMed Central

    Stanworth, Roger D; Jones, T Hugh

    2008-01-01

    An international consensus document was recently published and provides guidance on the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) in men. The diagnosis of LOH requires biochemical and clinical components. Controversy in defining the clinical syndrome continues due to the high prevalence of hypogonadal symptoms in the aging male population and the non-specific nature of these symptoms. Further controversy surrounds setting a lower limit of normal testosterone, the limitations of the commonly available total testosterone result in assessing some patients and the unavailability of reliable measures of bioavailable or free testosterone for general clinical use. As with any clinical intervention testosterone treatment should be judged on a balance of risk versus benefit. The traditional benefits of testosterone on sexual function, mood, strength and quality of life remain the primary goals of treatment but possible beneficial effects on other parameters such as bone density, obesity, insulin resistance and angina are emerging and will be reviewed. Potential concerns regarding the effects of testosterone on prostate disease, aggression and polycythaemia will also be addressed. The options available for treatment have increased in recent years with the availability of a number of testosterone preparations which can reliably produce physiological serum concentrations. PMID:18488876

  19. The DSL analog free testosterone assay: serum levels are not related to sex hormone-binding globulin in normative data throughout childhood and adolescence.

    PubMed

    Kratzsch, J; Keller, E; Hoepffner, W; Müller, G; Reich, A; Meyer, K; Kiess, W

    2001-01-01

    In this study we tested the performance of easy-to-use and rapid, commercially available immunoassays to measure free testosterone (fT) and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG). We asked whether fT and SHBG serum levels are age-dependent and whether or not there is a gender dependence of fT and SHBG in this age group. Finally, by measuring fT and SHBG in sera of a cohort of healthy children and adolescents using commercially available immunoassays, we established normative data for fT and SHBG in this age group: in boys fT levels increased significantly (r=0.83, p<0.0001) from 0.63 pmol/l (median) in the age group below 5 years to 56.9 pmol/l in the age group 16-20 years. In girls fT levels also increased with age (r=0.66, p<0.0001): from 0.72 pmol/l (median) in the age group below 5 years to 3.34 pmol/l in the age group 16-20 years. In contrast, SHBG serum concentrations significantly decreased with age in boys (r=-0.62, p<0.0001) but remained constant in girls (r=0.04, n.s.). Importantly, fT values were independent of SHBG levels as determined by our methods. In conclusion, fT can be measured in an acceptable quality using the DSL analog tracer-based immunoassay and normative data are now available. In addition, SHBG levels in healthy children and adolescents are also given and may permit for studies of pathophysiologic states in this age group.

  20. A glyphosate-based herbicide induces necrosis and apoptosis in mature rat testicular cells in vitro, and testosterone decrease at lower levels.

    PubMed

    Clair, Emilie; Mesnage, Robin; Travert, Carine; Séralini, Gilles-Éric

    2012-03-01

    The major herbicide used worldwide, Roundup, is a glyphosate-based pesticide with adjuvants. Glyphosate, its active ingredient in plants and its main metabolite (AMPA) are among the first contaminants of surface waters. Roundup is being used increasingly in particular on genetically modified plants grown for food and feed that contain its residues. Here we tested glyphosate and its formulation on mature rat fresh testicular cells from 1 to 10000ppm, thus from the range in some human urine and in environment to agricultural levels. We show that from 1 to 48h of Roundup exposure Leydig cells are damaged. Within 24-48h this formulation is also toxic on the other cells, mainly by necrosis, by contrast to glyphosate alone which is essentially toxic on Sertoli cells. Later, it also induces apoptosis at higher doses in germ cells and in Sertoli/germ cells co-cultures. At lower non toxic concentrations of Roundup and glyphosate (1ppm), the main endocrine disruption is a testosterone decrease by 35%. The pesticide has thus an endocrine impact at very low environmental doses, but only a high contamination appears to provoke an acute rat testicular toxicity. This does not anticipate the chronic toxicity which is insufficiently tested, and only with glyphosate in regulatory tests.

  1. Regulation of NUCB2/nesfatin-1 production in rat's stomach and adipose tissue is dependent on age, testosterone levels and lactating status.

    PubMed

    Senin, Lucia L; Al-Massadi, Omar; Barja-Fernandez, Silvia; Folgueira, Cintia; Castelao, Cecilia; Tovar, Sulay A; Leis, Rosaura; Lago, Francisca; Baltar, Javier; Baamonde, Ivan; Dieguez, Carlos; Casanueva, Felipe F; Seoane, Luisa M

    2015-08-15

    Nesfatin-1, which is derived from the NEFA/nucleobindin 2 (NUCB2) precursor, was recently identified as an anorexigenic peptide that is produced in several tissues including the hypothalamus. Currently, no data exist regarding the regulation of NUCB2/nesfatin-1 production in peripheral tissues, such as gastric mucosa and adipose tissue, through different periods of development. The aim of the present work was to study the variations on circulating levels, mRNA expression and tissue content in gastric mucosa and adipose tissue of NUCB2/nesfatin-1 with age and specially in two clue periods of maturation, weaning and puberty. The weaning period affected NUCB2/nesfatin-1 production in gastric tissue. The testosterone changes associated with the initiation of puberty regulated NUCB2/nesfatin-1 production via adipose tissue and gastric NUCB2/nesfatin-1 production. In conclusion, the production of NUCB2/nesfatin-1 by the stomach and adipose tissue fluctuates with age to regulate energy homeostasis during different states of development.

  2. Effects of 5-day styrene inhalation on serum LH and testosterone levels and on hypothalamic and striatal amino acid neurotransmitter concentrations in male rats.

    PubMed

    Jarry, Hubertus; Gamer, Armin; Wuttke, Wolfgang

    2004-04-01

    The volatile chemical styrene may impair male fertility. Testicular testosterone (T) production is controlled by the hypothalamic/pituitary/gonadal axis. From the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH), gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is released, which stimulates luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion from the pituitary, which in turn enhances T production. GnRH release is controlled by glutamate (GLU) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). GLU and GABA neurons are regulated by T. Thus, reduced fertility of styrene-exposed male workers may result from altered GLU/GABA neurotransmission, causing insufficient GnRH, LH, and T secretion. Therefore, we compared LH and T levels of male rats that have inhaled styrene (0, 150, 500, 1500 ppm for 6 h on 5 consecutive days) to GLU and GABA concentrations in the MBH and striatum. Animals were killed directly following the last exposure (immediate group) or after 24 h (recovery group). No suppression of LH or T levels was observed after styrene inhalation. LH levels of the immediate groups with 500 or 1500 ppm exposure were slightly but significantly elevated. Hypothalamic GLU and GABA concentrations remained unchanged. Increased striatal GABA concentrations were determined in recovery groups with 500 or 1500 ppm exposure. Striatal GLU concentrations remained unaffected. Thus, we demonstrate slightly increased LH and T levels in styrene-exposed male rats after inhalation of the two higher doses. This effect did not correlate with hypothalamic GLU and GABA concentrations. With the limitations inherent to any animal model, these data obtained from a 5-day exposure study with rats suggest, but do not unequivocally prove, that styrene may have also no reproductive toxicity effects in men chronically exposed to this chemical.

  3. Comparative safety of testosterone dosage forms

    PubMed Central

    Layton, J. Bradley; Meier, Christoph R.; Sharpless, Julie L.; Stürmer, Til; Jick, Susan S.; Brookhart, M. Alan

    2015-01-01

    Importance Increases in testosterone use and mixed reports of adverse events have raised concerns about the cardiovascular safety of testosterone. Testosterone is available in several delivery mechanisms with varying pharmacokinetics; injections cause spikes in testosterone levels, while transdermal patches and gels cause more subtle but sustained increases. The comparative cardiovascular safety of gels, injections and patches has not been studied. Objective To determine the comparative cardiovascular safety of testosterone injections, patches, and gels. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Administrative claims from a commercially-insured and Medicare population in the United States, and general practitioner records from the United Kingdom, years 2000 – 2012 Participants Adult (18+), male initiators of testosterone patches, gels, or injections following 180 days free of any testosterone use Exposure New initiation of a testosterone dosage form, followed for up to one year Main Outcomes and Measures In- or outpatient medical records, diagnoses, or claims for: cardio- and cerebrovascular events, including myocardial infarction (MI), unstable angina, stroke, composite acute event (MI, unstable angina, or stroke); venous thromboembolism (VTE); mortality, and all-cause hospitalization. Results We identified 431,687 testosterone initiators between the 3 datasets: 36% injection, 9% patch, 55% gel. Medicare had a majority of injection initiators (51%); the US commercially-insured population had majority gel initiators (56%); the United Kingdom had equal proportions of injections and gels (~41%). When compared to gels, injection initiators had higher hazards of CV events (MI, UA, and stroke) (HR=1.26, 95% CI: 1.18–1.35), hospitalization (HR=1.16, 95% CI: 1.13–1.18), and death (HR=1.34, 95% CI: 1.15–1.56), but not VTE (HR=0.92, 95% CI: 0.76–1.11). Patches did not confer increased hazards of CV events compared to gels (HR=1.10, 95% CI: 0.94–1

  4. [Micropenis. Results of treatment with testosterone].

    PubMed

    Vanelli, M; Bernasconi, S; Terzi, C; Bolondi, O; Boselli, E; Virdis, R; Giovannelli, G

    1984-01-01

    Two groups of children presenting with micropenis (penis length less than or equal to 2.5 cm) were treated according to 2 different therapeutic schedules. The first consisted of the transcutaneous administration of testosterone propionate (4 mg twice a day) and the second of the intramuscular injection of sustained action testosterone enanthate (25 mg every 2 weeks). Only the intramuscular treatment was able to induce a normal and durable penis growth, owing to the hyperplastic action that the testosterone injection exerted on the level of the cellular tissues of the penis. Using testosterone enanthate dosages varying from 25 to 50 mg, the risks for an abnormal acceleration of growth and bone age seem to be minimized.

  5. Diagnosis and management of testosterone deficiency

    PubMed Central

    McBride, James A; Carson, Culley C; Coward, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone supplementation therapy (TST) use has dramatically increased over the past decade, due to the availability of newer agents, aggressive marketing, and an increasing incidence of testosterone deficiency (TD). Despite the increase in TST, a degree of ambiguity remains as to the exact diagnostic criteria of TD, and administration and monitoring of TST. One explanation for this phenomenon is the complex role testosterone plays in multiple physiologic pathways. Numerous medical co-morbidities and medications can alter testosterone levels resulting in a wide range of nonspecific clinical signs and symptoms of TD. The diagnosis is also challenging due to the lack of a definitive serum total testosterone level that reliably correlates with symptoms. This observation is particularly true in the aging male and is exacerbated by inconsistencies between different laboratory assays. Several prominent medical societies have developed guideline statements to clarify the diagnosis, but they differ from each other and with expert opinion in several ways. Aside from diagnostic dilemmas, there are numerous subtle advantages and disadvantages of the various testosterone agents to appreciate. The available TST agents have changed significantly over the past decade similar to the trends in the diagnosis of TD. Therefore, as the usage of TST increases, clinicians will be challenged to maintain an up-to-date understanding of TD and TST. The purpose of this review is to provide a clear description of the current strategies for diagnosis and management of TD. PMID:25532575

  6. Testosterone and Sexual Function.

    PubMed

    Gannon, John R; Walsh, Thomas J

    2016-05-01

    Testosterone and sexual function are related. Current evidence suggests that testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) may improve sexual dysfunction. Sexual dysfunction in men who are hypogonadal, mixed, or eugonadal have all been examined through numerous studies. The most recent large analysis showed an overall improvement in sexual function outcomes in men treated with TRT. This improvement is difficult to measure and seems to differ based on the baseline hormonal status of the patient at the beginning of treatment. PMID:27132579

  7. Testosterone and depressive symptoms among men in the Diabetes Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Catherine; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Aroda, Vanita R.; Mather, Kieren J.; Christophi, Costas A.; Horton, Edward S.; Pi-Sunyer, Xavier; Bray, George A.; Labrie, Fernand; Golden, Sherita Hill

    2016-01-01

    Structured Abstract Objective We examined associations between randomization to intensive lifestyle intervention (ILS) and changes in testosterone and associations with mood among middle-aged men. Design Secondary analysis of men (n=886) participating in the Diabetes Prevention Program which randomized glucose-intolerant, overweight men to ILS, metformin, or placebo. Main Outcome Measures Changes in testosterone between baseline and 1-year follow-up and associations of these changes with mood measures (Beck Depression Inventory [BDI], Beck Anxiety Inventory [BAI]) Results Median baseline testosterone was 10.98 nmol/l and 44% (n=385) had testosterone < 10.41 nmol/l or 300 ng/dl, a common threshold for biochemical hypogonadism. Testosterone increases were greater among men randomized to ILS vs. metformin vs. placebo (1.15 nmol/l vs. −0.12 nmol/l vs. −0.27 nmol/l, p<0.001). The association between changes in testosterone and mood differed by randomization arm (p<0.001 for interaction); there were no significant associations between changes in testosterone and mood changes among men randomized to ILS or placebo. Among men randomized to metformin, increases in testosterone were significantly associated with decreases in BDI (improved depressive symptoms) (β-coefficient −0.2336, p=0.0002) indicating a 0.23 decrease in BDI for every 1 nmol/l increase in testosterone and decreases in BAI (improved anxiety symptoms) (β-coefficient −0.2147, p=0.0014). Similar patterns were observed for bioavailable testosterone. Conclusions Among overweight middle-aged men with glucose-intolerance, ILS increased endogenous testosterone slightly but without significant improvements in mood. Metformin did not increase testosterone, but among participants randomized to metformin, testosterone increases were associated with improvements in mood. Thus, interventions that increase endogenous testosterone may not also improve mood. PMID:27371769

  8. A new oral testosterone undecanoate formulation.

    PubMed

    Köhn, Frank-Michael; Schill, Wolf-Bernhard

    2003-11-01

    Testosterone undecanoate has been available on the market for more than 20 years. This testosterone ester is used worldwide for oral treatment of male hypogonadism. So far, testosterone undecanoate has been dissolved in oleic acid, leading to inconvenient storage conditions. It will now be available in a new formulation with castor oil and propylene glycol laurate instead of oleic acid, thus improving storage conditions markedly (stable at room temperature for approximately 3 years). Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies have demonstrated bioequivalence of the old and the new formulation of testosterone undecanoate. Therefore, the results of studies that were performed with the old formulation can be transferred to the clinical use of the new formulation. Controlled studies have shown its efficacy in the treatment of symptoms associated with reduced serum testosterone levels. In these cases testosterone undecanoate improves bone mineral density, quality of life, muscle mass, libido and mood. Further studies will help evaluate the efficacy and safety of the new formulation in the treatment of elderly men with late-onset hypogonadism. PMID:14579074

  9. Testosterone treatment comes of age: new options for hypogonadal men.

    PubMed

    Nieschlag, Eberhard

    2006-09-01

    Male hypogonadism is one of the most frequent, but also most underdiagnosed, endocrinopathies. However, the required testosterone treatment is simple and very effective if properly administered. Although testosterone has been available for clinical use for seven decades, until quite recently the treatment modalities were far from ideal. Subdermal testosterone pellets require minor surgery for insertion and often cause local problems. The injectable testosterone enanthate, for a long period the most frequently used mode of administration, lasts for two to four weeks, but produces supraphysiological levels initially and low levels before the next injection. The oral testosterone undecanoate has to be taken three times daily, has an uncertain absorption pattern and results in peaks and valleys of serum testosterone levels throughout the day. With the advent of transdermal testosterone preparations, the desired physiological serum levels could be achieved for the first time. Scrotal testosterone patches were the first to fulfil this requirement. These were followed by nonscrotal skin patches, which, however, cause considerable skin reactions including erythema and blisters. Recently introduced, invisible transdermal testosterone gels increased the intervals of application and are now slowly replacing other modalities. A mucoadhesive buccal testosterone tablet with sustained release is also a recent competing modality. Finally, injectable testosterone undecanoate in castor oil was made into a real depot preparation requiring only four injections per year for replacement therapy. These new preparations with a desired pharmacokinetic testosterone profile give the patient a real choice and make treatment easier. Based on pharmacogenetic considerations taking the androgen receptor polymorphism into account, treatment may be individualized for each patient in the future. PMID:16918944

  10. Cognitive effects of testosterone and finasteride administration in older hypogonadal men

    PubMed Central

    Borst, Stephen E; Yarrow, Joshua F; Fernandez, Carmen; Conover, Christine F; Ye, Fan; Meuleman, John R; Morrow, Matthew; Zou, Baiming; Shuster, Jonathan J

    2014-01-01

    Serum concentrations of neuroactive androgens decline in older men and, in some studies, low testosterone is associated with decreased cognitive function and incidence of depression. Existing studies evaluating the effect of testosterone administration on cognition in older men have been largely inconclusive, with some studies reporting minor to moderate cognitive benefit, while others indicate no cognitive effect. Our objective was to assess the cognitive effects of treating older hypogonadal men for 1 year with a supraphysiological dose of testosterone, either alone or in combination with finasteride (a type II 5α-reductase inhibitor), in order to determine whether testosterone produces cognitive benefit and whether suppressed dihydrotestosterone influences cognition. Sixty men aged ≥60 years with a serum testosterone concentration of ≤300 ng/dL or bioavailable testosterone ≤70 ng/dL and no evidence of cognitive impairment received testosterone-enanthate (125 mg/week) versus vehicle, paired with finasteride (5 mg/day) versus placebo using a 2×2 factorial design. Testosterone caused a small decrease in depressive symptoms as assessed by the Geriatric Depression Scale and a moderate increase in visuospatial memory as assessed by performance on a recall trial of the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test. Finasteride caused a small increase in performance on the Benton Judgment of Line Orientation test. In total, major improvements in cognition were not observed either with testosterone or finasteride. Further studies are warranted to determine if testosterone replacement may improve cognition in other domains. PMID:25143719

  11. Effects of gendered behavior on testosterone in women and men.

    PubMed

    van Anders, Sari M; Steiger, Jeffrey; Goldey, Katherine L

    2015-11-10

    Testosterone is typically understood to contribute to maleness and masculinity, although it also responds to behaviors such as competition. Competition is crucial to evolution and may increase testosterone but also is selectively discouraged for women and encouraged for men via gender norms. We conducted an experiment to test how gender norms might modulate testosterone as mediated by two possible gender→testosterone pathways. Using a novel experimental design, participants (trained actors) performed a specific type of competition (wielding power) in stereotypically masculine vs. feminine ways. We hypothesized in H1 (stereotyped behavior) that wielding power increases testosterone regardless of how it is performed, vs. H2 (stereotyped performance), that wielding power performed in masculine but not feminine ways increases testosterone. We found that wielding power increased testosterone in women compared with a control, regardless of whether it was performed in gender-stereotyped masculine or feminine ways. Results supported H1 over H2: stereotyped behavior but not performance modulated testosterone. These results also supported theory that competition modulates testosterone over masculinity. Our findings thus support a gender→testosterone pathway mediated by competitive behavior. Accordingly, cultural pushes for men to wield power and women to avoid doing so may partially explain, in addition to heritable factors, why testosterone levels tend to be higher in men than in women: A lifetime of gender socialization could contribute to "sex differences" in testosterone. Our experiment opens up new questions of gender→testosterone pathways, highlighting the potential of examining nature/nurture interactions and effects of socialization on human biology. PMID:26504229

  12. Effects of gendered behavior on testosterone in women and men

    PubMed Central

    van Anders, Sari M.; Steiger, Jeffrey; Goldey, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone is typically understood to contribute to maleness and masculinity, although it also responds to behaviors such as competition. Competition is crucial to evolution and may increase testosterone but also is selectively discouraged for women and encouraged for men via gender norms. We conducted an experiment to test how gender norms might modulate testosterone as mediated by two possible gender→testosterone pathways. Using a novel experimental design, participants (trained actors) performed a specific type of competition (wielding power) in stereotypically masculine vs. feminine ways. We hypothesized in H1 (stereotyped behavior) that wielding power increases testosterone regardless of how it is performed, vs. H2 (stereotyped performance), that wielding power performed in masculine but not feminine ways increases testosterone. We found that wielding power increased testosterone in women compared with a control, regardless of whether it was performed in gender-stereotyped masculine or feminine ways. Results supported H1 over H2: stereotyped behavior but not performance modulated testosterone. These results also supported theory that competition modulates testosterone over masculinity. Our findings thus support a gender→testosterone pathway mediated by competitive behavior. Accordingly, cultural pushes for men to wield power and women to avoid doing so may partially explain, in addition to heritable factors, why testosterone levels tend to be higher in men than in women: A lifetime of gender socialization could contribute to “sex differences” in testosterone. Our experiment opens up new questions of gender→testosterone pathways, highlighting the potential of examining nature/nurture interactions and effects of socialization on human biology. PMID:26504229

  13. Effects of gendered behavior on testosterone in women and men.

    PubMed

    van Anders, Sari M; Steiger, Jeffrey; Goldey, Katherine L

    2015-11-10

    Testosterone is typically understood to contribute to maleness and masculinity, although it also responds to behaviors such as competition. Competition is crucial to evolution and may increase testosterone but also is selectively discouraged for women and encouraged for men via gender norms. We conducted an experiment to test how gender norms might modulate testosterone as mediated by two possible gender→testosterone pathways. Using a novel experimental design, participants (trained actors) performed a specific type of competition (wielding power) in stereotypically masculine vs. feminine ways. We hypothesized in H1 (stereotyped behavior) that wielding power increases testosterone regardless of how it is performed, vs. H2 (stereotyped performance), that wielding power performed in masculine but not feminine ways increases testosterone. We found that wielding power increased testosterone in women compared with a control, regardless of whether it was performed in gender-stereotyped masculine or feminine ways. Results supported H1 over H2: stereotyped behavior but not performance modulated testosterone. These results also supported theory that competition modulates testosterone over masculinity. Our findings thus support a gender→testosterone pathway mediated by competitive behavior. Accordingly, cultural pushes for men to wield power and women to avoid doing so may partially explain, in addition to heritable factors, why testosterone levels tend to be higher in men than in women: A lifetime of gender socialization could contribute to "sex differences" in testosterone. Our experiment opens up new questions of gender→testosterone pathways, highlighting the potential of examining nature/nurture interactions and effects of socialization on human biology.

  14. The relationship between sleep disorders and testosterone in men

    PubMed Central

    Wittert, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Plasma testosterone levels display circadian variation, peaking during sleep, and reaching a nadir in the late afternoon, with a superimposed ultradian rhythm with pulses every 90 min reflecting the underlying rhythm of pulsatile luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion. The increase in testosterone is sleep, rather than circadian rhythm, dependent and requires at least 3 h of sleep with a normal architecture. Various disorders of sleep including abnormalities of sleep quality, duration, circadian rhythm disruption, and sleep-disordered breathing may result in a reduction in testosterone levels. The evidence, to support a direct effect of sleep restriction or circadian rhythm disruption on testosterone independent of an effect on sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), or the presence of comorbid conditions, is equivocal and on balance seems tenuous. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) appears to have no direct effect on testosterone, after adjusting for age and obesity. However, a possible indirect causal process may exist mediated by the effect of OSA on obesity. Treatment of moderate to severe OSA with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) does not reliably increase testosterone levels in most studies. In contrast, a reduction in weight does so predictably and linearly in proportion to the amount of weight lost. Apart from a very transient deleterious effect, testosterone treatment does not adversely affect OSA. The data on the effect of sleep quality on testosterone may depend on whether testosterone is given as replacement, in supratherapeutic doses, or in the context abuse. Experimental data suggest that testosterone may modulate individual vulnerability to subjective symptoms of sleep restriction. Low testosterone may affect overall sleep quality which is improved by replacement doses. Large doses of exogenous testosterone and anabolic/androgenic steroid abuse are associated with abnormalities of sleep duration and architecture. PMID:24435056

  15. FETAL TESTOSTERONE LEVELS ARE DIFFERENTIALLY AFFECTED IN MALE SPRAGUE DAWLEY AND WISTAR RATS AFTER IN UTERO EXPOSURE TO DIETHYLHEXYL PHTHALATE: A DOSE RESPONSE STUDY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to phthalate esters during sexual differentiation disrupts testosterone resulting in malformations of androgen-dependent tissues. We have found that gubernacular lesions are more prevalent in in utero diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP)-treated Wistar male than in the SD rat o...

  16. An update on testosterone, HDL and cardiovascular risk in men

    PubMed Central

    Thirumalai, Arthi; Rubinow, Katya B; Page, Stephanie T

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone prescriptions have risen steadily and sharply in the USA despite a lack of clear understanding of the relationship between androgens and cardiovascular disease. In men with increasing age, testosterone levels decline and cardiovascular disease risk goes up. Ties between hypogonadism and cardiovascular disease are suggested by observational data, yet therapy with testosterone replacement has not been shown to mitigate that risk. To the contrary, recent literature has raised concern for increased cardiovascular disease in certain groups of men receiving testosterone therapy. In this article, we review current literature in an attempt to better understand what it suggests is the true relationship between testosterone and cardiovascular disease. We also take a closer look at effects of testosterone on lipids and HDL in particular, to see if this explains the cardiovascular effects seen in clinical studies. PMID:26257830

  17. Plasma levels, metabolic clearance rates, and rates of secretion of testosterone and estradiol-l7 beta in the silver eel (Anguilla anguilla L. )

    SciTech Connect

    Querat, B.; Hardy, A.; Leloup-Hatey, J.

    1985-09-01

    Testosterone (T) and 17 beta-estradiol (E2) plasma levels and metabolic clearance rates (MCR) were measured to investigate their ovarian production in immature silver eel. The dynamics of T and E2 metabolism were studied in catheterized eels using single injections of 0.2 to 0.5 microCi /sup 3/H-labeled steroid. The distribution volumes, biological half-life and MCR of nonconjugated tracers were calculated on the basis of a two-compartment model. At the end of the experiments, radioactivity was measured in different organs and tissues to localize the site of T and E2 catabolism. The volume of the inner compartment was 3.4% for T and E2. The outer compartment was larger for T (6.4%) than that for E2 (4.3%). The biological half-life was three to four times shorter for T (14.5 hr) than that for E2 (48.5 hr). The MCR for T (1.71 ml/kg body wt/hr) was higher than for E2 (0.51 ml/kg body wt/hr). Plasma levels were determined, using radioimmunoassay, on samples taken before injections of radiolabeled steroid. Free or protein-bound hormone levels were 0.12 and 0.31 ng/ml for T and E2, respectively. Conjugated T and E2 levels were, respectively, 0.13 and 0.23 ng/ml. Production rates were determined as the product of the MCR and the plasma concentration of the nonconjugated hormone. No significant differences were observed between the production rates of T and E2 (0.24 ng/kg body wt/hr). The liver was the principal site of metabolism for both hormones, which were excreted via the enterohepatic route. E2 injection gave rise to no metabolite in the plasma whereas after T injection a metabolite was produced, the concentration of which increased as a function of time. Its chromatographic properties were different from that of E2 or androstenedione, suggesting that no significant peripheral aromatization or 17-oxidoreduction occurs in the immature silver eel.

  18. Assessment of trace metals contamination level, bioavailability and toxicity in sediments from Dakar coast and Saint Louis estuary in Senegal, West Africa.

    PubMed

    Diop, Cheikh; Dewaelé, Dorothée; Cazier, Fabrice; Diouf, Amadou; Ouddane, Baghdad

    2015-11-01

    Trace metals have the potential to associate with sediments that have been recognised as significant source of contamination for the benthic environment. The current study aims assessing the trace metals contamination level in sediments from Dakar coast and Saint Louis estuary, and to examine their bioavailability to predict potential toxicity of sediments. Surface sediment samples were collected between June 2012 and January 2013 in three sampling periods from eight stations. Trace metals were analysed using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer. Geoaccumulation indexes (Igeo) showed strong pollution by Cd, Cr, Cu and Pb confirmed by enrichment factor (EF) suggesting that these metals derived from anthropogenic sources. Toxicity indexes exceeded one in several sites suggesting the potential effects on sediment-dwelling organisms, which may constitute a risk to populations' health. However, seasonal variability of metal bioavailability was noted, revealing the best period to monitor metal contamination. From an ecotoxicological point of view, concentrations of Cd, Cr, Cu and Pb were above the effects range low threshold limit of the sediment quality guidelines for adverse biological effects. In addition, with Pb concentrations above the effect range medium values in some sites, biological effects may occur.

  19. Testosterone, territoriality, and the 'home advantage'.

    PubMed

    Neave, Nick; Wolfson, Sandy

    2003-02-01

    The consistently better performance seen by teams in various sporting contexts when playing at home is referred to as the 'home advantage'. Various explanations have been put forward to account for this robust phenomenon, though none has yet focussed on possible hormonal factors. In an initial study, we showed that salivary testosterone levels in soccer players were significantly higher before a home game than an away game.In a second study involving a different group of soccer players, this finding was replicated over two home games, two away games, and three training sessions. Perceived rivalry of the opposing team was important as testosterone levels were higher before playing an 'extreme' rival than a 'moderate' rival. Self-reported measures of mood in both studies were not linked to testosterone level. The present results corroborate and extend earlier findings on the relationships between testosterone, territoriality, and dominance in human competitive encounters and further suggest an important role for testosterone in the home advantage seen in various team sports.

  20. Testosterone Therapy in Adult Men with Androgen Deficiency Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood levels of testosterone of 300–1,000 ng/dL are considered normal, but these levels may ... blood PSA (prostate specific antigen) level over 4 ng/ mL (which suggests prostate cancer or other prostate ...

  1. Sludge organics bioavailability

    SciTech Connect

    Eiceman, G.E.; Bellin, C.A.; Ryan, J.A.; O'Connor, G.A.

    1991-01-01

    Concern over the bioavailability of toxic organics that can occur in municipal sludges threatens routine land application of sludge. Available data, however, show that concentrations of priority organics in normal sludges are low. Sludges applied at agronomic rates yield chemical concentrations in soil-sludge mixtures 50 to 100 fold lower. Plant uptake at these pollutant concentrations (and at much higher concentrations) is minimal. Chemicals are either (1) accumulated at extremely low levels (PCBs), (2) possibly accumulated, but then rapidly metabolized within plants to extremely low levels (DEHP), or (3) likely degraded so rapidly in soil that only minor contamination occurs (PCP and 2,4-DNP).

  2. Could you have low testosterone?

    MedlinePlus

    ... testicles. It is important for a man's sex drive and physical appearance. Certain health conditions, medicines, or ... drops with age. Low testosterone can affect sex drive, mood, and the body. Treatment with testosterone therapy ...

  3. Testosterone and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tambo, Amos; Roshan, Mohsin H.K.; Pace, Nikolai P.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease [CVD] is a leading cause of mortality accounting for a global incidence of over 31%. Atherosclerosis is the primary pathophysiology underpinning most types of CVD. Historically, modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors were suggested to precipitate CVD. Recently, epidemiological studies have identified emerging risk factors including hypotestosteronaemia, which have been associated with CVD. Previously considered in the realms of reproductive biology, testosterone is now believed to play a critical role in the cardiovascular system in health and disease. The actions of testosterone as they relate to the cardiac vasculature and its implication in cardiovascular pathology is reviewed. PMID:27014372

  4. Testosterone and Male Infertility.

    PubMed

    Ohlander, Samuel J; Lindgren, Mark C; Lipshultz, Larry I

    2016-05-01

    Hypogonadism and its therapies have a significant impact on male fertility potential. It is necessary to determine the etiology to treat and counsel the patient appropriately on therapeutic options. For the hypogonadal male on exogenous testosterone, management should begin with cessation of the exogenous testosterone and supplemental subcutaneous human chorionic gonadotropin and an oral follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-inducing agent to allow reestablishment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and spermatogenesis. Further supplemental therapy with recombinant FSH in some patients may be necessary to achieve optimal semen parameters.

  5. Testosterone and Male Infertility.

    PubMed

    Ohlander, Samuel J; Lindgren, Mark C; Lipshultz, Larry I

    2016-05-01

    Hypogonadism and its therapies have a significant impact on male fertility potential. It is necessary to determine the etiology to treat and counsel the patient appropriately on therapeutic options. For the hypogonadal male on exogenous testosterone, management should begin with cessation of the exogenous testosterone and supplemental subcutaneous human chorionic gonadotropin and an oral follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-inducing agent to allow reestablishment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and spermatogenesis. Further supplemental therapy with recombinant FSH in some patients may be necessary to achieve optimal semen parameters. PMID:27132576

  6. Testosterone deficiency syndrome: benefits, risks, and realities associated with testosterone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Jacob; Barkin, Jack

    2016-02-01

    Testosterone deficiency syndrome, which has sometimes been termed age-related or late-onset hypogonadism, is a syndrome characterized by both clinical manifestations as well as a biochemical deficiency of testosterone. This condition is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality, accounting for billions of dollars in health care costs. There is some evidence that suggests that restoring testosterone levels in these individuals may help to manage or delay progression of the associated morbidities. Furthermore, despite controversies in the literature and media, testosterone replacement has proven to be quite safe in most men with minimal if any adverse effects when dosing to achieve the eugonadal range. It is nevertheless very important for clinicians to be aware of the possible risks and contraindications of treatment to ensure proper patient selection and appropriate monitoring. PMID:26924592

  7. Testosterone in men with advanced liver disease: abnormalities and implications.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Marie; Grossmann, Mathis; Gow, Paul J; Angus, Peter W

    2015-02-01

    Serum testosterone is reduced in up to 90% of men with cirrhosis, with levels falling as liver disease advances. Testosterone is an important anabolic hormone, with effects on muscle, bone, and hematopoiesis. Many of the features of advanced liver disease are similar to those seen in hypogonadal men, including sarcopenia, osteoporosis, gynecomastia, and low libido. However, the relative contribution of testosterone deficiency to the symptomatology of advanced liver disease has not been well established. More recently, it has been demonstrated that low testosterone in men with cirrhosis is associated with increased mortality, independent of the classically recognized prognostic factors, such as the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score. Only several small clinical trials have examined the role of testosterone therapy in men with cirrhosis, none of which have resolved the issue of whether or not testosterone is beneficial. However, in men with organic hypogonadism due to structural hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis disease, testosterone therapy has been shown to improve muscle mass and bone mineral density, increase hemoglobin, and reduce insulin resistance. Despite initial concerns linking testosterone with hepatocellular carcinoma, more recent data suggest that this risk has been overstated. There is, therefore, now a strong rationale to assess the efficacy and safety of testosterone therapy in cirrhosis in well-designed randomized controlled trials. PMID:25087838

  8. Roles of Testosterone Replacement in Cardiac Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Pongkan, Wanpitak; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone is an anabolic steroid hormone, which is the major circulating androgen hormone in males. Testosterone levels decreasing below the normal physiological levels lead to a status known as androgen deficiency. Androgen deficiency has been shown to be a major risk factor in the development of several disorders, including obesity, metabolic syndrome, and ischemic heart disease. In the past decades, although several studies from animal models as well as clinical studies demonstrated that testosterone exerted cardioprotection, particularly during ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury, other preclinical and clinical studies have shown an inverse relationship between testosterone levels and cardioprotective effects. As a result, the effects of testosterone replacement on the heart remain controversial. In this review, reports regarding the roles of testosterone replacement in the heart following I/R injury are comprehensively summarized and discussed. At present, it may be concluded that chronic testosterone replacement at a physiological dose demonstrated cardioprotective effects, whereas acute testosterone replacement can cause adverse effects in the I/R heart.

  9. Testosterone negatively regulates right ventricular load stress responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Hemnes, Anna R; Maynard, Karen B; Champion, Hunter C; Gleaves, Linda; Penner, Niki; West, James; Newman, John H

    2012-07-01

    Right ventricular (RV) function is the major determinant of mortality in pulmonary arterial hypertension and male sex is a strong predictor of mortality in this disease. The effects of testosterone on RV structure and function in load stress are presently unknown. We tested whether testosterone levels affect RV hypertrophic responses, fibrosis, and function. Male C57BL/6 mice underwent castration or sham followed by pulmonary artery banding (PAB) or sham. After recovery, testosterone pellets were placed in a subset of the castrated mice and mice were maintained for at least two weeks, when they underwent hemodynamic measurements and tissues were harvested. Plasma levels of testosterone were reduced by castration and repleted by testosterone administration. In PAB, castration resulted in lower right ventricle/left ventricle + septum (RV/LV+S), and myocyte diameter (P < 0.05). Replacement of testosterone normalized these parameters and increased RV fibrosis (P < 0.05). Two weeks of PAB resulted in increased RV systolic pressure in all groups with decreased markers of RV systolic and diastolic function, specifically reduced ejection fraction and increased time constant, and dPdt minimum (P < 0.05), though there was minimal effect of testosterone on hemodynamic parameters. Survival was improved in mice that underwent castration with PAB compared with PAB alone (P < 0.05). Testosterone affects RV hypertrophic response to load stress through increased myocyte size and increased fibrosis in mice. Castration and testosterone replacement are not accompanied by significant alterations in RV in vivo hemodynamics, but testosterone deprivation appears to improve survival in PAB. Further study of the role of testosterone in RV dysfunction is warranted to better understand these findings in the context of human disease.

  10. Has testosterone passed the test in premenopausal women with low libido? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Beverly G; Bou Nemer, Laurice; Carr, Bruce R

    2016-01-01

    Background There are limited evaluation and treatment options for low libido in premenopausal women. This review sought to evaluate the available evidence supporting the evaluation of testosterone serum levels and testosterone treatment of premenopausal women with low libido. Methods MEDLINE, PubMed, and ClinicalTrials.gov were searched for articles that referenced the evaluation of testosterone serum level and/or testosterone treatment on premenopausal women with low libido from 1995 to 2015. Additional references were obtained from the reference sections of other papers and from peer review. Studies that included only postmenopausal women were excluded. A total of 13 studies were reviewed in detail. Nine studies examined the relationship between testosterone serum levels and sexuality, an additional three studies examined the effect of testosterone treatment on premenopausal women with low libido, and one study examined both the topics. Results Six of the ten testosterone serum evaluation studies failed to show a significant association between testosterone serum level and libido. Only one out of four studies examining testosterone treatment in premenopausal women was able to show any clear improvement in libido; however, the effect was limited to only the intermediate dose of testosterone, with the low and high doses of testosterone not producing any effect. Conclusion The currently available evidence does not support testosterone serum evaluation or treatment in premenopausal women with low libido. Hence, further studies are warranted. PMID:27785108

  11. Understanding testosterone variation in a tropical lek-breeding bird.

    PubMed

    Ryder, Thomas B; Horton, Brent M; Moore, Ignacio T

    2011-08-23

    Male reproductive coalitions, in which males cooperate to attract females, are a rare strategy among vertebrates. While some studies have investigated ultimate aspects of these relationships, little is known about the mechanistic role that hormones play in modulating cooperative behaviours. Here, we examined male testosterone variation in a tropical lekking bird, the wire-tailed manakin (Pipra filicauda), which exhibits cooperative male-male display coalitions. We found that testosterone levels in territorial males were comparable to those of temperate breeding birds, a surprising result given their environmental, social and reproductive dynamics. In addition, social status rather than plumage was a strong predictor of testosterone variation. Territorial males had significantly higher testosterone levels than did two other plumage classes of floater males, who do not hold territories. We hypothesize that testosterone variation plays an important role in the establishment of male dominance hierarchies (competition), while concurrently facilitating stable display partnerships (cooperation). PMID:21325306

  12. Neonatal exposure to benzo[a]pyrene decreases the levels of serum testosterone and histone H3K14 acetylation of the StAR promoter in the testes of SD rats.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jiren; Zhu, Hongyan; Li, Cuizhen; Ding, Yicheng; Zhou, Zhijun; Wu, Qing

    2012-12-16

    Although benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is an environmental endocrine disrupter, it has been unclear whether neonatal exposure to BaP affects the testosterone level and, if so, whether this influence persists into adulthood. In this present study, we gave neonatal rats (through oral gavages) doses of 0, 5, 10, or 25mg/kg day of BaP in corn oil from postnatal day 1 (PND 1) to PND 7. The rats were sacrificed at PND 8, PND 35, and PND 90. BaP exposure was confirmed through the induction of liver and testis CYP1A1 mRNA expression at PND 8 (i.e., immediately after exposure). The testicular daily sperm production and the sperm counts of the epididymis cauda at PND 90 were significantly lower than those of the control. The serum testosterone levels decreased markedly at PND 8, PND 35, and PND 90 after neonatal BaP exposure relative to those of the control. The mRNA expressions of StAR also decreased relative to those of the control at PND 8, PND 35, and PND 90, although the mRNA expressions of P450c17 and 17β-HSD were suppressed significantly only at PND 8. To further elucidate the mechanism of the persistent decrease in the mRNA expression of StAR, we determined the histone acetylation level in the StAR promoter. The extent of acetylation of H3K14 in the determined region decreased after neonatal exposure to BaP; this phenomenon persisted to the adult stage. Our results indicate that neonatal exposure to BaP damages testosterone production and sperm counts in the long term, possibly as a result of epigenetic regulation in the StAR promoter region.

  13. Diagnosis and Treatment of Low Testosterone among Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yeran; Johansen, Kirsten L

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of low testosterone level is particularly high among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and has been associated with mortality. In populations without ESRD, low testosterone level has also been associated with a number of morbidities including cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, low muscle mass, low bone mass, low physical performance, and frailty. However, there is controversy regarding what constitutes low testosterone level in the aging population and at what level replacement therapy with testosterone is indicated. There are no randomized controlled trials investigating long-term outcomes of testosterone replacement therapy in populations with or without ESRD. Available trial results suggest equivocal improvements in sexual function. Muscle mass and bone mineral density appear to improve, but results in physical function and performance are mixed and there are no data on fracture prevention. Some recent data suggest harm when testosterone was given to men with limited mobility. Finally, there is little evidence that testosterone adds to existing erythropoietin agents in the treatment of anemia in ESRD. Due to lack of evidence supporting long-term use of testosterone, the authors recommend against the routine use of testosterone in ESRD patients with low testosterone levels. Testosterone treatment can be considered in those with low bone mass and total testosterone level <200 ng/dl, or in younger patients with sexual complaints with total testosterone level lower than the reference range. It is important to engage patients in discussion of risks and benefits before initiating testosterone therapy; testosterone therapy should be discontinued if the intended treatment effect is not observed after short-term use. PMID:25376701

  14. Lowered testosterone in male obesity: mechanisms, morbidity and management

    PubMed Central

    Fui, Mark Ng Tang; Dupuis, Philippe; Grossmann, Mathis

    2014-01-01

    With increasing modernization and urbanization of Asia, much of the future focus of the obesity epidemic will be in the Asian region. Low testosterone levels are frequently encountered in obese men who do not otherwise have a recognizable hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular (HPT) axis pathology. Moderate obesity predominantly decreases total testosterone due to insulin resistance-associated reductions in sex hormone binding globulin. More severe obesity is additionally associated with reductions in free testosterone levels due to suppression of the HPT axis. Low testosterone by itself leads to increasing adiposity, creating a self-perpetuating cycle of metabolic complications. Obesity-associated hypotestosteronemia is a functional, non-permanent state, which can be reversible, but this requires substantial weight loss. While testosterone treatment can lead to moderate reductions in fat mass, obesity by itself, in the absence of symptomatic androgen deficiency, is not an established indication for testosterone therapy. Testosterone therapy may lead to a worsening of untreated sleep apnea and compromise fertility. Whether testosterone therapy augments diet- and exercise-induced weight loss requires evaluation in adequately designed randomized controlled clinical trials. PMID:24407187

  15. Response of micropenis to topical testosterone and gonadotropin.

    PubMed

    Klugo, R C; Cerny, J C

    1978-05-01

    Five patients were treated with gonadotropin and topical testosterone for micropenis associated with hypothalamic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. All patients received 1,000 units of gonadotropin weekly for 3 weeks, with a 6-week interval followed by 10% topical testosterone cream twice daily for 3 weeks. Serum testosterone levels were measured and remained equivalent for both modes of therapy. Average penile growth response with gonadotropin was 14.3% increase in length and 5.0% increase of girth. Topical testosterone produced an average increase of 60% in penile length and 52.9% in girth. The greatest growth response occurred in prepubertal male subjects with a minimal response in postpubertal male subjects. This study suggests that 10% topical testosterone cream twice daily will produce effective penile growth. The response appears to be greater in younger children, which is consistent with previously published studies of age-related 5 reductase activity.

  16. Testosterone, estradiol, ACTH and musical, spatial and verbal performance.

    PubMed

    Hassler, M; Gupta, D; Wollmann, H

    1992-01-01

    Testosterone, estradiol, and ACTH were determined in blood serum of 26 healthy males aged 19.16 and of 25 healthy females aged 18.77 years on average, and results were correlated with test scores of three spatial tests, a verbal fluency measure, and a test measuring general musical ability. In addition, hemispheric lateralization for verbal material and handedness was assessed. While testosterone and estradiol alone were not significantly related to any of the cognitive or musical tests, testosterone/estradiol ratio was significantly negatively correlated with spatial tests, and ACTH was significantly positively correlated with spatial and musical tests. Correlations were stronger in females than in males. The laterality index was significantly negatively correlated with testosterone in males indicating that right hemisphere involvement in verbal processing was associated with high testosterone levels.

  17. Testosterone stimulates reproductive behavior during autumn in mockingbirds (Mimus polyglottos).

    PubMed

    Logan, C A; Carlin, C A

    1991-06-01

    Mockingbirds normally secrete little or no testosterone during the period of autumnal territoriality. To determine the behavioral effects of exogenously administered testosterone, 20-mm lengths of Silastic tubing filled with crystalline testosterone were implanted into free-living resident mockingbirds during the autumn. Control residents were given sealed empty implants. Focal animal sampling showed that T-implanted males sang significantly more than controls. Perhaps as a consequence, a significantly greater percentage of the T-implanted males acquired mates. Though nest building does not naturally occur in autumn, T-implanted males also showed significantly more nest building than control males. However, T-implanted males only built if there was a female in the territory, suggesting a synergy between the presence of testosterone and social cues provided by the female. Examination of the effects of testosterone on territorial aggression showed that despite the high levels of territorial activity common in this species in autumn, territorial fights were unaffected by the presence of testosterone. One aggressive call, known to function in fall territorial defense, was significantly decreased in T-implanted versus control males. The presence of fall testosterone appears to stimulate a number of reproductive activities in mockingbirds, leaving autumnal aggressive interactions either unchanged or decreased. We discuss the application of these data to the effects of testosterone on the mockingbird's reproductive behavior during the breeding season.

  18. Marriage and motherhood are associated with lower testosterone concentrations in women

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Emily S.; Tran, Van; Thurston, Sally; Jasienska, Grazyna; Furberg, Anne-Sofie; Ellison, Peter T.; Thune, Inger

    2012-01-01

    Testosterone has been hypothesized to modulate the trade-off between mating and parenting effort in males. Indeed, evidence from humans and other pair-bonded species suggests that fathers and men in committed relationships have lower testosterone levels than single men and men with no children. To date, only one published study has examined testosterone in relation to motherhood, finding that mothers of young children have lower testosterone than non-mothers. Here, we examine this question in 195 reproductive-age Norwegian women. Testosterone was measured in morning serum samples taken during the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle, and marital and maternal status were assessed by questionnaire. Mothers of young children (age ≤3) had 14% lower testosterone than childless women and 19% lower testosterone than women who only had children over age 3. Among mothers, age of the youngest child strongly predicted testosterone levels. There was a trend towards lower testosterone among married women compared to unmarried women. All analyses controlled for body mass index (BMI), age, type of testosterone assay, and time of serum sample collection. This is the first study to look at testosterone concentrations in relation to marriage and motherhood in Western women, and it suggests that testosterone may differ with marital and maternal status in women, providing further corroboration of previous findings in both sexes. PMID:23123222

  19. Recent trends in the treatment of testosterone deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hong, Bum Sik; Ahn, Tai Young

    2007-11-01

    Testosterone deficiency syndrome (TDS) is defined as a clinical and biochemical syndrome associated with advancing age and is characterized by typical symptoms and deficiency in serum testosterone levels. TDS is a result of the interaction of hypothalamo-pituitary and testicular factors. Now, treatment of TDS with testosterone is still controversial due to a lack of large, controlled clinical trials on efficacy. The risks of treatment with testosterone appear to be minimal, although long-term studies on the safety of testosterone therapy are lacking. The aim of the therapy is to establish a physiological concentration of serum testosterone in order to correct the androgen deficiency, relieve its symptoms and prevent long-term sequelae. All of the available products, despite their varying pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profiles, are able to reach this goal. Newer testosterone patches seem not to cause severe skin irritation. Testosterone gels minimize the skin irritation while providing flexibility in dosing and a low discontinuation rate. Oral testosterone undecanoate (TU) is free of liver toxicity. Recent formulation of oral TU markedly increased shelf-live, a major drawback in the older preparation. Producing swings in testosterone levels rising rapidly to the supraphysiological range is not the case with the new injectable long-acting preparation of TU. To be able to rapidly react and stop treatment in cases where side-effects and contraindications are detected, the short-acting transdermal and oral delivery modes have certain advantages. However, there is no evidence that the use of an injectable long-acting TU in men with TDS has limitations in clinical application for this reason. The use of dehydroepiandrosterone is still controversial because of a lack of well designed long-term trials, although some recent studies suggest positive effects on various body systems. Only a few studies have been carried out to investigate the effect of hCG (human

  20. Exogenous testosterone alone or with finasteride does not improve measurements of cognition in healthy older men with low serum testosterone.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Camille; Goldstein, Felicia C; Tenover, J Lisa

    2007-01-01

    Testosterone (T) levels decline as men age, but it is unclear whether this has an effect on cognition. Some studies indicate that lower T levels are associated with memory loss; thus, maintaining a higher T level could have positive effects on aspects of cognitive function. Concerns exist, however, about the effect of T therapy on the prostate in older men. We hypothesized that T replacement in older men with low T levels would improve aspects of cognitive function and that the addition of finasteride would not affect the T-induced cognitive improvements. Healthy men, 65 to 83 years of age, with baseline total T below 350 ng/dL and no evidence of cognitive impairment were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 regimens: 200 mg of T every 2 weeks by intramuscular injection with placebo pill daily (T-only), 200 mg of T every 2 weeks by intramuscular injection with 5 mg of finasteride daily (T+F), or placebo injections and pills (placebo). Sixty-nine men completed baseline cognitive testing; 65 completed at least 4 months, and 46 completed all 36 months of the study. Participants were given a battery of cognitive evaluations at baseline, 4 months, and 36 months, along with measurement of serum hormone levels. Serum total T, bioavailable T, and estradiol levels in the T-only and T+F groups significantly increased throughout the treatment period, whereas these hormone levels did not change in the placebo group. Only minimally significant differences were seen among the 3 groups in any evaluation of cognitive performance, either in the short-term (4 months) or the long-term (36 months) analysis. These results indicate that T replacement, whether given alone or in combination with finasteride, for 36 months in healthy older men without cognitive impairment at baseline has no clinically significant effect on tests of cognitive function. Further studies are warranted to determine whether hormone replacement in men with preexisting cognitive impairment is beneficial. PMID:17609296

  1. Second to fourth digit ratio, testosterone and perceived male dominance.

    PubMed Central

    Neave, Nick; Laing, Sarah; Fink, Bernhard; Manning, John T

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that male faces with extreme features associated with testosterone are perceived as dominant and masculine. Women have been reported to prefer more masculinized male faces as they may consider testosterone markers to be an 'honest' indication of good health, and such considerations may underlie their aesthetic preferences. However, pronounced testosterone facial markers are also associated with dominance, and several negative personality traits. This suggests that female aesthetic preferences may be an adaptive compromise between positive attributes associated with higher than average testosterone, and negative attributes associated with more extreme masculinization. This current study attempts to clarify the role of hormone markers in female perceptions of dominance, masculinity and attractiveness, in male facial images. Recent evidence suggests that the relative length of the 2nd to 4th finger (2D : 4D ratio) is a pointer to prenatal testosterone levels and may thus serve as a window to the prenatal hormonal environment. We measured 2D : 4D in a sample of male college students and took salivary samples to analyse circulating levels of testosterone. Women rated facial images of these males for dominance, masculinity and attractiveness. Our results show that male 2D : 4D was significantly negatively related to perceived dominance and masculinity but not attractiveness. Circulating testosterone levels were not related to dominance, masculinity or attractiveness. These findings suggest that: (i) high prenatal levels of testosterone serve to 'organize' male facial features to subsequently reflect dominance and masculine characteristics presumably activated during puberty; and (ii) attractiveness is not directly related to testosterone levels. We conclude that facial dominance and masculinity reflect a male's perceived status rather than his physical attraction to women. PMID:14561281

  2. Testosterone and temperament traits in men: Longitudinal analysis.

    PubMed

    Määttänen, Ilmari; Jokela, Markus; Hintsa, Taina; Firtser, Sonja; Kähönen, Mika; Jula, Antti; Raitakari, Olli T; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa

    2013-10-01

    Testosterone is the main male hormone that has been associated with various behavioral traits in humans and other animals. We investigated whether levels of total testosterone, free testosterone, and sex hormone binding globulin were associated with temperament traits in a population-based sample of Finnish men at two measurement times taken 6 years apart (n=686 in year 2001, n=727 in year 2007). Temperament was assessed using the Temperament and Character Inventory that consists of four temperament traits: novelty seeking, harm avoidance, reward dependence, and persistence. Higher levels of total and free testosterone were associated with higher novelty seeking (standardized B=0.103, p<0.001). This association was also observed in a longitudinal within-person analysis (B=0.084, p=0.008), suggesting that the association is not confounded by stable between-individual differences in other characteristics. Within-individual variation in total testosterone was associated with higher reward dependence, and higher levels of free testosterone were marginally associated with higher reward dependence. Reward dependence reflects the importance of social rewards to an individual. These results provide additional evidence for the stable and time-varying associations between testosterone and temperament in humans.

  3. Correlation Between Personality Traits and Testosterone Concentrations in Healthy Population

    PubMed Central

    Tajima-Pozo, Kazuhiro; Bayón, Camila; Díaz-Marsá, Marina; Carrasco, Jose Luis

    2015-01-01

    Objective: High plasma testosterone levels have been associated with aggression, sexual behaviour and social status. The aim of this paper was to study the correlation between basal plasma testosterone levels and personality variables in healthy participants. Materials and Methods: Fifty-four participants were randomly enrolled into this study. Basal plasma testosterone levels were measured between 8:30 am and 10 am. After 24 hours of blood drawing, each subject completed personality questionnaires. Results: Positive correlation between basal plasma testosterone levels and anti-social personality traits in both genders was observed (r = 0.336 and P < 0.018). Also, a positive correlation was observed between basal plasmatestosterone levels and criminal thinking traits (r = 0. 376, P < 0.05) and Millon compulsive (r = 0.386, P < 0.010) in both genders. In female participants, a positive correlation between basal plasmatestosterone levels and psychoticism (r = 0. 25, P < 0.019) and Cloninger AUTO TCI (r = 0.507, P < 0.004) was observed. In males participants positive correlation between baseline plasmatic Testosterone levels and Millon Antisocial trait (r = 0. 544, P < 0.19) and Millon Hypomania trait (r = 0. 485, P < 0.41) and Millon Drug Abuse trait (r = 0.632, P < 0.05) was reported. Conclusion: Our results suggest gender differences in clinical and personality variables related with basal plasma testosterone level. In men, high plasma testosterone levels were associated with clinical traits, substance abuse and hypomania. Women with higher basal testosterone levels showed higher scores on personality self-direction traits. PMID:26664080

  4. Effect of obesity and fertility status on sex steroid levels in men.

    PubMed

    Jarow, J P; Kirkland, J; Koritnik, D R; Cefalu, W T

    1993-08-01

    Endocrine studies were performed on fertile and infertile obese men and compared with fertile and infertile nonobese men in order to determine the independent and codependent effects of obesity and fertility status on the male hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal axis. The obese infertile group exhibited significant endocrinologic changes as compared with fertile nonobese control group which was not observed in any of the other three groups. Serum testosterone was significantly lower. The testosterone/estradiol ratio was significantly lower despite a lack of significant change in serum estradiol levels. Serum steroid hormone binding globulin (SHBG) was significantly lower which correlated with elevated bioavailability of both testosterone and estradiol in the obese infertile group. Serum luteinizing hormone levels were no different, suggesting that free testosterone levels were unchanged. Obese infertile men exhibit endocrinologic changes that are not observed in men with either obesity or infertility alone. Reduction of serum SHBG, total testosterone, and testosterone/estradiol ratio appear to be a marker of infertility among obese men.

  5. Testosterone suppression of CRH-stimulated cortisol in men.

    PubMed

    Rubinow, David R; Roca, Catherine A; Schmidt, Peter J; Danaceau, Merry A; Putnam, Karen; Cizza, Giovanni; Chrousos, George; Nieman, Lynnette

    2005-10-01

    Despite observations of age-dependent sexual dimorphisms in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity, the role of androgens in the regulation of HPA axis activity in men has not been examined. We assessed this role by performing CRH stimulation tests in 10 men (ages 18-45 years) during gonadal suppression with leuprolide acetate and during testosterone addition to leuprolide. CRH-stimulated cortisol levels as well as peak cortisol and greatest cortisol excursion were significantly lower (p<0.05, 0.005, and 0.01, respectively) during testosterone replacement compared with the induced hypogonadal condition (leuprolide plus placebo); cortisol area under the curve was lower at a trend level (p<0.1). Paradoxically, CRH-stimulated corticotropin (ACTH) was increased significantly during testosterone replacement (p<0.05). The cortisol : ACTH ratio, a measure of adrenal sensitivity, was lower during testosterone replacement (p<0.1). A mixed effects regression model showed that testosterone but not estradiol or CBG significantly contributed to the variance of cortisol. These data demonstrate that testosterone regulates CRH-stimulated HPA axis activity in men, with the divergent effects on ACTH and cortisol suggesting a peripheral (adrenal) locus for the suppressive effects on cortisol. Our results further demonstrate that the enhanced stimulated HPA axis activity previously described in young men compared with young women cannot be ascribed to an activational upregulation of the axis by testosterone.

  6. Sex Differences in the Association Between Testosterone and Violent Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Assari, Shervin; Caldwell, Cleopatra H.; Zimmerman, Marc A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Research on the association between testosterone and violent behavior has provided conflicting findings. The majority of studies on the association between testosterone and antisocial-violent behaviors has used a clinical sample of severely violent individuals. These studies have mostly assessed males. Objectives: To study sex differences in the association between testosterone and violent behaviors in a community sample of young adults in the United States. Patients and Methods: A longitudinal study of an inner city population on subjects aged from adolescence to adulthood was undertaken. Testosterone and violent behaviors were measured among 257 young adults with an average age of 22 years (range 21 to 23 years). We used regression analysis to test the association between testosterone and violent behaviors in male and female samples. Results: There was a significant positive correlation between testosterone levels and violent behaviors among females, but not males. The association between testosterone levels and violent behaviors among females was significant, as it was above and beyond the effects of socio-economic status, age, education, and race. Conclusions: Our findings provide more information about the biological mechanisms for violent behaviors among young female adults. The study also helps us better understand sex differences in factors associated with violent behaviors in the community. PMID:25337519

  7. Postnatal Testosterone Concentrations and Male Social Development

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Gerianne M.

    2014-01-01

    Converging evidence from over 40 years of behavioral research indicates that higher testicular androgens in prenatal life and at puberty contribute to the masculinization of human behavior. However, the behavioral significance of the transient activation of the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal (HPG) axis in early postnatal life remains largely unknown. Although early research on non-human primates indicated that suppression of the postnatal surge in testicular androgens had no measurable effects on the later expression of the male behavioral phenotype, recent research from our laboratory suggests that postnatal testosterone concentrations influence male infant preferences for larger social groups and temperament characteristics associated with the later development of aggression. In later assessment of gender-linked behavior in the second year of life, concentrations of testosterone at 3–4 months of age were unrelated to toy choices and activity levels during toy play. However, higher concentrations of testosterone predicted less vocalization in toddlers and higher parental ratings on an established screening measure for autism spectrum disorder. These findings suggest a role of the transient activation of the HPG axis in the development of typical and atypical male social relations and suggest that it may be useful in future research on the exaggerated rise in testosterone secretion in preterm infants or exposure to hormone disruptors in early postnatal life to include assessment of gender-relevant behavioral outcomes, including childhood disorders with sex-biased prevalence rates. PMID:24600437

  8. Postnatal testosterone concentrations and male social development.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Gerianne M

    2014-01-01

    Converging evidence from over 40 years of behavioral research indicates that higher testicular androgens in prenatal life and at puberty contribute to the masculinization of human behavior. However, the behavioral significance of the transient activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in early postnatal life remains largely unknown. Although early research on non-human primates indicated that suppression of the postnatal surge in testicular androgens had no measurable effects on the later expression of the male behavioral phenotype, recent research from our laboratory suggests that postnatal testosterone concentrations influence male infant preferences for larger social groups and temperament characteristics associated with the later development of aggression. In later assessment of gender-linked behavior in the second year of life, concentrations of testosterone at 3-4 months of age were unrelated to toy choices and activity levels during toy play. However, higher concentrations of testosterone predicted less vocalization in toddlers and higher parental ratings on an established screening measure for autism spectrum disorder. These findings suggest a role of the transient activation of the HPG axis in the development of typical and atypical male social relations and suggest that it may be useful in future research on the exaggerated rise in testosterone secretion in preterm infants or exposure to hormone disruptors in early postnatal life to include assessment of gender-relevant behavioral outcomes, including childhood disorders with sex-biased prevalence rates.

  9. Oxytocin, testosterone, and human social cognition.

    PubMed

    Crespi, Bernard J

    2016-05-01

    I describe an integrative social-evolutionary model for the adaptive significance of the human oxytocinergic system. The model is based on a role for this hormone in the generation and maintenance of social familiarity and affiliation across five homologous, functionally similar, and sequentially co-opted contexts: mothers with offspring, female and male mates, kin groups, individuals with reciprocity partners, and individuals within cooperating and competing social groups defined by culture. In each situation, oxytocin motivates, mediates and rewards the cognitive and behavioural processes that underlie the formation and dynamics of a more or less stable social group, and promotes a relationship between two or more individuals. Such relationships may be positive (eliciting neurological reward, reducing anxiety and thus indicating fitness-enhancing effects), or negative (increasing anxiety and distress, and thus motivating attempts to alleviate a problematic, fitness-reducing social situation). I also present evidence that testosterone exhibits opposite effects from oxytocin on diverse aspects of cognition and behaviour, most generally by favouring self-oriented, asocial and antisocial behaviours. I apply this model for effects of oxytocin and testosterone to understanding human psychological disorders centrally involving social behaviour. Reduced oxytocin and higher testosterone levels have been associated with under-developed social cognition, especially in autism. By contrast, some combination of oxytocin increased above normal levels, and lower testosterone, has been reported in a notable number of studies of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depression, and, in some cases, higher oxytocin involves maladaptively 'hyper-developed' social cognition in these conditions. This pattern of findings suggests that human social cognition and behaviour are structured, in part, by joint and opposing effects of oxytocin and testosterone, and that extremes of such joint

  10. Testosterone differentially alters cocaine-induced ambulatory and rearing behavioral responses in adult and adolescent rats

    PubMed Central

    Minerly, AnaChristina E.; Wu, Hui Bing K.; Weierstall, Karen M.; Niyomchai, Tipyamol; Kemen, Lynne; Jenab, Shirzad; Quinones-Jenab, Vanya

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the physiological and behavioral effects of testosterone when co-administered with cocaine during adolescence. The present study aimed to determine whether exogenous testosterone administration differentially alters psychomotor responses to cocaine in adolescent and adult male rats. To this end, intact adolescent (30-days-old) and adult (60-day-old) male Fisher rats were pretreated with vehicle (sesame oil) or testosterone (5 or 10 mg/kg) 45 minutes prior to saline or cocaine (20 mg/kg) administration. Behavioral responses were monitored 1 hour after drug treatment, and serum testosterone levels were determined. Serum testosterone levels were affected by age: saline- and cocaine-treated adults in the vehicle groups had higher serum testosterone levels than adolescents rats, but after co-administration of testosterone the adolescent rats had higher serum testosterone levels than the adults. Pretreatment with testosterone affected baseline activity in adolescent rats: 5 mg/kg of testosterone increased both rearing and ambulatory behaviors in saline-treated adolescent rats. After normalizing data to % saline, an interaction between hormone administration and cocaine-induced behavioral responses was observed; 5 mg/kg of testosterone decreased both ambulatory and rearing behaviors among adolescents whereas 10 mg/kg of testosterone decreased only rearing behaviors. Testosterone pretreatment did not alter cocaine-induced behavioral responses in adult rats. These findings suggest that adolescents are more sensitive than adults to an interaction between testosterone and cocaine, and, indirectly, suggest that androgen abuse may lessen cocaine-induced behavioral responses in younger cocaine users. PMID:19822170

  11. The Effect of Testosterone on Men With Andropause

    PubMed Central

    Sofimajidpour, Heshmatollah; Teimoori, Taher; Gharibi, Fardin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Andropause is the gradual reduction of the male sex hormone (testosterone) with increasing age. Its symptoms are sexual dysfunction, weakness, fatigue, insomnia, loss of motivation, mood disorders and reduction of bone density. Treatment of andropause with testosterone has been recently considered. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of testosterone in the treatment of andropause in men. Patients and Methods: For men who met the inclusion criteria (50 years of age and older) laboratory tests and clinical examinations were conducted by an urologist in order to diagnose prostate cancer, prostate disease, urinary tract infection and active urinary retention. After obtaining consent, the patients were enrolled in the study. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20. Descriptive statistics (frequency and percentage, mean, standard deviation) and the paired t-test were used to compare levels of testosterone. To determine the correlation between age and testosterone levels, the Pearson correlation was used. Finally, to compare the treatment processes during the treatment period the repeated measures ANOVA was used. Results: The mean age of patients was 56.57 ± 3.21 years. A total of 31 patients (39%) were smokers, among them 30% smoked daily, 2.5% weekly and 6% smoked for fun. The mean testosterone level before treatment was 240.6 ± 125.4 and at 1, 3 and 6 months after treatment the level was raised, so that at the end of the sixth months it was 578.7 ± 141.7. The level of increase was statistically significant (P = 0.0001). Conclusions: Treatment with testosterone in men over 50 years with andropause will increase testosterone levels and also quality of life, sexual desire, erection, energy levels, ability to exercise and feel the joy of life more than before. Depression was decreased and they had sleepy feelings after dinner. PMID:26756004

  12. Testosterone, cortisol, and human competition.

    PubMed

    Casto, Kathleen V; Edwards, David A

    2016-06-01

    Testosterone and cortisol figure prominently in the research literature having to do with human competition. In this review, we track the history of this literature, concentrating particularly on major theoretical and empirical contributions, and provide commentary on what we see as important unresolved issues. In men and women, athletic competition is typically associated with an increase in testosterone (T) and cortisol (C). Hormone changes in response to non-athletic competition are less predictable. Person (e.g., power motivation, mood, aggressiveness, social anxiety, sex, and baseline levels of T and C) and context (e.g., whether a competition is won or lost, the closeness of the competition, whether the outcome is perceived as being influenced by ability vs. chance, provocations) factors can influence hormone responses to competition. From early on, studies pointed to a positive relationship between T and dominance motivation/status striving. Recent research, however, suggests that this relationship only holds for individuals with low levels of C - this is the core idea of the dual-hormone hypothesis, and it is certain that the broadest applications of the hypothesis have not yet been realized. Individuals differ with respect to the extent to which they embrace competition, but the hormonal correlates of competitiveness remain largely unexplored. Although rapid increases in both T and C associated with competition are likely adaptive, we still know very little about the psychological benefits of these hormonal changes. Administration studies have and will continue to contribute to this inquiry. We close with a discussion of what, we think, are important methodological and mechanistic issues for future research.

  13. Testosterone, cortisol, and human competition.

    PubMed

    Casto, Kathleen V; Edwards, David A

    2016-06-01

    Testosterone and cortisol figure prominently in the research literature having to do with human competition. In this review, we track the history of this literature, concentrating particularly on major theoretical and empirical contributions, and provide commentary on what we see as important unresolved issues. In men and women, athletic competition is typically associated with an increase in testosterone (T) and cortisol (C). Hormone changes in response to non-athletic competition are less predictable. Person (e.g., power motivation, mood, aggressiveness, social anxiety, sex, and baseline levels of T and C) and context (e.g., whether a competition is won or lost, the closeness of the competition, whether the outcome is perceived as being influenced by ability vs. chance, provocations) factors can influence hormone responses to competition. From early on, studies pointed to a positive relationship between T and dominance motivation/status striving. Recent research, however, suggests that this relationship only holds for individuals with low levels of C - this is the core idea of the dual-hormone hypothesis, and it is certain that the broadest applications of the hypothesis have not yet been realized. Individuals differ with respect to the extent to which they embrace competition, but the hormonal correlates of competitiveness remain largely unexplored. Although rapid increases in both T and C associated with competition are likely adaptive, we still know very little about the psychological benefits of these hormonal changes. Administration studies have and will continue to contribute to this inquiry. We close with a discussion of what, we think, are important methodological and mechanistic issues for future research. PMID:27103058

  14. Perinatal testosterone exposure and autistic-like traits in the general population: a longitudinal pregnancy-cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Increased prenatal testosterone exposure has been hypothesized as a mechanism underlying autism spectrum disorders (ASD). However, no studies have prospectively measured prenatal testosterone exposure and ASD. The current study sought to determine whether testosterone concentrations in umbilical cord blood are associated with a clinical diagnosis of ASD in a small number of children and with autistic-like traits in the general population. Methods Umbilical cord blood was collected from 707 children. Samples were analyzed for total (TT) and bioavailable (BioT) testosterone concentrations. Parent report indicated that five individuals had a clinical diagnosis of ASD. Those participants without a diagnosis were approached in early adulthood to complete the Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ), a self-report measure of autistic-like traits, with 184 males (M = 20.10 years; SD= 0.65 years) and 190 females (M = 19.92 years; SD=0.68 years) providing data. Results The BioT and TT concentrations of the five children diagnosed with ASD were within one standard-deviation of the sex-specific means. Spearman’s rank-order coefficients revealed no significant correlations between TT levels and scores on any AQ scale among males (rho range: -.01 to .06) or females (rho value range: -.07 to .01). There was also no significant association between BioT or TT concentrations and AQ scores among males (rho value range: -.07 to .08) or females (rho value range: -.06 to .12). Males were more likely than females to have ‘high’ scores (upper decile) on the AQ scale relating pattern and detail processing. However, the likelihood of a high score on this scale was unrelated to BioT and TT concentrations in both males and females. Conclusions These findings indicate that testosterone concentrations from umbilical cord blood are unrelated to autistic-like traits in the general population. However, the findings do not exclude an association between testosterone exposure in early

  15. Bill color, not badge size, indicates testosterone-related information in house sparrows

    PubMed Central

    Kempenaers, Bart; Dale, James

    2010-01-01

    The honesty of ornamental signals of quality is often argued to be enforced via costs associated with testosterone. It is still poorly understood, however, how seasonal variation of testosterone within individuals is related to the timing and extent of ornament development. Here, we studied inter- and intra-individual variability of plasma testosterone levels in a population of 150 captive male house sparrows (Passer domesticus) through the course of a full year. We further analyzed the relationship between plasma testosterone levels and two sexually dimorphic ornaments: badge size and bill coloration. Also, because of a known negative relation between molt and circulating testosterone levels, we analyzed the relationship between ornamentation and molt status during the fall. We found that testosterone levels increased towards the breeding season and decreased before the onset of annual molt. However, within individuals, relative testosterone titers demonstrated low repeatability between seasons. Plasma testosterone levels were not correlated with badge size in any season but were correlated strongly with bill coloration during all periods, except the breeding season when variation in bill color was low. Finally, we found that bill coloration strongly correlated with molt status during fall. Our results indicate that bill coloration, not badge size, is the best ornamental indicator of a “running average” of male testosterone in house sparrows and therefore the best potential indicator of qualities and/or behavioral strategies associated with testosterone. PMID:20730125

  16. Testosterone treatment in the aging male: myth or reality?

    PubMed

    Nigro, Nicole; Christ-Crain, Mirjam

    2012-03-19

    The definition of late onset hypogonadism in the aging male is controversially debated, and according to the latest literature consists of at least three especially sexual symptoms such as loss of morning erection, low sexual desire and erectile dysfunction as well as a total testosterone <8-11 nmol/l. Testosterone replacement therapy in the aging male has been shown to have a beneficial effect on muscle and fat mass as well as on bone mineral density, with more conflicting effects observed on muscle strength, sexual function, mood and quality of life. The prescriptions for testosterone products for the aging male increased by over 170% in the previous five years. Furthermore, there is a lot of epidemiological data showing an inverse relationship between testosterone levels and obesity, insulin resistance, the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, only few small randomised placebo-controlled studies have investigated the effect of testosterone replacement therapy on insulin resistance and HbA1c levels, with controversial results. Importantly, so far the long-term safety and efficacy of testosterone replacement therapy has not been established. Although until now no clear evidence has been found that testosterone replacement therapy has a causative role in prostate cancer or indeed in changes of the biology of the prostate, in a recent meta-analysis a 4-fold increased risk of prostate-associated event rates in testosterone treated elderly men sounds a note of caution. Also the risk for cardiovascular events is still not clear and caution is warranted especially in elderly men with cardiovascular disease and limited mobility. In summary, the actual available evidence of long-term risks and outcome of testosterone replacement therapy is still very limited and carefully designed placebo-controlled trials of testosterone administration to assess the risks and benefits of such a therapy are required. Until then, testosterone treatment in elderly men

  17. Testosterone and sport: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Wood, Ruth I; Stanton, Steven J

    2012-01-01

    Testosterone and other anabolic-androgenic steroids enhance athletic performance in men and women. As a result, exogenous androgen is banned from most competitive sports. However, due to variability in endogenous secretion, and similarities with exogenous testosterone, it has been challenging to establish allowable limits for testosterone in competition. Endogenous androgen production is dynamically regulated by both exercise and winning in competition. Furthermore, testosterone may promote athletic performance, not only through its long-term anabolic actions, but also through rapid effects on behavior. In women, excess production of endogenous testosterone due to inborn disorders of sexual development (DSD) may convey a competitive advantage. For many years, female competitors have been subject to tests of sexual genotype and phenotype known as gender verification. Although gender verification has not identified any normal man competing as a woman, this process has identified women athletes with DSD. As understanding of DSD has expanded in recent years, women with DSD are increasingly able to continue athletic competition.

  18. Flavonoid Bioavailability and Attempts for Bioavailability Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Thilakarathna, Surangi H.; Rupasinghe, H. P. Vasantha

    2013-01-01

    Flavonoids are a group of phytochemicals that have shown numerous health effects and have therefore been studied extensively. Of the six common food flavonoid classes, flavonols are distributed ubiquitously among different plant foods whereas appreciable amounts of isoflavones are found in leguminous plant-based foods. Flavonoids have shown promising health promoting effects in human cell culture, experimental animal and human clinical studies. They have shown antioxidant, hypocholesterolemic, anti-inflammatory effects as well as ability to modulate cell signaling and gene expression related disease development. Low bioavailability of flavonoids has been a concern as it can limit or even hinder their health effects. Therefore, attempts to improve their bioavailability in order to improve the efficacy of flavonoids are being studied. Further investigations on bioavailability are warranted as it is a determining factor for flavonoid biological activity. PMID:23989753

  19. Bioavailability of cyanide after consumption of a single meal of foods containing high levels of cyanogenic glycosides: a crossover study in humans.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Klaus; Buhrke, Thorsten; Lampen, Alfonso

    2016-03-01

    The acute toxicity of cyanide is determined by its peak levels reached in the body. Compared to the ingestion of free cyanide, lower peak levels may be expected after consumption of foods containing cyanogenic glycosides with the same equivalent dose of cyanide. This is due to possible delayed and/or incomplete release of cyanide from the cyanogenic glycosides depending on many factors. Data on bioavailability of cyanide after consumption of foods containing high levels of cyanogenic glycosides as presented herein were necessary to allow a meaningful risk assessment for these foods. A crossover study was carried out in 12 healthy adults who consumed persipan paste (equivalent total cyanide: 68 mg/kg), linseed (220 mg/kg), bitter apricot kernels (about 3250 mg/kg), and fresh cassava roots (76-150 mg/kg), with each "meal" containing equivalents of 6.8 mg cyanide. Cyanide levels were determined in whole blood using a GC-MS method with K(13)C(15)N as internal standard. Mean levels of cyanide at the different time points were highest after consumption of cassava (15.4 µM, after 37.5 min) and bitter apricot kernels (14.3 µM, after 20 min), followed by linseed (5.7 µM, after 40 min) and 100 g persipan (1.3 µM, after 105 min). The double dose of 13.6 mg cyanide eaten with 200 g persipan paste resulted in a mean peak level of 2.9 µM (after 150 min). An acute reference dose of 0.075 mg/kg body weight was derived being valid for a single application/meal of cyanides or hydrocyanic acid as well as of unprocessed foods with cyanogenic glycosides also containing the accompanying intact β-glucosidase. For some of these foods, this approach may be overly conservative due to delayed release of cyanide, as demonstrated for linseed. In case of missing or inactivated β-glucosidase, the hazard potential is much lower. PMID:25708890

  20. Bioavailability of cyanide after consumption of a single meal of foods containing high levels of cyanogenic glycosides: a crossover study in humans.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Klaus; Buhrke, Thorsten; Lampen, Alfonso

    2016-03-01

    The acute toxicity of cyanide is determined by its peak levels reached in the body. Compared to the ingestion of free cyanide, lower peak levels may be expected after consumption of foods containing cyanogenic glycosides with the same equivalent dose of cyanide. This is due to possible delayed and/or incomplete release of cyanide from the cyanogenic glycosides depending on many factors. Data on bioavailability of cyanide after consumption of foods containing high levels of cyanogenic glycosides as presented herein were necessary to allow a meaningful risk assessment for these foods. A crossover study was carried out in 12 healthy adults who consumed persipan paste (equivalent total cyanide: 68 mg/kg), linseed (220 mg/kg), bitter apricot kernels (about 3250 mg/kg), and fresh cassava roots (76-150 mg/kg), with each "meal" containing equivalents of 6.8 mg cyanide. Cyanide levels were determined in whole blood using a GC-MS method with K(13)C(15)N as internal standard. Mean levels of cyanide at the different time points were highest after consumption of cassava (15.4 µM, after 37.5 min) and bitter apricot kernels (14.3 µM, after 20 min), followed by linseed (5.7 µM, after 40 min) and 100 g persipan (1.3 µM, after 105 min). The double dose of 13.6 mg cyanide eaten with 200 g persipan paste resulted in a mean peak level of 2.9 µM (after 150 min). An acute reference dose of 0.075 mg/kg body weight was derived being valid for a single application/meal of cyanides or hydrocyanic acid as well as of unprocessed foods with cyanogenic glycosides also containing the accompanying intact β-glucosidase. For some of these foods, this approach may be overly conservative due to delayed release of cyanide, as demonstrated for linseed. In case of missing or inactivated β-glucosidase, the hazard potential is much lower.

  1. Genetic Polymorphisms Related to Testosterone Metabolism in Intellectually Gifted Boys

    PubMed Central

    Celec, Peter; Tretinárová, Denisa; Minárik, Gabriel; Ficek, Andrej; Szemes, Tomáš; Lakatošová, Silvia; Schmidtová, Eva; Turňa, Ján; Kádaši, Ľudevít; Ostatníková, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Prepubertal testosterone levels are lower in intellectually gifted boys. The aim of this pilot study was to analyze potential genetic factors related to testosterone metabolism in control and gifted boys. Intellectually gifted (IQ>130; n = 95) and control (n = 67) boys were genotyped. Polymorphisms of interests were chosen in genes including androgen and estrogen receptors, 5-alpha reductase, aromatase and sex hormone binding globulin. Significant differences between control and gifted boys in genotype distributions were found for ESR2 (rs928554) and SHBG (rs1799941). A significantly lower number of CAG repeats in the AR gene were found in gifted boys. Our results support the role of genetic factors related to testosterone metabolism in intellectual giftedness. Increased androgen signaling might explain previous results of lower testosterone levels in intellectually gifted boys and add to the understanding of variability in cognitive abilities. PMID:23382957

  2. Genetic polymorphisms related to testosterone metabolism in intellectually gifted boys.

    PubMed

    Celec, Peter; Tretinárová, Denisa; Minárik, Gabriel; Ficek, Andrej; Szemes, Tomáš; Lakatošová, Silvia; Schmidtová, Eva; Turňa, Ján; Kádaši, Ľudevít; Ostatníková, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Prepubertal testosterone levels are lower in intellectually gifted boys. The aim of this pilot study was to analyze potential genetic factors related to testosterone metabolism in control and gifted boys. Intellectually gifted (IQ>130; n = 95) and control (n = 67) boys were genotyped. Polymorphisms of interests were chosen in genes including androgen and estrogen receptors, 5-alpha reductase, aromatase and sex hormone binding globulin. Significant differences between control and gifted boys in genotype distributions were found for ESR2 (rs928554) and SHBG (rs1799941). A significantly lower number of CAG repeats in the AR gene were found in gifted boys. Our results support the role of genetic factors related to testosterone metabolism in intellectual giftedness. Increased androgen signaling might explain previous results of lower testosterone levels in intellectually gifted boys and add to the understanding of variability in cognitive abilities.

  3. [The importance of testosterone in the treatment of metabolic syndrome in men].

    PubMed

    Kempisty-Zdebik, Ewa; Zdebik, Aleksander

    2012-01-01

    Testosterone deficiency syndrome is being seen in increasing percentage of men with middle and old age. Besides the typical deterioration of sexual function there is predisposition to metabolic syndrome and increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. The similarity of the effects of testosterone substitution and the dietary treatment led the authors to a retrospective analysis of patient data treated for testosterone deficiency syndrome. Data on 341 patients aged over 45 years with metabolic syndrome and diabetes, meeting criteria for the diagnosis of testosterone deficiency syndrome were divided into 5 groups: T--testosterone substitution without additional diet, T-Low-Carb--testosterone and low carbohydrate diet, T-Fat-Low--testosterone and low fat diet, Carb-Low--only low carbohydrate diet, Fat-Low--only low fat diet. We analyzed change in body weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting glucose, HbAlc, HDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels within 6 months from the start of observation. The best results of all investigated parameters were obtained in patients treated with testosterone and low-carbohydrate diet and in the group treated with testosterone and low-fat diet. Slightly worse results in the group received the same diets and the worst in the group treated only with testosterone. The improvement obtained in the total testosterone therapy and diet was much greater than the simple sum of the effects of both methods witch suggests the existence of synergies. PMID:22764516

  4. Testosterone Lab Testing and Initiation in the United Kingdom and the United States, 2000 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongmei; Meier, Christoph R.; Sharpless, Julie L.; Stürmer, Til; Jick, Susan S.; Brookhart, M. Alan

    2014-01-01

    Context: New formulations, increased marketing, and wider recognition of declining testosterone levels in older age may have contributed to wider testosterone testing and supplementation in many countries. Objective: Our objective was to describe testosterone testing and testosterone treatment in men in the United Kingdom and United States. Design: This was a retrospective incident user cohort. Setting: We evaluated commercial and Medicare insurance claims from the United States and general practitioner healthcare records from the United Kingdom for the years 2000 through 2011. Participants: We identified 410 019 US men and 6858 UK men who initiated a testosterone formulation as well as 1 114 329 US men and 66 140 UK men with a new testosterone laboratory measurement. Main Outcome Measures: Outcome measures included initiation of any injected testosterone, implanted testosterone pellets, or prescribed transdermal or oral testosterone formulation. Results: Testosterone testing and supplementation have increased pronouncedly in the United States. Increased testing in the United Kingdom has identified more men with low levels, yet US testing has increased among men with normal levels. Men in the United States tend to initiate at normal levels more often than in the United Kingdom, and many men initiate testosterone without recent testing. Gels have become the most common initial treatment in both countries. Conclusions: Testosterone testing and use has increased over the past decade, particularly in the United States, with dramatic shifts from injections to gels. Substantial use is seen in men without recent testing and in US men with normal levels. Given widening use despite safety and efficacy questions, prescribers must consider the medical necessity of testosterone before initiation. PMID:24423353

  5. Single-nucleotide polymorphism, rs1799941 in the Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin (SHBG) gene, related to both serum testosterone and SHBG levels and the risk of myocardial infarction, type 2 diabetes, cancer and mortality in men: the Tromsø Study.

    PubMed

    Svartberg, J; Schirmer, H; Wilsgaard, T; Mathiesen, E B; Njølstad, I; Løchen, M-L; Jorde, R

    2014-03-01

    Low testosterone levels are associated with metabolic and cardiovascular disease risk factor, and have been shown to predict type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), myocardial infarction (MI) and all-cause mortality. It is not known if these associations are causal or not. Recently, it has been shown that the serum testosterone levels are associated with single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and we therefore studied the associations between one of these SNPs, rs1799941 on the Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin (SHBG) gene, and MI, T2DM, cancer and death. DNA was prepared from men who participated in the fourth survey of the Tromsø Study in 1994-1995 and who were registered with the endpoints MI, T2DM, cancer or death and a randomly selected control group. For mortality, the observation time was set from 1994, and for the other endpoints from birth. The endpoint data were completed up to 2010-2013. Genetic analyses were successfully performed in 5309 men, of whom 1454 were registered with MI, 638 with T2DM, 1534 with cancer and in 2226 who had died. Men with the minor homozygote genotype had significantly higher levels of total testosterone (14.7%) and SHBG (24.7%) compared with men with the major homozygote genotype, whereas free testosterone levels did not differ significantly between the genotypes. The SNP rs1799941 was not significantly associated with MI, T2DM, cancer or mortality. Thus, our result does not support a causal relationship between total testosterone and SHBG and MI, T2DM, cancer or mortality, suggesting that low testosterone more likely is a marker of poor health.

  6. Seasonal aggression independent of seasonal testosterone in wood rats.

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, G S; Glickman, S E; Smith, E R

    1984-01-01

    Levels of inter-male aggression, both in laboratory encounters and in the field, rise dramatically during the breeding season, closely paralleling the seasonal rise in testosterone. However, post-pubertally castrated males also show the dramatic seasonal rise in aggression in laboratory encounters with castrated opponents and show no decrement in fighting ability when paired with intact opponents, clearly demonstrating the independence of seasonal aggression from the proximate modulating effects of testosterone in wood rats. PMID:6591190

  7. Risks of testosterone replacement therapy in men

    PubMed Central

    Osterberg, E. Charles; Bernie, Aaron M.; Ramasamy, Ranjith

    2014-01-01

    Testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) is a widely used treatment for men with symptomatic hypogonadism. The benefits seen with TRT, such as increased libido and energy level, beneficial effects on bone density, strength and muscle as well as cardioprotective effects, have been well-documented. TRT is contraindicated in men with untreated prostate and breast cancer. Men on TRT should be monitored for side-effects such as polycythemia, peripheral edema, cardiac and hepatic dysfunction. PMID:24497673

  8. What does testosterone do for red deer males?

    PubMed Central

    Malo, A.F.; Roldan, E.R.S.; Garde, J.J.; Soler, A.J.; Vicente, J.; Gortazar, C.; Gomendio, M.

    2008-01-01

    Testosterone has been proposed to have a dual effect, enhancing sexual traits while depressing parasite resistance in males. Here, we test this hypothesis in red deer, examining males from captive populations during the whole annual cycle and males from natural populations during the breeding season. We first explored the effects of body size, age and sampling date on testosterone to avoid confounding effects. Our results show that in captive populations seasonal changes in testosterone levels were mirrored by changes in testes size, and that during the rut there was a strong correlation between both. In natural populations, males with higher testosterone levels had larger testes, improved sperm quality, smaller burr diameter, stronger antlers, higher haematocrit levels, and increased nematode parasite load. By contrast, no significant relationship was found between testosterone and spleen size or tick parasite load. We conclude that testosterone (i) improves males' reproductive investment and physical stamina, (ii) improves antler strength but reduces burr diameter, and (iii) imposes a cost in terms of depressed parasite resistance. PMID:19129132

  9. The Relationship between Testosterone Deficiency and Men's Health.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, Akira

    2013-08-01

    Testosterone is important in the physiology of various organs and tissues. The serum testosterone concentration gradually declines as one of the processes of aging. Thus, the concept of late-onset hypogonadism has gained increasing attention in the last few years. Reported symptoms of late-onset hypogonadism are easily recognized and include diminished sexual desire and erectile quality, particularly in nocturnal erections, changes in mood with concomitant decreases in intellectual activity and spatial orientation, fatigue, depression and anger, a decrease in lean body mass with associated decreases in muscle volume and strength, a decrease in body hair and skin alterations, and decreased bone mineral density resulting in osteoporosis. Among these various symptoms, sexual dysfunction has been the most common and necessary to treat in the field of urology. It is well known that a low serum testosterone level is associated with erectile dysfunction and hypoactive sexual libido and that testosterone replacement treatment can improve these symptoms in patients with hypogonadism. Recently, in addition to sexual dysfunction, a close relationship between metabolic syndrome, characterized by central obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension, and late-onset hypogonadism has been highlighted by several epidemiologic studies. Several randomized control trials have shown that testosterone replacement treatment significantly decreases insulin resistance in addition to its advantage for obesity. Furthermore, metabolic syndrome is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease, and a low serum testosterone level is closely related to the development of atherosclerosis. Presently, it is speculated that a low serum testosterone level may increase the risk for cardiovascular disease. Thus, testosterone is a key molecule in men's health, especially that of elderly men. PMID:24044107

  10. Testosterone precursors: use and abuse in pediatric athletes.

    PubMed

    Smurawa, Troy M; Congeni, Joseph A

    2007-08-01

    The dietary supplements androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone, and androstenediol are precursors in the endogenous production of testosterone. The efficacy and safety of these prohormones are not well established but are promoted to have the same androgenic effects on building muscle mass and strength as anabolic-androgenic steroids. Studies have demonstrated repeatedly that acute and long-term administration of these oral testosterone precursors does not effectively increase serum testosterone levels and fails to produce any significant changes in lean body mass, muscle strength, or performance improvement compared with placebo. The Anabolic Steroid Control Act of 2004 lists androstenedione as a schedule III controlled substance, and it is regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Testosterone precursors are banned by most major sports organizations.

  11. Testosterone Supplementation Therapy in the Treatment of Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kovac, Jason R.; Pastuszak, Alexander W.; Lamb, Dolores J.; Lipshultz, Larry I.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a clinical complex of risk factors including increased waist circumference, high triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol, high blood pressure and insulin resistance whose presence increases the likelihood of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. With a quarter of the American adult population affected, MetS has been referred to as the most significant public health threat of the 21st century. While lifestyle modification and weight loss are recommended, no specific pharmacological treatment is known. Given that low levels of testosterone have been implicated in the pathogenesis of MetS and an inverse relationship exists between circulating testosterone and the development of MetS, it is tempting to speculate that men with MetS may benefit from testosterone supplementation therapy (TST). As such, this review seeks to examine the role of testosterone and the use of TST as a treatment modality in men with MetS. PMID:25387223

  12. Is rising obesity causing a secular (age-independent) decline in testosterone among American men?

    PubMed

    Mazur, Allan; Westerman, Ronny; Mueller, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    The testosterone of men in industrial societies peaks in their twenties and tends to decline with increasing age. Apart from this individual-level decline, there have been reports of a secular (age-independent population-level) decline in testosterone among American and Scandinavian men during the past few decades, possibly an indication of declining male reproductive health. It has been suggested that both declines in testosterone (individual-level and population-level) are due to increasing male obesity because men in industrial society tend to add body fat as they age, and overall rates of obesity are increasing. Using an unusually large and lengthy longitudinal dataset (991 US Air Force veterans examined in six cycles over 20 years), we investigate the relationship of obesity to individual and population-level declines in testosterone. Over twenty years of study, longitudinal decline in mean testosterone was at least twice what would be expected from cross-sectional estimates of the aging decline. Men who put on weight intensified their testosterone decline, some greatly so, but even among those who held their weight constant or lost weight during the study, mean testosterone declined 117 ng/dl (19%) over 20 years. We have not identified the reason for secular decline in testosterone, but we exclude increasing obesity as a sufficient or primary explanation, and we deny the supposition that men who avoid excessive weight will maintain their youthful levels of testosterone.

  13. Low Serum Testosterone Increases Mortality Risk among Male Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Carrero, Juan Jesús; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Parini, Paolo; Arver, Stefan; Lindholm, Bengt; Bárány, Peter; Heimbürger, Olof; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Men treated with hemodialysis (HD) have a very poor prognosis and an elevated risk of premature cardiovascular disease (CVD). In the general population, associations between low testosterone concentrations and cardiovascular risk have been suggested. We performed a prospective observational study involving a well characterized cohort of 126 men treated with HD to examine the relationship between testosterone concentration and subsequent mortality during a mean follow-up period of 41 mo. Independent of age, serum creatinine, and sexual hormone binding globulin (SHBG), testosterone levels inversely and strongly associated with the inflammatory markers IL-6 and CRP. Patients with a clinical history of CVD had significantly lower testosterone levels. During follow up, 65 deaths occurred, 58% of which were a result of CVD. Men with testosterone values in the lowest tertile had increased all-cause and CVD mortality (crude hazard ratios [HRs] 2.03 [95% CI 1.24 to 3.31] and 3.19 [1.49 to 6.83], respectively), which persisted after adjustment for age, SHBG, previous CVD, diabetes, ACEi/ARB treatment, albumin, and inflammatory markers, but was lost after adjustment for creatinine. In summary, among men treated with HD, testosterone concentrations inversely correlate with all-cause and CVD-related mortality, as well as with markers of inflammation. Hypogonadism may be an additional treatable risk factor for patients with chronic kidney disease. PMID:19144759

  14. Low serum testosterone increases mortality risk among male dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Carrero, Juan Jesús; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Parini, Paolo; Arver, Stefan; Lindholm, Bengt; Bárány, Peter; Heimbürger, Olof; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2009-03-01

    Men treated with hemodialysis (HD) have a very poor prognosis and an elevated risk of premature cardiovascular disease (CVD). In the general population, associations between low testosterone concentrations and cardiovascular risk have been suggested. We performed a prospective observational study involving a well characterized cohort of 126 men treated with HD to examine the relationship between testosterone concentration and subsequent mortality during a mean follow-up period of 41 mo. Independent of age, serum creatinine, and sexual hormone binding globulin (SHBG), testosterone levels inversely and strongly associated with the inflammatory markers IL-6 and CRP. Patients with a clinical history of CVD had significantly lower testosterone levels. During follow up, 65 deaths occurred, 58% of which were a result of CVD. Men with testosterone values in the lowest tertile had increased all-cause and CVD mortality (crude hazard ratios [HRs] 2.03 [95% CI 1.24 to 3.31] and 3.19 [1.49 to 6.83], respectively), which persisted after adjustment for age, SHBG, previous CVD, diabetes, ACEi/ARB treatment, albumin, and inflammatory markers, but was lost after adjustment for creatinine. In summary, among men treated with HD, testosterone concentrations inversely correlate with all-cause and CVD-related mortality, as well as with markers of inflammation. Hypogonadism may be an additional treatable risk factor for patients with chronic kidney disease.

  15. Supra-physiological dose of testosterone induces pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Pirompol, Prapawadee; Teekabut, Vassana; Weerachatyanukul, Wattana; Bupha-Intr, Tepmanas; Wattanapermpool, Jonggonnee

    2016-04-01

    Testosterone and androgenic anabolic steroids have been misused for enhancement of physical performance despite many reports on cardiac sudden death. Although physiological level of testosterone provided many regulatory benefits to human health, including the cardiovascular function, supra-physiological levels of the hormone induce hypertrophy of the heart with unclear contractile activation. In this study, dose- and time-dependent effects of high-testosterone treatment on cardiac structure and function were evaluated. Adult male rats were divided into four groups of testosterone treatment for 0, 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg BW for 4, 8, or 12 weeks. Increases in both percentage heart:body weight ratio and cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area in representing hypertrophy of the heart were significantly shown in all testosterone-treated groups to the same degree. In 4-week-treated rats, physiological cardiac hypertrophy was apparent with an upregulation of α-MHC without any change in myofilament contractile activation. In contrast, pathological cardiac hypertrophy was observed in 8- and 12-week testosterone-treated groups, as indicated by suppression of myofilament activation and myocardial collagen deposition without transition of MHC isoforms. Only in 12-week testosterone-treated group, eccentric cardiac hypertrophy was demonstrated with unaltered myocardial stiffness, but significant reductions in the phosphorylation signals of ERK1/2 and mTOR. Results of our study suggest that the outcome of testosterone-induced cardiac hypertrophy is not dose dependent but is rather relied on the factor of exposure to duration in inducing maladaptive responses of the heart. PMID:26850730

  16. Long-Duration Space Flight and Bed Rest Effects on Testosterone and Other Steroids

    PubMed Central

    Heer, Martina; Wang, Zuwei; Huntoon, Carolyn L.; Zwart, Sara R.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Limited data suggest that testosterone is decreased during space flight, which could contribute to bone and muscle loss. Objective: The main objective was to assess testosterone and hormone status in long- and short-duration space flight and bed rest environments and to determine relationships with other physiological systems, including bone and muscle. Design: Blood and urine samples were collected before, during, and after long-duration space flight. Samples were also collected before and after 12- to 14-d missions and from participants in 30- to 90-d bed rest studies. Setting: Space flight studies were conducted on the International Space Station and before and after Space Shuttle missions. Bed rest studies were conducted in a clinical research center setting. Data from Skylab missions are also presented. Participants: All of the participants were male, and they included 15 long-duration and nine short-duration mission crew members and 30 bed rest subjects. Main Outcome Measures: Serum total, free, and bioavailable testosterone were measured along with serum and urinary cortisol, serum dehydroepiandrosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, and SHBG. Results: Total, free, and bioavailable testosterone was not changed during long-duration space flight but were decreased (P < 0.01) on landing day after these flights and after short-duration space flight. There were no changes in other hormones measured. Testosterone concentrations dropped before and soon after bed rest, but bed rest itself had no effect on testosterone. Conclusions: There was no evidence for decrements in testosterone during long-duration space flight or bed rest. PMID:22049169

  17. Testosterone is negatively associated with the severity of coronary atherosclerosis in men.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Guo, Chang-Yan; Jia, En-Zhi; Zhu, Tie-Bing; Wang, Lian-Sheng; Cao, Ke-Jiang; Ma, Wen-Zhu; Yang, Zhi-Jian

    2012-11-01

    This study aimed to determine whether plasma testosterone is associated with the severity of coronary atherosclerosis in a group of 803 men who underwent elective coronary angiography. Testosterone levels were measured in 803 male patients who were categorized into three groups according to testosterone level tertiles. All patients underwent elective coronary angiography, and the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD) was determined by the Gensini score. Moreover, patients were classified into two groups according to Gensini scores (score ≤26 and score >26) using the median values as cutoff points. The plasma testosterone levels were measured by an ELISA kit. The level of testosterone was negatively associated with the Gensini score (r=-0.188; P=0.000). A multiple linear regression analysis revealed that testosterone was an independent risk factor for the Gensini score (β=-0.110; P=0.002) after adjusting for confounding covariates. In a multivariate logistic regression model, the severity of CAD was shown to be significantly lower in the third tertile (highest) of testosterone compared to the first tertile (lowest) of testosterone (odds ratio (OR)=0.465; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.327-0.662; P=0.000). In this study, patients with lower testosterone levels had higher Gensini scores in a group of 803 men who underwent elective coronary angiography. Additional studies are needed to clarify the direction of causality and possible underlying mechanisms. PMID:23042448

  18. The Effects of Testosterone on Oxidative Stress Markers in Mice with Spinal Cord Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Choobineh, Hamid; Sadighi Gilani, Mohammad Ali; Pasalar, Parvin; Jahanzad, Issa; Ghorbani, Rostam; Hassanzadeh, Gholamreza

    2016-01-01

    Background Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes infertility in male patients through erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory dysfunction, semen and hormone abnormalities. Oxidative stress (OS) is involved in poor semen quality and subsequent infertility in males with SCI. The aim of this study is to examine the effects of SCI on the level of testosterone hormone. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, we evaluated the effects of exogenous testosterone on the activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) as well as the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein carbonylation (PCO), as markers of OS, in 10 groups of SCI mice. Total antioxidant capacity (TAC) was determined using the 2,29-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline- 6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical cation assay. Results Exogenous testosterone administration in mice with SCI significantly reduced SOD and GPx enzyme activities and MDA level. There was no significant decrease in PCO content. In addition, TAC remarkably increased in the sham and SCI groups not treated with testosterone but remained unchanged in all other experimental groups. Exogenous testosterone also reduced serum testosterone levels in all groups except the positive control group. Conclusion Our cumulative data indicated that SCI could cause sterility by disturbing the plasmatic testosterone balance. The normal level of endogenous testosterone was not completely restored by exogenous testosterone administration. PMID:27123205

  19. The biocide tributyltin reduces the accumulation of testosterone as fatty acid esters in the mud snail (Ilyanassa obsoleta).

    PubMed Central

    Gooding, Meredith P; Wilson, Vickie S; Folmar, Leroy C; Marcovich, Dragoslav T; LeBlanc, Gerald A

    2003-01-01

    Imposex, the development of male sex characteristics by female gonochoristic snails, has been documented globally and is causally associated with exposure to the ubiquitous environmental contaminant tributyltin (TBT). Elevated testosterone levels in snails also are associated with TBT, and direct exposure to testosterone has been shown to cause imposex. We discovered previously that the mud snail (Ilyanassa obsoleta)biotransforms and retains excess testosterone primarily as fatty acid esters. The purpose of this study was to determine whether TBT interferes with the esterification of testosterone, resulting in the elevated free (unesterified) testosterone levels associated with imposex. Exposure of snails to environmentally relevant concentrations of TBT (> or = 1.0 ng/L as tin) significantly increased the incidence of imposex. Total (free + esterified) testosterone levels in snails were not altered by TBT; however, free testosterone levels increased with increasing exposure concentration of TBT. TBT-exposed snails were given [14C

  20. Growing Up Or Growing Old? Cellular Aging Linked With Testosterone Reactivity To Stress In Youth

    PubMed Central

    Drury, Stacy S.; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A.; Shachet, Andrew; Phan, Jenny; Mabile, Emily; Brett, Zoë H.; Wren, Michael; Esteves, Kyle; Theall, Katherine P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Given the established relation between testosterone and aging in older adults, we tested whether buccal telomere length (TL), an established cellular biomarker of aging, was associated with testosterone levels in youth. Methods Children, mean age 10.2 years, were recruited from the greater New Orleans area and salivary testosterone was measured during both an acute stressor and diurnally. Buccal TL was measured using monochrome multiplex quantitative real-time PCR (MMQ-PCR). Testosterone and telomere length data was available on 77 individuals. The association between buccal TL and testosterone was tested using multivariate Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) to account for clustering of children within families. Results Greater peak testosterone levels (β=-0.87, p < 0.01) and slower recovery (β=-0.56, p < 0.01) and reactivity (β = -1.22, p < 0.01) following a social stressor were significantly associated with shorter buccal TL after controlling for parental age at conception, child age, sex, sociodemographic factors and puberty. No association was initially present between diurnal measurements of testosterone or morning basal testosterone levels and buccal TL. Sex significantly moderated the relation between testosterone reactivity and buccal TL. Conclusions The association between testosterone and buccal TL supports gonadal maturation as a developmentally sensitive biomarker of aging within youth. As stress levels of testosterone were significantly associated with buccal TL, these findings are consistent with the growing literature linking stress exposure and accelerated maturation. The lack of association of diurnal testosterone or morning basal levels with buccal TL bolsters the notion of a shared stress-related maturational mechanism between cellular stress and the hypothalamic pituitary gonadal (HPG) axis. These data provide novel evidence supporting the interaction of aging, physiologic stress and cellular processes as an underlying

  1. Racial/Ethnic Differences in Sex Hormone Levels among Postmenopausal Women in the Diabetes Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Sherita Hill; Mather, Kieren J.; Laughlin, Gail A.; Kong, Shengchun; Nan, Bin; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Randolph, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Sex hormones may differ by race/ethnicity in postmenopausal women. Whether racial/ethnic differences also exist among those who are overweight and glucose intolerant is not clear. Objectives: The objective of the study was to compare sex hormones by race/ethnicity [non-Hispanic white (NHW), Hispanic, African-American (AA)] in overweight, glucose-intolerant, postmenopausal women. Design: This was a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial. Participants: Participants included postmenopausal glucose-intolerant women participating in the Diabetes Prevention Program. Interventions: Interventions included intensive lifestyle modification (consisting of diet and physical activity) or metformin 850 mg twice a day vs. placebo. Main Outcome Measures: Baseline levels and 1-yr intervention-related changes in SHBG, total and bioavailable estradiol (E2), total and bioavailable testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone were measured. Results: At baseline, among women not using estrogen (n = 370), NHW had higher total and bioavailable E2 and testosterone levels than Hispanics independent of age, type of menopause, waist circumference, alcohol intake, and current smoking. NHW also had higher levels of bioavailable E2 and lower levels of SHBG than AA. At baseline, among estrogen users (n = 310), NHW had higher total and bioavailable E2 than Hispanics and higher levels of SHBG than AA after adjustment. At 1 yr, among women not using estrogen, NHW had larger declines in total E2 and bioavailable E2 levels than AA after adjustment for the above covariates, changes in waist circumference, and randomization arm. At 1 yr, among estrogen users, sex hormone changes did not differ by race/ethnicity. Conclusions: Among postmenopausal women, there were significant race/ethnicity differences in baseline sex hormones and changes in sex hormones. PMID:22879633

  2. Testosterone deficiency and cardiovascular mortality

    PubMed Central

    Morgentaler, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    New concerns have been raised regarding cardiovascular (CV) risks with testosterone (T) therapy (TTh). These concerns are based primarily on two widely reported retrospective studies. However, methodological flaws and data errors invalidate both studies as credible evidence of risk. One showed reduced adverse events by half in T-treated men but reversed this result using an unproven statistical approach. The authors subsequently acknowledged serious data errors including nearly 10% contamination of the dataset by women. The second study mistakenly used the rate of T prescriptions written by healthcare providers to men with recent myocardial infarction (MI) as a proxy for the naturally occurring rate of MI. Numerous studies suggest T is beneficial, including decreased mortality in association with TTh, reduced MI rate with TTh in men with the greatest MI risk prognosis, and reduced CV and overall mortality with higher serum levels of endogenous T. Randomized controlled trials have demonstrated benefits of TTh in men with coronary artery disease and congestive heart failure. Improvement in CV risk factors such as fat mass and glycemic control have been repeatedly demonstrated in T-deficient men treated with T. The current evidence does not support the belief that TTh is associated with increased CV risk or CV mortality. On the contrary, a wealth of evidence accumulated over several decades suggests that low serum T levels are associated with increased risk and that higher endogenous T, as well as TTh itself, appear to be beneficial for CV mortality and risk. PMID:25432501

  3. Testosterone, cortisol and anxiety in elite field hockey players.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Raúl; Jiménez, Manuel; Alvero-Cruz, José R

    2013-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the change in the levels of testosterone and cortisol after victory and defeat in male field hockey players during an important tournament. In the beginning of the game series, the players were ranked very closely to achieve (for the first time) the championship rising to The Honor Division-A, the highest status national category. The first game resulted in a 7-4 victory, the second game resulted in a 6-1 victory, and the third game resulted in a 1-2 defeat. As expected, there were changes in testosterone levels after the competition, dropping in the game which ended in defeat, and rising slightly in the two games which ended in victory; there were also changes in cortisol levels, rising in the game which ended in defeat, and showing no variations in the games which ended in victory; correlational analyses congruently showed that defeat led to rises in cortisol whereas victory led to rises in testosterone; anticipatory somatic anxiety was related to cortisol levels prior to games, and physical exertion during competition was related to the change in testosterone levels (suggesting an inhibitory effect) but not to the change in cortisol levels. Hence, this pattern of hormonal responses to a real-life dominance challenge complied with Mazur's (1985) [16] biosocial model of status and dominance motivation, by showing that testosterone and cortisol are linked to victory and defeat in a theoretically predictable fashion.

  4. Mechanism of Testosterone Deficiency in the Transgenic Sickle Cell Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Musicki, Biljana; Zhang, Yuxi; Chen, Haolin; Brown, Terry R.; Zirkin, Barry R.; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone deficiency is associated with sickle cell disease (SCD), but its underlying mechanism is not known. We investigated the possible occurrence and mechanism of testosterone deficiency in a mouse model of human SCD. Transgenic sickle male mice (Sickle) exhibited decreased serum and intratesticular testosterone and increased luteinizing hormone (LH) levels compared with wild type (WT) mice, indicating primary hypogonadism in Sickle mice. LH-, dbcAMP-, and pregnenolone- (but not 22-hydroxycholesterol)- stimulated testosterone production by Leydig cells isolated from the Sickle mouse testis was decreased compared to that of WT mice, implying defective Leydig cell steroidogenesis. There also was reduced protein expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR), but not cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), in the Sickle mouse testis. These data suggest that the capacity of P450scc to support testosterone production may be limited by the supply of cholesterol to the mitochondria in Sickle mice. The sickle mouse testis exhibited upregulated NADPH oxidase subunit gp91phox and increased oxidative stress, measured as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, and unchanged protein expression of an antioxidant glutathione peroxidase-1. Mice heterozygous for the human sickle globin (Hemi) exhibited intermediate hypogonadal changes between those of WT and Sickle mice. These results demonstrate that testosterone deficiency occurs in Sickle mice, mimicking the human condition. The defects in the Leydig cell steroidogenic pathway in Sickle mice, mainly due to reduced availability of cholesterol for testosterone production, may be related to NADPH oxidase-derived oxidative stress. Our findings suggest that targeting testicular oxidative stress or steroidogenesis mechanisms in SCD offers a potential treatment for improving phenotypic changes associated with testosterone deficiency in this disease. PMID:26023917

  5. Prenatal testosterone excess reduces sperm count and motility.

    PubMed

    Recabarren, Sergio E; Rojas-García, Pedro P; Recabarren, Mónica P; Alfaro, Victor H; Smith, Rosita; Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Sir-Petermann, Teresa

    2008-12-01

    The reproductive system is extremely susceptible to insults from exposure to exogenous steroids during development. Excess prenatal testosterone exposure programs neuroendocrine, ovarian, and metabolic deficits in the female, features seen in women with polycystic ovary disease. The objective of this study was to determine whether prenatal testosterone excess also disrupts the male reproductive system, using sheep as a model system. The extent of reproductive disruption was tested by assessing sperm quantity and quality as well as Leydig cell responsiveness to human chorionic gonadotropin. Males born to mothers treated with 30 mg testosterone propionate twice weekly from d 30 to 90 and with 40 mg testosterone propionate from d 90 to 120 of pregnancy (T-males) showed a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in body weight, scrotal circumference, and sperm count compared with control males. Mean straight line velocity of sperms was also lower in T-males (P < 0.05). Circulating testosterone levels in response to the human chorionic gonadotropin did not differ between groups. These findings demonstrate that exposure to excess testosterone during fetal development has a negative impact on reproductive health of the male offspring, raising concerns relative to unintended human exposure to steroidal mimics in the environment.

  6. A microcosm study to support aquatic risk assessment of nickel: Community-level effects and comparison with bioavailability-normalized species sensitivity distributions.

    PubMed

    Hommen, Udo; Knopf, Burkhard; Rüdel, Heinz; Schäfers, Christoph; De Schamphelaere, Karel; Schlekat, Chris; Garman, Emily Rogevich

    2016-05-01

    The aquatic risk assessment for nickel (Ni) in the European Union is based on chronic species sensitivity distributions and the use of bioavailability models. To test whether a bioavailability-based safe threshold of Ni (the hazardous concentration for 5% of species [HC5]) is protective for aquatic communities, microcosms were exposed to 5 stable Ni treatments (6-96 μg/L) and a control for 4 mo to assess bioaccumulation and effects on phytoplankton, periphyton, zooplankton, and snails. Concentrations of Ni in the periphyton, macrophytes, and snails measured at the end of the exposure period increased in a dose-dependent manner but did not indicate biomagnification. Abundance of phytoplankton and snails decreased in 48 μg Ni/L and 96 μg Ni/L treatments, which may have indirectly affected the abundance of zooplankton and periphyton. Exposure up to 24 μg Ni/L had no adverse effects on algae and zooplankton, whereas the rate of population decline of the snails at 24 μg Ni/L was significantly higher than in the controls. Therefore, the study-specific overall no-observed-adverse-effect concentration (NOAEC) is 12 μg Ni/L. This NOAEC is approximately twice the HC5 derived from a chronic species sensitivity distribution considering the specific water chemistry of the microcosm by means of bioavailability models. Thus, the present study provides support to the protectiveness of the bioavailability-normalized HC5 for freshwater communities.

  7. Testosterone during Pregnancy and Gender Role Behavior of Preschool Children: A Longitudinal, Population Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hines, Melissa; Golombok, Susan; Rust, John; Johnston, Katie J.; Golding, Jean

    2002-01-01

    Related blood levels of testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin in pregnant women to gender role behavior among 342 male and 337 female offspring at 3.5 years. Found that testosterone levels related linearly to girls' gender role behavior. Neither hormone related to boys' gender role behavior. Other factors, including older brothers or…

  8. The female menstrual cycle does not influence testosterone concentrations in male partners

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The time of ovulation has since long been believed to be concealed to male heterosexual partners. Recent studies have, however, called for revision of this notion. For example, male testosterone concentrations have been shown to increase in response to olfactory ovulation cues, which could be biologically relevant by increasing sexual drive and aggressiveness. However, this phenomenon has not previously been investigated in real-life human settings. We therefore thought it of interest to test the hypothesis that males' salivary testosterone concentrations are influenced by phases of their female partners' menstrual cycle; expecting a testosterone peak at ovulation. Methods Thirty young, healthy, heterosexual couples were recruited. During the course of 30-40 days, the women registered menses and ovulation, while the men registered sexual activity, physical exercise, alcohol intake and illness (confounders), and obtained daily saliva samples for testosterone measurements. All data, including the registered confounders, were subjected to multiple regression analysis. Results In contrast to the hypothesis, the ovulation did not affect the testosterone levels, and the resulting testosterone profile during the menstrual cycle was on the average flat. The specific main hypothesis, that male testosterone levels on the day of ovulation would be higher than day 4 of the cycle, was clearly contradicted by a type II error(β)-analysis (< 14.3% difference in normalized testosterone concentration; β = 0.05). Conclusions Even though an ovulation-related salivary testosterone peak was observed in individual cases, no significant effect was found on a group level. PMID:22214343

  9. The effects of saliva collection, handling and storage on salivary testosterone measurement.

    PubMed

    Durdiaková, Jaroslava; Fábryová, Helena; Koborová, Ivana; Ostatníková, Daniela; Celec, Peter

    2013-12-20

    Several endocrine parameters commonly measured in plasma, such as steroid hormones, can be measured in the oral fluid. However, there are several technical aspects of saliva sampling and processing that can potentially bias the validity of salivary testosterone measurement. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects caused by repeated sampling; 5 min centrifugation (at 2000, 6000 or 10,000g); the stimulation of saliva flow by a cotton swab soaked in 2% citric acid touching the tongue; different storage times and conditions as well as the impact of blood contamination on salivary testosterone concentration measured using a commercially available ELISA kit. Fresh, unprocessed, unstimulated saliva samples served as a control. Salivary testosterone concentrations were influenced neither by repeated sampling nor by stimulation of salivary flow. Testosterone levels determined in samples stored in various laboratory conditions for time periods up to 1 month did not differ in comparison with controls. For both genders, salivary testosterone levels were substantially reduced after centrifugation (men F=29.1; women F=56.17, p<0.0001). Blood contamination decreased salivary testosterone levels in a dose-dependent manner (men F=6.54, p<0.01, F=5.01, p<0.05). Salivary testosterone can be considered A robust and stable marker. However, saliva processing and blood leakage can introduce bias into measurements of salivary testosterone using ELISA. Our observations should be considered in studies focusing on salivary testosterone.

  10. Testosterone stimulates glucose uptake and GLUT4 translocation through LKB1/AMPK signaling in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Kazuteru; Senmaru, Takafumi; Fukuda, Takuya; Yamazaki, Masahiro; Shinomiya, Katsuhiko; Ueno, Morio; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Kitawaki, Jo; Katsuyama, Masato; Tsujikawa, Muneo; Obayashi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Naoto; Fukui, Michiaki

    2016-01-01

    Decreases in serum testosterone concentrations in aging men are associated with metabolic disorders. Testosterone has been reported to increase GLUT4-dependent glucose uptake in skeletal muscle cells and cardiomyocytes. However, studies on glucose uptake occurring in response to testosterone stimulation in adipocytes are currently not available. This study was designed to determine the effects of testosterone on glucose uptake in adipocytes. Glucose uptake was assessed with 2-[(3)H] deoxyglucose in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. GLUT4 translocation was evaluated in plasma membrane (PM) sheets and PM fractions by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting, respectively. Activation of GLUT4 translocation-related protein kinases, including Akt, AMPK, LKB1, CaMKI, CaMKII, and Cbl was followed by immunoblotting. Expression levels of androgen receptor (AR) mRNA and AR translocation to the PM were assessed by real-time RT-PCR and immunoblotting, respectively. The results showed that both high-dose (100 nM) testosterone and testosterone-BSA increased glucose uptake and GLUT4 translocation to the PM, independently of the intracellular AR. Testosterone and testosterone-BSA stimulated the phosphorylation of AMPK, LKB1, and CaMKII. The knockdown of LKB1 by siRNA attenuated testosterone- and testosterone-BSA-stimulated AMPK phosphorylation and glucose uptake. These results indicate that high-dose testosterone and testosterone-BSA increase GLUT4-dependent glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes by inducing the LKB1/AMPK signaling pathway.

  11. Interest in Babies Negatively Predicts Testosterone Responses to Sexual Visual Stimuli Among Heterosexual Young Men.

    PubMed

    Zilioli, Samuele; Ponzi, Davide; Henry, Andrea; Kubicki, Konrad; Nickels, Nora; Wilson, M Claire; Maestripieri, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Men's testosterone may be an important physiological mechanism mediating motivational and behavioral aspects of the mating/parenting trade-off not only over time but also in terms of stable differences between mating-oriented and parenting-oriented individuals. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that self-reported interest in babies is inversely related to testosterone reactivity to cues of short-term mating among heterosexual young men. Among 100 participants, interest in babies was related to a slow life-history strategy, as assessed by the Mini-K questionnaire, and negatively related to testosterone responses to an erotic video. Interest in babies was not associated with baseline testosterone levels or with testosterone reactivity to nonsexual social stimuli. These results provide the first evidence that differential testosterone reactivity to sexual stimuli may be an important aspect of individual differences in life-history strategies among human males.

  12. Interest in Babies Negatively Predicts Testosterone Responses to Sexual Visual Stimuli Among Heterosexual Young Men.

    PubMed

    Zilioli, Samuele; Ponzi, Davide; Henry, Andrea; Kubicki, Konrad; Nickels, Nora; Wilson, M Claire; Maestripieri, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Men's testosterone may be an important physiological mechanism mediating motivational and behavioral aspects of the mating/parenting trade-off not only over time but also in terms of stable differences between mating-oriented and parenting-oriented individuals. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that self-reported interest in babies is inversely related to testosterone reactivity to cues of short-term mating among heterosexual young men. Among 100 participants, interest in babies was related to a slow life-history strategy, as assessed by the Mini-K questionnaire, and negatively related to testosterone responses to an erotic video. Interest in babies was not associated with baseline testosterone levels or with testosterone reactivity to nonsexual social stimuli. These results provide the first evidence that differential testosterone reactivity to sexual stimuli may be an important aspect of individual differences in life-history strategies among human males. PMID:26626441

  13. Salivary testosterone change following monetary wins and losses predicts future financial risk-taking.

    PubMed

    Apicella, Coren L; Dreber, Anna; Mollerstrom, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    While baseline testosterone has recently been implicated in risk-taking in men, less is known about the effects of changing levels of testosterone on financial risk. Here we attempt to influence testosterone in men by having them win or lose money in a chance-based competition against another male opponent. We employ two treatments where we vary the amount of money at stake so that we can directly compare winners to losers who earn the same amount, thereby abstracting from income effects. We find that men who experience a greater increase in bioactive testosterone take on more risk, an association that remains when controlling for whether the participant won the competition. In fact, whether subjects won the competition did not predict future risk. These results suggest that testosterone change, and thus individual differences in testosterone reactivity, rather than the act of winning or losing, influence financial risk-taking. PMID:24275004

  14. Predicting low testosterone in aging men: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Millar, Adam C.; Lau, Adrian N.C.; Tomlinson, George; Kraguljac, Alan; Simel, David L.; Detsky, Allan S.; Lipscombe, Lorraine L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Physicians diagnose and treat suspected hypogonadism in older men by extrapolating from the defined clinical entity of hypogonadism found in younger men. We conducted a systematic review to estimate the accuracy of clinical symptoms and signs for predicting low testosterone among aging men. Methods: We searched the MEDLINE and Embase databases (January 1966 to July 2014) for studies that compared clinical features with a measurement of serum testosterone in men. Three of the authors independently reviewed articles for inclusion, assessed quality and extracted data. Results: Among 6053 articles identified, 40 met the inclusion criteria. The prevalence of low testosterone ranged between 2% and 77%. Threshold testosterone levels used for reference standards also varied substantially. The summary likelihood ratio associated with decreased libido was 1.6 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3–1.9), and the likelihood ratio for absence of this finding was 0.72 (95% CI 0.58–0.85). The likelihood ratio associated with the presence of erectile dysfunction was 1.5 (95% CI 1.3–1.8) and with absence of erectile dysfunction was 0.83 (95% CI 0.76–0.91). Of the multiple-item instruments, the ANDROTEST showed both the most favourable positive likelihood ratio (range 1.9–2.2) and the most favourable negative likelihood ratio (range 0.37–0.49). Interpretation: We found weak correlation between signs, symptoms and testosterone levels, uncertainty about what threshold testosterone levels should be considered low for aging men and wide variation in estimated prevalence of the condition. It is therefore difficult to extrapolate the method of diagnosing pathologic hypogonadism in younger men to clinical decisions regarding age-related testosterone decline in aging men. PMID:27325129

  15. Testosterone deficiency and quality of life in Australasian testicular cancer survivors: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    O'Carrigan, B; Fournier, M; Olver, I N; Stockler, M R; Whitford, H; Toner, G C; Thomson, D B; Davis, I D; Hanning, F; Singhal, N; Underhill, C; Clingan, P; McDonald, A; Boland, A; Grimison, P

    2014-08-01

    This is the first prospective study in a contemporary Australian/New Zealand population to determine the prevalence of testosterone deficiency in testicular cancer survivors at 12 months from treatment, and any association with poorer quality of life. Hormone assays from 54 evaluable patients in a prospective cohort study revealed biochemical hypogonadism in 18 patients (33%) and low-normal testosterone in 13 patients (24%). We found no association between testosterone levels and quality of life (all P > 0.05). Hypogonadal patients should be considered for testosterone replacement to prevent long-term morbidity. PMID:25081047

  16. Testosterone deficiency: a historical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Nieschlag, Eberhard; Nieschlag, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The biological effects of the testes and testosterone are known since antiquity. Aristotle knew the effects of castration and his hypothesis on fertilization is one of the first scientific encounters in reproductive biology. Over centuries, castration has been performed as punishment and to produce obedient slaves, but also to preserve the soprano voices of prepubertal boys. The Chinese imperial (and other oriental) courts employed castrates as overseers in harems who often obtained high-ranking political positions. The era of testis transplantation and organotherapy was initiated by John Hunter in London who transplanted testes into capons in 1786. The intention of his experiments was to prove the ‘vital principle’ as the basis for modern transplantation medicine, but Hunter did not consider endocrine aspects. Arnold Adolph Berthold postulated internal secretion from his testicular transplantation experiments in 1849 in Göttingen and is thus considered the father of endocrinology. Following his observations, testicular preparations were used for therapy, popularized by self-experiments by Charles-Edouard Brown-Séquard in Paris (1889), which can at best have placebo effects. In the 1920s Sergio Voronoff transplanted testes from animals to men, but their effectiveness was disproved. Today testicular transplantation is being refined by stem cell research and germ cell transplantation. Modern androgen therapy started in 1935 when Enrest Lacquer isolated testosterone from bull testes in Amsterdam. In the same year testosterone was chemically synthesized independently by Adolf Butenandt in Göttingen and Leopold Ruzicka in Basel. Since testosterone was ineffective orally it was either compressed into subcutaneous pellets or was used orally as 17α-methyl testosterone, now obsolete because of liver toxicity. The early phases of testosterone treatment coincide with the first description of the most prominent syndromes of hypogonadism by Klinefelter, by Kallmann, Del

  17. TESTOSTERONE AND SPORT: CURRENT PERSPECTIVES

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Ruth I.; Stanton, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Testosterone and other anabolic-androgenic steroids enhance athletic performance in men and women. As a result, exogenous androgen is banned from most competitive sports. However, due to variability in endogenous secretion, and similarities with exogenous testosterone, it has been challenging to establish allowable limits for testosterone in competition. Endogenous androgen production is dynamically regulated by both exercise and winning in competition. Furthermore, testosterone may promote athletic performance, not only through its long-term anabolic actions, but also through rapid effects on behavior. In women, excess production of endogenous testosterone due to inborn disorders of sexual development (DSD) may convey a competitive advantage. For many years, female competitors have been subject to tests of sexual genotype and phenotype known as gender verification. Although gender verification has not identified any normal man competing as a woman, this process has identified women athletes with DSD. As understanding of DSD has expanded in recent years, women with DSD are increasingly able to continue athletic competition. PMID:21983229

  18. First case report of testosterone assay-interference in a female taking maca (Lepidium meyenii)

    PubMed Central

    Srikugan, L; Sankaralingam, A; McGowan, B

    2011-01-01

    A young female with prolonged intermenstrual bleeding was found to have raised total plasma testosterone of 25.8 nmol/l (NR<2.9 nmol/l) using the Roche Elecsys Testosterone I immunoassay without clinical features of virulisation. Few months ago investigations for lethargy and low libido had shown normal total testosterone of 0.8 nmol/l. Further history revealed that she was using maca extract to improve her lethargy and low libido. Maca is traditionally used for its aphrodisiac and fertility-enhancing properties. Maca use has not been shown to affect serum testosterone in mice and human studies. Immunoassay interference with maca was suspected. Testosterone immunoassays use monoclonal antibodies specifically directed against testosterone. They are prone to interference from androgenic compounds. Reanalysis of the original serum sample using Elecsys Testosterone II assay, a higher affinity assay, revealed a total testosterone level of 2.9 nmol/l. It is important to exclude assay interference when testosterone level is greater than 5 nmol/l without supportive clinical signs. PMID:22700073

  19. The effects of castration followed testosterone supplementation in prostatic complex of Artibeus planirostris (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae).

    PubMed

    Puga, Cíntia C I; Beguelini, Mateus R; Morielle-Versute, Eliana; Vilamaior, Patricia S L; Taboga, Sebastião R

    2016-06-01

    The prostatic complex (ventral and dorsal regions) of Artibeus planirostris exhibits seasonal variations throughout the year. Circulating testosterone was correlated with prostate weight, showing an increase from autumn to summer, with the highest peak in summer corresponding to the largest breeding season. This indicates that the level of serum testosterone influences variations in both testicular and prostatic weights. Serum testosterone levels seem to be closely related to the different responses of these glands throughout the year. The castration (consequent suppression of testosterone) and subsequent hormone supplementation may elucidate the relationship of these two glandular types with testosterone. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of castration and the testosterone supplementation in the male prostatic complex of A. planirostris. The results indicated that both prostatic regions were affected by the ablation of testosterone, presenting a decrease in cell proliferation and an increase in apoptosis. Similarly, the prostate was responsive to hormonal supplementation, having a recovery of the active morphophysiological pattern with testosterone supplementation. However, data have shown that the ventral region was more sensitive to changes in testosterone than the dorsal, presenting greater cell renewal. PMID:27032910

  20. First case report of testosterone assay-interference in a female taking maca (Lepidium meyenii).

    PubMed

    Srikugan, L; Sankaralingam, A; McGowan, B

    2011-03-25

    A young female with prolonged intermenstrual bleeding was found to have raised total plasma testosterone of 25.8 nmol/l (NR<2.9 nmol/l) using the Roche Elecsys Testosterone I immunoassay without clinical features of virulisation. Few months ago investigations for lethargy and low libido had shown normal total testosterone of 0.8 nmol/l. Further history revealed that she was using maca extract to improve her lethargy and low libido. Maca is traditionally used for its aphrodisiac and fertility-enhancing properties. Maca use has not been shown to affect serum testosterone in mice and human studies. Immunoassay interference with maca was suspected. Testosterone immunoassays use monoclonal antibodies specifically directed against testosterone. They are prone to interference from androgenic compounds. Reanalysis of the original serum sample using Elecsys Testosterone II assay, a higher affinity assay, revealed a total testosterone level of 2.9 nmol/l. It is important to exclude assay interference when testosterone level is greater than 5 nmol/l without supportive clinical signs.

  1. Human Folate Bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Ohrvik, Veronica E.; Witthoft, Cornelia M.

    2011-01-01

    The vitamin folate is recognized as beneficial health-wise in the prevention of neural tube defects, anemia, cardiovascular diseases, poor cognitive performance, and some forms of cancer. However, suboptimal dietary folate intake has been reported in a number of countries. Several national health authorities have therefore introduced mandatory food fortification with synthetic folic acid, which is considered a convenient fortificant, being cost-efficient in production, more stable than natural food folate, and superior in terms of bioavailability and bioefficacy. Other countries have decided against fortification due to the ambiguous role of synthetic folic acid regarding promotion of subclinical cancers and other adverse health effects. This paper reviews recent studies on folate bioavailability after intervention with folate from food. Our conclusions were that limited folate bioavailability data are available for vegetables, fruits, cereal products, and fortified foods, and that it is difficult to evaluate the bioavailability of food folate or whether intervention with food folate improves folate status. We recommend revising the classical approach of using folic acid as a reference dose for estimating the plasma kinetics and relative bioavailability of food folate. PMID:22254106

  2. Testosterone and weight loss: the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Traish, Abdulmaged M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The purpose of this article is to examine the contemporary data linking testosterone therapy in overweight and obese men with testosterone deficiency to increased lean body mass, decreased fat mass, improvement in overall body composition and sustained weight loss. This is of paramount importance because testosterone therapy in obese men with testosterone deficiency represents a novel and a timely therapeutic strategy for managing obesity in men with testosterone deficiency. Recent findings Long-term testosterone therapy in men with testosterone deficiency produces significant and sustained weight loss, marked reduction in waist circumference and BMI and improvement in body composition. Further, testosterone therapy ameliorates components of the metabolic syndrome. The aforementioned improvements are attributed to improved mitochondrial function, increased energy utilization, increased motivation and vigor resulting in improved cardio-metabolic function and enhanced physical activity. Summary The implication of testosterone therapy in management of obesity in men with testosterone deficiency is of paramount clinical significance, as it produces sustained weight loss without recidivism. On the contrary, alternative therapeutic approaches other than bariatric surgery failed to produce significant and sustained outcome and exhibit a high rate of recidivism. These findings represent strong foundations for testosterone therapy in obese men with testosterone deficiency and should spur clinical research for better understanding of usefulness of testosterone therapy in treatment of underlying pathophysiological conditions of obesity. PMID:25105998

  3. Women's Preference for Attractive Makeup Tracks Changes in Their Salivary Testosterone.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Claire I; Hahn, Amanda C; DeBruine, Lisa M; Jones, Benedict C

    2015-12-01

    Previous research suggests that women's motivation to appear attractive is increased around the time of ovulation. However, the specific hormonal correlates of within-woman changes in motivation to appear attractive have not been investigated. To address this issue, we used a longitudinal design and a data-driven visual preference task. We found that women's preference for attractive makeup increases when their salivary testosterone levels are high. The relationship between testosterone level and preference for attractive makeup was independent of estradiol level, progesterone level, and estradiol-to-progesterone ratio. These results suggest that testosterone may contribute to changes in women's motivation to wear attractive makeup and, potentially, their motivation to appear attractive in general. Our results are also consistent with recent models of the role of testosterone in social behavior, according to which testosterone increases the probability of behaviors that could function to support the acquisition of mates and competition for resources.

  4. Correlates of low testosterone in men with chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Barbonetti, A; Vassallo, M R C; Pacca, F; Cavallo, F; Costanzo, M; Felzani, G; Francavilla, S; Francavilla, F

    2014-09-01

    Although high rates of serum testosterone deficiency have been reported in men with spinal cord injury (SCI), its determinants and attributes are not yet established. The aim of this study was to recognize, among putative determinants and attributes of androgen deficiency, those significantly associated to low testosterone after adjustment for confounders recognizable in men with chronic SCI. A biochemical androgen deficiency (total testosterone <300 ng/dL) was exhibited by 18 of 51 patients (35.3%). Significant correlates of testosterone levels were as follows: weekly leisure time physical activity (LTPA) explored by the LTPA Questionnaire for people with SCI, body mass index (BMI), homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), triglycerides and sexual symptoms, explored by the aging males' symptom (AMS) questionnaire. At the multiple linear regression analysis, among putative determinants of low testosterone, only weekly LTPA and BMI exhibited a significant association with testosterone levels, explaining 54.2 and 9.0% of testosterone variability respectively. At the linear regression models, among various putative attributes of androgen deficiency, only lower sexual desire and, at a lesser extent, higher HOMA-IR, exhibited significant associations with lower testosterone levels, after adjustment for BMI, age, comorbidities and weekly LTPA. In conclusion, poor LTPA, high BMI and low sexual desire are independent predictors of low testosterone in men with chronic SCI. This is relevant to clinical practice, as all these features are routinely assessed in rehabilitation settings for SCI. As poor LTPA and high BMI are modifiable life-style related risk factors, prospective studies could clarify whether life-style modification could increase the level of testosterone and improve the low sexual desire, relevant clinical attribute of low testosterone in men with SCI. PMID:24925765

  5. Testosterone Administration Decreases Generosity in the Ultimatum Game

    PubMed Central

    Zak, Paul J.; Kurzban, Robert; Ahmadi, Sheila; Swerdloff, Ronald S.; Park, Jang; Efremidze, Levan; Redwine, Karen; Morgan, Karla; Matzner, William

    2009-01-01

    How do human beings decide when to be selfish or selfless? In this study, we gave testosterone to 25 men to establish its impact on prosocial behaviors in a double-blind within-subjects design. We also confirmed participants' testosterone levels before and after treatment through blood draws. Using the Ultimatum Game from behavioral economics, we find that men with artificially raised T, compared to themselves on placebo, were 27% less generous towards strangers with money they controlled (95% CI placebo: (1.70, 2.72); 95% CI T: (.98, 2.30)). This effect scales with a man's level of total-, free-, and dihydro-testosterone (DHT). Men in the lowest decile of DHT were 560% more generous than men in the highest decile of DHT. We also found that men with elevated testosterone were more likely to use their own money punish those who were ungenerous toward them. Our results continue to hold after controlling for altruism. We conclude that elevated testosterone causes men to behave antisocially. PMID:20016825

  6. Testosterone regulates metabolism of plasma chylomicrons in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Staprans, I.; Rapp, J.H.; Pan, X.M.; Ong, D.L.; Feingold, K.R. )

    1990-07-01

    Previously we demonstrated a marked sex difference in the metabolism of chylomicrons in adult rats. In males, radiolabeled chylomicrons displayed a longer dwell time on endothelial surfaces, which resulted in a decreased chylomicron uptake by the liver. The increased rate of chylomicron metabolism in females was associated with increased postheparin lipoprotein lipase activity. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of physiological doses of sex steroid hormones on the metabolism of chylomicrons and postheparin lipoprotein lipase activity. No sex differences were found in prepubertal animals. We also found no difference in chylomicron metabolism in control female, castrated female, estrogen-treated female, castrated male, and estrogen-treated male rats. However, control male, testosterone-treated male, and testosterone-treated female rats showed increased endothelial binding of chylomicrons and decreased chylomicron uptake by the liver. Postheparin lipoprotein lipase activity also was decreased by testosterone administration. In parallel with the alterations in chylomicron metabolism, serum high density lipoprotein levels in male rats decreased with testosterone administration. These results indicate that the differences in chylomicron metabolism, postheparin lipoprotein lipase activities, and serum high density lipoprotein levels observed between male and female rats are due to testosterone.

  7. Single dose testosterone administration alleviates gaze avoidance in women with Social Anxiety Disorder.

    PubMed

    Enter, Dorien; Terburg, David; Harrewijn, Anita; Spinhoven, Philip; Roelofs, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Gaze avoidance is one of the most characteristic and persistent social features in people with Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD). It signals social submissiveness and hampers adequate social interactions. Patients with SAD typically show reduced testosterone levels, a hormone that facilitates socially dominant gaze behavior. Therefore we tested as a proof of principle whether single dose testosterone administration can reduce gaze avoidance in SAD. In a double-blind, within-subject design, 18 medication-free female participants with SAD and 19 female healthy control participants received a single dose of 0.5mg testosterone and a matched placebo, at two separate days. On each day, their spontaneous gaze behavior was recorded using eye-tracking, while they looked at angry, happy, and neutral facial expressions. Testosterone enhanced the percentage of first fixations to the eye-region in participants with SAD compared to healthy controls. In addition, SAD patients' initial gaze avoidance in the placebo condition was associated with more severe social anxiety symptoms and this relation was no longer present after testosterone administration. These findings indicate that single dose testosterone administration can alleviate gaze avoidance in SAD. They support theories on the dominance enhancing effects of testosterone and extend those by showing that effects are particularly strong in individuals featured by socially submissive behavior. The finding that this core characteristic of SAD can be directly influenced by single dose testosterone administration calls for future inquiry into the clinical utility of testosterone in the treatment of SAD.

  8. Testosterone supports hormone-dependent aggression in female rats.

    PubMed

    Albert, D J; Jonik, R H; Walsh, M L; Petrovic, D M

    1989-08-01

    Female hooded rats were ovariectomized and implanted with a single testosterone-filled Silastic tube or an empty tube. The tube size was one which allowed a release of testosterone at the high end of the mean normal serum testosterone concentration for intact females. Following a 7-day recovery period, all rats were placed on a 23-hr food-deprivation schedule and adapted to a highly palatable liquid food over a 5-day period. Each animal with a testosterone implant was then housed with an animal of similar weight but an empty implant. The pairs were subjected to a series of 3 restricted-access competition tests (1/day) followed 4 days later by a series of 3 free-access competition tests. The animals were then separated, adapted to a bland liquid food, and paired with new partners. They were then subjected to the restricted- and free-access food-competition tests but with bland food as the incentive. During the first 6 competition tests there were no significant differences between groups in aggression or in time spent licking at the food spout. During the second series of tests, females with testosterone implants were more aggressive and more successful at maintaining access to the food than were their competitors with empty implants. The difference between groups occurred during the free- as well as the restricted-access tests. The effectiveness of physiological levels of testosterone in supporting aggression is attributed to the use of a test situation that activates as well as elicits hormone-dependent aggression. These results suggest that testosterone may be the hormonal substrate for hormone-dependent aggression in female rats.

  9. Second-to-Fourth Digit Length, Testosterone and Spatial Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kempel, P.; Gohlke, B.; Klempau, J.; Zinsberger, P.; Reuter, M.; Hennig, J.

    2005-01-01

    Based on stimulating findings suggesting that prenatal levels of steroids may influence cognitive functions, a study with N=40 healthy volunteers of both sexes was conducted. Prenatal levels of testosterone (T) were estimated by use of the second-to-fourth digit ratio (2D:4D) which is supposed to be controlled by the same genes involved in…

  10. Effects of dopamine blockade on gonadotropins and testosterone in men.

    PubMed

    Siris, S G; Siris, E S; van Kammen, D P; Docherty, J P; Alexander, P E; Bunney, W E

    1980-02-01

    The authors found that plasma luteinizing hormone (LH), prolactin, and testosterone were initially normal in nine acutely psychotic males with schizophrenia or schizo-affective disorder; follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) was normal in eight of the nine. When patients were treated with pimozide, a relatively specific dopamine receptor blocker, there were statistically significant declines in FSH and LH, although levels remained within normal limits. Prolactin rose significantly, but testosterone did not change. The observed reductions in FSH and LH concentrations are consistent with the hypotheses that dopamine and/or prolactin play a role in gonadotropin secretion. The maintenance of normal levels of gonadotropins and testosterone, however, suggests that these patients possessed relatively normal hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis function before and during a course of neuroleptic treatment.

  11. Gender-Typed Play and Amniotic Testosterone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knickmeyer, Rebecca Christine; Wheelwright, Sally; Taylor, Kevin; Raggatt, Peter; Hackett, Gerald; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2005-01-01

    Sex differences in play are apparent in a number of mammalian species, including humans. Prenatal testosterone may contribute to these differences. The authors report the first attempt to correlate gender-typed play in a normative sample of humans with measurements of amniotic testosterone (aT). Testosterone was measured in the amniotic fluid of…

  12. Arsenic Bioavailability, Bioaccessibility, And Speciation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The term bioavailability has many different meanings across various disciplines. Often bioavailability is concerned with human health aspects such as the case of urban children interacting with contaminated soil. The still utilized approach to base risk assessment on total meta...

  13. Effect of testosterone supplementation on sexual functioning in aging men: a 6-month randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Emmelot-Vonk, M H; Verhaar, H J J; Nakhai-Pour, H R; Grobbee, D E; van der Schouw, Y T

    2009-01-01

    Serum testosterone levels decline significantly with aging and this has been associated with reduced sexual function. We have conducted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial to investigate the effect of testosterone supplementation on sexual function in 237 elderly men with a testosterone level <13.7 nmol l(-1). Participants were randomly assigned to receive oral testosterone undecanoate or a placebo for 6 months. A total of 207 men completed the study. After treatment, there were no differences in scores on sexual function between the groups. Subanalysis showed that although a baseline testosterone level in the lowest tertile was associated with significantly lower scores for sexual fantasies, desire of sexual contact and frequency of sexual contact, supplementation of testosterone did not result in improvement on any of these items in this group. In conclusion, the findings do not support the view that testosterone undecanoate supplementation for 6 months to elderly men with low-normal testosterone concentrations favorably affects sexual function. PMID:19225466

  14. Testosterone related to age and life-history stages in male baboons and geladas

    PubMed Central

    Beehner, Jacinta C.; Gesquiere, Laurence; Seyfarth, Robert M.; Cheney, Dorothy L.; Alberts, Susan C.; Altmann, Jeanne

    2013-01-01

    Despite significant advances in our knowledge of how testosterone mediates life-history trade-offs, this research has primarily focused on seasonal species. We know comparatively little about the relationship between testosterone and life-history stages for non-seasonally breeding species. Here we examine testosterone profiles across the lifespan of males from three non-seasonally breeding primates: yellow baboons (Papio cynocephalus or P. hamadryas cynocephalus), chacma baboons (Papio ursinus or P. h. ursinus), and geladas (Theropithecus gelada). First, we predict that testosterone profiles will track the reproductive profiles of each taxon across their respective breeding years. Second, we evaluate age-related changes in testosterone to determine whether several life-history transitions are associated with these changes. Subjects include males (>2.5 years) from wild populations of each taxon from whom we had fecal samples for hormone determination. Although testosterone profiles across species were broadly similar, considerable variability was found in the timing of two major changes: (1) the attainment of adult levels of testosterone, and (2) the decline in testosterone after the period of maximum production. Attainment of adult testosterone levels was delayed by one year in chacmas compared with yellows and geladas. With respect to the decline in testosterone, geladas and chacmas exhibited a significant drop after three years of maximum production, while yellows declined so gradually that no significant annual drop was ever detected. For both yellows and chacmas, increases in testosterone production preceded elevations in social dominance rank. We discuss these differences in the context of ecological and behavioral differences exhibited by these taxa. PMID:19712676

  15. Control of the misuse of testosterone in castrated horses based on an international threshold in plasma.

    PubMed

    Ho, Emmie N M; Kwok, W H; Leung, David K K; Riggs, Christopher M; Sidlow, Gordon; Stewart, Brian D; Wong, April S Y; Wan, Terence S M

    2015-05-01

    Testosterone is an endogenous steroid produced primarily in the testes. Trace levels of testosterone are found in urine samples from geldings, as testosterone is also secreted by the adrenal. An international threshold of free and conjugated testosterone in urine (20 ng/mL) was adopted by the International Federation of Horseracing Authorities (IFHA) in 1996 for controlling testosterone misuse in geldings. In view of the recent popularity of using blood in doping control testing, it is necessary to establish a threshold for testosterone in gelding plasma. A liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS) method was developed for quantifying low levels of free testosterone in gelding plasma. Based on a population study of 152 post-race plasma samples, the mean ± SD concentration of plasma testosterone was determined to be 14.7 ± 6.8 pg/mL. Normal distribution could be obtained after square-root or cube-root transformation, resulting in respective tentative thresholds of 49 or 55 pg/mL (corresponding to a risk factor of less than 1 in 10 000). A rounded-up threshold of 100 pg/mL of free testosterone in plasma was proposed. Based on the administration of Testosterone Suspension 100 to six geldings, the same average detection time of 14 days was observed in either plasma or urine using the proposed plasma threshold and the existing international urine threshold. The maximum detection time was 18 days in plasma and 20 days in urine. The results demonstrated the proposed plasma threshold is effective in controlling the misuse of testosterone in geldings. Similar results were subsequently obtained in Europe, and this proposed threshold was adopted by IFHA in October 2013.

  16. Effect of testosterone therapy on the female voice

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, R.; York, A.; Dimitrakakis, C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives This prospective study was designed to investigate the effect of testosterone, delivered by subcutaneous implants, on the female voice. Methods Ten women who had opted for testosterone therapy were recruited for voice analysis. Voices were recorded prior to treatment and at 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months while on testosterone therapy. Acoustic samples were collected with subjects reading a sentence, reading a paragraph, and participating in a conversation. Significant changes in the voice over time were investigated using a repeated-measures analysis of variance with the fundamental frequency (F 0) as a response variable. Demographic variables associated with characteristics of the voice were assessed. Results There were no significant differences in average F 0 related to smoking history, menopausal status, weight, or body mass index. There was no difference in average fundamental speaking frequency (sentence, paragraph, conversation) between the pre-treatment group and any post-treatment group at 3 and 12 months. There was an increase in sentence speech F 0 at 6 months. Two of three patients with lower than expected F 0 at baseline improved on testosterone therapy. Conclusion Therapeutic levels of testosterone, delivered by subcutaneous implant, had no adverse affect on the female voice including lowering or deepening of the voice. PMID:26857354

  17. Testosterone-secreting adrenal adenoma in a peripubertal girl

    SciTech Connect

    Kamilaris, T.C.; DeBold, C.R.; Manolas, K.J.; Hoursanidis, A.; Panageas, S.; Yiannatos, J.

    1987-11-13

    A 15-year-old girl who presented with primary amenorrhea and virilization had an adrenocortical adenoma that secreted predominantly testosterone. To the authors' knowledge, she is the first peripubertal and second youngest patient with a testosterone-secreting adrenal tumor described. Serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and urinary 17-ketosteroid an 17-hydroxycorticosteroid levels were normal. A tumor was located by a computed tomographic (CT) scan and by uptake of 6-..beta..-(/sup 75/Se) selenomethylnorcholesterol. Microscopic examination of the tumor showed typical features of an adrenocortical adenoma with no histologic features characteristic of Leydig cells. Postoperatively, her hirsutism regressed, she rapidly went through puberty, and regular monthly menstruation started four months later. Finding the source of testosterone in a virilized patient can be difficult. Eleven of the 14 previously described patients with testosterone-secreting adrenal tumors initially underwent misdirected surgery on the ovaries. Review of these cases revealed that results of hormone stimulation and suppression tests are unreliable and that these tumors are usually large. Therefore, CT scanning of the adrenal glands is recommended in all patients suspected of having a testosterone-secreting tumor.

  18. Partial Androgen Deficiency, Depression, and Testosterone Supplementation in Aging Men

    PubMed Central

    Amore, Mario; Innamorati, Marco; Costi, Sara; Sher, Leo; Girardi, Paolo; Pompili, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this review was to summarize current knowledge on the correlation between depressive symptoms with a syndrome called partial androgen deficiency of the aging male (PADAM) and on the potential benefits of testosterone (T) treatment on mood. Despite, the causative nature of the relationship between low T levels and depression is uncertain, many hypogonadal men suffer from depression and vice versa several depressed patients are affected by hypogonadism. Supplementation with testosterone failed to show sound evidence of effectiveness in the treatment of depression. Nevertheless, testosterone supplementation has proved to be effective on some domains significant for the quality of life of aged patients with PADAM (sexual function and cognitive functions, muscular strengths). PMID:22719760

  19. IQ, Fetal Testosterone and Individual Variability in Children's Functional Lateralization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercure, Evelyne; Ashwin, Emma; Dick, Frederic; Halit, Hanife; Auyeung, Bonnie; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Johnson, Mark H.

    2009-01-01

    Previous event-related potential (ERP) studies have revealed that faces and words show a robust difference in the lateralization of their N170. The present study investigated the development of this differential lateralization in school-age boys. We assessed the potential role of fetal testosterone (FT) level as a factor biasing the prenatal…

  20. Dose-response assessment of fetal testosterone production and gene expression levels in rat testes following in utero exposure to diethylhexyl phthalate, diisobutyl phthalate, diisoheptyl phthalate, and diisononyl phthalate.

    PubMed

    Hannas, Bethany R; Lambright, Christy S; Furr, Johnathan; Howdeshell, Kembra L; Wilson, Vickie S; Gray, Leon E

    2011-09-01

    Several phthalate esters have been linked to the Phthalate Syndrome, affecting male reproductive development when administered to pregnant rats during in utero sexual differentiation. The goal of the current study was to enhance understanding of this class of compounds in the Sprague Dawley (SD) fetal rat following exposure on gestational days (GDs) 14-18 by determining the relative potency factors for several phthalates on fetal testes endpoints, the effects of a nine phthalate mixture on fetal testosterone (T) production, and differences in SD and Wistar (W) strain responses of fetal T production and testicular gene expression to di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP). We determined that diisobutyl phthalate (DIBP) and diisoheptyl phthalate (DIHP) reduced fetal testicular T production with similar potency to DEHP, whereas diisononyl phthalate (DINP) was 2.3-fold less potent. DINP was also less potent at reducing StAR and Cyp11a gene expression levels, whereas DIBP was slightly more potent than DEHP. We observed that administration of dilutions of a mixture of nine phthalates (DEHP, DIHP, DIBP, dibutyl-, benzyl butyl-, dicyclohexyl-, diheptyl-, dihexyl-, and dipentyl phthalate) reduced fetal T production in a dose-dependent manner best predicted by dose addition. Finally, we found that the differential effects of in utero DEHP treatment on epididymal and gubernacular differentiation in male SD and W rats (0, 100, 300, 500, 625, 750, or 875 mg DEHP/kg/day) are likely due to tissue-specific strain differences in the androgen and insl3 signaling pathways rather than differential effects of DEHP on fetal testis T and insl3 production. PMID:21633115

  1. Musculoskeletal and prostate effects of combined testosterone and finasteride administration in older hypogonadal men: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Borst, Stephen E; Yarrow, Joshua F; Conover, Christine F; Nseyo, Unyime; Meuleman, John R; Lipinska, Judyta A; Braith, Randy W; Beck, Darren T; Martin, Jeffrey S; Morrow, Matthew; Roessner, Shirley; Beggs, Luke A; McCoy, Sean C; Cannady, Darryl F; Shuster, Jonathan J

    2014-02-15

    Testosterone acts directly at androgen receptors and also exerts potent actions following 5α-reduction to dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Finasteride (type II 5α-reductase inhibitor) lowers DHT and is used to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia. However, it is unknown whether elevated DHT mediates either beneficial musculoskeletal effects or prostate enlargement resulting from higher-than-replacement doses of testosterone. Our purpose was to determine whether administration of testosterone plus finasteride to older hypogonadal men could produce musculoskeletal benefits without prostate enlargement. Sixty men aged ≥60 yr with a serum testosterone concentration of ≤300 ng/dl or bioavailable testosterone ≤70 ng/dl received 52 wk of treatment with testosterone enanthate (TE; 125 mg/wk) vs. vehicle, paired with finasteride (5 mg/day) vs. placebo using a 2 × 2 factorial design. Over the course of 12 mo, TE increased upper and lower body muscle strength by 8-14% (P = 0.015 to <0.001), fat-free mass 4.04 kg (P = 0.032), lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD) 4.19% (P < 0.001), and total hip BMD 1.96% (P = 0.024) while reducing total body fat -3.87 kg (P < 0.001) and trunk fat -1.88 kg (P = 0.0051). In the first 3 mo, testosterone increased hematocrit 4.13% (P < 0.001). Coadministration of finasteride did not alter any of these effects. Over 12 mo, testosterone also increased prostate volume 11.4 cm(3) (P = 0.0051), an effect that was completely prevented by finasteride (P = 0.0027). We conclude that a higher-than-replacement TE combined with finasteride significantly increases muscle strength and BMD and reduces body fat without causing prostate enlargement. These results demonstrate that elevated DHT mediates testosterone-induced prostate enlargement but is not required for benefits in musculoskeletal or adipose tissue. PMID:24326421

  2. Testosterone is associated with cooperation during intergroup competition by enhancing parochial altruism

    PubMed Central

    Reimers, Luise; Diekhof, Esther K.

    2015-01-01

    The steroid hormone testosterone is widely associated with negative behavioral effects, such as aggression or dominance. However, recent studies applying economic exchange tasks revealed conflicting results. While some point to a prosocial effect of testosterone by increasing altruistic behavior, others report that testosterone promotes antisocial tendencies. Taking into account additional factors such as parochial altruism (i.e., ingroup favoritism and outgroup hostility) might help to explain this contradiction. First evidence for a link between testosterone and parochial altruism comes from recently reported data of male soccer fans playing the ultimatum game. In this study high levels of endogenous testosterone predicted increased altruistic punishment during outgroup interactions and at the same time heightened ingroup generosity. Here, we report findings of another experimental task, the prisoner's dilemma, applied in the same context to examine the role of testosterone on parochial tendencies in terms of cooperation. In this task, 50 male soccer fans were asked to decide whether or not they wanted to cooperate with partners marked as either fans of the subject's own favorite team (ingroup) or fans of other teams (outgroups). Our results show that high testosterone levels were associated with increased ingroup cooperation during intergroup competition. In addition, subjects displaying a high degree of parochialism during intergroup competition had significantly higher levels of testosterone than subjects who did not differentiate much between the different groups. In sum, the present data demonstrate that the behavioral effects of testosterone are not limited to aggressive and selfish tendencies but may imply prosocial aspects depending on the context. By this means, our results support the previously reported findings on testosterone-dependent intergroup bias and indicate that this social hormone might be an important factor driving parochial altruism. PMID

  3. Hot or not: the effects of exogenous testosterone on female attractiveness to male conspecifics in the budgerigar.

    PubMed

    Lahaye, Stefanie E P; Eens, Marcel; Darras, Veerle M; Pinxten, Rianne

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of studies indicate that not only females but also males can be selective when choosing a mate. In species exhibiting male or mutual mate choice, females may benefit from being attractive. While male attractiveness is often positively influenced by higher plasma levels of the androgenic hormone testosterone, it has been shown that testosterone can masculinise female behavior and morphology in several bird species, potentially rendering them less attractive. In this study, we investigated whether female budgerigars, Melopsittacusundulatus, suffer from increased plasma testosterone levels through a negative effect on their attractiveness to males. We experimentally increased plasma testosterone levels in testosterone-treated females (T-females) compared to controls (C-females) and allowed males to choose between a T- and a C-female in a two-way choice situation. Although testosterone treatment significantly affected female behavioral and morphological characteristics, males did not show a significant difference in preference between T- and C-females. These results suggest that experimentally increasing testosterone levels in females does not appear to influence male preference during initial mate choice. Our findings indicate that selection for higher levels of testosterone in male budgerigars is probably not constrained by a correlated response to selection causing negative effects on female attractiveness during initial mate choice. Evaluating whether or not a potential constraint may arise from negative testosterone-induced effects on other fitness related traits in females requires further work. PMID:23951365

  4. Hot or Not: The Effects of Exogenous Testosterone on Female Attractiveness to Male Conspecifics in the Budgerigar

    PubMed Central

    Lahaye, Stefanie E. P.; Eens, Marcel; Darras, Veerle M.; Pinxten, Rianne

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of studies indicate that not only females but also males can be selective when choosing a mate. In species exhibiting male or mutual mate choice, females may benefit from being attractive. While male attractiveness is often positively influenced by higher plasma levels of the androgenic hormone testosterone, it has been shown that testosterone can masculinise female behavior and morphology in several bird species, potentially rendering them less attractive. In this study, we investigated whether female budgerigars, Melopsittacusundulatus, suffer from increased plasma testosterone levels through a negative effect on their attractiveness to males. We experimentally increased plasma testosterone levels in testosterone-treated females (T-females) compared to controls (C-females) and allowed males to choose between a T- and a C-female in a two-way choice situation. Although testosterone treatment significantly affected female behavioral and morphological characteristics, males did not show a significant difference in preference between T- and C-females. These results suggest that experimentally increasing testosterone levels in females does not appear to influence male preference during initial mate choice. Our findings indicate that selection for higher levels of testosterone in male budgerigars is probably not constrained by a correlated response to selection causing negative effects on female attractiveness during initial mate choice. Evaluating whether or not a potential constraint may arise from negative testosterone-induced effects on other fitness related traits in females requires further work. PMID:23951365

  5. Leptin inhibits testosterone secretion from adult rat testis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tena-Sempere, M; Pinilla, L; González, L C; Diéguez, C; Casanueva, F F; Aguilar, E

    1999-05-01

    Leptin, the product of the ob gene, has emerged recently as a pivotal signal in the regulation of fertility. Although the actions of leptin in the control of reproductive function are thought to be exerted mainly at the hypothalamic level, the potential direct effects of leptin at the pituitary and gonadal level have been poorly characterised. In the present study, we first assessed the ability of leptin to regulate testicular testosterone secretion in vitro. Secondly, we aimed to evaluate whether leptin can modulate basal gonadotrophin and prolactin (PRL) release by incubated hemi-pituitaries from fasted male rats. To attain the first goal, testicular slices from prepubertal and adult rats were incubated with increasing concentrations (10(-9)-10(-7) M) of recombinant leptin. Assuming that in vitro testicular responsiveness to leptin may be dependent on the background leptin levels, testicular tissue from both food-deprived and normally-fed animals was used. Furthermore, leptin modulation of stimulated testosterone secretion was evaluated by incubation of testicular samples with different doses of leptin in the presence of 10 IU human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG). In addition, analysis of leptin actions on pituitary function was carried out using hemi-pituitaries from fasted adult male rats incubated in the presence of increasing concentrations (10(-9)-10(-7) M) of recombinant leptin. Serum testosterone levels, and basal and hCG-stimulated testosterone secretion by incubated testicular tissue were significantly decreased by fasting in prepubertal and adult male rats. However, a significant reduction in circulating LH levels was only evident in adult fasted rats. Doses of 10(-9)-10(-7) M leptin had no effect on basal or hCG-stimulated testosterone secretion by testes from prepubertal rats, regardless of the nutritional state of the donor animal. In contrast, leptin significantly decreased basal and hCG-induced testosterone secretion by testes from fasted and fed

  6. Leptin inhibits testosterone secretion from adult rat testis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tena-Sempere, M; Pinilla, L; González, L C; Diéguez, C; Casanueva, F F; Aguilar, E

    1999-05-01

    Leptin, the product of the ob gene, has emerged recently as a pivotal signal in the regulation of fertility. Although the actions of leptin in the control of reproductive function are thought to be exerted mainly at the hypothalamic level, the potential direct effects of leptin at the pituitary and gonadal level have been poorly characterised. In the present study, we first assessed the ability of leptin to regulate testicular testosterone secretion in vitro. Secondly, we aimed to evaluate whether leptin can modulate basal gonadotrophin and prolactin (PRL) release by incubated hemi-pituitaries from fasted male rats. To attain the first goal, testicular slices from prepubertal and adult rats were incubated with increasing concentrations (10(-9)-10(-7) M) of recombinant leptin. Assuming that in vitro testicular responsiveness to leptin may be dependent on the background leptin levels, testicular tissue from both food-deprived and normally-fed animals was used. Furthermore, leptin modulation of stimulated testosterone secretion was evaluated by incubation of testicular samples with different doses of leptin in the presence of 10 IU human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG). In addition, analysis of leptin actions on pituitary function was carried out using hemi-pituitaries from fasted adult male rats incubated in the presence of increasing concentrations (10(-9)-10(-7) M) of recombinant leptin. Serum testosterone levels, and basal and hCG-stimulated testosterone secretion by incubated testicular tissue were significantly decreased by fasting in prepubertal and adult male rats. However, a significant reduction in circulating LH levels was only evident in adult fasted rats. Doses of 10(-9)-10(-7) M leptin had no effect on basal or hCG-stimulated testosterone secretion by testes from prepubertal rats, regardless of the nutritional state of the donor animal. In contrast, leptin significantly decreased basal and hCG-induced testosterone secretion by testes from fasted and fed

  7. Testofen, a specialised Trigonella foenum-graecum seed extract reduces age-related symptoms of androgen decrease, increases testosterone levels and improves sexual function in healthy aging males in a double-blind randomised clinical study.

    PubMed

    Rao, Amanda; Steels, Elizabeth; Inder, Warrick J; Abraham, Suzanne; Vitetta, Luis

    2016-06-01

    This study examined the effect of Testofen, a specialised Trigonella foenum-graecum seed extract on the symptoms of possible androgen deficiency, sexual function and serum androgen concentrations in healthy aging males. This was a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial involving 120 healthy men aged between 43 and 70 years of age. The active treatment was standardised Trigonella foenum-graecum seed extract at a dose of 600 mg/day for 12 weeks. The primary outcome measure was the change in the Aging Male Symptom questionnaire (AMS), a measure of possible androgen deficiency symptoms; secondary outcome measures were sexual function and serum testosterone. There was a significant decrease in AMS score over time and between the active and placebo groups. Sexual function improved, including number of morning erections and frequency of sexual activity. Both total serum testosterone and free testosterone increased compared to placebo after 12 weeks of active treatment. Trigonella foenum-graecum seed extract is a safe and effective treatment for reducing symptoms of possible androgen deficiency, improves sexual function and increases serum testosterone in healthy middle-aged and older men. PMID:26791805

  8. Zinc bioavailability in pork loin

    SciTech Connect

    Hortin, A.E.; Bechtel, P.J. Baker, D.H. )

    1991-03-15

    Pork loins were uniformly trimmed and divided into three groups: raw, roasted and braised. Following cooking, the loins were freeze dried and then ground to a fine granular consistency. Zinc levels of 51, 60 and 63 mg/kg dry matter (DM) were contained in the raw, roasted and braised products, respectively. The chick bioavailability (BV) assay employed a Zn-deficient soy isolate basal diet that was supplemented with 0, 5 or 10 mg Zn/kg from ZnSO{sub 4}{center dot}H{sub 2}O to produce a standard straight-line response in tibia Zn as a function of supplemental Zn intake. Experimental Zn sources were also added to the basal diet to provide 10 mg Zn/kg. Standard curve methodology indicated that Zn BV was unaffected by cooking. Roasted pork lion had a Zn BV of 184% relative to ZnSO{sub 4}{center dot}H{sub 2}O. Addition of 0.40% L-cysteine to the diet containing 10 mg Zn/kg from ZnSO{sub 4}{center dot}H{sub 2}O increased Zn BV to 175%. Results with histidine as a Zn-enhancing factor were variable. It is apparent that pork loin is an excellent source of bioavailable Zn, and SH-containing compounds such as cysteine and glutathione that are present in meat may contribute to enhanced gut absorption of meat-source Zn.

  9. Parents’ Testosterone and Children’s Perception of Parent-Child Relationship Quality

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Alan; Hibel, Jacob; Granger, Douglas A.; Johnson, David

    2011-01-01

    We examine the link between parental testosterone and children’s perceptions of their relationship with their mother and father. Using data from 352 predominantly white working and middle class families, we find no direct link between mother’s and father’s testosterone and parent-child closeness. However, the association between mothers’ testosterone and mother-child closeness appears to be influenced by the quality of two other family relationships. When father’s marital satisfaction is low, mothers with high testosterone have a poorer relationship with their children. And, when fathers report low levels of intimacy with their children, high testosterone women have a poorer relationship with their children. No comparable associations were observed among fathers. PMID:21843525

  10. Prenatal Testosterone Exposure Decreases Aldosterone Production but Maintains Normal Plasma Volume and Increases Blood Pressure in Adult Female Rats.

    PubMed

    More, Amar S; Mishra, Jay S; Hankins, Gary D; Kumar, Sathish

    2016-08-01

    Plasma testosterone levels are elevated in pregnant women with preeclampsia and polycystic ovaries; their offspring are at increased risk for hypertension during adult life. We tested the hypothesis that prenatal testosterone exposure induces dysregulation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, which is known to play an important role in water and electrolyte balance and blood pressure regulation. Female rats (6 mo old) prenatally exposed to testosterone were examined for adrenal expression of steroidogenic genes, telemetric blood pressure, blood volume and Na(+) and K(+) levels, plasma aldosterone, angiotensin II and vasopressin levels, and vascular responses to angiotensin II and arg(8)-vasopressin. The levels of Cyp11b2 (aldosterone synthase), but not the other adrenal steroidogenic genes, were decreased in testosterone females. Accordingly, plasma aldosterone levels were lower in testosterone females. Plasma volume and serum and urine Na(+) and K(+) levels were not significantly different between control and testosterone females; however, prenatal testosterone exposure significantly increased plasma vasopressin and angiotensin II levels and arterial pressure in adult females. In testosterone females, mesenteric artery contractile responses to angiotensin II were significantly greater, while contractile responses to vasopressin were unaffected. Angiotensin II type-1 receptor expression was increased, while angiotensin II type-2 receptor was decreased in testosterone arteries. These results suggest that prenatal testosterone exposure downregulates adrenal Cyp11b2 expression, leading to decreased plasma aldosterone levels. Elevated angiotensin II and vasopressin levels along with enhanced vascular responsiveness to angiotensin II may serve as an underlying mechanism to maintain plasma volume and Na(+) and K(+) levels and mediate hypertension in adult testosterone females. PMID:27385784

  11. Aggressive behavior and change in salivary testosterone concentrations predict willingness to engage in a competitive task.

    PubMed

    Carré, Justin M; McCormick, Cheryl M

    2008-08-01

    The current study investigated relationships among aggressive behavior, change in salivary testosterone concentrations, and willingness to engage in a competitive task. Thirty-eight male participants provided saliva samples before and after performing the Point Subtraction Aggression Paradigm (a laboratory measure that provides opportunity for aggressive and defensive behavior while working for reward; all three involve pressing specific response keys). Baseline testosterone concentrations were not associated with aggressive responding. However, aggressive responding (but not point reward or point protection responding) predicted the pre- to post-PSAP change in testosterone: Those with the highest aggressive responding had the largest percent increase in testosterone concentrations. Together, aggressive responding and change in testosterone predicted willingness to compete following the PSAP. Controlling for aggression, men who showed a rise in testosterone were more likely to choose to compete again (p=0.03) and controlling for testosterone change, men who showed the highest level of aggressive responding were more likely to choose the non-competitive task (p=0.02). These results indicate that situation-specific aggressive behavior and testosterone responsiveness are functionally relevant predictors of future social behavior.

  12. Effects of Testosterone Therapy on Cognitive Function in Aging: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Hua, Jeremy T; Hildreth, Kerry L; Pelak, Victoria S

    2016-09-01

    Endogenous testosterone in the aging man has been scrutinized extensively in regard to its effects on performance in many cognitive domains, especially verbal fluency, visuospatial and visuoperceptual abilities, memory, and executive function. Studies of testosterone supplementation have sought to identify potential cognitive improvements in men with and without baseline cognitive impairment, and have had a wide range of results. The variability in outcomes is likely related, in part, to the lack of consensus on methods for testosterone measurement and supplementation and, in part, to the disparate measures of cognitive function used in randomized controlled studies. Despite the limitations imposed by such inconsistent methods, promising associations have been found between cognition and testosterone supplementation in both eugonadal men and men with low testosterone levels, with and without baseline cognitive dysfunction. This systematic review highlights the cognitive measures used in and the outcomes of existing studies of testosterone and cognition in aging men. The review suggests that larger studies and a more standardized approach to assessment will be needed before we can fully understand and realize sustained benefits from testosterone supplementation in the elderly male population, particularly given the substantial increase in testosterone supplementation in clinical practice. PMID:27662450

  13. Determination of Zinc, Cadmium and Lead Bioavailability in Contaminated Soils at the Single-Cell Level by a Combination of Whole-Cell Biosensors and Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Hurdebise, Quentin; Tarayre, Cédric; Fischer, Christophe; Colinet, Gilles; Hiligsmann, Serge; Delvigne, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Zinc, lead and cadmium are metallic trace elements (MTEs) that are widespread in the environment and tend to accumulate in soils because of their low mobility and non-degradability. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the applicability of biosensors as tools able to provide data about the bioavailability of such MTEs in contaminated soils. Here, we tested the genetically-engineered strain Escherichia coli pPZntAgfp as a biosensor applicable to the detection of zinc, lead and cadmium by the biosynthesis of green fluorescent protein (GFP) accumulating inside the cells. Flow cytometry was used to investigate the fluorescence induced by the MTEs. A curvilinear response to zinc between 0 and 25 mg/L and another curvilinear response to cadmium between 0 and 1.5 mg/L were highlighted in liquid media, while lead did not produce exploitable results. The response relating to a Zn2+/Cd2+ ratio of 10 was further investigated. In these conditions, E. coli pPZntAgfp responded to cadmium only. Several contaminated soils with a Zn2+/Cd2+ ratio of 10 were analyzed with the biosensor, and the metallic concentrations were also measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Our results showed that E. coli pPZntAgfp could be used as a monitoring tool for contaminated soils being processed. PMID:25894939

  14. Determination of zinc, cadmium and lead bioavailability in contaminated soils at the single-cell level by a combination of whole-cell biosensors and flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Hurdebise, Quentin; Tarayre, Cédric; Fischer, Christophe; Colinet, Gilles; Hiligsmann, Serge; Delvigne, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Zinc, lead and cadmium are metallic trace elements (MTEs) that are widespread in the environment and tend to accumulate in soils because of their low mobility and non-degradability. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the applicability of biosensors as tools able to provide data about the bioavailability of such MTEs in contaminated soils. Here, we tested the genetically-engineered strain Escherichia coli pP(ZntA)gfp as a biosensor applicable to the detection of zinc, lead and cadmium by the biosynthesis of green fluorescent protein (GFP) accumulating inside the cells. Flow cytometry was used to investigate the fluorescence induced by the MTEs. A curvilinear response to zinc between 0 and 25 mg/L and another curvilinear response to cadmium between 0 and 1.5 mg/L were highlighted in liquid media, while lead did not produce exploitable results. The response relating to a Zn2+/Cd2+ ratio of 10 was further investigated. In these conditions, E. coli pP(ZntA)gfp responded to cadmium only. Several contaminated soils with a Zn2+/Cd2+ ratio of 10 were analyzed with the biosensor, and the metallic concentrations were also measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Our results showed that E. coli pP(ZntA)gfp could be used as a monitoring tool for contaminated soils being processed.

  15. Detection of testosterone esters in blood.

    PubMed

    Forsdahl, Guro; Erceg, Damir; Geisendorfer, Thomas; Turkalj, Mirjana; Plavec, Davor; Thevis, Mario; Tretzel, Laura; Gmeiner, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Injections of synthetic esters of testosterone are among the most common forms of testosterone application. In doping control, the detection of an intact ester of testosterone in blood gives unequivocal proof of the administration of exogenous testosterone. The aim of the current project was to investigate the detection window for injected testosterone esters as a mixed substance preparation and as a single substance preparation in serum and plasma. Furthermore, the suitability of different types of blood collection devices was evaluated. Collection tubes with stabilizing additives, as well as non-stabilized serum separation tubes, were tested. A clinical study with six participants was carried out, comprising a single intramuscular injection of either 1000 mg testosterone undecanoate (Nebido(®)) or a mixture of 30 mg testosterone propionate, 60 mg testosterone phenylpropionate, 60 mg testosterone isocaproate, and 100 mg testosterone decanoate (Sustanon(®)). Blood was collected throughout a testing period of 60 days. The applied analytical method for blood analysis included liquid-liquid extraction and preparation of oxime derivatives, prior to TLX-sample clean-up and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) detection. All investigated testosterone esters could be detected in post-administration blood samples. The detection time depended on the type of ester administered. Furthermore, results from the study show that measured blood concentrations of especially short-chained testosterone esters are influenced by the type of blood collection device applied. The testosterone ester detection window, however, was comparable. PMID:26695486

  16. Detection of testosterone esters in blood.

    PubMed

    Forsdahl, Guro; Erceg, Damir; Geisendorfer, Thomas; Turkalj, Mirjana; Plavec, Davor; Thevis, Mario; Tretzel, Laura; Gmeiner, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Injections of synthetic esters of testosterone are among the most common forms of testosterone application. In doping control, the detection of an intact ester of testosterone in blood gives unequivocal proof of the administration of exogenous testosterone. The aim of the current project was to investigate the detection window for injected testosterone esters as a mixed substance preparation and as a single substance preparation in serum and plasma. Furthermore, the suitability of different types of blood collection devices was evaluated. Collection tubes with stabilizing additives, as well as non-stabilized serum separation tubes, were tested. A clinical study with six participants was carried out, comprising a single intramuscular injection of either 1000 mg testosterone undecanoate (Nebido(®)) or a mixture of 30 mg testosterone propionate, 60 mg testosterone phenylpropionate, 60 mg testosterone isocaproate, and 100 mg testosterone decanoate (Sustanon(®)). Blood was collected throughout a testing period of 60 days. The applied analytical method for blood analysis included liquid-liquid extraction and preparation of oxime derivatives, prior to TLX-sample clean-up and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) detection. All investigated testosterone esters could be detected in post-administration blood samples. The detection time depended on the type of ester administered. Furthermore, results from the study show that measured blood concentrations of especially short-chained testosterone esters are influenced by the type of blood collection device applied. The testosterone ester detection window, however, was comparable.

  17. The hidden dimensions of the competition effect: basal cortisol and basal testosterone jointly predict changes in salivary testosterone after social victory in men.

    PubMed

    Zilioli, Samuele; Watson, Neil V

    2012-11-01

    Dominance struggles appear to affect hormone concentrations in many mammalian species, such that higher concentrations of testosterone are seen in winners of competitions, compared to losers. This so-called, "competition effect" has received inconsistent empirical support, suggesting that additional psychological (e.g., mood), situational (i.e., nature of the competition) and physiological (e.g., cortisol) variables might intervene in modulating testosterone fluctuations after social contests. We investigated possible interactions between the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) stress axis in predicting transient changes in testosterone after social victory or defeat on a familiar competitive task. In particular, the present study examined the dual-hormone hypothesis - proposing that baseline cortisol potently modulates the competition effect (Mehta and Josephs, 2010) - in a sample of healthy young men engaged in head-to-head competition on a widely played commercial videogame, Tetris. We found a significant interaction between HPG and HPA axes status and the competition effect on testosterone in the randomly assigned videogame winners, such that winners with a pre-competition combination of high baseline testosterone and low baseline cortisol exhibited significantly greater post-competition testosterone concentrations. The randomly assigned videogame losers showed significantly decreased post-competition levels of testosterone. Possible biological and evolutionary mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are discussed.

  18. Increased physical activity has a greater effect than reduced energy intake on lifestyle modification-induced increases in testosterone

    PubMed Central

    Kumagai, Hiroshi; Zempo-Miyaki, Asako; Yoshikawa, Toru; Tsujimoto, Takehiko; Tanaka, Kiyoji; Maeda, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Obesity has reached epidemic proportions worldwide. Obesity results in reduced serum testosterone levels, which causes many disorders in men. Lifestyle modifications (increased physical activity and calorie restriction) can increase serum testosterone levels. However, it is unknown whether increased physical activity or calorie restriction during lifestyle modifications has a greater effects on serum testosterone levels. Forty-one overweight and obese men completed a 12-week lifestyle modification program (aerobic exercise training and calorie restriction). We measured serum testosterone levels, the number of steps, and the total energy intake. We divided participants into two groups based on the median change in the number of steps (high or low physical activities) or that in calorie restriction (high or low calorie restrictions). After the program, serum testosterone levels were significantly increased. Serum testosterone levels in the high physical activity group were significantly higher than those in the low activity group. This effect was not observed between the groups based on calorie restriction levels. We found a significant positive correlation between the changes in serum testosterone levels and the number of steps. Our results suggested that an increase in physical activity greatly affected the increased serum testosterone levels in overweight and obese men during lifestyle modification. PMID:26798202

  19. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of a novel testosterone transdermal delivery system (TTDS) using palm oil base

    PubMed Central

    Haron, Didi Erwandi Mohamad; Chik, Zamri; Noordin, Mohamed Ibrahm; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2015-01-01

    Objective (s): Transdermal preparations for testosterone are becoming popular because of their unique advantages such as avoidance of first-pass effect, convenience, improved bioavailability, and reduction of systemic side effects. A novel testosterone transdermal delivery system (TDDS) was developed using a palm oil base called HAMIN™ (a commercial product) and tested using in vitro and in vivo skin permeability test methods. Materials and Methods: The physical characteristics of the formulation such as particle size and viscosity were determined by using Franz diffusion cell and Brookfield viscometer, respectively. In vivo skin permeability test was performed on healthy rabbits through the skin. Testosterone in serum was analyzed using the validated Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) technique. Results: In vitro study showed that the cumulative amount of testosterone diffused was between 40 to 1400 ngcm-² over a period of five hr after application of TDDS through the artificial Strat-M™ membrane. In the in vivo rabbit skin permeability test, the results indicated that testosterone was well absorbed with a mean Cmax and Tmax of 60.94 ngml-1 and 2.29 hr after application of TDDS while no increase was observed in placebo treatment. Particle size analysis ranged from 79.4 nm to 630.0 nm for placebo and 97 to 774.0 nm for TDDS. Conclusion: The formulation was successfully prepared using HAMIN™, which has demonstrated great potential for topical delivery of testosterone. PMID:26877845

  20. Combined administration of testosterone plus an ornithine decarboxylase inhibitor as a selective prostate-sparing anabolic therapy.

    PubMed

    Jasuja, Ravi; Costello, James C; Singh, Rajan; Gupta, Vandana; Spina, Catherine S; Toraldo, Gianluca; Jang, Hyeran; Li, Hu; Serra, Carlo; Guo, Wen; Chauhan, Pratibha; Narula, Navjot S; Guarneri, Tyler; Ergun, Ayla; Travison, Thomas G; Collins, James J; Bhasin, Shalender

    2014-04-01

    Because of its anabolic effects on muscle, testosterone is being explored as a function-promoting anabolic therapy for functional limitations associated with aging; however, concerns about testosterone's adverse effects on prostate have inspired efforts to develop strategies that selectively increase muscle mass while sparing the prostate. Testosterone's promyogenic effects are mediated through upregulation of follistatin. We show here that the administration of recombinant follistatin (rFst) increased muscle mass in mice, but had no effect on prostate mass. Consistent with the results of rFst administration, follistatin transgenic mice with constitutively elevated follistatin levels displayed greater muscle mass than controls, but had similar prostate weights. To elucidate signaling pathways regulated differentially by testosterone and rFst in prostate and muscle, we performed microarray analysis of mRNAs from prostate and levator ani of castrated male mice treated with vehicle, testosterone, or rFst. Testosterone and rFst shared the regulation of many transcripts in levator ani; however, in prostate, 593 transcripts in several growth-promoting pathways were differentially expressed after testosterone treatment, while rFst showed a negligible effect with only 9 transcripts differentially expressed. Among pathways that were differentially responsive to testosterone in prostate, we identified ornithine decarboxylase (Odc1), an enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis, as a testosterone-responsive gene that is unresponsive to rFst. Accordingly, we administered testosterone with and without α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), an Odc1 inhibitor, to castrated mice. DFMO selectively blocked testosterone's effects on prostate, but did not affect testosterone's anabolic effects on muscle. Co-administration of testosterone and Odc1 inhibitor presents a novel therapeutic strategy for prostate-sparing anabolic therapy.

  1. A quantitative and qualitative review of the effects of testosterone on the function and structure of the human social-emotional brain.

    PubMed

    Heany, Sarah J; van Honk, Jack; Stein, Dan J; Brooks, Samantha J

    2016-02-01

    Social and affective research in humans is increasingly using functional and structural neuroimaging techniques to aid the understanding of how hormones, such as testosterone, modulate a wide range of psychological processes. We conducted a meta-analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies of testosterone administration, and of fMRI studies that measured endogenous levels of the hormone, in relation to social and affective stimuli. Furthermore, we conducted a review of structural MRI i.e. voxel based morphometry (VBM) studies which considered brain volume in relation to testosterone levels in adults and in children. In the included testosterone administration fMRI studies, which consisted of female samples only, bilateral amygdala/parahippocampal regions as well as the right caudate were significantly activated by social-affective stimuli in the testosterone condition. In the studies considering endogenous levels of testosterone, stimuli-invoked activations relating to testosterone levels were noted in the bilateral amygdala/parahippocampal regions and the brainstem. When the endogenous testosterone studies were split by sex, the significant activation of the brain stem was seen in the female samples only. Significant stimuli-invoked deactivations relating to endogenous testosterone levels were also seen in the right and left amygdala/parahippocampal regions studies. The findings of the VBM studies were less consistent. In adults larger volumes in the limbic and temporal regions were associated with higher endogenous testosterone. In children, boys showed a positive correlation between testosterone and brain volume in many regions, including the amygdala, as well as global grey matter volume, while girls showed a neutral or negative association between testosterone levels and many brain volumes. In conclusion, amygdalar and parahippocampal regions appear to be key target regions for the acute actions of testosterone in response to social and

  2. Testosterone signaling and the regulation of spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Walker, William H

    2011-04-01

    Spermatogenesis and male fertility are dependent upon the presence of testosterone in the testis. In the absence of testosterone or the androgen receptor, spermatogenesis does not proceed beyond the meiosis stage. The major cellular target and translator of testosterone signals to developing germ cells is the Sertoli cell. In the Sertoli cell, testosterone signals can be translated directly to changes in gene expression (the classical pathway) or testosterone can activate kinases that may regulate processes required to maintain spermatogenesis (the non-classical pathway). Contributions of the classical and non-classical testosterone signaling pathways to the maintenance of spermatogenesis are discussed. Studies that may further elaborate the mechanisms by with the pathways support spermatogenesis are proposed. PMID:22319659

  3. Aromatized testosterone attenuates contextual generalization of fear in male rats.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Joseph F; Vanderhoof, Tyler; Winiecki, Patrick; Latsko, Maeson S; Riccio, David C; Jasnow, Aaron M

    2016-08-01

    Generalization is a common symptom of many anxiety disorders, and females are 60% more likely to suffer from an anxiety disorder than males. We have previously demonstrated that female rats display significantly accelerated rates of contextual fear generalization compared to male rats; a process driven, in part, by activation of ERβ. The current study was designed to determine the impact of estrogens on contextual fear generalization in male rats. For experiment 1, adult male rats were gonadectomized (GDX) and implanted with a capsule containing testosterone proprionate, estradiol, dihydrotestosterone proprionate (DHT), or an empty capsule. Treatment with testosterone or estradiol maintained memory precision when rats were tested in a different (neutral) context 1day after training. However, male rats treated with DHT or empty capsules displayed significant levels of fear generalization, exhibiting high levels of fear in the neutral context. In Experiment 2, we used acute injections of gonadal hormones at a time known to elicit fear generalization in female rats (e.g. 24h before testing). Injection treatment followed the same pattern of results seen in Experiment 1. Finally, animals given daily injections of the aromatase inhibitor, Fadrozole, displayed significant fear generalization. These data suggest that testosterone attenuates fear generalization likely through the aromatization testosterone into estradiol as animals treated with the non-aromatizable androgen, DHT, or animals treated with Fadrozole, displayed significant generalized fear. Overall, these results demonstrate a sex-dependent effect of estradiol on the generalization of contextual fear. PMID:27368147

  4. [Hemoglobin and testosterone: importance on high altitude acclimatization and adaptation].

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Gustavo F

    2011-03-01

    The different types of response mechanisms that the organism uses when exposed to hypoxia include accommodation, acclimatization and adaptation. Accommodation is the initial response to acute exposure to high altitude hypoxia and is characterized by an increase in ventilation and heart rate. Acclimatization is observed in individuals temporarily exposed to high altitude, and to some extent, it enables them to tolerate the high altitudes. In this phase, erythropoiesis is increased, resulting in higher hemoglobin and hematocrit levels to improve oxygen delivery capacity. Adaptation is the process of natural acclimatization where genetical variations and acclimatization play a role in allowing subjects to live without any difficulties at high altitudes. Testosterone is a hormone that regulates erythropoiesis and ventilation and could be associated to the processes of acclimatization and adaptation to high altitude. Excessive erythrocytosis, which leads to chronic mountain sickness, is caused by low arterial oxygen saturation, ventilatory inefficiency and reduced ventilatory response to hypoxia. Testosterone increases during acute exposure to high altitude and also in natives at high altitude with excessive erythrocytosis. Results of current research allow us to conclude that increase in serum testosterone and hemoglobin is adequate for acclimatization, as they improve oxygen transport, but not for high altitude adaptation, since high serum testosterone levels are associated to excessive erythrocytosis.

  5. Effects of Nandrolone Stimulation on Testosterone Biosynthesis in Leydig Cells

    PubMed Central

    Barone, Rosario; Marino Gammazza, Antonella; Sangiorgi, Claudia; Barone, Fulvio; Pitruzzella, Alessandro; Locorotondo, Nicola; Di Gaudio, Francesca; Salerno, Monica; Maglietta, Francesca; Sarni, Antonio Luciano; Di Felice, Valentina; Cappello, Francesco; Turillazzi, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are among the drugs most used by athletes for improving physical performance, as well as for aesthetic purposes. A number of papers have showed the side effects of AAS in different organs and tissues. For example, AAS are known to suppress gonadotropin‐releasing hormone, luteinizing hormone, and follicle‐stimulating hormone. This study investigates the effects of nandrolone on testosterone biosynthesis in Leydig cells using various methods, including mass spectrometry, western blotting, confocal microscopy and quantitative real‐time PCR. The results obtained show that testosterone levels increase at a 3.9 μM concentration of nandrolone and return to the basal level a 15.6 μM dose of nandrolone. Nandrolone‐induced testosterone increment was associated with upregulation of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and downregulation of 17a‐hydroxylase/17, 20 lyase (CYP17A1). Instead, a 15.6 µM dose of nandrolone induced a down‐regulation of CYP17A1. Further in vivo studies based on these data are needed to better understand the relationship between disturbed testosterone homeostasis and reproductive system impairment in male subjects. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1385–1391, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26626779

  6. Effects of Nandrolone Stimulation on Testosterone Biosynthesis in Leydig Cells.

    PubMed

    Pomara, Cristoforo; Barone, Rosario; Marino Gammazza, Antonella; Sangiorgi, Claudia; Barone, Fulvio; Pitruzzella, Alessandro; Locorotondo, Nicola; Di Gaudio, Francesca; Salerno, Monica; Maglietta, Francesca; Sarni, Antonio Luciano; Di Felice, Valentina; Cappello, Francesco; Turillazzi, Emanuela

    2016-06-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are among the drugs most used by athletes for improving physical performance, as well as for aesthetic purposes. A number of papers have showed the side effects of AAS in different organs and tissues. For example, AAS are known to suppress gonadotropin-releasing hormone, luteinizing hormone, and follicle-stimulating hormone. This study investigates the effects of nandrolone on testosterone biosynthesis in Leydig cells using various methods, including mass spectrometry, western blotting, confocal microscopy and quantitative real-time PCR. The results obtained show that testosterone levels increase at a 3.9 μM concentration of nandrolone and return to the basal level a 15.6 μM dose of nandrolone. Nandrolone-induced testosterone increment was associated with upregulation of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and downregulation of 17a-hydroxylase/17, 20 lyase (CYP17A1). Instead, a 15.6 µM dose of nandrolone induced a down-regulation of CYP17A1. Further in vivo studies based on these data are needed to better understand the relationship between disturbed testosterone homeostasis and reproductive system impairment in male subjects. PMID:26626779

  7. Effects of Nandrolone Stimulation on Testosterone Biosynthesis in Leydig Cells.

    PubMed

    Pomara, Cristoforo; Barone, Rosario; Marino Gammazza, Antonella; Sangiorgi, Claudia; Barone, Fulvio; Pitruzzella, Alessandro; Locorotondo, Nicola; Di Gaudio, Francesca; Salerno, Monica; Maglietta, Francesca; Sarni, Antonio Luciano; Di Felice, Valentina; Cappello, Francesco; Turillazzi, Emanuela

    2016-06-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are among the drugs most used by athletes for improving physical performance, as well as for aesthetic purposes. A number of papers have showed the side effects of AAS in different organs and tissues. For example, AAS are known to suppress gonadotropin-releasing hormone, luteinizing hormone, and follicle-stimulating hormone. This study investigates the effects of nandrolone on testosterone biosynthesis in Leydig cells using various methods, including mass spectrometry, western blotting, confocal microscopy and quantitative real-time PCR. The results obtained show that testosterone levels increase at a 3.9 μM concentration of nandrolone and return to the basal level a 15.6 μM dose of nandrolone. Nandrolone-induced testosterone increment was associated with upregulation of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and downregulation of 17a-hydroxylase/17, 20 lyase (CYP17A1). Instead, a 15.6 µM dose of nandrolone induced a down-regulation of CYP17A1. Further in vivo studies based on these data are needed to better understand the relationship between disturbed testosterone homeostasis and reproductive system impairment in male subjects.

  8. Basal testosterone, leadership and dominance: A field study and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    van der Meij, Leander; Schaveling, Jaap; van Vugt, Mark

    2016-10-01

    This article examines the role of basal testosterone as a potential biological marker of leadership and hierarchy in the workplace. First, we report the result of a study with a sample of male employees from different corporate organizations in the Netherlands (n=125). Results showed that employees with higher basal testosterone levels reported a more authoritarian leadership style, but this relationship was absent among those who currently held a real management position (i.e., they had at least one subordinate). Furthermore, basal testosterone levels were not different between managers and non-managers, and testosterone was not associated with various indicators of status and hierarchy such as number of subordinates, income, and position in the organizational hierarchy. In our meta-analysis (second study), we showed that basal testosterone levels were not associated with leadership in men nor in women (9 studies, n=1103). Taken together, our findings show that basal testosterone is not associated with having a leadership position in the corporate world or related to leadership styles in leaders. We suggest that basal testosterone could play a role in acquiring leadership positions through dominant and authoritarian behavior. PMID:27372205

  9. Treatment of pain in fibromyalgia patients with testosterone gel: Pharmacokinetics and clinical response.

    PubMed

    White, Hillary D; Brown, Lin A J; Gyurik, Robert J; Manganiello, Paul D; Robinson, Thomas D; Hallock, Linda S; Lewis, Lionel D; Yeo, Kiang-Teck J

    2015-08-01

    To test our hypothesis that testosterone deficiency plays an important role in chronic pain, a Phase I/II pilot study was initiated with 12 fibromyalgia patients to verify that a daily dose for 28days with transdermal testosterone gel would 1) significantly and safely increase mean serum testosterone concentrations from low baseline levels to mid/high-normal levels, and 2) effectively treat the pain and fatigue symptoms of fibromyalgia. Pharmacokinetic data confirmed that serum free testosterone concentrations were raised significantly above baseline levels, by assessment of maximum hormone concentration (Cmax) and area under the curve (AUC) parameters: free testosterone Cmax was significantly raised from a mean of 2.64pg/mL to 3.91pg/mL (p<0.05), and 24hour free testosterone AUC was significantly raised from a mean of 35.0pg-hr/mL to 53.89pg-hr/mL. Assessment of the typical symptoms of fibromyalgia by patient questionnaire and tender point exam demonstrated significant change in: decreased muscle pain, stiffness, and fatigue, and increased libido during study treatment. These results are consistent with the hypothesized ability of testosterone to relieve the symptoms of fibromyalgia. Symptoms not tightly related to fibromyalgia were not improved. PMID:26004317

  10. Testosterone reverses ethanol-induced deficit in spatial reference memory in castrated rats.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Rafaat; King, Michael A; Soliman, Magdi R I

    2005-10-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of ethanol, testosterone and combination of ethanol and testosterone, on spatial reference memory and beta-endorphin (beta-EN) levels in castrated rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (120-150 g) were used in this study, Animals were castrated and ethanol, testosterone or combination of the drugs were administered to rats at 09:00 h. The drugs were administered after a training period of 5 days and spatial reference memory was evaluated for 7 days using the Morris water maze. One hour after the last injection, animals were sacrificed, their brains removed and dissected into cortex, hypothalamus, hippocampus and midbrain. The beta-EN levels in these brain regions were determined by radioimmunoassay. The time to find the platform (latency period) was significantly increased in ethanol-treated rats, indicating that ethanol induces deficit in spatial reference memory. On the other hand, testosterone administration improved spatial reference memory by significantly decreasing the latency period. In addition, there was a significant decrease in latency period in the animals treated with combination of ethanol and testosterone. Results also indicate that administration of ethanol resulted in a significant increase in beta-EN levels in the hippocampus and in the cortex while concurrent administration with testosterone abolished this increase. These findings clearly indicate that administration of testosterone did not only improve memory but also abolished the spatial memory deficit induced by ethanol in castrated rats.

  11. Basal testosterone, leadership and dominance: A field study and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    van der Meij, Leander; Schaveling, Jaap; van Vugt, Mark

    2016-10-01

    This article examines the role of basal testosterone as a potential biological marker of leadership and hierarchy in the workplace. First, we report the result of a study with a sample of male employees from different corporate organizations in the Netherlands (n=125). Results showed that employees with higher basal testosterone levels reported a more authoritarian leadership style, but this relationship was absent among those who currently held a real management position (i.e., they had at least one subordinate). Furthermore, basal testosterone levels were not different between managers and non-managers, and testosterone was not associated with various indicators of status and hierarchy such as number of subordinates, income, and position in the organizational hierarchy. In our meta-analysis (second study), we showed that basal testosterone levels were not associated with leadership in men nor in women (9 studies, n=1103). Taken together, our findings show that basal testosterone is not associated with having a leadership position in the corporate world or related to leadership styles in leaders. We suggest that basal testosterone could play a role in acquiring leadership positions through dominant and authoritarian behavior.

  12. Environmental exposure to metals and male reproductive hormones: Circulating testosterone is inversely associated with blood molybdenum

    PubMed Central

    Meeker, John D.; Rossano, Mary G.; Protas, Bridget; Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Diamond, Michael P.; Puscheck, Elizabeth; Daly, Douglas; Paneth, Nigel; Wirth, Julia J.

    2010-01-01

    Study Objective To explore associations between exposure to metals and male reproductive hormone levels. Design Cross-sectional epidemiology study with adjustment for potential confounders. Setting Metal concentrations and reproductive hormone levels were measured in blood samples collected from 219 men. Patients: Men recruited through two Michigan, USA infertility clinics. Interventions None Main Outcome Measures Serum FSH, LH, inhibin B, testosterone, and SHBG. Results Cadmium, copper and lead were all significantly or suggestively positively associated with testosterone when modeled individually (p-values = 0.1, 0.03, and 0.07, respectively), findings that are consistent with limited previous human and animal studies. Conversely, molybdenum was associated with reduced testosterone (p-value for trend = 0.001). A significant inverse trend between molybdenum and testosterone remained when additionally considering other metals in the model, where a positive association between testosterone and zinc was also found. Finally, in exploratory analysis there was evidence for an interaction between molybdenum and zinc, where high molybdenum was associated with a 37% reduction in testosterone (relative to the population median level) among men with low zinc. Conclusions While reductions in testosterone and reproductive toxicity following molybdenum exposure have been previously demonstrated in animal studies, more research is needed to determine whether molybdenum poses a risk to human reproductive health. PMID:18990371

  13. Treatment of pain in fibromyalgia patients with testosterone gel: Pharmacokinetics and clinical response.

    PubMed

    White, Hillary D; Brown, Lin A J; Gyurik, Robert J; Manganiello, Paul D; Robinson, Thomas D; Hallock, Linda S; Lewis, Lionel D; Yeo, Kiang-Teck J

    2015-08-01

    To test our hypothesis that testosterone deficiency plays an important role in chronic pain, a Phase I/II pilot study was initiated with 12 fibromyalgia patients to verify that a daily dose for 28days with transdermal testosterone gel would 1) significantly and safely increase mean serum testosterone concentrations from low baseline levels to mid/high-normal levels, and 2) effectively treat the pain and fatigue symptoms of fibromyalgia. Pharmacokinetic data confirmed that serum free testosterone concentrations were raised significantly above baseline levels, by assessment of maximum hormone concentration (Cmax) and area under the curve (AUC) parameters: free testosterone Cmax was significantly raised from a mean of 2.64pg/mL to 3.91pg/mL (p<0.05), and 24hour free testosterone AUC was significantly raised from a mean of 35.0pg-hr/mL to 53.89pg-hr/mL. Assessment of the typical symptoms of fibromyalgia by patient questionnaire and tender point exam demonstrated significant change in: decreased muscle pain, stiffness, and fatigue, and increased libido during study treatment. These results are consistent with the hypothesized ability of testosterone to relieve the symptoms of fibromyalgia. Symptoms not tightly related to fibromyalgia were not improved.

  14. Testosterone metabolism: a possible biological underpinning of non-verbal IQ in intellectually gifted girls.

    PubMed

    Durdiaková, Jaroslava; Celec, Peter; Laznibatová, Jolana; Minárik, Gabriel; Ostatníková, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The extraordinary giftedness is apparently a unique manifestation of a mutual interconnection between genes and environment. One of the possible etiological factors of intellectual giftedness is testosterone which is believed to affect the brain organization and function. The aim of our study was to analyze associations between 2D:4D digit ratio (a proxy of prenatal testosterone) and/or salivary testosterone levels with non-verbal IQ in intellectually gifted girls. Fifty-one girls with an age range of 10 to18 years and IQ scores higher than 130 were tested. Saliva samples were collected to obtain levels of salivary testosterone. 2D:4D digit ratio was measured on both hands as an indicator of prenatal testosterone. IQ parameters were assessed employing standardized set of tests. The CAG repeat polymorphism in exon 1 of the androgen receptor gene was analyzed to assess the sensitivity of androgen receptor. Testing of between-subjects effects proved significant interactions between right and left 2D:4D ratio, genetic variability in androgen receptor, and also salivary testosterone level with non-verbal IQ in gifted girls. Our results point out that the variability in parameters of androgenicity contributes to the variability of nonverbal IQ in gifted girls. However, the exact molecular mechanism of how testosterone acts on the brain and affects this cognitive domain remains still unclear.

  15. Hyperandrogenemia in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Exploration of the Role of Free Testosterone and Androstenedione in Metabolic Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Lerchbaum, Elisabeth; Schwetz, Verena; Rabe, Thomas; Giuliani, Albrecht; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association between androstenedione, testosterone, and free testosterone and metabolic disturbances in polycystic ovary syndrome. Methods We analyzed the association between androstenedione, testosterone, and free testosterone and metabolic parameters in a cross-sectional study including 706 polycystic ovary syndrome and 140 BMI-matched healthy women. Polycystic ovary syndrome women were categorized into 4 groups: normal androstenedione and normal free testosterone (NA/NFT), elevated androstenedione and normal free testosterone (HA/NFT), normal androstenedione and elevated free testosterone (NA/HFT), elevated androstenedione and free testosterone (HA/HFT). Results Polycystic ovary syndrome women with elevated free testosterone levels (HA/HFT and NA/HFT) have an adverse metabolic profile including 2 h glucose, HbA1c, fasting and 2 h insulin, area under the insulin response curve, insulin resistance, insulin sensitivity index (Matsuda), triglycerides, total and high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels compared to NA/NFT (p<0.05 for all age- and BMI-adjusted analyses). In binary logistic regression analysis adjusted for age and BMI, odds ratio for insulin resistance was 2.78 (1.34–5.75, p = 0.006) for polycystic ovary syndrome women with HA/HFT compared to NA/NFT. We found no significantly increased risk of metabolic disorders in polycystic ovary syndrome women with HA/NFT. In multiple linear regression analyses (age- and BMI-adjusted), we found a significant negative association between androstenedione/free testosterone-ratio and area under the insulin response curve, insulin resistance, and total cholesterol/high density lipoprotein cholesterol-ratio and a positive association with Matsuda-index, and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (p<0.05 for all). Conclusions Polycystic ovary syndrome women with elevated free testosterone levels but not with isolated androstenedione elevation have an adverse metabolic phenotype. Further, a

  16. Evaluation of the effects of testosterone and luteinizing hormone on regulation of β-amyloid in male 3xTg-AD mice.

    PubMed

    Rosario, Emily R; Carroll, Jenna C; Pike, Christian J

    2012-07-23

    During normal aging, men experience a significant decline in testosterone levels and a compensatory elevation in levels of gonadotropin luteinizing hormone (LH). Both low testosterone and elevated LH have been identified as significant risk factors for the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in men. It is unclear whether changes in testosterone or LH primarily underlie the relationship with AD, and therefore may be a more suitable therapeutic target. To examine this issue, we compared levels of β-amyloid (Aβ) immunoreactivity in male 3xTg-AD mice under varying experimental conditions associated with relatively low or high levels of testosterone and/or LH. In gonadally intact mice, Aβ accumulation increased after treatment with the gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist leuprolide, which inhibits the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis and reduces both testosterone and LH levels. In gonadectomized (GDX) mice with low testosterone and high LH, we also observed increased Aβ levels. Treatment of GDX mice with testosterone significantly reduced Aβ levels. In contrast, leuprolide did not significantly decrease Aβ levels and moreover, inhibited the Aβ-lowering effect of testosterone. Evaluation of hippocampal-dependent behavior revealed parallel findings, with performance in GDX mice improved by testosterone but not leuprolide. These data suggest that Aβ-lowering actions of testosterone are mediated directly by androgen pathways rather than indirectly via regulation of LH and the HPG axis. These findings support the clinical evaluation of androgen therapy in the prevention and perhaps treatment of AD in hypogonadal men.

  17. A review on the relationship between testosterone and life-course persistent antisocial behavior.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Bariş O; Derksen, Jan J L

    2012-12-30

    Life-course persistent antisocial behavior is 10 to 14 times more prevalent in males and it has been suggested that testosterone levels could account for this gender bias. Preliminary studies with measures of fetal testosterone find inconsistent associations with antisocial behavior, especially studies that use the 2D:4D ratio as a proxy for fetal testosterone. However, circulating testosterone consistently shows positive associations with antisocial behaviors throughout childhood, adolescence, and adulthood, particularly in males. It is suggested that high fetal/circulating testosterone interactively influence the maturation and functionality of mesolimbic dopaminergic circuitry, right orbitofrontal cortex, and cortico-subcortical connectivity, resulting in a strong reward motivation, low social sensitivity, and dampened regulation of strong motivational/emotional processes. The link between these testosterone induced endophenotypes and actual display of antisocial behavior is strongly modulated by different social (e.g., social rejection, low SES) and genetic (e.g., MAOA, 5HTT) risk factors that can disturb socio-, psycho-, and biological development and interact with testosterone in shaping behavior. When these additional risk factors are present, the testosterone induced endophenotypes may increase the risk for a chronic antisocial lifestyle. However, behavioral endophenotypes induced by testosterone can also predispose towards socially adaptive traits such as a strong achievement motivation, leadership, fair bargaining behaviors, and social assertiveness. These adaptive traits are more likely to emerge when the high testosterone individual has positive social experiences that promote prosocial behaviors such as strong and secure attachments with his caregivers, affiliation with prosocial peers, and sufficient socioeconomic resources. A theoretical model is presented, various hypotheses are examined, and future venues for research are discussed.

  18. Transcriptional regulation of myotrophic actions by testosterone and trenbolone on androgen-responsive muscle.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fan; McCoy, Sean C; Ross, Heather H; Bernardo, Joseph A; Beharry, Adam W; Senf, Sarah M; Judge, Andrew R; Beck, Darren T; Conover, Christine F; Cannady, Darryl F; Smith, Barbara K; Yarrow, Joshua F; Borst, Stephen E

    2014-09-01

    Androgens regulate body composition and skeletal muscle mass in males, but the molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. Recently, we demonstrated that trenbolone (a potent synthetic testosterone analogue that is not a substrate for 5-alpha reductase or for aromatase) induces myotrophic effects in skeletal muscle without causing prostate enlargement, which is in contrast to the known prostate enlarging effects of testosterone. These previous results suggest that the 5α-reduction of testosterone is not required for myotrophic action. We now report differential gene expression in response to testosterone versus trenbolone in the highly androgen-sensitive levator ani/bulbocavernosus (LABC) muscle complex of the adult rat after 6weeks of orchiectomy (ORX), using real time PCR. The ORX-induced expression of atrogenes (Muscle RING-finger protein-1 [MuRF1] and atrogin-1) was suppressed by both androgens, with trenbolone producing a greater suppression of atrogin-1 mRNA compared to testosterone. Both androgens elevated expression of anabolic genes (insulin-like growth factor-1 and mechano-growth factor) after ORX. ORX-induced increases in expression of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA were suppressed by trenbolone treatment, but not testosterone. In ORX animals, testosterone promoted WNT1-inducible-signaling pathway protein 2 (WISP-2) gene expression while trenbolone did not. Testosterone and trenbolone equally enhanced muscle regeneration as shown by increases in LABC mass and in protein expression of embryonic myosin by western blotting. In addition, testosterone increased WISP-2 protein levels. Together, these findings identify specific mechanisms by which testosterone and trenbolone may regulate skeletal muscle maintenance and growth. PMID:24928725

  19. Lower Serum Testosterone Associated with Elevated Polychlorinated Biphenyl Concentrations in Native American Men

    PubMed Central

    Goncharov, Alexey; Rej, Robert; Negoita, Serban; Schymura, Maria; Santiago-Rivera, Azara; Morse, Gayle; Carpenter, David O.

    2009-01-01

    Background Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and chlorinated pesticides are endocrine disruptors, altering both thyroid and estrogen hormonal systems. Less is known of action on androgenic systems. Objective We studied the relationship between serum concentrations of testosterone in relation to levels of PCBs and three chlorinated pesticides in an adult Native American (Mohawk) population. Methods We collected fasting serum samples from 703 adult Mohawks (257 men and 436 women) and analyzed samples for 101 PCB congeners, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), and mirex, as well as testosterone, cholesterol, and triglycerides. The associations between testosterone and tertiles of serum organochlorine levels (both wet weight and lipid adjusted) were assessed using a logistic regression model while controlling for age, body mass index (BMI), and other analytes, with the lowest tertile being considered the referent. Males and females were considered separately. Results Testosterone concentrations in males were inversely correlated with total PCB concentration, whether using wet-weight or lipid-adjusted values. The odds ratio (OR) of having a testosterone concentration above the median was 0.17 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.05–0.69] for total wet-weight PCBs (highest vs. lowest tertile) after adjustment for age, BMI, total serum lipids, and three pesticides. The OR for lipid-adjusted total PCB concentration was 0.23 (95% CI, 0.06–0.78) after adjustment for other analytes. Testosterone levels were significantly and inversely related to concentrations of PCBs 74, 99, 153, and 206, but not PCBs 52, 105, 118, 138, 170, 180, 201, or 203. Testosterone concentrations in females are much lower than in males, and not significantly related to serum PCBs. HCB, DDE, and mirex were not associated with testosterone concentration in either men or women. Conclusions Elevation in serum PCB levels is associated with a lower concentration of serum

  20. Testosterone improves erectile function through inhibition of reactive oxygen species generation in castrated rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui; Meng, Xianghu; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Tao; Yang, Jun; Niu, Yonghua; Cui, Kai; Wang, Shaogang

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone is overwhelmingly important in regulating erectile physiology. However, the associated molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to explore the effects and mechanisms of testosterone in erectile dysfunction (ED) in castrated rats. Forty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to four groups (control, sham-operated, castration and castration-with-testosterone-replacement). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was measured by dihydroethidium (DHE) staining. Erectile function was assessed by the recording of intracavernous pressure (ICP) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP). Protein expression levels were examined by western blotting. We found that castration reduced erectile function and that testosterone restored it. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity was decrease in the castrated rats, and testosterone administration attenuated this decrease (each p < 0.05). The testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) concentrations were lower in the castrated rats, and testosterone restored these levels (each p < 0.05). Furthermore, the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and prostacyclin synthase (PTGIS) expression levels and phospho-endothelial nitric oxide synthase (p-eNOS, Ser1177)/endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) ratio were reduced in the castrated rats compared with the controls (each p < 0.05). In addition, the p40phox and p67phox expression levels were increased in the castrated rats, and testosterone reversed these changes (each p < 0.05). Overall, our results demonstrate that testosterone ameliorates ED after castration by reducing ROS production and increasing the activity of the eNOS/cGMP and COX-2/PTGIS/cAMP signaling pathways. PMID:27168996

  1. Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer Is Associated With Reduced Serum Testosterone and Increased FSH and LH

    SciTech Connect

    Bruheim, Kjersti Svartberg, Johan; Carlsen, Erik; Dueland, Svein; Haug, Egil; Skovlund, Eva; Tveit, Kjell Magne; Guren, Marianne G.

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: It is known that scattered radiation to the testes during pelvic radiotherapy can affect fertility, but there is little knowledge on its effects on male sex hormones. The aim of this study was to determine whether radiotherapy for rectal cancer affects testosterone production. Methods and Materials: All male patients who had received adjuvant radiotherapy for rectal cancer from 1993 to 2003 were identified from the Norwegian Rectal Cancer Registry. Patients treated with surgery alone were randomly selected from the same registry as control subjects. Serum levels of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone, and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) were analyzed, and free testosterone was calculated (N = 290). Information about the radiotherapy treatment was collected from the patient hospital charts. Results: Serum FSH was 3 times higher in the radiotherapy group than in the control group (median, 18.8 vs. 6.3 IU/L, p <0.001), and serum LH was 1.7 times higher (median, 7.5 vs. 4.5 IU/l, p <0.001). In the radiotherapy group, 27% of patients had testosterone levels below the reference range (8-35 nmol/L), compared with 10% of the nonirradiated patients (p <0.001). Irradiated patients had lower serum testosterone (mean, 11.1 vs. 13.4 nmol/L, p <0.001) and lower calculated free testosterone (mean, 214 vs. 235 pmol/L, p <0.05) than control subjects. Total testosterone, calculated free testosterone, and gonadotropins were related to the distance from the bony pelvic structures to the caudal field edge. Conclusions: Increased serum levels of gonadotropins and subnormal serum levels of testosterone indicate that curative radiotherapy for rectal cancer can result in permanent testicular dysfunction.

  2. Increased hair testosterone but unaltered hair cortisol in female patients with borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Dettenborn, Lucia; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Gao, Wei; Spitzer, Carsten; Roepke, Stefan; Otte, Christian; Wingenfeld, Katja

    2016-09-01

    A number of studies have reported on dysfunctions in steroid secretion, including altered cortisol and testosterone levels in borderline personality disorder (BDP) patients compared to healthy controls. The present study extends findings from blood and saliva studies to the cumulative measure of hair steroids. We investigated women with BPD (n=18) and age- and education-matched healthy women (n=17). We did not find differences between BPD patients and healthy women (p=0.40) concerning hair cortisol levels but increased hair testosterone levels among BPD patients compared to controls (p=0.03). These results remained when restricting the analyses to unmedicated patients. Our data indicate altered long-term testosterone but not cortisol levels in females with BPD. Future studies should address the possible impact of altered testosterone on medical illness processes including metabolic syndrome in this population. PMID:27290653

  3. Serum Ferritin Is Inversely Correlated with Testosterone in Boys and Young Male Adolescents: A Cross-Sectional Study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Kuo-Ching; Chang, Chun-Chao; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chang, Jung-Su

    2015-01-01

    Objective The transition from childhood to teenaged years is associated with increased testosterone and a decreased iron status. It is not clear whether higher testosterone levels cause the decreased iron status, and to what extent, obesity-related inflammation influences the iron-testosterone relationship. The aim of the present study was to examine relationships of testosterone, iron status, and anti-/proinflammatory cytokines in relation to nutritional status in boys and young adolescent Taiwanese males. Methods In total, 137 boys aged 7~13 yr were included. Parameters for obesity, the iron status, testosterone, and inflammatory markers were evaluated. Results Overweight and obese (ow/obese) boys had higher mean serum testosterone, interleukin (IL)-1β, and nitric oxide (NO) levels compared to their normal-weight counterparts (all p<0.05). Mean serum ferritin was slightly higher in ow/obese boys compared to normal-weight boys, but this did not reach statistical significance. A multiple linear regression showed that serum ferritin (β = -0.7470, p = 0.003) was inversely correlated with testosterone, while serum IL-10 (β = 0.3475, p = 0.009) was positively associated with testosterone after adjusting for covariates. When normal-weight boys were separately assessed from ow/obesity boys, the association between testosterone and serum ferritin became stronger (β = -0.9628, p<0.0001), but the association between testosterone and IL-10 became non-significant (β = 0.1140, p = 0.4065) after adjusting for covariates. In ow/obese boys, only IL-10 was weakly associated with serum testosterone (β = 0.6444, p = 0.051) after adjusting for age. Conclusions Testosterone and serum ferritin are intrinsically interrelated but this relationship is weaker in ow/obese boys after adjusting for age. PMID:26646112

  4. Cortisol and testosterone increase financial risk taking and may destabilize markets.

    PubMed

    Cueva, Carlos; Roberts, R Edward; Spencer, Tom; Rani, Nisha; Tempest, Michelle; Tobler, Philippe N; Herbert, Joe; Rustichini, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    It is widely known that financial markets can become dangerously unstable, yet it is unclear why. Recent research has highlighted the possibility that endogenous hormones, in particular testosterone and cortisol, may critically influence traders' financial decision making. Here we show that cortisol, a hormone that modulates the response to physical or psychological stress, predicts instability in financial markets. Specifically, we recorded salivary levels of cortisol and testosterone in people participating in an experimental asset market (N = 142) and found that individual and aggregate levels of endogenous cortisol predict subsequent risk-taking and price instability. We then administered either cortisol (single oral dose of 100 mg hydrocortisone, N = 34) or testosterone (three doses of 10 g transdermal 1% testosterone gel over 48 hours, N = 41) to young males before they played an asset trading game. We found that both cortisol and testosterone shifted investment towards riskier assets. Cortisol appears to affect risk preferences directly, whereas testosterone operates by inducing increased optimism about future price changes. Our results suggest that changes in both cortisol and testosterone could play a destabilizing role in financial markets through increased risk taking behaviour, acting via different behavioural pathways. PMID:26135946

  5. Testosterone and reward prediction-errors in healthy men and men with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Morris, R W; Purves-Tyson, T D; Weickert, C Shannon; Rothmond, D; Lenroot, R; Weickert, T W

    2015-11-01

    Sex hormones impact reward processing, which is dysfunctional in schizophrenia; however, the degree to which testosterone levels relate to reward-related brain activity in healthy men and the extent to which this relationship may be altered in men with schizophrenia has not been determined. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure neural responses in the striatum during reward prediction-errors and hormone assays to measure testosterone and prolactin in serum. To determine if testosterone can have a direct effect on dopamine neurons, we also localized and measured androgen receptors in human midbrain with immunohistochemistry and quantitative PCR. We found correlations between testosterone and prediction-error related activity in the ventral striatum of healthy men, but not in men with schizophrenia, such that testosterone increased the size of positive and negative prediction-error related activity in a valence-specific manner. We also identified midbrain dopamine neurons that were androgen receptor immunoreactive, and found that androgen receptor (AR) mRNA was positively correlated with tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA in human male substantia nigra. The results suggest that sex steroid receptors can potentially influence midbrain dopamine biosynthesis, and higher levels of serum testosterone are linked to better discrimination of motivationally-relevant signals in the ventral striatum, putatively by modulation of the dopamine biosynthesis pathway via AR ligand binding. However, the normal relationship between serum testosterone and ventral striatum activity during reward learning appears to be disrupted in schizophrenia. PMID:26232868

  6. Testosterone affects hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) activity and lipid metabolism in the left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Langfort, Jozef; Jagsz, Slawomir; Dobrzyn, Pawel; Brzezinska, Zofia; Klapcinska, Barbara; Galbo, Henrik; Gorski, Jan

    2010-09-01

    Fatty acids, which are the major cardiac fuel, are derived from lipid droplets stored in cardiomyocytes, among other sources. The heart expresses hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), which regulates triglycerides (TG) breakdown, and the enzyme is under hormonal control. Evidence obtained from adipose tissue suggests that testosterone regulates HSL activity. To test whether this is also true in the heart, we measured HSL activity in the left ventricle of sedentary male rats that had been treated with testosterone supplementation or orchidectomy with or without testosterone substitution. Left ventricle HSL activity against TG was significantly elevated in intact rats supplemented with testosterone. HSL activity against both TG and diacylglyceride was reduced by orchidectomy, whereas testosterone replacement fully reversed this effect. Moreover, testosterone increased left ventricle free fatty acid levels, caused an inhibitory effect on carbohydrate metabolism in the heart, and elevated left ventricular phosphocreatine and ATP levels as compared to control rats. These data indicate that testosterone is involved in cardiac HSL activity regulation which, in turn, may affect cardiac lipid and carbohydrate metabolism.

  7. Cortisol and testosterone increase financial risk taking and may destabilize markets.

    PubMed

    Cueva, Carlos; Roberts, R Edward; Spencer, Tom; Rani, Nisha; Tempest, Michelle; Tobler, Philippe N; Herbert, Joe; Rustichini, Aldo

    2015-07-02

    It is widely known that financial markets can become dangerously unstable, yet it is unclear why. Recent research has highlighted the possibility that endogenous hormones, in particular testosterone and cortisol, may critically influence traders' financial decision making. Here we show that cortisol, a hormone that modulates the response to physical or psychological stress, predicts instability in financial markets. Specifically, we recorded salivary levels of cortisol and testosterone in people participating in an experimental asset market (N = 142) and found that individual and aggregate levels of endogenous cortisol predict subsequent risk-taking and price instability. We then administered either cortisol (single oral dose of 100 mg hydrocortisone, N = 34) or testosterone (three doses of 10 g transdermal 1% testosterone gel over 48 hours, N = 41) to young males before they played an asset trading game. We found that both cortisol and testosterone shifted investment towards riskier assets. Cortisol appears to affect risk preferences directly, whereas testosterone operates by inducing increased optimism about future price changes. Our results suggest that changes in both cortisol and testosterone could play a destabilizing role in financial markets through increased risk taking behaviour, acting via different behavioural pathways.

  8. Cortisol and testosterone increase financial risk taking and may destabilize markets

    PubMed Central

    Cueva, Carlos; Roberts, R. Edward; Spencer, Tom; Rani, Nisha; Tempest, Michelle; Tobler, Philippe N.; Herbert, Joe; Rustichini, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    It is widely known that financial markets can become dangerously unstable, yet it is unclear why. Recent research has highlighted the possibility that endogenous hormones, in particular testosterone and cortisol, may critically influence traders’ financial decision making. Here we show that cortisol, a hormone that modulates the response to physical or psychological stress, predicts instability in financial markets. Specifically, we recorded salivary levels of cortisol and testosterone in people participating in an experimental asset market (N = 142) and found that individual and aggregate levels of endogenous cortisol predict subsequent risk-taking and price instability. We then administered either cortisol (single oral dose of 100 mg hydrocortisone, N = 34) or testosterone (three doses of 10 g transdermal 1% testosterone gel over 48 hours, N = 41) to young males before they played an asset trading game. We found that both cortisol and testosterone shifted investment towards riskier assets. Cortisol appears to affect risk preferences directly, whereas testosterone operates by inducing increased optimism about future price changes. Our results suggest that changes in both cortisol and testosterone could play a destabilizing role in financial markets through increased risk taking behaviour, acting via different behavioural pathways. PMID:26135946

  9. Latent trait testosterone among 18-24 year olds: Methodological considerations and risk associations.

    PubMed

    Dariotis, Jacinda K; Chen, Frances R; Granger, Douglas A

    2016-05-01

    The study investigated the relationship between latent trait testosterone (LTT) and risk-taking among 126 youth (M age=21.34years; 56% female; 52% African American). Latent state-trait (LST) modeling isolates observed variance of samples via their correlations into (1) a latent trait testosterone (LTT) factor capturing individual differences, and (2) a component of state testosterone factor (LST) capturing state-specific situational or environmental influences and random error variances. Participants provided four laboratory (20min apart) and four home (waking, 20-min post-waking, noon, evening) salivary samples (later assayed for testosterone). Participants reported risk-taking tendencies and behaviors via an Audio Computer Assisted Self-Interview. Behavioral risk was measured using the Balloon Analog Risk Task. Results revealed: (1) LTT model invariance (operated similarly) for females and males; (2) LTT accounted for 18-89% (home samples) and 61-95% (lab samples) of the variance in testosterone levels, and (3) LTT was associated with risk-seeking behaviors and the strength of this association was similar across males and females. LST Modeling has potential to advance our understanding of testosterone-behavior associations to new limits by estimating stable trait-like components of the variance in testosterone levels. PMID:26852415

  10. Testosterone not associated with violent dreams or REM sleep behavior disorder in men with Parkinson's.

    PubMed

    Chou, Kelvin L; Moro-De-Casillas, Maria L; Amick, Melissa M; Borek, Leora L; Friedman, Joseph H

    2007-02-15

    We examined the relationship between testosterone levels, violent dreams, and REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) in 31 men with Parkinson's disease (PD): 12 with clinical RBD and 19 without. All PD patients with clinical RBD experienced violent dreams, but none of the 19 non-RBD patients reported violent dreams. While dream content appears to be more aggressive in PD patients with clinical RBD, the presence of violent dreams or clinical RBD is not associated with testosterone levels in men with PD.

  11. Correlation Between Testosterone and PSA Kinetics in Metastatic Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Diverse Chemical Castrations.

    PubMed

    Reis, Leonardo O; Denardi, Fernandes; Faria, Eliney F; Silva, Elcio Dias

    2015-09-01

    To assess total testosterone and prostatic-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics among diverse chemical castrations, advanced-stage prostate cancer patients were randomized into three groups of 20: Group 1, Leuprolide 3.75 mg; Group 2, Leuprolide 7.5 mg; and Group 3, Goserelin 3.6 mg. All groups were treated with monthly application of the respective drugs. The patients' levels of serum total testosterone and PSA were evaluated at two time periods: before the treatment and 3 months after the treatment. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was utilized to verify the hypothesis of linear correlation between total testosterone and PSA levels. At the beginning the patients' age, stage, grade, PSA, and total testosterone were similar within the three groups, with median age 72, 70, and 70 years in Groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Three months after the treatment, patients who received Leuprolide 7.5 mg presented significantly lower median total testosterone levels compared with Goserelin 3.6 mg and Leuprolide 3.75 mg (9.5 ng/dL vs. 20.0 ng/dL vs. 30.0 ng/dL, respectively; p = .0072), while those who received Goserelin 3.6 mg presented significantly lower PSA levels compared with Leuprolide 7.5 mg and Leuprolide 3.75 mg (0.67 vs. 1.86 vs. 2.57, respectively; p = .0067). There was no linear correlation between total testosterone and PSA levels. Overall, regarding castration levels of total testosterone, 28.77% of patients did not obtain levels ≤50 ng/dL and 47.80% did not obtain levels ≤20 ng/dL. There was no correlation between total testosterone and PSA kinetics and no equivalence among different pharmacological castrations.

  12. Circadian variation in salivary testosterone across age classes in Ache Amerindian males of Paraguay.

    PubMed

    Bribiescas, Richard G; Hill, Kim R

    2010-01-01

    Testosterone levels exhibit a circadian rhythm in healthy men, with morning levels tending to be higher compared to evening titers. However, circadian rhythms wane with age. Although this has been described in males living within industrialized settings, age-related changes have not received similar attention in populations outside these contexts. Because many nonindustrialized populations, such as Ache Amerindians of Paraguay, exhibit testosterone levels that are lower than what is commonly reported in the clinical literature and lack age-associated variation in testosterone, it was hypothesized that Ache men would not show age-related variation in testosterone circadian rhythms. Diurnal rhythmicity in testosterone within and between Ache men in association with age (n = 52; age range, 18-64) was therefore examined. A significant negative association was evident between the ratio of morning and evening salivary testosterone and age (r = -0.28, P = 0.04). Men in their third decade of life exhibited significant diurnal variation (P = 0.0003), whereas older and younger age classes did not. Men between the ages of 30 and 39 also exhibited a higher AM:PM testosterone ratio compared to 40-49 and 50< year old men (P = 0.002, 0.006). Overall, declines in testosterone with aging may not be universal among human males, however, within-individual analyses of diurnal variation capture age-related contrasts in daily testosterone fluctuations. Circadian rhythmicity differs with age among the Ache and may be a common aspect of reproductive senescence among men regardless of ecological context.

  13. Pretreatment Serum Testosterone and Androgen Deprivation: Effect on Disease Recurrence and Overall Survival in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S. Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Wallner, Kent E.; Allen, Zachariah A.; Lief, Jonathan H.; Adamovich, Edward

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: Low testosterone has been implicated as a possible adverse prognostic factor in patients with newly diagnosed prostate cancer. We evaluated the impact of pretreatment serum testosterone on survival after prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: From October 2001 to November 2004, 619 patients underwent brachytherapy and 546 had a pretreatment serum testosterone level measured. Pretreatment serum testosterone levels were assigned by the following criteria: below-normal (n = 105), low normal (n = 246), mid normal (n = 132), high normal (n = 50), and above normal (n = 13). Median follow-up was 5.2 years. Cause of death was determined for each deceased patient. Results: Six-year biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) were 97.7%, 99.8%, and 89.2%. When comparing patients with low or low normal testosterone with those with average or higher testosterone, there was no significant difference in bPFS (97.6% vs. 98.4%; p = 0.72), CSS (99.8% vs. 100%; p = 0.72), or OS (88.9% vs. 90.8%; p = 0.73). Among patients with average and higher pretreatment testosterone, there was no significant difference in outcomes when comparing patients who did and did not receive androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). For patients with low or low normal testosterone levels, there was no significant difference in bPFS or CSS when comparing patients who did and did not receive ADT. However, there was a trend toward lower OS in patients with baseline lower testosterone levels who also received ADT (83.9% vs. 91.3%, p = 0.075). Conclusions: Low pretreatment testosterone levels alone did not affect disease recurrence or OS. Patients with baseline low testosterone who also were treated with ADT had a trend toward decreased OS.

  14. Testosterone is involved in mediating the effects of prenatal stress in male guinea pig offspring.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Amita; Matthews, Stephen G

    2011-02-01

    Studies in humans have demonstrated a link between stress during pregnancy and altered behaviour and stress reactivity in children. In guinea pigs, we have previously shown that a short period of maternal stress during gestation leads to increased anxiety, elevated basal cortisol levels and decreased testosterone levels in adult males. We hypothesized that restoring testosterone to normal levels in the adult males born to prenatally stressed mothers would reverse the changes in behaviours and endocrine function. We found differences in attention and anxiety-related behaviours and basal stress endocrine activity between the prenatally stressed and control males. Administration of testosterone reversed the behavioural differences in the prenatally stressed offspring. There was, however, little effect of postnatal testosterone administration on stress-related endocrine activity. This study provides new information to begin to address the mechanism underlying the interplay between prenatal stress, gonadal steroids and postnatal behaviours.

  15. [Testosterone replacement therapy and prostate cancer: the downfall of a paradigm?].

    PubMed

    Castillo, Octavio A; López-Fontana, Gastón; Vidal-Mora, Ivar; López Laur, José Daniel

    2015-04-06

    For six decades, it has been a part of the conventional medical wisdom that higher levels of testosterone increase the risk of prostate cancer. This belief is mostly derived from the well-documented regression of prostate cancer after surgical or pharmacological castration. However, there is an absence of scientific data supporting the concept that higher testosterone levels are associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer. Moreover, men with hypogonadism have substantial rates of prostate cancer in prostatic biopsies, suggesting that low testosterone has no protective effect against the development of prostate cancer. Moreover, prostate cancer rate is higher in elderly patients when hormonal levels are low. These results argue against an increased risk of prostate cancer with testosterone replacement therapy.

  16. Testosterone is involved in mediating the effects of prenatal stress in male guinea pig offspring.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Amita; Matthews, Stephen G

    2011-02-01

    Studies in humans have demonstrated a link between stress during pregnancy and altered behaviour and stress reactivity in children. In guinea pigs, we have previously shown that a short period of maternal stress during gestation leads to increased anxiety, elevated basal cortisol levels and decreased testosterone levels in adult males. We hypothesized that restoring testosterone to normal levels in the adult males born to prenatally stressed mothers would reverse the changes in behaviours and endocrine function. We found differences in attention and anxiety-related behaviours and basal stress endocrine activity between the prenatally stressed and control males. Administration of testosterone reversed the behavioural differences in the prenatally stressed offspring. There was, however, little effect of postnatal testosterone administration on stress-related endocrine activity. This study provides new information to begin to address the mechanism underlying the interplay between prenatal stress, gonadal steroids and postnatal behaviours. PMID:21173081

  17. Recruitment and Screening for the Testosterone Trials

    PubMed Central

    Fluharty, Laura; Ellenberg, Susan S.; Gill, Thomas M.; Ensrud, Kristine E.; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Cifelli, Denise; Cunningham, Glenn R.; Matsumoto, Alvin M.; Bhasin, Shalender; Pahor, Marco; Farrar, John T.; Cella, David; Rosen, Raymond C.; Resnick, Susan M.; Swerdloff, Ronald S.; Lewis, Cora E.; Molitch, Mark E.; Crandall, Jill P.; Stephens-Shields, Alisa J.; Strorer, Thomas W.; Wang, Christina; Anton, Stephen; Basaria, Shehzad; Diem, Susan; Tabatabaie, Vafa; Dougar, Darlene; Hou, Xiaoling; Snyder, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Background. We describe the recruitment of men for The Testosterone (T) Trials, which were designed to determine the efficacy of T treatment. Methods. Men were eligible if they were ≥65 years, had an average of two morning total T values <275ng/dL with neither value >300ng/mL, and had symptoms and objective evidence of mobility limitation, sexual dysfunction, and/or low vitality. Men had to be eligible for and enroll in at least one of these three main trials (physical function, sexual function, vitality). Results. Men were recruited primarily through mass mailings in 12 U.S. communities: 82% of men who contacted the sites did so in response to mailings. Men who responded were screened by telephone to ascertain eligibility. Of 51,085 telephone screens, 53.5% were eligible for further screening. Of 23,889 initial screening visits (SV1), 2,781 (11.6%) men were eligible for the second screening visit (SV2), which 2,261 (81.3%) completed. At SV2, 931 (41.2%) men met the criteria for one or more trials, the T level criterion and had no other exclusions. Of these, 790 (84.6%) were randomized; 99 (12.5%) in all three trials and 348 (44%) in two trials. Their mean age was 72 years and mean body mass index (BMI) was 31.0kg/m2. Mean (standard deviation) total T (ng/dL) was 212.0 (40.0). Conclusion: Despite the telephone screening to enrollment ratio of 65 to 1, we met the recruitment goals for each trial. Recruitment of symptomatic older men with low testosterone levels is difficult but feasible. PMID:25878029

  18. Lack of evidence for meteorological effects on infradian dynamics of testosterone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celec, Peter; Smreková, Lucia; Ostatníková, Daniela; Čabajová, Zlata; Hodosy, Július; Kúdela, Matúš

    2009-09-01

    Climatic factors are known to influence the endocrine system. Previous studies have shown that circannual seasonal variations of testosterone might be partly explained by changes in air temperature. Whether infradian variations are affected by meteorological factors is unknown. To analyze possible effects of meteorological parameters on infradian variations of salivary testosterone levels in both sexes, daily salivary testosterone levels were measured during 1 month in 14 men and 17 women. A correlation analysis between hormonal levels and selected meteorological parameters was performed. The results indicate that high testosterone levels are loosely associated with cold, sunny and dry weather in both sexes. However, only the correlations between testosterone and air temperature (men) and actual cloudiness (women) were statistically significant ( p < 0,05). Although some correlations reached the level of statistical significance, the effects of selected meteorological parameters on salivary testosterone levels remain unclear. Further longer-term studies concentrating on air temperature, cloudiness and average relative humidity in relation to the sex hormone axis are needed.

  19. No relation between 2D : 4D fetal testosterone marker and dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Boets, Bart; De Smedt, Bert; Wouters, Jan; Lemay, Katrien; Ghesquière, Pol

    2007-09-17

    It has been suggested that high levels of prenatal testosterone exposure are implied in the aetiology of dyslexia and its frequently co-occurring sensory problems. This study examined 2D : 4D digit ratio (a marker of fetal testosterone exposure) in dyslexic and normal reading children. No group differences in 2D : 4D were observed. Digit ratio did not show the postulated relation with reading, spelling, phonological ability, speech perception, auditory processing and visual processing. These findings challenge the validity of theories that allocate a prominent role to fetal testosterone exposure in the aetiology of dyslexia and its sensory impairments. PMID:17712280

  20. Association of androgen with gender difference in serum adipocyte fatty acid binding protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiang; Ma, Xiaojing; Pan, Xiaoping; Luo, Yuqi; Xu, Yiting; Xiong, Qin; Bao, Yuqian; Jia, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Clinical investigations have indicated women have higher levels of adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (A-FABP) than men. The present study aimed to identify factors related to gender difference in serum A-FABP levels. A total of 507 participants (194 men, 132 premenopausal women, and 181 postmenopausal women) were enrolled in the present study. Serum A-FABP levels increased in the order from men to premenopausal women to postmenopausal women in both body mass index categories (<25.0 and ≥25.0 kg/m2; all P < 0.05). Multiple stepwise regression analyses showed that after adjustment for factors related to serum A-FABP levels, the trunk fat mass was an independent and positive factor of serum A-FABP levels. For men, total testosterone was associated independently and inversely with serum A-FABP levels. For pre- and postmenopausal women, bioavailable testosterone and total testosterone were independent and positive factors associated with serum A-FABP levels, respectively. The present study demonstrated that the androgen was correlated with the serum A-FABP levels negatively in men, but positively in women. With these effects on the fat content, especially trunk fat, androgen might contribute to the gender difference in serum A-FABP levels. PMID:27270834

  1. Effects of testosterone replacement in men with opioid-induced androgen deficiency: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Basaria, Shehzad; Travison, Thomas G; Alford, Daniel; Knapp, Philip E; Teeter, Kjersten; Cahalan, Christine; Eder, Richard; Lakshman, Kishore; Bachman, Eric; Mensing, George; Martel, Marc O; Le, Dillon; Stroh, Helene; Bhasin, Shalender; Wasan, Ajay D; Edwards, Robert R

    2015-02-01

    Symptomatic androgen deficiency is common in patients taking opioid analgesics, as these drugs potently suppress the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. However, the efficacy of testosterone replacement in this setting remains unclear. The objective of this trial was to evaluate the efficacy of testosterone replacement on pain perception and other androgen-dependent outcomes in men with opioid-induced androgen deficiency. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, parallel placebo-controlled trial at an outpatient academic research center. Participants were men aged 18 to 64 years on opioid analgesics for chronic noncancer pain, and total testosterone levels were <350 ng/dL. Participants were randomly assigned to 14 weeks of daily transdermal gel that contained 5 g of testosterone or placebo. Primary outcomes were changes in self-reported clinical pain and objectively assessed pain sensitivity. Sexual function, quality of life, and body composition were also assessed. The mean age was 49 years. The median total and free testosterone levels at baseline were 243 ng/dL and 47 pg/mL and 251 ng/dL and 43 pg/mL in the testosterone and placebo arm, respectively. Of the 84 randomized participants, 65 had follow-up data on efficacy outcomes. Compared with men assigned to the placebo arm, those assigned to testosterone replacement experienced greater improvements in pressure and mechanical hyperalgesia, sexual desire, and role limitation due to emotional problems. Testosterone administration was also associated with an improvement in body composition. There were no between-group differences in changes in self-reported pain. In conclusion, in men with opioid-induced androgen deficiency, testosterone administration improved pain sensitivity, sexual desire, body composition, and aspects of quality of life.

  2. Polymorphisms affecting trace element bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Mathers, John C; Méplan, Catherine; Hesketh, John E

    2010-10-01

    This review outlines the nature of inter-individual variation in trace element bioavailability, focusing on genetic and epigenetic determinants. We note that pathogenic mutations responsible for dangerously high (or low) status for the micronutrient are unlikely to make large contributions to variability in bioavailability among the general population. Prospective genotyping (for variants in genes encoding selenoproteins) of participants in human studies illustrate one approach to understanding the complex interactions between genotype and trace element supply, which determine the functional bioavailability of selenium. Rapid advances in technological and bioinformatics tools; e. g., as used in Genome-Wide Association Studies, are opening new avenues for research on the genetic determinants of inter-individual variation in trace element bioavailability. This may include copy number variants in addition to the more widely studied polymorphisms. Future research on trace element bioavailability should encompass studies of epigenetic variants, including the role of non-coding (micro) RNA.

  3. Testosterone deficiency: myth, facts, and controversy.

    PubMed

    Miner, Martin; Barkin, Jack; Rosenberg, Matt T

    2014-06-01

    Testosterone deficiency (TD) afflicts approximately 30% of men ages 40-79 years, with an increase in prevalence strongly associated with aging and common medical conditions including obesity, diabetes, and hypertension. There appears to be a strong relationship between TD and metabolic syndrome, though the relationship is not certain to be causal. Several studies have suggested that repletion of testosterone in deficient men with these comorbidities may indeed reverse or delay their progression. While testosterone repletion has been largely thought of in a sexual realm, we discuss its potential role in general men's health concerns: metabolic, body composition, and its association with decreased all-cause mortality. Recent guidelines and studies have suggested variable prevalence statistics and expanded uses of testosterone repletion in certain populations with both biochemical and clinical signs of testosterone deficiency. Yet, this is not done without risk. A recent randomized placebo-controlled trial of testosterone repletion in elderly frail men with limited mobility has suggested potential negative cardiovascular risks in this older, sicker group of men. Two more recent retrospective studies of variable clinical design and interpretation suggest testosterone poses an increased cardiovascular risk in older men than 65 years and younger men with heart disease. This review examines these and other studies, with practical recommendations for the diagnosis of testosterone deficiency and repletion in middle aged and older men, including an analysis of treatment modalities and areas of concern and uncertainty. PMID:24978631

  4. Lack of sexual activity from erectile dysfunction is associated with a reversible reduction in serum testosterone.

    PubMed

    Jannini, E A; Screponi, E; Carosa, E; Pepe, M; Lo Giudice, F; Trimarchi, F; Benvenga, S

    1999-12-01

    The role of androgenic hormones in human sexuality, in the mechanism of erection and in the pathogenesis of impotence is under debate. While the use of testosterone is common in the clinical therapy of male erectile dysfunction, hypogonadism is a rare cause of impotence. We evaluated serum testosterone levels in men with erectile dysfunction resulting either from organic or non-organic causes before and after non-hormonal impotence therapy. Eighty-three consecutive cases of impotence (70% organic, 30% non-organic, vascular aetiology being the most frequent) were subjected to hormonal screening before and after various psychological, medical (prostaglandin E1, yohimbine) or mechanical therapies (vascular surgery, penile prostheses, vacuum devices). Thirty age-matched healthy men served as a control group. Compared to controls, patients with impotence resulting from both organic and non-organic causes showed reduced serum levels of both total testosterone (11.1 +/- 2.4 vs. 17.7 +/- 5.5 nmol/L) and free testosterone (56.2 +/- 22.9 vs. 79.4 +/- 27.0 pmol/L) (both p < 0.001). Irrespective of the different aetiologies and of the various impotence therapies, a dramatic increase in serum total and free testosterone levels (15.6 +/- 4.2 nmol/L and 73.8 +/- 22.5 pmol/L, respectively) was observed in patients who achieved normal sexual activity 3 months after commencing therapy (p < 0.001). On the contrary, serum testosterone levels did not change in patients in whom therapies were ineffective. Since the pre-therapy low testosterone levels were independent of the aetiology of impotence, we hypothesize that this hormonal pattern is related to the loss of sexual activity, as demonstrated by its normalization with the resumption of coital activity after different therapies. The corollary is that sexual activity may feed itself throughout the increase in testosterone levels.

  5. Modeling Testosterone Circadian Rhythm in Hypogonadal Males: Effect of Age and Circannual Variations.

    PubMed

    González-Sales, Mario; Barrière, Olivier; Tremblay, Pierre-Olivier; Nekka, Fahima; Desrochers, Julie; Tanguay, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the baseline circadian rhythm of testosterone levels in hypogonadal men. A total of 859 baseline profiles of testosterone from hypogonadal men were included in this analysis. The circadian rhythm of the testosterone was described by a stretched cosine function. Model parameters were estimated using NONMEM(®) 7.3. The effect of different covariates on the testosterone levels was investigated. Model evaluation was performed using non-parametric bootstrap and predictive checks. A stretched cosine function deeply improved the data goodness of fit compared to the standard trigonometric function (p < 0.001; ΔOFV = -204). The effect of the age and the semester, defined as winter and spring versus summer and fall, were significantly associated with the baseline levels of testosterone (p < 0.001, ΔOFV = -15.6, and p < 0.001, ΔOFV = -47.0). Model evaluation procedures such as diagnostic plots, visual predictive check, and non-parametric bootstrap evidenced that the proposed stretched cosine function was able to model the time course of the diurnal testosterone levels in hypogonadal males with accuracy and precision. The circadian rhythm of the testosterone levels was better predicted by the proposed stretched cosine function than a standard cosine function. Testosterone levels decreased by 5.74 ng/dL (2.4%) every 10 years and were 19.3 ng/dL (8.1%) higher during winter and spring compared to summer and fall.

  6. The costs of dominance: testosterone, cortisol and intestinal parasites in wild male chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Male members of primate species that form multi-male groups typically invest considerable effort into attaining and maintaining high dominance rank. Aggressive behaviors are frequently employed to acquire and maintain dominance status, and testosterone has been considered the quintessential physiological moderator of such behaviors. Testosterone can alter both neurological and musculoskeletal functions that may potentiate pre-existing patterns of aggression. However, elevated testosterone levels impose several costs, including increased metabolic rates and immunosuppression. Cortisol also limits immune and reproductive functions. Methods To improve understanding of the relationships between dominance rank, hormones and infection status in nonhuman primates, we collected and analyzed 67 fecal samples from 22 wild adult male chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) at Ngogo, Kibale National Park, Uganda. Samples were analyzed for cortisol and testosterone levels as well as intestinal parasite prevalence and richness. 1,700 hours of observation data were used to determine dominance rank of each animal. We hypothesized that dominance rank would be directly associated with fecal testosterone and cortisol levels and intestinal parasite burden. Results Fecal testosterone (but not cortisol) levels were directly associated with dominance rank, and both testosterone and cortisol were directly associated with intestinal parasite richness (number of unique species recovered). Dominance rank was directly associated with helminth (but not protozoan) parasite richness, so that high ranking animals had higher testosterone levels and greater helminth burden. Conclusions One preliminary interpretation is that the antagonist pleiotropic effects of androgens and glucocorticoids place a cost on attaining and maintaining high dominance rank in this species. Because of the costs associated with elevated steroid levels, dominance status may be an honest signal of

  7. Episodic transdermal delivery of testosterone.

    PubMed

    Malik, Ritu; Venkatesh, K S; Dwivedi, Anil Kumar; Misra, Amit

    2012-06-01

    Film-forming lotions, precast films and adhesive patches containing testosterone (T) were prepared by compounding vinylic, acrylic and cellulosic polymers with a variety of excipients in order to achieve distribution of T in domains of heterogeneity within multicomponent matrices. The feasibility of this approach in achieving episodic transdermal delivery of testosterone (T) was investigated. Composition-dependent differences in extent of in vitro drug release and periodicity were observed. Representative formulations showing the most pronounced episodic T release in vitro were tested in female rats. Whereas intravenously administered T decayed exponentially, three maxima of T in serum were observed upon application of selected formulations. Thus, peak serum concentrations of 240, 36, and 29 ng/dL were observed at 0.2, 5, and 16.8 h after application of the preferred lotion formulation, and 89, 65, and 64 ng/dL at 1, 16.4, and 48.8 h after patches. Deconvolution, noncompartment pharmacokinetic analysis and multiple peak fitting also indicated episodicity. These results suggest the feasibility of using transdermal systems for pulsatile T delivery in a variety of clinical applications, including hormone supplementation and male contraception.

  8. A quantitative study on feedback control of LH by testosterone in young adult and old male rats.

    PubMed

    Pirke, K M; Geiss, M; Sintermann, R

    1978-12-01

    The hypothalamic pituitary gonadal axis was studied in young adult (3 month old) and old (24 to 27 month old) male Wistar rats. Plasma testosterone decreased significantly in old animals (x: 262 hg/100 ml (n = 35); versus x: 110 ng/100 ml (n =30). The fall in LH was less pronounced but still significant (54.5 ng LH-RP-1/ml in young versus 39.5 ng/ml in old rats). Groups of 6 to 8 animals of both ages were castrated and implanted with silastic capsules continuously releasing testosterone. The length of the capsules was directly proportional to the plasma testosterone levels achieved (range between 63 and 350 ng/100 ml). After one week young castrated rats not substituted with testosterone showed LH values three times higher (x: 351 ng/ml) than old rats treated in the same way (x = 126 ng/ml). LH values in the animals substituted with testosterone indicate that the sensitivity of the negative testosterone-LH feedback is greatly increased in old rats. Testosterone can be depressed to 60 ng/100 ml before an increase in LH occurs. In young rats no increase in LH was observed when testosterone values were higher than 170 ng/100 ml. In the range between 170 and 100 ng/100 ml about half of the young animals reacted with increased LH secretion, while an increase was observed in all young animals when testosterone dropped below 100 ng/100 ml.

  9. Hormone-dependent aggression in female rats: testosterone implants attenuate the decline in aggression following ovariectomy.

    PubMed

    Albert, D J; Jonik, R H; Walsh, M L

    1990-04-01

    Female rats were individually housed with a sterile male for a 4- to 5-week period. Each female was then tested for aggression toward an unfamiliar female intruder at weekly intervals. Those females that displayed a high level of aggression on each of three weekly tests were ovariectomized and given subcutaneous implants of testosterone-filled tubes, ovariectomized and given subcutaneous implants of empty tubes, or sham-ovariectomized and implanted with empty tubes. These implants should produce a serum testosterone concentration of about 0.6 ng/ml, compared to 0.17 ng/ml in intact females. Beginning 1 week postoperatively, the aggression of each female was tested weekly for 4 weeks. Ovariectomized females with testosterone implants displayed a level of aggression significantly higher than that of ovariectomized females with empty implants on 3 of 4 weekly tests. The level of aggression by females with testosterone implants was not significantly different from that of sham-ovariectomized females on the first postoperative test. Additional observations showed that testosterone implants did not produce an increase in aggression in females whose preoperative level of aggression was low. Further, Silastic implants containing estrogen (1 to 2 mm long) sufficient to maintain a serum estrogen level of 20 to 30 pg/ml also attenuated the decline of aggression following ovariectomy. These results suggest that testosterone and estrogen may both contribute to the biological substrate of hormone-dependent aggression in female rats.

  10. Evolution of testosterone treatment over 25 years: symptom responses, endocrine profiles and cardiovascular changes

    PubMed Central

    Carruthers, Malcolm; Cathcart, Paul; Feneley, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Testosterone treatment has evolved rapidly over the past 25 years as new, more effective and convenient methods have become available. This study reports experience with seven different methods, introduced on the market in the UK. Aim: To establish the symptom response when testosterone treatment was initiated on the basis of clinical features and symptoms of androgen deficiency, and the resulting endocrine, biochemical and physiological responses. Methods: Of 2693 patients attending the 3 Men’s Health Centers – The UK Androgen Study (UKAS), 2247 were treated. Treatments included pellet implants, oral testosterone undecanoate (Testocaps), mesterolone (Proviron), testosterone gel (Testogel), testosterone scrotal cream (Andromen) and scrotal gel (Tostran). Results: There was no correlation between initial testosterone level, initial symptom score or the success of treatment as defined by adequate resolution of symptoms. Despite the diverse endocrine patterns produced, the testosterone preparations appear equally safe over prolonged periods, with either no change or improvement of cardiovascular risk factors, especially in lowering cholesterol and diastolic blood pressure. Conclusions: It is suggested that because of excessive reliance on laboratory measures of androgens and undue safety concerns, many men who could benefit from symptom relief, improvement in related clinical conditions and given preventive medical benefits remain untreated. PMID:26218766

  11. Drug insight: Testosterone and selective androgen receptor modulators as anabolic therapies for chronic illness and aging.

    PubMed

    Bhasin, Shalender; Calof, Olga M; Storer, Thomas W; Lee, Martin L; Mazer, Norman A; Jasuja, Ravi; Montori, Victor M; Gao, Wenqing; Dalton, James T

    2006-03-01

    Several regulatory concerns have hindered development of androgens as anabolic therapies, despite unequivocal evidence that testosterone supplementation increases muscle mass and strength in men; it induces hypertrophy of type I and II muscle fibers, and increases myonuclear and satellite cell number. Androgens promote differentiation of mesenchymal multipotent cells into the myogenic lineage and inhibit their adipogenic differentiation, by facilitating association of androgen receptors with beta-catenin and activating T-cell factor 4. Meta-analyses indicate that testosterone supplementation increases fat-free mass and muscle strength in HIV-positive men with weight loss, glucocorticoid-treated men, and older men with low or low-normal testosterone levels. The effects of testosterone on physical function and outcomes important to patients have not, however, been studied. In older men, increased hematocrit and increased risk of prostate biopsy and detection of prostate events are the most frequent, testosterone-related adverse events. Concerns about long-term risks have restrained enthusiasm for testosterone use as anabolic therapy. Selective androgen-receptor modulators that are preferentially anabolic and that spare the prostate hold promise as anabolic therapies. We need more studies to determine whether testosterone or selective androgen-receptor modulators can induce meaningful improvements in physical function and patient-important outcomes in patients with physical dysfunction associated with chronic illness or aging.

  12. Testosterone Replacement Therapy and the Cardiovascular System.

    PubMed

    Naderi, Sahar

    2016-04-01

    As testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) has emerged as a commonly prescribed therapy for symptomatic low testosterone, conflicting data have been reported in terms of both its efficacy and potential adverse outcomes. One of the most controversial associations has been that of TRT and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This review briefly provides background on the history of TRT, the indications for TRT, and the data behind TRT for symptomatic low testosterone. It then specifically delves into the rather limited data for cardiovascular outcomes of those with low endogenous testosterone and those who receive TRT. The available body of literature strongly suggests that more work, by way of clinical trials, needs to be done to better understand the impact of testosterone and TRT on the cardiovascular system.

  13. Examining the role of testosterone in mediating short-term aggressive responses to social stimuli in a lizard.

    PubMed

    McEvoy, Jo; While, Geoffrey M; Jones, Susan M; Wapstra, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Hormones have been suggested as a key proximate mechanism that organize and maintain consistent individual differences in behavioural traits such as aggression. The steroid hormone testosterone in particular has an important activational role in mediating short-term aggressive responses to social and environmental stimuli within many vertebrate systems. We conducted two complementary experiments designed to investigate the activational relationship between testosterone and aggression in male Egernia whitii, a social lizard species. First, we investigated whether a conspecific aggressive challenge induced a testosterone response and second, we artificially manipulated testosterone concentrations to examine whether this changed aggression levels. We found that at the mean level, plasma T concentration did not appear to be influenced by an aggression challenge. However, there was a slight indication that receiving a challenge may influence intra-individual consistency of plasma T concentrations, with individuals not receiving an aggression challenge maintaining consistency in their circulating testosterone concentrations, while those individuals that received a challenge did not. Manipulating circulating testosterone concentrations had no influence on either mean-level or individual-level aggression. Combined with our previous work, our study adds increasing evidence that the relationship between testosterone and aggression is not straightforward, and promotes the investigation of alternative hormonal pathways and differences in neuro-synthesis and neuroendocrine pathways to account for species variable testosterone - aggression links.

  14. No Association between the 2D:4D Fetal Testosterone Marker and Multidimensional Attentional Abilities in Children with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemiere, Jurgen; Boets, Bart; Danckaerts, Marina

    2010-01-01

    Aim: It has been suggested that high levels of prenatal testosterone exposure are implied in the aetiology of attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This study examined the association between the ratio of the length of the second and fourth digits (2D:4D ratio), a marker of fetal testosterone exposure, and the presence of ADHD-related…

  15. Dominance, Politics, and Physiology: Voters' Testosterone Changes on the Night of the 2008 United States Presidential Election

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, Steven J.; Beehner, Jacinta C.; Saini, Ekjyot K.; Kuhn, Cynthia M.; LaBar, Kevin S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Political elections are dominance competitions. When men win a dominance competition, their testosterone levels rise or remain stable to resist a circadian decline; and when they lose, their testosterone levels fall. However, it is unknown whether this pattern of testosterone change extends beyond interpersonal competitions to the vicarious experience of winning or losing in the context of political elections. Women's testosterone responses to dominance competition outcomes are understudied, and to date, a clear pattern of testosterone changes in response to winning and losing dominance competitions has not emerged. Methodology/Principal Findings The present study investigated voters' testosterone responses to the outcome of the 2008 United States Presidential election. 183 participants provided multiple saliva samples before and after the winner was announced on Election Night. The results show that male Barack Obama voters (winners) had stable post-outcome testosterone levels, whereas testosterone levels dropped in male John McCain and Robert Barr voters (losers). There were no significant effects in female voters. Conclusions/Significance The findings indicate that male voters exhibit biological responses to the realignment of a country's dominance hierarchy as if they participated in an interpersonal dominance contest. PMID:19844583

  16. Examining the Role of Testosterone in Mediating Short-Term Aggressive Responses to Social Stimuli in a Lizard

    PubMed Central

    McEvoy, Jo; While, Geoffrey M.; Jones, Susan M.; Wapstra, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Hormones have been suggested as a key proximate mechanism that organize and maintain consistent individual differences in behavioural traits such as aggression. The steroid hormone testosterone in particular has an important activational role in mediating short-term aggressive responses to social and environmental stimuli within many vertebrate systems. We conducted two complementary experiments designed to investigate the activational relationship between testosterone and aggression in male Egernia whitii, a social lizard species. First, we investigated whether a conspecific aggressive challenge induced a testosterone response and second, we artificially manipulated testosterone concentrations to examine whether this changed aggression levels. We found that at the mean level, plasma T concentration did not appear to be influenced by an aggression challenge. However, there was a slight indication that receiving a challenge may influence intra-individual consistency of plasma T concentrations, with individuals not receiving an aggression challenge maintaining consistency in their circulating testosterone concentrations, while those individuals that received a challenge did not. Manipulating circulating testosterone concentrations had no influence on either mean-level or individual-level aggression. Combined with our previous work, our study adds increasing evidence that the relationship between testosterone and aggression is not straightforward, and promotes the investigation of alternative hormonal pathways and differences in neuro-synthesis and neuroendocrine pathways to account for species variable testosterone - aggression links. PMID:25906149

  17. Relationships among musical aptitude, digit ratio and testosterone in men and women.

    PubMed

    Borniger, Jeremy C; Chaudhry, Adeel; Muehlenbein, Michael P

    2013-01-01

    Circulating adult testosterone levels, digit ratio (length of the second finger relative to the fourth finger), and directional asymmetry in digit ratio are considered sexually dimorphic traits in humans. These have been related to spatial abilities in men and women, and because similar brain structures appear to be involved in both spatial and musical abilities, neuroendocrine function may be related to musical as well as spatial cognition. To evaluate relationships among testosterone and musical ability in men and women, saliva samples were collected, testosterone concentrations assessed, and digit ratios calculated using standardized protocols in a sample of university students (N = 61), including both music and non-music majors. Results of Spearman correlations suggest that digit ratio and testosterone levels are statistically related to musical aptitude and performance only within the female sample: A) those females with greater self-reported history of exposure to music (p = 0.016) and instrument proficiency (p = 0.040) scored higher on the Advanced Measures of Music Audiation test, B) those females with higher left hand digit ratio (and perhaps lower fetal testosterone levels) were more highly ranked (p = 0.007) in the orchestra, C) female music students exhibited a trend (p = 0.082) towards higher testosterone levels compared to female non-music students, and D) female music students with higher rank in the orchestra/band had higher testosterone levels (p = 0.003) than lower ranked students. None of these relationships were significant in the male sample, although a lack of statistical power may be one cause. The effects of testosterone are likely a small part of a poorly understood system of biological and environmental stimuli that contribute to musical aptitude. Hormones may play some role in modulating the phenotype of musical ability, and this may be the case for females more so than males.

  18. The effects of testosterone manipulation on the body condition of captive male yellow-legged gulls.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Alvarez, Carlos; Ferrer, Miguel; Figuerola, Jordi; Veira, José A R; Estepa, Julio; Torres, Luis M

    2002-02-01

    Persistently high testosterone levels are believed to be costly to males due to their negative effect on body condition. However, this assumption could not be validated when we analysed birds isolated from all social interactions. The hypothesis was tested on birds kept in isolation in order to analyse the effects of testosterone per se, and thereby exclude the influence of social interactions. Adult male yellow-legged gulls (Larus cachinnans) were captured, and after a period of adjustment, some individuals were subcutaneously implanted with testosterone, while the rest were used as controls. The gulls received ad libitum food for 10 days and were then fasted for 4 days. Thyroid hormones, body-mass change, daily food intake, hematocrit and several plasma biochemical parameters were analysed. Treated (T)-males maintained constant levels of plasma total protein throughout the experiment, whilst control (C)-males showed a decrease. We did not find any other differences between groups for the other variables analysed. Since the implanted birds sustained high testosterone levels for a number of days, any cost to body condition would have been revealed if these costs levels were actually important. Our results do not support the hypothesis that a reduction in body condition can be directly produced by plasma testosterone, although total protein changes do suggest different anabolic patterns in testosterone-treated gulls. PMID:11818219

  19. Testosterone and cortisol release among Spanish soccer fans watching the 2010 World Cup final.

    PubMed

    van der Meij, Leander; Almela, Mercedes; Hidalgo, Vanesa; Villada, Carolina; Ijzerman, Hans; van Lange, Paul A M; Salvador, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    This field study investigated the release of testosterone and cortisol of a vicarious winning experience in Spanish fans watching the finals between Spain and the Netherlands in the 2010 FIFA World Cup Soccer. Spanish fans (n = 50) watched the match with friends or family in a public place or at home and also participated in a control condition. Consistent with hypotheses, results revealed that testosterone and cortisol levels were higher when watching the match than on a control day. However, neither testosterone nor cortisol levels increased after the victory of the Spanish team. Moreover, the increase in testosterone secretion was not related to participants' sex, age or soccer fandom, but the increase in total cortisol secretion during the match was higher among men than among women and among fans that were younger. Also, increases in cortisol secretion were greater to the degree that people were a stronger fan of soccer. Level of fandom further appeared to account for the sex effect, but not for the age effect. Generally, the testosterone data from this study are in line with the challenge hypothesis, as testosterone levels of watchers increased to prepare their organism to defend or enhance their social status. The cortisol data from this study are in line with social self-preservation theory, as higher cortisol secretion among young and greater soccer fans suggests that especially they perceived that a negative outcome of the match would threaten their own social esteem. PMID:22529940

  20. Testosterone and Cortisol Release among Spanish Soccer Fans Watching the 2010 World Cup Final

    PubMed Central

    van der Meij, Leander; Almela, Mercedes; Hidalgo, Vanesa; Villada, Carolina; IJzerman, Hans; van Lange, Paul A. M.; Salvador, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    This field study investigated the release of testosterone and cortisol of a vicarious winning experience in Spanish fans watching the finals between Spain and the Netherlands in the 2010 FIFA World Cup Soccer. Spanish fans (n = 50) watched the match with friends or family in a public place or at home and also participated in a control condition. Consistent with hypotheses, results revealed that testosterone and cortisol levels were higher when watching the match than on a control day. However, neither testosterone nor cortisol levels increased after the victory of the Spanish team. Moreover, the increase in testosterone secretion was not related to participants' sex, age or soccer fandom, but the increase in total cortisol secretion during the match was higher among men than among women and among fans that were younger. Also, increases in cortisol secretion were greater to the degree that people were a stronger fan of soccer. Level of fandom further appeared to account for the sex effect, but not for the age effect. Generally, the testosterone data from this study are in line with the challenge hypothesis, as testosterone levels of watchers increased to prepare their organism to defend or enhance their social status. The cortisol data from this study are in line with social self-preservation theory, as higher cortisol secretion among young and greater soccer fans suggests that especially they perceived that a negative outcome of the match would threaten their own social esteem. PMID:22529940

  1. Circulating microRNA-122 as Potential Biomarker for Detection of Testosterone Abuse.

    PubMed

    Salamin, Olivier; Jaggi, Laetitia; Baume, Norbert; Robinson, Neil; Saugy, Martial; Leuenberger, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression and thus influence many cellular and physiological processes. miRNAs are also present in cell-free body fluids such as plasma or serum, and these circulating miRNAs are very stable, sensitive, and specific biomarkers of pathophysiological states. In this study, we investigated whether circulating miRNAs could serve as biomarkers of exogenous testosterone administration. Misuse of testosterone as a performance-enhancing drug is thought to be widespread in sports. Detection of testosterone through the urinary steroid profile of the Athlete Biological Passport faces several obstacles, indicating that new biomarkers are required. To this end, we analyzed plasma miRNA levels by high-throughput quantitative real-time PCR. Plasma samples were obtained before and at several time points after transdermal and oral testosterone administration. Screening identified three potential candidate miRNAs that were altered by both routes of testosterone administration. Longitudinal monitoring of these candidates revealed that variation in two of them (miR-150 and miR-342), relative to the corresponding levels in control samples, was testosterone-independent. However, levels of the liver-specific miR-122 increased 3.5-fold 1 day after drug intake. Given that testosterone is metabolized by the liver, this observation suggests that miR-122 in cell-free fluids may be used as a sensitive biomarker of testosterone misuse via multiple dosing routes and could therefore be integrated into a blood-based multiparametric follow-up. PMID:27171140

  2. Effects of velvet antler polypeptide on sexual behavior and testosterone synthesis in aging male mice

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Zhi-Jun; Tang, Hong-Feng; Tuo, Ying; Xing, Wei-Jie; Ji, Su-Yun; Gao, Yong; Deng, Chun-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Twenty-four-month-old male C57BL/6 mice with low serum testosterone levels were used as a late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) animal model for examining the effects of velvet antler polypeptide (VAP) on sexual function and testosterone synthesis. These mice received VAP for 5 consecutive weeks by daily gavage at doses of 100, 200, or 300 mg kg−1 body weight per day (n = 10 mice per dose). Control animals (n = 10) received the same weight-based volume of vehicle. Sexual behavior and testosterone levels in serum and interstitial tissue of testis were measured after the last administration of VAP. Furthermore, to investigate the mechanisms of how VAP affects sexual behavior and testosterone synthesis in vivo, the expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), cytochrome P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD) in Leydig cells was also measured by immunofluorescence staining and quantitative real-time PCR. As a result, VAP produced a significant improvement in the sexual function of these aging male mice. Serum testosterone level and intratesticular testosterone (ITT) concentration also increased in the VAP-treated groups. The expression of StAR, P450scc, and 3β-HSD was also found to be enhanced in the VAP-treated groups compared with the control group. Our results suggested that VAP was effective in improving sexual function in aging male mice. The effect of velvet antler on sexual function was due to the increased expression of several rate-limiting enzymes of testosterone synthesis (StAR, P450scc, and 3β-HSD) and the following promotion of testosterone synthesis in vivo. PMID:26608944

  3. Circulating microRNA-122 as Potential Biomarker for Detection of Testosterone Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Salamin, Olivier; Jaggi, Laetitia; Baume, Norbert; Robinson, Neil; Saugy, Martial; Leuenberger, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression and thus influence many cellular and physiological processes. miRNAs are also present in cell-free body fluids such as plasma or serum, and these circulating miRNAs are very stable, sensitive, and specific biomarkers of pathophysiological states. In this study, we investigated whether circulating miRNAs could serve as biomarkers of exogenous testosterone administration. Misuse of testosterone as a performance-enhancing drug is thought to be widespread in sports. Detection of testosterone through the urinary steroid profile of the Athlete Biological Passport faces several obstacles, indicating that new biomarkers are required. To this end, we analyzed plasma miRNA levels by high-throughput quantitative real-time PCR. Plasma samples were obtained before and at several time points after transdermal and oral testosterone administration. Screening identified three potential candidate miRNAs that were altered by both routes of testosterone administration. Longitudinal monitoring of these candidates revealed that variation in two of them (miR-150 and miR-342), relative to the corresponding levels in control samples, was testosterone-independent. However, levels of the liver-specific miR-122 increased 3.5-fold 1 day after drug intake. Given that testosterone is metabolized by the liver, this observation suggests that miR-122 in cell-free fluids may be used as a sensitive biomarker of testosterone misuse via multiple dosing routes and could therefore be integrated into a blood-based multiparametric follow-up. PMID:27171140

  4. The acute effects of bilateral ovariectomy or adrenalectomy on progesterone, testosterone and estradiol serum levels depend on the surgical approach and the day of the estrous cycle when they are performed

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Angélica; Gallegos, Alma I; Velasco, Jacqueline; Mendoza, Fernando D; Montiel, Cristina; Everardo, Pamela M; Cruz, María-Esther; Domínguez, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    Bilateral ovariectomy or adrenalectomy are experimental tools used to understand the mechanisms regulating the hypothalamus-pituitary-ovarian and the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. There is evidence that acute unilateral perforation of the dorsal peritoneum in rats results in significant changes in progesterone, testosterone and estradiol serum concentrations. Because different surgical approaches for unilateral or bilateral ovariectomy or adrenalectomy, sectioning the superior ovarian nerve or the vagus nerve are used, we compare the acute effects on hormone serum concentrations resulting from the unilateral or bilateral dorsal approach to performing bilateral ovariectomy or adrenalectomy with those obtained when an unilateral incision is performed in the ventral abdomen. In general, the progesterone, testosterone and estradiol serum concentrations were higher in animals with ventral approach than in those with dorsal surgery, the effects varying depending on the day of the estrous cycle when surgery was performed. The results suggest that the neural signals arising from different zones of the peritoneum and/or the abdominal wall play different roles in the mechanisms regulating steroid hormones concentrations. PMID:18954455

  5. Priapism in teenage boys following depot testosterone.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, James F; Davis, Nikki; Davies, Justin H; Rees, Roland W; Steinbrecher, Henrik A

    2012-01-01

    Priapism is rare in children and may result in erectile dysfunction and sexual aversion behaviours. Testosterone therapy is commonly regarded as safe in children and is widely used in constitutional delay of growth and puberty, hypogonadism, hypospadias and micropenis. We report two cases of priapism in teenage boys with constitutional delay of growth and puberty after a change in the formulation of depot testosterone. One case required surgical intervention and the other was preceded by stuttering priapism. These cases illustrate the importance of patient and/or parent counselling before testosterone administration and consideration of lower doses in at-risk patients.

  6. Bioavailability: implications for science/cleanup policy

    SciTech Connect

    Denit, Jeffery; Planicka, J. Gregory

    1998-12-01

    This paper examines the role of bioavailability in risk assessment and cleanup decisions. Bioavailability refers to how chemicals ''behave'' and their ''availability'' to interact with living organisms. Bioavailability has significant implications for exposure risks, cleanup goals, and site costs. Risk to human health and the environment is directly tied to the bioavailability of the chemicals of concern.

  7. Seasonal variation in serum testosterone, testicular measurements and semen characteristics in the collared peccary (Tayassu tajacu).

    PubMed

    Hellgren, E C; Lochmiller, R L; Amoss, M S; Seager, S W; Magyar, S J; Coscarelli, K P; Grant, W E

    1989-03-01

    Blood samples and testicular measurements were obtained from 4-8 captive adult collared peccaries monthly for 18 months and from wild adult males during summer (N = 16) and winter (N = 22) seasons. Serum concentrations of testosterone were determined by radioimmunoassay. Semen samples were collected monthly by electroejaculation from captive males for 1 year. Serum testosterone concentrations and testicular measurements varied in a low-amplitude circannual pattern, with maximum mean testosterone concentrations in fall and winter (1150-1400 pg/ml) and minimum values in summer (500-700 pg/ml). Circannual rhythms appeared to be related to dominance. Serum testosterone levels in wild males generally were lower than in captive males, although this difference was not significant (P greater than 0.05). Semen characteristics did not exhibit a circannual rhythm. These results suggest that the male peccary remains reproductively fertile throughout the year, yet may undergo a facultative summer quiescence influenced by ambient temperature and social factors.

  8. Role of testosterone in the pathogenesis, progression, prognosis and comorbidity of men with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Dousdampanis, Periklis; Trigka, Konstantina; Fourtounas, Costas; Bargman, Joanne M

    2014-06-01

    Testosterone deficiency and hypogonadism are common conditions in men with chronic kidney disease (CKD). A disturbed hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis due to CKD is thought to contribute to androgen deficiency. Data from experimental studies support the hypothesis that exogenous administration of testosterone may induce the activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), the production of endothelin and the regulation of anti- or/and proinflammatory cytokines involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension and kidney damage. On the other hand, low testosterone levels in male patients with CKD are paradoxically associated with a higher risk of morbidity and mortality, possibly explained by anemia, osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease. In this article, we present an overview of clinical and experimental studies of the impact of testosterone on the progression and prognosis of male patients with CKD; even today, this remains a controversial issue.

  9. Some like it hot: testosterone predicts laboratory eating behavior of spicy food.

    PubMed

    Bègue, Laurent; Bricout, Véronique; Boudesseul, Jordane; Shankland, Rébecca; Duke, Aaron A

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, we analyzed the relationship between eating behavior of spicy food and endogenous testosterone. Participants included 114 males between the ages of 18 and 44 recruited from the community. They were asked to indicate their preferences regarding spicy food and were then asked to season a sample of mashed potatoes with pepper sauce and salt (control substance) prior to evaluating the spiciness of the meal. A positive correlation was observed between endogenous salivary testosterone and the quantity of hot sauce individuals voluntarily and spontaneously consumed with a meal served as part of a laboratory task. In contrast, significant correlations were not observed between testosterone and behavioral preference for salty foods. This study suggests that behavioral preference for spicy food among men is related to endogenous testosterone levels. PMID:25462592

  10. Beyond testosterone cypionate: evidence behind the use of nandrolone in male health and wellness

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    Characterized by low serum testosterone levels and diverse symptoms, male hypogonadism is a common condition. Current medical treatment focuses on testosterone supplementation using multiple modalities such as injections, gels and pellets. Interestingly, while testosterone is considered an anabolic androgenic steroid, it has not been saddled with the social stigma that other, similar medications have. The goal of this review is to highlight an anabolic steroid, 19-nortestosterone (i.e., nandrolone, deca-durabolin) and illustrate prospective therapeutic applications for male health. Containing a chemical structure similar to testosterone, nandrolone has a higher myotrophic: androgenic ratio resulting in improved effects on muscle mass. Animal models have suggested application in the improvement of joint healing following rotator cuff repair. Minimal literature exists regarding the use of nandrolone and, as such, further human studies are required. PMID:27141449

  11. Oestradiol and testosterone binding sites in mice tibiae and their relationship with bone growth.

    PubMed

    Lopez, A; Ventanas, J; Burgos, J

    1986-11-01

    High affinity oestradiol and testosterone binding sites were found in tibiae cytosol from entire male and female of different ages. Scatchard assay allowed to estimate a Kd of 2.7 X 10(-9) M for oestradiol binding sites indicating that the 3H-oestradiol binding was of high affinity. Oestradiol and testosterone binding sites abundance in mice tibiae are subject to change with age. It is not easy to establish a direct correlation between these changes and the values reported here on bone growth in weight and length, however seems possible to point a negative relationship between bone lengthening and oestradiol binding site levels in female, as well a positive relationship with testosterone in both sexes. The presence of oestradiol and testosterone binding sites in epiphyses and not in the diaphyses reinforces the hypothesis that both are playing some role in bone growth.

  12. Activity Exerted by a Testosterone Derivative on Myocardial Injury Using an Ischemia/Reperfusion Model

    PubMed Central

    Lauro, Figueroa-Valverde; Francisco, Díaz-Cedillo; Elodia, García-Cervera; Eduardo, Pool-Gómez; Maria, López-Ramos; Marcela, Rosas-Nexticapa; Lenin, Hau-Heredia; Betty, Sarabia-Alcocer; Monica, Velázquez-Sarabia Betty

    2014-01-01

    Some reports indicate that several steroid derivatives have activity at cardiovascular level; nevertheless, there is scarce information about the activity exerted by the testosterone derivatives on cardiac injury caused by ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Analyzing these data, in this study, a new testosterone derivative was synthetized with the objective of evaluating its effect on myocardial injury using an ischemia/reperfusion model. In addition, perfusion pressure and coronary resistance were evaluated in isolated rat hearts using the Langendorff technique. Additionally, molecular mechanism involved in the activity exerted by the testosterone derivative on perfusion pressure and coronary resistance was evaluated by measuring left ventricular pressure in the absence or presence of the following compounds: flutamide, prazosin, metoprolol, nifedipine, indomethacin, and PINANE TXA2. The results showed that the testosterone derivative significantly increases (P = 0.05) the perfusion pressure and coronary resistance in isolated heart. Other data indicate that the testosterone derivative increases left ventricular pressure in a dose-dependent manner (0.001–100 nM); however, this phenomenon was significantly inhibited (P = 0.06) by indomethacin and PINANE-TXA2  (P = 0.05) at a dose of 1 nM. In conclusion, these data suggest that testosterone derivative induces changes in the left ventricular pressure levels through thromboxane receptor activation. PMID:24839599

  13. Testosterone reduces conscious detection of signals serving social correction: implications for antisocial behavior.

    PubMed

    van Honk, Jack; Schutter, Dennis J L G

    2007-08-01

    Elevated levels of testosterone have repeatedly been associated with antisocial behavior, but the psychobiological mechanisms underlying this effect are unknown. However, testosterone is evidently capable of altering the processing of facial threat, and facial signals of fear and anger serve sociality through their higher-level empathy-provoking and socially corrective properties. We investigated the hypothesis that testosterone predisposes people to antisocial behavior by reducing conscious recognition of facial threat. In a within-subjects design, testosterone (0.5 mg) or placebo was administered to 16 female volunteers. Afterward, a task with morphed stimuli indexed their sensitivity for consciously recognizing the facial expressions of threat (disgust, fear, and anger) and nonthreat (surprise, sadness, and happiness). Testosterone induced a significant reduction in the conscious recognition of facial threat overall. Separate analyses for the three categories of threat faces indicated that this effect was reliable for angry facial expressions exclusively. This testosterone-induced impairment in the conscious detection of the socially corrective facial signal of anger may predispose individuals to antisocial behavior.

  14. Effects of orchidectomy and testosterone replacement on mouse pyrrolidone carboxypeptidase activity in the HPA axis.

    PubMed

    García-López, M J; Martínez-Martos, J M; Mayas, M D; Carrera, M P; Ramírez-Expósito, M J

    2004-03-01

    Pyrrolidone carboxypeptidase, also known as pyroglutamyl aminopeptidase, removes pyroglutamyl terminal residues from biologically active peptides such as thyrotropin-releasing hormone. The aim of the present work was to study the influence of orchidectomy and testosterone replacement on soluble (pyrrolidone carboxypeptidase type I) and membrane-bound (pyrrolidone carboxypeptidase type II) activities in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. Forty male mice (Balb/C) were distributed into five groups: sham-operated controls, orchidectomized, and orchidectomized treated with increasing doses of testosterone in each group (3, 6 and 12 mg/kg). In the hypothalamus, orchidectomy increased pyrrolidone carboxypeptidase type I, whereas the highest dose of testosterone returned this activity to control levels. In the pituitary, neither pyrrolidone carboxypeptidase type I nor type II activities changed after orchidectomy, although both activities increased after administration of testosterone in both cases. On the other hand, orchidectomy increased pyrrolidone carboxypeptidase type I and type II activities in adrenal glands, while testosterone replacement returned it to control levels. These results suggest that testosterone differentially modulates pyrrolidone carboxypeptidase type I and type II activities, and therefore also their endogenous substrate regulation. Thus, the influence of sex hormones in the physiology of the HPA axis through the modulation of the Pyrrolidone carboxypeptidase type I and type II activities is of great importance on stress and neuropathology associated with HPA dysfunction

  15. Preventive effect of Pueraria mirifica on testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia in Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Masrudin, S S; Mohamad, J

    2015-12-01

    Pueraria mirifica (PM) extract contains phytoestrogen daidzein and genistein. In this study, we investigated the protective effect of PM extract, daidzein and genistein on a testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia in rats. Testosterone was administered at 3 mg kg(-1) to rats followed by the PM extract, daidzein and genistein for a period of 30 days with finasteride as positive control. The testosterone level was increased, indicating inhibition of 5α-reductase converting testosterone to dihydrotestosterone. This was confirmed by prostate-specific antigen level that significantly decreased when treated with PM extract, daidzein and genistein. The PM extract, daidzein and genistein reduced the increase in the prostate/body weight ratio in testosterone-induced rats. This gives indication that PM extract, daidzein and genistein possessed protective activity for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. The analysis of histoarchitechture of the prostate has also shown that there was a significant improvement in prostatic cells of the testosterone-induced rats when treated with PM extract, daidzein and genistein.

  16. Direct radioimmunoassay (RIA) of salivary testosterone: correlation with free and total serium testosterone

    SciTech Connect

    Vittek, J.; L'Hommedieu, D.G.; Gordon, G.G.; Rappaport, S.C.; Southren, A.L.

    1985-08-26

    Simple and sensitive direct RIA for determination of salivary testosterone was developed by using RSL NOSOLVEX TM (125 1) kit produced by Radioassay System Laboratories (Carcon, California). In addition, a relationship between salivary and serum free and total testosterone concentrations was studied in randomly selected 45 healthy subjects, 5 females on oral contraceptive pills and 28 hypertensive patients on various treatment regimens. The lowest weight of testosterone detectable by the modified method was equivalent to 1 pg/ml of saliva, taking into account analytical variability. Intra- and interassay coefficients of variation were 5.09 +/- 2.7% and 8.2 +/- 5.9% respectively. Statistically significant correlations were found between salivary and serum free testosterone (r = 0.97) and salivary and serum total testosterone concentrations (r = 0.70 - 0.87). The exception to this was a group of hypertensive females in which no correlation (r = 0.14) between salivary and total serum testosterone was found. It is also of interest that, while salivary testosterone was significantly increased in subjects taking oral contraceptives and most of the hypertensive patients, the total serum testosterone concentration was in normal range. These findings suggest that the determination of salivary testosterone is a reliable method to detect changes in the concentration of available biologically active hormone in the circulation. 21 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  17. Testosterone enhancement of thyroid carcinoma in rats: the role of TSH

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, C.; Oslapas, R.; Nayyar, R.; McCall, A.; Paloyan, E.

    1986-12-01

    Radiation treatment of Long-Evans male rats (40 mu Ci Na131I at the age of 2 months) led to a high incidence of thyroid follicular carcinomas at the age of 24 months; castration of males before irradiation caused a significant reduction in incidence of this tumor. In this study, replacement testosterone (T) was administered to castrated male rats by means of implanted, slow-release hormone-containing pellets (T-physiologic dose). Three testosterone doses (0.1T, 1.0T, and 30T) were used to treat groups of castrated irradiated and castrated nonirradiated rats from 2 to 18 months of age. The incidence of thyroid follicular carcinoma at 18 months in irradiated rats depended on the dose of replacement testosterone used. Tumor incidence was 8%, 14%, 41%, and 50% after treatment with 0T, 0.1T, 1.0T, and 30T, respectively. The incidence of thyroid follicular carcinoma in nonirradiated rats ranged from 0 to 7%. Mean serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) values in irradiated animal groups were elevated significantly above those for age-matched nonirradiated animals. The degree of TSH elevation in irradiated animals was related directly to the testosterone-replacement level. All rat groups showed age-dependent decreases in serum T4 levels, and T4 levels were also lowered by replacement testosterone in nonirradiated castrated animals. In aging irradiated animals, serum T4 levels were similarly decreased by testosterone, despite elevated TSH levels in these groups. In this study, testosterone appeared to act indirectly to promote development of irradiation-induced thyroid tumors by early and prolonged elevation of TSH levels.

  18. Testosterone abolishes implicit subordination in social anxiety.

    PubMed

    Terburg, David; Syal, Supriya; Rosenberger, Lisa A; Heany, Sarah J; Stein, Dan J; Honk, Jack van