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Sample records for bioceramic interfacial bonding

  1. Interfacial bonding stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boerio, J.

    1984-01-01

    Interfacial bonding stability by in situ ellipsometry was investigated. It is found that: (1) gamma MPS is an effective primer for bonding ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) to aluminum; (2) ellipsometry is an effective in situ technique for monitoring the stability of polymer/metal interfaces; (3) the aluminized back surface of silicon wafers contain significant amounts of silicon and may have glass like properties.

  2. Electrically active bioceramics: a review of interfacial responses.

    PubMed

    Baxter, F R; Bowen, C R; Turner, I G; Dent, A C E

    2010-06-01

    Electrical potentials in mechanically loaded bone have been implicated as signals in the bone remodeling cycle. Recently, interest has grown in exploiting this phenomenon to develop electrically active ceramics for implantation in hard tissue which may induce improved biological responses. Both polarized hydroxyapatite (HA), whose surface charge is not dependent on loading, and piezoelectric ceramics, which produce electrical potentials under stress, have been studied in order to determine the possible benefits of using electrically active bioceramics as implant materials. The polarization of HA has a positive influence on interfacial responses to the ceramic. In vivo studies of polarized HA have shown polarized samples to induce improvements in bone ingrowth. The majority of piezoelectric ceramics proposed for implant use contain barium titanate (BaTiO(3)). In vivo and in vitro investigations have indicated that such ceramics are biocompatible and, under appropriate mechanical loading, induce improved bone formation around implants. The mechanism by which electrical activity influences biological responses is yet to be clearly defined, but is likely to result from preferential adsorption of proteins and ions onto the polarized surface. Further investigation is warranted into the use of electrically active ceramics as the indications are that they have benefits over existing implant materials.

  3. Wettability and interfacial interactions in bioceramic-body-liquid systems.

    PubMed

    Agathopoulos, S; Nikolopoulos, P

    1995-04-01

    Wetting experiments, by the sessile drop technique, were carried out at 37 degrees C in air to determine the surface and interfacial interactions that take place in various solid bioceramics based on Al2O3, ZrO2(YPZ), SiO2, and TiO2 in contact with water, Ringer solution, artificial synovial fluid, calf serum, human plasma, and whole blood (+ EDTA). The surface energy of the liquids was measured by the ring method. The calculated values of the energy of interaction (work of adhesion) reveal that intermolecular forces act across the solid-liquid interfaces. The contribution of the dispersion and polar interactions to the surface energy of the polar liquids and the pure or mixed oxides was determined assuming that in the system of Mn-steel-liquids only dispersion forces act at the interface. It was found that the contribution of the polar interactions to the energy of interaction at the solid-liquid interface increases with the glassy phase content of the oxide that causes reduction of the measured contact angle.

  4. Interfacial adaptation and thickness of bioceramic-based root canal sealers.

    PubMed

    Al-Haddad, Afaf; Abu Kasim, Noor Hayaty; Che Ab Aziz, Zeti Adura

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated and compared the sealer thickness and interfacial adaptation of bioceramic sealers (Sankin Apatite III, MTA Fillapex(®), EndoSequence(®) BC) to root dentin against AH Plus(®) sealer. Sixty extracted single-root premolars were prepared and equally divided into four groups. Sealers were labeled with 0.1% Rhodamine B fluorescent dye. Roots were dissected along the transverse plane at 1 mm (apical), 3 mm (middle), and 6 mm (coronal) levels. Sealer-to-whole canal area ratio was evaluated. Percentage of gap-containing region to canal circumference was calculated using a confocal laser microscope. Sealer thickness was significantly higher at apical and middle levels than at coronal level. EndoSequence BC had the significantly highest thickness compared with MTA Fillapex and AH Plus. The coronal level had significantly less interfacial gaps compared with apical and middle levels. Bioceramic sealers showed more gaps compared with AH Plus, with no significant differences among them.

  5. Push-Out Bond Strength of Bioceramic Materials in a Synthetic Tissue Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Shokouhinejad, Noushin; Razmi, Hasan; Nekoofar, Mohammad Hossein; Sajadi, Sepideh; Dummer, Paul MH.; Khoshkhounejad, Mehrfam

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study compared the push-out bond strength of EndoSequence Root Repair Material (ERRM) and Bioaggregate (BA), new bioceramic materials, to that of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) after incubation in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), a synthetic tissue fluid, for either 1 week or 2 months. Materials and Methods: One-hundred and twenty root sections were filled with ProRoot MTA, BA, or ERRM. Each tested material was then randomly divided into two subgroups (n = 20): root sections were immersed in PBS for 1 week or 2 months. The bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine. After that, the failure modes were examined with stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The push-out data and failure mode categories were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and chi-square tests, respectively. Results: The bond strength of ERRM was significantly higher than that of BA and MTA at both incubation periods. No significant difference was found between the bond strength of MTA and BA at either 1 week or 2 months. Increasing the incubation time to 2 months resulted in a significant increase in bond strength of all the materials. The failure mode was mainly mixed for MTA and BA, but cohesive for ERRM at both incubation periods. Conclusion: ERRM had significantly higher bond strength to root canal walls compared to MTA and BA. Increasing the incubation time significantly improved the bond strength and bioactive reaction products of all materials. PMID:24910665

  6. Investigation of the interfacial condition between bioceramic coatings and metallic substrates using guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffari, Nader; Ong, Chuon-Szen

    2001-04-01

    The work reported here is on the characterization of the interfacial properties between plasma-sprayed Hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium substrates as used in cement-less hip orthopaedic implants. The phase velocity dispersion for the first Rayleigh-type mode for the coating-substrate system has been shown to be sensitive to the interfacial stiffness. Different interfacial conditions between the coating and substrate have been obtained by cyclic loading of the specimens in a four-point bend fatigue machine. The measured interfacial stiffness is then correlated with the interfacial fracture strength obtained by standard destructive shear tests.

  7. Interfacial deformation and friction heating in ultrasonic Al ribbon bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yasuo; Maeda, Masakatsu; Ando, Masaya; Yamaguchi, Eito

    2014-08-01

    The interfacial deformation and friction behavior between an Al ribbon and an electric pad (or substrate) during ultrasonic bonding is analyzed, based on numerical simulation and experimental results. The friction heating is estimated by the friction slip work at the bonding interface between the ribbon and pad. The temperature rise of the bonding interface is calculated by the numerical simulation and compared with the experimental results. It is suggested that the electric pad reduces the temperature rise, as compared to the bonding process without a pad. The shear stress at the bonding interface increases as the bonding progresses. The frictional slip due to adhesion increases stress and heats the bond interface.

  8. Anesthesia cutoff phenomenon: Interfacial hydrogen bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Chiou, J.S.; Ma, S.M.; Kamaya, H.; Ueda, I. )

    1990-05-04

    Anesthesia cutoff refers to the phenomenon of loss of anesthetic potency in a homologous series of alkanes and their derivatives when their sizes become too large. In this study, hydrogen bonding of 1-alkanol series (ethanol to eicosanol) to dipalmitoyl-L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) was studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) in DPPC-D2O-in-CCl4 reversed micelles. The alkanols formed hydrogen bonds with the phosphate moiety of DPPC and released the DPPC-bound deuterated water, evidenced by increases in the bound O-H stretching signal of the alkanol-DPPC complex and also in the free O-D stretching band of unbound D2O. These effects increased according to the elongation of the carbon chain of 1-alkanols from ethanol (C2) to 1-decanol (C10), but suddenly almost disappeared at 1-tetradecanol (C14). Anesthetic potencies of these alkanols, estimated by the activity of brine shrimps, were linearly related to hydrogen bond-breaking activities below C10 and agreed with the FTIR data in the cutoff at C10.

  9. Chemical Bonding Technology: Direct Investigation of Interfacial Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, J. L.; Boerio, F. J.; Plueddemann, E. P.; Miller, J.; Willis, P. B.; Cuddihy, E. F.

    1986-01-01

    This is the third Flat-Plate Solar Array (FSA) Project document reporting on chemical bonding technology for terrestrial photovoltaic (PV) modules. The impetus for this work originated in the late 1970s when PV modules employing silicone encapsulation materials were undergoing delamination during outdoor exposure. At that time, manufacturers were not employing adhesion promoters and, hence, module interfaces in common with the silicone materials were only in physical contact and therefore easily prone to separation if, for example, water were to penetrate to the interfaces. Delamination with silicone materials virtually vanished when adhesion promoters, recommended by silicone manufacturers, were used. The activities related to the direct investigation of chemically bonded interfaces are described.

  10. Bioceramics of calcium orthophosphates.

    PubMed

    Dorozhkin, Sergey V

    2010-03-01

    A strong interest in use of ceramics for biomedical applications appeared in the late 1960's. Used initially as alternatives to metals in order to increase a biocompatibility of implants, bioceramics have become a diverse class of biomaterials, presently including three basic types: relatively bioinert ceramics, bioactive (or surface reactive) and bioresorbable ones. Furthermore, any type of bioceramics could be porous to provide tissue ingrowth. This review is devoted to bioceramics prepared from calcium orthophosphates, which belong to the categories of bioresorbable and bioactive compounds. During the past 30-40 years, there have been a number of major advances in this field. Namely, after the initial work on development of bioceramics that was tolerated in the physiological environment, emphasis was shifted towards the use of bioceramics that interacted with bones by forming a direct chemical bond. By the structural and compositional control, it became possible to choose whether the bioceramics of calcium orthophosphates was biologically stable once incorporated within the skeletal structure or whether it was resorbed over time. At the turn of the millennium, a new concept of calcium orthophosphate bioceramics, which is able to regenerate bone tissues, has been developed. Current biomedical applications of calcium orthophosphate bioceramics include replacements for hips, knees, teeth, tendons and ligaments, as well as repair for periodontal disease, maxillofacial reconstruction, augmentation and stabilization of the jawbone, spinal fusion and bone fillers after tumor surgery. Potential future applications of calcium orthophosphate bioceramics will include drug-delivery systems, as well as they will become effective carriers of growth factors, bioactive peptides and/or various types of cells for tissue engineering purposes.

  11. Toward smart implant synthesis: bonding bioceramics of different resorbability to match bone growth rates.

    PubMed

    Comesaña, Rafael; Lusquiños, Fernando; Del Val, Jesús; Quintero, Félix; Riveiro, Antonio; Boutinguiza, Mohamed; Jones, Julian R; Hill, Robert G; Pou, Juan

    2015-06-02

    Craniofacial reconstructive surgery requires a bioactive bone implant capable to provide a gradual resorbability and to adjust to the kinetics of new bone formation during healing. Biomaterials made of calcium phosphate or bioactive glasses are currently available, mainly as bone defect fillers, but it is still required a versatile processing technique to fabricate composition-gradient bioceramics for application as controlled resorption implants. Here it is reported the application of rapid prototyping based on laser cladding to produce three-dimensional bioceramic implants comprising of a calcium phosphate inner core, with moderate in vitro degradation at physiological pH, surrounded by a bioactive glass outer layer of higher degradability. Each component of the implant is validated in terms of chemical and physical properties, and absence of toxicity. Pre-osteoblastic cell adhesion and proliferation assays reveal the adherence and growth of new bone cells on the material. This technique affords implants with gradual-resorbability for restoration of low-load-bearing bone.

  12. Toward Smart Implant Synthesis: Bonding Bioceramics of Different Resorbability to Match Bone Growth Rates

    PubMed Central

    Comesaña, Rafael; Lusquiños, Fernando; del Val, Jesús; Quintero, Félix; Riveiro, Antonio; Boutinguiza, Mohamed; Jones, Julian R.; Hill, Robert G.; Pou, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Craniofacial reconstructive surgery requires a bioactive bone implant capable to provide a gradual resorbability and to adjust to the kinetics of new bone formation during healing. Biomaterials made of calcium phosphate or bioactive glasses are currently available, mainly as bone defect fillers, but it is still required a versatile processing technique to fabricate composition-gradient bioceramics for application as controlled resorption implants. Here it is reported the application of rapid prototyping based on laser cladding to produce three-dimensional bioceramic implants comprising of a calcium phosphate inner core, with moderate in vitro degradation at physiological pH, surrounded by a bioactive glass outer layer of higher degradability. Each component of the implant is validated in terms of chemical and physical properties, and absence of toxicity. Pre–osteoblastic cell adhesion and proliferation assays reveal the adherence and growth of new bone cells on the material. This technique affords implants with gradual-resorbability for restoration of low-load-bearing bone. PMID:26032983

  13. The Effect of Different Irrigation Protocols for Smear Layer Removal on Bond Strength of a New Bioceramic Sealer

    PubMed Central

    Shokouhinejad, Noushin; Hoseini, Atefeh; Gorjestani, Hedayat; Shamshiri, Ahmad Reza

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of different irrigation protocols for smear layer removal on the bond strength of EndoSequence BC Sealer, a new bioceramic sealer, to root canal dentin. Materials and Methods The middle third of forty-four extracted human teeth were sectioned horizontally to obtain 128 dentin disks. After standardization of canal spaces, dentin disks were immersed in 5.25% NaOCl for 20 min. The specimens were then randomly assigned to four groups (n=32) according to dentin treatment procedure: group 1, 17% EDTA (1 min); group 2, 17% EDTA (1 min) + 5.25% NaOCl (5 min); group 3, 17% EDTA (1 min) + 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) (5 min); and group 4, 17% EDTA (1 min) + saline (5 min). After dentin treatment, two specimens of each group were prepared for investigation with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Surface of root canal wall was assessed in each specimen. Then the canal spaces were filled with EndoSequence BC Sealer in the remaining specimens. Push-out bond-strength and failure modes were assessed. The data on push-out test were analyzed using one-way ANOVA test. The significance level was set at P=0.05. Results There was no significant difference between the bond strengths of test groups (P=0.203). The bond failure was mainly cohesive for all groups. Conclusion Under the conditions of this ex vivo study, it could be concluded that the application of 17% EDTA alone or followed by 5.25% NaOCl, 2% CHX, or saline resulted in similar bond strength of EndoSequence BC Sealer to dentinal walls. PMID:23411764

  14. Bioceramics 15

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADPO18674 TITLE: Bioceramics 15 DISTRIBUTION: Approved for public release...compilation report: ADP018549 thru ADP018715 UNCLASSIFIED Advanced Reading Materials Science Solid State Physics and Engineering Bioceramics 15 Eds. Besim...911-3 Publication Date: January 2003 1010 pages, hardcover, E249.00US$249.00 Since their inception Bioceramics meetings have provided a treasure house

  15. Push-out bond strength of gutta-percha with a new bioceramic sealer in the presence or absence of smear layer.

    PubMed

    Shokouhinejad, Noushin; Gorjestani, Hedayat; Nasseh, Allen Ali; Hoseini, Atefeh; Mohammadi, Maryam; Shamshiri, Ahmad Reza

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the bond strength of a new bioceramic sealer (EndoSequence BC Sealer) and AH Plus in the presence or absence of smear layer. Extracted single-rooted human teeth were prepared and randomly divided into four groups. In groups 1 and 3, the root canals were finally irrigated with 5.25% NaOCl and smear layer was not removed, but in groups 2 and 4, the root canals were finally irrigated with 17% EDTA followed by 5.25% NaOCl in order to remove the smear layer. In groups 1 and 2, the root canals were obturated with gutta-percha/AH Plus, but in groups 3 and 4, obturation was performed with gutta-percha/EndoSequence BC Sealer. Push-out bond strength and failure modes were evaluated. The bond strength of gutta-percha/AH Plus and gutta-percha/EndoSequence BC Sealer was not significantly different (P = 0.89). The presence or absence of smear layer did not significantly affect the bond strength of filling materials (P = 0.69). The mode of bond failure was mainly cohesive for all groups. In conclusion, the bond strength of the new bioceramic sealer was equal to that of AH Plus with or without the smear layer.

  16. Multidirectional effects of Sr-, Mg-, and Si-containing bioceramic coatings with high bonding strength on inflammation, osteoclastogenesis, and osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chengtie; Chen, Zetao; Yi, Deliang; Chang, Jiang; Xiao, Yin

    2014-03-26

    Ideal coating materials for implants should be able to induce excellent osseointegration, which requires several important parameters, such as good bonding strength, limited inflammatory reaction, and balanced osteoclastogenesis and osteogenesis, to gain well-functioning coated implants with long-term life span after implantation. Bioactive elements, like Sr, Mg, and Si, have been found to play important roles in regulating the biological responses. It is of great interest to combine bioactive elements for developing bioactive coatings on Ti-6Al-4 V orthopedic implants to elicit multidirectional effects on the osseointegration. In this study, Sr-, Mg-, and Si-containing bioactive Sr2MgSi2O7 (SMS) ceramic coatings on Ti-6Al-4 V were successfully prepared by the plasma-spray coating method. The prepared SMS coatings have significantly higher bonding strength (∼37 MPa) than conventional pure hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings (mostly in the range of 15-25 MPa). It was also found that the prepared SMS coatings switch the macrophage phenotype into M2 extreme, inhibiting the inflammatory reaction via the inhibition of Wnt5A/Ca(2+) and Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathways of macrophages. In addition, the osteoclastic activities were also inhibited by SMS coatings. The expression of osteoclastogenesis-related genes (RANKL and MCSF) in bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal cells (BMSCs) with the involvement of macrophages was decreased, whereas OPG expression was enhanced on SMS coatings compared to HA coatings, indicating that SMS coatings also downregulated the osteoclastogenesis. However, the osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs with the involvement of macrophages was comparable between SMS and HA coatings. Therefore, the prepared SMS coatings showed multidirectional effects, such as improving bonding strength, reducing inflammatory reaction, and downregulating osteoclastic activities, but maintaining a comparable osteogenesis, as compared with HA coatings. The combination of

  17. Morphological Instability in InAs/GaSb Superlattices due to Interfacial Bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.H.; Moss, S.C.; Stokes, D.W.; Caha, O.; Bassler, K.E.; Ammu, S.L.; Bai, J.

    2005-08-26

    Synchrotron x-ray diffraction is used to compare the misfit strain and composition in a self-organized nanowire array in an InAs/GaSb superlattice with InSb interfacial bonds to a planar InAs/GaSb superlattice with GaAs interfacial bonds. It is found that the morphological instability that occurs in the nanowire array results from the large misfit strain that the InSb interfacial bonds have in the nanowire array. Based on this result, we propose that tailoring the type of interfacial bonds during the epitaxial growth of III-V semiconductor films provides a novel approach for producing the technologically important morphological instability in anomalously thin layers.

  18. Formation of Lamellar Pores for Splats via Interfacial or Sub-interfacial Delamination at Chemically Bonded Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin

    2017-02-01

    To comprehensively understand the formation mechanism of lamellar pores in splats, the delamination morphologies and crack patterns of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and lanthanum zirconia splats were examined. Results showed that both types of splats grew epitaxially on well-polished YSZ substrates, evidently confirming the formation of chemical bonding between splats and substrate. However, the interfacial or sub-interfacial delamination was observed in all kinds of splats in this study. Residual vertical cracks passing through delaminated domains (on bare substrate) were also observed, which clearly indicated that transverse delamination followed vertical cracking. Mechanical analysis about delamination was addressed, and the results were consistent with the experimental data.

  19. Interfacial and near interfacial crack growth phenomena in metal bonded alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Kruzic, Jamie Joseph

    2001-01-01

    Metal/ceramic interfaces can be found in many engineering applications including microelectronic packaging, multi-layered films, coatings, joints, and composite materials. In order to design reliable engineering systems that contain metal/ceramic interfaces, a comprehensive understanding of interfacial and near interfacial failure mechanisms is necessary.

  20. Interfacial crystalline structures in injection over-molded polypropylene and bond strength.

    PubMed

    Yan, Bowen; Wu, Hong; Jiang, Genjie; Guo, Shaoyun; Huang, Jian

    2010-11-01

    This paper describes interfacial crystalline structures found in injection overmolded polypropylene components and the relationship of these structures to bond strength between the components. The combined effects of the development of hierarchical gradient structures and the particular thermomechanical environment near the interface on the interfacial crystalline structures were investigated in detail by PLM, SEM, DSC, WAXD, and infrared dichroism spectroscopy. The experimental results showed that during molding there was competitive formation of interfacial crystalline structures consisted of "shish-kebab" layer (SKL) and a transcrystalline layers (TCL). Variation in shear stress (controlled by injection pressure and injection speed) plays an important role in the formation of the SKL. The formation of TCL is influenced by the thermal environment, namely melt temperature and mold temperature. Increasing within certain limits, interfacial temperature and the thermal gradient near the interface promotes β-iPP growth. The relationship between interfacial crystalline structures and interfacial bond strength was established by lap shear measurement. The interfacial bond strength is improved by enhancing the formation of TCL, but reduced if SKL predominates.

  1. Potential Effect of Interfacial Bonding on Used Nuclear Fuel Vibration Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Jiang, Hao; Wang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    This summary abstract describes the methodology used to evaluate the effect of pellet pellet and pellet clad interactions with consideration of the interfacial bonding efficiency on UNF vibration integrity. This methodology provides a solid roadmap for further protocol development with respect to effective lifetime prediction of a UNF system under normal transportation vibration. The proposed methodology that couples FEA simulations and experimental exploration efforts is also under development. The current methodology is focused on assessing the influence of interfacial bonding at the pellet pellet and the pellet clad interfaces on UNF vibration integrity. The FEA simulation results were also calibrated and benchmarked with the fatigue aging data obtained from reversible bending fatigue testing.

  2. The Effect of Canal Dryness on Bond Strength of Bioceramic and Epoxy-resin Sealers after Irrigation with Sodium Hypochlorite or Chlorhexidine

    PubMed Central

    Razmi, Hasan; Bolhari, Behnam; Karamzadeh Dashti, Negar; Fazlyab, Mahta

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of canal dryness on the push-out bond strength of two resin sealers (AH-Plus and Adseal) and a bioceramic sealer (Endosequence BC sealer) after canal irrigation with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and chlorhexidine (CHX). Methods and Materials: A total of 18 extracted human premolars were used. Canals were prepared and were divided to two groups based on irrigation solution (either NaOCl or CHX). The samples were again divided based on pre-obturation canal condition (wet, half-wet and dry). The samples were sub-divided into 3 groups based on the sealer type; the teeth were obturated with gutta-percha and test sealers (Adseal, AH-Plus or BC sealer). A total number of 18 groups were available to be cut into dentine disks (12 disks in each group). The type of bond failure was also assessed in each group. Data were analyzed using the 3-way ANOVA, post hoc Tukey’s tests, t-test and the Fisher’s exact test. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: The bond strength of Adseal was not affected by the canal condition or irrigation with either NaOCl or CHX. Although the bond strength of AH-Plus was not affected by the irrigant type, the highest bond strength was seen in dry canals. For Endosequence BC sealer, the canal conditions did not affect the bond strength; however, CHX reduced the bond strength. Conclusion: Bond strength of resin sealers was not affected by irrigation solution; however, canal moisture negatively affected the bond strength of AH-Plus. CHX reduced the bond strength of BC sealer. PMID:27141222

  3. Reverberation-ray matrix analysis for wave propagation in multiferroic plates with imperfect interfacial bonding.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jun; Chen, Weiqiu; Ye, Guiru

    2012-01-01

    The dispersion behavior of waves in multiferroic plates with imperfect interfacial bonding has been investigated via the method of reverberation-ray matrix, which is directly established from the three-dimensional equations of magneto-electro-elasticity in the form of state space formalism. A generalized spring-layer model is employed to characterize the interfacial imperfection. By introducing a dual system of local coordinates for each single layer, the numerical instability usually encountered in the state space method can be avoided. Based on the proposed method, a typical sandwich plate made of piezoelectric and piezomagnetic phases is considered in numerical examples to calculate the dispersion curves and mode shapes. It is demonstrated that the results obtained by the present method is unconditionally stable as compared to the traditional state space method. The influence of different interfacial bonding conditions on the dispersion characteristics and corresponding mode shapes is investigated.

  4. POTENTIAL IMPACT OF INTERFACIAL BONDING EFFICIENCY ON USED NUCLEAR FUEL VIBRATION INTEGRITY DURING NORMAL TRANSPORTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Hao; Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to investigate the impacts of interfacial bonding efficiency at pellet pellet and pellet clad interfaces on surrogate of used nuclear fuel (UNF) vibration integrity. The FEA simulation results were also validated and benchmarked with reversible bending fatigue test results on surrogate rods consisting of stainless steel (SS) tubes with alumina-pellet inserts. Bending moments (M) are applied to the FEA models to evaluate the system responses of the surrogate rods. From the induced curvature, , the flexural rigidity EI can be estimated as EI=M/ . The impacts of interfacial bonding efficiency include the moment carrying capacity distribution between pellets and clad and cohesion influence on the flexural rigidity of the surrogate rod system. The result also indicates that the immediate consequences of interfacial de-bonding are a load carrying capacity shift from the fuel pellets to the clad and a reduction of the composite rod flexural rigidity. Therefore, the flexural rigidity of the surrogate rod and the bending moment bearing capacity between the clad and fuel pellets are strongly dependent on the efficiency of interfacial bonding at the pellet pellet and pellet clad interfaces. FEA models will be further used to study UNF vibration integrity.

  5. High-resolution imaging and spectroscopy of interfacial water at single bond limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ying

    Hydrogen bond is one of the most important weak interactions in nature and plays an essential role in a broad spectrum of physics, chemistry, biology, energy and material sciences. The conventional methods for studying hydrogen-bonding interaction are all based on spectroscopic or diffraction techniques. However, those techniques have poor spatial resolution and only measure the average properties of many hydrogen bonds, which are susceptible to the structural inhomogeneity and local environments, especially when interfacial systems are concerned. The spatial variation and inter-bond coupling of the hydrogen bonds leads to significant spectral broadening, which prohibits the accurate understanding of the experimental data. In this talk, I will present our recent progress on the development of new-generation scanning probe microscopy/spectroscopy (SPM/S) with unprecedentedly high sensitivity and resolution, for addressing weak inter- and intra-molecular interactions, such as hydrogen bonds and van der Waals force. Based on a qPlus sensor, we have succeeded to push the real-space study of a prototypical hydrogen-bonded system, i.e. water, down to single bond limit. Combined with state-of-the-arts quantum simulations, we have discovered exotic nuclear quantum effects (NQEs) in interfacial water and revealed the quantum nature of the hydrogen bond from a completely new perspective

  6. Bioceramics in ophthalmology.

    PubMed

    Baino, Francesco; Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara

    2014-08-01

    The benefits of ceramics in biomedical applications have been universally appreciated as they exhibit an extraordinarily broad set of physico-chemical, mechanical and biological properties which can be properly tailored by acting on their composition, porosity and surface texture to increase their versatility and suitability for targeted healthcare applications. Bioceramics have traditionally been used for the repair of hard tissues, such as bone and teeth, mainly due to their suitable strength for load-bearing applications, wear resistance (especially alumina, zirconia and composites thereof) and, in some cases, bone-bonding ability (calcium orthophosphates and bioactive glasses). Bioceramics have been also applied in other medical areas, like ophthalmic surgery; although their use in such a context has been scientifically documented since the late 1700s, the potential and importance of ceramic ocular implants still seem to be underestimated and an exhaustive, critical assessment is currently lacking in the relevant literature. The present review aims to fill this gap by giving a comprehensive picture of the ceramic-based materials and implants that are currently used in ophthalmology and pointing out the strengths and weaknesses of the existing devices. A prospect for future research is also provided, highlighting the potential of new, smart bioceramics able to carry specific added values which could have a significant impact on the treatment of ocular diseases.

  7. Evaluation of various concentrations of alkaline surface treatment on interfacial bond strengths of amalgam bonded to amalgam.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Asaad Javaid; Ahmad, Asif; Mohammad, Taqi; Khan, Zahid Akhter

    2013-09-01

    This study was done to assess the influence of alkaline surface modification on interfacial bond strength of existing fractured (old) amalgam restoration bonded to fresh amalgam. Old and Fresh amalgam interfaced samples were prepared by applying a 4-methacryloyloxyethy trimellitate anhydride (4-META) containing adhesive. The adhesive used was Amalgabond (Parkell, Farmingdale, NY 11735, USA). Four concentrations of calcium hydroxide Ca(OH)2 solutions were used as a surface modifiers for old amalgam to increase the pH of the amalgam surfaces. The concentrations used were 2.5, 5, 10 and 15%. Direct measurement of the interfacial bond strength was carried out using an electromechanical universal tensile testing machine at crosshead speed of 10mm per minute. Results show that all the calcium hydroxide modified samples produced the increased tensile bond strength (TBS) as compared to their control group. The highest values of bond strength were achieved using 15% Ca(OH)2 solution as surface modifier. Pretreatment of fractured amalgam with calcium hydroxide improves the bond strength of 4-META adhesives. Its use in repair of amalgam may therefore be considered.

  8. Effect of phosphate-buffered saline on push-out bond strength of a new bioceramic sealer to root canal dentin

    PubMed Central

    Shokouhinejad, Noushin; Hoseini, Atefeh; Gorjestani, Hedayat; Raoof, Maryam; Assadian, Hadi; Shamshiri, Ahmad Reza

    2012-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to compare push-out bond strength of a new bioceramic endodontic sealer, EndoSequence BC sealer (Brasseler USA, Savannah, GA), used with gutta-percha in the presence or absence of phosphate-buffered saline solution (PBS) within the root canals. Materials and Methods: Forty single-rooted human teeth were prepared and randomly divided into four groups. Samples in groups 1 and 2 were dried, but those in groups 3 and 4 were moistened with PBS before obturation. All root canals were obturated with gutta-percha/EndoSequence BC sealer. The specimens were stored in PBS for 7 days in groups 1 and 3 and for 2 months in groups 2 and 4. Push-out bond strength values and failure modes were evaluated. The data on push-out bond strength were analyzed using two-way ANOVA. Results: The mean value for the bond strength of the obturation material in moistened canals was significantly higher than that in dried ones at 1 week (P = 0.00). Contrarily, there was no significant difference between dried and moistened root canals at 2 months (P = 0.61). In dried canals, bond strength increased significantly with time but in moistened ones, the difference was not significant. Inspection of the specimens revealed the bond failure to be mainly cohesive for all groups. Conclusion: The presence of PBS within the root canals increased the bond strength of EndoSequence BC sealer/gutta-percha at 1 week. However, no difference was found between the bond strength of EndoSequence BC sealer/gutta-percha in the presence or absence of PBS in the root canals at 2 months. PMID:23559925

  9. Novel strip-cast Mg/Al clad sheets with excellent tensile and interfacial bonding properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Su; Lee, Dong Ho; Jung, Seung-Pill; Lee, Kwang Seok; Kim, Ki Jong; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Byeong-Joo; Chang, Young Won; Yuh, Junhan; Lee, Sunghak

    2016-06-01

    In order to broaden industrial applications of Mg alloys, as lightest-weight metal alloys in practical uses, many efforts have been dedicated to manufacture various clad sheets which can complement inherent shortcomings of Mg alloys. Here, we present a new fabrication method of Mg/Al clad sheets by bonding thin Al alloy sheet on to Mg alloy melt during strip casting. In the as-strip-cast Mg/Al clad sheet, homogeneously distributed equi-axed dendrites existed in the Mg alloy side, and two types of thin reaction layers, i.e., γ (Mg17Al12) and β (Mg2Al3) phases, were formed along the Mg/Al interface. After post-treatments (homogenization, warm rolling, and annealing), the interfacial layers were deformed in a sawtooth shape by forming deformation bands in the Mg alloy and interfacial layers, which favorably led to dramatic improvement in tensile and interfacial bonding properties. This work presents new applications to multi-functional lightweight alloy sheets requiring excellent formability, surface quality, and corrosion resistance as well as tensile and interfacial bonding properties.

  10. Novel strip-cast Mg/Al clad sheets with excellent tensile and interfacial bonding properties

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Su; Lee, Dong Ho; Jung, Seung-Pill; Lee, Kwang Seok; Kim, Ki Jong; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Byeong-Joo; Chang, Young Won; Yuh, Junhan; Lee, Sunghak

    2016-01-01

    In order to broaden industrial applications of Mg alloys, as lightest-weight metal alloys in practical uses, many efforts have been dedicated to manufacture various clad sheets which can complement inherent shortcomings of Mg alloys. Here, we present a new fabrication method of Mg/Al clad sheets by bonding thin Al alloy sheet on to Mg alloy melt during strip casting. In the as-strip-cast Mg/Al clad sheet, homogeneously distributed equi-axed dendrites existed in the Mg alloy side, and two types of thin reaction layers, i.e., γ (Mg17Al12) and β (Mg2Al3) phases, were formed along the Mg/Al interface. After post-treatments (homogenization, warm rolling, and annealing), the interfacial layers were deformed in a sawtooth shape by forming deformation bands in the Mg alloy and interfacial layers, which favorably led to dramatic improvement in tensile and interfacial bonding properties. This work presents new applications to multi-functional lightweight alloy sheets requiring excellent formability, surface quality, and corrosion resistance as well as tensile and interfacial bonding properties. PMID:27245687

  11. Vibrational characteristics of FRP-bonded concrete interfacial defects in a low frequency regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Tin Kei; Lau, Denvid

    2014-04-01

    As externally bonded fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) is a critical load-bearing component of strengthened or retrofitted civil infrastructures, the betterment of structural health monitoring (SHM) methodology for such composites is imperative. Henceforth the vibrational characteristics of near surface interfacial defects involving delamination and trapped air pockets at the FRP-concrete interface are investigated in this study using a finite element approach. Intuitively, due to its lower interfacial stiffness compared with an intact interface, a damaged region is expected to have a set of resonance frequencies different from an intact region when excited by acoustic waves. It has been observed that, when excited acoustically, both the vibrational amplitudes and frequency peaks in the response spectrum of the defects demonstrate a significant deviation from an intact FRP-bonded region. For a thin sheet of FRP bonded to concrete with sizable interfacial defects, the fundamental mode under free vibration is shown to be relatively low, in the order of kHz. Due to the low resonance frequencies of the defects, the use of low-cost equipment for interfacial defect detection via response spectrum analysis is highly feasible.

  12. Improved Interfacial Bonding in Magnesium/Aluminum Overcasting Systems by Aluminum Surface Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Chen, Yiqing; Luo, Alan A.

    2014-12-01

    "Overcasting" technique is used to produce bimetallic magnesium/aluminum (Mg/Al) structures where lightweight Mg can be cast onto solid Al substrates. An inherent difficulty in creating strong Mg/Al interfacial bonding is the natural oxide film on the solid Al surfaces, which reduces the wettability between molten Mg and Al substrates during the casting process. In the paper, an "electropolishing + anodizing" surface treatment has been developed to disrupt the oxide film on a dilute Al-0.08 wt pct Ga alloy, improving the metallurgical bonding between molten Mg and Al substrates in the bimetallic experiments carried out in a high-vacuum test apparatus. The test results provided valuable information of the interfacial phenomena of the Mg/Al bimetallic samples. The results show significantly improved metallurgical bonding in the bimetallic samples with "electropolishing + anodizing" surface treatment and Ga alloying. It is recommended to adjust the pre-heating temperature and time of the Al substrates and the Mg melt temperature to control the interfacial reactions for optimum interfacial properties in the actual overcasting processes.

  13. Novel strip-cast Mg/Al clad sheets with excellent tensile and interfacial bonding properties.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Su; Lee, Dong Ho; Jung, Seung-Pill; Lee, Kwang Seok; Kim, Ki Jong; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Byeong-Joo; Chang, Young Won; Yuh, Junhan; Lee, Sunghak

    2016-06-01

    In order to broaden industrial applications of Mg alloys, as lightest-weight metal alloys in practical uses, many efforts have been dedicated to manufacture various clad sheets which can complement inherent shortcomings of Mg alloys. Here, we present a new fabrication method of Mg/Al clad sheets by bonding thin Al alloy sheet on to Mg alloy melt during strip casting. In the as-strip-cast Mg/Al clad sheet, homogeneously distributed equi-axed dendrites existed in the Mg alloy side, and two types of thin reaction layers, i.e., γ (Mg17Al12) and β (Mg2Al3) phases, were formed along the Mg/Al interface. After post-treatments (homogenization, warm rolling, and annealing), the interfacial layers were deformed in a sawtooth shape by forming deformation bands in the Mg alloy and interfacial layers, which favorably led to dramatic improvement in tensile and interfacial bonding properties. This work presents new applications to multi-functional lightweight alloy sheets requiring excellent formability, surface quality, and corrosion resistance as well as tensile and interfacial bonding properties.

  14. Interfacial bond strength of electrophoretically deposited hydroxyapatite coatings on metals.

    PubMed

    Wei, M; Ruys, A J; Swain, M V; Kim, S H; Milthorpe, B K; Sorrell, C C

    1999-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) coatings were deposited onto substrates of metal biomaterials (Ti, Ti6Al4V, and 316L stainless steel) by electrophoretic deposition (EPD). Only ultra-high surface area HAp powder, prepared by the metathesis method 10Ca(NO3)2 + 6(NH4)2HPO4 + 8NH4OH), could produce dense coatings when sintered at 875-1000degreesC. Single EPD coatings cracked during sintering owing to the 15-18% sintering shrinkage, but the HAp did not decompose. The use of dual coatings (coat, sinter, coat, sinter) resolved the cracking problem. Scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) inspection revealed that the second coating filled in the "valleys" in the cracks of the first coating. The interfacial shear strength of the dual coatings was found, by ASTM F1044-87, to be approximately 12 MPa on a titanium substrate and approximately 22 MPa on 316L stainless steel, comparing quite favorably with the 34 MPa benchmark (the shear strength of bovine cortical bone was found to be 34 MPa). Stainless steel gave the better result since -316L (20.5 microm mK(-1)) > alpha-HAp (approximately 14 microm mK(-1)), resulting in residual compressive stresses in the coating, whereas alpha-titanium (approximately 10.3 microm mK(-1)) < alpha-HAp, resulting in residual tensile stresses in the coating.

  15. On the interfacial fracture resistance of resin-bonded zirconia and glass-infiltrated graded zirconia

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Herzl; Kaizer, Marina; Chughtai, Asima; Tong, Hui; Tanaka, Carina; Zhang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Objective A major limiting factor for the widespread use of zirconia in prosthetic dentistry is its poor resin-cement bonding capabilities. We show that this deficiency can be overcome by infiltrating the zirconia cementation surface with glass. Current methods for assessing the fracture resistance of resin-ceramic bonds are marred by uneven stress distribution at the interface, which may result in erroneous interfacial fracture resistance values. We have applied a wedge-loaded double-cantilever-beam testing approach to accurately measure the interfacial fracture resistance of adhesively bonded zirconia-based restorative materials. Methods The interfacial fracture energy GC was determined for adhesively bonded zirconia, graded zirconia and feldspathic ceramic bars. The bonding surfaces were subjected to sandblasting or acid etching treatments. Baseline GC was measured for bonded specimens subjected to 7 days hydration at 37 °C. Long-term GC was determined for specimens exposed to 20,000 thermal cycles between 5 and 55 °C followed by 2-month aging at 37 °C in water. The test data were interpreted with the aid of a 2D finite element fracture analysis. Results The baseline and long-term GC for graded zirconia was 2–3 and 8 times that for zirconia, respectively. More significantly, both the baseline and long-term GC of graded zirconia were similar to those for feldspathic ceramic. Significance The interfacial fracture energy of feldspathic ceramic and graded zirconia was controlled by the fracture energy of the resin cement while that of zirconia by the interface. GC for the graded zirconia was as large as for feldspathic ceramic, making it an attractive material for use in dentistry. PMID:26365987

  16. Interfacial bonding characteristics between graphene and dielectric substrates.

    PubMed

    Das, Santanu; Lahiri, Debrupa; Agarwal, Arvind; Choi, Wonbong

    2014-01-31

    Achieving strong adhesion between graphene and SiO(x)/Si substrates is crucial to make reliable graphene based electronics and electro-optic devices. We report the enhanced adhesion energy by vacuum annealing and the quantification of graphene-SiO(x)/Si substrate adhesion energy by using the nano-scratch technique coupled with Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). We found that the adhesion energy of as-transferred graphene on SiO(x)/Si substrates is ~2.978 J m(-2). By applying different annealing protocols of rapid thermal annealing and vacuum annealing, the adhesion energy of graphene-SiO(x)/Si is increased to 10.09 and 20.64 J m(-2), respectively. The increase in adhesion energy is due to the formation of chemical bonds between the graphene and SiO(x) at high temperatures. The XPS depth profiling confirms that C-O and C=O chemical bond formation occurs at the graphene/SiO(x) interface. These results could be adapted for graphene/Si nanoelectronics device fabrication and they open up a pathway towards producing reliable solid state devices.

  17. The mode III crack problem in bonded materials with a nonhomogeneous interfacial zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Joseph, P. F.; Kaya, A. C.

    1991-01-01

    The mode 3 crack problem for two bonded homogeneous half planes was considered. The interfacial zone was modelled by a nonhomogeneous strip in such a way that the shear modulus is a continuous function throughout the composite medium and has discontinuous derivatives along the boundaries of the interfacial zone. The problem was formulated for cracks perpendicular to the nominal interface and was solved for various crack locations in and around the interfacial region. The asymptotic stress field near the tip of a crack terminating at an interface was examined and it was shown that, unlike the corresponding stress field in piecewise homogeneous materials, in this case the stresses have the standard square root singularity and their angular variation was identical to that of a crack in a homogeneous medium. With application to the subcritical crack growth process in mind, the results given include mostly the stress intensity factors for some typical crack geometries and various material combinations.

  18. The mode 3 crack problem in bonded materials with a nonhomogeneous interfacial zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, Fazil; Kaya, A. C.; Joseph, P. F.

    1988-01-01

    The mode 3 crack problem for two bonded homogeneous half planes was considered. The interfacial zone was modelled by a nonhomogeneous strip in such a way that the shear modulus is a continuous function throughout the composite medium and has discontinuous derivatives along the boundaries of the interfacial zone. The problem was formulated for cracks perpendicular to the nominal interface and was solved for various crack locations in and around the interfacial region. The asymptotic stress field near the tip of a crack terminating at an interface was examined and it was shown that, unlike the corresponding stress field in piecewise homogeneous materials, in this case the stresses have the standard square root singularity and their angular variation was identical to that of a crack in a homogeneous medium. With application to the subcritical crack growth process in mind, the results given include mostly the stress intensity factors for some typical crack geometries and various material combinations.

  19. Evaluation of the interfacial bond properties between carbon phenolic and glass phenolic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, K.; Clinton, R.; Jeelani, S.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of moisture and surface finish on the mechanical and physical properties of the interfacial bond between carbon/phenolic (C/P) and glass/phenolic (G/P) composite materials have been studied. Test results indicate that moisture substantially degrades the integrity of the interfacial bond between C/P and G/P materials. The apparent effect of the autoclave curing of the C/P material reduces the ultimate interlaminar shear length of the C/P material by 20 percent compared to the hydroclave curing of the C/P material. The variation in applied surface finishes is found to have no appreciable effect on the ultimate interlaminar shear strength of the interface in the wet laminate.

  20. Bond Strength and Interfacial Morphology of Different Dentin Adhesives in Primary Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Vashisth, Pallavi; Mittal, Mudit; Goswami, Mousumi; Chaudhary, Seema; Dwivedi, Swati

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the interfacial morphology and the bond strength produced by the three-step, two-step and single-step bonding systems in primary teeth. Materials and Methods: Occlusal surfaces of 72 extracted human deciduous teeth were ground to expose the dentin. The teeth were divided into four groups: (a) Scotchbond Multipurpose (3M, ESPE), (b) Adh Se (Vivadent), (d) OptiBond All-in-One (Kerr) and (e)Futurabond NR (VOCO, Cuxhaven, Germany). The adhesives were applied to each group following the manufacturer’s instructions. Then, teeth from each group were divided into two groups: (A) For viewing interfacial morphology (32 teeth), with 8 teeth in each group, and (B) For measurement of bond strength (40 teeth), with 10 teeth in each group. All the samples were prepared for viewing under SEM. The statistical analysis was done using SPSS version 15.0 software. Results: Observational measurement of tag length in different adhesives revealed that Scotchbond had the most widely spread values with a range from 12.20 to 89.10μm while OptiBond AIO had the narrowest range (0 to 22.50). The bond strength of Scotchbond Multipurpose was significantly higher (7.4744±1.88763) (p<0.001) as compared to Futurabond NR (3.8070±1.61345), Adhe SE (4.4478 ± 1.3820) and OptiBond-all-in-one (4.4856±1.07925). Conclusion: The three-step bonding system showed better results as compared to simplified studied bonding systems PMID:24910694

  1. High-temperature healing of interfacial voids in GaAs wafer bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, YewChung Sermon; Liu, Po Chun; Feigelson, R. S.; Route, R. K.

    2002-02-01

    Artificial voids were introduced at bonding interfaces to study how processing parameters affected the healing mechanism of interfacial voids in GaAs wafer bonding. These voids were created by placing unpatterned wafers in contact with topographically patterned wafers. During the bonding process, crystallites formed within these voids and corresponded to bonded regions within the voids. Their formation depended strongly on the height of the surface irregularities at the wafer interfaces. When the void depth (h) was ⩾200 nm, most of the crystallites were diamond shaped. The edges of the diamond features were elongated in the <100> direction. On the other hand, when the void depth was small (h⩽70 nm), dendrites grew quickly in the <110> direction.

  2. Differences in interfacial bond strengths of graphite fiber-epoxy resin composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Needles, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of epoxy-size and degree of cure on the interfacial bonding of an epoxy-amine-graphite fiber composite system is examined. The role of the fiber-resin interface in determining the overall mechanical properties of composites is poorly understood. A good interfacial adhesive bond is required to achieve maximum stress transfer to the fibers in composites, but at the same time some form of energy absorbing interfacial interaction is needed to achieve high fracture toughening. The incompatibility of these two processes makes it important to understand the nature and basic factors involved at the fiber-resin interface as stress is applied. The mechanical properties including interlaminar shear values for graphite fiber-resin composites are low compared to glass and boron-resin composites. These differences have been attributed to poor fiber-matrix adhesion. Graphite fibers are commonly subjected to post-treatments including application of organic sizing in order to improve their compatibility with the resin matrix and to protect the fiber tow from damage during processing and lay-up. In such processes, sized graphite fiber tow is impregnated with epoxy resin and then layed-up i nto the appropriate configuration. Following an extended ambient temperature cure, the graphite-resin composite structure is cured at elevated temperature using a programmed temperature sequence to cure and then cool the product.

  3. Molecular simulation on interfacial structure and gettering efficiency of direct silicon bonded (110)/(100) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kariyazaki, Hiroaki; Aoki, Tatsuhiko; Izunome, Koji; Sueoka, Koji

    2010-06-01

    Direct silicon bonded (DSB) substrates with (110)/(100) hybrid orientation technology are attracting considerable attention as a promising technology for high performance bulk complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technology. We have investigated the structure and the gettering efficiency of the (110)/(100) interface parallelling each ⟨110⟩ direction (DSB interface) by molecular dynamics (MD) and first-principles calculation. In MD calculations, initial calculation cells of 15 atomic-configurations with coincidence-site lattices were prepared. It was found that (i) the calculated DSB interface was stable independent of the initial atomic-configurations and (ii) the interfacial structures were essentially the same among the calculated models. Moreover, the calculated interfacial structure corresponds to the reported TEM observation. The first-principles calculation showed that Si atoms in the DSB interface formed covalent bonding. The dangling bonds in Si (110) and (100) surfaces disappeared due to restructuring in the DSB interface. Furthermore, the DSB interface, which exists just below the device active region, was found to be an efficient gettering site for Al, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Hf atoms.

  4. Controlling Interfacial Dynamics: Covalent Bonding versus Physical Adsorption in Polymer Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, Adam P.; Bocharova, Vera; Cheng, Shiwang; Kisliuk, Alexander M.; White, B. Tyler; Saito, Tomonori; Uhrig, David; Mahalik, J. P.; Kumar, Rajeev; Imel, Adam E.; Etampawala, Thusitha; Martin, Halie; Sikes, Nicole; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Dadmun, Mark D.; Sokolov, Alexei P.

    2016-06-23

    It is generally believed that the strength of the polymer nanoparticle interaction controls the modification of near-interface segmental mobility in polymer nanocomposites (PNCs). However, little is known about the effect of covalent bonding on the segmental dynamics and glass transition of matrix-free polymer-grafted nanoparticles (PGNs), especially when compared to PNCs. In this article, we directly compare the static and dynamic properties of poly(2-vinylpyridine)/silica-based nanocomposites with polymer chains either physically adsorbed (PNCs) or covalently bonded (PGNs) to identical silica nanoparticles (RNP = 12.5 nm) for three different molecular weight (MW) systems. Interestingly, when the MW of the matrix is as low as 6 kg/mol (RNP/Rg = 5.4) or as high as 140 kg/mol (RNP/Rg= 1.13), both small-angle X-ray scattering and broadband dielectric spectroscopy show similar static and dynamic properties for PNCs and PGNs. However, for the intermediate MW of 18 kg/mol (RNP/Rg = 3.16), the difference between physical adsorption and covalent bonding can be clearly identified in the static and dynamic properties of the interfacial layer. We ascribe the differences in the interfacial properties of PNCs and PGNs to changes in chain stretching, as quantified by self-consistent field theory calculations. These results demonstrate that the dynamic suppression at the interface is affected by the chain stretching; that is, it depends on the anisotropy of the segmental conformations, more so than the strength of the interaction, which suggests that the interfacial dynamics can be effectively tuned by the degree of stretching a parameter accessible from the MW or grafting density.

  5. Controlling Interfacial Dynamics: Covalent Bonding versus Physical Adsorption in Polymer Nanocomposites

    DOE PAGES

    Holt, Adam P.; Bocharova, Vera; Cheng, Shiwang; ...

    2016-06-23

    It is generally believed that the strength of the polymer nanoparticle interaction controls the modification of near-interface segmental mobility in polymer nanocomposites (PNCs). However, little is known about the effect of covalent bonding on the segmental dynamics and glass transition of matrix-free polymer-grafted nanoparticles (PGNs), especially when compared to PNCs. In this article, we directly compare the static and dynamic properties of poly(2-vinylpyridine)/silica-based nanocomposites with polymer chains either physically adsorbed (PNCs) or covalently bonded (PGNs) to identical silica nanoparticles (RNP = 12.5 nm) for three different molecular weight (MW) systems. Interestingly, when the MW of the matrix is as lowmore » as 6 kg/mol (RNP/Rg = 5.4) or as high as 140 kg/mol (RNP/Rg= 1.13), both small-angle X-ray scattering and broadband dielectric spectroscopy show similar static and dynamic properties for PNCs and PGNs. However, for the intermediate MW of 18 kg/mol (RNP/Rg = 3.16), the difference between physical adsorption and covalent bonding can be clearly identified in the static and dynamic properties of the interfacial layer. We ascribe the differences in the interfacial properties of PNCs and PGNs to changes in chain stretching, as quantified by self-consistent field theory calculations. These results demonstrate that the dynamic suppression at the interface is affected by the chain stretching; that is, it depends on the anisotropy of the segmental conformations, more so than the strength of the interaction, which suggests that the interfacial dynamics can be effectively tuned by the degree of stretching a parameter accessible from the MW or grafting density.« less

  6. Load and Time Dependence of Interfacial Chemical Bond-Induced Friction at the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Kaiwen; Gosvami, Nitya N.; Goldsby, David L.; Liu, Yun; Szlufarska, Izabela; Carpick, Robert W.

    2017-02-01

    Rate and state friction (RSF) laws are widely used empirical relationships that describe the macroscale frictional behavior of a broad range of materials, including rocks found in the seismogenic zone of Earth's crust. A fundamental aspect of the RSF laws is frictional "aging," where friction increases with the time of stationary contact due to asperity creep and/or interfacial strengthening. Recent atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments and simulations found that nanoscale silica contacts exhibit aging due to the progressive formation of interfacial chemical bonds. The role of normal load (and, thus, normal stress) on this interfacial chemical bond-induced (ICBI) friction is predicted to be significant but has not been examined experimentally. Here, we show using AFM that, for nanoscale ICBI friction of silica-silica interfaces, aging (the difference between the maximum static friction and the kinetic friction) increases approximately linearly with the product of the normal load and the log of the hold time. This behavior is attributed to the approximately linear dependence of the contact area on the load in the positive load regime before significant wear occurs, as inferred from sliding friction measurements. This implies that the average pressure, and thus the average bond formation rate, is load independent within the accessible load range. We also consider a more accurate nonlinear model for the contact area, from which we extract the activation volume and the average stress-free energy barrier to the aging process. Our work provides an approach for studying the load and time dependence of contact aging at the nanoscale and further establishes RSF laws for nanoscale asperity contacts.

  7. Simultaneous determination of interfacial molarities of amide bonds, carboxylate groups, and water by chemical trapping in micelles of amphiphiles containing peptide bond models.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongliang; Romsted, Laurence S; Zhuang, Lanzhen; de Jong, Sander

    2013-01-15

    Chemical trapping is a powerful approach for obtaining experimental estimates of interfacial molarities of weakly basic nucleophiles in the interfacial regions of amphiphile aggregates. Here, we demonstrate that the chemical probe 4-hexadecyl-2,6-dimethylbenzenediazonium ion (16-ArN(2)(+)) reacts competitively with interfacial water, with the amide carbonyl followed by cleavage of the headgroups from the tail at the amide oxygen, and with the terminal carboxylate groups in micelles of two N-acyl amino-acid amphiphiles, sodium N-lauroylsarcosinate (SLS) and sodium N-lauroylglycinate (SLG), simple peptide bond model amphiphiles. Interfacial molarities (in moles per liter of interfacial volume) of these three groups were obtained from product yields, assuming that selectivity toward a particular nucleophile compared to water is the same in an aqueous reference solution and in the interfacial region. Interfacial carboxylate group molarities are ~1.5 M in both SLS and SLG micelles, but the concentration of the amide carbonyl for SLS micelles is ~4.6-5 times less (ca. 0.7 M) than that of SLG micelles (~3 M). The proton on the secondary N of SLG helps solubilize the amide bond in the aqueous region, but the methyl on the tertiary N of SLS helps solubilize the amide bond in the micellar core, reducing its reaction with 16-ArN(2)(+). Application of chemical trapping to proteins in membrane mimetic interfaces should provide insight into the topology of the protein within the interface because trapping of the amide carbonyl and cleavage at the C-N bond occurs only within the interface, and fragment characterization marks those peptide bonds located within the interface.

  8. Analysis of interfacial structure and bond strength of self-etch adhesive systems

    PubMed Central

    Pinzon, Lilliam M; Watanabe, Larry G; Reis, Andre F; Powers, John M; Marshall, Sally J; Marshall, Grayson W

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine the bond strength, nanoleakage and interfacial morphology of four self-etch adhesives bonded to superficial dentin. Methods Micro-tensile (MT, n=15) and single plane shear (SP, n=8) bond tests were performed using human dentin polished through 320-grit SiC paper. Clearfil Protect Bond (PB), Clearfil S3 Bond (S3), Prompt L-Pop (PLP) and G-BOND (GB) were used according to manufacturers’ instructions. Composite was applied as cylinders with a thickness of 4 mm with a 1-mm diameter and stored in water at 37° C for 24 hours. Specimens were debonded with a testing machine at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min. Means and standard deviations of bond strength were calculated. Data were analyzed using ANOVA. Fisher’s PLSD intervals were calculated at the 0.05 level of significance. Failure modes were determined at 100X. The hybrid layer was revealed by treatment with 5N HCl/5% NaOCl or fractured perpendicular to the interface and sputter coated with gold. Specimens were viewed at 1000X, 2500X, and 5000X in a field emission SEM at 15 kV. Teeth (n=2) sectioned into 0.9-mm thick slabs were immersed in ammoniacal silver nitrate solution for 24 hours, rinsed and immersed in photo-developing solution for 8h. Specimens were sectioned (90-nm thick) and observed under TEM. Results Means ranged from 25.0 to 73.1 MPa for MT and from 15.5 to 56.4 MPa for SP. MT values were greater than SP, but were highly correlated (R2 = 0.99, p= 0.003) and provided the same order for the systems studied. Fisher’s PLSD intervals (p<0.05) for bond strength techniques and adhesives results were 1.7 and 2.3 MPa, respectively. Failures sites were mixed. TEM showed that hybrid layers were ~0.5 µm for PB, GB and S3 and ~5 µm for PLP. SEM showed morphologic differences among adhesives. Silver nitrate deposits were observed within interfaces for all adhesive systems. Clinical significance Simplification of application procedures appears to induce loss of adhesion capabilities. In this

  9. Toughness governs the rupture of the interfacial H-bond assemblies at a critical length scale in hybrid materials.

    PubMed

    Sakhavand, Navid; Muthuramalingam, Prakash; Shahsavari, Rouzbeh

    2013-06-25

    The geometry and material property mismatch across the interface of hybrid materials with dissimilar building blocks make it extremely difficult to fully understand the lateral chemical bonding processes and design nanocomposites with optimal performance. Here, we report a combined first-principles study, molecular dynamics modeling, and theoretical derivations to unravel the detailed mechanisms of H-bonding, deformation, load transfer, and failure at the interface of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and silicates, as an example of hybrid materials with geometry and property mismatch across the interface. We identify contributing H-bonds that are key to adhesion and demonstrate a specific periodic pattern of interfacial H-bond network dictated by the interface mismatch and intramolecular H-bonding. We find that the maximum toughness, incorporating both intra- and interlayer strain energy contributions, govern the existence of optimum overlap length and thus the rupture of interfacial (interlayer) H-bond assemblies in natural and synthetic hybrid materials. This universally valid result is in contrast to the previous reports that correlate shear strength with rupture of H-bonds assemblies at a finite overlap length. Overall, this work establishes a unified understanding to explain the interplay between geometric constraints, interfacial H-bonding, materials characteristics, and optimal mechanical properties in hybrid organic-inorganic materials.

  10. Effect of ZnO on the interfacial bonding between Na 2O-B 2O 3-SiO 2 vitrified bond and diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P. F.; Li, Zh. H.; Li, J.; Zhu, Y. M.

    2009-08-01

    Diamond composites were prepared by sintering diamond grains with low melting Na 2O-B 2O 3-SiO 2 vitrified bonds in air. The influence of ZnO on the wettability and flowing ability of Na 2O-B 2O 3-SiO 2 vitrified bonds was characterized by wetting angle, the interfacial bonding states between diamond grains and the vitrified bonds were observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM), and the micro-scale bonding mechanism in the interfaces was investigated by means of energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The experimental results showed that ZnO facilitated the dissociation of boron/silicon-oxygen polyhedra and the formation of larger amount of non-bridging oxygen in the glass network, which resulted in the increase of the vitrified bonds' wettability and the formation of -C dbnd O, -O-H and -C-H bonds on the surface of diamond grains. B and Si diffused from the vitrified bonds to the interface, and C-C, C-O, C dbnd O and C-B bond formed on the surface of sintered diamond grains during sintering process, by which the interfacial bonding between diamond grains and the vitrified bonds was strengthened.

  11. Use of self-assembled monolayers to control interface bonding in a model study of interfacial fracture

    SciTech Connect

    KENT,MICHAEL S.; YIM,HYUN; MATHESON,AARON J.; COGDILL,C.; REEDY JR.,EARL DAVID

    2000-03-02

    The relationship between the nature and spatial distribution of fundamental interfacial interactions and fracture stress/fracture toughness of a glassy adhesive-inorganic solid joint is not understood. This relationship is important from the standpoint of designing interfacial chemistry sufficient to provide the level of mechanical strength required for a particular application. In addition, it is also important for understanding the effects of surface contamination. Different types of contamination, or different levels of contamination, likely impact joint strength in different ways. Furthermore, the relationship is also important from the standpoint of aging. If interfacial chemical bonds scission over time due to the presence of a contaminant such as water, or exposure to UV, etc, the relationship between joint strength/fracture toughness and interface strength is important for predicting reliability with time. A fundamental understanding of the relationship between joint strength and fundamental interfacial interactions will give insight into these issues.

  12. Potential Impact of Interfacial Bonding Efficiency on High-Burnup Spent Nuclear Fuel Vibration Integrity during Normal Transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Hao; Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to investigate the impacts of interfacial bonding efficiency at pellet pellet and pellet clad interfaces on spent nuclear fuel (SNF) vibration integrity. The FEA simulation results were also validated and benchmarked with reverse bending fatigue test results on surrogate rods consisting of stainless steel (SS) tubes with alumina-pellet inserts. Bending moments (M) are applied to the FEA models to evaluate the system responses of the surrogate rods. From the induced curvature, , the flexural rigidity EI can be estimated as EI=M/ . The impacts of interfacial bonding efficiency on SNF vibration integrity include the moment carrying capacity distribution between pellets and clad and the impact of cohesion on the flexural rigidity of the surrogate rod system. The result also indicates that the immediate consequences of interfacial de-bonding are a load carrying capacity shift from the fuel pellets to the clad and a reduction of the composite rod flexural rigidity. Therefore, the flexural rigidity of the surrogate rod and the bending moment bearing capacity between the clad and fuel pellets are strongly dependent on the efficiency of interfacial bonding at the pellet pellet and pellet clad interfaces. The above-noted phenomenon was calibrated and validated by reverse bending fatigue testing using a surrogate rod system.

  13. Interfacial bonding and electronic structure of GaN/GaAs interface: A first-principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Ruyue; Zhang, Zhaofu; Wang, Changhong; Li, Haobo; Dong, Hong; Liu, Hui; Wang, Weichao; Xie, Xinjian

    2015-04-07

    Understanding of GaN interfacing with GaAs is crucial for GaN to be an effective interfacial layer between high-k oxides and III-V materials with the application in high-mobility metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) devices. Utilizing first principles calculations, here, we investigate the structural and electronic properties of the GaN/GaAs interface with respect to the interfacial nitrogen contents. The decrease of interfacial N contents leads to more Ga dangling bonds and As-As dimers. At the N-rich limit, the interface with N concentration of 87.5% shows the most stability. Furthermore, a strong band offsets dependence on the interfacial N concentration is also observed. The valance band offset of N7 with hybrid functional calculation is 0.51 eV. The electronic structure analysis shows that significant interface states exist in all the GaN/GaAs models with various N contents, which originate from the interfacial dangling bonds and some unsaturated Ga and N atoms. These large amounts of gap states result in Fermi level pinning and essentially degrade the device performance.

  14. Diffusion Bonding of TA15 and Ti2AlNb Alloys: Interfacial Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ping; Ji, Xiaohu; Xue, Kemin

    2017-03-01

    TA15 and Ti2AlNb alloys were joined by diffusion welding. The influence of holding time on morphology and mechanical properties of the joint was studied under two conditions of different bonding pressure and temperature. The interface structure was analyzed by BSE and EDS. The mechanical properties of joints were tested. The results show that the typical interfacial microstructure consists of lath α-phase (TA15 alloy)/flake α phase + α-interfacial phase + α2 phase/B2-rich phase/Ti2AlNb alloy. When bonding at 920 °C and 15 MPa with increasing holding time, the interface microstructure evolves into flake α phase and distributes as a basket-weave and the interfacial coarse spherical α phase distributes as a line. α2 phase and O phase disappear gradually while the content of the B2 phase increases. The tensile strength of the joints is 870, 892 and 903 MPa, for 120, 150 and 210 min holding time, respectively, while the elongation rises as well. When bonding at 940 °C and 10 MPa with increasing holding time, the interfacial area includes more Widmanstatten structure and B2 phase. The tensile strength of joints decreases from 921 to 908 MPa, while the elongation increases from 12 to 15.5%, for holding 120 and 210 min, respectively. The tendency of plastic fracture also increases with holding time for both temperature-pressure combinations.

  15. Surface modification of bioceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monkawa, Akira

    Hydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, HAp] is a major inorganic component of bone and teeth tissues and has the excellent biocompatibility and high osteoconductivity. The interactions between HAp and protein or cell have been studied. The HAp related bioceramics such as bone substitute, coating substance of metal implants, inorganic-polymer composites, and cell culture. We described two methods; (1) surface modification of HAp using organosilane; (2) fabrication of HAp ultra-thin layer on gold surface for protein adsorption analyzed with QCM-D technique. The interfacial interaction between collagen and HAp in a nano-region was controlled by depositing the organosilane of n-octadecyltrimethoxysilane (ODS: -CH3) or aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS: -NH2) with a chemical vapor deposition method. The morphologies of collagen adsorbed on the surfaces of HAp and HAp deposited with APTS were similar, however that of the surface with ODS was apparently different, due to the hydrophobic interaction between the organic head group of -CH3 and residual groups of collagen. We present a method for coating gold quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) sensor with ultra-thin layer of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals evenly covering and tightly bound to the surface. The hydroxyapatite sensor operated in liquid with high stability and sensitivity. The in-situ adsorption mechanism and conformational change of fibrinogen on gold, titanium and hydroxyapatite surfaces were investigated by QCM-D technique and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The study indicates that the hydroxyapatite sensor is applicable for qualitative and conformational analysis of protein adsorption.

  16. Use of a compact sandwich specimen to evaluate fracture toughness and interfacial bonding of bone.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Lankford, J; Agrawal, C M

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop a reliable and statistically valid test to measure the fracture toughness of small specimens of bone, and by extension, prosthetic materials, using a compact sandwich specimen. Samples of bone were sandwiched between holders of a different material and using this specimen configuration a new technique was developed to test the fracture toughness of the bone interlayer. The effects of different specimens sizes and holder materials were investigated empirically. Using finite element analysis a correction factor was determined to account for the finite thickness of the interlayer and the analytical solutions governing the test specimen were accordingly modified. Bulk compact tension specimens of bone were tested for comparison. Both wet and dry bone were evaluated and the fracture surface morphology characterized using scanning electron microscopy. The results indicate no statistically significant differences between the fracture toughness values obtained from the compact tension and sandwich specimens. The application of this technique to the testing of interfacial bonding between bone and biomaterials is discussed.

  17. Hydrogen bonds, interfacial stiffness moduli, and the interlaminar shear strength of carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, John H.

    2015-03-15

    The chemical treatment of carbon fibers used in carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites greatly affects the fraction of hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) formed at the fiber-matrix interface. The H-bonds are major contributors to the fiber-matrix interfacial shear strength and play a direct role in the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of the composite. The H-bond contributions τ to the ILSS and magnitudes K{sub N} of the fiber-matrix interfacial stiffness moduli of seven carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites, subjected to different fiber surface treatments, are calculated from the Morse potential for the interactions of hydroxyl and carboxyl acid groups formed on the carbon fiber surfaces with epoxy receptors. The τ calculations range from 7.7 MPa to 18.4 MPa in magnitude, depending on fiber treatment. The K{sub N} calculations fall in the range (2.01 – 4.67) ×10{sup 17} N m{sup −3}. The average ratio K{sub N}/|τ| is calculated to be (2.59 ± 0.043) × 10{sup 10} m{sup −1} for the seven composites, suggesting a nearly linear connection between ILSS and H-bonding at the fiber-matrix interfaces. The linear connection indicates that τ may be assessable nondestructively from measurements of K{sub N} via a technique such as angle beam ultrasonic spectroscopy.

  18. Bioceramic Resonance Effect on Meridian Channels: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Ting-Kai; Chan, Wing P.; Tai, Chen-Jei; Cho, Ting-Pin; Yang, Jen-Chang; Lee, Po-Tsung

    2015-01-01

    Bioceramic is a kind of material which emits nonionizing radiation and luminescence, induced by visible light. Bioceramic also facilitates the breakup of large clusters of water molecules by weakening hydrogen bonds. Hydrogen bond weakening, which allows water molecules to act in diverse ways under different conditions, is one of the key mechanisms underlying the effects of Bioceramic on biophysical and physical-chemical processes. Herein, we used sound to amplify the effect of Bioceramic and further developed an experimental device for use in humans. Thirteen patients who suffered from various chronic and acute illnesses that severely affected their sleep patterns and life quality were enrolled in a trial of Bioceramic resonance (i.e., rhythmic 100-dB sound waves with frequency set at 10 Hz) applied to the skin surface of the anterior chest. According to preliminary data, a “Propagated Sensation along Meridians” (PSM) was experienced in all Bioceramic resonance-treated patients but not in any of the nine control patients. The device was believed to enhance microcirculation through a series of biomolecular and physiological processes and to subject the specific meridian channels of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) to coherent vibration. This noninvasive technique may offer an alternative to needle acupuncture and other traditional medical practices with clinical benefits. PMID:26236383

  19. Bioceramic Resonance Effect on Meridian Channels: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Leung, Ting-Kai; Chan, Wing P; Tai, Chen-Jei; Cho, Ting-Pin; Yang, Jen-Chang; Lee, Po-Tsung

    2015-01-01

    Bioceramic is a kind of material which emits nonionizing radiation and luminescence, induced by visible light. Bioceramic also facilitates the breakup of large clusters of water molecules by weakening hydrogen bonds. Hydrogen bond weakening, which allows water molecules to act in diverse ways under different conditions, is one of the key mechanisms underlying the effects of Bioceramic on biophysical and physical-chemical processes. Herein, we used sound to amplify the effect of Bioceramic and further developed an experimental device for use in humans. Thirteen patients who suffered from various chronic and acute illnesses that severely affected their sleep patterns and life quality were enrolled in a trial of Bioceramic resonance (i.e., rhythmic 100-dB sound waves with frequency set at 10 Hz) applied to the skin surface of the anterior chest. According to preliminary data, a "Propagated Sensation along Meridians" (PSM) was experienced in all Bioceramic resonance-treated patients but not in any of the nine control patients. The device was believed to enhance microcirculation through a series of biomolecular and physiological processes and to subject the specific meridian channels of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) to coherent vibration. This noninvasive technique may offer an alternative to needle acupuncture and other traditional medical practices with clinical benefits.

  20. An evaluation of the interfacial bond properties between carbon phenolic and glass phenolic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Kelvin; Clinton, Raymond; Jeelani, Shaik

    1989-01-01

    The effects of moisture and surface finish on the mechanical and physical properties of the interfacial bond between the carbon/phenolic (C/P) and glass/phenolic (G/P) composite materials are presented. Four flat panel laminates were fabricated using the C/P and G/P materials. Of the four laminates, one panel was fabricated in which the C/P and G/P materials were cured simultaneously. It was identified as the cocure. The remaining laminates were processed with an initial simultaneous cure of the three C/P billets. Two surface finishes, one on each half, were applied to the top surface. Prior to the application and cure of the G/P material to the machined surface of the three C/P panels, each was subjected to the specific environmental conditioning. Types of conditioning included: (1) nominal fabrication environment, (2) a prescribed drying cycle, and (3) a total immersion in water at 160 F. Physical property tests were performed on specimens removed from the C/P materials of each laminate for determination of the specific gravity, residual volatiles and and resin content. Comparisons of results with shuttle solid rocket motor (SRM) nozzle material specifications verified that the materials used in fabricating the laminates met acceptance criteria and were representative of SRM nozzle materials. Mechanical property tests were performed at room temperature on specimens removed from the G/P, the C/P and the interface between the two materials for each laminate. The double-notched shear strength test was used to determine the ultimate interlaminar shear strength. Results indicate no appreciable difference in the C/P material of the four laminates with the exception of the cocure laminate, where 20 percent reduction in the strength was observed. The most significant effect and the ultimate strength was significantly reduced in the wet material. No appreciable variation was noted between the surface finishes in the wet laminate.

  1. Compound pendant drop tensiometry for interfacial tension measurement at zero bond number.

    PubMed

    Neeson, Michael J; Chan, Derek Y C; Tabor, Rico F

    2014-12-30

    A widely used method to determine the interfacial tension between fluids is to quantify the pendant drop shape that is determined by gravity and interfacial tension forces. Failure of this method for small drops or small fluid density differences is a critical limitation in microfluidic applications and when only small fluid samples are available. By adding a small spherical particle to the interface to apply an axisymmetric deformation, both the particle density and the interfacial tension can be simultaneously and precisely determined, providing an accurate and elegant solution to a long-standing problem.

  2. Tensile properties and interfacial bonding of multi-layered, high-purity titanium strips fabricated by ARB process.

    PubMed

    Ghafari-Gousheh, Soroush; Nedjad, Syamak Hossein; Khalil-Allafi, Jafar

    2015-11-01

    Severe plastic deformation (SPD) processing has shown very effective in promotion of mechanical properties of metals and alloys. In this study, the results of investigating mechanical properties and also inter-layer bond performance of accumulative roll bonded high purity titanium (HP-Ti) strips are presented. High purity titanium plates were severely deformed by use of a combination of cold rolling (CR) to a thickness reduction of approximately 87% and then accumulative roll bonding (ARB) for three cycles (N=3) at ambient temperature. Optical and scanning electron microscopy, tensile testing, and hardness measurements were conducted. The ARB strips exhibited lower tensile strength and ductility in comparison to cold rolled one which can basically be attributed to the poor function of the latest bonds established in the centerlines of the strips. Fractographic examinations revealed the interfacial de-bonding along the centerline between the layers having undergone roll bonding for just one cycle. It was while the interfaces having experienced roll bonding for more cycles showed much higher resistance against delaminating.

  3. Bonding performance and interfacial characteristics of short fiber-reinforced resin composite in comparison with other composite restoratives.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) and surface free-energy (SFE) of short fiber-reinforced resin composite (SFRC), using different adhesive systems, in comparison with other composite restoratives. The resin composites used were everX Posterior (EP), Clearfil AP-X (CA), and Filtek Supreme Ultra Universal Restorative (FS). The adhesive systems used were Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SM), Clearfil SE Bond (CS), and G-Premio Bond (GB). Resin composite was bonded to dentin, and SBS was determined after 24 h of storage in distilled water and after 10,000 thermal cycles (TCs). The SFEs of the resin composites and the adhesives were determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids. The SFE values and SFE characteristics were not influenced by the type of resin composite, but were influenced by the type of adhesive system. The results of this study suggest that the bonding performance and interfacial characteristics of SFRC are the same as for other composite restoratives, but that these parameters are affected by the type of adhesive system. The bonding performance of SFRC was enhanced by thermal cycling in a manner similar to that for other composite restoratives.

  4. Interfacial chemical bonding state and band alignment of CaF{sub 2}/hydrogen-terminated diamond heterojunction

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J. W.; Liao, M. Y.; Cheng, S. H.; Imura, M.; Koide, Y.

    2013-03-28

    CaF{sub 2} films are deposited on hydrogen-terminated diamond (H-diamond) by a radio-frequency sputter-deposition technique at room temperature. Interfacial chemical bonding state and band alignment of CaF{sub 2}/H-diamond heterojunction are investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is confirmed that there are only C-Ca bonds at the CaF{sub 2}/H-diamond heterointerface. Valence and conductance band offsets of the CaF{sub 2}/H-diamond heterojunciton are determined to be 3.7 {+-} 0.2 and 0.3 {+-} 0.2 eV, respectively. It shows a type I straddling band configuration. The large valence band offset suggests advantage of the CaF{sub 2}/H-diamond heterojunciton for the development of high power and high frequency field effect transistors.

  5. Hydrothermal and mechanical stresses degrade fiber-matrix interfacial bond strength in dental fiber-reinforced composites.

    PubMed

    Bouillaguet, Serge; Schütt, Andrea; Alander, Pasi; Schwaller, Patrick; Buerki, Gerhard; Michler, Johann; Cattani-Lorente, Maria; Vallittu, Pekka K; Krejci, Ivo

    2006-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs) show great promise as long-term restorative materials in dentistry and medicine. Recent evidence indicates that these materials degrade in vivo, but the mechanisms are unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate mechanisms of deterioration of glass fiber-polymer matrix bond strengths in dental fiber-reinforced composites during hydrothermal and mechanical aging. Conventional three-point bending tests on dental FRCs were used to assess flexural strengths and moduli. Micro push-out tests were used to measure glass fiber-polymer matrix bond strengths, and nanoindentation tests were used to determine the modulus of elasticity of fiber and polymer matrix phases separately. Bar-shaped specimens of FRCs (EverStick, StickTech, and Vectris Pontic, Ivoclar-Vivadent) were either stored at room temperature, in water (37 and 100 degrees C) or subjected to ageing (10(6) cycles, load: 49 N), then tested by three-point bending. Thin slices were prepared for micro push-out and nanoindentation tests. The ultimate flexural strengths of both FRCs were significantly reduced after aging (p < 0.05). Both water storage and mechanical loading reduced the interfacial bond strengths of glass fibers to polymer matrices. Nanoindentation tests revealed a slight reduction in the elastic modulus of the EverStick and Vectris Pontic polymer matrix after water storage. Mechanical properties of FRC materials degrade primarily by a loss of interfacial bond strength between the glass and resin phases. This degradation is detectable by micro push-out and nanoindentation methods.

  6. Interfacial layers evolution during annealing in Ti-Al multi-laminated composite processed using hot press and roll bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assari, A. H.; Eghbali, B.

    2016-09-01

    Ti-Al multi-laminated composites have great potential in high strength and low weight structures. In the present study, tri-layer Ti-Al composite was synthesized by hot press bonding under 40 MPa at 570 °C for 1 h and subsequent hot roll bonding at about 450 °C. This process was conducted in two accumulative passes to 30% and to 67% thickness reduction in initial and final passes, respectively. Then, the final annealing treatments were done at 550, 600, 650, 700 and 750 °C for 2, 4 and 6 h. Investigations on microstructural evolution and thickening of interfacial layers were performed by scanning electron microscopes, energy dispersive spectrometer, X-ray diffraction and micro-hardness tests. The results showed that the thickening of diffusion layers corresponds to amount of deformation. In addition to thickening of the diffusion layers, the thickness of aluminum layers decreased and after annealing treatment at 750 °C for 6 h the aluminum layers were consumed entirely, which occurred because of the enhanced interdiffusion of Ti and Al elements. Scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer showed that the sequence of interfacial layers as Ti3Al-TiAl-TiAl2-TiAl3 which are believed to be the result of thermodynamic and kinetic of phase formation. Micro-hardness results presented the variation profile in accordance with the sequence of intermetallic phases and their different structures.

  7. SiC-Si interfacial thermal and mechanical properties of reaction bonded SiC/Si ceramic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chun-Yen; Deng, Fei; Karandikar, Prashant; Ni, Chaoying

    Reaction bonded SiC/Si (RBSC) ceramic composites are broadly utilized in military, semiconductor and aerospace industries. RBSC affords advanced specific stiffness, hardness and thermal. Interface is a key region that has to be considered when working with any composites. Both thermal and mechanical behaviors of the RBSC are highly dependent on the SiC-Si interface. The SiC-Si interface had been found to act as a thermal barrier in restricting heat transferring at room temperature and to govern the energy absorption ability of the RBSC. However, up to present, the role of the SiC-Si interface to transport heat at higher temperatures and the interfacial properties in the nanoscale have not been established. This study focuses on these critically important subjects to explore scientific phenomena and underlying mechanisms. The RBSC thermal conductivity with volume percentages of SiC at 80 and 90 vol% was measured up to 1,200 °C, and was found to decrease for both samples with increasing environmental temperature. The RBSC with 90 vol% SiC has a higher thermal conductivity than that of the 80 vol%; however, is still significantly lower than that of the SiC. The interfacial thermal barrier effect was found to decrease at higher temperatures close 1200 °C. A custom-made in-situ tensile testing device which can be accommodated inside a ZEISS Auriga 60 FIB/SEM has been setup successfully. The SiC-Si interfacial bonding strength was measured at 98 MPa. The observation and analysis of crack propagation along the SiC-Si interface was achieved with in-situ TEM.

  8. Surface Functionalization of Metal Nanoparticles by Conjugated Metal-Ligand Interfacial Bonds: Impacts on Intraparticle Charge Transfer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Peiguang; Chen, Limei; Kang, Xiongwu; Chen, Shaowei

    2016-10-03

    Noble metal nanoparticles represent a unique class of functional nanomaterials with physical and chemical properties that deviate markedly from those of their atomic and bulk forms. In order to stabilize the nanoparticles and further manipulate the materials properties, surface functionalization with organic molecules has been utilized as a powerful tool. Among those, mercapto derivatives have been used extensively as the ligands of choice for nanoparticle surface functionalization by taking advantage of the strong affinity of thiol moieties to transition metal surfaces forming (polar) metal-thiolate linkages. Yet, the nanoparticle material properties are generally discussed within the context of the two structural components, the metal cores and the organic capping layers, whereas the impacts of the metal-sulfur interfacial bonds are largely ignored because of the lack of interesting chemistry. In recent years, it has been found that metal nanoparticles may also be functionalized by stable metal-carbon (or even -nitrogen) covalent bonds. Because of the formation of dπ-pπ interactions between the transition-metal nanoparticles and terminal carbon moieties, the interfacial resistance at the metal-ligand interface is markedly reduced, leading to the emergence of unprecedented optical and electronic properties. In this Account, we summarize recent progress in the studies of metal nanoparticles functionalized by conjugated metal-ligand interfacial bonds that include metal-carbene (M═C) and metal-acetylide (M-C≡)/metal-vinylidene (M═C═C) bonds. Such interfacial bonds are readily formed by ligand self-assembly onto nanoparticle metal cores. The resulting nanoparticles exhibit apparent intraparticle charge delocalization between the particle-bound functional moieties, leading to the emergence of optical and electronic properties that are analogous to those of their dimeric counterparts, as manifested in spectroscopic and electrochemical measurements. This is

  9. Ultrasonic characterization of the fiber-matrix interfacial bond in aerospace composites.

    PubMed

    Aggelis, D G; Kleitsa, D; Matikas, T E

    2013-01-01

    The properties of advanced composites rely on the quality of the fiber-matrix bonding. Service-induced damage results in deterioration of bonding quality, seriously compromising the load-bearing capacity of the structure. While traditional methods to assess bonding are destructive, herein a nondestructive methodology based on shear wave reflection is numerically investigated. Reflection relies on the bonding quality and results in discernable changes in the received waveform. The key element is the "interphase" model material with varying stiffness. The study is an example of how computational methods enhance the understanding of delicate features concerning the nondestructive evaluation of materials used in advanced structures.

  10. Ultrasonic Characterization of the Fiber-Matrix Interfacial Bond in Aerospace Composites

    PubMed Central

    Aggelis, D. G.; Kleitsa, D.; Matikas, T. E.

    2013-01-01

    The properties of advanced composites rely on the quality of the fiber-matrix bonding. Service-induced damage results in deterioration of bonding quality, seriously compromising the load-bearing capacity of the structure. While traditional methods to assess bonding are destructive, herein a nondestructive methodology based on shear wave reflection is numerically investigated. Reflection relies on the bonding quality and results in discernable changes in the received waveform. The key element is the “interphase” model material with varying stiffness. The study is an example of how computational methods enhance the understanding of delicate features concerning the nondestructive evaluation of materials used in advanced structures. PMID:23935408

  11. A Study of Influencing Factors on the Tensile Response of a Titanium Matrix Composite With Weak Interfacial Bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2000-01-01

    The generalized method of cells micromechanics model is utilized to analyze the tensile stress-strain response of a representative titanium matrix composite with weak interfacial bonding. The fiber/matrix interface is modeled through application of a displacement discontinuity between the fiber and matrix once a critical debonding stress has been exceeded. Unidirectional composites with loading parallel and perpendicular to the fibers are examined, as well as a cross-ply laminate. For each of the laminates studied, analytically obtained results are compared to experimental data. The application of residual stresses through a cool-down process was found to have a significant effect on the tensile response. For the unidirectional laminate with loading applied perpendicular to the fibers, fiber packing and fiber shape were shown to have a significant effect on the predicted tensile response. Furthermore, the interface was characterized through the use of semi-emperical parameters including an interfacial compliance and a "debond stress;" defined as the stress level across the interface which activates fiber/matrix debonding. The results in this paper demonstrate that if architectural factors are correctly accounted for and the interface is appropriately characterized, the macro-level composite behavior can be correctly predicted without modifying any of the fiber or matrix constituent properties.

  12. Supramolecular Construction of Multifluorescent Gels: Interfacial Assembly of Discrete Fluorescent Gels through Multiple Hydrogen Bonding.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiaofan; Shi, Bingbing; Wang, Hu; Xia, Danyu; Jie, Kecheng; Wu, Zi Liang; Huang, Feihe

    2015-12-22

    Multifluorescent supramolecular gels with complex structures are constructed from discrete fluorescent gels, which serve as the building blocks, through hydrogen bonding interactions at interfaces. The multifluorescent gel can realize rapid healing within only ≈100 s.

  13. Macroporous bioceramics: a remarkable material for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lew, Kien-Seng; Othman, Radzali; Ishikawa, Kunio; Yeoh, Fei-Yee

    2012-09-01

    This review summarises the major developments of macroporous bioceramics used mainly for repairing bone defects. Porous bioceramics have been receiving attention ever since their larger surface area was reported to be beneficial for the formation of more rigid bonds with host tissues. The study of porous bioceramics is important to overcome the less favourable bonds formed between dense bioceramics and host tissues, especially in healing bone defects. Macroporous bioceramics, which have been studied extensively, include hydroxyapatite, tricalcium phosphate, alumina, and zirconia. The pore size and interconnections both have significant effects on the growth rate of bone tissues. The optimum pore size of hydroxyapatite scaffolds for bone growth was found to be 300 µm. The existence of interconnections between pores is critical during the initial stage of tissue ingrowth on porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds. Furthermore, pore formation on β-tricalcium phosphate scaffolds also allowed the impregnation of growth factors and cells to improve bone tissues growth significantly. The formation of vascularised tissues was observed on macroporous alumina but did not take place in the case of dense alumina due to its bioinert nature. A macroporous alumina coating on scaffolds was able to improve the overall mechanical properties, and it enabled the impregnation of bioactive materials that could increase the bone growth rate. Despite the bioinertness of zirconia, porous zirconia was useful in designing scaffolds with superior mechanical properties after being coated with bioactive materials. The pores in zirconia were believed to improve the bone growth on the coated system. In summary, although the formation of pores in bioceramics may adversely affect mechanical properties, the advantages provided by the pores are crucial in repairing bone defects.

  14. Durable ultrathin silicon nitride/carbon bilayer overcoats for magnetic heads: The role of enhanced interfacial bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Yeo, Reuben J.; Dwivedi, Neeraj; Bhatia, Charanjit S.; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Zheng; Tripathy, S.; Lim, Christina Y. H.

    2015-01-28

    Pole tip recession (PTR) is one of the major issues faced in magnetic tape storage technology, which causes an increase in the magnetic spacing and hence signal loss during data readback. Despite efforts to reduce the magnetic spacing, PTR, and surface wear on the heads by using protective overcoats, most of them either employ complex fabrication processes and approaches do not provide adequate protection to the head or are too thick (∼10–20 nm), especially for future high density tape storage. In this work, we discuss an approach to reduce the PTR and surface wear at the head by developing an ultrathin ∼7 nm bilayer overcoat of silicon/silicon nitride (Si/SiN{sub x}) and carbon (C), which is totally fabricated by a cost-effective and industrial-friendly magnetron sputtering process. When compared with a monolithic C overcoat of similar thickness, the electrically insulating Si/SiN{sub x}/C bilayer overcoat was found to provide better wear protection for commercial tape heads, as demonstrated by Auger electron spectroscopic analyses after wear tests with commercial tape media. Although the microstructures of carbon in the monolithic and bilayer overcoats were similar, the improved wear durability of the bilayer overcoat was attributed to the creation of extensive interfacial bonding of Si and N with the C overcoat and the alumina-titanium carbide composite head substrate, as predicted by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and confirmed by in-depth X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses. This study highlights the pivotal role of enhanced interfaces and interfacial bonding in developing ultrathin yet wear-durable overcoats for tape heads.

  15. Effectively Exerting the Reinforcement of Dopamine Reduced Graphene Oxide on Epoxy-Based Composites via Strengthened Interfacial Bonding.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenbin; Shang, Tinghua; Yang, Wengang; Yang, Huichuan; Lin, Song; Jia, Xiaolong; Cai, Qing; Yang, Xiaoping

    2016-05-25

    The effects of dopamine reduced graphene oxide (pDop-rGO) on the curing activity and mechanical properties of epoxy-based composites were evaluated. Taking advantage of self-polymerization of mussel-inspired dopamine, pDop-rGO was prepared through simultaneous functionalization and reduction of graphene oxide (GO) via polydopamine coating. Benefiting from the universal binding ability of polydopamine, good dispersion of pDop-rGO in epoxy matrix was able to be achieved as the content of pDop-rGO being below 0.2 wt %. Curing kinetics of epoxy composites with pDop-rGO were systematically studied by nonisothermal differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Compared to the systems of neat epoxy or epoxy composites containing GO, epoxy composites loaded with pDop-rGO showed lower activation energy (Eα) over the range of cure (α). It revealed that the amino-bearing pDop-rGO was able to react with epoxy matrix and enhance the curing reactions as an amine-type curing agent. The nature of the interactions at GO-epoxy interface was further evaluated by Raman spectroscopy, confirming the occurrence of chemical bonding. The strengthened interfacial adhesion between pDop-rGO and epoxy matrix thus enhanced the effective stress transfer in the composites. Accordingly, the tensile and flexural properties of EP/pDop-rGO composites were enhanced due to both the well dispersion and strong interfacial bonding of pDop-rGO in epoxy matrix.

  16. Effect of interfacial chemical bonding and surface topography on adhesion in carbon fiber/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Drzal, L.T.; Sugiura, N.; Hook, D. |

    1994-12-31

    A series of PAN-based IM6 carbon fibers having varying amounts of surface treatment were, pretreated with compounds representing the constituents encountered in epoxy composites to pre-react any groups on the fiber surface before composite fabrication in order to determine the effect of chemical bonding on fiber-matrix adhesion. Chemical bonding was quantified using XPS. Chemical bonding between reactive groups in amine cured epoxy matrices and the surface groups present on IN46 carbon fibers as a result of commercial surface treatments has been detected although the absolute amount of chemical bonding is low (1-3%). It was found that reaction with monofunctional epoxy groups having hydrocarbon functionalities blocked the surface from further reaction and reduced the adhesion that could be attained to its lowest value. Prereaction with difunctional amines had little effect on adhesion when compared to normal composite fabrication procedures. Prereaction with difunctional epoxy groups did enhance adhesion levels over the level attained in normal composite fabrication methods. These results showed that chemical bonding between epoxy and the carbon fiber surface could increases the adhesion between fiber and matrix about 25% while between the amino group and the carbon fiber surface about 15%. Quantitative measurements of the fiber surface microtopography were made with scanning tunneling microscopy. An increase in roughness was detected with increasing surface treatment. It was concluded that surface roughness also accounted for a significant increase in fiber-matrix adhesion.

  17. On the role of interfacial hydrogen bonds in "on-water" catalysis.

    PubMed

    Karhan, Kristof; Khaliullin, Rustam Z; Kühne, Thomas D

    2014-12-14

    Numerous experiments have demonstrated that many classes of organic reactions exhibit increased reaction rates when performed in heterogeneous water emulsions. Despite enormous practical importance of the observed "on-water" catalytic effect and several mechanistic studies, its microscopic origins remains unclear. In this work, the second generation Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics method is extended to self-consistent charge density-functional based tight-binding in order to study "on-water" catalysis of the Diels-Alder reaction between dimethyl azodicarboxylate and quadricyclane. We find that the stabilization of the transition state by dangling hydrogen bonds exposed at the aqueous interfaces plays a significantly smaller role in "on-water" catalysis than has been suggested previously.

  18. On the role of interfacial hydrogen bonds in "on-water" catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karhan, Kristof; Khaliullin, Rustam Z.; Kühne, Thomas D.

    2014-12-01

    Numerous experiments have demonstrated that many classes of organic reactions exhibit increased reaction rates when performed in heterogeneous water emulsions. Despite enormous practical importance of the observed "on-water" catalytic effect and several mechanistic studies, its microscopic origins remains unclear. In this work, the second generation Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics method is extended to self-consistent charge density-functional based tight-binding in order to study "on-water" catalysis of the Diels-Alder reaction between dimethyl azodicarboxylate and quadricyclane. We find that the stabilization of the transition state by dangling hydrogen bonds exposed at the aqueous interfaces plays a significantly smaller role in "on-water" catalysis than has been suggested previously.

  19. Destabilization of Mg-H bonding through nano-interfacial confinement by unsaturated carbon for hydrogen desorption from MgH2.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yi; Sun, Chenghua; Cheng, Lina; Abdul Wahab, Md; Cui, Jie; Zou, Jin; Zhu, Min; Yao, Xiangdong

    2013-04-28

    We propose a new mechanism for destabilizing Mg-H bonding by means of a combination of the size effect and MgH2-carbon scaffold interfacial bonding, and experimentally realize low temperature hydrogen release starting from 50 °C using an MgH2@CMK-3 nanoconfinement system (37.5 wt% MgH2 loading amount). Based on computational calculations, it is found that the charge transfer from MgH2 to the carbon scaffold plays a critical role in the significant reduction of thermodynamics of MgH2 dehydrogenation. Our results suggest how to explore an alternative route for the enhancement of nano-interfacial confinement to destabilize the Mg-H hydrogen storage system.

  20. Influence of interfacial shear strength on the mechanical properties of SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of fiber/matrix interface microstructure and interfacial shear strength on the mechanical properties of a fiber-reinforced ceramic composite was evaluated. The composite consisted of approximately 30 vol percent uniaxially aligned 142 microns diameter SiC fibers (Textron SCS-6) in a reaction-bonded Si3N4 matrix (SiC/RBSN). The interface microstructure was varied by controlling the composite fabrication conditions and by heat treating the composite in an oxidizing environment. Interfacial shear strength was determined by the matrix crack spacing method. The results of microstructural examination indicate that the carbon-rich coating provided with the as-produced SiC fibers was stable in composites fabricated at 1200 C in a nitrogen or in a nitrogen plus 4 percent hydrogen mixture for 40 hr. However this coating degraded in composites fabricated at 1350 C in N2 + 4 percent H2 for 40 and 72 hr and also in composites heat treated in an oxidizing environment at 600 C for 100 hr after fabrication at 1200 C in a nitrogen. It was determined that degradation occurred by carbon removal which in turn had a strong influence on interfacial shear strength and other mechanical properties. Specifically, as the carbon coating was removed, the composite interfacial shear strength, primary elastic modulus, first matrix cracking stress, and ultimate tensile strength decreased, but the first matrix cracking strain remained nearly the same.

  1. Interfacial bonding enhancement of reel-to-reel selective electrodeposition of copper stabilizer on a multifilamentary second-generation high-temperature superconductor tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xinwei; Li, Wei; Bose, Anima; Selvamanickam, Venkat

    2016-10-01

    A reel-to-reel copper selective electrodeposition process over a multifilamentary second-generation high-temperature superconductor (2G-HTS) has been demonstrated in our previous work. If the interfacial bonding between the deposited copper layer and the underlying silver overlayer is weak, it might lead to delamination in applications including magnets, motors and generators. In this study, two approaches have been used to improve the copper-silver bonding without the degradation of superconductor performance. The first approach is acidifying the electrolyte by adding sulfuric acid, by which the kinetics of copper electrodeposition is enhanced, resulting in finer microstructure at the copper-silver interface and thus, improved interfacial bonding strength. The second approach consists of blocking the electrolyte outflow at the entrance of the reel-to-reel electroplating cell, by which the occurrence of large copper seeds on the tape caused by the heavy turbulence flow is effectively prevented. With these two improvements together deployed in the process, the peeling strength between the copper and silver layers of the 2G-HTS tape has been improved from <0.3 N to >2 N in 90° peeling and from <0.5 N to >3.0 N in 180° peeling, without any degradation on the superconducting performance.

  2. Nanostructured bioceramics for maxillofacial applications.

    PubMed

    Adamopoulos, Othon; Papadopoulos, Triantafillos

    2007-08-01

    Biomaterials science and technology have been expanding tremendously the recent years. The results of this evolution are obvious in maxillofacial applications especially with the contemporary development of Nanotechnology. Among biomaterials, bioceramics possess a specific field due to various interactions with the biological tissues. The combination of bioceramics and nanotechnology has resulted in enhanced skeletal interactions in maxillofacial applications. Nanotechnology secures better mechanical properties and more effective biological interactions with jaws. The main production methods for the synthesis of nanostructured materials include plasma arcing, chemical vapour deposition, sol-gel and precipitation. The bioceramics in Dentistry comprise inert, bioactive, resorbable and composite systems. The purpose of the present article is to describe the available nanotechnology methods and how these could be addressed to synthesise maxillofacial bioceramics with advanced properties for better biological applications. Additionally, it describes specific clinical applications in maxillofacial surgery of these biomaterials--either by themselves or in combination with others--that can be promising candidates for bone tissue engineering. Such applications include replacement of lost teeth, filling of jaws defects or reconstruction of mandible and temporomandibular joint.

  3. Surface characterization of silicate bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Cerruti, Marta

    2012-03-28

    The success of an implanted prosthetic material is determined by the early events occurring at the interface between the material and the body. These events depend on many surface properties, with the main ones including the surface's composition, porosity, roughness, topography, charge, functional groups and exposed area. This review will portray how our understanding of the surface reactivity of silicate bioceramics has emerged and evolved in the past four decades, owing to the adoption of many complementary surface characterization tools. The review is organized in sections dedicated to a specific surface property, each describing how the property influences the body's response to the material, and the tools that have been adopted to analyse it. The final section introduces the techniques that have yet to be applied extensively to silicate bioceramics, and the information that they could provide.

  4. Biocompatibility of a functionally graded bioceramic coating made by wide-band laser cladding.

    PubMed

    Weidong, Zhu; Qibin, Liu; Min, Zheng; Xudong, Wang

    2008-11-01

    The application of plasma spray is the most popular method by which a metal-bioceramic surface composite can be prepared for the repair of biological hard-tissue, but this method has disadvantages. These disadvantages include poor coating-to-substrate adhesion, low mechanical strength, and brittleness of the coating. In the investigation described in this article, a gradient bioceramic coating was prepared on a Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy surface using a gradient composite design and wide-band laser cladding techniques. Using a trilayer-structure composed of a substratum, an alloy and bioceramics, the coating was chemically and metallurgically bonded with the substratum. The coating, which contains beta-tricalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite, showed favorable biocompatibility with the bone tissue and promoted in vivo osteogenesis.

  5. Microstructure and osteoblast response of gradient bioceramic coating on titanium alloy fabricated by laser cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Min; Fan, Ding; Li, Xiu-Kun; Li, Wen-Fei; Liu, Qi-Bin; Zhang, Jian-Bin

    2008-11-01

    To construct a bioactive interface between metal implant and the surrounding bone tissue, the gradient calcium phosphate bioceramic coating on titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) was designed and fabricated by laser cladding. The results demonstrated that the gradient bioceramic coating was metallurgically bonded to the titanium alloy substrate. The appearance of hydroxyapatite and β-tricalcium phosphate indicated that the bioactive phases were synthesized on the surface of coating. The microhardness gradually decreased from the coating to substrate, which could help stress relaxation between coating and bone tissue. Furthermore, the methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay of cell proliferation revealed that the laser-cladded bioceramic coating had more favorable osteoblast response compared with the surface of untreated titanium alloy substrate.

  6. Enhancing Interfacial Bonding between Anisotropically Oriented Grains Using a Glue-Nanofiller for Advanced Li-Ion Battery Cathode.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyejung; Lee, Sanghan; Cho, Hyeon; Kim, Junhyeok; Lee, Jieun; Park, Suhyeon; Joo, Se Hun; Kim, Su Hwan; Cho, Yoon-Gyo; Song, Hyun-Kon; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Cho, Jaephil

    2016-06-01

    Formation of a glue-nanofiller layer between grains, consisting of a middle-temperature spinel-like Lix CoO2 phase, reinforces the strength of the incoherent interfacial binding between anisotropically oriented grains by enhancing the face-to-face adhesion strength. The cathode treated with the glue-layer exhibits steady cycling performance at both room-temperature and 60 °C. These results represent a step forward in advanced lithium-ion batteries via simple cathode coating.

  7. A review of protein adsorption on bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kefeng; Zhou, Changchun; Hong, Youliang; Zhang, Xingdong

    2012-06-06

    Bioceramics, because of its excellent biocompatible and mechanical properties, has always been considered as the most promising materials for hard tissue repair. It is well know that an appropriate cellular response to bioceramics surfaces is essential for tissue regeneration and integration. As the in vivo implants, the implanted bioceramics are immediately coated with proteins from blood and body fluids, and it is through this coated layer that cells sense and respond to foreign implants. Hence, the adsorption of proteins is critical within the sequence of biological activities. However, the biological mechanisms of the interactions of bioceramics and proteins are still not well understood. In this review, we will recapitulate the recent studies on the bioceramic-protein interactions.

  8. Surface modification of biphasic calcium phosphate bioceramic powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, W. Z.; Zhou, D. L.; Yin, G. F.; Li, G. D.

    2008-11-01

    Biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP)/poly L-lactide (PLLA) biocomposite is proven to be a promising bone graft material or scaffold for bone tissue engineering. To improve the interfacial compatibility of BCP bioceramic with biopolymer-PLLA, BCP powders were surface-modified in different condition to graft polymer groups onto the surface of the BCP powders. L-lactide and L-lactic acid (LA) oligomer were used to modify the BCP surface with stannous octanoate (Sn(Oct) 2) and stannous chloride (SnCl 2) as catalyst, respectively. Results show that the surface modification effect is obvious and the amount of grafted organic group is above 6.5 wt.%. Sn(Oct) 2 and SnCl 2 are the optimal catalysts for the surface grafting reaction of L-lactide and L-LA oligomer, respectively. The surface grafting slightly increase the particle size of BCP powders and reduce the tendency for their agglomeration.

  9. Amino-Functionalized Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Lead to Successful Ring-Opening Polymerization of Poly(ε-caprolactone): Enhanced Interfacial Bonding and Optimized Mechanical Properties.

    PubMed

    Roumeli, Eleftheria; Papageorgiou, Dimitrios G; Tsanaktsis, Vasilios; Terzopoulou, Zoe; Chrissafis, Konstantinos; Avgeropoulos, Apostolos; Bikiaris, Dimitrios N

    2015-06-03

    In this work, the synthesis, structural characteristics, interfacial bonding, and mechanical properties of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) nanocomposites with small amounts (0.5, 1.0, and 2.5 wt %) of amino-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs) prepared by ring-opening polymerization (ROP) are reported. This method allows the creation of a covalent-bonding zone on the surface of nanotubes, which leads to efficient debundling and therefore satisfactory dispersion and effective load transfer in the nanocomposites. The high covalent grafting extent combined with the higher crystallinity provide the basis for a significant enhancement of the mechanical properties, which was detected in the composites with up to 1 wt % f-MWCNTs. Increasing filler concentration encourages intrinsic aggregation forces, which allow only minor grafting efficiency and poorer dispersion and hence inferior mechanical performance. f-MWCNTs also cause a significant improvement on the polymerization reaction of PCL. Indeed, the in situ polymerization kinetics studies reveal a significant decrease in the reaction temperature, by a factor of 30-40 °C, combined with accelerated the reaction kinetics during initiation and propagation and a drastically reduced effective activation energy.

  10. A review of protein adsorption on bioceramics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kefeng; Zhou, Changchun; Hong, Youliang; Zhang, Xingdong

    2012-01-01

    Bioceramics, because of its excellent biocompatible and mechanical properties, has always been considered as the most promising materials for hard tissue repair. It is well know that an appropriate cellular response to bioceramics surfaces is essential for tissue regeneration and integration. As the in vivo implants, the implanted bioceramics are immediately coated with proteins from blood and body fluids, and it is through this coated layer that cells sense and respond to foreign implants. Hence, the adsorption of proteins is critical within the sequence of biological activities. However, the biological mechanisms of the interactions of bioceramics and proteins are still not well understood. In this review, we will recapitulate the recent studies on the bioceramic–protein interactions. PMID:23741605

  11. Supramolecular assembly of interfacial nanoporous networks with simultaneous expression of metal-organic and organic-bonding motifs.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, Saranyan; Ecija, David; Auwärter, Willi; Joshi, Sushobhan; Seufert, Knud; Drach, Mateusz; Nieckarz, Damian; Szabelski, Paweł; Aurisicchio, Claudia; Bonifazi, Davide; Barth, Johannes V

    2013-10-11

    The formation of 2D surface-confined supramolecular porous networks is scientifically and technologically appealing, notably for hosting guest species and confinement phenomena. In this study, we report a scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) study of the self-assembly of a tripod molecule specifically equipped with pyridyl functional groups to steer a simultaneous expression of lateral pyridyl-pyridyl interactions and Cu-pyridyl coordination bonds. The assembly protocols yield a new class of porous open assemblies, the formation of which is driven by multiple interactions. The tripod forms a purely porous organic network on Ag(111), phase α, in which the presence of the pyridyl groups is crucial for porosity, as confirmed by molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. Additional deposition of Cu dramatically alters this scenario. For submonolayer coverage, three different porous phases coexist (i.e., β, γ, and δ). Phases β and γ are chiral and exhibit a simultaneous expression of lateral pyridyl-pyridyl interactions and twofold Cu-pyridyl linkages, whereas phase δ is just stabilized by twofold Cu-pyridyl bonds. An increase in the lateral molecular coverage results in a rise in molecular pressure, which leads to the formation of a new porous phase (ε), only coexisting with phase α and stabilized by a simultaneous expression of lateral pyridyl-pyridyl interactions and threefold Cu-pyridyl bonds. Our results will open new avenues to create complex porous networks on surfaces by exploiting components specifically designed for molecular recognition through multiple interactions.

  12. Pseudopotential Calculations of Band Gaps and Band Edges of Short-Period (InAs)n/(GaSb)m Superlattices with Different Substrates, Layer Orientations and Interfacial Bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Piquini, P.; Zunger, A.; Magri, R.

    2008-01-01

    The band edges and band gaps of (InAs){sub n}/(GaSb){sub m} (n,m=1,20) superlattices have been theoretically studied through the plane-wave empirical pseudopotential method for different situations: (i) different substrates, GaSb and InAs; (ii) different point group symmetries, C{sub 2v} and D{sub 2d}; and (iii) different growth directions, (001) and (110). We find that (a) the band gaps for the (001) C{sub 2v} superlattices on a GaSb substrate exhibit a nonmonotonic behavior as a function of the GaSb barrier thickness when the number of (InAs){sub n} layers exceed n=5; (b) substrate effects: compared with the GaSb substrate, the different strain field generated by the InAs substrate leads to a larger variation of the band gaps for the (001) C{sub 2v} superlattices as a function of the InAs well thickness; (c) effect of the type of interfacial bonds: the In-Sb bonds at the interfaces of the (001) D{sub 2d} superlattices partially pin the band edge states, reducing the influence of the confinement effects on electrons and holes, and lowering the band gaps as compared to the (001) C{sub 2v} case. The valence band maximum of the (001) D{sub 2d} superlattices with Ga-As bonds at the interfaces are shifted down, increasing the band gaps as compared to the (001) C{sub 2v} case; (d) effect of layer orientation: the presence of In-Sb bonds at both interfaces of the (110) superlattices pin the band edge states and reduces the band gaps, as compared to the (001) C{sub 2v} case. An anticrossing between the electron and hole levels in the (110) superlattices, for thin GaSb and thick InAs layers, leads to an increase of the band gaps, as a function of the InAs thickness; (e) superlattices vs random alloys: the comparison between the band edges and band gaps of the superlattices on a GaSb substrate and those for random alloys, lattice matched to a GaSb substrate, as a function of the In composition, shows that the random alloys present almost always higher band gaps and give a

  13. Laser Cladding of Composite Bioceramic Coatings on Titanium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiang; Han, Jiege; Wang, Chunming; Huang, Anguo

    2016-02-01

    In this study, silicon nitride (Si3N4) and calcium phosphate tribasic (TCP) composite bioceramic coatings were fabricated on a Ti6Al4V (TC4) alloy using Nd:YAG pulsed laser, CO2 CW laser, and Semiconductor CW laser. The surface morphology, cross-sectional microstructure, mechanical properties, and biological behavior were carefully investigated. These investigations were conducted employing scanning electron microscope, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and other methodologies. The results showed that both Si3N4 and Si3N4/TCP composite coatings were able to form a compact bonding interface between the coating and the substrate by using appropriate laser parameters. The coating layers were dense, demonstrating a good surface appearance. The bioceramic coatings produced by laser cladding have good mechanical properties. Compared with that of the bulk material, microhardness of composite ceramic coatings on the surface significantly increased. In addition, good biological activity could be obtained by adding TCP into the composite coating.

  14. Effect of surface pretreatment on interfacial chemical bonding states of atomic layer deposited ZrO{sub 2} on AlGaN

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Gang; Arulkumaran, Subramaniam; Ng, Geok Ing; Li, Yang; Ang, Kian Siong; Wang, Hong; Liu, Zhi Hong

    2015-09-15

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of ZrO{sub 2} on native oxide covered (untreated) and buffered oxide etchant (BOE) treated AlGaN surface was analyzed by utilizing x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Evidenced by Ga–O and Al–O chemical bonds by XPS, parasitic oxidation during deposition is largely enhanced on BOE treated AlGaN surface. Due to the high reactivity of Al atoms, more prominent oxidation of Al atoms is observed, which leads to thicker interfacial layer formed on BOE treated surface. The results suggest that native oxide on AlGaN surface may serve as a protecting layer to inhibit the surface from further parasitic oxidation during ALD. The findings provide important process guidelines for the use of ALD ZrO{sub 2} and its pre-ALD surface treatments for high-k AlGaN/GaN metal–insulator–semiconductor high electron mobility transistors and other related device applications.

  15. The Effect of Hydrogen Bonding on the interfacial width of PS-b-PMMA Block Copolymer Microdomains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyuseong; Han, Sunghyun; Jang, Sangshin; Park, Jicheol; Kwak, Jongheon; Kim, Jin Kon

    2015-03-01

    Sharp interface between two blocks in block copolymer nano pattern is one of the important issues because of strong demand in industrial applications to nano-patterning. We utilized hydrogen bonding between N-(4-aminomethyl-benzyl)-4-hydroxymethyl-bezamide (BA) and urea (U) at the interface of polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) copolymer (PS-PMMA). For this purpose, we first synthesized PS by ATRP method, then the end group was converted to amino group. Next, it was reacted with BA, followed by reaction with 4-pentynoic acid, resulting in alkyne-terminated group (PS-U-BA-alkyne). Also, azide-terminated PMMA was prepared by anionic polymerization followed by end functionalization. Finally, by the azide-alkyne click reaction between PS-U-BA-alkyne and PMMA-azide, PS-U-BA-PMMA was synthesized. We investigated, via small angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy, phase behavior of PS-U-BA-PMMA. Corresponding author.

  16. Bioceramic Coatings for Orthopaedic Implants

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Allison A.

    2003-11-02

    During the past century, man-made materials and devices have been developed to the point at which they have been used successfully to replace and/or restore function to diseased or damaged tissues. In the field of orthopaedics, the use of metal implants has significantly improved the quality of life for countless individuals. Critical factors for implant success include proper design, material selection, and biocompatibility. While early research focused on the understanding biomechanical properties of the metal device, recent work has turned toward improving the biological properties of these devices. This has lead to the introduction of calcium phosphate (CaP) bioceramics as a bioactive interface between the bulk metal impart and the surrounding tissue. The first calcium phosphate coatings where produced via vapor phase routes but more recently, there has been the emergence of solution based and biomimetic methods. While each approach has its own intrinsic materials and biological properties, in general CaP coatings have the promise to improve implant biocompatibility and ultimately implant longevity.

  17. Interfacial Bond-Breaking Electron Transfer in Mixed Water–Ethylene Glycol Solutions: Reorganization Energy and Interplay between Different Solvent Modes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We explore solvent dynamics effects in interfacial bond breaking electron transfer in terms of a multimode approach and make an attempt to interpret challenging recent experimental results (the nonmonotonous behavior of the rate constant of electroreduction of S2O82– from mixed water–EG solutions when increasing the EG fraction; see Zagrebin, P.A. et al. J. Phys. Chem. B2010, 114, 311). The exact expansion of the solvent correlation function (calculated using experimental dielectric spectra) in a series predicts the splitting of solvent coordinate in three independent modes characterized by different relaxation times. This makes it possible to construct a 5D free-energy surface along three solvent coordinates and one intramolecular degree of freedom describing first electron transfer at the reduction of a peroxodisulphate anion. Classical molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the solvation of a peroxodisulphate anion (S2O82–) in oxidized and reduced states in pure water and ethylene glycol (EG) as well as mixed H2O–EG solutions. The solvent reorganization energy of the first electron-transfer step at the reduction of S2O82– was calculated for several compositions of the mixed solution. This quantity was found to be significantly asymmetric. (The reorganization energies of reduction and oxidation differ from each other.) The averaged reorganization energy slightly increases with increasing the EG content in solution. This finding clearly indicates that for the reaction under study the static solvent effect no longer competes with solvent dynamics. Brownian dynamics simulations were performed to calculate the electron-transfer rate constants as a function of the solvent composition. The results of the simulations explain the experimental data, at least qualitatively. PMID:23768162

  18. Bioceramics: from bone regeneration to cancer nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Vallet-Regí, María; Ruiz-Hernández, Eduardo

    2011-11-23

    Research on biomaterials has been growing in the last few years due to the clinical needs in organs and tissues replacement and regeneration. In addition, cancer nanomedicine has recently appeared as an effective means to combine nanotechnology developments towards a clinical application. Ceramic materials are suitable candidates to be used in the manufacturing of bone-like scaffolds. Bioceramic materials may also be designed to deliver biologically active substances aimed at repairing, maintaining, restoring or improving the function of organs and tissues in the organism. Several materials such as calcium phosphates, glasses and glass ceramics able to load and subsequently release in a controlled fashion drugs, hormones, growth factors, peptides or nucleic acids have been developed. In particular, to prevent post surgical infections bioceramics may be surface modified and loaded with certain antibiotics, thus preventing the formation of bacterial biofilms. Remarkably, mesoporous bioactive glasses have shown excellent characteristics as drug carrying bone regeneration materials. These bioceramics are not only osteoconductive and osteoproductive, but also osteoinductive, and have therefore been proposed as ideal components for the fabrication of scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. A recent promising development of bioceramic materials is related to the design of magnetic mediators against tumors. Magnetic composites are suitable thermoseeds for cancer treatment by hyperthermia. Moreover, magnetic nanomaterials offer a wide range of possibilities for diagnosis and therapy. These nanoparticles may be conjugated with therapeutic agents and heat the surrounding tissue under the action of alternating magnetic fields, enabling hyperthermia of cancer as an effective adjunct to chemotherapy regimens.

  19. Template synthesis of ordered macroporous hydroxyapatite bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Ji, Lijun; Jell, Gavin; Dong, Yixiang; Jones, Julian R; Stevens, Molly M

    2011-08-28

    Hydroxyapatite has found wide application in bone tissue engineering. Here we use a macroporous carbon template to generate highly ordered macroporous hydroxyapatite bioceramics composed of close-packed hollow spherical pores with interconnected channels. The template has advantages for the preparation of ordered materials.

  20. Sintering of calcium phosphate bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Champion, E

    2013-04-01

    Calcium phosphate ceramics have become of prime importance for biological applications in the field of bone tissue engineering. This paper reviews the sintering behaviour of these bioceramics. Conventional pressureless sintering of hydroxyapatite, Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, a reference compound, has been extensively studied. Its physico-chemistry is detailed. It can be seen as a competition between two thermally activated phenomena that proceed by solid-state diffusion of matter: densification and grain growth. Usually, the objective is to promote the first and prevent the second. Literature data are analysed from sintering maps (i.e. grain growth vs. densification). Sintering trajectories of hydroxyapatite produced by conventional pressureless sintering and non-conventional techniques, including two-step sintering, liquid phase sintering, hot pressing, hot isostatic pressing, ultrahigh pressure, microwave and spark plasma sintering, are presented. Whatever the sintering technique may be, grain growth occurs mainly during the last step of sintering, when the relative bulk density reaches 95% of the maximum value. Though often considered very advantageous, most assisted sintering techniques do not appear very superior to conventional pressureless sintering. Sintering of tricalcium phosphate or biphasic calcium phosphates is also discussed. The chemical composition of calcium phosphate influences the behaviour. Similarly, ionic substitutions in hydroxyapatite or in tricalcium phosphate create lattice defects that modify the sintering rate. Depending on their nature, they can either accelerate or slow down the sintering rate. The thermal stability of compounds at the sintering temperature must also be taken into account. Controlled atmospheres may be required to prevent thermal decomposition, and flash sintering techniques, which allow consolidation at low temperature, can be helpful.

  1. Bioceramic-Based Root Canal Sealers: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Che Ab Aziz, Zeti A.

    2016-01-01

    Bioceramic-based root canal sealers are considered to be an advantageous technology in endodontics. The aim of this review was to consider laboratory experiments and clinical studies of these sealers. An extensive search of the endodontic literature was made to identify publications related to bioceramic-based root canal sealers. The outcome of laboratory and clinical studies on the biological and physical properties of bioceramic-based sealers along with comparative studies with other sealers was assessed. Several studies were evaluated covering different properties of bioceramic-based sealers including physical properties, biocompatibility, sealing ability, adhesion, solubility, and antibacterial efficacy. Bioceramic-based sealers were found to be biocompatible and comparable to other commercial sealers. The clinical outcomes associated with the use of bioceramic-based root canal sealers are not established in the literature. PMID:27242904

  2. Bioceramic-Based Root Canal Sealers: A Review.

    PubMed

    Al-Haddad, Afaf; Che Ab Aziz, Zeti A

    2016-01-01

    Bioceramic-based root canal sealers are considered to be an advantageous technology in endodontics. The aim of this review was to consider laboratory experiments and clinical studies of these sealers. An extensive search of the endodontic literature was made to identify publications related to bioceramic-based root canal sealers. The outcome of laboratory and clinical studies on the biological and physical properties of bioceramic-based sealers along with comparative studies with other sealers was assessed. Several studies were evaluated covering different properties of bioceramic-based sealers including physical properties, biocompatibility, sealing ability, adhesion, solubility, and antibacterial efficacy. Bioceramic-based sealers were found to be biocompatible and comparable to other commercial sealers. The clinical outcomes associated with the use of bioceramic-based root canal sealers are not established in the literature.

  3. Atomic structure and bonding of the interfacial bilayer between Au nanoparticles and epitaxially regrown MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Guo-zhen; Majdi, Tahereh; Preston, John S.; Shao, Yang; Bugnet, Matthieu; Botton, Gianluigi A.

    2014-12-08

    A unique metal/oxide interfacial bilayer formed between Au nanoparticles and MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} substrates following thermal treatment is reported. Associated with the formation of the bilayer was the onset of an abnormal epitaxial growth of the substrate under the nanoparticle. According to the redistribution of atoms and the changes of their electronic structure probed across the interface by a transmission electron microscopy, we suggest two possible atomic models of the interfacial bilayer.

  4. Functionalization of the Polymeric Surface with Bioceramic Nanoparticles via a Novel, Nonthermal Dip Coating Method.

    PubMed

    Riau, Andri K; Mondal, Debasish; Setiawan, Melina; Palaniappan, Alagappan; Yam, Gary H F; Liedberg, Bo; Venkatraman, Subbu S; Mehta, Jodhbir S

    2016-12-28

    The only nonthermal method of depositing a bioceramic-based coating on polymeric substrates is by incubation in liquid, e.g., simulated body fluid to form an apatite-like layer. The drawbacks of this method include the long processing time, the production of low scratch resistant coating, and an end product that does not resemble the intended bioceramic composition. Techniques, such as plasma spraying and magnetron sputtering, involving high processing temperature are unsuitable for polymers, e.g., PMMA. Here, we introduce a nonthermal coating method to immobilize hydroxyapatite (HAp) and TiO2 nanoparticles on PMMA via a simple and fast dip coating method. Cavities that formed on the PMMA, induced by chloroform, appeared to trap the nanoparticles which accumulated to form layers of bioceramic coating only after 60 s. The resulting coating was hydrophilic and highly resistant to delamination. In the context of our research and to address the current clinical need, we demonstrate that the HAp-coated PMMA, which is intended to be used as a visual optic of a corneal prosthetic device, improves its bonding and biointegration with collagen, the main component of a corneal stroma. The HAp-coated PMMA resulted in better adhesion with the collagen than untreated PMMA in artificial tear fluid over 28 days. Human corneal stromal fibroblasts showed better attachment, viability, and proliferation rate on the HAp-coated PMMA than on untreated PMMA. This coating method is an innovative solution to immobilize various bioceramic nanoparticles on polymers and may be used in other biomedical implants.

  5. Bioceramics for osteogenesis, molecular and cellular advances.

    PubMed

    Demirkiran, Hande

    2012-01-01

    The remarkable need for bone tissue replacement in clinical situations, its limited availability and some major drawbacks of autologous (from the patient) and allogeneic (from a donor) bone grafts are driving researchers to search for alternative approaches for bone repair. In order to develop an appropriate bone substitute, one should understand bone structure and properties and its growth, which will guide researchers to select the optimal conditions for tissue culture and implantation. It's well accepted that bioceramics are excellent candidates as bone replacement with osteogenesis, osteoinduction and osteoconduction capacity. Therefore, the molecular and cellular interactions that take place at the surface of bioceramics and their relevance in osteogenesis excites many researchers to delve deeper into this line of research.

  6. Bioceramics and pharmaceuticals: A remarkable synergy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallet-Regí, María; Balas, Francisco; Colilla, Montserrat; Manzano, Miguel

    2007-09-01

    The research on controlled drug delivery systems using bioceramics as host matrices presents two distinct sides; one route aims at embedding pharmaceuticals in biomaterials designed for the reconstruction or regeneration of living tissues, in order to counteract inflammatory responses, infections, bone carcinomas and so forth, while the other route deals with the more traditional drug introduction systems, i.e. oral administration. The incorporation of pharmaceuticals to bioceramic matrices could be very interesting in clinical practice. It is rather common in these days for an orthopedic surgeon working in bone reconstruction to use bioceramics. An added value to the production of these ceramics would be the optional addition of pharmaceuticals such as antibiotics, anti-inflammatories, anti-carcinogens, etc. In this sense, if we take into account the infections statistics at hip joint prostheses, the incidence varies between 2 and 4%, reaching up to a 45% in bolts used as external fixation. One of the main problems in these situations is the access to the infected area of the bone, in order to deliver the adequate antibiotic. If the pharmaceutical could be included within the implant itself, the added value would be straightforward. And if the bioceramic is bioactive, and therefore precursor of new bone tissue, the capability to introduce peptides, proteins or growth factors at its pores could accelerate the bone regeneration processes. We are facing a fine example of multidisciplinary research, where the so-called transversal supply of knowledge from and between the domains of materials science, biology and medicine will empower the know-how and applications that shall, undoubtedly, give rise to new advances in science and technology.

  7. The use of bioceramics in endodontics - literature review

    PubMed Central

    JITARU, STEFAN; HODISAN, IOANA; TIMIS, LUCIA; LUCIAN, ANAMARIA; BUD, MARIUS

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim Bioceramics are ceramic compounds obtained both in situ and in vivo, by various chemical processes. Bioceramics exhibit excellent biocompatibility due to their similarity with biological materials, like hydroxyapatite. Bioceramics and multi-substituted hydroxyapatite or similar compounds have the ability to induce a regenerative response in the organism. The aim of this paper is to make a literature review on the main bioceramic materials currently used in endodontics and on their specific characteristics. Methods We conducted a search in the international databases (PubMed), to identify publications in the last 10 years, using the following key words: “bioceramics endodontics”, “bioceramic endodontic cement”, “bioceramic sealer” and “direct pulp capping bioceramic”. Results Commonly used endodontic sealers (e.g., containing zinc oxide, calcium hydroxide and a resin) have a long tradition in scientific research and clinical use in endodontics. For specific cases, like root resorptions, perforations, apexification, and retrograde fillings, new biocompatible materials were developed in order to improve the clinical outcome: ProRooT MTA (Dentsply Company, Germany); Biodentine (Septodont, France); Endosequence BC sealer (Brassler, SUA); Bioaggregate (IBC, Canada); Generex A (Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties, USA). Conclusion The studies are generally in favor of bioceramic materials even if there are not many products available on the market for endodontic use. As more products are launched and more research is performed regarding these materials, we will provide more reliable data on clinical outcome. PMID:27857514

  8. Bioactivity of calcium phosphate bioceramic coating fabricated by laser cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yizhi; Liu, Qibin; Xu, Peng; Li, Long; Jiang, Haibing; Bai, Yang

    2016-05-01

    There were always strong expectations for suitable biomaterials used for bone regeneration. In this study, to improve the biocompatiblity of titanium alloy, calcium phosphate bioceramic coating was obtained by laser cladding technology. The microstructure, phases, bioactivity, cell differentiation, morphology and resorption lacunae were investigated by optical microscope (OM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining and scanning electronic microscope (SEM), respectively. The results show that bioceramic coating consists of three layers, which are a substrate, an alloyed layer and a ceramic layer. Bioactive phases of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and hydroxyapatite (HA) were found in ceramic coating. Osteoclast precursors have excellent proliferation on the bioceramic surface. The bioceramics coating could be digested by osteoclasts, which led to the resorption lacunae formed on its surface. It revealed that the gradient bioceramic coating has an excellent bioactivity.

  9. Preparation of laponite bioceramics for potential bone tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuanshun; Wang, Shige; Li, Kai; Ju, Yaping; Li, Jipeng; Zhang, Yongxing; Li, Jinhua; Liu, Xuanyong; Shi, Xiangyang; Zhao, Qinghua

    2014-01-01

    We report a facile approach to preparing laponite (LAP) bioceramics via sintering LAP powder compacts for bone tissue engineering applications. The sintering behavior and mechanical properties of LAP compacts under different temperatures, heating rates, and soaking times were investigated. We show that LAP bioceramic with a smooth and porous surface can be formed at 800°C with a heating rate of 5°C/h for 6 h under air. The formed LAP bioceramic was systematically characterized via different methods. Our results reveal that the LAP bioceramic possesses an excellent surface hydrophilicity and serum absorption capacity, and good cytocompatibility and hemocompatibility as demonstrated by resazurin reduction assay of rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) and hemolytic assay of pig red blood cells, respectively. The potential bone tissue engineering applicability of LAP bioceramic was explored by studying the surface mineralization behavior via soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF), as well as the surface cellular response of rMSCs. Our results suggest that LAP bioceramic is able to induce hydroxyapatite deposition on its surface when soaked in SBF and rMSCs can proliferate well on the LAP bioceramic surface. Most strikingly, alkaline phosphatase activity together with alizarin red staining results reveal that the produced LAP bioceramic is able to induce osteoblast differentiation of rMSCs in growth medium without any inducing factors. Finally, in vivo animal implantation, acute systemic toxicity test and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-staining data demonstrate that the prepared LAP bioceramic displays an excellent biosafety and is able to heal the bone defect. Findings from this study suggest that the developed LAP bioceramic holds a great promise for treating bone defects in bone tissue engineering.

  10. Wave-induced flow in meridians demonstrated using photoluminescent bioceramic material on acupuncture points.

    PubMed

    Chen, C Will; Tai, Chen-Jei; Choy, Cheuk-Sing; Hsu, Chau-Yun; Lin, Shoei-Loong; Chan, Wing P; Chiang, Han-Sun; Chen, Chang-An; Leung, Ting-Kai

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms of acupuncture remain poorly understood, but it is generally assumed that measuring the electrical conductivity at various meridians provides data representing various meridian energies. In the past, noninvasive methods have been used to stimulate the acupuncture points at meridians, such as heat, electricity, magnets, and lasers. Photoluminescent bioceramic (PLB) material has been proven to weaken hydrogen bonds and alter the characteristics of liquid water. In this study, we applied the noninvasive PLB technique to acupuncture point irradiation, attempting to detect its effects by using electrical conductivity measurements. We reviewed relevant literature, searching for information on meridians including their wave-induced flow characteristics.

  11. Smart scaffolds: the future of bioceramic.

    PubMed

    Daculsi, Guy

    2015-04-01

    The commercial offer for bioceramic bone substitutes is very large, however, the prerequisites for applications in bone reconstruction and tissue engineering, are most often absent. The main criteria being: on the one hand physico-chemical features providing surgeons with an injectable and/or shapeable biomaterial; on the second hand the multi-scale bioactivity leading to osteoconduction and osteoinduction properties. In order to obtain greater suitability according to the nature of the bone defect to be treated, new bone regeneration technologies, "smart scaffolds" must be developed and optimize to support suitable Ortho Biology.

  12. Study the bonding mechanism of binders on hydroxyapatite surface and mechanical properties for 3DP fabrication bone scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qinghua; Wang, Yanen; Li, Xinpei; Yang, Mingming; Chai, Weihong; Wang, Kai; zhang, Yingfeng

    2016-04-01

    In 3DP fabricating artificial bone scaffolds process, the interaction mechanism between binder and bioceramics power determines the microstructure and macro mechanical properties of Hydroxyapatite (HA) bone scaffold. In this study, we applied Molecular Dynamics (MD) methods to investigating the bonding mechanism and essence of binders on the HA crystallographic planes for 3DP fabrication bone scaffolds. The cohesive energy densities of binders and the binding energies, PCFs g(r), mechanical properties of binder/HA interaction models were analyzed through the MD simulation. Additionally, we prepared the HA bone scaffold specimens with different glues by 3DP additive manufacturing, and tested their mechanical properties by the electronic universal testing machine. The simulation results revealed that the relationship of the binding energies between binders and HA surface is consistent with the cohesive energy densities of binders, which is PAM/HA>PVA/HA>PVP/HA. The PCFs g(r) indicated that their interfacial interactions mainly attribute to the ionic bonds and hydrogen bonds which formed between the polar atoms, functional groups in binder polymer and the Ca, -OH in HA. The results of mechanical experiments verified the relationship of Young׳s modulus for three interaction models in simulation, which is PVA/HA>PAM/HA>PVP/HA. But the trend of compressive strength is PAM/HA>PVA/HA>PVP/HA, this is consistent with the binding energies of simulation. Therefore, the Young׳s modulus of bone scaffolds are limited by the Young׳s modulus of binders, and the compressive strength is mainly decided by the viscosity of binder. Finally, the major reasons for differences in mechanical properties between simulation and experiment were found, the space among HA pellets and the incomplete infiltration of glue were the main reasons influencing the mechanical properties of 3DP fabrication HA bone scaffolds. These results provide useful information in choosing binder for 3DP fabrication

  13. Influence of bonded-phase coverage in reversed-phase liquid chromatography via molecular simulation I. Effects on chain conformation and interfacial properties.

    PubMed

    Rafferty, Jake L; Siepmann, J Ilja; Schure, Mark R

    2008-09-12

    Particle-based Monte Carlo simulations were employed to examine the effects of bonding density on molecular structure in reversed-phase liquid chromatography. Octadecylsilane stationary phases with five different bonding densities (1.6, 2.3, 2.9, 3.5, and 4.2 micromol/m(2)) in contact with a water/methanol (50/50 mol%) mobile phase were simulated at a temperature of 323 K. The simulations indicate that the alkyl chains become more aligned and form a more uniform alkyl layer as coverage is increased. However, this does not imply that the chains are highly ordered (e.g., all-trans conformation or uniform tilt angle), but rather exhibit a broad distribution of conformations and tilt angles at all bonding densities. At lower densities, significant amounts of the silica surface are exposed leading to an enhanced wetting of the stationary phase. At high densities, the solvent is nearly excluded from the bonded phase and persists only near the residual silanols. An enrichment in the methanol concentration and a disruption in the mobile phase's hydrogen bond network are observed at the interface as bonding density is increased.

  14. Polymer: bioceramic composites optimization by tetracycline addition.

    PubMed

    Pataro, André L; Oliveira, Michele F; Teixeira, Karina I R; Turchetti-Maia, Regina M M; Lopes, Miriam T P; Wykrota, Francisco H L; Sinisterra, Rubén D; Cortés, Maria E

    2007-05-04

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the biocompatibility of composites of poly-lactic acid polymer (PLA) and copolymer of lactic and glycolic acid (PLGA), dispersed in a bioceramic matrix, Osteosynt (BC), to which tetracycline (TC) was added. The in vitro test used direct contact test (ASTM F-813) and elution test (USP-XXIII, ISO 10993-5), and in vivo evaluation was performed after subcutaneous implantation in outbread Swiss mice. The 0.01% (w/w) TC addition did not affect composite cytotoxicity in vitro. The macroscopic and histologic evaluation in vivo after 1, 7, 13, 21, 28 and 56 days showed an initial intense infiltrate of inflammatory cells for most of the groups. The tissue showed normal pattern after 21 days for all the groups. TC addition exhibited significantly larger reduction of inflammation signs (Mann-Whitney test, p<0.05) in the critical period of the resolution of the inflammatory process. Angiogenesis, cellular adsorption and fibrous deposit were observed on SEM evaluation. In conclusion, TC addition optimized composites polymer/bioceramic biocompatibility, contributing to anti-inflammatory response during the early phases of the wound healing process.

  15. Promising trends of bioceramics in the biomaterials field.

    PubMed

    Arcos, D; Izquierdo-Barba, I; Vallet-Regí, M

    2009-02-01

    Biomedical scientific community is currently demanding new advances in the designing of 3rd generation bioceramics, which promote bone tissue regeneration. In the last years, the development of supramolecular chemistry and the application of organic-inorganic hybrid materials in the biomedical field have resulted in a new generation of advanced bioceramics, which exhibit fascinating properties for regenerative purposes together with the possibility of being used as carriers of biologically active molecules. This communication overviews the evolution occurred from the first silica based bioceramics to the last advances in the synthesis of bioceramics for bone tissue regeneration. A critical review concerning the first bioactive glasses as well as the newest hybrid bioactive materials and templated mesoporous bioactive systems, will be performed from the point of view of their potential applications as replacement materials in bone repair and regeneration.

  16. Calcium orthophosphates as bioceramics: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Dorozhkin, Sergey V

    2010-11-30

    In the late 1960s, much interest was raised in regard to biomedical applications of various ceramic materials. A little bit later, such materials were named bioceramics. This review is limited to bioceramics prepared from calcium orthophosphates only, which belong to the categories of bioactive and bioresorbable compounds. There have been a number of important advances in this field during the past 30-40 years. Namely, by structural and compositional control, it became possible to choose whether calcium orthophosphate bioceramics were biologically stable once incorporated within the skeletal structure or whether they were resorbed over time. At the turn of the millennium, a new concept of calcium orthophosphate bioceramics-which is able to promote regeneration of bones-was developed. Presently, calcium orthophosphate bioceramics are available in the form of particulates, blocks, cements, coatings, customized designs for specific applications and as injectable composites in a polymer carrier. Current biomedical applications include artificial replacements for hips, knees, teeth, tendons and ligaments, as well as repair for periodontal disease, maxillofacial reconstruction, augmentation and stabilization of the jawbone, spinal fusion and bone fillers after tumor surgery. Exploratory studies demonstrate potential applications of calcium orthophosphate bioceramics as scaffolds, drug delivery systems, as well as carriers of growth factors, bioactive peptides and/or various types of cells for tissue engineering purposes.

  17. Effects of the application techniques of self-adhesive resin cements on the interfacial integrity and bond strength of fiber posts to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Pedreira, Ana Paula Ribeiro do Vale; D'Alpino, Paulo Henrique Perlatti; Pereira, Patrícia Nóbrega Rodrigues; Chaves, Sasha Braun; Wang, Linda; Hilgert, Leandro; Garcia, Fernanda Cristina Pimentel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the influence of an application technique of a glass-fiber post using self-adhesive resin cements on the push-out bond strength and the presence of bubbles in the root thirds. The cements were either applied according to the manufacturer's instruction or using a commercial delivering system (Centrix), at which the cement pastes were collected and applied after manipulation. Material and Methods: Self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX U200/3M ESPE-U200; Maxcem Elite/Kerr-MAX; Clearfil SA Cement/Kuraray-CSA) and a conventional cement (RelyX ARC/3M ESPE-ARC) were used to cement a post and applied either based on the manufacturer's instructions or using a Centrix syringe to deliver the cements directly onto the post of choice, or directly into canal. The roots were scanned with a micro-computed tomography (μCT) and then sectioned into nine 1-mm thick slices for a push-out bond strength test. The μCT images showed the percentage of bubbles in the root thirds (cervical, medium, and apical). Data were analyzed with three-way ANOVA/Tukey (α=0.05). Results: Triple interaction was not significant (p>0.05). The interaction “material” vs “root third” was not significant. A significant interaction was observed between “material” vs “application technique” (p<0.05). For ARC, U200, and MAX, significantly lower percentages of bubbles were observed when the Centrix syringe delivered the cements. Equivalent percentages of voids were observed for CSA, irrespective of the application technique (p>0.05). Significantly higher bond strength was observed when the self-adhesive resin cements were applied using the Centrix delivery system, in comparison with the manufacturer's instructions (p<0.05). Bond strength varied with the root third: cervical>medium>apical (p<0.05). No correlations were found between the bond strength and voids. Conclusions: Bond strength and voids are negatively influenced by the conventional application technique for

  18. Impact of post-deposition annealing on interfacial chemical bonding states between AlGaN and ZrO{sub 2} grown by atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Gang; Arulkumaran, Subramaniam; Ng, Geok Ing; Li, Yang; Ang, Kian Siong; Wang, Hong; Liu, Zhi Hong

    2015-03-02

    The effect of post-deposition annealing on chemical bonding states at interface between Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}N and ZrO{sub 2} grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) is studied by angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. It has been found that both of Al-O/Al 2p and Ga-O/Ga 3d area ratio decrease at annealing temperatures lower than 500 °C, which could be attributed to “clean up” effect of ALD-ZrO{sub 2} on AlGaN. Compared to Ga spectra, a much larger decrease in Al-O/Al 2p ratio at a smaller take-off angle θ is observed, which indicates higher effectiveness of the passivation of Al-O bond than Ga-O bond through “clean up” effect near the interface. However, degradation of ZrO{sub 2}/AlGaN interface quality due to re-oxidation at higher annealing temperature (>500 °C) is also found. The XPS spectra clearly reveal that Al atoms at ZrO{sub 2}/AlGaN interface are easier to get oxidized as compared with Ga atoms.

  19. Use of self assembled monolayers at variable coverage to control interface bonding in a model study of interfacial fracture: Pure shear loading

    SciTech Connect

    KENT,MICHAEL S.; YIM,HYUN; MATHESON,AARON J.; COGDILL,C.; NELSON,GERALD C.; REEDY JR.,EARL DAVID

    2000-05-16

    The relationships between fundamental interfacial interactions, energy dissipation mechanisms, and fracture stress or fracture toughness in a glassy thermoset/inorganic solid joint are not well understood. This subject is addressed with a model system involving an epoxy adhesive on a polished silicon wafer containing its native oxide. The proportions of physical and chemical interactions at the interface, and the in-plane distribution, are varied using self-assembling monolayers of octadecyltrichlorosilane (ODTS). The epoxy interacts strongly with the bare silicon oxide surface, but forms only a very weak interface with the methylated tails of the ODTS monolayer. The fracture stress is examined as a function of ODTS coverage in the napkin-ring (pure shear) loading geometry. The relationship between fracture stress and ODTS coverage is catastrophic, with a large change in fracture stress occurring over a narrow range of ODTS coverage. This transition in fracture stress does not correspond to a wetting transition of the epoxy. Rather, the transition in fracture stress corresponds to the onset of deformation in the epoxy, or the transition from brittle to ductile fracture. The authors postulate that the transition in fracture stress occurs when the local stress that the interface can support becomes comparable to the yield stress of the epoxy. The fracture results are independent of whether the ODTS deposition occurs by island growth (T{sub dep} = 10 C) or by homogeneous growth (T{sub dep} = 24 C).

  20. Broken bioceramic used in a computer-assisted reconstruction of the frontal skull bone.

    PubMed

    Petridis, Athanasios K; Barth, Harald; Doukas, Alexandros; Mehdorn, H Maximilian

    2009-08-01

    We report a complication occurring after the use of a bioceramic material for a three-dimensional reconstructive cranioplasty. A patient who had a satisfactory aesthetic result after frontal skull bone reconstruction with bioceramic injured his head after falling out of bed. The bioceramic material fragmented and the three fragments migrated over each other to form a lump. The bioceramic material had to be surgically removed. Care must be taken when using the fragile bioceramic material for reconstructive purposes, especially when patients are at risk of frequent falls.

  1. Calcium Orthophosphates as Bioceramics: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Dorozhkin, Sergey V.

    2010-01-01

    In the late 1960s, much interest was raised in regard to biomedical applications of various ceramic materials. A little bit later, such materials were named bioceramics. This review is limited to bioceramics prepared from calcium orthophosphates only, which belong to the categories of bioactive and bioresorbable compounds. There have been a number of important advances in this field during the past 30–40 years. Namely, by structural and compositional control, it became possible to choose whether calcium orthophosphate bioceramics were biologically stable once incorporated within the skeletal structure or whether they were resorbed over time. At the turn of the millennium, a new concept of calcium orthophosphate bioceramics—which is able to promote regeneration of bones—was developed. Presently, calcium orthophosphate bioceramics are available in the form of particulates, blocks, cements, coatings, customized designs for specific applications and as injectable composites in a polymer carrier. Current biomedical applications include artificial replacements for hips, knees, teeth, tendons and ligaments, as well as repair for periodontal disease, maxillofacial reconstruction, augmentation and stabilization of the jawbone, spinal fusion and bone fillers after tumor surgery. Exploratory studies demonstrate potential applications of calcium orthophosphate bioceramics as scaffolds, drug delivery systems, as well as carriers of growth factors, bioactive peptides and/or various types of cells for tissue engineering purposes. PMID:24955932

  2. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Nano-Bioceramics for Bone Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kankilic, Berna; Köse, Sevil; Korkusuz, Petek; Timuçin, Muharrem; Korkusuz, Feza

    Orthopedic disorders and trauma usually result in bone loss. Bone grafts are widely used to replace this tissue. Bone grafts excluding autografts unfortunately have disadvantages like evoking immune response, contamination and rejection. Autografts are of limited sources and optimum biomaterials that can replace bone have been searched for several decades. Bioceramics, which have the similar inorganic structure of natural bone, are widely used to regenerate bone or coat metallic implants. As people continuously look for a higher life quality, there are developments in technology almost everyday to meet their expectations. Nanotechnology is one of such technologies and it attracts everyone's attention in biomaterial science. Nano scale biomaterials have many advantages like larger surface area and higher biocompatibility and these properties make them more preferable than micro scale. Also, stem cells are used for bone regeneration besides nano-bioceramics due to their differentiation characteristics. This review covers current research on nano-bioceramics and mesenchymal stem cells and their role in bone regeneration.

  3. Fabrication of porous bioceramics with porosity gradients similar to the bimodal structure of cortical and cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Y H; Turner, I G; Miles, A W

    2007-12-01

    The aim of this study was to fabricate porous implant materials with graded pore structures similar to the bimodal structure of cortical and cancellous bone. Porous hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate (HA/TCP) bioceramics with interconnected porosity and controlled pore sizes required to simulate natural bone tissue morphology were fabricated by a novel technique of vacuum impregnation of reticulated polymeric foams with ceramic slip. Functionally gradient materials (FGMs) with porosity gradients were made by joining different pore per inch (ppi) foams together by either stitching or pressfitting to form templates. Post production, no defects could be seen at the interface between the two different porosity sections. The macropore sizes of the HA/TCP bioceramics were larger than 100 mum which is appropriate for bone ingrowth. A sample with a graded porous structure which is close to the human bone morphology was also developed. The two component structures were conspicuously different but joined together firmly. Four point bend testing of FGM samples showed them to have similar mechanical properties to homogeneous ceramics based on foam templates with uniform pore sizes, with no evidence of interfacial weakness. Many potential biomedical applications could be developed utilising graded porous structures. The ease of processing will make it possible to fabricate a range of complex shapes for different applications.

  4. Materials processing and in-vivo animal studies of nitrided hydroxyapatite bioceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, Nancy Elizabeth

    2000-10-01

    Calcium phosphate bioceramics are currently being used in medicine and dentistry, for reconstruction or repair of diseased or injured bone, but with limited success. Incorporating nitrogen into phosphate glasses has resulted in improved properties, and it is proposed that similar benefits may be gained from nitriding calcium phosphate bioceramics for bone implants as well. This work focuses on processing of hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate bioceramics nitrided by using solid, liquid, gas and ion sources. These materials were characterized by chemical, structural, mechanical, and biological methods to determine both the material structure and their suitability as implant materials. Calcium nitride and NaPON glass were unsatisfactory sources of nitrogen for hydroxyapatite (HA) and/or tricalcium phosphate (TCP) ceramics. Calcium nitride, Ca3N2, is reacts with water vapor in the air, releasing ammonia, and leaving behind crystals of calcium oxide, CaO. The calcium oxide byproduct decreases the chemical stability of hydroxyapatite and HA/TCP composites in simulated body fluid. Sodium phosphorus oxynitride (NaPON) glass, in the form of a liquid sintering aid for HA, produces an inhomogeneous, composite as well. Hydroxyapatite heated at 800C in an ammonia atmosphere produces a homogeneous material with up to 2 wt% N. Infrared spectroscopy indicates cyanamide ions, CN22-, are formed by the incorporated nitrogen and impurity carbon. The use of 15N-doped ammonia results in an 15N NMR peak at 83.2 ppm, indicating P--N bonding. Raman spectroscopy may also indicate P--N bonding, but it is inconclusive. In a limited study, nitrogen may decrease the hardness and fracture toughness of the phosphate ceramic, hydroxyapatite, contrary to results expected for nitrogen in phosphate glasses. Nitrogen ions are incorporated in hydroxyapatite by ion implantation, with lower energies producing higher nitrogen contents. The highest concentration achieved was 3.55 wt% N, as determined

  5. Investigation of fabrication and environmental effects on bioceramic bone scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivanco Morales, Juan Francisco

    2011-12-01

    Bioactive ceramic materials like tricalcium phosphates (TCP) have been emerging as viable material alternatives to the current therapies of bone scaffolding to target fracture healing and osteoporosis. Once scaffolds are implanted at the defect site they should provide mechanical and biological functions, ultimately serving to facilitate with surrounding native tissue. Optimal osteogenic signal expression and subsequent differentiation of cells seeded on the scaffold in both in vivo and in vitro conditions is known to be influenced by scaffold properties and biomechanical environmental conditions. Thus, the objective of this research was to investigate the effect of fabrication and environmental variables on the properties of bioceramic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications. Specifically, the effect of sintering temperature in the range of 950°C -1150°C of a cost-effective on a large scale manufacturing process, on the physical and mechanical properties of bioceramic bone scaffolds, was investigated. In addition, the effect of a controlled environment was investigated by implementing a bioreactor and bone loading system to study the response of ex vivo trabecular bone to compressive load while perfused with culture medium. Collectively, this thesis demonstrates that: (1) the sintering temperature to fabricate bioceramic scaffolds can be tuned to structural properties, and (2) the use of a controlled mechanical and biochemical environment can enhance bone tissue development. These findings support the development of clinically successful bioceramic scaffolds that may stimulate bone regeneration and scaffold integration while providing structural integrity.

  6. Wear analysis and finishing of bioceramic implant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Denkena, Berend; Reichstein, Martin; van der Meer, Marijke; Ostermeier, Sven; Hurschler, Christof

    2008-01-01

    A primary cause for revision operations of joint replacements is the implant loosening, due to immune reactions resulting from the agglomeration of polyethylene wear debris. Motivated by the successful application of bioceramic materials in hip joint prostheses, a trend towards the development of hard implant materials has occurred. Nonetheless in the area of total knee arthroplasty (TKA), modern efforts have still utilized polyethylene as the tibial-inlay joint component. The use of bioceramic hard-hard-pairings for total knee arthroplasty has been prevented by the complex kinematics and geometries required. Ceramics cannot cope with non-uniform loads, which suggests the need for new designs appropriate to the material. Furthermore, biomechanical requirements should be considered. A rolling-gliding wear simulator, which reproduces the movements and stresses of the knee joint on specimens of simplified geometry, has therefore been developed. High-precision machining processes for free formed bioceramic surfaces, with suitable grinding and polishing tools which adjust to constantly changing contact conditions, are essential. The goal is to put automated finishing in one clamping with five simultaneous controlled axes into practice. The developed manufacturing technologies will allow the advantageous bioceramic materials to be applied and accepted for more complex joint replacements such as knee prostheses.

  7. Structure and dynamics of H2O vis-á-vis phenylalanine recognition at a DPPC lipid membrane via interfacial H-bond types: Insights from polarized FT-IRRAS and ADMP simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarangi, Nirod Kumar; Ramesh, Nivarthi; Patnaik, Archita

    2015-01-01

    Preferential and enantioselective interactions of l-/d-Phenylalanine (l-Phe and d-Phe) and butoxycarbonyl-protected l-/d-Phenylalanine (LPA and DPA) as guest with 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (l-DPPC) as host were tapped by using real time Fourier transform infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (FT-IRRAS). Polarization-modulated FT-IRRAS of DPPC monolayers above the phenylalanine modified subphases depicted fine structure/conformation differences under considerations of controlled 2D surface pressure. Selective molecular recognition of d-enantiomer over l-enantiomer driven by the DPPC head group via H-bonding and electrostatic interactions was evident spectroscopically. Accordingly, binding constants (K) of 145, 346, 28, and 56 M-1 for LPA, DPA, l-Phe, and d-Phe, respectively, were estimated. The real time FT-IRRAS water bands were strictly conformation sensitive. The effect of micro-solvation on the structure and stability of the 1:1 diastereomeric l-lipid⋯, LPA/DPA and l-lipid⋯, (l/d)-Phe adducts was investigated with the aid of Atom-centered Density Matrix Propagation (ADMP), a first principle quantum mechanical molecular dynamics approach. The phosphodiester fragment was the primary site of hydration where specific solvent interactions were simulated through single- and triple- "water-phosphate" interactions, as water cluster's "tetrahedral dice" to a "trimeric motif" transformation as a partial de-clusterization was evident. Under all the hydration patterns considered in both static and dynamic descriptions of density functional theory, l-lipid/d-amino acid enantiomer adducts continued to be stable structures while in dynamic systems, water rearranged without getting "squeezed-out" in the process of recognition. In spite of the challenging computational realm of this multiscale problem, the ADMP simulated molecular interactions complying with polarized vibrational spectroscopy unraveled a novel route to chiral recognition and

  8. Structure and dynamics of H{sub 2}O vis-á-vis phenylalanine recognition at a DPPC lipid membrane via interfacial H-bond types: Insights from polarized FT-IRRAS and ADMP simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Sarangi, Nirod Kumar; Ramesh, Nivarthi; Patnaik, Archita

    2015-01-14

    Preferential and enantioselective interactions of L-/D-Phenylalanine (L-Phe and D-Phe) and butoxycarbonyl-protected L-/D-Phenylalanine (LPA and DPA) as guest with 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (L-DPPC) as host were tapped by using real time Fourier transform infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (FT-IRRAS). Polarization-modulated FT-IRRAS of DPPC monolayers above the phenylalanine modified subphases depicted fine structure/conformation differences under considerations of controlled 2D surface pressure. Selective molecular recognition of D-enantiomer over L-enantiomer driven by the DPPC head group via H-bonding and electrostatic interactions was evident spectroscopically. Accordingly, binding constants (K) of 145, 346, 28, and 56 M{sup −1} for LPA, DPA, L-Phe, and D-Phe, respectively, were estimated. The real time FT-IRRAS water bands were strictly conformation sensitive. The effect of micro-solvation on the structure and stability of the 1:1 diastereomeric L-lipid⋯, LPA/DPA and L-lipid⋯, (L/D)-Phe adducts was investigated with the aid of Atom-centered Density Matrix Propagation (ADMP), a first principle quantum mechanical molecular dynamics approach. The phosphodiester fragment was the primary site of hydration where specific solvent interactions were simulated through single- and triple- “water-phosphate” interactions, as water cluster’s “tetrahedral dice” to a “trimeric motif” transformation as a partial de-clusterization was evident. Under all the hydration patterns considered in both static and dynamic descriptions of density functional theory, L-lipid/D-amino acid enantiomer adducts continued to be stable structures while in dynamic systems, water rearranged without getting “squeezed-out” in the process of recognition. In spite of the challenging computational realm of this multiscale problem, the ADMP simulated molecular interactions complying with polarized vibrational spectroscopy unraveled a novel route to chiral

  9. Chemical bonding technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plueddemann, E.

    1986-01-01

    Primers employed in bonding together the various material interfaces in a photovoltaic module are being developed. The approach develops interfacial adhesion by generating actual chemical bonds between the various materials bonded together. The current status of the program is described along with the progress toward developing two general purpose primers for ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA), one for glass and metals, and another for plastic films.

  10. A comparative study of calcium phosphate formation on bioceramics in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xin, Renlong; Leng, Yang; Chen, Jiyong; Zhang, Qiyi

    2005-11-01

    Formation of calcium phosphate (Ca-P) on various bioceramic surfaces in simulated body fluid (SBF) and in rabbit muscle sites was investigated. The bioceramics were sintered porous solids, including bioglass, glass-ceramics, hydroxyapatite, alpha-tricalcium phosphate and beta-tricalcium phosphate. The ability of inducing Ca-P formation was compared among the bioceramics. The Ca-P crystal structures were identified using single-crystal diffraction patterns in transmission electron microscopy. The examination results show that ability of inducing Ca-P formation in SBF was similar among bioceramics, but considerably varied among bioceramics in vivo. Sintered beta-tricalcium phosphate exhibited a poor ability of inducing Ca-P formation both in vitro and in vivo. Octacalcium phosphate (OCP) formed on the surfaces of bioglass, A-W, hydroxyapatite and alpha-tricalcium phosphate in vitro and in vivo. Apatite formation in physiological environments cannot be confirmed as a common feature of bioceramics.

  11. Chemical functionalization of bioceramics to enhance endothelial cells adhesion for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Borcard, Françoise; Staedler, Davide; Comas, Horacio; Juillerat, Franziska Krauss; Sturzenegger, Philip N; Heuberger, Roman; Gonzenbach, Urs T; Juillerat-Jeanneret, Lucienne; Gerber-Lemaire, Sandrine

    2012-09-27

    To control the selective adhesion of human endothelial cells and human serum proteins to bioceramics of different compositions, a multifunctional ligand containing a cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) peptide, a tetraethylene glycol spacer, and a gallate moiety was designed, synthesized, and characterized. The binding of this ligand to alumina-based, hydroxyapatite-based, and calcium phosphate-based bioceramics was demonstrated. The conjugation of this ligand to the bioceramics induced a decrease in the nonselective and integrin-selective binding of human serum proteins, whereas the binding and adhesion of human endothelial cells was enhanced, dependent on the particular bioceramics.

  12. Bioceramic fabrics improve quiet standing posture and handstand stability in expert gymnasts.

    PubMed

    Cian, C; Gianocca, V; Barraud, P A; Guerraz, M; Bresciani, J P

    2015-10-01

    Bioceramic fabrics have been claimed to improve blood circulation, thermoregulation and muscle relaxation, thereby also improving muscular activity. Here we tested whether bioceramic fabrics have an effect on postural control and contribute to improve postural stability. In Experiment 1, we tested whether bioceramic fabrics contribute to reduce body-sway when maintaining standard standing posture. In Experiment 2, we measured the effect of bioceramic fabrics on body-sway when maintaining a more instable posture, namely a handstand hold. For both experiments, postural oscillations were measured using a force platform with four strain gauges that recorded the displacements of the center of pressure (CoP) in the horizontal plane. In half of the trials, the participants wore a full-body second skin suit containing a bioceramic layer. In the other half of the trials, they wore a 'placebo' second skin suit that had the same cut, appearance and elasticity as the bioceramic suit but did not contain the bioceramic layer. In both experiments, the surface of displacement of the CoP was significantly smaller when participants were wearing the bioceramic suit than when they were wearing the placebo suit. The results suggest that bioceramic fabrics do have an effect on postural control and improve postural stability.

  13. In Vitro and In Vivo Studies of the Biological Effects of Bioceramic (a Material of Emitting High Performance Far-Infrared Ray) Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Leung, Ting-Kai

    2015-06-30

    Bioceramic is a material that emits high performance far-infrared ray, and possess physical, chemical and biological characteristics on irradiation of water, particularly to in reducing the size of water clusters, weakening of the hydrogen bonds of water molecules and other effects on physical and chemical properties of water. In this review paper, we summarized the in vivo and in vitro biological effects of Biocermaic, and included previous published data on nitric oxide, calmodulin induction on cells, effects of bioceramic on intracellular heat shock protein and intracellular nitric oxide contents of melanoma cells, antioxidant effects of Bioceramic on cells and plants under H₂O₂-mediated oxidative stress, effects on anti-oxidative stress of myoblast cells and on preventing fatigue of amphibian skeletal muscle during exercise, anti-inflammatory and pain relief mechanism, effects on the chondrosarcoma cell line with prostaglandin E2 production, effects on the rabbit with inflammatory arthritis by injection of lipopolysaccharides under monitoring by positron emission tomography scan, effects on psychological stress-conditioned elevated heart rate, blood pressure and oxidative stress-suppressed cardiac contractility, and protective effects of non-ionized radiation against oxidative stress on human breast epithelial cell. We anticipate that the present work will benefit medical applications.

  14. Bioceramics composed of octacalcium phosphate demonstrate enhanced biological behavior.

    PubMed

    Komlev, Vladimir S; Barinov, Sergei M; Bozo, Ilya I; Deev, Roman V; Eremin, Ilya I; Fedotov, Alexander Yu; Gurin, Alex N; Khromova, Natalia V; Kopnin, Pavel B; Kuvshinova, Ekaterina A; Mamonov, Vasily E; Rybko, Vera A; Sergeeva, Natalia S; Teterina, Anastasia Yu; Zorin, Vadim L

    2014-10-08

    Bioceramics are used to treat bone defects but in general do not induce formation of new bone, which is essential for regeneration process. Many aspects related to bioceramics synthesis, properties and biological response that are still unknown and, there is a great need for further development. In the most recent research efforts were aimed on creation of materials from biological precursors of apatite formation in humans. One possible precursor is octacalcium phosphate (OCP), which is believed to not only exhibit osteoconductivity but possess osteoinductive quality, the ability to induce bone formation. Here we propose a relatively simple route for OCP ceramics preparation with a specifically designed microstructure. Comprehensive study for OCP ceramics including biodegradation, osteogenic properties in ortopic and heterotopic models and limited clinical trials were performed that demonstrated enhanced biological behavior. Our results provide a possible new concept for the clinical applications of OCP ceramics.

  15. Bioceramic Materials and the Changing Concepts in Vital Pulp Therapy.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yangpei; Bogen, George; Lim, Jung; Shon, Won-Jun; Kang, Mo K

    2016-05-01

    Vital pulp therapy (VPT) is devised to preserve and maintain vitality of pulpally involved teeth challenged by a variety of intraoral conditions. Notable progress has been made in this field due to a better understanding of pulp physiology, improved clinical protocols and advanced bioceramic materials paired with adhesive technology. With focused case selection, conservative VPT can provide reliable treatment options for permanent teeth diagnosed with normal pulps or reversible pulpitis.

  16. Bacterial adherence to SiO2-based multifunctional bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Kinnari, Teemu J; Esteban, Jaime; Gomez-Barrena, Enrique; Zamora, Nieves; Fernandez-Roblas, Ricardo; Nieto, Alejandra; Doadrio, Juan C; López-Noriega, Adolfo; Ruiz-Hernández, Eduardo; Arcos, Daniel; Vallet-Regí, María

    2009-04-01

    The bacterial adherence onto different multifunctional silica-based bioceramics has been evaluated. Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis were chosen, as they cause the majority of the implant-related infections in this field. Two SiO2 mesoporous materials (MCM-41, SBA-15), an ordered SiO2-CaO-P2O5 mesoporous glass (OMG), and a biphasic magnetic bioceramic (BMB), were incubated with S. aureus and S. epidermidis for 90 min, and subsequently sonicated to quantify the number of adhered bacteria on each material. It was found that S. aureus and S. epidermidis (10(8) CFU/mL) adhered significantly less to BMB samples when compared to MCM-41, SBA-15, or OMG. However, when the material pores accessible for bacteria in each material were taken into account, the lowest bacterial adherence was found in MCM-41, and the highest in SBA-15. The results show that bacterial adherence is higher on mesoporous bioceramics, although this higher microbial attachment is mainly due to the intergranular porosity and grain size morphology rather than to the mesoporous structure.

  17. Bioceramics and Scaffolds: A Winning Combination for Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Baino, Francesco; Novajra, Giorgia; Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    In the last few decades, we have assisted to a general increase of elder population worldwide associated with age-related pathologies. Therefore, there is the need for new biomaterials that can substitute damaged tissues, stimulate the body's own regenerative mechanisms, and promote tissue healing. Porous templates referred to as "scaffolds" are thought to be required for three-dimensional tissue growth. Bioceramics, a special set of fully, partially, or non-crystalline ceramics (e.g., calcium phosphates, bioactive glasses, and glass-ceramics) that are designed for the repair and reconstruction of diseased parts of the body, have high potential as scaffold materials. Traditionally, bioceramics have been used to fill and restore bone and dental defects (repair of hard tissues). More recently, this category of biomaterials has also revealed promising applications in the field of soft-tissue engineering. Starting with an overview of the fundamental requirements for tissue engineering scaffolds, this article provides a detailed picture on recent developments of porous bioceramics and composites, including a summary of common fabrication technologies and a critical analysis of structure-property and structure-function relationships. Areas of future research are highlighted at the end of this review, with special attention to the development of multifunctional scaffolds exploiting therapeutic ion/drug release and emerging applications beyond hard tissue repair.

  18. Bioceramics and Scaffolds: A Winning Combination for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Baino, Francesco; Novajra, Giorgia; Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    In the last few decades, we have assisted to a general increase of elder population worldwide associated with age-related pathologies. Therefore, there is the need for new biomaterials that can substitute damaged tissues, stimulate the body’s own regenerative mechanisms, and promote tissue healing. Porous templates referred to as “scaffolds” are thought to be required for three-dimensional tissue growth. Bioceramics, a special set of fully, partially, or non-crystalline ceramics (e.g., calcium phosphates, bioactive glasses, and glass–ceramics) that are designed for the repair and reconstruction of diseased parts of the body, have high potential as scaffold materials. Traditionally, bioceramics have been used to fill and restore bone and dental defects (repair of hard tissues). More recently, this category of biomaterials has also revealed promising applications in the field of soft-tissue engineering. Starting with an overview of the fundamental requirements for tissue engineering scaffolds, this article provides a detailed picture on recent developments of porous bioceramics and composites, including a summary of common fabrication technologies and a critical analysis of structure–property and structure–function relationships. Areas of future research are highlighted at the end of this review, with special attention to the development of multifunctional scaffolds exploiting therapeutic ion/drug release and emerging applications beyond hard tissue repair. PMID:26734605

  19. Bioceramic microneedles with flexible and self-swelling substrate.

    PubMed

    Cai, Bing; Xia, Wei; Bredenberg, Susanne; Li, Hao; Engqvist, Håkan

    2015-08-01

    To reduce the effort required to penetrate the skin and optimize drug release profiles, bioceramic microneedle arrays with higher-aspect-ratio needles and a flexible and self-swelling substrate have been developed. Swelling of the substrate can assist in separating it from the needles and leave them in the skin as a drug depot. The preparation procedures for this bioceramic microneedle are described in the paper. Clonidine hydrochloride, the model drug, was released in a controlled manner by the microneedle device in vitro. Results showed that the microneedle array with a flexible and self-swelling substrate released the drug content faster than the array with a rigid substrate. Disintegration of the needle material and diffusion of the drug molecules are believed as the main control mechanisms of the drug release from these microneedle arrays. Ex vivo skin penetration showed that they can effectively penetrate the stratum corneum without an extra device. This work represents a progression in the improvement of bioceramic microneedles for transdermal drug delivery.

  20. Physiological effects of bioceramic material: harvard step, resting metabolic rate and treadmill running assessments.

    PubMed

    Leung, Ting-Kai; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Lee, Chi-Ming; Kan, Nai-Wen; Hou, Chien-Wen

    2013-12-31

    Previous biomolecular and animal studies have shown that a room-temperature far-infrared-rayemitting ceramic material (bioceramic) demonstrates physical-biological effects, including the normalization of psychologically induced stress-conditioned elevated heart rate in animals. In this clinical study, the Harvard step test, the resting metabolic rate (RMR) assessment and the treadmill running test were conducted to evaluate possible physiological effects of the bioceramic material in human patients. The analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) during the Harvard step test indicated that the bioceramic material significantly increased the high-frequency (HF) power spectrum. In addition, the results of RMR analysis suggest that the bioceramic material reduced oxygen consumption (VO2). Our results demonstrate that the bioceramic material has the tendency to stimulate parasympathetic responses, which may reduce resting energy expenditure and improve cardiorespiratory recovery following exercise.

  1. Engineering bioceramic microstructure for customized drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco Gomez, Hernando Jose

    One of the most efficient approaches to treat cancer and infection is to use biomaterials as a drug delivery system (DDS). The goal is for the material to provide a sustained release of therapeutic drug dose locally to target the ill tissue without affecting other organs. Silica Calcium Phosphate nano composite (SCPC) is a drug delivery platform that successfully demonstrated the ability to bind and release several therapeutics including antibiotics, anticancer drugs, and growth factors. The aim of the present work is to analyze the role of SCPC microstructure on drug binding and release kinetics. The main crystalline phases of SCPC are alpha-cristobalite (SiO2, Cris) and beta-rhenanite (NaCaPO4, Rhe); therefore, these two phases were prepared and characterized separately. Structural and compositional features of Cris, Rhe and SCPC bioceramics demonstrated a significant influence on the loading capacity and release kinetics profile of Vancomycin (Vanc) and Cisplatin (Cis). Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy analyses demonstrated that the P-O functional group in Rhe and SCPC has high affinity to the (C=O and N-H) of Vanc and (N-H and O-H) of Cis. By contrast, a weak chemical interaction between the Si-O functional group in Cris and SCPC and the two drugs was observed. Vanc loading per unit surface area increased in the order 8.00 microg Vanc/m2 for Rhe > 4.49 microg Vanc /m2 for SCPC>3.01 microg Vanc /m2 for Cris (p<0.05). Cis loading capacity increased in the order 8.59 microg Vanc /m2 for Cris, 17.8 microg Vanc/m2 for Rhe and 6.03 microg Vanc /m2 for SCPC (p<0.05). Drug release kinetics was dependent on the carrier as well as on the kind of drug. Different burst release and sustained release rates were measured for Vanc and Cis from the same carrier. The percentages of drug amount released from Cris, Rhe and SCPC during the burst stage (the first 2h) were: 50%, 50%, and 46% of Vanc; and 53.4%, 36.6%, and 30.6 % of Cis, respectively. Burst release was

  2. Influences of the steam sterilization on the properties of calcium phosphate porous bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangfeng; Guo, Bo; Xiao, Yumei; Yuan, Tun; Fan, Yujiang; Zhang, Xingdong

    2016-01-01

    The influences of steam sterilization on the physicochemical properties of calcium phosphate (Ca-P) porous bioceramics, including β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) and hydroxyapatite (HA) are investigated. After being steam sterilized in an autoclave (121 °C for 40 min), the porous bioceramics are dried and characterized. The steam sterilization has no obvious effects on the phase composition, thermal stability, pH value and dissolubility of β-TCP porous bioceramic, but changes its morphology and mechanical strength. Meanwhile, the steam sterilization leads to the significant changes of the morphology, phase composition, pH value and dissolubility of BCP porous bioceramic. The increase of dissolubility and mechanical strength, the decrease of pH value of the immersed solution and partial oriented growth of crystals are also observed in HA porous bioceramic after steam sterilization. These results indicate that the steam sterilization can result in different influences on the physicochemical properties of β-TCP, BCP and HA porous bioceramics, thus the application of the steam sterilization on the three kinds of Ca-P porous bioceramics should be considered carefully based on the above changed properties.

  3. Transdermal delivery of insulin with bioceramic composite microneedles fabricated by gelatin and hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Yu, Weijiang; Jiang, Guohua; Liu, Depeng; Li, Lei; Tong, Zaizai; Yao, Juming; Kong, Xiangdong

    2017-04-01

    The organic-inorganic bioceramic composite microneedles (MNs) were prepared from hydroxyapatite (Hap) and gelatin (Gel) via a template method. The resultant hydroxyapatite and gelatin composite MNs exhibited low cytotoxicity and excellent mechanical properties. After transdermal administration to the diabetic rats, the insulin could be released from bioceramic composite MNs. An obvious and effective hypoglycemic effect could be obtained compared with that of subcutaneous injection route. This work suggests that bioceramic composite MNs containing of insulin have a potential application in diabetes treatment via transdermal ingestion.

  4. Oxidation-resistant interfacial coatings for continuous fiber ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M.; Bleier, A.; Shanmugham, S.; Liaw, P.K.

    1995-08-01

    Continuous fiber ceramic composites mechanical behavior are influenced by the bonding characteristics between the fiber and the matrix. Finite modeling studies suggest that a low-modulus interfacial coating material will be effective in reducing the residual thermal stresses that are generated upon cooling from processing temperatures. Nicalon{trademark}/SiC composites with carbon, alumina and mullite interfacial coatings were fabricated with the SiC matrix deposited using a forced-flow, thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration process. Composites with mullite interfacial coatings exhibited considerable fiber pull-out even after oxidation and have potential as a composite system.

  5. Interfacial adhesion - Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, John; Banerjea, Amitava; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Finley, Clarence W.

    1988-01-01

    Adhesion, the binding of different materials at an interface, is of general interest to many branches of technology, e.g., microelectronics, tribology, manufacturing, construction, etc. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of such diverse interfaces. In addition, experimental techniques generally have practical objectives, such as the achievement of sufficient strength to sustain mechanical or thermal effects and/or have the proper electronic properties. In addition, the theoretical description of binding at interfaces is quite limited, and a proper data base for such theoretical analysis does not exist. This presentation will review both experimental and theoretical aspects of adhesion in nonpolymer materials. The objective will be to delineate the critical parameters needed, governing adhesion testing along with an outline of testing objectives. A distinction will be made between practical and fundamental objectives. Examples are given where interfacial bonding may govern experimental consideration. The present status of theory is presented along with recommendations for future progress and needs.

  6. Interfacial adhesion: Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, John; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Finley, Clarence W.; Banerjea, Amitava

    1988-01-01

    Adhesion, the binding of different materials at an interface, is of general interest to many branches of technology, e.g., microelectronics, tribology, manufacturing, construction, etc. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of such diverse interfaces. In addition, experimental techniques generally have practical objectives, such as the achievement of sufficient strength to sustain mechanical or thermal effects and/or have the proper electronic properties. In addition, the theoretical description of binding at interfaces is quite limited, and a proper data base for such theoretical analysis does not exist. This presentation will review both experimental and theoretical aspects of adhesion in nonpolymer materials. The objective will be to delineate the critical parameters needed, governing adhesion testing along with an outline of testing objectives. A distinction will be made between practical and fundamental objectives. Examples are given where interfacial bonding may govern experimental consideration. The present status of theory is presented along wiith recommendations for future progress and needs.

  7. Preparation and characterization of laser cladding wollastonite derived bioceramic coating on titanium alloy.

    PubMed

    Li, Huan-cai; Wang, Dian-gang; Chen, Chuan-zhong; Weng, Fei; Shi, Hua

    2015-09-25

    The bioceramic coating is fabricated on titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) by laser cladding the preplaced wollastonite (CaSiO3) powders. The coating on Ti6Al4V is characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy, and attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared. The interface bonding strength is measured using the stretching method using an RGD-5-type electronic tensile machine. The microhardness distribution of the cross-section is determined using an indentation test. The in vitro bioactivity of the coating on Ti6Al4V is evaluated using the in vitro simulated body fluid (SBF) immersion test. The microstructure of the laser cladding sample is affected by the process parameters. The coating surface is coarse, accidented, and microporous. The cross-section microstructure of the ceramic layer from the bottom to the top gradually changes from cellular crystal, fine cellular-dendrite structure to underdeveloped dendrite crystal. The coating on Ti6Al4V is composed of CaTiO3, CaO, α-Ca2SiO4, SiO2, and TiO2. After soaking in the SBF solution, the calcium phosphate layer is formed on the coating surface.

  8. Bioceramic dip-coating on Ti-6Al-4V and 316L SS implant materials.

    PubMed

    Aksakal, Bunyamin; Hanyaloglu, C

    2008-05-01

    The focus of the present study is based on more economical and rapid bioceramic coating on the most common implant substrates such as Ti-6Al-4V and 316L SS used often in orthopedics. For ceramic dip coating of implant substrates, Hydroxyapatite (HA) powder, Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, P2O5, Na2CO3 and KH2PO4 are used to provide the gel. Ceramic films on sandblasted substrates have been deposited by using a newly manufactured dip-coating apparatus. Sample characterization is evaluated by SEM and XRD analysis. A smooth and homogeneous coating films have been obtained and average of 20 MPa bonding strength has been achieved for both Ti-6Al-4V and 316L SS alloys after sintering at 750 degrees C under flowing argon. The level of importance of the process parameters on coating was determined by using analysis of variance (ANOVA). The current process appears to be cheap, easy, and flexible to shape variations and high production rates for orthopedic applications.

  9. Calcium phosphate bioceramics induce mineralization modulated by proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kefeng; Leng, Yang; Lu, Xiong; Ren, Fuzeng

    2013-08-01

    Proteins play an important role in the process of biomineralization, which is considered the critical process of new bone formation. The calcium phosphate (Ca-P) mineralization happened on hydroxyapatite (HA), β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) when proteins presented were investigated systematically. The results reveal that the presence of protein in the revised simulated body fluid (RSBF) did not alter the shape and crystal structure of the precipitated micro-crystals in the Ca-P layer formed on the three types of bioceramics. However, the morphology of the Ca-P precipitates was regulated but the structure of Ca-P crystal was unchanged in vivo. The presence of proteins always inhibits Ca-P mineralization in RSBF and the degree of inhibitory effect is concentration dependent. Furthermore, Protein presence can increase the possibility of HA precipitation in vitro and in vivo. The results obtained in this study can be helpful for better understanding the mechanism of biomineralization induced by the Ca-P bioceramics.

  10. Silicon Nitride Bioceramics Induce Chemically Driven Lysis in Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Pezzotti, Giuseppe; Bock, Ryan M; McEntire, Bryan J; Jones, Erin; Boffelli, Marco; Zhu, Wenliang; Baggio, Greta; Boschetto, Francesco; Puppulin, Leonardo; Adachi, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Toshiro; Kanamura, Narisato; Marunaka, Yoshinori; Bal, B Sonny

    2016-03-29

    Organisms of Gram-negative phylum bacteroidetes, Porphyromonas gingivalis, underwent lysis on polished surfaces of silicon nitride (Si3N4) bioceramics. The antibacterial activity of Si3N4 was mainly the result of chemically driven principles. The lytic activity, although not osmotic in nature, was related to the peculiar pH-dependent surface chemistry of Si3N4. A buffering effect via the formation of ammonium ions (NH4(+)) (and their modifications) was experimentally observed by pH microscopy. Lysis was confirmed by conventional fluorescence spectroscopy, and the bacteria's metabolism was traced with the aid of in situ Raman microprobe spectroscopy. This latter technique revealed the formation of peroxynitrite within the bacterium itself. Degradation of the bacteria's nucleic acid, drastic reduction in phenilalanine, and reduction of lipid concentration were observed due to short-term exposure (6 days) to Si3N4. Altering the surface chemistry of Si3N4 by either chemical etching or thermal oxidation influenced peroxynitrite formation and affected bacteria metabolism in different ways. Exploiting the peculiar surface chemistry of Si3N4 bioceramics could be helpful in counteracting Porphyromonas gingivalis in an alkaline pH environment.

  11. Osseointegration of alumina bioceramic granules: A comparative experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rerikh, V. V.; Avetisyan, A. R.; Zaydman, A. M.; Anikin, K. A.; Bataev, V. A.; Nikulina, A. A.; Sadovoy, M. A.; Aronov, A. M.; Semantsova, E. S.

    2016-08-01

    To perform a comparative analysis of osseointegration of bioceramic alumina-based granules, hydroxyapatite-based granules, and deproteinized bone granules. The experiment was conducted on 52 adult male Kyoto-Wistar rats weighing 350 to 520 g. The animals were divided into five matched groups that differed only in the type of an implanted material. The granules were implanted in the lumbar vertebral bodies and in the distal right femur of each laboratory animal. Two months after surgery, the animals were euthanized, followed by tissue sampling for morphological studies. An examination of specimens from the groups with implanted alumina granules revealed the newly formed trabecular bone with remodeling signs. The bone tissue filled the intragranular space, tightly adhering to the granule surface. There was no connective tissue capsule on the border between bone tissue and alumina granules. Cylindrical bioceramic alumina-based granules with an open internal channel have a higher strength surpassing than that of analogs and the osseointegration ability close to that of hydroxyapatite and deproteinized bone granules.

  12. Preparation of graded zirconia hydroxyapatite composite bioceramic and its immunocompatibility in vitro.

    PubMed

    Quan, Renfu; Yang, Disheng; Miao, Xudong; Wu, Xiaochun; Wang, Hongbin; Li, Wei

    2007-09-01

    To obtain immunocompatibility, graded zirconia-hydroxyapatite (ZrO(2)-HA) composite bioceramic and simplex ZrO(2)-HA composite bioceramic are prepared. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) harvested from healthy individuals are cultured with the two ceramic extracts to assess their effect on the transformation of lymphocytes, apoptotic ratio, CD69 expression, and expression of cytokine of TNFalpha and IL-6, with or without phytohemoagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated cells. Ceramic extracts did not activate the resting lymphocytes, whereas the response of the PHA-stimulated cells was significantly modified. The PBMCs activated by graded ZrO(2)-HA composite bioceramic is noticeably smaller than that by simplex ZrO(2)-HA composite bioceramic; these results, however can only be seen under the amplified effect of PHA-stimulation.

  13. Induction heat treatment and technique of bioceramic coatings production on medical titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, Aleksandr A.; Rodionov, Igor V.; Fomina, Marina A.; Poshivalova, Elena Y.; Krasnikov, Aleksandr V.; Petrova, Natalia N.; Zakharevich, Andrey M.; Skaptsov, Alexander A.; Gribov, Andrey N.; Atkin, Vsevolod S.

    2015-03-01

    Prospective composite bioceramic titania coatings were obtained on intraosseous implants fabricated from medical titanium alloy VT16 (Ti-2.5Al-5Mo-5V). Consistency changes of morphological characteristics, physico-mechanical properties and biocompatibility of experimental titanium implant coatings obtained by oxidation during induction heat treatment are defined. Technological recommendations for obtaining bioceramic coatings with extremely high strength on titanium items surface are given.

  14. Li-Ion Battery Cathodes: Enhancing Interfacial Bonding between Anisotropically Oriented Grains Using a Glue-Nanofiller for Advanced Li-Ion Battery Cathode (Adv. Mater. 23/2016).

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyejung; Lee, Sanghan; Cho, Hyeon; Kim, Junhyeok; Lee, Jieun; Park, Suhyeon; Joo, Se Hun; Kim, Su Hwan; Cho, Yoon-Gyo; Song, Hyun-Kon; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Cho, Jaephil

    2016-06-01

    The formation of a spinel Lix CoO2 layer in a Ni-rich secondary particle for lithium-ion batteries is reported by S. K. Kwak, J. Cho, and co-workers on page 4705, who find that the spinel-like Lix CoO2 layer, between layered primary particles, can enhance the mechanical strength of secondary particles by enhancing the interfacial binding energy among the grains. Moreover, the layer can effectively protect the unstable surface of the primary particles and offers a fast electron-ion pathway, resulting in overall enhancements of stability and kinetics in battery performance.

  15. Medical applications of organic-inorganic hybrid materials within the field of silica-based bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Vallet-Regí, María; Colilla, Montserrat; González, Blanca

    2011-02-01

    Research on bioceramics has evolved from the use of inert materials for mere substitution of living tissues towards the development of third-generation bioceramics aimed at inducing bone tissue regeneration. Within this context hybrid bioceramics have remarkable features resulting from the synergistic combination of both inorganic and organic components that make them suitable for a wide range of medical applications. Certain bioceramics, such as ordered mesoporous silicas, can exhibit different kind of interaction with organic molecules to develop different functions. The weak interaction of these host matrixes with drug molecules confined in the mesoporous channels allows these hybrid systems to be used as controlled delivery devices. Moreover, mesoporous silicas can be used to fabricate three (3D)-dimensional scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. In this last case, different osteoinductive agents (peptides, hormones and growth factors) can be strongly grafted to the bioceramic matrix to act as attracting signals for bone cells to promote bone regeneration process. Finally, recent research examples of organic-inorganic hybrid bioceramics, such as stimuli-responsive drug delivery systems and nanosystems for targeting of cancer cells and gene transfection, are also tackled in this tutorial review (64 references).

  16. [The effect of technological parameters of wide-band laser cladding on microstructure and sinterability of gradient bioceramics composite coating].

    PubMed

    Liu, Qibin; Zhu, Weidong; Zou, Longjiang; Zheng, Min; Dong, Chuang

    2005-12-01

    The gradient bioceramics coating was prepared on the surface of Ti-6Al-4V alloy by using wide-band laser cladding. And the effect of technological parameters of wide-band laser cladding on microstructure and sinterability of gradient bioceramics composite coating was studied. The experimental results indicated that in the circumstances of size of laser doze D and scanning velocity V being fixed, with the increasement of power P, the density of microstructure in bioceramics coating gradually degraded; with the increasement of power P, the pore rate of bioceramics gradually became high. While P = 2.3 KW, the bioceramics coating with dense structure and lower pore rate (5.11%) was obtained; while P = 2.9 KW, the bioceramics coating with disappointing density was formed and its pore rate was up to 21.32%. The microhardness of bioceramics coating demonstrated that while P = 2.3 KW, the largest value of microhardness of bioceramics coating was 1100 HV. Under the condition of our research work, the optimum technological parameters for preparing gradient bioceramics coating by wide-band laser cladding are: P = 2.3 KW, V = 145 mm/min, D = 16 mm x 2 mm.

  17. Crystal structures of CaSiO3 polymorphs control growth and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells on bioceramic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nianli; Molenda, James A; Mankoci, Steven; Zhou, Xianfeng; Murphy, William L; Sahai, Nita

    2013-10-01

    The repair and replacement of damaged or diseased human bone tissue requires a stable interface between the orthopedic implant and living tissue. The ideal material should be both osteoconductive (promote bonding to bone) and osteoinductive (induce osteogenic differentiation of cells and generate new bone). Partially resorbable bioceramic materials with both properties are developed by expensive trial-and-error methods. Structure-reactivity relationships for predicting the osteoinductive properties of ceramics would significantly increase the efficiency of developing materials for bone tissue engineering. Here we propose the novel hypothesis that the crystal structure of a bioceramic controls the release rates, subsequent surface modifications due to precipitation of new phases, and thus, the concentrations of soluble factors, and ultimately, the attachment, viability and osteogenic differentiation of human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hMSCs). To illustrate our hypothesis, we used two CaSiO3 polymorphs, pseudo-wollastonite (psw, β-CaSiO3) and wollastonite (wol, α-CaSiO3) as scaffolds for hMSC culture. Polymorphs are materials which have identical chemical composition and stoichiometry, but different crystal structures. We combined the results of detailed surface characterizations, including environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) back-scattered imaging, and spot-analysis and 2D elemental mapping by SEM-Energy Dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX), High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and surface roughness analysis; culture medium solution analyses; and molecular/genetic assays from cell culture. Our results confirmed the hypothesis that the psw polymorph, which has a strained silicate ring structure, is more osteoinductive than the wol polymorph, which has a more stable, open silicate chain structure. The observations could be attributed to easier dissolution (resorption) of psw compared to wol, which resulted in concentration profiles that were more

  18. Study of in vitro bioactivity and mechanical properties of diopside nano-bioceramic synthesized by a facile method using eggshell as raw material.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, Amirhossein; Abdellahi, Majid; Khajeh-Sharafabadi, Armina; Khandan, Amirsalar; Ozada, Neriman

    2017-02-01

    In this study, diopside bioceramic was synthesized using a mechanical milling process and subsequent heat treatment. The simplicity of experiments and also the high energy available in ball milling lead to rapid synthesis of the products in comparison with other synthesis methods. Magnesium oxide (MgO), silicon dioxide (SiO2) and eggshell (as the calcium source) powders were weighted in stoichiometric conditions and milled to initial activation of the surface of the powder's mixture. Then a sintering process was conducted to complete formation of diopside nanopowder and also evaluates its thermal stability. The mechanisms occurred during the synthesis of this bioceramic were carefully investigated. X-Ray diffraction analysis (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetry (TG), differential thermal analysis (DTA), and inductive coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) were used for gathering and analyzing data. The ability and rate of apatite formation on the sample surface were evaluated by Simulated Body Fluid (SBF) test, a method that is well recognized to characterize the in vitro bioactivity of ceramic materials. According to the results obtained, the diopside samples had a significant potential to form apatite layer on their surface during soaking in the SBF solution. Besides, the bonding strength of this bioceramic was about 350±7MPa which was almost more than three times of that reported for hydroxyapatite. An excellent fracture toughness of 4±0.3MPam(0.5) was also obtained for this ceramic which was higher than that of previously reported works.

  19. Crystal structures of CaSiO3 polymorphs control growth and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells on bioceramic surfaces†

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nianli; Molenda, James A.; Mankoci, Steven; Zhou, Xianfeng; Murphy, William L.

    2014-01-01

    The repair and replacement of damaged or diseased human bone tissue requires a stable interface between the orthopedic implant and living tissue. The ideal material should be both osteoconductive (promote bonding to bone) and osteoinductive (induce osteogenic differentiation of cells and generate new bone). Partially resorbable bioceramic materials with both properties are developed by expensive trial-and-error methods. Structure–reactivity relationships for predicting the osteoinductive properties of ceramics would significantly increase the efficiency of developing materials for bone tissue engineering. Here we propose the novel hypothesis that the crystal structure of a bioceramic controls the release rates, subsequent surface modifications due to precipitation of new phases, and thus, the concentrations of soluble factors, and ultimately, the attachment, viability and osteogenic differentiation of human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hMSCs). To illustrate our hypothesis, we used two CaSiO3 polymorphs, pseudo-wollastonite (psw, β-CaSiO3) and wollastonite (wol, α-CaSiO3) as scaffolds for hMSC culture. Polymorphs are materials which have identical chemical composition and stoichiometry, but different crystal structures. We combined the results of detailed surface characterizations, including environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) back-scattered imaging, and spot-analysis and 2D elemental mapping by SEM-Energy Dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX), High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and surface roughness analysis; culture medium solution analyses; and molecular/genetic assays from cell culture. Our results confirmed the hypothesis that the psw polymorph, which has a strained silicate ring structure, is more osteoinductive than the wol polymorph, which has a more stable, open silicate chain structure. The observations could be attributed to easier dissolution (resorption) of psw compared to wol, which resulted in concentration profiles that were

  20. Interfacial tension and interfacial profiles: an equation-of-state approach.

    PubMed

    Panayiotou, Costas

    2003-11-15

    A quasi-thermodynamic approach of inhomogeneous systems is used for modeling the fluid-fluid interface. It is based on the recently introduced QCHB (quasi-chemical hydrogen bonding) equation-of-state model of fluids and their mixtures, which is used for the estimation of the Helmholtz free energy density difference, Deltapsi(0), between the system with interface and another system of the same constitution but without interface. Consistent expressions for the interfacial tension and interfacial profiles for various properties are presented. The interfacial tension is proportional to the integral of Deltapsi(0) along the full height of the system, the proportionality constant being equal to 1, when no density gradient contributions are taken into consideration, 2, when the Cahn-Hilliard approximation is adopted, and 4, when the full density gradient contributions are taken into consideration. A satisfactory agreement is obtained between experimental and calculated surface tensions. Extension of the approach to mixtures is examined along with the associated problems for the numerical calculations of the interfacial profiles. A new equation is derived for the chemical potentials in the interfacial region, which facilitates very much the calculation of the composition profiles across the interface.

  1. Emulsions for interfacial filtration.

    SciTech Connect

    Grillet, Anne Mary; Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Souza, Caroline Ann; Welk, Margaret Ellen; Hartenberger, Joel David; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2006-11-01

    We have investigated a novel emulsion interfacial filter that is applicable for a wide range of materials, from nano-particles to cells and bacteria. This technology uses the interface between the two immiscible phases as the active surface area for adsorption of targeted materials. We showed that emulsion interfaces can effectively collect and trap materials from aqueous solution. We tested two aqueous systems, a bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution and coal bed methane produced water (CBMPW). Using a pendant drop technique to monitor the interfacial tension, we demonstrated that materials in both samples were adsorbed to the liquid-liquid interface, and did not readily desorb. A prototype system was built to test the emulsion interfacial filter concept. For the BSA system, a protein assay showed a progressive decrease in the residual BSA concentration as the sample was processed. Based on the initial prototype operation, we propose an improved system design.

  2. Thermoseeds for interstitial magnetic hyperthermia: from bioceramics to nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeza, A.; Arcos, D.; Vallet-Regí, M.

    2013-12-01

    The development of magnetic materials for interstitial hyperthermia treatment of cancer is an ever evolving research field which provides new alternatives to antitumoral therapies. The development of biocompatible magnetic materials has resulted in new biomaterials with multifunctional properties, which are able to adapt to the complex scenario of tumoral processes. Once implanted or injected in the body, magnetic materials can behave as thermoseeds under the effect of AC magnetic fields. Magnetic bioceramics aimed to treat bone tumors and magnetic nanoparticles are among the most studied thermoseeds, and supply different solutions for the different scenarios in cancerous processes. This paper reviews some of the biomaterials used for bone cancer treatment and skeletal reinforcing, as well as the more complex topic of magnetic nanoparticles for intracellular targeting and hyperthermia.

  3. Thermoseeds for interstitial magnetic hyperthermia: from bioceramics to nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Baeza, A; Arcos, D; Vallet-Regí, M

    2013-12-04

    The development of magnetic materials for interstitial hyperthermia treatment of cancer is an ever evolving research field which provides new alternatives to antitumoral therapies. The development of biocompatible magnetic materials has resulted in new biomaterials with multifunctional properties, which are able to adapt to the complex scenario of tumoral processes. Once implanted or injected in the body, magnetic materials can behave as thermoseeds under the effect of AC magnetic fields. Magnetic bioceramics aimed to treat bone tumors and magnetic nanoparticles are among the most studied thermoseeds, and supply different solutions for the different scenarios in cancerous processes. This paper reviews some of the biomaterials used for bone cancer treatment and skeletal reinforcing, as well as the more complex topic of magnetic nanoparticles for intracellular targeting and hyperthermia.

  4. Three-dimensional laser-assisted processing of bioceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comesaña, R.; Lusquiños, F.; del Val, J.; Malot, T.; Riveiro, A.; Quintero, F.; Boutinguiza, M.; Aubry, P.; Pou, J.

    The study of calcium phosphate bioceramics processing by rapid prototyping based on laser cladding was tackled in this work. This technique shows a great potential to provide a three-dimensional tailored implant adapted to the specific problem of each patient. Working window to produce stable geometrical features and repeatable microstructures was established by real time process monitoring and characterization of the processed material. The relationships between the processing parameters and the obtained properties are discussed, in addition to the biological behaviour of the produced parts. The obtained calcium phosphate phases (oxyapatite, tricalcium phosphate, tetracalcium phosphate and amorphous calcium phosphate) are found to favorably influence the degradability of the precursor hydroxyapatite in Tris-HCl buffer which is a good sign of the favorable behavior of this type of materials when implanted 'in vivo'.

  5. Nanofiber generation of hydroxyapatite and fluor-hydroxyapatite bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hae-Won; Kim, Hyoun-Ee

    2006-05-01

    In this study, we produced hydroxyapatite (HA) and fluor-hydroxyapatite (FHA) bioceramics as a novel geometrical form, the nanoscale fiber, for the biomedical applications. Based on the sol-gel precursors of the apatites, an electrospinning technique was introduced to generate nanoscale fibers. The diameter of the fibers was exploited in the range of a few micrometers to hundreds of nanometers (1.55 microm-240 nm) by means of adjusting the concentration of the sols. Through the fluoridation of apatite, the solubility of the fiber was tailored and the fluorine ions were well released from the FHA. The HA and FHA nanofibers produced in this study are considered to find potential applications in the biomaterials and tissue engineering fields.

  6. Characterisation of a Hydroxyapatite and Carbon Nanotube Bioceramic Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kealley, C.; Ben-Nissan, B.; van Riessen, A.; Elcombe, M.

    2006-03-01

    A biocompatible composite for bone replacement applications was investigated. The effects that the microstructure may have on the mechanical properties of the bioceramic have been assessed. Hydroxyapatite was prepared as reported previously[1] with 2, 5 and 10 wt% of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) being incorporated during the production before hot isostatic pressing. Microstructural analysis of the composite has been undertaken by SEM/EDS, TEM/EDS, XRD and ND. The effects of concentration of the CNTs on the mechanical properties of the composite material have been determined. At 2 wt% excellent densification has been achieved, and there is a significant improvement in Vickers Hardness and Young's Modulus. However, as expected fracture toughness is reduced. [1] Lewis, K., Kealley, C., Elcombe, M., van Riessen, A., and Ben-Nissan, B. (2005), J. Aust. Ceram. Soc., 41(2), p52-55.

  7. Resorption Rate Tunable Bioceramic: Si, Zn-Modified Tricalcium Phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Xiang

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation is organized in an alternate format. Several manuscripts which have already been published or are to be submitted for publication have been included as separate chapters. Chapter 1 is a general introduction which describes the dissertation organization and introduces the human bone and ceramic materials as bone substitute. Chapter 2 is the background and literature review on dissolution behavior of calcium phosphate, and discussion of motivation for this research. Chapter 3 is a manuscript entitled ''Si,Zn-modified tricalcium phosphate: a phase composition and crystal structure study'', which was published in ''Key Engineering Materials'' [1]. Chapter 4 gives more crystal structure details by neutron powder diffraction, which identifies the position for Si and Zn substitution and explains the stabilization mechanism of the structure. A manuscript entitled ''Crystal structure analysis of Si, Zn-modified Tricalcium phosphate by Neutron Powder Diffraction'' will be submitted to Biomaterials [2]. Chapter 5 is a manuscript, entitled ''Dissolution behavior and cytotoxicity test of Si, Zn-modified tricalcium phosphate'', which is to be submitted to Biomaterials [3]. This paper discusses the additives effect on the dissolution behavior of TCP, and cytotoxicity test result is also included. Chapter 6 is the study of hydrolysis process of {alpha}-tricalcium phosphate in the simulated body fluid, and the phase development during drying process is discussed. A manuscript entitled ''Hydrolysis of {alpha}-tricalcium phosphate in simulated body fluid and phase transformation during drying process'' is to be submitted to Biomaterials [4]. Ozan Ugurlu is included as co-authors in these two papers due to his TEM contributions. Appendix A is the general introduction of the materials synthesis, crystal structure and preliminary dissolution result. A manuscript entitled ''Resorption rate tunable bioceramic: Si and Zn-modified tricalcium phosphate'' was published in

  8. Modulation of organic interfacial spin polarization by interfacial angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhao; Li, Ying; Zhang, Guang-ping; Ren, Jun-feng; Wang, Chuan-kui; Hu, Gui-chao

    2017-01-01

    Based on ab initio theory, we theoretically investigated the interfacial spin polarization by adsorbing a benzene-dithiolate molecule onto a nickel surface with different interfacial angles. A variable magnitude and even an inversion of the interfacial spin polarization are observed with the increase of the interfacial angle. The orbital analysis shows that the interfacial spin polarization is codetermined by two kinds of orbital hybridization between the molecule and the ferromagnet, the pz-d hybridization and the sp3-d hybridization, which show different dependence on the angle. These results indicate a new way to manipulate the spin polarization at organic spinterface.

  9. Preparation, characterization and in vitro dissolution behavior of porous biphasic α/β-tricalcium phosphate bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lu; Yu, Haiyang; Deng, Yi; Yang, Weizhong; Liao, Li; Long, Qin

    2016-02-01

    The ideal bone tissue engineering scaffolds are long-cherished with the properties of interconnected macroporous structures, adjustable degradation and excellent biocompatibility. Here, a series of porous α/β-tricalcium phosphate (α/β-TCP) biphasic bioceramics with different phase ratios of α-TCP and β-TCP were successfully synthesized by heating an amorphous calcium phosphate precursor. The chemical and morphological characterization showed that α- and β-TCP phases co-existed in the α/β-TCP bioceramics and they had interconnected pore structures with size between 200 and 500μm. The in vitro dissolution behavior and bioactivity of the dual α/β-TCP were also probed in static and dynamic SBF for the first time. The results revealed that α/β-TCP scaffolds had good in vitro bioactivity, as the formation of bone-like apatite layers was induced on the scaffolds after mineralization in SBF. Moreover, dissolution rate of α/β-TCP bioceramics in dynamic environment was higher than that under static condition. Compared with monophasic TCP ceramics, these porous α/β-TCP bioceramics displayed a tailored dissolution rate proportionate to the TCP content (α and β) in the materials. Further, the degradation profile of porous α/β-TCP was well-described by Avrami equation. The porous dual α/β-TCP bioceramics with controllable degradation behavior hold great potential to be applied in bone tissue engineering as bone substitutes.

  10. Bioinspired structure of bioceramics for bone regeneration in load-bearing sites.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Faming; Chang, Jiang; Lu, Jianxi; Lin, Kaili; Ning, Congqin

    2007-11-01

    The major problem with the use of porous bioceramics as bone regeneration grafts is their weak mechanical strength, which has not been overcome to date. Here we described a novel way to solve this problem. Beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) bioceramics with a bioinspired structure were designed and prepared with a porous cancellous core (porosity: 70-90%) inside and a dense compact shell (porosity: 5-10%) outside that mimics the characteristics of natural bone. They showed excellent mechanical properties, with a compressive strength of 10-80MPa and an elastic modulus of 180MPa-1.0GPa, which could be tailored by the dense/porous cross-sectional area ratio obeying the rule of exponential growth. The in vitro degradation of the bioinspired bioceramics was faster than that of dense bioceramics but slower than that of porous counterparts. The changes in mechanical properties of the bioinspired ceramics during in vitro degradation were also investigated. A concept of the bioinspired macrostructure design of natural bone was proposed which provided a simple but effective way to increase the mechanical properties of porous bioceramics for load-bearing bone regeneration applications. It should be readily applicable to other porous materials.

  11. Interfacial and surface characterization of two self-etching adhesive systems and a total-etch adhesive after bonding to ground and unground bovine enamel--a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Ibarra, Gabriela; Vargas, Marcos A; Geurtsen, Werner

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the enamel surface and interface morphology of two self-etching adhesive systems (SAS) vs a total-etch control, after bonding to ground and unground enamel using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Thirty bovine incisors were used in this study. The buccal enamel surface of 15 teeth was ground flat to resemble freshly cut enamel. The rest of the teeth were left intact. Two SAS, Clearfil SE Bond (CSE, Kuraray) and Prompt L-Pop (3M-ESPE), and a conventional adhesive system, Scotchbond Multipurpose (3M-ESPE, control), were used to condition the surface of unground and ground enamel on 12 teeth. A composite button was bonded to the remaining 18 teeth; a cross-section (1 mm thick) was obtained from each and the bonded interface was polished. All specimens were dehydrated in ascending grades of ethanol, gold-sputter-coated, and observed under FESEM (Hitachi S-4000) to evaluate the ultrastructural morphology of the enamel surface and the enamel-dentin interface. The etching patterns and adhesive penetration varied according to the aggressiveness of the SAS, with CSE being the mildest and H3PO4 being the most aggressive. There were no significant differences on the ultrastructural morphology of the enamel surface between unground and ground specimens. It appears that microporosities within enamel prisms provide sufficient enamel-resin hybridization in unground enamel. The enamel dissolution pattern and depth of infiltration depend on the type of SAS used, with no significant differences in unground and ground enamel.

  12. Iridium Interfacial Stack (IRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spry, David James (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An iridium interfacial stack ("IrIS") and a method for producing the same are provided. The IrIS may include ordered layers of TaSi.sub.2, platinum, iridium, and platinum, and may be placed on top of a titanium layer and a silicon carbide layer. The IrIS may prevent, reduce, or mitigate against diffusion of elements such as oxygen, platinum, and gold through at least some of its layers.

  13. Interfacial phase-change memory.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R E; Fons, P; Kolobov, A V; Fukaya, T; Krbal, M; Yagi, T; Tominaga, J

    2011-07-03

    Phase-change memory technology relies on the electrical and optical properties of certain materials changing substantially when the atomic structure of the material is altered by heating or some other excitation process. For example, switching the composite Ge(2)Sb(2)Te(5) (GST) alloy from its covalently bonded amorphous phase to its resonantly bonded metastable cubic crystalline phase decreases the resistivity by three orders of magnitude, and also increases reflectivity across the visible spectrum. Moreover, phase-change memory based on GST is scalable, and is therefore a candidate to replace Flash memory for non-volatile data storage applications. The energy needed to switch between the two phases depends on the intrinsic properties of the phase-change material and the device architecture; this energy is usually supplied by laser or electrical pulses. The switching energy for GST can be reduced by limiting the movement of the atoms to a single dimension, thus substantially reducing the entropic losses associated with the phase-change process. In particular, aligning the c-axis of a hexagonal Sb(2)Te(3) layer and the 〈111〉 direction of a cubic GeTe layer in a superlattice structure creates a material in which Ge atoms can switch between octahedral sites and lower-coordination sites at the interface of the superlattice layers. Here we demonstrate GeTe/Sb(2)Te(3) interfacial phase-change memory (IPCM) data storage devices with reduced switching energies, improved write-erase cycle lifetimes and faster switching speeds.

  14. Bioactive behavior of silicon substituted calcium phosphate based bioceramics for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ather Farooq; Saleem, Muhammad; Afzal, Adeel; Ali, Asghar; Khan, Afsar; Khan, Abdur Rahman

    2014-02-01

    Bone graft substitutes are widely used for bone regeneration and repair in defect sites resulting from aging, disease, trauma, or accident. With invariably increasing clinical demands, there is an urgent need to produce artificial materials, which are readily available and are capable of fast and guided skeletal repair. Calcium phosphate based bioactive ceramics are extensively utilized in bone regeneration and repair applications. Silicon is often utilized as a substituent or a dopant in these bioceramics, since it significantly enhances the ultimate properties of conventional biomaterials such as surface chemical structure, mechanical strength, bioactivity, biocompatibility, etc. This article presents an overview of the silicon substituted bioceramics, which have emerged as efficient bone replacement and bone regeneration materials. Thus, the role of silicon in enhancing the biological performance and bone forming capabilities of conventional calcium phosphate based bioceramics is identified and reviewed.

  15. Surface toughness of silicon nitride bioceramics: I, Raman spectroscopy-assisted micromechanics.

    PubMed

    Pezzotti, Giuseppe; Enomoto, Yuto; Zhu, Wenliang; Boffelli, Marco; Marin, Elia; McEntire, Bryan J

    2016-02-01

    Indentation micro-fracture is revisited as a tool for evaluating the surface toughness of silicon nitride (Si3N4) bioceramics for artificial joint applications. Despite being unique and practical from an experimental perspective, a quantitative assessment of surface fracture toughness using this method is challenging. An improved method has been developed, consisting of coupling indentation with confocal (spatially resolved) Raman piezo-spectroscopy. Empowered by the Raman microprobe, the indentation micro-fracture method was found to be capable of providing reliable surface toughness measurements in silicon nitride biomaterials. In designing the microstructures of bioceramic bearing couples for improved tribological performance, surface toughness must be considered as a fundamentally different and distinct parameter from bulk toughness. The coupling of indention crack opening displacements (COD) with local stress field assessments by spectroscopy paves the way to reliably compare the structural properties of bioceramics and to quantitatively monitor their evolution during environmental exposure.

  16. A Periosteum-Inspired 3D Hydrogel-Bioceramic Composite for Enhanced Bone Regeneration .

    PubMed

    Chun, Yong Yao; Wang, Jun Kit; Tan, Nguan Soon; Chan, Peggy Puk Yik; Tan, Timothy Thatt Yang; Choong, Cleo

    2016-02-01

    A 3D injectable hydrogel-bioceramic composite consisting of gelatin-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl) propionic acid (Gtn-HPA) and carboxymethyl cellulose-tyramine (CMC-Tyr), incorporated with fish scale-derived calcium phosphate (CaP), is developed for bone applications. The hydrogel-bioceramic composite has significantly improved the elastic modulus compared to the non-filled hydrogel, of which the addition of 10 w/v% CaP showed zero order fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran release profile and a significantly higher proliferation rate of encapsulated cells. All the samples promote the nucleation and growth of CaP minerals when exposed to 1× SBF. Overall, the hydrogel-bioceramic composite with 10 w/v% CaP can potentially be used as a periosteum-mimicking membrane to facilitate bone regeneration.

  17. Synthesis and evaluation of bioceramics for orthopedics and tissue culture applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirkiran, Hande

    Hydroxyapatite is the most well known phosphate in the biologically active phosphate ceramic family by virtue of its similarity to natural bone mineral. Among all bioglass compositions BioglassRTM45S5 is one of the most bioactive glasses. This study initially started by adding different amounts (1, 2.5, 5, 10, and 25 wt.%) of BioglassRTM45S5 to synthetic hydroxyapatite in order to improve the bioactivity of these bioceramics. The chemistries formed by sintering and their effect on different material properties including bioactivity were identified by using various techniques, such as powder and thin film x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy, compression test, and nano indentation. All the results demonstrated that 10 and 25 wt.% BioglassRTM45S5 addition to hydroxyapatite and sintering at 1200°C for 4 hours yield new compositions with main Ca 5(PO4)2SiO4 and Na3Ca 6(PO4)5 crystalline phases dispersed in silicate glassy matrices, respectively. In addition, in vitro bioactivity tests such as bone like apatite formation in simulated body fluid and bone marrow stromal cell culture have shown that the crystalline and amorphous phases have an important role on improving bioactivity of these bioceramic compositions. Besides, compression test and nano indentation has given important information on compression strength and nano structure properties of these newly composed bioceramic materials and the bone like apatite layers formed on them, respectively. Finally, the effect of silicate addition on both formation and bioactivity of Na3Ca6(PO4)5 bioceramics were shown. These findings and different techniques used assisted to develop a phenomenological approach to demonstrate how the novel bioceramic compositions were composed and aid improving bioactivity of known bioceramic materials.

  18. 3D Printing Bioceramic Porous Scaffolds with Good Mechanical Property and Cell Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chih-Hao; Lin, Chih-Yang; Liu, Fwu-Hsing; Chen, Mark Hung-Chih; Lin, Chun-Pin; Ho, Hong-Nerng; Liao, Yunn-Shiuan

    2015-01-01

    Artificial bone grafting is widely used in current orthopedic surgery for bone defect problems. Unfortunately, surgeons remain unsatisfied with the current commercially available products. One of the major complaints is that these products cannot provide sufficient mechanical strength to support the human skeletal structure. In this study, we aimed to develop a bone scaffold with better mechanical property and good cell affinity by 3D printing (3DP) techniques. A self-developed 3D printer with laser-aided gelling (LAG) process was used to fabricate bioceramic scaffolds with inter-porous structures. To improve the mechanical property of the bioceramic parts after heating, CaCO3 was added to the silica ceramic slurry. CaCO3 was blended into a homogenous SiO2-sol dispersion at weight ratios varying from 0/100 to 5/95 to 9/91 (w/w). Bi-component CaCO3/SiO2-sol was prepared as a biocomposite for the 3DP scaffold. The well-mixed biocomposite was used to fabricate the bioceramic green part using the LAG method. The varied scaffolds were sintered at different temperatures ranging from 900 to 1500°C, and the mechanical property was subsequently analyzed. The scaffolds showed good property with the composite ratio of 5:95 CaCO3:SiO2 at a sintering temperature of 1300°C. The compressive strength was 47 MPa, and the porosity was 34%. The topography of the sintered 3DP bioceramic scaffold was examined by SEM, EDS and XRD. The silica bioceramic presented no cytotoxicity and good MG-63 osteoblast-like cell affinity, demonstrating good biocompatibility. Therefore, the new silica biocomposite is viable for fabricating 3DP bone bioceramics with improved mechanical property and good cell affinity. PMID:26618362

  19. 3D Printing Bioceramic Porous Scaffolds with Good Mechanical Property and Cell Affinity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Hao; Lin, Chih-Yang; Liu, Fwu-Hsing; Chen, Mark Hung-Chih; Lin, Chun-Pin; Ho, Hong-Nerng; Liao, Yunn-Shiuan

    2015-01-01

    Artificial bone grafting is widely used in current orthopedic surgery for bone defect problems. Unfortunately, surgeons remain unsatisfied with the current commercially available products. One of the major complaints is that these products cannot provide sufficient mechanical strength to support the human skeletal structure. In this study, we aimed to develop a bone scaffold with better mechanical property and good cell affinity by 3D printing (3DP) techniques. A self-developed 3D printer with laser-aided gelling (LAG) process was used to fabricate bioceramic scaffolds with inter-porous structures. To improve the mechanical property of the bioceramic parts after heating, CaCO3 was added to the silica ceramic slurry. CaCO3 was blended into a homogenous SiO2-sol dispersion at weight ratios varying from 0/100 to 5/95 to 9/91 (w/w). Bi-component CaCO3/SiO2-sol was prepared as a biocomposite for the 3DP scaffold. The well-mixed biocomposite was used to fabricate the bioceramic green part using the LAG method. The varied scaffolds were sintered at different temperatures ranging from 900 to 1500°C, and the mechanical property was subsequently analyzed. The scaffolds showed good property with the composite ratio of 5:95 CaCO3:SiO2 at a sintering temperature of 1300°C. The compressive strength was 47 MPa, and the porosity was 34%. The topography of the sintered 3DP bioceramic scaffold was examined by SEM, EDS and XRD. The silica bioceramic presented no cytotoxicity and good MG-63 osteoblast-like cell affinity, demonstrating good biocompatibility. Therefore, the new silica biocomposite is viable for fabricating 3DP bone bioceramics with improved mechanical property and good cell affinity.

  20. Control of Metal/graphite Interfacial Energy Through the Interfacial Segregation of Alloying Additions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, Utpal

    concentration which was determined to be 0.45 monolayers. Crater edge profiling studies also revealed Ni at the interface. A theoretical model based on the nearest neighbor bond-regular solution approximation was developed for estimating the surface concentration of the solute. This model was used in the Au-Ni system to estimate the surface Ni concentration and the consequent reduction in surface energy. The predicted values compared favorably with the corresponding experimental values. A model was also developed using a similar approach to predict interfacial Ni concentration in a metal/graphite system. This model was used to estimate the Ni content at a Au/graphite interface for a Au-0. 15Ni sample at 850^circC. The predicted interfacial atom fraction did not agree very well with the experimentally determined value. Nevertheless, it did yield a qualitatively correct trend and the right kind of temperature dependence.

  1. Membrane Perturbation Induced by Interfacially Adsorbed Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zemel, Assaf; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam; May, Sylvio

    2004-01-01

    The structural and energetic characteristics of the interaction between interfacially adsorbed (partially inserted) α-helical, amphipathic peptides and the lipid bilayer substrate are studied using a molecular level theory of lipid chain packing in membranes. The peptides are modeled as “amphipathic cylinders” characterized by a well-defined polar angle. Assuming two-dimensional nematic order of the adsorbed peptides, the membrane perturbation free energy is evaluated using a cell-like model; the peptide axes are parallel to the membrane plane. The elastic and interfacial contributions to the perturbation free energy of the “peptide-dressed” membrane are evaluated as a function of: the peptide penetration depth into the bilayer's hydrophobic core, the membrane thickness, the polar angle, and the lipid/peptide ratio. The structural properties calculated include the shape and extent of the distorted (stretched and bent) lipid chains surrounding the adsorbed peptide, and their orientational (C-H) bond order parameter profiles. The changes in bond order parameters attendant upon peptide adsorption are in good agreement with magnetic resonance measurements. Also consistent with experiment, our model predicts that peptide adsorption results in membrane thinning. Our calculations reveal pronounced, membrane-mediated, attractive interactions between the adsorbed peptides, suggesting a possible mechanism for lateral aggregation of membrane-bound peptides. As a special case of interest, we have also investigated completely hydrophobic peptides, for which we find a strong energetic preference for the transmembrane (inserted) orientation over the horizontal (adsorbed) orientation. PMID:15189858

  2. Structural analysis of bioceramic materials for denture application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauf, Nurlaela; Tahir, Dahlang; Arbiansyah, Muhammad

    2016-03-01

    Structural analysis has been performed on bioceramic materials for denture application by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). XRF is using for analysis chemical composition of raw materials. XRF shows the ratio 1 : 1 : 1 : 1 between feldspar, quartz, kaolin and eggshell, respectively, resulting composition CaO content of 56.78 %, which is similar with natural tooth. Sample preparation was carried out on temperature of 800 °C, 900 °C and 1000 °C. X-ray diffraction result showed that the structure is crystalline with trigonal crystal system for SiO2 (a=b=4.9134 Å and c=5.4051 Å) and CaH2O2 (a=b=3.5925 Å and c=4.9082 Å). Based on the Scherrer's equation showed the crystallite size of the highest peak (SiO2) increase with increasing the temperature preparation. The highest hardness value (87 kg/mm2) and match with the standards of dentin hardness. The surface structure was observed by using SEM also discussed.

  3. Fabrication of Bioceramic Bone Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fwu-Hsing

    2014-10-01

    In this study, microhydroxyapatite and nanosilica sol were used as the raw materials for fabrication of bioceramic bone scaffold using selective laser sintering technology in a self-developed 3D Printing apparatus. When the fluidity of ceramic slurry is matched with suitable laser processing parameters, a controlled pore size of porous bone scaffold can be fabricated under a lower laser energy. Results shown that the fabricated scaffolds have a bending strength of 14.1 MPa, a compressive strength of 24 MPa, a surface roughness of 725 nm, a pore size of 750 μm, an apparent porosity of 32%, and a optical density of 1.8. Results indicate that the mechanical strength of the scaffold can be improved after heat treatment at 1200 °C for 2 h, while simultaneously increasing surface roughness conducive to osteoprogenitor cell adhesion. MTT method and SEM observations confirmed that bone scaffolds fabricated under the optimal manufacturing process possess suitable biocompatibility and mechanical properties, allowing smooth adhesion and proliferation of osteoblast-like cells. Therefore, they have great potential for development in the field of tissue engineering.

  4. [Research on the mechanical properties of bone scaffold reinforced by magnesium alloy/bioceramics composite with stereolithography double channels].

    PubMed

    Li, Changhai; Lian, Qin; Zhuang, Pei; Wang, Junzhong; Li, Dichen

    2015-02-01

    Focusing on the poor mechanical strength of porous bioceramics bone scaffold, and taking into account of the good mechanical properties of biodegradable magnesium alloy, we proposed a novel method to fabricate magnesium alloy/bioceramics composite bone scaffold with stereolithography double channels. Firstly, a scaffold structure without mutually connected double channels was designed. Then, an optimized bioceramics scaffold was fabricated according to stereolithography and gel-casing. Molten AZ31 magnesium alloy was perfused into the secondary channel of scaffold by low-pressure casting, and magnesium alloy/bioceramics composite bone scaffold was obtained when magnesium alloy was solidified. The compression test showed that the strength of bioceramics scaffold with only one channel and without magnesium alloy was (9.76 ± 0.64) MPa, while the strength of magnesium alloy/bioceramics composite scaffold with double channels was (17.25 ± 0.88) MPa. It can be concluded that the magnesium alloy/bioceramics composite is obviously able to improve the scaffold strength.

  5. Effect of nanoscale patterned interfacial roughness on interfacial toughness.

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Moody, Neville Reid; Mook, William M.; Kennedy, Marian S.; Bahr, David F.; Zhou, Xiao Wang; Reedy, Earl David, Jr.

    2007-09-01

    The performance and the reliability of many devices are controlled by interfaces between thin films. In this study we investigated the use of patterned, nanoscale interfacial roughness as a way to increase the apparent interfacial toughness of brittle, thin-film material systems. The experimental portion of the study measured the interfacial toughness of a number of interfaces with nanoscale roughness. This included a silicon interface with a rectangular-toothed pattern of 60-nm wide by 90-nm deep channels fabricated using nanoimprint lithography techniques. Detailed finite element simulations were used to investigate the nature of interfacial crack growth when the interface is patterned. These simulations examined how geometric and material parameter choices affect the apparent toughness. Atomistic simulations were also performed with the aim of identifying possible modifications to the interfacial separation models currently used in nanoscale, finite element fracture analyses. The fundamental nature of atomistic traction separation for mixed mode loadings was investigated.

  6. Molecular dynamics studies of interfacial water at the alumina surface.

    SciTech Connect

    Argyris, Dr. Dimitrios; Ho, Thomas; Cole, David

    2011-01-01

    Interfacial water properties at the alumina surface were investigated via all-atom equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations at ambient temperature. Al-terminated and OH-terminated alumina surfaces were considered to assess the structural and dynamic behavior of the first few hydration layers in contact with the substrates. Density profiles suggest water layering up to {approx}10 {angstrom} from the solid substrate. Planar density distribution data indicate that water molecules in the first interfacial layer are organized in well-defined patterns dictated by the atomic terminations of the alumina surface. Interfacial water exhibits preferential orientation and delayed dynamics compared to bulk water. Water exhibits bulk-like behavior at distances greater than {approx}10 {angstrom} from the substrate. The formation of an extended hydrogen bond network within the first few hydration layers illustrates the significance of water?water interactions on the structural properties at the interface.

  7. Solid/liquid interfacial free energies in binary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nason, D.; Tiller, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    Description of a semiquantitative technique for predicting the segregation characteristics of smooth interfaces between binary solid and liquid solutions in terms of readily available thermodynamic parameters of the bulk solutions. A lattice-liquid interfacial model and a pair-bonded regular solution model are employed in the treatment with an accommodation for liquid interfacial entropy. The method is used to calculate the interfacial segregation and the free energy of segregation for solid-liquid interfaces between binary solutions for the (111) boundary of fcc crystals. The zone of compositional transition across the interface is shown to be on the order of a few atomic layers in width, being moderately narrower for ideal solutions. The free energy of the segregated interface depends primarily upon the solid composition and the heats of fusion of the component atoms, the composition difference of the solutions, and the difference of the heats of mixing of the solutions.

  8. Mullite/Mo interfaces formed by Intrusion bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolome, Jose F.; Diaz, Marcos; Moya, Jose S.; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2003-04-30

    The microstructure and strength of Mo/mullite interfaces formed by diffusion bonding at 1650 C has been analyzed. Interfacial metal-ceramic interlocking contributes to flexural strength of approx. 140 MPa as measured by 3 point bending. Saturation of mullite with MoO2 does not affect the interfacial strength.

  9. Stoichiometry, Crystallinity, and Nano-Scale Surface Morphology of the Graded Calcium Phosphate-Based Bio-Ceramic Interlayer on Ti-A1-V

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    a bonding interlayer between bone and implant [1]. Further- more, calcium phosphates with apatite-like structure are the major constituents of the...replication of biological apatites, featuring nano-crystalline structures in bone and dentin materials. Above all, surface morphology with nano-scale features...based films (including HA) deposition suffer from poor coating-metal implant interfacial bonding strength, excessive amorphosity or larger, than in

  10. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of akermanite bioceramics for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Jin, Xiaogang; Zhang, Xiaoling; Sun, Hongli; Tu, Jinwen; Tang, Tingting; Chang, Jiang; Dai, Kerong

    2009-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of a calcium magnesium silicate bioceramic (akermanite) for bone regeneration in vitro and in vivo, with beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) as a control. In vitro, the human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hBMSCs) were cultured in an osteogenic medium supplemented with a certain concentration of two bioceramics' extracts for 20 days. An MTT assay showed that akermanite extract promoted proliferation of hBMSC significantly more than did beta-TCP extract. The results of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity test and the expression of osteogenic marker genes such as ALP, osteopontin (OPN), osteocalcin (OCN) and bone sialoprotein (BSP) demonstrated that the osteogenic differentiation of hBMSC was enhanced more by akermanite extract than by beta-TCP extract. In vivo, a histomorphology analysis and histomorphometry of the two porous bioceramics implants in rabbit femur defect models indicated that both in early- and late-stage implantations, akermanite promoted more osteogenesis and biodegradation than did beta-TCP; and in late-stage implantations, the rate of new bone formation was faster in akermanite than in beta-TCP. These results suggest that akermanite might be a potential and attractive bioceramic for tissue engineering.

  11. Functional hydroxyapatite bioceramics with excellent osteoconductivity and stern-interface induced antibacterial ability.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chao; Gao, Jianyong; Wang, Ming; Shao, Yiran; Wang, Liping; Wang, Dalin; Zhu, Yingchun

    2016-04-01

    The biocompatibility and antibacterial properties of hydroxyapatite (HAp) bioceramics are crucial in medical applications. However, it is still a challenge to control HAp with antibacterial ability while maintaining other biological properties in the development of bioactive bone implants. Herein, we report functional silver ion substituted HAp bioceramics with excellent osteoconductivity and efficient antibacterial activity and propose a stern-interface induced antibacterial mechanism of such bioactive ceramics. In this antibacterial process, the concentration of Ag(+) at the stern-interface of Ag/HAp bioceramics is nearly 5 times higher than that in the bulk solution due to the trace dopant Ag(+) enrichment in the stern layer of the electric double layer at the negatively charged surface of Ag/HAp bioceramics. Trace Ag-doping in HAp induces a positive shift of zeta potential and increase of hydrophilicity, which may help inhibit bacterial proliferation. The positive osteoblast adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of ultra-trace doped Ag/HAp are also demonstrated through actin cytoskeleton staining, MTT and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity assays. This work may enlighten us on the artificial design of novel smart anti-infective bone grafts using ultra-trace functional elements and also suggest its potential applications in orthopedic surgery and bone osseointegration.

  12. Comparative characteristics of porous bioceramics for an osteogenic response in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Rim; Kim, Han-Jun; Ko, Ji-Seung; Choi, Yong-Suk; Ahn, Myun-Whan; Kim, Sukyoung; Do, Sun Hee

    2013-01-01

    Porous calcium phosphate ceramics are used in orthopedic and craniofacial applications to treat bone loss, or in dental applications to replace missing teeth. The implantation of these materials, however, does not induce stem cell differentiation, so suitable additional materials such as porous calcium phosphate discs are needed to influence physicochemical responses or structural changes. Rabbit adipose-derived stem cells (ADSC) and mouse osteoblastic cells (MC3T3-E1) were evaluated in vitro by the MTT assay, semi-quantitative RT-PCR, and immunoblotting using cells cultured in medium supplemented with extracts from bioceramics, including calcium metaphosphate (CMP), hydroxyapatite (HA) and collagen-grafted HA (HA-col). In vivo evaluation of the bone forming capacity of these bioceramics in rat models using femur defects and intramuscular implants for 12 weeks was performed. Histological analysis showed that newly formed stromal-rich tissues were observed in all the implanted regions and that the implants showed positive immunoreaction against type I collagen and alkaline phosphatase (ALP). The intramuscular implant region, in particular, showed strong positive immunoreactivity for both type I collagen and ALP, which was further confirmed by mRNA expression and immunoblotting results, indicating that each bioceramic material enhanced osteogenesis stimulation. These results support our hypothesis that smart bioceramics can induce osteoconduction and osteoinduction in vivo, although mature bone formation, including lacunae, osteocytes, and mineralization, was not prominent until 12 weeks after implantation.

  13. Tailoring the nanostructured surfaces of hydroxyapatite bioceramics to promote protein adsorption, osteoblast growth, and osteogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kaili; Xia, Lunguo; Gan, Jingbo; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Chen, Hong; Jiang, Xinquan; Chang, Jiang

    2013-08-28

    To promote and understand the biological responses of the implant via nanostructured surface design is essential for the development of bioactive bone implants. However, the control of the surface topography of the bioceramics in nanoscale is a big challenge because of their brittle property. Herein, the hydroxyapatite (HAp) bioceramics with distinct nanostructured topographies were fabricated via hydrothermal treatment using α-tricalcium phosphate ceramic as hard-template under different reaction conditions. HAp bioceramics with nanosheet, nanorod and micro-nanohybrid structured surface in macroscopical size were obtained by controlling the composition of the reaction media. Comparing with the traditional sample with flat and dense surface, the fabricated HAp bioceramics with hierarchical 3D micro-nanotextured surfaces possessed higher specific surface area, which selectively enhanced adsorption of specific proteins including Fn and Vn in plasma, and stimulated osteoblast adhesion, growth, and osoteogenic differentiation. In particular, the biomimetic features of the hierarchical micro-nanohybrid surface resulted in the best ability for simultaneous enhancement of protein adsorption, osteoblast proliferation, and differentiation. The results suggest that the hierarchical micro-nanohybrid topography might be one of the critical factors to be considered in the design of functional bone grafts.

  14. 3D-printed silicate porous bioceramics using a non-sacrificial preceramic polymer binder.

    PubMed

    Zocca, A; Elsayed, H; Bernardo, E; Gomes, C M; Lopez-Heredia, M A; Knabe, C; Colombo, P; Günster, J

    2015-05-22

    Silicate bioceramics possess an excellent bioactivity; however, shaping them into complex geometries is still challenging. Therefore, this paper aims to present a new strategy for the shaping of a bioglass-ceramic with controlled geometry and properties starting from a glass powder combined with a preceramic polymer, i.e. a silicon resin, and reactive fillers. The powder-based three-dimensional (3D)-printing of wollastonite (CaSiO3)-based silicate bioceramic parts was demonstrated in this work. The resin plays a dual role, as it not only acts as a non-sacrificial binder for the filler powders in the printing process but it also reacts with the fillers to generate the desired bioceramic phases. The mechanical and physical properties, i.e. ball-on-three-balls test, density, porosity and morphology, were evaluated in 3D-printed discs. These samples possessed a total porosity around 64 vol% and a biaxial flexural strength around 6 MPa. The raw materials used in this work also enabled the 3D-printing of scaffolds possessing a designed multi-scale porosity, suitable bioceramic phase assemblage and a compressive strength of 1 MPa (for cylindrical scaffolds with total porosity ~80 vol%). Solubility in TRIS/HCl and in vitro assays, i.e. viability, cytotoxicity and apoptosis assays, were also performed. In vitro tests indicated good cell viability and no cytotoxicity effect on the cells.

  15. Surface modification of titanium by nano-TiO 2/HA bioceramic coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, G.; Hu, J.; Wei, S. C.; Li, J. H.; Liang, X. H.; Luo, E.

    2008-11-01

    A nano-TiO 2/hydroxyapatite composite bioceramic coating was developed and applied to the surfaces of pure titanium discs by the sol-gel method. A TiO 2 anatase bioceramic coating was utilized in the inner layer, which could adhere tightly to the titanium substrate. A porous hydroxyapatite (HA) bioceramic coating was utilized in the outer layer, which has higher solubility and better short-term bioactivity. Conventional HA coatings and commercially pure titanium were used as controls. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed to characterize the crystallization, surface morphology, and thickness of the coatings. The bioactivities of the coatings were evaluated by in vitro osteoblast cultures. Results showed that the nano-TiO 2/HA composite bioceramic coating exhibited good crystallization and homogeneous, nano-scale surface morphology. In addition, the nano-TiO 2/HA coating adhered tightly to the substrate, and the in vitro osteoblast cultures exhibited satisfactory bioactivity.

  16. Bent Bonds and Multiple Bonds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Edward A.; Gillespie, Ronald J.

    1980-01-01

    Considers carbon-carbon multiple bonds in terms of Pauling's bent bond model, which allows direct calculation of double and triple bonds from the length of a CC single bond. Lengths of these multiple bonds are estimated from direct measurements on "bent-bond" models constructed of plastic tubing and standard kits. (CS)

  17. Mechanobiology of interfacial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarletta, P.; Preziosi, L.; Maugin, G. A.

    2013-03-01

    A multiscale analysis integrating biomechanics and mechanobiology is today required for deciphering the crosstalk between biochemistry, geometry and elasticity in living materials. In this paper we derive a unified thermomechanical theory coupling growth processes with mass transport phenomena across boundaries and/or material interfaces. Inside a living system made by two contiguous bodies with varying volumes, an interfacial growth mechanism is considered to force fast but continuous variations of the physical fields inside a narrow volume across the material interface. Such a phenomenon is modelled deriving homogenized surface fields on a growing non-material discontinuity, possibly including a singular edge line. A number of balance laws is derived for imposing the conservation of the thermomechanical properties of the biological system. From thermodynamical arguments we find that the normal displacement of the non-material interface is governed by the jump of a new form of material mechanical-energy flux, also involving the kinetic energies and the mass fluxes. Furthermore, the configurational balance indicates that the surface Eshelby tensor is the tangential stress measure driving the material inhomogeneities on the non-material interface. Accordingly, stress-dependent evolution laws for bulk and interfacial growth processes are derived for both volume and surface fields. The proposed thermomechanical theory is finally applied to three biological system models. The first two examples are focused on stress-free growth problems, concerning the morphogenesis of animal horns and of seashells. The third application finally deals with the stress-driven surface evolution of avascular tumours with heterogeneous structures. The results demonstrate that the proposed theory can successfully model those biological systems where growth and mass transport phenomena interact at different length-scales. Coupling biological, mechanical and geometrical factors, the proposed

  18. Effect of nano-structured bioceramic surface on osteogenic differentiation of adipose derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Xia, Lunguo; Lin, Kaili; Jiang, Xinquan; Fang, Bing; Xu, Yuanjin; Liu, Jiaqiang; Zeng, Deliang; Zhang, Maolin; Zhang, Xiuli; Chang, Jiang; Zhang, Zhiyuan

    2014-10-01

    Tissue engineering strategies to construct vascularized bone grafts potentially revolutionize the treatment of massive bone loss. The surface topography of the grafts plays critical roles on bone regeneration, while adipose derived stem cells (ASCs) are known for their capability to promote osteogenesis and angiogenesis when applied to bone defects. In the present study, the effects of hydroxyapatite (HAp) bioceramic scaffolds with nanosheet, nanorod, and micro-nano-hybrid (the hybrid of nanorod and microrod) surface topographies on attachment, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation, as well as the expression of angiogenic factors of rat ASCs were systematically investigated. The results showed that the HAp bioceramic scaffolds with the micro-/nano-topography surfaces significantly enhanced cell attachment and viability, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and mRNA expression levels of osteogenic markers and angiogenic factors of ASCs. More importantly, the biomimetic feature of the hierarchical micro-nano-hybrid surface topography showed the highest stimulatory effect. The activation in Akt signaling pathway was observed in ASCs cultured on HAp bioceramics with nanorod, and micro-nano-hybrid surface topographies. Moreover, these induction effects could be repressed by Akt signaling pathway inhibitor LY294002. Finally, the in vivo bone regeneration results of rat critical-sized calvarial defect models confirmed that the combination of the micro-nano-hybrid surface and ASCs could significantly enhance both osteogenesis and angiogenesis as compared with the control HAp bioceramic scaffold with traditional smooth surface. Our results suggest that HAp bioceramic scaffolds with micro-nano-hybrid surface can act as cell carrier for ASCs, and consequently combine with ASCs to construct vascularized tissue-engineered bone.

  19. Enhanced Calcium Phosphate Precipitation on the Surface of Mg-ION-IMPLANTED ZrO2 Bioceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, H.; Huang, Y.; He, F.; Ding, H. F.; Wan, Y. Z.

    Modification of bioceramics by ion implantation of magnesium (Mg) is of interest as Mg is the fourth abundant cation in the human body. In this work, magnesium was ion-implanted into a ZrO2 based bioceramic stabilized with Y2O3 and Al2O3. Both Mg-implanted and unimplanted samples were soaked in a simulated body fluid (SBF) for a period of time. The deposits on the surface of various samples were characterized with scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). We find that the Mg-implanted ZrO2 shows better bioactivity than the plain bioceramic. These results indicate that Mg-implantation can improve the bioactivity of the ZrO2 based bioceramic. Mechanisms governing the improvement are discussed in this paper.

  20. Oxide-bioceramic coatings obtained on titanium items by the induction heat treatment and modified with hydroxyapatite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, Aleksandr A.; Fomina, Marina A.; Rodionov, Igor V.; Koshuro, Vladimir A.; Petrova, Natalia V.; Skaptsov, Aleksandr A.; Atkin, Vsevolod S.

    2015-06-01

    Prospective composite bioceramic titania coatings were obtained on intraosseous implants fabricated from cp-titanium and medical titanium alloy VT16 (Ti-2.5Al-5Mo-5V). Consistency changes of morphological characteristics, mechanical properties and biocompatibility of experimental titanium implant coatings obtained by oxidation during induction heat treatment are defined. Technological recommendations for obtaining bioceramic coatings with extremely high strength on titanium items surface are given.

  1. Interfacial Instabilities in Evaporating Drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffat, Ross; Sefiane, Khellil; Matar, Omar

    2007-11-01

    We study the effect of substrate thermal properties on the evaporation of sessile drops of various liquids. An infra-red imaging technique was used to record the interfacial temperature. This technique illustrates the non-uniformity in interfacial temperature distribution that characterises the evaporation process. Our results also demonstrate that the evaporation of methanol droplets is accompanied by the formation of wave-trains in the interfacial temperature field; similar patterns, however, were not observed in the case of water droplets. More complex patterns are observed for FC-72 refrigerant drops. The effect of substrate thermal conductivity on the structure of the complex pattern formation is also elucidated.

  2. International Symposium on Interfacial Joining and Surface Technology (IJST2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yasuo

    2014-08-01

    Interfacial joining (bonding) is a widely accepted welding process and one of the environmentally benign technologies used in industrial production. As the bonding temperature is lower than the melting point of the parent materials, melting of the latter is kept to a minimum. The process can be based on diffusion bonding, pressure welding, friction welding, ultrasonic bonding, or brazing-soldering, all of which offer many advantages over fusion welding. In addition, surface technologies such as surface modification, spraying, coating, plating, and thin-film formation are necessary for advanced manufacturing, fabrication, and electronics packaging. Together, interfacial joining and surface technology (IJST) will continue to be used in various industrial fields because IJST is a very significant form of environmentally conscious materials processing. The international symposium of IJST 2013 was held at Icho Kaikan, Osaka University, Japan from 27-29 November, 2013. A total of 138 participants came from around the world to attend 56 oral presentations and 36 posters presented at the symposium, and to discuss the latest research and developments on interfacial joining and surface technologies. This symposium was also held to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the Technical Commission on Interfacial Joining of the Japan Welding Society. On behalf of the chair of the symposium, it is my great pleasure to present this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering (MSE). Among the presentations, 43 papers are published here, and I believe all of the papers have provided the welding community with much useful information. I would like to thank the authors for their enthusiastic and excellent contributions. Finally, I would like to thank all members of the committees, secretariats, participants, and everyone who contributed to this symposium through their support and invaluable effort for the success of IJST 2013. Yasuo Takahashi Chair of IJST 2013

  3. Relationship Between Casting Distortion, Mold Filling, and Interfacial Heat Transfer in Sand Molds

    SciTech Connect

    J. K. Parker; K. A. Woodbury; T. S. Piwonka; Y. Owusu

    1999-09-30

    This project sought to determine the relationship between casting dimensions and interfacial heat transfer in aluminum alloy sand castings. The program had four parts; measurement of interfacial heat transfer coefficients in resin bonded and green sand molds, the measurement of gap formation in these molds, the analysis of castings made in varying gatings, orientations and thicknesses, and the measurement of residual stresses in castings in the as-cast and gate removed condition. New values for interfacial heat transfer coefficients were measured, a novel method for gap formation was developed, and the variation of casting dimensions with casting method, gating, and casting orientation in the mold was documented.

  4. Iridium Interfacial Stack - IrIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spry, David

    2012-01-01

    Iridium Interfacial Stack (IrIS) is the sputter deposition of high-purity tantalum silicide (TaSi2-400 nm)/platinum (Pt-200 nm)/iridium (Ir-200 nm)/platinum (Pt-200 nm) in an ultra-high vacuum system followed by a 600 C anneal in nitrogen for 30 minutes. IrIS simultaneously acts as both a bond metal and a diffusion barrier. This bondable metallization that also acts as a diffusion barrier can prevent oxygen from air and gold from the wire-bond from infiltrating silicon carbide (SiC) monolithically integrated circuits (ICs) operating above 500 C in air for over 1,000 hours. This TaSi2/Pt/Ir/Pt metallization is easily bonded for electrical connection to off-chip circuitry and does not require extra anneals or masking steps. There are two ways that IrIS can be used in SiC ICs for applications above 500 C: it can be put directly on a SiC ohmic contact metal, such as Ti, or be used as a bond metal residing on top of an interconnect metal. For simplicity, only the use as a bond metal is discussed. The layer thickness ratio of TaSi2 to the first Pt layer deposited thereon should be 2:1. This will allow Si from the TaSi2 to react with the Pt to form Pt2Si during the 600 C anneal carried out after all layers have been deposited. The Ir layer does not readily form a silicide at 600 C, and thereby prevents the Si from migrating into the top-most Pt layer during future anneals and high-temperature IC operation. The second (i.e., top-most) deposited Pt layer needs to be about 200 nm to enable easy wire bonding. The thickness of 200 nm for Ir was chosen for initial experiments; further optimization of the Ir layer thickness may be possible via further experimentation. Ir itself is not easily wire-bonded because of its hardness and much higher melting point than Pt. Below the iridium layer, the TaSi2 and Pt react and form desired Pt2Si during the post-deposition anneal while above the iridium layer remains pure Pt as desired to facilitate easy and strong wire-bonding to the Si

  5. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bozovic, Ivan; Logvenov, Gennady; Gozar, Adrian Mihai

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  6. Diffusion bonding of titanium-titanium aluminide-alumina sandwich

    SciTech Connect

    Wickman, H.A.; Chin, E.S.C.; Biederman, R.R.

    1995-12-31

    Diffusion bonding of a metallic-intermetallic-ceramic sandwich is of interest for potential armor applications. Low cost titanium, titanium diboride reinforced titanium aluminide (Ti-48at.%Al), and aluminum oxide are diffusion bonded in a vacuum furnace between 1,000 C and 1,400 C. Metallographic examination of the prior bonding interface showed excellent metallurgical coupling between the Ti-48at.%Al composite and the low cost Ti. A series of microstructures representative of phases consistent with a hypothetical Ti-Al-B phase diagram is visible. The alumina-Ti-48at.%Al interfacial bond is achieved through penetration of titanium-aluminum phases into the existing alumina porosity. A detailed microstructural analysis identifying mechanisms of interfacial bonding will be presented for each interfacial zone.

  7. Visualizing interfacial charge transfer in dye sensitized nanoparticles using x-ray transient absorption spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. Y.; Smolentsev, G.; Guo, J.; Attenkofer, K.; Kurtz, C.; Jennings, G.; Lockard, J. V.; Stickrath, A. B.; Chen, L. X.

    2011-01-01

    A molecular level understanding of the structural reorganization accompanying interfacial electron transfer is important for rational design of solar cells. Here we have applied XTA (X-ray transient absorption) spectroscopy to study transient structures in a heterogeneous interfacial system mimicking the charge separation process in dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) with Ru(dcbpy){sub 2}(NCS){sub 2} (RuN3) dye adsorbed to TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle surfaces. The results show that the average Ru-NCS bond length reduces by 0.06 {angstrom}, whereas the average Ru-N(dcbpy) bond length remains nearly unchanged after the electron injection. The differences in bond-order change and steric hindrance between two types of ligands are attributed to their structural response in the charge separation. This study extends the application of XTA into optically opaque hybrid interfacial systems relevant to the solar energy conversion.

  8. Ultrasonic characterization of interfaces in composite bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, N.; Lobkis, O. I.; Rokhlin, S. I.; Cantrell, J. H.

    2011-06-23

    The inverse determination of imperfect interfaces from reflection spectra of normal and oblique incident ultrasonic waves in adhesive bonds of multidirectional composites is investigated. The oblique measurements are complicated by the highly dispersed nature of oblique wave spectra at frequencies above 3MHz. Different strategies for bond property reconstruction, including a modulation method, are discussed. The relation of measured interfacial spring density to the physico-chemical model of a composite interface described by polymer molecular bonds to emulate loss of molecular strength on an adhesive composite interface is discussed. This potentially relates the interfacial (adhesion) strength (number of bonds at the adhesive substrate interface) to the spring constant (stiffness) area density (flux), which is an ultrasonically measurable parameter.

  9. Ultrasonic Characterization of Interfaces in Composite Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, N.; Lobkis, O. I.; Rokhlin, S. I.; Cantrell, J. H.

    2010-01-01

    The inverse determination of imperfect interfaces from reflection spectra of normal and oblique incident ultrasonic waves in adhesive bonds of multidirectional composites is investigated. The oblique measurements are complicated by the highly dispersed nature of oblique wave spectra at frequencies above 3MHz. Different strategies for bond property reconstruction, including a modulation method, are discussed. The relation of measured interfacial spring density to the physico-chemical model of a composite interface described by polymer molecular bonds to emulate loss of molecular strength on an adhesive composite interface is discussed. This potentially relates the interfacial (adhesion) strength (number of bonds at the adhesive substrate interface) to the spring constant (stiffness) area density (flux), which is an ultrasonically measurable parameter.

  10. Trend report on international and Japanese standardization activities for bioceramics and tissue engineered medical products.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Sadami

    2010-02-01

    Since porous and injectable bioceramics have recently been utilized often as scaffolds for bone regenerative medicine, the need for their standardization has increased. One of the standard proposals in ISO/TC150 and JIS has been a draft for characterization of the porous bioceramic scaffolds in both micro- and macro-scopic aspects. ISO/TC150/SC7 (Tissue engineered medical products) has been co-chaired by Professor J E Lemons, Department of Surgery, University of Alabama at Birmingham and Dr R Nakaoka, Division of Medical Devices, National Institute of Health Sciences, Japan. The scope of SC7 has been specified as 'Standardization for the general requirements and performance of tissue engineered medical products with the exclusion of gene therapy, transplantation and transfusion'.

  11. Polyfunctional bioceramics modified by M-type hexagonal ferrite particles for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachenko, M. V.; Ol'Khovik, L. P.; Kamzin, A. S.

    2011-06-01

    Magnetic bioceramics based on Ca5(PO4)3OH hydroxyapatite and M-type hexagonal ferrite (HF) microcrystals has been synthesized and characterized. The material consists of a biocompatible apatite matrix containing dispersed M-type HF particles. The latter component makes the magnetic characteristics of synthesized ceramics significantly higher as compared to those of iron-oxide-modified bioglass ceramics currently used in medicine. These properties increase the efficiency and prospects of using the new bioceramics in medicine, in particular, for the hyperthermal treatment of malignant tumors. Thus, a new class of materials is created, which combine the necessary biocompatibility and biological activity of Ca5(PO4)3OH hydroxyapatite and high magnetic characteristics of M-type HF microcrystals.

  12. Three-dimensional printing of porous load-bearing bioceramic scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, Elena; Alharbi, Naif; Bretcanu, Oana A; Marshall, Martyn; Birch, Mark A; McCaskie, Andrew W; Dalgarno, Kenneth W

    2016-12-01

    This article reports on the use of the binder jetting three-dimensional printing process combined with sintering to process bioceramic materials to form micro- and macroporous three-dimensional structures. Three different glass-ceramic formulations, apatite-wollastonite and two silicate-based glasses, have been processed using this route to create porous structures which have Young's modulus equivalent to cortical bone and average bending strengths in the range 24-36 MPa. It is demonstrated that a range of macroporous geometries can be created with accuracies of ±0.25 mm over length scales up to 40 mm. Hot-stage microscopy is a valuable tool in the definition of processing parameters for the sintering step of the process. Overall, it is concluded that binder jetting followed by sintering offers a versatile process for the manufacture of load-bearing bioceramic components for bone replacement applications.

  13. Trend report on international and Japanese standardization activities for bioceramics and tissue engineered medical products

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsumi, Sadami

    2010-01-01

    Since porous and injectable bioceramics have recently been utilized often as scaffolds for bone regenerative medicine, the need for their standardization has increased. One of the standard proposals in ISO/TC150 and JIS has been a draft for characterization of the porous bioceramic scaffolds in both micro- and macro-scopic aspects. ISO/TC150/SC7 (Tissue engineered medical products) has been co-chaired by Professor J E Lemons, Department of Surgery, University of Alabama at Birmingham and Dr R Nakaoka, Division of Medical Devices, National Institute of Health Sciences, Japan. The scope of SC7 has been specified as ‘Standardization for the general requirements and performance of tissue engineered medical products with the exclusion of gene therapy, transplantation and transfusion’. PMID:27877327

  14. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of a nanoparticulate bioceramic paste for dental pulp repair.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lingxin; Yang, Jingwen; Zhang, Jie; Lei, Dongqi; Xiao, Lan; Cheng, Xue; Lin, Ying; Peng, Bin

    2014-12-01

    Bioactive materials play an important role in facilitating dental pulp repair when living dental pulp is exposed after injuries. Mineral trioxide aggregate is the currently recommended material of choice for pulp repair procedures though has several disadvantages, especially the inconvenience of handling. Little information is yet available about the early events and molecular mechanisms involved in bioceramic-mediated dental pulp repair. We aimed to characterize and determine the apatite-forming ability of the novel ready-to-use nanoparticulate bioceramic iRoot BP Plus, and investigate its effects on the in vitro recruitment of human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), as well as its capacity to induce dentin bridge formation in an in vivo model of pulp repair. It was found that iRoot BP Plus was nanosized and had excellent apatite-forming ability in vitro. Treatment with iRoot BP Plus extracts promoted the adhesion, migration and attachment of DPSCs, and optimized focal adhesion formation (Vinculin, p-Paxillin and p-Focal adhesion kinase) and stress fibre assembly. Consistent with the in vitro results, we observed the formation of a homogeneous dentin bridge and the expression of odontogenic (dentin sialoprotein, dentin matrix protein 1) and focal adhesion molecules (Vinculin, p-Paxillin) at the injury site of pulp repair model by iRoot BP Plus. Our findings provide valuable insights into the mechanism of bioceramic-mediated dental pulp repair, and the novel revolutionary ready-to-use nanoparticulate bioceramic paste shows promising therapeutic potential in dental pulp repair application.

  15. Strontium-doped calcium silicate bioceramic with enhanced in vitro osteogenic properties.

    PubMed

    No, Young Jung; Roohani-Esfahani, Seyed-Iman; Lu, Zufu; Shi, Jeffrey; Zreiqat, Hala

    2017-03-28

    Gehlenite (GLN, Ca2SiAl2O7) is a bioceramic that has been recently shown to possess excellent mechanical strength and in vitro osteogenic properties for bone regeneration. Substitutional incorporation of strontium in place of calcium is an effective way to further enhance biological properties of calcium-based bioceramics and glasses. However, such strategy has the potential to affect other important physicochemical parameters such as strength and degradation due to differences in the ionic radius of strontium and calcium. This study is the first to investigate the effect of a range of concentrations of strontium substitution of calcium at 1, 2, 5, 10 mol% (S1-GLN, S2-GLN, S5-GLN and S10-GLN) on the physicochemical and biological properties of GLN. We showed that up to 2 mol% strontium ion substitution retains the monophasic GLN structure when sintered at 1450 oC, whereas higher concentrations resulted in presence of calcium silicate impurities. Increased strontium incorporation resulted in changes in grain morphology and reduced densification when the ceramics were sintered at 1450 oC. Porous GLN, S1-GLN and S2-GLN scaffolds (~80% porosity) showed compressive strengths of 2.05 ± 0.46 MPa, 1.76 ± 0.79 MPa and 1.57 ± 0.52 MPa respectively. S1-GLN and S2-GLN immersed in simulated body fluid showed increased strontium ion release but reduced calcium and silicon ion release compared to GLN without affecting overall weight loss and pH over a 21 day period. The bioactivity of the S2-GLN ceramics was significantly improved as reflected in the significant upregulation of HOB proliferation and differentiation compared to GLN. Overall, these results suggest that increased incorporation of strontium presents a trade-off between bioactivity and mechanical strength for GLN bioceramics. This is an important consideration in the development of strontium-doped bioceramics.

  16. A comparative biomechanical study of bone ingrowth in two porous hydroxyapatite bioceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Li-Mei; Todo, Mitsugu; Arahira, Takaaki; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Myoui, Akira

    2012-12-01

    Calcium phosphate-based bioceramics have been widely used as artificial bone substitute materials because of their superior biocompatibility and osteoconductivity. In the present study, mechanical properties changes of two hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramics induced by bone ingrowth were tested and evaluated in a rabbit model. Both materials (NEOBONE®, Apaceram-AX®) have highly interconnected pores with a porosity of 75-85%. The major structural difference between them lies in that Apaceram-AX® has micropores smaller than 10 micrometers in diameter, whereas NEOBONE® does not contain such micropores. Both materials were implanted into the femoral condyles of rabbits for the specified observation period (1, 5, 12, 24, and 48 weeks) and then evaluated by experimental approach in combination with finite element method (FEM). Results indicate that two porous bioceramics exhibit different degradability in vivo, and remarkably different variation of total stiffness, elastic modulus distribution, as well as strain energy density distribution calculated by FE simulation. These results demonstrate how the internal microstructures affect the progress of bone regeneration and mechanical properties with the duration of implantation, emphasizing the importance of biomaterial design tailored to various clinic applications. Additionally, this study showed a potential for applying the computational method to monitor the time-dependent biomechanical changes of implanted porous bioceramics.

  17. Akermanite bioceramics promote osteogenesis, angiogenesis and suppress osteoclastogenesis for osteoporotic bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Xia, Lunguo; Yin, Zhilan; Mao, Lixia; Wang, Xiuhui; Liu, Jiaqiang; Jiang, Xinquan; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Lin, Kaili; Chang, Jiang; Fang, Bing

    2016-02-25

    It is a big challenge for bone healing under osteoporotic pathological condition with impaired angiogenesis, osteogenesis and remodeling. In the present study, the effect of Ca, Mg, Si containing akermanite bioceramics (Ca2MgSi2O7) extract on cell proliferation, osteogenic differentiation and angiogenic factor expression of BMSCs derived from ovariectomized rats (BMSCs-OVX) as well as the expression of osteoclastogenic factors was evaluated. The results showed that akermanite could enhance cell proliferation, ALP activity, expression of Runx2, BMP-2, BSP, OPN, OCN, OPG and angiogenic factors including VEGF and ANG-1. Meanwhile, akermanite could repress expression of osteoclastogenic factors including RANKL and TNF-α. Moreover, akermanite could activate ERK, P38, AKT and STAT3 signaling pathways, while crosstalk among these signaling pathways was evident. More importantly, the effect of akermanite extract on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis was evaluated by TRAP staining and real-time PCR assay. The results showed that akermanite could suppress osteoclast formation and expression of TRAP, cathepsin K and NFATc1. The in vivo experiments revealed that akermanite bioceramics dramatically stimulated osteogenesis and angiogenesis in an OVX rat critical-sized calvarial defect model. All these results suggest that akermanite bioceramics with the effects of Mg and Si ions on osteogenesis, angiogenesis and osteoclastogenesis are promising biomaterials for osteoporotic bone regeneration.

  18. Poly-cyclodextrin functionalized porous bioceramics for local chemotherapy and anticancer bone reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chai, Feng; Abdelkarim, Mohamed; Laurent, Thomas; Tabary, Nicolas; Degoutin, Stephanie; Simon, Nicolas; Peters, Fabian; Blanchemain, Nicolas; Martel, Bernard; Hildebrand, Hartmut F

    2014-08-01

    The progress in bone cancer surgery and multimodal treatment concept achieve only modest improvement in the overall survival, due to failure in clearing out residual cancer cells at the surgical margin and extreme side-effects of adjuvant postoperative treatments. Our study aims to propose a new method based on cyclodextrin polymer (polyCD) functionalized hydroxyapatite (HA) for achieving a high local drug concentration with a sustained release profile and a better control of residual malignant cells via local drug delivery and promotion of the reconstruction of bone defects. PolyCD, a versatile carrier for therapeutic molecules, can be incorporated into HA (bone regeneration scaffold) through thermal treatment. The parameters of polyCD treatment on the macroporous HA (porosity 65%) were characterized via thermogravimetric analysis. Good cytocompatibility of polyCD functionalized bioceramics was demonstrated on osteoblast cells by cell vitality assay. An antibiotic (gentamicin) and an anticancer agent (cisplatin) were respectively loaded on polyCD functionalized bioceramics for drug release test. The results show that polyCD functionalization leads to significantly improved drug loading quantity (30% more concerning gentamicin and twice more for cisplatin) and drug release duration (7 days longer concerning gentamicin and 3 days longer for cisplatin). Conclusively, this study offers a safe and reliable drug delivery system for bioceramic matrices, which can load anticancer agents (or/and antibiotics) to reduce local recurrence (or/and infection).

  19. A comparative study on the synthesis mechanism, bioactivity and mechanical properties of three silicate bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Najafinezhad, Aliakbar; Abdellahi, Majid; Ghayour, Hamid; Soheily, Ali; Chami, Akbar; Khandan, Amirsalar

    2017-03-01

    In the present study three akermanite (Ca2MgSi2O7), diopside (CaMgSi2O6) and baghdadite (Ca3ZrSi2O9) applicable bioceramics were synthesized via a sol-gel based method. The combination of sol-gel method and the raw materials used in this study presents a new route for the synthesis of the mentioned bioceramics. By the use of thermal analysis, the mechanisms occurred during the synthesis of these bioceramics were investigated. The differences in the structural density and their relation with the degradation rate and mechanical properties of all three ceramics were studied. In vitro bioactivity and apatite formation mechanisms of the samples soaked in the simulated body fluid were considered. The results showed that baghdadite as a Zr-containing material has a more dense structure in comparison with the other ceramics, which leads to a lower degradation rate and also lower bioactivity. There were also main differences between akermanite and diopside as Mg-containing ceramics. Diopside showed a structure with lower porosity content compared to the akermanite samples which resulted in the lower degradation rate and higher compressive strength.

  20. Akermanite bioceramics promote osteogenesis, angiogenesis and suppress osteoclastogenesis for osteoporotic bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Lunguo; Yin, Zhilan; Mao, Lixia; Wang, Xiuhui; Liu, Jiaqiang; Jiang, Xinquan; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Lin, Kaili; Chang, Jiang; Fang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    It is a big challenge for bone healing under osteoporotic pathological condition with impaired angiogenesis, osteogenesis and remodeling. In the present study, the effect of Ca, Mg, Si containing akermanite bioceramics (Ca2MgSi2O7) extract on cell proliferation, osteogenic differentiation and angiogenic factor expression of BMSCs derived from ovariectomized rats (BMSCs-OVX) as well as the expression of osteoclastogenic factors was evaluated. The results showed that akermanite could enhance cell proliferation, ALP activity, expression of Runx2, BMP-2, BSP, OPN, OCN, OPG and angiogenic factors including VEGF and ANG-1. Meanwhile, akermanite could repress expression of osteoclastogenic factors including RANKL and TNF-α. Moreover, akermanite could activate ERK, P38, AKT and STAT3 signaling pathways, while crosstalk among these signaling pathways was evident. More importantly, the effect of akermanite extract on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis was evaluated by TRAP staining and real-time PCR assay. The results showed that akermanite could suppress osteoclast formation and expression of TRAP, cathepsin K and NFATc1. The in vivo experiments revealed that akermanite bioceramics dramatically stimulated osteogenesis and angiogenesis in an OVX rat critical-sized calvarial defect model. All these results suggest that akermanite bioceramics with the effects of Mg and Si ions on osteogenesis, angiogenesis and osteoclastogenesis are promising biomaterials for osteoporotic bone regeneration. PMID:26911441

  1. Mechanical characterization of injection-molded macro porous bioceramic bone scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Vivanco, Juan; Aiyangar, Ameet; Araneda, Aldo; Ploeg, Heidi-Lynn

    2012-05-01

    Bioactive ceramic materials like tricalcium phosphate (TCP) have been emerging as viable material alternatives to the current therapies of bone scaffolding to target fracture healing and osteoporosis. Both material and architectural characteristics play a critical role in the osteoconductive capacity and strength of bone scaffolds. Thus, the objective of this research was to investigate the sintering temperature effect of a cost-effective manufacturing process on the architecture and mechanical properties of a controlled macro porous bioceramic bone scaffold. In this study the physical and mechanical properties of β-TCP bioceramic scaffolds were investigated as a function of the sintering temperature in the range of 950-1150 °C. Physical properties investigated included bulk dimensions, pore size, and strut thickness; and, compressive mechanical properties were evaluated in air at room temperature and in saline solution at body temperature. Statistically significant increases in apparent elastic modulus were measured for scaffolds sintered at higher temperatures. Structural stiffness for all the specimens was significantly reduced when tested at body temperature in saline solution. These findings support the development of clinically successful bioceramic scaffolds that may stimulate bone regeneration and scaffold integration while providing structural integrity.

  2. The effect of sintering temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a bioceramic bone scaffold.

    PubMed

    Vivanco, Juan; Slane, Josh; Nay, Rick; Simpson, Amanda; Ploeg, Heidi-Lynn

    2011-11-01

    Micro and nanostructural properties are believed to play a critical role in the osteoinductive capacity of bioceramic bone scaffolds. Physical characteristics also play an important role for optimum biological performance, including osteoconductivity and strength. In this study microstructural and nano-mechanical properties of a bioceramic bone scaffold were investigated as a function of the sintering temperature in the range of 950-1150 °C, through the use of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and nanoindentation testing. Although the samples presented the same crystallographic phase, an increase in sintering temperature resulted in increased grain size, density and crystallite size. The intrinsic mechanical properties were measured by nanoindentation testing and analyzed with the Oliver-Pharr method. The nanoindentation tests consisted of a series of fourteen partial unload tests (n=14 per treatment) of twelve steps ranging from 1 to 12 mN. Statistically significant increases in hardness and elastic modulus were measured for increasing sintering temperature. These results support the development of clinically successful bioceramic scaffolds with mechanical properties that encourage bone ingrowth and provide structural integrity.

  3. Conformational Changes and Competitive Adsorption between Serum Albumin and Hemoglobin on Bioceramic Substrates.

    PubMed

    Gruian, Cristina Mihaela; Rickert, Christian; Nicklisch, Sascha C T; Vanea, Emilia; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen; Simon, Simion

    2017-01-05

    Traditional methods to analyze interactions and conformational changes of proteins adsorbed onto biomaterials are limited by the protein's associations with the substrate material and the complexity of the surrounding media. We have used EPR spectroscopy in combination with site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) to investigate single protein and competitive adsorption kinetics of horse hemoglobin (Hgb) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) on a silica-calcium-phosphate bioceramic substrate. Combined continuous wave and pulsed (DEER) EPR techniques were employed to monitor local mobility/flexibility changes within the proteins and tertiary structure dynamics upon adsorption. An alternate labeling technique was introduced to allow for specific quantification of each protein adsorbed to the bioceramic surface. We show that at buffer pH 7.4 and 4.7 the amount of adsorbed hemoglobin was increased by a factor of 4-5 compared with BSA. The tertiary structure of hemoglobin was strongly affected upon adsorption, leading to a dissociation of the tetrameric molecule into monomers or αβ dimers. When the bioceramic substrate was previously functionalized with a layer of BSA, dissociation was reduced by 71 % compared with the untreated surface, indicating a "primer" effect of BSA for better adhesion of the globular hemoglobin.

  4. Calcium phosphate bioceramics fabricated from extracted human teeth for tooth tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ki-Taek; Suh, Je Duck; Kim, Jangho; Choung, Pill-Hoon; Chung, Jong Hoon

    2011-11-01

    Bioceramic tooth powders were prepared via heat treatment of extracted human teeth using sintering temperatures between 600°C and 1200°C, and their properties were investigated for potential tooth tissue engineering. The sintered human tooth powders were characterized using thermal analysis (thermogravimetric analysis (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA)), field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Additionally, the phase constitutions and chemical homogeneities of the composite samples were examined using a quantitative chemical analysis with inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy. The results revealed that the annealing process produced useful hydroxyapatite-based bioceramic biomaterials when annealed above 1000°C. The FTIR spectra and the TG/DTA thermograms of the tooth powders indicated the presence of organic compounds, which were completely removed after annealing at temperatures above 1000°C. The tooth powders annealed between 1000°C and 1200°C had good characteristics as bioceramic biomaterials. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of each tooth powder was evaluated using in vitro and in vivo techniques; our results indicate that the prepared human tooth powders have great potential for tooth tissue engineering applications.

  5. Three-Dimensional Printing of Hollow-Struts-Packed Bioceramic Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yongxiang; Zhai, Dong; Huan, Zhiguang; Zhu, Haibo; Xia, Lunguo; Chang, Jiang; Wu, Chengtie

    2015-11-04

    Three-dimensional printing technologies have shown distinct advantages to create porous scaffolds with designed macropores for application in bone tissue engineering. However, until now, 3D-printed bioceramic scaffolds only possessing a single type of macropore have been reported. Generally, those scaffolds with a single type of macropore have relatively low porosity and pore surfaces, limited delivery of oxygen and nutrition to surviving cells, and new bone tissue formation in the center of the scaffolds. Therefore, in this work, we present a useful and facile method for preparing hollow-struts-packed (HSP) bioceramic scaffolds with designed macropores and multioriented hollow channels via a modified coaxial 3D printing strategy. The prepared HSP scaffolds combined high porosity and surface area with impressive mechanical strength. The unique hollow-struts structures of bioceramic scaffolds significantly improved cell attachment and proliferation and further promoted formation of new bone tissue in the center of the scaffolds, indicating that HSP ceramic scaffolds can be used for regeneration of large bone defects. In addition, the strategy can be used to prepare other HSP ceramic scaffolds, indicating a universal application for tissue engineering, mechanical engineering, catalysis, and environmental materials.

  6. [The effect of a simulated inflammation procedure in simulated body fluid on bone-like apatite formation on porous HA/beta-TCP bioceramics].

    PubMed

    Ji, Jingou; Ran, Junguo; Gou, Li; Wang, Fangfu; Sun, Luwei

    2004-08-01

    The formation of bone-like apatite on porous HA/beta-TCP bioceramics in dynamic simulated body fluid (SBF) undergoing a simulated inflammation procedure (pH = 6.5) was investigated in order to study the mechanism of osteoinduction and build a new method to choose biomaterials with better bioactivity. The results showed that the surface of porous HA/beta-TCP bioceramics which underwent a simulated inflammation procedure in dynamic SBF was more smooth. The light acidity in the simulated inflammation procedure would dissolve the fine grains and the parts possessing smaller curvature radius on the surface of porous HA/beta-TCP bioceramics, which would reduce the bioceramics solubility. Followed in normal SBF (pH = 7.4), the amount of bone-like apatite formed on the porous HA/beta-TCP bioceramics was less than that of porous HA/beta-TCP bioceramics incubation in normal SBF all along. The results also showed that the amount of bone-like apatite formed on the porous HA/beta-TCP bioceramics sintered by a microwave plasma was more than that of porous HA/beta-TCP bioceramics sintered by a conventional furnace.

  7. BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Interfacial Bonding Efficiency Study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Jiang, Hao

    2015-04-30

    The objective of this project is to perform a systematic study of spent nuclear fuel (SNF, also known as “used nuclear fuel” [UNF]) integrity under simulated transportation environments using the Cyclic Integrated Reversible-Bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT) hot-cell testing technology developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in August 2013. Under Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsorship, ORNL completed four benchmark tests, four static tests, and twelve dynamic or cycle tests on H. B. Robinson (HBR) high burn-up (HBU) fuel. The clad of the HBR fuels was made of Zircaloy-4. Testing was continued in fiscal year (FY) 2014 using Department of Energy (DOE) funds. Additional CIRFT testing was conducted on three HBR rods; two specimens failed, and one specimen was tested to over 2.23 × 107 cycles without failing. The data analysis on all the HBR SNF rods demonstrated that it is necessary to characterize the fatigue life of the SNF rods in terms of (1) the curvature amplitude and (2) the maximum absolute of curvature extremes. The maximum extremes are significant because they signify the maximum tensile stress for the outer fiber of the bending rod. CIRFT testing has also addressed a large variation in hydrogen content on the HBR rods. While the load amplitude is the dominant factor that controls the fatigue life of bending rods, the hydrogen content also has an important effect on the lifetime attained at each load range tested. In FY 15, eleven SNF rod segments from the Limerick BWR were tested using the ORNL CIRFT equipment; one test under static conditions and ten tests under dynamic loading conditions. Under static unidirectional loading, a moment of 85 N·m was obtained at a maximum curvature of 4.0 m-1. The specimen did not show any sign of failure during three repeated loading cycles to a similar maximum curvature. Ten cyclic tests were conducted with amplitudes varying from 15.2 to 7.1 N·m. Failure was observed in nine of the tested rod specimens. The cycles-to-failure ranged from 1.22 × 105 to 4.70 × 106, and the amplitudes varied from 15.2 to 7.6 N·m. The measurements at the interrupts indicated a range of flexural rigidity from 30 to 50 N·m2. Online monitoring revealed that the flexural rigidity was slightly lower due to the higher loading, from 25 to 42 N·m2. Generally, no substantial change of rigidity was observed based on the online monitoring during the cyclic fatigue testing process. Overall, the decreasing trend of sample lifetime with increasing amplitude is well defined.

  8. Infiltration Kinetics and Interfacial Bond Strength of Metal Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-01

    aniediby Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401. of contact, 1 1 this process may also be accompanied by Manuscript submitted October 31...indice, la, for the 4- tendency of liquid metal to form a mutual plane interface with the idealized porous substrate: 1, = ’rr 2 y(I/O - l) ( cos 6 + 1)1...circular cross section, PURE U-- rr~p d (hc- = 2rryl cos 0 - vroghc - 8rih c 30o- dt d ___________________ (1 ) - i (dhc)2 [21. I I i " -t -4 (r~ -dt

  9. Measurement of surface and interfacial tension using pendant drop tensiometry.

    PubMed

    Berry, Joseph D; Neeson, Michael J; Dagastine, Raymond R; Chan, Derek Y C; Tabor, Rico F

    2015-09-15

    Pendant drop tensiometry offers a simple and elegant solution to determining surface and interfacial tension - a central parameter in many colloidal systems including emulsions, foams and wetting phenomena. The technique involves the acquisition of a silhouette of an axisymmetric fluid droplet, and iterative fitting of the Young-Laplace equation that balances gravitational deformation of the drop with the restorative interfacial tension. Since the advent of high-quality digital cameras and desktop computers, this process has been automated with high speed and precision. However, despite its beguiling simplicity, there are complications and limitations that accompany pendant drop tensiometry connected with both Bond number (the balance between interfacial tension and gravitational forces) and drop volume. Here, we discuss the process involved with going from a captured experimental image to a fitted interfacial tension value, highlighting pertinent features and limitations along the way. We introduce a new parameter, the Worthington number, Wo, to characterise the measurement precision. A fully functional, open-source acquisition and fitting software is provided to enable the reader to test and develop the technique further.

  10. Identifying mechanisms of interfacial dynamics using single-molecule tracking.

    PubMed

    Kastantin, Mark; Walder, Robert; Schwartz, Daniel K

    2012-08-28

    The "soft" (i.e., noncovalent) interactions between molecules and surfaces are complex and highly varied (e.g., hydrophobic, hydrogen bonding, and ionic), often leading to heterogeneous interfacial behavior. Heterogeneity can arise either from the spatial variation of the surface/interface itself or from molecular configurations (i.e., conformation, orientation, aggregation state, etc.). By observing the adsorption, diffusion, and desorption of individual fluorescent molecules, single-molecule tracking can characterize these types of heterogeneous interfacial behavior in ways that are inaccessible to traditional ensemble-averaged methods. Moreover, the fluorescence intensity or emission wavelength (in resonance energy transfer experiments) can be used to track the molecular configuration and simultaneously directly relate this to the resulting interfacial mobility or affinity. In this feature article, we review recent advances involving the use of single-molecule tracking to characterize heterogeneous molecule-surface interactions including multiple modes of diffusion and desorption associated with both internal and external molecular configuration, Arrhenius-activated interfacial transport, spatially dependent interactions, and many more.

  11. Identifying Mechanisms of Interfacial Dynamics Using Single-Molecule Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Kastantin, Mark; Walder, Robert; Schwartz, Daniel K.

    2012-01-01

    The “soft” (i.e. non-covalent) interactions between molecules and surfaces are complex and highly-varied (e.g. hydrophobic, hydrogen bonding, ionic) often leading to heterogeneous interfacial behavior. Heterogeneity can arise either from spatial variation of the surface/interface itself or from molecular configurations (i.e. conformation, orientation, aggregation state, etc.). By observing adsorption, diffusion, and desorption of individual fluorescent molecules, single-molecule tracking can characterize these types of heterogeneous interfacial behavior in ways that are inaccessible to traditional ensemble-averaged methods. Moreover, the fluorescence intensity or emission wavelength (in resonance energy transfer experiments) can be used to simultaneously track molecular configuration and directly relate this to the resulting interfacial mobility or affinity. In this feature article, we review recent advances involving the use of single-molecule tracking to characterize heterogeneous molecule-surface interactions including: multiple modes of diffusion and desorption associated with both internal and external molecular configuration, Arrhenius activated interfacial transport, spatially dependent interactions, and many more. PMID:22716995

  12. The effect of autoclaving on the physical and biological properties of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate bioceramics: brushite vs. monetite.

    PubMed

    Tamimi, Faleh; Le Nihouannen, Damien; Eimar, Hazem; Sheikh, Zeeshan; Komarova, Svetlana; Barralet, Jake

    2012-08-01

    Dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (brushite) is an osteoconductive biomaterial with great potential as a bioresorbable cement for bone regeneration. Preset brushite cement can be dehydrated into dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (monetite) bioceramics by autoclaving. This heat treatment results in changes in the physical characteristics of the material, improving in vivo bioresorption. This property is a great advantage in bone regeneration; however, it is not known how autoclaving brushite preset cement might improve its capacity to regenerate bone. This study was designed to compare brushite bioceramics with monetite bioceramics in terms of physical characteristics in vitro, and in vivo performance upon bone implantation. In this study we observed that monetite bioceramics prepared by autoclaving preset brushite cements had higher porosity, interconnected porosity and specific surface area than their brushite precursors. In vitro cell culture experiments revealed that bone marrow cells expressed higher levels of osteogenic genes Runx2, Opn, and Alp when the cells were cultured on monetite ceramics rather than on brushite ones. In vivo experiments revealed that monetite bioceramics resorbed faster than brushite ones and were more infiltrated with newly formed bone. In summary, autoclaving preset brushite cements results in a material with improved properties for bone regeneration procedures.

  13. Application of nanoindentation testing to study of the interfacial transition zone in steel fiber reinforced mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaohui Jacobsen, Stefan; He Jianying; Zhang Zhiliang; Lee, Siaw Foon; Lein, Hilde Lea

    2009-08-15

    The characteristics of the profiles of elastic modulus and hardness of the steel fiber-matrix and fiber-matrix-aggregate interfacial zones in steel fiber reinforced mortars have been investigated by using nanoindentation and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), where two sets of parameters, i.e. water/binder ratio and content of silica fume were considered. Different interfacial bond conditions in the interfacial transition zones (ITZ) are discussed. For sample without silica fume, efficient interfacial bonds across the steel fiber-matrix and fiber-matrix-aggregate interfaces are shown in low water/binder ratio mortar; while in high water/binder ratio mortar, due to the discontinuous bleeding voids underneath the fiber, the fiber-matrix bond is not very good. On the other hand, for sample with silica fume, the addition of 10% silica fume leads to no distinct presence of weak ITZ in the steel fiber-matrix interface; but the effect of the silica fume on the steel fiber-matrix-aggregate interfacial zone is not obvious due to voids in the vicinity of steel fiber.

  14. Sticker Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Laura Corbin

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a science activity on the bonding of chemical compounds. Assigns students the role of either a cation or anion and asks them to write the ions they may bond with. Assesses students' understanding of charge, bonding, and other concepts. (YDS)

  15. Three-Dimensional Molding Based on Microstereolithography Using Beta-Tricalcium Phosphate Slurry for the Production of Bioceramic Scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, Takashi; Inada, Makoto; Maruo, Shoji

    2011-06-01

    We report on a three-dimensional (3D) molding technique of fabricating bioceramic scaffolds. In this method, ceramic slurry is cast into a 3D polymer master mold, which is fabricated via microstereolithography, by a centrifugal casting method. The polymer master mold is thermally decomposed, so that a complex 3D bioceramic scaffold can be produced. In experiments, the decomposition process of the polymer model was optimized by the master decomposition curve theory to reduce harmful cracks in a green body. As a result, we could produce not only precise lattice models but also a sophisticated porous scaffold using beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) slurry. This bioceramic 3D molding technique based on microstereolithography will be useful for tailor-made tissue engineering and regeneration medicine.

  16. Zinc oxide nanowire interphase for enhanced interfacial strength in lightweight polymer fiber composites.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Gregory J; Sodano, Henry A

    2009-08-01

    A novel functionalization method for aramid fibers is developed to enhance the bonding of a ZnO nanowire interphase grown on the fiber surface for interfacial strength enhancement. The nanowire interphase functionally grades the typically discrete interface and reduces the stress concentration between the fiber and matrix. The functionalization process is developed to improve the bonding between the ZnO nanowires and the aramid fiber and is validated through Fourier transform IR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies. Mechanical testing shows significant improvement in the interfacial shear strength with no decrease in the base fiber strength. This is the only technique found in the literature for the growth of a nanowire interphase on polymer fibers for structural enhancement without degrading the in-plane properties of the bulk composite. Furthermore, it is firmly shown that the functionalization process is a necessary condition for enhanced interfacial strength, demonstrating that ZnO nanowires strongly interact with carboxylic acid functional groups.

  17. Interfacial behavior of polymer electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, John; Kerr, John B.; Han, Yong Bong; Liu, Gao; Reeder, Craig; Xie, Jiangbing; Sun, Xiaoguang

    2003-06-03

    Evidence is presented concerning the effect of surfaces on the segmental motion of PEO-based polymer electrolytes in lithium batteries. For dry systems with no moisture the effect of surfaces of nano-particle fillers is to inhibit the segmental motion and to reduce the lithium ion transport. These effects also occur at the surfaces in composite electrodes that contain considerable quantities of carbon black nano-particles for electronic connection. The problem of reduced polymer mobility is compounded by the generation of salt concentration gradients within the composite electrode. Highly concentrated polymer electrolytes have reduced transport properties due to the increased ionic cross-linking. Combined with the interfacial interactions this leads to the generation of low mobility electrolyte layers within the electrode and to loss of capacity and power capability. It is shown that even with planar lithium metal electrodes the concentration gradients can significantly impact the interfacial impedance. The interfacial impedance of lithium/PEO-LiTFSI cells varies depending upon the time elapsed since current was turned off after polarization. The behavior is consistent with relaxation of the salt concentration gradients and indicates that a portion of the interfacial impedance usually attributed to the SEI layer is due to concentrated salt solutions next to the electrode surfaces that are very resistive. These resistive layers may undergo actual phase changes in a non-uniform manner and the possible role of the reduced mobility polymer layers in dendrite initiation and growth is also explored. It is concluded that PEO and ethylene oxide-based polymers are less than ideal with respect to this interfacial behavior.

  18. Controlling E. coli adhesion on high-k dielectric bioceramics films using poly(amino acid) multilayers.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Neil J; Wells-Kingsbury, Jamie M; Ihrig, Marcella M; Fangman, Teresa E; Namavar, Fereydoon; Cheung, Chin Li

    2012-03-06

    The influence of high-k dielectric bioceramics with poly(amino acid) multilayer coatings on the adhesion behavior of Escherichia coli (E. coli) was studied by evaluating the density of bacteria coverage on the surfaces of these materials. A biofilm forming K-12 strain (PHL628), a wild-type strain (JM109), and an engineered strain (XL1-Blue) of E. coli were examined for their adherence to zirconium oxide (ZrO(2)) and tantalum oxide (Ta(2)O(5)) surfaces functionalized with single and multiple layers of poly(amino acid) polyelectrolytes made by the layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition. Two poly(amino acids), poly(l-arginine) (PARG) and poly(l-aspartic acid) (PASP), were chosen for the functionalization schemes. All three strains were found to grow and preferentially adhere to bare bioceramic film surfaces over bare glass slides. The bioceramic and glass surfaces functionalized with positively charged poly(amino acid) top layers were observed to enhance the adhesion of these bacteria by up to 4-fold in terms of bacteria surface coverage. Minimal bacteria coverage was detected on surfaces functionalized with negatively charged poly(amino acid) top layers. The effect of different poly(amino acid) coatings to promote or minimize bacterial adhesion was observed to be drastically enhanced with the bioceramic substrates than with glass. Such observed enhancements were postulated to be attributed to the formation of higher density of poly(amino acids) coatings enabled by the high dielectric strength (k) of these bioceramics. The multilayer poly(amino acid) functionalization scheme was successfully applied to utilize this finding for micropatterning E. coli on bioceramic thin films.

  19. Ultrasonic Vibration Assisted Grinding of Bio-ceramic Materials: Modeling, Simulation, and Experimental Investigations on Edge Chipping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesfay, Hayelom D.

    Bio-ceramics are those engineered materials that find their applications in the field of biomedical engineering or medicine. They have been widely used in dental restorations, repairing bones, joint replacements, pacemakers, kidney dialysis machines, and respirators. etc. due to their physico-chemical properties, such as excellent corrosion resistance, good biocompatibility, high strength and high wear resistance. Because of their inherent brittleness and hardness nature they are difficult to machine to exact sizes and dimensions. Abrasive machining processes such as grinding is one of the most widely used manufacturing processes for bioceramics. However, the principal technical challenge resulted from these machining is edge chipping. Edge chipping is a common edge failure commonly observed during the machining of bio-ceramic materials. The presence of edge chipping on bio-ceramic products affects dimensional accuracy, increases manufacturing cost, hider their industrial applications and causes potential failure during service. To overcome these technological challenges, a new ultrasonic vibration-assisted grinding (UVAG) manufacturing method has been developed and employed in this research. The ultimate aim of this study is to develop a new cost-effective manufacturing process relevant to eliminate edge chippings in grinding of bio-ceramic materials. In this dissertation, comprehensive investigations will be carried out using experimental, theoretical, and numerical approaches to evaluate the effect of ultrasonic vibrations on edge chipping of bioceramics. Moreover, effects of nine input variables (static load, vibration frequency, grinding depth, spindle speed, grinding distance, tool speed, grain size, grain number, and vibration amplitude) on edge chipping will be studied based on the developed models. Following a description of previous research and existing approaches, a series of experimental tests on three bio-ceramic materials (Lava, partially fired Lava

  20. Nanomechanical Sensing of Biological Interfacial Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Wenjian

    Cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer on earth. Cellulase is an enzyme capable of converting insoluble cellulose into soluble sugars. Cellulosic biofuel produced from such fermentable simple sugars is a promising substitute as an energy source. However, its economic feasibility is limited by the low efficiency of the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose by cellulase. Cellulose is insoluble and resistant to enzymatic degradation, not only because the beta-1,4-glycosidic bonds are strong covalent bonds, but also because cellulose microfibrils are packed into tightly bound, crystalline lattices. Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose by cellulase involves three steps--initial binding, decrystallization, and hydrolytic cleavage. Currently, the mechanism for the decrystallization has not yet been elucidated, though it is speculated to be the rate-limiting step of the overall enzymatic activity. The major technical challenge limiting the understanding of the decrystallization is the lack of an effective experimental approach capable of examining the decrystallization, an interfacial enzymatic activity on solid substrates. The work presented develops a nanomechanical sensing approach to investigate both the decrystallization and enzymatic hydrolytic cleavage of cellulose. The first experimental evidence of the decrystallization is obtained by comparing the results from native cellulase and non-hydrolytic cellulase. Surface topography has been applied to examine the activities of native cellulase and non-hydrolytic cellulase on cellulose substrate. The study demonstrates additional experimental evidence of the decrystallization in the hydrolysis of cellulose. By combining simulation and monitoring technology, the current study also investigates the structural changes of cellulose at a molecular level. In particular, the study employs cellulose nanoparticles with a bilayer structure on mica sheets. By comparing results from a molecular dynamic simulation and the distance

  1. Effect of micro-nano-hybrid structured hydroxyapatite bioceramics on osteogenic and cementogenic differentiation of human periodontal ligament stem cell via Wnt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Mao, Lixia; Liu, Jiaqiang; Zhao, Jinglei; Chang, Jiang; Xia, Lunguo; Jiang, Lingyong; Wang, Xiuhui; Lin, Kaili; Fang, Bing

    2015-01-01

    The surface structure of bioceramic scaffolds is crucial for its bioactivity and osteoinductive ability, and in recent years, human periodontal ligament stem cells have been certified to possess high osteogenic and cementogenic differential ability. In the present study, hydroxyapatite (HA) bioceramics with micro-nano-hybrid surface (mnHA [the hybrid of nanorods and microrods]) were fabricated via hydrothermal reaction of the α-tricalcium phosphate granules as precursors in aqueous solution, and the effects of mnHA on the attachment, proliferation, osteogenic and cementogenic differentiations of human periodontal ligament stem cells as well as the related mechanisms were systematically investigated. The results showed that mnHA bioceramics could promote cell adhesion, proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and expression of osteogenic/cementogenic-related markers including runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), ALP, osteocalcin (OCN), cementum attachment protein (CAP), and cementum protein (CEMP) as compared to the HA bioceramics with flat and dense surface. Moreover, mnHA bioceramics stimulated gene expression of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) and β-catenin, which are the key genes of canonical Wnt signaling. Moreover, the stimulatory effect on ALP activity and osteogenic and cementogenic gene expression, including that of ALP, OCN, CAP, CEMP, and Runx2 of mnHA bioceramics could be repressed by canonical Wnt signaling inhibitor dickkopf1 (Dkk1). The results suggested that the HA bioceramics with mnHA could act as promising grafts for periodontal tissue regeneration.

  2. Effect of micro-nano-hybrid structured hydroxyapatite bioceramics on osteogenic and cementogenic differentiation of human periodontal ligament stem cell via Wnt signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Lixia; Liu, Jiaqiang; Zhao, Jinglei; Chang, Jiang; Xia, Lunguo; Jiang, Lingyong; Wang, Xiuhui; Lin, Kaili; Fang, Bing

    2015-01-01

    The surface structure of bioceramic scaffolds is crucial for its bioactivity and osteoinductive ability, and in recent years, human periodontal ligament stem cells have been certified to possess high osteogenic and cementogenic differential ability. In the present study, hydroxyapatite (HA) bioceramics with micro-nano-hybrid surface (mnHA [the hybrid of nanorods and microrods]) were fabricated via hydrothermal reaction of the α-tricalcium phosphate granules as precursors in aqueous solution, and the effects of mnHA on the attachment, proliferation, osteogenic and cementogenic differentiations of human periodontal ligament stem cells as well as the related mechanisms were systematically investigated. The results showed that mnHA bioceramics could promote cell adhesion, proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and expression of osteogenic/cementogenic-related markers including runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), ALP, osteocalcin (OCN), cementum attachment protein (CAP), and cementum protein (CEMP) as compared to the HA bioceramics with flat and dense surface. Moreover, mnHA bioceramics stimulated gene expression of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) and β-catenin, which are the key genes of canonical Wnt signaling. Moreover, the stimulatory effect on ALP activity and osteogenic and cementogenic gene expression, including that of ALP, OCN, CAP, CEMP, and Runx2 of mnHA bioceramics could be repressed by canonical Wnt signaling inhibitor dickkopf1 (Dkk1). The results suggested that the HA bioceramics with mnHA could act as promising grafts for periodontal tissue regeneration. PMID:26648716

  3. Bioactive glass-reinforced bioceramic ink writing scaffolds: sintering, microstructure and mechanical behavior.

    PubMed

    Shao, Huifeng; Yang, Xianyan; He, Yong; Fu, Jianzhong; Liu, Limin; Ma, Liang; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Guojing; Gao, Changyou; Gou, Zhongru

    2015-09-10

    The densification of pore struts in bioceramic scaffolds is important for structure stability and strength reliability. An advantage of ceramic ink writing is the precise control over the microstructure and macroarchitecture. However, the use of organic binder in such ink writing process would heavily affect the densification of ceramic struts and sacrifice the mechanical strength of porous scaffolds after sintering. This study presents a low-melt-point bioactive glass (BG)-assisted sintering strategy to overcome the main limitations of direct ink writing (extrusion-based three-dimensional printing) and to produce high-strength calcium silicate (CSi) bioceramic scaffolds. The 1% BG-added CSi (CSi-BG1) scaffolds with rectangular pore morphology sintered at 1080 °C have a very small BG content, readily induce apatite formation, and show appreciable linear shrinkage (∼21%), which is consistent with the composite scaffolds with less or more BG contents sintered at either the same or a higher temperature. These CSi-BG1 scaffolds also possess a high elastic modulus (∼350 MPa) and appreciable compressive strength (∼48 MPa), and show significant strength enhancement after exposure to simulated body fluid-a performance markedly superior to those of pure CSi scaffolds. Particularly, the honeycomb-pore CSi-BG1 scaffolds show markedly higher compressive strength (∼88 MPa) than the scaffolds with rectangular, parallelogram, and Archimedean chord pore structures. It is suggested that this approach can potentially facilitate the translation of ceramic ink writing and BG-assisted sintering of bioceramic scaffold technologies to the in situ bone repair.

  4. Mechanics of interfacial composite materials.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Anand Bala; Abkarian, Manouk; Mahadevan, L; Stone, Howard A

    2006-11-21

    Recent experiments and simulations have demonstrated that particle-covered fluid/fluid interfaces can exist in stable nonspherical shapes as a result of the steric jamming of the interfacially trapped particles. The jamming confers the interface with solidlike properties. We provide an experimental and theoretical characterization of the mechanical properties of these armored objects, with attention given to the two-dimensional granular state of the interface. Small inhomogeneous stresses produce a plastic response, while homogeneous stresses produce a weak elastic response. Shear-driven particle-scale rearrangements explain the basic threshold needed to obtain the near-perfect plastic deformation that is observed. Furthermore, the inhomogeneous stress state of the interface is exhibited experimentally by using surfactants to destabilize the particles on the surface. Since the interfacially trapped particles retain their individual characteristics, armored interfaces can be recognized as a kind of composite material with distinct chemical, structural, and mechanical properties.

  5. Elastocapillary-mediated interfacial assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Arthur

    2015-11-01

    Particles confined to an interface are present in a large number of industrial applications and ubiquitous in cellular biophysics. Interactions mediated by the interface, such as capillary effects in the presence of surface tension, give rise to rafts and aggregates whose structure is ultimately determined by geometric characteristics of these adsorbed particles. A common strategy for assembling interfacial structures relies on exploiting these interactions by tuning particle anisotropy, either by constructing rigid particles with heterogeneous wetting properties or fabricating particles that have a naturally anisotropic shape. Less explored, however, is the scenario where the interface causes the particles to deform. In this talk I will discuss the implications for interfacial assembly using elastocapillary-mediated interactions. The competition between surface energy and elasticity can wrinkle and buckle adsorbed soft particles, leading to complicated (but programmable) aggregates.

  6. Supramolecular interfacial architectures for biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fang; Yao, Danfeng; Christensen, Danica; Neumann, Thomas; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2004-12-01

    This contribution summarizes some of our efforts in designing, assembling and functionally characterizing supramolecular interfacial architectures for bio-affinity studies and for biosensor development. All the surface interaction studies will be based on the recently introduced novel sensor platforms involving surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS) and -microscopy (SPFM). Emphasis will be put on documenting the distance-dependence of fluorescence intensity at the metal-dielectric interface and utilizing this principle to optimize the conformation/orientation of the interfacial supra-molecular sensor coatings. This is exemplified by a number of examples, including a layer-by-layer assembly system, antibody-antigen interactions, oligonucleotide-oligonucleotide, and oligonucleotide-PCR amplicon hybridization. For practical sensing purposes, a three-dimensionally extended surface coating is then employed to overcome the fluorescence quenching problem on a planar matrix. A commercial dextran layer is shown to be an optimized matrix for SPFS, with an example of a protein-binding study.

  7. The affect of densification and dehydroxylation on the mechanical properties of stoichiometric hydroxyapatite bioceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Laasri, S.; Taha, M.; Laghzizil, A.; Hlil, E.K.; Chevalier, J.

    2010-10-15

    This paper reports the effects of processing densification on the mechanical properties of hydroxyapatite bioceramics. Densification of synthetic hydroxyapatite is conducted in the range 1000-1300 {sup o}C. X-ray diffraction and SEM microscopy are used to check the microstructure transformations. Vickers hardness, toughness and Young's modulus are analyzed versus the density and grain size. The sintering temperature and the particle size influence strongly the densification and the resulting mechanical properties. In addition, the critical sintering temperature appears around 1200 {sup o}C and the declined strength at the temperature up to 1200 {sup o}C is found sensitive to the dehydroxylation process of hydroxyapatite.

  8. Fascinating properties of bioactive templated glasses: A new generation of nanostructured bioceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izquierdo-Barba, Isabel; Vallet-Regí, María

    2011-04-01

    This review article, dedicated to Prof. Osamu Terasaki, is focused on current trends in nanostructured bioceramics in the field of bone repair and regeneration. This communication overviews the main characteristics of so called "templated glasses" recently described which exhibit an outstanding bioactive behavior compared with conventional bioactive glasses. A deep study regarding the control of textural, structural and compositional properties in the nanometric scale in relation to the charming bioactivity properties described for these nanostructured materials is herein discussed. The possibility to tailor such properties offers a wide range of reactivity/bioactivity depending on the medical application requested.

  9. Static friction of porous bioceramic β-TCP on intestinal mucus films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin-Yu; Han, Ying-Chao; Jiang, Xin; Dai, Hong-Lian; Li, Shi-Pu

    2006-09-01

    The static friction behavior between a porous bioceramic material and an intestinal mucus film was investigated in order to develop a new intestine robotic endoscope. Here, the friction couple is porous β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and an artificial intestine mucus film. The effect of pore size of the β-TCP material on the friction behavior is investigated. The results illustrated that in this friction system there is a relatively small normal force upon the intestinal mucus film of the intestine wall during locomotion. The maximum static friction force in this friction couple varies with the pore size of the porous β-TCP material.

  10. Early healing of nanothickness bioceramic coatings on dental implants. An experimental study in dogs.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Paulo G; Cardaropoli, Giuseppe; Suzuki, Marcelo; Lemons, Jack E

    2009-02-01

    Thick bioceramic coatings like plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite have been shown to increase the overall tissue response and biomechanical fixation of dental implants. However, the presence and potential fracture of a bone-coating-metallic substrate interface at long times after implantation led these implants to fall from favor in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical fixation and biological response of Ca- and P-based, 20-50 nm thickness bioceramic deposition on a previously alumina-blasted/acid-etched Ti-6Al-4V implant surface in a dog model. Cylindrical alumina-blasted/acid-etched (AB/AE) (Control, n = 16), and Nanothickness bioceramic coated AB/AE(Nano, n = 16) implant surfaces were surgically placed in dogs proximal tibia and remained for 2 and 4 weeks in vivo. Following euthanization, the implants-in-bone were mounted in epoxy and pullout at a 0.5 mm/min rate. Following mechanical testing, the specimens were decalcified and processed (Hematoxylin and Eosin) for standard transmitted light microscopy evaluation. Percent bone-to-implant contact (BIC) to the pulled out implant surface was determined through computer software. Statistical analyses were performed by one-way ANOVA at 95% level of significance and Tukey's post-hoc multiple comparisons. No significant differences in pullout force were observed (p > 0.88): 2W Control (212.08 +/- 42.96 N), 2W Nano (224.35 +/- 42.97 N), 4W Control (207.07 +/- 42.97 N), and 4W Nano (190.15 +/- 45.94 N). No significant differences in %BIC were observed (p > 0.94): 2W Control (72.66 +/- 8.51), 2W Nano (69.44 +/- 8.51), 4W Control (70.44 +/- 8.51), and 4W Nano (69.11 +/- 9.09). It is shown that 20-50 nm thickness bioceramic depositions onto previously alumina-blasted/acid-etched substrates did not improve the biomechanical fixation and the BIC at early implantation times, and studies concerning shorter and longer implantation times are recommended for confirmation or before a conclusion

  11. Diffusion bonding of copper to niobium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Adrian R.

    Processes used to join metal to ceramic at low temperatures have proven to be inefficient because multiple brazing cycles with different brazing temperatures and braze filler metals are required. Even though this is reproducible and robust, it is not ideal due to the manufacturing time and cost associated with multiple brazing cycles. A more efficient and cost effective process is to utilize the diffusion bonding technique to join different metallic layers prior to joining the entire ceramic assembly in one brazing cycle. In this study, the diffusion bonding of copper to niobium was examined. To the author's knowledge, the diffusion bonding of Cu to Nb has not been researched, and the diffusion of Cu into Nb or Nb into Cu has not been observed. A series of diffusion bonding experiments were conducted to determine the optimal bonding time, temperature, and pressure for the Cu-Nb system. The diffusion bonded samples were evaluated using mechanical testing and microscopy. Results from characterization indicate that diffusion of Nb into Cu occurs, and a robust bond with no interfacial voids is formed using different combinations of bonding parameters. The diffusion of Nb into Cu and with failure occurring outside the diffusion bonded region during all mechanical testing indicate that Cu can be bonded to Nb via the diffusion bonding technique.

  12. Effect of metal-ion-to-fuel ratio on the phase formation of bioceramic phosphates synthesized by self-propagating combustion.

    PubMed

    Sasikumar, Swamiappan; Vijayaraghavan, Rajagopalan

    2008-07-01

    Synthetic calcium hydroxyapatite (HAP, Ca10 (PO4)6 (OH)2) is a well-known bioceramic material used in orthopedic and dental applications because of its excellent biocompatibility and bone-bonding ability due to its structural and compositional similarity to human bone. Here we report, for the first time, the synthesis of HAP by combustion employing tartaric acid as a fuel. Calcium nitrate is used as the source of calcium and diammonium hydrogen phosphate serves as the source of phosphate ions. Reaction processing parameters such as the pH, fuel-oxidant ratio and autoignition temperature are controlled and monitored. The products were characterized by powder x-ray diffraction, which revealed the formation of a hexagonal hydroxyapatite phase. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) spectra showed that the substitution of a carbonate ion occurs at the phosphate site. The morphology of the particles was imaged by scanning electron microscopy, which also revealed that the particles are of submicron size. Thermal analysis showed that the phase formation takes place at the time of combustion. Surface area and porosity analysis showed that the surface area is high and that the pores are of nanometer size. The mean grain size of the HAP powder, determined by the Debye-Scherrer formula, is in the range 20-30 nm. Chemical analyses to determine the Ca : P atomic ratio in synthesized ceramics were performed, and it was found to be 1 : 1.66.

  13. Effect of metal-ion-to-fuel ratio on the phase formation of bioceramic phosphates synthesized by self-propagating combustion

    PubMed Central

    Sasikumar, Swamiappan; Vijayaraghavan, Rajagopalan

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic calcium hydroxyapatite (HAP, Ca10 (PO4)6 (OH)2) is a well-known bioceramic material used in orthopedic and dental applications because of its excellent biocompatibility and bone-bonding ability due to its structural and compositional similarity to human bone. Here we report, for the first time, the synthesis of HAP by combustion employing tartaric acid as a fuel. Calcium nitrate is used as the source of calcium and diammonium hydrogen phosphate serves as the source of phosphate ions. Reaction processing parameters such as the pH, fuel-oxidant ratio and autoignition temperature are controlled and monitored. The products were characterized by powder x-ray diffraction, which revealed the formation of a hexagonal hydroxyapatite phase. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) spectra showed that the substitution of a carbonate ion occurs at the phosphate site. The morphology of the particles was imaged by scanning electron microscopy, which also revealed that the particles are of submicron size. Thermal analysis showed that the phase formation takes place at the time of combustion. Surface area and porosity analysis showed that the surface area is high and that the pores are of nanometer size. The mean grain size of the HAP powder, determined by the Debye–Scherrer formula, is in the range 20–30 nm. Chemical analyses to determine the Ca : P atomic ratio in synthesized ceramics were performed, and it was found to be 1 : 1.66. PMID:27878000

  14. Effect of metal-ion-to-fuel ratio on the phase formation of bioceramic phosphates synthesized by self-propagating combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasikumar, Swamiappan; Vijayaraghavan, Rajagopalan

    2008-07-01

    Synthetic calcium hydroxyapatite (HAP, Ca10 (PO4)6 (OH)2) is a well-known bioceramic material used in orthopedic and dental applications because of its excellent biocompatibility and bone-bonding ability due to its structural and compositional similarity to human bone. Here we report, for the first time, the synthesis of HAP by combustion employing tartaric acid as a fuel. Calcium nitrate is used as the source of calcium and diammonium hydrogen phosphate serves as the source of phosphate ions. Reaction processing parameters such as the pH, fuel-oxidant ratio and autoignition temperature are controlled and monitored. The products were characterized by powder x-ray diffraction, which revealed the formation of a hexagonal hydroxyapatite phase. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) spectra showed that the substitution of a carbonate ion occurs at the phosphate site. The morphology of the particles was imaged by scanning electron microscopy, which also revealed that the particles are of submicron size. Thermal analysis showed that the phase formation takes place at the time of combustion. Surface area and porosity analysis showed that the surface area is high and that the pores are of nanometer size. The mean grain size of the HAP powder, determined by the Debye-Scherrer formula, is in the range 20-30 nm. Chemical analyses to determine the Ca : P atomic ratio in synthesized ceramics were performed, and it was found to be 1 : 1.66.

  15. Comparison of bond strength of different endodontic sealers to root dentin: An in vitro push-out test

    PubMed Central

    Madhuri, G. Vijaya; Varri, Sujana; Bolla, Nagesh; Mandava, Pragna; Akkala, Lakshmi Swathi; Shaik, Jaheer

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To compare the bond strength of four different endodontic sealers to root dentin through push-out test design. Materials and Methods: Forty single-rooted teeth with completely formed apices were selected. Teeth were decoronated, and working length was determined. Instrumentation and irrigation were performed. The teeth were divided into four groups based upon the sealer used. Group 1: Bioceramic sealer (Endosequence), Group 2: Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) based sealer (MTA Fill apex), Group 3: Epoxy resin based sealer (MM-Seal), and Group 4: Dual cure resin-based sealer (Hybrid Root Seal). Manipulation and application of the sealer was done as per the manufacturer instructions. All the teeth were obturated using 6% gutta-percha. After obturation, each tooth was prepared for push-out test with root slices of 2 mm thickness using universal testing machine. Results: The highest bond strength was found in Group 1 (Endosequence) (P < 0.05) compared to other groups. The lowest bond strength was found in Group 2 (MTA Fill apex). Statistical analysis is done by two-way ANOVA and Newman-Keuls multiple post hoc. Conclusion: The push-out bond strength of Bioceramic sealer was highest followed by resin-based sealer and lowest bond strength was observed in MTA-based sealer. PMID:27656067

  16. Interfacial properties of stanene-metal contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ying; Pan, Feng; Ye, Meng; Wang, Yangyang; Pan, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xiuying; Li, Jingzhen; Zhang, Han; Lu, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Recently, two-dimensional buckled honeycomb stanene has been manufactured by molecular beam epitaxy growth. Free-standing stanene is predicted to have a sizable opened band gap of 100 meV at the Dirac point due to spin-orbit coupling (SOC), resulting in many fascinating properties such as quantum spin Hall effect, quantum anomalous Hall effect, and quantum valley Hall effect. In the first time, we systematically study the interfacial properties of stanene-metal interfaces (metals = Ag, Au, Cu, Al, Pd, Pt, Ir, and Ni) by using ab initio electronic structure calculations considering the SOC effects. The honeycomb structure of stanene is preserved on the metal supports, but the buckling height is changed. The buckling of stanene on the Au, Al, Ag, and Cu metal supports is higher than that of free-standing stanene. By contrast, a planar graphene-like structure is stabilized for stanene on the Ir, Pd, Pt, and Ni metal supports. The band structure of stanene is destroyed on all the metal supports, accompanied by a metallization of stanene because the covalent bonds between stanene and the metal supports are formed and the structure of stanene is distorted. Besides, no tunneling barrier exists between stanene and the metal supports. Therefore, stanene and the eight metals form a good vertical Ohmic contact.

  17. Effects of h-BN addition on microstructures and mechanical properties of β-CaSiO3 bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ying; Yao, Dongxu; Zuo, Kaihui; Xia, Yongfeng; Yin, Jinwei; Liang, Hanqin; Zeng, Yuping

    2016-09-01

    The main purpose of this study consists in investigating the effects of h-BN addition on the sinterability of β-CaSiO3 (β-CS) bioceramics. β-CS bioceramics with different contents of h-BN were prepared at the sintering temperature ranging from 800°C to 1100°C. The results showed that h-BN can be successfully used as sintering additive by being oxidized to form low melting point B2O3 related glassy phase and enhanced the flexural strength by the formation of rod-like β-CS grains. β-CS bioceramics with 1wt% h-BN sintered at 1000°C revealed flexural strength and fracture toughness of 182.2MPa and 2.4MPam(1/2) respectively, which were much higher than that of pure β-CS bioceramics (30.2MPa, 0.53MPam(1/2)) fabricated in the same processing condition.

  18. In vitro and in vivo degradation evaluation of novel iron-bioceramic composites for bone implant applications.

    PubMed

    Ulum, M F; Arafat, A; Noviana, D; Yusop, A H; Nasution, A K; Abdul Kadir, M R; Hermawan, H

    2014-03-01

    Biodegradable metals such as magnesium, iron and their alloys have been known as potential materials for temporary medical implants. However, most of the studies on biodegradable metals have been focusing on optimizing their mechanical properties and degradation behavior with no emphasis on improving their bioactivity behavior. We therefore investigated the possibility of improving iron biodegradation rate and bioactivity by incorporating various bioactive bioceramics. The iron-based bioceramic (hydroxyapatite, tricalcium phosphate and biphasic calcium phosphate) composites were prepared by mechanical mixing and sintering process. Degradation studies indicated that the addition of bioceramics lowered the corrosion potential of the composites and slightly increased their corrosion rate compared to that of pure iron. In vitro cytotoxicity results showed an increase of cellular activity when rat smooth muscle cells interacted with the degrading composites compared to pure iron. X-ray radiogram analysis showed a consistent degradation progress with that found in vivo and positive tissue response up to 70 days implantation in sheep animal model. Therefore, the iron-based bioceramic composites have the potential to be used for biodegradable bone implant applications.

  19. Interfacial chemistry of zinc anodes for reinforced concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, B.S. Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Cramer, S.D.; Holcomb, G.R.; McGill, G.E.; Cryer, C.B.; Stoneman, A.; Carter, R.R.

    1997-12-01

    Thermally-sprayed zinc anodes are used in both galvanic and impressed current cathodic protection systems for reinforced concrete structures. The Albany Research Center, in collaboration with the Oregon Department of Transportation, has been studying the effect of electrochemical aging on the bond strength of zinc anodes for bridge cathodic protection systems. Changes in anode bond strength and other anode properties can be explained by the chemistry of the zinc-concrete interface. The chemistry of the zinc-concrete interface in laboratory electrochemical aging studies is compared with that of several bridges with thermal-sprayed zinc anodes and which have been in service for 5 to 10 years using both galvanic and impressed current cathodic protection systems. The bridges are the Cape Creek Bridge on the Oregon coast and the East Camino Undercrossing near Placerville, CA. Also reported are interfacial chemistry results for galvanized steel rebar from the 48 year old Longbird Bridge in Bermuda.

  20. Preparation and analysis of chemically gradient functional bioceramic coating formed by pulsed laser deposition.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, P; Muraleedharan, C V; Sureshbabu, S; Komath, Manoj; Varma, Harikrishna

    2012-02-01

    Bioactive ceramic coatings based on calcium phosphates yield better functionality in the human body for a variety of metallic implant devices including orthopaedic and dental prostheses. In the present study chemically and hence functionally gradient bioceramic coating was obtained by pulsed laser deposition method. Calcium phosphate bioactive ceramic coatings based on hydroxyapatite (HA) and tricalcium phosphate (TCP) were deposited over titanium substrate to produce gradation in physico-chemical characteristics and in vitro dissolution behaviour. Sintered targets of HA and α-TCP were deposited in a multi target laser deposition system. The obtained deposits were characterized by X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy was used to estimate the in vitro dissolution behaviour of coatings. The variation in mechanical property of the gradient layer was evaluated through scratch test and micro-indentation hardness. The bioactivity was examined in vitro with respect to the ability of HA layer to form on the surface as a result of contact with simulated body fluid. It could be inferred that chemically gradient functional bioceramic coating can be produced by laser deposition of multiple sintered targets with variable chemical composition.

  1. The Effect of Photoluminescence of Bioceramic Irradiation on Middle Cerebral Arterial Occlusion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Chan, Paul; Liu, Zhong-Min; Hwang, Ling-Ling; Lin, Kuo-Chi; Chan, Wing P.; Leung, Ting-Kai; Choy, Cheuk Sing

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the possible effect of photoluminescence of bioceramic (PLB) on ischemic cerebral infarction (stroke), by using an animal model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Sprague-Dawley rats were used to induce MCAO to block the origin of the left MCAO; three months later, the positive chronic stroke rats were selected by running tunnel maze; the MCAO rats with significant chronic stroke and neurological defects were used for treadmill experiments with varying speed settings to test their capability for restoration after muscular fatigue under conditions of with and without PLB irradiation. As a result, PLB irradiation could improve exercise completion rate and average running speed during slow and fast treadmill settings. After PLB irradiation, the selected MCAO rats successfully completed all the second-round treadmill exercises at the maximum speed setting, and they had better restoration from muscular fatigue. An in vitro cell study on astrocytes of rats by bioceramic irradiation further demonstrated increased intracellular nitric oxide. To explain these results, we suggest that cortical brain stimulation of microcirculation and enhancement of peripheral muscular activity are the main causes of the improved exercise performance in MCAO rats by PLB. PMID:27375765

  2. Fabrication and in vitro biological properties of piezoelectric bioceramics for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yufei; Wu, Cong; Wu, Zixiang; Hu, Long; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Kang

    2017-02-27

    The piezoelectric effect of biological piezoelectric materials promotes bone growth. However, the material should be subjected to stress before it can produce an electric charge that promotes bone repair and reconstruction conducive to fracture healing. A novel method for in vitro experimentation of biological piezoelectric materials with physiological load is presented. A dynamic loading device that can simulate the force of human motion and provide periodic load to piezoelectric materials when co-cultured with cells was designed to obtain a realistic expression of piezoelectric effect on bone repair. Hydroxyapatite (HA)/barium titanate (BaTiO3) composite materials were fabricated by slip casting, and their piezoelectric properties were obtained by polarization. The d33 of HA/BaTiO3 piezoelectric ceramics after polarization was 1.3 pC/N to 6.8 pC/N with BaTiO3 content ranging from 80% to 100%. The in vitro biological properties of piezoelectric bioceramics with and without cycle loading were investigated. When HA/BaTiO3 piezoelectric bioceramics were affected by cycle loading, the piezoelectric effect of BaTiO3 promoted the growth of osteoblasts and interaction with HA, which was better than the effect of HA alone. The best biocompatibility and bone-inducing activity were demonstrated by the 10%HA/90%BaTiO3 piezoelectric ceramics.

  3. Surface toughness of silicon nitride bioceramics: II, Comparison with commercial oxide materials.

    PubMed

    McEntire, Bryan J; Enomoto, Yuto; Zhu, Wenliang; Boffelli, Marco; Marin, Elia; Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2016-02-01

    Raman microprobe-assisted indentation, a micromechanics method validated in a companion paper, was used to compare the surface toughening behaviors of silicon nitride (Si3N4) and alumina-based bioceramics employed in joint arthroplasty (i.e., monolithic alumina, Al2O3, and yttria-stabilized zirconia (ZrO2)-toughened alumina, ZTA). Quantitative assessments of microscopic stress fields both ahead and behind the tip of Vickers indentation cracks propagated under increasing indentation loads were systematically made using a Raman microprobe with spatial resolution on the order of a single micrometer. Concurrently, crack opening displacement (COD) profiles were monitored on the same microcracks screened by Raman spectroscopy. The Raman eye clearly visualized different mechanisms operative in toughening Si3N4 and ZTA bioceramics (i.e., crack-face bridging and ZrO2 polymorphic transformation, respectively) as compared to the brittle behavior of monolithic Al2O3. Moreover, emphasis was placed on assessing not only the effectiveness but also the durability of such toughening effects when the biomaterials were aged in a hydrothermal environment. A significant degree of embrittlement at the biomaterial surface was recorded in the transformation-toughened ZTA, with the surface toughness reduced by exposure to the hydrothermal environment. Conversely, the Si3N4 biomaterial experienced a surface toughness value independent of hydrothermal attack. Crack-face bridging thus appears to be a durable surface toughening mechanism for biomaterials in joint arthroplasty.

  4. Evidences of in vivo bioactivity of Fe-bioceramic composites for temporary bone implants.

    PubMed

    Ulum, Mokhamad F; Nasution, Ahmad K; Yusop, Abdul H; Arafat, Andril; Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq A; Juniantito, Vetnizah; Noviana, Deni; Hermawan, Hendra

    2015-10-01

    Iron-bioceramic composites have been developed as biodegradable implant materials with tailored degradation behavior and bioactive features. In the current work, in vivo bioactivity of the composites was comprehensively studied by using sheep animal model. Five groups of specimens (Fe-HA, Fe-TCP, Fe-BCP composites, and pure-Fe and SS316L as controls) were surgically implanted into medio proximal region of the radial bones. Real-time ultrasound analysis showed a decreased echo pattern at the peri-implant biodegradation site of the composites indicating minimal tissue response during the wound healing process. Peripheral whole blood biomarkers monitoring showed a normal dynamic change of blood cellular responses and no stress effect was observed. Meanwhile, the released Fe ion concentration was increasing along the implantation period. Histological analysis showed that the composites corresponded with a lower inflammatory giant cell count than that of SS316L. Analysis of the retrieved implants showed a thicker degradation layer on the composites compared with pure-Fe. It can be concluded that the iron-bioceramic composites are bioactive and induce a preferable wound healing process.

  5. Novel Bioceramic Urethral Bulking Agents Elicit Improved Host Tissue Responses in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Mann-Gow, Travis K.; King, Benjamin J.; El-Ghannam, Ahmed; Knabe-Ducheyne, Christine; Kida, Masatoshi; Dall, Ole M.; Krhut, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To test the physical properties and host response to the bioceramic particles, silica-calcium phosphate (SCPC10) and Cristobalite, in a rat animal model and compare their biocompatibility to the current clinically utilized urethral bulking materials. Material and Methods. The novel bulking materials, SCPC10 and Cristobalite, were suspended in hyaluronic acid sodium salt and injected into the mid urethra of a rat. Additional animals were injected with bulking materials currently in clinical use. Physiological response was assessed using voiding trials, and host tissue response was evaluated using hard tissue histology and immunohistochemical analysis. Distant organs were evaluated for the presence of particles or their components. Results. Histological analysis of the urethral tissue five months after injection showed that both SCPC10 and Cristobalite induced a more robust fibroblastic and histiocytic reaction, promoting integration and encapsulation of the particle aggregates, leading to a larger bulking effect. Concentrations of Ca, Na, Si, and P ions in the experimental groups were comparable to control animals. Conclusions. This side-by-side examination of urethral bulking agents using a rat animal model and hard tissue histology techniques compared two newly developed bioactive ceramic particles to three of the currently used bulking agents. The local host tissue response and bulking effects of bioceramic particles were superior while also possessing a comparable safety profile. PMID:27688751

  6. Compositional dependence of hematopoietic stem cells expansion on bioceramic composite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sarika; Rajyalakshmi, A; Balasubramanian, K

    2012-09-01

    Bioceramics are although well known for their osteoinductive and osseointegrative properties in bone tissue regeneration, yet, they are inappropriate for load bearing applications due to inadequate mechanical strength. In this article, the authors report the expansion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) on as-synthesized composite scaffolds from hydroxyapatite and β-tricalcium phosphate for bone tissue engineering, in an adequate load-bearing application. The physical, structural, and mechanical properties of the composite scaffolds have been examined and correlated with the in vitro adhesion pattern of HSCs. The results indicated that the response of HSCs varies with change in the stoichiometry of composite scaffolds. The H2T2 scaffolds have exhibited the highest expansion of CD34+ cells and long-term culture initiating cells when compared with other stoichiometries. The results suggest that H2T2 composite can be a potential strategic bone-graft substitute in contrast with monolithic bioceramics, serving a dual role of bioresorbability and enhanced load-bearing capacity.

  7. Fabrication and in vitro biological properties of piezoelectric bioceramics for bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yufei; Wu, Cong; Wu, Zixiang; Hu, Long; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Kang

    2017-01-01

    The piezoelectric effect of biological piezoelectric materials promotes bone growth. However, the material should be subjected to stress before it can produce an electric charge that promotes bone repair and reconstruction conducive to fracture healing. A novel method for in vitro experimentation of biological piezoelectric materials with physiological load is presented. A dynamic loading device that can simulate the force of human motion and provide periodic load to piezoelectric materials when co-cultured with cells was designed to obtain a realistic expression of piezoelectric effect on bone repair. Hydroxyapatite (HA)/barium titanate (BaTiO3) composite materials were fabricated by slip casting, and their piezoelectric properties were obtained by polarization. The d33 of HA/BaTiO3 piezoelectric ceramics after polarization was 1.3 pC/N to 6.8 pC/N with BaTiO3 content ranging from 80% to 100%. The in vitro biological properties of piezoelectric bioceramics with and without cycle loading were investigated. When HA/BaTiO3 piezoelectric bioceramics were affected by cycle loading, the piezoelectric effect of BaTiO3 promoted the growth of osteoblasts and interaction with HA, which was better than the effect of HA alone. The best biocompatibility and bone-inducing activity were demonstrated by the 10%HA/90%BaTiO3 piezoelectric ceramics. PMID:28240268

  8. Novel Bioceramic Urethral Bulking Agents Elicit Improved Host Tissue Responses in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Mann-Gow, Travis K; King, Benjamin J; El-Ghannam, Ahmed; Knabe-Ducheyne, Christine; Kida, Masatoshi; Dall, Ole M; Krhut, Jan; Zvara, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To test the physical properties and host response to the bioceramic particles, silica-calcium phosphate (SCPC10) and Cristobalite, in a rat animal model and compare their biocompatibility to the current clinically utilized urethral bulking materials. Material and Methods. The novel bulking materials, SCPC10 and Cristobalite, were suspended in hyaluronic acid sodium salt and injected into the mid urethra of a rat. Additional animals were injected with bulking materials currently in clinical use. Physiological response was assessed using voiding trials, and host tissue response was evaluated using hard tissue histology and immunohistochemical analysis. Distant organs were evaluated for the presence of particles or their components. Results. Histological analysis of the urethral tissue five months after injection showed that both SCPC10 and Cristobalite induced a more robust fibroblastic and histiocytic reaction, promoting integration and encapsulation of the particle aggregates, leading to a larger bulking effect. Concentrations of Ca, Na, Si, and P ions in the experimental groups were comparable to control animals. Conclusions. This side-by-side examination of urethral bulking agents using a rat animal model and hard tissue histology techniques compared two newly developed bioactive ceramic particles to three of the currently used bulking agents. The local host tissue response and bulking effects of bioceramic particles were superior while also possessing a comparable safety profile.

  9. Statistical analysis of the behavior of fracture toughness of compound bioceramic artificial bone.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shilian; Xu, Renping; Li, Ruoqi

    2011-12-01

    We show the manufacturing procedure of the test specimen of the compound bioceramic artificial bone, conduct experiments to measure its fracture toughness, and conclude that the experiment data conform to the two-parameter Weibull distribution with scale parameter β = 0.527369 and form parameter α = 5.24317. Furthermore, compound bioceramic artificial bone is of a high level of crack sensitivity and its data for the fracture toughness is has a high dispersion. We also analyze the evolution of the confidence level of the reliability of its fracture toughness. With the increase of the confidence level γ, the crack sensitivity increases, but the median, the discreteness, and the confidence intervals decrease. The size of the test specimen influences the experiment for the fracture toughness, the measured values and their dispersion, and there exists the conversion between size of the test specimen and that of the real device. We extend the results to introduce the statistic model of the size effect of the fracture toughness.

  10. The Effect of Photoluminescence of Bioceramic Irradiation on Middle Cerebral Arterial Occlusion in Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Chan, Paul; Liu, Zhong-Min; Hwang, Ling-Ling; Lin, Kuo-Chi; Chan, Wing P; Leung, Ting-Kai; Choy, Cheuk Sing

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the possible effect of photoluminescence of bioceramic (PLB) on ischemic cerebral infarction (stroke), by using an animal model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Sprague-Dawley rats were used to induce MCAO to block the origin of the left MCAO; three months later, the positive chronic stroke rats were selected by running tunnel maze; the MCAO rats with significant chronic stroke and neurological defects were used for treadmill experiments with varying speed settings to test their capability for restoration after muscular fatigue under conditions of with and without PLB irradiation. As a result, PLB irradiation could improve exercise completion rate and average running speed during slow and fast treadmill settings. After PLB irradiation, the selected MCAO rats successfully completed all the second-round treadmill exercises at the maximum speed setting, and they had better restoration from muscular fatigue. An in vitro cell study on astrocytes of rats by bioceramic irradiation further demonstrated increased intracellular nitric oxide. To explain these results, we suggest that cortical brain stimulation of microcirculation and enhancement of peripheral muscular activity are the main causes of the improved exercise performance in MCAO rats by PLB.

  11. Physicochemical Properties of Epoxy Resin-Based and Bioceramic-Based Root Canal Sealers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju Kyung; Kwak, Sang Won; Ha, Jung-Hong; Lee, WooCheol; Kim, Hyeon-Cheol

    2017-01-01

    Three bioceramic sealers (EndoSequence BC sealer, EndoSeal MTA, and MTA Fillapex) and three epoxy resin-based sealers (AH-Plus, AD Seal, and Radic-Sealer) were tested to evaluate the physicochemical properties: flow, final setting time, radiopacity, dimensional stability, and pH change. The one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test were used to analyze the data (P = 0.05). The MTA Fillapex sealer had a highest flow and the BC Sealer presented a flow significantly lower than the others (P < 0.05). The BC Sealer and MTA Fillapex samples were not set in humid incubator condition even after one month. EndoSeal MTA had the longest setting time among the measurable materials and Radic-Sealer and AD Seal showed shorter setting time than the AH-Plus (P < 0.05). AH-Plus and EndoSeal MTA showed statistically higher values and MTA Fillapex showed statistically lower radiopacity (P < 0.05). BC Sealer showed the highest alkaline pH in all evaluation periods. Set samples of 3 epoxy resin-based sealers and EndoSeal MTA presented a significant increase of pH over experimental time for 4 weeks. In conclusion, the bioceramic sealer and epoxy resin-based sealers showed clinical acceptable physicochemical properties, but BC Sealer and MTA Fillapex were not set completely.

  12. Physicochemical Properties of Epoxy Resin-Based and Bioceramic-Based Root Canal Sealers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju Kyung; Kwak, Sang Won; Ha, Jung-Hong; Lee, WooCheol

    2017-01-01

    Three bioceramic sealers (EndoSequence BC sealer, EndoSeal MTA, and MTA Fillapex) and three epoxy resin-based sealers (AH-Plus, AD Seal, and Radic-Sealer) were tested to evaluate the physicochemical properties: flow, final setting time, radiopacity, dimensional stability, and pH change. The one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test were used to analyze the data (P = 0.05). The MTA Fillapex sealer had a highest flow and the BC Sealer presented a flow significantly lower than the others (P < 0.05). The BC Sealer and MTA Fillapex samples were not set in humid incubator condition even after one month. EndoSeal MTA had the longest setting time among the measurable materials and Radic-Sealer and AD Seal showed shorter setting time than the AH-Plus (P < 0.05). AH-Plus and EndoSeal MTA showed statistically higher values and MTA Fillapex showed statistically lower radiopacity (P < 0.05). BC Sealer showed the highest alkaline pH in all evaluation periods. Set samples of 3 epoxy resin-based sealers and EndoSeal MTA presented a significant increase of pH over experimental time for 4 weeks. In conclusion, the bioceramic sealer and epoxy resin-based sealers showed clinical acceptable physicochemical properties, but BC Sealer and MTA Fillapex were not set completely. PMID:28210204

  13. Improvement of organics removal by bio-ceramic filtration of raw water with addition of phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Sang, Junqiang; Zhang, Xihui; Li, Lingzhi; Wang, Zhansheng

    2003-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of phosphorus addition on biological pretreatment of raw water. Experiments were conducted in pilot-scale bio-ceramic filters with raw water from a reservoir located in Beijing, China. The results demonstrated that phosphorus was the limiting nutrient for bacterial growth in the raw water investigated in this study. The measured values of bacterial regrowth potential (BRP) and biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) of the raw water increased by 50-65% and 30-40% with addition of 50 microg of PO4(3-)-PL(-1), respectively. Addition of 25 microg of PO4(3-)-PL(-1) to the influent of bio-ceramic filter enhanced the percent removal of organics by 4.6, 5.7 and 15 percentage points in terms of COD(Mn), TOC and BDOC, respectively. Biomass in terms of phospholipid content increased by 13-22% and oxygen uptake rate (OUR) increased by 35-45%. The ratio of C:P for bacteria growth was 100:1.6 for the raw water used in this study. Since change of phosphorus concentrations can influence the performance of biological pretreatment and the biological stability of drinking water, this study is of substantial significance for waterworks in China. The role of phosphorus in biological processes of drinking water should deserve more attention.

  14. Fabrication and in vitro biological properties of piezoelectric bioceramics for bone regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yufei; Wu, Cong; Wu, Zixiang; Hu, Long; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Kang

    2017-02-01

    The piezoelectric effect of biological piezoelectric materials promotes bone growth. However, the material should be subjected to stress before it can produce an electric charge that promotes bone repair and reconstruction conducive to fracture healing. A novel method for in vitro experimentation of biological piezoelectric materials with physiological load is presented. A dynamic loading device that can simulate the force of human motion and provide periodic load to piezoelectric materials when co-cultured with cells was designed to obtain a realistic expression of piezoelectric effect on bone repair. Hydroxyapatite (HA)/barium titanate (BaTiO3) composite materials were fabricated by slip casting, and their piezoelectric properties were obtained by polarization. The d33 of HA/BaTiO3 piezoelectric ceramics after polarization was 1.3 pC/N to 6.8 pC/N with BaTiO3 content ranging from 80% to 100%. The in vitro biological properties of piezoelectric bioceramics with and without cycle loading were investigated. When HA/BaTiO3 piezoelectric bioceramics were affected by cycle loading, the piezoelectric effect of BaTiO3 promoted the growth of osteoblasts and interaction with HA, which was better than the effect of HA alone. The best biocompatibility and bone-inducing activity were demonstrated by the 10%HA/90%BaTiO3 piezoelectric ceramics.

  15. Application of K/Sr co-doped calcium polyphosphate bioceramic as scaffolds for bone substitutes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Huixu; Wang, Qianbin; Ye, Qingsong; Wan, Changxiu; Li, Longjiang

    2012-04-01

    Ion doping is one of the most important methods to modify the properties of bioceramics for better biodegrade abilities, biomechanical properties, and biocompatibilities. This paper presents a novel ion doping method applied in calcium polyphosphate (CPP)-based bioceramic scaffolds substituted by potassium and strontium ions (K/Sr) to form (K/Sr-CPP) scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration. The microstructure and crystallization of the scaffolds were detected by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Compressive strength and degradation tests were assessed to evaluate the mechanical and chemical stabilities of K/Sr-CPP in vitro. The cell biocompatibility was measured with respect to the cytotoxicity of the extractions of scaffolds. Muscle pouches and bone implantation were performed to evaluate the biodegradability and osteoconductivity of the scaffolds. The results indicated that the obtained K/Sr-CPP scaffolds had a single beta-CPP phase. The unit cell volume and average grain size increased but the crystallization decreased after the ions were doped into the CPP structure. The K/Sr-CPP scaffolds yielded a higher compressive strength and a better degradation property than the pure CPP scaffold. The MTT assay and in vivo results reveal that the K/Sr-CPP scaffolds exhibited a better cell biocompatibility and a tissue biocompatibility than CPP and hydroxyapatite scaffolds. This study proves the potential applications of K/Sr-CPP scaffolds in bone repair.

  16. Stimulatory effects of the ionic products from Ca-Mg-Si bioceramics on both osteogenesis and angiogenesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Wanyin; Lu, Hongxu; Wu, Chengtie; Chen, Lei; Lin, Xiaoting; Naoki, Kawazoe; Chen, Guoping; Chang, Jiang

    2013-08-01

    Ideal biomaterials for bone tissue engineering should have the capability to guide the osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells and, at the same time, to stimulate angiogenesis of endothelia cells. In this study it was found that three Ca-Mg-Si-containing bioceramics (bredigite Ca7MgSi4O16, akermanite Ca2MgSi2O7 and diopside CaMgSi2O6) had osteogenic and angiogenic potential. The effects of three silicate ceramics on the osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) and the angiogenesis of human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were explored in comparison with β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) bioceramics. The proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALPase) activity and bone-related gene expression (COL1, ALPase, OP, BSP and OC) of hBMSCs were significantly enhanced upon stimulation with ionic extracts of these silicate bioceramics. In addition, the results showed that extracts from the three silicate bioceramics also stimulated HAEC proliferation and in vitro angiogenesis with improved NO synthesis and angiogenic gene expression (KDR, FGFR1, ACVRL1 and NOS3). Among the three silicate ceramics bredigite showed the highest osteogenic and angiogenic potential and with the highest extract Si (possibly Si(OH)3O(-)) concentration, while diopside had the lowest osteogenic and angiogenic potential with the lowest extract Si concentration. Furthermore, it was found that the concentration of Si ions in extracts of the three silicate bioceramics was obviously higher than that of β-TCP ceramics, indicating an important role of Si ions in stimulating cell proliferation, osteogenic differentiation and angiogenesis. The results suggest that the silicate-based akermanite and bredigite ceramics might be good scaffold biomaterials for bone tissue engineering applications due to their distinctive dual functions of osteogenesis/angiogenesis stimulation.

  17. On 'large-scale' stable fiber displacement during interfacial failure in metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrich, R. R.; Koss, D. A.; Hellmann, J. R.; Kallas, M. N.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental results are presented to show that interfacial failure in sapphire-reinforced niobium is characterized by 'large-scale' (5-15 microns) plasticity-controlled fiber displacements occurring under increasing loads. The results are based on the responses during thin-slice fiber pushout tests wherein the fiber is supported over a hole twice the fiber diameter. The results describe an interfacial failure process that should also occur near fiber ends during pullout when a fiber is well-bonded to a soft, ductile matrix, such that eventual failure occurs by shear within the matrix near the interface.

  18. Effects of far infrared rays irradiated from ceramic material (BIOCERAMIC) on psychological stress-conditioned elevated heart rate, blood pressure, and oxidative stress-suppressed cardiac contractility.

    PubMed

    Leung, Ting-Kai; Chen, Chien-Ho; Tsai, Shih-Ying; Hsiao, George; Lee, Chi-Ming

    2012-10-31

    The present study examined the effects of BIOCERAMIC on psychological stress-conditioned elevated heart rate, blood pressure and oxidative stress-suppressed cardiac contractility using in vivo and in vitro animal models. We investigated the effects of BIOCERAMIC on the in vivo cardiovascular hemodynamic parameters of rats by monitoring their heart rates, systolic blood pressure, mean blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure. Thereafter, we assayed its effects on the heart rate in an isolated frog heart with and without adrenaline stimulation, and on cardiac contractility under oxidative stress. BIOCERAMIC caused significant decreases in heart rates and systolic and mean blood pressure in the stress-conditioned heart rate rat models (P < 0.05), as well as in the experimental models of an isolated frog heart with and without adrenaline stimulation (P < 0.05), and normalized cardiac contractility under oxidative stress (P < 0.05). BIOCERAMIC may, therefore, normalize the effects of psychological stress and oxidative stress conditions.

  19. Measuring Interfacial Tension Between Immiscible Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, Nasser; Balasubramaniam, R.; Delsignore, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Glass capillary tube technique measures interfacial tension between two immiscible liquids. Yields useful data over fairly wide range of interfacial tensions, both for pairs of liquids having equal densities and pairs of liquids having unequal densities. Data on interfacial tensions important in diverse industrial chemical applications, including enhanced extraction of oil; printing; processing foods; and manufacture of paper, emulsions, foams, aerosols, detergents, gel encapsulants, coating materials, fertilizers, pesticides, and cosmetics.

  20. Experiments of Interfacial Instability on a Ferrofluid Droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ching-Yao; Cheng, Y.-Z.; Tsai, W.-K.; Miranda, Jose A.

    2008-11-01

    The interfacial morphologies of an extremely thin layer of ferrofluid droplet under a constant perpendicular magnetic field are investigated. Striking patterns consisting of numerous sub-scale droplets that develop from Rosensweig instability are observed. For a dry plate the breaking pattern of sub-scale droplets can be characterized by a dimensionless magnetic Bond number, Bom. In general, a more pronounced instability, which is evident by a greater number of breaking sub-scale droplets N, arises with a higher Bom. For a magnetic Bond number that is larger than a critical value, the central droplet is torn apart. For a prewetted plate, a nearly flat fluid surface is achieved due to a smaller contact angle, which then leads to virtually evenly distributed sub-scale droplets. A global size for all breaking sub-scale droplets is observed regardless of their initial diameters. On the other hand, when a ferrofluid droplet is immersed in a thin layer of a nonmagnetic fluid, a formation of intriguing interfacial structures is observed, and the development of a hybrid-type ferrohydrodynamic instability is verified, where peak and labyrinthine ferrofluid patterns coexist and share a coupled dynamic evolution.

  1. Quantification of bone mass gain in response to the application of biphasic bioceramics and platelet concentrate in critical-size bone defects.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Sonja Ellen; Wykrota, Francisco Henrique Lanna; Oliveira, Ana Carolina Marques Barbosa; Kerkis, Irina; Mahecha, Germán Bohorquez; Alves, Humberto José

    2009-05-01

    Biphasic bioceramics have been widely indicated for bone reconstruction; however, the real gain in bone mass due to the presence of such biomaterials has not been established yet nor the advantages of its association with platelet concentrate. This study aims at quantifying the volume of bone matrix, osteoblasts, osteocytes, blood vessels and adipose tissue after the application of a biphasic bioceramics composed of 65% hydroxyapatite and 35% beta-tricalcium phosphate. Critical-size bone defects were produced in rabbit femora and reconstructed with bioceramics only, with bioceramics combined with platelet concentrate, with platelet concentrate alone, and with no treatment (blood clot). The quantitative evaluation was performed on histological sections using histomorphometry. Our data provide original evidence that consolidates the indication of bioceramics for clinical bone loss reconstruction. The application of biphasic bioceramics alone led to major bone mass gain and was followed by its association with platelet concentrate. On the other hand, platelet concentrate can contribute to the augmentation and maintenance of the adipose tissue, representing a new field for future applications in plastic surgery.

  2. Sinusoidal Forcing of Interfacial Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasheed, Fayaz; Raghunandan, Aditya; Hirsa, Amir; Lopez, Juan

    2015-11-01

    Fluid transport, in vivo, is accomplished via pumping mechanisms of the heart and lungs, which results in biological fluids being subjected to oscillatory shear. Flow is known to influence biological macromolecules, but predicting the effect of shear is incomplete without also accounting for the influence of complex interfaces ubiquitous throughout the body. Here, we investigated the oscillatory response of the structure of aqueous interfacial films using a cylindrical knife edge viscometer. Vitamin K1 was used as a model monolayer because its behaviour has been thoroughly quantified and it doesn't show any measurable hysteresis. The monolayer was subjected to sinusoidal forcing under varied conditions of surface concentrations, periodic frequencies, and knife edge amplitudes. Particle Image Velocimetry(PIV) data was collected using Brewster Angle Microscopy(BAM), revealing the influence of oscillatory interfacial shear stress on the monolayer. Insights were gained as to how the velocity profile dampens at specific distances from the knife edge contact depending on the amplitude, frequency, and concentration of Vitamin K1. Supported by NNX13AQ22G, National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  3. Convection and interfacial mass exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colinet, P.; Legros, J. C.; Dauby, P. C.; Lebon, G.; Bestehorn, M.; Stephan, P.; Tadrist, L.; Cerisier, P.; Poncelet, D.; Barremaecker, L.

    2005-10-01

    Mass-exchange through fluid interfaces is ubiquitous in many natural and industrial processes. Yet even basic phase-change processes such as evaporation of a pure liquid are not fully understood, in particular when coupled with fluid motions in the vicinity of the phase-change interface, or with microscopic physical phenomena in the vicinity of a triple line (where the interface meets a solid). Nowadays, many industries recognise that this lack of fundamental knowledge is hindering the optimisation of existing processes. Their modelling tools are too dependent on empirical correlations with a limited - and often unknown - range of applicability. In addition to the intrinsic multiscale nature of the phenomena involved in typical industrial processes linked to interfacial mass exchange, their study is highly multi-disciplinary, involving tools and techniques belonging to physical chemistry, chemical engineering, fluid dynamics, non-linear physics, non-equilibrium thermodynamics, chemistry and statistical physics. From the experimental point of view, microgravity offers a unique environment to obtain valuable data on phase-change processes, greatly reducing the influence of body forces and allowing the detailed and accurate study of interfacial dynamics. In turn, such improved understanding leads to optimisation of industrial processes and devices involving phase-change, both for space and ground applications.

  4. Protein interfacial structure and nanotoxicology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, John W.; Perriman, Adam W.; McGillivray, Duncan J.; Lin, Jhih-Min

    2009-02-01

    Here we briefly recapitulate the use of X-ray and neutron reflectometry at the air-water interface to find protein structures and thermodynamics at interfaces and test a possibility for understanding those interactions between nanoparticles and proteins which lead to nanoparticle toxicology through entry into living cells. Stable monomolecular protein films have been made at the air-water interface and, with a specially designed vessel, the substrate changed from that which the air-water interfacial film was deposited. This procedure allows interactions, both chemical and physical, between introduced species and the monomolecular film to be studied by reflectometry. The method is briefly illustrated here with some new results on protein-protein interaction between β-casein and κ-casein at the air-water interface using X-rays. These two proteins are an essential component of the structure of milk. In the experiments reported, specific and directional interactions appear to cause different interfacial structures if first, a β-casein monolayer is attacked by a κ-casein solution compared to the reverse. The additional contrast associated with neutrons will be an advantage here. We then show the first results of experiments on the interaction of a β-casein monolayer with a nanoparticle titanium oxide sol, foreshadowing the study of the nanoparticle "corona" thought to be important for nanoparticle-cell wall penetration.

  5. Interfacial functionalization and engineering of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yang

    The intense research interest in nanoscience and nanotechnology is largely fueled by the unique properties of nanoscale materials. In this dissertation, the research efforts are focused on surface functionalization and interfacial engineering of functional nanoparticles in the preparation of patchy nanoparticles (e.g., Janus nanoparticles and Neapolitan nanoparticles) such that the nanoparticle structures and properties may be manipulated to an unprecedented level of sophistication. Experimentally, Janus nanoparticles were prepared by an interfacial engineering method where one hemisphere of the originally hydrophobic nanoparticles was replaced with hydrophilic ligands at the air|liquid or solid|liquid interface. The amphiphilic surface characters of the Janus nanoparticles were verified by contact angle measurements, as compared to those of the bulk-exchange counterparts where the two types of ligands were distributed rather homogeneously on the nanoparticle surface. In a further study, a mercapto derivative of diacetylene was used as the hydrophilic ligands to prepare Janus nanoparticles by using hydrophobic hexanethiolate-protected gold nanoparticles as the starting materials. Exposure to UV irradiation led to effective covalent cross-linking between the diacetylene moieties of neighboring ligands and hence marked enhancement of the structural integrity of the Janus nanoparticles, which was attributable to the impeded surface diffusion of the thiol ligands on the nanoparticle surface, as manifested in fluorescence measurements of aged nanoparticles. More complicated bimetallic AgAu Janus nanoparticles were prepared by interfacial galvanic exchange reactions of a Langmuir-Blodgett monolayer of 1-hexanethiolate-passivated silver nanoparticles on a glass slide with gold(I)-mercaptopropanediol complex in a water/ethanol solution. The resulting nanoparticles exhibited an asymmetrical distribution not only of the organic capping ligands on the nanoparticle surface but

  6. Interfacial material for solid oxide fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Baozhen, Li; Ruka, Roswell J.; Singhal, Subhash C.

    1999-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells having improved low-temperature operation are disclosed. In one embodiment, an interfacial layer of terbia-stabilized zirconia is located between the air electrode and electrolyte of the solid oxide fuel cell. The interfacial layer provides a barrier which controls interaction between the air electrode and electrolyte. The interfacial layer also reduces polarization loss through the reduction of the air electrode/electrolyte interfacial electrical resistance. In another embodiment, the solid oxide fuel cell comprises a scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolyte having high electrical conductivity. The scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolyte may be provided as a very thin layer in order to reduce resistance. The scandia-stabilized electrolyte is preferably used in combination with the terbia-stabilized interfacial layer. The solid oxide fuel cells are operable over wider temperature ranges and wider temperature gradients in comparison with conventional fuel cells.

  7. Interfacial instabilities in vibrated fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Jeff; Laverón-Simavilla, Ana; Tinao Perez-Miravete, Ignacio; Fernandez Fraile, Jose Javier

    2016-07-01

    Vibrations induce a range of different interfacial phenomena in fluid systems depending on the frequency and orientation of the forcing. With gravity, (large) interfaces are approximately flat and there is a qualitative difference between vertical and horizontal forcing. Sufficient vertical forcing produces subharmonic standing waves (Faraday waves) that extend over the whole interface. Horizontal forcing can excite both localized and extended interfacial phenomena. The vibrating solid boundaries act as wavemakers to excite traveling waves (or sloshing modes at low frequencies) but they also drive evanescent bulk modes whose oscillatory pressure gradient can parametrically excite subharmonic surface waves like cross-waves. Depending on the magnitude of the damping and the aspect ratio of the container, these locally generated surfaces waves may interact in the interior resulting in temporal modulation and other complex dynamics. In the case where the interface separates two fluids of different density in, for example, a rectangular container, the mass transfer due to vertical motion near the endwalls requires a counterflow in the interior region that can lead to a Kelvin-Helmholtz type instability and a ``frozen wave" pattern. In microgravity, the dominance of surface forces favors non-flat equilibrium configurations and the distinction between vertical and horizontal applied forcing can be lost. Hysteresis and multiplicity of solutions are more common, especially in non-wetting systems where disconnected (partial) volumes of fluid can be established. Furthermore, the vibrational field contributes a dynamic pressure term that competes with surface tension to select the (time averaged) shape of the surface. These new (quasi-static) surface configurations, known as vibroequilibria, can differ substantially from the hydrostatic state. There is a tendency for the interface to orient perpendicular to the vibrational axis and, in some cases, a bulge or cavity is induced

  8. Micromechanical study of concrete materials with interfacial transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambheera, Ramesh

    This thesis describes analytical and finite element micromechanical studies for investigating the mechanical behavior of concrete materials. A concrete material is treated as a three phase composite consisting of aggregate, bulk paste and an interfacial transition zone around the aggregate. Experimental work on the microstructure of concrete has demonstrated the existence of interfacial transition zone and that this is the weakest link in the composite system of concrete material. Hence, the main focus of this thesis is to understand the role of the interfacial transition zone on the overall mechanical behavior of concrete materials. A four phase composite model consisting of aggregate, ITZ, bulk paste and an equivalent homogeneous medium is proposed to represent the concrete material. Analytical solutions are derived for the overall elastic moduli of the four phase composite model. The effects of volume fraction and the elastic moduli of the transition zone on the overall elastic moduli are investigated. The results obtained using the analytical model are in good agreement with those obtained from experiments. Analytical stress solutions are also derived for the four phase composite model subjected to uniaxial compression in two and three dimensions. The stress concentration and the tensile stress development in the interfacial transition zone are investigated. The effect of imperfect shear interfacial bond on the overall elastic moduli and on the stresses in the transition zone is also investigated. Basic concepts of damage mechanics are applied to model the damage in the transition zone. The effect of local damage in the transition zone on the overall damage in a concrete material is illustrated. For the specific case of uniaxial compression, the pre-peak stress-strain curves are generated. Computational analysis of micromechanical models of concrete materials requires efficient finite elements. This thesis proposes the use of hybrid finite elements for the

  9. Synthesis of bioactive β-TCP coatings with tailored physico-chemical properties on zirconia bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Stefanic, Martin; Milacic, Radmila; Drazic, Goran; Škarabot, Miha; Budič, Bojan; Krnel, Kristoffer; Kosmač, Tomaž

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a synthesis procedure for the deposition of β-TCP coatings with tailored physico-chemical properties on zirconia bioceramics. The synthesis procedure involved two steps: (i) a rapid wet-chemical deposition of a biomimetic CaP coating and (ii) a subsequent post-deposition processing of the biomimetic CaP coating, which included a heat treatment between 800 and 1200 °C, followed by a short sonication in a water bath. By regulating the heating temperature the topography of the β-TCP coatings could be controlled. The average surface roughness (Ra) ranged from 42 nm for the coating that was heated at 900 °C (TCP-900) to 630 nm for the TCP-1200 coating. Moreover, the heating temperature also affected the dissolution rate of the coatings in a physiological solution, their protein-adsorption capacity and their bioactivity in a simulated body fluid.

  10. Degradation and drug release in calcium polyphosphate bioceramics: an MRI-based characterization.

    PubMed

    Bray, J M; Filiaggi, M J; Bowen, C V; Beyea, S D

    2012-10-01

    Degradable, bioceramic bone implants made of calcium polyphosphate (CPP) hold potential for controlled release of therapeutic agents in the treatment of localized bone disease. Magnetic resonance imaging techniques for non-invasively mapping fluid distribution, T(1) and T(2) relaxation times and the apparent diffusion coefficient were performed in conjunction with a drug elution protocol to resolve free and bound water components within the material microstructure in two CPP formulations (G1 and G2). The T(2) maps provided the most accurate estimates of free and bound water, and showed that G1 disks contained a detectable free water component at all times, with drug release dominated by a Fickian diffusion mechanism. Drug release from G2 disks was characterized by a combined diffusional/structural relaxation mechanism, which may be related to the gradual infiltration of a free water component associated with swelling and/or chemical degradation.

  11. Ion-Doped Silicate Bioceramic Coating of Ti-Based Implant.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Hossein; Sepantafar, Mohammadmajid

    2016-09-01

    Titanium and its alloy are known as important load-bearing biomaterials. The major drawbacks of these metals are fibrous formation and low corrosion rate after implantation. The surface modification of biomedical implants through various methods such as plasma spray improves their osseointegration and clinical lifetime. Different materials have been already used as coatings on biomedical implant, including calcium phosphates and bioglass. However, these materials have been reported to have limited clinical success. The excellent bioactivity of calcium silicate (Ca-Si) has been also regarded as coating material. However, their high degradation rate and low mechanical strength limit their further coating application. Trace element modification of (Ca-Si) bioceramics is a promising method, which improves their mechanical strength and chemical stability. In this review, the potential of trace element-modified silicate coatings on better bone formation of titanium implant is investigated.

  12. Two-scale extended finite element method for studying crack propagation of porous bioceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jinlong; Wang, Mingguo; Zhan, Nan; Ji, Xinhua

    2008-11-01

    Extended finite element method (X-FEM) is a new method to solve the discontinuous problems, the basic theory of XFEM is presented in this paper, then the X-FEM is used to simulate the crack growth process of the hydroxyapatite material by three points bending test, and its deformation and stress field distribution is analyzed. The numerical results show the effectiveness of the method, the mesh in extended finite element method is independent of the internal geometry and physical interfaces, such that the trouble of high density meshing and re-meshing in the discontinuous field can be avoided. This greatly simplifies the analysis of the crack propagation process, showing the unique advantages of the extended finite element method in fracture expansion analysis of bioceramic. We also propose a two-scale strategy for crack propagation which enables one to use a refined mesh only in the crack's vicinity where it is required.

  13. Ion-Doped Silicate Bioceramic Coating of Ti-Based Implant

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Hossein; Sepantafar, Mohammadmajid

    2016-01-01

    Titanium and its alloy are known as important load-bearing biomaterials. The major drawbacks of these metals are fibrous formation and low corrosion rate after implantation. The surface modification of biomedical implants through various methods such as plasma spray improves their osseointegration and clinical lifetime. Different materials have been already used as coatings on biomedical implant, including calcium phosphates and bioglass. However, these materials have been reported to have limited clinical success. The excellent bioactivity of calcium silicate (Ca-Si) has been also regarded as coating material. However, their high degradation rate and low mechanical strength limit their further coating application. Trace element modification of (Ca-Si) bioceramics is a promising method, which improves their mechanical strength and chemical stability. In this review, the potential of trace element-modified silicate coatings on better bone formation of titanium implant is investigated. PMID:26979401

  14. Cytocompatibility and osteogenic activity of a novel calcium phosphate silicate bioceramic: Silicocarnotite.

    PubMed

    Duan, Wei; Ning, Congqin; Tang, Tingting

    2013-07-01

    In the present study, the effect of a novel bioceramic, silicon-containing calcium phosphate ceramic (silicocarnotite, Ca5 (PO4 )2 SiO4 , CPS) on attachment, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSC) has been investigated in comparison to hydroxyapatite (HA). The CPS showed a similar cell attachment behavior to HA, while the proliferation of rBMSC on CPS was significantly higher than that on HA, which indicated that CPS had a good cytocompatibility. Moreover, the expression of alkaline phosphatase activity and osteogenic-related genes, including Runx-2, osteopontin (OPN), bone sialoprotein (BSP) and osteocalcin (OC), demonstrated that CPS enhanced the osteogenic differentiation of rBMSC and accelerated the differentiation process. The results suggest that CPS ceramic exhibits a good cytocompatibility and osteogenic activity, which might be used as a potential candidate material for bone tissue engineering.

  15. Structure design and manufacturing of layered bioceramic scaffolds for load-bearing bone reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing-Zhou; Hu, Xiao-Zhi; Sultana, Rumana; Edward Day, Robert; Ichim, Paul

    2015-07-08

    Bioceramic scaffolds with desired bone regeneration functions have the potential to become real alternatives to autologous bone grafts for reconstruction of load-bearing and critical-sized segmental bone defects. The aim of this paper was to develop a layered scaffold structure that has the biodegradable function of common monolithic scaffolds and adequate mechanical function for surgical fixing and after surgery support. The exemplary case of this study is assumed to be a large-segment tibia or femur bone repair. The layered scaffold structure consists of a macro porous hydroxyapatite-wollastonite layer and a strong dense zirconia matrix dense layer. The bio-functional scaffold layer with interconnected freeze-dried porous structures shows excellent apatite formation, cell attachment, and cell proliferation capabilities. The mechanical functional layer provides a bending strength matching that of the compact bone.

  16. Influence of sintering temperatures on hardness and Young's modulus of tricalcium phosphate bioceramic by nanoindentation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.X. . E-mail: c.wang@bham.ac.uk; Zhou, X.; Wang, M.

    2004-07-15

    Nanoindentation experiments on tricalcium phosphate (TCP) bioceramic sintered at different temperatures were performed with a Berkovich indenter for determining hardness and elastic modulus from load and displacement data. The hardness and Young's modulus increased with the increase of sintering temperature up to 1300 deg. C, but the Young's modulus decreased with the further increase of sintering temperatures at 1400 and 1500 deg. C. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results showed that the transformation {beta}{yields}{alpha}-TCP happened when the sintering temperature reached around 1400 deg. C, which contributed to the decreases of modulus at 1400 and 1500 deg. C. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results showed that the sintering effect was improved with the increase in sintering temperature.

  17. Response of stem cells from different origins to biphasic calcium phosphate bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Sonja E; Glickman, Robert; da Silva, Wagner N; Arinzeh, Treena L; Kerkis, Irina

    2015-08-01

    Biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) bioceramics have been successfully applied in a broad variety of presentation forms and with different ratios of hydroxyapatite (HA) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP). BCPs have been loaded with stem cells from different origins for bone tissue engineering purposes, but evidence of stem cell behavior on different compositions (various HA/β-TCP ratios) and physical features of BCPs is limited. We compared the adhesion, proliferation, viability and osteogenic potential of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on granular BCPs with equal HA/β-TCP ratio of diverse particle sizes and on porous blocks which had different chemical compositions. In addition, the osteogenic differentiation of MSCs was compared to adipose-derived (ADSC) and dental pulp (DPSC) stem cells, as well as to pre-osteoblasts on a particulate BCP. MSCs growing on granular BCPs demonstrated increased number as compared to MSCs growing on blocks. Cells proliferated to a greater extent on small granular BCPs, while large granular BCPs and blocks promoted cell differentiation. Surprisingly, the expression of genes involved in osteogenesis was upregulated in MSCs on bioceramics in basal medium which indicates that BCPs may have osteoinductive potential. This was confirmed with the upregulation of osteochondrogenic markers, at different time points, when stem cells from various tissues were grown on the BCP. This study demonstrates that BCPs, depending on their physical features and chemical composition, modulate stem cell behavior, and that stem cells from different origins are inherently distinct in their gene expression profile and can be triggered toward osteochondrogenic fate by BCPs.

  18. Atomic scale modeling of iron-doped biphasic calcium phosphate bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Sandrine; Kaur, Amandeep; Grenèche, Jean-Marc; Nedelec, Jean-Marie; Renaudin, Guillaume

    2017-03-01

    Biphasic calcium phosphates (BCPs) are bioceramics composed of hydroxyapatite (HAp, Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) and beta-Tricalcium Phosphate (β-TCP, Ca3(PO4)2). Because their chemical and mineral composition closely resembles that of the mineral component of bone, they are potentially interesting candidates for bone repair surgery, and doping can advantageously be used to improve their biological behavior. However, it is important to describe the doping mechanism of BCP thoroughly in order to be able to master its synthesis and then to fully appraise the benefit of the doping process. In the present paper we describe the ferric doping mechanism: the crystallographic description of our samples, sintered at between 500°C and 1100°C, was provided by Rietveld analyses on X-ray powder diffraction, and the results were confirmed using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and (57)Fe Mössbauer spectrometry. The mechanism is temperature-dependent, like the previously reported zinc doping mechanism. Doping was performed on the HAp phase, at high temperature only, by an insertion mechanism. The Fe(3+) interstitial site is located in the HAp hexagonal channel, shifted from its centre to form a triangular three-fold coordination. At lower temperatures, the Fe(3+) are located at the centre of the channel, forming linear two-fold coordinated O-Fe-O entities. The knowledge of the doping mechanism is a prerequisite for a correct synthesis of the targeted bioceramic with the adapted (Ca+Fe)/P ratio, and so to be able to correctly predict its potential iron release or magnetic properties.

  19. Interfacial structures of LaAlO3 films on Si(100) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X. B.; Liu, Z. G.; Shi, G. H.; Ling, H. Q.; Zhou, H. W.; Wang, X. P.; Nguyen, B. Y.

    This paper investigates the interfacial characteristics of LaAlO3 (LAO) and LaAlOxNy (LAON) films deposited directly on silicon substrates by the pulsed-laser deposition technique. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) pictures indicate that an interfacial reaction between LAO and Si often exists. The interfacial layer thickness of LAO films deposited in a nitrogen ambient atmosphere is smaller than that of LAO films deposited in an oxygen ambient atmosphere. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) were used to study the composition of the interfacial layer. The shift of the La 3d photoelectron peak to a higher binding energy compared to LaAlO3, the shift of the Al 2p peak to a higher binding energy compared to LaAlO3, the shift of the Si 2p peak to a lower binding energy compared to SiO2 and the intermediate location of the O 1s peak compared to LaAlO3 and SiO2 indicate the existence of a La-Al-Si-O bonding structure, which was also proved by the AES depth profile of LAO films. It can be concluded that the interfacial layer is not simply SiO2 but a compound of La-Al-Si-O.

  20. Finite-size effects on molecular dynamics interfacial thermal-resistance predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhi; Keblinski, Pawel

    2014-08-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we study the role of finite size effects on the determination of interfacial thermal resistance between two solids characterized by high phonon mean free paths. In particular, we will show that a direct, heat source-sink method leads to strong size effect, associated with ballistic phonon transport to and from, and specular reflections at the simulation domain boundary. Lack of proper account for these effects can lead to incorrect predictions about the role of interfacial bonding and structure on interfacial thermal resistance. We also show that the finite size effect can be dramatically reduced by introduction of rough external boundaries leading to diffuse phonon scattering, as explicitly demonstrated by phonon wave-packet simulations. Finally, we demonstrate that when careful considerations are given to the effects associated with the finite heat capacity of the simulation domains and phonon scattering from the external surfaces, a size-independent interfacial resistance can be properly extracted from the time integral of the correlation function of heat power across the interface. Our work demonstrates that reliable and consistent values of the interfacial thermal resistance can be obtained by equilibrium and nonequilibrium methods with a relatively small computational cost.

  1. Interfacial enhancement of carbon fiber composites by generation 1-3 dendritic hexamethylenetetramine functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lichun; Meng, Linghui; Fan, Dapeng; He, Jinmei; Yu, Jiali; Qi, Meiwei; Chen, Zhongwu; Huang, Yudong

    2014-03-01

    PAN-based carbon fibers (CF) were functionalized with generation (n) 1-3 dendritic hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) (denoted as CF-Gn-HMTA, n = 1, 2 and 3) in an attempt to improve the interfacial properties between carbon fibers and epoxy matrix. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), dynamic contact angle analysis (DCA), interfacial shear strength (IFSS) and single fiber tensile testing were carried out to investigate the functionalization process of carbon fibers and the interfacial properties of the composites. Experimental results showed that generation (n) 1-3 dendritic hexamethylenetetramine was grafted uniformly on the fiber surface through the chemical reaction, and then it increased significantly the fiber surface polarity and roughness. The surface energy and IFSS of carbon fibers increased obviously after the graft CF-G3-HMTA, by 147.6% and 81%, respectively. Generation (n) 1-3 dendritic hexamethylenetetramine enhanced effectively the interfacial adhesion of the composites by improving resin wettability, increasing chemical bonding and mechanical interlocking, and the interfacial adhesion increased with dendritic generation number. Moreover, the grafting of generation (n) 1-3 dendritic hexamethylenetetramine on the carbon fiber surface improved the fiber tensile strength, which is beneficial to the in-plane properties of the resulting composites.

  2. TOPICAL REVIEW: Trend report on international and Japanese standardization activities for bioceramics and tissue engineered medical products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsumi, Sadami

    2010-02-01

    Since porous and injectable bioceramics have recently been utilized often as scaffolds for bone regenerative medicine, the need for their standardization has increased. One of the standard proposals in ISO/TC150 and JIS has been a draft for characterization of the porous bioceramic scaffolds in both micro- and macro-scopic aspects. ISO/TC150/SC7 (Tissue engineered medical products) has been co-chaired by Professor J E Lemons, Department of Surgery, University of Alabama at Birmingham and Dr R Nakaoka, Division of Medical Devices, National Institute of Health Sciences, Japan. The scope of SC7 has been specified as 'Standardization for the general requirements and performance of tissue engineered medical products with the exclusion of gene therapy, transplantation and transfusion'.

  3. Yankee bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Delaney, P. )

    1993-10-01

    Yankee and Euromarket bonds may soon find their way into the financing of power projects in Latin America. For developers seeking long-term commitments under build, own, operate, and transfer (BOOT) power projects in Latin America, the benefits are substantial.

  4. Intrinsic bond strength of metal films on polymer substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Donald R.; Osaki, Hiroyuki

    1990-01-01

    A semiquantitative method for the measurement of the intrinsic bond strength between elastic substrates and elastic films that fail by brittle fracture is described. Measurements on a polyethylene terephthalate (PET)-Ni couple were used to verify the essential features of the analysis. It was found that the interfacial shear strength of Ni on PET doubled after ion etching.

  5. Effect of hydrogen on Al2O3/Cu interfacial structure and adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Smith, John R.; Scheffler, Matthias

    2002-08-01

    We have carried out an ab initio investigation of the effect of hydrogen on the Al2O3/Cu interface. H on the Al2O3 surface can play a bridging role in the formation of the interface. The interfacial OH bond is stable in the presence of two atomic layers of Cu. In contrast, an Al monolayer would dissociate the surface OH bond. For thicker Cu, one-third of a monolayer of H remains stable in the interface, lowering the work of separation by 2.3 J/m2. The interfacial work of separation remains larger than that of bulk Cu, however. These results are consistent with available experimental data.

  6. Biological responses of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells to Sr-M-Si (M = Zn, Mg) silicate bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meili; Wu, Chengtie; Lin, Kaili; Fan, Wei; Chen, Lei; Xiao, Yin; Chang, Jiang

    2012-11-01

    Strontium (Sr), Zinc (Zn), magnesium (Mg), and silicon (Si) are reported to be essential trace elements for the growth and mineralization of bone. We speculated that the combination of these bioactive elements in bioceramics may be effective to regulate the osteogenic property of bone-forming cells. In this study, two Sr-containing silicate bioceramics, Sr(2)ZnSi(2)O(7) (SZS) and Sr(2)MgSi(2)O(7) (SMS), were prepared. The biological response of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) to the two bioceramics (in the forms of powders and dense ceramic bulks) was systematically studied. In powder form, the effect of powder extracts on the viability and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of BMSCs was investigated. In ceramic disc form, both direct and indirect coculture of BMSCs with ceramic discs were used to investigate their biological response, including attachment, proliferation, ALP activity, and bone-related genes expression. Beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and akermanite (Ca(2)MgSi(2)O(7), CMS) were used as control materials. The results showed that the Sr, Zn, and Si (or Sr, Mg, and Si)-containing ionic products from SZS and SMS powders enhanced ALP activity of BMSCs, compared to those from β-TCP. Both SZS and SMS ceramic discs supported the growth of BMSCs, and most importantly, significantly enhanced the ALP activity and bone-related genes expression of BMSCs as compared to β-TCP. The results suggest that the specific combination of bioactive ions (Sr, Zn, Si, e.g.) in bioceramics is a viable way to improve the biological performance of biomaterials, and the form of materials and surface properties were nonnegligible factors to influence cell response.

  7. Interfacial reactions in titanium-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.M.; Jeng, S.M. )

    1989-11-01

    A study of the interfacial reaction characteristics of SiC fiber-reinforced titanium aluminide and disordered titanium alloy composites has determined that the matrix alloy compositions affect the microstructure and the distribution of the reaction products, as well as the growth kinetics of the reaction zones. The interfacial reaction products in the ordered titanium aluminide composite are more complicated than those in the disordered titanium-alloy composite. The activation energy of the interfacial reaction in the ordered titanium aluminide composite is also higher than that in the disordered titanium alloy composite. Designing an optimum interface is necessary to enhance the reliability and service life at elevated temperatures. 16 refs.

  8. Investigation of interfacial shear strength in SiC/Si3N4 composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Bhatt, R. T.; Kiser, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    A fiber push-out technique was used to determine fiber/matrix interfacial shear strength (ISS) for silicon carbide fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SiC/RBSN) composites in the as-fabricated condition and after consolidation by hot isostatic pressing (HIPing). In situ video microscopy and acoustic emission detection greatly aided the interpretation of push-out load/displacement curves.

  9. Electrochemical and morphological investigation of silver and zinc modified calcium phosphate bioceramic coatings on metallic implant materials.

    PubMed

    Furko, M; Jiang, Y; Wilkins, T A; Balázsi, C

    2016-05-01

    In our research nanostructured silver and zinc doped calcium-phosphate (CaP) bioceramic coatings were prepared on commonly used orthopaedic implant materials (Ti6Al4V). The deposition process was carried out by the pulse current technique at 70 °C from electrolyte containing the appropriate amount of Ca(NO3)2 and NH4H2PO4 components. During the electrochemical deposition Ag(+) and Zn(2+) ions were introduced into the solution. The electrochemical behaviour and corrosion rate of the bioceramic coatings were investigated by potentiodynamic polarization and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) measurements in conventional Ringer's solution in a three electrode open cell. The coating came into contact with the electrolyte and corrosion occurred during immersion. In order to achieve antimicrobial properties, it is important to maintain a continuous release of silver ions into physiological media, while the bioactive CaP layer enhances the biocompatibility properties of the layer by fostering the bone cell growth. The role of Zn(2+) is to shorten wound healing time. Morphology and composition of coatings were studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy and Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Differential thermal analyses (DTA) were performed to determine the thermal stability of the pure and modified CaP bioceramic coatings while the structure and phases of the layers were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements.

  10. Osteogenic differentiation of osteoblasts induced by calcium silicate and calcium silicate/β-tricalcium phosphate composite bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Fei, Lisha; Wang, Chen; Xue, Yang; Lin, Kaili; Chang, Jiang; Sun, Jiao

    2012-07-01

    In this study, calcium silicate (CS) and CS/β-tricalcium phosphate (CS/β-TCP) composites were investigated on their mechanism of osteogenic proliferation and differentiation through regulating osteogenic-related gene and proteins. Osteoblast-like cells were cultured in the extracts of these CS-based bioceramics and pure β-TCP, respectively. The main ionic content in extracts was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. The cell viability, mineralization, and differentiation were evaluated by MTT assay, Alizarin Red-S staining and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity assay. The expressions of BMP-2, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), Runx2, ALP, and osteocalcin (OCN) at both gene and protein level were detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis and Western blot. The result showed that the extracts of CS-based bioceramics promoted cells proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization when compared with pure β-TCP. Accordingly, pure CS and CS/β-TCP composites stimulated osteoblast-like cells to express BMP-2/TGF-β gene and proteins, and further regulate the expression of Runx2 gene and protein, and ultimately affect the ALP activity and OCN deposition. This study suggested that the CS-based bioceramics could not only promote the expression of osteogenic-related genes but also enhance the genes to encode the corresponding proteins, which could finally control osteoblast-like cells proliferation and differentiation.

  11. Current perspectives of bio-ceramic technology in endodontics: calcium enriched mixture cement - review of its composition, properties and applications

    PubMed Central

    Nawal, Ruchika Roongta; Talwar, Sangeeta; Verma, Mahesh

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in bio-ceramic technology has revolutionised endodontic material science by enhancing the treatment outcome for patients. This class of dental materials conciliates excellent biocompatibility with high osseoconductivity that render them ideal for endodontic care. Few recently introduced bio-ceramic materials have shown considerable clinical success over their early generations in terms of good handling characteristics. Calcium enriched mixture (CEM) cement, Endosequence sealer, and root repair materials, Biodentine and BioAggregate are the new classes of bio-ceramic materials. The aim of this literature review is to present investigations regarding properties and applications of CEM cement in endodontics. A review of the existing literature was performed by using electronic and hand searching methods for CEM cement from January 2006 to December 2013. CEM cement has a different chemical composition from that of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) but has similar clinical applications. It combines the biocompatibility of MTA with more efficient characteristics, such as significantly shorter setting time, good handling characteristics, no staining of tooth and effective seal against bacterial leakage. PMID:25671207

  12. The effect of grain size on the biocompatibility, cell-materials interface, and mechanical properties of microwave-sintered bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Veljović, Djordje; Colić, Miodrag; Kojić, Vesna; Bogdanović, Gordana; Kojić, Zvezdana; Banjac, Andrijana; Palcevskis, Eriks; Petrović, Rada; Janaćković, Djordje

    2012-11-01

    The effect of decreasing the grain size on the biocompatibility, cell-material interface, and mechanical properties of microwave-sintered monophase hydroxyapatite bioceramics was investigated in this study. A nanosized stoichiometric hydroxyapatite powder was isostatically pressed at high pressure and sintered in a microwave furnace in order to obtain fine grained dense bioceramics. The samples sintered at 1200°C, with a density near the theoretical one, were composed of micron-sized grains, while the grain size decreased to 130 nm on decreasing the sintering temperature to 900°C. This decrease in the grain size certainly led to increases in the fracture toughness by much as 54%. An in vitro investigation of biocompatibility with L929 and human MRC-5 fibroblast cells showed noncytotoxic effects for both types of bioceramics, while the relative cell proliferation rate, cell attachment and metabolic activity of the fibroblasts were improved with decreasing of grain size. An initial in vivo investigation of biocompatibility by the primary cutaneous irritation test showed that both materials exhibited no irritation properties.

  13. First-principles study of the interfacial adhesion between Si O2 and Mo Si2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, D. E.; Carter, Emily A.

    2005-10-01

    Upon oxidation, a silica scale forms on MoSi2 , a potential high-temperature coating material for metals. This silica scale protects MoSi2 against high-temperature corrosive gases or liquids. We use periodic density functional theory to examine the interface between SiO2 and MoSi2 . The interfacial bonding is localized, as evidenced by an adhesion energy that changes only slightly with the thickness of the SiO2 layer. Moreover, the adhesion energy displays a relatively large (0.40J/m2) variation with the relative lateral position of the SiO2 and MoSi2 lattices due to changes in Si-O bonding across the interface. The most stable interfacial structure yields an ideal work of adhesion of 5.75J/m2 within the local density approximation ( 5.02J/m2 within the generalized-gradient approximation) to electron exchange and correlation, indicating extremely strong adhesion. Local densities of states and electron density difference plots demonstrate that the interfacial Si-O bonds are covalent in character. Mo-O interactions are not found in the SiO2/MoSi2 interface investigated here. Our work predicts that the SiO2 scale strongly adheres to MoSi2 , and further supports the potential of MoSi2 as a high-temperature structural material and coating.

  14. Laser ultrasonic characterization of adhesive bonds between epoxy coating and aluminum substrate.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Qian, M L; Liu, W

    2006-12-22

    Nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation through transparent epoxy bonded to aluminum substrate excites wide-band ultrasonic waves at the bonded interface. The normal displacements on the rear surface of aluminum produced by the direct and multi-reflected longitudinal waves in the coating layer are detected by a laser interferometer. The amplitude of the reflected signal depends on the properties of the coating/substrate interface, which is described by terms of the interfacial stiffness using a spring boundary model. The waveforms at the epicenter versus interfacial stiffness are simulated and found to be in good agreement with experimental results. The relation between the interfacial stiffness and the amplitude ratio of the reflected and direct waves is thus established. An image of amplitude ratio of a specimen (null 10 mm) is obtained from the epicenter waveforms recorded by a laser ultrasonic scanning system, which shows the distribution of bond quality on the bonding interface.

  15. Interfacial Symmetry Control of Emergent Ferromagnetism at the Nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Grutter, A J; Vailionis, A; Borchers, J A; Kirby, B J; Flint, C L; He, C; Arenholz, E; Suzuki, Y

    2016-09-14

    The emergence of complex new ground states at interfaces has been identified as one of the most promising routes to highly tunable nanoscale materials. Despite recent progress, isolating and controlling the underlying mechanisms behind these emergent properties remains among the most challenging materials physics problems to date. In particular, generating ferromagnetism localized at the interface of two nonferromagnetic materials is of fundamental and technological interest. Moreover, the ability to turn the ferromagnetism on and off would shed light on the origin of such emergent phenomena and is promising for spintronic applications. We demonstrate that ferromagnetism confined within one unit cell at the interface of CaRuO3 and CaMnO3 can be switched on and off by changing the symmetry of the oxygen octahedra connectivity at the boundary. Interfaces that are symmetry-matched across the boundary exhibit interfacial CaMnO3 ferromagnetism while the ferromagnetism at symmetry-mismatched interfaces is suppressed. We attribute the suppression of ferromagnetic order to a reduction in charge transfer at symmetry-mismatched interfaces, where frustrated bonding weakens the orbital overlap. Thus, interfacial symmetry is a new route to control emergent ferromagnetism in materials such as CaMnO3 that exhibit antiferromagnetism in bulk form.

  16. Interfacial pH during mussel adhesive plaque formation

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Nadine R. Martinez; Das, Saurabh; Kaufman, Yair; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Mussel (Mytilus californianus) adhesion to marine surfaces involves an intricate and adaptive synergy of molecules and spatio-temporal processes. Although the molecules, such as mussel foot proteins (mfps), are well characterized, deposition details remain vague and speculative. Developing methods for the precise surveillance of conditions that apply during mfp deposition would aid both in understanding mussel adhesion and translating this adhesion into useful technologies. To probe the interfacial pH at which mussels buffer the local environment during mfp deposition, a lipid bilayer with tethered pH-sensitive fluorochromes was assembled on mica. The interfacial pH during foot contact with modified mica ranged from 2.2−3.3, which is well below the seawater pH of ~8. The acidic pH serves multiple functions: it limits mfp-Dopa oxidation, thereby enabling the catecholic functionalities to adsorb to surface oxides by H-bonding and metal ion coordination, and provides a solubility switch for mfps, most of which aggregate at pH ≥ 7-8. PMID:25875963

  17. Molecular and Interfacial Calculations of Iron(II) Light Harvesters.

    PubMed

    Fredin, Lisa A; Wärnmark, Kenneth; Sundström, Villy; Persson, Petter

    2016-04-07

    Iron-carbene complexes show considerable promise as earth-abundant light-harvesters, and adsorption onto nanostructured TiO2 is a crucial step for developing solar energy applications. Intrinsic electron injection capabilities of such promising Fe(II) N-heterocyclic complexes (Fe-NHC) to TiO2 are calculated here, and found to correlate well with recent experimental findings of highly efficient interfacial injection. First, we examine the special bonding characteristics of Fe-NHC light harvesters. The excited-state surfaces are examined using density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) to explore relaxed excited-state properties. Finally, by relaxing an Fe-NHC adsorbed on a TiO2 nanocluster, we show favorable injection properties in terms of interfacial energy level alignment and electronic coupling suitable for efficient electron injection of excited electrons from the Fe complex into the TiO2 conduction band on ∼100 fs time scales.

  18. Interfacial pH during mussel adhesive plaque formation.

    PubMed

    Martinez Rodriguez, Nadine R; Das, Saurabh; Kaufman, Yair; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Waite, J Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Mussel (Mytilus californianus) adhesion to marine surfaces involves an intricate and adaptive synergy of molecules and spatio-temporal processes. Although the molecules, such as mussel foot proteins (mfps), are well characterized, deposition details remain vague and speculative. Developing methods for the precise surveillance of conditions that apply during mfp deposition would aid both in understanding mussel adhesion and translating this adhesion into useful technologies. To probe the interfacial pH at which mussels buffer the local environment during mfp deposition, a lipid bilayer with tethered pH-sensitive fluorochromes was assembled on mica. The interfacial pH during foot contact with modified mica ranged from 2.2 to 3.3, which is well below the seawater pH of ~ 8. The acidic pH serves multiple functions: it limits mfp-Dopa oxidation, thereby enabling the catecholic functionalities to adsorb to surface oxides by H-bonding and metal ion coordination, and provides a solubility switch for mfps, most of which aggregate at pH ≥ 7-8.

  19. Interfacial fracture toughness of synthetic bone-cement interface

    PubMed Central

    Tong, J

    2008-01-01

    Conventionally, the bonding strength of bone-cement interface is obtained by mechanical strength testing which tends to produce large variability between specimens and test methods. In this work, interfacial fracture toughness of synthetic bone-cement interface has been determined using sandwiched Brazilian disk specimens. Experiments were carried out under selected loading angles from 0 to 25 degrees to achieve full loading conditions from mode I to mode II. Solutions for complex stress intensity factors as well as strain energy release rates were obtained for a sandwich disk with a finite interlayer using the finite element method. Phase angles were obtained at a fixed distance to the crack tip. The fracture loads were obtained from the load displacement curves and the values of interfacial fracture toughness were calculated from the fracture loads and the finite element J-integral solutions. The implication of this information on the assessment of fixation in acetabular replacements was discussed in the light of in-vitro fatigue testing of implanted acetabula. PMID:19325935

  20. Interfacial fracture toughness of synthetic bone-cement interface.

    PubMed

    Tong, J

    2006-06-15

    Conventionally, the bonding strength of bone-cement interface is obtained by mechanical strength testing which tends to produce large variability between specimens and test methods. In this work, interfacial fracture toughness of synthetic bone-cement interface has been determined using sandwiched Brazilian disk specimens. Experiments were carried out under selected loading angles from 0 to 25 degrees to achieve full loading conditions from mode I to mode II. Solutions for complex stress intensity factors as well as strain energy release rates were obtained for a sandwich disk with a finite interlayer using the finite element method. Phase angles were obtained at a fixed distance to the crack tip. The fracture loads were obtained from the load displacement curves and the values of interfacial fracture toughness were calculated from the fracture loads and the finite element J-integral solutions. The implication of this information on the assessment of fixation in acetabular replacements was discussed in the light of in-vitro fatigue testing of implanted acetabula.

  1. Diffusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert C.

    1976-06-22

    1. A method for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding, comprising the steps of coating at least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces with nickel, positioning a coated surface portion in a contiguous relationship with an other surface portion, subjecting the contiguously disposed surface portions to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure, applying a force upon the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other, heating the contiguous surface portions to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, substantially uniformly decreasing the applied force while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature, and maintaining a portion of the applied force at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions.

  2. Interfacial structure, thermodynamics, and electrostatics of aqueous methanol solutions via molecular dynamics simulations using charge equilibration models.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sandeep; Zhong, Yang; Bauer, Brad A; Davis, Joseph E

    2009-07-09

    interface normal. We observe a nonmonotonic behavior of the methanol in-plane dielectric permittivity that tracks the methanol density profiles at low methanol mole fractions. At higher methanol mole fractions, the total in-plane permittivity is dominated by methanol and displays a monotonic decrease from bulk to vapor. We finally probe the nature of hydration of water in the bulk versus interfacial regions for methanol mole fractions of 0.1 and 0.2. In the bulk, methanol perturbs water structure so as to give rise to water hydrogen bond excesses. Moreover, we observe negative hydrogen bond excess in the vicinity of the alkyl group, as reported by Zhong et al. for bulk ethanol-water solutions using charge equilibration force fields, and positive excess in regions hydrogen bonding to nearest-neighbor methanol molecules. Within the interfacial region, water and methanol density reduction lead to concomitant water hydrogen bond deficiencies (negative hydrogen-bond excess).

  3. Physicochemically functional ultrathin films by interfacial polymerization

    DOEpatents

    Lonsdale, Harold K.; Babcock, Walter C.; Friensen, Dwayne T.; Smith, Kelly L.; Johnson, Bruce M.; Wamser, Carl C.

    1990-01-01

    Interfacially-polymerized ultrathin films containing physicochemically functional groups are disclosed, both with and without supports. Various applications are disclsoed, including membrane electrodes, selective membranes and sorbents, biocompatible materials, targeted drug delivery, and narrow band optical absorbers.

  4. Physicochemically functional ultrathin films by interfacial polymerization

    DOEpatents

    Lonsdale, H.K.; Babcock, W.C.; Friensen, D.T.; Smith, K.L.; Johnson, B.M.; Wamser, C.C.

    1990-08-14

    Interfacially-polymerized ultrathin films containing physicochemically functional groups are disclosed, both with and without supports. Various applications are disclosed, including membrane electrodes, selective membranes and sorbents, biocompatible materials, targeted drug delivery, and narrow band optical absorbers. 3 figs.

  5. Recovery of small bioparticles by interfacial partitioning.

    PubMed

    Jauregi, P; Hoeben, M A; van der Lans, R G J M; Kwant, G; van der Wielen, L A M

    2002-05-20

    In this article, a qualitative study of the recovery of small bioparticles by interfacial partitioning in liquid-liquid biphasic systems is presented. A range of crystallised biomolecules with varying polarities have been chosen such as glycine, phenylglycine and ampicillin. Liquid-liquid biphasic systems in a range of polarity differences were selected such as an aqueous two-phase system (ATPS), water-butanol and water-hexanol. The results indicate that interfacial partitioning of crystals occurs even when their density exceeds that of the individual liquid phases. Yet, not all crystals partition to the same extent to the interface to form a stable and thick interphase layer. This indicates some degree of selectivity. From the analysis of these results in relation to the physicochemical properties of the crystals and the liquid phases, a hypothetical mechanism for the interfacial partitioning is deduced. Overall these results support the potential of interfacial partitioning as a large scale separation technology.

  6. Chemistry of the metal-polymer interfacial region.

    PubMed

    Leidheiser, H; Deck, P D

    1988-09-02

    In many polymer-metal systems, chemical bonds are formed that involve metal-oxygen-carbon complexes. Infrared and Mössbauer spectroscopic studies indicate that carboxylate groups play an important role in some systems. The oxygen sources may be the polymer, the oxygen present in the oxide on the metal surface, or atmospheric oxygen. Diffusion of metal ions from the substrate into the polymer interphase may occur in some systems that are cured at elevated temperatures. It is unclear whether a similar, less extensive diffusion occurs over long time periods in systems maintained at room temperature. The interfacial region is dynamic, and chemical changes occur with aging at room temperature. Positron annihilation spectroscopy may have application to characterizing the voids at the metal-polymer interface.

  7. Effects of Impurities on Alumina-Niobium InterfacialMicrostructures

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Sugar, Joshua D.; Gronsky, Ronald; Glaeser,Andreas M.

    2005-06-20

    Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy were employed to examine the interfacial microstructural effects of impurities in alumina substrates used to fabricate alumina-niobium interfaces via liquid-film-assisted joining. Three types of alumina were used: undoped high-purity single-crystal sapphire; a high-purity, high-strength polycrystalline alumina; and a lower-purity, lower-strength polycrystalline alumina. Interfaces formed between niobium and both the sapphire and high-purity polycrystalline alumina were free of detectable levels of impurities. In the lower-purity alumina, niobium silicides were observed at the alumina-niobium interface and on alumina grain boundaries near the interface. These silicides formed in small-grained regions of the alumina and were found to grow from the interface into the alumina along grain boundaries. Smaller silicide precipitates found on grain boundaries are believed to form upon cooling from the bonding temperature.

  8. Electric Field Induced Interfacial Instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kusner, Robert E.; Min, Kyung Yang; Wu, Xiao-Lun; Onuki, Akira

    1996-01-01

    The study of the interface in a charge-free, nonpolar, critical and near-critical binary fluid in the presence of an externally applied electric field is presented. At sufficiently large fields, the interface between the two phases of the binary fluid should become unstable and exhibit an undulation with a predefined wavelength on the order of the capillary length. As the critical point is approached, this wavelength is reduced, potentially approaching length-scales such as the correlation length or critical nucleation radius. At this point the critical properties of the system may be affected. In zero gravity, the interface is unstable at all long wavelengths in the presence of a field applied across it. It is conjectured that this will cause the binary fluid to break up into domains small enough to be outside the instability condition. The resulting pattern formation, and the effects on the critical properties as the domains approach the correlation length are of acute interest. With direct observation, laser light scattering, and interferometry, the phenomena can be probed to gain further understanding of interfacial instabilities and the pattern formation which results, and dimensional crossover in critical systems as the critical fluctuations in a particular direction are suppressed by external forces.

  9. Interfacial Instabilities on a Droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalaal, Maziyar; Mehravaran, Kian

    2013-11-01

    The fragmentation of droplets is an essential stage of several natural and industrial applications such as fuel atomization and rain phenomena. In spite of its relatively long history, the mechanism of fragmentation is not clear yet. This is mainly due to small length and time scales as well as the non-linearity of the process. In the present study, two and three-dimensional numerical simulations have been performed to understand the early stages of the fragmentation of an initially spherical droplet. Simulations are performed for high Reynolds and a range of relatively high Weber numbers (shear breakup). To resolve the small-scale instabilities generated over the droplet, a second-order adaptive finite volume/volume of fluids (FV/VOF) method is employed, where the grid resolution is increased with the curvature of the gas-liquid interface as well as the vorticity magnitude. The study is focused on the onset and growth of interfacial instabilities. The role of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (in surface wave formation) and Rayleigh-Taylor instability (in azimuthal transverse modulation) are shown and the obtained results are compared with the linear instability theories for zero and non-zero vorticity layers. Moreover, the analogy between the fragmentation of a single drop and a co-axial liquid jet is discussed. The current results can be used for the further development of the current secondary atomization models.

  10. Modeling interfacial fracture in Sierra.

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Arthur A.; Ohashi, Yuki; Lu, Wei-Yang; Nelson, Stacy A. C.; Foulk, James W.,; Reedy, Earl David,; Austin, Kevin N.; Margolis, Stephen B.

    2013-09-01

    This report summarizes computational efforts to model interfacial fracture using cohesive zone models in the SIERRA/SolidMechanics (SIERRA/SM) finite element code. Cohesive surface elements were used to model crack initiation and propagation along predefined paths. Mesh convergence was observed with SIERRA/SM for numerous geometries. As the funding for this project came from the Advanced Simulation and Computing Verification and Validation (ASC V&V) focus area, considerable effort was spent performing verification and validation. Code verification was performed to compare code predictions to analytical solutions for simple three-element simulations as well as a higher-fidelity simulation of a double-cantilever beam. Parameter identification was conducted with Dakota using experimental results on asymmetric double-cantilever beam (ADCB) and end-notched-flexure (ENF) experiments conducted under Campaign-6 funding. Discretization convergence studies were also performed with respect to mesh size and time step and an optimization study was completed for mode II delamination using the ENF geometry. Throughout this verification process, numerous SIERRA/SM bugs were found and reported, all of which have been fixed, leading to over a 10-fold increase in convergence rates. Finally, mixed-mode flexure experiments were performed for validation. One of the unexplained issues encountered was material property variability for ostensibly the same composite material. Since the variability is not fully understood, it is difficult to accurately assess uncertainty when performing predictions.

  11. Interfacial area transport in bubbly flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, M.; Wu, Q.; Revankar, S.T.

    1997-12-31

    In order to close the two-fluid model for two-phase flow analyses, the interfacial area concentration needs to be modeled as a constitutive relation. In this study, the focus was on the investigation of the interfacial area concentration transport phenomena, both theoretically and experimentally. The interfacial area concentration transport equation for air-water bubbly up-flow in a vertical pipe was developed, and the models for the source and sink terms were provided. The necessary parameters for the experimental studies were identified, including the local time-averaged void fraction, interfacial area concentration, bubble interfacial velocity, liquid velocity and turbulent intensity. Experiments were performed with air-water mixture at atmospheric pressure. Double-sensor conductivity probe and hot-film probe were employed to measure the identified parameters. With these experimental data, the preliminary model evaluation was carried out for the simplest form of the developed interfacial area transport equation, i.e., the one-dimensional transport equation.

  12. Correlating interfacial properties with stress transfer in SMA composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, G.E.; Jonnalagadda, K.; Sottos, N.R.

    1995-12-31

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) wires have been proposed as large strain actuators for use in smart structures. SMA wires can be embedded in a host material to alter the stiffness or modal response and provide vibration control. The interaction between the embedded SMA and the host material is critical to applications requiring transfer of loads or strain from the wire to the host. Paine, Jones and Rogers have asserted the importance of interfacial adhesion between embedded SMA wires and the host material. When the SMA wires are actuated, large shear strains are generated at the SMA/host interface. The stronger the interface, the greater the transfer of strain from the actuator to the host material. Although there has been a significant amount of research dedicated to characterizing and modeling the response of SMA alone, little work has been done to understand the behavior of embedded SMA wires. Maximum displacement, load transfer and repeatability of actuation of the embedded wire are particularly critical in assessing the effects of the host material. This work continues to investigate the interaction between SMA wires and a host polymer matrix. High resolution photoelasticity was utilized to study the internal stresses induced during actuation of an embedded shape memory alloy wire in a polymer matrix. The influence of several wire surface treatments on the resulting stresses and load transfer was investigated. Four different surface treatments were considered: untreated, acid etched, hand sanded and sandblasted. Pull-out data indicated that sandblasting of wires increased the SMA/polymer interfacial bond strength while hand sanding and acid cleaning actually decreased the bond strength. Wires with greater adhesion (sandblasted) resulted in higher stresses induced in the polymer while those with lower adhesion transferred less load. Overall, properties of the SMA/polymer interface were shown to significantly affect the performance of the embedded SMA actuator.

  13. Bond strength of repaired amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Rey, Rosalia; Mondragon, Eduardo; Shen, Chiayi

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated the interfacial flexural strength (FS) of amalgam repairs and the optimal combination of repair materials and mechanical retention required for a consistent and durable repair bond. Amalgam bricks were created, each with 1 end roughened to expose a fresh surface before repair. Four groups followed separate repair protocols: group 1, bonding agent with amalgam; group 2, bonding agent with composite resin; group 3, mechanical retention (slot) with amalgam; and group 4, slot with bonding agent and amalgam. Repaired specimens were stored in artificial saliva for 1, 10, 30, 120, or 360 days before being loaded to failure in a 3-point bending test. Statistical analysis showed significant changes in median FS over time in groups 2 and 4. The effect of the repair method on the FS values after each storage period was significant for most groups except the 30-day storage groups. Amalgam-amalgam repair with adequate condensation yielded the most consistent and durable bond. An amalgam bonding agent could be beneficial when firm condensation on the repair surface cannot be achieved or when tooth structure is involved. Composite resin can be a viable option for amalgam repair in an esthetically demanding region, but proper mechanical modification of the amalgam surface and selection of the proper bonding system are essential.

  14. Visualizing interfacial charge transfer in Ru-dye sensitized TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles using x-ray transient absorption spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Smolentsev, G.; Guo, J.; Attenkofer, K.; Kurtz, C.; Jennings, G.; Lockard, J. V.; Stickrath, A. B.; Chen, L. X.

    2011-03-01

    A molecular level understanding of the structural reorganization accompanying interfacial electron transfer is important for rational design of solar cells. Here we have applied XTA (X-ray transient absorption) spectroscopy to study transient structures in a heterogeneous interfacial system mimicking the charge separation process in dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) with Ru(dcbpy){sub 2}(NCS){sub 2} (RuN3) dye adsorbed to TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle surfaces. The results show that the average Ru-NCS bond length reduces by 0.06 {angstrom}, whereas the average Ru?N(dcbpy) bond length remains nearly unchanged after the electron injection. The differences in bond-order change and steric hindrance between two types of ligands are attributed to their structural response in the charge separation. This study extends the application of XTA into optically opaque hybrid interfacial systems relevant to the solar energy conversion.

  15. Pi Bond Orders and Bond Lengths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herndon, William C.; Parkanyi, Cyril

    1976-01-01

    Discusses three methods of correlating bond orders and bond lengths in unsaturated hydrocarbons: the Pauling theory, the Huckel molecular orbital technique, and self-consistent-field techniques. (MLH)

  16. Air-water interfacial areas in unsaturated soils: Evaluation of interfacial domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanza-Robinson, Molly S.; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2002-10-01

    A gas-phase miscible-displacement method, using decane as an interfacial tracer, was used to measure air-water interfacial areas for a sand with water contents ranging from ˜2% to 20%. The expected trend of decreasing interfacial areas with increasing water contents was observed. The maximum estimated interfacial area of 19,500 cm-1 appears reasonable given it is smaller than the measured surface area of the porous medium (60,888 cm-1). Comparison of the experimental data presented herein with literature data provided further insight into the characterization of the air-water interface in unsaturated porous media. Specifically, comparison of interfacial areas measured using gas-phase versus aqueous-phase methods indicates that the gas-phase method generally yields larger interfacial areas than the aqueous-phase methods, even when accounting for differences in water content and physical properties of the porous media. The observations are consistent with proposed differences in interfacial accessibility of the aqueous- and gas-phase tracers. Evaluation of the data in light of functional interfacial domains, described herein, yields the hypothesis that aqueous interfacial tracers measure primarily air-water interfaces formed by "capillary water," while gas-phase tracers measure air-water interfaces formed by both capillary and surface-adsorbed (film) water. The gas- and aqueous-phase methods may each provide interfacial area information that is more relevant to specific problems of interest. For example, gas-phase interfacial area measurements may be most relevant to contaminant transport in unsaturated systems, where retention at the air-water interface may be significant. Conversely, the aqueous-phase methods may yield information with direct bearing on multiphase flow processes that are dominated by capillary-phase behavior.

  17. Chemical strategies for die/wafer submicron alignment and bonding.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, James Ellis; Baca, Alicia I.; Chu, Dahwey; Rohwer, Lauren Elizabeth Shea

    2010-09-01

    This late-start LDRD explores chemical strategies that will enable sub-micron alignment accuracy of dies and wafers by exploiting the interfacial energies of chemical ligands. We have micropatterned commensurate features, such as 2-d arrays of micron-sized gold lines on the die to be bonded. Each gold line is functionalized with alkanethiol ligands before the die are brought into contact. The ligand interfacial energy is minimized when the lines on the die are brought into registration, due to favorable interactions between the complementary ligand tails. After registration is achieved, standard bonding techniques are used to create precision permanent bonds. We have computed the alignment forces and torque between two surfaces patterned with arrays of lines or square pads to illustrate how best to maximize the tendency to align. We also discuss complex, aperiodic patterns such as rectilinear pad assemblies, concentric circles, and spirals that point the way towards extremely precise alignment.

  18. Two interfacial shear strength calculations based on the single fiber composite test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhandarov, S. F.; Pisanova, E. V.

    1996-07-01

    The fragmentation of a single fiber embedded in a polymer matrix upon stretching (SFC test) provides valuable information on the fiber-matrix bond strength (τ), which determines stress transfer through the interface and, thus, significantly affects the mechanical properties of the composite material. However, the calculated bond strength appears to depend on data interpretation, i.e., on the applied theoretical model, since the direct result of the SFC test is the fiber fragment length distribution rather than the τ value. Two approaches are used in SFC testing for calculation of the bond strength: 1) the Kelly-Tyson model, in which the matrix is assumed to be totally elastic and 2) the Cox model using the elastic constants of the fiber and the matrix. In this paper, an attempt has been made to compare these two approaches employing theory as well as the experimental data of several authors. The dependence of the tensile stress in the fiber and the interfacial shear stress on various factors has been analyzed. For both models, the mean interfacial shear stress in the fragment of critical length (lc) was shown to satisfy the same formula (τ) = (σcD)/2lc, where D is the fiber diameter and σc is the tensile strength of a fiber at gauge length equal to lc. However, the critical lengths from the Kelly-Tyson approach and Cox model are differently related to the fragment length distribution parameters such as the mean fragment length. This discrepancy results in different (τ) values for the same experimental data set. While the main parameter in the Kelly-Tyson model assumed constant for a given fiber-matrix pair is the interfacial shear strength, the ultimate (local) bond strength τult may be seen as the corresponding parameter in the Cox model. Various τult values were obtained for carbon fiber-epoxy matrix systems by analyzing the data of continuously monitored single fiber composite tests. Whereas the mean value of the interfacial shear stress calculated in

  19. Oxide film microstructure: the link between surface preparation processes and strength/durability of adhesively bonded aluminum. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hsia, K. Jimmy; Pearlstein, Arne J.; Scheeline, Alexander; Shang, Jian Ku

    2000-11-30

    Strength and durability of adhesive bonding of aluminum alloys structures are intrinsically determined by the surface microstructures and interfacial failure micromechanisms. The current project presents a multidisciplinary approach to addressing critical issues controlling the strength and durability of adhesive bonds of aluminum alloys. Three main thrust areas have been pursued: surface treatment technology development to achieve desirable surface microstructures; relationship between surface structure and properties of adhesive bonds; and failure mechanisms of adhesively bonded components.

  20. Characterization of interfacial solvent in protein complexes and contribution of wet spots to the interface description.

    PubMed

    Teyra, Joan; Pisabarro, M T

    2007-06-01

    Water networks in protein interfaces can complement direct interactions contributing significantly to molecular recognition, function, and stability of protein association. Thus, water can be seen as an extension or addition of protein structural features, which may add plenty of information to protein interfacial definition. However, solvent is frequently neglected in protein interaction studies. Analysis of the interfacial information contained in the PDB is essential to achieve more accurate descriptions of protein interfaces. With this aim, we have used the SCOWLP database (http://www.scowlp.org) and applied computational geometry methods to extract and analyze interfacial information of a high-resolution nonredundant dataset of 176 protein complexes containing obligate and transient interfaces. We have identified all interfacial residues and characterized them in terms of temperature factors, secondary structure, residue composition, and pairing preferences to understand their contribution to the interface description. We have paid special attention to water-bridged residues; focusing on those that interact only mediated by a water molecule called wet spots. Our results show that 40.1% of the interfacial residues are interacting through water and that wet spots represent a 14.5% of the total, emphasizing the importance of the inclusion of solvent in protein interaction studies, and the contribution of wet spots to interfacial description. Wet spots present similar characteristics to residues binding buried water molecules in the core or cavities of proteins; being preferably located in nonregular secondary structures and establishing hydrogen bonds by their main-chains. We observe that obligate and transient interfaces present a comparable amount of solvent. Moreover, the role of solvent in both complex types differs according to the different nature of their interfaces. The information obtained in our studies will assist in the process of accomplishing more

  1. Effect of sputter deposited YSZ thin films on the fracture behavior of dental bioceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, Erica Cappelletto Nogueira

    The fracture behavior of dental bioceramic materials was evaluated under physiologic conditions when modified by yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thin film deposition. It was hypothesized that changing the YSZ thin film properties will produce a significant enhancement in the strength of bioceramic materials, ultimately promoting a more fatigue resistant construct. Porcelain, alumina, and zirconia were evaluated in terms of dynamic fatigue for an initial characterization of their fracture behavior. Data showed that strength degradation occurred in all three materials, most drastically in porcelain. Initial strength measurements, focused on depositing YSZ thin films on three unique substrates; porcelain, alumina, and zirconia, were carried out. A significant increase in strength was observed for alumina and porcelain. Since strength alone is not enough to characterize the fracture behavior of brittle materials, coated specimens of porcelain and zirconia were subjected to dynamic fatigue and Weibull analysis. Coated YSZ porcelain specimens showed a significant increase in strength at all tested stressing rates. YSZ coated zirconia specimens showed similar strength values at all stressing rates. The effect of film thickness on porcelain was also evaluated. Data demonstrated that film thickness alone does not appear to control increases in the flexural strength of a modified substrate. It is expected that deposition induced stress in YSZ sputtered films does not change with film thickness. However, a thicker film will generate a larger force at the film/substrate interface, contributing to delamination of the film. It was clear that in order to have a significant improvement in the fracture behavior of porcelain, changing the thickness of the film is not enough. The columnar structure of the YSZ films developed seems to favor an easy path for crack propagation limiting the benefits expected by the coating. The effect of a multilayered film, composed by brittle

  2. Recent Advances in Colloidal and Interfacial Phenomena Involving Liquid Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yiqun; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes recent advances in several areas of research involving the interfacial ordering of liquid crystals (LCs). The first advance revolves around the ordering of LCs at bio/chemically functionalized surfaces. Whereas the majority of past studies of surface-induced ordering of LCs have involved surfaces of solids that present a limited diversity of chemical functional groups (surfaces at which van der Waals forces dominate surface-induced ordering), recent studies have moved to investigate the ordering of LCs on chemically complex surfaces. For example, surfaces decorated with biomolecules (e.g. oligopeptides and proteins) and transition metal ions have been investigated, leading to an understanding of the roles that metal-ligand coordination interactions, electrical double-layers, acid-base interactions, and hydrogen bonding can have on the interfacial ordering of LCs. The opportunity to create chemically-responsive LCs capable of undergoing ordering transitions in the presence of targeted molecular events (e.g., ligand exchange around a metal center) has emerged from these fundamental studies. A second advance has focused on investigations of the ordering of LCs at interfaces with immiscible isotropic fluids, particularly water. In contrast to prior studies of surface-induced ordering of LCs on solid surfaces, LC- aqueous interfaces are deformable and molecules at these interfaces exhibit high levels of mobility and thus can reorganize in response to changes in interfacial environment. A range of fundamental investigations involving these LC-aqueous interfaces have revealed that (i) the spatial and temporal characteristics of assemblies formed from biomolecular interactions can be reported by surface-driven ordering transitions in the LCs, (ii) the interfacial phase behaviour of molecules and colloids can be coupled to (and manipulated via) the ordering (and nematic elasticity) of LCs, and (iii) confinement of LCs leads to unanticipated size

  3. Bonded Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Another spinoff to the food processing industry involves a dry lubricant developed by General Magnaplate Corp. of Linden, N.J. Used in such spacecraft as Apollo, Skylab and Viking, the lubricant is a coating bonded to metal surfaces providing permanent lubrication and corrosion resistance. The coating lengthens equipment life and permits machinery to be operated at greater speed, thus increasing productivity and reducing costs. Bonded lubricants are used in scores of commercia1 applications. They have proved particularly valuable to food processing firms because, while increasing production efficiency, they also help meet the stringent USDA sanitation codes for food-handling equipment. For example, a cookie manufacturer plagued production interruptions because sticky batter was clogging the cookie molds had the brass molds coated to solve the problem. Similarly, a pasta producer faced USDA action on a sanitation violation because dough was clinging to an automatic ravioli-forming machine; use of the anti-stick coating on the steel forming plates solved the dual problem of sanitation deficiency and production line downtime.

  4. Preparation of porous bioceramics using reverse thermo-responsive hydrogels in combination with rhBMP-2 carriers: in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yin-Chih; Chen, Chung-Hwan; Wang, Chau-Zen; Wang, Yan-Hsiung; Chang, Je-Ken; Wang, Gwo-Jaw; Ho, Mei-Ling; Wang, Chih-Kuang

    2013-11-01

    Porous biphasic calcium phosphates (BCP) were fabricated using reverse thermo-responsive hydrogels with hydroxyapatite (HAp) and β-tricalcium (β-TCP) powder and planetary centrifugal mixer. This hydrogel mixture slurry will shrink and compress the HAp powder during the sintering process. The porous bioceramics are expected to have good mechanical properties after sintering at 1200°C. Reverse thermo-responsive hydrogels of poly[(N-isopropylacrylamide)-co-(methacrylic acid)] p(NiPAAm-MAA) were synthesized by free-radical cross-linking copolymerization, and their chemical properties were evaluated by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry. The lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the hydrogel was determined using turbidity measurements. A thermogravimetric analysis was used to examine the thermal properties. The porous bioceramic properties were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, bulk density, compressive strength testing and cytotoxicity. The compressive strength and average porosity of the porous bioceramics were examined at approximately 6.8MPa and 66% under 10wt% p(NiPAAm-MAA)=99:1 condition. The ratio of HAp/β-TCP can adjust two different compositional behaviors during the 1200°C sintering process without resulting in cell toxicity. The (rhBMP-2)-HAp-PLGA carriers were fabricated as in our previous study of the double emulsion and drop-coating technique. Results of animal study included histological micrographs of the 1-mm defect in the femurs, with the rhBMP-2 carrier group, the bioceramic spacer group and the bioceramic spacer with rhBMP-2 carriers group showing better callus formation around the femur defect site than the control group. The optimal dual effects of the bone growth factors from osteoconductive bioceramics and osteoinductive rhBMP-2 carriers produced better bone formation.

  5. Measuring air-water interfacial areas with X-ray microtomography and interfacial partitioning tracer tests.

    PubMed

    Brusseau, Mark L; Peng, Sheng; Schnaar, Gregory; Murao, Asami

    2007-03-15

    Air-water interfacial areas as a function of water saturation were measured for a sandy, natural porous medium using two methods, aqueous-phase interfacial partitioning tracer tests and synchrotron X-ray microtomography. In addition, interfacial areas measured in a prior study with the gas-phase interfacial partitioning tracer-test method for the same porous medium were included for comparison. For all three methods, total air-water interfacial areas increased with decreasing water saturation. The interfacial areas measured with the tracer-test methods were generally larger than those obtained from microtomography, and the disparity increased as water saturation decreased. The interfacial areas measured by microtomography extrapolated to a value (147 cm(-1)) very similar to the specific solid surface area (151 cm(-1)) calculated using the smooth-sphere assumption, indicating that the method does not characterize the area associated with microscopic surface heterogeneity (surface roughness, microporosity). This is consistent with the method resolution of approximately 12 microm. In contrast, the interfacial areas measured with the gas-phase tracer tests approached the N2/BET measured specific solid surface area (56000 cm(-1)), indicating that this method does characterize the interfacial area associated with microscopic surface heterogeneity. The largest interfacial area measured with the aqueous-phase tracer tests was 224 cm(-1), while the extrapolated maximum interfacial area was approximately 1100 cm(-1). Both of these values are larger than the smooth-sphere specific solid surface area but much smaller than the N2/BET specific solid surface area, which suggests that the method measures a limited portion of the interfacial area associated with microscopic surface heterogeneity. All three methods provide measures of total (capillary + film) interfacial area, a primary difference being that the film-associated area is a smooth-surface equivalent for the

  6. Substratum interfacial energetic effects on the attachment of marine bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ista, Linnea Kathryn

    Biofilms represent an ancient, ubiquitous and influential form of life on earth. Biofilm formation is initiated by attachment of bacterial cells from an aqueous suspension onto a suitable attachment substratum. While in certain, well studied cases initial attachment and subsequent biofilm formation is mediated by specific ligand-receptor pairs on the bacteria and attachment substratum, in the open environment, including the ocean, it is assumed to be non-specific and mediated by processes similar to those that drive adsorption of colloids at the water-solid interface. Colloidal principles are studied to determine the molecular and physicochemical interactions involved in the attachment of the model marine bacterium, Cobetia marina to model self-assembled monolayer surfaces. In the simplest application of colloidal principles the wettability of attachment substrata, as measured by the advancing contact angle of water (theta AW) on the surface, is frequently used as an approximation for the surface tension. We demonstrate the applicability of this approach for attachment of C. marina and algal zoospores and extend it to the development of a means to control attachment and release of microorganisms by altering and tuning surface thetaAW. In many cases, however, thetaAW does not capture all the information necessary to model attachment of bacteria to attachment substrata; SAMs with similar thetaAW attach different number of bacteria. More advanced colloidal models of initial bacterial attachment have evolved over the last several decades, with the emergence of the model proposed by van Oss, Chaudhury and Good (VCG) as preeminent. The VCG model enables calculation of interfacial tensions by dividing these into two major interactions thought to be important at biointerfaces: apolar, Lifshitz-van der Waals and polar, Lewis acid-base (including hydrogen bonding) interactions. These interfacial tensions are combined to yield DeltaGadh, the free energy associated with

  7. Interfacial area and interfacial transfer in two-phase systems. DOE final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, Mamoru; Hibiki, T.; Revankar, S.T.; Kim, S.; Le Corre, J.M.

    2002-07-01

    In the two-fluid model, the field equations are expressed by the six conservation equations consisting of mass, momentum and energy equations for each phase. The existence of the interfacial transfer terms is one of the most important characteristics of the two-fluid model formulation. The interfacial transfer terms are strongly related to the interfacial area concentration and to the local transfer mechanisms such as the degree of turbulence near interfaces. This study focuses on the development of a closure relation for the interfacial area concentration. A brief summary of several problems of the current closure relation for the interfacial area concentration and a new concept to overcome the problem are given.

  8. Effects of atmospheres on bonding characteristics of silver and alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin Yong; Engelhard, Mark H.; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Weil, K. Scott

    2008-03-12

    Joints prepared using a silver-copper oxide based reactive air brazing (RAB) technique is known to experience a significant decrease in joint strength when exposed in a reducing atmosphere at high temperature. To investigate the effects of atmospheres on the bonding characteristics of ceramic joints brazed with Ag-CuO braze filler metals, alumina joints prepared using a series of Ag-CuO compositions were exposed to a reducing atmosphere in hydrogen and also reoxidized in air at 800°C. All the brazed joints exposed to hydrogen revealed significant reduction in flexural strength and exhibited debonding of the interface between the braze filler and the alumina substrate. In the case of the joints brazed with a braze filler containing a high copper content of 8 mol%, the formation of interfacial porosity caused by the reduction of interfacial oxide phases led to an extremely weak interface, which was not recovered after subsequent reoxidation in air at 800°C. However, no significant microstructural change or interfacial porosity formation was observed in the braze filler metals containing no or low copper contents, and the interface remained intact even though interfacial strength was weak. Subsequent reoxidation of the joints with these filler materials resulted in the recovery of interfacial strength and flexural strength. This result clearly indicates that the bonding characteristics of the silver/alumina interface are by and large influenced by atmospheres of high temperature exposure. XPS analysis conducted on the in-situ¬ fractured surfaces of as-brazed and hydrogen-treated samples prepared using a braze filler with 2 mol% Cu indicated that oxygen in the silver matrix plays a critical role in bond strength between silver and alumina. The sample exposed in inert atmosphere also revealed low flexural strength and debonding of the silver/alumina interface, confirming the role of oxygen on the bond strength between silver and alumina.

  9. On the hierarchy of interfacial dislocation structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balluffi, R. W.; Olson, G. B.

    1985-04-01

    Many different types of dislocations have been defined in dislocation models for grain boundaries and interphase boundaries. It is emphasized that there is no unique dislocation model for a boundary, and that the formal dislocation content depends upon the choice of the lattice correspondence relating the adjoining lattices. However, it is concluded that no problems of real physical significance arise from this lack of uniqueness. “Best≓, or most useful, descriptions often exist, and these are discussed. A hierarchy consisting of four different types of interfacial dislocations may be distinguished, which is useful in describing the dislocation content of interfaces. These entities are termed: (1) primary interfacial dislocations; (2) secondary interfacial dislocations; (3) coherency interfacial dislocations; and (4) translational interfacial dislocations. While there may be a lack of agreement on terminology in the literature, it is believed that these dislocation types are distinguishable and play unique roles in useful dislocation models for interfaces. Detailed descriptions of these dislocation types are given, and actual examples in real interfaces are presented. It is concluded that dislocation descriptions of interface structures become of purely formal significance in the limit of fully incoherent interfaces since the cores are then delocalized. The utility of various dislocation descriptions therefore depends on the degree to which various types of local coherency exist.

  10. Reinforcing bioceramic scaffolds with in situ synthesized ε-polycaprolactone coatings.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Vázquez, Francisco J; Miranda, Pedro; Guiberteau, Fernando; Pajares, Antonia

    2013-12-01

    In situ ring-opening polymerization of ε-caprolactone (ε-CL) was performed to coat β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffolds fabricated by robocasting in order to enhance their mechanical performance while preserving the predesigned macropore architecture. Concentrated colloidal inks prepared from β-TCP commercial powders were used to fabricate porous structures consisting of a three-dimensional mesh of interpenetrating rods. Then, ε-CL was in situ polymerized within the ceramic structure using a lipase as catalyst and toluene as solvent, to obtain a highly homogeneous coating and full impregnation of in-rod microporosity. The strength and toughness of scaffolds coated by ε-polycaprolactone (ε-PCL) were significantly increased (twofold and fivefold increase, respectively) over those of the bare structures. Enhancement of both properties is associated to the healing of preexisting microdefects in the bioceramic rods. These enhancements are compared to results from previous work on fully impregnated structures. The implications of the results for the optimization of the mechanical and biological performance of scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications are discussed.

  11. Characterization of fabricated three dimensional scaffolds of bioceramic-polymer composite via microstereolithography technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talib, Marina; Covington, James A.; Bolarinwa, Aminat

    2014-02-01

    Microstereolithography is a method used for rapid prototyping of polymeric and ceramic components. This technique converts a computer-aided design (CAD) to a three dimensional (3D) model, and enables layer per layer fabrication curing a liquid resin with UV-light or laser source. The aim of this project was to formulate photocurable polymer reinforced with synthesized calcium pyrophosphate (CPP), and to fabricate a 3D scaffolds with optimum mechanical properties for specific tissue engineering applications. The photocurable ceramic suspension was prepared with acrylate polyester, multifunctional acrylate monomer with the addition of 50-70wt% of CPP, photoinitiators and photoinhibitors. The 3D structure of disc (5 mm height × 4 mm diameter) was successfully fabricated using Envisiontec Perfactory3® . They were then sintered at high temperature for polymer removal, to obtain a ceramic of the desired porosity. The density increased to more than 35% and the dimensional shrinkage after sintering were 33%. The discs were then subjected compressive measurement, biodegradation and bioactivity test. Morphology and CPP content of the sintered polymer was investigated with SEM and XRD, respectively. The addition of CPP coupled with high temperature sintering, had a significant effect on the compressive strength exhibited by the bioceramic. The values are in the range of cancellous bone (2-4 MPa). In biodegradation and bioactivity test, the synthesized CPP induced the formation of apatite layer and its nucleation onto the composite surface.

  12. Structure and functionalization of mesoporous bioceramics for bone tissue regeneration and local drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Vallet-Regí, María; Izquierdo-Barba, Isabel; Colilla, Montserrat

    2012-03-28

    This review article describes the importance of structure and functionalization in the performance of mesoporous silica bioceramics for bone tissue regeneration and local drug delivery purposes. Herein, we summarize the pivotal features of mesoporous bioactive glasses, also known as 'templated glasses' (TGs), which present chemical compositions similar to those of conventional bioactive sol-gel glasses and the added value of an ordered mesopore arrangement. An in-depth study concerning the possibility of tailoring the structural and textural characteristics of TGs at the nanometric scale and their influence on bioactive behaviour is discussed. The highly ordered mesoporous arrangement of cavities allows these materials to confine drugs to be subsequently released, acting as drug delivery devices. The functionalization of mesoporous silica walls has been revealed as the cornerstone in the performance of these materials as controlled release systems. The synergy between the improved bioactive behaviour and local sustained drug release capability of mesostructured materials makes them suitable to manufacture three-dimensional macroporous scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Finally, this review tackles the possibility of covalently grafting different osteoinductive agents to the scaffold surface that act as attracting signals for bone cells to promote the bone regeneration process.

  13. Effect of silica on porosity, strength, and toughness of pressureless sintered calcium phosphate-zirconia bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Thomas C; Treccani, Laura; Rezwan, Kurosch

    2015-08-12

    The preparation of dense, high-strength calcium phosphate-zirconia (CaP-ZrO2) composed bioceramics is realized via versatile pressureless sintering by adding silica nanoparticles. Two different weight ratios of HAp:ZrO2, 9:1 and 1:1, are used with varying silica contents from 5 to 20 wt%. After sintering at 1200 °C, the phase composition, microstructure, porosity, biaxial bending strength, and fracture toughness as well as SBF in vitro bioactivity are characterized. We show that the addition of silica altered the crystal phase composition, inhibiting the formation of non-favourable cubic ZrO2. Furthermore, SiO2 addition leads to an increase of the biaxial bending strength, and the fracture toughness of CaP-ZrO2-containing materials. With the addition of 20 wt% silica we find the highest characteristic strength (268 MPa) and toughness (2.3   ±   0.1 MPam(0.5)) at  <1% porosity. Both mechanical properties are 2 times higher than those of pure hydroxyapatite. At the same time we observe for the very same composition similar bioactivity to that of pure hydroxyapatite.

  14. Stem cell technology using bioceramics: hard tissue regeneration towards clinical application.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Hiroe; Oda, Yasuaki; Ohgushi, Hajime

    2010-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells which show differentiation capabilities toward various cell lineages. We have already used MSCs for treatments of osteoarthritis, bone necrosis and bone tumor. For this purpose, culture expanded MSCs were combined with various ceramics and then implanted. Because of rejection response to allogeneic MSC implantation, we have utilized patients' own MSCs for the treatment. Bone marrow is a good cell source of MSCs, although the MSCs also exist in adipose tissue. When comparing osteogenic differentiation of these MSCs, bone marrow MSCs show more extensive bone forming capability than adipose MSCs. Thus, the bone marrow MSCs are useful for bone tissue regeneration. However, the MSCs show limited proliferation and differentiation capabilities that hindered clinical applications in some cases. Recent advances reveal that transduction of plural transcription factors into human adult cells results in generation of new type of stem cells called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells). A drawback of the iPS cells for clinical applications is tumor formation after their in vivo implantation; therefore it is difficult to use iPS cells for the treatment. To circumvent the problem, we transduced a single factor of either SOX2 or NANOG into the MSCs and found high proliferation as well as osteogenic differentiation capabilities of the MSCs. The stem cells could be combined with bioceramics for clinical applications. Here, we summarize our recent technologies using adult stem cells in viewpoints of bone tissue regeneration.

  15. TOPICAL REVIEW: Stem cell technology using bioceramics: hard tissue regeneration towards clinical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Hiroe; Oda, Yasuaki; Ohgushi, Hajime

    2010-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells which show differentiation capabilities toward various cell lineages. We have already used MSCs for treatments of osteoarthritis, bone necrosis and bone tumor. For this purpose, culture expanded MSCs were combined with various ceramics and then implanted. Because of rejection response to allogeneic MSC implantation, we have utilized patients' own MSCs for the treatment. Bone marrow is a good cell source of MSCs, although the MSCs also exist in adipose tissue. When comparing osteogenic differentiation of these MSCs, bone marrow MSCs show more extensive bone forming capability than adipose MSCs. Thus, the bone marrow MSCs are useful for bone tissue regeneration. However, the MSCs show limited proliferation and differentiation capabilities that hindered clinical applications in some cases. Recent advances reveal that transduction of plural transcription factors into human adult cells results in generation of new type of stem cells called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells). A drawback of the iPS cells for clinical applications is tumor formation after their in vivo implantation; therefore it is difficult to use iPS cells for the treatment. To circumvent the problem, we transduced a single factor of either SOX2 or NANOG into the MSCs and found high proliferation as well as osteogenic differentiation capabilities of the MSCs. The stem cells could be combined with bioceramics for clinical applications. Here, we summarize our recent technologies using adult stem cells in viewpoints of bone tissue regeneration.

  16. Processing and characterization of multi-cellular monolithic bioceramics for bone regenerative scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ari-Wahjoedi, Bambang; Ginta, Turnad Lenggo; Parman, Setyamartana; Abustaman, Mohd Zikri Ahmad

    2014-10-01

    Multicellular monolithic ceramic body is a ceramic material which has many gas or liquid passages partitioned by thin walls throughout the bulk material. There are many currently known advanced industrial applications of multicellular ceramics structures i.e. as supports for various catalysts, electrode support structure for solid oxide fuel cells, refractories, electric/electronic materials, aerospace vehicle re-entry heat shields and biomaterials for dental as well as orthopaedic implants by naming only a few. Multicellular ceramic bodies are usually made of ceramic phases such as mullite, cordierite, aluminum titanate or pure oxides such as silica, zirconia and alumina. What make alumina ceramics is excellent for the above functions are the intrinsic properties of alumina which are hard, wear resistant, excellent dielectric properties, resists strong acid and alkali attacks at elevated temperatures, good thermal conductivities, high strength and stiffness as well as biocompatible. In this work the processing technology leading to truly multicellular monolithic alumina ceramic bodies and their characterization are reported. Ceramic slip with 66 wt.% solid loading was found to be optimum as impregnant to the polyurethane foam template. Mullitic ceramic composite of alumina-sodium alumino disilicate-Leucite-like phases with bulk and true densities of 0.852 and 1.241 g cm-3 respectively, pore linear density of ±35 cm-1, linear and bulk volume shrinkages of 7-16% and 32 vol.% were obtained. The compressive strength and elastic modulus of the bioceramics are ≈0.5-1.0 and ≈20 MPa respectively.

  17. Simultaneous mechanical property and biodegradation improvement of wollastonite bioceramic through magnesium dilute doping.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jiajun; Yang, Xianyan; Shao, Huifeng; Ye, Juan; He, Yong; Fu, Jianzhong; Gao, Changyou; Gou, Zhongru

    2016-02-01

    The large-area bone defects in head (including calvarial, orbital, and maxillofacial bone) and segmental bone are attracting increased attention in a wide range of clinical departments. A key requirement for the clinical success of the bioactive ceramics is the match of the mechanical behavior of the implants with the specific bone tissue to be filled. This raises the question as to what design strategy might be the best indicators for the balance between mechanical properties and biological performances. Here we go beyond the traditional approaches that use phase conversion or biphasic hybrid; instead, we achieved a simultaneous enhancement of several mechanical parameters and optimalization of biodegradability by using a dilute doping of Mg in a single-phase wollastonite bioceramic. We show that the wollastonite ceramic can be rationally tuned in phase (α or β), mechanical strength (in compression and bending mode), elastic modulus (18-23GPa), and fracture toughness (>3.2MPam(1/2)) through the usage of Mg dopant introduced at precisely defined dilute concentrations (Mg/Ca molar ratio: 1.2-2.1%). Meanwhile, the dilute Mg-doped wollastonite ceramics are shown to exhibit good bioactivity in vitro in SBF but biodegradation in Tris is inversely proportional to Mg content. Consequently, such new highly bioactive ceramics with appreciable strength and toughness are promising for making specific porous scaffolds for enhancing large segmental bone defect and thin-wall bone defect repair.

  18. Contrasting the beam interaction characteristics of selected lasers with a partially stabilized zirconia bio-ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, J.

    2002-08-01

    Differences in the beam interaction characteristics of a CO2 laser, a Nd : YAG laser, a high power diode laser (HPDL) and an excimer laser with a partially stabilized zirconia bio-ceramic have been studied. A derivative of Beer-Lambert's law was applied and the laser beam absorption lengths of the four lasers were calculated as 33.55×10-3 cm for the CO2 laser, 18.22×10-3 cm for the Nd : YAG laser, 17.17×10-3 cm for the HPDL and 8.41×10-6 cm for the excimer laser. It was determined graphically that the fluence threshold values at which significant material removal was effected by the CO2 laser, the Nd : YAG laser, the HPDL and the excimer laser were 52 J cm-2, 97 J cm-2, 115 J cm-2 and 0.48 J cm-2, respectively. The thermal loading value for the CO2 laser, the Nd : YAG laser, the HPDL and the excimer laser were calculated as being 1.55 kJ cm-3, 5.32 kJ cm3, 6.69 kJ cm-3 and 57.04 kJ cm-3, respectively.

  19. Inhibition of infectious bursal disease virus transmission using bioceramic derived from chicken feces.

    PubMed

    Thammakarn, Chanathip; Ishida, Yuki; Suguro, Atsushi; Hakim, Hakimullah; Nakajima, Katsuhiro; Kitazawa, Minori; Takehara, Kazuaki

    2015-06-02

    Bioceramic powder (BCX), at pH 13.0, derived from chicken feces, was evaluated for its efficacy to inactivate virus and inhibit virus horizontal transmission by fecal-oral route, using infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) vaccine strain D78 as a challenge virus. Three 1-week-old SPF chicks were vaccinated per os and used as seeder birds. Six hours later, 3 sentinel 1-week-old SPF chicks were introduced into the same cage. Results revealed that BCX had excellent efficacy to inactivate IBDV within 3 min. Treating IBDV contaminated litter in the cage with BCX could prevent transmission of IBDV to new sensitive chicks completely. Further, transmission of IBDV to the sentinel chicks was significantly inhibited by adding BCX to litter and chicken feed. These data suggest that BCX at pH 13, derived from chicken feces, has excellent efficacy to inactivate IBDV, which can be applied in bedding materials for preventing viral transmission during production round. It is a good material that can effectively be used for enhancing biosecurity system in poultry farms.

  20. Evaluation of the apical sealing ability of bioceramic sealer, AH plus & epiphany: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Suprit Sudhir; Pujar, Madhu Ajay; Makandar, Saleem Dadapeer

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This in vitro study evaluated and compared the microleakage of three sealers; Endosequence bioceramic (BC) sealer, AH Plus and Epiphany. Materials and Methods: Study was done on 75 extracted human single rooted permanent teeth, which were decoronated and the root canals were instrumented. The specimens were randomly divided into three groups (n = 25) and obturated by continuous wave condensation technique. Group A: using Endosequence BC, Group B: using AH Plus sealer, Group C: using Resilon Epiphany system. Microleakage was evaluated using dye penetration method. Teeth were split longitudinally and then horizontally markings were made at 2, 4 and 6 mm from the apex. Dye penetration evaluation was done under stereomicroscope (30X magnification). Results: The dye penetration in Group B was more than in Group A and C in both vertical and horizontal directions, suggesting that newly introduced BC sealer and Epiphany sealer sealed the root canal better compared to AH Plus Sealer. Conclusion: Newer root canal sealers seal the root canal better but cannot totally eliminate leakage. PMID:25506149

  1. Investigation of silicon complexes in Si-doped calcium phosphate bioceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, P.; Stott, M. J.; Sayer, M.; Wu, G.

    2007-03-01

    Silicon doped calcium phosphate materials have drawn great interest as bioceramics for bone repair due to their enhanced bioactivity. However, the low level of doping in these materials, generally ˜1 wt.%, makes it difficult to determine the effects the silicon has on the structure of these materials. In this study, silicon substituted hydroxyapatite (Si-HA), silicon stabilized alpha tricalcium phosphate (Si-TCP), and a multi-phase mixture consisting of approximately 75% Si-TCP with the remainder being mainly Si-HA have been synthesized using isotopically enriched silica containing ^29Si. ^29Si magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MAS-NMR) has been used to examine the silicon complexes within these materials resulting from the substitution of SiO4^4- for PO4^3- and the required charge compensation mechanism needed to achieve this. Previous ab initio studies on these materials have investigated charge compensation mechanisms to suggest possible silicon complexes and these serve as a basis for interpreting the NMR results.

  2. A model for the interfacial kinetics of phospholipase D activity on long-chain lipids.

    PubMed

    Majd, Sheereen; Yusko, Erik C; Yang, Jerry; Sept, David; Mayer, Michael

    2013-07-02

    The membrane-active enzyme phospholipase D (PLD) catalyzes the hydrolysis of the phosphodiester bond in phospholipids and plays a critical role in cell signaling. This catalytic reaction proceeds on lipid-water interfaces and is an example of heterogeneous catalysis in biology. Recently we showed that planar lipid bilayers, a previously unexplored model membrane for these kinetic studies, can be used for monitoring interfacial catalytic reactions under well-defined experimental conditions with chemical and electrical access to both sides of the lipid membrane. Employing an assay that relies on the conductance of the pore-forming peptide gramicidin A to monitor PLD activity, the work presented here reveals the kinetics of hydrolysis of long-chain phosphatidylcholine lipids in situ. We have developed an extension of a basic kinetic model for interfacial catalysis that includes product activation and substrate depletion. This model describes the kinetic behavior very well and reveals two kinetic parameters, the specificity constant and the interfacial quality constant. This approach results in a simple and general model to account for product accumulation in interfacial enzyme kinetics.

  3. First-principles study of the Al(001)-Al3Nb(001) interfacial properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yanhong; Xu, Rui

    2017-03-01

    The adhesion, interfacial energy and bonding on fcc-Al(001)/D022-Al3Nb(001) interface were investigated using density functional calculations. Considering different terminations of Al3Nb(001) (Al+Nb-terminated and Al-terminated) and stacking sites (top-, bridge- and center-sites), six Al(001)/Al3Nb(001) models were calculated. For the models with same stacking site, Al+Nb-terminated model has larger work of adhesion (Wad) than the Al-terminated one. For the models with same termination, the work of adhesion increases, and the interface energy decreases as the order of center-sited, bridge-sited and top-sited. Al+Nb-terminated-center-sited and Al-terminated-center-sited models are more stable among six models. The interfacial bonding was discussed with analysis of valence electron density distribution and partial density of states (PDOS). The bonding is mainly contributed from Al-Nb covalent bonds and Al-Al metallic interactions.

  4. Evolutionary design of interfacial phase change van der Waals heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Kalikka, Janne; Zhou, Xilin; Behera, Jitendra; Nannicini, Giacomo; Simpson, Robert E

    2016-10-27

    We use an evolutionary algorithm to explore the design space of hexagonal Ge2Sb2Te5; a van der Waals layered two dimensional crystal heterostructure. The Ge2Sb2Te5 structure is more complicated than previously thought. Predominant features include layers of Ge3Sb2Te6 and Ge1Sb2Te4 two dimensional crystals that interact through Te-Te van der Waals bonds. Interestingly, (Ge/Sb)-Te-(Ge/Sb)-Te alternation is a common feature for the most stable structures of each generation's evolution. This emergent rule provides an important structural motif that must be included in the design of high performance Sb2Te3-GeTe van der Waals heterostructure superlattices with interfacial atomic switching capability. The structures predicted by the algorithm agree well with experimental measurements on highly oriented, and single crystal Ge2Sb2Te5 samples. By analysing the evolutionary algorithm optimised structures, we show that diffusive atomic switching is probable by Ge atoms undergoing a transition at the van der Waals interface from layers of Ge3Sb2Te6 to Ge1Sb2Te4 thus producing two blocks of Ge2Sb2Te5. Evolutionary methods present an efficient approach to explore the enormous multi-dimensional design parameter space of van der Waals bonded heterostructure superlattices.

  5. Water adsorption in interfacial silane layers by neutron reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, M.S.; McNamara, W.F.; Domeier, L.; Wong, A.P.Y.; Wu, W.L.

    1997-03-01

    It is well known that water plays an important role in the degradation of adhesive strength between a wide variety of materials. It is also well established that silane coupling agents can provide excellent bond durability in aqueous environments. However, the detrimental effects of interfacial water are not limited to adhesive failure. The present study was motivated by concerns in the printed circuit board industry regarding the loss of electrical resistance, as well as adhesive failure, which may arise from water at epoxy/silane/E-glass interphases. The commercial silane finish used in this study provides excellent adhesive strength between epoxy and E-glass, and remarkable bond durability even after extensive conditioning in boiling water or a pressure cooker. However, circuit boards with this finish do not perform well in insulation resistance testing following such conditioning. The goal of this work is to develop a detailed understanding of the mechanism by which water interacts with a resin/silane interphase, with a focus on the consequences for both electrical resistance and adhesion. The present report focuses on the measurement of profiles of adsorbed moisture by neutron reflection.

  6. Interfacial-layers-free Ga2O3(Gd2O3)/Ge MOS Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. H.; Lin, T. D.; Lee, K. Y.; Huang, M. L.; Tung, L. T.; Hong, M.; Kwo, J.

    2008-03-01

    High κ dielectric Ga2O3(Gd2O3) films were deposited directly on Ge by Molecular-Beam-Epitaxy without the employment of GeON interfacial layer. Excellent electrical properties, such as a high κ value of 14.5, a low leakage current density of only 3x10-9 A/cm^2 at Vfb+1V, and well-behaved CV characteristics, were demonstrated, even being subjected to a 500^oC annealing in N2 ambient for 5 min. An abrupt Ga2O3(Gd2O3)/Ge interface without any interfacial layer was revealed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy as well as in-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Detailed XPS studies indicate that the oxide/Ge interface consists of mainly Ge-O-Gd bonding, distinctly different from that of native oxide. Furthermore, the 500^oC annealing did not change the chemical bonding, implying a great thermodynamic stability of the hetero-structure. The outstanding electrical and thermodynamic properties qualified Ga2O3(Gd2O3) as a promising dielectric for Ge and proved the GeON interfacial layer to be unnecessary.

  7. Magneto-ionic control of interfacial magnetism.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Uwe; Yao, Lide; Tan, Aik Jun; Agrawal, Parnika; Emori, Satoru; Tuller, Harry L; van Dijken, Sebastiaan; Beach, Geoffrey S D

    2015-02-01

    In metal/oxide heterostructures, rich chemical, electronic, magnetic and mechanical properties can emerge from interfacial chemistry and structure. The possibility to dynamically control interface characteristics with an electric field paves the way towards voltage control of these properties in solid-state devices. Here, we show that electrical switching of the interfacial oxidation state allows for voltage control of magnetic properties to an extent never before achieved through conventional magneto-electric coupling mechanisms. We directly observe in situ voltage-driven O(2-) migration in a Co/metal-oxide bilayer, which we use to toggle the interfacial magnetic anisotropy energy by >0.75 erg cm(-2) at just 2 V. We exploit the thermally activated nature of ion migration to markedly increase the switching efficiency and to demonstrate reversible patterning of magnetic properties through local activation of ionic migration. These results suggest a path towards voltage-programmable materials based on solid-state switching of interface oxygen chemistry.

  8. Interfacial Shear Rheology of Coffee Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Läuger, Jörg; Heyer, Patrick

    2008-07-01

    Both oscillatory and rotational measurements on the film formation process and on interfacial rheological properties of the final film of coffee samples with different concentrations are presented. As higher the concentration as faster the film formation process is, whereas the concentration does not have a large effect on the visco-elastic properties of the final films. Two geometries, a biconical geometry and a Du Noüy ring have been employed. The presented results show that interfacial shear rheology allows detailed investigations on coffee films. Although with a Du Noüy ring it is possible to measure the qualitative behavior and relative differences only the biconical geometry is sensitive enough to test weak films and to reveal real absolute values for the interfacial shear rheological quantities.

  9. Magneto-ionic control of interfacial magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Uwe; Yao, Lide; Tan, Aik Jun; Agrawal, Parnika; Emori, Satoru; Tuller, Harry L.; van Dijken, Sebastiaan; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.

    2015-02-01

    In metal/oxide heterostructures, rich chemical, electronic, magnetic and mechanical properties can emerge from interfacial chemistry and structure. The possibility to dynamically control interface characteristics with an electric field paves the way towards voltage control of these properties in solid-state devices. Here, we show that electrical switching of the interfacial oxidation state allows for voltage control of magnetic properties to an extent never before achieved through conventional magneto-electric coupling mechanisms. We directly observe in situ voltage-driven O2- migration in a Co/metal-oxide bilayer, which we use to toggle the interfacial magnetic anisotropy energy by >0.75 erg cm-2 at just 2 V. We exploit the thermally activated nature of ion migration to markedly increase the switching efficiency and to demonstrate reversible patterning of magnetic properties through local activation of ionic migration. These results suggest a path towards voltage-programmable materials based on solid-state switching of interface oxygen chemistry.

  10. Mechanisms of formation of chemical bonding and defect formation at the a-SiO 2 /BaTiO 3 interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kimmel, Anna V.; Sushko, Peter V.

    2015-10-28

    The structure and mechanisms of bonding and defect formation at the interfaces between amorphous silica (a-SiO2) and BaTiO3(0 0 1) were investigated using ab initio molecular dynamics. It was found that the nature of interfacial bonds crucially depends on the BaTiO3 surface termination. In particular, the interface between silica and TiO2-terminated BaTiO3 (BTO) slab is characterised by strong covalent Ti–O–Si bonds, while the interface between silica and BaO-terminated BTO demonstrates ionic character of interfacial bonds and exhibits bond instability. In both cases, the dynamics of oxygen species at oxide interfaces is a driving force of the formation of interfacial bonds and defects.

  11. Evaluation of host inflammatory responses of β-tricalcium phosphate bioceramics caused by calcium pyrophosphate impurity using a subcutaneous model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kaili; Yuan, Wei; Wang, Lu; Lu, Jianxi; Chen, Lei; Wang, Zhen; Chang, Jiang

    2011-11-01

    Implantation of synthetic materials into body elicits inflammatory host responses that limit medical device integration and biological performance. Since the effective use of biomaterials in vivo requires good biocompatibility and bio-functionality, it is vital that we assess the inflammatory reactions provoked by various implanted biomaterials. In chemical precipitation of β-tricalcium phosphate [β-Ca₃(PO₄)₂, β-TCP], the impurity of calcium pyrophosphate (Ca₂P₂O₇, CPP) will easily appear if the preparation conditions are not well controlled. To test the influences of CCP-impurity on the biocompatibility of the material, four groups of β-TCP ceramic samples doped with 0.5-10 wt % of CCP impurity, and pure β-TCP and CCP samples were fabricated and implanted in rat subcutaneous site for one, two, and four weeks. The host tissue responses to the ceramics were evaluated by histomorphometric analysis, and the results were compared with pure β-TCPbioceramics. The results show that the CPP impurity can elicit and stimulate the inflammatory responses at the tissue/implant interface. Moreover, with the increase of CPP doping amount, the inflammation increases apparently. However, the pure β-TCP bioceramics only present slight post-implantation inflammatory responses. The influence of the CPP doping on the inflammatory responses is mainly related to a microparticles release because of an insufficient sintering of β-TCP by CPP doping. The microparticle release could be at the origin of local inflammation and cell/tissue damages. Therefore, to obtain perfect biocompatibility and high quality β-TCP bioceramics, it is important to avoid and control the CPP impurity in the preparation of β-TCP powders and bioceramics.

  12. The correlation between the internal structure and vascularization of controllable porous bioceramic materials in vivo: a quantitative study.

    PubMed

    Bai, Feng; Wang, Zhen; Lu, Jianxi; Liu, Jian; Chen, Gongyi; Lv, Rong; Wang, Jun; Lin, Kaili; Zhang, Jinkang; Huang, Xin

    2010-12-01

    It is noticeable that porous architectural characteristics of the biomaterials play an important role in revascularization of the scaffold. However, there has been no consensus regarding the optimal conditions for vascularization, including macropore size, shape, interconnection, and the arrangement of macropores, due to the failure to accurately control porous structure of biomaterials. To investigate the effect of the porous structure parameters on vascularization of the biomaterials, an accurate control of these parameters is required. In this study, porous β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) with accurately controlled pore parameters is fabricated by using assembled organic microspheres as templates combined with casting technique. Using this technique, we produced a series of disk-type β-TCP with variable pore sizes and variable interconnections to evaluate the influence of macropore size and interconnection on the vascularization of bioceramic material in vivo. The vascularization of β-TCP implanted in the rabbit model is evaluated by histomorphology and single photon emission computed tomography. The results showed that the pore parameters affect not only the size of the blood vessels growing into the porous structure but also the number of blood vessels formed in the pores of the bioceramic. The increase in pore size only resulted in an increase in size of the blood vessels growing into the macroporous of the bioceramic scaffolds. However, with the increase in size of interconnection, both the size and number of the blood vessels formed in the macroporous increased. Therefore, we conclude that the size of the interconnections is more important for vascularization in the scaffold compared with the pore size. On the other hand, there was no significant difference in vascularization in the scaffolds with pores size above 400 μm, and there was no marked increase in extent of vascularization with further increase in pore size above 400 μm, indicating that

  13. Hierarchical bioceramic scaffolds with 3D-plotted macropores and mussel-inspired surface nanolayers for stimulating osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mengchi; Zhai, Dong; Xia, Lunguo; Li, Hong; Chen, Shiyi; Fang, Bing; Chang, Jiang; Wu, Chengtie

    2016-07-14

    The hierarchical structure of biomaterials plays an important role in the process of tissue reconstruction and regeneration. 3D-plotted scaffolds have been widely used for bone tissue engineering due to their controlled macropore structure and mechanical properties. However, the lack of micro- or nano-structures on the strut surface of 3D-plotted scaffolds, especially for bioceramic scaffolds, limits their biological activity. Inspired by the adhesive versatility of mussels and the active ion-chelating capacity of polydopamine, we set out to prepare a hierarchical bioceramic scaffold with controlled macropores and mussel-inspired surface nanolayers by combining the 3D-plotting technique with the polydopamine/apatite hybrid strategy in order to synergistically accelerate the osteogenesis and angiogenesis. β-Tricalcium phosphate (TCP) scaffolds were firstly 3D-plotted and then treated in dopamine-Tris/HCl and dopamine-SBF solutions to obtain TCP-DOPA-Tris and TCP-DOPA-SBF scaffolds, respectively. It was found that polydopamine/apatite hybrid nanolayers were formed on the surface of both TCP-DOPA-Tris and TCP-DOPA-SBF scaffolds and TCP-DOPA-SBF scaffolds induced apatite mineralization for the second time during the cell culture. As compared to TCP scaffolds, both TCP-DOPA-Tris and TCP-DOPA-SBF scaffolds significantly promoted the osteogenesis of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) as well as the angiogenesis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and the TCP-DOPA-SBF group presented the highest in vitro osteogenic/angiogenic activity among the three groups. Furthermore, both TCP-DOPA-Tris and TCP-DOPA-SBF scaffolds significantly improved the formation of new bone in vivo as compared to TCP scaffolds without a nanostructured surface. Our results suggest that the utilization of a mussel-inspired Ca, P-chelated polydopamine nanolayer on 3D-plotted bioceramic scaffolds is a viable and effective strategy to construct a hierarchical structure for synergistically

  14. Processing and Characterization of Novel Biomimetic Nanoporous Bioceramic Surface on β-Ti Implant by Powder Mixed Electric Discharge Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Chander; Kansal, H. K.; Pabla, B. S.; Puri, Sanjeev

    2015-09-01

    Herein, a β-Ti-based implant was subjected to powder mixed electric discharge machining (PMEDM) for surface modification to produce a novel biomimetic nanoporous bioceramic surface. The microstructure, surface topography, and phase composition of the non-machined and machined (PMEDMed) surfaces were investigated using field-emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. The microhardness of the surfaces was measured on a Vickers hardness tester. The corrosion resistance of the surfaces was evaluated via potentiodynamic polarization measurements in simulated body fluid. The application of PMEDM not only altered the surface chemistry, but also imparted the surface with a nanoporous topography or a natural bone-like surface structure. The characterization results confirmed that the alloyed layer mainly comprised bioceramic oxides and carbide phases (TiO2, Nb2O5, ZrO2, SiO2, TiC, NbC, SiC). The microhardness of PMEDMed surface was twofold higher than that of the base material (β-Ti alloy), primarily because of the formation of the hard carbide phases on the machined layer. Electrochemical analysis revealed that PMEDMed surface featured insulative and protective properties and thus displayed higher corrosion resistance ability when compared with the non-machined surface. This result was attributed to the formation of the bioceramic oxides on the machined surface. Additionally, the in vitro biocompatibility of the surfaces was evaluated using human osteoblastic cell line MG-63. PMEDMed surface with a micro-, sub-micro-, and nano-structured topography exhibited bioactivity and improved biocompatibility relative to β-Ti surface. Furthermore, PMEDMed surface enabled better adhesion and growth of MG-63 when compared with the non-machined substrate.

  15. Mephisto: Interfacial Destabilization in Metal Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Favier, J. J.; Malmejac, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The destabilizing mechanisms at a solidification interface were studied to obtain information on the kinetics and morphologies in the transient and steady state, and to separate the influences of liquid phase instabilities from interfacial instabilities. A differential seebeck voltage measurements technique was developed to provide a continuous record of the solid-liquid interface temperature as the solidification rate is varied to determine the kinetic coefficients. Signal processing and noise suppression techniques allow nonovolt precision which corresponds to mK accuracy for the interfacial temperature.

  16. Thermodynamic and kinetic study on interfacial reaction and diamond graphitization of Cu—Fe-based diamond composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wen-Sheng; Zhang, Jie; Dong, Hong-Feng; Chu, Ke; Wang, Shun-Cai; Liu, Yi; Li, Ya-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Cu—Fe based diamond composites used for saw-blade segments are directly fabricated by vacuum and pressure-assisted sintering. The carbide forming elements Cr and Ti are added to improve interfacial bonding between diamond and the Cu—Fe matrix. The interfacial reactions between diamond/graphite and Cr or Ti, and diamond graphitization are investigated by thermodynamics/kinetics analyses and experimental methods. The results show that interfacial reactions and graphitization of diamond can automatically proceed thermodynamically. The Cr3C2, Cr7C3, Cr23C6, and TiC are formed at the interfaces of composites by reactions between diamond and Cr or Ti; diamond graphitization does not occur because of the kinetic difficulty at 1093 K under the pressure of 13 MPa.

  17. Interfacial closure of contacting surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieutord, F.; Rauer, C.; Moriceau, H.

    2014-08-01

    Understanding the contact between solid surfaces is a long-standing problem which has a strong impact on the physics of many processes such as adhesion, friction, lubrication and wear. Experimentally, the investigation of solid/solid interfaces remains challenging today, due to the lack of experimental techniques able to provide sub-nanometer scale information on interfaces buried between millimeters of materials. Yet, a strong interest exists improving the modeling of contact mechanics of materials in order to adjust their interface properties (e.g., thermal transport, friction). We show here that the essential features of the residual gap between contacting surfaces can be measured using high energy X-ray synchrotron reflectivity. The presence of this nano-gap is general to the contact of solids. In some special case however, it can be removed when attractive forces take over repulsive contributions, depending on both height and wavelength of asperity distributions (roughness). A criterion for this instability is established in the standard case of van der Waals attractive forces and elastic asperity compression repulsive forces (Hertz model). This collapse instability is confirmed experimentally in the case of silicon direct bonding, using high-energy X-ray synchrotron reflectivity and adhesion energy measurements. The possibility to achieve fully closed interfaces at room temperature opens interesting perspectives to build stronger assemblies with smaller thermal budgets.

  18. Thermal and mechanical interfacial properties of the DGEBA/PMR-15 blend system.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Jin; Lee, Hwa-Young; Han, Mijeong; Hong, Sung-Kwon

    2004-02-15

    In this work, the blend system of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A and PMR-15 polyimide is investigated in terms of thermal and dynamic mechanical interfacial properties of the casting specimens. The thermal stabilities are studied by thermogravimetric and thermomechanical analyses, and the dynamic mechanical properties are carried out by dynamic mechanical analysis. The results show that the thermal stabilities based on the initial decomposition temperature, the integral procedural decomposition temperature, and the glass transition temperature are increased with increasing PMR-15 content. The crosslinking density (rho) of the blend system is increased at 10 phr of PMR-15, compared with that of neat epoxy. Mechanical interfacial properties measured in the context of critical stress intensity factor and critical strain energy release rate show similar behaviors with E(a) and rho, probably due to the increase in intermolecular interactions or hydrogen bondings in polymer chains.

  19. Hemp-Fiber-Reinforced Unsaturated Polyester Composites: Optimization of Processing and Improvement of Interfacial Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Qui, Renhui; Ren, Xiaofeng; Fifield, Leonard S.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Li, Kaichang

    2011-02-25

    The processing variables for making hemp-fiber-reinforced unsaturated polyester (UPE) composites were optimized through orthogonal experiments. It was found that the usage of initiator, methyl ethyl ketone peroxide, had the most significant effect on the tensile strength of the composites. The treatment of hemp fibers with a combination of 1, 6-diisocyanatohexane (DIH) and 2-hydroxylethyl acrylate (HEA) significantly increased tensile strength, flexural modulus of rupture and flexural modulus of elasticity, and water resistance of the resulting hemp-UPE composites. FTIR spectra revealed that DIH and HEA were covalently bonded to hemp fibers. Scanning electronic microscopy graphs of the fractured hemp-UPE composites demonstrated that treatment of hemp fibers with a combination of DIH and HEA greatly improved the interfacial adhesion between hemp fibers and UPE. The mechanism of improving the interfacial adhesion is proposed.

  20. Interfacial Reaction Characteristics of Au Stud/Sn/Cu Pillar Bump During Annealing and Current Stressing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun-Beom; Lee, Byeong-Rok; Kim, Sung-Hyuk; Park, Jong-Myeong; Park, Young-Bae

    2015-11-01

    In this work, intermetallic compound (IMC) growth behavior in Au stud/Sn/Cu pillar bumps was investigated under annealing and current stressing conditions. AuSn2 and AuSn4 IMCs formed at the interface between the Au studs and Sn after bonding. The AuSn2 phase grew significantly as the stressing time increased, causing micro-voids to form near the (Cu, Au)6Sn5, AuSn2 and AuSn4 IMC interfaces. The interfacial reactions resulting from current stressing took place quicker than observed for pure annealing. The apparent activation energies for the growth of the AuSn2 phase during annealing and current stressing were 0.52 eV and 0.47 eV, respectively, which may be closely related to the acceleration of the interfacial reaction by electron wind forces during current stressing.

  1. Shear-induced lamellar ordering and interfacial sliding in amorphous carbon films: A superlow friction regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Tian-Bao; Hu, Yuan-Zhong; Xu, Liang; Wang, Lin-Feng; Wang, Hui

    2011-10-01

    A shear-induced phase transition from disorder to lamellar ordering in amorphous carbon films are investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. Formation of well-separated graphene-like interfacial layers is observed with large interlayer distances, diminishing and ultimately vanishing interlayer bonds, which provides a near-frictionless sliding plane. The steady-state velocity accommodation mode after the running-in stage is interfacial sliding between the graphene-like layers, which explains the experimentally observed graphitization and formation of carbon-rich transfer layers. A superlow friction or superlubricity regime with friction coefficient of approximately 0.01 originates from the extremely large repulsive and low shear interactions across the sliding interface.

  2. The Constrained Vapor Bubble Experiment - Interfacial Flow Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundan, Akshay; Wayner, Peter C., Jr.; Plawsky, Joel L.

    2015-01-01

    Internal heat transfer coefficient of the CVB correlated to the presence of the interfacial flow region. Competition between capillary and Marangoni flow caused Flooding and not a Dry-out region. Interfacial flow region growth is arrested at higher power inputs. 1D heat model confirms the presence of interfacial flow region. 1D heat model confirms the arresting phenomena of interfacial flow region Visual observations are essential to understanding.

  3. Effect of UVA-activated riboflavin on dentin bonding.

    PubMed

    Cova, A; Breschi, L; Nato, F; Ruggeri, A; Carrilho, M; Tjäderhane, L; Prati, C; Di Lenarda, R; Tay, F R; Pashley, D H; Mazzoni, A

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies have reported collagen cross-linking after exposure to riboflavin followed by ultraviolet-A (UVA) exposure. This study is the first to investigate the effect of a riboflavin-containing primer on adhesive interface stability and dentinal matrix metalloproteinase activity. Human dentin was etched with 35% phosphoric acid, treated with 0.1% riboflavin, exposed to UVA for 2 min, and bonded with a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive. Adhesive was applied to control specimens without riboflavin/UVA. Specimens were subjected to microtensile bond strength tests and pulled to failure after storage for 24 hrs, 6 mos, or 1 yr. Interfacial nanoleakage was evaluated by light and transmission electron microscopy. To investigate dentinal matrix metalloproteinase activity, we performed correlative zymographic assays on protein extracts obtained from phosphoric-acid-etched dentin powder with or without riboflavin/UVA treatment and XP Bond. Ultraviolet-activated riboflavin treatment increased the immediate bond strength to dentin at all aging intervals (p < 0.05 vs. control) and decreased interfacial nanoleakage in aged specimens (1 yr; p < 0.05). Zymograms revealed that riboflavin/UVA pre-treatment inhibited dentinal matrix metalloproteinase activity (especially MMP-9). In conclusion, dentinal collagen cross-linking induced by riboflavin/UVA increased immediate bond strength, stabilized the adhesive interface, and inhibited dentin matrix metalloproteinases, thereby increasing the durability of resin-dentin bonds.

  4. Effect of UVA-activated Riboflavin on Dentin Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Cova, A.; Breschi, L.; Nato, F.; Ruggeri, A.; Carrilho, M.; Tjäderhane, L.; Prati, C.; Di Lenarda, R.; Tay, F.R.; Pashley, D.H.; Mazzoni, A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have reported collagen cross-linking after exposure to riboflavin followed by ultraviolet-A (UVA) exposure. This study is the first to investigate the effect of a riboflavin-containing primer on adhesive interface stability and dentinal matrix metalloproteinase activity. Human dentin was etched with 35% phosphoric acid, treated with 0.1% riboflavin, exposed to UVA for 2 min, and bonded with a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive. Adhesive was applied to control specimens without riboflavin/UVA. Specimens were subjected to microtensile bond strength tests and pulled to failure after storage for 24 hrs, 6 mos, or 1 yr. Interfacial nanoleakage was evaluated by light and transmission electron microscopy. To investigate dentinal matrix metalloproteinase activity, we performed correlative zymographic assays on protein extracts obtained from phosphoric-acid-etched dentin powder with or without riboflavin/UVA treatment and XP Bond. Ultraviolet-activated riboflavin treatment increased the immediate bond strength to dentin at all aging intervals (p < 0.05 vs. control) and decreased interfacial nanoleakage in aged specimens (1 yr; p < 0.05). Zymograms revealed that riboflavin/UVA pre-treatment inhibited dentinal matrix metalloproteinase activity (especially MMP-9). In conclusion, dentinal collagen cross-linking induced by riboflavin/UVA increased immediate bond strength, stabilized the adhesive interface, and inhibited dentin matrix metalloproteinases, thereby increasing the durability of resin-dentin bonds. PMID:21940521

  5. Exchange bias mediated by interfacial nanoparticles (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, A. E.; Sinha, S. K.; Fullerton, E. E.; Smith, D. J.

    2015-05-07

    The objective of this study on the iconic exchange-bias bilayer Permalloy/CoO has been to identify those elements of the interfacial microstructure and accompanying magnetic properties that are responsible for the exchange-bias and hysteretic properties of this bilayer. Both epitaxial and polycrystalline samples were examined. X-ray and neutron reflectometry established that there existed an interfacial region, of width ∼1 nm, whose magnetic properties differed from those of Py or CoO. A model was developed for the interfacial microstructure that predicts all the relevant properties of this system; namely; the temperature and Permalloy thickness dependence of the exchange-bias, H{sub EX}, and coercivity, H{sub C}; the much smaller measured values of H{sub EX} from what was nominally expected; the different behavior of H{sub EX} and H{sub C} in epitaxial and polycrystalline bilayers. A surprising result is that the exchange-bias does not involve direct exchange-coupling between Permalloy and CoO, but rather is mediated by CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles in the interfacial region.

  6. Novel Colloidal and Dynamic Interfacial Phenomena in Liquid Crystalline Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-13

    investigation supported by this grant moved beyond past studies of interfacial and colloidal phenomena involving isotropic liquids to explore and understand a...2010 20-May-2014 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Novel Colloidal and Dynamic Interfacial Phenomena in Liquid...Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 liquid crystals, interfacial phenomena, colloids , amphiphiles

  7. Dimer Structure of an Interfacially Impaired Phosphatidylinositol-Specific Pholpholipase C

    SciTech Connect

    Shao,C.; Shi, X.; Wehbi, H.; Zambonelli, C.; Head, J.; Seaton, B.; Roberts, M,.

    2007-01-01

    The crystal structure of the W47A/W242A mutant of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) from Bacillus thuringiensis has been solved to 1.8{angstrom} resolution. The W47A/W242A mutant is an interfacially challenged enzyme, and it has been proposed that one or both tryptophan side chains serve as membrane interfacial anchors (Feng, J., Wehbi, H., and Roberts, M. F. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 19867-19875). The crystal structure supports this hypothesis. Relative to the crystal structure of the closely related (97% identity) wild-type PI-PLC from Bacillus cereus, significant conformational differences occur at the membrane-binding interfacial region rather than the active site. The Trp {yields} Ala mutations not only remove the membrane-partitioning aromatic side chains but also perturb the conformations of the so-called helix B and rim loop regions, both of which are implicated in interfacial binding. The crystal structure also reveals a homodimer, the first such observation for a bacterial PI-PLC, with pseudo-2-fold symmetry. The symmetric dimer interface is stabilized by hydrophobic and hydrogen-bonding interactions, contributed primarily by a central swath of aromatic residues arranged in a quasiherringbone pattern. Evidence that interfacially active wild-type PI-PLC enzymes may dimerize in the presence of phosphatidylcholine vesicles is provided by fluorescence quenching of PI-PLC mutants with pyrene-labeled cysteine residues. The combined data suggest that wild-type PI-PLC can form similar homodimers, anchored to the interface by the tryptophan and neighboring membrane-partitioning residues.

  8. Anisotropy of solid Si-liquid (Al,Si) interfacial tension in the binary and Sr-doped Al-Si eutectic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sens, H.; Eustathopoulos, N.; Camel, D.

    1989-12-01

    The atomic structure of interfaces between solid Si and liquid Al-Si alloys with or without Sr doping is derived from measurements of the orientation dependence of the interfacial tension at 873 K. This involves analysing the shape of small liquid droplets inside silicon grains. The results are discussed on the basis of simple broken-bond models and the periodic bond chain concept.

  9. Effect of rotary cutting instruments on the resin-tooth interfacial ultra structure: An in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Sherawat, Sudhir; Tewari, Sanjay; Duhan, Jigyasa; Singla, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effect of cutting teeth with different types of burs at various speeds on surface topography of tooth surface and interfacial gap formation at resin-tooth interface. Material and Methods: The human molars were divided into seven groups: Diamond bur in airrotor (DA) & micromotor (DM), crosscut carbide bur in airrotor (CCA) & micromotor (CCM), plain carbide bur in airrotor (CA) & micromotor (CM) and #600-grit silicon carbide paper (SiC). In five samples from each group Class II box-only cavities were restored. The occlusal surface of four teeth per group was flattened. Two out of four teeth were acid etched. Teeth were subjected for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: Interfacial gap was observed in all groups with no significant difference. SEM observations revealed CA, CCA & DA were coarser than CM, CCM, DM and SiC. SEM of etched tooth surfaces revealed complete removal of amorphous smear layer in CA & CM, partial removal in CCA, CCM, DA & DM and no removal in SiC. Conclusions: Selecting an appropriate bur and its speed may not play an important role in bonding in terms of interfacial gap formation. Variable changes were observed in surface topography with different burs before and after acid etching. Key words:Surface topography, resin-tooth interface, interfacial gap, bonding. PMID:25674310

  10. Cation effects on interfacial water organization of aqueous chloride solutions. I. Monovalent cations: Li+, Na+, K+, and NH4(+).

    PubMed

    Hua, Wei; Verreault, Dominique; Huang, Zishuai; Adams, Ellen M; Allen, Heather C

    2014-07-17

    The influence of monovalent cations on the interfacial water organization of alkali (LiCl, NaCl, and KCl) and ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) salt solutions was investigated using surface-sensitive conventional vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) and heterodyne-detected (HD-)VSFG spectroscopy. It was found in the conventional VSFG spectra that LiCl and NH4Cl significantly perturb water’s hydrogen-bonding network. In contrast, NaCl and KCl had little effect on the interfacial water structure and exhibited weak concentration dependency. The Im χs(2)(ωIR) spectra from HD-VSFG further revealed that, for all chloride solutions, the net transition dipole moments of hydrogen-bonded water molecules (O → H) are oriented more toward the vapor phase relative to neat water. This suggests the presence of an interfacial electric field generated from the formation of an ionic double layer in the interfacial region with a distribution of Cl(-) ions located above the countercations, in agreement with predictions from MD simulations. The magnitude of this electric field shows a small but definite cation specificity and follows the order Li(+) ≈ Na(+) > NH4(+) > K(+). The observed trend was found to be in good agreement with previously published surface potential data.

  11. Preparation and characterization of PVDF-glass fiber composite membrane reinforced by interfacial UV-grafting copolymerization.

    PubMed

    Luo, Nan; Xu, Rongle; Yang, Min; Yuan, Xing; Zhong, Hui; Fan, Yaobo

    2015-12-01

    A novel inorganic-organic composite membrane, namely poly(vinylidene fluoride) PVDF-glass fiber (PGF) composite membrane, was prepared and reinforced by interfacial ultraviolet (UV)-grafting copolymerization to improve the interfacial bonding strength between the membrane layer and the glass fiber. The interfacial polymerization between inorganic-organic interfaces is a chemical cross-linking reaction that depends on the functionalized glass fiber with silane coupling (KH570) as the initiator and the polymer solution with acrylamide monomer (AM) as the grafting block. The Fourier transform infrared spectrometer-attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) spectra and the energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) pictures of the interface between the glass fiber and polymer matrix confirmed that the AM was grafted to the surface of the glass fiber fabric and that the grafting polymer was successfully embedded in the membrane matrix. The formation mechanisms, permeation, and anti-fouling performance of the PGF composite membrane were measured with different amounts of AM in the doping solutions. The results showed that the grafting composite membrane improved the interfacial bonding strength and permeability, and the peeling strength was improved by 32.6% for PGF composite membranes with an AM concentration at 2wt.%.

  12. Processing and characterization of multi-cellular monolithic bioceramics for bone regenerative scaffolds

    SciTech Connect

    Ari-Wahjoedi, Bambang; Ginta, Turnad Lenggo; Parman, Setyamartana; Abustaman, Mohd Zikri Ahmad

    2014-10-24

    Multicellular monolithic ceramic body is a ceramic material which has many gas or liquid passages partitioned by thin walls throughout the bulk material. There are many currently known advanced industrial applications of multicellular ceramics structures i.e. as supports for various catalysts, electrode support structure for solid oxide fuel cells, refractories, electric/electronic materials, aerospace vehicle re-entry heat shields and biomaterials for dental as well as orthopaedic implants by naming only a few. Multicellular ceramic bodies are usually made of ceramic phases such as mullite, cordierite, aluminum titanate or pure oxides such as silica, zirconia and alumina. What make alumina ceramics is excellent for the above functions are the intrinsic properties of alumina which are hard, wear resistant, excellent dielectric properties, resists strong acid and alkali attacks at elevated temperatures, good thermal conductivities, high strength and stiffness as well as biocompatible. In this work the processing technology leading to truly multicellular monolithic alumina ceramic bodies and their characterization are reported. Ceramic slip with 66 wt.% solid loading was found to be optimum as impregnant to the polyurethane foam template. Mullitic ceramic composite of alumina-sodium alumino disilicate-Leucite-like phases with bulk and true densities of 0.852 and 1.241 g cm{sup −3} respectively, pore linear density of ±35 cm{sup −1}, linear and bulk volume shrinkages of 7-16% and 32 vol.% were obtained. The compressive strength and elastic modulus of the bioceramics are ≈0.5-1.0 and ≈20 MPa respectively.

  13. Bifunctional bioceramics stimulating osteogenic differentiation of a gingival fibroblast and inhibiting plaque biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ya; Wang, Zhejun; Wang, Jiao; Zhou, Yinghong; Chen, Hui; Wu, Chengtie; Haapasalo, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Gingival recession is a common clinical problem that results in esthetic deficiencies and poor plaque control and predominantly occurs in aged patients. In order to restore the cervical region, ideal biomaterials should possess the ability to stimulate proliferation and osteogenesis/cementogenesis of human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) and have a strong antibiofilm effect. The aim of the present study was to investigate the interactions of HGF and oral multispecies biofilms with Ca, Mg and Si-containing bredigite (BRT, Ca7MgSi4O16) bioceramics. BRT extract induced osteogenic/cementogenic differentiation of HGF and its inhibition of plaque biofilm formation were systematically studied. BRT extract in concentrations lower than <200 mg mL(-1) presented high biocompatibility to HGF cells in 3 days. Ion extracts from BRT also stimulated a series of bone-related gene and protein expressions in HGF cells. Furthermore, BRT extract significantly inhibited oral multispecies plaque biofilm growth on its surface and contributed to over 30% bacterial cell death without additional antibacterial agents in two weeks. A planktonic killing test showed that BRT suppressed 98% plaque bacterial growth compared to blank control in 3 days. The results also revealed that BRT extract has an osteostimulation effect on HGF. The suppression effect on plaque biofilms suggested that BRT might be used as a bioactive material for cervical restoration and that the synergistic effect of bioactive ions, such as Ca, Mg and Si ions, played an important role in the design and construction of bifunctional biomaterials in combination with tissue regeneration and antibiofilm activity.

  14. Analysis of radiopacity, pH and cytotoxicity of a new bioceramic material

    PubMed Central

    de SOUZA, Letícia Chaves; YADLAPATI, Mamatha; DORN, Samuel O; SILVA, Renato; LETRA, Ariadne

    2015-01-01

    Objective RetroMTA® is a new hydraulic bioceramic indicated for pulp capping, perforations or root resorption repair, apexification and apical surgery. The aim of this study was to compare the radiopacity, pH variation and cytotoxicity of this material to ProRoot® MTA. Material and Methods Mixed cements were exposed to a digital x-ray along with an aluminum stepwedge for the radiopacity assay. pH values were verified after incubation period of 3, 24, 48, 72 and 168 hours. The cytotoxicity of each cement was tested on human periodontal ligament fibroblasts using a multiparametric assay. Data analysis was performed using ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc in GraphPad Prism. Results ProRoot® MTA had higher radiopacity than RetroMTA® (p<0.001). No significant differences were observed for the pH of the materials throughout experimental periods (p>0.05) although pH levels of both materials reduced over time. Both ProRoot® MTA and RetroMTA® allowed for significantly higher cell viability when compared with the positive control (p<0.001). No statistical difference was observed between ProRoot® MTA and RetroMTA® cytotoxicity level in all test parameters, except for the ProRoot® MTA 48-hour extract media in the NR assay (p<0.05). Conclusion The current study provides new data about the physicochemical and biological properties of Retro® MTA concerning radiopacity, pH and cytotoxic effects on human periodontal ligaments cells. Based on our findings, RetroMTA® meets the radiopacity requirements standardized by ANSI/ADA number 572, and similar pH values and biocompatibility to ProRoot® MTA. Further studies should be performed to evaluate additional properties of this new material. PMID:26398510

  15. Marginal Adaptation of New Bioceramic Materials and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate: A Scanning Electron Microscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Shokouhinejad, Noushin; Nekoofar, Mohmmad Hossein; Ashoftehyazdi, Kazem; Zahraee, Shohreh; Khoshkhounejad, Mehrfam

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This study aimed to compare the marginal adaptation of new bioceramic materials, EndoSequence Root Repair Material (ERRM putty and ERRM paste), to that of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) as root-end filling materials. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six extracted human single-rooted teeth were prepared and obturated with gutta-percha and AH-26 sealer. The roots were resected 3 mm from the apex. Root-end cavities were then prepared with an ultrasonic retrotip. The specimens were divided into three groups (n=12) and filled with MTA, ERRM putty or ERRM paste. Epoxy resin replicas from the resected root-end surfaces and longitudinally sectioned roots were fabricated. The gaps at the material/dentin interface were measured using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Transversal, longitudinal, and overall gap sizes were measured for each specimen. The data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: In transversal sections, no significant difference was found between MTA, ERRM putty and ERRM paste (P=0.31). However, in longitudinal sections, larger gaps were evident between ERRM paste and dentinal walls compared to MTA and ERRM putty (P=0.002 and P=0.033, respectively). Considering the overall gap size values, the difference between three tested materials was not statistically significant (P=0.17). Conclusion: Within the limits of this study, the marginal adaptation of ERRM paste and putty was comparable to that of MTA. However, ERRM putty might be more suitable for filling the root-end cavities because of its superior adaptation compared to ERRM paste in longitudinal sections. PMID:24688585

  16. Chemical Bonds II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, R. T.

    1972-01-01

    The continuation of a paper discussing chemical bonding from a bond energy viewpoint, with a number of examples of single and multiple bonds. (Part I appeared in volume 1 number 3, pages 16-23, February 1972.) (AL)

  17. What Determines Bond Costs. Municipal Bonds Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Douglas; And Others

    Public officials in small towns who participate infrequently in the bond market need information about bond financing. This publication, one in a series of booklets published by the Western Rural Development Center using research gathered between 1967-77, discusses factors influencing the marketability and cost of bond financing for towns and…

  18. Effect of bioceramic functional groups on drug binding and release kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Christopher

    Bioceramics have been studied extensively as drug delivery systems (DDS). Those studies have aimed to tailor the drug binding and release kinetics to successfully treat infections and other diseases. This research suggests that the drug binding and release kinetics are predominantly driven by the functional groups available on the surface of a bioceramic. The goal of the present study is to explain the role of silicate and phosphate functional groups in drug binding to and release kinetics from bioceramics. alpha-cristobalite (Cris; SiO2) particles (90-150 microm) were prepared and doped with 0 microg (P-0), 39.1 microg (P-39.1), 78.2 microg (P-78.2), 165.5 microg (P-165.5) or 331 microg (P-331) of P 2O5 per gram Cris, using 85% orthophosphoric (H3PO 4) acid and thermal treatment. The material structure was analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) with Rietveld Refinement and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy with Gaussian fitting. XRD demonstrated an increase from sample P-0 (170.5373 A3) to P-331 (170.6466 A 3) in the unit cell volume as the P2O5 concentration increased in the material confirming phosphate silicate substitution in Cris. Moreover, FTIR showed the characteristic bands of phosphate functional groups of nu4 PO4/O-P-O bending, P-O-P stretching, P-O-P bending, P=O stretching, and P-O-H bending in doped Cris indicating phosphate incorporation in the silicate structure. Furthermore, FTIR showed that the nu4 PO4/O-P-O bending band around 557.6 cm-1 and P=O stretching band around 1343.9 cm-1 increased in area for samples P-39.1 to P-331 from 3.5 to 10.5 and from 10.1 to 22.4, respectively due to phosphate doping. In conjunction with the increase of the nu4 PO4/O-P-O bending band and P=O stretching band, a decrease in area of the O-Si-O bending bands around 488.1 and 629.8 cm-1 was noticed for samples P-39.1 to P-331 from 5 to 2 and from 11.8 to 5.4, respectively. Furthermore, Cris samples (200 mg, n=5 for each sample) were immersed separately in

  19. Partial Pulpotomy of Immature Teeth with Apical Periodontitis using Bioceramics and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate: A Report of Three Cases.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shan; Wu, Hao; Zhang, Cheng Fei

    2016-06-01

    Pulpal necrosis of an immature permanent tooth with an open apex poses a challenge for the clinician. The conventional apexification technique using calcium hydroxide has yielded short-term success, but this technique has inevitable shortcomings. Hence, this case series aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of using bioceramics (iRoot BP) or mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) for partial pulpotomies. Three boys aged 9 to 11 years old presented with partial pulp necrosis and symptomatic apical periodontitis of the mandibular right and left second premolar. The involved teeth were treated with a partial pulpotomy using either iRoot BP (case 1 and 2) or MTA (case 3). At the 8-month follow-up, no abnormal clinical signs or symptoms were observed. Periapical radiographs revealed a significant reduction in periapical radiolucency, a marked increase in the root canal wall thickness and ongoing closure of the apical opening. The bioceramic material (iRoot BP) and MTA both produced successful outcomes in the partial pulpotomy of immature teeth with partial pulp necrosis and apical periodontitis. However, iRoot BP was superior in terms of ease of clinical application, and would therefore be a better treatment alternative than MTA.

  20. A novel and economical route for synthesizing akermanite (Ca2MgSi2O7) nano-bioceramic.

    PubMed

    Sharafabadi, Armina Khajeh; Abdellahi, Majid; Kazemi, Amirhossein; Khandan, Amirsalar; Ozada, Neriman

    2017-02-01

    Despite the benefits of akermanite, there are limited reports on making powder and dense bulk akermanite (Ca2MgSi2O7) and most articles have focused on building akermanite scaffolds. This study centers on a new and economical route for the synthesis of akermanite bioceramic via high energy ball milling and subsequent sintering of a mixed powders of eggshell (as calcium source), MgO, and SiO2. The mechanisms occurred during akermanite synthesis were carefully investigated. XRD, DTA, FTIR, TGA, SEM, TEM, ICP and EDS were used for analyzing the obtained results. Simulated body fluid (SBF) was also used for assessing in vitro bioactivity of the akermanite samples. According to the results, the method presented in this study can be introduced as a facile method for preparing akermanite samples with a good compressive strength of 210±7MPa. The XRD patterns also indicated that akermanite bioceramic was synthesized after heat treating at 900°C which is very low compared to previous researches. With increasing the sintering time of the akermanite samples and the reduction of the surface porosities, the amount of the formed apatite and also the rate of apatite formation decreased and the compressive strength of the samples increased.

  1. Chemical bonding technology for terrestrial photovoltaic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulter, D. R.; Cuddihy, E. F.; Plueddeman, E. P.

    1983-01-01

    Encapsulated photovoltaic modules must hold together for 20 years, reliably resisting delamination and separation of any of the component materials. Delamination of encapsulation materials from each other, or from solar cells and interconnects, can create voids for accumulation of water, promoting corrosive failure. Delamination of silicone elastomers from unprimed surfaces was a common occurrence with early modules, but the incidences of silicone delamination with later modules decreased when adhesion promoters recommended by silicone manufacturers were used. An investigation of silicone delamination from unprimed surfaces successfully identified the mechanism, which was related to atmospheric oxygen and moisture. This early finding indicated that reliance on physical bonding of encapsulation interfaces for long life in an outdoor environment would be risky. For long outdoor life, the material components of a module must therefore be held together by weather-stable adhesion promoters that desirably form strong, interfacial chemical bonds.

  2. Interfacial structure and wetting properties of water droplets on graphene under a static electric field.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hongru; Zhang, Leining; Li, Xiongying; Li, Yifan; Wu, Weikang; Li, Hui

    2015-09-28

    The behavior of water droplets located on graphene in the presence of various external electric fields (E-fields) is investigated using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We explore the effect of E-field on mass density distribution, water polarization as well as hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) to gain insight into the wetting properties of water droplets on graphene and their interfacial structure under uniform E-fields. The MD simulation results reveal that the equilibrium water droplets present a hemispherical, a conical and an ordered cylindrical shape with the increase of external E-field intensity. Accompanied by the shape variation of water droplets, the dipole orientation of water molecules experiences a remarkable change from a disordered state to an ordered state because of the polarization of water molecules induced by static E-field. The distinct two peaks in mass density and H-bond distribution profiles demonstrate that water has a layering structure in the interfacial region, which sensitively depends on the strong E-field (>0.8 V nm(-1)). In addition, when the external E-field is parallel to the substrate, the E-field would make the contact angle of the water droplets become small and increase its wettability. Our findings provide the possibility to control the structure and wetting properties of water on graphene by tuning the direction and intensity of external E-field which is of importance for relevant industrial processes on the solid surface.

  3. Shear Strength and Interfacial Toughness Characterization of Sapphire-Epoxy Interfaces for Nacre-Inspired Composites.

    PubMed

    Behr, Sebastian; Jungblut, Laura; Swain, Michael V; Schneider, Gerold A

    2016-10-12

    The common tensile lap-shear test for adhesive joints is inappropriate for brittle substrates such as glasses or ceramics where stress intensifications due to clamping and additional bending moments invalidate results. Nevertheless, bonding of glasses and ceramics is still important in display applications for electronics, in safety glass and ballistic armor, for dental braces and restoratives, or in recently developed bioinspired composites. To mechanically characterize adhesive bondings in these fields nonetheless, a novel approach based on the so-called Schwickerath test for dental sintered joints is used. This new method not only matches data from conventional analysis but also uniquely combines the accurate determination of interfacial shear strength and toughness in one simple test. The approach is verified for sapphire-epoxy joints that are of interest for bioinspired composites. For these, the procedure not only provides quantitative interfacial properties for the first time, it also exemplarily suggests annealing of sapphire at 1000 °C for 10 h for mechanically and economically effective improvements of the interfacial bond strength and toughness. With increases of strength and toughness from approximately 8 to 29 MPa and from 2.6 to 35 J/m(2), respectively, this thermal modification drastically enhances the properties of unmodified sapphire-epoxy interfaces. At the same time, it is much more convenient than wet-chemical approaches such as silanization. Hence, besides the introduction of a new testing procedure for adhesive joints of brittle or expensive substrates, a new and facile annealing process for improvements of the adhesive properties of sapphire is suggested and quantitative data for the mechanical properties of sapphire-epoxy interfaces that are common in synthetic nacre-inspired composites are provided for the first time.

  4. Ordered mesoporous materials based on interfacial assembly and engineering.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Yue, Qin; Deng, Yonghui; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2013-10-04

    Ordered mesoporous materials have inspired prominent research interest due to their unique properties and functionalities and potential applications in adsorption, separation, catalysis, sensors, drug delivery, energy conversion and storage, and so on. Thanks to continuous efforts over the past two decades, great achievements have been made in the synthesis and structural characterization of mesoporous materials. In this review, we summarize recent progresses in preparing ordered mesoporous materials from the viewpoint of interfacial assembly and engineering. Five interfacial assembly and synthesis are comprehensively highlighted, including liquid-solid interfacial assembly, gas-liquid interfacial assembly, liquid-liquid interfacial assembly, gas-solid interfacial synthesis, and solid-solid interfacial synthesis, basics about their synthesis pathways, princples and interface engineering strategies.

  5. Computational analysis of effect of modification on the interfacial characteristics of a carbon nanotube-polyethylene composite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qingbin; Xia, Dan; Xue, Qingzhong; Yan, Keyou; Gao, Xili; Li, Qun

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the non-covalent association of single-walled nanotube (SWNT) with polyethylene (PE) molecule and the influence of sidewall modification on the interfacial bonding between the SWNTs and polymer were investigated using molecular mechanics (MM) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The model of interaction between the initially separated PE and SWNT fragments, which can be either wrapping or filling, was computed. The possible extension of polymers wrapping or filling SWNTs can be used to structurally bridge the SWNTs and polymers to significantly improve the load transfer between them when SWNTs are used to produce nanocomposites. The interfacial bonding characteristics between the single-walled nanotubes, on which -COOH, -CONH 2, -C 6H 11, or -C 6H 5 groups have been chemically attached, and the polymer matrix were also investigated by performing pullout simulations. The results show that appropriate functionalization of nanotubes at low densities of functionalized carbon atoms drastically increase their interfacial bonding and shear stress between the nanotubes and the polymer matrix, where chemisorption with -C 6H 5 groups to as little as 5.0% of the nanotube carbon atoms increases the shear stress by about 1700%. Furthermore, this suggests the possibility to use functionalized nanotubes to effectively reinforce other kinds of polymer-based materials as well.

  6. Mesoscale Interfacial Dynamics in Magnetoelectric Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Shashank, Priya

    2009-12-14

    Biphasic composites are the key towards achieving enhanced magnetoelectric response. In order understand the control behavior of the composites and resultant symmetry of the multifunctional product tensors, we need to synthesized model material systems with the following features (i) interface formation through either deposition control or natural decomposition; (ii) a very high interphase-interfacial area, to maximize the ME coupling; and (iii) an equilibrium phase distribution and morphology, resulting in preferred crystallographic orientation relations between phases across the interphase-interfacial boundaries. This thought process guided the experimental evolution in this program. We initiated the research with the co-fired composites approach and then moved on to the thin film laminates deposited through the rf-magnetron sputtering and pulsed laser deposition process

  7. Interfacial geometry dictates cancer cell tumorigenicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Junmin; Abdeen, Amr A.; Wycislo, Kathryn L.; Fan, Timothy M.; Kilian, Kristopher A.

    2016-08-01

    Within the heterogeneous architecture of tumour tissue there exists an elusive population of stem-like cells that are implicated in both recurrence and metastasis. Here, by using engineered extracellular matrices, we show that geometric features at the perimeter of tumour tissue will prime a population of cells with a stem-cell-like phenotype. These cells show characteristics of cancer stem cells in vitro, as well as enhanced tumorigenicity in murine models of primary tumour growth and pulmonary metastases. We also show that interfacial geometry modulates cell shape, adhesion through integrin α5β1, MAPK and STAT activity, and initiation of pluripotency signalling. Our results for several human cancer cell lines suggest that interfacial geometry triggers a general mechanism for the regulation of cancer-cell state. Similar to how a growing tumour can co-opt normal soluble signalling pathways, our findings demonstrate how cancer can also exploit geometry to orchestrate oncogenesis.

  8. Scaling for interfacial tensions near critical endpoints.

    PubMed

    Zinn, Shun-Yong; Fisher, Michael E

    2005-01-01

    Parametric scaling representations are obtained and studied for the asymptotic behavior of interfacial tensions in the full neighborhood of a fluid (or Ising-type) critical endpoint, i.e., as a function both of temperature and of density/order parameter or chemical potential/ordering field. Accurate nonclassical critical exponents and reliable estimates for the universal amplitude ratios are included naturally on the basis of the "extended de Gennes-Fisher" local-functional theory. Serious defects in previous scaling treatments are rectified and complete wetting behavior is represented; however, quantitatively small, but unphysical residual nonanalyticities on the wetting side of the critical isotherm are smoothed out "manually." Comparisons with the limited available observations are presented elsewhere but the theory invites new, searching experiments and simulations, e.g., for the vapor-liquid interfacial tension on the two sides of the critical endpoint isotherm for which an amplitude ratio -3.25+/-0.05 is predicted.

  9. Interfacial thermodynamics of micro heat pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, L.W. ); Peterson, G.P. )

    1995-02-01

    Successful analysis and modeling of micro heat pipes requires a complete understanding of the vapor-liquid interface. A thermodynamic model of the vapor-liquid interface in micro heat pipes has been formulated that includes axial pressure and temperature differences, changes in local interfacial curvature, Marangoni effects, and the disjoining pressure. Relationships were developed for the interfacial mass flux in an extended meniscus, the heat transfer rate in the intrinsic meniscus, the 'thermocapillary' heat-pipe limitation, as well as the nonevaporating superheated liquid film thickness that exists between adjacent menisci and occurs during liquid dry out in the evaporator. These relationships can be used to define quantitative restrictions and/or requirements necessary for proper operation of micro heat pipes. They also provide fundamental insight into the critical mechanisms required for proper heat pipe operation. 29 refs., 6 figs.

  10. The contact area dependent interfacial thermal conductance

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chenhan; Wei, Zhiyong; Bi, Kedong; Yang, Juekuan; Chen, Yunfei; Wang, Jian

    2015-12-15

    The effects of the contact area on the interfacial thermal conductance σ are investigated using the atomic Green’s function method. Different from the prediction of the heat diffusion transport model, we obtain an interesting result that the interfacial thermal conductance per unit area Λ is positively dependent on the contact area as the area varies from a few atoms to several square nanometers. Through calculating the phonon transmission function, it is uncovered that the phonon transmission per unit area increases with the increased contact area. This is attributed to that each atom has more neighboring atoms in the counterpart of the interface with the increased contact area, which provides more channels for phonon transport.

  11. Frontiers of interfacial water research :workshop report.

    SciTech Connect

    Cygan, Randall Timothy; Greathouse, Jeffery A.

    2005-10-01

    Water is the critical natural resource of the new century. Significant improvements in traditional water treatment processes require novel approaches based on a fundamental understanding of nanoscale and atomic interactions at interfaces between aqueous solution and materials. To better understand these critical issues and to promote an open dialog among leading international experts in water-related specialties, Sandia National Laboratories sponsored a workshop on April 24-26, 2005 in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The ''Frontiers of Interfacial Water Research Workshop'' provided attendees with a critical review of water technologies and emphasized the new advances in surface and interfacial microscopy, spectroscopy, diffraction, and computer simulation needed for the development of new materials for water treatment.

  12. Interfacial ultramorphology evaluation of resin luting cements to dentin: a correlative scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Thaiane Rodrigues; Vermelho, Paulo Moreira; André, Carolina Bosso; Giannini, Marcelo

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the dentin-resin cements interfacial ultramorphologies using two different methods: scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Four commercial products were evaluated: two conventional cementing system (RelyX ARC/Adper™ Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose Plus, 3M ESPE and Clearfil Esthetic Cement/DC Bond, Kuraray) and two self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, 3M ESPE and Clearfil SA Cement, Kuraray). Prepolymerized resin disks (Sinfony, 3M ESPE) were cemented on oclusal dentin surfaces of 24 third human molars, simulating the indirect restorations. After 24 h, teeth were sectioned into 0.9-mm thick slabs and processed for microscopy analyses (SEM or TEM/ n = 3). Qualitative characterization of dentin-resin cement interface was performed. Hybrid layer formation with long and dense resin tags was observed only for RelyX ARC cementing system. Clearfil Esthetic Cement/DC Bond system revealed few and short resin tags formation, whereas no hybridization and resin tags were detected for self-adhesive resin cements. Some interfacial regions exhibited that the self-adhesive resin cements were not bonded to dentin, presenting bubbles or voids at the interfaces. In conclusion, TEM and SEM bonding interface analyses showed ultramorphological variations among resin cements, which are directly related to dental bonding strategies used for each resin cement tested.

  13. Interfacial chemistry and structure in ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H.; Saenz, N.T.; Schilling, C.H.

    1990-09-01

    The interfacial chemistry and structure of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) play a major role in the properties of these materials. Fiber-matrix interfaces chemistries are vitally important in the fracture strength, fracture toughness, and fracture resistance of ceramic composites because they influence fiber loading and fiber pullout. Elevated-temperature properties are also linked to the interfacial characteristics through the chemical stability of the interface in corrosive environments and the creep/pullout behavior of the interface. Physical properties such as electrical and thermal conductivity are also dependent on the interface. Fiber-matrix interfaces containing a 1-{mu}m-thick multilayered interface with amorphous and graphitic C to a 1-nm-thick SiO{sub 2} layer can result from sintering operations for some composite systems. Fibers coated with C, BN, C/BC/BN, and Si are also used to produce controlled interface chemistries and structures. Growth interfaces within the matrix resulting from processing of CMCs can also be crucial to the behavior of these materials. Evaluation of the interfacial chemistry and structure of CMCs requires the use of a variety of analytical tools, including optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive x-ray analysis. A review of the interfacial chemistry and structure of SiC whisker- and fiber-reinforced Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and SiC/SiC materials is presented. Where possible, correlations with fracture properties and high-temperature stability are made. 94 refs., 10 figs.

  14. Intrinsic interfacial phenomena in manganite heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Vaz, C A F; Walker, F J; Ahn, C H; Ismail-Beigi, S

    2015-04-01

    We review recent advances in our understanding of interfacial phenomena that emerge when dissimilar materials are brought together at atomically sharp and coherent interfaces. In particular, we focus on phenomena that are intrinsic to the interface and review recent work carried out on perovskite manganites interfaces, a class of complex oxides whose rich electronic properties have proven to be a useful playground for the discovery and prediction of novel phenomena.

  15. Interfacial chemistry in solvent extraction systems

    SciTech Connect

    Neuman, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    Research last year emphasized the nature of microscopic interfaces, i. e., reversed micelles and other association microstructures, which form in both practical and simplified acidic organophosphorus extraction systems associated with Ni, Co and Na in order to improve on a recently proposed model for aggregation of metal-extractant complexes. Also, the macroscopic interfacial behavior of extractant molecules and their interactions with metal ions which occur in hydrometallurgical solvent extraction systems were further investigated.

  16. Interfacial chemistry in solvent extraction systems

    SciTech Connect

    Neuman, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    Research this past year continued to emphasize characterization of the physicochemical nature of the microscopic interfaces, i.e., reversed micelles and other association microstructures, which form in both practical and simplified acidic organophosphorus extraction systems associated with Ni, Co, and Na in order to improve on the model for aggregation of metal-extractant complexes. Also, the macroscopic interfacial behavior of model extractant (surfactant) molecules was further investigated. 1 fig.

  17. Magnetoelectric Coupling Induced by Interfacial Orbital Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cui, Bin; Song, Cheng; Mao, Haijun; Wu, Huaqiang; Li, Fan; Peng, Jingjing; Wang, Guangyue; Zeng, Fei; Pan, Feng

    2015-11-01

    Reversible orbital reconstruction driven by ferroelectric polarization modulates the magnetic performance of model ferroelectric/ferromagnetic heterostructures without onerous limitations. Mn-d(x2-y2) orbital occupancy and related interfacial exotic magnetic states are enhanced and weakened by negative and positive electric fields, respectively, filling the missing member-orbital in the mechanism of magnetoelectric coupling and advancing the application of orbitals to microelectronics.

  18. Using Multiple Bonding Strategies.

    PubMed

    Larson, Thomas D

    2015-01-01

    There are many ways to bond to tooth structure, some micro-mechanical some chemical, some a combination. Different dentin bonding materials have different bonding strengths to differently prepared surfaces, and because of differences in their nature, different areas of tooth structure present peculiar bonding challenges. This paper will review a variety of material types, elucidating their particular bonding strengths and commenting on improved bonding strategies to increase durability, strength, and favorable pulpal response. In this discussion, resin dentin bonding systems, glass ionomers, Gluma, resin cements, and newer combined products will br reviewed.

  19. Investigation of interfacial rheology & foam stability.

    SciTech Connect

    Yaklin, Melissa A.; Cote, Raymond O.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Walker, Lynn M.; Koehler, Timothy P.; Reichert, Matthew D.; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2010-05-01

    The rheology at gas-liquid interfaces strongly influences the stability and dynamics of foams and emulsions. Several experimental techniques are employed to characterize the rheology at liquid-gas interfaces with an emphasis on the non-Newtonian behavior of surfactant-laden interfaces. The focus is to relate the interfacial rheology to the foamability and foam stability of various aqueous systems. An interfacial stress rheometer (ISR) is used to measure the steady and dynamic rheology by applying an external magnetic field to actuate a magnetic needle suspended at the interface. Results are compared with those from a double wall ring attachment to a rotational rheometer (TA Instruments AR-G2). Micro-interfacial rheology (MIR) is also performed using optical tweezers to manipulate suspended microparticle probes at the interface to investigate the steady and dynamic rheology. Additionally, a surface dilatational rheometer (SDR) is used to periodically oscillate the volume of a pendant drop or buoyant bubble. Applying the Young-Laplace equation to the drop shape, a time-dependent surface tension can be calculated and used to determine the effective dilatational viscosity of an interface. Using the ISR, double wall ring, SDR, and MIR, a wide range of sensitivity in surface forces (fN to nN) can be explored as each experimental method has different sensitivities. Measurements will be compared to foam stability.

  20. Interfacial gauge methods for incompressible fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Saye, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Designing numerical methods for incompressible fluid flow involving moving interfaces, for example, in the computational modeling of bubble dynamics, swimming organisms, or surface waves, presents challenges due to the coupling of interfacial forces with incompressibility constraints. A class of methods, denoted interfacial gauge methods, is introduced for computing solutions to the corresponding incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. These methods use a type of “gauge freedom” to reduce the numerical coupling between fluid velocity, pressure, and interface position, allowing high-order accurate numerical methods to be developed more easily. Making use of an implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin framework, developed in tandem with this work, high-order results are demonstrated, including surface tension dynamics in which fluid velocity, pressure, and interface geometry are computed with fourth-order spatial accuracy in the maximum norm. Applications are demonstrated with two-phase fluid flow displaying fine-scaled capillary wave dynamics, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and a fluid-jet free surface flow problem exhibiting vortex shedding induced by a type of Plateau-Rayleigh instability. The developed methods can be generalized to other types of interfacial flow and facilitate precise computation of complex fluid interface phenomena. PMID:27386567

  1. Interfacial gauge methods for incompressible fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Saye, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Designing numerical methods for incompressible fluid flow involving moving interfaces, for example, in the computational modeling of bubble dynamics, swimming organisms, or surface waves, presents challenges due to the coupling of interfacial forces with incompressibility constraints. A class of methods, denoted interfacial gauge methods, is introduced for computing solutions to the corresponding incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. These methods use a type of "gauge freedom" to reduce the numerical coupling between fluid velocity, pressure, and interface position, allowing high-order accurate numerical methods to be developed more easily. Making use of an implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin framework, developed in tandem with this work, high-order results are demonstrated, including surface tension dynamics in which fluid velocity, pressure, and interface geometry are computed with fourth-order spatial accuracy in the maximum norm. Applications are demonstrated with two-phase fluid flow displaying fine-scaled capillary wave dynamics, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and a fluid-jet free surface flow problem exhibiting vortex shedding induced by a type of Plateau-Rayleigh instability. The developed methods can be generalized to other types of interfacial flow and facilitate precise computation of complex fluid interface phenomena.

  2. Interfacial Studies of Sized Carbon Fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Shahrul, S. N.; Hartini, M. N.; Hilmi, E. A.; Nizam, A.

    2010-03-11

    This study was performed to investigate the influence of sizing treatment on carbon fiber in respect of interfacial adhesion in composite materials, Epolam registered 2025. Fortafil unsized carbon fiber was used to performed the experiment. The fiber was commercially surface treated and it was a polyacrylonitrile based carbon fiber with 3000 filament per strand. Epicure registered 3370 was used as basic sizing chemical and dissolved in two types of solvent, ethanol and acetone for the comparison purpose. The single pull out test has been used to determine the influence of sizing on carbon fiber. The morphology of carbon fiber was observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The apparent interfacial strength IFSS values determined by pull out test for the Epicure registered 3370/ethanol sized carbon fiber pointed to a good interfacial behaviour compared to the Epicure registered 3370/acetone sized carbon fiber. The Epicure registered 3370/ethanol sizing agent was found to be effective in promoting adhesion because of the chemical reactions between the sizing and Epolam registered 2025 during the curing process. From this work, it showed that sized carbon fiber using Epicure registered 3370 with addition of ethanol give higher mechanical properties of carbon fiber in terms of shear strength and also provided a good adhesion between fiber and matrix compared to the sizing chemical that contain acetone as a solvent.

  3. In vitro assessment of three-dimensionally plotted nagelschmidtite bioceramic scaffolds with varied macropore morphologies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mengchi; Zhai, Dong; Chang, Jiang; Wu, Chengtie

    2014-01-01

    It is known that porous scaffolds play an important role in bone/periodontal tissue engineering. A new nagelschmidtite (NAGEL, Ca7Si2P2O16) ceramic has recently been prepared which shows excellent apatite mineralization ability and osteo-/cementostimulation properties in vitro. However, up to now porous NAGEL scaffolds have not been developed yet. There has been no systematic study of the effect of macropore morphology of bioceramic scaffolds on their physico-chemical and biological properties. The aim of this study was to prepare NAGEL scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications. We applied a modified three-dimensional (3-D) plotting method to prepare highly controllable NAGEL scaffolds and investigated the effect of macropore morphology on the physico-chemical and biological properties. The results showed that the macropore size and morphology of 3-D plotted NAGEL scaffolds could be effectively controlled. Compared with β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffolds NAGEL scaffolds possess a significantly enhanced compressive strength, a higher modulus and better degradability. Nagel scaffolds with a square pore morphology presented a higher compressive strength, a higher modulus and greater weight loss rate than those with triangular and parallelogram pore morphologies. In addition, all of the NAGEL scaffolds with the three macropore morphologies supported the attachment and proliferation of MC3T3 cells. The proliferation of MC3T3 cells on NAGEL scaffolds with triangular and parallelogram structures was higher than that on β-TCP scaffolds with the same pore structure. Cells on all three groups of NAGEL scaffolds revealed higher alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity compared with cells on β-TCP scaffolds, and among the three NAGEL scaffolds groups those with a parallelogram pore structure showed the highest ALP activity. Furthermore, the angiogenic cell experiments showed that the ionic products from NAGEL scaffolds promoted tube formation, expression of pro

  4. Promotion of Dental Pulp Cell Migration and Pulp Repair by a Bioceramic Putty Involving FGFR-mediated Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Zhu, L X; Cheng, X; Lin, Y; Yan, P; Peng, B

    2015-06-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate is the currently recommended material of choice for clinical pulp repair despite several disadvantages, including handling inconvenience. Little is known about the signaling mechanisms involved in bioceramic-mediated dental pulp repair-particularly, dental pulp cell (DPC) migration. This study evaluated the effects of iRoot BP Plus, a novel ready-to-use nanoparticulate bioceramic putty, on DPC migration in vitro and pulp repair in vivo, focusing on possible involvement of fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR)-related signaling, including mitogen-activated protein kinase and Akt pathways. Treatment with iRoot BP Plus extracts enhanced horizontal and vertical migration of DPCs, which was comparable with the effects induced by mineral trioxide aggregate extracts. The DPCs exposed to iRoot BP Plus extracts demonstrated no evident apoptosis. Importantly, treatment with iRoot BP Plus extracts resulted in rapid activation of FGFR, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), and Akt signaling in DPCs. Confocal immunofluorescence staining revealed that iRoot BP Plus stimulated focal adhesion formation and stress fiber assembly in DPCs, in addition to upregulating the expression of focal adhesion molecules, including p-focal adhesion kinase, p-paxillin, and vinculin. Moreover, activation of FGFR, ERK, JNK, and Akt were found to mediate the upregulated expression of focal adhesion molecules, stress fiber assembly, and enhanced DPC migration induced by iRoot BP Plus. Consistent with the in vitro results, we observed induction of homogeneous dentin bridge formation and expression of p-focal adhesion kinase, p-FGFR, p-ERK 1/2, p-JNK, and p-Akt near injury sites by iRoot BP Plus in an in vivo pulp repair model. These data demonstrate that iRoot BP Plus can promote DPC migration and pulp repair involving the FGFR-mediated ERK 1/2, JNK, and Akt pathways. These findings provide

  5. Effect of transcrystalline morphology on interfacial adhesion in biocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsson, J.; Hedenberg, P.; Felix, J.

    1995-12-01

    The efficient transfer of load from matrix to fibers is crucial for achieving good mechanical performance in composite materials. Much attention has been paid in recent years to producing strong bonds across fibers and matrix in composite materials. An attractive alternative to surface modification of fibers or the use of compatibilizing agents is creating molecular order at the interphase. In this study, the ability of natural cellulose fibers, such as cotton and wood fibers, to induce transcrystallinity in synthetic polymer such as polypropylene (PP), was utilized to create various interphase morphologies. The effect of trancrystalline layers of different thicknesses at the fiber interface on interfacial shear stress transfer was investigated using the single-fiber fragmentation test. It was found that the trancrystalline morphology at the fiber/matrix interface considerably improved the shear transfer. The fiber surface roughness as measured by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) as well as surface crystalline structure is proposed to be responsible for creating a favorable interphase morphology. The interphase morphology of a new generation of biodegradable composites based on celluse fiber-reinforced bacteria-produced polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is currently under investigation in our laboratories.

  6. Interfacial structures of acidic and basic aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, C.; Ji, N.; Waychunas, G.; Shen, Y.R.

    2008-10-20

    Phase-sensitive sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy was used to study water/vapor interfaces of HCl, HI, and NaOH solutions. The measured imaginary part of the surface spectral responses provided direct characterization of OH stretch vibrations and information about net polar orientations of water species contributing to different regions of the spectrum. We found clear evidence that hydronium ions prefer to emerge at interfaces. Their OH stretches contribute to the 'ice-like' band in the spectrum. Their charges create a positive surface field that tends to reorient water molecules more loosely bonded to the topmost water layer with oxygen toward the interface, and thus enhances significantly the 'liquid-like' band in the spectrum. Iodine ions in solution also like to appear at the interface and alter the positive surface field by forming a narrow double-charge layer with hydronium ions. In NaOH solution, the observed weak change of the 'liquid-like' band and disappearance of the 'ice-like' band in the spectrum indicates that OH{sup -} ions must also have excess at the interface. How they are incorporated in the interfacial water structure is however not clear.

  7. Interfacial interaction between the epoxidized natural rubber and silica in natural rubber/silica composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tiwen; Jia, Zhixin; Luo, Yuanfang; Jia, Demin; Peng, Zheng

    2015-02-01

    The epoxidized natural rubber (ENR) as an interfacial modifier was used to improve the mechanical and dynamical mechanical properties of NR/silica composites. In order to reveal the interaction mechanism between ENR and silica, the ENR/Silica model compound was prepared by using an open mill and the interfacial interaction of ENR with silica was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and stress-strain testing. The results indicated that the ring-opening reaction occurs between the epoxy groups of ENR chains and Si-OH groups on the silica surfaces and the covalent bonds are formed between two phases, which can improve the dispersion of silica in the rubber matrix and enhance the interfacial combination between rubber and silica. The ring-opening reaction occurs not only in vulcanization process but also in mixing process, meanwhile, the latter seems to be more important due to the simultaneous effects of mechanical force and temperature.

  8. Modeling of Interfacial Modification Effects on Thermal Conductivity of Carbon Nanotube Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, Thomas C.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of functionalization of carbon nanotubes on the thermal conductivity of nanocomposites has been studied using a multi-scale modeling approach. These results predict that grafting linear hydrocarbon chains to the surface of a single wall carbon nanotube with covalent chemical bonds should result in a significant increase in the thermal conductivity of these nanocomposites. This is due to the decrease in the interfacial thermal (Kapitza) resistance between the single wall carbon nanotube and the surrounding polymer matrix upon chemical functionalization. The nanocomposites studied here consist of single wall carbon nanotubes in a bulk poly(ethylene vinyl acetate) matrix. The nanotubes are functionalized by end-grafting linear hydrocarbon chains of varying length to the surface of the nanotube. The effect which this functionalization has on the interfacial thermal resistance is studied by molecular dynamics simulation. Interfacial thermal resistance values are calculated for a range of chemical grafting densities and with several chain lengths. These results are subsequently used in an analytical model to predict the resulting effect on the bulk thermal conductivity of the nanocomposite.

  9. Optimization of interfacial properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composites via a modified polyacrylate emulsion sizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiaomin; Zhu, Bo; Cai, Xun; Liu, Jianjun; Qiao, Kun; Yu, Junwei

    2017-04-01

    The adhesion behavior of epoxy resin to carbon fibers has always been a challenge, on account of the inertness of carbon fibers and the lack of reactive functional groups. In this work, a modified polyacrylate sizing agent was prepared to modify the interface between the carbon fiber and the epoxy matrix. The surface characteristics of carbon fibers were investigated to determine chemical composition, morphology, wettability, interfacial phase analysis and interfacial adhesion. Sized carbon fibers featured improved wettability and a slightly decreased surface roughness due to the coverage of a smooth sizing layer, compared with the unsized ones. Moreover, the content of surface activated carbon atoms increased from 12.65% to 24.70% and the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of carbon fiber/epoxy composites raised by 14.2%, indicating a significant improvement of chemical activity and mechanical property. SEM images of the fractured surface of composites further proved that a gradient interfacial structure with increased thicknesses was formed due to the transition role of the sizing. Based on these results, a sizing mechanism consisting of chemical interaction bonding and physical force absorption was proposed, which provides an efficient and feasible method to solve the poor adhesion between carbon fiber and epoxy matrix.

  10. Experimentally probing the libration of interfacial water: the rotational potential of water is stiffer at the air/water interface than in bulk liquid.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yujin; Kampfrath, Tobias; Campen, R Kramer

    2016-07-21

    Most properties of liquid water are determined by its hydrogen-bond network. Because forming an aqueous interface requires termination of this network, one might expect the molecular level properties of interfacial water to markedly differ from water in bulk. Intriguingly, much prior experimental and theoretical work has found that, from the perspective of their time-averaged structure and picosecond structural dynamics, hydrogen-bonded OH groups at an air/water interface behave the same as hydrogen-bonded OH groups in bulk liquid water. Here we report the first experimental observation of interfacial water's libration (i.e. frustrated rotation) using the laser-based technique vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy. We find this mode has a frequency of 834 cm(-1), ≈165 cm(-1) higher than in bulk liquid water at the same temperature and similar to bulk ice. Because libration frequency is proportional to the stiffness of water's rotational potential, this increase suggests that one effect of terminating bulk water's hydrogen bonding network at the air/water interface is retarding rotation of water around intact hydrogen bonds. Because in bulk liquid water the libration plays a key role in stabilizing reaction intermediates and dissipating excess vibrational energy, we expect the ability to probe this mode in interfacial water to open new perspectives on the kinetics of heterogeneous reactions at aqueous interfaces.

  11. Domination of volumetric toughening by silver nanoparticles over interfacial strengthening of carbon nanotubes in bactericidal hydroxyapatite biocomposite.

    PubMed

    Herkendell, Katharina; Shukla, Vishnu Raj; Patel, Anup Kumar; Balani, Kantesh

    2014-01-01

    In order to address the problem of bacterial infections in bone-substitution surgery, it is essential that bone replacement biomaterials are equipped with bactericidal components. This research aims to optimize the content of silver (Ag), a well-known antibacterial metal, in a multiwalled carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced hydroxyapatite (HA) composite, to yield a bioceramic which can be used as an antibacterial and tough surface of bone replacement prosthesis. The bactericidal properties evaluated using Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus epidermidis indicate that CNT reinforcement supports growth of Gram negative E. coli bacteria (~8.5% more adhesion than pure HA); but showed a strong decrease of Gram positive S. epidermidis bacteria (~diminished to 66%) compared to that of pure HA. Small amounts of silver (2-5wt.%) already show a severe bactericidal effect when compared to that of HA-CNT (by 30% and ~60% respectively). MTT assay confirmed enhanced biocompatibility of L929 cells on HA-4wt.% CNT (~121%), HA-4wt.% CNT-1wt.% Ag (~124%) sample and HA-4wt.% CNT-2wt.% Ag (~100%) when compared to that of pure HA. The samples with higher silver content showed decreased biocompatibility (77% for HA-4wt.% CNT-5wt.% Ag sample and 73% for HA-4wt.% CNT-10wt.% Ag). Though reinforcement of 4wt.% CNT has shown an increase of fracture toughness by ~62%, silver reinforcement has shown enhancement of up to 244% (i.e. 3.43 times). Accordingly, isolation of toughening contribution indicates that volumetric toughening by silver dominates over interfacial strengthening contributed by CNTs towards enhanced fracture toughness of potential HA-Ag-CNT biocomposites.

  12. Proanthocyanidins Alter Adhesive/Dentin Bonding Strengths when Included in a Bonding System

    PubMed Central

    Hechler, Benjamin; Yao, Xiaomei; Wang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the effect of proanthocyanidins (PA) incorporation into a bonding system on dentin/adhesive bond stability following long-term storage in buffer and collagenase. Methods Human dentin surfaces were bonded with no PA (0-PA), PA incorporated in the primer (PA-primer), or PA incorporated in the adhesive (PA-adhesive), and composite build-ups were created. Following sectioning into beams, bonded specimens were stored in buffer or collagenase for 0, 1, 4, 26, or 52 weeks before being tested for microtensile bond strength (μTBS). ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD post-hoc were performed. Fractured surfaces were viewed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results Both bonding system and storage time but not storage medium significantly affected μTBS. Initially, 0-PA and PA-primer were superior to PA-adhesive, and after 1 week both PA groups were inferior to 0-PA. However, after 4 weeks PA-adhesive had significantly increased and 0-PA significantly decreased such that all three groups were equal. Thereafter, both PA-primer/adhesive groups trended with an increase (the 0-PA group remaing consistent) such that at 52 weeks PA-primer samples were significantly stronger (p < 0.001) or nearly so (p = 0.08) when compared to 0-PA samples. SEM revealed that initial fractures tended to occur at the middle/bottom of the hybrid layer for 0-PA and PA-primer groups but at the top of the hybrid layer/in the adhesive for PA-adhesive. After 4 weeks, however, all groups fractured similarly at the middle/bottom of the hybrid layer. Clinical Significance PA incorporation into a bonding system significantly alters interfacial bonding strengths, and its incorporation may stabilize the interface and protect degradation over time under clinical conditions. PMID:23243975

  13. Thermally assisted peeling of an elastic strip in adhesion with a substrate via molecular bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Jin; Lin, Ji; Xu, Guang-Kui; Lin, Yuan; Gao, Huajian

    A statistical model is proposed to describe the peeling of an elastic strip in adhesion with a flat substrate via an array of non-covalent molecular bonds. Under an imposed tensile peeling force, the interfacial bonds undergo diffusion-type transition in their bonding state, a process governed by a set of probabilistic equations coupled to the stretching, bending and shearing of the elastic strip. Because of the low characteristic energy scale associated with molecular bonding, thermal excitations are found to play an important role in assisting the escape of individual molecular bonds from their bonding energy well, leading to propagation of the peeling front well below the threshold peel-off force predicted by the classical theories. Our study establishes a link between the deformation of the strip and the spatiotemporal evolution of interfacial bonds, and delineates how factors like the peeling force, bending rigidity of the strip and binding energy of bonds influence the resultant peeling velocity and dimensions of the process zone. In terms of the apparent adhesion strength and dissipated energy, the bond-mediated interface is found to resist peeling in a strongly rate-dependent manner.

  14. Measurement of interfacial shear strength in SiC-fiber/Si3N4 composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughner, James W.; Bhatt, Rham T.

    1989-01-01

    An indentation method for measuring shear strength in brittle matrix composites was applied to SiC-fiber/Si3N4-matrix samples. Three methods were used to manufacture the composites: reaction bonding of a Si/SiC preform, hot-pressing, and nitrogen-overpressure sintering. An indentation technique developed by Marshall for thin specimens was used to measure the shear strength of the interface and the interfacial friction stresses. This was done by inverting the sample after the initial push through and retesting the pushed fibers. SEM observations showed that the shear strength was determined by the degree of reaction between the fiber and the matrix unless the fiber was pushed out of its (well-bonded) sheath.

  15. Interfacial development of electrophoretically deposited graphene oxide films on Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Sumin; Dickerson, James H.; Pham, Viet Hung; Brochu, Mathieu

    2015-07-28

    Adhesion between film and substrate is critical for electronic device and coating applications. Interfacial development between electrophoretically deposited graphene oxide films on Al 1100 and Al 5052 alloys were investigated using FT-IR and XPS depth profiling techniques. Obtained results suggest metal ion permeation from the substrates into deposited graphene oxide films. The interface between the films and the substrates were primarily composed of Al-O-C bonds from oxygenated defects on graphene oxide plane rather than expected Al-C formation. Films heat treated at 150 °C had change in microstructure and peak shifts in XPS spectra suggesting change in chemical structure of bonds between the films and the substrates.

  16. The interfacial behavior of water/PMMA thin film under normal compression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao-Chun; Hsieh, Jin-Yuan; Chen, Chuan; Chang, Jee-Gong; Lin, Jenn-Sen; Ju, Shin-Pon; Wang, Hung-Hsiang; Lee, Wen-Jay

    2010-11-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation (MD) has been used to investigate the structure property of water/PMMA interface under compression and compression release. A virtual repulsive wall was employed to generate a normal compression strain on the simulation model, leading a compressive system. In order to understand the difference of interfacial phenomenon between the system under strain and under release, the hydrogen bond and density distributions of water and PMMA along the normal direction are calculated. The results show that the hydrogen bond distribution profile of compressive system is different from that of the release system at the same strain. It demonstrates that the characteristic structure of water/PMMA interface under a compression-release cycle is not reversible.

  17. Unraveling the Molecular Weight Dependence of Interfacial Interactions in Poly(2-vinylpyridine)/Silica Nanocomposites

    DOE PAGES

    Voylov, Dmitry N; Holt, Adam P; Doughty, Benjamin L; ...

    2017-01-10

    In this paper, the structure and polymer–nanoparticle interactions among physically adsorbed poly(2-vinylpyridine) chains on the surface of silica nanoparticles (NPs) were systematically studied as a function of molecular weight (MW) by sum frequency generation (SFG) and X-ray photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopies. Analysis of XPS data identified hydrogen bonds between the polymer and NPs, while SFG evaluated the change in the number of free OH sites on the NP’s surface. Our data revealed that the hydrogen bonds and amount of the free ¯OH sites have a significant dependence on the polymer’s MW. Finally, these results provide clear experimental evidence that the interactionmore » of physically adsorbed chains with nanoparticles is strongly MW dependent and aids in unraveling the microscopic mechanism responsible for the strong MW dependence of dynamics of the interfacial layer in polymer nanocomposites.« less

  18. Hydroxide-catalyzed bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwo, Dz-Hung (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method of bonding substrates by hydroxide-catalyzed hydration/dehydration involves applying a bonding material to at least one surface to be bonded, and placing the at least one surface sufficiently close to another surface such that a bonding interface is formed between them. A bonding material of the invention comprises a source of hydroxide ions, and may optionally include a silicate component, a particulate filling material, and a property-modifying component. Bonding methods of the invention reliably and reproducibly provide bonds which are strong and precise, and which may be tailored according to a wide range of possible applications. Possible applications for bonding materials of the invention include: forming composite materials, coating substrates, forming laminate structures, assembly of precision optical components, and preparing objects of defined geometry and composition. Bonding materials and methods of preparing the same are also disclosed.

  19. Mechanical and biological properties of the micro-/nano-grain functionally graded hydroxyapatite bioceramics for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Changchun; Deng, Congying; Chen, Xuening; Zhao, Xiufen; Chen, Ying; Fan, Yujiang; Zhang, Xingdong

    2015-08-01

    Functionally graded materials (FGM) open the promising approach for bone tissue repair. In this study, a novel functionally graded hydroxyapatite (HA) bioceramic with micrograin and nanograin structure was fabricated. Its mechanical properties were tailored by composition of micrograin and nanograin. The dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) indicated that the graded HA ceramics had similar mechanical property compared to natural bones. Their cytocompatibility was evaluated via fluorescent microscopy and MTT colorimetric assay. The viability and proliferation of rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) on ceramics indicated that this functionally graded HA ceramic had better cytocompatibility than conventional HA ceramic. This study demonstrated that functionally graded HA ceramics create suitable structures to satisfy both the mechanical and biological requirements of bone tissues.

  20. Effect of molecular flexibility of Lennard-Jones chains on vapor-liquid interfacial properties.

    PubMed

    Blas, F J; Moreno-Ventas Bravo, A I; Algaba, J; Martínez-Ruiz, F J; MacDowell, L G

    2014-03-21

    We have determined the interfacial properties of short fully flexible chains formed from tangentially bonded Lennard-Jones monomeric units from direct simulation of the vapor-liquid interface. The results obtained are compared with those corresponding to rigid-linear chains formed from the same chain length, previously determined in the literature [F. J. Blas, A. I. M.-V. Bravo, J. M. Míguez, M. M. Piñeiro, and L. G. MacDowell, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 084706 (2012)]. The full long-range tails of the potential are accounted for by means of an improved version of the inhomogeneous long-range corrections of Janeček [J. Phys. Chem. B 129, 6264 (2006)] proposed recently by MacDowell and Blas [J. Chem. Phys. 131, 074705 (2008)] valid for spherical as well as for rigid and flexible molecular systems. Three different model systems comprising of 3, 5, and 6 monomers per molecule are considered. The simulations are performed in the canonical ensemble, and the vapor-liquid interfacial tension is evaluated using the test-area method. In addition to the surface tension, we also obtained density profiles, coexistence densities, critical temperature and density, and interfacial thickness as functions of temperature, paying particular attention to the effect of the chain length and rigidity on these properties. According to our results, the main effect of increasing the chain length (at fixed temperature) is to sharpen the vapor-liquid interface and to increase the width of the biphasic coexistence region. As a result, the interfacial thickness decreases and the surface tension increases as the molecular chains get longer. Comparison between predictions for fully flexible and rigid-linear chains, formed by the same number of monomeric units, indicates that the main effects of increasing the flexibility, i.e., passing from a rigid-linear to a fully flexible chain, are: (a) to decrease the difference between the liquid and vapor densities; (b) to decrease the critical temperature and

  1. High interfacial activity of polymers "grafted through" functionalized iron oxide nanoparticle clusters.

    PubMed

    Foster, Lynn M; Worthen, Andrew J; Foster, Edward L; Dong, Jiannan; Roach, Clarissa M; Metaxas, Athena E; Hardy, Clifford D; Larsen, Eric S; Bollinger, Jonathan A; Truskett, Thomas M; Bielawski, Christopher W; Johnston, Keith P

    2014-09-02

    The mechanism by which polymers, when grafted to inorganic nanoparticles, lower the interfacial tension at the oil-water interface is not well understood, despite the great interest in particle stabilized emulsions and foams. A simple and highly versatile free radical "grafting through" technique was used to bond high organic fractions (by weight) of poly(oligo(ethylene oxide) monomethyl ether methacrylate) onto iron oxide clusters, without the need for catalysts. In the resulting ∼1 μm hybrid particles, the inorganic cores and grafting architecture contribute to the high local concentration of grafted polymer chains to the dodecane/water interface to produce low interfacial tensions of only 0.003 w/v % (polymer and particle core). This "critical particle concentration" (CPC) for these hybrid inorganic/polymer amphiphilic particles to lower the interfacial tension by 36 mN/m was over 30-fold lower than the critical micelle concentration of the free polymer (without inorganic cores) to produce nearly the same interfacial tension. The low CPC is favored by the high adsorption energy (∼10(6) kBT) for the large ∼1 μm hybrid particles, the high local polymer concentration on the particles surfaces, and the ability of the deformable hybrid nanocluster cores as well as the polymer chains to conform to the interface. The nanocluster cores also increased the entanglement of the polymer chains in bulk DI water or synthetic seawater, producing a viscosity up to 35,000 cP at 0.01 s(-1), in contrast with only 600 cP for the free polymer. As a consequence of these interfacial and rheological properties, the hybrid particles stabilized oil-in-water emulsions at concentrations as low as 0.01 w/v %, with average drop sizes down to 30 μm. In contrast, the bulk viscosity was low for the free polymer, and it did not stabilize the emulsions. The ability to influence the interfacial activity and rheology of polymers upon grafting them to inorganic particles, including clusters

  2. Interfacial inhibitors of protein-nucleic acid interactions.

    PubMed

    Pommier, Yves; Marchand, Christophe

    2005-07-01

    This essay develops the paradigm of "Interfacial Inhibitors" (Pommier and Cherfils, TiPS, 2005, 28: 136) for inhibitory drugs beside orthosteric (competitive or non-competitive) and allosteric inhibitors. Interfacial inhibitors bind with high selectivity to a binding site involving two or more macromolecules within macromolecular complexes undergoing conformational changes. Interfacial binding traps (generally reversibly) a transition state of the complex, resulting in kinetic inactivation. The exemplary case of interfacial inhibitor of protein-DNA interface is camptothecin and its clinical derivatives. We will also provide examples generalizing the interfacial inhibitor concept to inhibitors of topoisomerase II (anthracyclines, ellipticines, epipodophyllotoxins), gyrase (quinolones, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin), RNA polymerases (alpha-amanitin and actinomycin D), and ribosomes (antibiotics such as streptomycin, hygromycin B, tetracycline, kirromycin, fusidic acid, thiostrepton, and possibly cycloheximide). We discuss the implications of the interfacial inhibitor concept for drug discovery.

  3. Pervasive nanoscale deformation twinning as a catalyst for efficient energy dissipation in a bioceramic armour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ling; Ortiz, Christine

    2014-05-01

    Hierarchical composite materials design in biological exoskeletons achieves penetration resistance through a variety of energy-dissipating mechanisms while simultaneously balancing the need for damage localization to avoid compromising the mechanical integrity of the entire structure and to maintain multi-hit capability. Here, we show that the shell of the bivalve Placuna placenta (~99 wt% calcite), which possesses the unique optical property of ~80% total transmission of visible light, simultaneously achieves penetration resistance and deformation localization via increasing energy dissipation density (0.290 ± 0.072 nJ μm-3) by approximately an order of magnitude relative to single-crystal geological calcite (0.034 ± 0.013 nJ μm-3). P. placenta, which is composed of a layered assembly of elongated diamond-shaped calcite crystals, undergoes pervasive nanoscale deformation twinning (width ~50 nm) surrounding the penetration zone, which catalyses a series of additional inelastic energy dissipating mechanisms such as interfacial and intracrystalline nanocracking, viscoplastic stretching of interfacial organic material, and nanograin formation and reorientation.

  4. Pervasive nanoscale deformation twinning as a catalyst for efficient energy dissipation in a bioceramic armour.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Ortiz, Christine

    2014-05-01

    Hierarchical composite materials design in biological exoskeletons achieves penetration resistance through a variety of energy-dissipating mechanisms while simultaneously balancing the need for damage localization to avoid compromising the mechanical integrity of the entire structure and to maintain multi-hit capability. Here, we show that the shell of the bivalve Placuna placenta (~99 wt% calcite), which possesses the unique optical property of ~80% total transmission of visible light, simultaneously achieves penetration resistance and deformation localization via increasing energy dissipation density (0.290 ± 0.072 nJ μm(-3)) by approximately an order of magnitude relative to single-crystal geological calcite (0.034 ± 0.013 nJ μm(-3)). P. placenta, which is composed of a layered assembly of elongated diamond-shaped calcite crystals, undergoes pervasive nanoscale deformation twinning (width ~50 nm) surrounding the penetration zone, which catalyses a series of additional inelastic energy dissipating mechanisms such as interfacial and intracrystalline nanocracking, viscoplastic stretching of interfacial organic material, and nanograin formation and reorientation.

  5. New Bio-Ceramization Processes Applied to Vegetable Hierarchical Structures for Bone Regeneration: An Experimental Model in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Filardo, Giuseppe; Tampieri, Anna; Cabezas-Rodríguez, Rafael; Di Martino, Alessandro; Fini, Milena; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Lelli, Marco; Martínez-Fernández, Julian; Martini, Lucia; Ramírez-Rico, Joaquin; Salamanna, Francesca; Sandri, Monica; Sprio, Simone; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2014-01-01

    Bone loss is still a major problem in orthopedics. The purpose of this experimental study is to evaluate the safety and regenerative potential of a new scaffold based on a bio-ceramization process for bone regeneration in long diaphyseal defects in a sheep model. The scaffold was obtained by transformation of wood pieces into porous biomorphic silicon carbide (BioSiC®). The process enabled the maintenance of the original wood microstructure, thus exhibiting hierarchically organized porosity and high mechanical strength. To improve cell adhesion and osseointegration, the external surface of the hollow cylinder was made more bioactive by electrodeposition of a uniform layer of collagen fibers that were mineralized with biomimetic hydroxyapatite, whereas the internal part was filled with a bio-hybrid HA/collagen composite. The final scaffold was then implanted in the metatarsus of 15 crossbred (Merinos-Sarda) adult sheep, divided into 3 groups: scaffold alone, scaffold with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) augmentation, and scaffold with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) added during implantation. Radiological analysis was performed at 4, 8, 12 weeks, and 4 months, when animals were sacrificed for the final radiological, histological, and histomorphometric evaluation. In all tested treatments, these analyses highlighted the presence of newly formed bone at the bone scaffolds' interface. Although a lack of substantial effect of PRP was demonstrated, the scaffold+BMSC augmentation showed the highest value of bone-to-implant contact and new bone growth inside the scaffold. The findings of this study suggest the potential of bio-ceramization processes applied to vegetable hierarchical structures for the production of wood-derived bone scaffolds, and document a suitable augmentation procedure in enhancing bone regeneration, particularly when combined with BMSCs. PMID:24099033

  6. Silicate bioceramics enhanced vascularization and osteogenesis through stimulating interactions between endothelia cells and bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyan; Xue, Ke; Kong, Ni; Liu, Kai; Chang, Jiang

    2014-04-01

    The facts that biomaterials affect the behavior of single type of cells have been widely accepted. However, the effects of biomaterials on cell-cell interactions have rarely been reported. Bone tissue engineering involves osteoblastic cells (OCs), endothelial cells (ECs) and the interactions between OCs and ECs. It has been reported that silicate biomaterials can stimulate osteogenic differentiation of OCs and vascularization of ECs. However, the effects of silicate biomaterials on the interactions between ECs and OCs during vascularization and osteogenesis have not been reported, which are critical for bone tissue regeneration in vivo. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effects of calcium silicate (CS) bioceramics on interactions between human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs) and on stimulation of vascularization and osteogenesis in vivo through combining co-cultures with CS containing scaffolds. Specifically, the effects of CS on the angiogenic growth factor VEGF, osteogenic growth factor BMP-2 and the cross-talks between VEGF and BMP-2 in the co-culture system were elucidated. Results showed that CS stimulated co-cultured HBMSCs (co-HBMSCs) to express VEGF and the VEGF activated its receptor KDR on co-cultured HUVECs (co-HUVECs), which was also up-regulated by CS. Then, BMP-2 and nitric oxide expression from the co-HUVECs were stimulated by CS and the former stimulated osteogenic differentiation of co-HBMSCs while the latter stimulated vascularization of co-HVUECs. Finally, the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/CS composite scaffolds with the co-cultured HBMSCs and HUVECs significantly enhanced vascularization and osteogenic differentiation in vitro and in vivo, which indicates that it is a promising way to enhance bone regeneration by combining scaffolds containing silicate bioceramics and co-cultures of ECs and OCs.

  7. Influence of surface porosity and pH on bacterial adherence to hydroxyapatite and biphasic calcium phosphate bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Kinnari, Teemu J; Esteban, Jaime; Martin-de-Hijas, Nieves Z; Sánchez-Muñoz, Orlando; Sánchez-Salcedo, Sandra; Colilla, Montserrat; Vallet-Regí, María; Gomez-Barrena, Enrique

    2009-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) and biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) ceramic materials are widely employed as bone substitutes due to their porous and osteoconductive structure. Their porosity and the lowering of surrounding pH as a result of surgical trauma may, however, predispose these materials to bacterial infections. For this reason, the influence of porosity and pH on the adherence of common Gram-positive bacteria to the surfaces of these materials requires investigation. Mercury intrusion porosimetry measurements revealed that the pore size distribution of both bioceramics had, on a logarithmic scale, a sinusoidal frequency distribution ranging from 50 to 300 nm, with a mean pore diameter of 200 nm. Moreover, total porosity was 20 % for HA and 50 % for BCP. Adherence of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis was studied at a physiological pH of 7.4 and at a pH simulating bone infection of 6.8. Moreover, the effect of pH on the zeta potential of HA, BCP and of both staphylococci was evaluated. Results showed that when pH decreased from 7.4 to 6.8, the adherence of both staphylococci to HA and BCP surfaces decreased significantly, although at the same time the negative zeta-potential values of the ceramic surfaces and both bacteria diminished. At both pH values, the number of S. aureus adhered to the HA surface appeared to be lower than that for BCP. A decrease in pH to 6.8 reduced the adherence of both bacterial species (mean 57 %). This study provides evidence that HA and BCP ceramics do not have pores sufficiently large to allow the internalization of staphylococci. Their anti-adherent properties seemed to improve when pH value decreased, suggesting that HA and BCP bioceramics are not compromised upon orthopaedic use.

  8. The effect of pore size on tissue ingrowth and neovascularization in porous bioceramics of controlled architecture in vivo.

    PubMed

    Feng, Bai; Jinkang, Zhang; Zhen, Wang; Jianxi, Lu; Jiang, Chang; Jian, Liu; Guolin, Meng; Xin, Dong

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of pore size on tissue ingrowth and neovascularization in porous bioceramics under the accurate control of the pore parameters. For that purpose, β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) cylinders with four different macropore sizes (300-400, 400-500, 500-600 and 600-700 µm) but the same interconnection size (120 µm) and unchangeable porosity were implanted into fascia lumbodorsalis in rabbits. The fibrous tissues and blood vessels formed in scaffolds were observed histologically and histomorphometrically. The vascularization of the porous bioceramics was analyzed by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). It is found that pore size as an important parameter of a porous structure plays an important role in tissue infiltration into porous biomaterial scaffolds. The amount of fibrous tissue ingrowth increases with the decrease of the pore size. In four kinds of scaffolds with different macropore sizes (300-400, 400-500, 500-600 and 600-700 µm) and a constant interconnection size of 120 µm, the areas of fibrous tissue (%) were 60.5%, 52.2%, 41.3% and 37.3%, respectively, representing a significant decrease at 4 weeks (P < 0.01). The pore size of a scaffold is closely related to neovascularization of macroporous biomaterials implanted in vivo. A large pore size is beneficial for the growth of blood vessels, and the diameter of a pore smaller than 400 µm limits the growth of blood vessels and results in a smaller blood vessel diameter.

  9. Hybrid plasma bonding for void-free strong bonded interface of silicon/glass at 200 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Howlader, M M R; Kibria, M G; Zhang, F; Kim, M J

    2010-07-15

    A novel hybrid plasma bonding (HPB) that combines sequential plasma activation (reactive ion etching followed by microwave radicals) with anodic bonding has been developed to achieve void-free and strong silicon/glass bonding at low temperature. The interfacial voids were observed at the silicon/glass interface both in the anodic bonding and in the plasma activated anodic bonding, but the voids were completely disappeared in the HPB method at 200 degrees C. The bonding strength of the silicon/glass in the HPB was as high as 30 MPa at 200 degrees C, which was higher than that in the individual treatment of anodic and plasma activated bonding methods. The improved characteristic behavior of the interface in the HPB is attributed to the higher hydrophilicity and smooth surfaces of silicon and glass after sequential plasma activation. These highly reactive and clean surfaces enhance the mobility of alkaline cations from the glass surface across the interface toward the bulk of glass in the HPB. This transportation resulted in a approximately 353 nm thick alkaline depletion layer in the glass and enlarged the amorphous SiO(2) across the interface. The void-free strong bonding is attributed to the clean hydrophilic surfaces and the amorphous SiO(2) layer across the interface.

  10. Molecular Dynamics Simulation and Analysis of Interfacial Water at Selected Sulfide Mineral Surfaces under Anaerobic Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Jiaqi; Miller, Jan D.; Dang, Liem X.

    2014-04-10

    In this paper, we report on a molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) study of the behavior of interfacial water at selected sulfide mineral surfaces under anaerobic conditions. The study revealed the interfacial water structure and wetting characteristics of the pyrite (100) surface, galena (100) surface, chalcopyrite (012) surface, sphalerite (110) surface, and molybdenite surfaces (i.e., the face, armchair-edge, and zigzag-edge surfaces), including simulated contact angles, relative number density profiles, water dipole orientations, hydrogen-bonding, and residence times. For force fields of the metal and sulfur atoms in selected sulfide minerals used in the MDS, we used the universal force field (UFF) and another set of force fields optimized by quantum chemical calculations for interactions with interfacial water molecules at selected sulfide mineral surfaces. Simulation results for the structural and dynamic properties of interfacial water molecules indicate the natural hydrophobic character for the selected sulfide mineral surfaces under anaerobic conditions as well as the relatively weak hydrophobicity for the sphalerite (110) surface and two molybdenite edge surfaces. Part of the financial support for this study was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under Basic Science Grant No. DE-FG-03-93ER14315. The Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), of the DOE, funded work performed by Liem X. Dang. Battelle operates Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by BES. The authors are grateful to Professor Tsun-Mei Chang for valuable discussions.

  11. Hierarchical bioceramic scaffolds with 3D-plotted macropores and mussel-inspired surface nanolayers for stimulating osteogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mengchi; Zhai, Dong; Xia, Lunguo; Li, Hong; Chen, Shiyi; Fang, Bing; Chang, Jiang; Wu, Chengtie

    2016-07-01

    The hierarchical structure of biomaterials plays an important role in the process of tissue reconstruction and regeneration. 3D-plotted scaffolds have been widely used for bone tissue engineering due to their controlled macropore structure and mechanical properties. However, the lack of micro- or nano-structures on the strut surface of 3D-plotted scaffolds, especially for bioceramic scaffolds, limits their biological activity. Inspired by the adhesive versatility of mussels and the active ion-chelating capacity of polydopamine, we set out to prepare a hierarchical bioceramic scaffold with controlled macropores and mussel-inspired surface nanolayers by combining the 3D-plotting technique with the polydopamine/apatite hybrid strategy in order to synergistically accelerate the osteogenesis and angiogenesis. β-Tricalcium phosphate (TCP) scaffolds were firstly 3D-plotted and then treated in dopamine-Tris/HCl and dopamine-SBF solutions to obtain TCP-DOPA-Tris and TCP-DOPA-SBF scaffolds, respectively. It was found that polydopamine/apatite hybrid nanolayers were formed on the surface of both TCP-DOPA-Tris and TCP-DOPA-SBF scaffolds and TCP-DOPA-SBF scaffolds induced apatite mineralization for the second time during the cell culture. As compared to TCP scaffolds, both TCP-DOPA-Tris and TCP-DOPA-SBF scaffolds significantly promoted the osteogenesis of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) as well as the angiogenesis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and the TCP-DOPA-SBF group presented the highest in vitro osteogenic/angiogenic activity among the three groups. Furthermore, both TCP-DOPA-Tris and TCP-DOPA-SBF scaffolds significantly improved the formation of new bone in vivo as compared to TCP scaffolds without a nanostructured surface. Our results suggest that the utilization of a mussel-inspired Ca, P-chelated polydopamine nanolayer on 3D-plotted bioceramic scaffolds is a viable and effective strategy to construct a hierarchical structure for synergistically

  12. Interfacial Reactions Between ZnAl(Ge) Solders on Cu and Ni Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rautiainen, Antti; Vuorinen, Vesa; Paulasto-Kröckel, Mervi

    2017-04-01

    Reactions between zinc-aluminum-germanium solder and copper/nickel substrates were investigated after 30 min of soldering at 420°C that simulates a wafer-level bonding process, and the results were compared to a eutectic zinc-aluminum solder. The ZnAlGe system (81.4 at.% Zn, 13.1 at.% Al, 5.5 at.% Ge) was selected in order to decrease the eutectic temperature of the ZnAleut (88.7 at.% Zn, 11.3 at.% Al) for high-temperature lead-free solder applications. In addition, a standard high temperature storage test at 150°C was performed up to 3000 h in order to investigate the evolution of the interconnection microstructures. Extensive copper dissolution was discovered during the soldering process. Germanium did not participate in any of the interfacial reactions on a copper substrate. On a nickel substrate, rapid formation of intermetallic compounds was discovered with both solders, and all the aluminum from the 500 μm thick solder was consumed by the formation of the Al3Ni2 phase during bonding. Germanium was observed to dissolve in the Al3Ni2 phase, but the addition of germanium to the solder was not found to affect markedly the interfacial microstructure. Based on the results, isothermal sections at 150°C of Al-Cu-Zn and Al-Ni-Zn systems are presented with superimposed diffusion paths.

  13. Surface grafting of Kevlar fibers for improved interfacial properties of fiber-reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ravichandran, Vasudha.

    1991-01-01

    Matrix-specific chemical modification of the Kevlar fiber surfaces was carried out with the aim of enhancing adhesion, through covalent bonding, to selected thermoset matrix resins such as vinyl ester, unsaturated polyester and epoxy. A two-step grafting method, involving initial metalation followed by subsequent substitution, was used to graft vinyl and epoxy terminated groups onto Kevlar fiber surfaces. The physical changes in fiber surface were characterized by scanning-electron microscopy and surface area measurement and the chemical changes due to grafting were measured by contact angle measurement and neutron activation analysis; high concentrations of double bonds and epoxy groups were measured. The change in interfacial sear strength due to the surface grafting was measured by means of a single fiber pull out test. The results show a nearly twofold increase in the interfacial shear strength due to vinyl terminated grafts in the case of Kevlar/vinyl ester and Kevlar/polyester composites. Kevlar fibers containing the epoxy functionality on the surface had enhanced adhesion to epoxy matrix resin.

  14. Determination of interfacial fracture toughness of bone–cement interface using sandwich Brazilian disks

    PubMed Central

    Tong, J.; Wong, K.Y.; Lupton, C.

    2007-01-01

    The long-term stability of cemented total hip replacements critically depends on the lasting integrity of the bond between bone and bone cement. Conventionally, the bonding strength of bone–cement is obtained by mechanical tests that tend to produce a large variability between specimens and test methods. In this work, interfacial fracture toughness of synthetic bone–cement interface has been studied using sandwiched Brazilian disk specimens. Experiments were carried out using polyurethane foams as substrates and a common bone cement as an interlayer. Selected loading angles from 0° to 25° were used to achieve full loading conditions from mode I to mode II. Finite element analyses were carried out to obtain the solutions for strain energy release rates at given phase angles associated with the experimental models. The effects of crack length on the measured interfacial fracture toughness were examined. Microscopic studies were also carried out to obtain the morphology of the fractured interfaces at selected loading angles. The implication of the results on the assessment of fixation in acetabular replacements is discussed in the light of preliminary work on bovine cancellous bone–cement interface. PMID:19330043

  15. An analysis of the sensitivity of pendant drops and liquid bridges to measure the interfacial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrera, C.; Montanero, J. M.; Cabezas, M. G.

    2007-12-01

    Drop shape techniques, such as axisymmetric drop shape analysis, provide accurate measurements of the interfacial tension from images of pendant drops for a wide variety of experimental conditions. However, these techniques are known to fail when dealing with nearly spherical drop shapes, which may occur, for instance, when working with interfaces between liquids of similar densities and/or under microgravity. We analyzed the advantages of using liquid bridges close to the minimum volume stability limit instead of pendant drops to measure the interfacial tension under different experimental conditions. First, the sensitivity of both configurations to a variation of the interfacial tension is studied numerically as a function of the volume for several Bond numbers B. The results indicate that a liquid bridge close to the minimum volume stability limit is generally more sensitive than a pendant drop of the same volume, especially for small values of the density difference across the interface and/or gravity. This suggests that the use of liquid bridges may extend the range of applicability of drop shape techniques. To explore this possibility, synthetic images of both pendant drops and liquid bridges were generated and then processed by TIFA-AI. The results demonstrated that the use of liquid bridges enhances the range of Bond numbers for which drop shape techniques work satisfactorily. More specifically, similar accuracy is obtained from both configurations for B ~ 10-1, while the use of liquid bridges yields much better results for B ~ 10-2. Finally, experiments were conducted to partially validate the analysis based on synthetic images. Good agreement was found between the values determined from the real and synthetic images.

  16. Functionalization enhancement on interfacial shear strength between graphene and polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yikuang; Duan, Fangli; Mu, Xiaojing

    2016-11-01

    Pull-out processes were simulated to investigate the interfacial mechanical properties between the functionalized graphene sheet (FGS) and polyethylene (PE) matrix by using molecular dynamics simulation with ReaxFF reactive force field. The interfacial structure of polymer and the interfacial interaction in the equilibrium FGS/PE systems were also analyzed to reveal the enhancement mechanism of interfacial shear strength. We observed the insertion of functional groups into polymer layer in the equilibrium FGS/PE systems. During the pull-out process, some interfacial chains were attached on the FGS and pulled out from the polymer matrix. The behavior of these pulled out chains was further analyzed to clarify the different traction action of functional groups applied on them. The results show that the traction effect of functional groups on the pulled-out chains is agreement with their enhancement influence on the interfacial shear strength of the FGS/PE systems. They both are basically dominated by the size of functional groups, suggesting the enhancement mechanism of mechanical interlocking. However, interfacial binding strength also exhibits an obvious influence on the interfacial shear properties of the hybrid system. Our simulation show that geometric constrains at the interface is the principal contributor to the enhancement of interfacial shear strength in the FGS/PE systems, which could be further strengthened by the wrinkled morphology of graphene in experiments.

  17. Direct handling of sharp interfacial energy for microstructural evolution

    DOE PAGES

    Hernández–Rivera, Efraín; Tikare, Veena; Noirot, Laurence; ...

    2014-08-24

    In this study, we introduce a simplification to the previously demonstrated hybrid Potts–phase field (hPPF), which relates interfacial energies to microstructural sharp interfaces. The model defines interfacial energy by a Potts-like discrete interface approach of counting unlike neighbors, which we use to compute local curvature. The model is compared to the hPPF by studying interfacial characteristics and grain growth behavior. The models give virtually identical results, while the new model allows the simulator more direct control of interfacial energy.

  18. Interfacial properties of semifluorinated alkane diblock copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Flint; Tsige, Mesfin; Borodin, Oleg; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2008-06-01

    The liquid-vapor interfacial properties of semifluorinated linear alkane diblock copolymers of the form F3C(CF2)n-1(CH2)m-1CH3 are studied by fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. The chemical composition and the conformation of the molecules at the interface are identified and correlated with the interfacial energies. A modified form of the Optimized Parameter for Liquid Simulation All-Atom (OPLS-AA) force field of Jorgensen and co-workers [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 106, 6638 (1984); 118, 11225 (1996); J. Phys. Chem. A 105, 4118 (2001)], which includes specific dihedral terms for H-F blocks-and corrections to the H-F nonbonded interaction, is used together with a new version of the exp-6 force field developed in this work. Both force fields yield good agreement with the available experimental liquid density and surface tension data as well as each other over significant temperature ranges and for a variety of chain lengths and compositions. The interfacial regions of semifluorinated alkanes are found to be rich in fluorinated groups compared to hydrogenated groups, an effect that decreases with increasing temperature but is independent of the fractional length of the fluorinated segments. The proliferation of fluorine at the surface substantially lowers the surface tension of the diblock copolymers, yielding values near those of perfluorinated alkanes and distinct from those of protonated alkanes of the same chain length. With decreasing temperatures within the liquid state, chains are found to preferentially align perpendicular to the interface, as previously seen.

  19. Interfacial Molecular Searching Using Forager Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monserud, Jon H.; Schwartz, Daniel K.

    2016-03-01

    Many biological and technological systems employ efficient non-Brownian intermittent search strategies where localized searches alternate with long flights. Coincidentally, molecular species exhibit intermittent behavior at the solid-liquid interface, where periods of slow motion are punctuated by fast flights through the liquid phase. Single-molecule tracking was used here to observe the interfacial search process of DNA for complementary DNA. Measured search times were qualitatively consistent with an intermittent-flight model, and ˜10 times faster than equivalent Brownian searches, suggesting that molecular searches for reactive sites benefit from similar efficiencies as biological organisms.

  20. Interfacial supersaturation, secondary nucleation, and crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Clifford Y.; Wu, Jenn-Fang; Rousseau, Ronald W.

    1992-02-01

    A theory describing the source of nuclei in secondary nucleation is presented and used to rationalize experimental data from the literature, some of which had appeared to be conflicting. The theory rests on a model in which an adsorption layer consisting of clusters of growth units of varying size is formed on the surface of growing crystals. The existence of the layer is related to the two-resistance model of crystal growth; by varying system conditions, the relative importance of the two resistances is altered and thereby changes the interfacial supersaturation even though overall supersaturation remains constant. Interracial supersaturation and contact energy determine kinetics in a system dominated by contact nucleation.

  1. Viscosity of interfacial water regulates ice nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Kaiyong; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Qiaolan; Zhang, Yifan; Xu, Shun; Zhou, Xin; Cui, Dapeng; Wang, Jianjun Song, Yanlin

    2014-03-10

    Ice formation on solid surfaces is an important phenomenon in many fields, such as cloud formation and atmospheric icing, and a key factor for applications in preventing freezing. Here, we report temperature-dependent nucleation rates of ice for hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. The results show that hydrophilic surface presents a lower ice nucleation rate. We develop a strategy to extract the thermodynamic parameters, J{sub 0} and Γ, in the context of classical nucleation theory. From the extracted J{sub 0} and Γ, we reveal the dominant role played by interfacial water. The results provide an insight into freezing mechanism on solid surfaces.

  2. Bioceramic vertebral augmentation with a calcium sulphate/hydroxyapatite composite (Cerament SpineSupport): in vertebral compression fractures due to osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Rauschmann, Michael; Vogl, Thomas; Verheyden, Akhil; Pflugmacher, Robert; Werba, Thomas; Schmidt, Sven; Hierholzer, Johannes

    2010-06-01

    A prospective, non-randomized multicenter study was initiated to study efficacy and safety of a partly resorbable composite of calcium sulphate and hydroxyapatite (Cerament SpineSupport), a novel, injectable bioceramic, in osteoporotic patients with vertebral compression fractures during 18-month follow-up. Fifteen patients with low-energy trauma and 1-2 vertebral compression fractures verified by magnetic resonance imaging were recruited to undergo percutaneous bioceramic vertebral augmentation under fluoroscopy. The patients were treated with a highly flowable bioceramic containing calcium sulphate, hydroxyapatite and the non-ionic radiocontrast agent iohexol, with final setting time within 1 h. After the procedure, the patients were allowed to mobilize after 2 h. Pain (VAS), occurrence of remote and adjacent fractures, and Quality of Life (QoL; SF-36 and EQ-5D) was recorded during 18 months. The injected volume of the composite material ranged from 2.8 to 9 mL (mean 4.2 mL). Pre-operative VAS score was mean 70.3 (CI95% +/-8.7) with an immediate post-operative pain relief, which was maintained at the 4-week visit (mean 26.4 with CI95% +/-16.1) and 8-week visit (mean 18.0 with CI95% +/-13.5 pain relief). Eighty percent of the patients demonstrated a clinical improvement. The pain relief was maintained over 18 months and no adjacent fractures were observed. There was a statistically significant improvement of physical components in the QoL assessment. No extra-vertebral leakage or neurological deficits were reported in this series. This first prospective multicenter study on a partly resorbable bioceramic material indicate that fracture healing can be achieved with sustained pain relief over a follow-up period of 18 months in an osteoporotic patient population with vertebral compression fractures.

  3. Interfacial Structure, Thermodynamics, and Electrostatics of Aqueous Methanol Solutions via Molecular Dynamics Simulations Using Charge Equilibration Models

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sandeep; Zhong, Yang; Bauer, Brad A.; Davis, Joseph E.

    2014-01-01

    along the interface normal. We observe a non-monotonic behavior of the methanol in-plane dielectric permittivity that tracks the methanol density profiles at low methanol mole fractions. At higher methanol mole fractions, the total in-plane permittivity is dominated by methanol, and displays a monotonic decrease from bulk to vapor. We finally probe the nature of hydration of water in the bulk versus interfacial regions for methanol mole fractions of 0.1 and 0.2. In the bulk, methanol perturbs water structure so as to give rise to water hydrogen bond excesses. Moreover, we observe negative hydrogen bond excess in the vicinity of the alkyl group, as reported by Zhong et al for bulk ethanol-water solutions using charge equilibration force fields, and positive excess in regions hydrogen bonding to nearest-neighbor methanol molecules. Within the interfacial region, water and methanol density reduction lead to concomitant water hydrogen bond deficiencies (negative hydrogen-bond excess). PMID:19569724

  4. Dynamic interfacial behavior of viscoelastic aqueous hyaluronic acid: effects of molecular weight, concentration and interfacial velocity.

    PubMed

    Vorvolakos, Katherine; Coburn, James C; Saylor, David M

    2014-04-07

    An aqueous hyaluronic acid (HA(aq)) pericellular coat, when mediating the tactile aspect of cellular contact inhibition, has three tasks: interface formation, mechanical signal transmission and interface separation. To quantify the interfacial adhesive behavior of HA(aq), we induce simultaneous interface formation and separation between HA(aq) and a model hydrophobic, hysteretic Si-SAM surface. While surface tension γ remains essentially constant, interface formation and separation depend greatly on concentration (5 ≤ C ≤ 30 mg mL(-1)), molecular weight (6 ≤ MW ≤ 2000 kDa) and interfacial velocity (0 ≤ V ≤ 3 mm s(-1)), each of which affect shear elastic and loss moduli G′ and G′′, respectively. Viscoelasticity dictates the mode of interfacial motion: wetting-dewetting, capillary necking, or rolling. Wetting-dewetting is quantified using advancing and receding contact angles θ(A) and θ(R), and the hysteresis between them, yielding data landscapes for each C above the [MW, V] plane. The landscape sizes, shapes, and curvatures disclose the interplay, between surface tension and viscoelasticity, which governs interfacial dynamics. Gel point coordinates modulus G and angular frequency ω appear to predict wetting-dewetting (G < 75 ω0.2), capillary necking (75 ω0.2 < G < 200 ω0.075) or rolling (G > 200ω0.075). Dominantly dissipative HA(aq) sticks to itself and distorts irreversibly before separating, while dominantly elastic HA(aq) makes contact and separates with only minor, reversible distortion. We propose the dimensionless number (G′V)/(ω(r)γ), varying from 10(-5) to 10(3) in this work, as a tool to predict the mode of interface formation-separation by relating interfacial kinetics with bulk viscoelasticity. Cellular contact inhibition may be thus aided or compromised by physiological or interventional shifts in [C, MW, V], and thus in (G′V)/(ω(r)γ), which affect both mechanotransduction and interfacial dynamics. These observations

  5. AFOSR Wafer Bonding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-31

    cleanliness (foreign particles) and surface morphology (roughness). Two silicon wafers, when properly cleaned, can easily bond at room temperature because of...4 Figure IV data for nSi-nGaN bond. Structure is similar to that shown in Figure Difficulties and Knowledge Added Surface Morphology and...Particles One of the most important features of materials in determining whether they will bond is the quality of the bonding surfaces , in both

  6. Diffusion bonding aeroengine components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, G. A.; Broughton, T.

    1988-10-01

    The use of diffusion bonding processes at Rolls-Royce for the manufacture of titanium-alloy aircraft engine components and structures is described. A liquid-phase diffusion bonding process called activated diffusion bonding has been developed for the manufacture of the hollow titanium wide chord fan blade. In addition, solid-state diffusion bonding is being used in the manufacture of hollow vane/blade airfoil constructions mainly in conjunction with superplastic forming and hot forming techniques.

  7. The effect of calcium silicate on in vitro physiochemical properties and in vivo osteogenesis, degradability and bioactivity of porous β-tricalcium phosphate bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shen; Jin, Fangchun; Lin, Kaili; Lu, Jianxi; Sun, Jiao; Chang, Jiang; Dai, Kerong; Fan, Cunyi

    2013-04-01

    Porous β-tricalcium phosphate(TCP)/calcium silicate(CS) composite bioceramics with different weight proportions were prepared to investigate the in vitro effects of CS on the physiochemical properties of TCP and the in vivo effects of CS on the degradability, osteogenesis and bioactivity of TCP. The physiochemical results showed that the addition of CS to porous TCP resulted in a looser and rougher surface and a lower solid density, compressive strength and Young's modulus and a lower pH value as compared to pure CS without any chemical interaction between the TCP and the CS. The in vivo study showed that the material degradation of porous TCP/CS composite bioceramics was slower than that of pure CS, although the osteogenesis, degradability and bioactivity were significantly increased in the long term. Thereafter, the introduction of CS into porous TCP bioceramics is an effective way to prepare bioactive bone grafting scaffolds for clinical use and to control properties such as in vivo degradability and osteoinduction of TCP.

  8. SYNCHROTRON X-RAY MICROTOMOGRAPHY AND INTERFACIAL PARTITIONING TRACER TEST MEASUREMENTS OF NAPL-WATER INTERFACIAL AREAS

    PubMed Central

    Brusseau, Mark L.; Janousek, Hilary; Murao, Asami; Schnaar, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Interfacial areas between an immiscible organic liquid (NAPL) and water were measured for two natural porous media using two methods, aqueous-phase interfacial partitioning tracer tests and synchrotron X-ray microtomography. The interfacial areas measured with the tracer tests were similar to previously reported values obtained with the method. The values were, however, significantly larger than those obtained from microtomography. Analysis of microtomography data collected before and after introduction of the interfacial tracer solution indicated that the surfactant tracer had minimal impact on fluid-phase configuration and interfacial areas under conditions associated with typical laboratory application. The disparity between the tracer-test and microtomography values is attributed primarily to the inability of the microtomography method to resolve interfacial area associated with microscopic surface heterogeneity. This hypothesis is consistent with results recently reported for a comparison of microtomographic analysis and interfacial tracer tests conducted for an air-water system. The tracer-test method provides a measure of effective, total (capillary and film) interfacial area, whereas microtomography can be used to determine separately both capillary-associated and film-associated interfacial areas. Both methods appear to provide useful information for given applications. A key to their effective use is recognizing the specific nature of the information provided by each, as well as associated limitations. PMID:23678204

  9. Acrylic mechanical bond tests

    SciTech Connect

    Wouters, J.M.; Doe, P.J.

    1991-02-01

    The tensile strength of bonded acrylic is tested as a function of bond joint thickness. 0.125 in. thick bond joints were found to posses the maximum strength while the acceptable range of joints varied from 0.063 in. to almost 0.25 in. Such joints are used in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory.

  10. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, B. A.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Hodges, W. T.

    1984-01-01

    Adhesive bonding in the aerospace industry typically utilizes autoclaves or presses which have considerable thermal mass. As a consequence, the rates of heatup and cooldown of the bonded parts are limited and the total time and cost of the bonding process is often relatively high. Many of the adhesives themselves do not inherently require long processing times. Bonding could be performed rapidly if the heat was concentrated in the bond lines or at least in the adherends. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts were developed to utilize induction heating techniques to provide heat directly to the bond line and/or adherends without heating the entire structure, supports, and fixtures of a bonding assembly. Bonding times for specimens are cut by a factor of 10 to 100 compared to standard press bonding. The development of rapid adhesive bonding for lap shear specimens (per ASTM D1003 and D3163), for aerospace panel bonding, and for field repair needs of metallic and advanced fiber reinforced polymeric matrix composite structures are reviewed.

  11. Bonding aluminum beam leads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkett, F. S.

    1978-01-01

    Report makes it relatively easy for hybrid-circuit manufacturers to convert integrated circuit chips with aluminum bead leads. Report covers: techniques for handling tiny chips; proper geometries for ultrasonic bonding tips; best combinations of pressure, pulse time, and ultrasonic energy for bonding; and best thickness for metal films to which beam leads are bonded.

  12. Electronic Structure and Ferromagnetism Modulation in Cu/Cu2O Interface: Impact of Interfacial Cu Vacancy and Its Diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao-Bo; Wang, Weichao; Xie, Xinjian; Cheng, Yahui; Zhang, Zhaofu; Dong, Hong; Zheng, Rongkun; Wang, Wei-Hua; Lu, Feng; Liu, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Cu/Cu2O composite structures have been discovered to show sizable ferromagnetism (FM) with the potential applications in spintronic devices. To date, there is no consensus on the FM origin in Cu/Cu2O systems. Here, first principles calculations are performed on the interface structure to explore the microscopic mechanism of the FM. It is found that only the Cu vacancy (VCu) adjacent to the outermost Cu2O layer induces a considerable magnetic moment, mostly contributed by 2p orbitals of the nearest-neighbor oxygen atom (ONN) with two dangling bonds and 3d orbitals of the Cu atoms bonding with the ONN. Meanwhile, the charge transfer from Cu to Cu2O creates higher density of states at the Fermi level and subsequently leads to the spontaneous FM. Furthermore, the FM could be modulated by the amount of interfacial VCu, governed by the interfacial Cu diffusion with a moderate energy barrier (~1.2 eV). These findings provide insights into the FM mechanism and tuning the FM via interfacial cation diffusion in the Cu/Cu2O contact. PMID:26478505

  13. Molecular Dynamics Studies on the Effects of Water Speciation on Interfacial Structure and Dynamics in Silica-Filled PDMS Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, R H; Maxwell, R S; Dinh, L N; Balazs, B

    2001-11-21

    Significant changes in materials properties of siloxane based polymers can be obtained by the addition of inorganic fillers. In silica-filled polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) based composites the mechanism of this reinforcing behavior is presumably hydrogen bonding between surface hydroxyls and backbone siloxane species. We have chosen to investigate in detail the effect of chemisorbed and physisorbed water on the interfacial structure and dynamics in silica-filled PDMS based composites. Toward this end, we have combined molecular dynamics simulations and experimental studies employing DMA and Nh4R analysis. Our results suggest that the polymer-silica contact distance and the mobility of interfacial polymer chains significantly decreased as the hydration level at the interface was reduced. The reduced mobility of the PDMS chains in the interfacial domain reduced the overall, bulk, motional properties of the polymer, thus causing an effective ''stiffening'' of the polymer matrix. The role of the long-ranged Coulombic interactions on the structural features and chain dynamics of the polymer were also examined. Both are found to be strongly influenced by the electrostatic interactions as identified by the bond orientation time correlation function and local density distribution functions. These results have important implications for the design of nanocomposite silica-siloxane materials.

  14. Model colloid system for interfacial sorption kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salipante, Paul; Hudson, Steven

    2014-11-01

    Adsorption kinetics of nanometer scale molecules, such as proteins at interfaces, is usually determined through measurements of surface coverage. Their small size limits the ability to directly observe individual molecule behavior. To better understand the behavior of nanometer size molecules and the effect on interfacial kinetics, we use micron size colloids with a weak interfacial interaction potential as a model system. Thus, the interaction strength is comparable to many nanoscale systems (less than 10 kBT). The colloid-interface interaction potential is tuned using a combination of depletion, electrostatic, and gravitational forces. The colloids transition between an entropically trapped adsorbed state and a desorbed state through Brownian motion. Observations are made using an LED-based Total Internal Reflection Microscopy (TIRM) setup. The observed adsorption and desorption rates are compared theoretical predictions based on the measured interaction potential and near wall particle diffusivity. This experimental system also allows for the study of more complex dynamics such as nonspherical colloids and collective effects at higher concentrations.

  15. Interfacial adsorption and aggregation of amphiphilic proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, David

    2012-02-01

    The adsorption and aggregation on liquid interfaces of proteins is important in many biological contexts, such as the formation of aerial structures, immune response, and catalysis. Likewise the adsorption of proteins onto interfaces has applications in food technology, drug delivery, and in personal care products. As such there has been much interest in the study of a wide range of biomolecules at liquid interfaces. One class of proteins that has attracted particular attention are hydrophobins, small, fungal proteins with a distinct, amphiphilic surface structure. This makes these proteins highly surface active and they recently attracted much interest. In order to understand their potential applications a microscopic description of their interfacial and self-assembly is necessary and molecular simulation provides a powerful tool for providing this. In this presentation I will describe some recent work using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to study the interfacial and aggregation behaviour of hydrophobins. Specifically this will present the calculation of their adsorption strength at oil-water and air-water interfaces, investigate the stability of hydrophobin aggregates in solution and their interaction with surfactants.

  16. Enhancing interfacial magnetization with a ferroelectric

    DOE PAGES

    Meyer, Tricia L.; Herklotz, Andreas; Lauter, Valeria; ...

    2016-11-21

    Ferroelectric control of interfacial magnetism has attracted much attention. However, the coupling of these two functionalities has not been understood well at the atomic scale. The lack of scientific progress is mainly due to the limited characterization methods by which the interface’s magnetic properties can be probed at an atomic level. In this paper, we use polarized neutron reflectometry to probe the evolution of the magnetic moment at interfaces in ferroelectric/strongly correlated oxide [PbZr0.2Ti0.8O3/La0.8Sr0.2MnO3(PZT/LSMO)] heterostructures. We find that the magnetization at the surfaces and interfaces of our LSMO films without PZT are always deteriorated and such magnetic deterioration can bemore » greatly improved by interfacing with a strongly polar PZT film. Magnetoelectric coupling of magnetism and ferroelectric polarization was observed within a couple of nanometers of the interface via an increase in the LSMO surface magnetization to 4.0μB/f.u., a value nearly 70% higher than the surface magnetization of our LSMO film without interfacing with a ferroelectric layer. We attribute this behavior to hole depletion driven by the ferroelectric polarization. Finally, these compelling results not only probe the presence of nanoscale magnetic suppression and its control by ferroelectrics, but also emphasize the importance of utilizing probing techniques that can distinguish between bulk and interfacial phenomena.« less

  17. Enhancing interfacial magnetization with a ferroelectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Tricia L.; Herklotz, Andreas; Lauter, Valeria; Freeland, John W.; Nichols, John; Guo, Er-Jia; Lee, Shinbuhm; Ward, T. Zac; Balke, Nina; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Fitzsimmons, Michael R.; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2016-11-01

    Ferroelectric control of interfacial magnetism has attracted much attention. However, the coupling of these two functionalities has not been understood well at the atomic scale. The lack of scientific progress is mainly due to the limited characterization methods by which the interface's magnetic properties can be probed at an atomic level. Here, we use polarized neutron reflectometry to probe the evolution of the magnetic moment at interfaces in ferroelectric/strongly correlated oxide [PbZ r0.2T i0.8O3/L a0.8S r0.2Mn O3(PZT /LSMO ) ] heterostructures. We find that the magnetization at the surfaces and interfaces of our LSMO films without PZT are always deteriorated and such magnetic deterioration can be greatly improved by interfacing with a strongly polar PZT film. Magnetoelectric coupling of magnetism and ferroelectric polarization was observed within a couple of nanometers of the interface via an increase in the LSMO surface magnetization to 4.0 μB/f .u . , a value nearly 70% higher than the surface magnetization of our LSMO film without interfacing with a ferroelectric layer. We attribute this behavior to hole depletion driven by the ferroelectric polarization. These compelling results not only probe the presence of nanoscale magnetic suppression and its control by ferroelectrics, but also emphasize the importance of utilizing probing techniques that can distinguish between bulk and interfacial phenomena.

  18. Bonding thermoplastic polymers

    DOEpatents

    Wallow, Thomas I.; Hunter, Marion C.; Krafcik, Karen Lee; Morales, Alfredo M.; Simmons, Blake A.; Domeier, Linda A.

    2008-06-24

    We demonstrate a new method for joining patterned thermoplastic parts into layered structures. The method takes advantage of case-II permeant diffusion to generate dimensionally controlled, activated bonding layers at the surfaces being joined. It is capable of producing bonds characterized by cohesive failure while preserving the fidelity of patterned features in the bonding surfaces. This approach is uniquely suited to production of microfluidic multilayer structures, as it allows the bond-forming interface between plastic parts to be precisely manipulated at micrometer length scales. The bond enhancing procedure is easily integrated in standard process flows and requires no specialized equipment.

  19. Effect of intracanal medicaments on push-out bond strength of Smart-Seal system

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Vibha; Arora, Shashank

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effects of calcium hydroxide (CH), triple and double antibiotic pastes (DAPs) on the bond strength of Smart-Seal obturation, C-points with Endosequence Bio-ceramic (BC) sealer to the root canal dentin. Materials and Methods: Sixty-four freshly extracted single-rooted human mandibular premolars were de-coronated and prepared using rotary Pro-taper system with full sequence till F3. The specimens were randomly divided into a control group (without intracanal dressing) and 3 experimental groups that received an intracanal dressing with either CH, DAP, or triple antibiotic paste (TAP) (n = 16). The intracanal dressing was removed after 3 weeks by rinsing with 10 mL 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, followed by 10 mL 3% sodium hypochlorite. The root canals were then obturated with C-points and Endosequence BC sealer. A push-out test was used to measure the bond strength between the root canal dentin and the obturating system. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and Tukey post-hoc test. Results: The push-out bond strength values were significantly affected by the intracanal medicaments (P < 0.001), but not by the root canal thirds (P > 0.05). In the middle and apical third, the bond strength of the TAP group was higher than those of the CH and DAP groups (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The DAP and CH did not affect the bond strength of the novel hydrophilic obutrating system. TAP improved the bond strength of Smart-Seal system in the middle and apical thirds. PMID:26430308

  20. Characterization of interfacial failure in SiC reinforced Si3N4 matrix composite material by both fiber push-out testing and Auger electron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Honecy, F. S.

    1990-01-01

    AES depth profiling and a fiber push-out test for interfacial shear-strength determination have been used to ascertain the mechanical/chemical properties of the fiber/matrix interface in SiC-reinforced reaction-bonded Si3N4, with attention to the weak point where interfacial failure occurs. In the cases of both composite fracture and fiber push-outs, the interfacial failure occurred either between the two C-rich coatings that are present on the double-coated SiC fibers, or between the inner C-rich coating and the SiC fiber. Interface failure occurs at points of very abrupt concentration changes.

  1. Effect of HIPing on the effective thermal conductivity/diffusivity and the interfacial thermal conductance of uniaxial SiC fibre-reinforced RBSN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, H.; Donaldson, K. Y.; Hasselman, D. P. H.; Bhatt, R. T.

    1992-01-01

    Hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) was found to increase the thermal diffusivity/conductivity of uniaxial silicon carbide fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) matrix composites, as the result of the densification of the matrix, the increase in the grain size of the silicon carbide and the improved thermal contact between the fibers and the matrix. Transverse to the fiber direction the thermal diffusivity/conductivity was found to be a function of the surrounding gaseous atmosphere due to the access of the gas phase to the fiber-matrix interface, which was facilitated by the existence of an interfacial gap due to the thermal expansion mismatch between the fibers and the matrix. The interfacial conductance was found to exhibit a strong positive temperature dependence as the result of the closure of the interfacial gap with increasing temperature.

  2. Simple Bond Cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Groenewold

    2005-08-01

    Simple bond cleavage is a class of fragmentation reactions in which a single bond is broken, without formation of new bonds between previously unconnected atoms. Because no bond making is involved, simple bond cleavages are endothermic, and activation energies are generally higher than for rearrangement eliminations. The rate of simple bond cleavage reactions is a strong function of the internal energy of the molecular ion, which reflects a loose transition state that resembles reaction products, and has a high density of accessible states. For this reason, simple bond cleavages tend to dominate fragmentation reactions for highly energized molecular ions. Simple bond cleavages have negligible reverse activation energy, and hence they are used as valuable probes of ion thermochemistry, since the energy dependence of the reactions can be related to the bond energy. In organic mass spectrometry, simple bond cleavages of odd electron ions can be either homolytic or heterolytic, depending on whether the fragmentation is driven by the radical site or the charge site. Simple bond cleavages of even electron ions tend to be heterolytic, producing even electron product ions and neutrals.

  3. Hydrogen multicentre bonds.

    PubMed

    Janotti, Anderson; Van de Walle, Chris G

    2007-01-01

    The concept of a chemical bond stands out as a major development in the process of understanding how atoms are held together in molecules and solids. Lewis' classical picture of chemical bonds as shared-electron pairs evolved to the quantum-mechanical valence-bond and molecular-orbital theories, and the classification of molecules and solids in terms of their bonding type: covalent, ionic, van der Waals and metallic. Along with the more complex hydrogen bonds and three-centre bonds, they form a paradigm within which the structure of almost all molecules and solids can be understood. Here, we present evidence for hydrogen multicentre bonds-a generalization of three-centre bonds-in which a hydrogen atom equally bonds to four or more other atoms. When substituting for oxygen in metal oxides, hydrogen bonds equally to all the surrounding metal atoms, becoming fourfold coordinated in ZnO, and sixfold coordinated in MgO. These multicentre bonds are remarkably strong despite their large hydrogen-metal distances. The calculated local vibration mode frequency in MgO agrees with infrared spectroscopy measurements. Multicoordinated hydrogen also explains the dependence of electrical conductivity on oxygen partial pressure, resolving a long-standing controversy on the role of point defects in unintentional n-type conductivity of ZnO (refs 8-10).

  4. Review of interfacial layer's effect on thermal conductivity in nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotia, Ankit; Borkakoti, Sheeba; Deval, Piyush; Ghosh, Subrata Kumar

    2017-01-01

    An ordered liquid layer around the particle-liquid interface is called as interfacial layer. It has been observed that interfacial layer is an essential parameter for determining the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids. The review attempts to summarize the prominent articles related to interfacial layer effect on the thermal conductivity of nanofluids. First section of the paper discusses about various experimental approaches used to describe the effect of interfacial layer. Second section deals with about the mathematical models and assumed values regarding the thickness of interfacial layer by several authors. A review of previous works featuring mathematical investigations and experimental approaches seem to be suggesting that, interfacial layer have dominating effect on the effective thermal conductivity of the nanofluids. Third section of the paper deals with various mathematical models available in open literature for interfacial layer thermal conductivity. In the last section, models for effective thermal conductivity of the nanofluids considering the interfacial layer and percentage deviations in the predictions of mathematical models have been discussed.

  5. Damage Evolution in Al Wire Bonds Subjected to a Junction Temperature Fluctuation of 30 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agyakwa, Pearl A.; Yang, Li; Arjmand, Elaheh; Evans, Paul; Corfield, Martin R.; Johnson, C. Mark

    2016-07-01

    Ultrasonically bonded heavy Al wires subjected to a small junction temperature fluctuation under power cycling from 40°C to 70°C were investigated using a non-destructive three-dimensional (3-D) x-ray tomography evaluation approach. The occurrence of irreversible deformation of the microstructure and wear-out under such conditions were demonstrated. The observed microstructures consist of interfacial and inter-granular cracks concentrated in zones of stress intensity, i.e., near heels and emanating from interface precracks. Interfacial voids were also observed within the bond interior. Degradation rates of `first' and `stitch' bonds are compared and contrasted. A correlative microscopy study combining perspectives from optical microscopy with the x-ray tomography results clarifies the damage observed. An estimation of lifetime is made from the results and discussed in the light of existing predictions.

  6. Curvature dependence of the interfacial heat and mass transfer coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavatskiy, K. S.; Bedeaux, D.

    2014-03-01

    Nucleation is often accompanied by heat transfer between the surroundings and a nucleus of a new phase. The interface between two phases gives an additional resistance to this transfer. For small nuclei the interfacial curvature is high, which affects not only equilibrium quantities such as surface tension, but also the transport properties. In particular, high curvature affects the interfacial resistance to heat and mass transfer. We develop a framework for determining the curvature dependence of the interfacial heat and mass transfer resistances. We determine the interfacial resistances as a function of a curvature. The analysis is performed for a bubble of a one-component fluid and may be extended to various nuclei of multicomponent systems. The curvature dependence of the interfacial resistances is important in modeling transport processes in multiphase systems.

  7. Interfacial potential approach for Ag/ZnO (0001) interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hong-Quan; Shen, Jiang; Qian, Ping; Chen, Nan-Xian

    2014-12-01

    Systematic approaches are presented to extract the interfacial potentials from the ab initio adhesive energy of the interface system by using the Chen—Möbius inversion method. We focus on the interface structure of the metal (111)/ZnO (0001) in this work. The interfacial potentials of Ag—Zn and Ag—O are obtained. These potentials can be used to solve some problems about Ag/ZnO interfacial structure. Three metastable interfacial structures are investigated in order to check these potentials. Using the interfacial potentials we study the procedure of interface fracture in the Ag/ZnO (0001) interface and discuss the change of the energy, stress, and atomic structures in tensile process. The result indicates that the exact misfit dislocation reduces the total energy and softens the fracture process. Meanwhile, the formation and mobility of the vacancy near the interface are observed.

  8. A critical study of the role of the surface oxide layer in titanium bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dias, S.; Wightman, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    Scanning electron microscope/X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (SEM/XPS) analysis of fractured adhesively bonded Ti 6-4 samples is discussed. The text adhesives incuded NR 056X polyimide, polypheylquinoxaline (PPQ), and LARC-13 polyimide. Differentiation between cohesive and interfacial failure was based on the absence of presence of a Ti 2p XPS photopeak. In addition, the surface oxide layer on Ti-(6A1-4V) adherends is characterized and bond strength and durability are addressed. Bond durability in various environmental conditions is discussed.

  9. Carboxyl functionalization of carbon fibers via aryl diazonium reaction in molten urea to enhance interfacial shear strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuwei; Meng, Linghui; Fan, Liquan; Wu, Guangshun; Ma, Lichun; Zhao, Min; Huang, Yudong

    2016-01-01

    Using molten urea as the solvent, carbon fibers were functionalized with carboxylic acid groups via aryl diazonium reaction in 15 min to improve their interfacial bonding with epoxy resin. The surface functionalization was quantified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which showed that the relative surface coverage of carboxylic acid groups increased from an initial percentage of 3.17-10.41%. Mechanical property test results indicated that the aryl diazonium reaction in this paper could improve the interfacial shear strength by 66%. Meanwhile, the technique did not adopt any pre-oxidation step to produce functional groups prior to grafting and was shown to maintain the tensile strength of the fibers. This methodology provided a rapid, facile and economically viable route to produce covalently functionalized carbon fibers in large quantities with an eco-friendly method.

  10. "Butterfly effect" in CuO/graphene composite nanosheets: a small interfacial adjustment triggers big changes in electronic structure and Li-ion storage performance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoting; Zhou, Jisheng; Song, Huaihe; Chen, Xiaohong; Fedoseeva, Yu V; Okotrub, A V; Bulusheva, L G

    2014-10-08

    Generally speaking, excellent electrochemical performance of metal oxide/graphene nanosheets (GNSs) composite is attributed to the interfacial interaction (or "synergistic effect") between constituents. However, there are no any direct observations on how the electronic structure is changed and how the properties of Li-ion storage are affected by adjusting the interfacial interaction, despite of limited investigations on the possible nature of binding between GNSs and metal oxide. In this paper, CuO nanosheets/GNSs composites with a little Cu2O (ca. 4 wt %) were utilized as an interesting model to illustrate directly the changes of interfacial nature as well as its deep influence on the electronic structure and Li-ion storage performance of composite. The interfacial adjustment was successfully fulfilled by removal of Cu2O in the composite by NH3·H2O. Formation of Cu-O-C bonds on interfaces both between CuO and GNSs, and Cu2O and GNSs in the original CuO/GNSs composites was detected. The small interfacial alteration by removal of the little Cu2O results in the obvious changes in electronic structure, such as weakening of covalent Cu-O-C interfacial interaction and recovery of π bonds in graphene, and simultaneously leads to variations in electrochemical performance of composites, including a 21% increase of reversible capacity, degradation of cyclic stability and rate-performance, and obvious increase of charge-transfer resistance, which can be called a "butterfly effect" in graphene-based metal oxide composites. These interesting phenomena could be helpful to design not only the high-performance graphene/metal oxide anode materials but also various advanced graphene-based composites used in the other fields such as sensors, catalysis, fuel cells, solar cells, etc.

  11. Nature-Inspired One-Step Green Procedure for Enhancing the Antibacterial and Antioxidant Behavior of a Chitin Film: Controlled Interfacial Assembly of Tannic Acid onto a Chitin Film.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuntao; Li, Jing; Li, Bin

    2016-07-20

    The final goal of this study was to develop antimicrobial food-contact materials based on a natural phenolic compound (tannic acid) and chitin, which is the second most abundant polysaccharide on earth, using an interfacial assembly approach. Chitin film has poor antibacterial and antioxidant ability, which limits its application in industrial fields such as active packaging. Therefore, in this study, a novel one-step green procedure was applied to introduce antibacterial and antioxidant properties into a chitin film simultaneously by incorporation of tannic acid into the chitin film through interfacial assembly. The antibacterial and antioxidant behavior of chitin film has been greatly enhanced. Hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interaction were found to be the main driving forces for interfacial assembly. Therefore, controlled interfacial assembly of tannic acid onto a chitin film demonstrated a good way to develop functional materials that can be potentially applied in industry.

  12. Sulfide bonded atomic radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, G. V.; Ross, N. L.; Cox, D. F.

    2017-03-01

    The bonded radius, r b(S), of the S atom, calculated for first- and second-row non-transition metal sulfide crystals and third-row transition metal sulfide molecules and crystals indicates that the radius of the sulfur atom is not fixed as traditionally assumed, but that it decreases systematically along the bond paths of the bonded atoms with decreasing bond length as observed in an earlier study of the bonded radius of the oxygen atom. When bonded to non-transition metal atoms, r b(S) decreases systematically with decreasing bond length from 1.68 Å when the S atom is bonded to the electropositive VINa atom to 1.25 Å when bonded to the more electronegative IVP atom. In the case of transition metal atoms, rb(S) likewise decreases with decreasing bond length from 1.82 Å when bonded to Cu and to 1.12 Å when bonded to Fe. As r b(S) is not fixed at a given value but varies substantially depending on the bond length and the field strength of the bonded atoms, it is apparent that sets of crystal and atomic sulfide atomic radii based on an assumed fixed radius for the sulfur atom are satisfactory in that they reproduce bond lengths, on the one hand, whereas on the other, they are unsatisfactory in that they fail to define the actual sizes of the bonded atoms determined in terms of the minima in the electron density between the atoms. As such, we urge that the crystal chemistry and the properties of sulfides be studied in terms of the bond lengths determined by adding the radii of either the atomic and crystal radii of the atoms but not in terms of existing sets of crystal and atomic radii. After all, the bond lengths were used to determine the radii that were experimentally determined, whereas the individual radii were determined on the basis of an assumed radius for the sulfur atom.

  13. Single-molecule interfacial electron transfer dynamics in solar energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhital, Bharat

    molecule on ITO surface. Finally, the electric field effect on the interface properties has been probed by using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and supported by density functional theory calculations in alizarin-TiO2 system. The perturbation, created by the external potential, has been observed to cause a shift and/or splitting interfacial bond vibrational mode, typical indicator of the coupling energy changes between alizarin and TiO2. Such splitting provides evidence for electric field-dependent electronic coupling changes that have a significant impact on the interfacial electron transfer dynamics.

  14. Fabrication of Direct Silicon Bonded Hybrid Orientation Substrate by Separation by Implanted Oxygen Layer Transfer and Oxide Dissolution Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xing; Xue, Zhongying; Wu, Aimin; Cao, Gongbai; Zhang, Bo; Lin, Chenglu; Zhang, Miao; Wang, Xi

    2011-03-01

    The quasi direct Si bonded (DSB) hybrid orientation substrate with a 3 nm interfacial oxide layer between the (100) superficial Si and the (110) handle wafer is fabricated by the separation by implanted oxygen layer transfer (SLT) process. The quasi DSB hybrid orientation substrates are annealed in oxygen-containing and oxygen-free ambient. The cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) results show the oxide-free (100) Si/(110) Si bonding interface, indicating that the direct Si-Si bonded structure is realized by these two processes. The anisotropic bonding interface morphology of the DSB hybrid orientation substrates is observed, and the formation mechanism is discussed in detail.

  15. Oscillatory interfacial instability between miscible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevtsova, Valentina; Gaponenko, Yuri; Mialdun, Aliaksandr; Torregrosa, Marita; Yasnou, Viktar

    Interfacial instabilities occurring between two fluids are of fundamental interest in fluid dynamics, biological systems and engineering applications such as liquid storage, solvent extraction, oil recovery and mixing. Horizontal vibrations applied to stratified layers of immiscible liquids may generate spatially periodic waving of the interface, stationary in the reference frame of the vibrated cell, referred to as a "frozen wave". We present experimental evidence that frozen wave instability exists between two ordinary miscible liquids of similar densities and viscosities. At the experiments and at the numerical model, two superimposed layers of ordinary liquids, water-alcohol of different concentrations, are placed in a closed cavity in a gravitationally stable configuration. The density and viscosity of these fluids are somewhat similar. Similar to the immiscible fluids this instability has a threshold. When the value of forcing is increased the amplitudes of perturbations grow continuously displaying a saw-tooth structure. The decrease of gravity drastically changes the structure of frozen waves.

  16. Attempt to control the interfacial strength

    SciTech Connect

    Schneibel, J.H.; Subramanian, R.

    1997-11-01

    Composites consisting of a B2 iron aluminide matrix and 40 vol.% of TiB{sub 2} particles were processed by liquid phase sintering. In order to encourage segregation of B or Ti at the FeAl/TiB{sub 2} interfaces, the iron aluminide matrix was microalloyed with B or Ti, respectively. Additions of Ti degraded the mechanical properties. However, for composites microalloyed with B, room temperature flexure tests show slight increases in the maximum strength (from 1250 to 1380 MPa) and the fracture toughness. Interfacial segregation of B may have contributed to this result. Significantly improved processing of the composites would be required in order to verify the effect of B conclusively. 15 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Mapping interfacial excess in atom probe data.

    PubMed

    Felfer, Peter; Scherrer, Barbara; Demeulemeester, Jelle; Vandervorst, Wilfried; Cairney, Julie M

    2015-12-01

    Using modern wide-angle atom probes, it is possible to acquire atomic scale 3D data containing 1000 s of nm(2) of interfaces. It is therefore possible to probe the distribution of segregated species across these interfaces. Here, we present techniques that allow the production of models for interfacial excess (IE) mapping and discuss the underlying considerations and sampling statistics. We also show, how the same principles can be used to achieve thickness mapping of thin films. We demonstrate the effectiveness on example applications, including the analysis of segregation to a phase boundary in stainless steel, segregation to a metal-ceramic interface and the assessment of thickness variations of the gate oxide in a fin-FET.

  18. An interfacial stress sensor for biomechanical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundara-Rajan, K.; Bestick, A.; Rowe, G. I.; Klute, G. K.; Ledoux, W. R.; Wang, H. C.; Mamishev, A. V.

    2012-08-01

    This paper presents a capacitive sensor that measures interfacial forces in prostheses and is promising for other biomedical applications. These sensors can be integrated into prosthetic devices to measure both normal and shear stress simultaneously, allowing for the study of prosthetic limb fit, and ultimately for the ability to better adapt prosthetics to individual users. A sensing cell with a 1.0 cm2 spatial resolution and a measurement range of 0-220 kPa of shear and 0-2 MPa of pressure was constructed. The cell was load tested and found to be capable of isolating the applied shear and pressure forces. This paper discusses the construction of the prototype, the mechanical and electrode design, fabrication and characterization. The work presented is aimed at creating a class of adaptive prosthetic interfaces using a capacitive sensor.

  19. Liquid-liquid interfacial nanoparticle assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Emrick, Todd S.; Russell, Thomas P.; Dinsmore, Anthony; Skaff, Habib; Lin, Yao

    2008-12-30

    Self-assembly of nanoparticles at the interface between two fluids, and methods to control such self-assembly process, e.g., the surface density of particles assembling at the interface; to utilize the assembled nanoparticles and their ligands in fabrication of capsules, where the elastic properties of the capsules can be varied from soft to tough; to develop capsules with well-defined porosities for ultimate use as delivery systems; and to develop chemistries whereby multiple ligands or ligands with multiple functionalities can be attached to the nanoparticles to promote the interfacial segregation and assembly of the nanoparticles. Certain embodiments use cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanoparticles, since the photoluminescence of the particles provides a convenient means by which the spatial location and organization of the particles can be probed. However, the systems and methodologies presented here are general and can, with suitable modification of the chemistries, be adapted to any type of nanoparticle.

  20. Interfacial Widths of Conjugated Polymer Bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    NCSU; UC Berkeley; UCSB; Advanced Light Source; Garcia, Andres; Yan, Hongping; Sohn, Karen E.; Hexemer, Alexander; Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen; Bazan, Guillermo C.; Kramer, Edward J.; Ade, Harald

    2009-08-13

    The interfaces of conjugated polyelectrolyte (CPE)/poly[2-methoxy-5-(2{prime}-ethylhexyloxy)-p-phenylene vinylene] (MEH-PPV) bilayers cast from differential solvents are shown by resonant soft X-ray reflectivity (RSoXR) to be very smooth and sharp. The chemical interdiffusion due to casting is limited to less than 0.6 nm, and the interface created is thus nearly 'molecularly' sharp. These results demonstrate for the first time and with high precision that the nonpolar MEH-PPV layer is not much disturbed by casting the CPE layer from a polar solvent. A baseline is established for understanding the role of interfacial structure in determining the performance of CPE-based polymer light-emitting diodes. More broadly, we anticipate further applications of RSoXR as an important tool in achieving a deeper understanding of other multilayer organic optoelectronic devices, including multilayer photovoltaic devices.