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Sample records for biochemical evolution iii

  1. Biochemical and Structural Properties of Mouse Kynurenine Aminotransferase III

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Q.; Robinson, H; Cai, T; Tagle, D; Li, J

    2009-01-01

    Kynurenine aminotransferase III (KAT III) has been considered to be involved in the production of mammalian brain kynurenic acid (KYNA), which plays an important role in protecting neurons from overstimulation by excitatory neurotransmitters. The enzyme was identified based on its high sequence identity with mammalian KAT I, but its activity toward kynurenine and its structural characteristics have not been established. In this study, the biochemical and structural properties of mouse KAT III (mKAT III) were determined. Specifically, mKAT III cDNA was amplified from a mouse brain cDNA library, and its recombinant protein was expressed in an insect cell protein expression system. We established that mKAT III is able to efficiently catalyze the transamination of kynurenine to KYNA and has optimum activity at relatively basic conditions of around pH 9.0 and at relatively high temperatures of 50 to 60C. In addition, mKAT III is active toward a number of other amino acids. Its activity toward kynurenine is significantly decreased in the presence of methionine, histidine, glutamine, leucine, cysteine, and 3-hydroxykynurenine. Through macromolecular crystallography, we determined the mKAT III crystal structure and its structures in complex with kynurenine and glutamine. Structural analysis revealed the overall architecture of mKAT III and its cofactor binding site and active center residues. This is the first report concerning the biochemical characteristics and crystal structures of KAT III enzymes and provides a basis toward understanding the overall physiological role of mammalian KAT III in vivo and insight into regulating the levels of endogenous KYNA through modulation of the enzyme in the mouse brain.

  2. Biochemical Lab Activity Supports Evolution Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyman, Daniel J.

    1974-01-01

    Described is thin-layer chromatography (TLC), a technique that can be conveniently used in the laboratory to generate evidence supporting the principle that degrees of biochemical similarity reflect degrees of evolutionary relatedness among organisms. (Author/PEB)

  3. Biochemical Lab Activity Supports Evolution Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyman, Daniel J.

    1974-01-01

    Described is thin-layer chromatography (TLC), a technique that can be conveniently used in the laboratory to generate evidence supporting the principle that degrees of biochemical similarity reflect degrees of evolutionary relatedness among organisms. (Author/PEB)

  4. Galapagos III World Evolution Summit: why evolution matters.

    PubMed

    Paz-Y-Miño-C, Guillermo; Espinosa, Avelina

    There is no place on Earth like the Galapagos Islands and no better destination to discuss the reality of evolution. Under the theme 'Why Does Evolution Matter', the University San Francisco of Quito (USFQ), Ecuador, and its Galapagos Institute for the Arts and Sciences (GAIAS), organized the III World Evolution Summit in San Cristóbal Island. The 200-attendee meeting took place on 1 to 5 June 2013; it included 12 keynote speakers, 20 oral presentations by international scholars, and 31 posters by faculty, postdocs, and graduate and undergraduate students. The Summit encompassed five sessions: evolution and society, pre-cellular evolution and the RNA world, behavior and environment, genome, and microbes and diseases. USFQ and GAIAS launched officially the Lynn Margulis Center for Evolutionary Biology and showcased the Galapagos Science Center, in San Cristóbal, an impressive research facility conceptualized in partnership with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA. USFQ and GAIAS excelled at managing the conference with exceptional vision and at highlighting the relevance of Galapagos in the history of modern evolutionary thinking; Charles Darwin's visit to this volcanic archipelago in 1835 unfolded unprecedented scientific interest in what today is a matchless World Heritage.

  5. Galapagos III World Evolution Summit: why evolution matters

    PubMed Central

    Paz-y-Miño-C, Guillermo; Espinosa, Avelina

    2016-01-01

    There is no place on Earth like the Galapagos Islands and no better destination to discuss the reality of evolution. Under the theme ‘Why Does Evolution Matter’, the University San Francisco of Quito (USFQ), Ecuador, and its Galapagos Institute for the Arts and Sciences (GAIAS), organized the III World Evolution Summit in San Cristóbal Island. The 200-attendee meeting took place on 1 to 5 June 2013; it included 12 keynote speakers, 20 oral presentations by international scholars, and 31 posters by faculty, postdocs, and graduate and undergraduate students. The Summit encompassed five sessions: evolution and society, pre-cellular evolution and the RNA world, behavior and environment, genome, and microbes and diseases. USFQ and GAIAS launched officially the Lynn Margulis Center for Evolutionary Biology and showcased the Galapagos Science Center, in San Cristóbal, an impressive research facility conceptualized in partnership with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA. USFQ and GAIAS excelled at managing the conference with exceptional vision and at highlighting the relevance of Galapagos in the history of modern evolutionary thinking; Charles Darwin’s visit to this volcanic archipelago in 1835 unfolded unprecedented scientific interest in what today is a matchless World Heritage. PMID:26925190

  6. Characterization of the biochemical properties of Campylobacter jejuni RNase III

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Nabila; Saramago, Margarida; Matos, Rute G.; Prévost, Hervé; Arraiano, Cecília M.

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a foodborne bacterial pathogen, which is now considered as a leading cause of human bacterial gastroenteritis. The information regarding ribonucleases in C. jejuni is very scarce but there are hints that they can be instrumental in virulence mechanisms. Namely, PNPase (polynucleotide phosphorylase) was shown to allow survival of C. jejuni in refrigerated conditions, to facilitate bacterial swimming, cell adhesion, colonization and invasion. In several microorganisms PNPase synthesis is auto-controlled in an RNase III (ribonuclease III)-dependent mechanism. Thereby, we have cloned, overexpressed, purified and characterized Cj-RNase III (C. jejuni RNase III). We have demonstrated that Cj-RNase III is able to complement an Escherichia coli rnc-deficient strain in 30S rRNA processing and PNPase regulation. Cj-RNase III was shown to be active in an unexpectedly large range of conditions, and Mn2+ seems to be its preferred co-factor, contrarily to what was described for other RNase III orthologues. The results lead us to speculate that Cj-RNase III may have an important role under a Mn2+-rich environment. Mutational analysis strengthened the function of some residues in the catalytic mechanism of action of RNase III, which was shown to be conserved. PMID:24073828

  7. Characterization of the biochemical properties of Campylobacter jejuni RNase III.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Nabila; Saramago, Margarida; Matos, Rute G; Prévost, Hervé; Arraiano, Cecília M

    2013-11-25

    Campylobacter jejuni is a foodborne bacterial pathogen, which is now considered as a leading cause of human bacterial gastroenteritis. The information regarding ribonucleases in C. jejuni is very scarce but there are hints that they can be instrumental in virulence mechanisms. Namely, PNPase (polynucleotide phosphorylase) was shown to allow survival of C. jejuni in refrigerated conditions, to facilitate bacterial swimming, cell adhesion, colonization and invasion. In several microorganisms PNPase synthesis is auto-controlled in an RNase III (ribonuclease III)-dependent mechanism. Thereby, we have cloned, overexpressed, purified and characterized Cj-RNase III (C. jejuni RNase III). We have demonstrated that Cj-RNase III is able to complement an Escherichia coli rnc-deficient strain in 30S rRNA processing and PNPase regulation. Cj-RNase III was shown to be active in an unexpectedly large range of conditions, and Mn2+ seems to be its preferred co-factor, contrarily to what was described for other RNase III orthologues. The results lead us to speculate that Cj-RNase III may have an important role under a Mn2+-rich environment. Mutational analysis strengthened the function of some residues in the catalytic mechanism of action of RNase III, which was shown to be conserved.

  8. Evolution and expression of class III peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Mathé, Catherine; Barre, Annick; Jourda, Cyril; Dunand, Christophe

    2010-08-01

    Class III peroxidases are members of a large multigenic family, only detected in the plant kingdom and absent from green algae sensu stricto (chlorophyte algae or Chlorophyta). Their evolution is thought to be related to the emergence of the land plants. However class III peroxidases are present in a lower copy number in some basal Streptophytes (Charapyceae), which predate land colonization. Gene structures are variable among organisms and within species with respect to the number of introns, but their positions are highly conserved. Their high copy number, as well as their conservation could be related to plant complexity and adaptation to increasing stresses. No specific function has been assigned to respective isoforms, but in large multigenic families, particular structure-function relations can be expected. Plant peroxidase sequences contain highly conserved residues and motifs, variable domains surrounded by conserved residues and present a low identity level among their promoter regions, further suggesting the existence of sub-functionalization of the different isoforms. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Plant Actin-Depolymerizing Factors Possess Opposing Biochemical Properties Arising from Key Amino Acid Changes throughout Evolution.

    PubMed

    Nan, Qiong; Qian, Dong; Niu, Yue; He, Yongxing; Tong, Shaofei; Niu, Zhimin; Ma, Jianchao; Yang, Yang; An, Lizhe; Wan, Dongshi; Xiang, Yun

    2017-02-01

    Functional divergence in paralogs is an important genetic source of evolutionary innovation. Actin-depolymerizing factors (ADFs) are among the most important actin binding proteins and are involved in generating and remodeling actin cytoskeletal architecture via their conserved F-actin severing or depolymerizing activity. In plants, ADFs coevolved with actin, but their biochemical properties are diverse. Unfortunately, the biochemical function of most plant ADFs and the potential mechanisms of their functional divergence remain unclear. Here, in vitro biochemical analyses demonstrated that all 11 ADF genes in Arabidopsis thaliana exhibit opposing biochemical properties. Subclass III ADFs evolved F-actin bundling (B-type) function from conserved F-actin depolymerizing (D-type) function, and subclass I ADFs have enhanced D-type function. By tracking historical mutation sites on ancestral proteins, several fundamental amino acid residues affecting the biochemical functions of these proteins were identified in Arabidopsis and various plants, suggesting that the biochemical divergence of ADFs has been conserved during the evolution of angiosperm plants. Importantly, N-terminal extensions on subclass III ADFs that arose from intron-sliding events are indispensable for the alteration of D-type to B-type function. We conclude that the evolution of these N-terminal extensions and several conserved mutations produced the diverse biochemical functions of plant ADFs from a putative ancestor.

  10. Plant Actin-Depolymerizing Factors Possess Opposing Biochemical Properties Arising from Key Amino Acid Changes throughout Evolution[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Qiong; Niu, Yue; He, Yongxing; Tong, Shaofei; Niu, Zhimin; Ma, Jianchao; Yang, Yang; An, Lizhe; Wan, Dongshi

    2017-01-01

    Functional divergence in paralogs is an important genetic source of evolutionary innovation. Actin-depolymerizing factors (ADFs) are among the most important actin binding proteins and are involved in generating and remodeling actin cytoskeletal architecture via their conserved F-actin severing or depolymerizing activity. In plants, ADFs coevolved with actin, but their biochemical properties are diverse. Unfortunately, the biochemical function of most plant ADFs and the potential mechanisms of their functional divergence remain unclear. Here, in vitro biochemical analyses demonstrated that all 11 ADF genes in Arabidopsis thaliana exhibit opposing biochemical properties. Subclass III ADFs evolved F-actin bundling (B-type) function from conserved F-actin depolymerizing (D-type) function, and subclass I ADFs have enhanced D-type function. By tracking historical mutation sites on ancestral proteins, several fundamental amino acid residues affecting the biochemical functions of these proteins were identified in Arabidopsis and various plants, suggesting that the biochemical divergence of ADFs has been conserved during the evolution of angiosperm plants. Importantly, N-terminal extensions on subclass III ADFs that arose from intron-sliding events are indispensable for the alteration of D-type to B-type function. We conclude that the evolution of these N-terminal extensions and several conserved mutations produced the diverse biochemical functions of plant ADFs from a putative ancestor. PMID:28123105

  11. Structuring evolution: biochemical networks and metabolic diversification in birds.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Erin S; Badyaev, Alexander V

    2016-08-25

    Recurrence and predictability of evolution are thought to reflect the correspondence between genomic and phenotypic dimensions of organisms, and the connectivity in deterministic networks within these dimensions. Direct examination of the correspondence between opportunities for diversification imbedded in such networks and realized diversity is illuminating, but is empirically challenging because both the deterministic networks and phenotypic diversity are modified in the course of evolution. Here we overcome this problem by directly comparing the structure of a "global" carotenoid network - comprising of all known enzymatic reactions among naturally occurring carotenoids - with the patterns of evolutionary diversification in carotenoid-producing metabolic networks utilized by birds. We found that phenotypic diversification in carotenoid networks across 250 species was closely associated with enzymatic connectivity of the underlying biochemical network - compounds with greater connectivity occurred the most frequently across species and were the hotspots of metabolic pathway diversification. In contrast, we found no evidence for diversification along the metabolic pathways, corroborating findings that the utilization of the global carotenoid network was not strongly influenced by history in avian evolution. The finding that the diversification in species-specific carotenoid networks is qualitatively predictable from the connectivity of the underlying enzymatic network points to significant structural determinism in phenotypic evolution.

  12. In silico evolution of oscillatory dynamics in biochemical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Md Zulfikar; Wingreen, Ned S.; Mukhopadhyay, Ranjan

    2015-03-01

    We are studying in silico evolution of complex, oscillatory network dynamics within the framework of a minimal mutational model of protein-protein interactions. In our model we consider two different types of proteins, kinase (activator) and phosphatase(inhibitor). In our model. each protein can either be phosphorylated(active) or unphospphorylated (inactive), represented by binary strings. Active proteins can modify their target based on the Michaelis-Menten kinetics of chemical equation. Reaction rate constants are directly related to sequence dependent protein-protein interaction energies. This model can be stuided for non-trivial behavior e.g. oscillations, chaos, multiple stable states. We focus here on biochemical oscillators; some questions we will address within our framework include how the oscillatory dynamics depends on number of protein species, connectivity of the network, whether evolution can readily converge on a stable oscillator if we start with random intitial parameters, neutral evolution with additional protein components and general questions of robustness and evolavability.

  13. Evolution of Class III treatment in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Ngan, Peter; Moon, Won

    2015-07-01

    Angle, Tweed, and Moyers classified Class III malocclusions into 3 types: pseudo, dentoalveolar, and skeletal. Clinicians have been trying to identify the best timing to intercept a Class III malocclusion that develops as early as the deciduous dentition. With microimplants as skeletal anchorage, orthopedic growth modification became more effective, and it also increased the scope of camouflage orthodontic treatment for patients who were not eligible for orthognathic surgery. However, orthodontic treatment combined with orthognathic surgery remains the only option for patients with a severe skeletal Class III malocclusion or a craniofacial anomaly. Distraction osteogenesis can now be performed intraorally at an earlier age. The surgery-first approach can minimize the length of time that the malocclusion needs to worsen before orthognathic surgery. Finally, the use of computed tomography scans for 3-dimensional diagnosis and treatment planning together with advances in imaging technology can improve the accuracy of surgical movements and the esthetic outcomes for these patients.

  14. The Evolution of Population III Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Araujo, J. C. N.; Opher, R.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Estudiamos el enfriamiento y colapso de las perturbaciones iso- termicas de masa M % Mj (masa de Jeans en la era de recombinaci6n) y M « Mj tomando en consideraci5n la expansi6n del Universo, presi6n, arrastre de fotones, enfriamiento de fotones (calentamiento), fotoioni- zaci6n, ionizaci5n por colisiones y la formaci6n y enfriamiento de mo- leculas de hidr6geno. Tambien estudiamos el efecto de no-esfericidad, rotaci6n y campos magneticos en el colapso de M % Mj debido a perturbaciones residuales que sobreviven para N « Mj. ABSTRACT. We study the cooling and collapse of isothermal perturbations of mass N % Nj (Jeans mass at recombination era) and N « NJ taking into account the expansion of the Universe, pressure, photon-drag, photon -cooling (heating), photoionization, collisional ionization and the formation and cooling of hydrogen molecules. We also study the effect of the nonsphericity, rotation and magnetic fields in the collapse of N % NJ. The formation of protostars from the fragmentation of clouds of mass M % MJ due to the residual perturbations that survive for N « NJ is also investigated. K ok : HYDRODYNANICS - STARS-POPULATION III

  15. Molecular and biochemical characterization of Tunisian patients with glycogen storage disease type III.

    PubMed

    Mili, Amira; Ben Charfeddine, Ilhem; Mamaï, Ons; Abdelhak, Sonia; Adala, Labiba; Amara, Abdelbasset; Pagliarani, Serena; Lucchiarri, Sabrina; Lucchiari, Sabrina; Ayadi, Abdelkarim; Tebib, Neji; Harbi, Abdelaziz; Bouguila, Jihene; H'Mida, Dorra; Saad, Ali; Limem, Khalifa; Comi, G P; Gribaa, Moez

    2012-03-01

    Glycogen storage disease type III (GSD III) is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism caused by mutations in the glycogen debranching enzyme amylo-1,6-glucosidase gene, which is located on chromosome 1p21.2. GSD III is characterized by the storage of structurally abnormal glycogen, termed limit dextrin, in both skeletal and cardiac muscle and/or liver, with great variability in resultant organ dysfunction. The spectrum of AGL gene mutations in GSD III patients depends on ethnic group. The most prevalent mutations have been reported in the North African Jewish population and in an isolate such as the Faroe Islands. Here, we present the molecular and biochemical analyses of 22 Tunisian GSD III patients. Molecular analysis revealed three novel mutations: nonsense (Tyr1148X) and two deletions (3033_3036del AATT and 3216_3217del GA) and five known mutations: three nonsense (R864X, W1327X and W255X), a missense (R524H) and an acceptor splice-site mutation (IVS32-12A>G). Each mutation is associated to a specific haplotype. This is the first report of screening for mutations of AGL gene in the Tunisian population.

  16. Biochemical and molecular investigation of two Korean patients with glycogen storage disease type III.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sue-Hyun; Park, Hyung-Doo; Ki, Chang-Seok; Choe, Yon-Ho; Lee, Soo-Youn

    2008-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type III (GSD-III) is an inborn error of glycogen metabolism caused by a deficiency of the glycogen debranching enzyme, amylo-1,6-glucosidase,4-alpha-glucanotransferase (AGL). Here, we describe two unrelated Korean patients with GSD-III and review their clinical and laboratory findings. The patients were 18- and 11-month-old girls. They presented with hepatosplenomegaly, developmental delay and hypotonia. The routine laboratory findings showed an elevated serum aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, creatine kinase and triglyceride levels. The blood lactate and uric acid levels were within normal limits. PCR and direct sequencing were performed to determine genetic findings. Glycogen quantitation was markedly increased and AGL activity was undetectable in both patients. Sequence analysis of the AGL gene showed that both patients were compound heterozygotes for c.853C>T (p.R285X) and c.1735+1G>T in one patient, and c.2894_2896delGGAinsTG and c.4090G>C (p.D1364H) in the other patient. The c.2894_2896delGGAinsTG and c.4090G>C (p.D1364H) mutation was a novel finding. GSD-III should be ruled out when a patient presents with hepatic abnormalities, hypoglycemia, myopathy and hyperlipidemia. This is the first report of confirmation of GSD-III in Korean patients by biochemical and genetic findings.

  17. Biochemical and genetic studies in cystinuria: observations on double heterozygotes of genotype I/II

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Claude L.; Thompson, Margaret W.; Jackson, Sanford H.; Sass-Kortsak, Andrew

    1971-01-01

    10 families with cystinuria were investigated by measuring: (a) quantitative 24 hr urinary excretion of amino acids by column chromatography; (b) endogenous renal clearances of amino acids and creatinine; (c) intestinal uptake of 34C-labeled L-cystine, L-lysine, and L-arginine using jejunal mucosal biopsies; (d) oral cystine loading tests. All four of these were studied in the probands and the first two in a large number of the family members. 49 members of 8 families were found to have a regular genetic pattern as described previously by Harris, Rosenberg, and their coworkers. Clinical or biochemical differences between the homozygotes type I (recessive cystinuria) and homozygotes type II (incompletely recessive cystinuria) have not been found. Both types excreted similarly excessive amounts of cystine, lysine, arginine, and ornithine, and had high endogenous renal clearances for these four amino acids. Some homozygotes of both types had a cystine clearance higher than the glomerular filtration rate. Jejunal mucosa from both types of homozygotes exhibited near complete inability to concentrate cystine and lysine in vitro. This was also documented in vivo with oral cystine loads. The heterozygotes type I were phenotypically normal with respect to the above four measurements. The heterozygotes type II showed moderate but definite abnormalities in their urinary excretion and their renal clearances of dibasic amino acids. Of the four amino acids concerned, cystine was the most reliable marker to differentiate between the heterozygotes type II and the homozygous normals. In this study, type III cystinuria, as described by Rosenberg, was not encountered. In two additional families, double heterozygotes of genotype I/II were found. The disease affecting these is clinically and biochemically less severe than that affecting homozygotes of either type I or type II. With respect to the four parameters used in this study, the double heterozygotes type I/II have results which

  18. Mathematical Descriptions of Biochemical Networks: Stability, Stochasticity, Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Simon

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we review some fundamental aspects, as well as some new developments, in the emerging field of network biology. The focus of attention is placed on mathematical approaches to conceptual modeling of biomolecular networks with special emphasis on dynamic stability, stochasticity and evolution. PMID:21419158

  19. Planetary change and biochemical adaptation: molecular evolution of corrinoid and heme biosyntheses.

    PubMed

    Lazcano, Antonio

    2012-04-01

    This review examines the evidence suggesting that the anaerobic biosynthesis of cobalamin (vitamin B12) evolved during early stages of cell evolution and was quickly recruited in the pathway leading to deoxyribonucleotides, the building blocks of DNA genomes. Biochemical evolution preceding the synthesis of the heme group and related molecules is discussed within the framework of geological evolution in which the appearance and accumulation of an oxygen-rich atmosphere stands as one of the major events in the evolution of the planet and the biosphere.

  20. Biochemical Evolution of Iron and Copper Proteins, Substances Vital to Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frieden, Earl

    1974-01-01

    Summarizes studies in the area of biochemical evolution of iron, copper, and heme proteins to provide an historical outline. Included are lists of major kinds of proteins and enzymes and charts illustrating electron flow in a cytochrome electron transport system and interconversion of jerrous to ferric ion in iron metabolism. (CC)

  1. Biochemical Evolution of Iron and Copper Proteins, Substances Vital to Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frieden, Earl

    1974-01-01

    Summarizes studies in the area of biochemical evolution of iron, copper, and heme proteins to provide an historical outline. Included are lists of major kinds of proteins and enzymes and charts illustrating electron flow in a cytochrome electron transport system and interconversion of jerrous to ferric ion in iron metabolism. (CC)

  2. Genes encoding Δ(8)-sphingolipid desaturase from various plants: identification, biochemical functions, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Fen; Zhang, Guo-Jun; Zhang, Xue-Jin; Yuan, Jin-Hong; Deng, Chuan-Liang; Hu, Zan-Min; Gao, Wu-Jun

    2016-09-01

    ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturase catalyzes the C8 desaturation of a long chain base, which is the characteristic structure of various complex sphingolipids. The genes of 20 ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturases from 12 plants were identified and functionally detected by using Saccharomyces cerevisiae system to elucidate the relationship between the biochemical function and evolution of this enzyme. Results showed that the 20 genes all can encode a functional ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturase, which catalyzes different ratios of two products, namely, 8(Z) and 8(E)-C18-phytosphingenine. The coded enzymes could be divided into two groups on the basis of biochemical functions: ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturase with a preference for an E-isomer product and ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturase with a preference for a Z-isomer product. The conversion rate of the latter was generally lower than that of the former. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the 20 desaturases could also be clustered into two groups, and this grouping is consistent with that of the biochemical functions. Thus, the biochemical function of ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturase is correlated with its evolution. The two groups of ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturases could arise from distinct ancestors in higher plants. However, they might have initially evolved from ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturases in lower organisms, such as yeasts, which can produce E-isomer products only. Furthermore, almost all of the transgenic yeasts harboring ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturase genes exhibit an improvement in aluminum tolerance. Our study provided new insights into the biochemical function and evolution of ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturases in plants.

  3. The role of log-normal dynamics in the evolution of biochemical pathways.

    PubMed

    Nacher, J C; Ochiai, T; Yamada, T; Kanehisa, M; Akutsu, T

    2006-01-01

    The study of the scale-free topology in non-biological and biological networks and the dynamics that can explain this fascinating property of complex systems have captured the attention of the scientific community in the last years. Here, we analyze the biochemical pathways of three organisms (Methanococcus jannaschii, Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae) which are representatives of the main kingdoms Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryotes during the course of the biological evolution. We can consider two complementary representations of the biochemical pathways: the enzymes network and the chemical compounds network. In this article, we propose a stochastic model that explains that the scale-free topology with exponent in the vicinity of gamma approximately 3/2 found across these three organisms is governed by the log-normal dynamics in the evolution of the enzymes network. Precisely, the fluctuations of the connectivity degree of enzymes in the biochemical pathways between evolutionary distant organisms follow the same conserved dynamical principle, which in the end is the origin of the stationary scale-free distribution observed among species, from Archaea to Eukaryotes. In particular, the log-normal dynamics guarantees the conservation of the scale-free distribution in evolving networks. Furthermore, the log-normal dynamics also gives a possible explanation for the restricted range of observed exponents gamma in the scale-free networks (i.e., gamma > or = 3/2). Finally, our model is also applied to the chemical compounds network of biochemical pathways and the Internet network.

  4. Evolution of long-term coloration trends with biochemically unstable ingredients

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Sarah N.; Andrews, John E.; Badyaev, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    The evolutionarily persistent and widespread use of carotenoid pigments in animal coloration contrasts with their biochemical instability. Consequently, evolution of carotenoid-based displays should include mechanisms to accommodate or limit pigment degradation. In birds, this could involve two strategies: (i) evolution of a moult immediately prior to the mating season, enabling the use of particularly fast-degrading carotenoids and (ii) evolution of the ability to stabilize dietary carotenoids through metabolic modification or association with feather keratins. Here, we examine evolutionary lability and transitions between the two strategies across 126 species of birds. We report that species that express mostly unmodified, fast-degrading, carotenoids have pre-breeding moults, and a particularly short time between carotenoid deposition and the subsequent breeding season. Species that expressed mostly slow-degrading carotenoids in their plumage accomplished this through increased metabolic modification of dietary carotenoids, and the selective expression of these slow-degrading compounds. In these species, the timing of moult was not associated with carotenoid composition of plumage displays. Using repeated samples from individuals of one species, we found that metabolic modification of dietary carotenoids significantly slowed their degradation between moult and breeding season. Thus, the most complex and colourful ornamentation is likely the most biochemically stable in birds, and depends less on ecological factors, such as moult timing and migration tendency. We suggest that coevolution of metabolic modification, selective expression and biochemical stability of plumage carotenoids enables the use of unstable pigments in long-term evolutionary trends in plumage coloration. PMID:27194697

  5. Hemorrhagic metalloproteinase, Cc HSM-III, isolated from Cerastes cerastes venom: Purification and biochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Tachoua, Wafa; Boukhalfa-Abib, Hinda; Laraba-Djebari, Fatima

    2017-02-28

    Snake venom metalloproteinases are the most abundant toxins in Viperidae venoms. In this study, a new hemorrhagin, Cc HSM-III (66 kDa), was purified from Cerastes cerastes venom by gel filtration, ion exchange, and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographies. The analysis of Cc HSM-III by liquid chromatography with a tandem mass spectrometry revealed 32 peptides sharing a homology with P-III metalloproteinases from Echis ocellatus snake venom. Cc HSM-III displays hemorrhagic activity with a minimal hemorrhagic dose of 5 μg, which is abolished by ethylene diamine tetracetic acid but not by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride. The mechanism underlying Cc HSM-III hemorrhagic activity is probably due to its extensive proteolytic activity against type IV collagen. Cc HSM-III induces local tissue damage and an inflammatory response by upregulating both matrix metalloproteinase 2 and 9 in skin of mice. Thus, Cc HSM-III may play a key role in the pathogenesis of C. cerastes envenomation.

  6. The need for combined inorganic, biochemical, and nutritional studies of chromium(III).

    PubMed

    Vincent, John B; Love, Sharifa T

    2012-09-01

    The history of biochemical and nutritional studies of the element is unfortunately full of twists and turns, most leading to dead ends. Chromium (Cr), as the trivalent ion, has been proposed to be an essential element, a body mass and muscle development agent, and, in the form of the most popular Cr-containing nutritional supplement, to be toxic when given orally to mammals. None of these proposals, despite significant attention in the popular media, has proven to be correct. Trivalent chromium has also been proposed as a therapeutic agent to increase insulin sensitivity and affect lipid metabolism, although a molecular mechanism for such actions has not been elucidated. Greater cooperative research interactions between nutritionists, biochemists, and chemists might have avoided the earlier issues in nutritional and biochemical Cr research and is necessary to establish the potential role of Cr as a therapeutic agent at a molecular level. Copyright © 2012 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  7. Physiological and biochemical responses of Eichhornia crassipes exposed to Cr (III).

    PubMed

    González, C I; Maine, M A; Cazenave, J; Sanchez, G C; Benavides, M P

    2015-03-01

    The effect of exposure of Eichhornia crassipes to Cr (III) was assessed by measuring changes in photosynthetic pigments, malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase, catalase, and guaiacol peroxidase activities, as well as Cr concentration in tissues. Cr concentration in roots was significantly higher than in aerial parts and increased with Cr concentration in water. Photosynthetic pigments increased significantly, whereas the activities of antioxidant enzymes varied differently in plant tissues. Low Cr concentrations induced a rapid response of E. crassipes during short-term exposure, implying that the antioxidant system conferred redox homeostasis. Results showed that Cr (III) was more toxic at the two highest concentrations and long-term exposure, while it was not harmful but beneficial at the two lowest concentrations and short-term exposure. This work concludes that E. crassipes was able to grow under Cr (III) stress by protecting itself with an increase in the activity of its antioxidant system.

  8. Molecular and biochemical evidence for the presence of type III adenylyl cyclase in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Katsel, Pavel L; Tagliente, Thomas M; Schwarz, Todd E; Craddock-Royal, Barbara D; Patel, Nayana D; Maayani, Saul

    2003-02-01

    The isoform(s) of adenylyl cyclase (AC) present in human platelets has not been identified, and evidence supporting a role for AC in platelet aggregation is equivocal. We recently characterized deaggregation as an active component of the platelet aggregation response that may be an important determinant of the extent and duration of aggregation. G(i)-coupled receptors are linked to the inhibition of AC and are targets of antiplatelet drugs. They also affect platelet aggregation by modulating deaggregation, suggesting a role for AC in modulating this response. The purpose of this study was to identify the AC isoform(s) present in human platelets and to identify its physiological modulators. RT-PCR screening of platelet, buffy coat layer cell and bone marrow megakaryocyte cDNA, and Western blot analysis with AC type III (AC-III) antibodies identified AC-III in platelets and in megakaryocytes. Human platelet AC-III was cloned and expressed in HEK293 cells and its characteristics compared to native platelet AC. Both platelet AC and cloned AC-III required Mg(2+) for activity, were insensitive to Ca(2+) and were G(s)- and G(i)-coupled. Zn(2+) and SQ22536 inhibited platelet AC activity. The affinity of SQ22536 was increased with Mg(2+)-related stimulation of AC, while that of Zn(2+) was unchanged, which is consistent with a non-competitive interaction between the two metal ions on AC. The Zn(2+) chelator TPEN reversed the inhibitory effects of Zn(2+). This study identified AC-III as the predominant AC isoform in human platelets, the activity of which may affect the extent and duration of the net aggregation response by modulating deaggregation.

  9. Diversity of Bile Salts in Fish and Amphibians: Evolution of a Complex Biochemical Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hagey, Lee R.; Møller, Peter R.; Hofmann, Alan F.; Krasowski, Matthew D.

    2010-01-01

    Bile salts are the major end-metabolites of cholesterol and are also important in lipid and protein digestion, as well as shaping of the gut microflora. Previous studies had demonstrated variation of bile salt structures across vertebrate species. We greatly extend prior surveys of bile salt variation in fish and amphibians, particularly in analysis of the biliary bile salts of Agnatha and Chondrichthyes. While there is significant structural variation of bile salts across all fish orders, bile salt profiles are generally stable within orders of fish and do not correlate with differences in diet. This large data set allowed us to infer evolutionary changes in the bile salt synthetic pathway. The hypothesized ancestral bile salt synthetic pathway, likely exemplified in extant hagfish, is simpler and much shorter than the pathway of most teleost fish and terrestrial vertebrates. Thus, the bile salt synthetic pathway has become longer and more complex throughout vertebrate evolution. Analysis of the evolution of bile salt synthetic pathways provides a rich model system for the molecular evolution of a complex biochemical pathway in vertebrates. PMID:20113173

  10. Diversity of bile salts in fish and amphibians: evolution of a complex biochemical pathway.

    PubMed

    Hagey, Lee R; Møller, Peter R; Hofmann, Alan F; Krasowski, Matthew D

    2010-01-01

    Bile salts are the major end metabolites of cholesterol and are also important in lipid and protein digestion, as well as shaping of the gut microflora. Previous studies had demonstrated variation of bile salt structures across vertebrate species. We greatly extend prior surveys of bile salt variation in fish and amphibians, particularly in analysis of the biliary bile salts of Agnatha and Chondrichthyes. While there is significant structural variation of bile salts across all fish orders, bile salt profiles are generally stable within orders of fish and do not correlate with differences in diet. This large data set allowed us to infer evolutionary changes in the bile salt synthetic pathway. The hypothesized ancestral bile salt synthetic pathway, likely exemplified in extant hagfish, is simpler and much shorter than the pathway of most teleost fish and terrestrial vertebrates. Thus, the bile salt synthetic pathway has become longer and more complex throughout vertebrate evolution. Analysis of the evolution of bile salt synthetic pathways provides a rich model system for the molecular evolution of a complex biochemical pathway in vertebrates.

  11. Interacting phenotypes and the evolutionary process. III. Social evolution.

    PubMed

    McGlothlin, Joel W; Moore, Allen J; Wolf, Jason B; Brodie, Edmund D

    2010-09-01

    Interactions among conspecifics influence social evolution through two distinct but intimately related paths. First, they provide the opportunity for indirect genetic effects (IGEs), where genes expressed in one individual influence the expression of traits in others. Second, interactions can generate social selection when traits expressed in one individual influence the fitness of others. Here, we present a quantitative genetic model of multivariate trait evolution that integrates the effects of both IGEs and social selection, which have previously been modeled independently. We show that social selection affects evolutionary change whenever the breeding value of one individual covaries with the phenotype of its social partners. This covariance can be created by both relatedness and IGEs, which are shown to have parallel roles in determining evolutionary response. We show that social selection is central to the estimation of inclusive fitness and derive a version of Hamilton's rule showing the symmetrical effects of relatedness and IGEs on the evolution of altruism. We illustrate the utility of our approach using altruism, greenbeards, aggression, and weapons as examples. Our model provides a general predictive equation for the evolution of social phenotypes that encompasses specific cases such as kin selection and reciprocity. The parameters can be measured empirically, and we emphasize the importance of considering both IGEs and social selection, in addition to relatedness, when testing hypotheses about social evolution. © 2010 The Author(s). Journal compilation © 2010 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  12. From molecules to mating: Rapid evolution and biochemical studies of reproductive proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wilburn, Damien B.; Swanson, Willie J.

    2015-01-01

    Sexual reproduction and the exchange of genetic information are essential biological processes for species across all branches of the tree of life. Over the last four decades, biochemists have continued to identify many of the factors that facilitate reproduction, but the molecular mechanisms that mediate this process continue to elude us. However, a recurring observation in this research has been the rapid evolution of reproductive proteins. In animals, the competing interests of males and females often result in arms race dynamics between pairs of interacting proteins. This phenomenon has been observed in all stages of reproduction, including pheromones, seminal fluid components, and gamete recognition proteins. In this article, we review how the integration of evolutionary theory with biochemical experiments can be used to study interacting reproductive proteins. Examples are included from both model and non-model organisms, and recent studies are highlighted for their use of state-of-the-art genomic and proteomic techniques. Significance Despite decades of research, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that mediate fertilization remain poorly characterized. To date, molecular evolutionary studies on both model and non-model organisms have provided some of the best inferences to elucidating the molecular underpinnings of animal reproduction. This review article details how biochemical and evolutionary experiments have jointly enhanced the field for 40 years, and how recent work using high-throughput genomic and proteomic techniques have shed additional insights into this crucial biological process. PMID:26074353

  13. Biochemical and mutational analysis of glutamine synthetase type III from the rumen anaerobe Ruminococcus albus 8.

    PubMed

    Amaya, Kensey R; Kocherginskaya, Svetlana A; Mackie, Roderick I; Cann, Isaac K O

    2005-11-01

    Two different genes encoding glutamine synthetase type I (GSI) and GSIII were identified in the genome sequence of R. albus 8. The identity of the GSIII protein was confirmed by the presence of its associated conserved motifs. The glnN gene, encoding the GSIII, was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 cells. The recombinant protein was purified and subjected to biochemical and physical analyses. Subunit organization suggested a protein present in solution as both monomers and oligomers. Kinetic studies using the forward and the gamma-glutamyl transferase (gamma-GT) assays were carried out. Mutations that changed conserved glutamic acid residues to alanine in the four GSIII motifs resulted in drastic decreases in GS activity using both assays, except for an E380A mutation, which rather resulted in an increase in activity in the forward assay compared to the wild-type protein. Reduced GSIII activity was also exhibited by mutating, individually, two lysines (K308 and K318) located in the putative nucleotide-binding site to alanine. Most importantly, the presence of mRNA transcripts of the glnN gene in R. albus 8 cells grown under ammonia limiting conditions, whereas little or no transcript was detected in cells grown under ammonia sufficient conditions, suggested an important role for the GSIII in the nitrogen metabolism of R. albus 8. Furthermore, the mutational studies on the conserved GSIII motifs demonstrated, for the first time, their importance in the structure and/or function of a GSIII protein.

  14. Biochemical and Mutational Analysis of Glutamine Synthetase Type III from the Rumen Anaerobe Ruminococcus albus 8

    PubMed Central

    Amaya, Kensey R.; Kocherginskaya, Svetlana A.; Mackie, Roderick I.; Cann, Isaac K. O.

    2005-01-01

    Two different genes encoding glutamine synthetase type I (GSI) and GSIII were identified in the genome sequence of R. albus 8. The identity of the GSIII protein was confirmed by the presence of its associated conserved motifs. The glnN gene, encoding the GSIII, was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 cells. The recombinant protein was purified and subjected to biochemical and physical analyses. Subunit organization suggested a protein present in solution as both monomers and oligomers. Kinetic studies using the forward and the γ-glutamyl transferase (γ-GT) assays were carried out. Mutations that changed conserved glutamic acid residues to alanine in the four GSIII motifs resulted in drastic decreases in GS activity using both assays, except for an E380A mutation, which rather resulted in an increase in activity in the forward assay compared to the wild-type protein. Reduced GSIII activity was also exhibited by mutating, individually, two lysines (K308 and K318) located in the putative nucleotide-binding site to alanine. Most importantly, the presence of mRNA transcripts of the glnN gene in R. albus 8 cells grown under ammonia limiting conditions, whereas little or no transcript was detected in cells grown under ammonia sufficient conditions, suggested an important role for the GSIII in the nitrogen metabolism of R. albus 8. Furthermore, the mutational studies on the conserved GSIII motifs demonstrated, for the first time, their importance in the structure and/or function of a GSIII protein. PMID:16237031

  15. Pele III, plate tectonics, atmospheric and biotic evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Sloan, R.E. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1994-04-01

    This paper is an elaboration of Pele I and II, Landis et al GSA Abstr. V. 25 No.6, and Hengst et al GSA Abstr. V. 25 No.6. The Pele hypothesis is that CO[sub 2] concentration in the atmosphere is directly related to the rate of seafloor spreading and the existence of superplumes. Excess CO[sub 2] favors expansion of plants and is converted to O[sub 2] by photosynthesis and deposition of buried carbon and carbonate. O[sub 2] is removed from the atmosphere by weathering. Resulting major variations in atmospheric CO[sub 2] and O[sub 2] have significant impact on the evolution and extinction of organisms.

  16. The evolution of galaxies. III - Metal-enhanced star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, R. J., Jr.; Arnett, W. D.

    1973-01-01

    The problem of the paucity of low-metal-abundance low-mass stars is discussed. One alternative to the variable-initial-mass-function (VIMF) solution is proposed. It is shown that this solution - metal-enhanced star formation - satisfies the classical test which prompted the VIMF hypothesis. Furthermore, with no additional parameters it provides improved fits to other tests - e.g., inhomogeneities in the abundances in young stars, concordance of all nucleo-cosmochronologies, and a required yield of heavy-element production which is consistent with current stellar evolution theory. In this model the age of the Galaxy is 18.6 plus or minus 5.7 b.y.

  17. The evolution of galaxies. III - Metal-enhanced star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, R. J., Jr.; Arnett, W. D.

    1973-01-01

    The problem of the paucity of low-metal-abundance low-mass stars is discussed. One alternative to the variable-initial-mass-function (VIMF) solution is proposed. It is shown that this solution - metal-enhanced star formation - satisfies the classical test which prompted the VIMF hypothesis. Furthermore, with no additional parameters it provides improved fits to other tests - e.g., inhomogeneities in the abundances in young stars, concordance of all nucleo-cosmochronologies, and a required yield of heavy-element production which is consistent with current stellar evolution theory. In this model the age of the Galaxy is 18.6 plus or minus 5.7 b.y.

  18. An alternative splicing event which occurs in mouse pachytene spermatocytes generates a form of DNA ligase III with distinct biochemical properties that may function in meiotic recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, Z B; Ramos, W; Levin, D S; Walter, C A; McCarrey, J R; Tomkinson, A E

    1997-01-01

    Three mammalian genes encoding DNA ligases have been identified. However, the role of each of these enzymes in mammalian DNA metabolism has not been established. In this study, we show that two forms of mammalian DNA ligase III, alpha and beta, are produced by a conserved tissue-specific alternative splicing mechanism involving exons encoding the C termini of the polypeptides. DNA ligase III-alpha cDNA, which encodes a 103-kDa polypeptide, is expressed in all tissues and cells, whereas DNA ligase III-beta cDNA, which encodes a 96-kDa polypeptide, is expressed only in the testis. During male germ cell differentiation, elevated expression of DNA ligase III-beta mRNA is restricted, beginning only in the latter stages of meiotic prophase and ending in the round spermatid stage. In 96-kDa DNA ligase III-beta, the C-terminal 77 amino acids of DNA ligase III-alpha are replaced by a different 17- to 18-amino acid sequence. As reported previously, the 103-kDa DNA ligase III-alpha interacts with the DNA strand break repair protein encoded by the human XRCC1 gene. In contrast, the 96-kDa DNA ligase III-beta does not interact with XRCC1, indicating that DNA ligase III-beta may play a role in cellular functions distinct from the DNA repair pathways involving the DNA ligase III-alpha x XRCC1 complex. The distinct biochemical properties of DNA ligase III-beta, in combination with the tissue- and cell-type-specific expression of DNA ligase III-beta mRNA, suggest that this form of DNA ligase III is specifically involved in the completion of homologous recombination events that occur during meiotic prophase. PMID:9001252

  19. Primary local orbital amyloidosis: biochemical identification of the immunoglobulin light chain kappaIII subtype in a small formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded tissue sample.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, B; Martin, B M; Cohen, H I; Manaster, J; Kassif, Y; Rehany, U; Livneh, A

    2005-05-01

    Amyloidosis refers to a heterogeneous group of disorders associated with the deposition of chemically distinct amyloid fibril proteins. Precise determination of chemical amyloid type has diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic relevance. Although immunohistochemical techniques are used routinely to determine the amyloid type, the results can be negative or inconclusive, so that biochemical characterisation is often required. The development and application of new biochemical microtechniques suitable for examination of extremely small tissue samples is essential for precise identification of the deposited amyloid proteins. To investigate biochemically the amyloid proteins present in a formalin fixed paraffin wax embedded orbital tissue from a patient with localised orbital amyloidosis in whom immunohistochemistry was not helpful in the determination of amyloid type. Extraction of amyloid proteins from fixed tissue and their identification was carried out by a recently developed microtechnique. An extremely small tissue sample was dewaxed and extracted with formic acid. The extracted material was analysed using electrophoresis, western blotting, and amino acid sequencing. Biochemical examination of the extracted proteins showed the presence of immunoglobulin (Ig) derived amyloid proteins, which were composed of the N-terminal fragments of the Ig light chain kappaIII subtype (AL-kappaIII) (16, 8, and 3 kDa). This is the first chemically proved AL case reported in association with primary localised orbital amyloidosis. The biochemical microtechnique used was useful in achieving a precise diagnosis of amyloid disease, in a case where the results of routine immunohistochemical examination of amyloid were inconclusive.

  20. Primary local orbital amyloidosis: biochemical identification of the immunoglobulin light chain κIII subtype in a small formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded tissue sample

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, B; Martin, B M; Cohen, H I; Manaster, J; Kassif, Y; Rehany, U; Livneh, A

    2005-01-01

    Background: Amyloidosis refers to a heterogeneous group of disorders associated with the deposition of chemically distinct amyloid fibril proteins. Precise determination of chemical amyloid type has diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic relevance. Although immunohistochemical techniques are used routinely to determine the amyloid type, the results can be negative or inconclusive, so that biochemical characterisation is often required. The development and application of new biochemical microtechniques suitable for examination of extremely small tissue samples is essential for precise identification of the deposited amyloid proteins. Aims: To investigate biochemically the amyloid proteins present in a formalin fixed paraffin wax embedded orbital tissue from a patient with localised orbital amyloidosis in whom immunohistochemistry was not helpful in the determination of amyloid type. Methods: Extraction of amyloid proteins from fixed tissue and their identification was carried out by a recently developed microtechnique. An extremely small tissue sample was dewaxed and extracted with formic acid. The extracted material was analysed using electrophoresis, western blotting, and amino acid sequencing. Results: Biochemical examination of the extracted proteins showed the presence of immunoglobulin (Ig) derived amyloid proteins, which were composed of the N-terminal fragments of the Ig light chain κIII subtype (AL-κIII) (16, 8, and 3 kDa). Conclusions: This is the first chemically proved AL case reported in association with primary localised orbital amyloidosis. The biochemical microtechnique used was useful in achieving a precise diagnosis of amyloid disease, in a case where the results of routine immunohistochemical examination of amyloid were inconclusive. PMID:15858128

  1. Biochemical evolution II: origin of life in tubular microstructures on weathered feldspar surfaces.

    PubMed

    Parsons, I; Lee, M R; Smith, J V

    1998-12-22

    Mineral surfaces were important during the emergence of life on Earth because the assembly of the necessary complex biomolecules by random collisions in dilute aqueous solutions is implausible. Most silicate mineral surfaces are hydrophilic and organophobic and unsuitable for catalytic reactions, but some silica-rich surfaces of partly dealuminated feldspars and zeolites are organophilic and potentially catalytic. Weathered alkali feldspar crystals from granitic rocks at Shap, north west England, contain abundant tubular etch pits, typically 0.4-0.6 microm wide, forming an orthogonal honeycomb network in a surface zone 50 microm thick, with 2-3 x 10(6) intersections per mm2 of crystal surface. Surviving metamorphic rocks demonstrate that granites and acidic surface water were present on the Earth's surface by approximately 3.8 Ga. By analogy with Shap granite, honeycombed feldspar has considerable potential as a natural catalytic surface for the start of biochemical evolution. Biomolecules should have become available by catalysis of amino acids, etc. The honeycomb would have provided access to various mineral inclusions in the feldspar, particularly apatite and oxides, which contain phosphorus and transition metals necessary for energetic life. The organized environment would have protected complex molecules from dispersion into dilute solutions, from hydrolysis, and from UV radiation. Sub-micrometer tubes in the honeycomb might have acted as rudimentary cell walls for proto-organisms, which ultimately evolved a lipid lid giving further shelter from the hostile outside environment. A lid would finally have become a complete cell wall permitting detachment and flotation in primordial "soup." Etch features on weathered alkali feldspar from Shap match the shape of overlying soil bacteria.

  2. Evolution of Dengue Virus Type 3 Genotype III in Venezuela: Diversification, Rates and Population Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Dengue virus (DENV) is a member of the genus Flavivirus of the family Flaviviridae. DENV are comprised of four distinct serotypes (DENV-1 through DENV-4) and each serotype can be divided in different genotypes. Currently, there is a dramatic emergence of DENV-3 genotype III in Latin America. Nevertheless, we still have an incomplete understanding of the evolutionary forces underlying the evolution of this genotype in this region of the world. In order to gain insight into the degree of genetic variability, rates and patterns of evolution of this genotype in Venezuela and the South American region, phylogenetic analysis, based on a large number (n = 119) of envelope gene sequences from DENV-3 genotype III strains isolated in Venezuela from 2001 to 2008, were performed. Results Phylogenetic analysis revealed an in situ evolution of DENV-3 genotype III following its introduction in the Latin American region, where three different genetic clusters (A to C) can be observed among the DENV-3 genotype III strains circulating in this region. Bayesian coalescent inference analyses revealed an evolutionary rate of 8.48 × 10-4 substitutions/site/year (s/s/y) for strains of cluster A, composed entirely of strains isolated in Venezuela. Amino acid substitution at position 329 of domain III of the E protein (A→V) was found in almost all E proteins from Cluster A strains. Conclusions A significant evolutionary change between DENV-3 genotype III strains that circulated in the initial years of the introduction in the continent and strains isolated in the Latin American region in recent years was observed. The presence of DENV-3 genotype III strains belonging to different clusters was observed in Venezuela, revealing several introduction events into this country. The evolutionary rate found for Cluster A strains circulating in Venezuela is similar to the others previously established for this genotype in other regions of the world. This suggests a lack of correlation

  3. Evolution of dengue virus type 3 genotype III in Venezuela: diversification, rates and population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Alvaro; Fajardo, Alvaro; Moros, Zoila; Gerder, Marlene; Caraballo, Gerson; Camacho, Daria; Comach, Guillermo; Alarcón, Victor; Zambrano, Julio; Hernández, Rosa; Moratorio, Gonzalo; Cristina, Juan; Liprandi, Ferdinando

    2010-11-18

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a member of the genus Flavivirus of the family Flaviviridae. DENV are comprised of four distinct serotypes (DENV-1 through DENV-4) and each serotype can be divided in different genotypes. Currently, there is a dramatic emergence of DENV-3 genotype III in Latin America. Nevertheless, we still have an incomplete understanding of the evolutionary forces underlying the evolution of this genotype in this region of the world. In order to gain insight into the degree of genetic variability, rates and patterns of evolution of this genotype in Venezuela and the South American region, phylogenetic analysis, based on a large number (n = 119) of envelope gene sequences from DENV-3 genotype III strains isolated in Venezuela from 2001 to 2008, were performed. Phylogenetic analysis revealed an in situ evolution of DENV-3 genotype III following its introduction in the Latin American region, where three different genetic clusters (A to C) can be observed among the DENV-3 genotype III strains circulating in this region. Bayesian coalescent inference analyses revealed an evolutionary rate of 8.48 x 10⁻⁴ substitutions/site/year (s/s/y) for strains of cluster A, composed entirely of strains isolated in Venezuela. Amino acid substitution at position 329 of domain III of the E protein (A→V) was found in almost all E proteins from Cluster A strains. A significant evolutionary change between DENV-3 genotype III strains that circulated in the initial years of the introduction in the continent and strains isolated in the Latin American region in recent years was observed. The presence of DENV-3 genotype III strains belonging to different clusters was observed in Venezuela, revealing several introduction events into this country. The evolutionary rate found for Cluster A strains circulating in Venezuela is similar to the others previously established for this genotype in other regions of the world. This suggests a lack of correlation among DENV genotype III

  4. Mutualistic Co-evolution of Type III Effector Genes in Sinorhizobium fredii and Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuan; Creason, Allison L.; Thireault, Caitlin A.; Sachs, Joel L.; Chang, Jeff H.

    2013-01-01

    Two diametric paradigms have been proposed to model the molecular co-evolution of microbial mutualists and their eukaryotic hosts. In one, mutualist and host exhibit an antagonistic arms race and each partner evolves rapidly to maximize their own fitness from the interaction at potential expense of the other. In the opposing model, conflicts between mutualist and host are largely resolved and the interaction is characterized by evolutionary stasis. We tested these opposing frameworks in two lineages of mutualistic rhizobia, Sinorhizobium fredii and Bradyrhizobium japonicum. To examine genes demonstrably important for host-interactions we coupled the mining of genome sequences to a comprehensive functional screen for type III effector genes, which are necessary for many Gram-negative pathogens to infect their hosts. We demonstrate that the rhizobial type III effector genes exhibit a surprisingly high degree of conservation in content and sequence that is in contrast to those of a well characterized plant pathogenic species. This type III effector gene conservation is particularly striking in the context of the relatively high genome-wide diversity of rhizobia. The evolution of rhizobial type III effectors is inconsistent with the molecular arms race paradigm. Instead, our results reveal that these loci are relatively static in rhizobial lineages and suggest that fitness conflicts between rhizobia mutualists and their host plants have been largely resolved. PMID:23468637

  5. Bacterial flagella and Type III secretion: case studies in the evolution of complexity.

    PubMed

    Pallen, M J; Gophna, U

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial flagella at first sight appear uniquely sophisticated in structure, so much so that they have even been considered 'irreducibly complex' by the intelligent design movement. However, a more detailed analysis reveals that these remarkable pieces of molecular machinery are the product of processes that are fully compatible with Darwinian evolution. In this chapter we present evidence for such processes, based on a review of experimental studies, molecular phylogeny and microbial genomics. Several processes have played important roles in flagellar evolution: self-assembly of simple repeating subunits, gene duplication with subsequent divergence, recruitment of elements from other systems ('molecular bricolage'), and recombination. We also discuss additional tentative new assignments of homology (FliG with MgtE, FliO with YscJ). In conclusion, rather than providing evidence of intelligent design, flagellar and non-flagellar Type III secretion systems instead provide excellent case studies in the evolution of complex systems from simpler components.

  6. Aging as Evolution-Facilitating Program and a Biochemical Approach to Switch It Off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skulachev, Vladimir P.

    A concept is presented considering aging of living organisms as a final step of their ontogenetic program. It is assumed that such an aging program was invented by biological evolution to facilitate the evolutionary process. Indications are summarized suggesting that controlled production of toxic forms of oxygen (so called reactive oxygen species) by respiring intracellular organelles (mitochondria) is an obligatory component of the aging program. First results of a research project devoted to an attempt to interrupt aging program by antioxidants specifically addressed to mitochondria have been described. Within the framework of the project, antioxidants of a new type (SkQ) were synthesized. SkQs are composed of (i) plastoquinone (an antioxidant moiety), (ii) a penetrating cation, and (iii) a decane or pentane linker. Using planar bilayer phospholipid membranes, we selected SkQ derivatives of the highest penetrability, namely plastoquinonyl decyl triphenylphosphonium (SkQ1), plastoquinonyl decyl rhodamine 19 (SkQR1), and methylplastoquinonyl decyl triphenylphosphonium (SkQ3). Anti- and prooxidant properties of these substances and also of ubiquinonyl-decyl-triphenylphosphonium (MitoQ) were tested in isolated mitochondria. Micromolar concentrations of cationic quinones are found to be very strong prooxidants, but in the lower (sub-micromolar) concentrations they display antioxidant activity which decreases in the series SkQ1 = SkQR1 > SkQ3 > MitoQ. Thus, the window between the anti- and prooxidant effects is the smallest for MitoQ and the largest for SkQ1 and SkQR1. SkQ1 is rapidly reduced by complex III of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, i.e. it is a rechargeable antioxidant. Extremely low concentrations of SkQ1 and SkQR1 completely arrest the H2O2-induced apoptosis in human fibroblasts and HeLa cells (for SkQ1, C 1/2 = 8 · 10-9M). Higher concentrations of SkQ1 are required to block necrosis initiated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). In mice, SkQ1

  7. Cell wall-bound cationic and anionic class III isoperoxidases of pea root: biochemical characterization and function in root growth

    PubMed Central

    Lüthje, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    Cell wall isolated from pea roots was used to separate and characterize two fractions possessing class III peroxidase activity: (i) ionically bound proteins and (ii) covalently bound proteins. Modified SDS–PAGE separated peroxidase isoforms by their apparent molecular weights: four bands of 56, 46, 44, and 41kDa were found in the ionically bound fraction (iPOD) and one band (70kDa) was resolved after treatment of the cell wall with cellulase and pectinase (cPOD). Isoelectric focusing (IEF) patterns for iPODs and cPODs were significantly different: five iPODs with highly cationic pI (9.5–9.2) were detected, whereas the nine cPODs were anionic with pI values between pH 3.7 and 5. iPODs and cPODs showed rather specific substrate affinity and different sensitivity to inhibitors, heat, and deglycosylation treatments. Peroxidase and oxidase activities and their IEF patterns for both fractions were determined in different zones along the root and in roots of different ages. New iPODs with pI 9.34 and 9.5 were induced with root growth, while the activity of cPODs was more related to the formation of the cell wall in non-elongating tissue. Treatment with auxin that inhibits root growth led to suppression of iPOD and induction of cPOD. A similar effect was obtained with the widely used elicitor, chitosan, which also induced cPODs with pI 5.3 and 5.7, which may be specifically related to pathogen defence. The differences reported here between biochemical properties of cPOD and iPOD and their differential induction during development and under specific treatments implicate that they are involved in specific and different physiological processes. Abbreviations:cPODcovalently bound peroxidaseDAB3,3'-diaminobenzidineDEPMPOspin-trap (5-diethoxy-phosphoryl-5-methyl-1-pyrroline-n-oxide)EPRelectron paramagnetic resonanceHRPhorseradish peroxidaseIAAindole-3-acetic acidHRPhorseradish peroxidaseIEFisoelectric focusingiPODionically bound peroxidaseNAAnaphthalene acetic acid

  8. Evolution, biogeography, and systematics of Puriana: evolution and speciation in Ostracoda, III.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, T. M.

    1987-01-01

    Three types of geographic isolation - land barriers, deep water barriers, and climatic barriers - resulted in three distinct evolutionary responses in Neogene and Quaternary species of the epineritic ostracode genus Puriana. Through systematic, paleobiogeographic, and morphologic study of several hundred fossil and Recent populations from the eastern Pacific, western Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico, and the Caribbean, the phylogeny of the genus and the geography of speciation events were determined. Isolation of large populations by the Isthumus of Panama during the Pliocene did not lead to lineage splitting in species known to have existed before the Isthmus formed. Conversely, the establishment of small isolated populations on Caribbean islands by passive dispersal mechanisms frequently led to the evolution of new species or subspecies. Climatic changes along the southeastern United States during the Pliocene also catalyzed possible parapatric speciation as populations that immigrated to the northeastern periphery of the genus' range split to form new species. The results provide evidence that evolutionary models describing the influence of abiotic events on patterns of evolution and speciation can be tested using properly selected tectonic and climatic events and fossil groups amenable to species-level analysis. Two new species, P. bajaensis and P. paikensis, are described. -Author

  9. Evolution of Class III Homeodomain–Leucine Zipper Genes in Streptophytes

    PubMed Central

    Floyd, Sandra K.; Zalewski, Christopher S.; Bowman, John L.

    2006-01-01

    Land plants underwent tremendous evolutionary change following the divergence of the ancestral lineage from algal relatives. Several important developmental innovations appeared as the embryophyte clade diversified, leading to the appearance of new organs and tissue types. To understand how these changes came about, we need to identify the fundamental genetic developmental programs that are responsible for growth, patterning, and differentiation and describe how these programs were modified and elaborated through time to produce novel morphologies. Class III homeodomain–leucine zipper (class III HD–Zip) genes, identified in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, provide good candidates for basic land plant patterning genes. We show that these genes may have evolved in a common ancestor of land plants and their algal sister group and that the gene family has diversified as land plant lineages have diversified. Phylogenetic analysis, expression data from nonflowering lineages, and evidence from Arabidopsis and other flowering plants indicate that class III HD–Zip genes acquired new functions in sporophyte apical growth, vascular patterning and differentiation, and leaf development. Modification of expression patterns that accompanied diversification of class III HD–Zip genes likely played an important role in the evolution of land plant form. PMID:16489224

  10. SIM-GC-MS analysis of biochemical evolution in Amanita genus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ristoiu, Dumitru; Kovacs, Emoke Dalma; Cobzac, Codruta; Parvu, Marcel; Ristoiu, Tania; Kovacs, Melinda Haydee

    2010-11-01

    Amanita is one of the most well known basidiomycetes genus throughout the world because some of its species that are acknowledged due to their toxic and/or hallucinogenic properties. Considering these properties in the last decades become more important for scientist to dignify exactly the chemical content of these mushroom species. Latter researches shown that A. phalloides contain two main groups of toxins: the amatoxins and the phallotoxins. As regards A. rubescens there are not so much studies referring to its biochemical "fingerprint". Two species (A. rubescens and A. phalloides) of Amanita genus were studied in order to determine the biochemical hall-mark at nanoscale for these basidiomycete's species. Parts as caps, gills, flesh and stem of these mushrooms were analyzed on quadrupole mass spectrometer engaged with a gas chromatograph (GC-qMS) using selective ion monitoring mode (SIM). The biochemical profiles of these species had shown the presence of compounds like fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), alkaloids, and volatile compounds (including alcohol compounds, carbonyl compounds, terpenes). The levels of biochemical compounds from these species were compared between the two types of species and also between young, mature and old samples for the same species as well as between the parts of mushroom. After this comparison were between the two species it was observed that in case of A. phalloides the alkaloid content were higher usually with almost 50 %. As regards presence of volatile compounds they have almost similar level in both mushroom species. Considering the levels of fatty acid methyl esters, their levels were higher with 30 - 40 % in case of A. rubescens.

  11. Photoactivation of the manganese catalyst of O2 evolution. I - Biochemical and kinetic aspects.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheniae, G. M.; Martin, I. F.

    1971-01-01

    A kinetic analysis is reported of the process of Mn photoactivation that the photosynthetic evolution of O2 requires. This process is investigated in Mn-deficient Anacystis nidulans cells. The implications are discussed of the results obtained.

  12. Modular evolution of glutathione peroxidase genes in association with different biochemical properties of their encoded proteins in invertebrate animals

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Young-An; Cai, Guo-Bin; Kim, Seon-Hee; Zo, Young-Gun; Kong, Yoon

    2009-01-01

    Background Phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidases (PHGPx), the most abundant isoforms of GPx families, interfere directly with hydroperoxidation of lipids. Biochemical properties of these proteins vary along with their donor organisms, which has complicated the phylogenetic classification of diverse PHGPx-like proteins. Despite efforts for comprehensive analyses, the evolutionary aspects of GPx genes in invertebrates remain largely unknown. Results We isolated GPx homologs via in silico screening of genomic and/or expressed sequence tag databases of eukaryotic organisms including protostomian species. Genes showing strong similarity to the mammalian PHGPx genes were commonly found in all genomes examined. GPx3- and GPx7-like genes were additionally detected from nematodes and platyhelminths, respectively. The overall distribution of the PHGPx-like proteins with different biochemical properties was biased across taxa; selenium- and glutathione (GSH)-dependent proteins were exclusively detected in platyhelminth and deuterostomian species, whereas selenium-independent and thioredoxin (Trx)-dependent enzymes were isolated in the other taxa. In comparison of genomic organization, the GSH-dependent PHGPx genes showed a conserved architectural pattern, while their Trx-dependent counterparts displayed complex exon-intron structures. A codon for the resolving Cys engaged in reductant binding was found to be substituted in a series of genes. Selection pressure to maintain the selenocysteine codon in GSH-dependent genes also appeared to be relaxed during their evolution. With the dichotomized fashion in genomic organizations, a highly polytomic topology of their phylogenetic trees implied that the GPx genes have multiple evolutionary intermediate forms. Conclusion Comparative analysis of invertebrate GPx genes provides informative evidence to support the modular pathways of GPx evolution, which have been accompanied with sporadic expansion/deletion and exon

  13. Evidence from Biochemical Pathways in Favor of Unfinished Evolution Rather than Intelligent Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrman, Edward J.; Marzluf, George A.

    2004-01-01

    An argument is made in favor of imperfect or unfinished evolution based on some metabolic pathways in which it seems that intelligent design would have done better. The case studies noted indicate the absence of highly intelligent design and are not intended as comprehensive collection but as a limited sample of inefficient situations in…

  14. Evidence from Biochemical Pathways in Favor of Unfinished Evolution Rather than Intelligent Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrman, Edward J.; Marzluf, George A.

    2004-01-01

    An argument is made in favor of imperfect or unfinished evolution based on some metabolic pathways in which it seems that intelligent design would have done better. The case studies noted indicate the absence of highly intelligent design and are not intended as comprehensive collection but as a limited sample of inefficient situations in…

  15. Comparative biochemical characterization of peroxidases (class III) tightly bound to the maize root cell walls and modulation of the enzyme properties as a result of covalent binding.

    PubMed

    Hadži-Tašković Šukalović, Vesna; Vuletić, Mirjana; Marković, Ksenija; Cvetić Antić, Tijana; Vučinić, Željko

    2015-01-01

    Comparative biochemical characterization of class III peroxidase activity tightly bound to the cell walls of maize roots was performed. Ionically bound proteins were solubilized from isolated walls by salt washing, and the remaining covalently bound peroxidases were released, either by enzymatic digestion or by a novel alkaline extraction procedure that released covalently bound alkali-resistant peroxidase enzyme. Solubilized fractions, as well as the salt-washed cell wall fragments containing covalently bound proteins, were analyzed for peroxidase activity. Peroxidative and oxidative activities indicated that peroxidase enzymes were predominately associated with walls by ionic interactions, and this fraction differs from the covalently bound one according to molecular weight, isozyme patterns, and biochemical parameters. The effect of covalent binding was evaluated by comparison of the catalytic properties of the enzyme bound to the salt-washed cell wall fragments with the corresponding solubilized and released enzyme. Higher thermal stability, improved resistance to KCN, increased susceptibility to H2O2, stimulated capacity of wall-bound enzyme to oxidize indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) as well as the difference in kinetic parameters between free and bound enzymes point to conformational changes due to covalent binding. Differences in biochemical properties of ionically and covalently bound peroxidases, as well as the modulation of the enzyme properties as a result of covalent binding to the walls, indicate that these two fractions of apoplastic peroxidases play different roles.

  16. Morphology evolution of gold nanoparticles as function of time, temperature, and Au(III)/sodium ascorbate molar ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priolisi, Ornella; Fabrizi, Alberto; Deon, Giovanna; Bonollo, Franco; Cattini, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    In this work the morphology evolution of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs), obtained by direct reduction, was studied as a function of time, temperature, and Au(III)/sodium ascorbate molar ratio. The NPs morphology was examined by transmission electron microscope with image analysis, while time evolution was investigated by visible and near-infrared absorption spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering. It is found that initially formed star-like NPs transform in more spheroidal particles and the evolution appears more rapid by increasing the temperature while a large amount of reducing agent prevents the remodeling of AuNPs. An explication of morphology evolution is proposed.

  17. Redshift evolution of the dynamical properties of massive galaxies from SDSS-III/BOSS

    SciTech Connect

    Beifiori, Alessandra; Saglia, Roberto P.; Bender, Ralf; Senger, Robert; Thomas, Daniel; Maraston, Claudia; Steele, Oliver; Masters, Karen L.; Pforr, Janine; Tojeiro, Rita; Johansson, Jonas; Nichol, Robert C.; Chen, Yan-Mei; Wake, David; Bolton, Adam; Brownstein, Joel R.; Leauthaud, Alexie; Schneider, Donald P.; Skibba, Ramin; Pan, Kaike; and others

    2014-07-10

    We study the redshift evolution of the dynamical properties of ∼180, 000 massive galaxies from SDSS-III/BOSS combined with a local early-type galaxy sample from SDSS-II in the redshift range 0.1 ≤ z ≤ 0.6. The typical stellar mass of this sample is M{sub *} ∼2 × 10{sup 11} M{sub ☉}. We analyze the evolution of the galaxy parameters effective radius, stellar velocity dispersion, and the dynamical to stellar mass ratio with redshift. As the effective radii of BOSS galaxies at these redshifts are not well resolved in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging we calibrate the SDSS size measurements with Hubble Space Telescope/COSMOS photometry for a sub-sample of galaxies. We further apply a correction for progenitor bias to build a sample which consists of a coeval, passively evolving population. Systematic errors due to size correction and the calculation of dynamical mass are assessed through Monte Carlo simulations. At fixed stellar or dynamical mass, we find moderate evolution in galaxy size and stellar velocity dispersion, in agreement with previous studies. We show that this results in a decrease of the dynamical to stellar mass ratio with redshift at >2σ significance. By combining our sample with high-redshift literature data, we find that this evolution of the dynamical to stellar mass ratio continues beyond z ∼ 0.7 up to z > 2 as M{sub dyn}/M{sub *} ∼(1 + z){sup –0.30±0.12}, further strengthening the evidence for an increase of M{sub dyn}/M{sub *} with cosmic time. This result is in line with recent predictions from galaxy formation simulations based on minor merger driven mass growth, in which the dark matter fraction within the half-light radius increases with cosmic time.

  18. An improved differential evolution algorithm for enhancing biochemical pathways simulation and production.

    PubMed

    Chong, Chuii Khim; Mohamad, Mohd Saberi; Deris, Safaai; Shamsir, Mohd Shahir; Abdullah, Afnizanfaizal

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an Improved Differential Evolution (IDE) algorithm to improve the kinetic parameter estimation in simulating the glycolysis pathway and the threonine biosynthesis pathway. Experimentally derived time series kinetic data are noisy and possess many unknown parameters. These characteristics of kinetic data cause lengthy computational time to compute the optimum value of the kinetic parameters. To solve this problem, this study had been conducted to develop a hybrid method that combined the Differential Evolution algorithm (DE) and the Kalman Filter (KF) to produce IDE. Results have shown that lesser computation time (6% and 18.5% faster) and more robust to noisy data with significant reduced error rates (93% and 79% reduced error rates) compared with the Genetic Algorithm (GA) and DE, respectively, in glycolysis and threonine biosynthesis pathway simulations. IDE is reliable as it demonstrated consistent standard deviation values which were close to mean values. We foresee the applicability of IDE into other metabolic pathway simulations.

  19. Biochemical investigation of yttrium(III) complex containing 1,10-phenanthroline: DNA binding and antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Khorasani-Motlagh, Mozhgan; Noroozifar, Meissam; Moodi, Asieh; Niroomand, Sona

    2013-03-05

    Characterization of the interaction between yttrium(III) complex containing 1,10-phenanthroline as ligand, [Y(phen)2Cl(OH2)3]Cl2⋅H2O, and DNA has been carried out by UV absorption, fluorescence spectra and viscosity measurements in order to investigate binding mode. The experimental results indicate that the yttrium(III) complex binds to DNA and absorption is decreasing in charge transfer band with the increase in amount of DNA. The binding constant (Kb) at different temperatures as well as thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (ΔH°) and entropy change (ΔS°), were calculated according to relevant fluorescent data and Vant' Hoff equation. The results of interaction mechanism studies, suggested that groove binding plays a major role in the binding of the complex and DNA. The activity of yttrium(III) complex against some bacteria was tested and antimicrobial screening tests shown growth inhibitory activity in the presence of yttrium(III) complex.

  20. LOCAL LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES. III. CO-EVOLUTION OF BLACK HOLE GROWTH AND STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY?

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Hernan-Caballero, Antonio; Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Rieke, George H.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Wang Yiping; Rigopoulou, Dimitra

    2013-03-10

    Local luminous infrared (IR) galaxies (LIRGs) have both high star formation rates (SFR) and a high AGN (Seyfert and AGN/starburst composite) incidence. Therefore, they are ideal candidates to explore the co-evolution of black hole (BH) growth and star formation (SF) activity, not necessarily associated with major mergers. Here, we use Spitzer/IRS spectroscopy of a complete volume-limited sample of local LIRGs (distances of <78 Mpc). We estimate typical BH masses of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun} using [Ne III] 15.56 {mu}m and optical [O III] {lambda}5007 gas velocity dispersions and literature stellar velocity dispersions. We find that in a large fraction of local LIRGs, the current SFR is taking place not only in the inner nuclear {approx}1.5 kpc region, as estimated from the nuclear 11.3 {mu}m PAH luminosities, but also in the host galaxy. We next use the ratios between the SFRs and BH accretion rates (BHAR) to study whether the SF activity and BH growth are contemporaneous in local LIRGs. On average, local LIRGs have SFR to BHAR ratios higher than those of optically selected Seyferts of similar active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosities. However, the majority of the IR-bright galaxies in the revised-Shapley-Ames Seyfert sample behave like local LIRGs. Moreover, the AGN incidence tends to be higher in local LIRGs with the lowest SFRs. All of this suggests that in local LIRGs there is a distinct IR-bright star-forming phase taking place prior to the bulk of the current BH growth (i.e., AGN phase). The latter is reflected first as a composite and then as a Seyfert, and later as a non-LIRG optically identified Seyfert nucleus with moderate SF in its host galaxy.

  1. Evolution of Fseg/Cseg dimorphism in region III of the Plasmodium falciparum eba-175 gene.

    PubMed

    Yasukochi, Yoshiki; Naka, Izumi; Patarapotikul, Jintana; Hananantachai, Hathairad; Ohashi, Jun

    2017-04-01

    The 175-kDa erythrocyte binding antigen (EBA-175) of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum is important for its invasion into human erythrocytes. The primary structure of eba-175 is divided into seven regions, namely I to VII. Region III contains highly divergent dimorphic segments, termed Fseg and Cseg. The allele frequencies of segmental dimorphism within a P. falciparum population have been extensively examined; however, the molecular evolution of segmental dimorphism is not well understood. A comprehensive comparison of nucleotide sequences among 32 P. falciparum eba-175 alleles identified in our previous study, two Plasmodium reichenowi, and one P. gaboni orthologous alleles obtained from the GenBank database was conducted to uncover the origin and evolutionary processes of segmental dimorphism in P. falciparum eba-175. In the eba-175 nucleotide sequence derived from a P. reichenowi CDC strain, both Fseg and Cseg were found in region III, which implies that the original eba-175 gene had both segments, and deletions of F- and C-segments generated Cseg and Fseg alleles, respectively. We also confirmed the presence of allele with Fseg and Cseg in another P. reichenowi strain (SY57), by re-mapping short reads obtained from the GenBank database. On the other hand, the segmental sequence of eba-175 ortholog in P. gaboni was quite diverged from those of the other species, suggesting that the original eba-175 dimorphism of P. falciparum can be traced back to the stem linage of P. falciparum and P. reichenowi. Our findings suggest that Fseg and Cseg alleles are derived from a single eba-175 allele containing both segments in the ancestral population of P. falciparum and P. reichenowi, and that the allelic dimorphism of eba-175 was shaped by the independent emergence of similar dimorphic lineage in different species that has never been observed in any evolutionary mode of allelic dimorphism at other loci in malaria genomes.

  2. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of SrcA, a Multi-cargo Type III Secretion Chaperone in Salmonella Required for Pathogenic Association with a Host

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, C.; Zhang, K; Andres, S; Fnag, Y; Kaniuk, N; Hannemann, M; Brumell, J; Foster, L; Junop, M; Coombes, B

    2010-01-01

    Many Gram-negative bacteria colonize and exploit host niches using a protein apparatus called a type III secretion system (T3SS) that translocates bacterial effector proteins into host cells where their functions are essential for pathogenesis. A suite of T3SS-associated chaperone proteins bind cargo in the bacterial cytosol, establishing protein interaction networks needed for effector translocation into host cells. In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, a T3SS encoded in a large genomic island (SPI-2) is required for intracellular infection, but the chaperone complement required for effector translocation by this system is not known. Using a reverse genetics approach, we identified a multi-cargo secretion chaperone that is functionally integrated with the SPI-2-encoded T3SS and required for systemic infection in mice. Crystallographic analysis of SrcA at a resolution of 2.5 {angstrom} revealed a dimer similar to the CesT chaperone from enteropathogenic E. coli but lacking a 17-amino acid extension at the carboxyl terminus. Further biochemical and quantitative proteomics data revealed three protein interactions with SrcA, including two effector cargos (SseL and PipB2) and the type III-associated ATPase, SsaN, that increases the efficiency of effector translocation. Using competitive infections in mice we show that SrcA increases bacterial fitness during host infection, highlighting the in vivo importance of effector chaperones for the SPI-2 T3SS.

  3. Chemical, biochemical, and environmental fiber sensors III; Proceedings of the Meeting, Boston, MA, Sept. 4, 5, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    Various papers on chemical, biochemical, and environmental fiber sensors are presented. Individual topics addressed include: fiber optic pressure sensor for combustion monitoring and control, viologen-based fiber optic oxygen sensors, renewable-reagent fiber optic sensor for ocean pCO2, transition metal complexes as indicators for a fiber optic oxygen sensor, fiber optic pH measurements using azo indicators, simple reversible fiber optic chemical sensors using solvatochromic dyes, totally integrated optical measuring sensors, integrated optic biosensor for environmental monitoring, radiation dosimetry using planar waveguide sensors, optical and piezoelectric analysis of polymer films for chemical sensor characterization, source polarization effects in an optical fiber fluorosensor, lens-type refractometer for on-line chemical analysis, fiber optic hydrocarbon sensor system, chemical sensors for environmental monitoring, optical fibers for liquid-crystal sensing and logic devices, suitability of single-mode fluoride fibers for evanescent-wave sensing, integrated modules for fiber optic sensors, optoelectronic sensors based on narrowband A3B5 alloys, fiber Bragg grating chemical sensor.

  4. The evolution of increased competitive ability, innate competitive advantages, and novel biochemical weapons act in concert for a tropical invader.

    PubMed

    Qin, Rui-Min; Zheng, Yu-Long; Valiente-Banuet, Alfonso; Callaway, Ragan M; Barclay, Gregor F; Pereyra, Carlos Silva; Feng, Yu-Long

    2013-02-01

    There are many non-mutually exclusive mechanisms for exotic invasions but few studies have concurrently tested more than one hypothesis for the same species. Here, we tested the evolution of increased competitive ability (EICA) hypothesis in two common garden experiments in which Chromolaena odorata plants originating from native and nonnative ranges were grown in competition with natives from each range, and the novel weapons hypothesis in laboratory experiments with leachates from C. odorata. Compared with conspecifics originating from the native range, C. odorata plants from the nonnative range were stronger competitors at high nutrient concentrations in the nonnative range in China and experienced far more herbivore damage in the native range in Mexico. In both China and Mexico, C. odorata was more suppressed by species native to Mexico than by species native to China. Species native to China were much more inhibited by leaf extracts from C. odorata than species from Mexico, and this difference in allelopathic effects may provide a possible explanation for the biogeographic differences in competitive ability. Our results indicate that EICA, innate competitive advantages, and novel biochemical weapons may act in concert to promote invasion by C. odorata, and emphasize the importance of exploring multiple, non-mutually exclusive mechanisms for invasions.

  5. Challenging the paradigms of leaf evolution: Class III HD-Zips in ferns and lycophytes.

    PubMed

    Vasco, Alejandra; Smalls, Tynisha L; Graham, Sean W; Cooper, Endymion D; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Stevenson, Dennis W; Moran, Robbin C; Ambrose, Barbara A

    2016-11-01

    Despite the extraordinary significance leaves have for life on Earth, their origin and development remain vigorously debated. More than a century of paleobotanical, morphological, and phylogenetic research has still not resolved fundamental questions about leaves. Developmental genetic data are sparse in ferns, and comparative studies of lycophytes and seed plants have reached opposing conclusions on the conservation of a leaf developmental program. We performed phylogenetic and expression analyses of a leaf developmental regulator (Class III HD-Zip genes; C3HDZs) spanning lycophytes and ferns. We show that a duplication and neofunctionalization of C3HDZs probably occurred in the ancestor of euphyllophytes, and that there is a common leaf developmental mechanism conserved between ferns and seed plants. We show C3HDZ expression in lycophyte and fern sporangia and show that C3HDZs have conserved expression patterns during initiation of lateral primordia (leaves or sporangia). This expression is maintained throughout sporangium development in lycophytes and ferns and indicates an ancestral role of C3HDZs in sporangium development. We hypothesize that there is a deep homology of all leaves and that a sporangium-specific developmental program was coopted independently for the development of lycophyte and euphyllophyte leaves. This provides molecular genetic support for a paradigm shift in theories of lycophyte leaf evolution.

  6. [Toxicological evaluation of colloidal nano-sized silver stabilized polyvinylpyrrolidone. III. Enzymological, biochemical markers, state of antioxidant defense system].

    PubMed

    Gmoshinsky, I V; Shipelin, V A; Vorozhko, I V; Sentsova, T B; Soto, S Kh; Avren'eva, L I; Guseva, G V; Kravchenko, L V; Khotimchenko, S A; Tutelyan, V A

    2016-01-01

    Nanosized colloidal silver (NCS) with primary nanoparticles (NPs) size in the range of 10-80 nm in aqueous suspension was administered to rats with initial weight 80±10 gfor the first 30 day intragastrically and for lasting 62 days with the diet consumed in doses of 0.1; 1.0 and 10 mg/kg of body weight b.w) per day based on silver (Ag). The control animals received deionized water and carrier of NPs - aqueous solution of stabilizer polyvinylpyrrolidone. Activity (Vmax) was determined in liver of microsomal mixed function monooxygenase isoforms CYP 1A1, 1A2 and 2B1 against their specific substrates, the activity of liver conjugating enzymes (glutathione-S-transferase and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase) in the microsomal fraction and a cytosol, and the overall and non-sedimentable activities of lysosomal hydrolases. In blood plasma there were evaluated malonic dialdehyde, PUFA diene conjugates, in erythrocytes - the activity of antioxidant enzymes. A set of standard biochemical indicators of blood serum was also determined. The studies revealed changes in a number of molecular markers of toxic action. Among them - the increase in the activity of key enzymes I and II stages of detoxification of xenobiotics, indicating its functional overvoltage; reducing the activity of glutathione peroxidase (GP), the total arylsulfatase A and B, β-galactosidase (in the absence of changes in their non-sedimentable activity), levels of uric acid, increased alkaline phosphatase activity. These changes occurred mainly at the dose Ag of 10 mg/kg b.w., except for the GP to which the threshold dose was 1 mg/kg b.w. No significant changes in the studied markers in a dose Ag 0,1 mg/kg b.w. were identified. Possible mechanisms of the toxic action of silver NPs are discussed.

  7. Biochemical characterization of a recombinant plant class III chitinase from the pitcher of the carnivorous plant Nepenthes alata.

    PubMed

    Ishisaki, Kana; Arai, Sachiko; Hamada, Tatsuro; Honda, Yuji

    2012-11-01

    A class III chitinase belonging to the GH18 family from Nepenthes alata (NaCHIT3) was expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme exhibited hydrolytic activity toward colloidal chitin, ethylene glycol chitin, and (GlcNAc)(n) (n=5 and 6). The enzyme hydrolyzed the fourth glycosidic linkage from the non-reducing end of (GlcNAc)(6). The anomeric form of the products indicated it was a retaining enzyme. The colloidal chitin hydrolytic reaction displayed high activity between pH 3.9 and 6.9, but the pH optimum of the (GlcNAc)(6) hydrolytic reaction was 3.9 at 37 °C. The optimal temperature for activity was 65 °C in 50 mM sodium acetate buffer (pH 3.9). The pH optima of NaCHIT3 and NaCHIT1 might be related to their roles in chitin degradation in the pitcher fluid.

  8. Biochemical analysis of callus tissue in osteogenesis imperfecta type IV. Evidence for transient overmodification in collagen types I and III.

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, R E; Vetter, U; Nerlich, A; Wörsdorfer, O; Teller, W M; Müller, P K

    1989-01-01

    We analyzed tissue and cells from a stationary and a rapidly growing hyperplastic callus from a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type IV and compared the results with those of compact bone and skin fibroblasts of an age-matched control. Collagen and protein contents per cell were low in the callus tissues and collagen I and III were overmodified as evidenced by an elevated level of hydroxylysine. The degree of lysyl hydroxylation was highest in those regions that appeared most immature by histological examination. Lysyl hydroxylation approached normal levels in collagen from the stationary callus and from the center of the growing callus. Overmodification of collagen was not seen in compact bone or cell cultures (neither skin fibroblasts nor callus cells) from the patient. Elevation of hydroxylysine in collagen from OI patients is generally attributed to mutations that delay triple helix formation. Our observations suggest that the varying degree of collagen modifications may occur in consequence of regulatory mechanisms during bone development and tissue repair. These mechanisms may be defective in some patients with OI as seen in this case with hyperplastic callus formation. Images PMID:2760218

  9. The Assembly and Evolution of Eastern Laurentia: Evidence from the QM-III Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darbyshire, F. A.; Levin, V. L.; Menke, W. H.; Bastow, I. D.; Petrescu, L.; Boyce, A.; Klaser, M.; Dunham, B.; Servali, A.; Neitz, T.

    2014-12-01

    Eastern North America is an excellent region to test hypotheses about the evolution through time of tectonic processes, the growth of continental crust and the assembly of continents. Over a spatial scale of just a few hundred kilometres, the surface geology records almost 3 billion years of Earth history, with a transition from the Archean Superior craton through the Proterozoic Grenville orogenic belt to the Phanerozoic Appalachian terranes and the edge of the North American continent. The boundaries between these major tectonic provinces have been mapped at the surface, and crustal-scale geophysical studies (e.g. LITHOPROBE) have been able to trace their complex signatures to the Moho and below in some parts of eastern Canada. Nevertheless, the nature of the boundaries across the region, and their continuation into the lithospheric mantle, remains enigmatic. The high wavespeed lithospheric keel of the Canadian Shield extends beneath the Proterozoic terranes; however it is still unclear whether this material represents a continuation of Archean lithosphere over which the Grenville terranes have been thrust, or whether the Grenville can be associated with its own thick keel. The transition from Proterozoic to Phanerozoic lithosphere beneath the Appalachian Front is likewise ambiguous. To shed new light on the tectonic evolution of the region, and the nature of the major tectonic boundaries, a broadband seismograph network was installed in eastern Canada in 2012-2013 through the QM-III (Quebec-Maine Across Three Sutures) experiment; stations will remain in place for 2-3 years. The network consists of a dense NW-SE profile from the southern tip of Hudson Bay to coastal Maine, supplemented by existing more sparsely-distributed stations, and a 2D deployment across Maritime Canada. Data acquisition is ongoing, but preliminary results from receiver function analysis, travel-time tomography and surface-wave dispersion are already showing some intriguing variations in

  10. Effects of combined dietary chromium(III) propionate complex and thiamine supplementation on insulin sensitivity, blood biochemical indices, and mineral levels in high-fructose-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Król, Ewelina; Krejpcio, Zbigniew; Michalak, Sławomir; Wójciak, Rafał W; Bogdański, Paweł

    2012-12-01

    Insulin resistance is the first step in glucose intolerance and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus, thus effective prevention strategies should also include dietary interventions to enhance insulin sensitivity. Nutrients, such as microelement chromium(III) and thiamine, play regulatory roles in carbohydrate metabolism. The objective of this study was to evaluate the insulin-sensitizing potential of the combined supplementary chromium(III) propionate complex (CrProp) and thiamine in insulin resistance animal model (rats fed a high-fructose diet). The experiment was carried out on 40 nine-week-old male Wistar rats divided into five groups (eight animals each). Animals were fed ad libitum: the control diet (AIN-93 M) and high-fructose diets with and without a combination of two levels of CrProp (0.1 and 1 mg Cr/kg body mass/day) and two levels of thiamine (0.5 and 10 mg/kg body mass/day) for 8 weeks. At the end of the experiment rats were sacrificed to collect blood and internal organs for analyses of blood biochemical and hematologic indices as well as tissular microelement levels that were measured using appropriate methods. It was found that both supplementary CrProp and thiamine (given alone) have significant insulin-sensitizing and moderate blood-lipid-lowering properties, while the combined supplementation with these agents does not give synergistic effects in insulin-resistant rats. CrProp given separately increased kidney Cu and Cr levels, while thiamine alone increased hepatic Cu contents and decreased renal Zn and Cu contents.

  11. EVOLUTION OF VERY MASSIVE POPULATION III STARS WITH MASS ACCRETION FROM PRE-MAIN SEQUENCE TO COLLAPSE

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, Takuya; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Umeda, Hideyuki; Yoshida, Naoki; Tsuruta, Sachiko E-mail: umeda@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.j E-mail: naoki.yoshida@ipmu.j

    2009-12-01

    We calculate the evolution of zero-metallicity Population III (Pop III) stars whose mass grows from the initial mass of approx1 M{sub sun} by accreting the surrounding gases. Our calculations cover whole evolutionary stages from the pre-main sequence, via various nuclear burning stages, through the final core-collapse or pair-creation instability phases. We adopt two different sets of stellar mass accretion rates as our fiducial models. One is derived from a cosmological simulation of the first generation (PopIII.1) stars, and the other is derived from a simulation of the second generation stars that are affected by radiation from PopIII.1 stars. The latter represents one case of PopIII.2 stars. We also adopt additional models that include radiative feedback effects. We show that the final mass of Pop III.1 stars can be as large as approx1000 M {sub sun}, beyond the mass range (140-300 M{sub sun}) for the pair-instability supernovae. Such massive stars undergo core-collapse to form intermediate-mass black holes, which may be the seeds for merger trees to supermassive black holes. On the other hand, Pop III.2 stars become less massive (approx<40-60 M{sub sun}), being in the mass range of ordinary iron core-collapse stars. Such stars explode and eject heavy elements to contribute to chemical enrichment of the early universe as observed in the abundance patterns of extremely metal-poor stars in the Galactic halo. In view of the large range of possible accretion rates, further studies are important to see if these fiducial models are actually the cases.

  12. Adaptation of a cyanobacterium to a biochemically rich environment in experimental evolution as an initial step toward a chloroplast-like state.

    PubMed

    Hosoda, Kazufumi; Habuchi, Masumi; Suzuki, Shingo; Miyazaki, Mikako; Takikawa, Go; Sakurai, Takahiro; Kashiwagi, Akiko; Sueyoshi, Makoto; Matsumoto, Yusuke; Kiuchi, Ayako; Mori, Kotaro; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplasts originated from cyanobacteria through endosymbiosis. The original cyanobacterial endosymbiont evolved to adapt to the biochemically rich intracellular environment of the host cell while maintaining its photosynthetic function; however, no such process has been experimentally demonstrated. Here, we show the adaptation of a model cyanobacterium, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, to a biochemically rich environment by experimental evolution. Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 does not grow in a biochemically rich, chemically defined medium because several amino acids are toxic to the cells at approximately 1 mM. We cultured the cyanobacteria in media with the toxic amino acids at 0.1 mM, then serially transferred the culture, gradually increasing the concentration of the toxic amino acids. The cells evolved to show approximately the same specific growth rate in media with 0 and 1 mM of the toxic amino acid in approximately 84 generations and evolved to grow faster in the media with 1 mM than in the media with 0 mM in approximately 181 generations. We did not detect a statistically significant decrease in the autotrophic growth of the evolved strain in an inorganic medium, indicating the maintenance of the photosynthetic function. Whole-genome resequencing revealed changes in the genes related to the cell membrane and the carboxysome. Moreover, we quantitatively analyzed the evolutionary changes by using simple mathematical models, which evaluated the evolution as an increase in the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) and estimated quantitative characteristics of the evolutionary process. Our results clearly demonstrate not only the potential of a model cyanobacterium to adapt to a biochemically rich environment without a significant decrease in photosynthetic function but also the properties of its evolutionary process, which sheds light of the evolution of chloroplasts at the initial stage.

  13. A prescription and fast code for the long-term evolution of star clusters - III. Unequal masses and stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Poul E. R.; Gieles, Mark; Lamers, Henny J. G. L. M.; Baumgardt, Holger

    2014-08-01

    We present a new version of the fast star cluster evolution code EVOLVE ME A CLUSTER OF STARS (EMACSS). While previous versions of EMACSS reproduced clusters of single-mass stars, this version models clusters with an evolving stellar content. Stellar evolution dominates early evolution, and leads to: (1) reduction of the mean mass of stars due to the mass loss of high-mass stars; (2) expansion of the half-mass radius; (3) for (nearly) Roche Volume filling clusters, the induced escape of stars. Once sufficient relaxation has occurred (≃10 relaxation times-scales), clusters reach a second, `balanced' state whereby the core releases energy as required by the cluster as a whole. In this state: (1) stars escape due to tidal effects faster than before balanced evolution; (2) the half-mass radius expands or contracts depending on the Roche volume filling factor; and (3) the mean mass of stars increases due to the preferential ejection of low-mass stars. We compare the EMACSS results of several cluster properties against N-body simulations of clusters spanning a range of initial number of stars, mass, half-mass radius, and tidal environments, and show that our prescription accurately predicts cluster evolution for this data base. Finally, we consider applications for EMACSS, such as studies of galactic globular cluster populations in cosmological simulations.

  14. Studying the evolution of a type III radio from the Sun up to 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Gottfried; Breitling, Frank; Vocks, Christian; Fallows, Richard; Melnik, Valentin; Konovalenko, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    On March 16, 2016, a type III burst was observed with the ground-based radio telescopes LOFAR and URAN-2 as well as with the radiospectrometer aboard the spacecraft WIND.It started at 80 MHz at 06:37 UT and reached 50 kHz after 23 minutes. A type III burst are considered as the radio signature of an electron beam travelling from the corona into the interplanetary space. The energetic electrons carrying the beam excites Langmuir waves, which convert into radio waves by wave-particle interaction. The relationship between the drift rate and the frequency as derived from the dynamic radio spectra reveals that the velocity of the electrons generating the radio waves of the type III burst is increasing with increasing distance from the center of the Sun.

  15. Evolution of corundum-structured III-oxide semiconductors: Growth, properties, and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Shizuo; Oda, Masaya; Kaneko, Kentaro; Hitora, Toshimi

    2016-12-01

    The recent progress and development of corundum-structured III-oxide semiconductors are reviewed. They allow bandgap engineering from 3.7 to ∼9 eV and function engineering, leading to highly durable electronic devices and deep ultraviolet optical devices as well as multifunctional devices. Mist chemical vapor deposition can be a simple and safe growth technology and is advantageous for reducing energy and cost for the growth. This is favorable for the wide commercial use of devices at low cost. The III-oxide semiconductors are promising candidates for new devices contributing to sustainable social, economic, and technological development for the future.

  16. Structure, Evolution, and Functions of Bacterial Type III Toxin-Antitoxin Systems

    PubMed Central

    Goeders, Nathalie; Chai, Ray; Chen, Bihe; Day, Andrew; Salmond, George P. C.

    2016-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are small genetic modules that encode a toxin (that targets an essential cellular process) and an antitoxin that neutralises or suppresses the deleterious effect of the toxin. Based on the molecular nature of the toxin and antitoxin components, TA systems are categorised into different types. Type III TA systems, the focus of this review, are composed of a toxic endoribonuclease neutralised by a non-coding RNA antitoxin in a pseudoknotted configuration. Bioinformatic analysis shows that the Type III systems can be classified into subtypes. These TA systems were originally discovered through a phage resistance phenotype arising due to a process akin to an altruistic suicide; the phenomenon of abortive infection. Some Type III TA systems are bifunctional and can stabilise plasmids during vegetative growth and sporulation. Features particular to Type III systems are explored here, emphasising some of the characteristics of the RNA antitoxin and how these may affect the co-evolutionary relationship between toxins and cognate antitoxins in their quaternary structures. Finally, an updated analysis of the distribution and diversity of these systems are presented and discussed. PMID:27690100

  17. The effects of stimulated star formation on the evolution of the galaxy. III - The chemical evolution of nonlinear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shore, Steven N.; Ferrini, Federico; Palla, Francesco

    1987-01-01

    The evolution of models for star formation in galaxies with disk and halo components is discussed. Two phases for the halo (gas and stars) and three for the disk (including clouds) are used in these calculations. The star-formation history is followed using nonlinear phase-coupling models which completely determine the populations of the phases as a function of time. It is shown that for a wide range of parameters, including the effects of both spontaneous and stimulated star formation and mass exchange between the spatial components of the system, the observed chemical history of the galaxy can easily be obtained. The most sensitive parameter in the detailed metallicity and star-formation history for the system is the rate of return of gas to the diffuse phase upon stellar death.

  18. Analysis of conifer FLOWERING LOCUS T/TERMINAL FLOWER1-like genes provides evidence for dramatic biochemical evolution in the angiosperm FT lineage.

    PubMed

    Klintenäs, Maria; Pin, Pierre A; Benlloch, Reyes; Ingvarsson, Pär K; Nilsson, Ove

    2012-12-01

    In flowering plants, homologs of the Arabidopsis phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein (PEBP) FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) are key components in controlling flowering time. We show here that, although FT homologs are found in all angiosperms with completed genome sequences, there is no evidence to date that FT-like genes exist in other groups of plants. Through phylogeny reconstructions and heterologous expression, we examined the biochemical function of the Picea (spruces) and Pinus (pines) PEBP families - two gymnosperm taxa phylogenetically distant from the angiosperms. We have defined a lineage of gymnosperm PEBP genes, termed the FT/TERMINAL FLOWER1 (TFL1)-like genes, that share sequence characteristics with both the angiosperm FT- and TFL1-like clades. When expressed in Arabidopsis, FT/TFL1-like genes repressed flowering, indicating that the proteins are biochemically more similar to the angiosperm TFL1-like proteins than to the FT-like proteins. This suggests that the regulation of the vegetative-to-reproductive switch might differ in gymnosperms compared with angiosperms. Molecular evolution studies suggest that plasticity at exon 4 contributes to the divergence of FT-like function in floral promotion. In addition, the presence of FT-like genes in basal angiosperms indicates that the FT-like function emerged at an early stage during the evolution of flowering plants as a means to regulate flowering time.

  19. Acoustic Microsensors III. Direct Detection of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B Employing a Piezoelectric Crystal Immunosensor with a Flexible Carboxylated Dextran Matrix as the Biochemical Interface.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-03-01

    of the hydrogel matrix are: • an increased immobilization capacity as compared to monolayer based coat- ings: the dextran layer is about 100 nm...employing a piezoelectric crystal immunosensor with a flexible carboxylated dextran matrix as the biochemical interface Lange Kleiweg 137 P.O. Box 45... dextran matrix as the biochemical in- terface Auteur(s) J.L.N. Harteveld Datum maart 1998 Opdrachtnr. : A93KL448 Rapportnr. : PML 1997-A58

  20. Rotation in the Pleiades with K2. III. Speculations on Origins and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, John; Rebull, Luisa; Bouvier, Jerome; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Collier-Cameron, Andrew; Pinsonneault, Marc; Aigrain, Suzanne; Barrado, David; Bouy, Herve; Ciardi, David; Cody, Ann Marie; David, Trevor; Micela, Giusi; Soderblom, David; Somers, Garrett; Stassun, Keivan G.; Valenti, Jeff; Vrba, Frederick J.

    2016-11-01

    We use high-quality K2 light curves for hundreds of stars in the Pleiades to better understand the angular momentum evolution and magnetic dynamos of young low-mass stars. The K2 light curves provide not only rotational periods but also detailed information from the shape of the phased light curve that was not available in previous studies. A slowly rotating sequence begins at {(V-{K}{{s}})}0 ˜ 1.1 (spectral type F5) and ends at {(V-{K}{{s}})}0 ˜ 3.7 (spectral type K8), with periods rising from ˜2 to ˜11 days in that interval. A total of 52% of the Pleiades members in that color interval have periods within 30% of a curve defining the slow sequence; the slowly rotating fraction decreases significantly redward of {(V-{K}{{s}})}0 = 2.6. Nearly all of the slow-sequence stars show light curves that evolve significantly on timescales less than the K2 campaign duration. The majority of the FGK Pleiades members identified as photometric binaries are relatively rapidly rotating, perhaps because binarity inhibits star-disk angular momentum loss mechanisms during pre-main-sequence evolution. The fully convective late M dwarf Pleiades members (5.0 < {(V-{K}{{s}})}0 < 6.0) nearly always show stable light curves, with little spot evolution or evidence of differential rotation. During pre-main-sequence evolution from ˜3 Myr (NGC 2264 age) to ˜125 Myr (Pleiades age), stars of 0.3 {M}⊙ shed about half of their angular momentum, with the fractional change in period between 3 and 125 Myr being nearly independent of mass for fully convective stars. Our data also suggest that very low mass binaries form with rotation periods more similar to each other and faster than would be true if drawn at random from the parent population of single stars.

  1. Enthalpy-Based Thermal Evolution of Loops: III. Comparison of Zero-Dimensional Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cargill, P. J.; Bradshaw, Stephen J.; Klimchuk, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Zero dimensional (0D) hydrodynamic models, provide a simple and quick way to study the thermal evolution of coronal loops subjected to time-dependent heating. This paper presents a comparison of a number of 0D models that have been published in the past and is intended to provide a guide for those interested in either using the old models or developing new ones. The principal difference between the models is the way the exchange of mass and energy between corona, transition region and chromosphere is treated, as plasma cycles into and out of a loop during a heating-cooling cycle. It is shown that models based on the principles of mass and energy conservation can give satisfactory results at some, or, in the case of the Enthalpy Based Thermal Evolution of Loops (EBTEL) model, all stages of the loop evolution. Empirical models can lead to low coronal densities, spurious delays between the peak density and temperature, and, for short heating pulses, overly short loop lifetimes.

  2. ENTHALPY-BASED THERMAL EVOLUTION OF LOOPS. III. COMPARISON OF ZERO-DIMENSIONAL MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Cargill, P. J.; Bradshaw, S. J.; Klimchuk, J. A.

    2012-10-10

    Zero-dimensional (0D) hydrodynamic models provide a simple and quick way to study the thermal evolution of coronal loops subjected to time-dependent heating. This paper presents a comparison of a number of 0D models that have been published in the past and is intended to provide a guide for those interested in either using the old models or developing new ones. The principal difference between the models is the way the exchange of mass and energy between corona, transition region, and chromosphere is treated, as plasma cycles into and out of a loop during a heating-cooling cycle. It is shown that models based on the principles of mass and energy conservation can give satisfactory results at some or, in the case of the Enthalpy-based Thermal Evolution of Loops model, all stages of the loop evolution. Empirical models can have significant difficulties in obtaining accurate behavior due to invocation of assumptions incompatible with the correct exchange of mass and energy between corona, transition region, and chromosphere.

  3. The Evolution of Galaxies. III - From Simple Approaches to Self-Consistent Models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensler, G.; Stasińska, G.; Harfst, S.; Kroupa, P.; Theis, Chr.

    2003-07-01

    Galaxies have a history. This has become clear from recent sky surveys which have shown that distant galaxies, formed early in the life of the Universe, differ from the nearby ones. New observational windows at ultraviolet, infrared and millimetric wavelengths (provided by ROSAT, IRAM, IUE, IRAS, ISO) have revealed that galaxies contain a wealth of components: very hot gas, atomic hydrogen, molecules, dust, dark matter...A significant advance is expected from the results of new instruments (VLT, FIRST, XMM) which will=0D=0Aallow one to explore the most distant Universe. Three Euroconferences were planned to punctuate this new epoch in galactic research, bringing together specialists in various fields of Astronomy. The first one, held in Granada (Spain) in May 2000, addressed the observational clues. The second one took place in October 2001 in St. Denis de la Réunion (France) and reviewed the basic building blocks and small-scale processes in galaxy evolution. The third conference was held in Kiel (Germany) in July 2002 and addressed the appropriate modelling of galaxy evolution from their cosmological formation to their presently observable structures. This book contains the proceedings of the third conference and presents the actual state-of-the-art of modelling galaxy evolution. Link: http://www.wkap.nl/prod/b/1-4020-1182-2

  4. The evolution of the EGFRvIII (rindopepimut) immunotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme patients

    PubMed Central

    Paff, Michelle; Alexandru-Abrams, Daniela; Hsu, Frank P K; Bota, Daniela A

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is the most common type of brain tumor and it is uniformly fatal. The community standard of treatment for this disease is gross or subtotal resection of the tumor, followed by radiation and temozolomide. At recurrence bevacizumab can be added for increased progression free survival. Many challenges are encountered while trying to devise new drugs to treat GBM, such as the presence of the blood brain barrier which is impermeable to most drugs. Therefore in the past few years attention was turned to immunological means for the treatment of this devastating disease. EGFRvIII targeting has proven a good way to attack glioblastoma cells by using the immune system. Although in still in development, this approach holds the promise as a great first step toward immune-tailored drugs for the treatment of brain cancers. PMID:25625931

  5. Treatment and evolution of grade III acromioclavicular dislocations in soccer players.

    PubMed

    Pereira-Graterol, Ernesto; Álvarez-Díaz, Pedro; Seijas, Roberto; Ares, Oscar; Cuscó, Xavier; Cugat, Ramón

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate postoperative functional results in soccer players diagnosed with acute grade III acromioclavicular dislocation, stabilized with clavicular hook plate. Between 2006 and 2010, 11 soccer players were diagnosed with acute acromioclavicular dislocation. Mean age was 22.9 years. The clavicular hook plate was used for stabilization. The follow-up was 4 years (2-6 years). Constant score showed 82 % excellent results and 18 % good functional results. Average pain measured with VAS was 1.8 (±0.59) mm out of 10. We did not report any complication within the process. Use of the clavicular hook plate is considered adequate for the treatment of acute acromioclavicular dislocation in soccer players, allowing a quick return to sports. Retrospective case series, Level IV.

  6. Charge state evolution in the solar wind. III. Model comparison with observations

    SciTech Connect

    Landi, E.; Oran, R.; Lepri, S. T.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Fisk, L. A.; Van der Holst, B.

    2014-08-01

    We test three theoretical models of the fast solar wind with a set of remote sensing observations and in-situ measurements taken during the minimum of solar cycle 23. First, the model electron density and temperature are compared to SOHO/SUMER spectroscopic measurements. Second, the model electron density, temperature, and wind speed are used to predict the charge state evolution of the wind plasma from the source regions to the freeze-in point. Frozen-in charge states are compared with Ulysses/SWICS measurements at 1 AU, while charge states close to the Sun are combined with the CHIANTI spectral code to calculate the intensities of selected spectral lines, to be compared with SOHO/SUMER observations in the north polar coronal hole. We find that none of the theoretical models are able to completely reproduce all observations; namely, all of them underestimate the charge state distribution of the solar wind everywhere, although the levels of disagreement vary from model to model. We discuss possible causes of the disagreement, namely, uncertainties in the calculation of the charge state evolution and of line intensities, in the atomic data, and in the assumptions on the wind plasma conditions. Last, we discuss the scenario where the wind is accelerated from a region located in the solar corona rather than in the chromosphere as assumed in the three theoretical models, and find that a wind originating from the corona is in much closer agreement with observations.

  7. The evolution of clinical gait analysis part III--kinetics and energy assessment.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, D H

    2005-06-01

    Historically, clinical applications of measurements of force and energy followed electromyography and kinematics in temporal sequence. This sequence is mirrored by the order of topics included in this trilogy on the Evolution of Clinical Gait Analysis, with part I [Sutherland DH. The evolution of clinical gait analysis part I: kinesiological EMG. Gait Posture 2001;14:61-70.] devoted to Kinesiological EMG and part II [Sutherland DH. The evolution of clinical gait analysis part II - kinematics. Gait Posture 2002;16(2):159-179.] to Kinematics. This final review in the series will focus on kinetics as it relates to gait applications. Kinematic measurements give the movements of the body segments, which can be compared with normal controls to identify pathological gait patterns, but they do not deal with the forces controlling the movements. As a major goal of scientifically minded clinicians is to understand the biomechanical forces producing movements, the objective measurement of ground reaction forces is essential. The force plate (platform) is now an indispensable tool in a state-of-the-art motion analysis laboratory. Nonetheless, it is not a stand-alone instrument as both kinematic and EMG measurements are needed for maximum clinical implementation and interpretation of force plate measurements. The subject of energy assessment is also given mention, as there is a compelling interest in whether walking has been made easier with intervention. The goals of this manuscript are to provide a historical background, recognize some of the important contributors, and describe the current multiple uses of the force plate in gait analysis. The widespread use of force plates for postural analyses is an important and more recent application of this technology, but this review will be restricted to measurements of gait rather than balance activities. Finally, this manuscript presents my personal perspective and discusses the developments and contributors that have shaped my

  8. On the evolution of epistasis III: the haploid case with mutation.

    PubMed

    Liberman, Uri; Feldman, Marcus

    2008-03-01

    Whether interaction between genes is better represented by synergistic or antagonistic epistasis has been a focus of experimental research in bacterial population genetics. Our previous research on evolution of modifiers of epistasis in diploid systems has indicated that the strength of positive or negative epistasis should increase provided linkage disequilibrium is maintained. Here we study a modifier of epistasis in fitness between two loci in a haploid system. Epistasis is modified in the neighborhood of a mutation-selection balance. We show that when linkage in the three-locus system is tight, an increase in the frequency of a modifier allele that induces either more negative or more positive epistasis is possible. Epistasis here can be measured on either an additive or multiplicative scale.

  9. Extra-solar planetary systems. III - Potential sites for the origin and evolution of technical civilisations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogg, M. J.

    1986-07-01

    A series of runs of the Silicon Creation' computer model developed by Fogg (1985) has been analyzed in order to evaluate the probable abundance of planets possessing suitable conditions for the evolution of technologically adept forms of life. The evolutionary simulation encompassed 100,000 disk stars of varying mass, metallicity, and age, and focused on civilizations that may have come into existence on planets over the past 10 to the 10th years of planetary disk history. The frequency of such sites is determined to be 0.00292, and the frequency of planets developing a technological civilization is 0.00009; these figures are two orders of magnitude lower than the most optimistic manipulations of the Drake equation, but not low enough to resolve the Fermi paradox, according to which an alien civilization, if existent, should long ago have colonized the entire Galaxy.

  10. Evolution of the biochemical profile of children treated or undergoing treatment for moderate or severe stunting: consequences of metabolic programming?

    PubMed

    Alves, Jullyana F R; Britto, Revilane P A; Ferreira, Haroldo S; Sawaya, Ana L; Florêncio, Telma M M T

    2014-01-01

    to evaluate changes in the biochemical profile of children treated or being treated for moderate or severe stunting in a nutrition recovery and education center. this was a retrospective longitudinal study of 263 children treated at this center between August of 2008 to August of 2011, aged 1 to 6 years, diagnosed with moderate (z-score of height-for-age [HAZ] < -2) or severe stunting (HAZ < -3). Data were collected on socioeconomic conditions, dietary habits, and biochemical changes, as well as height according to age. the nutritional intervention showed an increase in HAZ of children with moderate (0.51 ± 0.4, p = 0.001) and severe (0.91 ± 0.7, p = 0.001) stunting during the monitoring. Increased levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) (initial: 71.7 ng/dL; final: 90.4 ng/dL; p = 0.01) were also observed, as well as a reduction in triglycerides (TG) in both severely (initial: 91.8mg/dL; final: 79.1mg/dL; p = 0.01) and in moderately malnourished children (initial: 109.2mg/dL; final 88.7mg/dL; p = 0.01), and a significant increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol HDL-C only in the third year of intervention (initial: 31.4mg/dL; final: 42.2mg/dL). The values of total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels remained high throughout the treatment (initial: 165.1mg/dL; final: 163.5mg/dL and initial: 109.0mg/dL; final: 107.3mg/dL, respectively). the nutritional treatment for children with short stature was effective in reducing stunting and improving TG and HDL-C after three years of intervention. However, the levels of LDL-C and TC remained high even in treated children. It is therefore speculated that these changes may result from metabolic programming due to malnutrition. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. Galaxy Assembly and the Evolution of Structure over the First Third of Cosmic Time - III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, Sandra

    2011-10-01

    This survey will document the first third of galactic evolution fromz=8 to 1.5 andtest for evolution in the properties of Type Ia supernovae to z 2 byimaging more than 250,000 galaxies with WFC3/IR and ACS. Five premiermulti-wavelength regions are selected from within the Spitzer SEDSsurvey, providing complementaryIRAC data down to 26.5 AB mag, a unique resource forstellar masses at high redshifts. The use of five widely separatedfields mitigates cosmic variance and yields statistically robustsamples of galaxies down to 10^9 M_Sun out to z 8.We adopt a two-tiered strategy with a "Wide" component {roughly 2orbits deep over 0.2 sq. degrees} and a "Deep" component {roughly 12orbits deep over 0.04 sq. degrees}. Combining these with ultra-deepimaging from the Cycle 17 HUDF09 program yields a three-tieredstrategy for efficient sampling of both rare/bright and faint/commonobjects.Three of the Wide-survey fields are located in COSMOS, EGS, andUKIDSS/UDS. Each of these consists of roughly 3x15 WFC3/IR tiles.Each WFC3 tile will be observed for 2 orbits, with single orbitsseparated in time to allow a search for high-redshift Type Ia SNe.The co-added exposure times will be approximately 2/3 orbit in J{F125W} and 4/3 orbit in H {F160W}. ACS parallels overlap most of theWFC3 area and will consist of roughly 2/3 orbits in V {F606W} and4/3 orbit in I {F814W}. Because of the larger area of ACS,this results in effective exposures that are twice as long {4/3 in V,8/3 in I}, making a very significant improvement to existing ACSmosaics in COSMOS and EGS and creating a new ACS mosaic in UDS/UKIDSSwhere none now exists. Other Wide-survey components are located inthe GOODS fields {North and South} surrounding the Deep-survey areas.The Deep-survey fields cover roughly half of each GOODS field, withexact areas and placements to be determined as part of the Phase-2process. Each WFC3/IR tile within the Deep regions will receiveapproximately 12 orbits of exposure time split between Y{F105W}, J

  12. Evolution of planetary nebulae. III. Position-velocity images of butterfly-type nebulae

    SciTech Connect

    Icke, V.; Preston, H.L.; Balick, B.

    1989-02-01

    Observations of the motions of the shells of the planetary nebulae NGC 2346, NGC 2371-2, NGC 2440, NGC 6058, NGC 6210, IC 1747, IC 5217, J-320, and M2-9 are presented. These are all 'butterfly' type PNs, and show evidence for bipolar shocks. The observations are interpreted in terms of a fast spherical wind, driven by the central star into a quasi-toroidal envelope deposited earlier by the star, during its slow-wind phase on the asymptotic giant branch. It is shown that this model, which is a straightforward extension of a mechanism previously invoked to account for elliptical PNs, reproduces the essential kinematic features of butterfly PNs. It is inferred that the envelopes of butterflies must have a considerable equator-to-pole density gradient, and it is suggested that the origin of this asphericity must be sought in an as yet unknown mechanism during the AGB, Mira, or OH/IR phases of late stellar evolution. 28 references.

  13. Chromosomal evolution of Arvicolinae (Cricetidae, Rodentia). III. Karyotype relationships of ten Microtus species.

    PubMed

    Lemskaya, Natalia A; Romanenko, Svetlana A; Golenishchev, Feodor N; Rubtsova, Nadezhda V; Sablina, Olga V; Serdukova, Natalya A; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Fu, Beiyuan; Yiğit, Nuri; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Yang, Fengtang; Graphodatsky, Alexander S

    2010-06-01

    The genus Microtus consists of 65 extant species, making it one of the rodentia genera with the highest number of species. The extreme karyotype diversification in Microtus has made them an ideal species group for comparative cytogenetics and cytotaxonomy. Conventional comparative cytogenetic studies in Microtus have been based mainly on chromosomal banding patterns; the number of Microtus species examined by molecular cytogenetics-cross-species chromosome painting-is limited. In this study, we used whole chromosome painting probes of the field vole Microtus agrestis to detect regions of homology in the karyotypes of eight Microtus species. For almost all investigated species, species-specific associations of conserved chromosomal segments were revealed. Analysis of data obtained here and previously published data allowed us to propose that the ancestral Microtus species had a 2n = 54 karyotype, including two associations of field vole chromosomal segments (MAG 1/17 and 2/8). Further mapping of the chromosome rearrangements onto a molecular phylogenetic tree allows the reconstruction of a karyotype evolution pathway in the Microtus genus.

  14. Oxygen and hydrogen peroxide in the early evolution of life on earth: in silico comparative analysis of biochemical pathways.

    PubMed

    Slesak, Ireneusz; Slesak, Halina; Kruk, Jerzy

    2012-08-01

    In the Universe, oxygen is the third most widespread element, while on Earth it is the most abundant one. Moreover, oxygen is a major constituent of all biopolymers fundamental to living organisms. Besides O(2), reactive oxygen species (ROS), among them hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), are also important reactants in the present aerobic metabolism. According to a widely accepted hypothesis, aerobic metabolism and many other reactions/pathways involving O(2) appeared after the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis. In this study, the hypothesis was formulated that the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA) was at least able to tolerate O(2) and detoxify ROS in a primordial environment. A comparative analysis was carried out of a number of the O(2)-and H(2)O(2)-involving metabolic reactions that occur in strict anaerobes, facultative anaerobes, and aerobes. The results indicate that the most likely LUCA possessed O(2)-and H(2)O(2)-involving pathways, mainly reactions to remove ROS, and had, at least in part, the components of aerobic respiration. Based on this, the presence of a low, but significant, quantity of H(2)O(2) and O(2) should be taken into account in theoretical models of the early Archean atmosphere and oceans and the evolution of life. It is suggested that the early metabolism involving O(2)/H(2)O(2) was a key adaptation of LUCA to already existing weakly oxic zones in Earth's primordial environment.

  15. WINGS-SPE. III. Equivalent width measurements, spectral properties, and evolution of local cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, J.; Poggianti, B. M.; Cava, A.; Moretti, A.; Varela, J.; Bettoni, D.; Couch, W. J.; D'Onofrio D'Onofrio, M.; Dressler, A.; Fasano, G.; Kjærgaard, P.; Marziani, P.; Moles, M.; Omizzolo, A.

    2014-06-01

    Context. Cluster galaxies are the ideal sites to look at when studying the influence of the environment on the various aspects of the evolution of galaxies, such as the changes in their stellar content and morphological transformations. In the framework of wings, the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey, we have obtained optical spectra for ~6000 galaxies selected in fields centred on 48 local (0.04 < z < 0.07) X-ray selected clusters to tackle these issues. Aims: By classifying the spectra based on given spectral lines, we investigate the frequency of the various spectral types as a function of both the clusters' properties and the galaxies' characteristics. In this way, using the same classification criteria adopted for studies at higher redshift, we can consistently compare the properties of the local cluster population to those of their more distant counterparts. Methods: We describe a method that we have developed to automatically measure the equivalent width of spectral lines in a robust way, even in spectra with a non optimal signal-to-noise ratio. This way, we can derive a spectral classification reflecting the stellar content, based on the presence and strength of the [Oii] and Hδ lines. Results: After a quality check, we are able to measure 4381 of the ~6000 originally observed spectra in the fields of 48 clusters, of which 2744 are spectroscopically confirmed cluster members. The spectral classification is then analysed as a function of galaxies' luminosity, stellar mass, morphology, local density, and host cluster's global properties and compared to higher redshift samples (MORPHS and EDisCS). The vast majority of galaxies in the local clusters population are passive objects, being also the most luminous and massive. At a magnitude limit of MV < -18, galaxies in a post-starburst phase represent only ~11% of the cluster population, and this fraction is reduced to ~5% at MV < -19.5, which compares to the 18% at the same magnitude limit for high

  16. Coronal hole boundaries evolution at small scales. III. EIS and SUMER views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madjarska, M. S.; Huang, Z.; Doyle, J. G.; Subramanian, S.

    2012-09-01

    Context. We report on the plasma properties of small-scale transient events identified in the quiet Sun, coronal holes and their boundaries. Aims: We aim at deriving the physical characteristics of events that were identified as small-scale transient brightenings in XRT images. Methods: We used spectroscopic co-observations from SUMER/SoHO and EIS/Hinode combined with high-cadence imaging data from XRT/Hinode. We measured Doppler shifts using single and multiple Gaussian fits of the transition region and coronal lines as well as electron densities and temperatures. We combined co-temporal imaging and spectroscopy to separate brightening expansions from plasma flows. Results: The transient brightening events in coronal holes and their boundaries were found to be very dynamical, producing high-density outflows at high speeds. Most of these events represent X-ray jets from pre-existing or newly emerging coronal bright points at X-ray temperatures. The average electron density of the jets is log10 Ne ≈ 8.76 cm-3 while in the flaring site it is log10 Ne ≈ 9.51 cm-3. The jet temperatures reach a maximum of 2.5 MK but in the majority of the cases the temperatures do not exceed 1.6 MK. The footpoints of jets have maximum temperatures of 2.5 MK, though in a single event scanned a minute after the flaring the measured temperature was 12 MK. The jets are produced by multiple microflaring in the transition region and corona. Chromospheric emission was only detected in their footpoints and was only associated with downflows. The Doppler shift measurements in the quiet Sun transient brightenings confirmed that these events do not produce jet-like phenomena. The plasma flows in these phenomena remain trapped in closed loops. Conclusions: We can conclude that the dynamic day-by-day and even hour-by-hour small-scale evolution of coronal hole boundaries reported in Paper I is indeed related to coronal bright points. The XRT observations reported in Paper II revealed that these

  17. MOLECULAR EVOLUTION OF GLUTAMINE SYNTHETASE II AND III IN THE CHROMALVEOLATES(1).

    PubMed

    Ghoshroy, Sohini; Robertson, Deborah L

    2012-06-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is encoded by three distinct gene families (GSI, GSII, and GSIII) that are broadly distributed among the three domains of life. Previous studies established that GSII and GSIII isoenzymes were expressed in diatoms; however, less is known about the distribution and evolution of the gene families in other chromalveolate lineages. Thus, GSII cDNA sequences were isolated from three cryptophytes (Guillardia theta D. R. A. Hill et Wetherbee, Cryptomonas phaseolus Skuja, and Pyrenomonas helgolandii Santore), and GSIII was sequenced from G. theta. Red algal GSII sequences were obtained from Bangia atropurpurea (Mertens ex Roth) C. Agardh; Compsopogon caeruleus (Balbis ex C. Agardh) Mont.; Flintiella sanguinaria F. D. Ott and Porphyridium aerugineum Geitler; Rhodella violacea (Kornmann) Wehrmeyer and Dixoniella grisea (Geitler) J. L. Scott, S. T. Broadwater, B. D. Saunders, J. P. Thomas et P. W. Gabrielson; and Stylonema alsidii (Zanardini) K. M. Drew. In Bayesian inference and maximum-likelihood (ML) phylogenetic analyses, chromalveolate GSII sequences formed a weakly supported clade that nested among sequences from glaucophytes, red algae, green algae, and plants. Red algal GSII sequences formed two distinct clades. The largest clade contained representatives from the Cyanidiophytina and Rhodophytina and grouped with plants and green algae. The smaller clade (C. caeruleus, Porphyra yezoensis, and S. alsidii) nested within the chromalveolates, although its placement was unresolved. Chromalveolate GSIII sequences formed a well-supported clade in Bayesian and ML phylogenies, and mitochondrial transit peptides were identified in many of the sequences. There was strong support for a stramenopile-haptophyte-cryptophyte GSIII clade in which the cryptophyte sequence diverged from the deepest node. Overall, the evolutionary history of the GS gene families within the algae is complex with evidence for the presence of orthologous and paralogous sequences

  18. The nature of Hβ+[O III] and [O II] emitters to z ˜ 5 with HiZELS: stellar mass functions and the evolution of EWs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khostovan, A. A.; Sobral, D.; Mobasher, B.; Smail, I.; Darvish, B.; Nayyeri, H.; Hemmati, S.; Stott, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the properties of ˜7000 narrow-band selected galaxies with strong Hβ+[O III] and [O II] nebular emission lines from the High-z Emission-Line Survey between z ˜ 0.8 and 5.0. Our sample covers a wide range in stellar mass (Mstellar ˜ 107.5-12.0 M⊙), rest-frame equivalent widths (EWrest˜10-105 Å), and line luminosities (Lline ˜ 1040.5-43.2 erg s-1). We measure the Hβ+[O III]-selected stellar mass functions out to z ˜ 3.5 and find that both M⋆ and φ⋆ increases with cosmic time. The [O II]-selected stellar mass functions show a constant M⋆ ≈ 1011.6 M⊙ and a strong, increasing evolution with cosmic time in φ⋆ in line with Hα studies. We also investigate the evolution of the EWrest as a function of redshift with a fixed mass range (109.5-10.0 M⊙) and find an increasing trend best represented by (1 + z)3.81 ± 0.14 and (1 + z)2.72 ± 0.19 up to z ˜ 2 and ˜3 for Hβ+[O III] and [O II] emitters, respectively. This is the first time that the EWrest evolution has been directly measured for Hβ+[O III] and [O II] emitters up to these redshifts. There is evidence for a slower evolution for z > 2 in the Hβ+[O III] EWrest and a decreasing trend for z > 3 in the [O II] EWrest evolution, which would imply low [O II] EW at the highest redshifts and higher [O III]/[O II] line ratios. This suggests that the ionization parameter at higher redshift may be significantly higher than the local Universe. Our results set the stage for future near-IR space-based spectroscopic surveys to test our extrapolated predictions and also produce z > 5 measurements to constrain the high-z end of the EWrest and [O III]/[O II] evolution.

  19. The thermal and metallurgical state of steel strip during hot rolling: Part III. Microstructural evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devadas, C.; Samarasekera, I. V.; Hawbolt, E. B.

    1991-02-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to compute the changes in the austenite grain size during rolling in a hot-strip mill. The heat-transfer model described in the first of this series of papers has been employed to calculate the temperature distribution through the thickness which serves as a basis for the microstructure model. Single-and double-hit compression tests have been conducted at temperatures of 900 °C, 850°C, 950 °C, and 875 °C on 0.34 and 0.05 pct carbon steels to determine the degree of recrystallization by metallographic evaluation of quenched samples and by measuring the magnitude of fractional softening. The Institut de Recherches de la Sidérurgie Francaise, (IRSID) Saint Germain-en-Laye, France equation has been found to yield the best characterization of the observed recrystallization kinetics. The equations representing static recrystallization kinetics, recrystallized grain size, and grain growth kinetics have been incorporated in the model. The principle of additivity has been invoked to permit application of the isothermal recrystallization data to the nonisothermal cooling conditions. The model has been validated by comparing predicted austenite grain sizes with measurements made on samples quenched after one to four passes of rolling on the CANMET pilot mill. The austenite grain size evolution during rolling of a 0.34 pct carbon steel on Stelco’s Lake Erie Works (LEW) hot-strip mill has been computed with the aid of the model. The grain size decreased from an initial value of 180 μm to 35 μm in the first pass due to the high reduction of 46 pct. The changes in austenite grain size in subsequent passes were found to be small in comparison because of the lower per pass reductions. It has been shown that the equation employed to represent grain growth kinetics in the interstand region has a significant influence on the computed final grain size. Altering the rolling schedule had a negligible influence on the final grain size for a

  20. Oxygen and Hydrogen Peroxide in the Early Evolution of Life on Earth: In silico Comparative Analysis of Biochemical Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ślesak, Halina; Kruk, Jerzy

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In the Universe, oxygen is the third most widespread element, while on Earth it is the most abundant one. Moreover, oxygen is a major constituent of all biopolymers fundamental to living organisms. Besides O2, reactive oxygen species (ROS), among them hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), are also important reactants in the present aerobic metabolism. According to a widely accepted hypothesis, aerobic metabolism and many other reactions/pathways involving O2 appeared after the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis. In this study, the hypothesis was formulated that the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA) was at least able to tolerate O2 and detoxify ROS in a primordial environment. A comparative analysis was carried out of a number of the O2-and H2O2-involving metabolic reactions that occur in strict anaerobes, facultative anaerobes, and aerobes. The results indicate that the most likely LUCA possessed O2-and H2O2-involving pathways, mainly reactions to remove ROS, and had, at least in part, the components of aerobic respiration. Based on this, the presence of a low, but significant, quantity of H2O2 and O2 should be taken into account in theoretical models of the early Archean atmosphere and oceans and the evolution of life. It is suggested that the early metabolism involving O2/H2O2 was a key adaptation of LUCA to already existing weakly oxic zones in Earth's primordial environment. Key Words: Hydrogen peroxide—Oxygen—Origin of life—Photosynthesis—Superoxide dismutase—Superoxide reductase. Astrobiology 12, 775–784. PMID:22970865

  1. The evolution of three types of indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenases in fungi with distinct molecular and biochemical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Hajime J; Ball, Helen J

    2012-08-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is a tryptophan-degrading enzyme and known as a mammalian immunosuppressive molecule. In fungi, the primary role of IDO is to supply nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) via the kynurenine pathway. We previously reported that the koji-mold, Aspergillus oryzae has two IDO genes, IDOα and IDOβ. In the present study, we found that A. oryzae also has the third IDO, IDOγ. These three-types of IDOs are widely distributed among the Pezizomycotina fungi, although the black truffle, Tuber melanosporum has only one corresponding gene to IDOα/IDOβ. The yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae has a single IDO gene. Generally, Pezizomycotina IDOα showed similar enzymatic properties to the yeast IDO, suggesting that the IDOα is a functional homologue of the S. cerevisiae IDO. In contrast to IDOα, the K(m) value of IDOβ is higher. However, the reaction velocity of IDOβ is very fast, resulting in comparable or higher catalytic efficiency than IDOα. Thus IDOβ may functionally substitute for IDOα in fungal L-Trp metabolism. The enzymatic activity of IDOγ was comparatively very low with the values of enzymatic parameters comparable to vertebrate IDO2 enzymes. IDOα and IDOβ have similar gene structures, suggesting that they were generated by gene duplication which occurred rather early in Pezizomycotina evolution, although the timing of the duplication remains debatable. In contrast, the phylogenetic trees suggest that IDOγs form an evolutionarily distinct group of IDO enzymes, with a closer relationship to group I bacterial IDOs than other fungal IDOs. The ancestor of the IDOγ family is likely to have diverged from other eukaryotic IDOs at a very early stage of eukaryotic evolution. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. A biochemical quality study of a pharmaceutically licenced coagulation active plasma (Octaplas) thawed by the SAHARA-III dry tempering system compared to the regular use of a water bath.

    PubMed

    Heger, A; Römisch, J; Svae, T-E

    2008-01-01

    The most common way to thaw frozen coagulation-active plasma products for transfusion is the use of a water bath with good circulation at 30-37 degrees C. The aim of this study was to perform an extensive biochemical characterization of the pharmaceutically licenced solvent/detergent-treated plasma, Octaplas, thawed using the SAHARA-III dry tempering system from the company Sarstedt GmbH, Austria. A regular water bath was used in parallel for comparison. Six batches Octaplas with different blood groups were thawed in a water bath or using the SAHARA-III dry tempering system in parallel. Thawed plasma was investigated on screening tests for blood coagulation, as well as on the activities of important coagulation factors and protease inhibitors. In addition, markers of activated coagulation and fibrinolysis were tested and von Willebrand factor multimeric analysis was performed. There were neither significant differences in the blood coagulation parameters, coagulation factors, protease inhibitors, nor of markers of activated coagulation and fibrinolysis when Octaplas thawed by the two different methods was tested. The von Willebrand factor analyses showed no influence on the overall profile of the multimeric pattern when using the SAHARA-III dry tempering system. Octaplas can be thawed using the SAHARA-III dry tempering system without any negative influences on the demonstrated quality of this product. The SAHARA-III dry tempering system enables standardized thawing and warming procedure. Furthermore, tempering of Octaplas in the emergency unit or operating theatre, where no water baths can be utilized, is safe and can be fully endorsed.

  3. POISSON project. III. Investigating the evolution of the mass accretion rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniucci, S.; García López, R.; Nisini, B.; Caratti o Garatti, A.; Giannini, T.; Lorenzetti, D.

    2014-12-01

    Context. As part of the Protostellar Optical-Infrared Spectral Survey On NTT (POISSON) project, we present the results of the analysis of low-resolution near-IR spectroscopic data (0.9-2.4 μm) of two samples of young stellar objects in the Lupus (52 objects) and Serpens (17 objects) star-forming clouds, with masses in the range of 0.1 to 2.0 M⊙ and ages spanning from 105 to a few 107 yr. Aims: After determining the accretion parameters of the targets by analysing their H i near-IR emission features, we added the results from the Lupus and Serpens clouds to those from previous regions (investigated in POISSON with the same methodology) to obtain a final catalogue (143 objects) of mass accretion rate values (Ṁacc) derived in a homogeneous and consistent fashion. Our final goal is to analyse how Ṁacc correlates with the stellar mass (M∗) and how it evolves in time in the whole POISSON sample. Methods: We derived the accretion luminosity (Lacc) and Ṁacc for Lupus and Serpens objects from the Brγ (Paβ in a few cases) line by using relevant empirical relationships available in the literature that connect the H i line luminosity and Lacc. To minimise the biases that arise from adopting literature data that are based on different evolutionary models and also for self-consistency, we re-derived mass and age for each source of the POISSON samples using the same set of evolutionary tracks. Results: We observe a correlation Ṁacc~M*2.2 between mass accretion rate and stellar mass, similarly to what has previously been observed in several star-forming regions. We find that the time variation of Ṁacc is roughly consistent with the expected evolution of the accretion rate in viscous disks, with an asymptotic decay that behaves as t-1.6. However, Ṁacc values are characterised by a large scatter at similar ages and are on average higher than the predictions of viscous models. Conclusions: Although part of the scattering may be related to systematics due to the

  4. Biochemical and metabolic abnormalities in articular cartilage from osteoarthritic human hips. III. Distribution and metabolism of amino sugar-containing macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Mankin, H J; Johnson, M E; Lippiello, L

    1981-01-01

    Since 1960, numerous studies have supported the thesis that the synthetic activity of articular chondrocytes is increased in osteoarthritis, but several recent reports have challenged this concept. To clarify this problem fully and also to define further the products of this increased synthesis, three experiments were performed in which the distribution and rates of synthesis of amino sugar-containing macromolecules in normal and osteoarthritic cartilage from the human femoral head were assessed by biochemical analysis and studies of the incorporation of 3H-glucosamine and 35SO4. The biochemical data obtained clearly demonstrated the previously noted significant decrease in hexosamine content in osteoarthritic tissue. This decrease was principally due to a diminution in glucosamine concentration and correlated inversely with the severity of the disease process (as measured by a previously described histological-histochemical grading system). Metabolic studies showed a marked increment in the rates of incorporation of 3H-glucosamine into both the glucosamine and the galactosamine fractions of the cartilage. The increased synthesis correlated directly in a non-linear fashion with the severity of the disease. The ratio of the rate of incorporation of 3H-glucosamine into the glucosamine fraction to the rate of its incorporation into the galactosamine fraction was the same in normal and osteoarthritic samples, suggesting that the decline in glucosamine concentration was not related to a qualitative alteration of synthetic activity.

  5. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of Germicidin Synthase: Analysis of a Type III Polyketide Synthase That Employs Acyl-ACP as a Starter Unit Donor

    SciTech Connect

    Chemler, Joseph A.; Buchholz, Tonia J.; Geders, Todd W.; Akey, David L.; Rath, Christopher M.; Chlipala, George E.; Smith, Janet L.; Sherman, David H.

    2012-08-10

    Germicidin synthase (Gcs) from Streptomyces coelicolor is a type III polyketide synthase (PKS) with broad substrate flexibility for acyl groups linked through a thioester bond to either coenzyme A (CoA) or acyl carrier protein (ACP). Germicidin synthesis was reconstituted in vitro by coupling Gcs with fatty acid biosynthesis. Since Gcs has broad substrate flexibility, we directly compared the kinetic properties of Gcs with both acyl-ACP and acyl-CoA. The catalytic efficiency of Gcs for acyl-ACP was 10-fold higher than for acyl-CoA, suggesting a strong preference toward carrier protein starter unit transfer. The 2.9 {angstrom} germicidin synthase crystal structure revealed canonical type III PKS architecture along with an unusual helical bundle of unknown function that appears to extend the dimerization interface. A pair of arginine residues adjacent to the active site affect catalytic activity but not ACP binding. This investigation provides new and surprising information about the interactions between type III PKSs and ACPs that will facilitate the construction of engineered systems for production of novel polyketides.

  6. Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayr, Ernst

    1978-01-01

    Traces the history of evolution theory from Lamarck and Darwin to the present. Discusses natural selection in detail. Suggests that, besides biological evolution, there is also a cultural evolution which is more rapid than the former. (MA)

  7. Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayr, Ernst

    1978-01-01

    Traces the history of evolution theory from Lamarck and Darwin to the present. Discusses natural selection in detail. Suggests that, besides biological evolution, there is also a cultural evolution which is more rapid than the former. (MA)

  8. Biochemical, cellular, and molecular mechanisms in the evolution of secondary damage after severe traumatic brain injury in infants and children: Lessons learned from the bedside.

    PubMed

    Kochanek, Patrick M.; Clark, Robert S.B.; Ruppel, Randall A.; Adelson, P. David; Bell, Michael J.; Whalen, Michael J.; Robertson, Courtney L.; Satchell, Margaret A.; Seidberg, Neal A.; Marion, Donald W.; Jenkins, Larry W.

    2000-07-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present a state-of-the-art review of mechanisms of secondary injury in the evolution of damage after severe traumatic brain injury in infants and children. DATA SOURCES: We reviewed 152 peer-reviewed publications, 15 abstracts and proceedings, and other material relevant to the study of biochemical, cellular, and molecular mechanisms of damage in traumatic brain injury. Clinical studies of severe traumatic brain injury in infants and children were the focus, but reports in experimental models in immature animals were also considered. Results from both clinical studies in adults and models of traumatic brain injury in adult animals were presented for comparison. DATA SYNTHESIS: Categories of mechanisms defined were those associated with ischemia, excitotoxicity, energy failure, and resultant cell death cascades; secondary cerebral swelling; axonal injury; and inflammation and regeneration. CONCLUSIONS: A constellation of mediators of secondary damage, endogenous neuroprotection, repair, and regeneration are set into motion in the brain after severe traumatic injury. The quantitative contribution of each mediator to outcome, the interplay between these mediators, and the integration of these mechanistic findings with novel imaging methods, bedside physiology, outcome assessment, and therapeutic intervention remain an important target for future research.

  9. The evolution of the role of ABA in the regulation of water-use efficiency: From biochemical mechanisms to stomatal conductance.

    PubMed

    Negin, Boaz; Moshelion, Menachem

    2016-10-01

    Abscisic acid is found in a wide variety of organisms. In the plant kingdom, ABA's role in mediating responses to abiotic stress has been conserved and enhanced throughout evolution. The emergence of plants to terrestrial environments required the development of mechanisms to cope with ongoing and severe abiotic stress such as drought and rapid changes in humidity and temperature. The common understanding is that terrestrial plants evolved strategies ranging from desiccation-tolerance mechanisms (mosses) to drought tolerance (CAM plants), to better exploit different ecological niches. In between these divergent water regulation strategies, ABA plays a significant role in managing plants' adaptation to new environments by optimizing water-use efficiency (WUE) under particular environmental conditions. ABA plays some very different roles in the regulation of WUE. ABA's role in the regulation of guard cells and transpiration has yielded a wide variety of WUE-regulation mechanisms, ranging from no sensitivity (ferns) to low sensitivity (anisohydric behavior) to hypersensitivity to ABA (isohydric behavior and putatively CAM plants). ABA also plays a role in the regulation of non-stomatal, biochemical mechanisms of WUE regulation. In angiosperms, this includes the control of osmotic adjustment and morphological changes, including changes in leaf size, stomatal density, stomatal size and root development. Under severe stress, ABA also appears to initiate leaf senescence via transcriptional regulation, to directly inhibit photosynthesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Degradation of connective tissue matrices by macrophages. III. Morphological and biochemical studies on extracellular, pericellular, and intracellular events in matrix proteolysis by macrophages in culture

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    We have shown that macrophages in culture degrade the glycoproteins and amorphous elastin of insoluble extracellular matrices. Ultrastructural observation of the macrophage-matrix interaction revealed that connective tissue macromolecules were solubilized from the matrix extracellularly. At least part of the matrix breakdown was localized to the immediate vicinity of the cells, as shown by morphological and biochemical studies, although the rate of degradation correlated closely with the secretion of proteinases by various inflammatory stimuli in vivo, by glucocorticoids, prostaglandin E2 or colchicine, or by phagocytosis of latex, zymosan, or cholesterol-albumin complexes in culture was reflected in altered rates of glycoprotein and elastin degradation by the macrophages. Alteration of endocytosis and lysosomal digestion by cytochalasin B, NH4Cl, and proteinase inhibitors did not decrease the overall rate of matrix solubilization, but reduced the processing of the matrix fragments to peptides. Therefore, extracellular, pericellular, and lysosomal events each contribute to degradation of extracellular matrix macromolecules by inflammatory macrophages. PMID:7005386

  11. Simultaneous occurrence of the 11778 (ND4) and the 9438 (COX III) mtDNA mutations in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: Molecular, biochemical, and clinical findings

    SciTech Connect

    Oostra, R.J.; Bleeker-Wagemakers, E.M.; Zwart, R.

    1995-10-01

    Three mtDNA point mutations at nucleotide position (np) 3460, at np 11778 and at np 14484, are thought to be of primary importance in the pathogenesis of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), a maternally inherited disease characterized by subacute central vision loss. These mutations are present in genes coding for subunits of complex I (NADH dehydrogenase) of the respiratory chain, occur exclusively in LHON maternal pedigrees, and have never been reported to occur together. Johns and Neufeld postulated that an mtDNA mutation at np 9438, in the gene coding for one of the subunits (COX III) of complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase), was also of primary importance. Johns and Neufeld (1993) found this mutation, which changed a conserved glycine to a serine, in 5 unrelated LHON probands who did not carry one of the presently known primary mutations, but they did not find it in 400 controls. However, the role of this sequence variant has been questioned in the Journal when it has been found to occur in apparently healthy African and Cuban individuals. Subsequently, Johns et al. described this mutation in two Cuban individuals presenting with optic and peripheral neuropathy. 22 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  12. Biochemical evolution III: Polymerization on organophilic silica-rich surfaces, crystal–chemical modeling, formation of first cells, and geological clues

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Joseph V.; Arnold, Frederick P.; Parsons, Ian; Lee, Martin R.

    1999-01-01

    Catalysis at organophilic silica-rich surfaces of zeolites and feldspars might generate replicating biopolymers from simple chemicals supplied by meteorites, volcanic gases, and other geological sources. Crystal–chemical modeling yielded packings for amino acids neatly encapsulated in 10-ring channels of the molecular sieve silicalite-ZSM-5-(mutinaite). Calculation of binding and activation energies for catalytic assembly into polymers is progressing for a chemical composition with one catalytic Al–OH site per 25 neutral Si tetrahedral sites. Internal channel intersections and external terminations provide special stereochemical features suitable for complex organic species. Polymer migration along nano/micrometer channels of ancient weathered feldspars, plus exploitation of phosphorus and various transition metals in entrapped apatite and other microminerals, might have generated complexes of replicating catalytic biomolecules, leading to primitive cellular organisms. The first cell wall might have been an internal mineral surface, from which the cell developed a protective biological cap emerging into a nutrient-rich “soup.” Ultimately, the biological cap might have expanded into a complete cell wall, allowing mobility and colonization of energy-rich challenging environments. Electron microscopy of honeycomb channels inside weathered feldspars of the Shap granite (northwest England) has revealed modern bacteria, perhaps indicative of Archean ones. All known early rocks were metamorphosed too highly during geologic time to permit simple survival of large-pore zeolites, honeycombed feldspar, and encapsulated species. Possible microscopic clues to the proposed mineral adsorbents/catalysts are discussed for planning of systematic study of black cherts from weakly metamorphosed Archaean sediments. PMID:10097060

  13. One-Pot Synthesis of Fe(III)-Polydopamine Complex Nanospheres: Morphological Evolution, Mechanism, and Application of the Carbonized Hybrid Nanospheres in Catalysis and Zn-Air Battery.

    PubMed

    Ang, Jia Ming; Du, Yonghua; Tay, Boon Ying; Zhao, Chenyang; Kong, Junhua; Stubbs, Ludger Paul; Lu, Xuehong

    2016-09-13

    We report one-pot synthesis of Fe(III)-polydopamine (PDA) complex nanospheres, their structures, morphology evolution, and underlying mechanism. The complex nanospheres were synthesized by introducing ferric ions into the reaction mixture used for polymerization of dopamine. It is verified that both the oxidative polymerization of dopamine and Fe(III)-PDA complexation contribute to the "polymerization" process, in which the ferric ions form coordination bonds with both oxygen and nitrogen, as indicated by X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy. In the "polymerization" process, the morphology of the complex nanostructures is gradually transformed from sheetlike to spherical at the feed Fe(III)/dopamine molar ratio of 1/3. The final size of the complex spheres is much smaller than its neat PDA counterpart. At higher feed Fe(III)/dopamine molar ratios, the final morphology of the "polymerization" products is sheetlike. The results suggest that the formation of spherical morphology is likely to be driven by covalent polymerization-induced decrease of hydrophilic functional groups, which causes reself-assembly of the PDA oligomers to reduce surface area. We also demonstrate that this one-pot synthesis route for hybrid nanospheres enables the facile construction of carbonized PDA (C-PDA) nanospheres uniformly embedded with Fe3O4 nanoparticles of only 3-5 nm in size. The C-PDA/Fe3O4 nanospheres exhibit catalytic activity toward oxygen reduction reaction and deliver a stable discharge voltage for over 200 h when utilized as the cathode in a primary Zn-air battery and are also good recyclable catalyst supports.

  14. A unified N-body and statistical treatment of stellar dynamics. III - Early postcollapse evolution of globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, S. L. W.

    1986-01-01

    The period immediately following the core collapse phase in the evolution of a globular cluster is studied using a hybrid N-body/Fokker-Planck stellar dynamical code. Several core oscillations of the type predicted in earlier work are seen. The oscillations are driven by the formation, hardening, and ejection of binaries by three-body processes, and appear to decay on a timescale of about 10 to the 7th yr, for the choice of 'typical' cluster parameters made here. There is no evidence that they are gravothermal in nature. The mechanisms responsible for the decay are discussed in some detail. The distribution of hard binaries produced by the oscillations is compared with theoretical expectations and the longer term evolution of the system is considered.

  15. Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Ulmschneider

    When we are looking for intelligent life outside the Earth, there is a fundamental question: Assuming that life has formed on an extraterrestrial planet, will it also develop toward intelligence? As this is hotly debated, we will now describe the development of life on Earth in more detail in order to show that there are good reasons why evolution should culminate in intelligent beings.

  16. Repertoire, unified nomenclature and evolution of the Type III effector gene set in the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ralstonia solanacearum is a soil-borne beta-proteobacterium that causes bacterial wilt disease in many food crops and is a major problem for agriculture in intertropical regions. R. solanacearum is a heterogeneous species, both phenotypically and genetically, and is considered as a species complex. Pathogenicity of R. solanacearum relies on the Type III secretion system that injects Type III effector (T3E) proteins into plant cells. T3E collectively perturb host cell processes and modulate plant immunity to enable bacterial infection. Results We provide the catalogue of T3E in the R. solanacearum species complex, as well as candidates in newly sequenced strains. 94 T3E orthologous groups were defined on phylogenetic bases and ordered using a uniform nomenclature. This curated T3E catalog is available on a public website and a bioinformatic pipeline has been designed to rapidly predict T3E genes in newly sequenced strains. Systematical analyses were performed to detect lateral T3E gene transfer events and identify T3E genes under positive selection. Our analyses also pinpoint the RipF translocon proteins as major discriminating determinants among the phylogenetic lineages. Conclusions Establishment of T3E repertoires in strains representatives of the R. solanacearum biodiversity allowed determining a set of 22 T3E present in all the strains but provided no clues on host specificity determinants. The definition of a standardized nomenclature and the optimization of predictive tools will pave the way to understanding how variation of these repertoires is correlated to the diversification of this species complex and how they contribute to the different strain pathotypes. PMID:24314259

  17. Repertoire, unified nomenclature and evolution of the Type III effector gene set in the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Nemo; Carrère, Sébastien; Anisimova, Maria; Plener, Laure; Cazalé, Anne-Claire; Genin, Stephane

    2013-12-06

    Ralstonia solanacearum is a soil-borne beta-proteobacterium that causes bacterial wilt disease in many food crops and is a major problem for agriculture in intertropical regions. R. solanacearum is a heterogeneous species, both phenotypically and genetically, and is considered as a species complex. Pathogenicity of R. solanacearum relies on the Type III secretion system that injects Type III effector (T3E) proteins into plant cells. T3E collectively perturb host cell processes and modulate plant immunity to enable bacterial infection. We provide the catalogue of T3E in the R. solanacearum species complex, as well as candidates in newly sequenced strains. 94 T3E orthologous groups were defined on phylogenetic bases and ordered using a uniform nomenclature. This curated T3E catalog is available on a public website and a bioinformatic pipeline has been designed to rapidly predict T3E genes in newly sequenced strains. Systematical analyses were performed to detect lateral T3E gene transfer events and identify T3E genes under positive selection. Our analyses also pinpoint the RipF translocon proteins as major discriminating determinants among the phylogenetic lineages. Establishment of T3E repertoires in strains representatives of the R. solanacearum biodiversity allowed determining a set of 22 T3E present in all the strains but provided no clues on host specificity determinants. The definition of a standardized nomenclature and the optimization of predictive tools will pave the way to understanding how variation of these repertoires is correlated to the diversification of this species complex and how they contribute to the different strain pathotypes.

  18. Infrared Spectroscopic Data from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), SDSS-III Data Release 10

    DOE Data Explorer

    Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 10 is the first spectroscopic release from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), including spectra and derived stellar parameters for more than 50,000 stars. APOGEE is an ongoing survey of ~100,000 stars accessing all parts of the Milky Way. By operating in the infrared (H-band) portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, APOGEE is better able to detect light from stars lying in dusty regions of the Milky Way than surveys conducted in the optical, making this survey particularly well-suited for exploring the Galactic disk and bulge. APOGEE's high resolution spectra provide detailed information about the stellar atmospheres; DR10 provides derived effective temperatures, surface gravities, overall metallicities, and information on the abundances of several chemical elements. [copied from http://www.sdss3.org/dr10/irspec/

  19. Model Stellar Spectral Libraries for Analysis of the SDSS-III Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allende-Prieto, Carlos; Koesterke, L.; Shetrone, M. D.; Zamora, O.; Ruffoni, M. P.; Smith, V. V.; Cunha, K. M.; Lawler, J. E.; Pickering, J. C.; Nave, G.; Garcia Perez, A.; Bizyaev, D.; Edvardsson, B.; Gustafsson, B.; Plez, B.; Castelli, F.; Majewski, S. R.; Schiavon, R. P.; Meszaros, Sz.; de Vicente, A.

    2014-01-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) is obtaining high resolution ( 22,500), high signal-to-noise (> 100) spectra in the 1510-1690 nm spectral region for 100,000 cool, predominantly post-main sequence stars. To ascertain the stellar atmospheric parameters and measure chemical abundances for the numerous chemical elements with line transitions in this wavelength region, the APOGEE Atmospheric Parameters and Chemical Abundances Pipeline (ASPCAP) relies on an optimization algorithm that identifies the best-fitting model for each of the observed APOGEE spectra. The fitting algorithm speeds up the model evaluation by interpolation in pre-computed grids of synthetic spectra that have been compressed using Principal Component Analysis. Here we describe the main model grids used in ASPCAP for the tenth data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS DR10), how they were calculated. We also provide a description of ongoing and planned upgrades.

  20. The UV-Optical Galaxy Color-Magnitude Diagram. III. Constraints on Evolution from the Blue to the Red Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, D. Christopher; Wyder, Ted K.; Schiminovich, David; Barlow, Tom A.; Forster, Karl; Friedman, Peter G.; Morrissey, Patrick; Neff, Susan G.; Seibert, Mark; Small, Todd; Welsh, Barry Y.; Bianchi, Luciana; Donas, José; Heckman, Timothy M.; Lee, Young-Wook; Madore, Barry F.; Milliard, Bruno; Rich, R. Michael; Szalay, Alex S.; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2007-12-01

    We introduce a new quantity, the mass flux density of galaxies evolving from the blue sequence to the red sequence. We propose a simple technique for constraining this mass flux using the volume-corrected number density in the extinction-corrected UV-optical color-magnitude distribution, the stellar age indexes HδA and Dn(4000), and a simple prescription for spectral evolution using a quenched star formation history. We exploit the excellent separation of red and blue sequences in the NUV-r band Hess function. The final value we measure, ρT˙=0.033 Msolar yr-1 Mpc-3, is strictly speaking an upper limit due to the possible contributions of bursting, composite, and extincted galaxies. However, it compares favorably with estimates of the average mass flux that we make based on the red luminosity function evolution derived from the DEEP2 and COMBO-17 surveys, ρ˙R=+0.034 Msolar yr-1 Mpc-3. We find that the blue sequence mass has remained roughly constant since z=1 (ρB˙~=0.01 Msolar yr-1 Mpc-3, but the average on-going star formation of ρ˙SF~=0.037 Msolar yr-1 Mpc-3 over 0

  1. Decomposition driven interface evolution for layers of binary mixtures. III. Two-dimensional steady films with flat and modulated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bribesh, Fathi A. M.; Fraštia, Ľubor; Thiele, Uwe

    2012-06-01

    We study two-dimensional steady concentration and film thickness profiles for isothermal free surface films of a binary liquid mixture on a solid substrate employing model-H that couples the diffusive transport of the components of the mixture (convective Cahn-Hilliard equation) and the transport of momentum (Navier-Stokes-Korteweg equations). The analysis is based on minimising the underlying free energy equivalent to solving the static limit of model-H. Additionally, the linear stability (in time) of relevant layered films is analyzed. This allows for a comparison of the position of certain branching points in the bifurcation diagrams of steady solutions with the value predicted as onset of a linear instability. Results are presented for the cases of (i) a flat film without energetic bias at the free surface, (ii) a flat film with energetic bias, (iii) a height-modulated film without energetic bias, and (iv) a height-modulated film with energetic bias. In all cases we discuss symmetries of the various steady solutions allowing us to order them and to infer properties of solution branches and relations between them.

  2. Charge Photo-Accumulation and Photocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution Under Visible Light at an Iridium(III)-Photosensitized Polyoxotungstate.

    PubMed

    Matt, Benjamin; Fize, Jennifer; Moussa, Jamal; Amouri, Hani; Pereira, Alexandre; Artero, Vincent; Izzet, Guillaume; Proust, Anna

    2013-05-01

    Steady-state irradiation under visible light of a covalent Ir(III)-photosensitized polyoxotungstate is reported. In the presence of a sacrificial electron donor, the photolysis leads to the very efficient photoreduction of the polyoxometalate. Successive formation of the one-electron and two-electron reduced species, which are unambiguously identified by comparison with spectroelectrochemical measurements, is observed with a significantly faster rate reaction for the formation of the one-electron reduced species. The kinetics of the photoreduction, which are correlated to the reduction potentials of the polyoxometalate (POM), can be finely tuned by the presence of an acid. Indeed light-driven formation of the two-electron reduced POM is considerably facilitated in the presence of acetic acid. The system is also able to perform photocatalytic hydrogen production under visible light without significant loss of performance over more than 1 week of continuous photolysis and displays higher photocatalytic efficiency than the related multi-component system, outlining the decisive effect of the covalent bonding between the POM and the photosensitizer. This functional and modular system constitutes a promising step for the development of charge photoaccumulation devices and subsequent photoelectrocatalysts for artificial photosynthesis.

  3. Biosynthesis of biphenyls and benzophenones--evolution of benzoic acid-specific type III polyketide synthases in plants.

    PubMed

    Beerhues, Ludger; Liu, Benye

    2009-01-01

    Type III polyketide synthases (PKSs) generate a diverse array of secondary metabolites by varying the starter substrate, the number of condensation reactions, and the mechanism of ring closure. Among the starter substrates used, benzoyl-CoA is a rare starter molecule. Biphenyl synthase (BIS) and benzophenone synthase (BPS) catalyze the formation of identical linear tetraketide intermediates from benzoyl-CoA and three molecules of malonyl-CoA but use alternative intramolecular cyclization reactions to form 3,5-dihydroxybiphenyl and 2,4,6-trihydroxybenzophenone, respectively. In a phylogenetic tree, BIS and BPS group together closely, indicating that they arise from a relatively recent functional diversification of a common ancestral gene. The functionally diverse PKSs, which include BIS and BPS, and the ubiquitously distributed chalcone synthases (CHSs) form separate clusters, which originate from a gene duplication event prior to the speciation of the angiosperms. BIS is the key enzyme of biphenyl metabolism. Biphenyls and the related dibenzofurans are the phytoalexins of the Maloideae. This subfamily of the Rosaceae includes a number of economically important fruit trees, such as apple and pear. When incubated with ortho-hydroxybenzoyl (salicoyl)-CoA, BIS catalyzes a single decarboxylative condensation with malonyl-CoA to form 4-hydroxycoumarin. A well-known anticoagulant derivative of this enzymatic product is dicoumarol. Elicitor-treated cell cultures of Sorbus aucuparia also formed 4-hydroxycoumarin when fed with the N-acetylcysteamine thioester of salicylic acid (salicoyl-NAC). BPS is the key enzyme of benzophenone metabolism. Polyprenylated benzophenone derivatives with bridged polycyclic skeletons are widely distributed in the Clusiaceae (Guttiferae). Xanthones are regioselectively cyclized benzophenone derivatives. BPS was converted into a functional phenylpyrone synthase (PPS) by a single amino acid substitution in the initiation/elongation cavity. The

  4. Dust evolution, a global view: III. Core/mantle grains, organic nano-globules, comets and surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Jones, A P

    2016-12-01

    Within the framework of The Heterogeneous dust Evolution Model for Interstellar Solids (THEMIS), this work explores the surface processes and chemistry relating to core/mantle interstellar and cometary grain structures and their influence on the nature of these fascinating particles. It appears that a realistic consideration of the nature and chemical reactivity of interstellar grain surfaces could self-consistently and within a coherent framework explain: the anomalous oxygen depletion, the nature of the CO dark gas, the formation of 'polar ice' mantles, the red wing on the 3 μm water ice band, the basis for the O-rich chemistry observed in hot cores, the origin of organic nano-globules and the 3.2 μm 'carbonyl' absorption band observed in comet reflectance spectra. It is proposed that the reaction of gas phase species with carbonaceous a-C(:H) grain surfaces in the interstellar medium, in particular the incorporation of atomic oxygen into grain surfaces in epoxide functional groups, is the key to explaining these observations. Thus, the chemistry of cosmic dust is much more intimately related with that of the interstellar gas than has previously been considered. The current models for interstellar gas and dust chemistry will therefore most likely need to be fundamentally modified to include these new grain surface processes.

  5. Dust evolution, a global view: III. Core/mantle grains, organic nano-globules, comets and surface chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. P.

    2016-12-01

    Within the framework of The Heterogeneous dust Evolution Model for Interstellar Solids (THEMIS), this work explores the surface processes and chemistry relating to core/mantle interstellar and cometary grain structures and their influence on the nature of these fascinating particles. It appears that a realistic consideration of the nature and chemical reactivity of interstellar grain surfaces could self-consistently and within a coherent framework explain: the anomalous oxygen depletion, the nature of the CO dark gas, the formation of `polar ice' mantles, the red wing on the 3 μm water ice band, the basis for the O-rich chemistry observed in hot cores, the origin of organic nano-globules and the 3.2 μm `carbonyl' absorption band observed in comet reflectance spectra. It is proposed that the reaction of gas phase species with carbonaceous a-C(:H) grain surfaces in the interstellar medium, in particular the incorporation of atomic oxygen into grain surfaces in epoxide functional groups, is the key to explaining these observations. Thus, the chemistry of cosmic dust is much more intimately related with that of the interstellar gas than has previously been considered. The current models for interstellar gas and dust chemistry will therefore most likely need to be fundamentally modified to include these new grain surface processes.

  6. Metal Accretion onto White Dwarfs. III. A Still Better Approach Based on the Coupling of Diffusion with Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brassard, Pierre; Fontaine, Gilles

    2015-06-01

    The accretion-diffusion picture is the model par excellence for describing the presence of planetary debris polluting the atmospheres of relatively cool white dwarfs. In the time-dependent approach used in Paper II of this series (Fontaine et al. 2014), the basic assumption is that the accreted metals are trace elements and do not influence the background structure, which may be considered static in time. Furthermore, the usual assumption of instantaneous mixing in the convection zone is made. As part of the continuing development of our local evolutionary code, diffusion in presence of stellar winds or accretion is now fully coupled to evolution. Convection is treated as a diffusion process, i.e., the assumption of instantaneous mixing is relaxed, and, furthermore, overshooting is included. This allows feedback on the evolving structure from the accreting metals. For instance, depending of its abundance, a given metal may contribute enough to the overall opacity (especially in a He background) to change the size of the convection zone as a function of time. Our better approach also allows to include in a natural way the mechanism of thermohaline convection, which we discuss at some length. Also, it is easy to consider sophisticated time-dependent models of accretion from circumstellar disks, such as those developed by Roman Rafikov at Princeton for instance. The current limitations of our approach are 1) the calculations are extremely computer-intensive, and 2) we have not yet developed detailed EOS megatables for metals beyond oxygen.

  7. Dust evolution, a global view: III. Core/mantle grains, organic nano-globules, comets and surface chemistry

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Within the framework of The Heterogeneous dust Evolution Model for Interstellar Solids (THEMIS), this work explores the surface processes and chemistry relating to core/mantle interstellar and cometary grain structures and their influence on the nature of these fascinating particles. It appears that a realistic consideration of the nature and chemical reactivity of interstellar grain surfaces could self-consistently and within a coherent framework explain: the anomalous oxygen depletion, the nature of the CO dark gas, the formation of ‘polar ice’ mantles, the red wing on the 3 μm water ice band, the basis for the O-rich chemistry observed in hot cores, the origin of organic nano-globules and the 3.2 μm ‘carbonyl’ absorption band observed in comet reflectance spectra. It is proposed that the reaction of gas phase species with carbonaceous a-C(:H) grain surfaces in the interstellar medium, in particular the incorporation of atomic oxygen into grain surfaces in epoxide functional groups, is the key to explaining these observations. Thus, the chemistry of cosmic dust is much more intimately related with that of the interstellar gas than has previously been considered. The current models for interstellar gas and dust chemistry will therefore most likely need to be fundamentally modified to include these new grain surface processes. PMID:28083090

  8. The MUSIC of Galaxy Clusters - III. Properties, evolution and Y-M scaling relation of protoclusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sembolini, Federico; De Petris, Marco; Yepes, Gustavo; Foschi, Emma; Lamagna, Luca; Gottlöber, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    In this work, we study the properties of protoclusters of galaxies by employing the MultiDark SImulations of galaxy Clusters (MUSIC) set of hydrodynamical simulations, featuring a sample of 282 resimulated clusters with available merger trees up to z = 4. We study the characteristics and redshift evolution of the mass and the spatial distribution for all the protoclusters, which we define as the most massive progenitors of the clusters identified at z = 0. We extend the study of the baryon content to redshifts larger than 1 also in terms of gas and stars budgets: no remarkable variations with redshift are discovered. Furthermore, motivated by the proven potential of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich surveys to blindly search for faint distant objects, we compute the scaling relation between total object mass and integrated Compton y-parameter. We find that the slope of this scaling law is steeper than what expected for a self-similarity assumption among these objects, and it increases with redshift mainly when radiative processes are included. We use three different criteria to account for the dynamical state of the protoclusters, and find no significant dependence of the scaling parameters on the level of relaxation. We exclude the dynamical state as the cause of the observed deviations from self-similarity in protoclusters.

  9. Star formation in the first galaxies - III. Formation, evolution, and characteristics of the first metal-enriched stellar cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safranek-Shrader, Chalence; Montgomery, Michael H.; Milosavljević, Miloš; Bromm, Volker

    2016-01-01

    We simulate the formation of a low-metallicity (10-2 Z⊙) stellar cluster at redshift z ˜ 14. Beginning with cosmological initial conditions, the simulation utilizes adaptive mesh refinement and sink particles to follow the collapse and evolution of gas past the opacity limit for fragmentation, thus resolving the formation of individual protostellar cores. A time- and location-dependent protostellar radiation field, which heats the gas by absorption on dust, is computed by integration of protostellar evolutionary tracks. The simulation also includes a robust non-equilibrium chemical network that self-consistently treats gas thermodynamics and dust-gas coupling. The system is evolved for 18 kyr after the first protostellar source has formed. In this time span, 30 sink particles representing protostellar cores form with a total mass of 81 M⊙. Their masses range from ˜0.1 to 14.4 M⊙ with a median mass ˜0.5-1 M⊙. Massive protostars grow by competitive accretion while lower mass protostars are stunted in growth by close encounters and many-body ejections. In the regime explored here, the characteristic mass scale is determined by the cosmic microwave background temperature floor and the onset of efficient dust-gas coupling. It seems unlikely that host galaxies of the first bursts of metal-enriched star formation will be detectable with the James Webb Space Telescope or other next-generation infrared observatories. Instead, the most promising access route to the dawn of cosmic star formation may lie in the scrutiny of metal-poor, ancient stellar populations in the Galactic neighbourhood. The observable targets corresponding to the system simulated here are ultra-faint dwarf satellite galaxies such as Boötes II and Willman I.

  10. Surface decoration of amine-rich carbon nitride with iron nanoparticles for arsenite (As(III)) uptake: The evolution of the Fe-phases under ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Y; Mouzourakis, E; Bourlinos, A B; Zboril, R; Karakassides, M A; Douvalis, A P; Bakas, Th; Deligiannakis, Y

    2016-07-15

    A novel hybrid material (gC3N4-rFe) consisting of amine-rich graphitic carbon nitride (gC3N4), decorated with reduced iron nanoparticles (rFe) is presented. XRD and TEM show that gC3N4-rFe bears aggregation-free Fe-nanoparticles (10nm) uniformly dispersed over the gC3N4 surface. In contrast, non-supported iron nanoparticles are strongly aggregated, with non-uniform size distribution (20-100nm). (57)Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy, dual-mode electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and magnetization measurements, allow a detailed mapping of the evolution of the Fe-phases after exposure to ambient O2. The as-prepared gC3N4-rFe bears Fe(2+) and Fe° phases, however only after long exposure to ambient O2, a Fe-oxide layer is formed around the Fe° core. In this [Fe°/Fe-oxide] core-shell configuration, the gC3N4-rFe hybrid shows enhanced As(III) uptake capacity of 76.5mgg(-1), i.e., ca 90% higher than the unmodified carbonaceous support, and 300% higher than the non-supported Fe-nanoparticles. gC3N4-rFe is a superior As(III) sorbent i.e., compared to its single counterparts or vs. graphite/graphite oxide or activated carbon analogues (11-36mgg(-1)). The present results demonstrate that the gC3N4 matrix is not simply a net that holds the particles, but rather an active component that determines particle formation dynamics and ultimately their redox profile, size and surface dispersion homogeneity.

  11. Chemical weathering rates of a soil chronosequence on granitic alluvium: III. Hydrochemical evolution and contemporary solute fluxes and rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, A.F.; Schulz, M.S.; Vivit, D.V.; Blum, A.E.; Stonestrom, D.A.; Harden, J.W.

    2005-01-01

    Although long-term changes in solid-state compositions of soil chronosequences have been extensively investigated, this study presents the first detailed description of the concurrent hydrochemical evolution and contemporary weathering rates in such sequences. The most direct linkage between weathering and hydrology over 3 million years of soil development in the Merced chronosequence in Central California relates decreasing permeability and increasing hydrologic heterogeneity to the development of secondary argillic horizons and silica duripans. In a highly permeable, younger soil (40 kyr old), pore water solutes reflect seasonal to decadal-scale variations in rainfall and evapotranspiration (ET). This climate signal is strongly damped in less permeable older soils (250 to 600 kyr old) where solutes increasingly reflect weathering inputs modified by heterogeneous flow. Elemental balances in the soils are described in terms of solid state, exchange and pore water reservoirs and input/output fluxes from precipitation, ET, biomass, solute discharge and weathering. Solute mineral nutrients are strongly dependent on biomass variations as evidenced by an apparent negative K weathering flux reflecting aggradation by grassland plants. The ratios of solute Na to other base cations progressively increase with soil age. Discharge fluxes of Na and Si, when integrated over geologic time, are comparable to solid-state mass losses in the soils, implying similar past weathering conditions. Similarities in solute and sorbed Ca/Mg ratios reflect short-term equilibrium with the exchange reservoir. Long-term consistency in solute ratios, when contrasted against progressive decreases in solid-state Ca/Mg, requires an additional Ca source, probably from dry deposition. Amorphous silica precipitates from thermodynamically-saturated pore waters during periods of high evapotranspiration and result in the formation of duripans in the oldest soils. The degree of feldspar and secondary

  12. Deciphering the biodiversity of Listeria monocytogenes lineage III strains by polyphasic approaches.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hanxin; Chen, Jianshun; Fang, Chun; Xia, Ye; Cheng, Changyong; Jiang, Lingli; Fang, Weihuan

    2011-10-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen of humans and animals. The majority of human listeriosis cases are caused by strains of lineages I and II, while lineage III strains are rare and seldom implicated in human listeriosis. We revealed by 16S rRNA sequencing the special evolutionary status of L. monocytogenes lineage III, which falls between lineages I and II strains of L. monocytogenes and the non-pathogenic species L. innocua and L. marthii in the dendrogram. Thirteen lineage III strains were then characterized by polyphasic approaches. Biochemical reactions demonstrated 8 biotypes, internalin profiling identified 10 internal-in types clustered in 4 groups, and multilocus sequence typing differentiated 12 sequence types. These typing schemes show that lineage III strains represent the most diverse population of L. monocytogenes, and comprise at least four subpopulations IIIA-1, IIIA-2, HIB, and IIIC. The in vitro and in vivo virulence assessments showed that two lineage IIIA-2 strains had reduced pathogenicity, while the other lineage III strains had comparable virulence to lineages I and II. The HIB strains are phylogenetically distinct from other sub-populations, providing additional evidence that this sublineage represents a novel lineage. The two biochemical reactions L-rhamnose and L-lactate alkalinization, and 10 internalins were identified as potential markers for lineage III subpopulations. This study provides new insights into the biodiversity and population structure of lineage III strains, which are important for understanding the evolution of the L. mono-cytogenes-L. innocua clade.

  13. The spectroscopic evolution of the recurrent nova T Pyxidis during its 2011 outburst. III. The ultraviolet development from iron curtain through the post-X-ray turnoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gennaro Aquino, I.; Shore, S. N.; Schwarz, G. J.; Mason, E.; Starrfield, S.; Sion, E. M.

    2014-02-01

    We continue the analysis of the multiwavelength evolution of the recurrent nova T Pyx during its 2011 outburst, focussing on the spectral development on the 1150-3000 Å region. This extraordinary data set presents the longest temporal baseline high resolution view of the ultraviolet for any nova to date (classical or recurrent). The observations cover the early Fe-curtain stage, when the UV was completely optically thick, to 834 days after discovery when the outburst was effectively over. We present an analysis of dynamics and abundances of the interstellar species whose resonance lines are accessible in the UV. The Lyα profile is consistent with only interstellar absorption at all epochs and agrees with the H I 21 cm column density. The distance obtained to T Pyx is about 5 kpc, based on the ISM analysis. For the ejecta evolution we have been able to follow the changes in ionization and structure with previously unobtained resolution and cadence. The excited state isoelectronic transitions of C III, N IV], and O V displayed the same detached absorption lines as the optical He I transitions during the optical maximum. This is explained as resonance absorption within the ejecta of FUV ground state lines from the 300-1000 Å range. The resonance lines of all species showed absorption components between -1000 and -3000 km s-1 as soon as the Fe-curtain turned transparent (from day 105); these persisted at the same velocities and varied in strength from one ion to another through day 834. The last ultraviolet spectrum, taken more than 800 days after outburst, showed the same absorption lines on N V and C IV as day 105. There was no evidence of circumstellar absorbers. This and the related observations of profile evolution effectively rule out any wind model for the spectrum. The picture that emerges is of ejecta that became optically thin after visual maximum as the X-ray emission became visible following an outwardly propagating ionization front and for which the

  14. THE TENTH DATA RELEASE OF THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY: FIRST SPECTROSCOPIC DATA FROM THE SDSS-III APACHE POINT OBSERVATORY GALACTIC EVOLUTION EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Christopher P.; Anderton, Timothy; Alexandroff, Rachael; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Anderson, Scott F.; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Andrews, Brett H.; Aubourg, Éric; Bautista, Julian E.; Bastien, Fabienne A.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Bird, Jonathan C.; Beers, Timothy C.; Beifiori, Alessandra; Bender, Chad F.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blake, Cullen H.; and others

    2014-04-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) has been in operation since 2000 April. This paper presents the Tenth Public Data Release (DR10) from its current incarnation, SDSS-III. This data release includes the first spectroscopic data from the Apache Point Observatory Galaxy Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), along with spectroscopic data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) taken through 2012 July. The APOGEE instrument is a near-infrared R ∼ 22,500 300 fiber spectrograph covering 1.514-1.696 μm. The APOGEE survey is studying the chemical abundances and radial velocities of roughly 100,000 red giant star candidates in the bulge, bar, disk, and halo of the Milky Way. DR10 includes 178,397 spectra of 57,454 stars, each typically observed three or more times, from APOGEE. Derived quantities from these spectra (radial velocities, effective temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities) are also included. DR10 also roughly doubles the number of BOSS spectra over those included in the Ninth Data Release. DR10 includes a total of 1,507,954 BOSS spectra comprising 927,844 galaxy spectra, 182,009 quasar spectra, and 159,327 stellar spectra selected over 6373.2 deg{sup 2}.

  15. The Tenth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Spectroscopic Data from the SDSS-III Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Christopher P.; Alexandroff, Rachael; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Anders, Friedrich; Anderson, Scott F.; Anderton, Timothy; Andrews, Brett H.; Aubourg, Éric; Bailey, Stephen; Bastien, Fabienne A.; Bautista, Julian E.; Beers, Timothy C.; Beifiori, Alessandra; Bender, Chad F.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Beutler, Florian; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Bird, Jonathan C.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blake, Cullen H.; Blanton, Michael R.; Blomqvist, Michael; Bochanski, John J.; Bolton, Adam S.; Borde, Arnaud; Bovy, Jo; Shelden Bradley, Alaina; Brandt, W. N.; Brauer, Dorothée; Brinkmann, J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Busca, Nicolás G.; Carithers, William; Carlberg, Joleen K.; Carnero, Aurelio R.; Carr, Michael A.; Chiappini, Cristina; Chojnowski, S. Drew; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Comparat, Johan; Crepp, Justin R.; Cristiani, Stefano; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Cunha, Katia; da Costa, Luiz N.; Dawson, Kyle S.; De Lee, Nathan; Dean, Janice D. R.; Delubac, Timothée; Deshpande, Rohit; Dhital, Saurav; Ealet, Anne; Ebelke, Garrett L.; Edmondson, Edward M.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Epstein, Courtney R.; Escoffier, Stephanie; Esposito, Massimiliano; Evans, Michael L.; Fabbian, D.; Fan, Xiaohui; Favole, Ginevra; Femenía Castellá, Bruno; Fernández Alvar, Emma; Feuillet, Diane; Filiz Ak, Nurten; Finley, Hayley; Fleming, Scott W.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Galbraith-Frew, J. G.; García-Hernández, D. A.; García Pérez, Ana E.; Ge, Jian; Génova-Santos, R.; Gillespie, Bruce A.; Girardi, Léo; González Hernández, Jonay I.; Gott, J. Richard, III; Gunn, James E.; Guo, Hong; Halverson, Samuel; Harding, Paul; Harris, David W.; Hasselquist, Sten; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hayden, Michael; Hearty, Frederick R.; Herrero Davó, Artemio; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Honscheid, Klaus; Huehnerhoff, Joseph; Ivans, Inese I.; Jackson, Kelly M.; Jiang, Peng; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Kinemuchi, K.; Kirkby, David; Klaene, Mark A.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Koesterke, Lars; Lan, Ting-Wen; Lang, Dustin; Le Goff, Jean-Marc; Leauthaud, Alexie; Lee, Khee-Gan; Lee, Young Sun; Long, Daniel C.; Loomis, Craig P.; Lucatello, Sara; Lupton, Robert H.; Ma, Bo; Mack, Claude E., III; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Majewski, Steven R.; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Manchado, A.; Manera, Marc; Maraston, Claudia; Margala, Daniel; Martell, Sarah L.; Masters, Karen L.; McBride, Cameron K.; McGreer, Ian D.; McMahon, Richard G.; Ménard, Brice; Mészáros, Sz.; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Miyatake, Hironao; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; Montesano, Francesco; More, Surhud; Morrison, Heather L.; Muna, Demitri; Munn, Jeffrey A.; Myers, Adam D.; Nguyen, Duy Cuong; Nichol, Robert C.; Nidever, David L.; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Nuza, Sebastián E.; O'Connell, Julia E.; O'Connell, Robert W.; O'Connell, Ross; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Daniel J.; Owen, Russell; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John K.; Parihar, Prachi; Pâris, Isabelle; Pepper, Joshua; Percival, Will J.; Pérez-Ràfols, Ignasi; Dotto Perottoni, Hélio; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew M.; Pinsonneault, M. H.; Prada, Francisco; Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Raddick, M. Jordan; Rahman, Mubdi; Rebolo, Rafael; Reid, Beth A.; Richards, Jonathan C.; Riffel, Rogério; Robin, Annie C.; Rocha-Pinto, H. J.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Roe, Natalie A.; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Rossi, Graziano; Roy, Arpita; Rubiño-Martin, J. A.; Sabiu, Cristiano G.; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Santiago, Basílio; Sayres, Conor; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Schlegel, David J.; Schlesinger, Katharine J.; Schmidt, Sarah J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Schultheis, Mathias; Sellgren, Kris; Seo, Hee-Jong; Shen, Yue; Shetrone, Matthew; Shu, Yiping; Simmons, Audrey E.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Slosar, Anže; Smith, Verne V.; Snedden, Stephanie A.; Sobeck, Jennifer S.; Sobreira, Flavia; Stassun, Keivan G.; Steinmetz, Matthias; Strauss, Michael A.; Streblyanska, Alina; Suzuki, Nao; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Terrien, Ryan C.; Thakar, Aniruddha R.; Thomas, Daniel; Thompson, Benjamin A.; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Troup, Nicholas W.; Vandenberg, Jan; Vargas Magaña, Mariana; Viel, Matteo; Vogt, Nicole P.; Wake, David A.; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Weinberg, David H.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; White, Martin; White, Simon D. M.; Wilson, John C.; Wisniewski, John P.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Yèche, Christophe; York, Donald G.; Zamora, O.; Zasowski, Gail; Zehavi, Idit; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zheng, Zheng; Zhu, Guangtun

    2014-04-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) has been in operation since 2000 April. This paper presents the Tenth Public Data Release (DR10) from its current incarnation, SDSS-III. This data release includes the first spectroscopic data from the Apache Point Observatory Galaxy Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), along with spectroscopic data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) taken through 2012 July. The APOGEE instrument is a near-infrared R ~ 22,500 300 fiber spectrograph covering 1.514-1.696 μm. The APOGEE survey is studying the chemical abundances and radial velocities of roughly 100,000 red giant star candidates in the bulge, bar, disk, and halo of the Milky Way. DR10 includes 178,397 spectra of 57,454 stars, each typically observed three or more times, from APOGEE. Derived quantities from these spectra (radial velocities, effective temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities) are also included. DR10 also roughly doubles the number of BOSS spectra over those included in the Ninth Data Release. DR10 includes a total of 1,507,954 BOSS spectra comprising 927,844 galaxy spectra, 182,009 quasar spectra, and 159,327 stellar spectra selected over 6373.2 deg2.

  16. Structure and activity analyses of Escherichia coli K-12 NagD provide insight into the evolution of biochemical function in the haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase superfamily.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Lee W; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Allen, Karen N

    2006-01-31

    The HAD superfamily is a large superfamily of proteins which share a conserved core domain that provides those active site residues responsible for the chemistry common to all family members. The superfamily is further divided into the four subfamilies I, IIA, IIB, and III, based on the topology and insertion site of a cap domain that provides substrate specificity. This structural and functional division implies that members of a given HAD structural subclass may target substrates that have similar structural characteristics. To understand the structure/function relationships in all of the subfamilies, a type IIA subfamily member, NagD from Escherichia coli K-12, was selected (type I, IIB, and III members have been more extensively studied). The structure of the NagD protein was solved to 1.80 A with R(work) = 19.8% and R(free) = 21.8%. Substrate screening and kinetic analysis showed NagD to have high specificity for nucleotide monophosphates with k(cat)/K(m) = 3.12 x 10(4) and 1.28 x 10(4) microM(-)(1) s(-)(1) for UMP and GMP, respectively. This specificity is consistent with the presence of analogues of NagD that exist as fusion proteins with a nucleotide pyrophosphatase from the Nudix family. Docking of the nucleoside substrate in the active site brings it in contact with conserved residues from the cap domain that can act as a substrate specificity loop (NagD residues 144-149) in the type IIA subfamily. NagD and other subfamily IIA and IIB members show the common trait that substrate specificity and catalytic efficiencies (k(cat)/K(m)) are low (1 x 10(4) M(-)(1) s(-)(1)) and the boundaries defining physiological substrates are somewhat overlapping. The ability to catabolize other related secondary metabolites indicates that there is regulation at the genetic level.

  17. Structure and Activity Analyses of Escherichia coli K-12 NagD Provide Insight into the Evolution of Biochemical Function in the Haloakanoic Acid Dehlogenase Superfamily

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay,L.; Dunaway-Mariano, D.; Allen, K.

    2006-01-01

    The HAD superfamily is a large superfamily of proteins which share a conserved core domain that provides those active site residues responsible for the chemistry common to all family members. The superfamily is further divided into the four subfamilies I, IIA, IIB, and III, based on the topology and insertion site of a cap domain that provides substrate specificity. This structural and functional division implies that members of a given HAD structural subclass may target substrates that have similar structural characteristics. To understand the structure/function relationships in all of the subfamilies, a type IIA subfamily member, NagD from Escherichia coli K-12, was selected (type I, IIB, and III members have been more extensively studied). The structure of the NagD protein was solved to 1.80 Angstroms with R{sub work} = 19.8% and R{sub free} = 21.8%. Substrate screening and kinetic analysis showed NagD to have high specificity for nucleotide monophosphates with kcat/Km = 3.12 x 10{sup 4} and 1.28 x 10{sup 4} {micro}M{sup -1} s{sup -1} for UMP and GMP, respectively. This specificity is consistent with the presence of analogues of NagD that exist as fusion proteins with a nucleotide pyrophosphatase from the Nudix family. Docking of the nucleoside substrate in the active site brings it in contact with conserved residues from the cap domain that can act as a substrate specificity loop (NagD residues 144-149) in the type IIA subfamily. NagD and other subfamily IIA and IIB members show the common trait that substrate specificity and catalytic efficiencies (k{sub cat}/K{sub m}) are low (1 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}) and the boundaries defining physiological substrates are somewhat overlapping. The ability to catabolize other related secondary metabolites indicates that there is regulation at the genetic level.

  18. Biochemical, Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analyses of Digestion in the Scorpion Tityus serrulatus: Insights into Function and Evolution of Digestion in an Ancient Arthropod

    PubMed Central

    Fuzita, Felipe J.; Pinkse, Martijn W. H.; Patane, José S. L.; Juliano, Maria A.; Verhaert, Peter D. E. M.; Lopes, Adriana R.

    2015-01-01

    Scorpions are among the oldest terrestrial arthropods and they have passed through small morphological changes during their evolutionary history on land. They are efficient predators capable of capturing and consuming large preys and due to envenomation these animals can become a human health challenge. Understanding the physiology of scorpions can not only lead to evolutionary insights but also is a crucial step in the development of control strategies. However, the digestive process in scorpions has been scarcely studied. In this work, we describe the combinatory use of next generation sequencing, proteomic analysis and biochemical assays in order to investigate the digestive process in the yellow scorpion Tityus serrulatus, mainly focusing in the initial protein digestion. The transcriptome generated database allowed the quantitative identification by mass spectrometry of different enzymes and proteins involved in digestion. All the results suggested that cysteine cathepsins play an important role in protein digestion. Two digestive cysteine cathepsins were isolated and characterized presenting acidic characteristics (pH optima and stability), zymogen conversion to the mature form after acidic activation and a cross-class inhibition by pepstatin. A more elucidative picture of the molecular mechanism of digestion in a scorpion was proposed based on our results from Tityus serrulatus. The midgut and midgut glands (MMG) are composed by secretory and digestive cells. In fasting animals, the secretory granules are ready for the next predation event, containing enzymes needed for alkaline extra-oral digestion which will compose the digestive fluid, such as trypsins, astacins and chitinase. The digestive vacuoles are filled with an acidic proteolytic cocktail to the intracellular digestion composed by cathepsins L, B, F, D and legumain. Other proteins as lipases, carbohydrases, ctenitoxins and a chitolectin with a perithrophin domain were also detected. Evolutionarily

  19. Biochemical, transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of digestion in the scorpion Tityus serrulatus: insights into function and evolution of digestion in an ancient arthropod.

    PubMed

    Fuzita, Felipe J; Pinkse, Martijn W H; Patane, José S L; Juliano, Maria A; Verhaert, Peter D E M; Lopes, Adriana R

    2015-01-01

    Scorpions are among the oldest terrestrial arthropods and they have passed through small morphological changes during their evolutionary history on land. They are efficient predators capable of capturing and consuming large preys and due to envenomation these animals can become a human health challenge. Understanding the physiology of scorpions can not only lead to evolutionary insights but also is a crucial step in the development of control strategies. However, the digestive process in scorpions has been scarcely studied. In this work, we describe the combinatory use of next generation sequencing, proteomic analysis and biochemical assays in order to investigate the digestive process in the yellow scorpion Tityus serrulatus, mainly focusing in the initial protein digestion. The transcriptome generated database allowed the quantitative identification by mass spectrometry of different enzymes and proteins involved in digestion. All the results suggested that cysteine cathepsins play an important role in protein digestion. Two digestive cysteine cathepsins were isolated and characterized presenting acidic characteristics (pH optima and stability), zymogen conversion to the mature form after acidic activation and a cross-class inhibition by pepstatin. A more elucidative picture of the molecular mechanism of digestion in a scorpion was proposed based on our results from Tityus serrulatus. The midgut and midgut glands (MMG) are composed by secretory and digestive cells. In fasting animals, the secretory granules are ready for the next predation event, containing enzymes needed for alkaline extra-oral digestion which will compose the digestive fluid, such as trypsins, astacins and chitinase. The digestive vacuoles are filled with an acidic proteolytic cocktail to the intracellular digestion composed by cathepsins L, B, F, D and legumain. Other proteins as lipases, carbohydrases, ctenitoxins and a chitolectin with a perithrophin domain were also detected. Evolutionarily

  20. Evolution of the H β + [O III] and [O II] luminosity functions and the [O II] star formation history of the Universe up to z ˜ 5 from HiZELS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khostovan, A. A.; Sobral, D.; Mobasher, B.; Best, P. N.; Smail, I.; Stott, J. P.; Hemmati, S.; Nayyeri, H.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the evolution of the H β + [O III] and [O II] luminosity functions from z ˜ 0.8 to ˜5 in four redshift slices per emission line using data from the High-z Emission Line Survey (HiZELS). This is the first time that the H β + [O III] and [O II] luminosity functions have been studied at these redshifts in a self-consistent analysis. This is also the largest sample of [O II] and H β + [O III] emitters (3475 and 3298 emitters, respectively) in this redshift range, with large comoving volumes ˜1 × 106 Mpc-3 in two independent volumes (COSMOS and UDS), greatly reducing the effects of cosmic variance. The emitters were selected by a combination of photometric redshift and colour-colour selections, as well as spectroscopic follow-up, including recent spectroscopic observations using DEIMOS and MOSFIRE on the Keck Telescopes and FMOS on Subaru. We find a strong increase in L⋆ and a decrease in φ⋆ for both H β + [O III] and [O II] emitters. We derive the [O II] star formation history of the Universe since z ˜ 5 and find that the cosmic star formation rate density (SFRD) rises from z ˜ 5 to ˜3 and then drops towards z ˜ 0. We also find that our star formation history is able to reproduce the evolution of the stellar mass density up to z ˜ 5 based only on a single tracer of star formation. When comparing the H β + [O III] SFRDs to the [O II] and H α SFRD measurements in the literature, we find that there is a remarkable agreement, suggesting that the H β + [O III] sample is dominated by star-forming galaxies at high-z rather than AGNs.

  1. Biochemical adaptation to ocean acidification.

    PubMed

    Stillman, Jonathon H; Paganini, Adam W

    2015-06-01

    The change in oceanic carbonate chemistry due to increased atmospheric PCO2  has caused pH to decline in marine surface waters, a phenomenon known as ocean acidification (OA). The effects of OA on organisms have been shown to be widespread among diverse taxa from a wide range of habitats. The majority of studies of organismal response to OA are in short-term exposures to future levels of PCO2 . From such studies, much information has been gathered on plastic responses organisms may make in the future that are beneficial or harmful to fitness. Relatively few studies have examined whether organisms can adapt to negative-fitness consequences of plastic responses to OA. We outline major approaches that have been used to study the adaptive potential for organisms to OA, which include comparative studies and experimental evolution. Organisms that inhabit a range of pH environments (e.g. pH gradients at volcanic CO2 seeps or in upwelling zones) have great potential for studies that identify adaptive shifts that have occurred through evolution. Comparative studies have advanced our understanding of adaptation to OA by linking whole-organism responses with cellular mechanisms. Such optimization of function provides a link between genetic variation and adaptive evolution in tuning optimal function of rate-limiting cellular processes in different pH conditions. For example, in experimental evolution studies of organisms with short generation times (e.g. phytoplankton), hundreds of generations of growth under future conditions has resulted in fixed differences in gene expression related to acid-base regulation. However, biochemical mechanisms for adaptive responses to OA have yet to be fully characterized, and are likely to be more complex than simply changes in gene expression or protein modification. Finally, we present a hypothesis regarding an unexplored area for biochemical adaptation to ocean acidification. In this hypothesis, proteins and membranes exposed to the

  2. Raman spectroscopic biochemical mapping of tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Nicholas; Hart Prieto, Maria C.; Kendall, Catherine A.; Shetty, Geeta; Barr, Hugh

    2006-02-01

    Advances in technologies have brought us closer to routine spectroscopic diagnosis of early malignant disease. However, there is still a poor understanding of the carcinogenesis process. For example it is not known whether many cancers follow a logical sequence from dysplasia, to carcinoma in situ, to invasion. Biochemical tissue changes, triggered by genetic mutations, precede morphological and structural changes. These can be probed using Raman or FTIR microspectroscopy and the spectra analysed for biochemical constituents. Local microscopic distribution of various constituents can then be visualised. Raman mapping has been performed on a number of tissues including oesophagus, breast, bladder and prostate. The biochemical constituents have been calculated at each point using basis spectra and least squares analysis. The residual of the least squares fit indicates any unfit spectral components. The biochemical distribution will be compared with the defined histopathological boundaries. The distribution of nucleic acids, glycogen, actin, collagen I, III, IV, lipids and others appear to follow expected patterns.

  3. [Normal values of various biochemical indicators in lowland black-white dairy cows from the government sector of the Gdańsk Coast. III. Changes in those indicators during feeding seasons and in consecutive months and years].

    PubMed

    Wolańczyk-Rutkowiak, K

    1986-01-01

    In six consecutive feeding seasons the results of tests of biochemical parameters from 5329 cows were estimated. Besides, the parameters from 7229 cows for the consecutive calendar months and years in the period of 1973-1977 were evaluated. It was established that the cyclic seasonal changes were showed only by levels of proteins, sodium, magnesium and calcium. In the months from May to August a decrease of glucose level, an increase of total protein and urea levels as well as a low level of sodium existed. The values of the rest parameters changed irregularly, what ordered to be cautious in a drawing of conclusions on the basis of investigations performed in short periods of times. In particular seasons and years, such phenomena as hypoglycemia, hyperproteinemia, increased level of urea, hypochloremia, hypopotassemia, hypomagnesemia, hypocalcemia and hypophosphoremia could exist irregularly.

  4. THE SPECTRAL EVOLUTION OF THE FIRST GALAXIES. I. JAMES WEBB SPACE TELESCOPE DETECTION LIMITS AND COLOR CRITERIA FOR POPULATION III GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zackrisson, Erik; Rydberg, Claes-Erik; Oestlin, Goeran; Tuli, Manan; Schaerer, Daniel

    2011-10-10

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is expected to revolutionize our understanding of the high-redshift universe, and may be able to test the prediction that the first, chemically pristine (Population III) stars are formed with very high characteristic masses. Since isolated Population III stars are likely to be beyond the reach of JWST, small Population III galaxies may offer the best prospects of directly probing the properties of metal-free stars. Here, we present Yggdrasil, a new spectral synthesis code geared toward the first galaxies. Using this model, we explore the JWST imaging detection limits for Population III galaxies and investigate to what extent such objects may be identified based on their JWST colors. We predict that JWST should be able to detect Population III galaxies with stellar population masses as low as {approx}10{sup 5} M{sub sun} at z {approx} 10 in ultra deep exposures. Over limited redshift intervals, it may also be possible to use color criteria to select Population III galaxy candidates for follow-up spectroscopy. The colors of young Population III galaxies dominated by direct starlight can be used to probe the stellar initial mass function (IMF), but this requires almost complete leakage of ionizing photons into the intergalactic medium. The colors of objects dominated by nebular emission show no corresponding IMF sensitivity. We also note that a clean selection of Population III galaxies at z {approx} 7-8 can be achieved by adding two JWST/MIRI filters to the JWST/NIRCam filter sets usually discussed in the context of JWST ultra deep fields.

  5. Biochemical Education in Thailand: Past, Present, and Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svasti, Jisnuson; Surarit, Rudee

    1991-01-01

    Traces the history of Thailand's biochemical education from its initial evolution from medicine to modern day. Discusses the following aspects of Thailand's modern biochemical education: biochemistry teaching at Thai schools, university departments and biochemistry courses, textbooks, degree programs, interplay between research and teaching, and…

  6. Biochemical Education in Thailand: Past, Present, and Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svasti, Jisnuson; Surarit, Rudee

    1991-01-01

    Traces the history of Thailand's biochemical education from its initial evolution from medicine to modern day. Discusses the following aspects of Thailand's modern biochemical education: biochemistry teaching at Thai schools, university departments and biochemistry courses, textbooks, degree programs, interplay between research and teaching, and…

  7. Biochemical transformation of coals

    DOEpatents

    Lin, M.S.; Premuzic, E.T.

    1999-03-23

    A method of biochemically transforming macromolecular compounds found in solid carbonaceous materials, such as coal is provided. The preparation of new microorganisms, metabolically weaned through challenge growth processes to biochemically transform solid carbonaceous materials at extreme temperatures, pressures, pH, salt and toxic metal concentrations is also disclosed. 7 figs.

  8. Biochemical transformation of coals

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Mow S.; Premuzic, Eugene T.

    1999-03-23

    A method of biochemically transforming macromolecular compounds found in solid carbonaceous materials, such as coal is provided. The preparation of new microorganisms, metabolically weaned through challenge growth processes to biochemically transform solid carbonaceous materials at extreme temperatures, pressures, pH, salt and toxic metal concentrations is also disclosed.

  9. Early bioenergetic evolution

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Filipa L.; Thiergart, Thorsten; Landan, Giddy; Nelson-Sathi, Shijulal; Pereira, Inês A. C.; Allen, John F.; Lane, Nick; Martin, William F.

    2013-01-01

    Life is the harnessing of chemical energy in such a way that the energy-harnessing device makes a copy of itself. This paper outlines an energetically feasible path from a particular inorganic setting for the origin of life to the first free-living cells. The sources of energy available to early organic synthesis, early evolving systems and early cells stand in the foreground, as do the possible mechanisms of their conversion into harnessable chemical energy for synthetic reactions. With regard to the possible temporal sequence of events, we focus on: (i) alkaline hydrothermal vents as the far-from-equilibrium setting, (ii) the Wood–Ljungdahl (acetyl-CoA) pathway as the route that could have underpinned carbon assimilation for these processes, (iii) biochemical divergence, within the naturally formed inorganic compartments at a hydrothermal mound, of geochemically confined replicating entities with a complexity below that of free-living prokaryotes, and (iv) acetogenesis and methanogenesis as the ancestral forms of carbon and energy metabolism in the first free-living ancestors of the eubacteria and archaebacteria, respectively. In terms of the main evolutionary transitions in early bioenergetic evolution, we focus on: (i) thioester-dependent substrate-level phosphorylations, (ii) harnessing of naturally existing proton gradients at the vent–ocean interface via the ATP synthase, (iii) harnessing of Na+ gradients generated by H+/Na+ antiporters, (iv) flavin-based bifurcation-dependent gradient generation, and finally (v) quinone-based (and Q-cycle-dependent) proton gradient generation. Of those five transitions, the first four are posited to have taken place at the vent. Ultimately, all of these bioenergetic processes depend, even today, upon CO2 reduction with low-potential ferredoxin (Fd), generated either chemosynthetically or photosynthetically, suggesting a reaction of the type ‘reduced iron → reduced carbon’ at the beginning of bioenergetic evolution

  10. Systems biology and the origins of life? part II. Are biochemical networks possible ancestors of living systems? networks of catalysed chemical reactions: non-equilibrium, self-organization and evolution.

    PubMed

    Ricard, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    The present article discusses the possibility that catalysed chemical networks can evolve. Even simple enzyme-catalysed chemical reactions can display this property. The example studied is that of a two-substrate proteinoid, or enzyme, reaction displaying random binding of its substrates A and B. The fundamental property of such a system is to display either emergence or integration depending on the respective values of the probabilities that the enzyme has bound one of its substrate regardless it has bound the other substrate, or, specifically, after it has bound the other substrate. There is emergence of information if p(A)>p(AB) and p(B)>p(BA). Conversely, if p(A)evolution. Defined as open non-equilibrium structures, such biochemical networks possess two remarkable properties: (1) the probability of occurrence of their nodes is dependant upon the input and output of matter

  11. SAGE III

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2017-01-13

    SAGE III Data and Information The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas ... on the spacecraft. SAGE III produced L1 and L2 scientific data from 5/07/2002 until 12/31/2005. The flight of the second instrument is as ... Additional Info:  Data Format: HDF-EOS or Big Endian/IEEE Binary SCAR-B Block:  ...

  12. Direct Experimental Probe of the Ni(II)/Ni(III)/Ni(IV) Redox Evolution in LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 Electrodes

    DOE PAGES

    Qiao, Ruimin; Wray, L. Andrew; Kim, Jung -Hyun; ...

    2015-11-11

    The LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel is an appealing cathode material for next generation rechargeable Li-ion batteries due to its high operating voltage of ~4.7 V (vs Li/Li+). Although it is widely believed that the full range of electrochemical cycling involves the redox of Ni(II)/(IV), it has not been experimentally clarified whether Ni(III) exists as the intermediate state or a double-electron transfer takes place. Here, combined with theoretical calculations, we show unambiguous spectroscopic evidence of the Ni(III) state when the LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 electrode is half charged. This provides a direct verification of single-electron-transfer reactions in LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 upon cycling, namely, from Ni(II) to Ni(III), thenmore » to Ni(IV). Additionally, by virtue of its surface sensitivity, soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy also reveals the electrochemically inactive Ni2+ and Mn2+ phases on the electrode surface. Our work provides the long-awaited clarification of the single-electron transfer mechanism in LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 electrodes. Furthermore, the experimental results serve as a benchmark for further spectroscopic characterizations of Ni-based battery electrodes.« less

  13. Spinal muscular atrophy type II (intermediary) and III (Kugelberg-Welander). Evolution of 50 patients with physiotherapy and hydrotherapy in a swimming pool.

    PubMed

    Cunha, M C; Oliveira, A S; Labronici, R H; Gabbai, A A

    1996-09-01

    We added hydrotherapy to 50 patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) who were being treated with individual conventional physiotherapy. Hydrotherapy performed at an approximate temperature of 30 degrees Celsius, twice a week, for thirty minutes in children and forty-five minutes in adults during a 2-year period. The outcome derived from this combined modality of treatment was rated according to physiotherapeutic evaluations, the MMT (Manual Muscular Test), and the Barthel Ladder. Patients were reevaluated at 2-month intervals. After two years of ongoing treatment, we were able to observe that the deformities in hip, knee and foot were progressive in all SMA Type II patients, and in some Type III. Muscle strength stabilized in most SMA Type III patients, and improved in some. MMT was not done in SMA Type II. In all patients we were able to detect an improvement in the Barthel Ladder scale. This study suggests that a measurable improvement in the quality of daily living may be obtained in patients with SMA Types II and III subjected to conventional physiotherapy when associated with hydrotherapy.

  14. Biochemical Engineering Fundamentals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, J. E.; Ollis, D. F.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses a biochemical engineering course that is offered as part of a chemical engineering curriculum and includes topics that influence the behavior of man-made or natural microbial or enzyme reactors. (MLH)

  15. Systematic Survey for [O ii], [O iii], and Hα Blobs at z = 0.1-1.5: The Implication for Evolution of Galactic-scale Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuma, Suraphong; Ouchi, Masami; Drake, Alyssa B.; Fujimoto, Seiji; Kojima, Takashi; Sugahara, Yuma

    2017-06-01

    We conduct a systematic search for galaxies at z=0.1{--}1.5 with [O ii]λ 3727, [O iii]λ 5007, or Hα λ 6563 emission lines extended over at least 30 kpc by using deep narrowband and broadband imaging in the Subaru-XMM Deep Survey field. These extended emission-line galaxies are dubbed [O ii], [O iii], or Hα blobs. Based on a new selection method that securely selects extended emission-line galaxies, we find 77 blobs at z=0.40{--}1.46 with the isophotal area of emission lines down to 1.2× {10}-18 erg s-1 cm-2 kpc-2. Four of them are spectroscopically confirmed to be [O iii] blobs at z = 0.83. We identify AGN activities in eight blobs with X-ray and radio data, and find that the fraction of AGN contribution increases with increasing isophotal area of the extended emission. With the Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) and Anderson-Darling tests, we confirm that the stellar-mass distributions of Hα and [O ii] blobs are not drawn from those of the emitters at the > 90% confidence level in that Hα and [O ii] blobs are located at the massive end of the distributions, but cannot reject a null hypothesis of being the same distributions in terms of the specific star formation rates. It is suggested that galactic-scale outflows tend to be more prominent in more massive star-forming galaxies. Exploiting our sample homogeneously selected over the large area, we derive the number densities of blobs at each epoch. The number densities of blobs decrease drastically with redshifts at a rate that is larger than that of the decrease of cosmic star formation densities.

  16. BIOPLUME III

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    BIOPLUME III is a two-dimensional finite difference model for simulating the natural attenuation of organic contaminants in groundwater due to the processes of advection, dispersion, sorption, and biodegradation.

  17. Evolution of killer cell Ig-like receptor (KIR) genes: definition of an orangutan KIR haplotype reveals expansion of lineage III KIR associated with the emergence of MHC-C.

    PubMed

    Guethlein, Lisbeth A; Older Aguilar, Anastazia M; Abi-Rached, Laurent; Parham, Peter

    2007-07-01

    Orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) MHC-C appears less evolved than human HLA-C: Popy-C is not fixed and its alleles encode only one (C1) of the two motifs for killer cell Ig-like receptor (KIR) ligands. To assess the structure and complexity of the orangutan KIR locus, the complete nucleotide sequence of an orangutan KIR haplotype was determined. The PopyKIR locus is flanked by LILR and FCAR and consists of seven genes and pseudogenes, two novel and five corresponding to known cDNA. Distinguishing all KIRs in this rapidly evolving KIR locus from the KIR3DX1 gene is an LTR33A/MLT1D element in intron 3. These two forms of KIR represent lineages that originated by duplication of a common ancestor. The conserved, framework regions of primate KIR loci comprise the 5' part of a lineage V KIR, the 3' part of a pseudogene, the complete 2DL4 gene, and the 3' part of a lineage II KIR. Although previously defined PopyKIR2DL4 alleles contain premature termination codons, the sequenced haplotype's PopyKIR2DL4 allele encodes a full-length protein. A model for KIR evolution is proposed. Distinguishing the orangutan KIR haplotype from the proposed common ancestor of primate KIR haplotypes is an increased number to give three lineage III KIR genes in the centromeric part of the locus, the site for most human lineage III genes encoding HLA-C specific KIR. Thus, expansion of lineage III KIR is associated with emergence of MHC-C.

  18. The evolution of the [O II], H β and [O III] emission line luminosity functions over the last nine billions years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comparat, Johan; Zhu, Guangtun; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Norberg, Peder; Newman, Jeffrey; Tresse, Laurence; Richard, Johan; Yepes, Gustavo; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Raichoor, Anand; Prada, Francisco; Maraston, Claudia; Yèche, Christophe; Delubac, Timothée; Jullo, Eric

    2016-09-01

    Emission line galaxies are one of the main tracers of the large-scale structure to be targeted by the next-generation dark energy surveys. To provide a better understanding of the properties and statistics of these galaxies, we have collected spectroscopic data from the VVDS and DEEP2 deep surveys and estimated the galaxy luminosity functions (LFs) of three distinct emission lines, [O II}] (λ λ 3726,3729) (0.5 < z < 1.3), Hβ (λ4861) (0.3 < z < 0.8) and [O {III}] (λ 5007) (0.3 < z < 0.8). Our measurements are based on 35 639 emission line galaxies and cover a volume of ˜107 Mpc3. We present the first measurement of the Hβ LF at these redshifts. We have also compiled LFs from the literature that were based on independent data or covered different redshift ranges, and we fit the entire set over the whole redshift range with analytic Schechter and Saunders models, assuming a natural redshift dependence of the parameters. We find that the characteristic luminosity (L*) and density (φ*) of all LFs increase with redshift. Using the Schechter model over the redshift ranges considered, we find that, for [O {II}] emitters, the characteristic luminosity L*(z = 0.5) = 3.2 × 1041 erg s-1 increases by a factor of 2.7 ± 0.2 from z = 0.5 to 1.3; for Hβ emitters L*(z = 0.3) = 1.3 × 1041 erg s-1 increases by a factor of 2.0 ± 0.2 from z = 0.3 to 0.8; and for [O {III}] emitters L*(z = 0.3) = 7.3 × 1041 erg s-1 increases by a factor of 3.5 ± 0.4 from z = 0.3 to 0.8.

  19. Star formation properties in barred galaxies. III. Statistical study of bar-driven secular evolution using a sample of nearby barred spirals

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Zhi-Min; Wu, Hong; Cao, Chen E-mail: hwu@bao.ac.cn

    2015-01-01

    Stellar bars are important internal drivers of secular evolution in disk galaxies. Using a sample of nearby spiral galaxies with weak and strong bars, we explore the relationships between the star formation feature and stellar bars in galaxies. We find that galaxies with weak bars tend coincide with low concentrical star formation activity, while those with strong bars show a large scatter in the distribution of star formation activity. We find enhanced star formation activity in bulges toward stronger bars, although not predominantly, consistent with previous studies. Our results suggest that different stages of the secular process and many other factors may contribute to the complexity of the secular evolution. In addition, barred galaxies with intense star formation in bars tend to have active star formation in their bulges and disks, and bulges have higher star formation densities than bars and disks, indicating the evolutionary effects of bars. We then derived a possible criterion to quantify the different stages of the bar-driven physical process, while future work is needed because of the uncertainties.

  20. Global Positioning System III (GPS III)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    Global Positioning System III ( GPS III) As of FY 2015 President’s Budget...00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Global Positioning System III ( GPS III) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...Responsible Office References Program Name Global Positioning System III ( GPS III) DoD Component Air Force

  1. Evolution of EF-hand calcium-modulated proteins. III. Exon sequences confirm most dendrograms based on protein sequences: calmodulin dendrograms show significant lack of parallelism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakayama, S.; Kretsinger, R. H.

    1993-01-01

    In the first report in this series we presented dendrograms based on 152 individual proteins of the EF-hand family. In the second we used sequences from 228 proteins, containing 835 domains, and showed that eight of the 29 subfamilies are congruent and that the EF-hand domains of the remaining 21 subfamilies have diverse evolutionary histories. In this study we have computed dendrograms within and among the EF-hand subfamilies using the encoding DNA sequences. In most instances the dendrograms based on protein and on DNA sequences are very similar. Significant differences between protein and DNA trees for calmodulin remain unexplained. In our fourth report we evaluate the sequences and the distribution of introns within the EF-hand family and conclude that exon shuffling did not play a significant role in its evolution.

  2. Evolution of long-lived globular cluster stars. III. Effect of the initial helium spread on the position of stars in a synthetic Hertzsprung-Russell diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantereau, W.; Charbonnel, C.; Meynet, G.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Globular clusters host multiple populations of long-lived low-mass stars whose origin remains an open question. Several scenarios have been proposed to explain the associated photometric and spectroscopic peculiarities. They differ, for instance, in the maximum helium enrichment they predict for stars of the second population, which these stars can inherit at birth as the result of the internal pollution of the cluster by different types of stars of the first population. Aims: We present the distribution of helium-rich stars in present-day globular clusters as it is expected in the original framework of the fast-rotating massive stars scenario (FRMS) as first-population polluters. We focus on NGC 6752. Methods: We completed a grid of 330 stellar evolution models for globular cluster low-mass stars computed with different initial chemical compositions corresponding to the predictions of the original FRMS scenario for [Fe/H] = -1.75. Starting from the initial helium-sodium relation that allows reproducing the currently observed distribution of sodium in NGC 6752, we deduce the helium distribution expected in that cluster at ages equal to 9 and 13 Gyr. We distinguish the stars that are moderately enriched in helium from those that are very helium-rich (initial helium mass fraction below and above 0.4, respectively), and compare the predictions of the FRMS framework with other scenarios for globular cluster enrichment. Results: The effect of helium enrichment on the stellar lifetime and evolution reduces the total number of very helium-rich stars that remain in the cluster at 9 and 13 Gyr to only 12% and 10%, respectively, from an initial fraction of 21%. Within this age range, most of the stars still burn their hydrogen in their core, which widens the MS band significantly in effective temperature. The fraction of very helium-rich stars drops in the more advanced evolution phases, where the associated spread in effective temperature strongly decreases. These

  3. On the evolution of accretion disc flow in cataclysmic variables. III - Outburst properties of constant and uniform-alpha model discs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, D. N. C.; Faulkner, J.; Papaloizou, J.

    1985-01-01

    Attention is given to the stability and evolution of some simple accretion disk models in which the viscosity is prescribed by an ad hoc, uniform-alpha model. Emphasis is placed on systems in which the mass input rate from the secondary to the disk around the primary is assumed to be constant, although initial calculations with variable mass input rates are also performed. Time-dependent visual magnitude light curves constructed for cataclysmic binaries with a range of disk size, primary mass and mass input rate, and viscosity magnitude, are compared with the observed properties of various cataclysmic variable subclasses. The results obtained indicate that the observational differences between novae and dwarf novae may be due to mass input rate differences. The present models can reproduce the gross observational features of U-Gem-type dwarf nova outbursts.

  4. Evolution of EF-hand calcium-modulated proteins. III. Exon sequences confirm most dendrograms based on protein sequences: calmodulin dendrograms show significant lack of parallelism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakayama, S.; Kretsinger, R. H.

    1993-01-01

    In the first report in this series we presented dendrograms based on 152 individual proteins of the EF-hand family. In the second we used sequences from 228 proteins, containing 835 domains, and showed that eight of the 29 subfamilies are congruent and that the EF-hand domains of the remaining 21 subfamilies have diverse evolutionary histories. In this study we have computed dendrograms within and among the EF-hand subfamilies using the encoding DNA sequences. In most instances the dendrograms based on protein and on DNA sequences are very similar. Significant differences between protein and DNA trees for calmodulin remain unexplained. In our fourth report we evaluate the sequences and the distribution of introns within the EF-hand family and conclude that exon shuffling did not play a significant role in its evolution.

  5. On the evolution of accretion disc flow in cataclysmic variables. III - Outburst properties of constant and uniform-alpha model discs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, D. N. C.; Faulkner, J.; Papaloizou, J.

    1985-01-01

    Attention is given to the stability and evolution of some simple accretion disk models in which the viscosity is prescribed by an ad hoc, uniform-alpha model. Emphasis is placed on systems in which the mass input rate from the secondary to the disk around the primary is assumed to be constant, although initial calculations with variable mass input rates are also performed. Time-dependent visual magnitude light curves constructed for cataclysmic binaries with a range of disk size, primary mass and mass input rate, and viscosity magnitude, are compared with the observed properties of various cataclysmic variable subclasses. The results obtained indicate that the observational differences between novae and dwarf novae may be due to mass input rate differences. The present models can reproduce the gross observational features of U-Gem-type dwarf nova outbursts.

  6. Measures of Biochemical Sociology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snell, Joel; Marsh, Mitchell

    2008-01-01

    In a previous article, the authors introduced a new sub field in sociology that we labeled "biochemical sociology." We introduced the definition of a sociology that encompasses sociological measures, psychological measures, and biological indicators Snell & Marsh (2003). In this article, we want to demonstrate a research strategy that would assess…

  7. Biochemical upgrading of oils

    DOEpatents

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

    1999-01-12

    A process for biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils is provided. The process includes contacting heavy crude oils with adapted biocatalysts. The resulting upgraded oil shows, a relative increase in saturated hydrocarbons, emulsions and oxygenates and a decrease in compounds containing organic sulfur, organic nitrogen and trace metals. Adapted microorganisms which have been modified under challenged growth processes are also disclosed. 121 figs.

  8. Biochemical upgrading of oils

    DOEpatents

    Premuzic, Eugene T.; Lin, Mow S.

    1999-01-12

    A process for biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils is provided. The process includes contacting heavy crude oils with adapted biocatalysts. The resulting upgraded oil shows, a relative increase in saturated hydrocarbons, emulsions and oxygenates and a decrease in compounds containing in organic sulfur, organic nitrogen and trace metals. Adapted microorganisms which have been modified under challenged growth processes are also disclosed.

  9. Biochemical Education in Brazil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vella, F.

    1988-01-01

    Described are discussions held concerning the problems of biochemical education in Brazil at a meeting of the Sociedade Brazileira de Bioquimica in April 1988. Also discussed are other visits that were made to universities in Brazil. Three major recommendations to improve the state of biochemistry education in Brazil are presented. (CW)

  10. Nanoparticles as biochemical sensors

    PubMed Central

    El-Ansary, Afaf; Faddah, Layla M

    2010-01-01

    There is little doubt that nanoparticles offer real and new opportunities in many fields, such as biomedicine and materials science. Such particles are small enough to enter almost all areas of the body, including cells and organelles, potentially leading to new approaches in nanomedicine. Sensors for small molecules of biochemical interest are of critical importance. This review is an attempt to trace the use of nanomaterials in biochemical sensor design. The possibility of using nanoparticles functionalized with antibodies as markers for proteins will be elucidated. Moreover, capabilities and applications for nanoparticles based on gold, silver, magnetic, and semiconductor materials (quantum dots), used in optical (absorbance, luminescence, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy, surface plasmon resonance), electrochemical, and mass-sensitive sensors will be highlighted. The unique ability of nanosensors to improve the analysis of biochemical fluids is discussed either through considering the use of nanoparticles for in vitro molecular diagnosis, or in the biological/biochemical analysis for in vivo interaction with the human body. PMID:24198472

  11. Biochemical Education in Brazil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vella, F.

    1988-01-01

    Described are discussions held concerning the problems of biochemical education in Brazil at a meeting of the Sociedade Brazileira de Bioquimica in April 1988. Also discussed are other visits that were made to universities in Brazil. Three major recommendations to improve the state of biochemistry education in Brazil are presented. (CW)

  12. Measures of Biochemical Sociology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snell, Joel; Marsh, Mitchell

    2008-01-01

    In a previous article, the authors introduced a new sub field in sociology that we labeled "biochemical sociology." We introduced the definition of a sociology that encompasses sociological measures, psychological measures, and biological indicators Snell & Marsh (2003). In this article, we want to demonstrate a research strategy that would assess…

  13. Welding III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding III, an advanced course in arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with the proficiency necessary for industrial certification. The course objectives, which are outlined first, specify that students will…

  14. Welding III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding III, an advanced course in arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with the proficiency necessary for industrial certification. The course objectives, which are outlined first, specify that students will…

  15. Tidal evolution of the Uranian satellites. III - Evolution through the Miranda-Umbriel 3:1, Miranda-Ariel 5:3, and Ariel-Umbriel 2:1 mean-motion commensurabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tittemore, William C.; Wisdom, Jack

    1990-01-01

    Numerical experiments have been conducted which indicate that the orbital eccentricity of Miranda may have reached a value sufficiently large to have affected its thermal evolution. There is a large chaotic zone associated with the Miranda-Ariel 5:3 mean-motion commensurability, even in the planar approximation; the orbital eccentricities of both satellites may vary chaotically for a considerable period. Since the anomalously high orbital inclination of Miranda is a consequence of passage through the 3:1 commensurability with Umbriel, the requirement that the satellites encountered this resonance places a lower limit on the Uranian specific dissipation function of 39,000.

  16. Canine Antithrombin-III: Some Biochemical and Biologic Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-02

    8217 •, 3. Immunodiffusion Immunodiffusion tests were performed by the method of Ouchterlony (70) using a 196 agarose matrix. Volumes of samples tested...cross (specie) reactivities - an anticipated finding in view of the apparent antigen similarities. Results obtained with Ouchterlony double diffusion...York, Academic Press: 1953, pp. 393-460. 70. Ouchterlony , D.: Diffusion in gel methods for immunological analysis. Prog. Allergy 5:1 (1958). 71

  17. Formation and evolution of early-type galaxies - III. Dependence of the star formation history on the total mass and initial overdensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlin, E.; Chiosi, C.; Piovan, L.; Grassi, T.; Buonomo, U.; La Barbera, F.

    2012-12-01

    We investigate the influence of the initial overdensities and masses of proto-galaxies on their subsequent evolution (the star formation history in particular) to understand whether these key parameters are sufficient to account for the varied properties of the galactic populations. By means of fully hydrodynamical N-body simulations performed with the code EVOL, we produce 12 self-similar models of early-type galaxies of different initial masses and overdensities, and follow their evolution from the early epochs (detachment from the linear regime and Hubble flow at z ≥ 20) down to the stage when mass assembly is complete, i.e. z ≤ 1 (in some cases the models are calculated up to z = 0). The simulations include radiative cooling, star formation, stellar energy feedback, re-ionizing photo-heating background and chemical enrichment of the interstellar medium; we do not consider the possible presence of active nuclei. We find a strong correlation between the initial properties of the proto-haloes and their subsequent star formation histories. Massive (Mtot ≃ 1013 M⊙) haloes experience a single, intense burst of star formation (with rates ≥103 M⊙ yr-1) at early epochs, consistently with observations, with less pronounced dependence on the initial overdensity; intermediate-mass (Mtot ≃ 1011 M⊙) haloes have histories that strongly depend on their initial overdensity, whereas low-mass haloes (Mtot ≃ 109 M⊙) always have erratic, bursting like star-forming histories, due to the 'galactic breathing' phenomenon. The model galaxies have morphological, structural and chemical properties resembling those of real galaxies, even though some disagreement still occurs, likely a consequence of some numerical choices. We conclude that total mass and initial overdensity drive the star formation histories of early-type galaxies. The model galaxies belong to the so-called quasi-monolithic (or early hierarchical) scenario in the sense that the aggregation of lumps of

  18. Variations on a theme - the evolution of hydrocarbon solids. III. Size-dependent properties - the optEC(s)(a) model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. P.

    2012-06-01

    Context. The properties of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) dust evolve in response to the local radiation field in the interstellar medium (ISM) and the evolution of these properties is particularly dependent upon the particle size. Aims: A model for finite-sized, low-temperature amorphous hydrocarbon particles, based on the microphysical properties of random and defected networks of carbon and hydrogen atoms, with surfaces passivated by hydrogen atoms, has been developed. Methods: The eRCN/DG and the optEC(s) models have been combined, adapted and extended into a new optEC(s)(a) model that is used to calculate the optical properties of hydrocarbon grain materials down into the sub-nanometre size regime, where the particles contain only a few tens of carbon atoms. Results: The optEC(s)(a) model predicts a continuity in properties from large to small (sub-nm) carbonaceous grains. Tabulated data of the size-dependent optical constants (from EUV to cm wavelengths) for a-C:H (nano-)particles as a function of the bulk material band gap [Eg(bulk)], or equivalently the hydrogen content, are provided. The effective band gap [Eg(eff.)] is found to be significantly larger than Eg(bulk) for hydrogen-poor a-C(:H) nano-particles and their predicted long-wavelength (λ > 30 μm) optical properties differ from those derived for interstellar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Conclusions: The optEC(s)(a) model is used to investigate the size-dependent structural and spectral evolution of a-C(:H) materials under ISM conditions, including: the IR-FUV extinction, the 217 nm bump and the infrared emission bands. The model makes several predictions that can be tested against observations. Appendices A-E are available in electronic from at http://www.aanda.orgData files are only available form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/542/A98

  19. EVOLUTION, NUCLEOSYNTHESIS, AND YIELDS OF AGB STARS AT DIFFERENT METALLICITIES. III. INTERMEDIATE-MASS MODELS, REVISED LOW-MASS MODELS, AND THE pH-FRUITY INTERFACE

    SciTech Connect

    Cristallo, S.; Straniero, O.; Piersanti, L.; Gobrecht, D.

    2015-08-15

    We present a new set of models for intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars (4.0, 5.0, and 6.0 M{sub ⊙}) at different metallicities (−2.15 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤ +0.15). This set integrates the existing models for low-mass AGB stars (1.3 ≤ M/M{sub ⊙} ≤ 3.0) already included in the FRUITY database. We describe the physical and chemical evolution of the computed models from the main sequence up to the end of the AGB phase. Due to less efficient third dredge up episodes, models with large core masses show modest surface enhancements. This effect is due to the fact that the interpulse phases are short and, therefore, thermal pulses (TPs) are weak. Moreover, the high temperature at the base of the convective envelope prevents it from deeply penetrating the underlying radiative layers. Depending on the initial stellar mass, the heavy element nucleosynthesis is dominated by different neutron sources. In particular, the s-process distributions of the more massive models are dominated by the {sup 22}Ne(α,n){sup 25}Mg reaction, which is efficiently activated during TPs. At low metallicities, our models undergo hot bottom burning and hot third dredge up. We compare our theoretical final core masses to available white dwarf observations. Moreover, we quantify the influence intermediate-mass models have on the carbon star luminosity function. Finally, we present the upgrade of the FRUITY web interface, which now also includes the physical quantities of the TP-AGB phase for all of the models included in the database (ph-FRUITY)

  20. Evolution, Nucleosynthesis, and Yields of AGB Stars at Different Metallicities. III. Intermediate-mass Models, Revised Low-mass Models, and the ph-FRUITY Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristallo, S.; Straniero, O.; Piersanti, L.; Gobrecht, D.

    2015-08-01

    We present a new set of models for intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars (4.0, 5.0, and 6.0 M⊙) at different metallicities (-2.15 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤ +0.15). This set integrates the existing models for low-mass AGB stars (1.3 ≤ M/M⊙ ≤ 3.0) already included in the FRUITY database. We describe the physical and chemical evolution of the computed models from the main sequence up to the end of the AGB phase. Due to less efficient third dredge up episodes, models with large core masses show modest surface enhancements. This effect is due to the fact that the interpulse phases are short and, therefore, thermal pulses (TPs) are weak. Moreover, the high temperature at the base of the convective envelope prevents it from deeply penetrating the underlying radiative layers. Depending on the initial stellar mass, the heavy element nucleosynthesis is dominated by different neutron sources. In particular, the s-process distributions of the more massive models are dominated by the 22Ne(α,n)25Mg reaction, which is efficiently activated during TPs. At low metallicities, our models undergo hot bottom burning and hot third dredge up. We compare our theoretical final core masses to available white dwarf observations. Moreover, we quantify the influence intermediate-mass models have on the carbon star luminosity function. Finally, we present the upgrade of the FRUITY web interface, which now also includes the physical quantities of the TP-AGB phase for all of the models included in the database (ph-FRUITY).

  1. Control of Ligand pKa Values Tunes the Electrocatalytic Dihydrogen Evolution Mechanism in a Redox-Active Aluminum(III) Complex.

    PubMed

    Sherbow, Tobias J; Fettinger, James C; Berben, Louise A

    2017-08-07

    Redox-active ligands bring electron- and proton-transfer reactions to main-group coordination chemistry. In this Forum Article, we demonstrate how ligand pKa values can be used in the design of a reaction mechanism for a ligand-based electron- and proton-transfer pathway, where the ligand retains a negative charge and enables dihydrogen evolution. A bis(pyrazolyl)pyridine ligand, (iPr)Pz2P, reacts with 2 equiv of AlCl3 to afford [((iPr)Pz2P)AlCl2(THF)][AlCl4] (1). A reaction involving two-electron reduction and single-ligand protonation of 1 affords [((iPr)HPz2P(-))AlCl2] (2), where each of the electron- and proton-transfer events is ligand-centered. Protonation of 2 would formally close a catalytic cycle for dihydrogen production. At -1.26 V versus SCE, in a 0.3 M Bu4NPF6/tetrahydrofuran solution with salicylic acid or (HNEt3)(+) as the source of H(+), 1 produced dihydrogen electrocatalytically, according to cyclic voltammetry and controlled potential electrolysis experiments. The mechanism for the reaction is most likely two electron-transfer steps followed by two chemical steps based on the available reactivity information. A comparison of this work with our previously reported aluminum complexes of the phenyl-substituted bis(imino)pyridine system ((Ph)I2P) reveals that the pKa values of the N-donor atoms in (iPr)Pz2P are lower, which facilitates reduction before ligand protonation. In contrast, the (Ph)I2P ligand complexes of aluminum are protonated twice before reduction liberates dihydrogen.

  2. Evolution of sex-biased maternal effects in birds: III. Adjustment of ovulation order can enable sex-specific allocation of hormones, carotenoids, and vitamins.

    PubMed

    Badyaev, A V; Acevedo Seaman, D; Navara, K J; Hill, G E; Mendonça, M T

    2006-07-01

    Overlap in growth of offspring should constrain the opportunity for sex-biased maternal effects, yet sex-specific allocation of maternal resources among simultaneously growing ova is often observed in vertebrates. In birds, such allocation can be accomplished either by temporal clustering of ova that become the same sex, resulting in sex-biased egg-laying order, or by follicle-specific delivery of maternal resources. Two house finch populations at the northern and southern boundaries of the species range have opposite ovulation sequences of male and female eggs, and thus, in the absence of sex differences in ova growth or sex-specific maternal strategies, would be expected to have opposite sex-specific accumulation of maternal products. We found that the populations had strong and similar gradients of steroid distribution in relation to ovulation order, whereas distribution of carotenoids and vitamins correlated with each follicle's accumulation of steroids. In both populations, temporal bias in production of sons and daughters within a clutch enabled strongly sex-specific acquisition of maternal products, and oocytes of the same sex were highly interdependent in their accumulation of steroids. Moreover, in nests where the sex-bias in relation to ovulation order deviated from population-specific patterns, eggs had highly distinct concentrations of steroids, carotenoids and vitamins. These results and previous findings of sex-specific yolk partitioning among oocytes suggest that oocytes that become males and females are temporally or spatially clustered during their ovarian growth. We discuss the implication of these findings for the evolution of sex-specific maternal resource allocation.

  3. Biochemical and Structural Properties of Mouse Kynurenine Aminotransferase III▿

    PubMed Central

    Han, Qian; Robinson, Howard; Cai, Tao; Tagle, Danilo A.; Li, Jianyong

    2009-01-01

    Kynurenine aminotransferase III (KAT III) has been considered to be involved in the production of mammalian brain kynurenic acid (KYNA), which plays an important role in protecting neurons from overstimulation by excitatory neurotransmitters. The enzyme was identified based on its high sequence identity with mammalian KAT I, but its activity toward kynurenine and its structural characteristics have not been established. In this study, the biochemical and structural properties of mouse KAT III (mKAT III) were determined. Specifically, mKAT III cDNA was amplified from a mouse brain cDNA library, and its recombinant protein was expressed in an insect cell protein expression system. We established that mKAT III is able to efficiently catalyze the transamination of kynurenine to KYNA and has optimum activity at relatively basic conditions of around pH 9.0 and at relatively high temperatures of 50 to 60°C. In addition, mKAT III is active toward a number of other amino acids. Its activity toward kynurenine is significantly decreased in the presence of methionine, histidine, glutamine, leucine, cysteine, and 3-hydroxykynurenine. Through macromolecular crystallography, we determined the mKAT III crystal structure and its structures in complex with kynurenine and glutamine. Structural analysis revealed the overall architecture of mKAT III and its cofactor binding site and active center residues. This is the first report concerning the biochemical characteristics and crystal structures of KAT III enzymes and provides a basis toward understanding the overall physiological role of mammalian KAT III in vivo and insight into regulating the levels of endogenous KYNA through modulation of the enzyme in the mouse brain. PMID:19029248

  4. Associative learning in biochemical networks.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Nikhil; Ashkenasy, Gonen; Tannenbaum, Emmanuel

    2007-11-07

    It has been recently suggested that there are likely generic features characterizing the emergence of systems constructed from the self-organization of self-replicating agents acting under one or more selection pressures. Therefore, structures and behaviors at one length scale may be used to infer analogous structures and behaviors at other length scales. Motivated by this suggestion, we seek to characterize various "animate" behaviors in biochemical networks, and the influence that these behaviors have on genomic evolution. Specifically, in this paper, we develop a simple, chemostat-based model illustrating how a process analogous to associative learning can occur in a biochemical network. Associative learning is a form of learning whereby a system "learns" to associate two stimuli with one another. Associative learning, also known as conditioning, is believed to be a powerful learning process at work in the brain (associative learning is essentially "learning by analogy"). In our model, two types of replicating molecules, denoted as A and B, are present in some initial concentration in the chemostat. Molecules A and B are stimulated to replicate by some growth factors, denoted as G(A) and G(B), respectively. It is also assumed that A and B can covalently link, and that the conjugated molecule can be stimulated by either the G(A) or G(B) growth factors (and can be degraded). We show that, if the chemostat is stimulated by both growth factors for a certain time, followed by a time gap during which the chemostat is not stimulated at all, and if the chemostat is then stimulated again by only one of the growth factors, then there will be a transient increase in the number of molecules activated by the other growth factor. Therefore, the chemostat bears the imprint of earlier, simultaneous stimulation with both growth factors, which is indicative of associative learning. It is interesting to note that the dynamics of our model is consistent with certain aspects of

  5. Mass and environment as drivers of galaxy evolution. III. The constancy of the faint-end slope and the merging of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Ying-jie; Lilly, Simon J.; Carollo, Marcella; Renzini, Alvio

    2014-08-01

    Using our continuity approach, we explore the underlying connections between the evolution of the faint-end slope α{sub s} of the stellar mass function of star-forming galaxies, the logarithmic slope β of the specific star formation rate (sSFR)-mass relation, and the merging of galaxies. We derive analytically the consequences of the observed constancy of α{sub s} since redshifts of at least z ∼ 2. If the logarithmic slope β of the sSFR-mass relation is negative, then the faint-end slope α{sub s} should quickly diverge due to the differential mass increase of galaxies on the star-forming main sequence, and this will also quickly destroy the Schechter form of the mass function. This problem can be solved by removing low-mass galaxies by merging them into more massive galaxies. We quantify this process by introducing the specific merger mass rate (sMMR) as the specific rate of mass added to a given galaxy through mergers. For a modest negative value of β ∼ –0.1, an average sMMR ∼ 0.1 sSFR across the population is required to keep α{sub s} constant with epoch, as observed. This in turn implies a merger rate of ∼0.2 sSFR for major mergers, which is consistent with the available observational estimates. More negative values of β require higher sMMR and higher merger rates, and the steepening of the mass function becomes impossible to control for β < –(α{sub s} + 2). The close link that is required between the in situ sSFR and the sMMR probably arises because both are closely linked to the buildup of dark matter halos. These new findings further develop the formalism for the evolving galaxy population that we introduced earlier and show how striking symmetries in the galaxy population can emerge as the result of deep links between the physical processes involved.

  6. Keck Deep Fields. III. Luminosity-dependent Evolution of the Ultraviolet Luminosity and Star Formation Rate Densities at z~4, 3, and 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawicki, Marcin; Thompson, David

    2006-09-01

    We use our very deep UnGRI catalog of z~4, 3, and 2 UV-selected star-forming galaxies to study the cosmological evolution of the rest-frame 1700 Å luminosity density. The ability to reliably constrain the contribution of faint galaxies is critical here, and our data do so by reaching deep into the galaxy population, to M*LBG+2 at z~4 and deeper still at lower redshifts (M*LBG=-21.0 and L*LBG is the corresponding luminosity). We find that the luminosity density at z>~2 is dominated by the hitherto poorly studied galaxies fainter than L*LBG, and, indeed, the bulk of the UV light at these epochs comes from galaxies in the rather narrow luminosity range L=(0.1-1)L*LBG. Overall, there is a gradual rise in total luminosity density starting at >~4 (we find twice as much UV light at z~3 as at z~4), followed by a shallow peak or plateau within z~3-1, finally followed by the well-known plunge to z~0. Within this total picture, luminosity density in sub-L*LBG galaxies at z>~2 evolves more rapidly than that in more luminous objects; this trend is reversed at lower redshifts, z<~1-a reversal that is reminiscent of galaxy downsizing. We find that within the context of commonly used models there seemingly are not enough faint or bright LBGs to maintain ionization of intergalactic gas even as recently as z~4, and the problem becomes worse at higher redshifts: apparently the universe must be easier to reionize than some recent studies have assumed. Nevertheless, sub-L*LBG galaxies do dominate the total UV luminosity density at z>~2, and this dominance highlights the need for follow-up studies that will teach us more about these very numerous but thus far largely unexplored systems. Based on data obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA and was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  7. ON THE CLUSTER PHYSICS OF SUNYAEV-ZEL'DOVICH AND X-RAY SURVEYS. III. MEASUREMENT BIASES AND COSMOLOGICAL EVOLUTION OF GAS AND STELLAR MASS FRACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, N.; Bond, J. R.; Pfrommer, C.; Sievers, J. L.

    2013-11-10

    Gas masses tightly correlate with the virial masses of galaxy clusters, allowing for a precise determination of cosmological parameters by means of X-ray surveys. However, the gas mass fractions (f{sub gas}) at the virial radius (R{sub 200}) derived from recent Suzaku observations are considerably larger than the cosmic mean, calling into question the accuracy of cosmological parameters. Here, we use a large suite of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations to study measurement biases of f{sub gas}. We employ different variants of simulated physics, including radiative gas physics, star formation, and thermal feedback by active galactic nuclei, which we show is able to arrest overcooling and to result in constant stellar mass fractions for redshifts z < 1. Computing the mass profiles in 48 angular cones, we find anisotropic gas and total mass distributions that imply an angular variance of f{sub gas} at the level of 30%. This anisotropy originates from the recent formation epoch of clusters and from the strong internal baryon-to-dark-matter density bias. In the most extreme cones, f{sub gas} can be biased high by a factor of two at R{sub 200} in massive clusters (M{sub 200} ∼ 10{sup 15} M{sub ☉}), thereby providing an explanation for high f{sub gas} measurements by Suzaku. While projection lowers this factor, there are other measurement biases that may (partially) compensate. At R{sub 200}, f{sub gas} is biased high by 20% when assuming hydrostatic equilibrium masses, i.e., neglecting the kinetic pressure, and by another ∼10%-20% due to the presence of density clumping. At larger radii, both measurement biases increase dramatically. While the cluster sample variance of the true f{sub gas} decreases to a level of 5% at R{sub 200}, the sample variance that includes both measurement biases remains fairly constant at the level of 10%-20%. The constant redshift evolution of f{sub gas} within R{sub 500} for massive clusters is encouraging for using gas masses to

  8. Biochemical Analyses of Dissimilatory Iron Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruebush, S. S.; Tien, M.; Icopini, G. A.; Brantley, S. L.

    2002-12-01

    Shewanella oneidensis demonstrates respiratory flexibility by the transfer of electrons to Fe (III) and Mn (IV) oxides under anaerobic conditions. Researchers postulate that the bacterium utilizes surface proteins to facilitate the respiratory mechanism for dissimilatory iron(III) reduction. Previous genetic and biochemical studies has shown that iron reduction is associated with the outer membrane of the cell. The identity of the terminal reductase is not yet known. S. oneidensis has been shown to use soluble extra-cellular compounds to facilitate iron(III) reduction as well as expression of novel proteins on the cell surface when interacting with iron(III) oxides. Our results show that the outer membrane fraction possess enzymatic activity for converting Fe(III) to Fe(II) as measured by ferrozine complexation. AQDS, extra-cellular organic extracts, and iron(III) both soluble and solid have been assayed for activity with outer membrane fractions. Zymograms of the membrane fractions separated by isoelectric focusing and native PAGE electrophoresis stained using ferrozine have implicated proteins that are directly involved in the Fe(III) reduction process. A proteomics analysis of outer membrane proteins has also been implemented to identify different expression patterns under Fe(III) reducing conditions. Proteins that are unique to Fe(III) reduction have been isolated and identified using N-terminal sequence analysis. We will also attempt to examine the effect of enzymatic iron(III) reduction on isotopic partitioning from in vitro assays.

  9. THE M31 VELOCITY VECTOR. III. FUTURE MILKY WAY M31-M33 ORBITAL EVOLUTION, MERGING, AND FATE OF THE SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Marel, Roeland P.; Sohn, Sangmo Tony; Anderson, Jay; Besla, Gurtina; Cox, T. J.

    2012-07-01

    We study the future orbital evolution and merging of the Milky Way (MW)-M31-M33 system, using a combination of collisionless N-body simulations and semi-analytic orbit integrations. Monte Carlo simulations are used to explore the consequences of varying all relevant initial phase-space and mass parameters within their observational uncertainties. The observed M31 transverse velocity from Papers I and II implies that the MW and M31 will merge t = 5.86{sup +1.61}{sub -0.72} Gyr from now. The first pericenter occurs at t = 3.87{sup +0.42}{sub -0.32} Gyr, at a pericenter distance of r = 31.0{sup +38.0}{sub -19.8} kpc. In 41% of Monte Carlo orbits, M31 makes a direct hit with the MW, defined here as a first-pericenter distance less than 25 kpc. For the M31-M33 system, the first-pericenter time and distance are t = 0.85{sup +0.18}{sub -0.13} Gyr and r = 80.8{sup +42.2}{sub -31.7} kpc. By the time M31 gets to its first pericenter with the MW, M33 is close to its second pericenter with M31. For the MW-M33 system, the first-pericenter time and distance are t = 3.70{sup +0.74}{sub -0.46} Gyr and r = 176.0{sup +239.0}{sub -136.9} kpc. The most likely outcome is for the MW and M31 to merge first, with M33 settling onto an orbit around them that may decay toward a merger later. However, there is a 9% probability that M33 makes a direct hit with the MW at its first pericenter, before M31 gets to or collides with the MW. Also, there is a 7% probability that M33 gets ejected from the Local Group, temporarily or permanently. The radial mass profile of the MW-M31 merger remnant is significantly more extended than the original profiles of either the MW or M31, and suggests that the merger remnant will resemble an elliptical galaxy. The Sun will most likely ({approx}85% probability) end up at a larger radius from the center of the MW-M31 merger remnant than its current distance from the MW center, possibly further than 50 kpc ({approx}10% probability). There is a {approx}20

  10. Photo-catalyzed surface hydrolysis of iridium(iii) ions on semiconductors: a facile method for the preparation of semiconductor/IrOx composite photoanodes toward oxygen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qingyong; Xu, Di; Xue, Ning; Liu, Tengyi; Xiang, Min; Diao, Peng

    2016-12-21

    We previously reported that the hydrolysis of Ir(3+) in homogeneous solution could be triggered by irradiation with light whose energy was larger than a threshold value. In this work, we demonstrated that, by introducing Fe2O3 particles into solution, the incident light energy-restriction for the photo-catalyzed hydrolysis could be broken and the hydrolysis occurred at the Fe2O3/solution interface. The photo-generated holes on the Fe2O3 surface played a key role in oxidizing Ir(iii) to Ir(iv) species and triggered the deposition of IrOx. We showed that this photo-catalyzed surface hydrolysis is a universal phenomenon that takes place on the surface of many n-type semiconductors such as Fe2O3, TiO2, and Ag3PO4. As IrOx is an efficient catalyst for oxygen evolution reaction, surface hydrolysis is a general, facile and efficient strategy to prepare semiconductor/IrOx composites, which can be used as anodic materials for photoelectrochemical water splitting.

  11. Population genetics and evolution

    SciTech Connect

    De Jong, G.

    1988-01-01

    This volume reevaluates the position of population genetics in evolutionary biology by using population genetics as the tool to study the role of development and adaptation in evolution. The emphasis is on the organismic process of selection, and on how the study of selection means connecting variation at the molecular, biochemical, and phenotypic levels of organization with the resulting variation in fitness. This book illustrates that the tendency to view single locus differences in isolation as the building blocks of evolution is disappearing.

  12. A Biochemical Double Slit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kominis, Iannis

    2011-03-01

    Radical-ion-pair reactions, fundamental in photosynthesis and at the basis of the avian magnetic compass mechanism, have been recently shown to offer a rich playground for applying methods and concepts from quantum measurement/quantum information science. We will demonstrate that radical-ion-pair reactions are almost the exact analog of the optical double slit experiment, i.e. Nature has already engineered biochemical reactions performing the act of quantum interference. We will further elaborate on the non-trivial quantum effects pertaining in these reactions and the recent debate on their fundamental theoretical description that these effects have sparked.

  13. Biochemical Reversal of Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, John T. A.

    2006-03-01

    We cite our progress on biochemical reversal of aging. However, it may be circa 2 years before we have necessary substances at low cost. Meanwhile, without them, a number of measures can be adopted providing marked improvement for the problems of aging in modern societies. For example, enzymes are needed to excrete toxins that accelerate aging; Hg is the ultimate toxin that disables all enzymes (including those needed to excrete Hg itself). Low Hg level in the urine, due to loss of excretory ability, causes the diagnosis of Hg toxicity to almost always be missed. Hg sources must be removed from the body! Another example is excess sugar; hyperglycemia decreases intracellular ascorbic acid (AA) by competitively inhibiting the insulin- mediated active transport of AA into cells. Thus, immunity is impaired by low leucocyte AA. AA is needed for new proteins in aging tissues. Humans must supplement AA; their need same as in AA-synthesizing mammals.

  14. Misleading biochemical laboratory test results

    PubMed Central

    Nanji, Amin A.

    1984-01-01

    This article reviews the general and specific factors that interfere with the performance of common biochemical laboratory tests and the interpretation of their results. The clinical status of the patient, drug interactions, and in-vivo and in-vitro biochemical interactions and changes may alter the results obtained from biochemical analysis of blood constituents. Failure to recognize invalid laboratory test results may lead to injudicious and dangerous management of patients. PMID:6375845

  15. RNA polymerase III under control: repression and de-repression.

    PubMed

    Boguta, Magdalena; Graczyk, Damian

    2011-09-01

    The synthesis of tRNA by yeast RNA polymerase III (Pol III) is regulated in response to changing environmental conditions. This control is mediated by Maf1, the global negative regulator of Pol III transcription conserved from yeast to humans. Details regarding the molecular basis of Pol III repression by Maf1 are now emerging from recently reported structural and biochemical data on Pol III and Maf1. Efficient Pol III transcription, following the shift of cells from a non-fermentable carbon source to glucose, requires phosphorylation of Maf1. One of the newly identified Maf1 kinases is the chromatin-bound casein kinase II (CK2). Current studies have allowed us to propose an innovative mechanism of Pol III regulation. We suggest that CK2-mediated phosphorylation of Maf1, occurring directly on tDNA chromatin, controls Pol III recycling. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Rapamycin regulates biochemical metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Tucci, Paola; Porta, Giovanni; Agostini, Massimiliano; Antonov, Alexey; Garabadgiu, Alexander Vasilievich; Melino, Gerry; Willis, Anne E

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase is a master regulator of protein synthesis that couples nutrient sensing to cell growth, and deregulation of this pathway is associated with tumorigenesis. p53, and its less investigated family member p73, have been shown to interact closely with mTOR pathways through the transcriptional regulation of different target genes. To investigate the metabolic changes that occur upon inhibition of the mTOR pathway and the role of p73 in this response primary mouse embryonic fibroblast from control and TAp73−/− were treated with the macrocyclic lactone rapamycin. Extensive gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) analysis were used to obtain a rapamycin-dependent global metabolome profile from control or TAp73−/− cells. In total 289 metabolites involved in selective pathways were identified; 39 biochemical metabolites were found to be significantly altered, many of which are known to be associated with the cellular stress response. PMID:23839040

  17. Within-Person Covariation between Mood and Biochemicals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    experiments. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology , 37, 989-995. Vickers, R.R., Jr. (1979). The relationship of psychological coping and defenses to... Personality and Social Psychology , 10, 406-413. Si 15. Table 1. Average Within- Person Correlations Between Moods Act. Ang. Hap. Fear Dep. Fat...I AD-A158 196 WITHIN- PERSON COVARIATION BETWEEN MOOD AND BIOCHEMICALS III (U) NAVAL HEALTH RESEARCH CENTER SAN DIEGO CA I R R VICKERS ET AL. 1989

  18. Ribonuclease revisited: structural insights into ribonuclease III family enzymes.

    PubMed

    MacRae, Ian J; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2007-02-01

    Ribonuclease III (RNase III) enzymes occur ubiquitously in biology and are responsible for processing RNA precursors into functional RNAs that participate in protein synthesis, RNA interference and a range of other cellular activities. Members of the RNase III enzyme family, including Escherichia coli RNase III, Rnt1, Dicer and Drosha, share the ability to recognize and cleave double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), typically at specific positions or sequences. Recent biochemical and structural data have shed new light on how RNase III enzymes catalyze dsRNA hydrolysis and how substrate specificity is achieved. A major theme emerging from these studies is that accessory domains present in different RNase III enzymes are the key determinants of substrate selectivity, which in turn dictates the specialized biological function of each type of RNase III protein.

  19. Unquiet Evolution: Consideration of a Previous Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angseesing, J. P. A.

    1972-01-01

    Presents genetical and biochemical data to show that the conclusion presented by Dyer (EJ 036 108) is by no meas settled. Evidence to support the concept: evolution by selectively neutral polymorphisms is inconclusive. (AL)

  20. [Napoleon III's urogenital disease (1808-1873)].

    PubMed

    Androutsos, G

    2000-02-01

    We tried through this paper to reconstitute the evolution of the urologic illness of Napoleon III, last emperor of France, the first symptoms of which appeared many years before the fatal war of 1870, which led to the dismembering of France. In this connection, we present Napoleon III's physicians and his cures, along with the diagnostic and therapeutic errors. The case of Napoleon III is a typical example of the influence the bad health of a sovereign can exercise on the destiny of his country.

  1. Biochemical Engineering and Industrial Biotechnology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moo-Young, Murray

    1986-01-01

    Describes the biochemical engineering and industrial biotechnology programs of the University of Waterloo (Ontario, Canada). Provides descriptions of graduate courses, along with a sample of current research activities. Includes a discussion of the programs' mechanisms for technology transfer. (TW)

  2. A Course in... Biochemical Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Terry K-L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes a chemical engineering course for senior undergraduates and first year graduate students in biochemical engineering. Discusses five experiments used in the course: aseptic techniques, dissolved oxygen measurement, oxygen uptake by yeast, continuous sterilization, and cultivation of microorganisms. (MVL)

  3. Biochemical Engineering and Industrial Biotechnology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moo-Young, Murray

    1986-01-01

    Describes the biochemical engineering and industrial biotechnology programs of the University of Waterloo (Ontario, Canada). Provides descriptions of graduate courses, along with a sample of current research activities. Includes a discussion of the programs' mechanisms for technology transfer. (TW)

  4. A Course in... Biochemical Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Terry K-L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes a chemical engineering course for senior undergraduates and first year graduate students in biochemical engineering. Discusses five experiments used in the course: aseptic techniques, dissolved oxygen measurement, oxygen uptake by yeast, continuous sterilization, and cultivation of microorganisms. (MVL)

  5. Structure of a Eukaryotic RNase III Post-Cleavage Complex Reveals a Double- Ruler Mechanism for Substrate Selection

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yu-He; Lavoie, Mathieu; Comeau, Marc-Andre; Elela, Sherif Abou; Ji, Xinhua

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY RNase III represents a family of dsRNA-specific endoribonucleases required for RNA maturation and gene regulation. The mechanism of action has been well characterized for the bacterial enzyme, but is not clear for eukaryotic RNase IIIs. Here, we describe the structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase III (Rnt1p) post-cleavage complex and explain the basis of its affinity for RNA stems capped with an NGNN tetraloop. The structure shows specific interactions between a new structural motif located at the end of Rnt1p dsRNA-binding domain (dsRBD) and the guanine nucleotide in the second position of the loop. Strikingly, structural and biochemical analyses indicate that the dsRBD and N-terminal domain function as two rulers measuring the distance between the tetraloop and the cleavage site. This unusual mechanism of substrate selectivity represents an example of the evolution of substrate selectivity and provides a framework for understanding the mechanism of action of eukaryotic RNase IIIs. PMID:24703949

  6. The role of thermodynamics in biochemical engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Stockar, Urs

    2013-09-01

    This article is an adapted version of the introductory chapter of a book whose publication is imminent. It bears the title "Biothermodynamics - The role of thermodynamics in biochemical engineering." The aim of the paper is to give a very short overview of the state of biothermodynamics in an engineering context as reflected in this book. Seen from this perspective, biothermodynamics may be subdivided according to the scale used to formalize the description of the biological system into three large areas: (i) biomolecular thermodynamics (most fundamental scale), (ii) thermodynamics of metabolism (intermediary scale), and (iii) whole-cell thermodynamics ("black-box" description of living entities). In each of these subareas, the main available theoretical approaches and the current and the potential applications are discussed. Biomolecular thermodynamics (i) is especially well developed and is obviously highly pertinent for the development of downstream processing. Its use ought to be encouraged as much as possible. The subarea of thermodynamics of live cells (iii), although scarcely applied in practice, is also expected to enhance bioprocess research and development, particularly in predicting culture performances, for understanding the driving forces for cellular growth, and in developing, monitoring, and controlling cellular cultures. Finally, there is no question that thermodynamic analysis of cellular metabolism (ii) is a promising tool for systems biology and for many other applications, but quite a large research effort is still needed before it may be put to practical use.

  7. Hydrophobic hydrophilic phenomena in biochemical processes.

    PubMed

    Ben-Naim, Arieh

    2003-09-01

    The evolution of concepts developed in the study of the hydrophobic affect is surveyed, within the more general context of solvent-induced effects. A systematic analysis of the solvent-induced contribution to the driving force for the process of protein folding has led to two important modifications in our understanding of these effects. First, the conventional concepts of hydrophobic solvation and hydrophobic interactions had to be replaced by their respective conditional effects. Second, each of the hydrophobic effects has also a corresponding hydrophilic counterpart. Some of the latter effects could contribute significantly to the total driving force for the process of protein folding, and perhaps even dominate the driving force for biochemical processes.

  8. Divergent Evolution of the repFII Replicon of IncF Plasmids Carrying Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor cnf2, Cytolethal Distending Toxin cdtIII, and f17Ae Fimbrial Variant Genes in Type 2 Necrotoxigenic Escherichia coli Isolates from Calves

    PubMed Central

    Bihannic, Morgan; Haenni, Marisa; Oswald, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Among the pathovars of Escherichia coli in cattle, necrotoxigenic E. coli (NTEC) is defined by the production of cytotoxic necrotizing factors (CNFs). In particular, type 2 NTEC (NTEC2) strains are frequent in diarrheic and septicemic calves and usually coproduce CNF type 2 (CNF2), cytolethal distending toxin type III (CDTIII), and fimbrial adhesins of the F17 family, whose genetic determinants have frequently been reported on the same Vir-like plasmid. In this study, we investigated the genetic environment of the cnf2, f17Ae, and cdtIII genes in a collection of fecal E. coli isolates recovered from 484 French and 58 Iranian calves. In particular, we highlighted the spread of cnf2, f17Ae, and cdtIII on similar 150-kb IncF plasmids harboring the newly assigned repFII replicon allele F74 in NTEC2 isolates. Interestingly, this 150-kb IncF plasmid differed from the 140-kb IncF plasmid harboring the newly assigned repFII replicon allele F75 and carrying cnf2 alone. These results suggest two divergent lineages of cnf2-carrying IncF plasmids depending on the presence of the f17Ae and cdtIII genes. This partition was observed in E. coli strains of unrelated backgrounds, suggesting two different evolutionary paths of cnf2-carrying IncF plasmids rather than divergent evolutions of NTEC2 clones. The driving forces for such divergent evolutions are not known, and further studies are required to clarify the selection of plasmid subtypes spreading virulence determinants in E. coli, in particular, plasmids of the IncF family. PMID:26546422

  9. [Benign congenital myopathy associated with a partial deficiency of complexes I and III of the mitochondrial respiratory chain

    PubMed

    Castro-Gago, M; Eirís, J; Pintos, E; Rodrigo, E; Blanco-Barca, O; Campos, Y; Arenas, J

    Isolated or combined enzyme deficiencies of the mitochondrial respiratory chain results in a number of clinical heterogeneous conditions. When presented in the neonatal period or early in the infancy the course is usually severe, although isolated cases with benign evolution have also been described. To describe the clinical and biochemical characteristics of a child with a benign form of mitochondrial myopathy due to a combined deficiency of the complexes I and III of the respiratory chain. A 40 days-old male, the second son of a young non-consanguineous couple, presented with axial congenital hypotonia, asymmetrical macrocephaly, mild enlargement of the liver, mild coarsening of facial features, increased CK serum values, persistently elevation of serum lactate and lactate/pyruvate ratio and external hydrocephalus. Electromyogram and histological muscle examination were normal but analysis of the respiratory chain disclosed a deficiency of the complexes I and III. From 13 months-age onwards clinical detailed abnormalities progressively ameliorated and also did it serum CK, lactate and external hydrocephalus. We think that on clinical, basic biochemical and histological grounds there are some similarities between this case of congenital unspecific myopathy and benign reversible form of mitochondrial myopathy, arguing in favor of a possible relationship between both conditions.

  10. III-Nitride UV Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asif Khan, M.; Shatalov, M.; Maruska, H. P.; Wang, H. M.; Kuokstis, E.

    2005-10-01

    The need for efficient, compact and robust solid-state UV optical sources and sensors had stimulated the development of optical devices based on III-nitride material system. Rapid progress in material growth, device fabrication and packaging enabled demonstration of high efficiency visible-blind and solar-blind photodetectors, deep-UV light-emitting diodes with emission from 400 to 250 nm, and UV laser diodes with operation wavelengths ranging from 340 to 350 nm. Applications of these UV optical devices include flame sensing; fluorescence-based biochemical sensing; covert communications; air, water and food purification and disinfection; and biomedical instrumentation. This paper provides a review of recent advances in the development of UV optical devices. Performance of state-of-the-art devices as well as future prospects and challenges are discussed.

  11. Global Positioning System III (GPS III)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    modernization of the constellation . GPS III complies with 10 United States Code (USC) § 2281, ensuring the continued sustainment and operation of GPS for... constellations , further increasing the accuracy and availability of user PNT solutions. GPS III December 2015 SAR March 23, 2016 16:15:29 UNCLASSIFIED

  12. BEST: Biochemical Engineering Simulation Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1996-01-01

    The idea of developing a process simulator that can describe biochemical engineering (a relatively new technology area) was formulated at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) during the late 1980s. The initial plan was to build a consortium of industrial and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) partners to enhance a commercial simulator with biochemical unit operations. DOE supported this effort; however, before the consortium was established, the process simulator industry changed considerably. Work on the first phase of implementing various fermentation reactors into the chemical process simulator, ASPEN/SP-BEST, is complete. This report will focus on those developments. Simulation Sciences, Inc. (SimSci) no longer supports ASPEN/SP, and Aspen Technology, Inc. (AspenTech) has developed an add-on to its ASPEN PLUS (also called BioProcess Simulator [BPS]). This report will also explain the similarities and differences between BEST and BPS. ASPEN, developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for DOE in the late 1970s, is still the state-of-the-art chemical process simulator. It was selected as the only simulator with the potential to be easily expanded into the biochemical area. ASPEN/SP, commercially sold by SimSci, was selected for the BEST work. SimSci completed work on batch, fed-batch, and continuous fermentation reactors in 1993, just as it announced it would no longer commercially support the complete ASPEN/SP product. BEST was left without a basic support program. Luckily, during this same time frame, AspenTech was developing a biochemical simulator with its version of ASPEN (ASPEN PLUS), which incorporates most BEST concepts. The future of BEST will involve developing physical property data and models appropriate to biochemical systems that are necessary for good biochemical process design.

  13. Effects of Mad Honey on Some Biochemical Parameters in Rats.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Huseyin; Yildiz, Oktay; Kolayli, Sevgi

    2016-10-01

    The aims of this study were to determine grayanotoxin (GTX-III) toxin level in mad honey using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and examine the dynamic changes of certain biochemical parameters in blood serum of rats that consumed mad honey. For the experimental animal study, 20 Sprague-Dawley female rats were divided into 5 groups of 4 rats each, with one group being the control group (Group 1) and the others being the experimental groups (Groups 2-5). Groups 2, 3, 4, and 5 were, respectively, given mad honey extract at doses of 0.3, 0.6, 1.2, and 2.4 mg/g body weight/day via oral gavage for 8 days. According to results, the quantity of GTX-III found in the honey sample as 39.949 ± 0.020 μg GTX-III/g honey, and the biochemical analysis of the tested parameters (aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase, creatine kinase, and creatine kinase muscle and brain) showed a significant elevation with increasing concentration of honey. In conclusion, the use of increasing concentrations of Rhododendron honey was seen as a source of enzymatic symptoms.

  14. Biochemical mediator demand--a novel rapid alternative for measuring biochemical oxygen demand.

    PubMed

    Pasco, N; Baronian, K; Jeffries, C; Hay, J

    2000-05-01

    The biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) test (BOD5) is a crucial environmental index for monitoring organic pollutants in waste water but is limited by the 5-day requirement for completing the test. We have optimised a rapid microbial technique for measuring the BOD of a standard BOD5 substrate (150 mg glucose/l, 150 mg glutamic acid/l) by quantifying an equivalent biochemical mediator demand in the absence of oxygen. Elevated concentrations of Escherichia coli were incubated with an excess of redox mediator, potassium hexacyanoferrate(III), and a known substrate for 1 h at 37 degrees C without oxygen. The addition of substrate increased the respiratory activity of the microorganisms and the accumulation of reduced mediator; the mediator was subsequently re-oxidised at a working electrode generating a current quantifiable by a coulometric transducer. Catabolic conversion efficiencies exceeding 75% were observed for the oxidation of the standard substrate. The inclusion of a mediator allowed a higher co-substrate concentration compared to oxygen and substantially reduced the incubation time from 5 days to 1 h. The technique replicates the traditional BOD5 method, except that a mediator is substituted for oxygen, and we aim to apply the principle to measure the BOD of real waste streams in future work.

  15. Biochemical Control of Marine Fouling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-14

    amino acid and catecholamine analyses by ion-exchange chromatography, and determination with ninhydrin , performed in collaboration with Dr. Herbert...attempted to design and test new, potentially specific (nonhazardous, environmentally safe) biochemical inhibitors of the recruitment and fouling...reaction- sequences. In this effort, we have concentrated first on the design and testing of agents which specifically block the larval receptors and

  16. The mass distribution of Population III stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, M.; Casey, A. R.; Gilmore, G.; Heger, A.; Chan, C.

    2017-06-01

    Extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars are uniquely informative on the nature of massive Population III stars. Modulo a few elements that vary with stellar evolution, the present-day photospheric abundances observed in EMP stars are representative of their natal gas cloud composition. For this reason, the chemistry of EMP stars closely reflects the nucleosynthetic yields of supernovae from massive Population III stars. Here we collate detailed abundances of 53 EMP stars from the literature and infer the masses of their Population III progenitors. We fit a simple initial mass function (IMF) to a subset of 29 of the inferred Population III star masses, and find that the mass distribution is well represented by a power-law IMF with exponent α = 2.35^{+0.29}_{-0.24}. The inferred maximum progenitor mass for supernovae from massive Population III stars is M_{max} = 87^{+13}_{-33} M⊙, and we find no evidence in our sample for a contribution from stars with masses above ˜120 M⊙. The minimum mass is strongly consistent with the theoretical lower mass limit for Population III supernovae. We conclude that the IMF for massive Population III stars is consistent with the IMF of present-day massive stars and there may well have formed stars much below the supernova mass limit that could have survived to the present day.

  17. Biochemical and Genetic Insights into Asukamycin Biosynthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Rui, Zhe; Petříčková, Kateřina; Škanta, František; Pospíšil, Stanislav; Yang, Yanling; Chen, Chung-Yung; Tsai, Shih-Feng; Floss, Heinz G.; Petříček, Miroslav; Yu, Tin-Wein

    2010-01-01

    Asukamycin, a member of the manumycin family metabolites, is an antimicrobial and potential antitumor agent isolated from Streptomyces nodosus subsp. asukaensis. The entire asukamycin biosynthetic gene cluster was cloned, assembled, and expressed heterologously in Streptomyces lividans. Bioinformatic analysis and mutagenesis studies elucidated the biosynthetic pathway at the genetic and biochemical level. Four gene sets, asuA–D, govern the formation and assembly of the asukamycin building blocks: a 3-amino-4-hydroxybenzoic acid core component, a cyclohexane ring, two triene polyketide chains, and a 2-amino-3-hydroxycyclopent-2-enone moiety to form the intermediate protoasukamycin. AsuE1 and AsuE2 catalyze the conversion of protoasukamycin to 4-hydroxyprotoasukamycin, which is epoxidized at C5–C6 by AsuE3 to the final product, asukamycin. Branched acyl CoA starter units, derived from Val, Leu, and Ile, can be incorporated by the actions of the polyketide synthase III (KSIII) AsuC3/C4 as well as the cellular fatty acid synthase FabH to produce the asukamycin congeners A2–A7. In addition, the type II thioesterase AsuC15 limits the cellular level of ω-cyclohexyl fatty acids and likely maintains homeostasis of the cellular membrane. PMID:20522559

  18. Biochemical regulators in cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Kölbel, F; Schreiber, V

    1983-01-01

    In recent years research has shown that muscle is capable of reacting to mechanical stimuli by altering biochemical processes. Myocardium is probably the source of a biochemical factor, or factors which activate myocardial protein synthesis. In experimentally induced cardiac hypertrophy adaptive alterations have been shown to occur not only in the adrenal medulla but also in the adrenal cortex. Finally, detection of cross reactivity between digitalis glycosides and a number of steroid hormones has succeeded. We assume that such cross reactivity indicates the existence of an endogenic factor of steroid character, which is produced in the adrenal gland and functions as an endogenic cardiotonic agent. During experimental cardiac hypertrophy its synthesis is possibly increased. We propose the term "endocardin" or "endocardiotonin" for this agent.

  19. Interferometric biochemical and chemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauglitz, Guenter; Brecht, Andreas; Kraus, Gerolf

    1995-09-01

    Interferometric principles have gained wide acceptance in the field of chemical and biochemical sensing. Reflectometric interference spectrometry sensors using white light multiple reflections at thin layers, structures of polymers, or monolayers of biochemicals are discussed in a survey. These are compared to other techniques, especially methods using surface plasmon resonance and grating couplers. Applications in the area of environmental monitoring in public safety are given, demonstrating the results for halogenated hydrocarbons in air and water as well as pesticides in ground water. Calibration curves, limits of decision, of detection, and of determination are specified and discussed with respect to EU limits. The application of multivariate data analysis is considered including artificial neuronal networks for multisensor systems and referencing in the case of gas sensors.

  20. Metabolism. Part III: Lipids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodner, George M.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the metabolic processes of complex lipids, including saponification, activation and transport, and the beta-oxidation spiral. Discusses fatty acid degradation in regard to biochemical energy and ketone bodies. (TW)

  1. Metabolism. Part III: Lipids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodner, George M.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the metabolic processes of complex lipids, including saponification, activation and transport, and the beta-oxidation spiral. Discusses fatty acid degradation in regard to biochemical energy and ketone bodies. (TW)

  2. An Integrated Qualitative and Quantitative Biochemical Model Learning Framework Using Evolutionary Strategy and Simulated Annealing.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zujian; Pang, Wei; Coghill, George M

    Both qualitative and quantitative model learning frameworks for biochemical systems have been studied in computational systems biology. In this research, after introducing two forms of pre-defined component patterns to represent biochemical models, we propose an integrative qualitative and quantitative modelling framework for inferring biochemical systems. In the proposed framework, interactions between reactants in the candidate models for a target biochemical system are evolved and eventually identified by the application of a qualitative model learning approach with an evolution strategy. Kinetic rates of the models generated from qualitative model learning are then further optimised by employing a quantitative approach with simulated annealing. Experimental results indicate that our proposed integrative framework is feasible to learn the relationships between biochemical reactants qualitatively and to make the model replicate the behaviours of the target system by optimising the kinetic rates quantitatively. Moreover, potential reactants of a target biochemical system can be discovered by hypothesising complex reactants in the synthetic models. Based on the biochemical models learned from the proposed framework, biologists can further perform experimental study in wet laboratory. In this way, natural biochemical systems can be better understood.

  3. Direct Experimental Probe of the Ni(II)/Ni(III)/Ni(IV) Redox Evolution in LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, Ruimin; Wray, L. Andrew; Kim, Jung -Hyun; Pieczonka, Nicholas P. W.; Harris, Stephen J.; Yang, Wanli

    2015-11-11

    The LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel is an appealing cathode material for next generation rechargeable Li-ion batteries due to its high operating voltage of ~4.7 V (vs Li/Li+). Although it is widely believed that the full range of electrochemical cycling involves the redox of Ni(II)/(IV), it has not been experimentally clarified whether Ni(III) exists as the intermediate state or a double-electron transfer takes place. Here, combined with theoretical calculations, we show unambiguous spectroscopic evidence of the Ni(III) state when the LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 electrode is half charged. This provides a direct verification of single-electron-transfer reactions in LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 upon cycling, namely, from Ni(II) to Ni(III), then to Ni(IV). Additionally, by virtue of its surface sensitivity, soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy also reveals the electrochemically inactive Ni2+ and Mn2+ phases on the electrode surface. Our work provides the long-awaited clarification of the single-electron transfer mechanism in LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 electrodes. Furthermore, the experimental results serve as a benchmark for further spectroscopic characterizations of Ni-based battery electrodes.

  4. Induced biochemical interactions in crude oils

    SciTech Connect

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

    1996-08-01

    In the evolution of oil from sedimentary to reservoir conditions, the hydrogen to carbon ratios decrease while the oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur to carbon ratios increase. During this process, the oils become heavier and richer in asphaltenes. In terms of chemical composition, the oils become enriched in resins, asphaltenes, and polar compounds containing the heteroatoms and metals. Over the geological periods of time, the chemical and physical changes have been brought about by chemical, biological (biochemical) and physical (temperature and pressure) means as well as by the catalytic effects of the sedimentary matrices, migration, flooding, and other physical processes. Therefore, different types of oils are the end products of a given set of such interactions which were brought about by multiple and simultaneous physicochemical processes involving electron transfer, free radical, and chemical reactions. A biocatalyst introduced into a reaction mixture of the type produced by such reactions will seek available chemical reaction sites and react at the most favorable ones. The rates and the chemical pathways by which the biocatalytic reactions will proceed will depend on the oil type and the biocatalyst(s). Some of the possible reaction pathways that may occur in such complex mixtures are discussed.

  5. Biochemical characterization of a pedigree with mitochondrially inherited deafness.

    PubMed

    Prezant, R T; Shohat, M; Jaber, L; Pressman, S; Fischel-Ghodsian, N

    1992-11-01

    A large kindred with a predicted 2-locus inheritance of sensorineural deafness, caused by the combination of a mitochondrial and an autosomal recessive mutation, was examined at the biochemical level. Because of the mitochondrial inheritance of this disease, we looked for defects in the oxidative phosphorylation Complexes I, III, IV, and V, the 4 enzymes that include all of the 13 mitochondrially encoded polypeptides. Biosynthetic labelling of lymphoblastoid cells from deaf patients, unaffected siblings, and an unrelated control showed no difference in size, abundance, rate of synthesis, or chloramphenicol-sensitivity of the mitochondrially encoded subunits. Since overall mitochondrial protein synthesis appears normal, these results suggest that the mitochondrial mutation is unlikely to be in a tRNA or rRNA gene. No change in enzymatic levels was seen in lymphoblastoid mitochondria of the deaf patients, compared to unaffected sibs and controls, for Complexes I and IV. Both affected and unaffected family members showed an increase in Complex III activity compared to controls, which may reflect the mitochondrial DNA shared by maternal relatives, or be due to other genetic differences. Complex V activity was increased in deaf individuals compared to their unaffected sibs. Since the family members share the presumptive mitochondrial mutation, differences between deaf and unaffected individuals likely reflect the nuclear background and suggest that the autosomal recessive mutation may be related to the increase in Complex V activity. These biochemical studies provide a guide for sequence analysis of the patients' mitochondrial DNA and for linkage studies in this kindred.

  6. SUPERSTARS III: K-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Education, Raleigh.

    SUPERSTARS III is a K-8 program designed as an enrichment opportunity for self-directed learners in mathematics. The basic purpose of SUPERSTARS III is to provide the extra challenge that self-motivated students need in mathematics and to do so in a structured, long-term program that does not impinge on the normal classroom routine or the…

  7. Biochemical testing of thyroid function.

    PubMed

    Klee, G G; Hay, I D

    1997-12-01

    Various published guidelines recommending serum thyrotropin (TSH)-first thyroid testing are outlined. The entities called "subclinical hypothyroidism" and "subclinical hyperthyroidism" are defined on the basis of abnormal TSH concentrations and normal values of other biochemical thyroid tests. The controversies about follow-up and treatment of these disorders are discussed. The laboratory experience of Mayo Clinic Rochester in using TSH-first thyroid testing and the subsequent implementation of a thyroid test ordering cascade are presented. Finally, recommendations are given for further optimizing laboratory testing for thyroid disorders.

  8. Biochemical structure of Calendula officinalis.

    PubMed

    Korakhashvili, A; Kacharava, T; Kiknavelidze, N

    2007-01-01

    Calendula officinalis is a well known medicinal herb. It is common knowledge that its medicinal properties are conditioned on biologically active complex substances of Carotin (Provitamin A), Stearin, Triterpiniod, Plavonoid, Kumarin, macro and micro compound elements. Because of constant need in raw material of Calendula officinalis, features of its ontogenetic development agro-biological qualities in various eco regions of Georgia were investigated. The data of biologically active compounds, biochemical structure and the maintenance both in flowers and in others parts of plant is presented; the pharmacological activity and importance in medicine was reviewed.

  9. Hyponatraemia: biochemical and clinical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Gill, G; Leese, G

    1998-09-01

    Hyponatraemia is a common bio-chemical abnormality, occurring in about 15% of hospital inpatients. It is often associated with severe illness and relatively poor outcome. Pathophysiologically, hyponatraemia may be spurious, dilutional, depletional or redistributional. Particularly difficult causes and concepts of hyponatraemia are the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis and the sick cell syndrome, which are discussed here in detail. Therapy should always be targeted at the underlying disease process. 'Hyponatraemic symptoms' are of doubtful importance, and may be more related to water overload and/or the causative disease, than to hyponatraemia per se. Artificial elevation of plasma sodium by saline infusion carries the risk of induction of osmotic demyelination (central pontine myelinolysis).

  10. Co(II)1-xCo(0)x/3Mn(III)2x/3S Nanoparticles Supported on B/N-Codoped Mesoporous Nanocarbon as a Bifunctional Electrocatalyst of Oxygen Reduction/Evolution for High-Performance Zinc-Air Batteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zilong; Xiao, Shuang; An, Yiming; Long, Xia; Zheng, Xiaoli; Lu, Xihong; Tong, Yexiang; Yang, Shihe

    2016-06-01

    Rechargeable Zn-air battery is an ideal type of energy storage device due to its high energy and power density, high safety, and economic viability. Its large-scale application rests upon the availability of active, durable, low-cost electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in the discharge process and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in the charge process. Herein we developed a novel ORR/OER bifunctional electrocatalyst for rechargeable Zn-air batteries based on the codoping and hybridization strategies. The B/N-codoped mesoporous nanocarbon supported Co(II)1-xCo(0)x/3Mn(III)2x/3S nanoparticles exhibit a superior OER performance compared to that of IrO2 catalyst and comparable Zn-air battery performance to that of the Pt-based battery. The rechargeable Zn-air battery shows high discharge peak power density (over 250 mW cm(-2)) and current density (180 mA cm(-2) at 1 V), specific capacity (∼550 mAh g(-1)), small charge-discharge voltage gap of ∼0.72 V at 20 mA cm(-2) and even higher stability than the Pt-based battery. The advanced performance of the bifunctional catalysts highlights the beneficial role of the simultaneous formation of Mn(III) and Co(0) as well as the dispersed hybridization with the codoped nanocarbon support.

  11. Population III Stars Around the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komiya, Yutaka; Suda, Takuma; Fujimoto, Masayuki Y.

    2016-03-01

    We explore the possibility of observing Population III (Pop III) stars, born of primordial gas. Pop III stars with masses below 0.8 M⊙ should survive to date though are not yet observed, but the existence of stars with low metallicity as [{{Fe}}/{{H}}]\\lt -5 in the Milky Way halo suggests the surface pollution of Pop III stars with accreted metals from the interstellar gas after birth. In this paper, we investigate the runaway of Pop III stars from their host mini-halos, considering the ejection of secondary members from binary systems when their massive primaries explode as supernovae. These stars save them from surface pollution. By computing the star formation and chemical evolution along with the hierarchical structure formation based on the extended Press-Schechter merger trees, we demonstrate that several hundreds to tens of thousands of low-mass Pop III stars escape from the building blocks of the Milky Way. The second and later generations of extremely metal-poor stars also escaped from the mini-halos. We discuss the spatial distributions of these escaped stars by evaluating the distances between the mini-halos in the branches of merger trees under the spherical collapse model of dark matter halos. It is demonstrated that the escaped stars distribute beyond the stellar halo with a density profile close to the dark matter halo, while Pop III stars are slightly more centrally concentrated. 6%-30% of the escaped stars leave the Milky Way and go out into the intergalactic space. Based on the results, we discuss the feasibility of observing the Pop III stars with the pristine surface abundance.

  12. Constraining the Statistics of Population III Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacy, Athena; Bromm, Volker

    2012-01-01

    We perform a cosmological simulation in order to model the growth and evolution of Population III (Pop III) stellar systems in a range of host minihalo environments. A Pop III multiple system forms in each of the ten minihaloes, and the overall mass function is top-heavy compared to the currently observed initial mass function in the Milky Way. Using a sink particle to represent each growing protostar, we examine the binary characteristics of the multiple systems, resolving orbits on scales as small as 20 AU. We find a binary fraction of approx. 36, with semi-major axes as large as 3000 AU. The distribution of orbital periods is slightly peaked at approx. < 900 yr, while the distribution of mass ratios is relatively flat. Of all sink particles formed within the ten minihaloes, approx. 50 are lost to mergers with larger sinks, and 50 of the remaining sinks are ejected from their star-forming disks. The large binary fraction may have important implications for Pop III evolution and nucleosynthesis, as well as the final fate of the first stars.

  13. Thermodynamic constraints for biochemical networks.

    PubMed

    Beard, Daniel A; Babson, Eric; Curtis, Edward; Qian, Hong

    2004-06-07

    The constraint-based approach to analysis of biochemical systems has emerged as a useful tool for rational metabolic engineering. Flux balance analysis (FBA) is based on the constraint of mass conservation; energy balance analysis (EBA) is based on non-equilibrium thermodynamics. The power of these approaches lies in the fact that the constraints are based on physical laws, and do not make use of unknown parameters. Here, we show that the network structure (i.e. the stoichiometric matrix) alone provides a system of constraints on the fluxes in a biochemical network which are feasible according to both mass balance and the laws of thermodynamics. A realistic example shows that these constraints can be sufficient for deriving unambiguous, biologically meaningful results. The thermodynamic constraints are obtained by comparing of the sign pattern of the flux vector to the sign patterns of the cycles of the internal cycle space via connection between stoichiometric network theory (SNT) and the mathematical theory of oriented matroids.

  14. Bistability in biochemical signaling models.

    PubMed

    Sobie, Eric A

    2011-09-20

    This Teaching Resource provides lecture notes, slides, and a student assignment for a two-part lecture on the principles underlying bistability in biochemical signaling networks, which are illustrated with examples from the literature. The lectures cover analog, or graded, versus digital, all-or-none, responses in cells, with examples from different types of biological processes requiring each. Rate-balance plots are introduced as a method for determining whether generic one-variable systems exhibit one or several stable steady states. Bifurcation diagrams are presented as a more general method for detecting the presence of bistability in biochemical signaling networks. The examples include an artificial toggle switch, the lac operon in bacteria, and the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade in both Xenopus oocytes and mammalian cells. The second part of the lecture links the concepts of bistability more closely to the mathematical tools provided by dynamical systems analysis. The examples from the first part of the lecture are analyzed with phase-plane techniques and bifurcation analysis, using the scientific programming language MATLAB. Using these programs as a template, the assignment requires the students to implement a model from the literature and analyze the stability of this model's steady states.

  15. Biochemical abnormalities in Pearson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crippa, Beatrice Letizia; Leon, Eyby; Calhoun, Amy; Lowichik, Amy; Pasquali, Marzia; Longo, Nicola

    2015-03-01

    Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome is a multisystem mitochondrial disorder characterized by bone marrow failure and pancreatic insufficiency. Children who survive the severe bone marrow dysfunction in childhood develop Kearns-Sayre syndrome later in life. Here we report on four new cases with this condition and define their biochemical abnormalities. Three out of four patients presented with failure to thrive, with most of them having normal development and head size. All patients had evidence of bone marrow involvement that spontaneously improved in three out of four patients. Unique findings in our patients were acute pancreatitis (one out of four), renal Fanconi syndrome (present in all patients, but symptomatic only in one), and an unusual organic aciduria with 3-hydroxyisobutyric aciduria in one patient. Biochemical analysis indicated low levels of plasma citrulline and arginine, despite low-normal ammonia levels. Regression analysis indicated a significant correlation between each intermediate of the urea cycle and the next, except between ornithine and citrulline. This suggested that the reaction catalyzed by ornithine transcarbamylase (that converts ornithine to citrulline) might not be very efficient in patients with Pearson syndrome. In view of low-normal ammonia levels, we hypothesize that ammonia and carbamylphosphate could be diverted from the urea cycle to the synthesis of nucleotides in patients with Pearson syndrome and possibly other mitochondrial disorders.

  16. Vector Encoding in Biochemical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Garrett; Sun, Bo

    Encoding of environmental cues via biochemical signaling pathways is of vital importance in the transmission of information for cells in a network. The current literature assumes a single cell state is used to encode information, however, recent research suggests the optimal strategy utilizes a vector of cell states sampled at various time points. To elucidate the optimal sampling strategy for vector encoding, we take an information theoretic approach and determine the mutual information of the calcium signaling dynamics obtained from fibroblast cells perturbed with different concentrations of ATP. Specifically, we analyze the sampling strategies under the cases of fixed and non-fixed vector dimension as well as the efficiency of these strategies. Our results show that sampling with greater frequency is optimal in the case of non-fixed vector dimension but that, in general, a lower sampling frequency is best from both a fixed vector dimension and efficiency standpoint. Further, we find the use of a simple modified Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process as a model qualitatively captures many of our experimental results suggesting that sampling in biochemical networks is based on a few basic components.

  17. Biochemical aspects of Huntington's chorea.

    PubMed Central

    Caraceni, T; Calderini, G; Consolazione, A; Riva, E; Algeri, S; Girotti, F; Spreafico, R; Branciforti, A; Dall'olio, A; Morselli, P L

    1977-01-01

    Fifteen patients affected by Huntington's chorea were divided into two groups, 'slow' and 'fast', according to IQ scores on the Wechsler-Bellevue scale, and scores on some motor performance tests. A possible correlation was looked for between some biochemical data (cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), homovanillic acid (HVA), and 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5HIAA) levels, plasma dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DBH), dopamine (DA) uptake by platelets), and clinical data (duration of illness, severity of symptoms, age of patients, IQ scores, 'slow' and 'fast' groups). The CSF, HVA, and 5HIAA levels were found to be significantly lowered in comparison with normal controls. DBH activity and DA uptake by platelets did not differ significantly from normal subjects. Treatment with haloperidol in all patients and with dipropylacetic acid in three patients did not appear to modify the CSF, HVA, and 5HIAA concentrations, the plasma DBH activity, or the DA uptake. There were no significant differences in the CSF, HVA, and 5HIAA contents between the two groups of patients, and there was no correlation between biochemical data and clinical features. PMID:143508

  18. Structure-function analyses of plant type III polyketide synthases.

    PubMed

    Weng, Jing-Ke; Noel, Joseph P

    2012-01-01

    Plant type III polyketide synthases (PKSs) form a superfamily of biosynthetic enzymes involved in the production of a plethora of polyketide-derived natural products important for ecological adaptations and the fitness of land plants. Moreover, tremendous interest in bioengineering of type III PKSs to produce high-value compounds is increasing. Compared to type I and type II PKSs, which form either large modular protein complexes or dissociable molecular assemblies, type III PKSs exist as smaller homodimeric proteins, technically more amenable for detailed quantitative biochemical and phylogenetic analyses. In this chapter, we summarize a collection of approaches, including bioinformatics, genetics, protein crystallography, in vitro biochemistry, and mutagenesis, together affording a comprehensive interrogation of the structure-function-evolutionary relationships in the plant type III PKS family.

  19. Impact of volcanism on the evolution of Lake Van (eastern Anatolia) III: Periodic (Nemrut) vs. episodic (Süphan) explosive eruptions and climate forcing reflected in a tephra gap between ca. 14 ka and ca. 30 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmincke, Hans-Ulrich; Sumita, Mari

    2014-09-01

    Fifteen Lateglacial to Holocene rhyolitic, dominantly primary tephra layers piston-cored and drilled (ICDP Paleovan drilling project) in western Lake Van (eastern Anatolia, Turkey) were precisely correlated to either of the two adjacent and active large volcanoes Nemrut and Süphan based on shard textures, mineralogy and mineral and glass compositions. The young peralkaline (comenditic to pantelleritic) primary rhyolitic Nemrut tephras are characterized by anorthoclase, hedenbergitic to augitic clinopyroxene, fayalitic olivine, minor quartz, and rare accessory chevkinite and zircon. Phenocrysts in subalkaline primary rhyolitic Süphan tephras are chiefly oligoclase-labradorite, with minor K-rich sanidine in some, biotite, amphibole, hypersthene, rare augitic clinopyroxene, relatively common allanite and rare zircon. Two contrasting explosive eruptive modes are distinguished from each other: episodic (Süphan) and periodic (Nemrut). The Lateglacial Süphan tephra swarm covers a short time interval of ca. 338 years between ca. 13,078 vy BP and 12,740 vy BP, eruptions having occurred statistically every ca. 42 years with especially short intervals between V-11 (reworked) and V-14. Causes for the strongly episodic Süphan explosive behavior might include seismic triggering of a volcano-magma system unable to erupt explosively without the benefit of external triggering, as reflected in pervasive faulting preceding the Süphan tephra swarm. Seismic triggering may have caused the rise of more mafic ("trachyandesitic") parent magma, heating near-surface pockets of highly evolved magma - that might have formed silicic domes during this stage of volcano evolution - resulting in ascent and finally explosive fragmentation of magma essentially by external factors, probably significantly enhanced by magma-water/ice interaction. Explosive eruptions of the Nemrut volcano system, interpreted to be underlain by a large fractionating magma reservoir, follow a more periodic mode of (a

  20. How special is the biochemical function of native proteins?

    PubMed

    Skolnick, Jeffrey; Gao, Mu; Zhou, Hongyi

    2016-01-01

    Native proteins perform an amazing variety of biochemical functions, including enzymatic catalysis, and can engage in protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions that are essential for life. A key question is how special are these functional properties of proteins. Are they extremely rare, or are they an intrinsic feature? Comparison to the properties of compact conformations of artificially generated compact protein structures selected for thermodynamic stability but not any type of function, the artificial (ART) protein library, demonstrates that a remarkable number of the properties of native-like proteins are recapitulated. These include the complete set of small molecule ligand-binding pockets and most protein-protein interfaces. ART structures are predicted to be capable of weakly binding metabolites and cover a significant fraction of metabolic pathways, with the most enriched pathways including ancient ones such as glycolysis. Native-like active sites are also found in ART proteins. A small fraction of ART proteins are predicted to have strong protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions. Overall, it appears that biochemical function is an intrinsic feature of proteins which nature has significantly optimized during evolution. These studies raise questions as to the relative roles of specificity and promiscuity in the biochemical function and control of cells that need investigation.

  1. The Energy Costs of Insulators in Biochemical Networks

    PubMed Central

    Barton, John P.; Sontag, Eduardo D.

    2013-01-01

    Complex networks of biochemical reactions, such as intracellular protein signaling pathways and genetic networks, are often conceptualized in terms of modules—semiindependent collections of components that perform a well-defined function and which may be incorporated in multiple pathways. However, due to sequestration of molecular messengers during interactions and other effects, collectively referred to as retroactivity, real biochemical systems do not exhibit perfect modularity. Biochemical signaling pathways can be insulated from impedance and competition effects, which inhibit modularity, through enzymatic futile cycles that consume energy, typically in the form of ATP. We hypothesize that better insulation necessarily requires higher energy consumption. We test this hypothesis through a combined theoretical and computational analysis of a simplified physical model of covalent cycles, using two innovative measures of insulation, as well as a possible new way to characterize optimal insulation through the balancing of these two measures in a Pareto sense. Our results indicate that indeed better insulation requires more energy. While insulation may facilitate evolution by enabling a modular plug-and-play interconnection architecture, allowing for the creation of new behaviors by adding targets to existing pathways, our work suggests that this potential benefit must be balanced against the metabolic costs of insulation necessarily incurred in not affecting the behavior of existing processes. PMID:23528097

  2. Diagnosis of hyperandrogenism: biochemical criteria.

    PubMed

    Stanczyk, Frank Z

    2006-06-01

    Biochemical derangements in ovarian, adrenal, and peripheral androgen production and metabolism play an important role in underlying causes of hyperandrogenism. Specific diagnostic serum markers such as testosterone (total) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), respectively, may be helpful in the diagnosis of ovarian and adrenal hyperandrogenism, respectively. Validated immunoassays or mass spectrometry assays should be used to quantify testosterone, DHEAS and other principal androgens. Free testosterone measurements, determined by equilibrium dialysis or the calculated method, are advocated for routine evaluation of more subtle forms of hyperandrogenism. The skin, with its pilosebaceous units (PSUs), is an important site of active androgen production. A key regulator in PSUs is 5alpha-reductase, which transforms testosterone or androstenedione to dihydrotestosterone (DHT). DHT in blood is not effective in indicating the presence of hyperandrogenism. However, distal metabolites of DHT have been shown to be good markers of clinical manifestations of hirsutism, acne and alopecia. Assays for these peripheral markers need improvement for routine clinical testing.

  3. Biochemical nature of Russell Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Francesca Mossuto, Maria; Ami, Diletta; Anelli, Tiziana; Fagioli, Claudio; Maria Doglia, Silvia; Sitia, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Professional secretory cells produce and release abundant proteins. Particularly in case of mutations and/or insufficient chaperoning, these can aggregate and become toxic within or amongst cells. Immunoglobulins (Ig) are no exception. In the extracellular space, certain Ig-L chains form fibrils causing systemic amyloidosis. On the other hand, Ig variants lacking the first constant domain condense in dilated cisternae of the early secretory compartment, called Russell Bodies (RB), frequently observed in plasma cell dyscrasias, autoimmune diseases and chronic infections. RB biogenesis can be recapitulated in lymphoid and non-lymphoid cells by expressing mutant Ig-μ, providing powerful models to investigate the pathophysiology of endoplasmic reticulum storage disorders. Here we analyze the aggregation propensity and the biochemical features of the intra- and extra-cellular Ig deposits in human cells, revealing β-aggregated features for RB. PMID:26223695

  4. Biochemical nature of Russell Bodies.

    PubMed

    Mossuto, Maria Francesca; Ami, Diletta; Anelli, Tiziana; Fagioli, Claudio; Doglia, Silvia Maria; Sitia, Roberto

    2015-07-30

    Professional secretory cells produce and release abundant proteins. Particularly in case of mutations and/or insufficient chaperoning, these can aggregate and become toxic within or amongst cells. Immunoglobulins (Ig) are no exception. In the extracellular space, certain Ig-L chains form fibrils causing systemic amyloidosis. On the other hand, Ig variants lacking the first constant domain condense in dilated cisternae of the early secretory compartment, called Russell Bodies (RB), frequently observed in plasma cell dyscrasias, autoimmune diseases and chronic infections. RB biogenesis can be recapitulated in lymphoid and non-lymphoid cells by expressing mutant Ig-μ, providing powerful models to investigate the pathophysiology of endoplasmic reticulum storage disorders. Here we analyze the aggregation propensity and the biochemical features of the intra- and extra-cellular Ig deposits in human cells, revealing β-aggregated features for RB.

  5. Antithrombin III blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... AT III) is a protein that helps control blood clotting. A blood test can determine the amount of ... may mean you have an increased risk of blood clotting. This can occur when there is not enough ...

  6. Campylobacter jejuni Group III Phage CP81 Contains Many T4-Like Genes without Belonging to the T4-Type Phage Group: Implications for the Evolution of T4 Phages▿†

    PubMed Central

    Hammerl, Jens A.; Jäckel, Claudia; Reetz, Jochen; Beck, Sebastian; Alter, Thomas; Lurz, Rudi; Barretto, Caroline; Brüssow, Harald; Hertwig, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    CP81 is a virulent Campylobacter group III phage whose linear genome comprises 132,454 bp. At the nucleotide level, CP81 differs from other phages. However, a number of its structural and replication/recombination proteins revealed a relationship to the group II Campylobacter phages CP220/CPt10 and to T4-type phages. Unlike the T4-related phages, the CP81 genome does not contain conserved replication and virion modules. Instead, the respective genes are scattered throughout the phage genome. Moreover, most genes for metabolic enzymes of CP220/CPt10 are lacking in CP81. On the other hand, the CP81 genome contains nine similar genes for homing endonucleases which may be involved in the attrition of the conserved gene order for the virion core genes of T4-type phages. The phage apparently possesses an unusual modification of C or G bases. Efficient cleavage of its DNA was only achieved with restriction enzymes recognizing pure A/T sites. Uncommonly, phenol extraction leads to a significant loss of CP81 DNA from the aqueous layer, a property not yet described for other phages belonging to the T4 superfamily. PMID:21697478

  7. Computational optimization and biological evolution.

    PubMed

    Goryanin, Igor

    2010-10-01

    Modelling and optimization principles become a key concept in many biological areas, especially in biochemistry. Definitions of objective function, fitness and co-evolution, although they differ between biology and mathematics, are similar in a general sense. Although successful in fitting models to experimental data, and some biochemical predictions, optimization and evolutionary computations should be developed further to make more accurate real-life predictions, and deal not only with one organism in isolation, but also with communities of symbiotic and competing organisms. One of the future goals will be to explain and predict evolution not only for organisms in shake flasks or fermenters, but for real competitive multispecies environments.

  8. Evolution of chromospheres and coronae in solar mass stars - A far-ultraviolet and soft X-ray comparison of Arcturus /K2 III/ and Alpha Centauri A /G2 V/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayres, T. R.; Simon, T.; Linsky, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    IUE far-UV and Einstein Observatory soft X-ray observations for the red giant Arcturus and the nearby yellow dwarf Alpha-Centauri A, which are archetypes of solar mass stars in different stages of evolution, are compared. Evidence is found for neither coronal soft X-ray emission from the red giant, at surface flux levels of only 0.0006 that detected previously for the yellow dwarf, nor C II and IV resonance line emission at surface flux levels of only 0.02 those of the yellow dwarf. The resonance line upper limits and previous detections of the C II intersystem UV multiplet 0.01 near 2325 A provide evidence for an Arcturus outer atmosphere that is geometrically extended, tenuous and cool. The red giant has, in addition, a prominent cool stellar wind. An extensive tabulation of line identifications, widths and fluxes for the IUE far-UV echelle spectra of the two stars is given, and two competing explanations for the Wilson-Bappu effect are discussed.

  9. Evolution of chromospheres and coronae in solar mass stars - A far-ultraviolet and soft X-ray comparison of Arcturus /K2 III/ and Alpha Centauri A /G2 V/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayres, T. R.; Simon, T.; Linsky, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    IUE far-UV and Einstein Observatory soft X-ray observations for the red giant Arcturus and the nearby yellow dwarf Alpha-Centauri A, which are archetypes of solar mass stars in different stages of evolution, are compared. Evidence is found for neither coronal soft X-ray emission from the red giant, at surface flux levels of only 0.0006 that detected previously for the yellow dwarf, nor C II and IV resonance line emission at surface flux levels of only 0.02 those of the yellow dwarf. The resonance line upper limits and previous detections of the C II intersystem UV multiplet 0.01 near 2325 A provide evidence for an Arcturus outer atmosphere that is geometrically extended, tenuous and cool. The red giant has, in addition, a prominent cool stellar wind. An extensive tabulation of line identifications, widths and fluxes for the IUE far-UV echelle spectra of the two stars is given, and two competing explanations for the Wilson-Bappu effect are discussed.

  10. One of the possible mechanisms for the inhibition effect of Tb(III) on peroxidase activity in horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) treated with Tb(III).

    PubMed

    Guo, Shaofen; Cao, Rui; Lu, Aihua; Zhou, Qing; Lu, Tianhong; Ding, Xiaolan; Li, Chaojun; Huang, Xiaohua

    2008-05-01

    One of the possible mechanisms for the inhibition effect of Tb(III) on peroxidase activity in horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) treated with Tb(III) was investigated using some biophysical and biochemical methods. Firstly, it was found that a large amount of Tb(III) can be distributed on the cell wall, that some Tb(III) can enter into the horseradish cell, indicating that peroxidase was mainly distributed on cell wall, and thus that Tb(III) would interact with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in the plant. In addition, peroxidase bioactivity was decreased in the presence of Tb(III). Secondly, a new peroxidase-containing Tb(III) complex (Tb-HRP) was obtained from horseradish after treatment with Tb(III); the molecular mass of Tb-HRP is near 44 kDa and the pI is about 8.80. Thirdly, the electrocatalytic activity of Tb-HRP is much lower than that of HRP obtained from horseradish without treatment with Tb(III). The decrease in the activity of Tb-HRP is due to the destruction (unfolding) of the conformation in Tb-HRP. The planarity of the heme active center in the Tb-HRP molecule was increased and the extent of exposure of Fe(III) in heme was decreased, leading to inhibition of the electron transfer. The microstructure change in Tb-HRP might be the result of the inhibition effect of Tb(III) on peroxidase activity in horseradish.

  11. Serum Biochemical Phenotypes in the Domestic Dog.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Mei; Hadox, Erin; Szladovits, Balazs; Garden, Oliver A

    2016-01-01

    The serum or plasma biochemical profile is essential in the diagnosis and monitoring of systemic disease in veterinary medicine, but current reference intervals typically take no account of breed-specific differences. Breed-specific hematological phenotypes have been documented in the domestic dog, but little has been published on serum biochemical phenotypes in this species. Serum biochemical profiles of dogs in which all measurements fell within the existing reference intervals were retrieved from a large veterinary database. Serum biochemical profiles from 3045 dogs were retrieved, of which 1495 had an accompanying normal glucose concentration. Sixty pure breeds plus a mixed breed control group were represented by at least 10 individuals. All analytes, except for sodium, chloride and glucose, showed variation with age. Total protein, globulin, potassium, chloride, creatinine, cholesterol, total bilirubin, ALT, CK, amylase, and lipase varied between sexes. Neutering status significantly impacted all analytes except albumin, sodium, calcium, urea, and glucose. Principal component analysis of serum biochemical data revealed 36 pure breeds with distinctive phenotypes. Furthermore, comparative analysis identified 23 breeds with significant differences from the mixed breed group in all biochemical analytes except urea and glucose. Eighteen breeds were identified by both principal component and comparative analysis. Tentative reference intervals were generated for breeds with a distinctive phenotype identified by comparative analysis and represented by at least 120 individuals. This is the first large-scale analysis of breed-specific serum biochemical phenotypes in the domestic dog and highlights potential genetic components of biochemical traits in this species.

  12. Biochemical transformation of solid carbonaceous material

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Mow S.; Premuzic, Eugene T.

    2001-09-25

    A method of biochemically transforming macromolecular compounds found in solid carbonaceous materials, such as coal is provided. The preparation of new microorganisms, metabolically weaned through challenge growth processes to biochemically transform solid carbonaceous materials at extreme temperatures, pressures, pH, salt and toxic metal concentrations is also disclosed.

  13. Serum Biochemical Phenotypes in the Domestic Dog

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Mei; Hadox, Erin; Szladovits, Balazs; Garden, Oliver A.

    2016-01-01

    The serum or plasma biochemical profile is essential in the diagnosis and monitoring of systemic disease in veterinary medicine, but current reference intervals typically take no account of breed-specific differences. Breed-specific hematological phenotypes have been documented in the domestic dog, but little has been published on serum biochemical phenotypes in this species. Serum biochemical profiles of dogs in which all measurements fell within the existing reference intervals were retrieved from a large veterinary database. Serum biochemical profiles from 3045 dogs were retrieved, of which 1495 had an accompanying normal glucose concentration. Sixty pure breeds plus a mixed breed control group were represented by at least 10 individuals. All analytes, except for sodium, chloride and glucose, showed variation with age. Total protein, globulin, potassium, chloride, creatinine, cholesterol, total bilirubin, ALT, CK, amylase, and lipase varied between sexes. Neutering status significantly impacted all analytes except albumin, sodium, calcium, urea, and glucose. Principal component analysis of serum biochemical data revealed 36 pure breeds with distinctive phenotypes. Furthermore, comparative analysis identified 23 breeds with significant differences from the mixed breed group in all biochemical analytes except urea and glucose. Eighteen breeds were identified by both principal component and comparative analysis. Tentative reference intervals were generated for breeds with a distinctive phenotype identified by comparative analysis and represented by at least 120 individuals. This is the first large-scale analysis of breed-specific serum biochemical phenotypes in the domestic dog and highlights potential genetic components of biochemical traits in this species. PMID:26919479

  14. Ribonuclease III mechanisms of double-stranded RNA cleavage.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Allen W

    2014-01-01

    Double-stranded(ds) RNA has diverse roles in gene expression and regulation, host defense, and genome surveillance in bacterial and eukaryotic cells. A central aspect of dsRNA function is its selective recognition and cleavage by members of the ribonuclease III (RNase III) family of divalent-metal-ion-dependent phosphodiesterases. The processing of dsRNA by RNase III family members is an essential step in the maturation and decay of coding and noncoding RNAs, including miRNAs and siRNAs. RNase III, as first purified from Escherichia coli, has served as a biochemically well-characterized prototype, and other bacterial orthologs provided the first structural information. RNase III family members share a unique fold (RNase III domain) that can dimerize to form a structure that binds dsRNA and cleaves phosphodiesters on each strand, providing the characteristic 2 nt, 3'-overhang product ends. Ongoing studies are uncovering the functions of additional domains, including, inter alia, the dsRNA-binding and PAZ domains that cooperate with the RNase III domain to select target sites, regulate activity, confer processivity, and support the recognition of structurally diverse substrates. RNase III enzymes function in multicomponent assemblies that are regulated by diverse inputs, and at least one RNase III-related polypeptide can function as a noncatalytic, dsRNA-binding protein. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the mechanisms of catalysis and target site selection of RNase III family members, and also addresses less well understood aspects of these enzymes and their interactions with dsRNA. © 2013 The Authors. WIREs RNA published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Type III burst pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Zongjun; Fu, Qijun; Lu, Quankang

    2000-05-01

    We present a special solar radio burst detected on 5 January 1994 using the multi-channel (50) spectrometer (1.0-2.0 GHz) of the Beijing Astronomical Observatory (BAO). Sadly, the whole event could not be recorded since it had a broader bandwidth than the limit range of the instrument. The important part was obtained, however. The event is composed of a normal drift type III burst on the lower frequency side and a reverse drift type III burst appearing almost simultaneously on the high side. We call the burst type III a burst pair. It is a typical characteristic of two type III bursts that they are morphologically symmetric about some frequency from 1.64 GHz to 1.78 GHz on the dynamic spectra records, which indicates that there are two different electron beams from the same acceleration region travelling simultaneously in opposite directions (upward and downward). A magnetic reconnection mode is a nice interpretation of type III burst pair since the plasma beta β~=0.01 is much less than 1 and the beams have velocity of about 1.07×10^8 cm s^-1 after leaving the reconnection region if we assume that the ambient magnetic field strength is about 100 G.

  16. Type III burst pair.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zongjun, Ning; Fu, Qijun; Quankang, Lu

    2000-05-01

    Presents a special solar radio burst detected on 5 January 1994 using the multi-channel (50) spectrometer (1.0 - 2.0 GHz) of the Beijing Astronomical Observatory. Sadly, the whole event could not be recorded since it had a broader bandwidth than the limit range of the instrument. The important part was obtained, however. The event is composed of a normal drift type III burst on the lower frequency side and a reverse drift type III burst appearing almost simultaneously on the high side. The authors call the burst type III a burst pair. It is a typical characteristic of two type III bursts that they are morphologically symmetric about some frequency from 1.64 GHz to 1.78 GHz on the dynamic spectra records, which indicates that there are two different electron beams from the same acceleration region travelling simultaneously in opposite directions (upward and downward). A magnetic reconnection mode is an interpretation of type III burst pair.

  17. The chemical master equation approach to nonequilibrium steady-state of open biochemical systems: linear single-molecule enzyme kinetics and nonlinear biochemical reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Qian, Hong; Bishop, Lisa M

    2010-09-20

    We develop the stochastic, chemical master equation as a unifying approach to the dynamics of biochemical reaction systems in a mesoscopic volume under a living environment. A living environment provides a continuous chemical energy input that sustains the reaction system in a nonequilibrium steady state with concentration fluctuations. We discuss the linear, unimolecular single-molecule enzyme kinetics, phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle (PdPC) with bistability, and network exhibiting oscillations. Emphasis is paid to the comparison between the stochastic dynamics and the prediction based on the traditional approach based on the Law of Mass Action. We introduce the difference between nonlinear bistability and stochastic bistability, the latter has no deterministic counterpart. For systems with nonlinear bistability, there are three different time scales: (a) individual biochemical reactions, (b) nonlinear network dynamics approaching to attractors, and (c) cellular evolution. For mesoscopic systems with size of a living cell, dynamics in (a) and (c) are stochastic while that with (b) is dominantly deterministic. Both (b) and (c) are emergent properties of a dynamic biochemical network; We suggest that the (c) is most relevant to major cellular biochemical processes such as epi-genetic regulation, apoptosis, and cancer immunoediting. The cellular evolution proceeds with transitions among the attractors of (b) in a "punctuated equilibrium" manner.

  18. The Chemical Master Equation Approach to Nonequilibrium Steady-State of Open Biochemical Systems: Linear Single-Molecule Enzyme Kinetics and Nonlinear Biochemical Reaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Hong; Bishop, Lisa M.

    2010-01-01

    We develop the stochastic, chemical master equation as a unifying approach to the dynamics of biochemical reaction systems in a mesoscopic volume under a living environment. A living environment provides a continuous chemical energy input that sustains the reaction system in a nonequilibrium steady state with concentration fluctuations. We discuss the linear, unimolecular single-molecule enzyme kinetics, phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle (PdPC) with bistability, and network exhibiting oscillations. Emphasis is paid to the comparison between the stochastic dynamics and the prediction based on the traditional approach based on the Law of Mass Action. We introduce the difference between nonlinear bistability and stochastic bistability, the latter has no deterministic counterpart. For systems with nonlinear bistability, there are three different time scales: (a) individual biochemical reactions, (b) nonlinear network dynamics approaching to attractors, and (c) cellular evolution. For mesoscopic systems with size of a living cell, dynamics in (a) and (c) are stochastic while that with (b) is dominantly deterministic. Both (b) and (c) are emergent properties of a dynamic biochemical network; We suggest that the (c) is most relevant to major cellular biochemical processes such as epi-genetic regulation, apoptosis, and cancer immunoediting. The cellular evolution proceeds with transitions among the attractors of (b) in a “punctuated equilibrium” manner. PMID:20957107

  19. Biochemical genetic markers in sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Glaszmann, J C; Fautret, A; Noyer, J L; Feldmann, P; Lanaud, C

    1989-10-01

    Isozyme variation was used to identify biochemical markers of potential utility in sugarcane genetics and breeding. Electrophoretic polymorphism was surveyed for nine enzymes among 39 wild and noble sugarcane clones, belonging to the species most closely related to modern varieties. Up to 114 distinct bands showing presence versus absence type of variation were revealed and used for qualitative characterization of the materials. Multivariate analysis of the data isolated the Erianthus clone sampled and separated the Saccharum spontaneum clones from the S. robustum and S. officinarum clones; the latter two were not differentiated from one another. The analysis of self-progenies of a 2n=112 S. spontaneum and of a commercial variety showed examples of mono- and polyfactorial segregations. Within the progeny of the variety, co-segregation of two isozymes frequent in S. spontaneum led to them being assigned to a single chromosome initially contributed by a S. spontaneum donor. This illustrates how combined survey of ancestral species and segregation analysis in modern breeding materials should permit using the lack of interspecific cross-over to establish linkage groups in a sugarcane genome.

  20. Influence of low-frequency vibration on changes of biochemical parameters of living rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasprzak, Cezary; Damijan, Zbigniew; Panuszka, Ryszard

    2004-05-01

    The aim of the research was to investigate how some selected biochemical parameters of living rats depend on exposure of low-frequency vibrations. Experiments were run on 30 Wistar rats randomly segregated into three groups: (I) 20 days old (before puberty), (II) 70th day after; (III) control group. The exposure was repeated seven times, for 3 h, at the same time of day. Vibrations applied during the first tests of the experiment had acceleration 1.22 m/s2 and frequency 20 Hz. At the 135th day the rats' bones were a subject of morphometric/biochemical examination. The results of biochemical tests proved decrease in LDL and HDL cholesterol levels for exposed rats as well as the Ca contents in blood plasma. There was evident increasing of Ca in blood plasma in exposed rats for frequency of exposition.

  1. Biochemical and physiological processes associated with the differential ozone response in ozone-tolerant and sensitive soybean genotypes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biochemical and physiological traits of two soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] genotypes that differ in sensitivity to ozone (O3) were investigated to determine the possible basis for the differential response. Fiskeby III (O3-tolerant) and Mandarin (Ottawa) (O3-sensitive) were grown in a greenhouse ...

  2. HERMES III source characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Radasky, W.A. ); Halbleib, J. ); Nunan, S. )

    1991-01-01

    The Distant Light Program sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency (RAEE) is directed toward understanding the response of electronic systems to Source Region EMP (SREMP) and will result in the development of proven system hardening and validation techniques for SREMP. This program relies very strongly on testing in above ground test (AGT) simulators such as the HERMES III gamma ray simulator at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This paper describes theoretical and experimental efforts aimed at understanding the gamma ray flux produced by HERMES III in terms of its time dependence, spatial variation and spectrum. As part of this characterization, the calibration of various measuring devices must be considered. This paper describes the progress made in characterizing the HERMES III radiation output through December of 1990.

  3. Fusion Power Demonstration III

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.D.

    1985-07-01

    This is the third in the series of reports covering the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. This volume considers the FPD-III configuration that incorporates an octopole end plug. As compared with the quadrupole end-plugged designs of FPD-I and FPD-II, this octopole configuration reduces the number of end cell magnets and shortens the minimum ignition length of the central cell. The end-cell plasma length is also reduced, which in turn reduces the size and cost of the end cell magnets and shielding. As a contiuation in the series of documents covering the FPD, this report does not stand alone as a design description of FPD-III. Design details of FPD-III subsystems that do not differ significantly from those of the FPD-II configuration are not duplicated in this report.

  4. Silencing, Positive Selection and Parallel Evolution: Busy History of Primate Cytochromes c

    PubMed Central

    Pierron, Denis; Opazo, Juan C.; Heiske, Margit; Papper, Zack; Uddin, Monica; Chand, Gopi; Wildman, Derek E.; Romero, Roberto; Goodman, Morris; Grossman, Lawrence I.

    2011-01-01

    Cytochrome c (cyt c) participates in two crucial cellular processes, energy production and apoptosis, and unsurprisingly is a highly conserved protein. However, previous studies have reported for the primate lineage (i) loss of the paralogous testis isoform, (ii) an acceleration and then a deceleration of the amino acid replacement rate of the cyt c somatic isoform, and (iii) atypical biochemical behavior of human cyt c. To gain insight into the cause of these major evolutionary events, we have retraced the history of cyt c loci among primates. For testis cyt c, all primate sequences examined carry the same nonsense mutation, which suggests that silencing occurred before the primates diversified. For somatic cyt c, maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses yielded the same tree topology. The evolutionary analyses show that a fast accumulation of non-synonymous mutations (suggesting positive selection) occurred specifically on the anthropoid lineage root and then continued in parallel on the early catarrhini and platyrrhini stems. Analysis of evolutionary changes using the 3D structure suggests they are focused on the respiratory chain rather than on apoptosis or other cyt c functions. In agreement with previous biochemical studies, our results suggest that silencing of the cyt c testis isoform could be linked with the decrease of primate reproduction rate. Finally, the evolution of cyt c in the two sister anthropoid groups leads us to propose that somatic cyt c evolution may be related both to COX evolution and to the convergent brain and body mass enlargement in these two anthropoid clades. PMID:22028846

  5. Biochemical kinetics in changing volumes.

    PubMed

    Pawłowski, Piotr H; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr

    2004-01-01

    The need of taking into account the change of compartment volume when developing chemical kinetics analysis inside the living cell is discussed. Literature models of a single enzymatic Michaelis-Menten process, glycolytic oscillations, and mitotic cyclin oscillations were tested with appropriate theoretical extension in the direction of volume modification allowance. Linear and exponential type of volume increase regimes were compared. Due to the above, in a growing cell damping of the amplitude, phase shift, and time pattern deformation of the metabolic rhythms considered were detected, depending on the volume change character. The performed computer simulations allow us to conclude that evolution of the cell volume can be an essential factor of the chemical kinetics in a growing cell. The phenomenon of additional metabolite oscillations caused by the periodic cell growth and division was theoretically predicted and mathematically described. Also, the hypothesis of the periodized state in the growing cell as the generalization of the steady-state was formulated.

  6. Summary of Session III

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.A.

    2002-06-19

    This is a summary of the talks presented in Session III ''Simulations of Electron-Cloud Build Up'' of the Mini-Workshop on Electron-Cloud Simulations for Proton and Positron Beams ECLOUD-02, held at CERN, 15-18 April 2002.

  7. CITY III Director's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Envirometrics, Inc., Washington, DC.

    CITY III is a computer-assisted simulation game which allows the participants to make decisions affecting various aspects of the economic, governmental, and social sectors of a simulated urban area. The game director selects one of five possible starting city configurations, may set a number of conditions in the city before the start of play, and…

  8. The Apple III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ditlea, Steve

    1982-01-01

    Describes and evaluates the features, performance, peripheral devices, available software, and capabilities of the Apple III microcomputer. The computer's operating system, its hardware, and the commercially produced software it accepts are discussed. Specific applications programs for financial planning, accounting, and word processing are…

  9. BES-III distributed computing status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, S. D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Korenkov, V. V.; Li, W. D.; Lin, T.; Ma, Z. T.; Nicholson, C.; Pelevanyuk, I. S.; Suo, B.; Trofimov, V. V.; Tsaregorodtsev, A. U.; Uzhinskiy, A. V.; Yan, T.; Yan, X. F.; Zhang, X. M.; Zhemchugov, A. S.

    2016-09-01

    The BES-III experiment at the Institute of High Energy Physics (Beijing, China) is aimed at the precision measurements in e+e- annihilation in the energy range from 2.0 till 4.6 GeV. The world's largest samples of J/psi and psi' events and unique samples of XYZ data have been already collected. The expected increase of the data volume in the coming years required a significant evolution of the computing model, namely shift from a centralized data processing to a distributed one. This report summarizes a current design of the BES-III distributed computing system, some of key decisions and experience gained during 2 years of operations.

  10. [Biochemical aspects of chronic rheumatic inflammation].

    PubMed

    Delbrück, A

    1975-01-01

    Morphological phenomena in rheumatoid arthritis are closely correlated to the biochemical aberrations of connective tissue metabolism. Both, morphological and biochemical analysis of the altered tissue portions demonstrate evidence for uncontrolled proliferation resp. metabolism similar to human and experimental malignoma. The present state of biochemical knowledge in this field permits to describe the metabolic state of the afflicted tissue by means of enzyme activity and substrate pattern and to draw some conclusions in respect to the pathogenesis of inflammatory processes involved in chronic rheumatic diseases.

  11. Disconnecting XRCC1 and DNA ligase III.

    PubMed

    Katyal, Sachin; McKinnon, Peter J

    2011-07-15

    DNA strand break repair is essential for the prevention of multiple human diseases, particularly those which feature neuropathology. To further understand the pathogenesis of these syndromes, we recently developed animal models in which the DNA single-strand break repair (SSBR) components, XRCC1 and DNA Ligase III (LIG3), were inactivated in the developing nervous system. Although biochemical evidence suggests that inactivation of XRCC1 and LIG3 should share common biological defects, we found profound phenotypic differences between these two models, implying distinct biological roles for XRCC1 and LIG3 during DNA repair. Rather than a key role in nuclear DNA repair, we found LIG3 function was central to mitochondrial DNA maintenance. Instead, our data indicate that DNA Ligase 1 is the main DNA ligase for XRCC1-mediated DNA repair. These studies refine our understanding of DNA SSBR and the etiology of neurological disease.

  12. Disconnecting XRCC1 and DNA ligase III

    PubMed Central

    Katyal, Sachin

    2011-01-01

    DNA strand break repair is essential for the prevention of multiple human diseases, particularly those which feature neuropathology. To further understand the pathogenesis of these syndromes, we recently developed animal models in which the DNA single-strand break repair (SSBR) components, XRCC1 and DNA Ligase III (LIG3), were inactivated in the developing nervous system. Although biochemical evidence suggests that inactivation of XRCC1 and LIG3 should share common biological defects, we found profound phenotypic differences between these two models, implying distinct biological roles for XRCC1 and LIG3 during DNA repair. Rather than a key role in nuclear DNA repair, we found LIG3 function was central to mitochondrial DNA maintenance. Instead, our data indicate that DNA Ligase 1 is the main DNA ligase for XRCC1-mediated DNA repair. These studies refine our understanding of DNA SSBR and the etiology of neurological disease. PMID:21636980

  13. Photon track evolution.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A D

    2005-01-01

    Given the time scale of biological, biochemical, biophysical and physical effects in a radiation exposure of living tissue, the first physical stage can be considered to be independent of time. All the physical interactions caused by the incident photons happen at the same starting time. From this point of view it would seem that the evolution of photon tracks is not a relevant topic for analysis; however, if the photon track is considered as a sequence of several interactions, there are several steps until the total degradation of the energy of the primary photon. We can characterise the photon track structure by the probability p(E,j), that is, the probability that a photon with energy E suffers j secondary interactions. The aim of this work is to analyse the photon track structure by considering j as a step of the photon track evolution towards the total degradation of the photon energy. Low energy photons (<150 keV) are considered, with water phantoms and half-extended geometry. The photon track evolution concept is presented and compared with the energy deposition along the track and also with the spatial distribution of the several steps in the photon track.

  14. Simulation of Biochemical Pathway Adaptability Using Evolutionary Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Bosl, W J

    2005-01-26

    The systems approach to genomics seeks quantitative and predictive descriptions of cells and organisms. However, both the theoretical and experimental methods necessary for such studies still need to be developed. We are far from understanding even the simplest collective behavior of biomolecules, cells or organisms. A key aspect to all biological problems, including environmental microbiology, evolution of infectious diseases, and the adaptation of cancer cells is the evolvability of genomes. This is particularly important for Genomes to Life missions, which tend to focus on the prospect of engineering microorganisms to achieve desired goals in environmental remediation and climate change mitigation, and energy production. All of these will require quantitative tools for understanding the evolvability of organisms. Laboratory biodefense goals will need quantitative tools for predicting complicated host-pathogen interactions and finding counter-measures. In this project, we seek to develop methods to simulate how external and internal signals cause the genetic apparatus to adapt and organize to produce complex biochemical systems to achieve survival. This project is specifically directed toward building a computational methodology for simulating the adaptability of genomes. This project investigated the feasibility of using a novel quantitative approach to studying the adaptability of genomes and biochemical pathways. This effort was intended to be the preliminary part of a larger, long-term effort between key leaders in computational and systems biology at Harvard University and LLNL, with Dr. Bosl as the lead PI. Scientific goals for the long-term project include the development and testing of new hypotheses to explain the observed adaptability of yeast biochemical pathways when the myosin-II gene is deleted and the development of a novel data-driven evolutionary computation as a way to connect exploratory computational simulation with hypothesis

  15. Chemical Properties And Toxicity of Chromium(III) Nutritional Supplements

    SciTech Connect

    Levina, A.; Lay, P.A.

    2009-05-19

    The status of Cr(III) as an essential micronutrient for humans is currently under question. No functional Cr(III)-containing biomolecules have been definitively described as yet, and accumulated experience in the use of Cr(III) nutritional supplements (such as [Cr(pic){sub 3}], where pic = 2-pyridinecarboxylato) has shown no measurable benefits for nondiabetic people. Although the use of large doses of Cr(III) supplements may lead to improvements in glucose metabolism for type 2 diabetics, there is a growing concern over the possible genotoxicity of these compounds, particularly of [Cr(pic){sub 3}]. The current perspective discusses chemical transformations of Cr(III) nutritional supplements in biological media, with implications for both beneficial and toxic actions of Cr(III) complexes, which are likely to arise from the same biochemical mechanisms, dependent on concentrations of the reactive species. These species include: (1) partial hydrolysis products of Cr(III) nutritional supplements, which are capable of binding to biological macromolecules and altering their functions; and (2) highly reactive Cr(VI/V/IV) species and organic radicals, formed in reactions of Cr(III) with biological oxidants. Low concentrations of these species are likely to cause alterations in cell signaling (including enhancement of insulin signaling) through interactions with the active centers of regulatory enzymes in the cell membrane or in the cytoplasm, while higher concentrations are likely to produce genotoxic DNA lesions in the cell nucleus. These data suggest that the potential for genotoxic side-effects of Cr(III) complexes may outweigh their possible benefits as insulin enhancers, and that recommendations for their use as either nutritional supplements or antidiabetic drugs need to be reconsidered in light of these recent findings.

  16. Biochemical Oscillations and Cellular Rhythms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldbeter, Albert; Berridge, Foreword by M. J.

    1997-04-01

    1. Introduction; Part I. Glycolytic Oscillations: 2. Oscillatory enzymes: simple periodic behaviour in an allosteric model for glycolytic oscillations; Part II. From Simple to Complex Oscillatory Behaviour; 3. Birhythmicity: coexistence between two stable rhythms; 4. From simple periodic behaviour to complex oscillations, including bursting and chaos; Part III. Oscillations Of Cyclic Amo In Dictyostelium Cells: 5. Models for the periodic synthesis and relay of camp signals in Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae; 6. Complex oscillations and chaos in the camp signalling system of Dictyostelium; 7. The onset of camp oscillations in Dictyostelium as a model for the ontogenesis of biological rhythms; Part IV. Pulsatile Signalling In Intercellular Communication: 8. Function of the rhythm of intercellular communication in Dictyostelium. Link with pulsatile hormone secretion; Part V. Calcium Oscillations: 9. Oscillations and waves of intracellular calcium; Part VI. The Mitotic Oscillator: 10. Modelling the mitotic oscillator driving the cell division cycle; Part VII. Circadian Rhythms: 11. Towards a model for circadian oscillations in the Drosophila period protein (PER); 12. Conclusions and perspectives; References.

  17. Iron(III)-salen damages DNA and induces apoptosis in human cell via mitochondrial pathway.

    PubMed

    Woldemariam, Getachew A; Mandal, Subhrangsu S

    2008-04-01

    We synthesized a water soluble Fe(III)-salen complex and investigated its biochemical effects on DNA in vitro and on cultured human cells. We showed that Fe(III)-salen produces free radicals in the presence of reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT) and induces DNA damage in vitro. Interestingly, upon treatment with Fe(III)-salen at concentration as low as 10microM, HEK293 human cells showed morphological changes, nuclear fragmentation, and nuclear condensation that are typical features of apoptotic cell death. The cytotoxicity measurement showed that IC(50) of Fe(III)-salen is 2.0microM for HEK293 cells. Furthermore, treatment with Fe(III)-salen resulted in translocation of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytosol affecting mitochondrial membrane permeability. Our results demonstrated that Fe(III)-salen not only damages DNA in vitro, but also induces apoptosis in human cells via mitochondrial pathway.

  18. A case study of evolutionary computation of biochemical adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    François, Paul; Siggia, Eric D.

    2008-06-01

    Simulations of evolution have a long history, but their relation to biology is questioned because of the perceived contingency of evolution. Here we provide an example of a biological process, adaptation, where simulations are argued to approach closer to biology. Adaptation is a common feature of sensory systems, and a plausible component of other biochemical networks because it rescales upstream signals to facilitate downstream processing. We create random gene networks numerically, by linking genes with interactions that model transcription, phosphorylation and protein-protein association. We define a fitness function for adaptation in terms of two functional metrics, and show that any reasonable combination of them will yield the same adaptive networks after repeated rounds of mutation and selection. Convergence to these networks is driven by positive selection and thus fast. There is always a path in parameter space of continuously improving fitness that leads to perfect adaptation, implying that the actual mutation rates we use in the simulation do not bias the results. Our results imply a kinetic view of evolution, i.e., it favors gene networks that can be learned quickly from the random examples supplied by mutation. This formulation allows for deductive predictions of the networks realized in nature.

  19. Cryogenian evolution of stigmasteroid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Yosuke; Poshibaeva, Aleksandra; Meredith, William; Snape, Colin; Poshibaev, Vladimir; Versteegh, Gerard J. M.; Kuznetsov, Nikolay; Leider, Arne; van Maldegem, Lennart; Neumann, Mareike; Naeher, Sebastian; Moczydłowska, Małgorzata; Brocks, Jochen J.; Jarrett, Amber J. M.; Tang, Qing; Xiao, Shuhai; McKirdy, David; Das, Supriyo Kumar; Alvaro, José Javier; Sansjofre, Pierre; Hallmann, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Sedimentary hydrocarbon remnants of eukaryotic C26–C30 sterols can be used to reconstruct early algal evolution. Enhanced C29 sterol abundances provide algal cell membranes a density advantage in large temperature fluctuations. Here, we combined a literature review with new analyses to generate a comprehensive inventory of unambiguously syngenetic steranes in Neoproterozoic rocks. Our results show that the capacity for C29 24-ethyl-sterol biosynthesis emerged in the Cryogenian, that is, between 720 and 635 million years ago during the Neoproterozoic Snowball Earth glaciations, which were an evolutionary stimulant, not a bottleneck. This biochemical innovation heralded the rise of green algae to global dominance of marine ecosystems and highlights the environmental drivers for the evolution of sterol biosynthesis. The Cryogenian emergence of C29 sterol biosynthesis places a benchmark for verifying older sterane signatures and sets a new framework for our understanding of early algal evolution. PMID:28948220

  20. Cluster Physics & Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Daisuke; Arnaud, Monique; Dasadia, Sarthak; McDonald, Michael; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Morandi, Andrea

    Recent advances in X-ray and microwave observations have provided unprecedented insights into the structure and evolution of the hot X-ray emitting plasma from their cores to the virialization region in outskirts of galaxy clusters. Recent Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) surveys (ACT, Planck, SPT) have provided new cluster catalogs, significantly expanding coverage of the mass-redshift plane, while Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray follow-up programs have improved our understanding of cluster physics and evolution as well as the surveys themselves. However, the current cluster-based cosmological constraints are still limited by uncertainties in cluster astrophysics. In order to exploit the statistical power of the current and upcoming X-ray and microwave cluster surveys, it is critical to improve our understanding of the structure and evolution of the hot X-ray emitting intracluster medium (ICM). In this session, we discussed recent advances in observations and simulations of galaxy clusters, with highlights on (i) the evolution of ICM profiles and scaling relations, (ii) physical processes operating in the outskirts of galaxy clusters, and (iii) impact of mergers on the ICM structure in groups and clusters.

  1. [Biochemical aspects of fetal hypoxia].

    PubMed

    Biringer, K; Danko, J; Dókus, K; Mat'asová, K; Zibolen, M; Pullmann, R

    2011-09-01

    To evaluate validity of biochemical diagnostic methods of fetal hypoxia. A case-control study. Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine, Comenius University, Martin, Slovak Republic. We included 67 patients, and they were retrospectively divided into group of controls (n=36), and studied group (n=31) according to pH in umbilical artery (UA) <7.15. Acid-base parameters were assessed with Rapidlab 248, Bayer Healthcare LLC, East Walpole, USA. We determined criterion for metabolic acidosis (MAC) as pH UA <7.15, resp. base deficit (BD) UA >12 mmol/l. Postpartal lactate concentration in umbilical vein (UV) and UA was determined with lactatemeter Accutrend Lactate, Roche Diagnostics, Switzerland. Quantitative assessment of fetal human protein S100B was provided with ELISA (Sangtec 100 ELISA, DiaSorin Inc., Stillwater, Minnesota, USA). Fetal erythropoietin concentration in UV was examined with immunoenzymatic assessment Access EPO (Beckman Coulter, Inc., Fullerton, CA, USA). histograms, Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, Mann-Whitney test, Spearman's rho; statistical significance: p<0.05, Receiver Operating Characteristic curves, Area Under the Curve. The best correlation was between fetal acid-base parameters and lactate in UA (p<0.0005). Significant correlation was between EPO in UV, and protein S100B in UV (p<0.05). EPO in UV significantly correlated with lactate in UA (p<0.05). Correlation between EPO in UV and protein S100B was not significant. According to ROC curves in prediction of fetal hypoxia, we found an excellent accuracy (AUC>0.9) for lactate in UA, good accuracy (AUC>0.7) had EPO in UV. Results for protein S100B were not significant. The highest sensitivity had EPO in UV, while the highest specificity has had lactate in UA. An indisputable evidence of labor management quality is the fetal metabolic status. On the basis of our results, the suitable clinical markers are lactate and EPO, in addition to acid-base parameters.

  2. Biochemical thermodynamics: applications of Mathematica.

    PubMed

    Alberty, Robert A

    2006-01-01

    reactants. Thus loading this package makes available 774 mathematical functions for these properties. These functions can be added and subtracted to obtain changes in these properties in biochemical reactions and apparent equilibrium constants.

  3. Pacific Barrier Radar III (PACBAR III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. D.; Sigler, J. D.

    1983-11-01

    The Pacific Barrier (PACBAR III) C-band radar is being installed at the Western Space and Missile Center to furnish Revolution 0 detection of foreign launches. Previously installed on a tracking ship, the upgraded system will also identify and target space objects, maintain a catalog, and cover maneuvers and decay of space objects. Nominal operation will comprise a search of a predesignated 15 deg azimuth with the capability of detecting a 6 sq m target in a 400 km orbit, track spacecraft in orbits up to 800 km altitude, have a range resolution of about 80 yd, provide realtime payload and rocket body discrimination, and transmit two-way digital message traffic between the Center and NORAD in Cheyenne Mt. Interlaced vertical and horizontal pulses will augment the search and acquisition capabilities, and the antenna will have a 140 deg plunge range. The transmitter will function at 5.4-5.65 GHz, 320 p/sec, with a peak power of 0.8 MW, and the system will have a nonambiguous range of 32,768 nmi.

  4. Hyper III on ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The Hyper III was a full-scale lifting-body remotely piloted research vehicle (RPRV) built at what was then the NASA Flight Research Center located at Edwards Air Force Base in Southern California. The Flight Research Center (FRC--as Dryden was named from 1959 until 1976) already had experience with testing small-scale aircraft using model-airplane techniques, but the first true remotely piloted research vehicle was the Hyper III, which flew only once in December 1969. At that time, the Center was engaged in flight research with a variety of reentry shapes called lifting bodies, and there was a desire both to expand the flight research experience with maneuverable reentry vehicles, including a high-performance, variable-geometry craft, and to investigate a remotely piloted flight research technique that made maximum use of a research pilot's skill and experience by placing him 'in the loop' as if he were in the cockpit. (There have been, as yet, no female research pilots assigned to Dryden.) The Hyper III as originally conceived was a stiletto-shaped lifting body that had resulted from a study at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. It was one of a number of hypersonic, cross-range reentry vehicles studied at Langley. (Hypersonic means Mach 5--five times the speed of sound--or faster; cross-range means able to fly a considerable distance to the left or right of the initial reentry path.) The FRC added a small, deployable, skewed wing to compensate for the shape's extremely low glide ratio. Shop personnel built the 32-foot-long Hyper III and covered its tubular frame with dacron, aluminum, and fiberglass, for about $6,500. Hyper III employed the same '8-ball' attitude indicator developed for control-room use when flying the X-15, two model-airplane receivers to command the vehicle's hydraulic controls, and a telemetry system (surplus from the X-15 program) to transmit 12 channels of data to the ground not only for display and control but for data

  5. Hyper III on ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The Hyper III was a full-scale lifting-body remotely piloted research vehicle (RPRV) built at what was then the NASA Flight Research Center located at Edwards Air Force Base in Southern California. The Flight Research Center (FRC--as Dryden was named from 1959 until 1976) already had experience with testing small-scale aircraft using model-airplane techniques, but the first true remotely piloted research vehicle was the Hyper III, which flew only once in December 1969. At that time, the Center was engaged in flight research with a variety of reentry shapes called lifting bodies, and there was a desire both to expand the flight research experience with maneuverable reentry vehicles, including a high-performance, variable-geometry craft, and to investigate a remotely piloted flight research technique that made maximum use of a research pilot's skill and experience by placing him 'in the loop' as if he were in the cockpit. (There have been, as yet, no female research pilots assigned to Dryden.) The Hyper III as originally conceived was a stiletto-shaped lifting body that had resulted from a study at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. It was one of a number of hypersonic, cross-range reentry vehicles studied at Langley. (Hypersonic means Mach 5--five times the speed of sound--or faster; cross-range means able to fly a considerable distance to the left or right of the initial reentry path.) The FRC added a small, deployable, skewed wing to compensate for the shape's extremely low glide ratio. Shop personnel built the 32-foot-long Hyper III and covered its tubular frame with dacron, aluminum, and fiberglass, for about $6,500. Hyper III employed the same '8-ball' attitude indicator developed for control-room use when flying the X-15, two model-airplane receivers to command the vehicle's hydraulic controls, and a telemetry system (surplus from the X-15 program) to transmit 12 channels of data to the ground not only for display and control but for data

  6. A Program on Biochemical and Biomedical Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San, Ka-Yiu; McIntire, Larry V.

    1989-01-01

    Presents an introduction to the Biochemical and Biomedical Engineering program at Rice University. Describes the development of the academic and enhancement programs, including organizational structure and research project titles. (YP)

  7. A Program on Biochemical and Biomedical Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San, Ka-Yiu; McIntire, Larry V.

    1989-01-01

    Presents an introduction to the Biochemical and Biomedical Engineering program at Rice University. Describes the development of the academic and enhancement programs, including organizational structure and research project titles. (YP)

  8. Contrast in the Photoelectric Effect of Organic and Biochemical Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Birrell, G. B.; Burke, C.; Dehlinger, P.; Griffith, O. H.

    1973-01-01

    The photoelectric effect can provide the physical basis for a new method of mapping organic and biological surfaces. The technique, photoelectron microscopy, is similar to fluorescence microscopy using incident ultraviolet light except that photoejected electrons form the image of the specimen surface. In this work the minimum wavelengths of incident light required to produce an image were determined for the molecules 3,6-bis(dimethylamino)acridine (acridine orange) (I), benzo[a]pyrene (II), N,N,N′,N′-tetraphenylbenzidine (III), and copper phthalocyanine (IV). The photoelectron image thresholds for these compounds are 220 (I), 215 (II), 220 (III), and 240 nm (IV), all ±5 nm. Contrast of I-IV with respect to typical protein, lipid, nucleic acid, and polysaccharide surfaces was examined over the wavelength range 240-180 nm. The low magnification micrographs exhibited bright areas corresponding to I-IV but dark regions for the biochemical surfaces. The high contrast suggests the feasibility of performing extrinsic photoelectron microscopy experiments through selective labeling of sites on biological surfaces. ImagesFIGURE 3 PMID:4704486

  9. Novel Therapeutic Role for Dipeptidyl Peptidase III in the Treatment of Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiaoling; Shimizu, Akio; Kurita, Souichi; Zankov, Dimitar P; Takeuchi, Keisuke; Yasuda-Yamahara, Mako; Kume, Shinji; Ishida, Tetsuo; Ogita, Hisakazu

    2016-09-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase III (DPP III) cleaves dipeptide residues from the N terminus of polypeptides ranging from 3 to 10 amino acids in length and is implicated in pathophysiological processes through the breakdown of certain oligopeptides or their fragments. In this study, we newly identified the biochemical properties of DPP III for angiotensin II (Ang II), which consists of 8 amino acids. DPP III quickly and effectively digested Ang II with Km = 3.7×10(-6) mol/L. In the in vivo experiments, DPP III remarkably reduced blood pressure in Ang II-infused hypertensive mice without alteration of heart rate. DPP III did not affect hemodynamics in noradrenalin-induced hypertensive mice or normotensive mice, suggesting specificity for Ang II. When DPP III was intravenously injected every other day for 4 weeks after Ang II osmotic minipump implantation in mice, Ang II-induced cardiac fibrosis and hypertrophy were significantly attenuated. This DPP III effect was at least similar to that caused by an angiotensin receptor blocker candesartan. Furthermore, administration of DPP III dramatically reduced the increase in urine albumin excretion and kidney injury and inflammation markers caused by Ang II infusion. Both DPP III and candesartan administration showed slight additive inhibition in the albumin excretion. These results reveal a novel potential use of DPP III in the treatment of hypertension and its protective effects on hypertension-sensitive organs, such as the heart and kidneys. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Biochemical-Pathway Diversity in Archaebacteria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-30

    characteristic of much or all of the Gram-positive lineage of eubacteria . We have extended the enzymological base of information to include organisms...to compare the biochemical diversitv within the archaebacteria to the biochemical diversity already known or now emerging within the eubacteria . RAI...INALL: In eubacteria aromatic-pathway character states are exceedingly diverse. A given feature will cluster at a hierarchical level ot phylogeny that

  11. [Biochemical diagnostics of fatal opium intoxication].

    PubMed

    Papyshev, I P; Astashkina, O G; Tuchik, E S; Nikolaev, B S; Cherniaev, A L

    2013-01-01

    Biochemical diagnostics of fatal opium intoxication remains a topical problem in forensic medical science and practice. We investigated materials obtained in the course of forensic medical expertise of the cases of fatal opium intoxication. The study revealed significant differences between myoglobin levels in blood, urine, myocardium, and skeletal muscles. The proposed approach to biochemical diagnostics of fatal opium intoxication enhances the accuracy and the level of evidence of expert conclusions.

  12. Effect of Population III Multiplicity on Dark Star Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacy, Athena; Pawlik, Andreas H.; Bromm, Volker; Loeb, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    We numerically study the mutual interaction between dark matter (DM) and Population III (Pop III) stellar systems in order to explore the possibility of Pop III dark stars within this physical scenario. We perform a cosmological simulation, initialized at z approx. 100, which follows the evolution of gas and DM. We analyze the formation of the first mini halo at z approx. 20 and the subsequent collapse of the gas to densities of 10(exp 12)/cu cm. We then use this simulation to initialize a set of smaller-scale 'cut-out' simulations in which we further refine the DM to have spatial resolution similar to that of the gas. We test multiple DM density profiles, and we employ the sink particle method to represent the accreting star-forming region. We find that, for a range of DM configurations, the motion of the Pop III star-disk system serves to separate the positions of the protostars with respect to the DM density peak, such that there is insufficient DM to influence the formation and evolution of the protostars for more than approx. 5000 years. In addition, the star-disk system causes gravitational scattering of the central DM to lower densities, further decreasing the influence of DM over time. Any DM-powered phase of Pop III stars will thus be very short-lived for the typical multiple system, and DM will not serve to significantly prolong the life of Pop III stars.

  13. Lower glycolysis carries a higher flux than any biochemically possible alternative

    PubMed Central

    Court, Steven J.; Waclaw, Bartlomiej; Allen, Rosalind J.

    2015-01-01

    The universality of many pathways of core metabolism suggests a strong role for evolutionary selection, but it remains unclear whether existing pathways have been selected from a large or small set of biochemical possibilities. To address this question, we construct in silico all possible biochemically feasible alternatives to the trunk pathway of glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, one of the most highly conserved pathways in metabolism. We show that, even though a large number of alternative pathways exist, the alternatives carry lower flux than the real pathway under typical physiological conditions. We also find that if physiological conditions were different, different pathways could outperform those found in nature. Together, our results demonstrate how thermodynamic and biophysical constraints restrict the biochemical alternatives that are open to evolution, and suggest that the existing trunk pathway of glycolysis and gluconeogenesis may represent a maximal flux solution. PMID:26416228

  14. A general method for modeling biochemical and biomedical response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Roberto; Lerd Ng, Jia; Hughes, Tyler; Abou Ghantous, Michel; Bouhali, Othmane; Arredouani, Abdelilah; Allen, Roland

    2012-10-01

    The impressive achievements of biomedical science have come mostly from experimental research with human subjects, animal models, and sophisticated laboratory techniques. Additionally, theoretical chemistry has been a major aid in designing new drugs. Here we introduce a method which is similar to others already well known in theoretical systems biology, but which specifically addresses biochemical changes as the human body responds to medical interventions. It is common in systems biology to use first-order differential equations to model the time evolution of various chemical concentrations, and we as physicists can make a significant impact through designing realistic models and then solving the resulting equations. Biomedical research is rapidly advancing, and the technique presented in this talk can be applied in arbitrarily large models containing tens, hundreds, or even thousands of interacting species, to determine what beneficial effects and side effects may result from pharmaceuticals or other medical interventions.

  15. Effects of axions on Population III stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choplin, Arthur; Coc, Alain; Meynet, Georges; Olive, Keith A.; Uzan, Jean-Philippe; Vangioni, Elisabeth

    2017-09-01

    Aims: Following the renewed interest in axions as a dark matter component, we revisit the effects of energy loss by axion emission on the evolution of the first generation of stars. These stars with zero metallicity are assumed to be massive, more compact, and hotter than subsequent generations. It is hence important to extend previous studies, which were restricted to solar metallicity stars. Methods: Our analysis first compares the evolution of solar metallicity 8, 10, and 12 M⊙ stars to previous work. We then calculate the evolution of 8 zero-metallicity stars with and without axion losses and with masses ranging from 20 to 150 M⊙. Results: For the solar metallicity models, we confirm the disappearance of the blue-loop phase for a value of the axion-photon coupling of gaγ = 10-10 GeV-1. We show that for gaγ = 10-10 GeV-1, the evolution of Population III stars is not much affected by axion losses, except within the range of masses 80-130 M⊙. Such stars show significant differences in both their tracks within the Tc-ρc diagram and their central composition (in particular 20Ne and 24Mg). We discuss the origin of these modifications from the stellar physics point of view, and also their potential observational signatures.

  16. Teaching Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryner, Jeanna

    2005-01-01

    Eighty years after the famous 1925 Scopes "monkey trial," which tested a teacher's right to discuss the theory of evolution in the classroom, evolution--and its most recent counterview, called "intelligent design"--are in the headlines again, and just about everyone seems to have an opinion. This past July, President Bush weighed in, telling…

  17. FTS evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Provost, David E.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on flight telerobotic servicer evolution are presented. Topics covered include: paths for FTS evolution; frequently performed actions; primary task states; EPS radiator panel installation; generic task definitions; path planning; non-contact alignment; contact planning and control; and human operator interface.

  18. FTS evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Provost, David E.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on flight telerobotic servicer evolution are presented. Topics covered include: paths for FTS evolution; frequently performed actions; primary task states; EPS radiator panel installation; generic task definitions; path planning; non-contact alignment; contact planning and control; and human operator interface.

  19. Epistasis in protein evolution

    PubMed Central

    Starr, Tyler N.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The structure, function, and evolution of proteins depend on physical and genetic interactions among amino acids. Recent studies have used new strategies to explore the prevalence, biochemical mechanisms, and evolutionary implications of these interactions—called epistasis—within proteins. Here we describe an emerging picture of pervasive epistasis in which the physical and biological effects of mutations change over the course of evolution in a lineage‐specific fashion. Epistasis can restrict the trajectories available to an evolving protein or open new paths to sequences and functions that would otherwise have been inaccessible. We describe two broad classes of epistatic interactions, which arise from different physical mechanisms and have different effects on evolutionary processes. Specific epistasis—in which one mutation influences the phenotypic effect of few other mutations—is caused by direct and indirect physical interactions between mutations, which nonadditively change the protein's physical properties, such as conformation, stability, or affinity for ligands. In contrast, nonspecific epistasis describes mutations that modify the effect of many others; these typically behave additively with respect to the physical properties of a protein but exhibit epistasis because of a nonlinear relationship between the physical properties and their biological effects, such as function or fitness. Both types of interaction are rampant, but specific epistasis has stronger effects on the rate and outcomes of evolution, because it imposes stricter constraints and modulates evolutionary potential more dramatically; it therefore makes evolution more contingent on low‐probability historical events and leaves stronger marks on the sequences, structures, and functions of protein families. PMID:26833806

  20. The Mark III VLBI System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, A. E. E.; Whitney, A. R.; Levine, J. I.; Nesman, E. F.; Webber, J. C.; Hinteregger, H. F.

    1988-01-01

    Geodetic measurements have errors in centimeter range. Collection of three reports describes both equipment and results of some measurements taken with Mark III very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) system. Has demonstrated high accuracy over short baselines, where phase-delay measurements used. Advanced hardware, called Mark III A, developed to improve system performance and efficiency. Original Mark III hardware and III A subsystem upgrades developed as part of NASA Crustal Dynamics Project at Haystack Observatory.

  1. Chemical evolution and the origin of life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oro, J.

    1983-01-01

    A review is presented of recent advances made in the understanding of the formation of carbon compounds in the universe and the occurrence of processes of chemical evolution. Topics discussed include the principle of evolutionary continuity, evolution as a fundamental principle of the physical universe, the nuclear synthesis of biogenic elements, organic cosmochemistry and interstellar molecules, the solar nebula and the solar system in chemical evolution, the giant planets and Titan in chemical evolution, and comets and their interaction with the earth. Also examined are carbonaceous chondrites, environment of the primitive earth, energy sources available on the primitive earth, the synthesis of biochemical monomers and oligomers, the abiotic transcription of nucleotides, unified prebiotic and enzymatic mechanisms, phospholipids and membranes, and protobiological evolution.

  2. Chemical evolution and the origin of life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oro, J.

    1983-01-01

    A review is presented of recent advances made in the understanding of the formation of carbon compounds in the universe and the occurrence of processes of chemical evolution. Topics discussed include the principle of evolutionary continuity, evolution as a fundamental principle of the physical universe, the nuclear synthesis of biogenic elements, organic cosmochemistry and interstellar molecules, the solar nebula and the solar system in chemical evolution, the giant planets and Titan in chemical evolution, and comets and their interaction with the earth. Also examined are carbonaceous chondrites, environment of the primitive earth, energy sources available on the primitive earth, the synthesis of biochemical monomers and oligomers, the abiotic transcription of nucleotides, unified prebiotic and enzymatic mechanisms, phospholipids and membranes, and protobiological evolution.

  3. Behind the scene with the fathead team: Part III. Molecular, biochemical, and in vitro analyses

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a research team focused on aquatic toxicity testing using fathead minnows as a model species, this presentation is the third in the three-part series, giving an overview of the types of field and laboratory studies as well as sample processing our team conducts at the ...

  4. Behind the scene with the fathead team: Part III. Molecular, biochemical, and in vitro analyses

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a research team focused on aquatic toxicity testing using fathead minnows as a model species, this presentation is the third in the three-part series, giving an overview of the types of field and laboratory studies as well as sample processing our team conducts at the ...

  5. Medical treatment for biochemical relapse after radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Quero, L; Hennequin, C

    2014-10-01

    This article's purpose was to review the medical data justifying the use of a medical treatment for biochemical relapse after external beam radiotherapy. The MEDLINE database was searched to identify relevant information with the following medical subject headings: "prostate cancer", "radiotherapy" and "biochemical relapse". Prognostic factors affecting the overall survival of patients with a biochemical relapse after external beam radiotherapy have been identified: short prostate specific antigen (PSA)-doubling time (< 12 months), high PSA value (> 10 ng/mL) and short interval between treatment and biochemical relapse (< 18 months). If a second local treatment is not feasible, timing to initiate a salvage medical treatment is not defined. Particularly, randomized trials did not demonstrate a significant benefit of an early initiation of androgen deprivation treatment. Some retrospective studies suggest that an early androgen deprivation is justified if poor prognostic factors are found. However, if an androgen deprivation treatment is prescribed, intermittent schedule is non-inferior to a continuous administration and seems to offer a better quality of life. Many non-hormonal treatments have also been evaluated in this setting: only 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors could be proposed in some specific situations. In conclusion, the judicious use of a medical treatment for biochemical relapse is still debated. Given the natural history of this clinical situation, a simple surveillance is justified in many cases.

  6. Nonlinear biochemical signal processing via noise propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung Hyuk; Qian, Hong; Sauro, Herbert M.

    2013-10-01

    Single-cell studies often show significant phenotypic variability due to the stochastic nature of intra-cellular biochemical reactions. When the numbers of molecules, e.g., transcription factors and regulatory enzymes, are in low abundance, fluctuations in biochemical activities become significant and such "noise" can propagate through regulatory cascades in terms of biochemical reaction networks. Here we develop an intuitive, yet fully quantitative method for analyzing how noise affects cellular phenotypes based on identifying a system's nonlinearities and noise propagations. We observe that such noise can simultaneously enhance sensitivities in one behavioral region while reducing sensitivities in another. Employing this novel phenomenon we designed three biochemical signal processing modules: (a) A gene regulatory network that acts as a concentration detector with both enhanced amplitude and sensitivity. (b) A non-cooperative positive feedback system, with a graded dose-response in the deterministic case, that serves as a bistable switch due to noise-induced ultra-sensitivity. (c) A noise-induced linear amplifier for gene regulation that requires no feedback. The methods developed in the present work allow one to understand and engineer nonlinear biochemical signal processors based on fluctuation-induced phenotypes.

  7. Stellar evolution.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, H.-Y. (Editor); Muriel, A.

    1972-01-01

    Aspects of normal stellar evolution are discussed together with evolution near the main sequence, stellar evolution from main sequence to white dwarf or carbon ignition, the structure of massive main-sequence stars, and problems of stellar stability and stellar pulsation. Other subjects considered include variable stars, white dwarfs, close binaries, novae, early supernova luminosity, neutron stars, the photometry of field horizontal-branch stars, and stellar opacity. Transport mechanisms in stars are examined together with thermonuclear reactions and nucleosynthesis, the instability problem in nuclear burning shells, stellar coalescence, and intense magnetic fields in astrophysics. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  8. 40 CFR 158.2000 - Biochemical pesticides definition and applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides definition and...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2000 Biochemical pesticides definition and applicability. This subpart applies to all biochemical pesticides as defined in paragraphs (a...

  9. 40 CFR 158.2010 - Biochemical pesticides data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides data...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2010 Biochemical pesticides... required to support registration of biochemical pesticides. Sections 158.2080 through 158.2084 identify the...

  10. 40 CFR 158.2000 - Biochemical pesticides definition and applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides definition and...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2000 Biochemical pesticides definition and applicability. This subpart applies to all biochemical pesticides as defined in paragraphs (a...

  11. 40 CFR 158.2010 - Biochemical pesticides data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides data...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2010 Biochemical pesticides... required to support registration of biochemical pesticides. Sections 158.2080 through 158.2084 identify the...

  12. 40 CFR 158.2000 - Biochemical pesticides definition and applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides definition and...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2000 Biochemical pesticides definition and applicability. This subpart applies to all biochemical pesticides as defined in paragraphs (a...

  13. 40 CFR 158.2000 - Biochemical pesticides definition and applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides definition and...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2000 Biochemical pesticides definition and applicability. This subpart applies to all biochemical pesticides as defined in paragraphs (a...

  14. 40 CFR 158.2010 - Biochemical pesticides data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides data...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2010 Biochemical pesticides... required to support registration of biochemical pesticides. Sections 158.2080 through 158.2084 identify the...

  15. 40 CFR 158.2010 - Biochemical pesticides data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides data...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2010 Biochemical pesticides... required to support registration of biochemical pesticides. Sections 158.2080 through 158.2084 identify the...

  16. 40 CFR 158.2010 - Biochemical pesticides data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides data...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2010 Biochemical pesticides... required to support registration of biochemical pesticides. Sections 158.2080 through 158.2084 identify the...

  17. 40 CFR 158.2000 - Biochemical pesticides definition and applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides definition and...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2000 Biochemical pesticides definition and applicability. This subpart applies to all biochemical pesticides as defined in paragraphs (a...

  18. Type III Hyperlipoproteinaemia

    PubMed Central

    Borrie, Peter

    1969-01-01

    Eighteen patients with type III hyperlipoproteinaemia, diagnosed on the basis of skin lesions, serum lipids, and lipoprotein electrophoresis, have been fully investigated over a period of 15 years. The incidence of coronary artery disease was only slightly increased, and was not increased at all among first-degree relatives. Peripheral occlusive arterial disease was probably more common. An increased incidence of carbohydrate intolerance was found in neither the patients nor their relatives. The effects of treatment on the skin were uniformly good. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:5783124

  19. ESCRT-III on endosomes: new functions, new activation pathway.

    PubMed

    Woodman, Philip

    2016-01-15

    The multivesicular body (MVB) pathway sorts ubiquitinated membrane cargo to intraluminal vesicles (ILVs) within the endosome, en route to the lysosomal lumen. The pathway involves the sequential action of conserved protein complexes [endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs)], culminating in the activation by ESCRT-II of ESCRT-III, a membrane-sculpting complex. Although this linear pathway of ESCRT activation is widely accepted, a study by Luzio and colleagues in a recent issue of the Biochemical Journal suggests that there is greater complexity in ESCRT-III activation, at least for some MVB cargoes. They show that ubiquitin-dependent sorting of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I to the MVB requires the central ESCRT-III complex but does not involve either ESCRT-II or functional links between ESCRT-II and ESCRT-III. Instead, they propose that MHC class I utilizes histidine-domain protein tyrosine phosphatase (HD-PTP), a non-canonical ESCRT interactor, to promote ESCRT-III activation.

  20. Simulating Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stebbins, Robert C.; Allen, Brockenbrough

    1975-01-01

    Described are simulations that can be used to illustrate evolution by natural selection. Suggestions for simulating phenomena such as adaptive radiation, color match to background and vision of predators are offered. (BR)

  1. Biochemical alterations induced by oral subchronic exposure to fipronil, fluoride and their combination in buffalo calves.

    PubMed

    Gill, Kamalpreet Kaur; Dumka, Vinod Kumar

    2013-11-01

    The effects of various pesticides and minerals on biochemical parameters have been explored in different species, but hardly any data exist regarding the combined toxicological effect of pesticides and minerals on these parameters in animals. The present study investigated the effects of fipronil and fluoride co-exposure on biochemical parameters in buffalo calves. Twenty-four healthy male buffalo calves divided into four groups were treated for 98 consecutive days. Group I, receiving no treatment served as the control. Animals of groups II and III were orally administered with fipronil @ 0.5mg/kg/day and sodium fluoride (NaF) @ 6.67 mg/kg/day, respectively, for 98 days. An additional group IV was co-administered fipronil and NaF at the same dosages as groups II and III. Administration of fipronil alone produced mild toxic signs, significant elevation in plasma proteins, blood glucose, blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and significant decline in the plasma cholesterol levels. NaF exposure produced toxic signs specifically of muscle weakness and brown and black discoloration of teeth. Significant elevation was seen in whole blood cholinesterase, BUN and creatinine levels. However, it produced significant decline in blood glucose, cholesterol and plasma protein levels. Combined exposure to fipronil and sodium fluoride produced toxic signs with greater intensity while biochemical alterations produced were similar to those that were produced by their individual exposures.

  2. eQuilibrator--the biochemical thermodynamics calculator.

    PubMed

    Flamholz, Avi; Noor, Elad; Bar-Even, Arren; Milo, Ron

    2012-01-01

    The laws of thermodynamics constrain the action of biochemical systems. However, thermodynamic data on biochemical compounds can be difficult to find and is cumbersome to perform calculations with manually. Even simple thermodynamic questions like 'how much Gibbs energy is released by ATP hydrolysis at pH 5?' are complicated excessively by the search for accurate data. To address this problem, eQuilibrator couples a comprehensive and accurate database of thermodynamic properties of biochemical compounds and reactions with a simple and powerful online search and calculation interface. The web interface to eQuilibrator (http://equilibrator.weizmann.ac.il) enables easy calculation of Gibbs energies of compounds and reactions given arbitrary pH, ionic strength and metabolite concentrations. The eQuilibrator code is open-source and all thermodynamic source data are freely downloadable in standard formats. Here we describe the database characteristics and implementation and demonstrate its use.

  3. Biochemical Removal of HAP Precursors From Coal

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, G.; Tucker, L.; Richards, J.

    1997-07-01

    This project addresses DOE`s interest in advanced concepts for controlling emissions of air toxics from coal-fired utility boilers. We are determining the feasibility of developing a biochemical process for the precombustion removal of substantial percentages of 13 inorganic hazardous air pollutant (HAP) precursors from coal. These HAP precursors are Sb, As, Be, Cd, Cr, Cl, Co, F, Pb, Hg, Mn, Ni, and Se. Although rapid physical coal cleaning is done routinely in preparation plants, biochemical processes for removal of HAP precursors from coal potentially offer advantages of deeper cleaning, more specificity, and less coal loss. Compared to chemical processes for coal cleaning, biochemical processes potentially offer lower costs and milder process conditions. Pyrite oxidizing bacteria, most notably Thiobacillusferrooxidans, are being evaluated in this project for their ability to remove HAP precursors from U.S. coals.

  4. Simulation of cellular biochemical system kinetics.

    PubMed

    Beard, Daniel A

    2011-01-01

    The goal of realistically and reliably simulating the biochemical processes underlying cellular function is achievable through a systematic approach that makes use of the broadest possible amount of in vitro and in vivo data, and is consistent with all applicable physical chemical theories. Progress will be facilitated by establishing: (1) a concrete self-consistent theoretical foundation for systems simulation; (2) extensive and accurate databases of thermodynamic properties of biochemical reactions; (3) parameterized and validated models of enzyme and transporter catalytic mechanisms that are consistent with physical chemical theoretical foundation; and (4) software tools for integrating all these concepts, data, and models into a cohesive representation of cellular biochemical systems. Ongoing initiatives are laying the groundwork for the broad-based community cooperation that will be necessary to pursue these elements of a strategic infrastructure for systems simulation on a large scale. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  5. eQuilibrator—the biochemical thermodynamics calculator

    PubMed Central

    Flamholz, Avi; Noor, Elad; Bar-Even, Arren; Milo, Ron

    2012-01-01

    The laws of thermodynamics constrain the action of biochemical systems. However, thermodynamic data on biochemical compounds can be difficult to find and is cumbersome to perform calculations with manually. Even simple thermodynamic questions like ‘how much Gibbs energy is released by ATP hydrolysis at pH 5?’ are complicated excessively by the search for accurate data. To address this problem, eQuilibrator couples a comprehensive and accurate database of thermodynamic properties of biochemical compounds and reactions with a simple and powerful online search and calculation interface. The web interface to eQuilibrator (http://equilibrator.weizmann.ac.il) enables easy calculation of Gibbs energies of compounds and reactions given arbitrary pH, ionic strength and metabolite concentrations. The eQuilibrator code is open-source and all thermodynamic source data are freely downloadable in standard formats. Here we describe the database characteristics and implementation and demonstrate its use. PMID:22064852

  6. Biochemical characteristics among Mycobacterium bovis BCG substrains.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Daisuke; Takii, Takemasa; Mukai, Tetsu; Makino, Masahiko; Yasuda, Emi; Horita, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Ryuji; Fujiwara, Akiko; Kanai, Keita; Kondo, Maki; Kawarazaki, Aya; Yano, Ikuya; Yamamoto, Saburo; Onozaki, Kikuo

    2010-05-01

    In order to evaluate the biochemical characteristics of 14 substrains of Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette Guérin (BCG) - Russia, Moreau, Japan, Sweden, Birkhaug, Danish, Glaxo, Mexico, Tice, Connaught, Montreal, Phipps, Australia and Pasteur - we performed eight different biochemical tests, including those for nitrate reduction, catalase, niacin accumulation, urease, Tween 80 hydrolysis, pyrazinamidase, p-amino salicylate degradation and resistance to thiophene 2-carboxylic acid hydrazide. Catalase activities of the substrains were all low. Data for nitrate reduction, niacin accumulation, Tween 80 hydrolysis, susceptibility to hydrogen peroxide and nitrate, and optimal pH for growth were all variable among these substrains. These findings suggest that the heterogeneities of biochemical characteristics are relevant to the differences in resistance of BCG substrains to environmental stress. The study also contributes to the re-evaluation of BCG substrains for use as vaccines.

  7. Geometry Genetics and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siggia, Eric

    2011-03-01

    Darwin argued that highly perfected organs such as the vertebrate eye could evolve by a series of small changes, each of which conferred a selective advantage. In the context of gene networks, this idea can be recast into a predictive algorithm, namely find networks that can be built by incremental adaptation (gradient search) to perform some task. It embodies a ``kinetic'' view of evolution where a solution that is quick to evolve is preferred over a global optimum. Examples of biochemical kinetic networks were evolved for temporal adaptation, temperature compensated entrainable clocks, explore-exploit trade off in signal discrimination, will be presented as well as networks that model the spatially periodic somites (vertebrae) and HOX gene expression in the vertebrate embryo. These models appear complex by the criterion of 19th century applied mathematics since there is no separation of time or spatial scales, yet they are all derivable by gradient optimization of simple functions (several in the Pareto evolution) often based on the Shannon entropy of the time or spatial response. Joint work with P. Francois, Physics Dept. McGill University. With P. Francois, Physics Dept. McGill University

  8. Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III), Data Release 8

    DOE Data Explorer

    Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and SDSS-II, the SDSS-III Collaboration is working to map the Milky Way, search for extrasolar planets, and solve the mystery of dark energy. SDSS-III's first release, Data Release 8 (DR8), became available in the first half of 2012. DR8 contains all the images ever taken by the SDSS telescope. Together, these images make up the largest color image of the sky ever made. A version of the DR8 image is shown to the right. DR8 also includes measurements for nearly 500 million stars, galaxies, and quasars, and spectra for nearly two million. All of DR8's images, spectra, and measurements are available to anyone online. You can browse through sky images, look up data for individual objects, or search for objects anywhere using any criteria. SDSS-III will collect data from 2008 to 2014, using the 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. SDSS-III consists of four surveys, each focused on a different scientific theme. These four surveys are: 1) Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS); 2) SEGUE-2 (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration); 3) The APO Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE); and 4) The Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS). [Copied with edits from http://www.sdss3.org/index.php

  9. Population III Hypernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smidt, Joseph; Whalen, Daniel J.; Wiggins, Brandon K.; Even, Wesley; Johnson, Jarrett L.; Fryer, Chris L.

    2014-12-01

    Population III supernovae have been of growing interest of late for their potential to directly probe the properties of the first stars, particularly the most energetic events that are visible near the edge of the observable universe. Until now, hypernovae, the unusually energetic Type Ib/c supernovae that are sometimes associated with gamma-ray bursts, have been overlooked as cosmic beacons at the highest redshifts. In this, the latest of a series of studies on Population III supernovae, we present numerical simulations of 25-50 M ⊙ hypernovae and their light curves done with the Los Alamos RAGE and SPECTRUM codes. We find that they will be visible at z = 10-15 to the James Webb Space Telescope and z = 4-5 to the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope, tracing star formation rates in the first galaxies and at the end of cosmological reionization. If, however, the hypernova crashes into a dense shell ejected by its progenitor, it is expected that a superluminous event will occur that may be seen at z ~ 20 in the first generation of stars.

  10. POPULATION III HYPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Smidt, Joseph; Whalen, Daniel J.; Wiggins, Brandon K.; Even, Wesley; Fryer, Chris L.; Johnson, Jarrett L.

    2014-12-20

    Population III supernovae have been of growing interest of late for their potential to directly probe the properties of the first stars, particularly the most energetic events that are visible near the edge of the observable universe. Until now, hypernovae, the unusually energetic Type Ib/c supernovae that are sometimes associated with gamma-ray bursts, have been overlooked as cosmic beacons at the highest redshifts. In this, the latest of a series of studies on Population III supernovae, we present numerical simulations of 25-50 M {sub ☉} hypernovae and their light curves done with the Los Alamos RAGE and SPECTRUM codes. We find that they will be visible at z = 10-15 to the James Webb Space Telescope and z = 4-5 to the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope, tracing star formation rates in the first galaxies and at the end of cosmological reionization. If, however, the hypernova crashes into a dense shell ejected by its progenitor, it is expected that a superluminous event will occur that may be seen at z ∼ 20 in the first generation of stars.

  11. Biochemical characterization of predicted Precambrian RuBisCO

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Patrick M.; Occhialini, Alessandro; Cameron, Jeffrey C.; Andralojc, P John; Parry, Martin A. J.; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.

    2016-01-01

    The antiquity and global abundance of the enzyme, RuBisCO, attests to the crucial and longstanding role it has played in the biogeochemical cycles of Earth over billions of years. The counterproductive oxygenase activity of RuBisCO has persisted over billions of years of evolution, despite its competition with the carboxylase activity necessary for carbon fixation, yet hypotheses regarding the selective pressures governing RuBisCO evolution have been limited to speculation. Here we report the resurrection and biochemical characterization of ancestral RuBisCOs, dating back to over one billion years ago (Gyr ago). Our findings provide an ancient point of reference revealing divergent evolutionary paths taken by eukaryotic homologues towards improved specificity for CO2, versus the evolutionary emphasis on increased rates of carboxylation observed in bacterial homologues. Consistent with these distinctions, in vivo analysis reveals the propensity of ancestral RuBisCO to be encapsulated into modern-day carboxysomes, bacterial organelles central to the cyanobacterial CO2 concentrating mechanism. PMID:26790750

  12. Biochemical characterization of predicted Precambrian RuBisCO.

    PubMed

    Shih, Patrick M; Occhialini, Alessandro; Cameron, Jeffrey C; Andralojc, P John; Parry, Martin A J; Kerfeld, Cheryl A

    2016-01-21

    The antiquity and global abundance of the enzyme, RuBisCO, attests to the crucial and longstanding role it has played in the biogeochemical cycles of Earth over billions of years. The counterproductive oxygenase activity of RuBisCO has persisted over billions of years of evolution, despite its competition with the carboxylase activity necessary for carbon fixation, yet hypotheses regarding the selective pressures governing RuBisCO evolution have been limited to speculation. Here we report the resurrection and biochemical characterization of ancestral RuBisCOs, dating back to over one billion years ago (Gyr ago). Our findings provide an ancient point of reference revealing divergent evolutionary paths taken by eukaryotic homologues towards improved specificity for CO2, versus the evolutionary emphasis on increased rates of carboxylation observed in bacterial homologues. Consistent with these distinctions, in vivo analysis reveals the propensity of ancestral RuBisCO to be encapsulated into modern-day carboxysomes, bacterial organelles central to the cyanobacterial CO2 concentrating mechanism.

  13. Biochemical Screening for in utero Drug Exposure.

    PubMed

    Wright, Tricia E

    2015-01-01

    Licit and illicit drug use is a common complication of pregnancy. Accurate information on drug use is difficult to obtain for many reasons as women fear self-disclosure or consenting for drug testing due to stigma, guilt, and fear of social and legal harm. As information about drug use is clinically very important, biochemical testing is an important adjunct to careful maternal history. In addition, research studies depend on accurate measures of exposure when reporting risks of a substance. This paper delineates available matrices for and methods of biochemical drug testing in pregnant women and neonates.

  14. [Experimental testing of micro biochemical analytical system].

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Wen, Zhi-yu; Wen, Zhong-quan; Xu, Yi; Li, Xia; Jiang, Zi-ping

    2005-03-01

    A micro biochemical analytical system based on a micro fiber spectrometer is introduced. Experiment was carried out to calibrate and test the analysis system. In the experiment, the absorption spectra of Fe2+ -ferroin solution bodies with different concentrations were obtained. The working curve shows a fine linearity of the analysis system. The authors also compared the experimental results obtained from 722-spectrometer and those from our analysis system. It was shown that their system can meet the requirement of practical use. This system also has many advantages, such as real-time whole spectrum analyzing and small volume, and is an ideal instrument for biochemical analysis.

  15. Formation pathway of Population III coalescing binary black holes through stable mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inayoshi, Kohei; Hirai, Ryosuke; Kinugawa, Tomoya; Hotokezaka, Kenta

    2017-07-01

    We study the formation of stellar mass binary black holes (BBHs) originating from Population III (PopIII) stars, performing stellar evolution simulations for PopIII binaries with mesa. We find that a significant fraction of PopIII binaries form massive BBHs through stable mass transfer between two stars in a binary, without experiencing common envelope phases. We investigate necessary conditions required for PopIII binaries to form coalescing BBHs with a semi-analytical model calibrated by the stellar evolution simulations. The BBH formation efficiency is estimated for two different initial conditions for PopIII binaries with large and small separations, respectively. Consequently, in both models, ˜10 per cent of the total PopIII binaries form BBHs only through stable mass transfer and ˜10 per cent of these BBHs merge due to gravitational wave emission within the Hubble time. Furthermore, the chirp mass of merging BBHs has a flat distribution over 15 ≲ Mchirp/M⊙ ≲ 35. This formation pathway of PopIII BBHs is presumably robust because stable mass transfer is less uncertain than common envelope evolution, which is the main formation channel for Population II BBHs. We also test the hypothesis that the BBH mergers detected by LIGO originate from PopIII stars using the total number of PopIII stars formed in the early universe as inferred from the optical depth measured by Planck. We conclude that the PopIII BBH formation scenario can explain the mass-weighted merger rate of the LIGO's O1 events with the maximal PopIII formation efficiency inferred from the Planck measurement, even without BBHs formed by unstable mass transfer or common envelope phases.

  16. SENER molten salt tower technology. Ouarzazate NOOR III case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Relloso, Sergio; Gutiérrez, Yolanda

    2017-06-01

    NOOR III 150 MWe project is the evolution of Gemasolar (19.9 MWe) to large scale Molten Salt Tower plants. With more than 5 years of operational experience, Gemasolar lessons learned have been the starting point for the optimization of this technology, considered the leader of potential cost reduction in CSP. In addition, prototypes of plant key components (heliostat and receiver) were manufactured and thoroughly tested before project launch in order to prove the new engineering solutions adopted. The SENER proprietary technology of NOOR III will be applied in the next Molten Salt Tower plants that will follow in other countries, such as South Africa, Chile and Australia.

  17. Emerging principles of regulatory evolution

    PubMed Central

    Prud'homme, Benjamin; Gompel, Nicolas; Carroll, Sean B.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the genetic and molecular mechanisms governing the evolution of morphology is a major challenge in biology. Because most animals share a conserved repertoire of body-building and -patterning genes, morphological diversity appears to evolve primarily through changes in the deployment of these genes during development. The complex expression patterns of developmentally regulated genes are typically controlled by numerous independent cis-regulatory elements (CREs). It has been proposed that morphological evolution relies predominantly on changes in the architecture of gene regulatory networks and in particular on functional changes within CREs. Here, we discuss recent experimental studies that support this hypothesis and reveal some unanticipated features of how regulatory evolution occurs. From this growing body of evidence, we identify three key operating principles underlying regulatory evolution, that is, how regulatory evolution: (i) uses available genetic components in the form of preexisting and active transcription factors and CREs to generate novelty; (ii) minimizes the penalty to overall fitness by introducing discrete changes in gene expression; and (iii) allows interactions to arise among any transcription factor and downstream CRE. These principles endow regulatory evolution with a vast creative potential that accounts for both relatively modest morphological differences among closely related species and more profound anatomical divergences among groups at higher taxonomical levels. PMID:17494759

  18. The luminosity of Population III star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSouza, Alexander L.; Basu, Shantanu

    2015-06-01

    We analyse the time evolution of the luminosity of a cluster of Population III protostars formed in the early Universe. We argue from the Jeans criterion that primordial gas can collapse to form a cluster of first stars that evolve relatively independently of one another (i.e. with negligible gravitational interaction). We model the collapse of individual protostellar clumps using non-axisymmetric numerical hydrodynamics simulations. Each collapse produces a protostar surrounded by a massive disc (i.e. Mdisc /M* ≳ 0.1), whose evolution we follow for a further 30-40 kyr. Gravitational instabilities result in the fragmentation and the formation of gravitationally bound clumps within the disc. The accretion of these fragments by the host protostar produces accretion and luminosity bursts on the order of 106 L⊙. Within the cluster, we show that a simultaneity of such events across several protostellar cluster members can elevate the cluster luminosity to 5-10 times greater than expected, and that the cluster spends ˜15 per cent of its star-forming history at these levels. This enhanced luminosity effect is particularly enabled in clusters of modest size with ≃10-20 members. In one such instance, we identify a confluence of burst events that raise the luminosity to nearly 1000 times greater than the cluster mean luminosity, resulting in L > 108 L⊙. This phenomenon arises solely through the gravitational-instability-driven episodic fragmentation and accretion that characterizes this early stage of protostellar evolution.

  19. Pseudo Class III malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hummayani, Fadia M.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of deep anterior crossbite is technically challenging due to the difficulty of placing traditional brackets with fixed appliances. This case report represents a none traditional treatment modality to treat deep anterior crossbite in an adult pseudo class III malocclusion complicated by severely retruded, supraerupted upper and lower incisors. Treatment was carried out in 2 phases. Phase I treatment was performed by removable appliance “modified Hawley appliance with inverted labial bow,” some modifications were carried out to it to suit the presented case. Positive overbite and overjet was accomplished in one month, in this phase with minimal forces exerted on the lower incisors. Whereas, phase II treatment was performed with fixed appliances (braces) to align teeth and have proper over bite and overjet and to close posterior open bite, this phase was accomplished within 11 month. PMID:27052290

  20. Gravitational Collapse and Neutrino Emission of Population III Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazato, Ken'ichiro; Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke; Yamada, Shoichi

    2006-07-01

    Population III (Pop III) stars are the first stars in the universe. They do not contain metals, and their formation and evolution may be different from that of stars of later generations. In fact, according to the theory of star formation, Pop III stars might have very massive components (~100-10000 Msolar). In this paper, we compute the spherically symmetric gravitational collapse of these Pop III massive stars. We solve the general relativistic hydrodynamics and neutrino transfer equations simultaneously, treating neutrino reactions in detail. Unlike supermassive stars (>~105 Msolar), the stars of concern in this paper become opaque to neutrinos. The collapse is simulated until after an apparent horizon is formed. We confirm that the neutrino transfer plays a crucial role in the dynamics of gravitational collapse and find also that the β-equilibration leads to a somewhat unfamiliar evolution of electron fraction. Contrary to the naive expectation, the neutrino spectrum does not become harder for more massive stars. This is mainly because the neutrino cooling is more efficient and the outer core is more massive as the stellar mass increases. Here the outer core is the outer part of the iron core falling supersonically. We also evaluate the flux of relic neutrinos from Pop III massive stars. As expected, the detection of these neutrinos is difficult for the currently operating detectors. However, if ever observed, the spectrum will enable us to obtain information on the formation history of Pop III stars. We investigate 18 models covering the mass range of 300-104 Msolar, making this study the most detailed numerical exploration of spherically symmetric gravitational collapse of Pop III massive stars. This will also serve as an important foundation for multidimensional investigations.

  1. Biochemical Applications in the Analytical Chemistry Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Cynthia; Ruttencutter, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    An HPLC and a UV-visible spectrophotometer are identified as instruments that helps to incorporate more biologically-relevant experiments into the course, in order to increase the students understanding of selected biochemistry topics and enhances their ability to apply an analytical approach to biochemical problems. The experiment teaches…

  2. Biochemical Applications in the Analytical Chemistry Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Cynthia; Ruttencutter, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    An HPLC and a UV-visible spectrophotometer are identified as instruments that helps to incorporate more biologically-relevant experiments into the course, in order to increase the students understanding of selected biochemistry topics and enhances their ability to apply an analytical approach to biochemical problems. The experiment teaches…

  3. 2009 Biochemical Conversion Platform Review Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, John

    2009-12-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program’s Biochemical Conversion platform review meeting, held on April 14-16, 2009, at the Sheraton Denver Downtown, Denver, Colorado.

  4. A Course in Biochemical Engineering Fundamentals (Revisited).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, J. E.; Ollis, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    Provides: (1) a glossary of terms used in biochemical engineering; (2) a list of key developments in the field; and (3) emphases placed in 15 topic areas in a course restructured on the basis of these developments. Topic areas include enzyme kinetics/applications, genetics and microbial control, transport phenomena, and others. (JN)

  5. Survey of Biochemical Education in Japanese Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kagawa, Yasuo

    1995-01-01

    Reports findings of questionnaires sent to faculty in charge of biochemical education in medical schools and other programs from dentistry to agriculture. Total class hours have declined since 1984. New trends include bioethics and computer-assisted learning. Tables show trends in lecture hours, lecture content, laboratory hours, core subject…

  6. Metabonomics and medicine: the Biochemical Oracle.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Steve; Holmes, Elaine; Carmichael, Paul

    2002-10-01

    Occasionally, a new idea emerges that has the potential to revolutionize an entire field of scientific endeavour. It is now within our grasp to be able to detect subtle perturbations within the phenomenally complex biochemical matrix of living organisms. The discipline of metabonomics promises an all-encompassing approach to understanding total, yet fundamental, changes occurring in disease processes, drug toxicity and cell function.

  7. Biochemical Approaches to Improved Nitrogen Fixation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Improving symbiotic nitrogen fixation by legumes has emerged again as an important topic on the world scene due to the energy crisis and lack of access to nitrogen fertilizer in developing countries. We have taken a biochemical genomics approach to improving symbiotic nitrogen fixation in legumes. L...

  8. Survey of Biochemical Education in Japanese Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kagawa, Yasuo

    1995-01-01

    Reports findings of questionnaires sent to faculty in charge of biochemical education in medical schools and other programs from dentistry to agriculture. Total class hours have declined since 1984. New trends include bioethics and computer-assisted learning. Tables show trends in lecture hours, lecture content, laboratory hours, core subject…

  9. The Biochemical Basis of Minimal Brain Dysfunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaywitz, Sally E.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Available from: C. V. Mosby Company 11830 Westline Industrial Drive St. Louis, Missouri 63141 The research review examines evidence suggesting a biochemical basis for minimal brain dysfunction (MBD), which includes both a relationship between MBD and metabolic abnormalities and a significant genetic influence on the disorder in children. (IM)

  10. Biochemical Thermodynamics under near Physiological Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendez, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    The recommendations for nomenclature and tables in Biochemical Thermodynamics approved by IUBMB and IUPAC in 1994 can be easily introduced after the chemical thermodynamic formalism. Substitution of the usual standard thermodynamic properties by the transformed ones in the thermodynamic equations, and the use of appropriate thermodynamic tables…

  11. Biochemical changes in the injured brain

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Seelora; Nag, Deb Sanjay; Swain, Amlan; Samaddar, Devi Prasad

    2017-01-01

    Brain metabolism is an energy intensive phenomenon involving a wide spectrum of chemical intermediaries. Various injury states have a detrimental effect on the biochemical processes involved in the homeostatic and electrophysiological properties of the brain. The biochemical markers of brain injury are a recent addition in the armamentarium of neuro-clinicians and are being increasingly used in the routine management of neuro-pathological entities such as traumatic brain injury, stroke, subarachnoid haemorrhage and intracranial space occupying lesions. These markers are increasingly being used in assessing severity as well as in predicting the prognostic course of neuro-pathological lesions. S-100 protein, neuron specific enolase, creatinine phosphokinase isoenzyme BB and myelin basic protein are some of the biochemical markers which have been proven to have prognostic and clinical value in the brain injury. While S-100, glial fibrillary acidic protein and ubiquitin C terminal hydrolase are early biomarkers of neuronal injury and have the potential to aid in clinical decision-making in the initial management of patients presenting with an acute neuronal crisis, the other biomarkers are of value in predicting long-term complications and prognosis in such patients. In recent times cerebral microdialysis has established itself as a novel way of monitoring brain tissue biochemical metabolites such as glucose, lactate, pyruvate, glutamate and glycerol while small non-coding RNAs have presented themselves as potential markers of brain injury for future. PMID:28289516

  12. Biochemical Thermodynamics under near Physiological Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendez, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    The recommendations for nomenclature and tables in Biochemical Thermodynamics approved by IUBMB and IUPAC in 1994 can be easily introduced after the chemical thermodynamic formalism. Substitution of the usual standard thermodynamic properties by the transformed ones in the thermodynamic equations, and the use of appropriate thermodynamic tables…

  13. Biochemical changes in the injured brain.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Seelora; Nag, Deb Sanjay; Swain, Amlan; Samaddar, Devi Prasad

    2017-02-26

    Brain metabolism is an energy intensive phenomenon involving a wide spectrum of chemical intermediaries. Various injury states have a detrimental effect on the biochemical processes involved in the homeostatic and electrophysiological properties of the brain. The biochemical markers of brain injury are a recent addition in the armamentarium of neuro-clinicians and are being increasingly used in the routine management of neuro-pathological entities such as traumatic brain injury, stroke, subarachnoid haemorrhage and intracranial space occupying lesions. These markers are increasingly being used in assessing severity as well as in predicting the prognostic course of neuro-pathological lesions. S-100 protein, neuron specific enolase, creatinine phosphokinase isoenzyme BB and myelin basic protein are some of the biochemical markers which have been proven to have prognostic and clinical value in the brain injury. While S-100, glial fibrillary acidic protein and ubiquitin C terminal hydrolase are early biomarkers of neuronal injury and have the potential to aid in clinical decision-making in the initial management of patients presenting with an acute neuronal crisis, the other biomarkers are of value in predicting long-term complications and prognosis in such patients. In recent times cerebral microdialysis has established itself as a novel way of monitoring brain tissue biochemical metabolites such as glucose, lactate, pyruvate, glutamate and glycerol while small non-coding RNAs have presented themselves as potential markers of brain injury for future.

  14. Biochemical reactions of ozone in plants

    Treesearch

    J. Brian Mudd

    1998-01-01

    Plants react biochemically to ozone in three phases: with constitutive chemicals in the apoplastic fluid and cell membranes; by forming messenger molecules by the affected constitutive materials (ethylene); and by responding to the messenger molecules with pathogenic RNAs and proteins. For instance, plant reactions with ozone result in constitutive molecules such as...

  15. Subcellular Relocalization and Positive Selection Play Key Roles in the Retention of Duplicate Genes of Populus Class III Peroxidase Family[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Lin-Ling; Liu, Yan-Jing; Liu, Hai-Jing; Qian, Ting-Ting; Qi, Li-Wang; Wang, Xiao-Ru; Zeng, Qing-Yin

    2014-01-01

    Gene duplication is the primary source of new genes and novel functions. Over the course of evolution, many duplicate genes lose their function and are eventually removed by deletion. However, some duplicates have persisted and evolved diverse functions. A particular challenge is to understand how this diversity arises and whether positive selection plays a role. In this study, we reconstructed the evolutionary history of the class III peroxidase (PRX) genes from the Populus trichocarpa genome. PRXs are plant-specific enzymes that play important roles in cell wall metabolism and in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. We found that two large tandem-arrayed clusters of PRXs evolved from an ancestral cell wall type PRX to vacuole type, followed by tandem duplications and subsequent functional specification. Substitution models identified seven positively selected sites in the vacuole PRXs. These positively selected sites showed significant effects on the biochemical functions of the enzymes. We also found that positive selection acts more frequently on residues adjacent to, rather than directly at, a critical active site of the enzyme, and on flexible regions rather than on rigid structural elements of the protein. Our study provides new insights into the adaptive molecular evolution of plant enzyme families. PMID:24934172

  16. Experimental evolution.

    PubMed

    Kawecki, Tadeusz J; Lenski, Richard E; Ebert, Dieter; Hollis, Brian; Olivieri, Isabelle; Whitlock, Michael C

    2012-10-01

    Experimental evolution is the study of evolutionary processes occurring in experimental populations in response to conditions imposed by the experimenter. This research approach is increasingly used to study adaptation, estimate evolutionary parameters, and test diverse evolutionary hypotheses. Long applied in vaccine development, experimental evolution also finds new applications in biotechnology. Recent technological developments provide a path towards detailed understanding of the genomic and molecular basis of experimental evolutionary change, while new findings raise new questions that can be addressed with this approach. However, experimental evolution has important limitations, and the interpretation of results is subject to caveats resulting from small population sizes, limited timescales, the simplified nature of laboratory environments, and, in some cases, the potential to misinterpret the selective forces and other processes at work. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Monitoring changes of proteins and lipids in laser welded aorta tissue using Raman spectroscopy and basis biochemical component analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C. H.; Wang, W. B.; Alimova, A.; Sriramoju, V.; Kartazayev, V.; Alfano, R. R.

    2009-02-01

    The changes of Raman spectra from ex-vivo porcine aorta tissues were studied before and after laser tissue welding (LTW). Raman spectra were measured and compared for normal and welded tissues in both tunica adventitial and intimal sides. The vibrational modes at the peak of 1301 cm-1 and the weak shoulder peak of 1264 cm-1 of amide III for the normal tissue changed to a peak at 1322cm-1 and a relative intense peak at 1264cm-1, respectively, for the welded tissue. The Raman spectra were analyzed using a linear regression fitting method and compared with characteristic Raman spectra from proteins and lipids compounds. The relative biochemical molecular composition changes of proteins (Collagen types I, III, V and Elastin) and lipids for the laser welded tissue were modeled by basis biochemical component analyses (BBCA) and compared with the normal tissue.

  18. The Classification and Evolution of Enzyme Function

    PubMed Central

    Martínez Cuesta, Sergio; Rahman, Syed Asad; Furnham, Nicholas; Thornton, Janet M.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes are the proteins responsible for the catalysis of life. Enzymes sharing a common ancestor as defined by sequence and structure similarity are grouped into families and superfamilies. The molecular function of enzymes is defined as their ability to catalyze biochemical reactions; it is manually classified by the Enzyme Commission and robust approaches to quantitatively compare catalytic reactions are just beginning to appear. Here, we present an overview of studies at the interface of the evolution and function of enzymes. PMID:25986631

  19. Planets and their atmospheres - Origin and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, J. S.; Prinn, R. G.

    The origin, evolution, and composition of the planetary atmospheres are examined in an introductory review of ground-based and in situ observations and theoretical models. Chapters are devoted to the retention of volatiles by planets; evolutionary processes (such as hydrogen loss, accretion and outgassing, dissolution, photo-condensation, reactions with planetary surfaces, biochemical transformations, and atmospheric escape); and the present characteristics of the planetary, lunar-size-object, and asteroid atmospheres. Graphs, diagrams, and tables of numerical data are provided.

  20. The evolution of transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wray, Gregory A.; Hahn, Matthew W.; Abouheif, Ehab; Balhoff, James P.; Pizer, Margaret; Rockman, Matthew V.; Romano, Laura A.

    2003-01-01

    Gene expression is central to the genotype-phenotype relationship in all organisms, and it is an important component of the genetic basis for evolutionary change in diverse aspects of phenotype. However, the evolution of transcriptional regulation remains understudied and poorly understood. Here we review the evolutionary dynamics of promoter, or cis-regulatory, sequences and the evolutionary mechanisms that shape them. Existing evidence indicates that populations harbor extensive genetic variation in promoter sequences, that a substantial fraction of this variation has consequences for both biochemical and organismal phenotype, and that some of this functional variation is sorted by selection. As with protein-coding sequences, rates and patterns of promoter sequence evolution differ considerably among loci and among clades for reasons that are not well understood. Studying the evolution of transcriptional regulation poses empirical and conceptual challenges beyond those typically encountered in analyses of coding sequence evolution: promoter organization is much less regular than that of coding sequences, and sequences required for the transcription of each locus reside at multiple other loci in the genome. Because of the strong context-dependence of transcriptional regulation, sequence inspection alone provides limited information about promoter function. Understanding the functional consequences of sequence differences among promoters generally requires biochemical and in vivo functional assays. Despite these challenges, important insights have already been gained into the evolution of transcriptional regulation, and the pace of discovery is accelerating.

  1. The evolution of transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wray, Gregory A.; Hahn, Matthew W.; Abouheif, Ehab; Balhoff, James P.; Pizer, Margaret; Rockman, Matthew V.; Romano, Laura A.

    2003-01-01

    Gene expression is central to the genotype-phenotype relationship in all organisms, and it is an important component of the genetic basis for evolutionary change in diverse aspects of phenotype. However, the evolution of transcriptional regulation remains understudied and poorly understood. Here we review the evolutionary dynamics of promoter, or cis-regulatory, sequences and the evolutionary mechanisms that shape them. Existing evidence indicates that populations harbor extensive genetic variation in promoter sequences, that a substantial fraction of this variation has consequences for both biochemical and organismal phenotype, and that some of this functional variation is sorted by selection. As with protein-coding sequences, rates and patterns of promoter sequence evolution differ considerably among loci and among clades for reasons that are not well understood. Studying the evolution of transcriptional regulation poses empirical and conceptual challenges beyond those typically encountered in analyses of coding sequence evolution: promoter organization is much less regular than that of coding sequences, and sequences required for the transcription of each locus reside at multiple other loci in the genome. Because of the strong context-dependence of transcriptional regulation, sequence inspection alone provides limited information about promoter function. Understanding the functional consequences of sequence differences among promoters generally requires biochemical and in vivo functional assays. Despite these challenges, important insights have already been gained into the evolution of transcriptional regulation, and the pace of discovery is accelerating.

  2. Kombucha tea fermentation: Microbial and biochemical dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, Somnath; Bhattacharya, Semantee; Chatzinotas, Antonis; Chakraborty, Writachit; Bhattacharya, Debanjana; Gachhui, Ratan

    2016-03-02

    Kombucha tea, a non-alcoholic beverage, is acquiring significant interest due to its claimed beneficial properties. The microbial community of Kombucha tea consists of bacteria and yeast which thrive in two mutually non-exclusive compartments: the soup or the beverage and the biofilm floating on it. The microbial community and the biochemical properties of the beverage have so far mostly been described in separate studies. This, however, may prevent understanding the causal links between the microbial communities and the beneficial properties of Kombucha tea. Moreover, an extensive study into the microbial and biochemical dynamics has also been missing. In this study, we thus explored the structure and dynamics of the microbial community along with the biochemical properties of Kombucha tea at different time points up to 21 days of fermentation. We hypothesized that several biochemical properties will change during the course of fermentation along with the shifts in the yeast and bacterial communities. The yeast community of the biofilm did not show much variation over time and was dominated by Candida sp. (73.5-83%). The soup however, showed a significant shift in dominance from Candida sp. to Lachancea sp. on the 7th day of fermentation. This is the first report showing Candida as the most dominating yeast genus during Kombucha fermentation. Komagateibacter was identified as the single largest bacterial genus present in both the biofilm and the soup (~50%). The bacterial diversity was higher in the soup than in the biofilm with a peak on the seventh day of fermentation. The biochemical properties changed with the progression of the fermentation, i.e., beneficial properties of the beverage such as the radical scavenging ability increased significantly with a maximum increase at day 7. We further observed a significantly higher D-saccharic acid-1,4-lactone content and caffeine degradation property compared to previously described Kombucha tea fermentations. Our

  3. Security Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Patta, Joe

    2003-01-01

    Examines how to evaluate school security, begin making schools safe, secure schools without turning them into fortresses, and secure schools easily and affordably; the evolution of security systems into information technology systems; using schools' high-speed network lines; how one specific security system was developed; pros and cons of the…

  4. Art & Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, Mark

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author presents a two-week evolution unit for his biology class. He uses Maria Sybilla Merian (1647-1717) as an example of an Enlightenment mind at work--in this case a woman recognized as one of the great artists and natural scientists of her time. Her representations of butterflies, caterpillars and their pupae, and the…

  5. Silent evolution

    PubMed Central

    OSAWA, Syozo; SU, Zhi-Hui; NISHIKAWA, Masaaki; TOMINAGA, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses using mitochondrial DNA sequences of several kinds of beetles have shown that their evolution included a silent stage in which no morphological changes took place. We thus propose a new category of evolutionary process called “silent evolution”. PMID:27840392

  6. Art & Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, Mark

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author presents a two-week evolution unit for his biology class. He uses Maria Sybilla Merian (1647-1717) as an example of an Enlightenment mind at work--in this case a woman recognized as one of the great artists and natural scientists of her time. Her representations of butterflies, caterpillars and their pupae, and the…

  7. Cellular, biochemical and molecular mechanisms regulating oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Dekel, Nava

    2005-04-29

    The original model for regulation of oocyte maturation proposed by us in 1978 postulated that gap junction-mediated transmission of cAMP from the follicle cells to the oocyte inhibits meiosis and that luteinizing hormone (LH) terminates the flux of the follicle cAMP to the oocyte. A decrease in oocyte cAMP below inhibitory threshold occurs since oocytes lack the ability to generate sufficient amounts of cAMP to compensate for the phosphodiesterase activity. Our previous studies provided evidence to support this model. More recent studies in our laboratory were directed at identification of the cellular biochemical and molecular events initiated within rat oocytes upon the relief of cAMP inhibition. These studies: (i) identified an oocyte specific A kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) that is phosphorylated in oocytes resuming meiosis, (ii) confirmed that cdc25B governs meiosis reinitiation and demonstrated that its expression is translationally regulated, (iii) substantiated the indispensable role of proteasomal degradation at completion of the first meiotic division in a mammalian system, (iv) elucidated the role of MPF reactivation in suppressing interphase between the two meiotic divisions and (v) provided evidence that mos translation is negatively regulated by a protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated action of cAMP and is dependent on an active MPF. A detailed account on each of these findings is presented in this chapter.

  8. SUPERSTARS III: 3-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Education, Raleigh.

    SUPERSTARS III is a K-8 program designed as an enrichment opportunity for self-directed learners in mathematics. The basic purpose of SUPERSTARS III is to provide the extra challenge that self-motivated students need in mathematics and to do so in a structured, long-term program that does not impinge on the normal classroom routine or the…

  9. SUPERSTARS III: 6-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Education, Raleigh.

    SUPERSTARS III is a K-8 program designed as an enrichment opportunity for self-directed learners in mathematics. The basic purpose of SUPERSTARS III is to provide the extra challenge that self-motivated students need in mathematics and to do so in a structured, long-term program that does not impinge on the normal classroom routine or the…

  10. Using dBase III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Janet; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Four articles on dBASE III include three on library applications: a photocopy invoicing system for interlibrary loan, a vertical file subject headings list program, and a subject index to statistical resources. Another article explains the differences between interpreters and compilers and the advantages of the Clipper compiler for dBASE III. (EM)

  11. Title III and Cultural Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    The Title III Quarterly, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Title III projects dealing with cultural diversity in the classroom are described in this issue of the Title III Quarterly. Major articles are devoted to the following projects: Two Arts Culture Three Project, developing the crafts and music of mountain whites, blacks, and Cherokees; the Rota Bilingual Project, the Marianas District, emphasizing…

  12. Division III--Another Ballgame.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grites, Thomas J.; James, G. Larry

    1986-01-01

    The non-scholarship athletes of Division III represent a substantial group of advisees that are similar to, and yet different from the scholarship athlete. Division III student-athletes, their characteristics, situations, and needs are examined and specific efforts to improve their quality of student life are identified. (MLW)

  13. Evolutionary and functional analysis of mulberry type III polyketide synthases.

    PubMed

    Li, Han; Liang, Jiubo; Chen, Hu; Ding, Guangyu; Ma, Bi; He, Ningjia

    2016-08-04

    Type III polyketide synthases are important for the biosynthesis of flavonoids and various plant polyphenols. Mulberry plants have abundant polyphenols, but very little is known about the mulberry type III polyketide synthase genes. An analysis of these genes may provide new targets for genetic improvement to increase relevant secondary metabolites and enhance the plant tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses. Eighteen genes encoding type III polyketide synthases were identified, including six chalcone synthases (CHS), ten stilbene synthases (STS), and two polyketide synthases (PKS). Functional characterization of four genes representing most of the MnCHS and MnSTS genes by coexpression with 4-Coumaroyl-CoA ligase in Escherichia coli indicated that their products were able to catalyze p-coumaroyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA to generate naringenin and resveratrol, respectively. Microsynteny analysis within mulberry indicated that segmental and tandem duplication events contributed to the expansion of the MnCHS family, while tandem duplications were mainly responsible for the generation of the MnSTS genes. Combining the evolution and expression analysis results of the mulberry type III PKS genes indicated that MnCHS and MnSTS genes evolved mainly under purifying selection to maintain their original functions, but transcriptional subfunctionalization occurred during long-term species evolution. Moreover, mulberry leaves can rapidly accumulated oxyresveratrol after UV-C irradiation, suggesting that resveratrol was converted to oxyresveratrol. Characterizing the functions and evolution of mulberry type III PKS genes is crucial for advancing our understanding of these genes and providing the basis for further studies on the biosynthesis of relevant secondary metabolites in mulberry plants.

  14. THE GENUS VEILLONELLA III.

    PubMed Central

    Rogosa, Morrison; Bishop, Ferial S.

    1964-01-01

    Rogosa, Morrison (National Institute of Dental Research, Bethesda, Md.), and Ferial S. Bishop. The genus Veillonella. III. Hydrogen sulfide production by growing cultures. J. Bacteriol. 88:37–41. 1964.—The conditions necessary for H2S production by 105 strains of Veillonella, from a variety of sources and comprising seven anti-genic groups, are presented and discussed. All strains, during 1 to 2 days of growth, produced H2S in a defined medium supplemented with proper amounts of l-cysteine, l-cystine, reduced glutathione, thiosulfate, thiocyanate, or thioglycolate. Erratic or negative results were obtained with some commonly used media containing yeast extract and casein digest, but which were not supplemented with appropriate substrates for H2S production. Previous literature descriptions of V. alcalescens as not producing H2S are incorrect; H2S production, or the previously presumed lack of it, cannot be used as a criterion differentiating V. alcalescens from V. parvula. PMID:14198791

  15. On the theory of the type III burst exciter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. A.; Goldstein, M. L.; Papadopoulos, K.

    1976-01-01

    In situ satellite observations of type III burst exciters at 1 AU show that the beam does not evolve into a plateau in velocity space, contrary to the prediction of quasilinear theory. The observations can be explained by a theory that includes mode coupling effects due to excitation of the parametric oscillating two-stream instability and its saturation by anomalous resistivity. The time evolution of the beam velocity distribution is included in the analysis.

  16. Low dimensional III-V compound semiconductor structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P.

    2009-08-01

    Material incompatibilities among dissimilar group III-V compound semiconductors (III-V CSs) often place limits on combining epitaxial thin films, however low-dimensional epitaxial structures (e.g., quantum dots and nanowires) demonstrate coherent growth even on incompatible surfaces. First, InAs QDs grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs are described. Two-dimensional to three-dimensional morphological transition, lateral size evolution and vertical alignment of InAs QDs in a single and multiple stacks will be illustrated. Second, InP nanowires grown on non-single crystalline surfaces by metal organic chemical vapor deposition are described with the view toward applications where III-V CSs are functionally integrated onto various material platforms.

  17. Biochemical and immunohistochemical characterization of Mimosa annexin.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Daisuke; Hayashi, Asami; Temmei, Yusuke; Kanzawa, Nobuyuki; Tsuchiya, Takahide

    2004-09-01

    To characterize the biochemical properties of plant annexin, we isolated annexin from Mimosa pudica L. and analyzed the biochemical properties conserved between Mimosa annexin and animal annexins, e.g. the ability to bind phospholipid and F-actin in the presence of calcium. We show that Mimosa annexin is distributed in a wide variety of tissues. Immunoblot analysis also revealed that the amount of annexin is developmentally regulated. To identify novel functions of Mimosa annexin, we examined the pattern of distribution and the regulation of its expression in the pulvinus. The amount of annexin in the pulvinus increased at night and was sensitive to abscisic acid; however, there was no detectable induction of annexin by cold or mechanical stimulus. Annexin distribution in the cell periphery during the daytime was changed to a cytoplasmic distribution at night, indicating that Mimosa annexin may contribute to the nyctinastic movement in the pulvinus.

  18. Thermodynamics of biochemical networks and duality theorems.

    PubMed

    De Martino, Daniele

    2013-05-01

    One interesting yet difficult computational issue has recently been posed in biophysics in regard to the implementation of thermodynamic constraints to complex networks. Biochemical networks of enzymes inside cells are among the most efficient, robust, differentiated, and flexible free-energy transducers in nature. How is the second law of thermodynamics encoded for these complex networks? In this article it is demonstrated that for chemical reaction networks in the steady state the exclusion (presence) of closed reaction cycles makes possible (impossible) the definition of a chemical potential vector. Interestingly, this statement is encoded in one of the key results in combinatorial optimization, i.e., the Gordan theorem of the alternatives. From a computational viewpoint, the theorem reveals that calculating a reaction's free energy and identifying infeasible loops in flux states are dual problems whose solutions are mutually exclusive, and this opens the way for efficient and scalable methods to perform the energy balance analysis of large-scale biochemical networks.

  19. Construction and analysis of biochemical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binns, Michael; Theodoropoulos, Constantinos

    2012-09-01

    Bioprocesses are being implemented for a range of different applications including the production of fuels, chemicals and drugs. Hence, it is becoming increasingly important to understand and model how they function and how they can be modified or designed to give the optimal performance. Here we discuss the construction and analysis of biochemical networks which are the first logical steps towards this goal. The construction of a reaction network is possible through reconstruction: extracting information from literature and from databases. This can be supplemented by reaction prediction methods which can identify steps which are missing from the current knowledge base. Analysis of biochemical systems generally requires some experimental input but can be used to identify important reactions and targets for enhancing the performance of the organism involved. Metabolic flux, pathway and metabolic control analysis can be used to determine the limits, capabilities and potential targets for enhancement respectively.

  20. Molecular and biochemical mechanisms of preterm labour.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Aarthi R; Loudon, Jenifer A; Bennett, Phillip R

    2004-12-01

    Parturition involves the synchronization of myometrial activity and structural changes of the cervix, leading to regular co-ordinated uterine contractions and cervical dilatation and effacement. The biochemical events involved in parturition resemble an inflammatory reaction, with growing evidence pointing to a crucial role for pro-inflammatory cytokines and prostaglandins in labour. There is accumulating evidence that there are common mediators involved in the regulation of 'labour-associated proteins', and that, in each case, an increase or decrease in gene expression mediates changes in their concentration. It is possible, therefore, that targeting these common mediators may represent newer strategies for the prevention of preterm labour. Our aim is to review the mechanical and biochemical mechanisms that may be involved in the processes of term and preterm labour. Specifically, we will consider the regulation of some of the 'labour-associated proteins', chemotactic cytokines, prostaglandins and enzymes of the prostaglandin biosynthetic pathway and the oxytocin receptor.

  1. Thermodynamics of Computational Copying in Biochemical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouldridge, Thomas E.; Govern, Christopher C.; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2017-04-01

    Living cells use readout molecules to record the state of receptor proteins, similar to measurements or copies in typical computational devices. But is this analogy rigorous? Can cells be optimally efficient, and if not, why? We show that, as in computation, a canonical biochemical readout network generates correlations; extracting no work from these correlations sets a lower bound on dissipation. For general input, the biochemical network cannot reach this bound, even with arbitrarily slow reactions or weak thermodynamic driving. It faces an accuracy-dissipation trade-off that is qualitatively distinct from and worse than implied by the bound, and more complex steady-state copy processes cannot perform better. Nonetheless, the cost remains close to the thermodynamic bound unless accuracy is extremely high. Additionally, we show that biomolecular reactions could be used in thermodynamically optimal devices under exogenous manipulation of chemical fuels, suggesting an experimental system for testing computational thermodynamics.

  2. Advances in Biochemical Indices of Zooplankton Production.

    PubMed

    Yebra, L; Kobari, T; Sastri, A R; Gusmão, F; Hernández-León, S

    Several new approaches for measuring zooplankton growth and production rates have been developed since the publication of the ICES (International Council for the Exploration of the Sea) Zooplankton Methodology Manual (Harris et al., 2000). In this review, we summarize the advances in biochemical methods made in recent years. Our approach explores the rationale behind each method, the design of calibration experiments, the advantages and limitations of each method and their suitability as proxies for in situ rates of zooplankton community growth and production. We also provide detailed protocols for the existing methods and information relevant to scientists wanting to apply, calibrate or develop these biochemical indices for zooplankton production. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Structural and biochemical characterization of DSL ribozyme.

    PubMed

    Horie, Souta; Ikawa, Yoshiya; Inoue, Tan

    2006-01-06

    We recently reported on the molecular design and synthesis of a new RNA ligase ribozyme (DSL), whose active site was selected from a sequence library consisting of 30 random nucleotides set on a defined 3D structure of a designed RNA scaffold. In this study, we report on the structural and biochemical analyses of DSL. Structural analysis indicates that the active site, which consists of the selected sequence, attaches to the folded scaffold as designed. To see whether DSL resembles known ribozymes, a biochemical assay was performed. Metal-dependent kinetic studies suggest that the ligase requires Mg2+ ions. The replacement of Mg2+ with Co(NH3)6(3+) prohibits the reaction, indicating that DSL requires innersphere coordination of Mg2+ for a ligation reaction. The results show that DSL has requirements similar to those of previously reported catalytic RNAs.

  4. Extracellular assembly and activation principles of oncogenic class III receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Verstraete, Kenneth; Savvides, Savvas N

    2012-11-01

    Intracellular signalling cascades initiated by class III receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK-IIIs) and their cytokine ligands contribute to haematopoiesis and mesenchymal tissue development. They are also implicated in a wide range of inflammatory disorders and cancers. Recent snapshots of RTK-III ectodomains in complex with cognate cytokines have revealed timely insights into the structural determinants of RTK-III activation, evolution and pathology. Importantly, candidate 'driver' and 'passenger' mutations that have been identified in RTK-IIIs can now be collectively mapped for the first time to structural scaffolds of the corresponding RTK-III ectodomains. Such insights will generate a renewed interest in dissecting the mechanistic effects of such mutations and their therapeutic relevance.

  5. Magnetic interactions in CuII-LnIII cyclic tetranuclear complexes: is it possible to explain the occurrence of SMM behavior in CuII-TbIII and CuII-DyIII complexes?

    PubMed

    Hamamatsu, Takefumi; Yabe, Kazuya; Towatari, Masaaki; Osa, Shutaro; Matsumoto, Naohide; Re, Nazzareno; Pochaba, Andrzej; Mrozinski, Jerzy; Gallani, Jean-Louis; Barla, Alessandro; Imperia, Paolo; Paulsen, Carley; Kappler, Jean-Paul

    2007-05-28

    An extensive series of tetranuclear CuII2LnIII2 complexes [CuIILLnIII(hfac)2]2 (with LnIII being all lanthanide(III) ions except for the radioactive PmIII) has been prepared in order to investigate the nature of the CuII-LnIII magnetic interactions and to try to answer the following question: What makes the CuII2TbIII2 and CuII2DyIII2 complexes single molecule magnets while the other complexes are not? All the complexes within this series possess a similar cyclic tetranuclear structure, in which the CuII and LnIII ions are arrayed alternately via bridges of ligand complex (CuIIL). Regular SQUID magnetometry measurements have been performed on the series. The temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibilities from 2 to 300 K and the field-dependent magnetizations from 0 to 5 T at 2 K have been measured for the CuII2LnIII2 and NiII2LnIII2 complexes, with the NiII2LnIII2 complex containing diamagnetic NiII ions being used as a reference for the evaluation of the CuII-LnIII magnetic interactions. These measurements have revealed that the interactions between CuII and LnIII ions are very weakly antiferromagnetic if Ln=Ce, Nd, Sm, Yb, ferromagnetic if Ln=Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, and negligible if Ln=La, Eu, Pr, Lu. With the same goal of better understanding the evolution of the intramolecular magnetic interactions, X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) has also been measured on CuII2TbIII2, CuII2DyIII2, and NiII2TbIII2 complexes, either at the L- and M-edges of the metal ions or at the K-edge of the N and O atoms. Last, the CuII2TbIII2 complex exhibiting SMM behavior has received a closer examination of its low temperature magnetic properties down to 0.1 K. These particular measurements have revealed the unusual very slow setting-up of a 3D order below 0.6 K.

  6. Experimental evolution in biofilm populations

    PubMed Central

    Steenackers, Hans P.; Parijs, Ilse; Foster, Kevin R.; Vanderleyden, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are a major form of microbial life in which cells form dense surface associated communities that can persist for many generations. The long-life of biofilm communities means that they can be strongly shaped by evolutionary processes. Here, we review the experimental study of evolution in biofilm communities. We first provide an overview of the different experimental models used to study biofilm evolution and their associated advantages and disadvantages. We then illustrate the vast amount of diversification observed during biofilm evolution, and we discuss (i) potential ecological and evolutionary processes behind the observed diversification, (ii) recent insights into the genetics of adaptive diversification, (iii) the striking degree of parallelism between evolution experiments and real-life biofilms and (iv) potential consequences of diversification. In the second part, we discuss the insights provided by evolution experiments in how biofilm growth and structure can promote cooperative phenotypes. Overall, our analysis points to an important role of biofilm diversification and cooperation in bacterial survival and productivity. Deeper understanding of both processes is of key importance to design improved antimicrobial strategies and diagnostic techniques. PMID:26895713

  7. Pitfalls in the interpretation of common biochemical tests

    PubMed Central

    Ayling, R.

    2000-01-01

    This review considers some of the more common problems in the interpretation of the results of biochemical tests and, where possible, highlights ways in which errors can be identified or avoided.


Keywords: biochemical tests PMID:10684320

  8. Biochemical correlates of neurosensory changes in weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, Carolyn S.; Reschke, Millard F.

    1989-01-01

    The possible existence of a relationship between space motion sickness and chemical and biochemical variables measured in body fluids is studied. Clinical chemistry and endocrine measurements from blood and urine samples taken before and after Space Shuttle flights were analyzed along with the occurrence of SMS during flight and provocative testing before flight. Significant positive correlations were observed with serum chloride and significant negative correlations with serum phosphate, serum uric acid, and plasma thyroid stimulating hormone.

  9. Biochemical correlates of neurosensory changes in weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, Carolyn S.; Reschke, Millard F.

    1989-01-01

    The possible existence of a relationship between space motion sickness and chemical and biochemical variables measured in body fluids is studied. Clinical chemistry and endocrine measurements from blood and urine samples taken before and after Space Shuttle flights were analyzed along with the occurrence of SMS during flight and provocative testing before flight. Significant positive correlations were observed with serum chloride and significant negative correlations with serum phosphate, serum uric acid, and plasma thyroid stimulating hormone.

  10. Biochemical and pharmacologic comparison of thrombolytic agents.

    PubMed

    Stringer, K A

    1996-01-01

    The number of thrombolytic drugs for the management of acute myocardial infarction is rapidly expanding. New agents, some of which are biochemically modified versions of currently available thrombolytics, will soon arrive in the marketplace. The pharmacologic differences of the new drugs are the basis for clinical differences such as enhanced clot lysis and prolonged elimination half-life. Ultimately, these features may result in improved infarct artery patency and patient survival.

  11. Explorations into Chemical Reactions and Biochemical Pathways.

    PubMed

    Gasteiger, Johann

    2016-12-01

    A brief overview of the work in the research group of the present author on extracting knowledge from chemical reaction data is presented. Methods have been developed to calculate physicochemical effects at the reaction site. It is shown that these physicochemical effects can quite favourably be used to derive equations for the calculation of data on gas phase reactions and on reactions in solution such as aqueous acidity of alcohols or carboxylic acids or the hydrolysis of amides. Furthermore, it is shown that these physicochemical effects are quite effective for assigning reactions into reaction classes that correspond to chemical knowledge. Biochemical reactions constitute a particularly interesting and challenging task for increasing our understanding of living species. The BioPath.Database is a rich source of information on biochemical reactions and has been used for a variety of applications of chemical, biological, or medicinal interests. Thus, it was shown that biochemical reactions can be assigned by the physicochemical effects into classes that correspond to the classification of enzymes by the EC numbers. Furthermore, 3D models of reaction intermediates can be used for searching for novel enzyme inhibitors. It was shown in a combined application of chemoinformatics and bioinformatics that essential pathways of diseases can be uncovered. Furthermore, a study showed that bacterial flavor-forming pathways can be discovered.

  12. Inkjet printed (bio)chemical sensing devices.

    PubMed

    Komuro, Nobutoshi; Takaki, Shunsuke; Suzuki, Koji; Citterio, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    Inkjet printing has evolved from an office printing application to become an important tool in industrial mass fabrication. In parallel, this technology is increasingly used in research laboratories around the world for the fabrication of entire (bio)chemical sensing devices or single functional elements of such devices. Regularly stated characteristics of inkjet printing making it attractive to replace an alternative material deposition method are low cost, simplicity, high resolution, speed, reproducibility, flexibility, non-contact, and low amount of waste generated. With this review, we give an overview over areas of (bio)chemical sensing device development profiting from inkjet printing applications. A variety of printable functional sensor elements are introduced by examples, and the advantages and challenges of the inkjet method are pointed out. It is demonstrated that inkjet printing is already a routine tool for the fabrication of some (bio)chemical sensing devices, but also that novel applications are being continuously developed. Finally, some inherent limitations of the method and challenges for the further exploitation of this technology are pointed out.

  13. Cytokines as biochemical markers for knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mabey, Thomas; Honsawek, Sittisak

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a debilitating degenerative joint disease particularly affecting weightbearing joints within the body, principally the hips and knees. Current radiographic techniques are insufficient to show biochemical changes within joint tissue which can occur many years before symptoms become apparent. The need for better diagnostic and prognostic tools is heightened with the prevalence of OA set to increase in aging and obese populations. As inflammation is increasingly being considered an important part of OAs pathophysiology, cytokines are being assessed as possible candidates for biochemical markers. Cytokines, both pro- and anti-inflammatory, as well as angiogenic and chemotactic, have in recent years been studied for relevant characteristics. Biochemical markers show promise in determination of the severity of disease in addition to monitoring of the efficacy and safety of disease-modifying OA drugs, with the potential to act as diagnostic and prognostic tools. Currently, the diagnostic power of interleukin (IL)-6 and the relationship to disease burden of IL-1β, IL-15, tumor necrosis factor-α, and vascular endothelial growth factor make these the best candidates for assessment. Grouping appropriate cytokine markers together and assessing them collectively alongside other bone and cartilage degradation products will yield a more statistically powerful tool in research and clinical applications, and additionally aid in distinguishing between OA and a number of other diseases in which cytokines are known to have an involvement. Further large scale studies are needed to assess the validity and efficacy of current biomarkers, and to discover other potential biomarker candidates. PMID:25621214

  14. Electronic modulation of biochemical signal generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordonov, Tanya; Kim, Eunkyoung; Cheng, Yi; Ben-Yoav, Hadar; Ghodssi, Reza; Rubloff, Gary; Yin, Jun-Jie; Payne, Gregory F.; Bentley, William E.

    2014-08-01

    Microelectronic devices that contain biological components are typically used to interrogate biology rather than control biological function. Patterned assemblies of proteins and cells have, however, been used for in vitro metabolic engineering, where coordinated biochemical pathways allow cell metabolism to be characterized and potentially controlled on a chip. Such devices form part of technologies that attempt to recreate animal and human physiological functions on a chip and could be used to revolutionize drug development. These ambitious goals will, however, require new biofabrication methodologies that help connect microelectronics and biological systems and yield new approaches to device assembly and communication. Here, we report the electrically mediated assembly, interrogation and control of a multi-domain fusion protein that produces a bacterial signalling molecule. The biological system can be electrically tuned using a natural redox molecule, and its biochemical response is shown to provide the signalling cues to drive bacterial population behaviour. We show that the biochemical output of the system correlates with the electrical input charge, which suggests that electrical inputs could be used to control complex on-chip biological processes.

  15. Controllability of non-linear biochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Ervadi-Radhakrishnan, Anandhi; Voit, Eberhard O

    2005-07-01

    Mathematical methods of biochemical pathway analysis are rapidly maturing to a point where it is possible to provide objective rationale for the natural design of metabolic systems and where it is becoming feasible to manipulate these systems based on model predictions, for instance, with the goal of optimizing the yield of a desired microbial product. So far, theory-based metabolic optimization techniques have mostly been applied to steady-state conditions or the minimization of transition time, using either linear stoichiometric models or fully kinetic models within biochemical systems theory (BST). This article addresses the related problem of controllability, where the task is to steer a non-linear biochemical system, within a given time period, from an initial state to some target state, which may or may not be a steady state. For this purpose, BST models in S-system form are transformed into affine non-linear control systems, which are subjected to an exact feedback linearization that permits controllability through independent variables. The method is exemplified with a small glycolytic-glycogenolytic pathway that had been analyzed previously by several other authors in different contexts.

  16. [Basic biochemical processes in glaucoma progression].

    PubMed

    von Thun und Hohenstein-Blaul, N; Kunst, S; Pfeiffer, N; Grus, F H

    2015-05-01

    The term glaucoma summarizes a group of eye diseases that are accompanied by impairments of the optic nerve and related visual field deficits. An early diagnosis of glaucoma is currently not possible due to a lack of diagnostic tests; therefore, in most cases the disease is diagnosed many years after onset, which prevents an early therapy. The known risk factors for the development and progression of glaucomatous optic neuropathy comprise elevated intraocular pressure and a broad range of pressure fluctuations as well as lipometabolic disorders, genetic factor and diabetes. The consequences include the induction of anti-inflammatory proteins, elevated levels of oxidative stress and the destruction of retinal ganglion cells. Changes in the autoantibody repertoire have also been observed in the course of the disease. Basic ophthalmological research therefore focuses on the investigation of basic biochemical processes in the course of the disease. A better understanding of physiological and biochemical events is sought in order to develop new and more sensitive diagnostic options and to allow more targeted therapeutic measures. The understanding of biochemical processes allows a better insight into glaucoma progression to be gained, which will lead to improvements in diagnosis and therapy.

  17. Stoichiometric network theory for nonequilibrium biochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Qian, Hong; Beard, Daniel A; Liang, Shou-dan

    2003-02-01

    We introduce the basic concepts and develop a theory for nonequilibrium steady-state biochemical systems applicable to analyzing large-scale complex isothermal reaction networks. In terms of the stoichiometric matrix, we demonstrate both Kirchhoff's flux law sigma(l)J(l)=0 over a biochemical species, and potential law sigma(l) mu(l)=0 over a reaction loop. They reflect mass and energy conservation, respectively. For each reaction, its steady-state flux J can be decomposed into forward and backward one-way fluxes J = J+ - J-, with chemical potential difference deltamu = RT ln(J-/J+). The product -Jdeltamu gives the isothermal heat dissipation rate, which is necessarily non-negative according to the second law of thermodynamics. The stoichiometric network theory (SNT) embodies all of the relevant fundamental physics. Knowing J and deltamu of a biochemical reaction, a conductance can be computed which directly reflects the level of gene expression for the particular enzyme. For sufficiently small flux a linear relationship between J and deltamu can be established as the linear flux-force relation in irreversible thermodynamics, analogous to Ohm's law in electrical circuits.

  18. Biochemical assessment of acute myocardial ischaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Cárceles, M D; Osuna, E; Vieira, D N; Martínez, A; Luna, A

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To evaluate the efficacy of biochemical parameters in different fluids in the diagnosis of myocardial infarction of different causes, analysed after death. METHODS--The myoglobin concentration and total creatine kinase (CK) and creatine kinase MB isoenzyme (CK-MB) activities were measured in serum, pericardial fluid, and vitreous humour from seven diagnostic groups of cadavers classified according to the severity of myocardial ischaemia and cause of death. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and myosin were measured only in serum and pericardial fluid, and cathepsin D only in pericardial fluid. Routine haematoxylin and eosin and acridine orange staining were used for microscopy studies of heart tissue. RESULTS--In pericardial fluid there were substantial differences between the different groups with respect to CK, CK-MB, and LDH activities and myosin concentrations. The highest values were found in cases with morphological evidence of myocardial ischaemia. CONCLUSIONS--Biochemical parameters, which reach the pericardial fluid via passive diffusion and ultrafiltration due to a pressure gradient, were thus detectable in this fluid earlier than in serum in cases with myocardial ischaemia. These biochemical parameters may be of use for ruling out myocardial ischaemia in those controversial cases in which reliable morphological findings are lacking. PMID:7745110

  19. Hydrogel-based piezoresistive biochemical microsensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, Margarita; Schulz, Volker; Gerlach, Gerald; Wallmersperger, Thomas; Solzbacher, Florian; Magda, Jules J.; Tathireddy, Prashant; Lin, Genyao; Orthner, Michael P.

    2010-04-01

    This work is motivated by a demand for inexpensive, robust and reliable biochemical sensors with high signal reproducibility and long-term-stable sensitivity, especially for medical applications. Micro-fabricated sensors can provide continuous monitoring and on-line control of analyte concentrations in ambient aqueous solutions. The piezoresistive biochemical sensor containing a special biocompatible polymer (hydrogel) with a sharp volume phase transition in the neutral physiological pH range near 7.4 can detect a specific analyte, for example glucose. Thereby the hydrogel-based biochemical sensors are useful for the diagnosis and monitoring of diabetes. The response of the glucosesensitive hydrogel was studied at different regimes of the glucose concentration change and of the solution supply. Sensor response time and accuracy with which a sensor can track gradual changes in glucose was estimated. Additionally, the influence of various recommended sterilization methods on the gel swelling properties and on the mechano-electrical transducer of the pH-sensors has been evaluated in order to choose the most optimal sterilization method for the implantable sensors. It has been shown that there is no negative effect of gamma irradiation with a dose of 25.7 kGy on the hydrogel sensitivity. In order to achieve an optimum between sensor signal amplitude and sensor response time, corresponding calibration and measurement procedures have been proposed and evaluated for the chemical sensors.

  20. Genetic and Biochemical Biomarkers in Canine Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Graham, K L; McCowan, C; White, A

    2017-03-01

    In many health-related fields, there is great interest in the identification of biomarkers that distinguish diseased from healthy individuals. In addition to identifying the diseased state, biomarkers have potential use in predicting disease risk, monitoring disease progression, evaluating treatment efficacy, and informing pathogenesis. This review details the genetic and biochemical markers associated with canine primary glaucoma. While there are numerous molecular markers (biochemical and genetic) associated with glaucoma in dogs, there is no ideal biomarker that allows early diagnosis and/or identification of disease progression. Genetic mutations associated with canine glaucoma include those affecting ADAMTS10, ADAMTS17, Myocilin, Nebulin, COL1A2, RAB22A, and SRBD1. With the exception of Myocilin, there is very limited crossover in genetic biomarkers identified between human and canine glaucomas. Mutations associated with canine glaucoma vary between and within canine breeds, and gene discoveries therefore have limited overall effects as a screening tool in the general canine population. Biochemical markers of glaucoma include indicators of inflammation, oxidative stress, serum autoantibodies, matrix metalloproteinases, tumor necrosis factor-α, and transforming growth factor-β. These markers include those that indicate an adaptive or protective response, as well as those that reflect the damage arising from oxidative stress.

  1. PREFACE: Quantum Optics III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orszag, M.; Retamal, J. C.; Saavedra, C.; Wallentowitz, S.

    2007-06-01

    All the 50 years of conscious pondering did not bring me nearer to an answer to the question `what is light quanta?'. Nowadays, every rascal believes, he knows it, however, he is mistaken. (A Einstein, 1951 in a letter to M Besso) Quantum optics has played a key role in physics in the last several decades. On the other hand, in these early decades of the information age, the flow of information is becoming more and more central to our daily life. Thus, the related fields of quantum information theory as well as Bose-Einstein condensation have acquired tremendous importance in the last couple of decades. In Quantum Optics III, a fusion of these fields appears in a natural way. Quantum Optics III was held in Pucón, Chile, in 27-30 of November, 2006. This beautiful location in the south of Chile is near the lake Villarrica and below the snow covered volcano of the same name. This fantastic environment contributed to a relaxed atmosphere, suitable for informal discussion and for the students to have a chance to meet the key figures in the field. The previous Quantum Optics conferences took place in Santiago, Chile (Quantum Optics I, 2000) and Cozumel, Mexico (Quantum Optics II, 2004). About 115 participants from 19 countries attended and participated in the meeting to discuss a wide variety of topics such as quantum-information processing, experiments related to non-linear optics and squeezing, various aspects of entanglement including its sudden death, correlated twin-photon experiments, light storage, decoherence-free subspaces, Bose-Einstein condensation, discrete Wigner functions and many more. There was a strong Latin-American participation from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Peru, Uruguay, Venezuela and Mexico, as well as from Europe, USA, China, and Australia. New experimental and theoretical results were presented at the conference. In Latin-America a quiet revolution has taken place in the last twenty years. Several groups working in quantum optics and

  2. The Use of Item Analysis for Improvement of Biochemical Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagata, Ryoichi

    2004-01-01

    Item analysis was used to find out which biochemical explanations need to be improved in biochemical teaching, not which items are to be discarded, improved, or reusable in biochemical examinations. The analysis revealed the basic facts of which less able students had more misunderstanding than able students. Identifying these basic facts helps…

  3. 81 FR 3927 - Notice Seeking Public Comment on the Evolution of the Treasury Market Structure

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2016-01-22

    ... January 22, 2016 Part III Department of the Treasury Notice Seeking Public Comment on the Evolution of the... / Notices#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Notice Seeking Public Comment on the Evolution of the Treasury...) Further study of the evolution of the U.S. Treasury market and the implications for market structure and...

  4. Balanced Biochemical Reactions: A New Approach to Unify Chemical and Biochemical Thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sabatini, Antonio; Vacca, Alberto; Iotti, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    A novel procedure is presented which, by balancing elements and electric charge of biochemical reactions which occur at constant pH and pMg, allows assessing the thermodynamics properties of reaction ΔrG′0, ΔrH′0, ΔrS′0 and the change in binding of hydrogen and magnesium ions of these reactions. This procedure of general applicability avoids the complex calculations required by the use of the Legendre transformed thermodynamic properties of formation ΔfG′0, ΔfH′0 and ΔfS′0 hitherto considered an obligatory prerequisite to deal with the thermodynamics of biochemical reactions. As a consequence, the term “conditional” is proposed in substitution of “Legendre transformed” to indicate these thermodynamics properties. It is also shown that the thermodynamic potential G is fully adequate to give a criterion of spontaneous chemical change for all biochemical reactions and then that the use of the Legendre transformed G′ is unnecessary. The procedure proposed can be applied to any biochemical reaction, making possible to re-unify the two worlds of chemical and biochemical thermodynamics, which so far have been treated separately. PMID:22247780

  5. Balanced biochemical reactions: a new approach to unify chemical and biochemical thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Antonio; Vacca, Alberto; Iotti, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    A novel procedure is presented which, by balancing elements and electric charge of biochemical reactions which occur at constant pH and pMg, allows assessing the thermodynamics properties of reaction Δ(r)G'⁰, Δ(r)H'⁰, Δ(r)S'⁰ and the change in binding of hydrogen and magnesium ions of these reactions. This procedure of general applicability avoids the complex calculations required by the use of the Legendre transformed thermodynamic properties of formation Δ(f)G'⁰, Δ(f)H'⁰ and Δ(f)S'⁰ hitherto considered an obligatory prerequisite to deal with the thermodynamics of biochemical reactions. As a consequence, the term "conditional" is proposed in substitution of "Legendre transformed" to indicate these thermodynamics properties. It is also shown that the thermodynamic potential G is fully adequate to give a criterion of spontaneous chemical change for all biochemical reactions and then that the use of the Legendre transformed G' is unnecessary. The procedure proposed can be applied to any biochemical reaction, making possible to re-unify the two worlds of chemical and biochemical thermodynamics, which so far have been treated separately.

  6. Viking Phase III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    VIKING PHASE III - With the incredible success of the Viking missions on Mars, mission operations have progressed though a series of phases - each being funded as mission success dictated its potential. The Viking Primary Mission phase was concluded in November, 1976, when the reins were passed on to the second phase - the Viking Extended Mission. The Extended Mission successfully carried spacecraft operations through the desired period of time needed to provided a profile of a full Martian year, but would have fallen a little short of connecting and overlapping a full Martian year of Viking operations which scientists desired as a means of determining the degree of duplicity in the red planet's seasons - at least for the summer period. Without this continuation of spacecraft data acquisitions to and beyond the seasonal points when the spacecraft actually began their Mars observations, there would be no way of knowing whether the changing environmental values - such as temperatures and winds atmospheric dynamics and water vapor, surface thermal dynamics, etc. - would match up with those acquired as the spacecraft began investigations during the summer and fall of 1976. This same broad interest can be specifically pursued at the surface - where hundreds of rocks, soil drifts and other features have become extremely familiar during long-term analysis. This picture was acquired on the 690th Martian day of Lander 1 operations - 4009th picture sequence commanded of the two Viking Landers. As such, it became the first picture acquired as the third phase of Viking operations got under way - the Viking Continuation Mission. Between the start of the Continuation Mission in April, 1978, until spacecraft operations are concluded in November, the landers will acquire an additional 200 pictures. These will be used to monitor the two landscaped for the surface changes. All four cameras, two on Lander 1 and two on Lander 2, continue to operate perfectly. Both landers will also

  7. Microfluidic Compartmentalized Directed Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Paegel, Brian M.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Directed evolution studies often make use of water-in-oil compartments, which conventionally are prepared by bulk emulsification, a crude process that generates non-uniform droplets and can damage biochemical reagents. A microfluidic emulsification circuit was devised that generates uniform water-in-oil droplets (21.9 ± 0.8 μm radius) with high throughput (107–108 droplets per hour). The circuit contains a radial array of aqueous flow nozzles that intersect a surrounding oil flow channel. This device was used to evolve RNA enzymes with RNA ligase activity, selecting enzymes that could resist inhibition by neomycin. Each molecule in the population had the opportunity to undergo 108-fold selective amplification within its respective compartment. Then the progeny RNAs were harvested and used to seed new compartments. During five rounds of this procedure, the enzymes acquired mutations that conferred resistance to neomycin and caused some enzymes to become dependent on neomycin for optimal activity. PMID:20659684

  8. Mechanism and evolution of hypoxia-tolerance in humans.

    PubMed

    Hochachka, P W

    1998-04-01

    To physiologists, the term 'adaptation' usually refers to any trait that is considered advantageous; evolutionary biologists require a more rigorous definition (restricting it to traits arising and maintained under selection). By their definition, many physiological traits may merely reflect inheritance passed on through lineage. In considering the evolution of tolerance to reduced oxygen availability, we examined the issue (of true adaptations versus simple inheritance) in pinnipeds (the two dominant groups, phocids and otariids, with varying diving capacities) and in human lineages exposed for varying generational periods to hypobaric hypoxia. Basic principles of the evolution of complex physiological systems first emerged from an analysis of the diving response. We then analyzed human responses to hypobaric hypoxia in three different lineages: lowlanders, Andean natives (Quechuas) and Himalayan natives (Sherpas). As in the pinniped example, we found 'conservative' and 'adaptable' physiological characters involved in human responses to hypoxia. Conservative characters are clearly dominant and are too numerous to outline in detail; three examples are haemoglobin oxygen-affinities, the organization of muscle into different fibre types and the brain's almost exclusive preference for glucose as a fuel. Most notably, we also found evidence for 'adaptable' characters at all levels of organization examined. At the whole-body level in Quechuas and Sherpas, we found (i) that maximum aerobic and anaerobic exercise capacities were down-regulated, (ii) that the acute effect of hypoxia (making up the energy deficit due to oxygen lack; i.e. the Pasteur effect) expected from lowlanders was blunted, and (iii) that acclimation effects were also attenuated. The biochemical behaviour of skeletal muscles was consistent with lowered reliance on glycolytic contributions to energy supply, thus improving the yield of ATP per mole of carbon fuel utilized. Heart adaptations also seemed to

  9. Chemical synthesis enables biochemical and antibacterial evaluation of streptolydigin antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Pronin, Sergey V; Martinez, Anthony; Kuznedelov, Konstantin; Severinov, Konstantin; Shuman, Howard A; Kozmin, Sergey A

    2011-08-10

    Inhibition of bacterial transcription represents an effective and clinically validated anti-infective chemotherapeutic strategy. We describe the evolution of our approach to the streptolydigin class of antibiotics that target bacterial RNA polymerases (RNAPs). This effort resulted in the synthesis and biological evaluation of streptolydigin, streptolydiginone, streptolic acid, and a series of new streptolydigin-based agents. Subsequent biochemical evaluation of RNAP inhibition demonstrated that the presence of both streptolic acid and tetramic acid subunits was required for activity of this class of antibiotics. In addition, we identified 10,11-dihydrostreptolydigin as a new RNAP-targeting agent, which was assembled with high synthetic efficiency of 15 steps in the longest linear sequence. Dihydrostreptolydigin inhibited three representative bacterial RNAPs and displayed in vitro antibacterial activity against S. salivarius . The overall increase in synthetic efficiency combined with substantial antibacterial activity of this fully synthetic antibiotic demonstrates the power of organic synthesis in enabling design and comprehensive in vitro pharmacological evaluation of new chemical agents that target bacterial transcription. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  10. Cranial mononeuropathy III - diabetic type

    MedlinePlus

    ... diabetic type of cranial mononeuropathy III is a complication of diabetes . It causes double vision and eyelid drooping . ... Cooper ME, Vinik AI, Plutzky J, Boulton AJM. Complications of diabetes mellitus. In: Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, Kronenberg ...

  11. Division III: Planetary Systems Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowell, Edward L. G.; Meech, Karen J.; Williams, Iwan P.; Boss, Alan; Courtin, Régis; Gustafson, Bo Å. S.; Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Mayor, Michel; Spurný, Pavel; Watanabe, Jun-ichi; Consolmagno, Guy J.; Fernández, Julio A.; Huebner, Walter F.; Marov, Mikhail Ya.; Schulz, Rita M.; Valsecchi, Giovanni B.; Witt, Adolf N.

    2010-05-01

    The meeting was opened by Ted Bowell, president, at 11 am. The 2006 Division III meetings were reviewed by Guy Consolmagno, secretary; as the minutes of those meetings have already been published, they were assumed to be approved.

  12. Division Iii: Planetary System Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Iwan P.; Bowell, Edward L. G.; Marov, Mikhail Ya.; Consolmagno, Guy J.; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Boss, Alan P.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Levasseur-Regord, Anny-Chantal; Morrison, David; Tinney, Christopher G.

    2007-12-01

    Division III gathers astronomers engaged in the study of a comprehensive range of phenomena in the solar system and its bodies, from the major planets via comets to meteorites and interplanetary dust.

  13. Cherenkov imaging and biochemical sensing in vivo during radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongxiao

    While Cherenkov emission was discovered more than eighty years ago, the potential applications of imaging this during radiation therapy have just recently been explored. With approximately half of all cancer patients being treated by radiation at some point during their cancer management, there is a constant challenge to ensure optimal treatment efficiency is achieved with maximal tumor to normal tissue therapeutic ratio. To achieve this, the treatment process as well as biological information affecting the treatment should ideally be effective and directly derived from the delivery of radiation to the patient. The value of Cherenkov emission imaging was examined here, primarily for visualization of treatment monitoring and then secondarily for Cherenkov-excited luminescence for tissue biochemical sensing within tissue. Through synchronized gating to the short radiation pulses of a linear accelerator (200Hz & 3 micros pulses), and applying a gated intensified camera for imaging, the Cherenkov radiation can be captured near video frame rates (30 frame per sec) with dim ambient room lighting. This procedure, sometimes termed Cherenkoscopy, is readily visualized without affecting the normal process of external beam radiation therapy. With simulation, phantoms and clinical trial data, each application of Cherenkoscopy was examined: i) for treatment monitoring, ii) for patient position monitoring and motion tracking, and iii) for superficial dose imaging. The temporal dynamics of delivered radiation fields can easily be directly imaged on the patient's surface. Image registration and edge detection of Cherenkov images were used to verify patient positioning during treatment. Inter-fraction setup accuracy and intra-fraction patient motion was detectable to better than 1 mm accuracy. Cherenkov emission in tissue opens up a new field of biochemical sensing within the tissue environment, using luminescent agents which can be activated by this light. In the first study of

  14. NADH-coenzyme Q reductase (complex I) deficiency: heterogeneity in phenotype and biochemical findings.

    PubMed

    Pitkänen, S; Feigenbaum, A; Laframboise, R; Robinson, B H

    1996-01-01

    Twelve patient cell lines with biochemically proven complex I deficiency were compared for clinical presentation and outcome, together with their sensitivity to galactose and menadione toxicity. Each patient had elevated lactate to pyruvate ratios demonstrable in fibroblast cultures. Each patient also had decreased rotenone-sensitive NADH-cytochrome c reductase (complexes I and III) with normal succinate cytochrome c reductase (complexes II and III) and cytochrome oxidase (complex IV) activity in cultured skin fibroblasts, indicating a deficient NADH-coenzyme Q reductase (complex I) activity. The patients fell into five categories: severe neonatal lactic acidosis; Leigh disease; cardiomyopathy and cataracts; hepatopathy and tubulopathy; and mild symptoms with lactic acidaemia. Cell lines from 4 out of the 12 patients were susceptible to both galactose and menadione toxicity and 3 of these also displayed low levels of ATP synthesis in digitonin-permeabilized skin fibroblasts from a number of substrates. This study highlights the heterogeneity of complex I deficiency at the clinical and biochemical level.

  15. QUALIS PERIODIC EVALUATION: ANALYSIS OF QUALIS UPGRADE IN MEDICINE III.

    PubMed

    Jukemura, José; Diniz, Márcio Augusto

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the preliminary results related to journals up-grade that was used by Medicine III, through opportunity offered by Capes to all agency areas programs. Were used area document of Medicine I, II and III, besides other relevant topics available online at Capes site, between 2009 and 2013. The research was focused to answer two questions: 1) the stratification of Qualis is similar in the three areas of medicine? and 2) the evolution of Qualis in Medicine III was higher? Medicine III showed an increase in its Qualis classification and is publishing in journals with higher impact factors, virtually the same as the Medicine I and II. The area showed the strongest growth in recent three-year periods. Avaliar os resultados preliminares sobre a Medicina III do up-grade oportunizado pela Capes para todas as áreas. Foram utilizados os documentos de áreas e os relevantes ao tema disponíveis online no site da Capes entre 2009 e 2013. Procurou-se focar a pesquisa em dois aspectos para responder duas perguntas: 1) a estratificação do Qualis é semelhante nas três áreas da medicina? e 2) a evolução do Qualis da Medicina III foi maior? A Medicina III apresentou evolução em sua classificação Qualis e está publicando em revistas com maior fator de impacto e é praticamente igual ao da Medicina I e II. A área foi a que apresentou maior evolução nestes últimos triênios.

  16. Digital and analog chemical evolution.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Jay T; Mehta, Anil K; Lynn, David G

    2012-12-18

    created by modification of a nucleic acid backbone and show how it has exploited the digital-like base pairing for reversible polymer construction and information transfer. We further review how these lessons have been extended to the complex folding landscapes of templated peptide assembly. These insights have allowed for the construction of molecular hybrids of each biopolymer class and made possible the reimagining of chemical evolution. Such elaboration of biopolymer chimeras has already led to applications in therapeutics and diagnostics, to the construction of novel nanostructured materials, and toward orthogonal biochemical pathways that expand the evolution of existing biochemical systems. The ability to look beyond the primordial emergence of the ribosome may allow us to better define the origins of chemical evolution, to extend its horizons beyond the biology of today and ask whether evolution is an inherent property of matter unbounded by physical limitations imposed by our planet's diverse environments.

  17. Glycogen storage disease type III in the Irish population.

    PubMed

    Crushell, Ellen; Treacy, Eileen P; Dawe, J; Durkie, M; Beauchamp, Nicholas J

    2010-12-01

    Glycogen storage disease type III (GSD III) results from mutations of the AGL gene encoding the glycogen debrancher enzyme. The disease has clinical and biochemical heterogeneity reflecting the severity of the AGL mutations. We sought to characterise the molecular defects in our cohort of Irish patients with GSD III. Fifteen patients from eight unrelated Irish families were identified: six males and nine females. The age ranged from 2-39 years old, and all presented in the first 3 years of life. Four patients (of three families) had mild disease with hepatomegaly, mild hypoglycaemia and normal creatine kinase (CK) levels. Five families had more severe disease, with liver and skeletal muscle involvement and elevated CK. Eleven different mutations were identified amongst the eight families. Of the 11, six were novel: p.T512fs, p.S736fs, p.A1400fs, p.K1407fs, p.Y519X and p.D627Y. The family homozygous for p.A1400fs had the most severe phenotype (early-onset hypoglycaemia, massive hepatomegaly, myopathy and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy before age 2 years), which was not halted by aggressive carbohydrate and protein supplementation. Conversely, the only missense mutation identified in the cohort, p.D627Y, was associated with a mild phenotype. The phenotypic diversity in our GSD III cohort is mirrored by the allelic heterogeneity. We describe two novel null mutations in exon 32 in two families with severe GSD III resistant to current treatment modalities. Knowledge of the specific mutations segregating in this cohort may allow for the development of new therapeutic interventions.

  18. Updating quasar bolometric luminosity corrections - III. [O iii] bolometric corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennell, Alison; Runnoe, Jessie C.; Brotherton, M. S.

    2017-06-01

    We present quasar bolometric corrections using the [O III] λ 5007 narrow emission line luminosity based on the detailed spectral energy distributions of 53 bright quasars at low to moderate redshift (0.0345 < z < 1.0002). We adopted two functional forms to calculate Liso, the bolometric luminosity determined under the assumption of isotropy: {L_{iso}}=A {L_{[O III]}} for comparison with the literature and {log(L_{iso})}=B+C log(L_{[O III]}), which better characterizes the data. We also explored whether 'Eigenvector 1 (EV1)', which describes the range of quasar spectral properties and quantifies their diversity, introduces scatter into the L_{[O III]}-Liso relationship. We found that the {[O III]} bolometric correction can be significantly improved by adding a term including the equivalent width ratio R_{Fe II} ≡ EW_{{Fe II}}/EW_{Hβ }, which is an EV1 indicator. Inclusion of R_{Fe II} in predicting Liso is significant at nearly the 3σ level and reduces the scatter and systematic offset of the luminosity residuals. Typically, {[O III]} bolometric corrections are adopted for Type 2 sources where the quasar continuum is not observed and in these cases, R_{Fe II} cannot be measured. We searched for an alternative measure of EV1 that could be measured in the optical spectra of Type 2 sources but were unable to identify one. Thus, the main contribution of this work is to present an improved {[O III]} bolometric correction based on measured bolometric luminosities and highlight the EV1 dependence of the correction in Type 1 sources.

  19. Mechanisms of Ovarian Cancer Metastasis: Biochemical Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Kentaro; Nakayama, Naomi; Katagiri, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Kohji

    2012-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Despite advances in chemotherapy, the five-year survival rate of advanced ovarian cancer patients with peritoneal metastasis remains around 30%. The most significant prognostic factor is stage, and most patients present at an advanced stage with peritoneal dissemination. There is often no clearly identifiable precursor lesion; therefore, the events leading to metastatic disease are poorly understood. This article reviews metastatic suppressor genes, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and the tumor microenvironment as they relate to ovarian cancer metastasis. Additionally, novel chemotherapeutic agents targeting the metastasis-related biochemical pathways are discussed. PMID:23109879

  20. Biochemical Disincentives to Fertilizing Cellulosic Ethanol Crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, M. E.; Hockaday, W. C.; Snapp, S.; McSwiney, C.; Baldock, J.

    2010-12-01

    Corn grain biofuel crops produce the highest yields when the cropping ecosystem is not nitrogen (N)-limited, achieved by application of fertilizer. There are environmental consequences for excessive fertilizer application to crops, including greenhouse gas emissions, hypoxic “dead zones,” and health problems from N runoff into groundwater. The increase in corn acreage in response to demand for alternative fuels (i.e. ethanol) could exacerbate these problems, and divert food supplies to fuel production. A potential substitute for grain ethanol that could reduce some of these impacts is cellulosic ethanol. Cellulosic ethanol feedstocks include grasses (switchgrass), hardwoods, and crop residues (e.g. corn stover, wheat straw). It has been assumed that these feedstocks will require similar N fertilization rates to grain biofuel crops to maximize yields, but carbohydrate yield versus N application has not previously been monitored. We report the biochemical stocks (carbohydrate, protein, and lignin in Mg ha-1) of a corn ecosystem grown under varying N levels. We measured biochemical yield in Mg ha-1 within the grain, leaf and stem, and reproductive parts of corn plants grown at seven N fertilization rates (0-202 kg N ha-1), to evaluate the quantity and quality of these feedstocks across a N fertilization gradient. The N fertilization rate study was performed at the Kellogg Biological Station-Long Term Ecological Research Site (KBS-LTER) in Michigan. Biochemical stocks were measured using 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), combined with a molecular mixing model (Baldock et al. 2004). Carbohydrate and lignin are the main biochemicals of interest in ethanol production since carbohydrate is the ethanol feedstock, and lignin hinders the carbohydrate to ethanol conversion process. We show that corn residue carbohydrate yields respond only weakly to N fertilization compared to grain. Grain carbohydrate yields plateau in response to fertilization at

  1. Physiological and biochemical changes with Vamana procedure

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Bharti; Mahapatra, Sushil C.; Makhija, Renu; Kumar, Adarsh; Jirankalgikar, Nikhil M.; Padhi, Madan M.; Devalla, Ramesh Babu

    2012-01-01

    Vamana Karma (therapeutic emesis) primarily a Samshodhana Karma (purification procedure) is one of the five Pradhana Karmas (chief procedures) of Panchakarma. It is mentioned in Ayurvedic texts that a person after Samyak Vamana (proper Vamana) experiences lightness of the body, Hrit (precordium), Kantha (throat/voice), and Shirah (head) and weakness. This procedure is effectively used in healthy and ailing persons for purification of body and extraction of Doshas (especially Kapha) in Ayurvedic system. It has been found worth to observe the physiological and biochemical changes during Vamana and after the procedure to understand the effect/safety margins of the procedure in healthy volunteers. PMID:23723640

  2. Noise-induced metastability in biochemical networks.

    PubMed

    Biancalani, Tommaso; Rogers, Tim; McKane, Alan J

    2012-07-01

    Intracellular biochemical reactions exhibit a rich dynamical phenomenology which cannot be explained within the framework of mean-field rate equations and additive noise. Here, we show that the presence of metastable states and radically different time scales are general features of a broad class of autocatalytic reaction networks, and that this fact may be exploited to gain analytical results. The latter point is demonstrated by a treatment of the paradigmatic Togashi-Kaneko reaction, which has resisted theoretical analysis for the last decade.

  3. Azoospermia: clinical, hormonal, and biochemical investigation.

    PubMed

    Papadimas, J; Papadopoulou, F; Ioannidis, S; Spanos, E; Tarlatzis, B; Bontis, J; Mantalenakis, S

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical, hormonal and biochemical characteristics of infertile men with azoospermia. A total of 187 azoospermic out of 2610 infertile men (7.2%) were studied. Mean testicular volume and basal plasma levels of FSH were the most useful parameters concerning the evaluation of azoospermia. Basal plasma levels of LH and T were useful only in azoospermic men with hypogonadism, whereas plasma PRL levels, semen volume, and seminal plasma fructose levels were not found to be of common use except in selected cases.

  4. Sampling rare switching events in biochemical networks.

    PubMed

    Allen, Rosalind J; Warren, Patrick B; Ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2005-01-14

    Bistable biochemical switches are widely found in gene regulatory networks and signal transduction pathways. Their switching dynamics are difficult to study, however, because switching events are rare, and the systems are out of equilibrium. We present a simulation method for predicting the rate and mechanism of the flipping of these switches. We apply it to a genetic switch and find that it is highly efficient. The path ensembles for the forward and reverse processes do not coincide. The method is widely applicable to rare events and nonequilibrium processes.

  5. [Chronic fatigue syndrome: biochemical examination of blood].

    PubMed

    Hakariya, Yukiko; Kuratsune, Hirohiko

    2007-06-01

    Though patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) have lots of complaints, abnormal findings cannot be detected by biochemical screening tests. However, some specialized blood tests have revealed neuroendocrine immune axis abnormalities, which is closely associated with each other. Recent studies indicate that CFS can be understood as a special condition based on abnormality of the psycho-neuro-endocrino-immunological system, with the distinguishing feature of CFS seeming to be the secondary brain dysfunction caused by several cytokines and/or autoantibodies. In this paper, we summarize these abnormalities found in CFS and show the neuro-molecular mechanism leading to chronic fatigue.

  6. Biochemical processing of heavy oils and residuum

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M.S.; Premuzic, T.; Yablon, J.H.; Zhou, Wei-Min

    1995-05-01

    During the past several decades, the petroleum industry has adjusted gradually to accommodate the changes in market product demands, government regulations, and the quality and cost of feedstock crude oils. For example, the trends show that the demand for distillate fuels, such as diesel, as compared to gasoline are increasing. Air-quality standards have put additional demand on the processing of heavier and higher sulfur feed stocks. Thus, the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments require the industry to produce greater quantities of oxygenated gasoline, and lower sulfur diesel and reformulated gasoline. Biochemical technology may play an important role in responding to these demands on the petroleum industry.

  7. [Optical detection system for micro biochemical analyses].

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Wu, Yi-hui; Zhao, Hua-bing; Ju, Hui

    2005-04-01

    For the need of biochemical chip, which consumes fewer specimens and is easy to integrate with micro-fluid chip, two kinds of spectrophotometric analysis methods are described in the present paper. Both the direct detection method and evanescent wave detection method are used in the experiments with visible light (460-800 nm). The experimental results proved that the direct detection is simple and evident; on the other hand the evanescent wave detection method consumes much less reagent and is easy to integrate with microchips.

  8. Synchronization of stochastic oscillators in biochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Challenger, Joseph D; McKane, Alan J

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the synchronization of stochastic oscillations in biochemical models by calculating the complex coherence function within the linear noise approximation. The method is illustrated on a simple example and then applied to study the synchronization of chemical concentrations in social amoeba. The degree to which variation of rate constants in different cells and the volume of the cells affects synchronization of the oscillations is explored and the phase lag calculated. In all cases the analytical results are shown to be in good agreement with those obtained through numerical simulations.

  9. Design and optimization of a microwave irradiated and resonant continuous biochemical reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanti, A.; Casu, S.; Desogus, F.; Djuric, N.; Mazzarella, G.

    2016-07-01

    The design of a microwave irradiated enzyme (biochemical) reactor is here presented. It consists of a suitable higher-order mode resonant cavity which contains several tubes where the solution containing reagents and products flow in the laminar flow regime. The process evolution under irradiation has then been simulated using the COMSOL multiphysics environment. As an example, the enzymatic hydrolysis reaction of sucrose has been considered. The results of the multiphysics simulation show that such a reactor can be used to effectively perform the reaction process in the optimal conditions for maximizing the reaction rate and preventing the enzyme deactivation by a precise knowledge of the temperature distribution and its strict control.

  10. An integrative top-down and bottom-up qualitative model construction framework for exploration of biochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zujian; Pang, Wei; Coghill, George M

    Computational modelling of biochemical systems based on top-down and bottom-up approaches has been well studied over the last decade. In this research, after illustrating how to generate atomic components by a set of given reactants and two user pre-defined component patterns, we propose an integrative top-down and bottom-up modelling approach for stepwise qualitative exploration of interactions among reactants in biochemical systems. Evolution strategy is applied to the top-down modelling approach to compose models, and simulated annealing is employed in the bottom-up modelling approach to explore potential interactions based on models constructed from the top-down modelling process. Both the top-down and bottom-up approaches support stepwise modular addition or subtraction for the model evolution. Experimental results indicate that our modelling approach is feasible to learn the relationships among biochemical reactants qualitatively. In addition, hidden reactants of the target biochemical system can be obtained by generating complex reactants in corresponding composed models. Moreover, qualitatively learned models with inferred reactants and alternative topologies can be used for further web-lab experimental investigations by biologists of interest, which may result in a better understanding of the system.

  11. Physiology, phylogeny, early evolution, and GAPDH.

    PubMed

    Martin, William F; Cerff, Rüdiger

    2017-03-06

    The chloroplast and cytosol of plant cells harbor a number of parallel biochemical reactions germane to the Calvin cycle and glycolysis, respectively. These reactions are catalyzed by nuclear encoded, compartment-specific isoenzymes that differ in their physiochemical properties. The chloroplast cytosol isoenzymes of D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) harbor evidence of major events in the history of life: the origin of the first genes, the bacterial-archaeal split, the origin of eukaryotes, the evolution of protein compartmentation during eukaryote evolution, the origin of plastids, and the secondary endosymbiosis among the algae with complex plastids. The reaction mechanism of GAPDH entails phosphorolysis of a thioester to yield an energy-rich acyl phosphate bond, a chemistry that points to primitive pathways of energy conservation that existed even before the origin of the first free-living cells. Here, we recount the main insights that chloroplast and cytosolic GAPDH provided into endosymbiosis and physiological evolution.

  12. Pheochromocytoma-paraganglioma: Biochemical and genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Cano Megías, Marta; Rodriguez Puyol, Diego; Fernández Rodríguez, Loreto; Sención Martinez, Gloria Lisette; Martínez Miguel, Patricia

    Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are tumours derived from neural crest cells, which can be diagnosed by biochemical measurement of metanephrine and methoxytyramine. Advances in genetic research have identified many genes involved in the pathogenesis of these tumours, suggesting that up to 35-45% may have an underlying germline mutation. These genes have a singular transcriptional signature and can be grouped into 2 clusters (or groups): cluster 1 (VHL and SHDx), involved in angiogenesis and hypoxia pathways; and cluster 2 (MEN2 and NF1), linked to the kinase signalling pathway. In turn, these genes are associated with a characteristic biochemical phenotype (noradrenergic and adrenergic), and clinical features (location, biological behaviour, age of presentation, etc.) in a large number of cases. Early diagnosis of these tumours, accompanied by a correct genetic diagnosis, should eventually become a priority to enable better treatment, early detection of complications, proper screening of family members and related tumours, as well as an improvement in the overall prognosis of these patients. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. BIOCHEMICAL PROCESSES FOR GEOTHERMAL BRINE TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect

    PREMUZIC,E.T.; LIN,M.S.; BOHENEK,M.; JOSHI-TOPE,G.; ZHOU,W.; SHELENKOVA,L.; WILKE,R.

    1998-09-20

    As part of the DOE Geothermal Energy Program, BNL's Advanced Biochemical Processes for Geothermal Brines (ABPGB) project is aimed at the development of cost-efficient and environmentally acceptable technologies for the disposal of geothermal wastes. Extensive chemical studies of high and low salinity brines and precipitates have indicated that in addition to trace quantities of regulated substances, e.g., toxic metals such as arsenic and mercury, there are significant concentrations of valuable metals, including gold, silver and platinum. Further chemical and physical studies of the silica product have also shown that the produced silica is a valuable material with commercial potential. A combined biochemical and chemical technology is being developed which (1) solubilizes, separates, and removes environmentally regulated constituents in geothermal precipitates and brines (2) generates an amorphous silica product which may be used as feedstock for the production of revenue generating materials, (3) recover economically valuable trace metals and salts. Geothermal power resources which utilize low salinity brines and use the Stretford process for hydrogen sulfide abatement generate a contaminated sulfur cake. Combined technology converts such sulfur to a commercial grade sulfur, suitable for agricultural use. The R and D activities at BNL are conducted jointly with industrial parties in an effort focused on field applications.

  14. Biochemical processes for geothermal brine treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.; Bohenek, M.; Joshi-Tope, G.; Zhou, W.; Shelenkova, L.; Wilke, R.

    1998-08-01

    As part of the DOE Geothermal Energy Program, BNL`s Advanced Biochemical Processes for Geothermal Brines (ABPGB) project is aimed at the development of cost-efficient and environmentally acceptable technologies for the disposal of geothermal wastes. Extensive chemical studies of high and low salinity brines and precipitates have indicated that in addition to trace quantities of regulated substances, e.g., toxic metals such as arsenic and mercury, there are significant concentrations of valuable metals, including gold, silver and platinum. Further chemical and physical studies of the silica product have also shown that the produced silica is a valuable material with commercial potential. A combined biochemical and chemical technology is being developed which (1) solubilizes, separates, and removes environmentally regulated constituents in geothermal precipitates and brines, (2) generates an amorphous silica product which may be used as feedstock for the production of revenue generating materials, (3) recover economically valuable trace metals and salts. Geothermal power resources which utilize low salinity brines and use the Stretford process for hydrogen sulfide abatement generate a contaminated sulfur cake. Combined technology converts such sulfur to a commercial grade sulfur, suitable for agricultural use. The R and D activities at BNL are conducted jointly with industrial parties in an effort focused on field applications.

  15. Biochemical effects of oral sodium phosphate.

    PubMed

    DiPalma, J A; Buckley, S E; Warner, B A; Culpepper, R M

    1996-04-01

    Our objective was to monitor serum and urine biochemical changes after oral sodium phosphate cleansing in a prospectively designed study. The study subjects were seven healthy, asymptomatic adults. Sodium phosphate 45 ml diluted in 45 ml water was given orally at baseline and 12 hr later. Calcium, ionized calcium, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, creatinine, and PTH were analyzed at 2, 4, 6, 9, 12, 14, 16, 18, 21 and 24 hr after the first challenge. Urinary calcium, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, and cyclic AMP were analyzed at baseline and every 2 hr after oral sodium phosphate. Blood pressure, pulse, and respiratory rate were recorded every 2 hr and symptom questionnaires using visual analog scales were completed. A marked rise in phosphorus (peak range 3.6-12.4 mg/dl, P < 0.001) and falls in calcium (P < 0.001) and ionized calcium (P < 0.001) were seen. Rises seen in PTH and urinary cAMP confirmed the physiologic significance of the biochemical effect. There were no significant changes in other serum and urine laboratory or clinical assessments. Reported significant symptoms included bloating, cramps, abdominal pain, and nausea. Significant hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia after oral sodium phosphate raises concern about its use in normal individuals. Oral sodium phosphate should not be administered in patients with cardiopulmonary, renal, or hepatic disease.

  16. Rebinding in biochemical reactions on membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawley, Sean D.; Keener, James P.

    2017-10-01

    The behavior of many biochemical processes depends crucially on molecules rapidly rebinding after dissociating. In the case of multisite protein modification, the importance of rebinding has been demonstrated both experimentally and through several recent computational studies involving stochastic spatial simulations. As rebinding stems from spatio-temporal correlations, theorists have resorted to models that explicitly include space to properly account for the effects of rebinding. However, for reactions in three space dimensions it was recently shown that well-mixed ordinary differential equation (ODE) models can incorporate rebinding by adding connections to the reaction network. The rate constants for these new connections involve the probability that a pair of molecules rapidly rebinds after dissociation. In order to study biochemical reactions on membranes, in this paper we derive an explicit formula for this rebinding probability for reactions in two space dimensions. We show that ODE models can use the formula to replicate detailed stochastic spatial simulations, and that the formula can predict ultrasensitivity for reactions involving multisite modification of membrane-bound proteins. Further, we compute a new concentration-dependent rebinding probability for reactions in three space dimensions. Our analysis predicts that rebinding plays a much larger role in reactions on membranes compared to reactions in cytoplasm.

  17. Biochemical enzyme analysis in acute leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Drexler, H G; Gaedicke, G; Minowada, J

    1985-01-01

    This report summarises the current knowledge regarding the clinical utility of biochemical enzyme markers for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes in acute leukaemia. The enzymes studied most extensively in this field are terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase, adenosine deaminase, 5'-nucleotidase, purine nucleoside phosphorylase, and acid phosphatase, esterase, hexosaminidase isoenzymes. For each enzyme, the quantitative and qualitative characteristics in various immunologically defined subclasses of acute leukaemia are described. The quantitative evaluation of enzyme activities represents an adjunctive classification technique which should be incorporated into the multivariate analysis, the "multiple marker analysis." By qualitative characterisation pronounced heterogeneity of leukaemia subsets is uncovered. The application of 2'-deoxycoformycin, a specific inhibitor of adenosine deaminase, and the potential usefulness of two other enzymes as targets for treatment with selective agents is discussed. The concept that gene products expressed at certain developmental stages of normal cells can similarly be detected in leukaemic cells (which therefore seem to be "frozen" or "arrested" at this particular maturation/differentiation stage) is supported by the results obtained in enzyme studies. Besides their practical clinical importance for classification and treatment of acute leukaemias, biochemical enzyme markers constitute a valuable research tool to disclose biological properties of leukaemic cells. PMID:2981904

  18. Biochemical basis for the biological clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morre, D. James; Chueh, Pin-Ju; Pletcher, Jake; Tang, Xiaoyu; Wu, Lian-Ying; Morre, Dorothy M.

    2002-01-01

    NADH oxidases at the external surface of plant and animal cells (ECTO-NOX proteins) exhibit stable and recurring patterns of oscillations with potentially clock-related, entrainable, and temperature-compensated period lengths of 24 min. To determine if ECTO-NOX proteins might represent the ultradian time keepers (pacemakers) of the biological clock, COS cells were transfected with cDNAs encoding tNOX proteins having a period length of 22 min or with C575A or C558A cysteine to alanine replacements having period lengths of 36 or 42 min. Here we demonstrate that such transfectants exhibited 22, 36, or 40 to 42 h circadian patterns in the activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, a common clock-regulated protein, in addition to the endogenous 24 h circadian period length. The fact that the expression of a single oscillatory ECTO-NOX protein determines the period length of a circadian biochemical marker (60 X the ECTO-NOX period length) provides compelling evidence that ECTO-NOX proteins are the biochemical ultradian drivers of the cellular biological clock.

  19. Clinical, biochemical & cytomorphologic study on Hashimoto's thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Tina; Sreedharan, Suja; Khadilkar, Urmila N.; Deviprasad, D; Kamath, M. Panduranga; Bhojwani, Kiran M.; Alva, Arathi

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Despite, the extensive salt iodization programmes implemented in India, the prevalence of goiter has not reduced much in our country. The most frequent cause of hypothyroidism and goiter in iodine sufficient areas is Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT). This study records the clinical presentation, biochemical status, ultrasonographic picture and cytological appearance of this disease in a coastal endemic zone for goiter. Methods: Case records of patients with cytological diagnosis of HT were studied in detail, with reference to their symptoms, presence of goiter, thyroid function status, antibody levels and ultrasound picture. Detailed cytological study was conducted in selected patients. Results: A total of 144 patients with cytological proven HT/lymphocytic thyroiditis were studied. Ninety per cent of the patients were females and most of them presented within five years of onset of symptoms. Sixty eight per cent patients had diffuse goiter, 69 per cent were clinically euthyroid and 46 per cent were biochemically mildly hypothyroid. Antibody levels were elevated in 92.3 per cent cases. In majority of patients the sonographic picture showed heterogeneous echotexture with increased vascularity. Cytological changes were characteristic. Interpretation & conclusions: Our study showed predominance of females in the study population in 21-40 yr age group with diffuse goiter. We suggest that in an endemic zone for goiter, all women of the child bearing age should be screened for HT. PMID:25758571

  20. [Biochemical principles of early saturnism recognition].

    PubMed

    Tsimakuridze, M P; Mansuradze, E A; Zurashvili, D G; Tsimakuridze, M P

    2009-03-01

    The aim of the work is to determine the major sensitive criteria of biochemical indicators that allow timely discovery of negative influence of lead on organism and assist in early diagnosis of primary stages of saturnism. The workers of Georgian typographies, performing technological processes of letterpress printing were observed. Professional groups having contact with lead aerosols (main group of 66 people) and the workers of the same typography not being in touch with the poison (control group of 24 people) were studied. It was distinguished that, protracted professional contact with lead causes moderate increase of lead, coproporphyrin and DALA in daily urine in most cases; it is more clearly evidenced in the professional groups of lead smelters and lino operators and less clearly among typesetter and printers. Upon the checkup of people, having a direct contact with lead, biochemical analysis of urine should be given a preference, especially the determination of quantitative content of lead and coproporphyrin in urine with the aim of revealing the lead carrier, which is one of the first signals for occupational lookout and medical monitoring of the similar contingent.

  1. Biochemical basis for the biological clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morre, D. James; Chueh, Pin-Ju; Pletcher, Jake; Tang, Xiaoyu; Wu, Lian-Ying; Morre, Dorothy M.

    2002-01-01

    NADH oxidases at the external surface of plant and animal cells (ECTO-NOX proteins) exhibit stable and recurring patterns of oscillations with potentially clock-related, entrainable, and temperature-compensated period lengths of 24 min. To determine if ECTO-NOX proteins might represent the ultradian time keepers (pacemakers) of the biological clock, COS cells were transfected with cDNAs encoding tNOX proteins having a period length of 22 min or with C575A or C558A cysteine to alanine replacements having period lengths of 36 or 42 min. Here we demonstrate that such transfectants exhibited 22, 36, or 40 to 42 h circadian patterns in the activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, a common clock-regulated protein, in addition to the endogenous 24 h circadian period length. The fact that the expression of a single oscillatory ECTO-NOX protein determines the period length of a circadian biochemical marker (60 X the ECTO-NOX period length) provides compelling evidence that ECTO-NOX proteins are the biochemical ultradian drivers of the cellular biological clock.

  2. Biochemical responses of the Skylab crewman

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, C. S.; Rambaut, P. C.

    1974-01-01

    The biochemical investigations of the Skylab crewmen were designed to study the physiological changes that were observed on flight crews returning from previous space flight missions as well as to study those changes expected to result from prolonged weightless exposure. These studies can be divided into two broad categories. One category included routine blood studies similar to those used in clinical medical practice. The second included research-type endocrine analyses used to investigate more thoroughly the metabolic/endocrine responses to the space flight environment. The premission control values indicated that all Skylab crewmen were healthy and were free from biochemical abnormalities. The routine results during and after flight showed slight but significant changes in electrolytes, glucose, total protein, osmolality, uric acid, cholesterol, and creatinine. Plasma hormal changes included adrenocorticotrophic hormone, cortisol, angiotensin I, aldosterone, insulin, and thyroxine. The 24-hour urine analyses results revealed increased excretion of cortisol, catecholamines, antidiuretic hormone, and aldosterone as well as excretion of significant electrolyte and uric acid during the Skylab flights.

  3. FACT facilitates chromatin transcription by RNA polymerases I and III

    PubMed Central

    Birch, Joanna L; Tan, Bertrand C-M; Panov, Kostya I; Panova, Tatiana B; Andersen, Jens S; Owen-Hughes, Tom A; Russell, Jackie; Lee, Sheng-Chung; Zomerdijk, Joost C B M

    2009-01-01

    Efficient transcription elongation from a chromatin template requires RNA polymerases (Pols) to negotiate nucleosomes. Our biochemical analyses demonstrate that RNA Pol I can transcribe through nucleosome templates and that this requires structural rearrangement of the nucleosomal core particle. The subunits of the histone chaperone FACT (facilitates chromatin transcription), SSRP1 and Spt16, co-purify and co-immunoprecipitate with mammalian Pol I complexes. In cells, SSRP1 is detectable at the rRNA gene repeats. Crucially, siRNA-mediated repression of FACT subunit expression in cells results in a significant reduction in 47S pre-rRNA levels, whereas synthesis of the first 40 nt of the rRNA is not affected, implying that FACT is important for Pol I transcription elongation through chromatin. FACT also associates with RNA Pol III complexes, is present at the chromatin of genes transcribed by Pol III and facilitates their transcription in cells. Our findings indicate that, beyond the established role in Pol II transcription, FACT has physiological functions in chromatin transcription by all three nuclear RNA Pols. Our data also imply that local chromatin dynamics influence transcription of the active rRNA genes by Pol I and of Pol III-transcribed genes. PMID:19214185

  4. Atmospheric Evolution on Inhabited and Lifeless Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catling, David C.; Kasting, James F.

    2017-04-01

    Preface; Part I. Principles of Planetary Atmospheres: 1. The structure of planetary atmospheres; 2. Energy and radiation in planetary atmospheres; 3. Essentials of chemistry of planetary atmospheres; 4. Motions in planetary atmospheres; 5. Escape of atmospheres to space; Part II. Evolution of the Earth's Atmosphere: 6. Formation of Earth's atmosphere and oceans; 7. Volcanic outgassing and mantle redox evolution; 8. Atmospheric and global redox balance; 9. The prebiotic and early postbiotic atmosphere; 10. The rise of oxygen and ozone in Earth's atmosphere; 11. Long-term climate evolution; Part III. Atmospheres and Climates on Other Worlds: 12. Mars; 13. Evolution of Venus' atmosphere; 14. Giant planets and their satellites; 15. Exoplanets: habitability and characterization; Bibliography; Appendix A. One-dimensional climate model; Appendix B. Photochemical models; Appendix C. Atomic states and term symbols; Index.

  5. Evolution and the complexity of bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Serwer, Philip

    2007-01-01

    Background The genomes of both long-genome (> 200 Kb) bacteriophages and long-genome eukaryotic viruses have cellular gene homologs whose selective advantage is not explained. These homologs add genomic and possibly biochemical complexity. Understanding their significance requires a definition of complexity that is more biochemically oriented than past empirically based definitions. Hypothesis Initially, I propose two biochemistry-oriented definitions of complexity: either decreased randomness or increased encoded information that does not serve immediate needs. Then, I make the assumption that these two definitions are equivalent. This assumption and recent data lead to the following four-part hypothesis that explains the presence of cellular gene homologs in long bacteriophage genomes and also provides a pathway for complexity increases in prokaryotic cells: (1) Prokaryotes underwent evolutionary increases in biochemical complexity after the eukaryote/prokaryote splits. (2) Some of the complexity increases occurred via multi-step, weak selection that was both protected from strong selection and accelerated by embedding evolving cellular genes in the genomes of bacteriophages and, presumably, also archaeal viruses (first tier selection). (3) The mechanisms for retaining cellular genes in viral genomes evolved under additional, longer-term selection that was stronger (second tier selection). (4) The second tier selection was based on increased access by prokaryotic cells to improved biochemical systems. This access was achieved when DNA transfer moved to prokaryotic cells both the more evolved genes and their more competitive and complex biochemical systems. Testing the hypothesis I propose testing this hypothesis by controlled evolution in microbial communities to (1) determine the effects of deleting individual cellular gene homologs on the growth and evolution of long genome bacteriophages and hosts, (2) find the environmental conditions that select for the

  6. Impact analysis of Minuteman III Payload Transporter Type III

    SciTech Connect

    Stirbis, P.P.

    1993-12-01

    An analysis of the impact of the Minuteman III Payload Transporter Type III into a nonyielding target at 46 m.p.h. and 30 m.p.h., and into a yielding target at 46 m.p.h. is presented. The analysis considers the structural response of the tiedown system which secures the Minuteman III re-entry system to the floor of the payload transporter. A finite element model of the re-entry system, its tiedown system, which includes tie-rods and shear pins, and the pallet plate which is attached to the transporter floating plate, was constructed. Because accelerations of the payload transporter are not known, acceleration data from one-quarter scale testing of the Safe Secure Trailer was used to investigate the response of the tiedown system. These accelerations were applied to the pallet plate. The ABAQUS computer code was used to predict the forces in the members of the tiedown system.

  7. Dissociation of cerium(III) and neodymium(III) phthalocyanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomova, T. N.

    2015-07-01

    The kinetics of dissociation of phthalocyanine complexes with cerium(III) and neodymium(III) (X)LnPc (X = Cl-, Br-, AcO-) under the action of acetic acid in ethanol with isolation of the macrocyclic ligand depending on the temperature was studied. The kinetic equations with the numerical values of rate constants, activation parameters, and the stoichiometric mechanisms with the limiting simple reaction between the nonionized AcOH molecule and (phthalocyaninato)lanthanide(III) in the axially coordinated ((X)LnPc, cerium complexes) or axially ionized ([(AcOH)LnPc]+X-, neodymium complexes) state were derived by solving the direct and inverse problems. As shown by a comparative analysis of quantitative kinetic data, the state is determined by the electronic structure of the metal cation and the mutual effect of the axial and equatorial ligands in the first coordination sphere.

  8. The growing need for biochemical bioherbicides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The volume of herbicide use outpaces that of other pesticides. Evolution of resistance to the currently used herbicides has greatly increased the need for new modes of action (MOAs). More than 20 years have passed since the last new herbicide MOA was introduced. Natural products offer a source of...

  9. Qualitative study of Bianchi type-I, III and Kantowski-Sachs cosmological models with scalar field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaubey, Raghavendra; Raushan, Rakesh

    2016-08-01

    A qualitative analysis of Bianchi type-I, III and Kantowski-Sachs (KS) cosmological models with a scalar field and matter fluid is performed. The analysis of the resulting equations is made by the dynamical system method. To analyze the evolution equations, we have introduced suitable transformation of variables. The evolution of the corresponding solutions is represented by curves in the phase-plane diagram. We analyze the evolution of the effective equation of state parameter for Bianchi type-I, III and KS cosmological models. The nature of critical points are analyzed and stable attractors are examined for each cosmological model.

  10. The START III bargaining space

    SciTech Connect

    Karas, T.H.

    1998-08-01

    The declining state of the Russian military and precarious Russian economic condition will give the US considerable advantages at the START III bargaining table. Taking the US-RF asymmetries into account, this paper discusses a menu of START III measures the US could ask for, and measures it could offer in return, in attempting to negotiate an equitable treaty. Measures the US might seek in a START III treaty include: further reductions in deployed strategic nuclear warheads, irreversibility of reductions through warhead dismantlement; beginning to bring theater nuclear weapons under mutual control, and increased transparency into the Russian nuclear weapons complex. The US may, however, wish to apply its bargaining advantages to attempting to achieve the first steps toward two long-range goals that would enhance US security: bringing theater nuclear weapons into the US-RF arms control arena, and increasing transparency into the Russian nuclear weapons complex. In exchange for measures relating to these objectives, the US might consider offering to Russia: Further strategic weapons reductions approaching levels at which the Russians believe they could maintain a degree of parity with the US; Measures to decrease the large disparities in potential deliver-system uploading capabilities that appear likely under current START II/START III scenarios; and Financial assistance in achieving START II/START III reductions as rapidly as is technically possible.

  11. The effects of L-tryptophan and melatonin on selected biochemical parameters in patients with steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Cichoz-Lach, H; Celinski, K; Konturek, P C; Konturek, S J; Slomka, M

    2010-10-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common chronic liver disease and nonalcocholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is its advanced form. Oxidative stress and hepatocyte apoptosis may be involved in pathogenesis of NASH and particularly in progress of NASH to liver fibrosis and cirrhosis, which are initiated by the inflammation and which promote the progress of the disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of melatonin and L-tryptophan on selected biochemical parameters of blood in patients with NASH. Forty five patients with NASH, confirmed by histopathological examination of liver biopsy samples, were admitted to the study. They were divided into three groups (I, II and III). The first group (group I, n=15) received preparation Essentiale forte 3 times a day and tryptophan 500 mg twice daily for 4 weeks. In the second group (group II, n=15), Essentiale forte three times a day was administered with melatonin 5 mg applied twice a day for 4 weeks. The third group (group III, n=15) received only Essentiale forte with placebo three times a day for 4 weeks. After four-week treatment we found statistically significant reduction in GGTP, triglycerides and proinflammatory cytokine levels in the melatonin-treated (group I) and the L-tryptophan-treated patients (group II). Plasma level of melatonin was significantly elevated in groups treated with tryptophan (group I) and melatonin (group II), but remained unchanged in placebo-treated group (group III). Among patients from the third group (treated with placebo) no statistically significant differences in the measured biochemical parameters were observed. The present study suggests that melatonin and tryptophan have the significant impact on the reduction in plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines and may be useful in the treatment of patients with NASH.

  12. Evaluation of Nutritional Biochemical Parameters in Haemodialysis Patients over a Ten-year Period.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, A I-Q; Castillo, R F; Gomez Jimenez, F J; Nuñez Negrillo, A M

    2015-06-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition as well as systemic inflammation and metabolic disorders are common in patients with chronic kidney failure, who require renal replacement therapy (haemodialysis). Such malnutrition is a factor that significantly contributes to their morbidity and mortality. This study evaluated the nutritional status of haemodialysis patients by assessing biochemical and anthropometric parameters in order to determine whether these patients suffered disorders reflecting nutritional deterioration directly related to time on haemodialysis. This research comprised 90 patients of both genders with chronic kidney failure, who regularly received haemodialysis at our unit over a period of ten years. The patients' blood was tested quarterly for plasma albumin, total cholesterol and total proteins, and tested monthly for transferrin. The patients' weight, height and body mass index (BMI) were monitored. Body mass index was calculated using the formula: weight (kg)/height (m2 ) and classified in one of the following categories defined in the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Database on Body Mass Index: (i) underweight [BMI < 18.50], (ii) normal [BMI 18.50 - 24.99], (iii) overweight [BMI 25 - 29.99], (iv) obese [BMI > 30]. In the ten-year period of the study, the patients experienced a substantial decline in their biochemical parameters. Nevertheless, their BMI did not show any significant changes despite the patients' state of malnutrition. The prevalence of malnutrition in haemodialysis patients was evident. Nevertheless, the BMI of the subjects did not correspond to the biochemical parameters measured. Consequently, the results showed that the nutritional deterioration of these patients was mainly reflected in their biochemical parameters rather than in their anthropometric measurements.

  13. Systematic review of biochemical biomarkers for neck and upper-extremity musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Gold, Judith E; Hallman, David M; Hellström, Fredrik; Björklund, Martin; Crenshaw, Albert G; Djupsjobacka, Mats; Heiden, Marina; Mathiassen, Svend Erik; Piligian, George; Barbe, Mary F

    2016-03-01

    This study systematically summarizes biochemical biomarker research in non-traumatic musculoskeletal disorders (MSD). Two research questions guided the review: (i) Are there biochemical markers associated with neck and upper-extremity MSD? and (ii) Are there biochemical markers associated with the severity of neck and upper-extremity MSD? A literature search was conducted in PubMed and SCOPUS, and 87 studies met primary inclusion criteria. Following a quality screen, data were extracted from 44 articles of sufficient quality. Most of the 87 studies were cross-sectional and utilized convenience samples of patients as both cases and controls. A response rate was explicitly stated in only 11 (13%) studies. Less than half of the studies controlled for potential confounding through restriction or in the analysis. Most sufficient-quality studies were conducted in older populations (mean age in one or more analysis group >50 years). In sufficient-quality articles, 82% demonstrated at least one statistically significant association between the MSD and biomarker(s) studied. Evidence suggested that: (i) the collagen-repair marker TIMP-1 is decreased in fibro proliferative disorders, (ii) 5-HT (serotonin) is increased in trapezius myalgia, and (iii) triglycerides are increased in a variety of MSD. Only 5 studies showed an association between a biochemical marker and MSD severity. While some MSD biomarkers were identified, limitations in the articles examined included possible selection bias, confounding, spectrum effect (potentially heterogeneous biomarker associations in populations according to symptom severity or duration), and insufficient attention to comorbid conditions. A list of recommendations for future studies is provided.

  14. Evaluation of Nutritional Biochemical Parameters in Haemodialysis Patients over a Ten-year Period

    PubMed Central

    Alfonso, AIQ; Castillo, RF; Jimenez, FJ Gomez; Negrillo, AM Nuñez

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: Protein-energy malnutrition as well as systemic inflammation and metabolic disorders are common in patients with chronic kidney failure who require renal replacement therapy (haemodialysis). Such malnutrition is a factor that significantly contributes to their morbidity and mortality. This study evaluated the nutritional status of haemodialysis patients by assessing biochemical and anthropometric parameters in order to determine whether these patients suffered disorders reflecting nutritional deterioration directly related to time on haemodialysis. Subjects and Method: This research comprised 90 patients of both genders with chronic kidney failure, who regularly received haemodialysis at our unit over a period of ten years. The patients' blood was tested quarterly for plasma albumin, total cholesterol and total proteins, and tested monthly for transferrin. The patients' weight, height and body mass index (BMI) were monitored. Body mass index was calculated using the formula: weight (kg)/height (m2) and classified in one of the following categories defined in the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Database on Body Mass Index: (i) underweight [BMI < 18.50], (ii) normal [BMI 18.50 – 24.99], (iii) overweight [BMI 25 – 29.99], (iv) obese [BMI ≥ 30]. Results: In the ten-year period of the study, the patients experienced a substantial decline in their biochemical parameters. Nevertheless, their BMI did not show any significant changes despite the patients' state of malnutrition. Conclusions: The prevalence of malnutrition in haemodialysis patients was evident. Nevertheless, the BMI of the subjects did not correspond to the biochemical parameters measured. Consequently, the results showed that the nutritional deterioration of these patients was mainly reflected in their biochemical parameters rather than in their anthropometric measurements. PMID:26426172

  15. Case A Binary Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, C A; Eggleton, P P

    2001-03-28

    We undertake a comparison of observed Algol-type binaries with a library of computed Case A binary evolution tracks. The library consists of 5500 binary tracks with various values of initial primary mass M{sub 10}, mass ratio q{sub 0}, and period P{sub 0}, designed to sample the phase-space of Case A binaries in the range -0.10 {le} log M{sub 10} {le} 1.7. Each binary is evolved using a standard code with the assumption that both total mass and orbital angular momentum are conserved. This code follows the evolution of both stars until the point where contact or reverse mass transfer occurs. The resulting binary tracks show a rich variety of behavior which we sort into several subclasses of Case A and Case B. We present the results of this classification, the final mass ratio and the fraction of time spent in Roche Lobe overflow for each binary system. The conservative assumption under which we created this library is expected to hold for a broad range of binaries, where both components have spectra in the range G0 to B1 and luminosity class III - V. We gather a list of relatively well-determined observed hot Algol-type binaries meeting this criterion, as well as a list of cooler Algol-type binaries where we expect significant dynamo-driven mass loss and angular momentum loss. We fit each observed binary to our library of tracks using a {chi}{sup 2}-minimizing procedure. We find that the hot Algols display overall acceptable {chi}{sup 2}, confirming the conservative assumption, while the cool Algols show much less acceptable {chi}{sup 2} suggesting the need for more free parameters, such as mass and angular momentum loss.

  16. Thermal and optical properties of Tb(III), Eu(III) and Tb(III)/Eu(III) co-complexed silicone fluorinated acrylate copolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Yinfeng; Xie, Hongde; Cai, Haijun; Cai, Peiqing; Seo, Hyo Jin

    2015-07-01

    Tb(III), Eu(III) and Tb(III)/Eu(III) activated silicone fluorinated acrylate (SFA) have been successfully synthesized using the method of semi-continuous emulsion polymerization. The copolymers are characterized by flourier transform infrared (FT-IR), thermal gravity analysis (TGA), photoluminescence excitation (PLE) and emission (PL) spectroscopy. The copolymer containing Tb(III) and Eu(III) ions display green and red luminescent colors under UV light excitation, respectively. The TGA curves show the thermal decomposition temperatures of the copolymers are up to about 300 °C. The PL spectra show a strong green emission at 546 nm (5D4 → 7F5) of Tb(III) complexed copolymers, and show a prominent red emission at 615 nm (5D0 → 7F2) of Eu(III) complexed copolymers. Different concentrations of Eu(III) and Tb(III) ions are introduced into the copolymer and the energy transfer from Tb(III) to Eu(III) ions in the copolymer was found. Thus, based on the results it can be suggested that SFA:Eu(III), SFA:Tb(III) and SFA:Tb(III)/Eu(III) can be used potentially as luminescent materials.

  17. Gd(III)-Gd(III) distance measurements with chirp pump pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doll, Andrin; Qi, Mian; Wili, Nino; Pribitzer, Stephan; Godt, Adelheid; Jeschke, Gunnar

    2015-10-01

    The broad EPR spectrum of Gd(III) spin labels restricts the dipolar modulation depth in distance measurements between Gd(III) pairs to a few percent. To overcome this limitation, frequency-swept chirp pulses are utilized as pump pulses in the DEER experiment. Using a model system with 3.4 nm Gd-Gd distance, application of one single chirp pump pulse at Q-band frequencies leads to modulation depths beyond 10%. However, the larger modulation depth is counteracted by a reduction of the absolute echo intensity due to the pump pulse. As supported by spin dynamics simulations, this effect is primarily driven by signal loss to double-quantum coherence and specific to the Gd(III) high spin state of S = 7/2. In order to balance modulation depth and echo intensity for optimum sensitivity, a simple experimental procedure is proposed. An additional improvement by 25% in DEER sensitivity is achieved with two consecutive chirp pump pulses. These pulses pump the Gd(III) spectrum symmetrically around the observation position, therefore mutually compensating for dynamical Bloch-Siegert phase shifts at the observer spins. The improved sensitivity of the DEER data with modulation depths on the order of 20% is due to mitigation of the echo reduction effects by the consecutive pump pulses. In particular, the second pump pulse does not lead to additional signal loss if perfect inversion is assumed. Moreover, the compensation of the dynamical Bloch-Siegert phase prevents signal loss due to spatial dependence of the dynamical phase, which is caused by inhomogeneities in the driving field. The new methodology is combined with pre-polarization techniques to measure long distances up to 8.6 nm, where signal intensity and modulation depth become attenuated by long dipolar evolution windows. In addition, the influence of the zero-field splitting parameters on the echo intensity is studied with simulations. Herein, larger sensitivity is anticipated for Gd(III) complexes with zero

  18. Gd(III)-Gd(III) distance measurements with chirp pump pulses.

    PubMed

    Doll, Andrin; Qi, Mian; Wili, Nino; Pribitzer, Stephan; Godt, Adelheid; Jeschke, Gunnar

    2015-10-01

    The broad EPR spectrum of Gd(III) spin labels restricts the dipolar modulation depth in distance measurements between Gd(III) pairs to a few percent. To overcome this limitation, frequency-swept chirp pulses are utilized as pump pulses in the DEER experiment. Using a model system with 3.4 nm Gd-Gd distance, application of one single chirp pump pulse at Q-band frequencies leads to modulation depths beyond 10%. However, the larger modulation depth is counteracted by a reduction of the absolute echo intensity due to the pump pulse. As supported by spin dynamics simulations, this effect is primarily driven by signal loss to double-quantum coherence and specific to the Gd(III) high spin state of S=7/2. In order to balance modulation depth and echo intensity for optimum sensitivity, a simple experimental procedure is proposed. An additional improvement by 25% in DEER sensitivity is achieved with two consecutive chirp pump pulses. These pulses pump the Gd(III) spectrum symmetrically around the observation position, therefore mutually compensating for dynamical Bloch-Siegert phase shifts at the observer spins. The improved sensitivity of the DEER data with modulation depths on the order of 20% is due to mitigation of the echo reduction effects by the consecutive pump pulses. In particular, the second pump pulse does not lead to additional signal loss if perfect inversion is assumed. Moreover, the compensation of the dynamical Bloch-Siegert phase prevents signal loss due to spatial dependence of the dynamical phase, which is caused by inhomogeneities in the driving field. The new methodology is combined with pre-polarization techniques to measure long distances up to 8.6 nm, where signal intensity and modulation depth become attenuated by long dipolar evolution windows. In addition, the influence of the zero-field splitting parameters on the echo intensity is studied with simulations. Herein, larger sensitivity is anticipated for Gd(III) complexes with zero-field splitting

  19. III-Nitride nanowire optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Songrui; Nguyen, Hieu P. T.; Kibria, Md. G.; Mi, Zetian

    2015-11-01

    Group-III nitride nanowire structures, including GaN, InN, AlN and their alloys, have been intensively studied in the past decade. Unique to this material system is that its energy bandgap can be tuned from the deep ultraviolet (~6.2 eV for AlN) to the near infrared (~0.65 eV for InN). In this article, we provide an overview on the recent progress made in III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices, including light emitting diodes, lasers, photodetectors, single photon sources, intraband devices, solar cells, and artificial photosynthesis. The present challenges and future prospects of III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices are also discussed.

  20. First Stars III Conference Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shea, B. W.; McKee, C. F.; Heger, A.; Abel, T.

    2008-03-01

    The understanding of the formation, life, and death of Population III stars, as well as the impact that these objects had on later generations of structure formation, is one of the foremost issues in modern cosmological research and has been an active area of research during the past several years. We summarize the results presented at "First Stars III," a conference sponsored by Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, and the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics. This conference, the third in a series, took place in July 2007 at the La Fonda Hotel in Santa Fe, New Mexico, U.S.A.

  1. Identifying biochemical phenotypic differences between cryptic species

    PubMed Central

    Liebeke, Manuel; Bruford, Michael W.; Donnelly, Robert K.; Ebbels, Timothy M. D.; Hao, Jie; Kille, Peter; Lahive, Elma; Madison, Rachael M.; Morgan, A. John; Pinto-Juma, Gabriela A.; Spurgeon, David J.; Svendsen, Claus; Bundy, Jacob G.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular genetic methods can distinguish divergent evolutionary lineages in what previously appeared to be single species, but it is not always clear what functional differences exist between such cryptic species. We used a metabolomic approach to profile biochemical phenotype (metabotype) differences between two putative cryptic species of the earthworm Lumbricus rubellus. There were no straightforward metabolite biomarkers of lineage, i.e. no metabolites that were always at higher concentration in one lineage. Multivariate methods, however, identified a small number of metabolites that together helped distinguish the lineages, including uncommon metabolites such as Nε-trimethyllysine, which is not usually found at high concentrations. This approach could be useful for characterizing functional trait differences, especially as it is applicable to essentially any species group, irrespective of its genome sequencing status. PMID:25252836

  2. Identifying biochemical phenotypic differences between cryptic species.

    PubMed

    Liebeke, Manuel; Bruford, Michael W; Donnelly, Robert K; Ebbels, Timothy M D; Hao, Jie; Kille, Peter; Lahive, Elma; Madison, Rachael M; Morgan, A John; Pinto-Juma, Gabriela A; Spurgeon, David J; Svendsen, Claus; Bundy, Jacob G

    2014-09-01

    Molecular genetic methods can distinguish divergent evolutionary lineages in what previously appeared to be single species, but it is not always clear what functional differences exist between such cryptic species. We used a metabolomic approach to profile biochemical phenotype (metabotype) differences between two putative cryptic species of the earthworm Lumbricus rubellus. There were no straightforward metabolite biomarkers of lineage, i.e. no metabolites that were always at higher concentration in one lineage. Multivariate methods, however, identified a small number of metabolites that together helped distinguish the lineages, including uncommon metabolites such as Nε-trimethyllysine, which is not usually found at high concentrations. This approach could be useful for characterizing functional trait differences, especially as it is applicable to essentially any species group, irrespective of its genome sequencing status. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Hemoglobin Variants: Biochemical Properties and Clinical Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Thom, Christopher S.; Dickson, Claire F.; Gell, David A.; Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2013-01-01

    Diseases affecting hemoglobin synthesis and function are extremely common worldwide. More than 1000 naturally occurring human hemoglobin variants with single amino acid substitutions throughout the molecule have been discovered, mainly through their clinical and/or laboratory manifestations. These variants alter hemoglobin structure and biochemical properties with physiological effects ranging from insignificant to severe. Studies of these mutations in patients and in the laboratory have produced a wealth of information on hemoglobin biochemistry and biology with significant implications for hematology practice. More generally, landmark studies of hemoglobin performed over the past 60 years have established important paradigms for the disciplines of structural biology, genetics, biochemistry, and medicine. Here we review the major classes of hemoglobin variants, emphasizing general concepts and illustrative examples. PMID:23388674

  4. Thin membrane sensor with biochemical switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, George D. (Inventor); Worley, III, Jennings F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A modular biosensor system for chemical or biological agent detection utilizes electrochemical measurement of an ion current across a gate membrane triggered by the reaction of the target agent with a recognition protein conjugated to a channel blocker. The sensor system includes a bioresponse simulator or biochemical switch module which contains the recognition protein-channel blocker conjugate, and in which the detection reactions occur, and a transducer module which contains a gate membrane and a measuring electrode, and in which the presence of agent is sensed electrically. In the poised state, ion channels in the gate membrane are blocked by the recognition protein-channel blocker conjugate. Detection reactions remove the recognition protein-channel blocker conjugate from the ion channels, thus eliciting an ion current surge in the gate membrane which subsequently triggers an output alarm. Sufficiently large currents are generated that simple direct current electronics are adequate for the measurements. The biosensor has applications for environmental, medical, and industrial use.

  5. Droplet microfluidics in (bio)chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Basova, Evgenia Yu; Foret, Frantisek

    2015-01-07

    Droplet microfluidics may soon change the paradigm of performing chemical analyses and related instrumentation. It can improve not only the analysis scale, possibility for sensitivity improvement, and reduced consumption of chemical and biological reagents, but also the speed of performing a variety of unit operations. At present, microfluidic platforms can reproducibly generate monodisperse droplet populations at kHz or higher rates with droplet sizes suitable for high-throughput experiments, single-cell detection or even single molecule analysis. In addition to being used as microreactors with volume in the micro- to femtoliter range, droplet based systems have also been used to directly synthesize particles and encapsulate biological entities for biomedicine and biotechnology applications. This minireview summarizes various droplet microfluidics operations and applications for (bio)chemical assays described in the literature during the past few years.

  6. Highly valuable microalgae: biochemical and topological aspects.

    PubMed

    Pignolet, Olivier; Jubeau, Sébastien; Vaca-Garcia, Carlos; Michaud, Philippe

    2013-08-01

    The past decade has seen a surge in the interest in microalgae culture for biodiesel production and other applications as renewable biofuels as an alternative to petroleum transport fuels. The development of new technologies for the culture of these photosynthetic microorganisms and improved knowledge of their biochemical composition has spurred innovation in the field of high-value biomolecules. These developments are only economically viable if all the microalgae fractions are valorized in a biorefinery strategy. Achieving this objective requires an understanding of microalgae content and the cellular localization of the main biomolecular families in order to develop efficient harvest and sequential recovery technologies. This review summarizes the state of the art in microalgae compositions and topologies using some examples of the main industrially farmed microalgae.

  7. Biochemical Basis of Sestrin Physiological Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Allison; Cho, Chun-Seok; Namkoong, Sim; Cho, Uhn-Soo; Lee, Jun Hee

    2016-05-10

    Excessive accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and chronic activation of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1) are well-characterized promoters of aging and age-associated degenerative pathologies. Sestrins, a family of highly conserved stress-inducible proteins, are important negative regulators of both ROS and mTORC1 signaling pathways; however, the mechanistic basis of how Sestrins suppress these pathways remains elusive. In the past couple of years, breakthrough discoveries about Sestrin signaling and its molecular nature have markedly increased our biochemical understanding of Sestrin function. These discoveries have also uncovered new potential therapeutic strategies that may eventually enable us to attenuate aging and age-associated diseases.

  8. Comparative biochemical studies of carotenoids in catfishes.

    PubMed

    Tsushima, M; Ikuno, Y; Nagata, S; Kodama, K; Matsuno, T

    2002-11-01

    The carotenoids of 12 species of Siluriformes fishes (eight families) were investigated from a comparative biochemical point of view. The patterns of carotenoids in catfishes belonging to the family Siluridae were quite different from those of the other seven families of catfishes (Bagridae, Amblycipitidae, Clariidae, Plotosidae, Ictaluridae, Callichthyidae and Malapteruridae). 7, 8-Dihydro-beta-carotene; 7, 8, 7', 8'- and 7, 8, 9, 10-tetrahydro-beta-carotene; (3R)-7', 8'-dihydro-beta-cryptoxanthin; 7, 8-dihydrolutein A; 7, 8-dihydrolutein B; parasiloxanthin; 7', 8'-dihydroparasiloxanthin; and 4 or 4'-hydroxyparasiloxanthin were characteristic carotenoids found in only one family, Siluridae, and these carotenoids accounted for 24-60% of total carotenoids. In catfishes belonging to the other seven families except Siluridae, the carotenoid patterns were very similar and the most predominant carotenoid was zeaxanthins (23-56%). Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Inc.

  9. Charge trapping and luminescence in biochemical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, D. Wayne

    A review of radiation-induced charge trapping and release in biochemical systems is given. Several techniques appropriate to studying this damage are discussed; electron spin resonance (ESR), electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR), optical absorption, muon spin rotation (μSR), and thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL), for example, with the emphasis being on TSL. Experimental aspects of this technique, along with many results from TSL studies of amino acids, proteins, DNA, RNA, and related compounds are reviewed. Specific models derived from analyses of the TSL glow curves and emission spectra are discussed. The overwhelming majority of these studies suggest that electronic deexcitation of the radiation-induced trapped charge occurs via the singlet and triplet manifolds of the molecule.

  10. The biochemical basis of hereditary fructose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Bouteldja, Nadia; Timson, David J

    2010-04-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance is a rare, but potentially lethal, inherited disorder of fructose metabolism, caused by mutation of the aldolase B gene. Treatment currently relies solely on dietary restriction of problematic sugars. Biochemical study of defective aldolase B enzymes is key to revealing the molecular basis of the disease and providing a stronger basis for improved treatment and diagnosis. Such studies have revealed changes in enzyme activity, stability and oligomerisation. However, linking these changes to disease phenotypes has not always been straightforward. This review gives a general overview of the features of hereditary fructose intolerance, then concentrates on the biochemistry of the AP variant (Ala149Pro variant of aldolase B) and molecular pathological consequences of mutation of the aldolase B gene.

  11. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase: biochemical characterization and medical significance.

    PubMed

    Trimmer, Elizabeth E

    2013-01-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) catalyzes the reduction of 5,10-methylenetetrahydofolate (CH2-H4folate) to 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (CH3-H4folate). The enzyme employs a noncovalently-bound flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), which accepts reducing equivalents from NAD(P)H and transfers them to CH2-H4folate. The reaction provides the sole source of CH3-H4folate, which is utilized by methionine synthase in the synthesis of methionine from homocysteine. MTHFR plays a key role in folate metabolism and in the homeostasis of homocysteine; mutations in the enzyme lead to hyperhomocyst(e)inemia. A common C677T polymorphism in MTHFR has been associated with an increased risk for the development of cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's disease, and depression in adults, and of neural tube defects in the fetus. The mutation also confers protection for certain types of cancers. This review presents the current knowledge of the enzyme, its biochemical characterization, and medical significance.

  12. Optofluidics in bio-chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yunbo; Fan, Xudong

    2012-01-01

    Optofluidics organically integrates microfluidics and photonics and is an emerging technology in biological and chemical analysis. In this paper, we overview the recent studies in bio-chemical sensing applications of optofluidics. Particularly, we report the research progress in our lab in developing diverse optofluidic devices using two unique configurations: thin-walled capillary based optofluidic ring resonator (OFRR) and multi-hole capillary based optofluidic platforms. The first one has been developed to be OFRR-based label-free biosensor, microfluidic laser based intra-cavity sensors, and on-column optical detectors for micro-gas chromatography (μGC), while the second one has been developed to be optofluidic Fabry-Pérot based label-free biosensor and optofluidic Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) biosensor. All of these devices take advantage of superior fluidic handling capability and high sensitivity, and have been used in detecting various biological and chemical analytes in either liquid or vapor phase.

  13. Biochemical composition of marine monogenean parasite eggs.

    PubMed

    Brazenor, Alexander K; Francis, David S; Hutson, Kate S; Carton, Alexander G

    2017-08-24

    This study on the eggs of the tropical monogenean Neobenedenia girellae presents the first detailed quantitative biochemical information of a marine parasite species' eggs. Moisture and protein composed the majority of the contents of freshly laid eggs (79.12±0.82 and 11.51±0.49% respectively) followed by lipid (2.50±0.15%). Lipids were composed of approximately equal amounts of saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated fatty acids and the predominant lipid class was triacylglycerol (33.82±1.20%). This study represents a fundamental step towards a better understanding of the early life biology of this important species of parasite. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Biochemically enhanced methane production from coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opara, Aleksandra

    For many years, biogas was connected mostly with the organic matter decomposition in shallow sediments (e.g., wetlands, landfill gas, etc.). Recently, it has been realized that biogenic methane production is ongoing in many hydrocarbon reservoirs. This research examined microbial methane and carbon dioxide generation from coal. As original contributions methane production from various coal materials was examined in classical and electro-biochemical bench-scale reactors using unique, developed facultative microbial consortia that generate methane under anaerobic conditions. Facultative methanogenic populations are important as all known methanogens are strict anaerobes and their application outside laboratory would be problematic. Additional testing examined the influence of environmental conditions, such as pH, salinity, and nutrient amendments on methane and carbon dioxide generation. In 44-day ex-situ bench-scale batch bioreactor tests, up to 300,000 and 250,000 ppm methane was generated from bituminous coal and bituminous coal waste respectively, a significant improvement over 20-40 ppm methane generated from control samples. Chemical degradation of complex hydrocarbons using environmentally benign reagents, prior to microbial biodegradation and methanogenesis, resulted in dissolution of up to 5% bituminous coal and bituminous coal waste and up to 25% lignite in samples tested. Research results confirm that coal waste may be a significant underutilized resource that could be converted to useful fuel. Rapid acidification of lignite samples resulted in low pH (below 4.0), regardless of chemical pretreatment applied, and did not generate significant methane amounts. These results confirmed the importance of monitoring and adjusting in situ and ex situ environmental conditions during methane production. A patented Electro-Biochemical Reactor technology was used to supply electrons and electron acceptor environments, but appeared to influence methane generation in a

  15. Pattern Selection by Dynamical Biochemical Signals

    PubMed Central

    Palau-Ortin, David; Formosa-Jordan, Pau; Sancho, José M.; Ibañes, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The development of multicellular organisms involves cells to decide their fate upon the action of biochemical signals. This decision is often spatiotemporally coordinated such that a spatial pattern arises. The dynamics that drive pattern formation usually involve genetic nonlinear interactions and positive feedback loops. These complex dynamics may enable multiple stable patterns for the same conditions. Under these circumstances, pattern formation in a developing tissue involves a selection process: why is a certain pattern formed and not another stable one? Herein we computationally address this issue in the context of the Notch signaling pathway. We characterize a dynamical mechanism for developmental selection of a specific pattern through spatiotemporal changes of the control parameters of the dynamics, in contrast to commonly studied situations in which initial conditions and noise determine which pattern is selected among multiple stable ones. This mechanism can be understood as a path along the parameter space driven by a sequence of biochemical signals. We characterize the selection process for three different scenarios of this dynamical mechanism that can take place during development: the signal either 1) acts in all the cells at the same time, 2) acts only within a cluster of cells, or 3) propagates along the tissue. We found that key elements for pattern selection are the destabilization of the initial pattern, the subsequent exploration of other patterns determined by the spatiotemporal symmetry of the parameter changes, and the speeds of the path compared to the timescales of the pattern formation process itself. Each scenario enables the selection of different types of patterns and creates these elements in distinct ways, resulting in different features. Our approach extends the concept of selection involved in cellular decision-making, usually applied to cell-autonomous decisions, to systems that collectively make decisions through cell

  16. Biochemical processes of oligotrophic peat deposits of Vasyugan Mire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inisheva, L. I.; Sergeeva, M. A.

    2009-04-01

    The problem of peat and mire ecosystems functioning and their rational use is the main problem of biosphere study. This problem also refers to forecasting of biosphere changes results which are global and anthropogenic. According to many scientists' research the portion of mires in earth carbon balance is about 15% of world's stock. The aim of this study is to investigate biochemical processes in oligotrophic deposits in North-eastern part of Vasyugan Mire. The investigations were made on the territory of scientific-research ground (56˚ 03´ and 56˚ 57´ NL, 82˚ 22´ and 82˚ 42´ EL). It is situated between two rivers Bakchar and Iksa (in outskirts of the village Polynyanka, Bakchar region, Tomsk oblast). Evolution of investigated mire massif began with the domination of eutrophic phytocenosis - Filicinae, then sedge. Later transfer into oligotrophic phase was accompanied by formation of meter high-moor peat deposit. The age of three-meter peat deposit reaches four thousand years. Biochemical processes of carbon cycle cover the whole peat deposit, but the process activity and its direction in different layers are defined by genesis and duration of peat formation. So, the number of cellulose-fermenting aerobes in researched peat deposits ranges from 16.8 to 75.5 million CFU/g, and anaerobic bacteria from 9.6 to 48.6 million CFU/g. The high number of aerobes is characteristic for high water levels, organizing by raised bog peats. Their number decreases along the profile in 1.7 - 2 times. The number of microflora in peat deposit is defined by the position in the landscape profile (different geneses), by the depth, by hydrothermic conditions of years and individual months. But microflora activity shows along all depth of peat deposit. We found the same in the process of studying of micromycete complex structure. There was revealed either active component micromycete complex - mycelium, or inert one - spores in a meter layer of peat deposit. If mushrooms

  17. Psychological and Biochemical Effects of a Stress Management Program,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    risk factors for cardiovascular disease . We wanted to sample emotional, behavioral, physical and biochemical measures which might be sensitive to the changes of an effective stress management program.

  18. Fifty years of co-evolution and beyond: integrating co-evolution from molecules to species.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Diego; Fitzpatrick, Connor R; Johnson, Marc T J

    2015-11-01

    Fifty years after Ehrlich and Raven's seminal paper, the idea of co-evolution continues to grow as a key concept in our understanding of organic evolution. This concept has not only provided a compelling synthesis between evolutionary biology and community ecology, but has also inspired research that extends beyond its original scope. In this article, we identify unresolved questions about the co-evolutionary process and advocate for the integration of co-evolutionary research from molecular to interspecific interactions. We address two basic questions: (i) What is co-evolution and how common is it? (ii) What is the unit of co-evolution? Both questions aim to explore the heart of the co-evolutionary process. Despite the claim that co-evolution is ubiquitous, we argue that there is in fact little evidence to support the view that reciprocal natural selection and coadaptation are common in nature. We also challenge the traditional view that co-evolution only occurs between traits of interacting species. Co-evolution has the potential to explain evolutionary processes and patterns that result from intra- and intermolecular biochemical interactions within cells, intergenomic interactions (e.g. nuclear-cytoplasmic) within species, as well as intergenomic interactions mediated by phenotypic traits between species. Research that bridges across these levels of organization will help to advance our understanding of the importance of the co-evolutionary processes in shaping the diversity of life on Earth. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Determination of four biochemically distinct, sequential stages during vacuole inheritance in vitro

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Vacuole inheritance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be reconstituted in vitro using isolated organelles, cytosol, and ATP. Using the requirements of the reaction and its susceptibility to inhibitors, we have divided the in vitro reaction into four biochemically distinct, sequential subreactions. Stage I requires exposure of vacuoles to solutions of moderate ionic strength. Stage II requires "stage I" vacuoles and cytosol. In stage III, stage II vacuoles react with ATP. Finally, during stage IV, stage III vacuoles at a certain, minimal concentration complete the fusion reaction without further requirement for any soluble components. Reagents that inhibit the overall vacuole inheritance reaction block distinct stages. Stage III of the reaction is sensitive to the proton ionophore CCCP, to inhibitors of the vacuolar ATPase such as bafilomycin A1, and to the ATP-hydrolyzing enzyme apyrase, suggesting that an electrochemical potential across the vacuolar membrane is required during this stage. Inhibition studies with the amphiphilic peptide mastoparan and GTP gamma S suggest that GTP-hydrolyzing proteins might also be involved during this stage. Microcystin-LR, a specific inhibitor of protein phosphatases of type 1 and 2A, inhibits stage IV of the inheritance reaction, indicating that a protein dephosphorylation event is necessary for fusion. The definition of these four stages may allow the development of specific assays for the factors which catalyze each of the consecutive steps of the in vitro reaction. PMID:8027190

  20. Origins and Evolution of Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gargaud, Muriel; López-García, Purificación; Martin, Hervé

    2011-01-01

    Part I. What Is Life?: 1. Problems raised by a definition of life M. Morange; 2. Some remarks about uses of cosmological anthropic 'principles' D. Lambert; 3. Minimal cell: the biologist point of view C. Brochier-Armanet; 4. Minimal cell: the computer scientist point of view H. Bersini; 5. Origins of life: computing and simulation approaches B. Billoud; Part II. Astronomical and Geophysical Context of the Emergence of Life: 6. Organic molecules in interstellar medium C. Ceccarelli and C. Cernicharo; 7. Cosmochemical evolution and the origin of life: insights from meteorites S. Pizzarello; 8. Astronomical constraints on the emergence of life M. Gounelle and T. Montmerle; 9. Formation of habitable planets J. Chambers; 10. The concept of galactic habitable zone N. Prantzos; 11. The young Sun and its influence on planetary atmospheres M. Güdel and J. Kasting; 12. Climates of the Earth G. Ramstein; Part III. Role of Water in the Emergence of Life: 13. Liquid water: a necessary condition to all forms of life K. Bartik, G. Bruylants, E. Locci and J. Reisse; 14. The role of water in the formation and evolution of planets T. Encrenaz; 15. Water on Mars J. P. Bibring; Part IV. From Non-Living Systems to Life: 16. Energetic constraints on prebiotic pathways: application to the emergence of translation R. Pascal and L. Boiteau; 17. Comparative genomics and early cell evolution A. Lazcano; 18. Origin and evolution of metabolisms J. Peretó; Part V. Mechanisms for Life Evolution: 19. Molecular phylogeny: inferring the patterns of evolution E. Douzery; 20. Horizontal gene transfer: mechanisms and evolutionary consequences D. Moreira; 21. The role of symbiosis in eukaryotic evolution A. Latorre, A. Durbán, A. Moya and J. Peretó; Part VI. Life in Extreme Conditions: 22. Life in extreme conditions: Deinococcus radiodurans, an organism able to survive prolonged desiccation and high doses of ionising radiation S. Sommer and M. Toueille; 23. Molecular effects of UV and ionizing

  1. Generalized anxiety disorder: some biochemical aspects.

    PubMed

    Munjack, D J; Baltazar, P L; DeQuattro, V; Sobin, P; Palmer, R; Zulueta, A; Crocker, B; Usigli, R; Buckwalter, G; Leonard, M

    1990-04-01

    Fifty-one patients who met DSM-III criteria for generalized anxiety disorder, and who were recruited to participate in a drug outcome study, filled out a variety of rating scales and had blood samples drawn for plasma norepinephrine, epinephrine, and free 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG) after a 20-min rest period. This group was compared to 15 normal controls who also had their blood drawn after a 20-min rest period. While the two groups were initially found to have significantly different levels of plasma free MHPG through the use of t tests, this finding was not confirmed by subsequent discriminant analysis.

  2. Interplanetary density models as inferred from solar Type III bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppeneiger, Lucas; Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Lammer, Helmut; Lichtenegger, Herbert

    2016-04-01

    We report on the density models derived from spectral features of solar Type III bursts. They are generated by beams of electrons travelling outward from the Sun along open magnetic field lines. Electrons generate Langmuir waves at the plasma frequency along their ray paths through the corona and the interplanetary medium. A large frequency band is covered by the Type III bursts from several MHz down to few kHz. In this analysis, we consider the previous empirical density models proposed to describe the electron density in the interplanetary medium. We show that those models are mainly based on the analysis of Type III bursts generated in the interplanetary medium and observed by satellites (e.g. RAE, HELIOS, VOYAGER, ULYSSES,WIND). Those models are confronted to stereoscopic observations of Type III bursts recorded by WIND, ULYSSES and CASSINI spacecraft. We discuss the spatial evolution of the electron beam along the interplanetary medium where the trajectory is an Archimedean spiral. We show that the electron beams and the source locations are depending on the choose of the empirical density models.

  3. Improved Wavelengths and Oscillator Strengths of Cr III, Co III, and Fe III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Peter L.; Smillie, D. G.; Pickering, J. C.; Blackwell-Whitehead, R. J.

    2008-05-01

    Improvements in the resolution, accuracy, and range of spectra obtained by state-of-the-art space- and ground-based astronomical spectrographs have demonstrated a need for corresponding improvements in atomic data. Transition wavelengths with uncertainties of 1 part in 10^7 and oscillator strengths (f-values) with uncertainties of 10 to 15% are needed to accurately interpret modern astrophysical spectra. Our focus has been on spectra of doubly ionized iron group elements that dominate the UV spectra of hot B stars. We report here completion of measurements on Cr III, Co III, Fe III made with a UV high resolution Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) [J. C. Pickering, Vibrational Spectrosc. 29, 27 (2002)] with a typical wavelength/wavenumber uncertainty of a few parts in 10^8, supplemented by measurements were carried out at the US National Institute of Standards & Technology using their FTS and the Normal Incidence Vacuum (grating) Spectrograph (NIVS). The spectra were analyzed and line lists were produced to give calibrated line wavelengths and relative intensities. Measured wavelengths are, in many cases, an order of magnitude more accurate than previous measurements, and the energy level uncertainties are typically reduced by a factor or 3 more. Summaries of submitted papers on Cr III and Co III will be presented, as will work on improved wavelengths, energy levels, and oscillator strengths for Fe III. Limitations to the method and possible solutions will be discussed. This work is, or has been, supported in part by NASA Grant NAG5-12668; NASA inter-agency agreement W-10255; PPARC; the Royal Society of the UK; and by the Leverhulme Trust.

  4. Organometallic neptunium(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Dutkiewicz, Michał S; Farnaby, Joy H; Apostolidis, Christos; Colineau, Eric; Walter, Olaf; Magnani, Nicola; Gardiner, Michael G; Love, Jason B; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Caciuffo, Roberto; Arnold, Polly L

    2016-08-01

    Studies of transuranic organometallic complexes provide a particularly valuable insight into covalent contributions to the metal-ligand bonding, in which the subtle differences between the transuranium actinide ions and their lighter lanthanide counterparts are of fundamental importance for the effective remediation of nuclear waste. Unlike the organometallic chemistry of uranium, which has focused strongly on U(III) and has seen some spectacular advances, that of the transuranics is significantly technically more challenging and has remained dormant. In the case of neptunium, it is limited mainly to Np(IV). Here we report the synthesis of three new Np(III) organometallic compounds and the characterization of their molecular and electronic structures. These studies suggest that Np(III) complexes could act as single-molecule magnets, and that the lower oxidation state of Np(II) is chemically accessible. In comparison with lanthanide analogues, significant d- and f-electron contributions to key Np(III) orbitals are observed, which shows that fundamental neptunium organometallic chemistry can provide new insights into the behaviour of f-elements.

  5. Terrain Perception for DEMO III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manduchi, R.; Bellutta, P.; Matthies, L.; Owens, K.; Rankin, A.

    2000-01-01

    The Demo III program has as its primary focus the development of autonomous mobility for a small rugged cross country vehicle. In this paper we report recent progress on both stereo-based obstacle detection and terrain cover color-based classification.

  6. Title III hazardous air pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, R.

    1995-12-31

    The author presents an overview of the key provisions of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The key provisions include the following: 112(b) -- 189 Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP); 112(a) -- Major Source: 10 TPY/25 TPY; 112(d) -- Application of MACT; 112(g) -- Modifications; 112(I) -- State Program; 112(j) -- The Hammer; and 112(r) -- Accidental Release Provisions.

  7. Microbial diversity and biochemical characteristics of Borassus akeassii wine.

    PubMed

    Tapsoba, F; Savadogo, A; Legras, J-L; Zongo, C; Traore, A S

    2016-10-01

    Palm wine produced traditionally and consumed by many people in the South-West of Burkina Faso is subject to alteration. In this study, we carried out a follow-up of two palm wines' fermentation during the 10 days in which palm wines are classically produced and consumed. We monitored biochemical characteristics of fermenting wines as well as followed the microflora kinetics using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. The analysis of the acid content and the bacterial population revealed the correlation between the development of Lactic acid bacteria, acetic acid, and total acidity. Ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis and sequencing results revealed different yeast and bacterial populations for the two palm wines. Although Saccharomyces cerevisiae remained the sole yeast species in one fermentation, it was quickly replaced by Clavispora lusitaniae in the second fermentation, which had never been described until now in palm wine. When considering bacteria, the species Corynebacterium sp., Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus paracasei and Leuconostoc sp. were detected in both palm wines. But we also detected Acetobacter pasteurianus, Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis in the second fermentation. Our results highlight the evolution of palm wine during the 10 days separating palm tapping and consumption of the fermented wine. The fermentation step is performed within few hours and completed after 24 h. The next days, its acidity increases progressively with the production of lactic and acetic acids by bacteria. The high production of acetic acid is very likely one of the main cause of palm wine degradation during this period. This indicates that the solution to palm wine preservation might be protection against oxygen, as well as the limit of bacterial growth through the use of preservatives. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Insect evolution.

    PubMed

    Engel, Michael S

    2015-10-05

    It goes without saying that insects epitomize diversity, and with over a million documented species they stand out as one of the most remarkable lineages in the 3.5-billion-year history of life on earth (Figure 1). This reality is passé to even the layperson and is taken for granted in the same way none of us think much of our breathing as we go about our day, and yet insects are just as vital to our existence. Insects are simultaneously familiar and foreign to us, and while a small fraction are beloved or reviled, most are simply ignored. These inexorable evolutionary overachievers outnumber us all, their segmented body plan is remarkably labile, they combine a capacity for high rates of speciation with low levels of natural extinction, and their history of successes eclipses those of the more familiar ages of dinosaurs and mammals alike. It is their evolution - persisting over vast expanses of geological time and inextricably implicated in the diversification of other lineages - that stands as one of the most expansive subjects in biology.

  9. Clinical-biochemical correlations in acromegaly at diagnosis and the real prevalence of biochemically discordant disease.

    PubMed

    Mercado, Moisés; Espinosa de los Monteros, Ana Laura; Sosa, Ernesto; Cheng, Sonia; Mendoza, Victoria; Hernández, Irma; Sandoval, Carolina; Guinto, Gerardo; Molina, Mario

    2004-01-01

    To analyze clinical-biochemical correlations in newly diagnosed acromegaly, focusing in particular on patients with discrepant parameters. Retrospective study. Data from 164 patients with acromegaly seen between 1995 and 2003. Patients were reviewed for the presence of headaches, arthralgias, hypertension, menstrual abnormalities, impotence, glucose intolerance or diabetes. Biochemical evaluation consisted of age- and gender-adjusted IGF-I levels and glucose-suppressed GH. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed macroadenoma in 127 patients and microadenoma in 37. Patients with macroadenomas were younger than those with microadenomas and the disease was more frequent in females. Excluding acral enlargement, which was present in all the patients, the most commonly reported complaints were headaches (66%) and arthralgias (52%). Hypertension was present in 37% of patients, whereas the prevalence of glucose intolerance and diabetes was 27 and 32%, respectively. Hyperprolactinemia was present in 20% of patients with microadenomas and in 40% of patients with macroadenomas. Hypogonadism was demonstrated in more than half of the patients and was not related to tumor size or prolactin level. Of all the clinical and metabolic abnormalities of acromegaly, only the presence of diabetes correlated with both basal and nadir post-glucose GH levels. Only 4 patients (2.4%) had glucose-suppressed GH values of <1 ng/ml in the presence of clinical evidence of acromegaly, an elevated IGF-I level and a pituitary adenoma on MRI. Clinical features of acromegaly correlate poorly with indices of biochemical activity. The prevalence of biochemically discordant acromegaly is considerably lower than recently reported.

  10. ULK3 regulates cytokinetic abscission by phosphorylating ESCRT-III proteins.

    PubMed

    Caballe, Anna; Wenzel, Dawn M; Agromayor, Monica; Alam, Steven L; Skalicky, Jack J; Kloc, Magdalena; Carlton, Jeremy G; Labrador, Leticia; Sundquist, Wesley I; Martin-Serrano, Juan

    2015-05-26

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) machinery mediates the physical separation between daughter cells during cytokinetic abscission. This process is regulated by the abscission checkpoint, a genome protection mechanism that relies on Aurora B and the ESCRT-III subunit CHMP4C to delay abscission in response to chromosome missegregation. In this study, we show that Unc-51-like kinase 3 (ULK3) phosphorylates and binds ESCRT-III subunits via tandem MIT domains, and thereby, delays abscission in response to lagging chromosomes, nuclear pore defects, and tension forces at the midbody. Our structural and biochemical studies reveal an unusually tight interaction between ULK3 and IST1, an ESCRT-III subunit required for abscission. We also demonstrate that IST1 phosphorylation by ULK3 is an essential signal required to sustain the abscission checkpoint and that ULK3 and CHMP4C are functionally linked components of the timer that controls abscission in multiple physiological situations.

  11. Type III Secretion: Building and Operating a Remarkable Nanomachine.

    PubMed

    Portaliou, Athina G; Tsolis, Konstantinos C; Loos, Maria S; Zorzini, Valentina; Economou, Anastassios

    2016-02-01

    The Type III secretion system (T3SS) is a protein export pathway that is widespread in Gram-negative bacteria and delivers effector proteins directly into eukaryotic cells. At its core lie the injectisome (a sophisticated transmembrane secretion apparatus) and a complex network of specialized chaperones that target secretory proteins to the antechamber of the injectisome. The assembly of the system, and the subsequent secretion of proteins through it, undergo fine-tuned, hierarchical regulation. Here, we present the current understanding of the injectisome assembly process, secretion hierarchy, and the role of chaperones. We discuss these events in light of available structural and biochemical dissection and propose future directions essential to revealing mechanistic insight into this fascinating nanomachine.

  12. Diverse functions and reactions of class III peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Shigeto, Jun; Tsutsumi, Yuji

    2016-03-01

    Higher plants contain plant-specific peroxidases (class III peroxidase; Prxs) that exist as large multigene families. Reverse genetic studies to characterize the function of each Prx have revealed that Prxs are involved in lignification, cell elongation, stress defense and seed germination. However, the underlying mechanisms associated with plant phenotypes following genetic engineering of Prx genes are not fully understood. This is because Prxs can function as catalytic enzymes that oxidize phenolic compounds while consuming hydrogen peroxide and/or as generators of reactive oxygen species. Moreover, biochemical efforts to characterize Prxs responsible for lignin polymerization have revealed specialized activities of Prxs. In conclusion, not only spatiotemporal regulation of gene expression and protein distribution, but also differentiated oxidation properties of each Prx define the function of this class of peroxidases.

  13. Molecular evolution of SRP cycle components: functional implications.

    PubMed

    Althoff, S; Selinger, D; Wise, J A

    1994-06-11

    Signal recognition particle (SRP) is a cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein that targets a subset of nascent presecretory proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. We have considered the SRP cycle from the perspective of molecular evolution, using recently determined sequences of genes or cDNAs encoding homologs of SRP (7SL) RNA, the Srp54 protein (Srp54p), and the alpha subunit of the SRP receptor (SR alpha) from a broad spectrum of organisms, together with the remaining five polypeptides of mammalian SRP. Our analysis provides insight into the significance of structural variation in SRP RNA and identifies novel conserved motifs in protein components of this pathway. The lack of congruence between an established phylogenetic tree and size variation in 7SL homologs implies the occurrence of several independent events that eliminated more than half the sequence content of this RNA during bacterial evolution. The apparently non-essential structures are domain I, a tRNA-like element that is constant in archaea, varies in size among eucaryotes, and is generally missing in bacteria, and domain III, a tightly base-paired hairpin that is present in all eucaryotic and archeal SRP RNAs but is invariably absent in bacteria. Based on both structural and functional considerations, we propose that the conserved core of SRP consists minimally of the 54 kDa signal sequence-binding protein complexed with the loosely base-paired domain IV helix of SRP RNA, and is also likely to contain a homolog of the Srp68 protein. Comparative sequence analysis of the methionine-rich M domains from a diverse array of Srp54p homologs reveals an extended region of amino acid identity that resembles a recently identified RNA recognition motif. Multiple sequence alignment of the G domains of Srp54p and SR alpha homologs indicates that these two polypeptides exhibit significant similarity even outside the four GTPase consensus motifs, including a block of nine contiguous amino acids in a location

  14. Biochemical adaptations of notothenioid fishes: comparisons between cold temperate South American and New Zealand species and Antarctic species.

    PubMed

    Petricorena, Zulema L Coppes; Somero, George N

    2007-07-01

    Fishes of the perciform suborder Notothenioidei afford an excellent opportunity for studying the evolution and functional importance of diverse types of biochemical adaptation to temperature. Antarctic notothenioids have evolved numerous biochemical adaptations to stably cold waters, including antifreeze glycoproteins, which inhibit growth of ice crystals, and enzymatic proteins with cold-adapted specific activities (k(cat) values) and substrate binding abilities (K(m) values), which support metabolism at low temperatures. Antarctic notothenioids also exhibit the loss of certain biochemical traits that are ubiquitous in other fishes, including the heat-shock response (HSR) and, in members of the family Channichthyidae, hemoglobins and myoglobins. Tolerance of warm temperatures is also truncated in stenothermal Antarctic notothenioids. In contrast to Antarctic notothenioids, notothenioid species found in South American and New Zealand waters have biochemistries more reflective of cold-temperate environments. Some of the contemporary non-Antarctic notothenioids likely derive from ancestral species that evolved in the Antarctic and later "escaped" to lower latitude waters when the Antarctic Polar Front temporarily shifted northward during the late Miocene. Studies of cold-temperate notothenioids may enable the timing of critical events in the evolution of Antarctic notothenioids to be determined, notably the chronology of acquisition and amplification of antifreeze glycoprotein genes and the loss of the HSR. Genomic studies may reveal how the gene regulatory networks involved in acclimation to temperature differ between stenotherms like the Antarctic notothenioids and more eurythermal species like cold-temperate notothenioids. Comparative studies of Antarctic and cold-temperate notothenioids thus have high promise for revealing the mechanisms by which temperature-adaptive biochemical traits are acquired - or through which traits that cease to be of advantage under

  15. Effect of UV irradiation on cutaneous cicatrices: a randomized, controlled trial with clinical, skin reflectance, histological, immunohistochemical and biochemical evaluations.

    PubMed

    Due, Eva; Rossen, Kristian; Sorensen, Lars Tue; Kliem, Anette; Karlsmark, Tonny; Haedersdal, Merete

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on human cutaneous cicatrices. In this randomized, controlled study, dermal punch biopsy wounds served as a wound healing model. Wounds healed by primary or second intention and were randomized to postoperative solar UV irradiation or to no UV exposure. Evaluations after 5 and 12 weeks included blinded clinical assessments, skin reflectance measurements, histology, immunohistochemistry, and biochemical analyses of the N-terminal propeptide from procollagen-1, hydroxyproline, hydroxylysine, and proline. Twelve weeks postoperatively, UV-irradiated cicatrices healing by second intention: (i) were significantly pointed out as the most disfiguring; (ii) obtained significantly higher scores of colour, infiltration and cicatrix area; and (iii) showed significantly higher increase in skin-reflectance measurements of skin-pigmentation vs. non-irradiated cicatrices. No histological, immunohistochemical or biochemical differences were found. In conclusion, postoperative UV exposure aggravates the clinical appearance of cicatrices in humans.

  16. Biochemical subtypes of oligodendrocyte in the anterior medullary velum of the rat as revealed by the monoclonal antibody Rip.

    PubMed

    Butt, A M; Ibrahim, M; Ruge, F M; Berry, M

    1995-07-01

    Oligodendrocytes were studied in the anterior medullary velum (AMV) of the rat using the monoclonal antibody Rip, an oligodendrocyte marker of unknown function. Confocal microscopic imaging of double immunofluorescent labelling with antibodies to Rip and carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) revealed two biochemically and morphologically distinct populations of oligodendrocyte which were either Rip+CAII+ or Rip+CAII-. Double immunofluorescent labelling with Rip and myelin basic protein (MBP) or glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) provided direct evidence that Rip-labelled cells were phenotypically oligodendrocytes and confirmed that Rip did not recognise astrocytes. Oligodendrocytes which were Rip+CAII+ supported numerous myelin sheaths for small diameter axons, whilst Rip+CAII- oligodendrocytes supported fewer myelin sheaths for large diameter axons. Morphologically, Rip+CAII+ oligodendrocytes corresponded to types I or II of classical nomenclature, whilst Rip+CAII- oligodendrocytes corresponded to types III and IV. The results demonstrated a biochemical difference between oligodendrocytes which myelinated small and large diameter fibres.

  17. EMU evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouen, M.

    1991-01-01

    Evolution of Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) technology is necessary to support the Extravehicular Activity (EVA) requirements of the Space Station Freedom Program and those of the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI). Key qualities supporting long-duration missions include technologies that are highly reliable, durable, minimize logistics requirements, and are in-flight maintainable and serviceable. While these qualities are common to SSF and SEI EVA, development paths will differ where specific mission requirements impose different constraints. Development of reusable, regenerative technologies is necessary to minimize the logistics penalties. Increased battery discharge/recharge cycle life and usable wet life, compact high current density fuel cells, reusable CO2 absorbing media, and thermal radiation coupled with venting heat rejection technologies are just some methods of reducing consumables. Development must strive for durable, reliable systems that are in-flight serviceable and maintainable, which are vital for missions where logistics capabilities are extremely constrained. Key areas include suit components (e.g., gloves, boots, and cooling garments), and life support hardware such as fans, pumps, instrumentation, and emergency O2 systems. Higher pressure suits will reduce EVA prebreathe requirements and pre-EVA operations overall. Many challenges of higher pressure suits have been addressed by on-going development. Emphasis on glove development is necessary to provide low fatigue, dexterous glove mobility at higher suit pressures. Minimum impact hooks and scars which support an advanced SSF EMU have been identified. These accommodations permit upgrades that support servicing of low volume, high pressure oxygen systems, and hydrogen technologies such as fuel cell, and venting hydrogen heat rejection systems.

  18. Gamma-Ray Bursts and Population III Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toma, Kenji; Yoon, Sung-Chul; Bromm, Volker

    2016-12-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are ideal probes of the epoch of the first stars and galaxies. We review the recent theoretical understanding of the formation and evolution of the first (so-called Population III) stars, in light of their viability of providing GRB progenitors. We proceed to discuss possible unique observational signatures of such bursts, based on the current formation scenario of long GRBs. These include signatures related to the prompt emission mechanism, as well as to the afterglow radiation, where the surrounding intergalactic medium might imprint a telltale absorption spectrum. We emphasize important remaining uncertainties in our emerging theoretical framework.

  19. Numerical simulations of type-III solar radio bursts.

    PubMed

    Li, B; Robinson, P A; Cairns, I H

    2006-04-14

    The first numerical simulations are presented for type-III solar radio bursts in the inhomogeneous solar corona and interplanetary space, that include microscale quasilinear and nonlinear processes, intermediate-scale driven ambient density fluctuations, and large scale evolution of electron beams, Langmuir and ion sound waves, and fundamental and harmonic electromagnetic emission. Bidirectional coronal emission is asymmetric between the upward and downward directions, and harmonic emission dominates fundamental emission. In interplanetary space, fundamental and/or harmonic emission can be important. Langmuir and ion sound waves are bursty and the statistics of Langmuir wave energy agree well with the predictions of stochastic growth theory.

  20. Model-Based Design of Biochemical Microreactors.

    PubMed

    Elbinger, Tobias; Gahn, Markus; Neuss-Radu, Maria; Hante, Falk M; Voll, Lars M; Leugering, Günter; Knabner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of biochemical pathways is an important resource in Synthetic Biology, as the predictive power of simulating synthetic pathways represents an important step in the design of synthetic metabolons. In this paper, we are concerned with the mathematical modeling, simulation, and optimization of metabolic processes in biochemical microreactors able to carry out enzymatic reactions and to exchange metabolites with their surrounding medium. The results of the reported modeling approach are incorporated in the design of the first microreactor prototypes that are under construction. These microreactors consist of compartments separated by membranes carrying specific transporters for the input of substrates and export of products. Inside the compartments of the reactor multienzyme complexes assembled on nano-beads by peptide adapters are used to carry out metabolic reactions. The spatially resolved mathematical model describing the ongoing processes consists of a system of diffusion equations together with boundary and initial conditions. The boundary conditions model the exchange of metabolites with the neighboring compartments and the reactions at the surface of the nano-beads carrying the multienzyme complexes. Efficient and accurate approaches for numerical simulation of the mathematical model and for optimal design of the microreactor are developed. As a proof-of-concept scenario, a synthetic pathway for the conversion of sucrose to glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) was chosen. In this context, the mathematical model is employed to compute the spatio-temporal distributions of the metabolite concentrations, as well as application relevant quantities like the outflow rate of G6P. These computations are performed for different scenarios, where the number of beads as well as their loading capacity are varied. The computed metabolite distributions show spatial patterns, which differ for different experimental arrangements. Furthermore, the total output of G6P