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Sample records for biocompatible glass-ionomer cement

  1. Glass ionomer restorative cement systems: an update.

    PubMed

    Berg, Joel H; Croll, Theodore P

    2015-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements have been used in pediatric restorative dentistry for more than two decades. Their usefulness in clinical dentistry is preferential to other materials because of fluoride release from the glass component, biocompatibility, chemical adhesion to dentin and enamel, coefficient of thermal expansion similar to that of tooth structure, and versatility. The purpose of this paper was to review the uses of glass ionomer materials in pediatric dentistry, specifically as pit and fissure sealants, dentin and enamel replacement repair materials, and luting cements, and for use in glass ionomer/resin-based composite stratification tooth restoration (the sandwich technique). This article can also be used as a guide to research and clinical references regarding specific aspects of the glass ionomer systems and how they are used for young patients.

  2. Devitrification of ionomer glass and its effect on the in vitro biocompatibility of glass-ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Hurrell-Gillingham, K; Reaney, I M; Miller, C A; Crawford, A; Hatton, P V

    2003-08-01

    The effects of devitrification of an ionomer glass with a molar composition 4.5SiO(2).3Al(2)O(3).1.5P(2)O(5).3CaO.2CaF(2) on cement formation and in vitro biocompatibility were investigated. Differential thermal analysis was used to study the phase evolution in the glass, and to determine the heat treatments for production of glass-ceramics. X-ray diffraction patterns from glass frit heat-treated at 750 degrees C for 2h contained peaks corresponding to apatite (JCPDS 15-876), whereas for samples heat-treated at 950 degrees C for 2h apatite and mullite (JCPDS 15-776) were the major phases detected. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed that apatite and apatite-mullite phases were present after heat treatments at 750 degrees C and 950 degrees C respectively. Glass and glass-ceramics were ground to prepare <45microm powders and glass ionomer cements were produced using a ratio of 1g powder: 0.2g PAA: 0.3g 10% m/v tartaric acid solution in water. In vitro biocompatibility was evaluated using cultured rat osteosarcoma (ROS) cells. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that cells colonised the surfaces of cements prepared using untreated ionomer glass and glass crystallised to form apatite (750 degrees C/2h). However, quantitative evaluation using MTT and total protein assays indicated that more cell growth occurred in the presence of cements prepared using ionomer glasses crystallised to apatite than cements prepared using untreated glass. The least cell growth and respiratory activity was observed on cements made with crystallised glass containing both apatite and mullite. It was concluded that the controlled devitrification of ionomer glasses could be used to produce GIC bone cements with improved biocompatibility.

  3. Water dynamics in glass ionomer cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, M. C.; Jacobsen, J.; Momsen, N. C. R.; Benetti, A. R.; Telling, M. T. F.; Seydel, T.; Bordallo, H. N.

    2016-07-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are an alternative for preventive dentistry. However, these dental cements are complex systems where important motions related to the different states of the hydrogen atoms evolve in a confined porous structure. In this paper, we studied the water dynamics of two different liquids used to prepare either conventional or resin-modified glass ionomer cement. By combining thermal analysis with neutron scattering data we were able to relate the water structure in the liquids to the materials properties.

  4. A Review of Glass-Ionomer Cements for Clinical Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Sharanbir K; Nicholson, John W

    2016-06-28

    This article is an updated review of the published literature on glass-ionomer cements and covers their structure, properties and clinical uses within dentistry, with an emphasis on findings from the last five years or so. Glass-ionomers are shown to set by an acid-base reaction within 2-3 min and to form hard, reasonably strong materials with acceptable appearance. They release fluoride and are bioactive, so that they gradually develop a strong, durable interfacial ion-exchange layer at the interface with the tooth, which is responsible for their adhesion. Modified forms of glass-ionomers, namely resin-modified glass-ionomers and glass carbomer, are also described and their properties and applications covered. Physical properties of the resin-modified glass-ionomers are shown to be good, and comparable with those of conventional glass-ionomers, but biocompatibility is somewhat compromised by the presence of the resin component, 2 hydroxyethyl methacrylate. Properties of glass carbomer appear to be slightly inferior to those of the best modern conventional glass-ionomers, and there is not yet sufficient information to determine how their bioactivity compares, although they have been formulated to enhance this particular feature.

  5. A Review of Glass-Ionomer Cements for Clinical Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, Sharanbir K.; Nicholson, John W.

    2016-01-01

    This article is an updated review of the published literature on glass-ionomer cements and covers their structure, properties and clinical uses within dentistry, with an emphasis on findings from the last five years or so. Glass-ionomers are shown to set by an acid-base reaction within 2–3 min and to form hard, reasonably strong materials with acceptable appearance. They release fluoride and are bioactive, so that they gradually develop a strong, durable interfacial ion-exchange layer at the interface with the tooth, which is responsible for their adhesion. Modified forms of glass-ionomers, namely resin-modified glass-ionomers and glass carbomer, are also described and their properties and applications covered. Physical properties of the resin-modified glass-ionomers are shown to be good, and comparable with those of conventional glass-ionomers, but biocompatibility is somewhat compromised by the presence of the resin component, 2 hydroxyethyl methacrylate. Properties of glass carbomer appear to be slightly inferior to those of the best modern conventional glass-ionomers, and there is not yet sufficient information to determine how their bioactivity compares, although they have been formulated to enhance this particular feature. PMID:27367737

  6. Thermal diffusivity of glass ionomer cement systems.

    PubMed

    Brantley, W A; Kerby, R E

    1993-01-01

    The thermal diffusivity has been measured for 10 glass ionomer and resin-based materials: three conventional (water-hardened) glass ionomer cements, two silver-reinforced glass ionomers, an experimental stainless steel-reinforced glass ionomer, three visible light-cured (VLC) glass ionomer-resin hybrid materials, and a VLC resin-based product developed for the same clinical uses as the hybrid materials. Cube-shaped specimens, c. 10 x 10 x 10 mm, initially at room temperature were immersed in mercury surrounded by an ice-water bath. From the experimental cooling curve a semi-log plot of relative temperature decrease vs. time yielded a straight line whose slope is proportional to the thermal diffusivity. The values ranged from 1.74-5.16 x 10(-3) cm2 s-1, and all of the materials tested would have adequate insulating properties provided normal clinical thickness levels for lining materials are maintained. It was found that the thermal diffusivities for the three metal-reinforced glass ionomers, where composition information is available, do not follow a rule of mixtures applied to the individual components.

  7. Depth microhardness of glass ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, V; Moya, F; Payan, J; Bartala, M

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe the effect of different conditions of storage on the surface and in the depth of luting glass ionomer cement by measuring microhardness. The hardness of a glass ionomer cement was measured after storage in wet and dry conditions and in an atmosphere of 80% relative humidity, for times up to 1000 h. Storage in distilled water produced a softening effect, but the depth hardness increased progressively. The penetration of the water is a surface phenomenon and does not affect the depth of the cement. However, the cement is vulnerable to moisture to a depth of 600 microns and marginal gaps evolve in the range of 40 to 80 microns when the luting cement at the tooth crown margin is always destroyed.

  8. Evaluation of adhesive and compressive strength of glass ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Ramashanker; Singh, Raghuwar D; Chand, Pooran; Jurel, Sunit Km; Tripathi, Shuchi

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the study was to assess, compare and evaluate the adhesive strength and compressive strength of different brands of glass ionomer cements to a ceramometal alloy. (A) Glass ionomer cements: GC Fuji II (GC Corporation, Tokyo), Chem Flex (Dentsply DeTrey, Germany), Glass ionomer FX (Shofu-11, Japan), MR dental (MR dental suppliers Pvt Ltd, England). (B) Ceramometal alloy (Ni-Cr: Wiron 99; Bego, Bremen, Germany). (C) Cold cure acrylic resin. (E) Temperature cum humidity control chamber. (F) Instron Universal Testing Machine. Four different types of Glass ionomer cements were used in the study. From each type of the Glass ionomer cements, 15 specimens for each were made to evaluate the compressive strength and adhesive strength, respectively. The 15 specimens were further divided into three subgroups of five specimens. For compressive strength, specimens were tested at 2, 4 and 12 h by using Instron Universal Testing Machine. To evaluate the adhesive strength, specimens were surface treated with diamond bur, silicone carbide bur and sandblasting and tested under Instron Universal Testing Machine. It was concluded from the study that the compressive strength as well as the adhesive bond strength of MR dental glass ionomer cement with a ceramometal alloy was found to be maximum compare to other glass ionomer cements. Sandblasting surface treatment of ceramometal alloy was found to be comparatively more effective for adhesive bond strength between alloy and glass ionomer cement.

  9. Amino acid containing glass-ionomer cement for orthopedic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei

    Amino acid containing glass-ionomer cements were synthesized, formulated, and evaluated for orthopedic application. The formulation of different amino acid containing glass-ionomer bone cements was optimized, and conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer bone cements were compared. Properties of interest included handling characteristics, physical and chemical properties, and mechanical strength of the bone cement. The study was based on the synthesis of different vinyl containing amino acids, different polyelectrolytes containing these amino acid residues, and different resin-modified polyelectrolytes, as well as formulation and evaluation of conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer bone cements using these polyelectrolytes. Systematic preparation of polyelectrolytes and formulation of glass-ionomer bone cements were essential features of this work, since we anticipated that the mechanical properties of the glass-ionomer bone cements could be strongly affected by the nature of the polyelectrolytes and formulation. Mechanical properties were evaluated in a screw driven mechanical testing machine, and structure-property relationships were determined by scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observation of the fracture surface of the specimens. How the structure of polyelectrolytes, such as different amino acid residues, molecular weight, different modifying resin, and formulation of glass-ionomer bone cement, affected the mechanical properties was also studied.

  10. Toughness, bonding and fluoride-release properties of hydroxyapatite-added glass ionomer cement.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Milanita E; Arita, Kenji; Nishino, Mizuho

    2003-09-01

    Improving the mechanical strength of glass ionomer cement while preserving its favorable clinical properties such as fluoride release, bonding to tooth structure and biocompatibility is desirable. In this study, hydroxyapatite was incorporated into chemically setting glass ionomer cement and its effect on the fracture toughness, bonding to dentin and fluoride release was identified. Commercial glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP((R)) ) was the control and base material. Eight weight percent of hydroxyapatite was added into the glass ionomer powder. Specimens were fabricated and the fracture toughness, shear bond strength and eluted fluoride ion concentration were measured. Adding hydroxyapatite into the glass ionomer cement led to significantly higher fracture toughness after 15min and 24h from mixing. The hydroxyapatite-added cement also exhibited bond strength to dentin similar to that of the control from 15min to 56 days and consistent fluoride release for 13 weeks. SEM findings showed a cohesive type of fracture in the material for all specimens in both groups. These results indicate that hydroxyapatite-added glass ionomer cement has a potential as a reliable restorative material with improved fracture toughness, long-term bonding to dentin and unimpeded ability of sustained fluoride release.

  11. Effects of incorporation of nano-fluorapatite particles on microhardness, fluoride releasing properties, and biocompatibility of a conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC).

    PubMed

    Moshaverinia, Maryam; Borzabadi-Farahani, Ali; Sameni, Abdi; Moshaverinia, Alireza; Ansari, Sahar

    2016-01-01

    Present study evaluated effects of addition of Nanoparticles fluorapatite (Nano-FA) on microhardness and fluoride release of a Glass Ionomer Cement (GIC, Fuji IX GP Fast). Forty-eight specimens prepared, divided equally into 4 groups (2 with Nano-FA); after 24 h and one week Vickers microhardness (HV) was measured. Nano-FA specimens were made from addition of nano-FA to Fuji IX powder (glass powder/Nano-FA ratio=20:1 wt/wt, 3.6:1 P/L ratio). At 24 h, mean (95% CI) HV for GIC and Nano-FA GIC were 40.59 (39.51-41.66) and 46.89 (45.95-47.82) kg/mm(2), and at one week 44.98 (44.23-45.72), 53.29 (52.58-53.99) kg/mm(2), respectively. Findings indicated higher HV in Nano-FA specimens (F=221.088, p<0.001). Twenty-eight days weekly cumulative fluoride release in both groups was not different (p>0.05). MTT assay exhibited no inhibition of cell proliferation or reduction in metabolic activity in experimental [84.0 (3.3)] or control groups [85.1 (4.7)] with no difference between groups (p>0.05). New nano-FA GIC was biocompatible and showed improved surface hardness. Future clinical trials can verify the usefulness of Nano-FA GIC.

  12. Radiopacity of resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative cements.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, S K; Shah, P M; Chong, B S; Pitt Ford, T R

    1996-09-01

    This in vitro study compared the relative radiopacities of three commercially available resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (Vitremer, Fuji II LC, and Photac-Fil), an experimental resin-modified glass-ionomer (V-66), two conventional glass-ionomers (ChemFil and Fuji Cap II), and amalgam (as the control). Radiopacity was assessed densitometrically and expressed as equivalent thicknesses of aluminum. All the glass-ionomer cements were more radiopaque than enamel and dentin, with the exception of ChemFil and Photac-Fil. Apart from the control material, the experimental resin-modified glass-ionomer material, V-66, had the highest radiopacity of all the materials tested. Of the three resin-modified glass-ionomer materials tested, Fuji II LC was the most radiopaque and Photac-Fil the least. For the radiopacity of restorative glass-ionomer materials to exceed that of enamel, it should be greater than 1.5 mm of equivalent thickness of aluminum.

  13. How mobile are protons in the structure of dental glass ionomer cements?

    PubMed Central

    Benetti, Ana R.; Jacobsen, Johan; Lehnhoff, Benedict; Momsen, Niels C. R.; Okhrimenko, Denis V.; Telling, Mark T. F.; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Strobl, Markus; Seydel, Tilo; Manke, Ingo; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2015-01-01

    The development of dental materials with improved properties and increased longevity can save costs and minimize discomfort for patients. Due to their good biocompatibility, glass ionomer cements are an interesting restorative option. However, these cements have limited mechanical strength to survive in the challenging oral environment. Therefore, a better understanding of the structure and hydration process of these cements can bring the necessary understanding to further developments. Neutrons and X-rays have been used to investigate the highly complex pore structure, as well as to assess the hydrogen mobility within these cements. Our findings suggest that the lower mechanical strength in glass ionomer cements results not only from the presence of pores, but also from the increased hydrogen mobility within the material. The relationship between microstructure, hydrogen mobility and strength brings insights into the material's durability, also demonstrating the need and opening the possibility for further research in these dental cements. PMID:25754555

  14. How mobile are protons in the structure of dental glass ionomer cements?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benetti, Ana R.; Jacobsen, Johan; Lehnhoff, Benedict; Momsen, Niels C. R.; Okhrimenko, Denis V.; Telling, Mark T. F.; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Strobl, Markus; Seydel, Tilo; Manke, Ingo; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2015-03-01

    The development of dental materials with improved properties and increased longevity can save costs and minimize discomfort for patients. Due to their good biocompatibility, glass ionomer cements are an interesting restorative option. However, these cements have limited mechanical strength to survive in the challenging oral environment. Therefore, a better understanding of the structure and hydration process of these cements can bring the necessary understanding to further developments. Neutrons and X-rays have been used to investigate the highly complex pore structure, as well as to assess the hydrogen mobility within these cements. Our findings suggest that the lower mechanical strength in glass ionomer cements results not only from the presence of pores, but also from the increased hydrogen mobility within the material. The relationship between microstructure, hydrogen mobility and strength brings insights into the material's durability, also demonstrating the need and opening the possibility for further research in these dental cements.

  15. Antibacterial Activity and Fluoride Release of Glass-Ionomer Cement, Compomer and Zirconia Reinforced Glass-Ionomer Cement

    PubMed Central

    Kenchappa, Mallikarjuna; Bhayya, Deepak; Gupta, Shilpi; Saxena, Sudhanshu; Satyarth, Saurabh; Singh, Aishwarya; Gupta, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The cariostatic property of glass ionomer cement (GIC) stems from its ability to release fluoride into the oral environment. Recently, zirconia reinforced GIC has been launched which promises the protective benefits of glass ionomer while completely eliminating the hazard of mercury. Aim To evaluate invitro antibacterial activity and fluoride release from two conventional glass ionomer cements (GC II and GC IX), compomer (Compoglass) and a zirconia reinforced glass ionomer cement (Zirconomer). Materials and Methods The antibacterial activity of the cement specimens was evaluated against Streptococcus mutans using the agar inhibition test. Zone of inhibition on Mueller-Hinton agar plates was measured after 48 hours. The fluoride release from the cement specimens in ppm were measured at day 1, 7, 14 and 21 using a fluoride ion selective electrode. Data was analysed using one-way and two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by LSD post-hoc test. A p-value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Statistically significant largest zone of inhibition was observed with Zirconomer. Also, significant differences were seen in fluoride release of different materials. At all the time intervals maximum fluoride release was observed with Zirconomer and minimum with Compoglass. Conclusion This invitro investigation has revealed that zirconia reinforced GIC (Zirconomer) had maximum antibacterial activity against S.mutans and fluoride release. PMID:27190961

  16. Do conventional glass ionomer cements release more fluoride than resin-modified glass ionomer cements?

    PubMed Central

    Cabral, Maria Fernanda Costa; Martinho, Roberto Luiz de Menezes; Guedes-Neto, Manoel Valcácio; Rebelo, Maria Augusta Bessa; Pontes, Danielson Guedes

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the fluoride release of conventional glass ionomer cements (GICs) and resin-modified GICs. Materials and Methods The cements were grouped as follows: G1 (Vidrion R, SS White), G2 (Vitro Fil, DFL), G3 (Vitro Molar, DFL), G4 (Bioglass R, Biodinâmica), and G5 (Ketac Fil, 3M ESPE), as conventional GICs, and G6 (Vitremer, 3M ESPE), G7 (Vitro Fil LC, DFL), and G8 (Resiglass, Biodinâmica) as resin-modified GICs. Six specimens (8.60 mm in diameter; 1.65 mm in thickness) of each material were prepared using a stainless steel mold. The specimens were immersed in a demineralizing solution (pH 4.3) for 6 hr and a remineralizing solution (pH 7.0) for 18 hr a day. The fluoride ions were measured for 15 days. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test with 5% significance were applied. Results The highest amounts of fluoride release were found during the first 24 hr for all cements, decreasing abruptly on day 2, and reaching gradually decreasing levels on day 7. Based on these results, the decreasing scale of fluoride release was as follows: G2 > G3 > G8 = G4 = G7 > G6 = G1 > G5 (p < 0.05). Conclusions There were wide variations among the materials in terms of the cumulative amount of fluoride ion released, and the amount of fluoride release could not be attributed to the category of cement, that is, conventional GICs or resin-modified GICs. PMID:26295024

  17. New aspects of the setting of glass-ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Wasson, E A; Nicholson, J W

    1993-02-01

    For many years, glass-ionomer cements have been described as setting by the formation of a poly(acrylate) matrix. Recent research has suggested that a second reaction may be involved, namely, the formation of a silica matrix. So that this hypothesis could be tested, non-polymer cements, based on an ionomer glass plus acetic acid, were prepared and stored for up to six months. They were insoluble in water, and their compressive strength was found to increase rapidly over the period of storage. By contrast, the product of the reaction between ZnO and acetic acid was soluble in water. These results support the idea that there is a secondary setting reaction in glass ionomers and suggest that it is responsible for the increase in strength observed.

  18. Spheroidization of glass powders for glass ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Gu, Y W; Yap, A U J; Cheang, P; Kumar, R

    2004-08-01

    Commercial angular glass powders were spheroidized using both the flame spraying and inductively coupled radio frequency plasma spraying techniques. Spherical powders with different particle size distributions were obtained after spheroidization. The effects of spherical glass powders on the mechanical properties of glass ionomer cements (GICs) were investigated. Results showed that the particle size distribution of the glass powders had a significant influence on the mechanical properties of GICs. Powders with a bimodal particle size distribution ensured a high packing density of glass ionomer cements, giving relatively high mechanical properties of GICs. GICs prepared by flame-spheroidized powders showed low strength values due to the loss of fine particles during flame spraying, leading to a low packing density and few metal ions reacting with polyacrylic acid to form cross-linking. GICs prepared by the nano-sized powders showed low strength because of the low bulk density of the nano-sized powders and hence low powder/liquid ratio of GICs.

  19. Glass-ionomer cements as restorative and preventive materials.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Hien

    2010-07-01

    This article focuses on glass-ionomer cement (GIC) and its role in the clinical management of caries. It begins with a brief description of GIC, the mechanism of fluoride release and ion exchange, the interaction between GIC and the external environment, and finally the ion exchange between GIC and the tooth at the internal interface. The importance of GIC, as a tool, in caries management, in minimal intervention dentistry (MI), and Caries Management by Risk Assessment (CAMBRA) also will be highlighted.

  20. Fluoride Release by Glass Ionomer Cements, Compomer and Giomer

    PubMed Central

    Mousavinasab, Sayed Mostafa; Meyers, Ian

    2009-01-01

    Background: To measure the amounts of fluoride released from fluoride-containing materials, four glass ionomer cements (Fuji IX, Fuji VII, Fuji IX Extra and Fuji II LC), a compomer (Dyract Extra) and a giomer (Beautifil) were used in this study. Methods: Twenty cylindrical specimens were prepared from each material. The amount of released fluoride was measured during the first week and on the days 14 and 21 by using specific fluoride electrode and an ionanalyzer. The results were statistically analyzed using analysis of variance (two-way ANOVA) and Tukey Kramer multiple comparison tests (p=0.05). Results: Significant differences were seen in fluoride release of different days and materials (p<0.05). The maximum cumulative fluoride release of days 1-7 was related to Fuji VII, followed by Fuji IX Extra, Fuji II LC, Fuji IX, Dyract Extra and Beautifil in descending order and this order remained the same until the 21st day. Conclusion: Fuji IX, Fuji VII, Fuji IX Extra, and Fuji II LC released higher amounts of fluoride compared to Beautifil and Dyract Extra in this study. It seems that the extent of the glass ionomer matrix plays an important role in determining the fluoride releasing ability of glass ionomer cement materials. PMID:21528035

  1. Enhanced bioactivity of glass ionomer cement by incorporating calcium silicates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Song; Cai, Yixiao; Engqvist, Håkan; Xia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are known as a non-bioactive dental cement. During setting the GIC have an acidic pH, driven by the acrylic acid component. It is a challenge to make GIC alkaline without disturbing its mechanical properties. One strategy was to add slowly reacting systems with an alkaline pH. The aim of the present study is to investigate the possibility of forming a bioactive dental material based on the combination of glass ionomer cement and calcium silicates. Two types of GIC were used as control. Wollastonite (CS also denoted β-CaSiO3) or Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) was incorporated into the 2 types of GIC. The material formulations' setting time, compressive strength, pH and bioactivity were compared between modified GIC and GIC control. Apatite crystals were found on the surfaces of the modified cements but not on the control GIC. The compressive strength of the cement remained with the addition of 20% calcium silicate or 20% MTA after one day immersion. In addition, the compressive strength of GIC modified with 20% MTA had been increased during the 14 d immersion (p < 0 .05).

  2. Enhanced bioactivity of glass ionomer cement by incorporating calcium silicates

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Song; Cai, Yixiao; Engqvist, Håkan; Xia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are known as a non-bioactive dental cement. During setting the GIC have an acidic pH, driven by the acrylic acid component. It is a challenge to make GIC alkaline without disturbing its mechanical properties. One strategy was to add slowly reacting systems with an alkaline pH. The aim of the present study is to investigate the possibility of forming a bioactive dental material based on the combination of glass ionomer cement and calcium silicates. Two types of GIC were used as control. Wollastonite (CS also denoted β-CaSiO3) or Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) was incorporated into the 2 types of GIC. The material formulations’ setting time, compressive strength, pH and bioactivity were compared between modified GIC and GIC control. Apatite crystals were found on the surfaces of the modified cements but not on the control GIC. The compressive strength of the cement remained with the addition of 20% calcium silicate or 20% MTA after one day immersion. In addition, the compressive strength of GIC modified with 20% MTA had been increased during the 14 d immersion (p < 0 .05). PMID:26787304

  3. Comparative Evaluation of the Antimicrobial Properties of Glass Ionomer Cements with and without Chlorhexidine Gluconate

    PubMed Central

    Jampanapalli, Sharada Reddy; Konda, Suhasini; Inguva, Hema Chandrika; Chimata, Vamsi Krishna

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Chlorhexidine gluconate is a widely used antimicrobial agent. Adding chlorhexidine and quaternary ammonium compounds to filling materials, such as composite resins, acrylic resins, and glass ionomer cements increases the antibacterial property of restorative materials. This study includes antibacterial property of glass ionomer restorative cements with chlorhexidine gluconate. Aim: The primary objective of our study was to compare the antimicrobial properties of two commercially available glass ionomer cements with and without chlorhexidine gluconate on strains of mutans streptococci. Materials and methods: Two glass ionomers (Fuji II Conventional and Fuji IX) were used. Chlorhexidine gluconate was mixed with glass ionomer cements, and antimicrobial properties against mutans streptococci were assessed by agar diffusion. The tested bacterial strain was inhibited and the antimicrobial properties decreased with time. Results: The highest amount of antimicrobial activity with mean inhibitory zone was found in Fuji II with chlorhexidine gluconate followed by Fuji IX with chlorhexidine gluconate, Fuji II without chlorhexidine gluconate, and Fuji IX without chlorhexidine gluconate. Conclusion: The results of the study confirmed that the addition of 5% chlorhexidine gluconate to Fuji II and Fuji IX glass ionomer cements resulted in a restorative material that had increased antimicrobial properties over the conventional glass ionomer cements alone for Streptococcus mutans. How to cite this article: Yadiki JV, Jampanapalli SR , Konda S, Inguva HC, Chimata VK. Comparative Evaluation of the Antimicrobial Properties of Glass Ionomer Cements with and without Chlorhexidine Gluconate. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):99-103. PMID:27365927

  4. Does Addition of Propolis to Glass Ionomer Cement Alter its Physicomechanical Properties? An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, P; Girish Babu, K L; Neeraja, G; Pillai, S

    Propolis is a natural resinous substance produced by honey bees. The antimicrobial effects of glass ionomer cement have been shown to improve with the addition of propolis; however its effect on the physicomechanical properties of the cement is not known.

  5. Cytotoxicity of glass ionomer cements containing silver nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Ana-Paula-Rodrigues; Pires, Wanessa-Carvalho; Pereira, Flávia-Castro; Silveira-Lacerda, Elisângela-Paula; Carrião, Marcus-Santos; Bakuzis, Andris-Figueiroa; Souza-Costa, Carlos-Alberto; Lopes, Lawrence-Gonzaga; Estrela, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Background Some studies have investigated the possibility of incorporating silver nanoparticles (NAg) into dental materials to improve their antibacterial properties. However, the potential toxic effect of this material on pulp cells should be investigated in order to avoid additional damage to the pulp tissue. This study evaluated the cytotoxicity of conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements (GIC) with and without addition of NAg. Material and Methods NAg were added to the materials at two different concentrations by weight: 0.1% and 0.2%. Specimens with standardized dimensions were prepared, immersed in 400 µL of culture medium and incubated at 37°C and 5% CO2 for 48 h to prepare GIC liquid extracts, which were then incubated in contact with cells for 48 h. Culture medium and 0.78% NAg solution were used as negative and positive controls, respectively. Cell viability was determined by MTT and Trypan Blue assays. ANOVA and the Tukey test (α=0.05) were used for statistical analyses. Results Both tests revealed a significant decrease in cell viability in all groups of resin modified cements (p<0.001). There were no statistically significant differences between groups with and without NAg (p>0.05). The differences in cell viability between any group of conventional GIC and the negative control were not statistically significant (p>0.05). Conclusions NAg did not affect the cytotoxicity of the GIC under evaluation. Key words:Glass ionomer cements, totoxicity, cell culture techniques, nanotechnology, metal nanoparticles. PMID:26644839

  6. Glass-ionomer cement restorative materials: a sticky subject?

    PubMed

    Sidhu, S K

    2011-06-01

    Glass-ionomer cement (GIC) materials have been in clinical use since their inception 40 years ago. They have undergone several permutations to yield different categories of these materials. Although all GICs share the same generic properties, subtle differences between commercial products may occur. They have a wide range of uses such as lining, bonding, sealing, luting or restoring a tooth. In general, GICs are useful for reasons of adhesion to tooth structure, fluoride release and being tooth-coloured although their sensitivity to moisture, inherent opacity, long-term wear and strength are not as adequate as desired. They are useful in situations where they are not disadvantaged by their comparatively lower physical properties, such as where there is adequate remaining tooth structure to support the material and where they are not subject to heavy occlusal loading. The last decade has seen the use of these materials being extended. However, they are likely to retain their specific niches of clinical application.

  7. Glass-ionomer Cements in Restorative Dentistry: A Critical Appraisal.

    PubMed

    Almuhaiza, Mohammed

    2016-04-01

    Glass-ionomer cements (GICs) are mainstream restorative materials that are bioactive and have a wide range of uses, such as lining, bonding, sealing, luting or restoring a tooth. Although the major characteristics of GICs for the wider applications in dentistry are adhesion to tooth structure, fluoride releasing capacity and tooth-colored restorations, the sensitivity to moisture, inherent opacity, long-term wear and strength are not as adequate as desired. They have undergone remarkable changes in their composition, such as the addition of metallic ions or resin components to their composition, which contributed to improve their physical properties and diversified their use as a restorative material of great clinical applicability. The light-cured polymer reinforced materials appear to have substantial benefits, while retaining the advantages of fluoride release and adhesion. Further research should be directed towards improving the properties, such as strength and esthetics without altering its inherent qualities, such as adhesion and fluoride releasing capabilities.

  8. An evaluation of commercial and experimental resin-modified glass-ionomer cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanchanavasita, Widchaya

    Glass-ionomer cement (GIG) has become widely accepted as a restorative material due to its bonding ability and sustained release of fluoride. The cement is, however, sensitive to moisture imbalance and lacks toughness. Recently, resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (RMGIC) have been introduced. These materials contain monomeric species, such as 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) in addition to the components of the conventional glass-ionomer cements. Disadvantages of RMGICs include a relatively high contraction and exotherm on polymerisation. HEMA is known to be cytotoxic, leading to problems of biocompatibility, and polyHEMA swells on exposure to water, leading to dimensional instability of the cements. Addressing these problems is important in the development of the RMGICs. Using alternative monomers to replace or reduce the amount of HEMA used in the current RMGIC formulations would be appropriate. This study was divided into two parts. Initially certain properties such as water sorption, micro-hardness, flexural strength and polymerisation exotherm of commercially available RMGICs were evaluated. Long-term storage of RMGICs in aqueous solutions resulted in their high water uptakes and solubilities and large volumetric expansions. However, the surface hardness and strengths of the restorative grade RMGICs were not affected on storage in distilled water. When the materials were immersed in artificial saliva, significantly higher water uptake were obtained; the equilibrium water uptake were not reached after 20 months. As a consequence, plastic behaviour and reduced surface hardness were observed. The RMGICs also produced high exotherm during polymerisation. The second part of the study investigated the use of an experimental resin as an alternative to HEMA. The experimental resin has the advantage of low toxicity to the pulp and relatively low polymerisation shrinkage. This study compared the polymerisations of the resin and HEMA, and of mixtures of these two

  9. Push-out bond strength of fiber posts to root dentin using glass ionomer and resin modified glass ionomer cements

    PubMed Central

    PEREIRA, Jefferson Ricardo; da ROSA, Ricardo Abreu; SÓ, Marcus Vinícius Reis; AFONSO, Daniele; KUGA, Milton Carlos; HONÓRIO, Heitor Marques; do VALLE, Accácio Lins; VIDOTTI, Hugo Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to assess the push-out bond strength of glass fiber posts to root dentin after cementation with glass ionomer (GICs) and resin-modified glass ionomer cements (RMGICs). Material and Methods Fifty human maxillary canines were transversally sectioned at 15 mm from the apex. Canals were prepared with a step back technique until the application of a #55 K-file and filled. Post spaces were prepared and specimens were divided into five groups according to the cement used for post cementation: Luting & Lining Cement; Fuji II LC Improved; RelyX Luting; Ketac Cem; and Ionoseal. After cementation of the glass fiber posts, all roots were stored at 100% humidity until testing. For push-out test, 1-mm thick slices were produced. The push-out test was performed in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute and the values (MPa) were analyzed by Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Levene's tests and by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test at a significance level of 5%. Results Fiber posts cemented using Luting & Lining Cement, Fuji II LC Improved, and Ketac Cem presented the highest bond strength to root dentin, followed by RelyX Luting. Ionoseal presented the lowest bond strength values (P>0.05). The post level did not influence the bond strength of fiber posts to root dentin (P=0.148). The major cause of failure was cohesive at the cement for all GICs and RMGICs. Conclusions Except for Ionoseal, all cements provided satisfactory bond strength values. PMID:25004052

  10. Resin-modified glass ionomer cements: fluoride release and uptake.

    PubMed

    Forsten, L

    1995-08-01

    The aim was to study the short- and long-term fluoride release from resin-modified glass ionomer cements (GIC). The aim was also to determine the effect of fluoride treatment of 9-month-old specimens, consistency of the mix, and pH of the environment on the fluoride release. GIC test specimens were continually exposed to running water, and the fluoride release was measured periodically by storing the specimens in 5 ml deionized water for 1 week and measuring the fluoride content of the solution. After 24 h, 1 month, 9 months, and 11 months in running water four of the six resin-modified GICs released as much as or more fluoride than the auto-curing GIC tested for comparison. Fluoride treatment after 9 months also increased the fluoride release of these four brands, as was the case with the conventional GIC. At 24 h and 1 month two of the resin-modified GICs released smaller amounts of fluoride than the other materials, and the fluoride treatment used on those had no or only a minimal effect. Thin consistency of a mix resulted in higher fluoride release for one resin-modified material than a thick mix. Low pH increased the fluoride release for all materials.

  11. Modification of resin modified glass ionomer cement by addition of bioactive glass nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Valanezhad, Alireza; Odatsu, Tetsuro; Udoh, Koichi; Shiraishi, Takanobu; Sawase, Takashi; Watanabe, Ikuya

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, sol-gel derived nanoparticle calcium silicate bioactive glass was added to the resin-modified light cure glass-ionomer cement to assess the influence of additional bioactive glass nanoparticles on the mechanical and biological properties of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement. The fabricated bioactive glass nanoparticles added resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (GICs) were immersed in the phosphate buffer solution for 28 days to mimic real condition for the mechanical properties. Resin-modified GICs containing 3, 5 and 10 % bioactive glass nanoparticles improved the flexural strength compared to the resin-modified glass-ionomer cement and the samples containing 15 and 20 % bioactive glass nanoparticles before and after immersing in the phosphate buffer solution. Characterization of the samples successfully expressed the cause of the critical condition for mechanical properties. Cell study clarified that resin-modified glass-ionomer cement with high concentrations of bioactive glass nanoparticles has higher cell viability and better cell morphology compare to control groups. The results for mechanical properties and toxicity approved that the considering in selection of an optimum condition would have been a more satisfying conclusion for this study.

  12. Correlation between the strength of glass ionomer cements and their bond strength to bovine teeth.

    PubMed

    Hibino, Yasushi; Kuramochi, Ken-ichi; Harashima, Atsushi; Honda, Muneaki; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Nagasawa, Yuko; Yamaga, Taniichiro; Nakajima, Hiroshi

    2004-12-01

    This study examined the possible correlation between the strength of glass ionomers and their adhesive strength to bovine teeth. The shear bond strengths of three different brands of glass ionomer mixed at four different P/L ratios to bovine teeth were measured 24 hours after the cement specimens were prepared. The correlation between shear bond strength and mechanical strength reported in our previous study was also examined. No significant (p > 0.05) increases in the bond strength to bovine teeth were found in any of the cements when the mixing ratio increased. The present study showed no significant (p > 0.05) correlation between mechanical strength of cement and its bond strength to bovine teeth. Rather than trying to increase the strength of the cement, it would be more effective to enhance the adhesive bond strength through procedures such as surface conditioning or cleaning of the tooth structure when glass ionomers are used as luting agents.

  13. Orthodontic bracket bonding with a plasma-arc light and resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, H; Komori, A; Kojima, I; Ando, F

    2001-07-01

    Developments in light-curing technology have led to the introduction of a plasma-arc light-curing unit that delivers high-intensity output for faster curing. The purposes of this study were to determine the shear bond strengths of light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement cured with a plasma-arc light-curing unit and to evaluate the durability of the resultant bond strength with thermal cycling. Comparisons were made between light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement and light-cured composite resin. Two light-curing units were used in this study: a plasma-arc light-curing unit and a conventional light-curing unit. The mean shear bond strengths of light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement with the plasma-arc and the conventional light-curing units were 20.3 MPa and 26.0 MPa, respectively. An analysis of variance showed no statistically significant differences between the plasma-arc and the conventional light-curing units. Light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement and light-cured composite resin demonstrated similar bond strengths and exhibited no statistical differences. There was no statistical difference in bond strength between the teeth that were thermal cycled and those that were not. Failure sites for the brackets bonded with light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement appeared to be predominantly at the bracket-adhesive interface. The SDs of light-cured composite resin were high for both light-curing units. Whereas the coefficients of variation for light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement ranged from 20% to 30%, those of light-cured composite resin ranged from 40% to 60%. The bond strength of light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement cured with either a conventional light-curing unit or a plasma-arc light-curing unit surpassed the clinically required threshold. The plasma-arc light-curing unit may be an advantageous alternative to the conventional light-curing unit for orthodontic bracket bonding with both

  14. Bioactive glass-ionomer cement with potential therapeutic function to dentin capping mineralization.

    PubMed

    Xie, Dong; Zhao, Jun; Weng, Yiming; Park, Jong-Gu; Jiang, Hui; Platt, Jeffrey A

    2008-10-01

    We have developed a novel bioactive resin-modified glass-ionomer cement system with therapeutic function to dentin capping mineralization. In the system, the newly synthesized star-shape poly(acrylic acid) was formulated with water, Fuji II LC filler, and bioactive glass S53P4 to form resin-modified glass-ionomer cement. Compressive strength (CS) was used as a screening tool for evaluation. The commercial glass-ionomer cement Fuji II LC was used as a control. All the specimens were conditioned in simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 degrees C prior to testing. The effect of aging in SBF on CS and microhardness of the cements was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the in vitro dentin surface changes caused by the incorporation of bioactive glass. The results show that the system not only provided strengths comparable to original commercial Fuji II LC cement but also allowed the cement to help mineralize the dentin in the presence of SBF. It appears that this bioactive glass-ionomer cement system has direct therapeutic impact on dental restorations that require root surface fillings.

  15. Comparative assessment of antibacterial activity of different glass ionomer cements on cariogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dodamani, Arun Suresh; Jadhav, Harish Chaitram; Deshmukh, Manjiri Abhay

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Glass ionomer cements (GICs), which are biocompatible and adhesive to the tooth surface, are widely used nowadays for tooth restoration. They inhibit the demineralization and promote the remineralization of the tooth structure adjacent to the restoration, as well as interfere with bacterial growth. Hence, the present study was conducted to assess and compare the antimicrobial activity of three commercially available GICs against two cariogenic bacteria. Materials and Methods An agar plate diffusion test was used for evaluating the antimicrobial effect of three different GICs (Fuji IX, Ketac Molar, and d-tech) on Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) and Lactobacillus acidophilus (L. acidophilus). Thirty plates were prepared and divided into two groups. The first group was inoculated with S. mutans, and the second group was inoculated with L. acidophilus. These plates were then incubated at 37℃ for 24 hours. Zones of bacterial growth inhibition that formed around each well were recorded in millimeters (mm). Results The zones of inhibition for Fuji IX, Ketac Molar, and d-tech on S. mutans were found to be 10.84 ± 0.22 mm, 10.23 ± 0.15 mm, and 15.65 ± 0.31 mm, respectively, whereas those for L. acidophilus were found to be 10.43 ± 0.12 mm, 10.16 ± 0.11 mm, and 15.57 ± 0.13 mm, respectively. Conclusions D-tech cement performed better in terms of the zone of bacterial inhibition against the two test bacteria, than the other two tested glass ionomers. PMID:27847749

  16. Dispersive surface properties of glass-ionomer cements determined by inverse gas chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrzejewska, E.; Voelkel, A.; Andrzejewski, M.; Limanowska-Shaw, H.

    2005-05-01

    The surface properties of several glass-ionomer cements (GIC), restorative dental materials, (GC-Fuji, Chemadent G-J, Ketac Fil and Ketac Molar) were investigated for the first time by means of inverse gas chromatography. This method enables characterization of surface activity in dispersive (non-polar) and acid-base interactions. The ability of the surface of glass-ionomers to participate in dispersive interactions was expressed by the use of the dispersive component of surface free energy γsd. This parameter was determined with satisfactory precision, meaning that the values of γsd can be further used in the discussion of the influence of the type of GIC, its preparation and the storage time on the surface properties. The greatest capacity for dispersive interactions was revealed by Ketac Molar and the lowest by GC-Fuji. Dispersive interactions in the surface activity of glass-ionomers increased with increasing storage time after cement preparation.

  17. Lactic acid jet test: in vitro erosion rates of glass ionomer dental cements containing radiopacifying elements.

    PubMed

    Williams, J A; Billington, R W; Pearson, G J

    1993-06-01

    The lactic acid jet test erosion rates were measured for 13 radiopaque glass ionomer dental materials obtained from a number of manufacturing sources. The erosion rate was compared with that found for the non-radiopaque restorative from the same manufacturer to determine whether the addition of an extra element had affected the resistance to erosion. Six materials were not significantly affected, six showed a significant increase in erosion rate. Only one material showed a reduced erosion rate. Materials containing a high proportion of any additive could show an increased erosion rate. Glass ionomer cements with or without radiopacifying elements had low erosion rates compared with other dental materials.

  18. Initial sliding wear kinetics of two types of glass ionomer cement: a tribological study.

    PubMed

    Villat, Cyril; Ponthiaux, Pierre; Pradelle-Plasse, Nelly; Grosgogeat, Brigitte; Colon, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize the initial wear kinetics of two different types of glass ionomer cement used in dentistry (the conventional glass ionomer cement and the resin-modified glass ionomer cement) under sliding friction after 28-day storing in distilled water or Ringer's solution. Sliding friction was applied through a pin-on-disk tribometer, in sphere-on-plane contact conditions, under 5 N normal load and 120 rotations per minute. The test lasted 7500 cycles and replicas were performed at 2500, 5000 and 7500 cycles. A profilometer was used to evaluate the wear volume. Data were analysed using Student's t-test at a significant level of 5%. There is no statistical significant difference between the results obtained for a given material with the maturation media (P > 0.05). However, for a given maturation medium, there are significant statistical differences between the data obtained for the two materials at each measurement (P < 0.0001). The wear rates of both materials decrease continuously during the running-in period between 0 and 2500 cycles. After 2500 cycles, the wear rate becomes constant and equal for both materials. The resin matrix contained in the resin-modified glass ionomer cement weakens the tribological behaviour of this material.

  19. Effects of dentin surface treatments on shear bond strength of glass-ionomer cements

    PubMed Central

    Poggio, Claudio; Beltrami, Riccardo; Scribante, Andrea; Colombo, Marco; Lombardini, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Summary Aim The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of a conventional glass-ionomer cement (GIC) and a resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC) to dentin. Materials and methods 80 bovine permanent incisors were used. 40 cylindrical specimens of a GIC (Fuji IX GP Extra) and 40 cylindrical specimens of a RMGIC (Fuji II LC) were attached to the dentin. The teeth were then randomly assigned to 8 groups of equal size (n=10), 4 for every type of glass-ionomer cement, corresponding to type of dentin surface treatments. Group 1: GC Cavity Conditioner; Group 2: 37% phosphoric acid gel; Group 3: Clearfil SE Bond; Group 4: no dentin conditioning (control). The specimens were placed in a universal testing machine (Model 3343, Instron Corp., Canton, Mass., USA) and subsequently tested for shear bond strength (MPa). Results ANOVA showed the presence of significant differences among the various groups. Post hoc Tukey test showed different values of shear bond strength for Fuji IX GP Extra and for Fuji II LC. The different conditioners variably influence the adhesion of the glass-ionomer cements tested. Conclusions. RMGIC shear bond to dentin was higher than GIC. The use of a Self-etch adhesive system improved the shear bond strength values of RMGIC and lowered the shear bond strength values of GIC significantly. PMID:24753797

  20. The Effect of Glass Ionomer and Adhesive Cements on Substance P Expression in Human Dental Pulp

    PubMed Central

    Ariza-Garcia, German; Camelo, Patricia; Mejia, Monica; Ojeda, Karyn; Azuero-Holguin, Maria M.; Abad-Coronel, Dunia; Munoz, Hugo R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to quantify the effect of glass ionomer and adhesive cements on SP expression in healthy human dental pulp. Study Design: Forty pulp samples were obtained from healthy premolars where extraction was indicated for orthodontic reasons. In thirty of these premolars a Class V cavity preparation was performed and teeth were equally divided in three groups: Experimental Group I: Glass Ionomer cement was placed in the cavity. Experimental Group II: Adhesive Cement was placed in the cavity. Positive control group: Class V cavities only. The remaining ten healthy premolars where extracted without treatment and served as a negative control group. All pulp samples were processed and SP was measured by radioimmunoassay. Results: Greater SP expression was found in the adhesive cement group, followed by the glass ionomer and the positive control groups. The lower SP values were for the negative control group. ANOVA showed statistically significant differences between groups (p<0.0001). Tukey HSD post hoc tests showed statistically significant differences in SP expression between negative control group and the 3 other groups (p<0.01). Differences between the cavity-only group and the two experimental groups were also statistically significant (p<0.05 and p<0.01 respectively). There is also a statistically significant difference between the two experimental groups (p<0.01). Conclusions: These findings suggest that adhesive cements provoke a greater SP expression when compared with glass ionomer. Key words:Glass Ionomer, adhesive cement, Substance P, human dental pulp. PMID:23722145

  1. Heat transfer properties and thermal cure of glass-ionomer dental cements.

    PubMed

    Gavic, Lidia; Gorseta, Kristina; Glavina, Domagoj; Czarnecka, Beata; Nicholson, John W

    2015-10-01

    Under clinical conditions, conventional glass-ionomer dental cements can be cured by application of heat from dental cure lamps, which causes acceleration in the setting. In order for this to be successful, such heat must be able to spread sufficiently through the cement to enhance cure, but not transmit heat so effectively that the underlying dental pulp of the tooth is damaged. The current study was aimed at measuring heat transfer properties of modern restorative glass-ionomers to determine the extent to which they meet these twin requirements. Three commercial glass ionomer cements (Ionofil Molar, Ketac Molar and Equia™ Fill) were used in association with three different light emitting diode cure lamps designed for clinical use. In addition, for each cement, one set of specimens was allowed to cure without application of a lamp. Temperature changes were measured at three different depths (2, 3 and 4 mm) after cure times of 20, 40 and 60 s. The difference among the tested groups was evaluated by ANOVA (P < 0.05) and post hoc Newman-Keuls test. All brands of glass-ionomer showed a small inherent setting exotherm in the absence of heat irradiation, but much greater temperature increases when exposed to the cure lamp. However, temperature rises did not exceed 12.9 °C. Application of the cure lamp led to the establishment of a temperature gradient throughout each specimen. Differences were typically significant (P < 0.05) and did not reflect the nominal power of the lamps, because those lamps have variable cooling systems, and are designed to optimize light output, not heating effect. Because the thermal conductivity of glass-ionomers is low, temperature rises at 4 mm depths were much lower than at 2 mm. At no time did the temperature rise sufficiently to cause concern about potential damage to the pulp.

  2. Review paper: Role of aluminum in glass-ionomer dental cements and its biological effects.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, John W; Czarnecka, Beata

    2009-11-01

    The role of aluminum in glass-ionomers and resin-modified glass-ionomers for dentistry is reviewed. Aluminum is included in the glass component of these materials in the form of Al(2)O(3) to confer basicity on the glass and enable the glass to take part in the acid-base setting reactions. Results of studies of these reactions by FTIR and magic-angle spinning (MAS)-NMR spectroscopy are reported and the role of aluminum is discussed in detail. Aluminum has been shown to be present in the glasses in predominantly 4-coordination, as well as 5- and 6-coordination, and during setting a proportion of this is converted to 6-coordinate species within the matrix of the cement. Despite this, mature cements may contain detectable amounts of both 4- and 5-coordinate aluminum. Aluminum has been found to be leached from glass-ionomer cements, with greater amounts being released under acidic conditions. It may be associated with fluoride, with which it is known to complex strongly. Aluminum that enters the body via the gastro-intestinal tract is mainly excreted, and only about 1% ingested aluminum crosses the gut wall. Calculation shows that, if a glass-ionomer filling dissolved completely over 5 years, it would add only an extra 0.5% of the recommended maximum intake of aluminum to an adult patient. This leads to the conclusion that the release of aluminum from either type of glass-ionomer cement in the mouth poses a negligible health hazard.

  3. A Twofold Comparison between Dual Cure Resin Modified Cement and Glass Ionomer Cement for Orthodontic Band Cementation

    PubMed Central

    Attar, Hanaa El; Elhiny, Omnia; Salem, Ghada; Abdelrahman, Ahmed; Attia, Mazen

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To test the solubility of dual cure resin modified resin cement in a food simulating solution and the shear bond strength compared to conventional Glass ionomer cement. MATERIALS AND METHOD: The materials tested were self-adhesive dual cure resin modified cement and Glass Ionomer (GIC). Twenty Teflon moulds were divided into two groups of tens. The first group was injected and packed with the modified resin cement, the second group was packed with GIC. To test the solubility, each mould was weighed before and after being placed in an analytical reagent for 30 days. The solubility was measured as the difference between the initial and final drying mass. To measure the Shear bond strength, 20 freshly extracted wisdom teeth were equally divided into two groups and embedded in self-cure acrylic resin. Four mm sections of stainless steel bands were cemented to the exposed buccal surfaces of teeth under a constant load of 500 g. Shear bond strength was measured using a computer controlled materials testing machine and the load required to deband the samples was recorded in Newtons. RESULTS: GIC showed significantly higher mean weight loss and an insignificant lower Shear bond strength, compared to dual cure resin Cement. CONCLUSION: It was found that dual cure resin modified cement was less soluble than glass ionomer cement and of comparable bond strength rendering it more useful clinically for orthodontic band cementation. PMID:28028417

  4. Effect of home-use fluoride gels on resin-modified glass-ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    El-Badrawy, W A; McComb, D

    1998-01-01

    Acidic fluoride gels have been found to significantly damage conventional glass-ionomer cements. In this study the effect to acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) and neutral fluoride gels on the recently introduced resin-modified glass ionomers and a polyacid-modified composite resin (Variglass) was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Five materials were examined: Photac-Fil, Fuji II LC, Vitremer, Variglass, and Ketac-Fil (control). Groups of five specimens of each material were treated for 24 hours with one of the following: 1) distilled water, 2) neutral fluoride gel, 3) APF gel. Surface micro-structure of treated specimens was examined using SEM, and microphotographs were evaluated using a three-point scale. APF was found to have a deleterious effect on all examined materials, while minimal effects resulted from the neutral fluoride gel compared to the control group. Although showing greater resistance to the APF gel than conventional glass-ionomer cements, resin-modified glass-ionomer materials revealed characteristic immersion and erosion behavior, substantiating their differentiation from a hybrid material containing a preponderance of resin.

  5. [Bonding of glass ionomer cement to dentin. An in vitro study].

    PubMed

    Gonzalez Lopez, S; Perez Gutierrez, I; Navajas Rodriguez de Mondelo, J M

    1991-01-01

    It's been studied "in vitro" the influence of the "Smear Layer" on the cement adhesión of the glass ionomer to the dentin. Using phosphoric acid at 37% and poliacrylic in the dentin during short periods of time, the adhesion between the cement and the dentin is improved because the Smear Layer is removed totally in the case of phosphoric acid and partially in the case of polyacrylic acid.

  6. Antimicrobial Effects of Dental Luting Glass Ionomer Cements on Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Altenburger, Markus; Spitzmüller, Bettina; Anderson, Annette; Hellwig, Elmar

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To reduce secondary caries, glass ionomer luting cements are often used for cementing of indirect restorations. This is because of their well-known antimicrobial potential through the release of fluoride ions. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the antimicrobial effect of five dental luting cements which were based on glass ionomer cement technology. Methods. Five different glass ionomer based luting cements were tested for their antimicrobial effects on Streptococcus mutans in two different experimental setups: (i) determination of colony-forming units (CFUs) in a plate-counting assay; (ii) live/dead staining (LDS) and fluorescence microscopy. All experiments were conducted with or without prior treatment of the materials using sterilized human saliva. Antimicrobial effects were evaluated for adherent and planktonic bacteria. Bovine enamel slabs (BES) were used as negative control. BES covered with 0.2% chlorhexidine (CHX) served as positive control. Results. Each of the tested materials significantly reduced the number of initially adhered CFUs; this reduction was even more pronounced after prior incubation in saliva. Antimicrobial effects on adherent bacteria were confirmed by live-dead staining. Conclusion. All five luting cements showed an antimicrobial potential which was increased by prior incubation with human saliva, suggesting an enhanced effect in vivo. PMID:24795539

  7. Effect of triturator speed variation on physical properties of encapsulated glass-ionomer luting cements.

    PubMed

    Rupp, D C; Hermesch, C B; Charlton, D G

    1996-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of variation of triturator mixing speed on the physical properties of two encapsulated glass-ionomer luting cements. Physical properties evaluated were working time, setting time, film thickness, and 24-hour and 7-day compressive strengths. Encapsulated glass-ionomer luting cements were mixed at 3000, 3500, 4000 (control), and 4500 cycles per minute (cpm). An oscillating rheometer was used to determine working and setting times. Film thickness and compressive strength were determined using methods described in ANSI/ADA Specification No 66 for dental glass-ionomer cements. Results of the study indicated that decreased mixing speed may prolong working and setting times for Ketac-Cem Maxicap and Fuji Cap I. Within the range of 3500 to 4500 cpm, variations in mixing speed do not significantly affect compressive strength or film thickness values for either cement. Excessively slow mixing speed (3000 cpm) often resulted in the presence of unmixed powder expressed from the capsule nozzle prior to the expression of mixed cement. The presence of this unmixed powder results in a decreased powder/liquid ratio, which may have an adverse effect on the physical properties of the set cement.

  8. A three-year clinical trial using a glass ionomer cement for the bonding of orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Miller, J R; Mancl, L; Arbuckle, G; Baldwin, J; Phillips, R W

    1996-01-01

    Recent clinical studies measuring orthodontic bracket failure, when using glass ionomer cement as an adhesive, have reported a wide range of percentages of bracket failure. The present study recorded bracket failure over a 3-year period, longer than had been previously measured. Seventeen participants were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups, either using glass ionomer cement or composite resin for bonding. In each group, brackets were bonded to incisors, canines, and premolars. Bracket failure was measured over the duration of comprehensive orthodontic treatment for all participants. Brackets bonded with the glass ionomer cement were more likely to fail (log-rank test; P < or = 0.022). This difference was clinically significant. At the present time, the disadvantage of extra bracket failures appears to outweigh potential advantages when considering glass ionomer cement for the routine bonding of orthodontic brackets.

  9. Effect of Zirconia and Alumina Fillers on the Microstructure and Mechanical Strength of Dental Glass Ionomer Cements

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Júlio C. M.; Silva, Joel B.; Aladim, Andrea; Carvalho, Oscar; Nascimento, Rubens M.; Silva, Filipe S.; Martinelli, Antonio E.; Henriques, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Background: Glass-ionomer cements perform a protective effect on the dentin-pulp complex considering the F ions release and chemical bonding to the dental structures. On the other hand, those materials have poor physic-mechanical properties in comparison with the restorative resin composite. The main aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of zirconia and/or alumina fillers on the microstructure and strength of a resin modified glass-ionomer cement after thermal cycling. Methods: An in vitro experimental study was carried out on 9 groups (n = 10) of cylindrical samples (6 x 4 mm) made from resin modified glass-ionomer (Vitremer, 3M, USA) with different contents of alumina and/or zirconia fillers. A nano-hybrid resin composite was tested as a control group. Samples were mechanically characterized by axial compressive tests and electron scanning microscopy (SEM) coupled to energy dispersive X-ray spectrophotometry (EDS), before and after thermal cycling. Thermal cycling procedures were performed at 3000, 6000 and 10000 cycles in Fusayama´s artificial saliva at 5 and 60 oC. Results: An improvement of compressive strength was noticed on glass-ionomer reinforced with alumina fillers in comparison with the commercial glass ionomer. SEM images revealed the morphology and distribution of alumina or zirconia in the microstructure of glass-ionomers. Also, defects such as cracks and pores were detected on the glass-ionomer cements. The materials tested were not affected by thermal cycling in artificial saliva. Conclusion: Addition of inorganic particles at nano-scale such as alumina can increase the mechanical properties of glass-ionomer cements. However, the presence of cracks and pores present in glass-ionomer can negatively affect the mechanical properties of the material because they are areas of stress concentration. PMID:27053969

  10. In vitro fluoride release from a different kind of conventional and resin modified glass-ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Selimović-Dragaš, Mediha; Hasić-Branković, Lajla; Korać, Fehim; Đapo, Nermin; Huseinbegović, Amina; Kobašlija, Sedin; Lekić, Meliha; Hatibović-Kofman, Šahza

    2013-08-01

    Fluoride release is important characteristic of glass-ionomer cements. Quantity of fluoride ions released from the glass-ionomer cements has major importance in definition of their biological activity. The objectives of this study were to define the quantity of fluoride ions released from the experimental glass-ionomer cements and to define the effect of fluoride ions released from the experimental glass-ionomer cements on their cytotoxicity. Concentrations of the fluoride ions released in the evaluated glass-ionomer cements were measured indirectly, by the fluoride-selective WTW, F500 electrode potential, combined with reference R503/D electrode. Statistical analyses of F-ion concentrations released by all glass-ionomers evaluated at two time points, after 8 and after 24 hours, show statistically higher fluoride releases from RMGICs: Vitrebond, Fuji II LC and Fuji Plus, when compared to conventional glass-ionomer cements: Fuji Triage, Fuji IX GP Fast and Ketac Silver, both after 8 and after 24 hours. Correlation coefficient between concentrations of fluoride ion released by evaluated glass-ionomer cements and cytotoxic response of UMR-106 osteoblast cell-line are relatively high, but do not reach levels of biological significance. Correlation between concentrations of fluoride ion released and cytotoxic response of NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast cell line after 8 hours is high, positive and statistically significant for conventional GICs, Fuji Triage and Fuji IX GP Fast, and RMGIC, Fuji II LC. Statistically significant Correlation coefficient between concentrations of fluoride ion released and cytotoxic response of NIH3T3 cell line after 24 hours is defined for RMGIC Fuji II LC only.

  11. Effects of incorporation of HA/ZrO(2) into glass ionomer cement (GIC).

    PubMed

    Gu, Y W; Yap, A U J; Cheang, P; Khor, K A

    2005-03-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GICs) are a class of bioactive cements that bond directly to bone. In this paper, a new bioactive hydroxyapatite (HA)/zirconia (ZrO(2))-filled GIC composite was developed to improve the biocompatibility and bioactivity of the GICs with the surrounding bone and connective tissues. Nano-sized HA/30 wt% ZrO(2) powders were heat treated at 700 degrees Celsius and 800 degrees Celsius for 3 h to elucidate the influence of the crystallinity of composite powders on the performance of HA/ZrO(2)-GICs. The effects of different volume percentages of HA/ZrO(2) powders (4, 12, 28 and 40 vol%) substituted within GICs were investigated based on their microhardness, compressive strength and diametral tensile strength. The HA/ZrO(2)-GICs composite was soaked in distilled water for 1 day and 1 week before subjecting the samples to mechanical testing. Results showed that the glass and HA/ZrO(2) particles were distributed uniformly in the GIC matrix. The substitution of highly crystalline HA/ZrO(2) improved the mechanical properties of the HA/ZrO(2)-GICs due to the slow resorption rate for highly crystalline powders in distilled water. The mechanical properties of HA/ZrO(2)-GICs increased with increasing soak time due to the continuous formation of aluminium salt bridges, which improved the final strength of the cements. The compositions 4 and 12 vol% HA/ZrO(2)-GICs exhibited superior mechanical properties than the original GICs. The mechanical properties of HA/ZrO(2)-GICs were found to be much better than those of HA-GICs because ZrO(2) has the attributes of high strength, high modulus, and is significantly harder than glass and HA particles. Furthermore, ZrO(2) does not dissolve with increasing soaking time.

  12. A study of the interactions between glass-ionomer cement and S. sanguis biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hengtrakool, Chanotai

    Glass-ionomer cements (GIC) have been used for dental procedures for many years and more recently in other medical applications such as bone cements, for bone reconstruction and also as drug release agents. The postulated caries-preventive activities of GIC are thought to result from their sealing ability, remineralization potential and antibacterial effects. Extensive 'in vitro' investigations have attempted to quantify these effects. In this study, an artificial mouth model, simulating 'in vivo' conditions at the tooth surface, was used to achieve a better understanding of the interaction of oral bacteria with the cements. This study investigated the interaction of Streptococcus sanguis, a common mouth commensal, with two glass-ionomer formulations (one containing fluoride and the other without fluoride ion) with particular reference to bacterial growth, changes in surface roughness and hardness of the glass-ionomer cement with respect to time. Restorative materials with rough surfaces will promote bacterial accumulation 'in vivo' and plaque formation is one factor in surface degradation. The constant depth film fermenter (CDFF) permits the examination of these phenomena and was used to investigate glass-ionomer/S. sanguis biofilm interaction over periods up to 14 days. In conjunction with these studies, surface roughness was measured using a 3-dimension laser profilometer and the surface hardness evaluated using a micro-indenter. Fluoride release from the cement was measured over 84 days. The results showed that autoclaving the CDFF prior to bacterial innoculate did not appear to affect the long-term fluoride release of the GIC. Laser profilometry revealed that the initial roughness and surface area of the GICs was significantly greater than the hydroxyapatite control. S. sanguis viable counts were significantly reduced for both glass-ionomer formulations in the shortterm, the greater reduction being with fluoride-GIC. S. sanguis biofilms produced similar

  13. Effects of etching and adhesive applications on the bond strength between composite resin and glass-ionomer cements

    PubMed Central

    PAMIR, Tijen; ŞEN, Bilge Hakan; EVCIN, Özgür

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study determined the effects of various surface treatment modalities on the bond strength of composite resins to glass-ionomer cements. Material and Methods Conventional (KetacTM Molar Quick ApplicapTM) or resin-modified (PhotacTM Fil Quick AplicapTM) glass-ionomer cements were prepared. Two-step etch-rinse & bond adhesive (AdperTM Single Bond 2) or single-step self-etching adhesive (AdperTM PromptTM L-PopTM) was applied to the set cements. In the etch-rinse & bond group, the sample surfaces were pre-treated as follows: (1) no etching, (2) 15 s of etching with 35% phosphoric acid, (3) 30 s of etching, and (4) 60 s of etching. Following the placement of the composite resin (FiltekTM Z250), the bond strength was measured in a universal testing machine and the data obtained were analyzed with the two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by the Tukey's HSD post hoc analysis (p=0.05). Then, the fractured surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Results The bond strength of the composite resin to the conventional glass-ionomer cement was significantly lower than that to the resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (p<0.001). No significant differences were determined between the self-etching and etch-rinse & bond adhesives at any etching time (p>0.05). However, a greater bond strength was obtained with 30 s of phosphoric acid application. Conclusions The resin-modified glass-ionomer cement improved the bond strength of the composite resin to the glass-ionomer cement. Both etch-rinse & bond and self-etching adhesives may be used effectively in the lamination of glass-ionomer cements. However, an etching time of at least 30 s appears to be optimal. PMID:23329245

  14. IR and NMR analyses of hardening and maturation of glass-ionomer cement.

    PubMed

    Matsuya, S; Maeda, T; Ohta, M

    1996-12-01

    It has been reported that the silicate phase as well as the cross-linking of the polycarboxylic acid by aluminum and calcium ions played an important role in the hardening of glass-ionomer cement. The objective of this study was to investigate the structural change during hardening of the cements by means of infrared (IR) spectroscopy and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and to confirm the role of the silica phase in the hardening of the cement. For that purpose, we measured the change in compressive strength of an experimental glass-ionomer cement, two commercial glass-ionomer cements, and a polycarboxylate cement and carried out 29Si and 27Al NMR analyses of the cement samples after the strength measurement. In the IR spectra during hardening, a characteristic band of the silicate network around 1000 cm-1 shifted toward high frequency with time. The spectrum after hardening was similar to that for a hydrated amorphous silica structure. The 27Al NMR analysis showed that Al3+ ion was tetrahedrally coordinated by oxygen in the original glass, but a part of the Al3+ ion was octahedrally coordinated after hardening to form Al polyacrylate gel. The chemical shift of Si in the 29Si NMR spectra also changed during hardening. The variation in the chemical shift reflected the structural change in the silicate network. The initial increase in compressive strength of the cement was mainly caused by polycarboxylate gel formation. However, it was concluded that the reconstruction of the silicate network contributed to the increase in strength with time during the period after the gelation by cross-linking was completed.

  15. Environmental degradation of glass-ionomer cements: a depth-sensing microindentation study.

    PubMed

    Wang, X Y; Yap, Adrian U J; Ngo, H C; Chung, S M

    2007-07-01

    This study investigated the effects of various environmental conditions on the hardness and elastic modulus of restorative glass-ionomer cements (GICs). Two resin-modified GICs (RMGICs) (Fuji II LC [FL]; Photac-Fil Quick [PQ]) and three highly viscous GICs (HVGICs) (Fuji IX Fast [FN]; KetacMolar [KM]; KetacMolar Quick [KQ]) were evaluated in this study. Specimens were fabricated according to the manufacturers' instructions and stored under a variety of conditions (n = 7): 100% humidity, distilled water, pH 5 demineralization solution, and pH 7 remineralization solution. The hardness and elastic modulus were measured using a depth-sensing microindentation test after 4 weeks. The results were analyzed using the independent samples T-test and ANOVA/Scheffe's post hoc test (p < 0.05). HVGICs showed significantly higher hardness and elastic modulus than RMGICs under all storage conditions. Storage in distilled water significantly increased the hardness and elastic modulus of FN, but decreased that of PQ. All HVGICs and RMGICs stored in remineralization solution had hardness values and elastic moduli comparable to those stored in water. Compared to remineralization solution, demineralization solution had no significant effects on the modified GICs with the exception of KQ. The results suggest that the mechanical properties of glass-ionomer restoratives are material-type and storage condition dependent. Therefore, the clinical selection of a glass-ionomer material should be based on the oral environment to which it will be subjected.

  16. The effect of short polyethylene fiber with different weight percentages on diametral tensile strength of conventional and resin modified glass ionomer cements

    PubMed Central

    Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Ghaboos, Seyed-Ali

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of polyethylene fiber on diametral tensile strength of conventional and resin modified glass ionomer cements. Material and Methods 60 specimens in 6 groups (n=10) were prepared. In group 1 conventional glass ionomer (Fuji GC) and in group 2 resin modified glass ionomer (Fuji LC) were as control groups. In group 3 and 4 conventional glass ionomers mixed with short polyethylene fibers in proportion of 1 wt% and 3 wt%, respectively. In fifth and sixth groups, resin modified glass ionomer and short polyethylene fibers were mixed in 1 and 3% wt, respectively. Samples were prepared in a round brass mold (6.5×2.5 mm). After thermo-cycling, the diametral tensile strength of the specimens were tested and data were analyzed with ANOVA and post-hoc tests (p<0.05). Results Diametral tensile strength of both conventional and resin modified glass ionomer cements increased after mixing with polyethylene fiber (p<0.001). Also, reinforcement occurred as the mixing percentage increased from 1% wt to 3% wt in either conventional and resin modified glass ionomer (p<0.001). Conclusions The polyethylene fiber was shown to have a significant positive influence on diametral tensile strength of two types of glass ionomers. Key words:Conventional glass ionomer, diametral tensile strength, polyethylene fiber, resin modified glass ionomer. PMID:28298993

  17. Enhancement effect of pre-reacted glass on strength of glass-ionomer cement.

    PubMed

    Monmaturapoj, Naruporn; Soodsawang, Wiwaporn; Tanodekaew, Siriporn

    2012-02-03

    In this paper, we report on the enhanced strength of glass ionomer cement (GIC) by using the process of pre acid-base reaction and spray drying in glass preparation. The pre acid-base reaction was induced by prior mixing of the glass powder with poly(alkenoic acid). The weight ratios of glass powder to poly(alkenoic acid) were varied to investigate the extent of the pre acid-base reaction of the glass. The effect of the spray drying process which produced spherical glass particles on cement strength was also studied and discussed. The results show that adding 2%-wt of poly(alkenoic acid) liquid in the pre-reacted step improved cement strength. GICs prepared using a mixture of pre-reacted glass with both spherical and irregular powders at 60:40 by weight exhibited the highest compressive strength at 138.64±7.73 MPa. It was concluded that glass ionomer cements containing pre-reacted glass with mixed glass morphology using both spherical and irregular forms are promising as restorative dental materials with improved mechanical properties and handling characteristics.

  18. Effects of cyclic stressing on attachment bond strength using glass ionomer cement and composite resin.

    PubMed

    Moseley, H C; Horrocks, E N; Pearson, G J; Davies, E H

    1995-02-01

    Bonded orthodontic brackets were subjected to cyclic loading in order to simulate the effect of occlusal forces. The subsequent effect on bond strength was determined. Stainless steel, mesh-based brackets were bonded to extracted teeth with either composite resin or glass ionomer cement. A jig was designed to subject each bracket to a preselected loading level and the 24-hour shear/peel bond strength of both stressed and unstressed brackets was subsequently measured. Cyclic loading brought about a comparative decrease in bond strength when using both types of material. The potential implications of selecting these different types of bonding material for clinical use are discussed.

  19. Influence of the retention of antiseptic solution dyes on the translucence of glass-ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Catirse, A B; Dinelli, W; Garcia, P P; Corona, S A

    2001-01-01

    Due to the great importance that antiseptic solutions have on the control and prevention of oral diseases and their influence on the translucence of esthetic restorative materials, the present study evaluated the effect of antiseptic solutions on the translucence of two glass-ionomer cements, Vidrion R and Chelon Fil, at eight time periods. Four antiseptic solutions were used: Listerine, Malvona, Flogoral and Plax. Vidrion R was less translucent than Chelon Fil. Translucence decreased with longer observation time and Malvona caused the lowest translucence.

  20. Calcium polyphosphate as an additive to zinc-silicate glass ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Valliant, Esther Mae; Gagnier, David; Dickey, Brett Thomas; Boyd, Daniel; Filiaggi, Mark Joseph

    2015-07-01

    Aluminum-free glass ionomer cements (GICs) are under development for orthopedic applications, but are limited by their insufficient handling properties. Here, the addition of calcium polyphosphate (CPP) was investigated as an additive to an experimental zinc-silicate glass ionomer cement. A 50% maximum increase in working time was observed with CPP addition, though this was not clinically significant due to the short working times of the starting zinc-silicate GIC. Surprisingly, CPP also improved the mechanical properties, especially the tensile strength which increased by ∼33% after 30 days in TRIS buffer solution upon CPP addition up to 37.5 wt%. This strengthening may have been due to the formation of ionic crosslinks between the polyphosphate chains and polyacrylic acid. Thus, CPP is a potential additive to future GIC compositions as it has been shown to improve handling and mechanical properties. In addition, CPP may stimulate new bone growth and provide the ability for drug delivery, which are desirable modifications for an orthopedic cement.

  1. Modifications in Glass Ionomer Cements: Nano-Sized Fillers and Bioactive Nanoceramics

    PubMed Central

    Najeeb, Shariq; Khurshid, Zohaib; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail; Khan, Abdul Samad; Zohaib, Sana; Martí, Juan Manuel Nuñez; Sauro, Salvatore; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur

    2016-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GICs) are being used for a wide range of applications in dentistry. In order to overcome the poor mechanical properties of glass ionomers, several modifications have been introduced to the conventional GICs. Nanotechnology involves the use of systems, modifications or materials the size of which is in the range of 1–100 nm. Nano-modification of conventional GICs and resin modified GICs (RMGICs) can be achieved by incorporation of nano-sized fillers to RMGICs, reducing the size of the glass particles, and introducing nano-sized bioceramics to the glass powder. Studies suggest that the commercially available nano-filled RMGIC does not hold any significant advantage over conventional RMGICs as far as the mechanical and bonding properties are concerned. Conversely, incorporation of nano-sized apatite crystals not only increases the mechanical properties of conventional GICs, but also can enhance fluoride release and bioactivity. By increasing the crystallinity of the set matrix, apatites can make the set cement chemically more stable, insoluble, and improve the bond strength with tooth structure. Increased fluoride release can also reduce and arrest secondary caries. However, due to a lack of long-term clinical studies, the use of nano-modified glass ionomers is still limited in daily clinical dentistry. In addition to the in vitro and in vivo studies, more randomized clinical trials are required to justify the use of these promising materials. The aim of this paper is to review the modification performed in GIC-based materials to improve their physicochemical properties. PMID:27428956

  2. Effect of Self-etching Adhesives on the Bond Strength of Glass-Ionomer Cements

    PubMed Central

    Jaberi Ansari, Zahra; Panahandeh, Narges; Tabatabaei Shafiei, Zahra Sadat; Akbarzadeh Baghban, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Statement of Problem: Adequate bond strength between glass ionomer cements and composite resin is necessary for the success of the sandwich technique. Purpose of Study: This study assessed the micro-shear bond strength of composite resin to glass-ionomer cements (GIC) using self-etch adhesives with different pH values. Materials and Methods: One hundred specimens (6×4×2 mm) were made using Fuji II and Fuji II LC GICs and treated with different adhesives as follows: Group 1:Fuji II+ Adper Prompt L-Pop, Group-2: Fuji II+SE bond, Group-3: Fuji II + AdheSE, Group-4:Fuji II+ Protect bond, Group-5: Fuji II + Single bond, Group-6:Fuji II LC+ Adper Prompt LPop, Group-7: Fuji II LC+SE bond, Group-8:Fuji II LC+ AdheSE, Group-9: Fuji II LC+ Protect bond, and Group-10: Fuji II LC+ Single bond. Each group consisted of 10 specimens. A cylinder of Z100 composite resin was placed on each sample and light cured. After 24 hours of water storage (37°C), the specimens were subjected to micro-shear bond strength tests (0.5 mm/min). Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results: The mean micro-shear bond strength of groups 1–10 was 11.66±1.79, 16.50±1.85, 18.47±1.77, 13.95±1.77, 15.27±1.49, 15.14±0.90, 20.03±1.19, 17.48±3.00, 16.24±1.98 and 16.03±1.49 MPa, respectively. There were significant differences between groups 1 and 7 (P<0.05). No significant difference was observed between other groups (P>0.05). Fuji II LC showed higher bond strength than Fuji II (P<0.05). Conclusion: Type of self-etch adhesive had no significant effect on micro-shear bond strength of glass-ionomer to composite resin. Resin modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) exhibited higher bond strength than the conventional GIC. PMID:25628698

  3. Aluminum-free glass-ionomer bone cements with enhanced bioactivity and biodegradability.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Filipa O; Pires, Ricardo A; Reis, Rui L

    2013-04-01

    Al-free glasses of general composition 0.340SiO2:0.300ZnO:(0.250-a-b)CaO:aSrO:bMgO:0.050Na2O:0.060P2O5 (a, b=0.000 or 0.125) were synthesized by melt quenching and their ability to form glass-ionomer cements was evaluated using poly(acrylic acid) and water. We evaluated the influence of the poly(acrylic acid) molecular weight and glass particle size in the cement mechanical performance. Higher compressive strength (25±5 MPa) and higher compressive elastic modulus (492±17 MPa) were achieved with a poly(acrylic acid) of 50 kDa and glass particle sizes between 63 and 125 μm. Cements prepared with glass formulation a=0.125 and b=0.000 were analyzed after immersion in simulated body fluid; they presented a surface morphology consistent with a calcium phosphate coating and a Ca/P ratio of 1.55 (similar to calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite). Addition of starch to the cement formulation induced partial degradability after 8 weeks of immersion in phosphate buffer saline containing α-amylase. Micro-computed tomography analysis revealed that the inclusion of starch increased the cement porosity from 35% to 42%. We were able to produce partially degradable Al-free glass-ionomer bone cements with mechanical performance, bioactivity and biodegradability suitable to be applied on non-load bearing sites and with the appropriate physical characteristics for osteointegration upon partial degradation. Zn release studies (concentrations between 413 μM and 887 μM) evidenced the necessity to tune the cement formulations to reduce the Zn concentration in the surrounding environment.

  4. Microleakage of glass-ionomer cement placed in association with non-setting calcium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, S A; Wood, D J; Boyle, E L; Jarad, F D; Youngson, C C

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether non-setting calcium hydroxide [Ca (OH)2] cement placed in the root canal system of premolar teeth would affect the subsequent microleakage of a glass-ionomer restoration (GIC). Following selection, 62 human premolar teeth extracted for orthodontic reasons were accessed and root canals prepared according to a standardized procedure. The specimens were then allocated randomly into two major groups each of 30 teeth. Two other teeth were used as a positive and a negative control. The control group was restored with glass-ionomer cement following drying of the canal and placement of a cotton wool pledget. The test group had all canals dressed with non-setting Ca(OH)2 and then was subdivided, one set (n = 22) being restored following conditioning of the access cavity margins, the other (n = 8) having the margins cleaned with a hand excavator. Samples were assessed for microleakage using a two-point scoring system (leakage or no leakage) in conjunction with a clearing technique using AgNO3. Using Fisher's exact test, a statistically significant difference was found between the control and test groups (P < 0.05) but there was no significant difference between the excavated and conditioned cavities (P=0.55). It is concluded that contamination of access cavity margins with Ca(OH)2 during medication of a root canal interferes with the bond of GIC, resulting in increased microleakage in vitro.

  5. Translationally controlled tumor protein supplemented chitosan modified glass ionomer cement promotes osteoblast proliferation and function.

    PubMed

    Sangsuwan, Jiraporn; Wanichpakorn, Supreya; Kedjarune-Leggat, Ureporn

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) supplemented in a novel glass ionomer cement (BIO-GIC) on normal human osteoblasts (NHost cells). BIO-GIC was a glass ionomer cement (GIC) modified by adding chitosan and albumin to promote the release of TCTP. NHost cells were seeded on specimens of GIC, GIC+TCTP, BIO-GIC and BIO-GIC+TCTP. Cell proliferation was determined by BrdU assay. It was found that BIO-GIC+TCTP had significantly higher proliferation of cells than other specimens. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and osteopontin (OPN) gene expressions assessed by quantitative real time PCR and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were used to determine cell differentiation. Bone cell function was investigated by calcium deposition using alizarin assay. Both BMP-2 and OPN gene expressions of cells cultured on specimens with added TCTP increased gradually up-regulation after day 1 and reached the highest on day 3 then down-regulation on day 7. The ALP activity of cells cultured on BIO-GIC+TCTP for 7 days and calcium content after 14 days were significantly higher than other groups. BIO-GIC+TCTP can promote osteoblast cells proliferation, differentiation and function.

  6. Chemical and structural characterization of glass ionomer cements indicated for atraumatic restorative treatment.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Orlando Aguirre; Borges, Álvaro Henrique; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho; Nakatani, Mariana Kyosen; de Araújo Estrela, Cyntia Rodrigues; de Alencar, Ana Helena Gonçalves; Estrela, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GICs) are restorative materials, which clinical use has increased significantly during the last decade. The aim of the present study was to analyze the chemical constitution and surface morphology of four glass ionomer cements: Maxxion R, VitroFill, Vidrion R and Vitremer. Twelve polyethylene tubes with an internal diameter of 3 and 3 mm in length were prepared, filled and then transferred to a chamber with 95% relative humidity and a temperature of 37°C. The surface morphology of the tested materials was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and main components were investigated by energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX). Scanning electron microscopy revealed irregular and rough external surface. Cracking was not observed. The main constituents were found to be aluminum, silicon, calcium, sodium and fluoride. Phosphorus, sulfur and barium were only observed in Vidrion R, while chlorine were only observed in Maxxion R. Elemental mapping of the outer surface revealed high concentration of aluminum and silicon. Significant irregularities on the surface of the tested materials were observed. The chemical constitution of all GIC was similar.

  7. Resin-modified glass ionomer cements: fluoride release and influence on Streptococcus mutans growth.

    PubMed

    Friedl, K H; Schmalz, G; Hiller, K A; Shams, M

    1997-02-01

    The aims of the present study were to measure the fluoride release of 1 glass ionomer cement, 1 cermet, 3 resin-modified glass ionomer cements and 1 compomer, and to determine the influence of each material on bacterial growth. Test specimens were eluted in saline for 180 days. Every 2 days, the specimens were transferred into fresh saline and the fluoride content of the solution was measured. Furthermore, 48-h, 14-d, 90-d, and 180-d eluates were inoculated with Streptococcus mutans and bacterial growth was recorded nephelometrically. Fluoride release dropped significantly over time for each material with values between 6.2 (Ketac-Silver) and 29.3 (Photac-Fil) ppm after 48 h to values between 0.6 (Ketac-Silver) and 1.7 (Ketac-Fil, Vitremer) ppm after 180 days. Each material reduced bacterial growth at each time of examination, but the effect decreased significantly over time with a maximum growth of 71.7% (Ketac-Fil) to 85.6% (Ketac-Silver) after 48 h and 94.7 (Vitremer) to 99.0% (Ketac-Silver) after 180 days (growth control = 100%). Both Ketac-Silver and Dyract showed a significantly lower inhibiting effect on bacterial growth than the other materials. The tested materials showed a good correlation between fluoride release and influence on bacterial growth. However, both effects dropped dramatically over the 180-days period.

  8. Effect of insertion method on knoop hardness of high viscous glass ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Raggio, Daniela Prócida; Bonifácio, Clarissa Calil; Bönecker, Marcelo; Imparato, José Carlos P; Gee, Anton J de; Amerongen, Willem Evert van

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the Knoop hardness of three high viscous glass ionomer cements: G1 - Ketac Molar; G2 - Ketac Molar Easymix (3M ESPE) and G3 - Magic Glass ART (Vigodent). As a parallel goal, three different methods for insertion of Ketac Molar Easymix were tested: G4 - conventional spatula; G5 - commercial syringe (Centrix) and G6 - low-cost syringe. Ten specimens of each group were prepared and the Knoop hardness was determined 5 times on each specimen with a HM-124 hardness machine (25 g/30 s dwell time) after 24 h, 1 and 2 weeks. During the entire test period, the specimens were stored in liquid paraffin at 37ºC. Significant differences were found between G3 and G1/G2 (two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test; p<0.01). There was no significant difference in the results among the multiple ways of insertion. The glass ionomer cement Magic Glass ART showed the lowest hardness, while the insertion technique had no significant influence on hardness.

  9. Influence of air abrasion preparation on microleakage in glass ionomer cement restorations.

    PubMed

    Reis, Lucia da Silva; Chinelatti, Michelle A; Corona, Silmara A M; Palma-Dibb, Regina G; Borsatto, Maria Cristina

    2004-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess microleakage in class V cavities prepared by air abrasion or high-speed dental bur and restored with different glass ionomer cements. Sixty bovine incisors were equally divided into 6 groups: I, II and III (preparation by high-speed) and IV, V and VI (preparation by air abrasion). Groups I and IV were restored with Fuji IX; groups II and V with Ketac Molar; and groups III and VI with Vitremer. After 24 h (37 degrees C), specimens were thermocycled, isolated with nail varnish, immersed in a 0.2% Rhodamine B solution for 24 hours, sectioned longitudinally and analyzed for microleakage using an optical microscope connected to a digital camera and a computer. The images were digitized and a software allowed the quantitative evaluation of microleakage in millimeters. Data were analyzed by Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests. It was observed that there were significant differences (p < 0.05) between incisal (enamel) and cervical (dentine/cementum) margins, mainly for Ketac Molar; there was no difference (p > 0.05) between preparation methods, except for group II (high-speed/Ketac Molar) that showed higher infiltration; regarding the materials, Ketac Molar demonstrated the highest microleakage values (p < 0.05), and only Vitremer sealed completely both margins of restorations. It was concluded that air abrasion preparation did not influence microleakage in class V restorations with the employed glass ionomer cements.

  10. Influence of an alloy addition on the physical and clinical behaviour of glass ionomer cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abour, Mohamed Abour Bashir

    These in vitro studies compared the various properties of an experimental high powder liquid content glass ionomer cement (EXPT) with those of a metal addition GIC (Hi-Dense) and disperse phase amalgam (Dispersalloy). Bi-axial, four point flexural and compressive tests were used to evaluate strength. Six groups of ten specimens were constructed for each test for each material and allowed to set in an oven at 37°C for 60 minutes. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C until testing at one day, one week, one, three, six months and year. It was found that the strength of Hi-Dense increased and then maintained over extended time, whereas the strength of EXPT showed a declined at 3 months. The bond strengths of the materials to both enamel and dentine were also evaluated. Ten groups of ten teeth, five for each surface for each glass ionomer materials, were prepared. Teeth were aligned leaving the enamel and dentine surfaces exposed. The mixed material was condensed into a cylinder placed on the appropriate surface. These specimens were also stored in distilled water at 37°C. It was found that Hi-Dense had a higher bond strength to enamel that increased with time. The bond strength to dentine was maintained over the test period. The erosion rate of the materials was evaluated using the lactic acid erosion test. Three groups of six specimens for each material were constructed and tested after one hour, one day and at six months. Each specimen was subjected to an impinging jet of lactic acid solution. The erosion rate was determined by weight loss and dimensional change. It was found that Hi-Dense had a high erosion resistance which was slightly better than the experimental material. The microleakage, around restorations prepared, using the glass ionomer materials, was evaluated after cyclical loading the restoration-tooth complex. It was found that there was less leakage around Hi-Dense than EXPT at both the cervical and occlusal margins. In a clinical

  11. Powder-liquid ratio and properties of two restorative glass ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Zahra, Vivian N; Kohen, Sergio G; Macchi, Ricardo L

    2011-01-01

    Changes in the powder-liquid ratio of glass ionomer cements may affect some of its physical properties and acid erosion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the physical properties and acid erosion of two conventional restorative glass ionomer cements against ISO 9917-1:2007 standards after changing the powder-liquid ratio to an adequate consistency for luting indirect restorations. The methodology of ISO Specification 9917-1:2007 was applied to the powder-liquid ratio indicated by the manufacturer and to a modified ratio. Two restorative glass ionomer cements, ChemFil (Ch) (Dentsply) and lonofil Plus (IP) (Voco), were used to evaluate film thickness, compressive strength, net setting time and acid erosion. Thickness was measured three times with a digital micrometer (Digimatic Mitutoyo Corporation). Sample size was five for each cement or condition. Compressive strength (Instron 1011, crosshead speed of 1 mm/min) was evaluated after 24 h immersion in water at 37 degreesC. Sample size was five for each cement or condition. Setting time was evaluated for Ch and IP at 37 degreesC. Sample size was three for each cement or condition. Specimen moulds (30 x 30 x 5 mm) with a central perforation of 5 mm in diameter and 2 mm depth were usedfor acid erosion tests. Erosion depth was measured with a micrometer gauge with a precision of 0. 001 mm, before and after 24-hour immersion in a lactic acid-sodium lactate solution with pH 2.74 at 370C. Sample size wasfivefor each condition. Student's t test was performed with a level of significance ofp< O.05 for each material and condition tested. Arithmetic mean (Standard Deviation). Powder-liquid ratio according to manufacturers: film thickness (in pm): Ch 220 (40), IP: 382 (5); compressive strength (in MPa) at 24 hs: Ch 166.3 (16,6), IP: 100 (10); net setting time (in min.) at 370C: Ch 3.44 (0.3), IP: 5.26 (0.1) ; depth of acid erosion (in mm): Ch 0.15 (0.02), IP: 0.17 (0.02). Modified powder-liquid ratio: film thickness (in pm

  12. Reactions in glass-ionomer cements: IV. Effect of chelating comonomers on setting behavior.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A D; Crisp, S; Ferner, A J

    1976-01-01

    The oscillating rheometer is a valuable instrument for studying the effects of additives on the setting behavior of a cement system. Using this instrument, it was found that certain chelating comonomers, the hydroxycarboxylic acids, could improve the setting characteristics of the glass-ionomer cement system when added to the PAA solution. The acid chelates probably assign the extraction of metal ions from the glass and also tend to hold them in solution, preventing premature ion binding of the polyanion chains. The effect is to increase the rate of hardening without reducing the working time, which may indeed by slightly increased. Tartaric acid, the most effective of the comonomers, can form a chelate bridge between aluminum atoms, and this metal complex probably acts as a flexible bridge structure linking polyanion chains. This mechanism offers some steric advantages over a simple salt bridge.

  13. Preparation and evaluation of an experimental luting glass ionomer cement to be used in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Bertolini, M J; Zaghete, M A; Gimenes, R; Padovani, G C; Cruz, C A S

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to compare the fluoride-releasing and mechanical properties of an experimental luting glass ionomer cement, which has a modified composition and a commercial luting cement. The experimental powder was obtained by sol-gel process and then, it was used to prepare the experimental cements. The properties of cement pastes, such as setting time and working time, microhardness and diametral tensile strength were determined. Fluoride release from GICs was evaluated at time intervals of 1, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days in deionized water. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) analyses showed that the surface of the experimental cements is more homogeneous than commercial GICs. The mechanical properties and the measure of liberation of fluoride of the two cements were influenced by ratio powder:liquid and chemical composition of the precursor powders. Experimental cements released less fluoride than commercial cements. However, this liberation was more constant during the analyzed period. Thus, the results obtained in this study indicated that the composition of the experimental powder modified by the niobium can lead the formation of the polysalt matrix with good mechanical properties. In other words, we can say that experimental powder offered considerable promise for exploitation in dental field.

  14. The incorporation of nanoparticles into conventional glass-ionomer dental restorative cements.

    PubMed

    Gjorgievska, Elizabeta; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Nicholson, John W; Coleman, Nichola J; Slipper, Ian J; Booth, Samantha

    2015-04-01

    Conventional glass-ionomer cements (GICs) are popular restorative materials, but their use is limited by their relatively low mechanical strength. This paper reports an attempt to improve these materials by incorporation of 10 wt% of three different types of nanoparticles, aluminum oxide, zirconium oxide, and titanium dioxide, into two commercial GICs (ChemFil® Rock and EQUIA™ Fil). The results indicate that the nanoparticles readily dispersed into the cement matrix by hand mixing and reduced the porosity of set cements by filling the empty spaces between the glass particles. Both cements showed no significant difference in compressive strength with added alumina, and ChemFil® Rock also showed no significant difference with zirconia. By contrast, ChemFil® Rock showed significantly higher compressive strength with added titania, and EQUIA™ Fil showed significantly higher compressive strength with both zirconia and titania. Fewer air voids were observed in all nanoparticle-containing cements and this, in turn, reduced the development of cracks within the matrix of the cements. These changes in microstructure provide a likely reason for the observed increases in compressive strength, and overall the addition of nanoparticles appears to be a promising strategy for improving the physical properties of GICs.

  15. Evaluation of the mechanical properties of dental adhesives and glass-ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Magni, Elisa; Ferrari, Marco; Hickel, Reinhard; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2010-02-01

    Adhesives and lining/base materials should relieve the stresses concentrated at the tooth/restoration interface. The study aimed at comparing the mechanical properties of eight adhesives and six glass-ionomer cements (GICs). The adhesives were applied on dentin disks, whereas 2 mm x 3 mm x 2 mm GICs specimens were prepared in a teflon mold. Vicker's hardness (VH), elastic modulus (E), creep (Cr) and elastic work (We/Wtot) were measured with a micro hardness indenter. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's test were used to compare the mechanical properties within each materials' type and among the materials' classes. Enamel and dentin were used as references. Significant differences were detected within each materials' type and among the materials' classes and enamel and dentin. GICs were superior to adhesives in VH and E and showed a VH similar to dentin. GICs presented mechanical properties more similar to enamel and dentin than adhesives.

  16. Glass ionomer cement as an occlusive barrier in Class III furcation defect.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Rameshwari

    2011-01-01

    Predicting the prognosis of molars that have experienced furcation invasion, is often a frustrating experience to the dental clinician and disappointing report to the patient involved. Although multiple treatment modalities have been attempted to retain teeth with severe furcation invasion, clinical success has not been predictable. A case report involving the use of glass ionomer cement (GIC) as an occlusive barrier in the management of Class III furcation defect involving mandibular first molar is presented. A literature review on the subject matter was conducted using Medline, Google search engines, and manual library search. GIC restoration of Class III furcation invasion gives a satisfactory result. Surgical and nonsurgical treatment options are available for the management of the condition. GIC as an occlusive barrier in Class III furcation invasion is an economical and less invasive treatment option. It also makes home care easy for the patient.

  17. Effects of enamel deproteinization on bracket bonding with conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Tatiana Bahia Junqueira; Jansen, Wellington Corrêa; Pithon, Matheus Melo; Souki, Bernardo Quiroga; Tanaka, Orlando Motohiro; Oliveira, Dauro Douglas

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to test the effects of enamel deproteinization on bracket bonding with conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC). One hundred premolars, extracted for orthodontic reasons, were divided into five groups (n = 20). Group 1 (control): enamel was etched with 35 per cent phosphoric acid, a thin layer of adhesive was applied, and the brackets were bonded with Transbond XT. Group 2: enamel was etched with 10 per cent polyacrylic acid and the brackets were bonded with conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC). Group 3: enamel was treated with 5.25 per cent NaOCl, etched with 10 per cent polyacrylic acid, and the brackets were bonded with conventional GIC. Group 4: enamel was etched with 10 per cent polyacrylic acid and the brackets were bonded with RMGIC. Group 5: enamel was treated with 5.25 per cent NaOCl, etched with 10 per cent polyacrylic acid, and the brackets were bonded with RMGIC. The teeth were stored in distilled water for 24 hours before they were submitted to shear testing. The results demonstrated that bond strength values of group 1 (17.08 ± 6.39 MPa) were significantly higher in comparison with the other groups. Groups 2 (3.43 ± 1.94 MPa) and 3 (3.92 ± 1.57 MPa) presented values below the average recommended in the literature. With regard to adhesive remnant index, the groups in which the enamel was treated with NaOCl showed a behaviour similar to that of the resin composite. It is conclude with enamel treatment with NaOCl increased bonding strength of brackets bonded with GIC and RMGIC, but increased bond strength was not statistically significant when compared to the untreated groups.

  18. Microtensile bond strength of glass ionomer cements to artificially created carious dentin.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyungho; Oshida, Yoshiki; Platt, Jeffrey A; Cochran, Michael A; Matis, Bruce A; Yi, Keewook

    2006-01-01

    In this laboratory study, the microtensile bond strengths of a conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC) and a resin modified glass ionomer cement (CRMGIC) to artificially created carious dentin and sound dentin were compared, and the ultrastructural morphology of the fractured interface was examined with a low-vacuum scanning electron microscope (SEM). The specimens were divided into 4 groups: 1) a conventional GIC (Ketac-Fil Plus Aplicap) placed on sound dentin; 2) a conventional GIC placed on artificially created carious dentin; 3) an RMGIC (Photac-Fil Aplicap) placed on sound dentin and 4) an RMGIC placed on artificially created carious dentin. Artificial carious lesions were created using a chemical demineralizing solution of 0.1 M/L lactic acid and 0.2% carbopol. GIC buildups were made on the dentin surfaces according to the manufacturer's directions. After storage in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours, the teeth were sectioned vertically into 1 x 1 x 8-mm beams for the microtensile bond strength test. The microtensile bond strength of each specimen was measured, and failure mode was determined using an optical microscope (40x). The fractured surfaces were further examined with SEM. Two-way analysis of variance showed that the mean microtensile bond strengths of a GIC and an RMGIC to carious dentin were significantly lower than those to sound dentin, and the mean microtensile bond strengths of Photac-Fil to both sound and carious dentin were significantly higher than those of Ketac-Fil Plus. Chi-square tests indicated that there was a significant difference in failure mode between the sound dentin and carious dentin groups. In sound dentin groups, cohesive failure in GIC was pre- dominant; whereas, mixed failure was predominant in carious dentin groups. SEM examination showed that the specimens determined to be cohesive failures under light microscopy in the Photac-Fil/Sound Dentin group were actually mixed failures under high magnification of SEM.

  19. Microleakage evaluation of class V restorations with conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Danielson Guedes; Guedes-Neto, Manoel Valcacio; Cabral, Maria Fernanda Costa; Cohen-Carneiro, Flávia

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the marginal microleakage of conventional Glass Ionomer Cements (GIC) and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cements (RMGIC). The tested materials were grouped as follows: GIC category - G1 (Vidrion R - SSWhite); G2 (Vitro Fill - DFL); G3 (Vitro Molar - DFL); G4 (Bioglass R - Biodinâmica); and G5 (Ketac Fill - 3M/ESPE); and RMGIC category - G6 (Vitremer - 3M/ESPE); G7 (Vitro Fill LC - DFL); and G8 (Resiglass - Biodinâmica). Therefore, 80 class V cavities (2.0X2.0 mm) were prepared in bovine incisors, either in the buccal face. The samples were randomly divided into 8 groups and restored using each material tested according to the manufacturer. The root apices were then sealed with acrylic resin. The teeth were stored for 24 h in 100% humidity at 37°C. After storage, the specimens were polished with extra-slim burs and silicon disc (Soft-lex - 3M/ESPE), then were isolated with cosmetic nail polish up to 1 mm around the restoration. Then, the samples were immersed in 50% AgNO3 solution for 12 h and in a developing solution for 30 min. They were rinsed and buccal-lingual sectioned. The evaluation of the microleakage followed scores from 0 to 3. The Kruskal-Wallis test and Dunn method test were applied (a=0.05). The results showed that there was no difference between the enamel and dentin margins. However, GIC materials presented more microleakage than RMGIC.

  20. Sealing properties of Ketac-Endo glass ionomer cement and AH26 root canal sealers.

    PubMed

    De Gee, A J; Wu, M K; Wesselink, P R

    1994-09-01

    Sealing capacity, setting shrinkage and setting time of a recently introduced glass ionomer cement Ketac-Endo were compared with that of a conventional sealer AH26. Sixty half-cylinders, 8 mm long, 4 mm in diameter, made from fresh bovine root dentine, had their smear layer removed before being cemented together while separated by 1-mm spacers. This resulted in a group of 15 cylinders cemented with Ketac-Endo and a similar group with AH26. After coating the lateral surface with nail varnish, one end of each cylinder was connected with a tube filled with water under 120 kPa (1.2 atm) pressure. At the other end the fluid leaking through the cemented interface of the cylinders was measured by displacement of an air bubble in an attached standard glass capillary. In this particular set-up where the sealers were used in bulk between two opposing dentine surfaces, Ketac-Endo leaked significantly more than AH26. After shear loading the cemented specimens, it was found that the area of adhesive failure was 88% for Ketac-Endo, and 15% for AH26. The leakage pathways were most probably at the dentine-sealer interface for Ketac-Endo and through cohesive fractures in the sealer for AH26.

  1. Effect of Nanoclay Dispersion on the Properties of a Commercial Glass Ionomer Cement

    PubMed Central

    Fareed, Muhammad A.; Stamboulis, Artemis

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The reinforcement effect of polymer-grade montmorillonite (PGV and PGN nanoclay) on Fuji-IX glass ionomer cement was investigated. Materials and Method. PGV and PGV nanoclays (2.0 wt%) were dispersed in the liquid portion of Fuji-IX. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) were used to quantify acid-base reaction and the liquid portion of GIC. The mechanical properties (CS, DTS, FS, and Ef) of cements (n = 20) were measured at 1 hour, 1 day, and 1 month. The microstructure was examined by cryo-SEM and TEM. Results. FTIR shows that the setting reaction involves the neutralisation of PAA by the glass powder which was linked with the formation of calcium and aluminium salt-complexes. The experimental GICs (C-V and C-N) exhibited mechanical properties in compliance to ISO standard requirement have higher values than Fuji-IX cement. There was no significant correlation of mechanical properties was found between C-V and C-N. The average Mw of Fuji-IX was 15,700 and the refractive index chromatogram peak area was 33,800. TEM observation confirmed that nanoclays were mostly exfoliated and dispersed in the matrix of GIC. Conclusion. The reinforcement of nanoclays in GICs may potentially produce cements with better mechanical properties without compromising the nature of polyacid neutralisation. PMID:25210518

  2. Therapeutic ion-releasing bioactive glass ionomer cements with improved mechanical strength and radiopacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Maximilian; Gentleman, Eileen; Shahid, Saroash; Hill, Robert; Brauer, Delia

    2015-10-01

    Bioactive glasses (BG) are used to regenerate bone, as they degrade and release therapeutic ions. Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are used in dentistry, can be delivered by injection and set in situ by a reaction between an acid-degradable glass and a polymeric acid. Our aim was to combine the advantages of BG and GIC, and we investigated the use of alkali-free BG (SiO2-CaO-CaF2-MgO) with 0 to 50% of calcium replaced by strontium, as the beneficial effects of strontium on bone formation are well documented. When mixing BG and poly(vinyl phosphonic-co-acrylic acid), ions were released fast (up to 90% within 15 minutes at pH 1), which resulted in GIC setting, as followed by infrared spectroscopy. GIC mixed well and set to hard cements (compressive strength up to 35 MPa), staying hard when in contact with aqueous solution. This is in contrast to GIC prepared with poly(acrylic acid), which were shown previously to become soft in contact with water. Strontium release from GIC increased linearly with strontium for calcium substitution, allowing for tailoring of strontium release depending on clinical requirements. Furthermore, strontium substitution increased GIC radiopacity. GIC passed ISO10993 cytotoxicity test, making them promising candidates for use as injectable bone cements.

  3. Nanoclay addition to a conventional glass ionomer cements: Influence on physical properties

    PubMed Central

    Fareed, Muhammad A.; Stamboulis, Artemis

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the present study is to investigate the reinforcement effect of polymer-grade montmorillonite (PGN nanoclay) on physical properties of glass ionomer cement (GIC). Materials and Methods: The PGN nanoclay was dispersed in the liquid portion of GIC (HiFi, Advanced Healthcare, Kent, UK) at 1%, 2% and 4% (w/w). Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to quantify the polymer liquid of GICs after dispersion of nanoclay. The molecular weight (Mw) of HiFi liquid was determined by gel permeation chromatography. The compressive strength (CS), diametral-tensile strength, flexural strength (FS) and flexural modulus (Ef) of cements (n = 20) were measured after storage for 1 day, 1 week and 1 month. Fractured surface was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The working and setting time (WT and ST) of cements was measured by a modified Wilson's rheometer. Results: The FTIR results showed a new peak at 1041 cm−1 which increased in intensity with an increase in the nanoclay content and was related to the Si-O stretching mode in PGN nanoclay. The Mw of poly (acrylic acid) used to form cement was in the range of 53,000 g/mol. The nanoclay reinforced GICs containing <2% nanoclays exhibited higher CS and FS. The Ef cement with 1% nanoclays was significantly higher. The WT and ST of 1% nanoclay reinforced cement were similar to the control cement but were reduced with 2% and 4% nanoclay addition. Conclusion: The dispersion of nanoclays in GICs was achieved, and GIC containing 2 wt% nanoclay is a promising restorative materials with improved physical properties. PMID:25512724

  4. Comparative Evaluation of Fluoride Recharge Ability of Conventional and Hydroxyapatite Modified Glass Ionomer Cement with Daily Low Fluoride Exposure- An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Sudeep, S.; Sharma, Shalini; Mohanty, Susant

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Glass ionomer cement (GIC) has best suited paediatric dentists and is well recognised in the preventive era of dentistry. However its use is affected by its inferior mechanical properties. Hydroxyapatite whiskers have been lately introduced as strengthening additive without affecting its fluoride releasing property, but literature lacks data related to its effect on recharging ability of glass ionomer cement. Aim To evaluate and compare fluoride release from hydroxyapatite incorporated glass ionomer cement following recharging with low fluoride dentifrices. Materials and Methods An 8% Hydroxyapatite whiskers were added to Conventional Glass ionomer powder and 40 specimens each of conventional and Hydroxyapatite Glass ionomer cement were prepared using customised Teflon mould (5mm x 2mm) and were suspended in deionised water. Recharging of aged specimens was done using low fluoridated dentifrices containing 500ppm fluoride, twice daily and water was replenished every 24 hours. Fluoride release was analysed daily for 7 days and then weekly till 21 days using Sension 4 pH/ion selective electrode. Data thus obtained was statistically analysed by descriptive analysis followed by repeated measures ANOVA. Results Significant (p<0.01) increase in fluoride release was observed in both the materials following recharging regimen. Recharge pattern of hydroxyapatite glass ionomer was found to be similar to conventional glass ionomer cement. Conclusion Within the limitations of this study it can be evinced that fluoride rechargability and re-release remains unaffected by the addition of hydroxyapatite whiskers and hence proves to be more acceptable additive to glass ionomer cement to improve its mechanical properties widening its arena of usage by clinicians. PMID:27042586

  5. Compressive strength and setting time determination of glass-ionomer cements incorporated with cetylpyridinium chloride and benzalkonium chloride.

    PubMed

    Dimkov, A; Nicholson, W J; Gjorgievska, E; Booth, S

    2012-01-01

    Because of the relatively frequent occurrence of recurrent caries after a restorative treatment, and because of the huge number of cariogenic microorganisms present in the oral cavity, which present a potential risk factor regarding the development of new carious lesions, attention has increasingly been directed towards the therapeutic antimicrobial effects of restorative materials. The glass ionomer cements distinguish themselves as the most acceptable restorative materials possessing the positive characteristics of fluorine in the processes of remineralisation and antimicrobial action. In addition to the release of fluoride ions, GICs can potentially be used as templates for the release of other active antimicrobial components. The addition of antimicrobial compounds in the glass ionomer cements and analysis of their physical characteristics are very important especially for use in the posterior region of milk teeth. The aim of this study was to analyse the physical characteristics of ChemFlex and Fuji IX, conventional glass ionomer cements incorporated with the antimicrobial components Cetylpyridinium Chloride and Benzalkonium Chloride, through measurements of their setting times, and determination of their compressive strengths. Five samples of each glass ionomer with no antimicrobial compounds added were prepared--to serve as a control group; and collections of five samples of each cement with different concentrations of Cetylpyridinium Chloride and Benzalkonium Chloride--1%, 2% and 3%--added to them were also prepared--a total of 60 samples. The results of the analysis point out that it is possible to incorporate these antimicrobial agents in conventional GICs, and this is especially true when the added amount of the antimicrobial agents is 1%.

  6. Effect of mixing process on microleakage of glass ionomer cements used in atraumatic restorative treatment on primary molars.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Fernanda de Morais; do Vale, Miriam Pimenta Parreira; Jansen, Wellington Corrêa; Paiva, Saul Martins; Pordeus, Isabela Almeida

    2007-01-01

    Aiming to assess the effect of mixing process on microleakage, 40 primary molars were filled with encapsulated glass ionomer cements (GICs) (Vidrion, RCaps and Fuji, IXGPFAST) or with GICs stored in bottles (Vidrion, R and Fuji, IX). Dye penetration was assessed using scores. Encapsulation and mechanical mixing have reduced significantly marginal microleakage levels in class II restorations performed with conventional GICs if compared to the values obtained by their bottled correspondents (p=0.000).

  7. Surface hardness properties of resin-modified glass ionomer cements and polyacid-modified composite resins.

    PubMed

    Bayindir, Yusuf Ziya; Yildiz, Mehmet

    2004-11-15

    In this study the top and bottom surface hardness of two polyacid-modified composite resins (PMCRs), one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC), and one composite resin were evaluated. The affect of water storage on their hardness was also investigated. The study was conducted using four different groups, each having five specimens obtained from fiberglass die molds with a diameter of 5 mm and a height of 2 mm. Measurements were made on the top and bottom surface of each specimen and recorded after 24 hours and again at 60 days. All tested materials showed different hardness values, and the values of top surfaces of the specimens were found to be higher than the bottom surface in all test groups. There was no statistical difference in the Vickers hardness (HV) values when the test specimens were kept in water storage. In conclusion Hytac displayed microhardness values higher than Vitremer and Dyract. We found the order of HV values to be Surfil > Hytac > Dyract > Vitremer, respectively. Vitremer presented the lowest microhardness level and Surfil the highest.

  8. Effects of adding silica particles on certain properties of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement

    PubMed Central

    Felemban, Nayef H.; Ebrahim, Mohamed I.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of incorporation of silica particles with different concentrations on some properties of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC): Microleakage, compressive strength, tensile strength, water sorption, and solubility. Materials and Methods: Silica particle was incorporated into RMGIC powder to study its effects, one type of RMGIC (Type II visible light-cured) and three concentrations of silica particles (0.06, 0.08, and 0.1% weight) were used. One hundred and twenty specimens were fabricated for measuring microleakage, compressive strength, tensile strength, water sorption, and solubility. Statistical Analysis: One-way analysis of variance and Tukey's tests were used for measuring significance between means where P ≤ 0.05. Results: RMGIC specimens without any additives showed significantly highest microleakage and lowest compressive and tensile strengths. Conclusion: Silica particles added to RMGIC have the potential as a reliable restorative material with increased compressive strength, tensile strength, and water sorption but decreased microleakage and water solubility. PMID:27095901

  9. Effectiveness of surface protection of resin modified glass ionomer cements evaluated spectrophotometrically.

    PubMed

    Cefaly, D F; Seabra, B G; Tapety, C M; Taga, E M; Valera, F; Navarro, M F

    2001-01-01

    The effectiveness of four surface protectors for resin-modified glass ionomer cements was evaluated by spectrophotometrically determining dye uptake. Ninety specimens, 3.0 mm in diameter and 1.0 mm in height, were made with Photac-Fil, Fuji II LC and Vitremer and divided into six groups for each material. Positive and negative controls were not protected while experimental specimens were protected with proprietary glaze, nail varnish, flowable resin and glaze. The discs were immersed in 0.1% methylene blue solution for 10 minutes after mixing, except for those negative control specimens that were immersed in deionized-water. After 24 hours, the specimens were washed and the protectors trimmed with Sof-Lex discs. The specimens were then removed from the matrixes and individually placed in 1.5 mL of 65% nitric acid for five hours. The absorbance was determined spectrophotometrically at 590 nm. Dye uptake was expressed in microgram dye/specimen. The data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer tests. All surface protectors tested were effective. For Fuji II LC and Vitremer no differences were observed among tested protections. For Photac-Fil, nail varnish showed better performance than the proprietary glaze.

  10. Surface roughening of glass ionomer cements by neutral NaF solutions.

    PubMed

    De Witte, An M J C; De Maeyer, Erna A P; Verbeeck, Ronald M H

    2003-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of repeated applications of a neutral NaF solution on the surface roughness of four conventional glass ionomer cements (GIC) (ChemFil Superior encapsulated, Fuji Cap II, Ketac-Fil and Hi Dense), three resin-modified (RM-) GIC (Fuji II LC encapsulated, Photac-Fil and Vitremer) and one polyacid-modified composite resin (PAM-C) (Dyract). Matured specimens were four times alternately eluted in water and exposed to 2% neutral NaF aqueous solutions for 1h. Control specimens were only subjected to elution in water for the same time period. After the treatment the surface roughness R(a) was determined using non-contact surface profilometry and selected samples were examined with SEM. Except for the PAM-C, R(a) increased drastically for the fluoride-treated samples compared to water-stored samples, the effect being most pronounced for the GIC. Surface roughening apparently is caused by a progressive disintegration or chemical erosion of the polysalt matrix of (RM-)GIC.

  11. Surface texture of resin-modified glass ionomer cements: effects of finishing/polishing time.

    PubMed

    Yap, A U J; Ong, S B; Yap, W Y; Tan, W S; Yeo, J C

    2002-01-01

    This study compared the surface texture of resin-modified glass ionomer cements after immediate and delayed finishing with different finishing/polishing systems. Class V preparations were made on the buccal and lingual/palatal surfaces of 64 freshly extracted teeth. The cavities on each tooth were restored with Fuji II LC (GC) and Photac-Fil Quick (3M-ESPE) according to manufacturers' instructions. Immediately after light-polymerization, gross finishing was done with 8-fluted tungsten carbide burs. The teeth were then randomly divided into four groups of 16 teeth. Half of the teeth in each group were finished immediately, while the remaining half were finished after one-week storage in distilled water at 37 degrees C. The following finishing/polishing systems were employed: (a) Robot Carbides; (b) Super-Snap system; (c) OneGloss and (d) CompoSite Polishers. The mean surface roughness (microm; n=8) in vertical (RaV) and horizontal (RaH) axis was measured using a profilometer. Data was subjected to ANOVA/Scheffe's tests and Independent Samples t-test at significance level 0.05. Ra values were generally lower in both vertical and horizontal axis with delayed finishing/polishing. Although significant differences in RaV and RaH values were observed among several systems with immediate finishing/polishing, only one (Fuji II LC: RaH - Super-Snap < Robot Carbides) was observed with delayed finishing.

  12. Comparative Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Three Commercially Available Glass Ionomer Cements in Primary Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, S Srinivasa; Murthy, Gargi S

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aims to comparatively evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of three commercially available glass ionomer cements - Miracle Mix (MM) (GC America Inc., Alsip, USA), Ketac Molar (KM) (3M Corp., Minnesota, USA) and amalgomer CR (AM) (Advanced Healthcare Ltd., Kent, England) in primary teeth and later examine the mode of the adhesive failure at the interface. Materials and Methods: Totally, 90 extracted sound primary molars were selected, and dentin on the buccal surface of crowns was exposed. Specimens were randomly assigned into three groups according to the restorative materials being tested. SBS tests were performed, and the obtained values were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey tests (P < 0.05). SBS mean values on were recorded in megapascals (MPa) and the mode of failure was assessed using a scanning electron microscope. Results: SBS (in MPa) was - MM-5.39, KM-4.84, AM-6.38. The predominant failure mode was cohesive. Conclusion: Amalgomer CR exhibited statistically significant higher SBS of 6.38 MPa to primary teeth and has better adhesion to the primary teeth compared to the other test materials and can be considered as a restorative material in pediatric dentistry. However, the results of this study should be corroborated with further investigation to reach a definitive conclusion. PMID:26464550

  13. Dental glass ionomer cement reinforced by cellulose microfibers and cellulose nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Silva, Rafael M; Pereira, Fabiano V; Mota, Felipe A P; Watanabe, Evandro; Soares, Suelleng M C S; Santos, Maria Helena

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate if the addition of cellulose microfibers (CmF) or cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) would improve the mechanical properties of a commercial dental glass ionomer cement (GIC). Different amounts of CmF and CNC were previously prepared and then added to reinforce the GIC matrix while it was being manipulated. Test specimens with various concentrations of CmF or CNC in their total masses were fabricated and submitted to mechanical tests (to evaluate their compressive and diametral tensile strength,modulus, surface microhardness and wear resistance) and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The incorporation of CmF in the GIC matrix did not greatly improve the mechanical properties of GIC. However, the addition of a small amount of CNC in the GIC led to significant improvements in all of the mechanical properties evaluated: compressive strength (increased up to 110% compared with the control group), elastic modulus increased by 161%, diametral tensile strength increased by 53%, and the mass loss decreased from 10.95 to 3.87%. Because the composites presented a considerable increase in mechanical properties, the modification of the conventional GIC with CNC can represent a new and promising dental restorative material.

  14. A review of glass-ionomers: From conventional glass-ionomer to bioactive glass-ionomer

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Keshani, Fateme

    2013-01-01

    Materials used in the body, especially the materials used in various oral cavity regions should be stable and passive without any interactions with the body tissues or fluids. Dental amalgam, composite resins and dental cements are the materials of choice with such properties. The first attempts to produce active materials, which could interact with the human body tissues and fluids were prompted by the concept that fluoride-releasing materials exert useful effects in the body. The concept of using the “smart” materials in dentistry has attracted a lot of attention in recent years. Conventional glass-ionomer (GI) cements have a large number of applications in dentistry. They are biocompatible with the dental pulp to some extent. GI is predominantly used as cements in dentistry; however, they have some disadvantages, the most important of which is lack of adequate strength and toughness. In an attempt to improve the mechanical properties of the conventional GI, resin-modified glass-ionomers have been marketed, with hydrophilic monomers, such as hydroxyethyl methacrylated (HEMA). Some recent studies have evaluated GI with bioactive glass in its structure to validate the claims that such a combination will improve tooth bioactivity, regeneration capacity and restoration. There is ever-increasing interest in the application of bioactive materials in the dental field in an attempt to remineralize affected dentin. The aim of this review article is to evaluate these materials and their characteristics and applications. PMID:24130573

  15. The effect of glass synthesis route on mechanical and physical properties of resultant glass ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Wren, A; Clarkin, O M; Laffir, F R; Ohtsuki, C; Kim, I Y; Towler, M R

    2009-10-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GICs) have potential orthopaedic applications. Solgel processing is reported as having advantages over the traditional melt-quench route for synthesizing the glass phase of GICs, including far lower processing temperatures and higher levels of glass purity and homogeneity. This work investigates a novel glass formulation, BT 101 (0.48 SiO(2)-0.36 ZnO-0.12 CaO-0.04 SrO) produced by both the melt-quench and the solgel route. The glass phase was characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD) to determine whether the material was amorphous and differential thermal analysis (DTA) to measure the glass transition temperature (T (g)). Particle size analysis (PSA) was used to determine the mean particle size and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to investigate the structure and composition of the glass. Both glasses, the melt-quench BT 101 and the solgel BT 101, were mixed with 50 wt% polyacrylic acid (M (w), 80,800) and water to form a GIC and the working time (T (w)) and the setting time (T (s)) of the resultant cements were then determined. The cement based on the solgel glass had a longer T (w) (78 s) as compared to the cement based on the melt derived glass (19 s). T (s) was also much longer for the cement based on the solgel (1,644 s) glass than for the cement based on the melt-derived glass (25 s). The cements based on the melt derived glass produced higher strengths in both compression (sigma(c)) and biaxial flexure (sigma(f)), where the highest strength was found to be 63 MPa in compression, at both 1 and 7 days. The differences in setting and mechanical properties can be associated to structural differences within the glass as determined by XPS which revealed the absence of Ca in the solgel system and a much greater concentration of bridging oxygens (BO) as compared to the melt-derived system.

  16. Comparative Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength and Fluoride Release of Conventional Glass Ionomer with 1% Ethanolic Extract of Propolis Incorporated Glass Ionomer Cement –Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakar, Attiguppe Ramashetty; Basappa, Nadig

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Atraumatic restorative treatment is a minimal intervention approach which involves manual removal of caries followed by restoration using adhesive restorative material. Due to incomplete manual caries excavation, there is a high chance of secondary caries under the restoration. Hence, many antibacterial agents have been incorporated in cement to enhance their antibacterial effect. Propolis is one of the natural medicines that has highlighted application in dentistry. Aim The current study evaluated the shear bond strength and fluoride release of Glass Ionomer Cement (GIC) combined with 1% Ethanolic Extract of Propolis (EEP). The research hypothesis was that the incorporation of 1% EEP in GIC has an effect on shear bond strength and fluoride release. Materials and Methods A study was conducted among two groups. Group A conventional GIC (control), Group B GIC incorporated with 1% EEP (experimental). Shear bond strength: Thirty samples were prepared. Dentinal surface was restored and bond strength was assessed using a universal testing machine. Fluoride release: Thirty samples were prepared and stored in distilled water at a constant temperature until the time of measurement. The fluoride release was assessed by ion selective electrode after 1st day and 7th day. Data obtained by shear bond strength analysis was subjected to statistical analysis using an unpaired t-test and the data obtained by the fluoride release analysis was subjected to an unpaired t-test and paired t-test. Results Result showed that there was no statistically significant difference in shear bond strength between the groups (p-value 0.77). A statistically significant difference was noticed in fluoride release among the groups after 1st and 7th day (p-0.001). However, the release was lesser in both the groups after the 1st day. Conclusion A 1% EEP incorporated GIC enhanced the fluoride release without causing a significant effect on shear bond strength of GIC. PMID:27437368

  17. A Comparative Evaluation of Sorption, Solubility, and Compressive Strength of Three Different Glass Ionomer Cements in Artificial Saliva: An in vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Hind P; Sood, Shveta; Sharma, Naresh

    2017-01-01

    Aim To evaluate and compare the sorption, solubility, and compressive strength of three different glass ionomer cements in artificial saliva - type IX glass ionomer cement, silver-reinforced glass ionomer cement, and zirconia-reinforced glass ionomer cement, so as to determine the material of choice for stress-bearing areas. Materials and methods A total of 90 cylindrical specimens (4 mm diameter and 6 mm height) were prepared for each material following the manufacturer’s instructions. After subjecting the specimens to thermocycling, 45 specimens were immersed in artificial saliva for 24 hours for compressive strength testing under a universal testing machine, and the other 45 were evaluated for sorption and solubility, by first weighing them by a precision weighing scale (W1), then immersing them in artificial saliva for 28 days and weighing them (W2), and finally dehydrating in an oven for 24 hours and weighing them (W3). Results Group III (zirconomer) shows the highest compressive strength followed by group II (Miracle Mix) and least compressive strength is seen in group I (glass ionomer cement type IX-Extra) with statistically significant differences between the groups. The sorption and solubility values in artificial saliva were highest for glass ionomer cement type IX - Extra-GC (group I) followed by zirconomer-Shofu (group III), and the least value was seen for Miracle Mix-GC (group II). Conclusion Zirconia-reinforced glass ionomer cement is a promising dental material and can be used as a restoration in stress-bearing areas due to its high strength and low solubility and sorption rate. It may be a substitute for silver-reinforced glass ionomer cement due to the added advantage of esthetics. Clinical significance This study provides vital information to pediatric dental surgeons on relatively new restorative materials as physical and mechanical properties of the new material are compared with conventional materials to determine the best suited material in

  18. Mechanical, antibacterial and bond strength properties of nano-titanium-enriched glass ionomer cement

    PubMed Central

    GARCIA-CONTRERAS, Rene; SCOUGALL-VILCHIS, Rogelio Jose; CONTRERAS-BULNES, Rosalía; SAKAGAMI, Hiroshi; MORALES-LUCKIE, Raul Alberto; NAKAJIMA, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The use of nanoparticles (NPs) has become a significant area of research in Dentistry. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the physical, antibacterial activity and bond strength properties of conventional base, core build and restorative of glass ionomer cement (GIC) compared to GIC supplemented with titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanopowder at 3% and 5% (w/w). Material and Methods Vickers microhardness was estimated with diamond indenter. Compressive and flexural strengths were analyzed in a universal testing machine. Specimens were bonded to enamel and dentine, and tested for shear bond strength in a universal testing machine. Specimens were incubated with S. mutans suspension for evaluating antibacterial activity. Surface analysis of restorative conventional and modified GIC was performed with SEM and EDS. The analyses were carried out with Kolmogorov-Smirnov, ANOVA (post-hoc), Tukey test, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann Whitney. Results Conventional GIC and GIC modified with TiO2 nanopowder for the base/liner cement and core build showed no differences for mechanical, antibacterial, and shear bond properties (p>0.05). In contrast, the supplementation of TiO2 NPs to restorative GIC significantly improved Vickers microhardness (p<0.05), flexural and compressive strength (p<0.05), and antibacterial activity (p<0.001), without interfering with adhesion to enamel and dentin. Conclusion GIC supplemented with TiO2 NPs (FX-II) is a promising material for restoration because of its potential antibacterial activity and durable restoration to withstand the mastication force. PMID:26221928

  19. Effect of antibacterial agents on the surface hardness of a conventional glass-ionomer cement

    PubMed Central

    TÜZÜNER, Tamer; ULUSU, Tezer

    2012-01-01

    In atraumatic restorative treatment (ART), caries removal with hand excavation instruments is not as efficient as that with rotary burs in eliminating bacteria under the glass ionomer cements (GICs). Thus, different antibacterial agents have been used in recent studies to enhance the antibacterial properties of the GICs, without jeopardizing their basic physical properties. Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of antibacterial agents on the surface hardness of a conventional GIC (Fuji IX) using Vickers microhardness [Vickers hardness number (VHN)] test. Material and Methods Cetrimide (CT), cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) and chlorhexidine (CHX) were added to the powder and benzalkonium chloride (BC) was added to the liquid of Fuji IX in concentrations of 1% and 2%, and served as the experimental groups. A control group containing no additive was also prepared. After the completion of setting reaction, VHN measurements were recorded at 1, 7, 15, 30, 60, and 90 days after storage in 37ºC distilled water. A one-way ANOVA was performed followed by a Dunnett t test and Tamhane T2 tests and also repeated measurements ANOVA was used for multiple comparisons in 95% confidence interval. Results VHN results showed significant differences between the control and the experimental groups at all time periods (p<0.05 for all). Significant differences were observed between all study periods for individual groups (p<0.05). After 7 days, VHNs were decreased in all experimental groups while they continued to increase in the control group. BC and CHX groups demonstrated the least whereas CT and CPC groups exhibited most adverse effect on the hardness of set cements. Conclusions Despite the decreased microhardness values in all experimental groups compared to the controls after 7 up to 90 days, incorporating certain antibacterial agents into Fuji IX GIC showed tolerable microhardness alterations within the limitations of this in vitro study. PMID:22437677

  20. Mechanical, antibacterial and bond strength properties of nano-titanium-enriched glass ionomer cement.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Contreras, Rene; Scougall-Vilchis, Rogelio Jose; Contreras-Bulnes, Rosalía; Sakagami, Hiroshi; Morales-Luckie, Raul Alberto; Nakajima, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The use of nanoparticles (NPs) has become a significant area of research in Dentistry. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the physical, antibacterial activity and bond strength properties of conventional base, core build and restorative of glass ionomer cement (GIC) compared to GIC supplemented with titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanopowder at 3% and 5% (w/w). Material and Methods Vickers microhardness was estimated with diamond indenter. Compressive and flexural strengths were analyzed in a universal testing machine. Specimens were bonded to enamel and dentine, and tested for shear bond strength in a universal testing machine. Specimens were incubated with S. mutans suspension for evaluating antibacterial activity. Surface analysis of restorative conventional and modified GIC was performed with SEM and EDS. The analyses were carried out with Kolmogorov-Smirnov, ANOVA (post-hoc), Tukey test, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann Whitney. Results Conventional GIC and GIC modified with TiO2 nanopowder for the base/liner cement and core build showed no differences for mechanical, antibacterial, and shear bond properties (p>0.05). In contrast, the supplementation of TiO2 NPs to restorative GIC significantly improved Vickers microhardness (p<0.05), flexural and compressive strength (p<0.05), and antibacterial activity (p<0.001), without interfering with adhesion to enamel and dentin. Conclusion GIC supplemented with TiO2 NPs (FX-II) is a promising material for restoration because of its potential antibacterial activity and durable restoration to withstand the mastication force.

  1. Mechanical performance of encapsulated restorative glass-ionomer cements for use with Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART)

    PubMed Central

    MOLINA, Gustavo Fabián; CABRAL, Ricardo Juan; MAZZOLA, Ignacio; BRAIN LASCANO, Laura; FRENCKEN, Jo. E.

    2013-01-01

    The Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) approach was suggested to be a suitable method to treat enamel and dentine carious lesions in patients with disabilities. The use of a restorative glass-ionomer with optimal mechanical properties is, therefore, very important. Objective: To test the null-hypotheses that no difference in diametral tensile, compressive and flexural strengths exists between: (1) The EQUIA system and (2) The Chemfil Rock (encapsulated glass-ionomers; test materials) and the Fuji 9 Gold Label and the Ketac Molar Easymix (hand-mixed conventional glass-ionomers; control materials); (3) The EQUIA system and Chemfil Rock. Material and Methods: Specimens for testing flexural (n=240) and diametral tensile (n=80) strengths were prepared according to standardized specifications; the compressive strength (n=80) was measured using a tooth-model of a class II ART restoration. ANOVA and Tukey B tests were used to test for significant differences between dependent and independent variables. Results: The EQUIA system and Chemfil Rock had significantly higher mean scores for all the three strength variables than the Fuji 9 Gold Label and Ketac Molar Easymix (α=0.05). The EQUIA system had significant higher mean scores for diametral tensile and flexural strengths than the Chemfil Rock (α=0.05). Conclusion: The two encapsulated high-viscosity glass-ionomers had significantly higher test values for diametral tensile, flexural and compressive strengths than the commonly used hand-mixed high-viscosity glass-ionomers. PMID:23857657

  2. Development of a novel aluminum-free glass ionomer cement based on magnesium/strontium-silicate glasses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Ae; Abo-Mosallam, Hany A; Lee, Hye-Young; Kim, Gyu-Ri; Kim, Hae-Won; Lee, Hae-Hyoung

    2014-09-01

    The effects of strontium substitution for magnesium in a novel aluminum-free multicomponent glass composition for glass ionomer cements (GICs) were investigated. A series of glass compositions were prepared based on SiO2-P2O5-CaO-ZnO-MgO(1-X)-SrOX-CaF2 (X=0, 0.25, 0.5 and 0.75). The mechanical properties of GICs prepared were characterized by compressive strength, flexural strength, flexural modules, and microhardness. Cell proliferation was evaluated indirectly by CCK-8 assay using various dilutions of the cement and rat mesenchyme stem cells. Incorporation of strontium instead of magnesium in the glasses has a significant influence on setting time of the cements and the properties. All mechanical properties of the GICs with SrO substitution at X=0.25 were significantly increased, then gradually decreased with further increase of the amount of strontium substitution in the glass. The GIC at X=0.25, also, showed an improved cell viability at low doses of the cement extracts in comparison with other groups or control without extracts. The results of this study demonstrate that the glass compositions with strontium substitution at low levels can be successfully used to prepare aluminum-free glass ionomer cements for repair and regeneration of hard tissues.

  3. Development of a novel antimicrobial-releasing glass ionomer cement functionalized with chlorhexidine hexametaphosphate nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Glass ionomer cements (GICs) are a class of dental biomaterials. They have a wide range of uses including permanent restorations (fillings), cavity linings, fissure sealants and adhesives. One of the most common reasons for replacing a dental restoration is recurrent bacterial tooth decay around the margins of the biomaterial. Therefore, a dental biomaterial which creates a sustained antimicrobial environment around the restoration would be of considerable clinical benefit. In this manuscript, the formulation of a GIC containing novel antimicrobial nanoparticles composed of chlorhexidine hexametaphosphate at 1, 2, 5, 10 and 20% powder substitution by mass is reported. The aim is to create GICs which contain chlorhexidine-hexametaphosphate nanoparticles and characterize the nanoparticle size, morphology and charge and the release of chlorhexidine and fluoride, tensile strength and morphology of the GICs. Results The GICs released chlorhexidine, which is a broad spectrum antimicrobial agent effective against a wide range of oral bacteria, over the duration of the experiment in a dose-dependent manner. This was not at the expense of other properties; fluoride release was not significantly affected by the substitution of antimicrobial nanoparticles in most formulations and internal structure appeared unaffected up to and including 10% substitution. Diametral tensile strength decreased numerically with substitutions of 10 and 20% nanoparticles but this difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion A series of GICs functionalized with chlorhexidine-hexametaphosphate nanoparticles were created for the first time. These released chlorhexidine in a dose-dependent manner. These materials may find application in the development of a new generation of antimicrobial dental nanomaterials. PMID:24456793

  4. Effect of different root caries treatments on the sealing ability of conventional glass ionomer cement restorations.

    PubMed

    Geraldo-Martins, Vinicius R; Lepri, Cesar P; Palma-Dibb, Regina G

    2012-01-01

    In this study we compared the microleakage of conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC) restorations following the use of different methods of root caries removal. In vitro root caries were induced in 75 human root dentin samples that were divided in five groups of 15 each according to the method used for caries removal: in group 1 spherical carbide burs at low speed were used, in group 2 a hand-held excavator was used, and in groups 3 to 5 an Er,Cr:YSGG laser was used at 2.25 W, 40.18 J/cm(2) (group 3), 2.50 W, 44.64 J/cm(2) (group 4) and 2.75 W, 49.11 J/cm(2) (group 5). The air/water cooling during irradiation was set to 55%/65% respectively. All cavities were filled with GIC. Five samples from each group were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the other ten samples were thermocycled and submitted to a microleakage test. The data obtained were compared by ANOVA followed by Fisher's test (p≤0.05). Group 4 showed the lowest microleakage index (56.65 6.30; p<0.05). There were no significant differences among the other groups. On SEM images samples of groups 1 and 2 showed a more regular interface than the irradiated samples. Demineralized dentin below the restoration was observed, that was probably affected dentin. Group 4 showed the lowest microleakage values compared to the other experimental groups, so under the conditions of the present study the method that provided the lowest microleakage was the Er,Cr:YSGG laser with a power output of 2.5 W yielding an energy density of 44.64 J/cm(2).

  5. Surface texture of resin-modified glass ionomer cements: effects of finishing/polishing systems.

    PubMed

    Yap, Adrian U J; Tan, W S; Yeo, J C; Yap, W Y; Ong, S B

    2002-01-01

    This study investigated the surface texture of two resin-modified glass ionomer cements (RMGICs) in the vertical and horizontal axis after treatment with different finishing/polishing systems. Class V preparations were made on the buccal and lingual/palatal surfaces of freshly extracted teeth. The cavities on each tooth were restored with Fuji II LC (GC) and Photac-Fil Quick (ESPE) according to manufacturers' instructions. Immediately after light-polymerization, gross finishing was done with 8-flute tungsten carbide burs. The teeth were then randomly divided into four groups and finished/polished with (a) Robot Carbides (RC); (b) Super-Snap system (SS); (c) OneGloss (OG) and (d) CompoSite Points (CS). The sample size for each material-finishing/polishing system combination was eight. The mean surface roughness (microm) in vertical (RaV) and horizontal (RaH) axis was measured using a profilometer. Data was subjected to ANOVA/Scheffe's tests and Independent Samples t-test at significance level 0.05. Mean RaV ranged from 0.59-1.31 and 0.83-1.52, while mean RaH ranged from 0.80-1.43 and 0.85-1.58 for Fuji II LC and Photac-Fil, respectively. Results of statistical analysis were as follows: Fuji II LC: RaV-RC, SS

  6. Effects of instrumentation time on microleakage of resin-modified glass ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Yap, Adrian U J; Yeo, Egwin J C; Yap, W Y; Ong, Debbie S B; Tan, Jane W S

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of instrumentation time on the microleakage of resin-modified glass ionomer cements (RMGICs). Class V cavities were prepared on buccal and lingual/ palatal surfaces of 64 freshly extracted non-carious premolars. The cavities on each tooth were restored with Fuji II LC (FT [GC]) and Photac-Fil Quick (PF [3M-ESPE]). The restored teeth were randomly divided into two groups of 32 teeth. Finishing/polishing was done immediately after light-polymerization in one group and was delayed for one week in the other group. The following finishing/polishing systems were evaluated: (a) Robot Carbides (RC); (b) SuperSnap (SS); (c) OneGloss (OG) and (d) CompoSite Polishers (CS). The sample size for each instrumentation time, material and finishing/polishing system combination was 8. Storage medium for both immediate and delayed instrumentation groups was distilled water at 37 degrees C during the hiatus period. The teeth were subsequently subjected to dye penetration testing (0.5% basic fushcin), sectioned and scored. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests at significance level 0.05. For PF, significant difference in enamel leakage was observed between immediate and delayed instrumentation with SS and CS. Significant differences in dentin leakage were also observed between the two instrumentation times for SS. For FT, significant differences in leakage between instrumentation times were observed only in dentin and with RC. Where significant differences in dye penetration scores existed, delayed finishing/polishing resulted in less microleakage.

  7. Adhesion of glass-ionomer cement sealers to bovine dentin conditioned with intracanal medications.

    PubMed

    Chung, H A; Titley, K; Torneck, C D; Lawrence, H P; Friedman, S

    2001-02-01

    This in vitro study assessed the adherence of glass-ionomer cement (GIC) root canal sealers to dentin conditioned by three endodontic intracanal medications. Three GIC sealers were used: (i) Ketac-Endo; (ii) KT-308, an experimental GIC sealer; and (iii) ZUT, a combination of KT-308 and a silver-containing zeolite (0.2% by weight). Superficial dentin of 120 bovine incisor crowns was used as a substrate. The dentin was irrigated with 2.6% NaOCI for 30 s and then blotted dry. One of the following conditioning media (n = 30) was maintained in contact with the dentin for 7 days: (i) Ca(OH)2 paste; (ii) chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX) liquid 0.12%; (iii) formocresol (FML) liquid; (iv) distilled water (dH2O) used as control. The GIC sealers were applied to the conditioned dentin, bench set for 90 min, stored in 100% humidity at 37 degrees C for 48 h, then tested to failure for shear bond strength (MPa) in an Instron machine. In the ZUT specimens, the shear bond strength did not differ significantly among those conditioned with Ca(OH)2, CHX, FML, and dH2O. For KT-308, the mean scores were significantly lower (p < 0.05) after conditioning with CHX than with dH2O. For Ketac-Endo, the mean scores were significantly lower after conditioning with Ca(OH)2 and FML than with dH2O (p < 0.05). Furthermore Ketac-Endo demonstrated significantly lower (p < 0.05) shear bond strength than KT-308 or ZUT to the dentin conditioned with Ca(OH)2 or FML. The results suggest that intracanal medications differentially influence the adhesion of various GIC sealers to root canal dentin.

  8. Effect of acid etching of glass ionomer cement surface on the microleakage of sandwich restorations.

    PubMed

    Bona, Alvaro Della; Pinzetta, Caroline; Rosa, Vinícius

    2007-06-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the sealing ability of different glass ionomer cements (GICs) used for sandwich restorations and to assess the effect of acid etching of GIC on microleakage at GIC-resin composite interface. Forty cavities were prepared on the proximal surfaces of 20 permanent human premolars (2 cavities per tooth), assigned to 4 groups (n=10) and restored as follows: Group CIE - conventional GIC (CI) was applied onto the axial and cervical cavity walls, allowed setting for 5 min and acid etched (E) along the cavity margins with 35% phosphoric acid for 15 s, washed for 30 s and water was blotted; the adhesive system was applied and light cured for 10 s, completing the restoration with composite resin light cured for 40 s; Group CIN - same as Group CIE, except for acid etching of the CI surface; Group RME - same as CIE, but using a resin modified GIC (RMGIC); Group RMN - same as Group RME, except for acid etching of the RMGIC surface. Specimens were soaked in 1% methylene blue dye solution at 24 degrees C for 24 h, rinsed under running water for 1 h, bisected longitudinally and dye penetration was measured following the ISO/TS 11405-2003 standard. Results were statistically analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and chi-square tests (a=0.05). Dye penetration scores were as follow: CIE - 2.5; CIN - 2.5; RME - 0.9; and RMN - 0.6. The results suggest that phosphoric acid etching of GIC prior to the placement of composite resin does not improve the sealing ability of sandwich restorations. The RMGIC was more effective in preventing dye penetration at the GIC-resin composite-dentin interfaces than CI.

  9. Marginal gap, cement thickness, and microleakage of 2 zirconia crown systems luted with glass ionomer and MDP-based cements.

    PubMed

    Sener, Isil; Turker, Begum; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2014-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the marginal gap, cement thickness, and microleakage of glass-ionomer cement (GIC) and phosphate monomer-containing resin cement (MDP-RC) under 2 zirconia crown systems (Cercon and DC-Zirkon). Forty human premolars were prepared for all-ceramic zirconia crowns with a 1 mm circumferential finish line and a 1.5 mm occlusal reduction. The crowns (n = 10 per group) from each zirconia system were randomly divided into 2 groups and cemented either with GIC (Vivaglass CEM) or MDP-RC (Panavia F 2.0) cement. The cemented crowns were thermocycled 5000 times (5°-55°C). The crowns were immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsine dye solution for 24 hours and sectioned buccolingually and mesiodistally. Specimens were examined under optical microscope (100X). Data were analyzed using Student t-test and chi-square tests (α = 0.05). Mean marginal gap values for Cercon (85 ± 11.4 μm) were significantly higher than for DC-Zircon (75.3 ± 13.2 μm) (P = 0.018). The mean cement thickness values of GIC (81.7 ± 13.9 μm) and MDP-RC (78.5 ± 12.5 μm) were not significantly different (P = 0.447). Microleakage scores did not demonstrate significant difference between GIC (P = 0.385) and MDP-RC (P = 0.631) under Cercon or DC-Zircon. Considering the cement thickness values and microleakage scores obtained, both zirconia crown systems could be cemented in combination with either GIC or MDP-RC.

  10. Evaluation of antibacterial and antifungal activity of new calcium-based cement (Biodentine) compared to MTA and glass ionomer cement

    PubMed Central

    Bhavana, Vankayala; Chaitanya, Krishna Popuri; Gandi, Padma; Patil, Jayaprakash; Dola, Binoy; Reddy, Rahul B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the antibacterial and antifungal properties of calcium-based cement, Biodentine (Ca3SiO2), compared to commercial glass ionomer cements (GICs) and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Materials and Methods: Pellets of GICs, ProRoot MTA, and Biodentine were prepared to test the influence of these cements on the growth of four oral microbial strains: Streptococcus mutans, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, and Candida albicans; using agar diffusion method. Wells were formed by removing the agar and the manipulated materials were immediately placed in the wells. The pellets were lodged in seeded plates and the growth inhibition diameter around the material was measured after 24-72 h incubation at 37°C. The data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) test to compare the differences among the three cements at different concentrations. Results: Test indicates that the antimicrobial activity of Biodentine, on all the microorganisms tested, was very strong, showing a mean inhibition zone of 3.2 mm, which extends over time towards all the strains. For Biodentine, GIC, and MTA, the diameters of the inhibition zones for S. mutans were significantly larger than for E. faecalis, Candida, and E. coli (P < 0.05). Conclusion: All materials showed antimicrobial activity against the tested strains except for GIC on Candida. Largest inhibition zone was observed for Streptococcus group. Biodentine created larger inhibition zones than MTA and GIC. PMID:25657526

  11. Clinical applications of glass ionomers in endodontics: a review.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Zahed; Shalavi, Sousan

    2012-10-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GICs) are biocompatible and have capacities to release fluoride and to bond to dentine, and thus are appropriate for use in endodontics. This paper reviews the composition and properties of different GICs, including their biocompatibility and antibacterial activity, their applications as intraorifice barriers and root canal sealers, and their use in the repair of root perforations, root-end fillings and temporary coronal restorations.

  12. Comparative Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Various Glass Ionomer Cements to Dentin of Primary Teeth: An in vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Jaidka, Shipra; Singh, Deepti J; Sibal, Gurleen K

    2016-01-01

    Aim To evaluate and compare shear bond strength of various glass ionomer cements (GICs) to dentin of primary teeth. Materials and methods Sample size taken for the study was 72 deciduous molars with intact buccal or lingual surfaces. Samples were randomly divided into three groups, i.e., groups A, B, and C and were restored with conventional type II GIC, type II light cure (LC) GIC, and type IX GIC respectively. Thermocycling was done to simulate oral conditions. After 24 hours, shear bond strength was determined using Instron Universal testing Machine at crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/ minute until fracture. Results were tabulated and statistically analyzed. Results It was found that the shear bond strength was highest in group B (LC GIC) 9.851 ± 1.620 MPa, followed by group C (type IX GIC) 7.226 ± 0.877 MPa, and was lowest in group A (conventional GIC) 4.931 ± 0.9735 MPa. Conclusion Light cure GIC was significantly better than type IX GIC and conventional GIC in terms of shear bond strength. How to cite this article Somani R, Jaidka S, Singh DJ, Sibal GK. Comparative Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Various Glass Ionomer Cements to Dentin of Primary Teeth: An in vitro Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(3):192-196. PMID:27843248

  13. Degree of conversion and hardness of two different systems of the Vitrebond™ glass ionomer cement light cured with blue LED.

    PubMed

    Calixto, Luiz Rafael; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Pinto, Shelon Cristina Souza; Barros, Erico Damasceno; Borges, Alvaro Henrique; Lima, Fabricio Viana Pereira; de Andrade, Marcelo Ferrarezi; Bandéca, Matheus Coelho

    2013-03-01

    This study investigated the physicochemical properties of the new formulation of the glass ionomer cements through hardness test and degree of conversion by infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Forty specimens (n = 40) were made in a metallic mold (4 mm diameter x 2 mm thickness) with two resin-modified glass ionomer cements, Vitrebond™ and Vitrebond™ Plus (3M/ ESPE). Each specimen was light cured with blue LED with power density of 500 mW/cm(2) during 30 s. Immediately after light curing, 24h, 48h and 7 days the hardness and degree of conversion was determined. The Vickers hardness was performed by the MMT-3 microhardness tester using load of 50 gm force for 30 seconds. For degree of conversion, the specimens were pulverized, pressed with KBr and analyzed with FT-IR (Nexus 470). The statistical analysis of the data by ANOVA showed that the Vitrebond™ and Vitrebond™ Plus were no difference significant between the same storage times (p > 0.05). For degree of conversion, the Vitrebond™ and Vitrebond™ Plus were statistically different in all storage times after light curing. The Vitrebond™ showed higher values than Vitrebond™ Plus (p < 0.05). The performance of Vitrebond™ had greater results for degree of conversion than Vitrebond™ Plus. The correlation between hardness and degree of conversion was no evidence in this study.

  14. Biaxial flexural strength of high-viscosity glass-ionomer cements heat-cured with an LED lamp during setting.

    PubMed

    Fabián Molina, Gustavo; Cabral, Ricardo Juan; Mazzola, Ignacio; Brain Lascano, Laura; Frencken, Jo E

    2013-01-01

    Adding heat to glass ionomers during setting might improve mechanical properties. The aim was to compare the biaxial flexural strength (BFS) between and within four glass ionomers, by time of exposure to a high-intensity LED light-curing unit. Materials and methods. Samples of Fuji 9 Gold Label, Ketac Molar Easymix, ChemFil Rock, and the EQUIA system were divided into three treatment groups (n = 30): without heating (Group 1), heated with LED lamp of 1400 mW/cm(2) for 30 s while setting (Group 2), and heated with LED lamp of 1400 mW/cm(2) for 60 s while setting (Group 3). Samples were stored for 48 hours in distilled water at 37°C until tested. BFS was tested, using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed, using ANOVA test with the Bonferroni correction (α = 0.05). Heating the glass-ionomer cements with an LED curing light of 1400 mW/cm(2) during setting for 30 s increased the BFS value of all GICs. No statistically significant difference in mean BFS scores was found between the EQUIA system and ChemFil Rock at 30 s and 60 s. The mean BFS value was statistically significantly higher for the EQUIA system and ChemFil Rock than for Fuji 9 Gold Label and Ketac Molar Easymix at all exposure times.

  15. The effect of polishing systems on microleakage of tooth coloured restoratives: Part 1. Conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Yap, A U; Tan, S; Teh, T Y

    2000-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of polishing systems on the microleakage of conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer cements. Class V cavities were prepared at the cemento-enamel junction of 80 freshly extracted posterior teeth. The prepared teeth were randomly divided into two groups and restored with conventional or resin-modified glass-ionomer cements. The restored teeth were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 1 week after removal of excess restorative with diamond finishing burs. The restored teeth were then divided into four groups of 10 and finished and polished using the following systems: Two Striper MFS; Sof-Lex XT; Enhance Composite Finishing and Polishing System; Shofu Composite Finishing Kit. The finished restorations were subjected to dye penetration testing. Results showed that the microleakage at dentin margins of conventional glass-ionomer cements and enamel margins of resin-modified glass-ionomer cements are significantly affected by the different polishing systems.

  16. Effect of different cavity conditioners on microleakage of glass ionomer cement with a high viscosity in primary teeth

    PubMed Central

    Mazaheri, Romina; Pishevar, Leila; Shichani, Ava Vali; Geravandi, Sanas

    2015-01-01

    Background: Glass ionomer cement is a common material used in pediatric dentistry. The aim of this study was to evaluate the microleakage of high-viscosity glass ionomer restorations in deciduous teeth after conditioning with four different conditioners. Materials and Methods: Fifty intact primary canines were collected. Standard Class V cavities (2 mm × 1.5 mm × 3 mm) were prepared by one operator on all buccal tooth surfaces, including both enamel and dentin. The samples were divided into five groups with different conditioners (no conditioner, 20% acrylic acid, 35% phosphoric acid, 12% citric acid, and 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid [EDTA]). Two-way — ANOVA, Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney tests were used to compare the means of microleakage between the five groups. The significance level was set at P < 0.05. Results: There was no significant difference between the means of microleakage in incisal (enamel) and gingival (dentin) margins (P = 0.34). Furthermore, there was no significant difference between the means of microleakage in enamel and dentin margins (P = 0.4). There was a significant difference between the means of microleakage in different groups (P = 0.03). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, it is suggested that 20% acrylic acid and 17% EDTA be used for cavity conditioning which can result in better chemical and micromechanical adhesion. PMID:26288623

  17. Removal of amalgam, glass-ionomer cement and compomer restorations: changes in cavity dimensions and duration of the procedure.

    PubMed

    Szep, Susanne; Baum, C; Alamouti, C; Schmidt, D; Gerhardt, T; Heidemann, D

    2002-01-01

    This study investigated changes in the dimensions of Class II cavities following the removal of amalgam, glass ionomer and compomer restorations. In 30 extracted caries-free human molars, preparation for 60 mesio-occlusal and occluso-distal cavities (two cavities per tooth) occurred. With a CEREC 3 laser triangulation sensor and software-based construction analysis, the dimensions of the cavities at seven defined sites were measured. The cavities were randomized into four groups. Group 1 was restored with Ketac-Fil glass-ionomer cement, Group 2 with amalgam and Group 3 with Compoglass F compomer. In Group 4, Compoglass F was used in combination with photochromic Tetric Flow Chroma as a cavity liner. The completed restorations were then removed using 2x magnification and the cavities were once again controlled using the laser system. The duration of the removal procedure was also recorded. Changes in cavity dimensions (depth, height and width) following removal of the restorations were significantly smaller in Groups 1 and 2. Groups 3 and 4 were characterized by a significant overextension of the cavities compared to Groups 1 and 2 in all three dimensions. Group 4, with Tetric Flow Chroma as a cavity liner, showed better results than Group 3, but this improvement was not statistically significant. The duration of the removal procedure was significantly shorter in Group 2 than in the other groups.

  18. Reactions in glass ionomer cements: V. Effect of incorporating tartaric acid in the cement liquid.

    PubMed

    Crisp, S; Wilson, A D

    1976-01-01

    A description is give of the effect on the ASPA cement reaction of tartaric acid incorporated in the cement liquid. Tartaric acid acts as an accelerator that aids in the extraction of ions from the aluminosilicate glass and facilitates their binding to the polyanion chains. Postgelation hardening is significantly increased. Working time is unaffected possibly because cations are initially present as complexes.

  19. Evaluation and comparison of the effect of different surface preparations on bond strength of glass ionomer cement with nickel-chrome metal-ceramic alloy: a laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Hasti, Kalpana; Jagadeesh, H G; Patil, Narendra P

    2011-03-01

    Retention of fixed partial dentures is mostly dependent upon the bond between metal and cement as well as cement and tooth structure. However, most of the time clinical failure of bond has been observed at metal and cement interface. The treatment of metal surface, prior to luting, plays a crucial role in bonding cement with the metal. This study is conducted to evaluate and compare the effect of different surface preparations on the bond strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cement with nickel-chromium metal ceramic alloy. Fifty caries-free extracted molar teeth were made flat until the dentin of the occlusal surface was exposed. After fabrication of the wax patterns and subsequent castings, the castings were subjected to porcelain firing cycles. The nickel-chromium metal ceramic alloy discs were also divided into five groups and subjected to various surface treatments: (1) Unsandblasted (U), (2) sandblasted (S), (3) sandblasted and treated with 10% aqueous solution of KMnO4 (SK), (4) unsandblasted and roughened with diamond abrasive points (UD) and (5) unsandblasted and roughened with diamond abrasive points and treated with 10% aqueous solution of KMnO(4) (UDK). After surface treatments, the castings were cemented using Fuji PLUS encapsulated resin-modified glass ionomer cement. The obtained values of all the groups were subjected to statistical analysis for Tensile and Shear bond strength. Different surface treatments of the metal affects the bond strength values of resin-modified glass ionomer cement when used as luting agent.

  20. Bond strength of resin-reinforced glass ionomer cements after enamel etching.

    PubMed

    Cortes, O; Garcia-Godoy, F; Boj, J R

    1993-12-01

    This study evaluated the shear bond strength of resin-reinforced glass ionomers to enamel etched or unetched. Human, non-carious extracted permanent molars stored in distilled water were used. Flat buccal and lingual enamel surfaces were ground wet on 600-grit silicon carbide paper. The teeth were then distributed at random into six groups of 5 teeth (10 surfaces) each: Group 1: Fuji II LC, no enamel etching; Group 2: Fuji II LC, enamel etched with 10% phosphoric acid for 10 seconds; Group 3: Dyract, no enamel etching; Group 4: Dyract, enamel etched with 10% phosphoric acid for 10 seconds; Group 5: Photac-Fil, no enamel etching; Group 6: Photac-Fil, enamel etched with 10% phosphoric acid for 10 seconds. Cylindrical samples of the glass ionomers were prepared in plastic molds and bonded to the enamel surface according to the manufacturers' instructions. All samples were placed in distilled water for 24 hours, and sheared with an Instron at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. The results (in MPa) were: Group 1: 11.29 +/- 4.84; Group 2: 19.64 +/- 5.43; Group 3: 8.26 +/- 3.61; Group 4: 22.04 +/- 5.40; Group 5: 2.05 +/- 3.05; Group 6: 9.12 +/- 6.61. ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls procedure revealed that on etched enamel, Fuji II LC and Dyract had a significantly higher bond strength than all the other groups tested (P < 0.0001), but not significantly different between each other. With these two groups, cohesive failure within the material was recorded in all samples while in the unetched samples, all specimens displayed an adhesive failure (glass ionomer-enamel interface). All samples with Photac-Fil, with or without enamel etching had adhesive failures.

  1. The use of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for the determination of fluorine concentration in glass ionomer cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratochvíl, T.; Pouzar, M.; Novotný, K.; Havránek, V.; Černohorský, T.; Zvolská, M.

    2013-10-01

    The influence of He atmosphere and gate width in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) determination of fluorine concentration was investigated in detail. The measurements were realized on two double pulse LIBS devices featuring different parameters. Calibration curves, describing the relationship between the fluorine concentration and the corresponding intensity of the LIBS signal, were constructed for both LIBS devices, with and without He flow, respectively. Detection limits achieved were in the range 1.18-0.47 wt.%. The best LOD value was obtained in He atmosphere. The LIBS measurement of fluorine content is influenced by different gate widths and the atmosphere in the working chamber. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of fluorine concentration in glass ionomer cements.

  2. The influence of dicarboxylic acids: Oxalic acid and tartaric acid on the compressive strength of glass ionomer cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permana, Ahmadi Jaya; Setyawati, Harsasi; Hamami, Murwani, Irmina Kris

    2016-03-01

    Glass ionomer cement (GIC) has limitation on the mechanical properties especially compressive strength. The change of compressive strength of GIC by adding oxalic acid and tartaric acid has been investigated. Oxalic acid and tartaric acid was added to the liquid components at concentrations of 0 - 15% (w/w). Powder component of GIC was made from optimum experimental powder glass SiO2-Al2O3-CaF2. GIC was characterized by compressive strength test, SEM-EDX and FTIR. The addition of tartaric acid to GIC has greater improvement than addition of oxalic acid. The addition of tartaric acid at 10 % (w/w) to GIC has greatest value of compressive strength.

  3. Effect of time on the diametral tensile strength of resin-modified restorative glass ionomer cements and compomer.

    PubMed

    Cefaly, D F; Valarelli, F P; Seabra, B G; Mondelli, R F; Navarro, M F

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the diametral tensile strengths of three resin-modified restorative glass ionomer cements--Vitremer, Fuji II LC and Photac Fil and one compomer--Dyract. They were tested at 1 hour, 1 day and 1 week. Kratos testing machine was used to load the specimens at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. The data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test that showed statistically significant differences among the materials. The tested materials presented an increase in strength from 1 hour to 1 week and were as follows for each material respectively: Vitremer (19.22-27.29), Fuji II LC (23.91-28.67), Photac Fil (19.35-22.86), Dyract (28.83-46.95). Dyract presented the highest strengths.

  4. Clinical evaluation of resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative cements in cervical 'abrasion' lesions: one-year results.

    PubMed

    Maneenut, C; Tyas, M J

    1995-10-01

    Sixty non-undercut Class V "abrasion" lesions in 13 patients were restored with light-cured Type IIa glass-ionomer cements in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions, 20 each with Fuji II LC, Photac-Fil, and Vitremer. Patients were recalled for examination and photographs 1 week, 6 months, and 1 year posttreatment. Color, marginal discoloration, and retention of the restorations were assessed at each recall period. At 1 year, no loss of restorations was found. Analysis revealed statistically significant darkening in color of the Vitremer restorations, no significant change in color of the Fuji II LC and Photac-Fil restorations, and statistically significant but clinically negligible development of marginal discoloration of all materials.

  5. Predicting composition-property relationships for glass ionomer cements: a multifactor central composite approach to material optimization.

    PubMed

    Kiri, Lauren; Boyd, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    Adjusting powder-liquid ratio (P/L) and polyacrylic acid concentration (AC) has been documented as a means of tailoring the handling and mechanical properties of glass ionomer cements (GICs). This work implemented a novel approach in which the interactive effects of these two factors on three key GIC properties (working time, setting time, and compressive strength) were investigated using a central composite design of experiments. Using nonlinear regression analysis, formulation-property relationships were derived for each property, which enabled prediction of an optimal formulation (P/L and AC) through application of the desirability approach. A novel aluminum free GIC was investigated, as this material may present the first clinically viable GIC for use in injectable spinal applications, such as vertebroplasty. Ultimately, this study presents the first series of predictive regression models that explain the formulation-dependence of a GIC, and the first statistical method for optimizing both P/L and AC depending on user-defined inputs.

  6. Influence of powder/liquid ratio on the radiodensity and diametral tensile strength of glass ionomer cements

    PubMed Central

    FONSECA, Rodrigo Borges; BRANCO, Carolina Assaf; QUAGLIATTO, Paulo Sérgio; GONÇALVES, Luciano de Souza; SOARES, Carlos José; CARLO, Hugo Lemes; CORRER-SOBRINHO, Lourenço

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the influence of P/L ratio on the radiodensity and diametral tensile strength (DTS) of glass ionomer cements. Material and Methods There were 2 factors under study: P/L ratio (manufacturer's recommended P/L ratio and a 50% reduced P/L ratio), and materials (Vitro Molar, Vitro Fil, Vitro Cem conventional GICs and Vitro Fil LC, Ortho Glass LC RMGICs). Five 1-mm-thick samples of each material-P/L ratio were produced for radiodensity evaluation. Samples were x-ray exposed onto Digora phosphor plate and radiodensity was obtained using the software Digora for Windows 2.5 Rev 0. For DTS, five (4.0x8.0 mm) cylinder samples of each material were tested (0.5 mm/min). Data were subjected to one- and two-way ANOVA (5x2) followed by Tukey's HSD test, or Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's method. For paired comparisons, t-test or Mann-Whitney test were used (a=0.05). Results There was a significant interaction (P=0.001) for the studied factors (materials vs. P/L ratio). Reduced P/L ratio resulted in significantly lower DTS for the RMGICs, but radiodensity was affected for all materials (P<0.05). Conclusions Reduced P/L ratio affected properties of the tested glass ionomer cements. RMGICs were more susceptible to lower values of DTS, but radiodensity decreased for all materials following P/L ratio reduction. PMID:21308288

  7. Antibacterial effects of glass ionomers.

    PubMed

    DeSchepper, E J; White, R R; von der Lehr, W

    1989-04-01

    Glass ionomer cements have been shown to possess antimicrobial activity. Proposed mechanisms of action include acidity and fluoride. It was the purpose of this study to determine the antimicrobial effect of 11 glass ionomer cements, their individual powder and liquid components and one resin-bonded liner containing high fluoride ionomer glass against Streptococcus mutans #6715. The role of fluoride and pH in the antibacterial activity was also studied. Using agar diffusion assay methodology, the following results were obtained. All of the glass ionomer cements were inhibitory against S. mutans. The antibacterial cements and slurries that were tested for fluoride, released the ion in excess of reported minimum inhibitory values. The antimicrobial activity of the liquid components, that were tested for the effects of pH changes, was totally lost when the pH was adjusted to 5. The resin bonded liner was inactive against S. mutans and did not release inhibitory concentrations of fluoride. These results indicate that freshly-mixed glass ionomer cements are antimicrobial against S. mutans and that the mechanism of action is probably a function of both fluoride and pH although additional factors may be involved.

  8. In vitro study of 24-hour and 30-day shear bond strengths of three resin-glass ionomer cements used to bond orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Lippitz, S J; Staley, R N; Jakobsen, J R

    1998-06-01

    Interest in using composite resin-glass ionomer hybrid cements as orthodontic bracket adhesives has grown because of their potential for fluoride release. The purpose of this pilot study was to compare shear bond strengths of three resin-glass ionomer cements (Advance, Fuji Duet, Fuji Ortho LC) used as bracket adhesives with a composite resin 24 hours and 30 days after bonding. The amount of adhesive remaining on the debonded enamel surface was scored for each adhesive. Mesh-backed stainless-steel brackets were bonded to 100 extracted human premolars, which were stored in artificial saliva at 37 degrees C until being tested to failure in a testing machine. The hybrid cements, with one exception, had bond strengths similar to those of the composite resin at 24 hours and 30 days. Fuji Ortho LC had significantly lower bond strengths (ANOVA p < or = 0.05) than the other adhesives at 24 hours and 30 days when it was bonded to unetched, water-moistened enamel. Adhesive-remnant scores were similar for all cements, except for cement Fuji Ortho LC when it was bonded to unetched enamel. The resin-glass ionomer cements we tested appear to have bond strengths suitable for routine use as orthodontic bracket-bonding adhesives.

  9. Cytotoxicity evaluation of a new fast set highly viscous conventional glass ionomer cement with L929 fibroblast cell line

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Hany Mohamed Aly; Omar, Nor Shamsuria; Luddin, Norhayati; Saini, Rajan; Saini, Deepti

    2011-01-01

    Aim: This study aims to evaluate the cytotoxicity of a new fast set highly viscous conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC) with L929 fibroblasts. Materials and Methods: The cement capsule was mixed and introduced into a paraffin wax mould. After setting, the cement was incubated in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium. Six replicates of the material extract were added to the culture medium in 96-well plates. L929 mouse fibroblast cells were added into the wells and then incubated for 48 h. Dimethylthiazol diphenyltetrazolium bromide test was performed for cytotoxicity evaluation. Results: The results showed that this GIC brand did not yield a half-maximal inhibitory concentration value, IC50, as the cell viability was above 50% at all concentrations. Cell viability over 90% was observed at the concentrations of 3.125 and 1.5625 mg/ml. Maximum concentration of the material showed cell viability of 59.4%. Conclusions: This new fast set highly viscous conventional GIC showed low cytotoxicity to mouse fibroblast cells, and it can be suggested as a substitute for dental cements exhibiting a long setting time. PMID:22144813

  10. Methotrexate-loaded glass ionomer cements for drug release in the skeleton: An examination of composition-property relationships.

    PubMed

    Kiri, Lauren; Filiaggi, Mark; Boyd, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic-loaded bone cement may be an effective method of drug delivery for the management of cancer-related vertebral fractures that require cement injection for pain relief. Recent advancements in the development of aluminum-free glass ionomer cements (GICs) have rendered this class of biomaterials clinically viable for such applications. To expand the therapeutic benefits of these materials, this study examined, for the first time, their drug delivery potential. Through incrementally loading the GIC with methotrexate (MTX) by up to 10-wt%, composition-property relationships were established, correlating MTX loading with working time and setting time, as well as compressive strength, drug release, and cytotoxic effect over 31 days. The most significant finding of this study was that MTX was readily released from the GIC, while maintaining cytotoxic activity. Release correlated linearly with initial loading and appeared to be diffusion mediated, delivering a total of 1-2% of the incorporated drug. MTX loading in this range exerted minimal effects to handling and strength, indicating the clinical utility of the material was not compromised by MTX loading. The MTX-GIC systems examined herein are promising materials for combined structural delivery applications.

  11. Efficacy of Glass Ionomer Cements for Prevention of White Spot Lesions During Orthodontic Banding: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Fallahinejad Ghajari, Masoud; Eslamian, Ladan; Naji Rad, Azam; Morovati, Seyyedeh Pouya

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to compare the incidence of white spot lesions (WSLs) around orthodontic bands following the application of two glass ionomer (GI) cements namely GC Gold Label and GC Fuji Plus for six to 12 months. Materials and Methods: A total of 186 permanent first molars of orthodontic patients requiring banding of at least two permanent first molars were chosen. The teeth were examined for caries and presence of WSLs by visual inspection and by DIAGNOdent (scores 0–29). Orthodontic bands were randomly cemented to the right or left molars using GC Gold Label or GC Fuji Plus GI cements. Samples were randomly divided into three groups and bands were removed after six, nine and 12 months in groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively. The teeth were then examined for caries and presence of WSLs by visual inspection. DIAGNOdent was used on the buccal and lingual surfaces to determine the presence of WSLs. The data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA, multivariate repeated measures ANOVA, the Kruskal Wallis and the Mann-Whitney tests. Results: Totally 174 teeth were evaluated. DIAGNOdent scores were not significantly different before cementation and after removal of bands in buccal and lingual surfaces of the teeth in the two cement groups. Lesions simulating WSLs were seen in 21 out of 174 teeth but DIAGNOdent scores were not indicative of caries. Conclusion: Remarkable WSLs were not detected visually or by DIAGNOdent at six, nine or 12 months following the cementation of bands with two GI cements. PMID:27559351

  12. The physical properties of conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer dental cements stored in saliva, proprietary acidic beverages, saline and water.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, M A; Linden, R W A; Nicholson, J W

    2003-10-01

    Specimens of three conventional and one resin-modified glass-ionomer cement were prepared for both compressive strength and biaxial flexure strength determination. They were stored either in neutral media (water, saline, unstimulated whole saliva or stimulated parotid saliva) or in acidic beverages (apple juice, orange juice or Coca-Cola) for time periods ranging from 1 day to 1 year. In neutral media, the compressive and biaxial flexural strengths of all cements studied showed similar results, with significant increases apparent in compressive strengths at 6 months and which continued to 1 year, but no significant differences between the media; and no significant differences with time for biaxial flexure strength in all media. These findings show that interactions of these cements with saliva, which are known to result in deposition of calcium and phosphate, do not affect strength. Results for specimens stored in Coca-Cola were the same as for those stored in neutral media. By contrast, in orange and apple juice specimens underwent severe erosion resulting in dissolution of the conventional glass-ionomers after 3-6 months, and/or significant loss of strength at 1-3 months. Erosion of the resin-modified glass-ionomer, Vitremer, led to a significant reduction in strength, but not in dissolution, even after 12 months. The chelating carboxylic acids in these fruit juices were assumed to be responsible for these effects.

  13. Comparative evaluation of intracanal sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate and glass ionomer cement: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Gauri; Bogra, Poonam; Singh, Simranjeet; Samra, Rupandeep K

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The purpose of this study was to compare the sealing ability of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) and Glass Ionomer Cement (GIC) when used over gutta-percha as intracanal sealing materials. The study also evaluated the sealing ability of Zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE) cement and Acroseal sealer. Materials and Methods: Teeth were obturated with gutta-percha using sealer ZOE (group A, C, D) and Acroseal (group B). The groups were further divided into 2 subgroups (15 premolars each) on the basis of intracanal sealing material used: GIC subgroups (A1, B1) and MTA in subgroups (A2, B2). The clearing technique was used in this study for leakage evaluation. Seventy mandibular premolars were prepared using step-back technique and divided into experimental groups A and B (30 premolars each) and the positive and negative control groups C and D (5 premolars each). Statistical analysis used: Coronal microleakage was determined under stereomicroscope using 15X magnification. Data was statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by Post-Hoc Multiple comparison (Bonferroni). Results: MTA group leaked significantly less than GIC group (P < 0.05). Acroseal exhibited better sealing ability than ZOE sealer. Teeth with no intracanal barrier showed almost complete leakage. Conclusions: MTA may be preferred over GIC as an intracanal barrier. PMID:24347890

  14. In vitro Evaluation of Stainless Steel Crowns cemented with Resin-modified Glass Ionomer and Two New Self-adhesive Resin Cements

    PubMed Central

    Shashibhushan, KK; Poornima, P; Reddy, VV Subba

    2016-01-01

    Aims To assess and compare the retentive strength of two dual-polymerized self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX U200, 3M ESPE & SmartCem2, Dentsply Caulk) and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC; RelyX Luting 2, 3M ESPE) on stainless steel crown (SSC). Materials and methods Thirty extracted teeth were mounted on cold cured acrylic resin blocks exposing the crown till the cemento-enamel junction. Pretrimmed, precontoured SSC was selected for a particular tooth. Standardized tooth preparation for SSC was performed by single operator. The crowns were then luted with either RelyX U200 or SmartCem2 or RelyX Luting 2 cement. Retentive strength was tested using Instron universal testing machine. The retentive strength values were recorded and calculated by the formula: Load/Area. Statistical analysis One-way analysis of variance was used for multiple comparisons followed by post hoc Tukey’s test for groupwise comparisons. Unpaired t-test was used for intergroup comparisons. Results RelyX U200 showed significantly higher retentive strength than rest of the two cements (p < 0.001). No significant difference was found between the retentive strength of SmartCem2 and RelyX Luting 2 (p > 0.05). Conclusion The retentive strength of dual-polymerized self-adhesive resin cements was better than RMGIC, and RelyX U200 significantly improved crown retention when compared with SmartCem2 and RelyX Luting 2. How to cite this article Pathak S, Shashibhushan KK, Poornima P, Reddy VVS. In vitro Evaluation of Stainless Steel Crowns cemented with Resin-modified Glass Ionomer and Two New Self-adhesive Resin Cements. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(3):197-200. PMID:27843249

  15. Comparative evaluation of microleakage of three restorative glass ionomer cements: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Diwanji, Amish; Dhar, Vineet; Arora, Ruchi; Madhusudan, A.; Rathore, Ambika Singh

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the microleakage of glass ionomers (conventional and resin modified) with that of recently introduced nanoionomers. Materials and Methods: Standardized class I and class V cavities were prepared on 120 young permanent teeth. Samples were equally divided into group I (class I restorations) and group II (class V restorations), and further divided into subgroups. The subgroups were restored with Fuji IX, Fuji II LC, and newly introduced Ketac™ N 100 (KN 100). Samples were thermocycled and submerged in Acridine dye for 24 h. Samples were sectioned to view under fluorescent microscope and marginal leakage was evaluated by Chi-square and Kruskal — Wallis test. Results: Fuji IX showed the maximum leakage, followed by LC II and the least was observed in KN 100. In class I restorations, there was significant difference while comparing Fuji IX with Fuji LC II and KN 100 and nonsignificant difference between LC II and KN100. In class V restorations, Fuji IX and KN100, KN 100 and LC II showed significant difference. Fuji IX and LC II showed nonsignificant difference. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, Fuji IX showed the maximum microleakage. KN 100 showed minimum leakage, better sealing ability, and was more consistent. PMID:25097418

  16. A comparison study on the flexural strength and compressive strength of four resin-modified luting glass ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Lin, Hong; Zheng, Gang; Zhang, Xuehui; Xu, Yongxiang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the differences in flexural strength and compressive strength between four resin-modified luting glass ionomer cements that are commonly used in clinics. Furthermore, this study investigates the influence of curing mode on the flexural strength and compressive strength of dual-cured resin-modified glass ionomer cements. Initially, flexural strength and compressive strength test specimens were prepared for RL, NR, GCP, and GCC. The RL group and NR group were cured by the light-curing mode and chemical-curing mode. Five specimens were prepared for each test group, and the flexural strength and compressive strength of each were measured. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA with SPSS 13.0. Furthermore, the fracture morphology of the flexural specimens was observed by SEM. The result of the mean flexural strength of each group is as follows: the NR light-cured group > NR chemically-cured group > GCP > RL light-cured group > GCC > RL chemically-cured group. More specifically, the flexural strength of the NR light-cured group ((42.903±4.242) MPa) is significantly higher (P<0.05) than those of the other groups, and in addition, the flexural strength of the light-curing mode is significantly higher (P<0. 05) than that of both the NR and RL chemically-cured groups. The result of the mean compressive strength of each group is as follows: GCP > NR chemically-cured group > NR light-cured group > GCC > RL light-cured group > RL chemically-cured group. Although the compressive strengths of the NR and GCP groups are higher than those of the GCC and RL groups, there are no significant differences (P>0.05) between NR and GCP, and no significant differences between GCC and RL. Furthermore, there are no significant differences (P>0.05) between the two curing modes on NR and RL. From the present study, it can be concluded that NR has superior flexural strength and compressive strength compared to the other three materials. Additionally, the

  17. Smooth surface glass ionomer restoration for primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Killian, C M; Croll, T P

    1991-01-01

    Glass ionomer restorative cement offers the clinician an alternative to bonded composite resin for restoration of certain lesions in primary teeth. This article details a step-by-step procedure for restoration of a smooth surface carious lesion in a primary incisor using an encapsulated glass ionomer restorative material and reviews advantages and limitations of the cement. A light-hardened glass ionomer liner/base that has proven useful as an enamel and dentin restorative is also described.

  18. Streptococcus mutans-induced secondary caries adjacent to glass ionomer cement, composite resin and amalgam restorations in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gama-Teixeira, Adriana; Simionato, Maria Regina Lorenzeti; Elian, Silvia Nagib; Sobral, Maria Angela Pita; Luz, Maria Aparecida Alves de Cerqueira

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define, in vitro, the potential to inhibit secondary caries of restorative materials currently used in dental practice. Standard cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of fifty extracted human third molars. The teeth were randomly divided into five groups, each one restored with one of the following materials: glass ionomer cement (GIC); amalgam; light-cured composite resin; ion-releasing composite; and light-cured, fluoride-containing composite resin. The teeth were thermocycled, sterilized with gamma irradiation, exposed to a cariogenic challenge using a bacterial system using Streptococcus mutans, and then prepared for microscopic observation. The following parameters were measured in each lesion formed: extension, depth, and caries inhibition area. The outer lesions developed showed an intact surface layer and had a rectangular shape. Wall lesions were not observed inside the cavities. After Analysis of Variance and Component of Variance Models Analysis, it was observed that the GIC group had the smallest lesions and the greatest number of caries inhibition areas. The lesions developed around Amalgam and Ariston pHc restorations had an intermediate size and the largest lesions were observed around Z-100 and Heliomolar restorations. It may be concluded that the restorative materials GIC, amalgam and ion-releasing composites may reduce secondary caries formation.

  19. Adhesion of Streptococcus Mutans to Glass Ionomer, BisCem Cement and Enamel: An in Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Jalalian, Ezzatollah; Ahmadpour, Sogol

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Considering the adhesion of some microorganisms such as Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) to restorative materials and the unrecognized consequences of this phenomenon, and due to the controversies in this regard, it is important to discover the materials to which the lowest adhesion of S. mutans occurs. The objective of this study was to assess the level of adhesion of S. mutans to glass ionomer (GI), BisCem Cement and enamel. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro experimental study, 12 specimens including five GI blocks (GC America Inc., Alsip, IL, USA), five BisCem blocks (Bisco Inc., Schaumburg, IL, USA) and two enamel blocks were exposed to a bacterial suspension (1×106 mg/mL). After incubation for one hour at 37°C, the swab samples were taken and cultured in blood agar. The S. mutans colonies were counted by unaided vision after 48 hours of incubation. The results were analyzed using ANOVA followed by the Tukey’s test. Results: The number of colonies attributed to enamel, GI, and BisCem blocks was 24±2, 24.2±2.7 and 14.8±1.7 colonies/mm2, respectively. There was no difference between enamel and GI in terms of adhesion of S. mutans (P=0.08 and P>0.001, respectively); however, the difference between these two and BisCem was statistically significant (P= 0.00075 and P<0.001, respectively). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, BisCem cement is superior to GI for the cementation of indirect restorations. PMID:27148379

  20. Comparison of shear bond strength of resin reinforced chemical cure glass ionomer, conventional chemical cure glass ionomer and chemical cure composite resin in direct bonding systems: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Rao, Kolasani Srinivasa; Reddy, T Praveen Kumar; Yugandhar, Garlapati; Kumar, B Sunil; Reddy, S N Chandrasekhar; Babu, Devatha Ashok

    2013-01-01

    The acid pretreatment and use of composite resins as the bonding medium has disadvantages like scratching and loss of surface enamel, decalcification, etc. To overcome disadvantages of composite resins, glass ionomers and its modifications are being used for bonding. The study was conducted to evaluate the efficiency of resin reinforced glass ionomer as a direct bonding system with conventional glass ionomer cement and composite resin. The study showed that shear bond strength of composite resin has the higher value than both resin reinforced glass ionomer and conventional glass ionomer cement in both 1 and 24 hours duration and it increased from 1 to 24 hours in all groups. The shear bond strength of resin reinforced glass ionomer cement was higher than the conventional glass ionomer cement in both 1 and 24 hours duration. Conditioning with polyacrylic acid improved the bond strength of resin reinforced glass ionomer cement significantly but not statistically significant in the case of conventional glass ionomer cement.

  1. Bonding of contemporary glass ionomer cements to different tooth substrates; microshear bond strength and scanning electron microscope study

    PubMed Central

    El Wakeel, Aliaa Mohamed; Elkassas, Dina Wafik; Yousry, Mai Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study was conducted to evaluate the microshear bond strength (μSBS) and ultramorphological characterization of glass ionomer (GI) cements; conventional GI cement (Fuji IX, CGI), resin modified GI (Fuji II LC, RMGI) and nano-ionomer (Ketac N100, NI) to enamel, dentin and cementum substrates. Materials and Methods: Forty-five lower molars were sectioned above the cemento-enamel junction. The occlusal surfaces were ground flat to obtain enamel and dentin substrates, meanwhile the cervical one-third of the root portion were utilized to evaluate the bonding efficacy to cementum substrate. Each substrate received microcylinders from the three tested materials; which were applied according to manufacturer instructions. μSBS was assessed using a universal testing machine. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's post-hoc test. Modes of failure were examined using stereomicroscope at ×25 magnification. Interfacial analysis of the bonded specimens was carried out using environmental field emission scanning electron microscope. Results: Two-way ANOVA revealed that materials, substrates and their interaction had a statistically significant effect on the mean μSBS values at P values; ˂0.0001, 0.0108 and 0.0037 respectively. RMGI showed statistically significant the highest μSBS values to all examined tooth substrates. CGI and RMGI show substrate independent bonding efficiency, meanwhile; NI showed higher μSBS values to dentin and cementum compared to enamel. Conclusion: Despite technological development of GI materials, mainly the nano-particles use, better results have not been achieved for both investigations, when compared to RMGI, independent of tooth substrate. PMID:26038646

  2. In-vitro Study on Temperature Changes in the Pulp Chamber Due to Thermo-Cure Glass Ionomer Cements.

    PubMed

    van Duinen, Raimond Nb; Shahid, Saroash; Hill, Robert; Glavina, Domagoj

    2016-12-01

    The application of the Glass Ionomer Cements in clinical dentistry is recommended due to properties such as fluoride release, chemical adhesion to tooth, negligible setting shrinkage, and coefficient of thermal expansion close to tooth, low creep, and good color stability. However, the cement is vulnerable to early exposure to moisture due to slow setting characteristics. The uses of external energy such as ultrasound and radiant heat (Thermo-curing) have been reported to provide acceleration of the setting chemistry and enhance physical properties. Aim: The aim of this in vitro study was to analyze temperature changes in the pulpal chamber when using radiant heat to accelerate the setting of GICs. Material and Methods:The encapsulated GIC Equia Forte was used for this study. The temperature changes in the pulp were measured using thermocouple in the cavities which were 2,6 and 4,7mm deep with and without filling. Results:The results showed that a temperature rise (ΔT) in the pulp chamber was 3,7°C. ΔT for the 2.6mm and 4.7mm deep cavity and without placing any restoration the temperature was 4,2°C and 2,6°C respectively. After the restoration has been placed, the ΔT range in the pulp chamber was lower ranging from 1.9°C to 2.4°C. Conclusion: It could be concluded that Thermo-curing of the GIC during the setting is safe for the pulp and can be recommended in clinical practice.

  3. In-vitro Study on Temperature Changes in the Pulp Chamber Due to Thermo-Cure Glass Ionomer Cements

    PubMed Central

    van Duinen, Raimond NB; Shahid, Saroash; Hill, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The application of the Glass Ionomer Cements in clinical dentistry is recommended due to properties such as fluoride release, chemical adhesion to tooth, negligible setting shrinkage, and coefficient of thermal expansion close to tooth, low creep, and good color stability. However, the cement is vulnerable to early exposure to moisture due to slow setting characteristics. The uses of external energy such as ultrasound and radiant heat (Thermo-curing) have been reported to provide acceleration of the setting chemistry and enhance physical properties. Aim: The aim of this in vitro study was to analyze temperature changes in the pulpal chamber when using radiant heat to accelerate the setting of GICs. Material and Methods:The encapsulated GIC Equia Forte was used for this study. The temperature changes in the pulp were measured using thermocouple in the cavities which were 2,6 and 4,7mm deep with and without filling. Results:The results showed that a temperature rise (ΔT) in the pulp chamber was 3,7°C. ΔT for the 2.6mm and 4.7mm deep cavity and without placing any restoration the temperature was 4,2°C and 2,6°C respectively. After the restoration has been placed, the ΔT range in the pulp chamber was lower ranging from 1.9°C to 2.4°C. Conclusion: It could be concluded that Thermo-curing of the GIC during the setting is safe for the pulp and can be recommended in clinical practice. PMID:28275275

  4. Biological and mechanical properties of an experimental glass-ionomer cement modified by partial replacement of CaO with MgO or ZnO.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Ae; Abo-Mosallam, Hany; Lee, Hye-Young; Lee, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Hae-Won; Lee, Hae-Hyoung

    2015-01-01

    Some weaknesses of conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC) as dental materials, for instance the lack of bioactive potential and poor mechanical properties, remain unsolved.Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the partial replacement of CaO with MgO or ZnO on the mechanical and biological properties of the experimental glass ionomer cements.Material and Methods Calcium fluoro-alumino-silicate glass was prepared for an experimental glass ionomer cement by melt quenching technique. The glass composition was modified by partial replacement (10 mol%) of CaO with MgO or ZnO. Net setting time, compressive and flexural properties, and in vitrorat dental pulp stem cells (rDPSCs) viability were examined for the prepared GICs and compared to a commercial GIC.Results The experimental GICs set more slowly than the commercial product, but their extended setting times are still within the maximum limit (8 min) specified in ISO 9917-1. Compressive strength of the experimental GIC was not increased by the partial substitution of CaO with either MgO or ZnO, but was comparable to the commercial control. For flexural properties, although there was no significance between the base and the modified glass, all prepared GICs marked a statistically higher flexural strength (p<0.05) and comparable modulus to control. The modified cements showed increased cell viability for rDPSCs.Conclusions The experimental GICs modified with MgO or ZnO can be considered bioactive dental materials.

  5. Biological and mechanical properties of an experimental glass-ionomer cement modified by partial replacement of CaO with MgO or ZnO

    PubMed Central

    Dong-Ae, KIM; Hany, ABO-MOSALLAM; Hye-Young, LEE; Jung-Hwan, LEE; Hae-Won, KIM; Hae-Hyoung, LEE

    2015-01-01

    Some weaknesses of conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC) as dental materials, for instance the lack of bioactive potential and poor mechanical properties, remain unsolved. Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the partial replacement of CaO with MgO or ZnO on the mechanical and biological properties of the experimental glass ionomer cements. Material and Methods Calcium fluoro-alumino-silicate glass was prepared for an experimental glass ionomer cement by melt quenching technique. The glass composition was modified by partial replacement (10 mol%) of CaO with MgO or ZnO. Net setting time, compressive and flexural properties, and in vitro rat dental pulp stem cells (rDPSCs) viability were examined for the prepared GICs and compared to a commercial GIC. Results The experimental GICs set more slowly than the commercial product, but their extended setting times are still within the maximum limit (8 min) specified in ISO 9917-1. Compressive strength of the experimental GIC was not increased by the partial substitution of CaO with either MgO or ZnO, but was comparable to the commercial control. For flexural properties, although there was no significance between the base and the modified glass, all prepared GICs marked a statistically higher flexural strength (p<0.05) and comparable modulus to control. The modified cements showed increased cell viability for rDPSCs. Conclusions The experimental GICs modified with MgO or ZnO can be considered bioactive dental materials. PMID:26398508

  6. Present and future of glass-ionomers and calcium-silicate cements as bioactive materials in dentistry: Biophotonics-based interfacial analyses in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Timothy F.; Atmeh, Amre R.; Sajini, Shara; Cook, Richard J.; Festy, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    Objective Since their introduction, calcium silicate cements have primarily found use as endodontic sealers, due to long setting times. While similar in chemistry, recent variations such as constituent proportions, purities and manufacturing processes mandate a critical understanding of service behavior differences of the new coronal restorative material variants. Of particular relevance to minimally invasive philosophies is the potential for ion supply, from initial hydration to mature set in dental cements. They may be capable of supporting repair and remineralization of dentin left after decay and cavity preparation, following the concepts of ion exchange from glass ionomers. Methods This paper reviews the underlying chemistry and interactions of glass ionomer and calcium silicate cements, with dental tissues, concentrating on dentin–restoration interface reactions. We additionally demonstrate a new optical technique, based around high resolution deep tissue, two-photon fluorescence and lifetime imaging, which allows monitoring of undisturbed cement–dentin interface samples behavior over time. Results The local bioactivity of the calcium-silicate based materials has been shown to produce mineralization within the subjacent dentin substrate, extending deep within the tissues. This suggests that the local ion-rich alkaline environment may be more favorable to mineral repair and re-construction, compared with the acidic environs of comparable glass ionomer based materials. Significance The advantages of this potential re-mineralization phenomenon for minimally invasive management of carious dentin are self-evident. There is a clear need to improve the bioactivity of restorative dental materials and these calcium silicate cement systems offer exciting possibilities in realizing this goal. PMID:24113131

  7. Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Reduces Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Development on Glass Ionomer Cement and Disrupts Established Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sze-Wei; Myroforidis, Helen; Zalizniak, Ilya; Palamara, Joseph E. A.; Huq, N. Laila; Reynolds, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are dental restorative materials that are suitable for modification to help prevent dental plaque (biofilm) formation. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of incorporating casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) into a GIC on the colonisation and establishment of Streptococcus mutans biofilms and the effects of aqueous CPP-ACP on established S mutans biofilms. S. mutans biofilms were either established in flow cells before a single ten min exposure to 1% w/v CPP-ACP treatment or cultured in static wells or flow cells with either GIC or GIC containing 3% w/w CPP-ACP as the substratum. The biofilms were then visualised using confocal laser scanning microscopy after BacLight LIVE/DEAD staining. A significant decrease in biovolume and average thickness of S. mutans biofilms was observed in both static and flow cell assays when 3% CPP-ACP was incorporated into the GIC substratum. A single ten min treatment with aqueous 1% CPP-ACP resulted in a 58% decrease in biofilm biomass and thickness of established S. mutans biofilms grown in a flow cell. The treatment also significantly altered the structure of these biofilms compared with controls. The incorporation of 3% CPP-ACP into GIC significantly reduced S. mutans biofilm development indicating another potential anticariogenic mechanism of this material. Additionally aqueous CPP-ACP disrupted established S. mutans biofilms. The use of CPP-ACP containing GIC combined with regular CPP-ACP treatment may lower S. mutans challenge. PMID:27589264

  8. Characterization of the Mineral Trioxide Aggregate–Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement Interface in Different Setting Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Ashraf A.; Komabayashi, Takashi; Watanabe, Etsuko; Shiraishi, Takanobu; Watanabe, Ikuya

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has been used successfully for perforation repair, vital pulpotomies, and direct pulp capping. However, little is known about the interactions between MTA and glass ionomer cement (GIC) in final restorations. In this study, 2 null hypotheses were tested: (1) GIC placement time does not affect the MTA-GIC structural interface and hardness and (2) moisture does not affect the MTA-GIC structural interface and hardness. Methods Fifty cylinders were half filled with MTA and divided into 5 groups. The other half was filled with resin-modified GIC either immediately after MTA placement or after 1 or 7 days of temporization in the presence or absence of a wet cotton pellet. The specimens were then sectioned, carbon coated, and examined using a scanning electron microscope and an electron probe micro-analyzer (SEM-EPMA) for interfacial adaptation, gap formation, and elemental analysis. The Vickers hardness numbers of the interfacial MTA were recorded 24 hours after GIC placement and 8 days after MTA placement and analyzed using the analysis of variance test. Results Hardness testing 24 hours after GIC placement revealed a significant increase in hardness with an increase of temporization time but not with a change of moisture conditions (P < .05). Hardness testing 8 days after MTA placement indicated no significant differences among groups. SEM-EPMA showed interfacial adaptation to improve with temporization time and moisture. Observed changes were limited to the outermost layer of MTA. The 2 null hypotheses were not rejected. Conclusions GIC can be applied over freshly mixed MTA with minimal effects on the MTA, which seemed to decrease with time. PMID:22794220

  9. Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Reduces Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Development on Glass Ionomer Cement and Disrupts Established Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Dashper, Stuart G; Catmull, Deanne V; Liu, Sze-Wei; Myroforidis, Helen; Zalizniak, Ilya; Palamara, Joseph E A; Huq, N Laila; Reynolds, Eric C

    2016-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are dental restorative materials that are suitable for modification to help prevent dental plaque (biofilm) formation. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of incorporating casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) into a GIC on the colonisation and establishment of Streptococcus mutans biofilms and the effects of aqueous CPP-ACP on established S mutans biofilms. S. mutans biofilms were either established in flow cells before a single ten min exposure to 1% w/v CPP-ACP treatment or cultured in static wells or flow cells with either GIC or GIC containing 3% w/w CPP-ACP as the substratum. The biofilms were then visualised using confocal laser scanning microscopy after BacLight LIVE/DEAD staining. A significant decrease in biovolume and average thickness of S. mutans biofilms was observed in both static and flow cell assays when 3% CPP-ACP was incorporated into the GIC substratum. A single ten min treatment with aqueous 1% CPP-ACP resulted in a 58% decrease in biofilm biomass and thickness of established S. mutans biofilms grown in a flow cell. The treatment also significantly altered the structure of these biofilms compared with controls. The incorporation of 3% CPP-ACP into GIC significantly reduced S. mutans biofilm development indicating another potential anticariogenic mechanism of this material. Additionally aqueous CPP-ACP disrupted established S. mutans biofilms. The use of CPP-ACP containing GIC combined with regular CPP-ACP treatment may lower S. mutans challenge.

  10. Effect of novel chitosan-fluoroaluminosilicate resin modified glass ionomer cement supplemented with translationally controlled tumor protein on pulp cells.

    PubMed

    Wanachottrakul, Nattaporn; Chotigeat, Wilaiwan; Kedjarune-Leggat, Ureporn

    2014-04-01

    Dental materials that can promote cell proliferation and function is required for regenerative pulp therapy. Resin modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC), a broadly used liner or restorative material, can cause apoptosis to pulp cells mainly due to HEMA (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate), the released residual monomer. Recent studies found that chitosan and albumin could promote release of protein in GIC while translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) has an anti-apoptotic activity against HEMA. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of chitosan and albumin modified RMGIC (Exp-RMGIC) supplemented with TCTP on pulp cell viability and mineralization. Exp-RMGIC+TCTP was composed of RMGIC powder incorporated with 15 % of chitosan, 5 % albumin and supplemented with TCTP mixed with the same liquid components of RMGIC. The effect of each specimen on pulp cells was examined using the Transwell plate. From the MTT assay, Exp-RMGIC+TCTP had the highest percentages of viable cells (P < 0.05) at both 24 and 74 h. Flow cytometry revealed that, after 24 h, Exp-RMGIC+TCTP gave the lowest percentages of apoptotic cells compared to other groups. There was no difference in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity among different formula of the specimens, while cells cultured in media with TCTP had higher ALP activity. Von Kossa staining revealed that RMGIC+TCTP, and Exp-RMGIC+TCTP had higher percentages of calcium deposit area compared to those without TCTP. It was concluded that Exp-RMGIC supplemented with TCTP had less cytotoxicity than RMGIC and can protect cells from apoptosis better than RMGIC supplemented with TCTP.

  11. Microhardness of glass ionomer cements indicated for the ART technique according to surface protection treatment and storage time.

    PubMed

    Shintome, Luciana Keiko; Nagayassu, Marcos Paulo; Di Nicoló, Rebeca; Myaki, Silvio Issáo

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the microhardness of 5 glass ionomer cements (GIC) - Vidrion R (V, SS White), Fuji IX (F, GC Corp.), Magic Glass ART (MG, Vigodent), Maxxion R (MR, FGM) and ChemFlex (CF, Dentsply) - in the presence or absence of a surface protection treatment, and after different storage periods. For each GIC, 36 test specimens were made, divided into 3 groups according to the surface protection treatment applied - no protection, varnish or nail varnish. The specimens were stored in distilled water for 24 h, 7 and 30 days and the microhardness tests were performed at these times. The data obtained were submitted to the ANOVA for repeated measures and Tukey tests (alpha = 5%). The results revealed that the mean microhardness values of the GICs were, in decreasing order, as follows: F > CF = MR > MG > V; that surface protection was significant for MR, at 24 h, without protection (64.2 + or - 3.6a), protected with GIC varnish (59.6 + or - 3.4b) and protected with nail varnish (62.7 + or - 2.8ab); for F, at 7 days, without protection (97.8 + or - 3.7ab), protected with varnish (95.9 + or - 3.2b) and protected with nail varnish (100.8 + or - 3.4a); and at 30 days, for F, without protection (98.8 + or - 2.6b), protected with varnish (103.3 + or - 4.4a) and protected with nail varnish (101 + or - 4.1ab) and, for V, without protection (46 + or - 1.3b), protected with varnish (49.6 + or - 1.7ab) and protected with nail varnish (51.1 + or - 2.6a). The increase in storage time produced an increase in microhardness. It was concluded that the different GICs, surface protection treatments and storage times could alter the microhardness values.

  12. BOND STRENGTH OF RESIN MODIFIED GLASS IONOMER CEMENT TO PRIMARY DENTIN AFTER CUTTING WITH DIFFERENT BUR TYPES AND DENTIN CONDITIONING

    PubMed Central

    Nicoló, Rebeca Di; Shintome, Luciana Keiko; Myaki, Silvio Issáo; Nagayassu, Marcos Paulo

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of different bur types and acid etching protocols on the shear bond strength (SBS) of a resin modified glass ionomer cement (RM-GIC) to primary dentin. Forty-eight clinically sound human primary molars were selected and randomly assigned to four groups (n=12). In G1, the lingual surface of the teeth was cut with a carbide bur until a 2.0-mm-diameter dentin area was exposed, followed by the application of RM-GIC (Vitremer – 3M/ESPE) prepared according to the manufacturer’s instructions. The specimens of G2, received the same treatment of G1, however the dentin was conditioned with phosphoric acid. In groups G3 and G4 the same procedures of G1 and G2 were conducted respectively, nevertheless dentin cutting was made with a diamond bur. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24h, and then tested in a universal testing machine. SBS. data were submitted to 2-way ANOVA (= 5%) and indicated that SBS values of RM-GIC bonded to primary dentin cut with different burs were not statistically different, but the specimens that were conditioned with phosphoric acid presented SBS values significantly higher that those without conditioning. To observe micromorphologic characteristics of the effects of dentin surface cut by diamond or carbide rotary instruments and conditioners treatment, some specimens were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Smear layer was present in all specimens regardless of the type of rotary instrument used for dentin cutting, and specimens etched with phosphoric acid presented more effective removal of smear layer. It was concluded that SBS of a RM-GIC to primary dentin was affected by the acid conditioning but the bur type had no influence. PMID:19089179

  13. Absence of carious lesions at margins of glass-ionomer cement and amalgam restorations: An update of systematic review evidence

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This article aims to update the existing systematic review evidence elicited by Mickenautsch et al. up to 18 January 2008 (published in the European Journal of Paediatric Dentistry in 2009) and addressing the review question of whether, in the same dentition and same cavity class, glass-ionomer cement (GIC) restored cavities show less recurrent carious lesions on cavity margins than cavities restored with amalgam. Methods The systematic literature search was extended beyond the original search date and a further hand-search and reference check was done. The quality of accepted trials was assessed, using updated quality criteria, and the risk of bias was investigated in more depth than previously reported. In addition, the focus of quantitative synthesis was shifted to single datasets extracted from the accepted trials. Results The database search (up to 10 August 2010) identified 1 new trial, in addition to the 9 included in the original systematic review, and 11 further trials were included after a hand-search and reference check. Of these 21 trials, 11 were excluded and 10 were accepted for data extraction and quality assessment. Thirteen dichotomous datasets of primary outcomes and 4 datasets with secondary outcomes were extracted. Meta-analysis and cumulative meta-analysis were used in combining clinically homogenous datasets. The overall results of the computed datasets suggest that GIC has a higher caries-preventive effect than amalgam for restorations in permanent teeth. No difference was found for restorations in the primary dentition. Conclusion This outcome is in agreement with the conclusions of the original systematic review. Although the findings of the trials identified in this update may be considered to be less affected by attrition- and publication bias, their risk of selection- and detection/performance bias is high. Thus, verification of the currently available results requires further high-quality randomised control trials. PMID

  14. Shear bond strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cements to Er:YAG laser-treated tooth structure.

    PubMed

    de Souza-Gabriel, Aline Evangelista; do Amaral, Flávia Lucisano Botelho; Pécora, Jesus Djalma; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of Er:YAG laser irradiation of enamel and dentin on the shear bond strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cements (RMGIC). Twenty molars were selected and the roots removed. The crowns were bisected, embedded in polyester resin and ground to plane the enamel or expose the dentin. The bonding site was delimited, and samples were randomly assigned according to the cavity preparation device: I--Er.YAG laser (350mJ/2Hz); II--Carbide bur (control group). They were subdivided according to the restorative material employed: A) Fuji II LC (GC); B) Vitremer (3M). Samples were then fixed to a metallic device where ionomer cylinders were prepared. Sequentially, the molars were stored for 24 hours and subjected to a shear bond strength test (50Kgf at 0.5 mm/minute). Means in MPa were: Enamel--IA) 4.77 (+/- 1.12); IB) 4.36 (+/- 1.50); IIA) 7.70 (+/- 1.53); IIB) 7.34 (+/- 1.52) and Dentin--IA) 3.13 (+/- 1.15); IB) 2.67 (+/- 0.74); IIA) 6.38 (+/- 1.44); IIB) 5.58 (+/-2.09). Data were submitted to statistical analysis by ANOVA. Adhesion for enamel was more efficient than for dentin (p < 0.01). The cavities prepared with a conventional bur (control group) presented higher bond strength values than those recorded for Er:YAG laser (p < 0.01). No significant differences were observed between the restorative materials. Based on these results, it was concluded that Er:YAG laser adversely affected the shear bond strength of RMGIC for both enamel and dentin.

  15. Antimicrobial Capacity of Casein Phosphopeptide/Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Enzymes in Glass Ionomer Cement in Dentin Carious Lesions

    PubMed Central

    PINHEIRO, SÉRGIO LUIZ; AZENHA, GIULIANA RODRIGUES; DE MILITO, FLÁVIA; DEMOCH, YASMIN MARIALVA

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the ability of casein phosphopeptide/amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP/ACP) and lysozyme, lactoferrin, and lactoperoxidase (LLL) added to glass ionomer cement (GIC) to inhibit the growth of S. mutans in a caries model. Material and methods Eighty permanent third molars were selected. The dentin of these teeth was exposed and flattened. Except for the coronal dentin, the specimens were waterproofed, autoclaved, and submitted to cariogenic challenge with standard strain of S. mutans. The carious lesions were sealed as follows: group 1 (n=20): GIC without additives; group 2 (n=20): GIC + CPP/ACP; group 3 (n=20): GIC + LLL; group 4 (n=20): GIC + CPP/ACP + LLL. S. mutans counts were performed before the caries were sealed (n=5), after 24 hours (n=5), at 1 month (n=5), and at 6 months (n=5). The results were analyzed using descriptive statistical analysis and the Kruskal-Wallis test (Student-Newman-Keuls test). Results GIC + LLL caused a significant reduction of S. mutans 1 month after sealing (p<0.01); however, there was a significant growth of S. mutans 6 months after sealing. GIC, GIC + CPP/ACP, and GIC + CPP/ACP + LLL showed similar behavior with significant reduction of S. mutans after 24 hours (p<0.05) and increase after 1 and 6 months. Conclusion The addition of LLL to GIC increases the antimicrobial action of GIC on S. mutans. This leads to control of bacterial biofilm for 1 month, thus stopping the progression of carious lesions. PMID:27688392

  16. Bond strength and durability of glass ionomer cements used as bonding agents in the placement of orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Klockowski, R; Davis, E L; Joynt, R B; Wieczkowski, G; MacDonald, A

    1989-07-01

    One potential risk of orthodontic treatment is the development of surface decalcification in association with use of brackets and bands. A bonding agent that could render tooth structure more resistant to the caries process clearly would reduce the negative iatrogenic outcomes of orthodontic therapy and thereby benefit the patient. Glass ionomer cement (GIC) bonds chemically to both enamel and dentin. In addition its high fluoride content makes enamel more resistant to caries. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength and durability of GIC when used as a bonding agent in the placement of orthodontic brackets. The materials tested were three GICs (Ketac-Fil, Ketac-Cem, and Chelon) and a standard bonding agent currently in widespread use (Rely-A-Bond). Brackets were attached to the facial surface of 96 premolar specimens and half the specimens for each bonding agent were thermocycled. Bond shear strength was determined with an Instron testing device by applying a load to the occlusal margin of each bracket to the point of failure. A two-way ANOVA indicated a significant bonding agent by thermocycling interaction (F = 4.78, p less than 0.01). Thermocycling decreased bond strength significantly for all materials, but had the greatest impact on Rely-A-Bond. However, Rely-A-Bond provided the strongest bond with and without thermocycling. Although bond strength for the standard orthodontic bonding agent deteriorates significantly under thermal stress, these results suggest that it is still greater than the bond strength provided by GIC materials.

  17. Microleakage of Three Types of Glass Ionomer Cement Restorations: Effect of CPP-ACP Paste Tooth Pretreatment

    PubMed Central

    Doozandeh, Maryam; Shafiei, Fereshteh; Alavi, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Casein phosphopeptide–amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) increases the mineral content of tooth structure. This may enhance the chemical bonding of glass ionomer cements (GIC) and marginal sealing of their restorations. Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of CPP-ACP paste pretreatment on the microleakage of three types of GIC. Materials and Method In this study, 72 Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of molars with occlusal margins in enamel and gingival margins in root. The cavities were divided into 6 groups. Cavities in group 1 and 2 were restored with Fuji II, group 3 and 4 with Fuji II LC, and group 5 and 6 with Ketac N100 with respect to the manufacturers’ instructions. In groups 2, 4 and 6, CPP-ACP containing paste (MI paste) was placed into the cavities for 3 minutes before being filled with GIC. The teeth were thermocycled, stained with dye, sectioned, and scored for microleakage under stereomicroscope. Kruskall-Wallis and Chi-Square tests were used to analyze the data. Result There were no statistically significant differences between the control and the CPP-ACP pretreatment groups in enamel and dentin margins. In pairwise comparisons, there were no significant differences between the control and the experimental groups in enamel margin, and in dentin margins of G1 and 2, G5 and 6; however, a significant differences was detected in dentin margins between G3 and 4 (p= 0.041). Conclusion CPP-ACP paste pretreatment did not affect the microleakage of Fuji II and Ketac N100 in enamel or dentin, but decreased the microleakage in dentine margins of Fuji II LC when cavity conditioner was applied before surface treatment. PMID:26331147

  18. Energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis, fluoride release, and antimicrobial properties of glass ionomer cements indicated for atraumatic restorative treatment

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Sudhanshu; Tiwari, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare constituents of glass powder, fluoride release, and antimicrobial properties of new atraumatic restorative treatment material with zirconia fillers and conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC) type IX. Materials and Methods: Thisin vitro study comparing Zirconomer and Fuji IX was executed in three parts: (1) energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis of glass powders (2) analysis of fluoride release at 1st, 3rd, 7th, 15th, and 30th day, and (3) antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus casei, and Candida albicans at 48 hours. Data was analyzed using unpaired t-test and two way analysis of variance followed by least significant difference post hoc test. A P value of < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis revealed that, in both Zirconomer and Fuji IX glass powders, mean atomic percentage of oxygen was more than 50%. According to the weight percentage, zirconium in Zirconomer and silica in Fuji IX were the second main elements. Calcium, zinc, and zirconium were observed only in Zirconomer. At all the time intervals, statistically significant higher amount of fluoride release was observed with Zirconomer than Fuji IX. At 48 hours, mean ± standard deviation (SD) of zone of inhibition against Streptococcus mutans was 11.14 ± 0.77 mm and 8.51 ± 0.43 mm for Zirconomer and Fuji IX, respectively. Against Lactobacillus casei, it was 14.06 ± 0.71 mm for Zirconomer and 11.70 ± 0.39 mm for Fuji IX. No antifungal activity was observed against Candida albicans by Zirconomer and Fuji IX. Conclusion: Zirconomer had higher antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus casei, which may be attributed to its composition and higher fluoride release. However, it failed to show antifungal effect againstCandida albicans. PMID:27583226

  19. The effect of glass ionomer cement or composite resin bases on restoration of cuspal stiffness of endodontically treated premolars in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, N; Just, N; Haller, B; Hugo, B; Klaiber, B

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to decide whether composite resin or conventional glass ionomer cement should be preferred as a base material in endodontically treated premolars. Twelve extracted human maxillary premolars were mounted in a universal testing machine at a 35 degrees angle. Cuspal stiffness was determined by applying a load of 75 N to the buccal cusp and recording the displacement of the cusp using inductive displacement transducers. In the same teeth, different cavity preparations and restorations were performed sequentially. Standard MOD cavities were enlarged to allow endodontic access. In addition, the cusps were undermined. Half of the teeth were restored to the level of the previous shallow cavities using conventional glass ionomer cement (Ketac Fil), in the rest of the teeth dentine bonding agent (Syntac) and composite resin (Tetric) were used instead. Finally, composite resin fillings (Tetric) were placed. All restorations were removed and the experiments were repeated twice. For each replication, the assignment of the base materials to the experimental groups was reversed, and ceramic inlays (Empress) were used as final restorations for the last replication. Improvement of cuspal stiffness achieved by conventional glass ionomer bases was very small, whereas composite resin bases increased cuspal stability by more than a factor of two. After placement of the final restorations, however, there was no longer a difference between teeth with different base materials. Nevertheless, composite resin bases might be preferred for two reasons. Firstly, deterioration of adhesive restorations will probably start at the cavosurface margins. The incidence of margin gaps, however, will not only compromise marginal seal but also the stabilizing effect of the restoration. In this situation, the resin base may still stabilize the tooth. Moreover, resin bases may reduce the risk of cusp fracture during the time between cavity preparation and the insertion

  20. [Effect of the application of fluoride on the superficial roughness of vitremer glass ionomer cement and microbial adhesion to this material].

    PubMed

    Pedrini, D; Gaetti-Jardim Júnior, E; Mori, G G

    2001-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements are important options in restorative and preventive dentistry due to their adhesion to the tooth surface and to fluoride release, which can decrease the risk of recurrent caries. The topical use of acidulated and neutral fluoride gels has been frequent in dentistry. However, this procedure can adversely affect the surface of restorative materials, increasing their roughness and the retention of dental plaque. Thus, this study evaluated the period in which Vitremer glass ionomer cement maintains its antimicrobial activity over Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175, as well as the effects of topical application of acidulated and neutral fluoride gels on these microbiological parameters and on the superficial characteristics of the restorative material. It was verified that the antimicrobial activity of Vitremer is very transient, decreasing to an undetectable level after four days, and the topical application of fluoride gel did not restore this activity. It was observed that S. mutans ATCC 25175 adheres to this restorative material, and the topical fluorides did not affect this event. The surface of Vitremer was not altered by the application of fluoride gels.

  1. TRANSMISSION OF COMPOSITE POLYMERIZATION CONTRACTION FORCE THROUGH A FLOWABLE COMPOSITE AND A RESIN-MODIFIED GLASS IONOMER CEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Castañeda-Espinosa, Juan Carlos; Pereira, Rosana Aparecida; Cavalcanti, Ana Paula; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the individual contraction force during polymerization of a composite resin (Z-250), a flowable composite (Filtek Flow, FF) and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitrebond, VB), and the transmission of Z-250 composite resin polymerization contraction force through different thicknesses of FF and VB. The experiment setup consisted of two identical parallel steel plates connected to a universal testing machine. One was fixed to a transversal base and the other to the equipment's cross head. The evaluated materials were inserted into a 1-mm space between the steel plates or between the inferior steel plate and a previously polymerized layer of an intermediate material (either FF or VB) adhered to the upper steel plate. The composite resin was light-cured with a halogen lamp with light intensity of 500 mW/cm2 for 60 s. A force/time graph was obtained for each sample for up to 120 s. Seven groups of 10 specimens each were evaluated: G1: Z-250; G2: FF; G3: VB; G4: Z-250 through a 0.5-mm layer of FF; G5: Z-250 through a 1-mm layer of FF; G6: Z-250 through a 0.5-mm of VB; G7: Z-250 through a 1-mm layer of VB. They were averaged and compared using one-way ANOVA and Tukey test at a = 0.05. The obtained contraction forces were: G1: 6.3N ± 0.2N; G2: 9.8 ± 0.2N; G3: 1.8 ± 0.2N; G4: 6.8N ± 0.2N; G5: 6.9N ± 0.3N; G6: 4.0N ± 0.4N and G7: 2.8N ± 0.4N. The use of VB as an intermediate layer promoted a significant decrease in polymerization contraction force values of the restorative system, regardless of material thickness. The use of FF as an intermediate layer promoted an increase in polymerization contraction force values with both material thicknesses. PMID:19089187

  2. Characteristics of glass ionomer cements composed of glass powders in CaO-SrO-ZnO-SiO₂ system prepared by two different synthetic routes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ill Yong; Ohtsuki, Chikara; Coughlan, Aisling; Placek, Lana; Wren, Anthony W; Towler, Mark R

    2013-12-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GICs) are composed of an acid degradable glass, polyacrylic acid and water. Sol-gel processing to prepare the glass phase has certain advantages, such as the ability to employ lower synthesis temperatures than melt quenching and glasses that are reported to have higher purity. A previous study reported the effects of glass synthesis route on GIC fabrication. However, in that study, the sol-gel derived glass exhibited a reduced concentration of cations. This study investigates increasing the cation content of a sol-gel derived glass, 12CaO.4SrO.36ZnO.48SiO2 (molar ratio) by heating before aging to reduce dissolution of cations. This glass was prepared by both sol-gel and melt-quenched routes. GICs were subsequently prepared using both glasses. The resultant cement based on the sol-gel derived glass had a shorter working time than the cement based on the melt-quenched one. Contrary to this, setting time was considerably longer for the cement based on the sol-gel derived glass than for the cement based on the melt-quenched one. The cements based on the sol-gel derived glass were stronger in both compression and biaxial flexure than the cements prepared from the melt-quenched glass. The differences in setting and mechanical properties were associated with both cation content in the glass phase and the different surface area of the resultant cements.

  3. Characterization of a novel light-cured star-shape poly(acrylic acid)-composed glass-ionomer cement: fluoride release, water sorption, shrinkage, and hygroscopic expansion.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun; Platt, Jeffrey A; Xie, Dong

    2009-12-01

    This study evaluated the fluoride release, water sorption, curing shrinkage, and hygroscopic expansion of a novel experimental light-cured glass-ionomer cement. The effects of glycidyl methacrylate (GM) grafting, polymer : water (P : W) and powder : liquid (P : L) ratios were investigated. Commercial Fuji II and Fuji II LC cements were used as controls for comparison. All the specimens were conditioned in deionized water at 37 degrees C before testing. The results demonstrated that the experimental cement showed lower burst and slower bulk fluoride release than Fuji II and Fuji II LC. The experimental cement absorbed more water than Fuji II and Fuji II LC as a result of its hydroxyl and carboxyl functional group content. The lower water-diffusion rate and reduced hygroscopic expansion of the experimental cement suggest that it had a highly crosslinked network. Both Fuji II and Fuji II LC exhibited much higher shrinkage values (2.8% and 4.7%) than the experimental cement (0.8%). It appears that this novel cement will be a clinically attractive dental restorative because not only has it shown superior mechanical strength, it has also demonstrated satisfactory physical properties.

  4. The effect of CO2 laser irradiation plus fluoride dentifrice on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to glass ionomer cement or composite resin restorations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, S. R.; Moraes, M.; Hanashiro, F. S.; Youssef, M. N.; Brugnera Junior, A.; Nobre-dos-Santos, M.; de Souza-Zaroni, W. C.

    2016-02-01

    Although the cariostatic effects of CO2 laser on the root surface have been shown, there is scarce information regarding its effects on root secondary caries. The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of the association of CO2 laser and a fluoride dentifrice on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to composite-resin or glass-ionomer-cement restorations. Dental blocks of human roots were divided into two groups: composite resin (CR) or glass ionomer cement (GIC). Subsequently, the blocks were divided into four subgroups (n  =  10): C, non-fluoride dentifrice; FD, fluoride dentifrice; L, CO2 laser with an energy density of 6.0 J cm-2  +  non-fluoride dentifrice; and L  +  FD, CO2 laser  +  fluoride dentifrice. The blocks were subjected to pH cycling to simulate a high cariogenic challenge. Dental demineralization around the restorations was quantified by microhardness analysis. The results were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey-Kramer test (p  ⩽  0.05). As for mineral loss, it can be observed that all the groups that were treated with a fluoride dentifrice and laser, used alone or not, were statistically similar and superior to the RC-C group. It was concluded that CO2 laser irradiation and a fluoride dentifrice used alone or combined with each other are efficient surface treatments for preventing secondary root caries, regardless of the restorative material used.

  5. Evaluation of shear bond strength of two resin-based composites and glass ionomer cement to pure tricalcium silicate-based cement (Biodentine®)

    PubMed Central

    CANTEKİN, Kenan; AVCİ, Serap

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Tricalcium silicate is the major constituent phase in mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). It is thus postulated that pure tricalcium silicate can replace the Portland cement component of MTA. The aim of this study was to evaluate bond strength of methacrylate-based (MB) composites, silorane-based (SB) composites, and glass ionomer cement (GIC) to Biodentine® and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Material and Methods Acrylic blocks (n=90, 2 mm high, 5 mm diameter central hole) were prepared. In 45 of the samples, the holes were fully filled with Biodentine® and in the other 45 samples, the holes were fully filled with MTA. The Biodentine® and the MTA samples were randomly divided into 3 subgroups of 15 specimens each: Group-1: MB composite; Group-2: SB composite; and Group-3: GIC. For the shear bond strength (SBS) test, each block was secured in a universal testing machine. Results The highest (17.7±6.2 MPa) and the lowest (5.8±3.2 MPa) bond strength values were recorded for the MB composite-Biodentine® and the GIC-MTA, respectively. Although the MB composite showed significantly higher bond strength to Biodentine (17.7±6.2) than it did to MTA (8.9±5.7) (p<0.001), the SB composite (SB and MTA=7.4±3.3; SB and Biodentine®=8.0±3,6) and GIC (GIC and MTA=5.8±3.2; GIC and Biodentine=6.7±2.6) showed similar bond strength performance with MTA compared with Biodentine (p=0.73 and p=0.38, respectively). Conclusions The new pure tricalcium-based pulp capping, repair, and endodontic material showed higher shear bond scores compared to MTA when used with the MB composite. PMID:25141202

  6. A novel glass ionomer cement containing MgCO(3 )apatite induced the increased proliferation and differentiation of human pulp cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Laiteerapong, Arunee; Lochaiwatana, Yossakit; Hirata, Isao; Okazaki, Masayuki; Mori, Kenta; Murakami, Shinya; Poolthong, Suchit

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the in vitro biological response of human dental pulp cells to glass ionomer cement (GIC, Fuji IX GP(®)) containing 2.5% magnesium carbonate apatite (MgCO(3)Ap). MgCO(3)Ap was synthesized by wet method and characterized using FT-IR, XPS, and SEM. Fuji IX GP(®) served as a control. Test and control cements were prepared by encapsulated mixing the powder with Fuji IX-liquid (P/L=3.6:1). Eluates from cements extracted by 1 mL culture medium were collected at day 1, 7 and 14, and used for WST-1 proliferation assay. For ALPase activity, cells were maintained with cements in transwells, harvested and enzyme activity was measured at day 1, 4, 7, 14, and 21. We found a higher cell proliferation and increased ALPase activity by pulp cells in the test group compared to the control. This suggests the potential of GIC containing this novel biological apatite as a restorative material for pulp-dentin regeneration.

  7. Influence of air-abrasion executed with polyacrylic acid-Bioglass 45S5 on the bonding performance of a resin-modified glass ionomer cement.

    PubMed

    Sauro, Salvatore; Watson, Timothy F; Thompson, Ian; Toledano, Manuel; Nucci, Cesare; Banerjee, Avijit

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to test the microtensile bond strength (μTBS), after 6 months of storage in PBS, of a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) bonded to dentine pretreated with Bioglass 45S5 (BAG) using various etching and air-abrasion techniques. The RMGIC (GC Fuji II LC) was applied onto differently treated dentine surfaces followed by light curing for 30 s. The specimens were cut into matchsticks with cross-sectional areas of 0.9 mm(2). The μTBS of the specimens was measured after 24 h or 6 months of storage in PBS and the results were statistically analysed using two-way anova and the Student-Newman-Keuls test (α = 0.05). Further RMCGIC-bonded dentine specimens were used for interfacial characterization, micropermeability, and nanoleakage analyses by confocal microscopy. The RMGIC-dentine interface layer showed no water absorption after 6 months of storage in PBS except for the interdiffusion layer of the silicon carbide (SiC)-abraded/polyacrylic acid (PAA)-etched bonded dentine. The RMGIC applied onto dentine air-abraded with BAG/H(2)O only or with BAG/PAA-fluid followed by etching procedures (10% PAA gel) showed no statistically significant reduction in μTBS after 6 months of storage in PBS. The abrasion procedures performed using BAG in combination with PAA might be a suitable strategy to enhance the bonding durability and the healing ability of RMGIC bonded to dentine.

  8. Effects of the addition of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) on mechanical properties of luting and lining glass ionomer cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heravi, Farzin; Bagheri, Hossein; Rangrazi, Abdolrasoul; Mojtaba Zebarjad, Seyed

    2016-07-01

    Recently, the addition of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) into glass ionomer cements (GICs) has attracted interest due to its remineralization of teeth and its antibacterial effects. However, it should be investigated to ensure that the incorporation of CPP-ACP does not have significant adverse effects on its mechanical properties. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of the addition of CPP-ACP on the mechanical properties of luting and lining GIC. The first step was to synthesize the CPP-ACP. Then the CPP-ACP at concentrations of 1%, 1.56% and 2% of CPP-ACP was added into a luting and lining GIC. GIC without CPP-ACP was used as a control group. The results revealed that the incorporation of CPP-ACP up to 1.56%(w/w) increased the flexural strength (29%), diametral tensile strength (36%) and microhardness (18%), followed by a reduction in these mechanical properties at 2%(w/w) CPP-ACP. The wear rate was significantly decreased (23%) in 1.56%(w/w) concentration of CPP-ACP and it was increased in 2%(w/w). Accordingly, the addition of 1.56%(w/w) CPP-ACP into luting and lining GIC had no adverse effect on the mechanical properties of luting and lining GIC and could be used in clinical practice.

  9. Effect of radiant heat on conventional glass ionomer cements during setting by using a blue light diode laser system (445 nm).

    PubMed

    Dionysopoulos, Dimitrios; Tolidis, Kosmas; Strakas, Dimitrios; Gerasimou, Paris; Sfeikos, Thrasyvoulos; Gutknecht, Norbert

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of radiant heat on surface hardness of three conventional glass ionomer cements (GICs) by using a blue diode laser system (445 nm) and a light-emitting diode (LED) unit. Additionally, the safety of the laser treatment was evaluated. Thirty disk-shaped specimens were prepared of each tested GIC (Equia Fil, Ketac Universal Aplicap and Riva Self Cure). The experimental groups (n = 10) of the study were as follows: group 1 was the control group of the study; in group 2, the specimens were irradiated for 60 s at the top surface using a LED light-curing unit; and in group 3, the specimens were irradiated for 60 s at the top surface using a blue light diode laser system (445 nm). Statistical analysis was performed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc tests at a level of significance of a = 0.05. Radiant heat treatments, with both laser and LED devices, increased surface hardness (p < 0.05) but in different extent. Blue diode laser treatment was seemed to be more effective compared to LED treatment. There were no alterations in surface morphology or chemical composition after laser treatment. The tested radiant heat treatment with a blue diode laser may be advantageous for the longevity of GIC restorations. The safety of the use of blue diode laser for this application was confirmed.

  10. Effect of a CO2 Laser on the Inhibition of Root Surface Caries Adjacent to Restorations of Glass Ionomer Cement or Composite Resin: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, L. C.; Araújo, F. C.; Zancopé, B. R.; Hanashiro, F. S.; Nobre-dos-Santos, M.; Youssef, M. N.; Souza-Zaroni, W. C.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of CO2 laser irradiation on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to glass ionomer cement (GIC) or composite resin (CR) restorations. 40 dental blocks were divided into 4 groups: G1 (negative control): cavity preparation + adhesive restoration with CR; G2: (positive control) cavity preparation + GIC restoration; G3: equal to group 1 + CO2 laser with 6 J/cm2; G4: equal to group 2 + CO2 laser. The blocks were submitted to thermal and pH cycling. Dental demineralization around restorations was quantified using microhardness analyses and Light-Induced Fluorescence (QLF). The groups showed no significant differences in mineral loss at depths between 20 μm and 40 μm. At 60 μm, G2 and G3 ≠ G1, but G4 = G1, G2 and G3. At 80 μm, G4 ≠ G1, and at 100 μm, G4 = G2 = G1. At 140 and 220 μm, G2, G3, and G4 = G1. The averages obtained using QFL in groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 were 0.637, 0.162, 0.095, and 0.048, respectively. QLF and microhardness analyses showed that CO2 laser irradiation reduced mineral loss around the CR restorations but that it did not increase the anticariogenic effect of GIC restorations. PMID:26347900

  11. The strength of two reinforced glass ionomer materials.

    PubMed

    Mazarakis, E; van der Vyver, P J; Janse van Rensburg, S D; de Wet, F A

    1994-08-01

    Preformed stainless steel crowns survive longer than multi-surface amalgams on deciduous molars. With the use of reinforced glass ionomers the bulk of the lost tooth structure can be replaced and the stainless steel crown cemented simultaneously. The purpose of this study was to compare two glass ionomer cements with regard to their shear bond strength (SBS) to the dentine of extracted primary molars and to their diametral tensile strength (DTS). The results showed that Vitremer was significantly (p < 0.01) stronger (DTS:x = 19.21; SBS:x = 7.63) than Ketac-Silver (DTS:x = 8.94; SBS:x = 2.92).

  12. Effect of Silver Diamine Fluoride and Potassium Iodide Treatment on Secondary Caries Prevention and Tooth Discolouration in Cervical Glass Ionomer Cement Restoration

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Irene Shuping; Mei, May Lei; Burrow, Michael F.; Lo, Edward Chin-Man; Chu, Chun-Hung

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of silver diamine fluoride (SDF) and potassium iodide (KI) treatment on secondary caries prevention and tooth discolouration in glass ionomer cement (GIC) restoration. Cervical GIC restorations were done on 30 premolars with: Group 1, SDF + KI; Group 2, SDF (positive control); Group 3, no treatment (negative control). After cariogenic biofilm challenge, the demineralisation of dentine adjacent to the restoration was evaluated using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The colour of dentine adjacent to the restoration was assessed using CIELAB system at different time points. Total colour change (∆E) was calculated and was visible if ∆E > 3.7. Micro-CT showed the outer lesion depths for Groups 1, 2 and 3 were 91 ± 7 µm, 80 ± 7 µm and 119 ± 8 µm, respectively (p < 0.001; Group 2 < Group 1 < Group 3). FTIR found that there was a significant difference in amide I-to-hydrogen phosphate ratio among the three groups (p < 0.001; Group 2 < Group 1 < Group 3). ∆E of Groups 1, 2 and 3 after biofilm challenge were 22.5 ± 4.9, 70.2 ± 8.3 and 2.9 ± 0.9, respectively (p < 0.001; Group 3 < Group 1 < Group 2). SDF + KI treatment reduced secondary caries formation on GIC restoration, but it was not as effective as SDF treatment alone. Moreover, a perceptible staining on the restoration margin was observed, but the intensity of discolouration was less than that with solely SDF treatment. PMID:28178188

  13. Effect of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement lining and composite layering technique on the adhesive interface of lateral wall

    PubMed Central

    AZEVEDO, Larissa Marinho; CASAS-APAYCO, Leslie Carol; VILLAVICENCIO ESPINOZA, Carlos Andres; WANG, Linda; NAVARRO, Maria Fidela de Lima; ATTA, Maria Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Interface integrity can be maintained by setting the composite in a layering technique and using liners. Objective The aim of this in vitro study was to verify the effect of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC) lining and composite layering technique on the bond strength of the dentin/resin adhesive interface of lateral walls of occlusal restorations. Material and Methods Occlusal cavities were prepared in 52 extracted sound human molars, randomly assigned into 4 groups: Group 2H (control) – no lining + two horizontal layers; Group 4O: no lining + four oblique layers; Group V-2H: RMGIC lining (Vitrebond) + two horizontal layers; and Group V-4O: RMGIC lining (Vitrebond) + four oblique layers. Resin composite (Filtek Z250, 3M ESPE) was placed after application of an adhesive system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE) dyed with a fluorescent reagent (Rhodamine B) to allow confocal microscopy analysis. The teeth were stored in deionized water at 37oC for 24 hours before being sectioned into 0.8 mm slices. One slice of each tooth was randomly selected for Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) analysis. The other slices were sectioned into 0.8 mm x 0.8 mm sticks to microtensile bond strength test (MPa). Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Fisher’s test. Results There was no statistical difference on bond strength among groups (p>0.05). CLSM analysis showed no significant statistical difference regarding the presence of gap at the interface dentin/resin among groups. Conclusions RMGIC lining and composite layering techniques showed no effect on the microtensile bond strength and gap formation at the adhesive interface of lateral walls of high C-factor occlusal restorations. PMID:26221927

  14. A comparative evaluation of the retention of metallic brackets bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer cement under different enamel preparations: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Padmaja; Valiathan, Ashima; Arora, Ankit; Agarwal, Sachin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: For orthodontists, the ideal bonding material should be less moisture-sensitive and should release fluoride, thereby reducing unfavorable iatrogenic decalcification. Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cements (RMGICs), due to their ability to bond in the presence of saliva and blood can be a very good bonding agent for orthodontic attachments especially in the areas of mouth, which are difficult to access. Moreover, their fluoride releasing property makes them an ideal bonding agent for patients with poor oral hygiene. However, their immediate bond strength is said to be too low to immediately ligate the initial wire, which could increase the total number of appointments. The effect of sandblasting and the use of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCL) on the immediate bond failure of RMGIC clinically have not been reported in the literature until the date. This investigation intended to assess the effect of sandblasting (of the bracket base and enamel) and NaOCL on the rate of bond failure (with immediate ligation at 30 min) of Fuji Ortho LC and its comparison with that of conventional light cured composite resin over a period of 1 year. Materials and Methods: 400 sample teeth were further divided into 4 groups of 100 each and bonded as follows: (1) Group 1: Normal metallic brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (2) Group 2: Sandblasted bracket base and enamel surface, brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (3) Group 3: Deproteinized enamel surface using sodium hypochlorite and brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (4) Group 4: Normal metallic bracket bonded with Transbond XT after etching enamel with 37% phosphoric acid. This group served as control group. Results and Conclusion: Results showed that sandblasting the bracket base and enamel, can significantly reduce the bond failure rate of RMGIC. PMID:24014999

  15. Comparative Evaluation of Microleakage Between Nano-Ionomer, Giomer and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement in Class V Cavities- CLSM Study

    PubMed Central

    Hari, Archana; Thumu, Jayaprakash; Velagula, Lakshmi Deepa; Bolla, Nagesh; Varri, Sujana; Kasaraneni, Srikanth; Nalli, Siva Venkata Malathi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Marginal integrity of adhesive restorative materials provides better sealing ability for enamel and dentin and plays an important role in success of restoration in Class V cavities. Restorative material with good marginal adaptation improves the longevity of restorations. Aim Aim of this study was to evaluate microleakage in Class V cavities which were restored with Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (RMGIC), Giomer and Nano-Ionomer. Materials and Methods This in-vitro study was performed on 60 human maxillary and mandibular premolars which were extracted for orthodontic reasons. A standard wedge shaped defect was prepared on the buccal surfaces of teeth with the gingival margin placed near Cemento Enamel Junction (CEJ). Teeth were divided into three groups of 20 each and restored with RMGIC, Giomer and Nano-Ionomer and were subjected to thermocycling. Teeth were then immersed in 0.5% Rhodamine B dye for 48 hours. They were sectioned longitudinally from the middle of cavity into mesial and distal parts. The sections were observed under Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope (CLSM) to evaluate microleakage. Depth of dye penetration was measured in millimeters. Statistical Analysis The data was analysed using the Kruskal Wallis test. Pair wise comparison was done with Mann Whitney U Test. A p-value<0.05 is taken as statistically significant. Results Nano-Ionomer showed less microleakage which was statistically significant when compared to Giomer (p=0.0050). Statistically no significant difference was found between Nano Ionomer and RMGIC (p=0.3550). There was statistically significant difference between RMGIC and Giomer (p=0.0450). Conclusion Nano-Ionomer and RMGIC showed significantly less leakage and better adaptation than Giomer and there was no statistically significant difference between Nano-Ionomer and RMGIC. PMID:27437363

  16. Effect of Silver Diamine Fluoride and Potassium Iodide Treatment on Secondary Caries Prevention and Tooth Discolouration in Cervical Glass Ionomer Cement Restoration.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Irene Shuping; Mei, May Lei; Burrow, Michael F; Lo, Edward Chin-Man; Chu, Chun-Hung

    2017-02-06

    This study investigated the effect of silver diamine fluoride (SDF) and potassium iodide (KI) treatment on secondary caries prevention and tooth discolouration in glass ionomer cement (GIC) restoration. Cervical GIC restorations were done on 30 premolars with: Group 1, SDF + KI; Group 2, SDF (positive control); Group 3, no treatment (negative control). After cariogenic biofilm challenge, the demineralisation of dentine adjacent to the restoration was evaluated using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The colour of dentine adjacent to the restoration was assessed using CIELAB system at different time points. Total colour change (∆E) was calculated and was visible if ∆E > 3.7. Micro-CT showed the outer lesion depths for Groups 1, 2 and 3 were 91 ± 7 µm, 80 ± 7 µm and 119 ± 8 µm, respectively (p < 0.001; Group 2 < Group 1 < Group 3). FTIR found that there was a significant difference in amide I-to-hydrogen phosphate ratio among the three groups (p < 0.001; Group 2 < Group 1 < Group 3). ∆E of Groups 1, 2 and 3 after biofilm challenge were 22.5 ± 4.9, 70.2 ± 8.3 and 2.9 ± 0.9, respectively (p < 0.001; Group 3 < Group 1 < Group 2). SDF + KI treatment reduced secondary caries formation on GIC restoration, but it was not as effective as SDF treatment alone. Moreover, a perceptible staining on the restoration margin was observed, but the intensity of discolouration was less than that with solely SDF treatment.

  17. Effect of Ascorbic Acid on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded with Resin-modified Glass-ionomer Cement to Bleached Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Khosravanifard, Behnam; Rakhshan, Vahid; Araghi, Solmaz; Parhiz, Hadi

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Bleaching can considerably reduce shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded with composite adhesives. Application of antioxidants is a method to reverse the negative effect of bleaching on composite-to-enamel bond. However, the efficacy of antioxidants in increasing the SBS of brackets bonded using resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC) has not been studied, which was the aim of this study. Materials and methods Fifty freshly extracted human maxillary first premolars were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide (Pola Office Bleaching, SDI). Sodium ascorbate 10% was applied to the experimental specimens (n=25). All the specimens were etched with 37% phosphoric acid (Ivoclar/Vivadent) and bonded using RMGIC (Fuji Ortho LC, GC). The specimens were subjected to incubation (37°C, 24h) and thermocycling (1000 cycles, 5-55°C, dwell time = 1 min). The SBS was measured at 0.5 mm/min debonding crosshead speed. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was scored under ×10 magni-fication. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test, one- and independent-samples t-test, and Fisher’sexact test (α=0.05). Results The mean SBS of experimental and control groups were 11.97 ± 4.49 and 7.7 ± 3.19 MPa, respectively. The dif-ference was statistically significant (P=0.000 by t-test). SBS of both control (P=0.014) and experimental (P=0.000) groups were significantly higher than the minimum acceptable SBS of 6 MPa, according to one-sample t-test. Conclusion Application of ascorbic acid can guarantee a strong bond when RMGIC is to be used. However, RMGIC might tolerate the negative effect of bleaching with minimum SA treatments (or perhaps without treatments), which de-serves further studies. PMID:22991638

  18. The effects of ambient temperature and mixing time of glass ionomer cement material on the survival rate of proximal ART restorations in primary molars

    PubMed Central

    Kemoli, Arthur M

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Temperature fluctuations and material mixing times are likely to affect the consistency and integrity of the material mixture, and hence the restoration made out of it. The purpose of the present study was to determine the influence of the ambient temperature and the mixing time of glass ionomer cement (GIC) restorative material on the survival rate of proximal atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) restorations placed in primary molars. Materials and Methods: A total of 804 restorations were placed in the primary molars of 6-8-year-olds using the ART approach. The restorations were then followed for a period of 2 years and evaluated at given intervals. The data collected were analyzed using SPSS computer statistical program, and the results tested and compared using the Chi-square, Kaplan Meier survival analysis and Cox Proportional hazard statistical tests. Results: The cumulative survival rate of the restorations dropped from the initial 94.4% to 30.8% at the end of 2 years. The higher survival rate of the restorations was associated with the experienced operators and assistants when using the rubber dam isolation method. However, there was no statistically significant difference in the survival rate of the restorations when related to the room temperature and the mixing time of the GIC materials used in spite of the variations in the temperature recoded and the methods used in mixing the materials. Conclusion: The ambient temperature and mixing time of GIC did not have a significant effect on the survival of the proximal ART restorations. PMID:24808692

  19. Comparative evaluation of the calcium release from mineral trioxide aggregate and its mixture with glass ionomer cement in different proportions and time intervals – An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Sawhney, Surbhi; Vivekananda Pai, A.R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Addition of glass ionomer cement (GIC) has been suggested to improve the setting time and handling characteristics of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). This study evaluated the effect of adding GIC to MTA in terms of calcium release, an issue that has not been previously studied. Materials and methods The study comprised four groups with five samples each: a control group of MTA alone and experimental groups I (1MTA:1GIC), II (2MTA:1GIC), and III (1MTA:2GIC) based on the mixture of MTA and GIC powders in the respective proportions by volume. Calcium release from the samples was measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry at 15 min, 6 h, 24 h, and 1 week after setting. The level of statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. Results Groups I (1MTA:1GIC) and III (1MTA:2GIC) released significantly less calcium than the control group at all time periods, except at 15 min for group I. Group II (2MTA:1GIC) showed no significant difference in calcium release compared to the control at any time period. Group II exhibited greater calcium release than group I or III at all time periods, with significant differences between groups I and II at 1 week and between groups I and III at 24 h and 1 week. There were no statistical differences in calcium release between groups I and III. Conclusions Adding GIC to improve the setting time and handling properties of the MTA powder can be detrimental to the calcium-releasing ability of the resultant mixture, depending on the proportion of GIC added. Adding MTA and GIC at a proportion of 2:1 by volume did not impact calcium release from the mixture. These findings should be verified through further clinical studies. PMID:26644757

  20. In vitro comparison of the shear bond strength of amalgam to tooth structure using two bonding agents--lutting glass ionomer and 4-META.

    PubMed

    Sheela, K; Sudeep, P T; Hegde, V; Francis, R F; Bhat, K S; Sundeep, P T

    1998-01-01

    Bonding dental amalgam to tooth structure using 4-META has become an accepted clinical procedure. Glass ionomer cements possess the ability to bind to tooth structure as well as to the components of dental amalgam. The present in vitro study evaluates the shear bond strength of amalgam to tooth structure using luting glass ionomer as a bond mediating agent, and compares with that obtained using 4-META. Results indicate that it is possible to bond amalgam to tooth structure using a thin layer of glass ionomer cement. The shear bond strength of glass ionomer cement mediated bond is significant and may be adequate for clinical application.

  1. Reinforcement of conventional glass-ionomer restorative material with short glass fibers.

    PubMed

    Hammouda, Ibrahim M

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the strengthening effect of glass fibers when added to conventional glass-ionomer restorative material. Glass fibers were incorporated into glass-ionomer powder in 3 wt% and 5 wt%. The fibers used had 1 mm length and 10 microm thickness. These criteria of fiber length, diameter, and concentration represent a new approach for reinforcing conventional glass-ionomer [Medifill, conventional restorative glass-ionomer]. The mechanical properties tested were diametral tensile strength, hardness, flexural strength, flexural modulus and fracture toughness after 24-h and 7-days of storage in deionized water. Glass short fibers were mixed thoroughly into the glass-ionomer powder before mixing with the cement liquid. Samples of specific dimensions were prepared for each time interval and fiber loading according to the manufacturer's instructions and international standards. Hardness was measured using a micro-hardness tester at 100 gram applied load for 15 s. The other mechanical properties were measured using a Lloyd universal testing machine. The results showed increased diametral tensile strength, flexural strength, flexural modulus, and fracture toughness by the addition of glass fibers. There was an appreciable increase of the tested mechanical properties of glass-ionomer restorative material as a result of increasing fiber loading and water storage for 1 week. It was concluded that conventional glass-ionomer can be reinforced by the addition of short glass fibers.

  2. The properties of metal-reinforced glass ionomer materials.

    PubMed

    Chung, K H

    1993-01-01

    The physical properties and bond strengths of two glass ionomer materials reinforced with silver and amalgam alloy powders were compared with those of a conventional material from the same manufacture as well as two commercially available products. The diametral tensile strength, hardness and bonding strength are improved with the addition of either commercial available silver particles or fabricated high-copper amalgam alloy powders to the glass. Simple mixture of the metal or alloy powders with the glass ionomer cement seems to be feasible to improve the properties of the regular cement. However, further studies in formulating an optimal composition of metal or alloy, setting characteristics and long-term clinical evaluation are necessary before proposing uses for this new material.

  3. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite bonded to three different liners: TheraCal LC, Biodentine, and resin-modified glass ionomer cement using universal adhesive: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Deepa, Velagala L; Dhamaraju, Bhargavi; Bollu, Indira Priyadharsini; Balaji, Tandri S

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To compare and evaluate the bonding ability of resin composite (RC) to three different liners: TheraCal LC™ (TLC), a novel resin-modified (RM) calcium silicate cement, Biodentine™ (BD), and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) using an universal silane-containing adhesive and characterizing their failure modes. Materials and Methods: Thirty extracted intact human molars with occlusal cavity (6-mm diameter and 2-mm height) were mounted in acrylic blocks and divided into three groups of 10 samples each based on the liner used as Group A (TLC), Group B (BD), and Group C (RMGIC). Composite post of 3 mm diameter and 3 mm height was then bonded to each sample using universal adhesive. Shear bond strength (SBS) analysis was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc test using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20. Results: No significant difference was observed between group A and group C (P = 0.573) while group B showed the least bond strength values with a highly significant difference (P = 0.000). The modes of failure were predominantly cohesive in Groups A and B (TLC and BD) while RMGIC showed mixed and adhesive failures. Conclusions: Hence, this present study concludes that the bond strength of composite resin to TLC and RMGIC was similar and significantly higher than that of BD following application of universal adhesive. PMID:27099425

  4. Effect of Rebonding on the Bond Strength of Orthodontic Tubes: A Comparison of Light Cure Adhesive and Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cement In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Aleksiejunaite, Monika; Sidlauskas, Antanas

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of different enamel preparation procedures and compare light cure composite (LCC) and resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI) on the bond strength of orthodontic metal tubes rebonded to the enamel. Twenty human molars were divided into two groups (n = 10). Tubes were bonded using LCC (Transbond XT) in group 1 and RMGI (Fuji Ortho LC) in group 2. The tubes in each group were bonded following manufacturers' instructions (experiment I) and then debonded using testing machine. Then, the same brackets were sandblasted and rebonded twice. Before the first rebonding, the enamel was cleaned using carbide bur (experiment II) and before second rebonding, it was cleaned using carbide bur and soda blasted (experiment III). Mann–Whitney and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests showed no significant difference between RMGI and LCC bond strengths in case of normal bonding and rebonding, when enamel was cleaned using carbide bur before rebonding. Enamel soda blasting before rebonding significantly increased RMGI tensile bond strength value compared to LLC (p < 0.05). LCC and RMGI (especially RMGI) provide sufficient bond strengths for rebonding of molar tubes, when residual adhesive from previous bonding is removed and enamel soda blasted. PMID:28386279

  5. Effect of glass-ionomer cement as an intra-canal barrier in post space prepared teeth: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Vijay, Rajakumar; Indira, R

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the bacterial microleakage across remaining Gutta-percha in teeth prepared for post space with and without the use of an intracanal glass ionomer barrier. Materials and Methods: Forty freshly extracted intact human mandibular premolars with single canal were instrumented, obturated with Gutta-percha and AH plus sealer and post spaces were created. Teeth were assigned into experimental groups as follows: Group I – 3 mm of Gutta-percha, Group II – 4 mm of Gutta-percha, Group III – 3 mm of Gutta-percha with 1 mm of Vitrebond as barrier, Group IV – 4 mm of Gutta-percha with 1mm of Vitrebond as barrier. The roots were suspended in Rogosa SL broth and 50 μl of lyophilized Lactobacilli Casei was inoculated as the microbial marker. The mean days taken for the broth to turn turbid were tabulated. The values were statistically analyzed using one way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test. Results: At the end of 64 days, the mean and standard deviation of the number of days for the broth to turn turbid was: Group I – 20.50, (SD - 3.96). Group II – 25.43, (SD - 4.83), Group III – 38.63, (SD - 9.36), and Group IV – 53.50, (SD - 11.15) Conclusion: Vitrebond could be used as an intracanal barrier to provide a superior coronal seal in teeth requiring post and core. PMID:20617069

  6. Comparison of marginal adaptation of mineral trioxide aggregate, glass ionomer cement and intermediate restorative material as root-end filling materials, using scanning electron microscope: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Gundam, Sirisha; Patil, Jayaprakash; Venigalla, Bhuvan Shome; Yadanaparti, Sravanthi; Maddu, Radhika; Gurram, Sindhura Reddy

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The present study compares the marginal adaption of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA), Glass Ionomer Cement (GIC) and Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM) as root-end filling materials in extracted human teeth using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Materials and Methods: Thirty single rooted human teeth were obturated with Gutta-percha after cleaning and shaping. Apical 3 mm of roots were resected and retrofilled with MTA, GIC and IRM. One millimeter transverse section of the retrofilled area was used to study the marginal adaptation of the restorative material with the dentin. Mounted specimens were examined using SEM at approximately 15 Kv and 10-6 Torr under high vacuum condition. At 2000 X magnification, the gap size at the material-tooth interface was recorded at 2 points in microns. Statistical Analysis: One way ANOVA Analysis of the data from the experimental group was carried out with gap size as the dependent variable, and material as independent variable. Results: The lowest mean value of gap size was recorded in MTA group (0.722 ± 0.438 μm) and the largest mean gap in GIC group (1.778 ± 0.697 μm). Conclusion: MTA showed least gap size when compared to IRM and GIC suggesting a better marginal adaptation. PMID:25506146

  7. Cytotoxicity and biocompatibility of Zirconia (Y-TZP) posts with various dental cements

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyeongsoon; Ko, Hyunjung

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Endodontically treated teeth with insufficient tooth structure are often restored with esthetic restorations. This study evaluated the cytotoxicity and biological effects of yttria partially stabilized zirconia (Y-TZP) blocks in combination with several dental cements. Materials and Methods Pairs of zirconia cylinders with medium alone or cemented with three types of dental cement including RelyX U200 (3M ESPE), FujiCEM 2 (GC), and Panavia F 2.0 (Kuraray) were incubated in medium for 14 days. The cytotoxicity of each supernatant was determined using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays on L929 fibroblasts and MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts. The levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA were evaluated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and IL-6 protein was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc tests. A p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results The MTT assays showed that MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were more susceptible to dental cements than L929 fibroblasts. The resin based dental cements increased IL-6 expression in L929 cells, but reduced IL-6 expression in MC3T3-E1 cells. Conclusions Zirconia alone or blocks cemented with dental cement showed acceptable biocompatibilities. The results showed resin-modified glass-ionomer based cement less produced inflammatory cytokines than other self-adhesive resin-based cements. Furthermore, osteoblasts were more susceptible than fibroblasts to the biological effects of dental cement. PMID:27508157

  8. Microleakage on Class V glass ionomer restorations after cavity preparation with aluminum oxide air abrasion.

    PubMed

    Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori; Borsatto, Maria Cristina; Rocha, Renata Andréa Salvitti de Sá; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka

    2005-01-01

    This in vitro study assessed the marginal microleakage on class V cavities prepared with aluminum oxide air abrasion and restored with different glass ionomer cements. The cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of 15 sound third molars with an air- abrasion device (Kreativ Mach 4.1; New Image) using a 27.5-microm aluminum oxide particle stream, and were assigned to 3 groups of 10 cavities each. The restorative materials were: group I, a conventional glass ionomer cement (Ketac-Fil); groups II and III, resin-modified glass ionomer cements (Vitremer R and Fuji II LC, respectively). After placement of the restorations, the teeth were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 h, polished and then submitted to a thermocycling regimen of 500 cycles, isolated, immersed in 0.2% Rhodamine B solution for 24 h, included and serially sectioned. Microleakage was assessed by viewing the specimens under an optical microscope connected to a color video camera and a computer. The images obtained were digitized and analyzed for microleakage using software that allows for a standard quantitative assessment of dye penetration in millimeters. Statistical analysis was done using the Kruskall-Wallis and Wilcoxon tests. Means of dye penetration (%) were: occlusal - I: 25.76 +/- 34.35, II: 20.00 +/- 42.16, III: 28.25 +/- 41.67; cervical - I: 23.72 +/- 41.84; II: 44.22 +/- 49.69, III: 39.27 +/- 50.74. No statistically significant differences (p>0.05) were observed among either the glass ionomer cements or the margins. In conclusion, class V cavities restored with either conventional or resin-modified glass ionomer cements after preparation with aluminum oxide air abrasion did not show complete sealing at the enamel and dentin/cementum margins.

  9. Acid base surface properties of glass-ionomers determined by IGC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelkel, A.; Andrzejewska, E.; Limanowska-Shaw, H.; Andrzejewski, M.

    2005-05-01

    SummaryThe surface properties of several glass-ionomer restorative dental materials (GC Fuji, Chemadent G-J, Ketac Fil and Ketac Molar) were investigated by means of inverse gas chromatography. The capacity of the surface of glass-ionomers to undergo specific interactions was expressed using the specific component of free energy Δ Gs as well as the parameters KA and KD to describe the ability of the cement to act both as an electron acceptor and an electron donor, respectively. The character of the examined surface was expressed with the use of the SC parameter. All these parameters were determined with a high degree of precision. It was found that the surface of glass-ionomer cements had a well-marked acidic character. The ability of the cement surface to take part in specific interactions differed with the various types of commercial products. The surface activity of the glass-ionomers investigated changed with the storage time (up to 6 months) indicating an on-going setting reaction.

  10. Crack closure on rehydration of glass-ionomer materials.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Sharanbir K; Pilecki, Peter; Sherriff, Martyn; Watson, Timothy F

    2004-10-01

    Moisture-sensitivity of immature glass-ionomer cements suggests that hydration-induced volumetric expansion might close and potentially heal established cracks. Crack closure in glass-ionomer cements (GICs) was observed following rehydration. Circular cavities were prepared in 15 teeth: 10 were restored with resin-modified GICs (5 with Fuji II LC and 5 with Photac-Fil) and 5 were restored with a conventional GIC (Fuji IX); all were dehydrated for 1 min with air and imaged immediately by confocal microscopy. Crack formation in each was located, after which water was placed on the surface and observed for 15 min via a CCD camera. Dehydration caused cracks with measurable gaps, while rehydration resulted in varying degrees of closure: closure was limited in the conventional GIC, and complete or near complete along part/s of the crack in the resin-modified GICs. In all, closure movement became imperceptible after the first 10 min. Statistical analysis indicated no significant difference between the closure behavior of all materials. However, the resin-modified GICs appeared to show a greater potential for closure of established cracks than the conventional GIC upon rehydration.

  11. Use of glass ionomers as retrofilling materials.

    PubMed

    Barkhordar, R A; Pelzner, R B; Stark, M M

    1989-06-01

    Many materials have been used as retrofillings. Because of the bonding property of glass ionomer cement, this study was conducted to evaluate its possible use as a retrofilling material. Seventy human maxillary anterior teeth were chosen. The root canal systems were cleansed and shaped, and the teeth were assigned to six groups of 10 each. The root canals were obturated with gutta-percha and Grossman sealer, and the apical 2 mm of each root was resected. In all groups a retrofilling preparation was made to a depth of a number 331 bur. The apical preparations were filled in the following manner: silver amalgam (group I), silver amalgam plus two layers of varnish (group II), Ketac-Silver plus two layers of varnish (group III), Ketac-Silver without varnish (group IV), Ketac-Fil plus two layers of varnish (group V), Ketac-Fil without varnish (group VI), and Ketac-Bond (group VII). All the root surfaces with the exception of 2 mm from the resected line were coated with two layers of clear varnish. All the teeth were immersed in methylene blue for 24 hours. After vertical sectioning, dye penetration was measured under a dissecting microscope. The mean apical leakage (in millimeters) was as follows: I = 0.57, II = 0.39, III = 0.22, IV = 0.54, V = 0.11, VI = 0.46, and VII = 0.17. One-way analysis of variance performed on the group means indicated that Ketac-Fil with varnish (group V) and Ketac-Bond (group VII) had significantly less leakage than other groups (p less than 0.05). This study indicates that Ketac-Fil and Ketac-Bond may have potential as retrofilling materials.

  12. Microleakage of glass ionomer formulations after erbium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet laser preparation.

    PubMed

    Delmé, Katleen I M; Deman, Peter J; De Bruyne, Mieke A A; Nammour, Samir; De Moor, Roeland J G

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the microleakage in class V cavities restored with four conventionally setting glass ionomers (CGIs) and one resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI) following erbium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Er:YAG) laser or conventional preparation. Four hundred class V cavities were assigned to four groups: A and B were prepared by an Er:YAG laser; C and D were conventionally prepared. In groups B and D, the surface was additionally conditioned with Ketac conditioner. Each group was divided into five subgroups according to the glass ionomer cement (GIC) used: groups 1 (Ketac Fil), 2 (Ketac Molar), 3 (Ionofil Molar), 4 (Ionofil Molar Quick) and 5 (Photac Fil Quick). After thermocycling, a 2% methylene blue solution was used as dye. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) photographs were taken to show the conditioner's effect. Complete marginal sealing could not be reached. PhotacFil showed less microleakage than the conventionally setting glass ionomer cements (CGICs) investigated. Conditioning laser-prepared cavities did not negatively influence microleakage results except for Ionofil Molar Quick.

  13. Assessment of the Shear Bond Strength between Nanofilled Composite Bonded to Glass-ionomer Cement Using Self-etch Adhesive with Different pHs and Total-Etch Adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Choobineh, Mohammad Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem In the sandwich technique, the undesirable bond between the composite resin and glass-ionomer cement (GIc) is one of the most important factors which lead to the failure of restoration. Total-etch and self-etch adhesives may improve the bond strength based on their pH. Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength between the nanofilled composite resin and GIc using different adhesives. Materials and Method In this experimental study, 40 specimens (6×6mm) in 4 groups (n=10) were prepared in acrylic mold. Each specimen contained conventional GI ChemFil Superior with a height of 3mm, bonded to Z350 composite resin with a height measured 3mm. In order to bond the composite to the GI, the following adhesives were used, respectively: A: mild Clearfil SE Bond self-etch (pH=2), B: intermediate OptiBond self-etch (pH=1.4), C: strong Adper Prompt L-Pop (pH=1), and D: Adper Single Bond 2 total-etch (pH=7.2). The shear bond strength was measured by using universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test were used to analyze the data (p< 0.05). Results The shear bond strength in group A was significantly higher than group B (p= 0.002), C (p< 0.001), and D (p< 0.001). Moreover, the shear bond strength of groups A and B (self-etch) was significantly different from group D (total-etch) (p< 0.001); and C (self-etch) with D (p= 0.024). Conclusion The results of this study showed that applying the mild self-etch adhesive between the composite and the GIc results in stronger shear bond strength compared to intermediate and strong self-etch adhesives. Moreover, the self-etch adhesive increased the shear bond strength between composite resin and GIc more significantly than total-etch adhesive. PMID:26966701

  14. Fracture frequency and longevity of fractured resin composite, polyacid-modified resin composite, and resin-modified glass ionomer cement class IV restorations: an up to 14 years of follow-up.

    PubMed

    van Dijken, Jan W V; Pallesen, Ulla

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fracture frequency and longevity of fractured class IV resin composite (RC), polyacid-modified resin composite (compomer; PMRC), and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) restorations in a longitudinal long-term follow-up. Eighty-five class IV RC (43: Pekafil), PMRC (24: Dyract (D), Hytac (H)), and RMGIC (18: Fuji II LC (F), Photac Fil (P)) restorations were placed in ongoing longitudinal follow-ups in 45 patients (mean age 54.5 years). The restorations were evaluated during 14 years by slightly modified USPHS criteria at yearly recalls especially for their fracture behavior. For all restorations, 36.5% were fractured, with a Kaplan-Meier (KM) estimate of 8.8 years (standard error (SE) 0.5, confidence interval (CI) 7.9-9.8). The number of fractures per material was 11 RC (25.6%; KM 9.9 years, CI 8.7-11.0), 13 PMRC (54.2%; D 66.6%; H 50.0%; KM 7.5 years, CI 5.8-9.2), and seven RMGIC (36.5%; F 22.2%, P 71.4%; KM 6.9 years, CI 7.9-9.8). Significant differences were seen between RC and PMRC (p = 0.043). A significant higher fracture rate was observed in teeth 12 + 22 compared to teeth 11 + 21. No significant differences were observed between male and female patients. Restorations in bruxing patients (45) showed 22 fractures (KM 8 years; CI 6.9-9.3) and in non-bruxing patients (39) nine fractures (KM 9.9 years, CI 8.7-11.1; p = 0.017). With regard to the longevity of the replaced failed restorations, for RC, the mean age was 4.5 years; for PMRC, 4.3 years; and for RMGIC, 3.3 years. It can be concluded that fracture was the main reason for failure of class IV restorations. An improved longevity was observed for class IV restorations compared to those presented in earlier studies. RC restorations showed the lowest failure frequency and the highest longevity.

  15. Therapeutic effect of glass-ionomers: an overview of evidence.

    PubMed

    Mickenautsch, S; Mount, G; Yengopal, V

    2011-03-01

    The requirements for an ideal restorative material include adhesion to tooth structure (enamel and dentine) and an ability to withstand the traumas of occlusion. However, some level of an anticaries effect is also desirable. After a long history of glass-ionomer cement (GIC) development, an evidence base in support of the therapeutic effect of GIC, particularly with regard to its anticaries effect, is emerging. This evidence is increasingly presented through systematic reviews of clinical GIC application and, to a certain extent, relates to a caries-preventive effect of the material itself. However, the strength of evidence supporting other aspects of GIC, such as a higher remineralizing effect, fluoride uptake in hard tooth tissue and fluoride release of GIC, is limited. Nevertheless, the results of these in situ and laboratory trials provide valuable insights into factors that facilitate understanding of the clinical efficacy of GIC.

  16. Bond strength of a light-cured and two auto-cured glass ionomer liners.

    PubMed

    Holtan, J R; Nystrom, G P; Olin, P S; Rudney, J; Douglas, W H

    1990-10-01

    Ninety-nine extracted human molar teeth were used in this study comparing the shear bond strengths on dentine of one light-cured and two auto-cured polyalkenoate (glass ionomer) cements. Bond strength can be influenced by differences in tooth structure. A balanced-incomplete block design (Hull and Nie, 1981) was used to reduce variation attributable to such differences. Cements were applied to paired dentine surfaces in combinations such that 66 tooth sides were treated with each material. A light-cured dentinal adhesive and composite resin restorative material were then placed and shear bond strength testing was conducted exactly 24 h after the completion of each specimen. Mean forces (MPa) for the three materials were compared using an appropriate analysis of variance model (balanced-incomplete-blocks) The shear bond strengths (MPa) of the light-cured liner (Espe, Seefeld/Oberbay, FRG) was 4.71 +/- 1.16. Vitrabond showed the greatest variance of all three materials tested, however this material's average bond strength was greater than the maximum achieved for the other materials. Student-Newman-Keuls comparison of means showed that all cements differed significantly from each other (alpha = 0.05). It is concluded that the light-cured glass ionomer liner exhibited significantly better shear bond strength performance than the two auto-cured glass ionomers tested.

  17. In vitro microleakage of glass-ionomer composite resin hybrid materials.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, J A; De Magalhães, C S; Serra, M C; Rodrigues Júnior, A L

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microleakage of six glass-ionomer composite resin hybrid materials compared with a glass-ionomer cement and a composite resin. Standardized class 5 dentin cavities were prepared on root surfaces of 240 extracted human teeth that were randomly assigned to eight groups and restored using the following restorative systems: (I) Vitremer, (II) Compoglass, (III) Photac-Fil Aplicap, (IV) Variglass, (V) Dyract, (VI) Fuji II LC, (VII) Ketac-Fil Aplicap, and (VIII) Z100. The teeth were thermocycled, placed in a 2% methylene blue solution, and sectioned with diamond disks. Dye penetration was scored on a scale of 0-3. Results showed no significant differences among groups VIII, IV, I, V, VI, III, and II. There were also no significant differences among groups VI, III, II, and VII.

  18. Surface finishing of resin-modified glass ionomer.

    PubMed

    Liporoni, Priscila; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre; Cury, Jaime Aparecido; Dos Santos Dias, Carlos Tadeu; Paradella, Thais Cachute

    2003-01-01

    This study utilized spectrophotometry to evaluate in vitro superficial dye deposition on resin-modified glass ionomer, following different surface finishing and polishing treatments. Materials that were photocured adjacent to the mylar strip produced the surfaces with the lowest mean after superficial staining. A restorative technique without excesses resulted in a smoother surface and prolonged the life of the restoration. The resin-modified glass ionomers tested offer adequate clinical performance.

  19. Dental repair material: a resin-modified glass-ionomer bioactive ionic resin-based composite.

    PubMed

    Croll, Theodore P; Berg, Joel H; Donly, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    This report documents treatment and repair of three carious teeth that were restored with a new dental repair material that features the characteristics of both resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative cement (RMGI) and resin-based composite (RBC). The restorative products presented are reported by the manufacturer to be the first bioactive dental materials with an ionic resin matrix, a shock-absorbing resin component, and bioactive fillers that mimic the physical and chemical properties of natural teeth. The restorative material and base/liner, which feature three hardening mechanisms, could prove to be a notable advancement in the adhesive dentistry restorative materials continuum.

  20. Fluoride release and uptake by aged resin-modified glass ionomers and a polyacid-modified resin composite.

    PubMed

    Ylp, H K; Smales, R J

    1999-08-01

    Little has been reported of the relationship of fluoride release and weight loss, and the effects of use of different fluoride agents on restorations, for the new generation of glass ionomer cements. The objectives of this study were to compare fluoride release of fresh and aged specimens of a polyacid-modified resin composite (Dyract), and of three resin-modified glass ionomer cements (Fuji II LC, Photac-Fil, Vitremer); and to correlate fluoride release and weight loss of aged specimens after recharging with three different fluoride agents. All materials showed high initial fluoride release immediately after uptake when using the agents. However, the levels of fluoride release dropped rapidly soon afterwards. Although initial fluoride release was significantly different between Dyract and the three resin-modified glass ionomers, when different fluoride agents were used on aged specimens after recharging, no significant differences were found after the first few hours. Linear regression analyses also showed no correlation between cumulative fluoride release and weight loss. Possible beneficial oral health effects may only be expected by frequent exposure of these materials to fluoride agents.

  1. Biocompatibility of a flowable composite bonded with a self-etching adhesive compared with a glass lonomer cement and a high copper amalgam.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Yasushi; Seki, Yuichi; Sasafuchi, Yasutaka; Arakawa, Makoto; Burrow, Michael F; Otsuki, Masayuki; Tagami, Junji

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the pulpal response and in-vivo microleakage of a flowable composite bonded with a self-etching adhesive and compared the results with a glass ionomer cement and amalgam. Cervical cavities were prepared in monkey teeth. The teeth were randomly divided into three groups. A self-etching primer system (Imperva FluoroBond, Shofu) was applied to the teeth in one of the experimental groups, and the cavities were filled with a flowable composite (SI-BF-2001-LF, Shofu). In the other groups, a glass ionomer cement (Fuji II, GC) or amalgam (Dispersalloy, Johnson & Johnson) filled the cavity. The teeth were then extracted after 3, 30 and 90 days, fixed in 10% buffered formalin solution and prepared according to routine histological techniques. Five micrometer sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin or Brown and Brenn gram stain for bacterial observation. No serious inflammatory reaction of the pulp, such as necrosis or abscess formation, was observed in any of the experimental groups. Slight inflammatory cell infiltration was the main initial reaction, while deposition of reparative dentin was the major long-term reaction in all groups. No bacterial penetration along the cavity walls was detected in the flowable composite or glass ionomer cement except for one case at 30 days in the glass ionomer cement. The flowable composite bonded with self-etching adhesive showed an acceptable biological com- patibility to monkey pulp. The in vivo sealing ability of the flowable composite in combination with the self-etching adhesive was considered comparable to glass ionomer cement. Amalgam restorations without adhesive liners showed slight bacterial penetration along the cavity wall.

  2. Effects of daily fluoride exposures on fluoride release by glass ionomer-based restoratives.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Rick; Diefenderfer, Kim E

    2003-01-01

    It is well documented that glass ionomer cements absorb and release fluoride following single fluoride exposures. This study examined fluoride release among three glass ionomer-based restorative materials following multiple daily exposures to three topical fluoride regimens. Using a Delrin mold, 32 cylindrical specimens, each of a glass ionomer (Ketac-Fil), resin-modified glass ionomer (Photac-Fil) and polyacid-modified resin (Dyract AP) were created. Each specimen was subjected to one of four daily treatments (n = 8): (1) no fluoride treatment (control); (2) application of a fluoride dentifrice (1000 ppm) for one minute once daily; (3) application of the same dentifrice for one minute twice daily; (4) the same regimen as (3), plus immersion in a 0.05% sodium fluoride (NaF) mouth rinse (225 ppm) for one minute immediately following the second dentifrice application. Each specimen was suspended in a polyethylene test tube containing 1.0 ml demineralizing solution (pH 4.3) at 37 degrees C for six hours, then transferred to a new test tube containing 1.0 ml remineralizing solution (pH 7.0) at 37 degrees C for 18 hours. Fluoride treatments were completed at the time of transfer daily for seven days. Media solutions were buffered with equal volumes of TISAB II; fluoride levels were measured using a digital ion analyzer and fluoride electrode. Fluoride release decreased significantly from Day 1 to Day 3 for all materials regardless of fluoride treatment (Repeated Measures ANOVA, Tukey HSD, p < 0.05). All specimens released significantly more fluoride in demineralizing solution than in remineralizing solution. For Days 2-7, Treatment 4 produced greater fluoride release than both the control and Treatment 2 for all three materials (p < 0.05); For each material, the fluoride release produced by Treatments 3 and 4 was statistically similar on most days throughout the study. By Day 7, Photac-Fil demonstrated both the greatest total fluoride release and the greatest

  3. Water Absorption and HEMA Release of Resin-Modified Glass-Ionomers

    PubMed Central

    Beriat, Nilufer Celebi; Nalbant, Dilek

    2009-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the water absorption and the amount of hydroxyethyl metacrylate (HEMA) level released from various resin modified glass ionomer cements. Methods Advance, Vitremer and Protec-Cem resin modified glass ionomer cements were used to evaluate the HEMA release. Ten specimens were fabricated from each cement in 10 x 1 mm height. Thirty specimens were immersed in glass containers filled with 20 ml deionized water. 1 ml solution was taken from the container at 10 minutes, 1 hour, 24 hour and 7 days intervals from each group and analyzed with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) machine and the results are presented in ppm. The data were subjected to Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests at a 0.05 significance level. Results At all time intervals Vitremer showed highest HEMA release ( 10 min: 54.2 ppm; 1 h: 86.8 ppm; 24 h: 93.4 ppm) (P=0.0001). At the end of 10 minutes and first hour, following Vitremer, HEMA release was highest for Protec-Cem (10 min: 14.8 ppm; 1 h: 23.6 ppm) and then Advance (10 min: 5.5 ppm; 1 h: 18.8 ppm) (P<.05). Water absorption tests were performed according to the specifications of ISO 4049. Water absorption was highest for Vitremer and lowest for the Protec-Cem and the difference among cement groups was significant (P<.005). Conclusions Vitremer showed the highest HEMA release and water absorption values and Protec-Cem showed the lowest values. HEMA release by time was significant for Advance cement. This release may be relevant both to the risk of adverse pulpal responses in patients and to the risk of allergy in patients and dental personnel. PMID:19826597

  4. Bonded amalgam restorations: using a glass-ionomer as an adhesive liner.

    PubMed

    Chen, R S; Liu, C C; Cheng, M R; Lin, C P

    2000-01-01

    Due to the lack of adhesiveness of amalgam to tooth structure, several adhesive cements have been utilized in bonded amalgam restorations. This study evaluated whether Fuji-II glass-ionomer cement is an appropriate adhesive liner in bonded amalgam restorations. Two adhesive composite luting cements (Amalgambond Plus and Panavia-21) and Copalite cavity liner were compared. The study was conducted in two phases. In the first part, we quantitatively assessed the tensile bond strengths as well as the failure modes of amalgam bonded to human dentin, using different adhesive liners. In each group, the flat dentin surface was treated with the assigned adhesive cement with a Teflon mold, followed by condensation of amalgam (Valiant PhD) onto it. Each group's mean tensile bond strengths were recorded and the statistical analysis by one way ANOVA showed no significant differences among groups (p > 0.05). Similar to the fracture patterns of the Amalgambond Plus and Panavia-21 groups, the failure mode of Fuji-II group was predominantly adhesive fracture. In the second part, the fracture strengths of amalgam restored teeth were measured using different adhesive liners. Standard MOD cavities were prepared in each tooth except for the intact tooth group. After treatment with the assigned adhesives or varnish, the cavities were restored with amalgam. Fracture strengths were then measured and the fractured interfaces examined using a scanning electron microscope. The fracture strengths of the intact tooth, Amalgambond Plus, Panavia-21 and Fuji-II groups were significantly higher than those of the Copalite and prepared cavity without restoration groups (p < 0.01). Accordingly, Fuji-II glass-ionomer cement, when used as an adhesive liner of amalgam restoration, may effectively reinforce the remaining tooth structure and, therefore, enhance the fracture resistance of the amalgam-restored teeth.

  5. Marginal ridge fracture resistance, microleakage and pulpal response to glass ionomer/glass cermet partial tunnel restorations.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, N T; Munshi, A K; Shetty, T R

    1997-01-01

    Sixty sound premolars which were to be extracted for orthodontic treatment purposes were restored either with glass ionomer cement or glass cermet cements after partial tunnel preparation, and prior to the extraction after a time interval of 30 and 60 days respectively. The teeth were then subjected to marginal ridge fracture resistance, microleakage study using dye penetration and histological evaluation of the pulpal response to these materials. Both the materials exhibited increase in marginal ridge fracture resistance at 60 days, with minimal degree of microleakage and were biologically compatible with the dental pulp.

  6. Retention of a resin-based sealant and a glass ionomer used as a fissure sealant in children with special needs

    PubMed Central

    Nualart-Grollmus, Zacy-Carola

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this research is to evaluate the retention of sealants of resin and resin-modified ionomeric glass pits and fissures, on first permanent molars of special patients. Material and Methods: The sample was comprised by 32 children. The ages were between 7 and 18 years. The sealing procedure was made with the relative isolation of the molars to be sealed, through the use of cotton rolls. Two molars were sealed with Clinpro Sealant 3M Dental and the others with Vitremer. Checking of the sealants was made after 3 and 6 months of their placement, evaluating with 3 values: TR: Totally Restrained; PR: Partially Restrained; and CL: Completely Lost. Results: 67.18% of the resinous sealants, and 70.31% of the glass ionomer sealants were successful after three months. After six months, 57.81% of the resin-based sealants and 51.56% of the glass ionomer sealants were successful. When performing the Chi-square statistical analysis (P<0.05) no statistical significance was observed after 6 months. Conclusions: The retention of the resin sealant was similar to that of the glass ionomer cement at the end of six months and the retention of sealants on maxillary teeth was higher than on mandibular teeth. Key words:Sealant, glass ionomer, retention, caries, special needs. PMID:25674325

  7. A comparative evaluation of dental luting cements by fracture toughness tests and fractography.

    PubMed

    Ryan, A K; Orr, J F; Mitchell, C A

    2001-01-01

    In recent years there has been a shift from traditional methods of investigating dental materials to a fracture mechanics approach. Fracture toughness (KIC) is an intrinsic material property which can be considered to be a measure of a material's resistance to crack propagation. Glass-ionomer cements are biocompatible and bioactive dental restorative materials, but they suffer from poor fracture toughness and are extremely susceptible to dehydration. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the fracture toughness of three types of commercially available dental cements (polyacid-modified composite resin, resin-modified and conventional glass ionomer) using a short-rod chevron-notch test and to investigate and interpret the results by means of fractography using scanning electron microscopy. Ten specimens of each cement were fabricated according to manufacturers' instructions, coated in varnish, and stored at ambient laboratory humidity, 100 per cent relative humidity, or in water at 37 degrees C for 7 days prior to preparation for testing. Results indicated that significant differences existed between each group of materials and that the fracture toughness ranged from 0.27 to 0.72 MN/m3/2. It was concluded that the resin-modified glass-ionomer cement demonstrated the highest resistance to crack propagation. Fractographs clearly showed areas of stable and unstable crack growth along the fractured surfaces for the three materials examined.

  8. CYTOTOXICITY AND BIOCOMPATIBILITY OF DIRECT AND INDIRECT PULP CAPPING MATERIALS

    PubMed Central

    Modena, Karin Cristina da Silva; Casas-Apayco, Leslie Caroll; Atta, Maria Teresa; Costa, Carlos Alberto de Souza; Hebling, Josimeri; Sipert, Carla Renata; Navarro, Maria Fidela de Lima; Santos, Carlos Ferreira

    2009-01-01

    There are several studies about the cytotoxic effects of dental materials in contact with the pulp tissue, such as calcium hydroxide (CH), adhesive systems, resin composite and glass ionomer cements. The aim of this review article was to summarize and discuss the cytotoxicity and biocompatibility of materials used for protection of the dentin-pulp complex, some components of resin composites and adhesive systems when placed in direct or indirect contact with the pulp tissue. A large number of dental materials present cytotoxic effects when applied close or directly to the pulp, and the only material that seems to stimulate early pulp repair and dentin hard tissue barrier formation is CH. PMID:20027424

  9. Secondary caries formation in vitro around glass ionomer-lined amalgam and composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Dionysopoulos, P; Kotsanos, N; Papadogianis, Y

    1996-08-01

    The aim of this in vitro secondary caries study was to examine the glass-ionomer liner's effect on wall-lesion inhibition when a conventional and a light-cured glass ionomer liner was placed under amalgam and composite resin restorations. Class V preparations in extracted upper premolars were used and ten restorations were used for each of the following groups: (i) two layers of copal varnish and amalgam; (ii) conventional glass-ionomer and amalgam; (iii) light-cured glass-ionomer and amalgam; (iv) bonding agent and light-cured composite resin; (v) conventional glass-ionomer, bonding agent and light-cured composite resin; (vi) light-cured glass-ionomer, extended 0.3 mm short of the enamel margin bonding agent and light-cured composite resin; and (vii) light-cured glass-ionomer, extended 1 mm short of the enamel margin, bonding agent and light-cured composite resin. The teeth were thermocycled and artificial caries were created using an acid-gel. The results of this study showed that artificial recurrent caries can be reduced significantly (P < 0.05) with a glass-ionomer liner under amalgam restorations. The results also showed that when the light-cured glass-ionomer liner was placed 0.3 mm from the cavosurface margin under composite resin restoration, the artificial recurrent caries reduced significantly (P < 0.05).

  10. Biocompatibility of a new pulp capping cement

    PubMed Central

    Poggio, Claudio; Ceci, Matteo; Beltrami, Riccardo; Dagna, Alberto; Colombo, Marco; Chiesa, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Summary Aim The aim of the present study was to evaluate the biocompatibility of a new pulp capping material (Biodentine, Septodont) compared with reference pulp capping materials: Dycal (Dentsply), ProRoot MTA (Dentsply) and MTA-Angelus (Angelus) by using murine odontoblast cell line and Alamar blue and MTT cytotoxicity tests. Methods The citocompatibility of murine odontoblasts cells (MDPC-23) were evaluated at different times using a 24 Transwell culture plate by Alamar blue test and MTT assay. Results The results were significantly different among the pulp capping materials tested. Biocompatibility was significant different among materials with different composition. Conclusions Biodentine and MTA-based products show lower cytotoxicity varying from calcium hydroxide-based material which present higher citotoxicity. PMID:25002921

  11. Microleakage of high-strength glass ionomer: resin composite restorations in minimally invasive treatment.

    PubMed

    Platt, J A; Rhodes, B

    Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) has been investigated as an alternative caries treatment. The technique involves removal of loose tooth structure with a spoon excavator, followed by placement of an adhesive restorative material, often a high-strength glass ionomer. This study compares the microleakage of a high-strength glass ionomer/resin composite and two occlusal resin composite restoration techniques.

  12. Bond strength of Bis-GMA and glass ionomer pit and fissure sealants using cyclic fatigue.

    PubMed

    Dewji, H R; Drummond, J L; Fadavi, S; Punwani, I

    1998-02-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the bond strength of glass ionomer and resin-modified glass ionomer sealants compared to Bis-GMA sealants using both static and cyclic fatigue shear testing. Four materials were evaluated: D, a Bis-GMA sealant with 10% phosphoric acid etchant; FC, a resin-modified glass ionomer sealant with 20% polyacrylic acid etchant; FD, a resin-modified glass ionomer sealant with 10% polyacrylic acid etchant; and FSC, a self-cured glass ionomer sealant with no etchant. Gelatin capsules filled with the sealant material were bonded to the enamel surfaces of bovine teeth after appropriate surface conditioning and then tested in shear static and cyclic fatigue. Static and cyclic shear bond strengths, respectively, for each group were (MPa): FC: 21.1+/-2.8 and 17.1+/-3.1; FD: 14.6+/-5.9 and 8.5+/-3.1; D: 10.8+/-4.9 and 4.7+/-2.6; FSC: 8.7 (1.0 and 2.9+/-0.6. The resin-modified glass ionomer sealants had better fatigue bond strength than both Bis-GMA and self-cured glass ionomer sealants with the surface conditioning affecting the bond strength of the resin-modified glass ionomer sealants.

  13. One year comparative clinical evaluation of EQUIA with resin-modified glass ionomer and a nanohybrid composite in noncarious cervical lesions

    PubMed Central

    Vaid, Deepa Sunil; Shah, Nimisha Chinmay; Bilgi, Priyanka Shripad

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Comparative evaluation of EQUIA with a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC; GC Gold Label glass ionomer light cured universal restorative cement) and a nanohybrid composite (Tetric N-Ceram) in noncarious cervical lesions (NCCLs). Background: To establish the most suitable material for the restoration of NCCLs. Settings and Design: In vivo study. Materials and Methods: Eighty-seven NCCLs were randomly restored with EQUIA, a RMGIC, and a nanohybrid composite. Clinical evaluation of the restorations was done following the Unites States Public Health criteria by a single-blinded investigator. Data were formulated, and statistical analysis was done by Chi-square test. Statistical Analysis Used: Chi-square test. Results: No significant difference was found between EQUIA, RMGIC, and nanohybrid composite at 1-month, at 6 months, and at 1-year (P > 0.05). Conclusions: EQUIA, resin-modified glass ionomer, and nanohybrid composite performed equally at 1-month, 6 months, and 1-year follow-up periods. PMID:26752837

  14. N-vinylpyrrolidone modified glass-ionomer resins for improved dental restoratives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Dong

    The studies described in this dissertation focus on improvement of mechanical properties of current glass-ionomer cements. Thermal properties and microstructures of the cements were correlated with their mechanical strengths. The first study evaluated mechanical properties of selected commercial glass-ionomer cements and examined their microstructures. The results showed that resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (RM GICs) exhibited much higher flexural (FS) and diametral tensile strengths (DTS), compared to conventional GICs (C GICs). In addition, they exhibited comparable compressive strength (CS), relatively low microhardness and less wear resistance than C GICs. The C GICs exhibited brittle behavior, whereas the RM GICs underwent substantial plastic deformation in compression. The mechanical properties of the GICs were closely related to their microstructures. Factors such as the density of the microstructure, the integrity of the interface between the glass particles and polymer matrix, particle size and the number and size of voids have important roles in determining the mechanical properties. The second study evaluated thermal properties of these GICs. The results showed that the RM GICs exhibited higher thermal transition temperatures than those of the C GICs, thermal expansion coefficients of these cements were close to those of human teeth, and the indentation creep of the RM GICs were higher than the C GICs. The third study explored and evaluated the effect of a water-soluble monomer, N-vinylpyrrolidone (NVP), on the performance of current C GICs, indicating a significant improvement in both mechanical and working properties. The fourth study demonstrated the process of determining the optimal molar ratio of the NVP-containing copolymers, using design of experiment. The results showed that the optimal molar ratio for these copolymers was 7:1:3 for poly(acrylic acid-co-itaconic acid-co-N-vinylpyrrolidone), based on the FS test. The molar ratio of 8:2:1 (AA

  15. Ion leaching of a glass-ionomer glass: an empirical model and effects on setting characteristics and strength.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Leon H; Tyas, Martin J; Burrow, Michael F

    2007-01-01

    The release of ions from a glass-ionomer glass, which in the polyacid matrix effects the cross-linking and setting of a cement, can be modelled and initiated by acid-treatment in a dilute acid. This study examined the effect of time of acetic acid leaching on the working time, setting time, and strength of a model GIC. A reactive fluoride glass was immersed in hot acetic acid for 0 (control), 5, 15, 35, 65, 95 and 125 min, filtered and dried. The glass was mixed with an experimental GI liquid in a capsule system and the mixed pastes assessed for working and initial setting time. Compressive strength testing was undertaken according to ISO9917:2003. Immersion time had a significant effect on both working and setting time of the resultant pastes only up to 65 min of immersion, and corresponded with a thin-film ion diffusion model. Compressive strength did not vary significantly with immersion time. The glass-ionomer setting reaction can be conveniently retarded by immersion of the powder in acetic acid, without affecting strength. A reactivity model was developed, whereby the effects of various changes to the leaching process may be usefully examined.

  16. Effects of porous-hydroxyapatite incorporated into glass-ionomer sealants.

    PubMed

    Shinonaga, Yukari; Arita, Kenji; Nishimura, Takako; Chiu, Szu-Yu; Chiu, Hsiu-Hui; Abe, Yoko; Sonomoto, Mie; Harada, Kyoko; Nagaoka, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the mechanical and chemical properties of a novel glass ionomer cement for use as a pit and fissure sealant containing a porous hydroxyapatite, namely, apatite ionomer cement (AIC). Control sealant samples were used Fuji III (GIC-S). The experiment sealant samples (AIC-S) consisted of porous spherical hydroxyapatite (HApS) particles added at 28 wt% to GIC-S powder. The GIC-S and AIC-S samples were evaluated through mechanical strength measurements, scanning electron microscopy observations, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis, fluoride ion release tests, and antibacterial tests. The flexural strength of the AIC-S was significantly higher than that of GIC-S for each period, 1 h, 24 h and 1 year. The fluoride release dose for AIC-S was consistently higher than that for GIC-S. In addition, the antibacterial properties of AIC-S were superior to those of GIC-S. The novel AIC-S may be a more suitable sealant material for pits and fissures with intact and/or infected enamel.

  17. Comparative evaluation of sealing ability of glass ionomer-resin continuum as root-end filling materials: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Chohan, Hitesh; Dewan, Harisha; Annapoorna, B. M.; Manjunath, M. K.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Root-end filling is a prudent procedure aimed at sealing the root canal to prevent penetration of tissue fluids into the root canals. An ideal root-end filling material should produce a complete apical seal. Therefore, the aim of this study is to compare the leakage behavior of four different root-end filling materials. Materials and Methods: Sixty-eight maxillary central incisors were obturated with laterally condensed gutta-percha and AH plus sealer. The roots were resected at the level of 3 mm perpendicular to the long axis of the tooth. Root-end cavities were prepared with straight fissure stainless steel bur. The teeth were then divided into four experimental and two control groups, and cavities restored as per the groupings. The teeth were immersed in methylene blue for 48 h, split longitudinally, and dye penetration was measured. Results: A highly significant difference existed in the mean dye penetration of Group I (conventional glass ionomer) and the other groups (resin-modified glass ionomer, polyacid-modified composite, and composite resin). There was no statistically significant difference among the three groups. Conclusions: (1) Significant difference was found in the dye penetration values of conventional glass ionomer cement and other groups. (2) No statistically significant difference was found in the dye penetration values of groups II, III, and IV. PMID:26759803

  18. The Effect of Lucite Glass Reinforcement on the Properties of Conventional Glass-Ionomer Filling Materials

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi Yazdi, Haleh; Van Noort, Richard; Mansouri, Mona

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: The usage of glass ionomer cements (GICs) restorative materials are very limited due to lack of flexural strength and toughness. Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of using a leucite glass on a range of mechanical and optical properties of commercially available conventional glass ionomer cement. Materials and Method: Ball milled 45μm leucite glass particles were incorporated into commercial conventional GIC, Ketac-Molar Easymix (KMEm). The characteristics of the powder particles were observed under scanning electron microscopy. The samples were made for each experimental group; KMEm and lucite- modified Ketac-Molar easy Mix (LMKMEm) according to manufacturer’s instruction then were collected in damp tissue and stored in incubator for 1 hour. The samples were divided into two groups, one stored in distilled water for 24 hours and the others for 1 week.10 samples were made for testing biaxial flexural strength after 1 day and 1 week, with a crosshead speed of 1mm/min, calculated in MPa. The hardness (Vickers hardness tester) of each experimental group was also tested. To evaluate optical properties, 3 samples were made for each experimental group and evaluated with a spectrophotometer. The setting time of modified GIC was measured with Gillmore machine. Result: The setting time in LMKMEm was 8 minutes. The mean biaxial flexural strength was LMKMEm/ 1day: 24.13±4.14 MPa, LMKMEm/ 1 week: 24.22±4.87 MPa KMEm/1day:28.87±6.31 MPa and KMEm/1 week: 26.65±5.82 MPa which were not statistically different from each other. The mean Vickers hardness was LMKMEm: 403±66 Mpa and KMEm: 358±22 MPa; though not statistically different from each other. The mean total transmittance (Tt) was LMKMEm: 15.9±0.7, KMEm: 22.3±1.2, the mean diffuse transmittance (Td) was LMKMEm: 12.2±0.5, KMEm: 18.0±0.5 which were statistically different from each other. Conclusion: Leucite glass can be incorporated with a conventional GIC without

  19. Comparison of the effect of topical fluorides on the commercially available conventional glass ionomers, resin modified glass ionomers and polyacid modified composite resins--an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Setty, J V; Singh, S; Subba Reddy, V V

    2003-06-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the effect of a single application of three professionally applied topical fluoride agents (Sodium fluoride 2%, Stannous fluoride 8% and APF 1.23%) on the surfaces of six modern esthetic restorative materials used in pediatric dentistry viz., two conventional glass ionomers (Fuji II and Shofu-restorative), two resin modified glass ionomers (Vitremer, with and without glaze, and Photac-fil Quick) and two Polyacid modified composite resins (Luxat and Hytac Aplitip). Mean surface roughness and surface micro hardness (SMH) measurements were the parameters employed for comparison. Results showed that APF gel applications significantly increased the surface roughness measurements and decreased SMH of all tested materials, which was pronounced in conventional glass ionomers when compared with resin modified glass ionomers and polyacid modified composite resins. NaF and SnF2 produced a statistically significant increase in the surface roughness of conventional glass ionomers without any significant change in surface roughness and SMH on rest of the materials tested, except for NaF on SMH values of Fuji II, which was statistically significant.

  20. Biocompatibility of Portland cement combined with different radiopacifying agents.

    PubMed

    Lourenço Neto, Natalino; Marques, Nádia C T; Fernandes, Ana Paula; Rodini, Camila O; Duarte, Marco A H; Lima, Marta C; Machado, Maria A A M; Abdo, Ruy C C; Oliveira, Thais M

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the response of rat subcutaneous tissue to Portland cement combined with two different radiopacifying agents, iodoform (CHI3) and zirconium oxide (ZrO2). These materials were placed in polyethylene tubes and implanted into the dorsal connective tissue of Wistar rats for 7 and 15 days. The specimens were then stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and inflammatory reaction parameters were evaluated by light microscopy. The intensity of the inflammatory response to the sealants was analyzed by two blind calibrated observers throughout the experimental period. Histological analysis showed that all the materials caused a moderated inflammatory reaction at 7 days, which then diminished with time. At 15 days, the inflammatory reaction was almost absent, and fibroblasts and collagen fibers were observed indicating normal tissue healing. The degrees of the inflammatory reaction on different days throughout the experimental period were compared using the non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test. Statistical analysis demonstrated no significant differences amongst the groups, and Portland cement associated with radiopacifying agents gave satisfactory results. Therefore, Portland cement used in combination with radiopacifying agents can be considered a biocompatible material. Although our results are very encouraging, further studies are needed in order to establish safe clinical indications for Portland cement combined with radiopacifying agents.

  1. Bonding strength of glass ionomers to dense synthetic hydroxyapatite and fluoroapatite ceramics.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Liu, Y; Liu, Y; Söremark, R

    1996-02-01

    The bonding strength of two glass ionomers, a resin-modified and a conventional one, to dense synthetic hydroxyapatite (HA) and fluoroapatite (FA) ceramics was compared by measuring the shear strength between the ionomers and the apatites. Before the glass ionomers were applied on the apatites, the surfaces of HA and FA plates were either fine-polished or acid-etched after fine polishing. Commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) plates were used as a control. The effects of polyacrylic acid (PAA) surface preconditioning on bonding strength were also studied. The results show that the ionomers bind to HA significantly more strongly than to FA in all cases. The resin-modified material showed a significantly higher shear strength to apatites than the conventional one. Acid etching increased the shear strength significantly for the conventional glass ionomer to both HA and FA, and 25% PAA preconditioning increased the shear strength significantly for the resin-modified glass ionomer to both HA and FA. It was concluded that glass ionomers seemed to bind to apatite chemically, and the bonding strength was influenced by the cohesive strength of the ionomers and the surface roughness of the apatites. The dense synthetic apatites seemed to be good test materials for bonding evaluations of glass ionomers to mineral tissue.

  2. Conventional glass ionomers as posterior restorations. A status report for the American Journal of Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Naasan, M A; Watson, T F

    1998-02-01

    The search for a material to replace amalgam continues as a major quest in materials science. Resin composites may offer one solution but an alternative class of material, the glass ionomer cements (GICs) may have some potential for fulfilling this role. GICs were first introduced to the dental profession in 1976, and have now become an accepted part of the dental armamentarium, especially for use in low load bearing situations. They possess a low coefficient of thermal expansion similar to that of tooth structure, physicochemical bonding to both enamel and dentin, and the release of fluoride ions into the adjacent tooth tissue. These properties help to reduce marginal leakage and may contribute to a reduced incidence of recurrent decay in the restored tooth. Fluoride released into the ambient fluids has a caries-preventive effect in neighboring teeth by enhancing remineralization and inhibiting demineralization of the dental hard tissues. The main criticisms of the GICs are their brittleness, poor surface polish, porosity and surface wear. To overcome some of these deficiencies, considerable attention has been directed at improving their physical properties, especially with the addition of metal powders, the metal-modified GICs. Different metal powders have been tried, including alloys of silver and tin, pure silver, gold, titanium, palladium and stainless steel. There is conflicting data as to whether or not these materials are sufficiently strong for use in high stress restorations, especially their potential use as replacement materials for amalgam fillings.

  3. Curing depth of a resin-modified glass ionomer and two resin-based luting agents.

    PubMed

    Sigemori, Ricardo Massao; Reis, André Figueiredo; Giannini, Marcelo; Paulillo, Luís Alexandre M S

    2005-01-01

    The degree of conversion of resin-based luting agents used for retention of prefabricated posts has been questioned due to the difficulty of light penetration into the resin-filled root canal. This study evaluated the depth of cure of a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Rely X--3M ESPE) and two resin-based luting agents (Rely X ARC--3M ESPE and Enforce-Dentsply). Twenty-four 14x2x2mm3 specimens were prepared in a Teflon split mold with the three luting agents (n=8). After preparation, the specimens were stored at 37 degrees C in a dark box for 24 hours prior to microhardness testing. Measurements of Knoop hardness were performed at three different depths: superficial, medium and deep thirds. The results (KHN) were statistically analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey test (0.05), which showed that resin-based luting agents presented the highest Knoop hardness values within the superficial third. Within the medium third, there were no significant differences among luting materials. However, within the deep third, Rely X presented the highest values. KHN values of resin-based luting agents decreased remarkably as depth increased.

  4. Structural integrity of resin-modified glass ionomers as affected by the delay or omission of light activation.

    PubMed

    de Gee, A J; Leloup, G; Werner, A; Vreven, J; Davidson, C L

    1998-08-01

    Since light activation of resin-modified glass ionomers as a means of polymerizing the HEMA is usually done shortly after mixing occurs, the acid-base reaction will proceed mainly within a formed HEMA-polymer matrix. Delaying or omitting light activation may alter the structure and consequently its integrity. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect on the structural integrity of Fuji II LC, Photac-Fil, and Vitremer by delaying or omitting light initiation as compared with the integrity when light activation is performed 2 min after mixing occurs. We evaluated integrity by three-body wear experiments, conducted 8 hrs after sample preparation, to establish the integrity in the early phase of hardening, as well as after 1 wk and after 4 mos, to follow the materials throughout the process of maturation. When light activation was delayed for 1 hr, the structural integrity of Fuji II LC and Photac-Fil improved significantly in the early stages of hardening. In the case of Vitremer, an hour's delay of light activation significantly decreased integrity, which declined further when light activation was omitted. Fuji II LC was not affected by the omission of light activation, while Photac-Fil was markedly weakened. After 4 mos of aging, most of the samples of each product which had been cured by the different methods attained equal integrity, with the exception of the non-light-activated Vitremer samples, which remained weaker. We concluded that the structural integrity of resin-modified glass-ionomer cements benefits from a chemical integration of the polyalkenoate and poly-HEMA networks, as in Vitremer. Improvement in the structural integrity in the early phase for cements with a mechanical entanglement of the matrices, as in Fuji II LC and Photac-Fil, requires an acid-base reaction, a considerable portion of which may take place before activation of the HEMA polymerization.

  5. An in vitro comparative SEM study of marginal adaptation of IRM, light- and chemically-cured glass ionomer, and amalgam in furcation perforations.

    PubMed

    Rajablou, N; Azimi, S

    2001-12-01

    The furcation regions of 30 human mandibular molars were perforated and sealed using four different materials: IRM, light- and chemically-cured glass ionomer cement (GIC), and amalgam. The materials were compared for marginal gaps in coronal, mid, and apical regions after routine SEM processing. While light-cured GIC showed the smallest gaps in the three regions, in mid and coronal regions chemically-cured GIC, and in apical regions amalgam, showed the largest gaps. IRM cases showed the highest rate of fillings with a good "fit", whereas the majority of amalgam cases and none of the chemically-cured GIC cases were overfilled.

  6. A novel star-shaped poly(carboxylic acid) for resin-modified glass-ionomer restoratives.

    PubMed

    Weng, Y; Howard, L; Xie, D

    2014-07-01

    We have developed a novel glass-ionomer cement (GIC) system composed of photo-curable star-shaped poly(acrylic acid-co-itaconic acid)s. These polyacids were synthesized via a chain-transfer radical polymerization using a newly synthesized multi-arm chain-transfer agent. The star-shaped polyacids showed significantly lower viscosities in water as compared to the linear polyacids. Due to the lower viscosities, the molecular weight (MW) of the polyacids can be significantly increased for enhancing the mechanical strengths while keeping the ease of mixing and handling. The effects of MW, GM-tethering ratio, P/L ratio, and aging on the compressive properties of the experimental cements were significant. The light-cured experimental cements showed significantly improved mechanical strengths i.e. 49% in yield strength, 41% in modulus, 25% in CS, 20% in DTS, and 36% in FS, higher than commercial Fuji II LC. After aging in water for 1 month, the compressive strength of the novel light-cured experimental cement reached 343 MPa, which was 34% and 42% higher than Fuji II and Fuji II LC, respectively. This one-month aged experimental cement was also 23% higher than itself after one day aging, indicating that aging in water can significantly enhance salt-bridge formation for this novel star-shaped polyacid-comprised GIC.

  7. Antibacterial and physical properties of resin modified glass-ionomers combined with chlorhexidine.

    PubMed

    Sanders, B J; Gregory, R L; Moore, K; Avery, D R

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect on mechanical properties and antimicrobial activity of the addition of chlorhexidine (CHX) to a resin modified glass-ionomer (Photac-fil, ESPE, Norristown, PA, USA). Chlorhexidine diacetate was combined with a resin modified glass-ionomer material at a concentration of 5%. The samples were tested for hardness, tensile strength and erosion at 24 h and 6-week intervals and for elution of CHX and antimicrobial activity weekly for 6 weeks. At 24 h there was no significant difference in hardness between the two groups, but at 6 weeks the resin modified glass-ionomer group was significantly harder than the CHX groups (P < 0.05). The diametral tensile strength test indicated no difference between the control and CHX groups at 24 h or at 6 weeks. The jet erosion test demonstrated significantly less erosion with the CHX group at 24 h but at 6 weeks the CHX group showed significantly more erosion than the control group. The chemical assay data demonstrated a peak elution of CHX at week 1 with residual amounts at weeks 2 and 3. The microbial data demonstrated that the CHX group had a significant reduction in Streptococcus mutans numbers for weeks 1-3, but after week 4 there was no difference between the glass-ionomer with and without CHX. The addition of CHX to resin modified glass-ionomer altered hardness and erosion of the resin-modified glass-ionomer, but because there are no material specifications, it is difficult to determine clinical implications. Chlorhexidine did significantly improve the antimicrobial effect of the glass-ionomer which was consistent with the chemical assay data. The results indicated that the addition of CHX to resin modified glass-ionomer material (Photac-fil) did not seriously degrade the physical properties during the time period tested and that the addition of CHX resulted in a greater reduction in S. mutans when compared with glass-ionomer alone.

  8. Effect of Vital Bleaching on Disintegration Tendency of Glass Ionomer Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Baroudi, Kusai; Mahmoud, Rasha Said; Tarakji, Bassel; Altamimi, Mohammed Alsakran

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This study was designed to assess the effect of two bleaching agents on the disintegration tendency of three types of glass ionomers. Materials and Methods: A total of 90 specimens were prepared by using a split Teflon ring with an internal diameter of 5 mm and a thickness of 2 mm. The tested materials were applied and bleached according to manufacturer’s instructions. Dissolution measurements were made by calculating weight loss through different periods of the test; (one week, one month and three months) and they were analyzed by using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), followed by Tukey’s post-hoc test. Results: All glass ionomer materials exhibited a degree of dissolution. Opalescence Xtra increased the dissolution of Photac Fil and F2000 significantly, while Opalescence Quick had no effect on dissolution of glass ionomer restoratives. Conclusion: Bleaching effect on dissolution of glass ionomers is material and time dependant. Care should be taken by clinicians When bleaching teeth that are restored by glass ionomer, because this dissolution may affect the physical properties of these restorations. PMID:24701538

  9. Improvement of enamel bond strengths for conventional and resin-modified glass ionomers: acid-etching vs. conditioning*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling; Tang, Tian; Zhang, Zhen-liang; Liang, Bing; Wang, Xiao-miao; Fu, Bai-ping

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study deals with the effect of phosphoric acid etching and conditioning on enamel micro-tensile bond strengths (μTBSs) of conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements (GICs/RMGICs). Methods: Forty-eight bovine incisors were prepared into rectangular blocks. Highly-polished labial enamel surfaces were either acid-etched, conditioned with liquids of cements, or not further treated (control). Subsequently, two matching pre-treated enamel surfaces were cemented together with one of four cements [two GICs: Fuji I (GC), Ketac Cem Easymix (3M ESPE); two RMGICs: Fuji Plus (GC), RelyX Luting (3M ESPE)] in preparation for μTBS tests. Pre-treated enamel surfaces and cement-enamel interfaces were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: Phosphoric acid etching significantly increased the enamel μTBS of GICs/RMGICs. Conditioning with the liquids of the cements produced significantly weaker or equivalent enamel μTBS compared to the control. Regardless of etching, RMGICs yielded stronger enamel μTBS than GICs. A visible hybrid layer was found at certain enamel-cement interfaces of the etched enamels. Conclusions: Phosphoric acid etching significantly increased the enamel μTBSs of GICs/RMGICs. Phosphoric acid etching should be recommended to etch the enamel margins before the cementation of the prostheses such as inlays and onlays, using GICs/RMGICs to improve the bond strengths. RMGICs provided stronger enamel bond strength than GICs and conditioning did not increase enamel bond strength. PMID:24190447

  10. Evaluation of the effect of adding micro-hydroxyapatite and nano-hydroxyapatite on the microleakage of conventional and resin-modified Glass-ionomer Cl V restorations

    PubMed Central

    Sharafeddin, Farahnaz

    2017-01-01

    Background Pulpal reaction to restorative materials depends on marginal microleakage, which is a dynamic phenomenon that allows bacteria and fluids to traverse across the tooth-restoration interface. Glass-ionomer cement (GIC) exhibits low microleakage due to direct bonding to tooth structures. Hydroxyapatite (HAP) based on the similarity with tooth structure may decrease the microleakage. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate marginal microleakage of a mixture of conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI) with micro- and nano-HAP. Material and Methods In this in vitro study, 30 non-carious extracted human third molar teeth were used. Standard Cl V cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces. The cavities were restored in six experimental groups as follows: group 1, conventional glass-ionomer cement (CGIC); group 2, CGIC with micro-HAP; group 3, CGIC with nano-HAP; group 4, RMGI; group 5, RMGI with micro-HAP; group 6, RMGI with nano-HAP. The restorations were finished and polished. The teeth were coated with nail polish, sealed with sticky wax, thermocycled and placed in a solution of 2% basic fuchsine for 24 hours. The teeth were sectioned and microleakage was measured. Kruskal-Wallis, Man-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests were used for data analysis (P<0.05). Results The data analysis revealed significantly lower microleakage in groups 5 and 6 at both occlusal and gingival margins. Also in these two groups the gingival microleakage was significantly lower than occlusal margin (P=0.009 and P=0.001 respectively), but in groups 1(CGIC) and 3(CGIC+ nano-HAP) and 4(RMGI) the microleakage of occlusal margin were significantly lower than that of gingival margin (P=0.001, P=0.007 and P=0.001 respectively). Conclusions Mixing RMGI with nano-HAP and micro-HAP resulted in lower microleakage. Key words:Glass-ionomer, micro-hydroxyapatite, microleakage, nano-hydroxyapatite. PMID:28210443

  11. Comparison of shear bond strength of resin-modified glass ionomer to conditioned and unconditioned mineral trioxide aggregate surface: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Shikha; Shenoy, Vanitha Umesh; Margasahayam, Sumanthini Venkatasubramanyam

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of resin modified glass ionomer cement to conditioned and unconditioned mineral trioxide aggregate surface. Materials and Method: White Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (WMTA) and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (RMGIC) were used for the study. 60 WMTA specimens were prepared and stored in an incubator at 37° C and 100% humidity for 72 hrs. The specimens were then divided into two groups- half of the specimens were conditioned and remaining half were left unconditioned, subsequent to which RMGIC was placed over MTA. The specimens were then stored in an incubator for 24 hrs at 37° C and 100% humidity. The shear bond strength value of RMGIC to conditioned and unconditioned WMTA was measured and compared using unpaired 't  ’ test. Results: The mean shear bond strength of value of RMGIC to conditioned and unconditioned WMTA was 6.59 MPa and 7.587 MPa respectively. Statistical analysis using unpaired t-test revealed that the difference between values of two groups was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Conclusions: During clinical procedures like pulp capping and furcal repair, if RMGIC is placed as a base over MTA, then conditioning should be done to increase the bond strength between RMGIC and dentin and any inadvertent contact of conditioner with MTA will not significantly affect the shear bond strength value of RMGIC to MTA. PMID:25298644

  12. The Biocompatibility of Porous vs Non-Porous Bone Cements: A New Methodological Approach

    PubMed Central

    Dall’Oca, C.; Maluta, T.; Cavani, F.; Morbioli, G.P.; Bernardi, P.; Sbarbati, A.; Degl’Innocenti, D.; Magnan, B.

    2014-01-01

    Composite cements have been shown to be biocompatible, bioactive, with good mechanical properties and capability to bind to the bone. Despite these interesting characteristic, in vivo studies on animal models are still incomplete and ultrastructural data are lacking. The acquisition of new ultrastructural data is hampered by uncertainties in the methods of preparation of histological samples due to the use of resins that melt methacrylate present in bone cement composition. A new porous acrylic cement composed of polymethyl-metacrylate (PMMA) and β-tricalcium-phosphate (p-TCP) was developed and tested on an animal model. The cement was implanted in femurs of 8 New Zealand White rabbits, which were observed for 8 weeks before their sacrifice. Histological samples were prepared with an infiltration process of LR white resin and then the specimens were studied by X-rays, histology and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). As a control, an acrylic standard cement, commonly used in clinical procedures, was chosen. Radiographic ultrastructural and histological exams have allowed finding an excellent biocompatibility of the new porous cement. The high degree of osteointegration was demonstrated by growth of neo-created bone tissue inside the cement sample. Local or systemic toxicity signs were not detected. The present work shows that the proposed procedure for the evaluation of biocompatibility, based on the use of LR white resin allows to make a thorough and objective assessment of the biocompatibility of porous and non-porous bone cements. PMID:24998920

  13. Shear Bond Strength of Self-Adhering Flowable Composite and Resin-modified Glass Ionomer to Two Pulp Capping Materials

    PubMed Central

    Doozaneh, Maryam; Koohpeima, Fatemeh; Firouzmandi, Maryam; Abbassiyan, Forugh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of a self-adhering flowable composite (SAFC) and resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI) to mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement. Methods and Materials: A total of 72 acrylic blocks with a central hole (4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in depth) were prepared. The holes were filled with MTA (sub group A) and CEM cement. The specimens of both restorative materials were divided into 6 groups; overall there were 12 groups. In groups 1 and 4, SAFC was used without bonding while in groups 2 and 5 SAFC was used with bonding agent. In all these groups the material was placed into the plastic mold and light cured. In groups 3 and 6, after surface conditioning with poly acrylic acid and rinsing, RMGI was placed into the mold and photo polymerized. After 24 h, the shear bond strength values were measured and fracture patterns were examined by a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using the two-way ANOVA and student’s t-test. Results: The use of bonding agent significantly increased the shear bond strength of FC to MTA and CEM cement (P=0.008 and 0.00, respectively). In both materials, RMGI had the lowest shear bond strength values (2.25 Mpa in MTA and 1.32 Mpa in CEM). The mean shear bond strength were significantly higher in MTA specimen than CEM cement (P=0.003). There was a significant differences between fracture patterns among groups (P=0.001). Most failures were adhesive/mix in MTA specimen but in CEM cement groups the cohesive failures were observed in most of the samples. Conclusion: The bond strength of self-adhering flowable composite resin to MTA and CEM cement was higher than RMGI which was improved after the additional application of adhesive. PMID:28179935

  14. Glass ionomer as an expander of allograft in revision arthroplasty of the hip.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, J D J; Cunningham, J L; Samuels, A; Blunn, G W; Lawes, T J; Learmonth, I D; Goodship, A E

    2003-02-01

    The use of glass ionomer as a bone graft expander was investigated in an in vivo model of revision hip arthroplasty. Bone grafts of pure allograft and allograft + glass ionomer particles in a 50:50 by weight mixture were implanted in an ovine hemi-arthroplasty model. Post-operative assessments of locomotor function, radiographic appearance and quantitative changes in mineralisation around the graft were made at 2, 4 and 6 months. Post-mortem assessments of radiographic and histologic appearance of the grafts were made at 6 months. No significant differences were noted in any of the measured or assessed parameters between the two graft types. The glass ionomer particles seemed to be well tolerated within the matrix of new bone, smaller sized particles appearing to be better incorporated than larger ones. The use of particles of glass ionomer as a bone graft expander, in this in vivo model of revision hip arthroplasty, would therefore appear to offer no detriment in performance over pure allograft in the short to medium term.

  15. Clinical performance of Class I nanohybrid composite restorations with resin-modified glass-ionomer liner and flowable composite liner: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Suhasini, Krishtipati; Madhusudhana, Koppolu; Suneelkumar, Chinni; Lavanya, Anumula; Chandrababu, K. S.; Kumar, Perisetty Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Liners play a vital role in minimizing polymerization shrinkage stress by elastic bonding concept and increase the longevity and favorable outcome for composite restorations. Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of nanohybrid composite restorations using resin-modified glass-ionomer and flowable composite liners. Settings and Design: A single-centered, double-blinded randomized clinical trial, with split-mouth design and equal allocation ratio that was conducted in the Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics. Materials and Methods: In forty patients, a total of eighty Class I restorations were placed with resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC) liner (FUJI II LC, GC America) in one group and flowable composite liner (smart dentin replacement/SDR, Dentsply Caulk, Milford, DE, USA) in another group. All restorations were clinically evaluated by two examiners, immediately (baseline), 3, 6, and 12 months using US Public Health Service modified criteria. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed using McNemar's test (P < 0.05). Results: There was no significant difference in the color match, marginal discoloration, surface roughness, and marginal adaptation. Restorations with RMGIC liner group show 20% Bravo scores on anatomic form at 12 months but are still clinically acceptable. Conclusion: Nanohybrid composite restorations with RMGIC (Fuji II LC) and flowable composite liner (SDR) demonstrated clinically acceptable performance after 12 months. PMID:27994310

  16. Bioglass: A novel biocompatible innovation

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Vidya; Lakshmi, T.

    2013-01-01

    Advancement of materials technology has been immense, especially in the past 30 years. Ceramics has not been new to dentistry. Porcelain crowns, silica fillers in composite resins, and glass ionomer cements have already been proved to be successful. Materials used in the replacement of tissues have come a long way from being inert, to compatible, and now regenerative. When hydroxyapatite was believed to be the best biocompatible replacement material, Larry Hench developed a material using silica (glass) as the host material, incorporated with calcium and phosphorous to fuse broken bones. This material mimics bone material and stimulates the regrowth of new bone material. Thus, due to its biocompatibility and osteogenic capacity it came to be known as “bioactive glass-bioglass.” It is now encompassed, along with synthetic hydroxyapatite, in the field of biomaterials science known as “bioactive ceramics.” The aim of this article is to give a bird's-eye view, of the various uses in dentistry, of this novel, miracle material which can bond, induce osteogenesis, and also regenerate bone. PMID:23833747

  17. The role of glass composition in the behaviour of glass acetic acid and glass lactic acid cements.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Saroash; Billington, R W; Pearson, G J

    2008-02-01

    Cements have recently been described, made from glass ionomer glass reacted with acetic and lactic acid instead of polymeric carboxylic acid. From their behaviour a theory relating to a possible secondary setting mechanism of glass ionomer has been adduced. However, only one glass (G338) was used throughout. In this study a much simpler glass ionomer glass (MP4) was compared with G338. This produced very different results. With acetic acid G338 formed cement which became resistant to water over a period of hours, as previously reported, MP4 formed cement which was never stable to water. With lactic acid G338 behaved similarly to G338 with acetic acid, again as reported, but MP4 produced a cement which was completely resistant to water at early exposure and unusually became slightly less resistant if exposure was delayed for 6 h or more. These findings indicate that the theories relating to secondary setting in glass ionomer maturation may need revision.

  18. Bonding ability of paste-paste glass ionomer systems to tooth structure: in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Cook, N B; Feitosa, S A; Patel, A; Alfawaz, Y; Eckert, G J; Bottino, M C

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of nonrinse conditioners (ie, Ketac Nano Primer [KNP] and GC Self Conditioner [SC]) used as substrate pretreatment and their respective paste-paste resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC) (ie, Ketac Nano [KN] and Fuji Filling LC [FF]) on microtensile bond strength to dentin and marginal sealing when compared with traditional RMGIC (ie, Photac Fil [PF] and Fuji II LC [FII]) used in association with polyacrylic acid (ie, Ketac Cavity Conditioner [KC] and GC Cavity Conditioner [CC]). A total of 192 extracted human molars were allocated into eight groups: KNP-KN, KC-KN, KNP-PF, KC-PF, SC-FF, CC-FF, SC-FII, and CC-FII. For microtensile bond strength, the teeth were sectioned to expose occlusal dentin and restored according to the group. After 24 hours the teeth were cut to yield nine beams per tooth (±0.8 mm(2)). Testing was done using a universal testing machine followed by failure mode classification. For microleakage testing, standardized cavity preparations were made on the buccal cementoenamel junction and restored according to the group. The teeth were thermocycled (500 cycles, 8°C to 48°C), sealed, immersed in methylene blue for 24 hours, and then assessed for microleakage using a stereomicroscope. Microtensile bond strengths in megapascals (mean±SE) were KNP-KN: 14.9 ± 1.6, KC-KN: 17.2 ± 1.5, KNP-PF: 31.2 ± 1.6, KC-PF: 26.2 ± 1.2, SC-FF: 23.6 ± 1.5, SC-FII: 31.2 ± 1.5, and CC-FII: 21.9 ± 1.5. Cervical margins showed more microleakage compared with occlusal margins. Overall, the use of nonrinse conditioners in association with traditional RMGICs demonstrated superior microtensile bond strengths to dentin when compared with the paste-paste RMGICs. Meanwhile, the association between polyacrylic acid (CC) and a traditional RMGIC (FII) led to the least microleakage for cervical locations when compared with all other groups.

  19. Shear bond strengths of resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Swift, E J; Pawlus, M A; Vargas, M A

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative materials to dentin. The materials tested were Fuji II LC, Geristore, Photac-Fil, VariGlass VLC, and Vitremer. Ketac-Fil, a conventional glass ionomer, was used as the control. The occlusal surfaces of 60 extracted molars were ground flat in dentin using 600-grit silicon carbide abrasive paper. Dentin surfaces were treated according to manufacturers' instructions, and restorative materials were applied using gelatin capsule matrices. Shear bond strengths were determined after the specimens were thermocycled 500 times. Mean bond strengths of the resin-modified glass ionomers ranged from 1.4 MPa (Photac-Fil) to 12.3 MPa (Fuji II LC). Except for Photac-Fil, all values were significantly higher than the control. Pairwise comparisons between the means for Fuji II LC and Vitremer, Vitremer and Geristore, and Geristore and VariGlass were not significantly different.

  20. Injectable acrylic bone cements for vertebroplasty based on a radiopaque hydroxyapatite. Bioactivity and biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Lidia; Parra, Juan; Vázquez, Blanca; Bravo, Antonio López; Collía, Francisco; Goñi, Isabel; Gurruchaga, Marilo; San Román, Julio

    2009-01-01

    Radiopaque bone cements have been formulated to provide injectable pastes with improved bioactivity to be applied in vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty techniques. The bioactive compound was strontium containing hydroxyapatite salt, which was introduced as obtained (SrHA) or after treatment with MMA monomer (SrHA-t). The in vitro bioactivity of the cements was tested in cement films or in cement pastes introduced directly in a simulated body fluid (SBF) solution at 37 degrees C to mimic the in vivo conditions. Precipitation of an apatite-like layer was observed for the 20 wt %-SrHA-t containing cement in the first experiments, and in all formulations in the second ones. The deposited particles were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy and by EDAX analysis. Radiopacity of cements after immersion in SBF was confirmed. The biocompatibility exhibited by the SrHA containing cements was, in some cases, superior to that shown by a formulation with 10 wt % of BaSO(4). The new formulations prepared with the treated filler exhibited the lowest cytotoxicity and enhanced cellular proliferation. The in vivo biocompatibility tested by an intramuscular model in rats indicated the formation of a membrane formed by collagen fibers containing fibroblasts with no inflammatory cells, such as macrophages, giant cells or lymphocytes in all formulations.

  1. Biocompatibility of mineral trioxide aggregate and three new endodontic cements: An animal study

    PubMed Central

    Aminozarbian, Mohammad-Ghasem; Barati, Masoud; Salehi, Iman; Mousavi, Seyed Behrouz

    2012-01-01

    Background: Introducing new endodontic cements should await comprehensive investigations and new formulations have to be tested in vivo before applying in human beings. So, the purpose of this study was to compare the biocompatibility of new endodontic cements, calcium aluminate α-aluminate cement (CAAC), calcium aluminate α-aluminate plus cement (CAAC plus), and a mixture of wollastonite and CAAC cement (WOLCA) and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), in subcutaneous connective tissue of rats. Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven Wistar rats were divided into three groups of 7, 14, and 30 experimental days. Sterile polyethylene tubes were filled with MTA, CAAC, CAAC Plus, and WOLCA cement and implanted subcutaneously. Empty tubes were implanted as negative control. After the experimental periods, animals were sacrificed by anesthetic overdosing. The occurrence of inflammatory responses was scored according to the previously established scores. Data were statistically analyzed using Friedman, Wilcoxon, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann-Whitney tests. The level of significance was 5% (P<0.05). Results: There was a statistically significant difference between experimental and negative control sites in each group (P<0.05). CAAC Plus showed the highest mean scores of inflammation, compared with MTA, CAAC, and WOLCA cement sits at the end of all periods (P<0.05). There were no statistically significant differences between inflammatory scores of each site in different experimental groups, except CAAC plus sites, in which inflammation increased significantly with time (P<0.05). Conclusion: According to the results of the current study, biocompatibility of CAAC and WOLCA cement were comparable with that of MTA, but CAAC Plus induced an inflammatory response higher than MTA, therefore is not biocompatible. PMID:22363364

  2. Interfacial characteristics of resin-modified glass-ionomer materials: a study on fluid permeability using confocal fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, S K; Watson, T F

    1998-09-01

    The tooth interface with resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (RM GICs) is poorly understood. This study examined the interface, especially with dentin. Cervical cavities in extracted teeth were restored with Fuji II LC, Vitremer, Photac-Fil, or a conventional GIC, Fuji Cap II. Fluorescent dye was placed in the pulp chambers for 3 hrs before the specimens were sectioned. Examination of the tooth/material interface with a confocal microscope showed that dye uptake by the restoration varied among materials. A "structureless", non-particulate, highly-stained layer of GIC was observed next to dentin in Fuji II LC. This layer varied in width, was prominent where the dentin tubules were cut "end-on" and in areas closer to the pulp, and was not seen adjacent to enamel. Vitremer showed minimal dye uptake, and the "structureless" layer was barely discernible. Photac-Fil showed more uniform uptake and absence of this layer. Cracking of enamel was also noted with these materials. The conventional GIC did not show any dye uptake, presence of a "structureless" layer, or enamel cracking. We elucidated the potential mechanisms involved in the formation of a "structureless" interfacial layer in Fuji II LC by studying the variables of cavity design, surface pre-treatment, water content of the tooth, time for it to develop, early finishing, and coating of the restoration. This layer, the "absorption layer", is probably related to water flux within the maturing cement, depending on environmental moisture changes and communication with the pulp in a wet tooth. The "micropermeability model" was useful in this study of the interfacial characteristics of RM GICs.

  3. The effects of glass ionomer and flowable composite liners on the fracture resistance of open-sandwich class II restorations.

    PubMed

    Güray Efes, Begüm; Yaman, Batu Can; Gümüştaş, Burak; Tıryakı, Murat

    2013-01-01

    This in vitro study aimed to investigate the effects of glass-ionomer and flowable composite liners on the fracture resistance of Class II amalgam and composite restorations. Group 1 cavities were restored with amalgam and Group 4 cavities with nanofill composite after the application of a dentin-bonding agent. For the remaining groups, light-cured-glass-ionomer liner was used in a gingival floor proximal box (Groups 2, 5) or flowable composite was used as a liner (Groups 3, 6), the remainder of the cavity was restored with amalgam (Groups 2, 3) or composite (Groups 5, 6). The restorations were loaded in compression to failure. The data was analyzed using Tukey's multiple comparison test. The fracture resistance was significantly higher (p<0.05) in Group 3 than in all other groups, except Group 2 (p>0.05). Flowable composite, glass-ionomer liners increased the fracture resistance of open-sandwich Class II amalgam restorations.

  4. (α'(H))-Dicalcium silicate bone cement doped with tricalcium phosphate: characterization, bioactivity and biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    de Aza, Piedad N; Zuleta, Fausto; Velasquez, Pablo; Vicente-Salar, Nestor; Reig, Juan A

    2014-02-01

    The influence of phosphorus doping on the properties of (α'(H))-dicalcium silicate (C(2)S) bone cement was analyzed, in addition to bioactivity and biocompatibility. All the cements were composed of a solid solution of TCP in C(2)S ([Formula: see text]-C(2)S(ss)) as the only phase present. The compressive strength ranged from 3.8-16.3 MPa. Final setting times ranged from 10 to 50 min and were lower for cements with lower L/P content. Calcium silicate hydrate was the principal phase formed during the hydration process of the cements. The cement exhibited a moderate degradation and could induce carbonated hydroxyapatite formation on its surface and into the pores. The cell attachment test showed that the (α'(H))-C(2)SiO(4) solid solution supported human adipose stem cells adhesion and spreading, and the cells established close contacts with the cement after 24 h of culture. The novel (α'(H))-C(2)S(ss) cements might be suitable for potential applications in the biomedical field, preferentially as materials for bone/dental repair.

  5. Evaluation of the Effect of Different Food Media on the Marginal Integrity of Class V Compomer, Conventional and Resin-Modified Glass-Ionomer Restorations: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Dinakaran, Shiji

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cervical lesions of anterior and posterior teeth are a common finding in routine dental practice. They are of much concern to the patient, if present in esthetically sensitive regions. Adhesive tooth-colored restorative materials are generally recommended for treating such lesions. The aim of the present study was to evaluate and compare the effect of various food media (lime juice, tea, coffee, and Coca-Cola) on the marginal integrity of Class V compomer (Dyract®), conventional glass-ionomer (Fuji II) and resin-modified glass-ionomer (Fuji II LC improved) restorations along their cemental and enamel margins with saline as control media. Materials and Methods: After restoration of prepared Class V cavities in human premolars with the three different materials (n = 8), they were immersed in the test media for 7 days and then stained with methylene blue dye. Buccolingual sections were prepared and examined under stereomicroscope and scores (0-2) were given. Results: Data were analyzed statistically using one-way analysis of variance in SPSS version 16.0. P < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Conclusions: Among the three tested materials Compomer (Dyract®) showed more marginal integrity than the other two. Micro leakage values of Fuji II and Fuji II LC improved were statistically significant in acidic media (lime juice and Coca-Cola) compared to saline. Enamel margins showed more marginal adaptation than cemental margins. PMID:25878480

  6. Human pulp cells response to Portland cement in vitro.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyung-San; Kim, Hyun-Il; Park, Hyo-Jin; Pi, Sung-Hee; Hong, Chan-Ui; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular effects of Portland cement on cultured human pulp cells. Using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, no cytotoxicity was observed in the Portland cement group in comparison with the negative control group, whereas the glass ionomer cement, intermediate restorative material, and Dycal groups showed a survival rate of less than 40% at 12 hours. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that human pulp cells attached to the Portland cement were flat and had numerous cytoplasmic extensions. In the groups in which other materials were used, a few rounded cells were observed on the material but no living cells were observed. The expression of both osteonectin and dentin sialophosphoprotein mRNAs was induced in the Portland cement-treated group. These results suggest that Portland cement is biocompatible, allows the expression of mineralization-related genes on cultured human pulp cells, and has the potential to be used as a proper pulp-capping material.

  7. Phase composition, mechanical performance and in vitro biocompatibility of hydraulic setting calcium magnesium phosphate cement.

    PubMed

    Klammert, Uwe; Reuther, Tobias; Blank, Melanie; Reske, Isabelle; Barralet, Jake E; Grover, Liam M; Kübler, Alexander C; Gbureck, Uwe

    2010-04-01

    Brushite (CaHPO(4) x 2H(2)O)-forming calcium phosphate cements are of great interest as bone replacement materials because they are resorbable in physiological conditions. However, their short setting times and low mechanical strengths limit broad clinical application. In this study, we showed that a significant improvement of these properties of brushite cement could be achieved by the use of magnesium-substituted beta-tricalcium phosphate with the general formula Mg(x)Ca((3-x))((PO(4))(2) with 0 < x < 3 as cement reactants. The incorporation of magnesium ions increased the setting times of cements from 2 min for a magnesium-free matrix to 8-11 min for Mg(2.25)Ca(0.75)(PO(4))(2) as reactant. At the same time, the compressive strength of set cements was doubled from 19 MPa to more than 40 MPa after 24h wet storage. Magnesium ions were not only retarding the setting reaction to brushite but were also forming newberyite (MgHPO(4) x 3H(2)O) as a second setting product. The biocompatibility of the material was investigated in vitro using the osteoblast-like cell line MC3T3-E1. A considerable increase of cell proliferation and expression of alkaline phosphatase, indicating an osteoblastic differentiation, could be noticed. Scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed an obvious cell growth on the surface of the scaffolds. Analysis of the culture medium showed minor alterations of pH value within the physiological range. The concentrations of free calcium, magnesium and phosphate ions were altered markedly due to the chemical solubility of the scaffolds. We conclude that the calcium magnesium phosphate (newberyite) cements have a promising potential for their use as bone replacement material since they provide a suitable biocompatibility, an extended workability and improved mechanical performance compared with brushite cements.

  8. Comparative evaluation of microleakage of nano-filled resin-modified glass ionomer: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Eronat, Nesrin; Yilmaz, Emir; Kara, Nazan; Topaloglu, Ak Asli

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This in vitro study evaluated the microleakage of a nano-filled resin-modified glass ionomer and a high viscosity glass-ionomer restorations in class V cavities. Materials and Methods: Thirty-two class V cavities prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of 16 sound, third molar teeth were randomly assigned into two groups and restored by one of the glass ionomer material; Group A: A high viscosity (Ketac Molar, 3M ESPE) Group B: A nano-filled resin-modified (Ketac N100, 3M ESPE) glass ionomer. One clinician prepared all the cavities. The materials were used according to the manufacturers’ recommendations. The restored teeth were then stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h, thermocycled at 5-55°C for 1000 cycles. The specimens were immersed in aqueous solution of Indian ink dye for 48 h at room temperature. They were embedded in resin polyester and sectioned longitudinally in a buccolingual direction. Microleakage was assessed according to the depth of dye penetration along the restoration. The extent of dye penetration at the occlusal and gingival margins was assessed using a stereo microscope. Randomly selected samples from each group were prepared for scanning electron microscope evaluation. The data were statistically analyzed with Friedman and Wilcoxon signed ranks tests. Results: There were statistically significant differences between the microleakage scores of the two groups for both occlusal and gingival scores (P = 0.001). Occlusal and gingival scores for high viscosity glass ionomer (P = 0.024) and nanoionomer (P = 0.021) using Wilcoxon signed ranks tests showed statistically significant differences. High viscosity glass ionomer showed significantly less microleakage compared to the nano-filled resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGIs) at occlusal margin (P = 0.001). No significant differences were found between the groups at gingival margin (P = 0.0317). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this in vitro study, nano-filled RMGIs

  9. β-Dicalcium silicate-based cement: synthesis, characterization and in vitro bioactivity and biocompatibility studies.

    PubMed

    Correa, Daniel; Almirall, Amisel; García-Carrodeguas, Raúl; dos Santos, Luis Alberto; De Aza, Antonio H; Parra, Juan; Delgado, José Ángel

    2014-10-01

    β-dicalcium silicate (β-Ca₂ SiO₄, β-C₂ S) is one of the main constituents in Portland cement clinker and many refractory materials, itself is a hydraulic cement that reacts with water or aqueous solution at room/body temperature to form a hydrated phase (C-S-H), which provides mechanical strength to the end product. In the present investigation, β-C₂ S was synthesized by sol-gel process and it was used as powder to cement preparation, named CSiC. In vitro bioactivity and biocompatibility studies were assessed by soaking the cement samples in simulated body fluid solutions and human osteoblast cell cultures for various time periods, respectively. The results showed that the sol-gel process is an available synthesis method in order to obtain a pure powder of β-C₂ S at relatively low temperatures without chemical stabilizers. A bone-like apatite layer covered the material surface after soaking in SBF and its compressive strength (CSiC cement) was comparable with that of the human trabecular bone. The extracts of this cement were not cytotoxic and the cell growth and relative cell viability were comparable to negative control.

  10. To evaluate the biocompatibility of the Indian Portland cement with potential for use in dentistry: An animal study

    PubMed Central

    Mangala, M G; Chandra, S M Sharath; Bhavle, Radhika M.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: This study evaluated the biocompatibility of the Indian Portland cement with potential for use in dentistry. Materials and Methods: This study was performed in Swiss albino mice, by implanting the Indian Portland cement pellets subcutaneously. After 1, 3, and 6 weeks the tissue specimens were prepared for histological examination. Results: The histological analysis showed moderate to severe inflammation at 1 week. The inflammation gradually decreased by 6 weeks, with most of the specimens showing the absence of inflammatory reaction. Conclusions: According to these experimental conditions, the tested Indian Portland cement was biocompatible. PMID:26752835

  11. Radiopacity Evaluation of Contemporary Luting Cements by Digitization of Images

    PubMed Central

    Reis, José Maurício dos Santos Nunes; Jorge, Érica Gouveia; Ribeiro, João Gustavo Rabelo; Pinelli, Ligia Antunes Pereira; Abi-Rached, Filipe de Oliveira; Tanomaru-Filho, Mário

    2012-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiopacity of two conventional cements (Zinc Cement and Ketac Cem Easymix), one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RelyX Luting 2) and six resin cements (Multilink, Bistite II DC, RelyX ARC, Fill Magic Dual Cement, Enforce and Panavia F) by digitization of images. Methods. Five disc-shaped specimens (10 × 1.0 mm) were made for each material, according to ISO 4049. After setting of the cements, radiographs were made using occlusal films and a graduated aluminum stepwedge varying from 1.0 to 16 mm in thickness. The radiographs were digitized, and the radiopacity of the cements was compared with the aluminum stepwedge using the software VIXWIN-2000. Data (mmAl) were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). Results. The Zinc Cement was the most radiopaque material tested (P < 0.05). The resin cements presented higher radiopacity (P < 0.05) than the conventional (Ketac Cem Easymix) or resin-modified glass ionomer (RelyX Luting 2) cements, except for the Fill Magic Dual Cement and Enforce. The Multilink presented the highest radiopacity (P < 0.05) among the resin cements. Conclusion. The glass ionomer-based cements (Ketac Cem Easymix and RelyX Luting 2) and the resin cements (Fill Magic Dual Cement and Enforce) showed lower radiopacity values than the minimum recommended by the ISO standard. PMID:23008777

  12. Tissue response to experimental dental cements prepared from a modified powder glass composition.

    PubMed

    Boaventura, Juliana Maria Capelozza; Bertolini, Marcio José; Padovani, Gislaine Cristina; de Oliveira, Maria Rita Brancini; Zaghete, Maria Aparecida; de Oliveira Júnior, Osmir Batista; de Andrade, Marcelo Ferrarezi

    2012-01-01

    The present work seeks to evaluate the biocompatibility of experimental glass ionomer cements (GIC) prepared from niobium-calcium fluoro-alumino-silicate glass powder and two commercial GICs. The GICs were implanted into the subcutaneous connective tissue of sixty rats. The rats were sacrificed during four varying time periods: 7, 15, 30, and 60 days and histopathological examinations were then performed. The Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to evaluate any significant differences between the materials. Additionally, multiple comparisons of the mean rank were also carried out using the Dunn test (p<0.05). No significant differences were observed that one GIC was superior to the other. The tissue response for all of the GICs tested was similar in all the periods examined.

  13. Failure of resin-modified glass-ionomers subjected to shear loading.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, S K; Sherriff, M; Watson, T F

    1999-07-01

    The mechanism of bond failure of resin-modified glass-ionomers is unknown. This study examined the failure on shear loading at the dentine interface of these materials. Twenty-five teeth (embedded in acrylic blocks) were sectioned longitudinally to expose a flat dentine surface. Cylinders of materials were made by injecting into a tube placed on the dentine of each section surface. The materials used were Fuji Cap II and Fuji II LC (GC Corp., Japan), Vitremer (3M Dental Products, USA), Photac-Fil (original) and Photac-Fil* (new) (ESPE Dental-AG, Germany). After a week, a fluorescent dye was placed in the pulp chamber of each tooth and left for 3 h. The specimens were sectioned through the cylinders before both halves were tested in shear. The failure was observed using a confocal microscope, with video rate images (stored) digitally. The shear load at failure and locus of failure were recorded. All specimens had intact interfaces before testing, except the original Photac-Fil specimens which dislodged from their tooth surfaces even before testing, while being mounted on the device. An amorphous zone or absorption layer was noted at the dentine interface of 60% of Fuji II LC, 22% of Vitremer and all of the Photac-Fil* (new) specimens, but not in Fuji Cap II. Failure was cohesive in Fuji II LC, adhesive in Vitremer, cohesive/adhesive in Photac-Fil* (new) and cohesive in Fuji Cap II. In specimens with the absorption layer present, the failure was at the material/absorption layer interface, leaving it behind on the dentine surface. The mean stresses at failure (MPa) and standard deviations were 5.60, 2.46 (Fuji II LC); 4.82, 0.99 (Vitremer); 4.97, 2.10 MPa (Photac-Fil*); and 3.48, 1.06 (Fuji Cap II). All data were normally distributed as tested by the Shapiro-Francia test. One-way analysis of variance using exact inferential statistics indicated no significant difference between the mean failure stress for all the systems, p = 0.08. The mechanism of failure of resin

  14. Evaluation of inherent toxicology and biocompatibility of magnesium phosphate bone cement.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yonglin; Wang, Jing; Liu, Changsheng; Zhang, Bingwen; Chen, Honghong; Guo, Han; Zhong, Gaoren; Qu, Weidong; Jiang, Songhui; Huang, Huangyuan

    2010-04-01

    Magnesium phosphate cement (MPC) is a kind of novel biodegradable bone adhesive for its distinct performance. However, there is few research work concerning on the systemic biocompatibility and genetic toxicological evaluation of MPC. In this study, the investigation on the inherited toxicology of MPC including gene mutation assay (Ames test), chromosome aberration assay (micronucleus test), and DNA damage assay (unscheduled DNA synthesis test) were carried out. Fracture healing and degradation behavior were explored for the evaluation of the biocompatibility of MPC, using macroscopical histological, histomorphometrical, and scanning electron microscopical methods. The results of mutagenicity and potential carcinogenicity of MPC extracts were negative, and the animal implantation illustrated no toxicity and good resorption. The study suggested that bioresorbable MPC was safe for application and might have potential applications for physiological fracture fixation.

  15. Two-year clinical performance of a resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative material.

    PubMed

    Brackett, W W; Gilpatrick, R O; Browning, W D; Gregory, P N

    1999-01-01

    This study was a 2-year clinical evaluation of a conventional and a resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative material. Thirty-four restorations each of Ketac-Fil and Photac-Fil were placed without tooth preparation in cervical abrasion/abfraction lesions, primarily in premolar teeth. Patients ranged in age from 30 to 73 years, with a median age of 45 years. Isolation for the restorations was accomplished with cotton rolls. Restorations of both materials were retained at the rate of 93%, and both were comparable in appearance, receiving Alfa ratings for more than 85% of the restorations. One occurrence of secondary caries was observed for each material. No significant difference between the materials was observed for any evaluation category (exact binomial test, P > 0.05).

  16. Fluoride release of glass ionomer restorations after bleaching with two different bleaching materials

    PubMed Central

    Baroudi, Kusai; Mahmoud, Rasha Said; Tarakji, Bassel

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to evaluate the effect of two bleaching agents on the fluoride release of three types of glass ionomer materials. Materials and Methods: A total of 90 specimens of the tested materials (Ketac Fil, Photac Fil and F2000) were prepared by a split Teflon ring with an internal diameter of 5 mm and thickness of 2 mm. The tested materials were applied and bleached according to manufacturer instructions. Fluoride release measurements were made by using specific ion electrode. Results: Results revealed that bleaching with opalescence Xtra caused little increase in fluoride release from Ketac Fil and Photac Fil but has no effect on F2000. However, Opalescence Quick had no significant effect on the three tested materials. Conclusions: Bleaching effect on fluoride release is material dependent and time has a significant role on fluoride release. PMID:24883026

  17. Reinforcing effect of a resin glass ionomer in the restoration of immature roots in vitro.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Fernando; Kaplan, Andrea; Roitman, Marcela; Manfré, Susana; Picca, Mariana

    2002-04-01

    Fifty-six extracted maxillary central incisors were used for this study. The crown of each tooth was removed in order to obtain a standard length of 13 mm. Root canals were enlarged to simulate immature teeth after apexification. The apical 2 mm of the root canal was obturated with gutta-percha and AH26 sealer. The specimens were divided into two groups. Group A was unrestored and served as positive control. In group B, the canal walls were reinforced with a resin modified glass ionomer using a translucent curing post. All teeth were subjected to compressive force using an Instron testing machine until fracture occurred. Group B showed an increased resistance to fracture (456.02 +/- 172.47 N) compared with group A (263.46 +/- 98.00 N). The difference between groups was statistically significant (P < 0.005).

  18. An assessment of encapsulated versus hand-mixed glass ionomer restoratives.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Garry J P; Zala, Dillon M

    2003-01-01

    Capsulation should enable uniform proportioning and mixing of dental restoratives so that functional properties of the cementitious mass will not be susceptible to clinically induced variability. Mechanical mixing induces a definite pore distribution determined by the viscosity of the system. This study evaluated the mixing process on the performance of a range of glass ionomer dental restoratives. Mean compressive fracture strengths and standard deviations and the associated Weibull Moduli (m) were determined for six glass ionomer restoratives that were either encapsulated or mixed by hand. Working characteristics were assessed using an oscillating rheometer. Scanning electron microscopy and image analysis was used to investigate the influence of the mixing method on pore distribution. The fracture strength data for some encapsulated restoratives resulted in significant differences compared with hand-mixing. Rotomix (compared with the Capmix mechanical agitator) resulted in increased Weibull moduli and 10% failure stress for the two restoratives that were investigated. Encapsulated restoratives that were prepared utilizing Rotomix or Capmix resulted in no significant differences for working characteristics; however, the setting time for the ChemFlex in Caps was extended compared with the hand-mixed ChemFlex. Not all restoratives had reduced porosity and improved performance following mixing with a Rotomix. This suggested that optimization of the initial viscosity of the system by manipulating the individual proportions of the constituents may not have been appropriate for all the restoratives investigated. The increased viscosity for hand-mixed ChemFlex prepared to a consistency of 3.8 g/ml compared with encapsulated ChemFlex in Caps prepared to a consistency of 3.5 g/ml was responsible for the reduced setting time.

  19. Effect of time on the flexural strength of glass ionomer and composite orthodontic adhesives.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Christophe; Forestier, Jean-Paul; Tavernier, Bruno

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of time on the flexural strength of a resin-reinforced glass ionomer and a composite adhesive system, specifically at three time frames corresponding to the three stages of polymerization of Fuji Ortho LC. Ten rectangular specimens of each material were prepared in a metal mold (25 x 2 x 2 mm) and then stored at 37 degrees C and 100% humidity in an incubator. Six test groups were created, in which each specimen was fractured using a 3-point-bending test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The test results indicated that there were significant differences among the groups (P = .0001). The flexural strengths were significantly higher in the two groups (III and VI) that were fractured after seven days. This was true for both the Fuji Ortho LC (x = 77 +/- 6.1 MPa) and the Concise (x = 103.9 +/- 4.2 MPa). The flexural strength of the resin-modified glass ionomer adhesive was significantly lower than that for the composite whatever the time of fracture, 10 minutes, one hour, or seven days. The analysis of the strength-deformation curve of the group of Fuji Ortho LC, which was fractured within 10 minutes after setting (group I), showed viscoplastic behavior, whereas that of all the others groups showed elastic behavior. According to this study, clinicians must consider the mechanics of Fuji Ortho LC setting and, when this material is used, wait for at least one hour to ligate initial or repaired arch wires.

  20. Plasma nitriding of titanium alloy: Effect of roughness, hardness, biocompatibility, and bonding with bone cement.

    PubMed

    Khandaker, Morshed; Riahinezhad, Shahram; Li, Yanling; Vaughan, Melville B; Sultana, Fariha; Morris, Tracy L; Phinney, Lucas; Hossain, Khalid

    2016-11-25

    Titanium (Ti) alloys have been widely used in orthopedics and orthodontic surgeries as implants because of their beneficial chemical, mechanical, and biological properties. Improvement of these properties of a Ti alloy, Ti-6Al-4V Eli, is possible by the use of plasma nitriding treatment on the Ti alloy. The novelty of this study is the evaluation of a DC glow discharge nitrogen plasma treatment method on the surface, mechanical and biological properties of Ti alloy. Specifically, this study measured the chemical states, roughness, hardness, and biocompatibility of plasma nitride treated Ti-6Al-4V Eli as well as determined the effect of plasma treatment on the fracture strength between the Ti alloy and bone clement. This study hypothesized that DC glow discharge nitrogen plasma treatment may alter the surface chemical and mechanical states of the Ti alloy that may influence the fracture strength of implant/cement interfaces under static load. This study found that plasma nitride treatment on Ti alloy does not have effect on the roughness and biocompatibility (P value > 0.5), but significantly effect on the hardness and fracture strength of Ti-bone cement interfaces compared to those values of untreated Ti samples (P value < 0.5). Therefore, the DC glow discharge nitrogen plasma treated Ti alloy can potentially be used for orthopedic applications.

  1. Effect of Tricalcium Aluminate on the Physicochemical Properties, Bioactivity, and Biocompatibility of Partially Stabilized Cements

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kai-Chun; Chang, Chia-Chieh; Huang, Ying-Chieh; Chen, Min-Hua; Lin, Feng-Huei; Lin, Chun-Pin

    2014-01-01

    Background/Purpose Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) was widely used as a root-end filling material and for vital pulp therapy. A significant disadvantage to MTA is the prolonged setting time has limited the application in endodontic treatments. This study examined the physicochemical properties and biological performance of novel partially stabilized cements (PSCs) prepared to address some of the drawbacks of MTA, without causing any change in biological properties. PSC has a great potential as the vital pulp therapy material in dentistry. Methods This study examined three experimental groups consisting of samples that were fabricated using sol-gel processes in C3S/C3A molar ratios of 9/1, 7/3, and 5/5 (denoted as PSC-91, PSC-73, and PSC-55, respectively). The comparison group consisted of MTA samples. The setting times, pH variation, compressive strength, morphology, and phase composition of hydration products and ex vivo bioactivity were evaluated. Moreover, biocompatibility was assessed by using lactate dehydrogenase to determine the cytotoxicity and a cell proliferation (WST-1) assay kit to determine cell viability. Mineralization was evaluated using Alizarin Red S staining. Results Crystalline phases, which were determined using X-ray diffraction analysis, confirmed that the C3A contents of the material powder differed. The initial setting times of PSC-73 and PSC-55 ranged between 15 and 25 min; these values are significantly (p<0.05, ANOVA and post-hoc test) lower than those obtained for MTA (165 min) and PSC-91 (80.5 min). All of the PSCs exhibited ex vivo bioactivity when immersed in simulated body fluid. The biocompatibility results for all of the tested cements were as favorable as those of the negative control, except for PSC-55, which exhibited mild cytotoxicity. Conclusion PSC-91 is a favorable material for vital pulp therapy because it exhibits optimal compressive strength, a short setting time, and high biocompatibility and bioactivity. PMID:25247808

  2. Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Methacrylate- and Silorane-based Composite Resin Bonded to Resin-Modified Glass-ionomer Containing Micro- and Nano-hydroxyapatite

    PubMed Central

    Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Moradian, Marzie; Motamedi, Mehran

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem The adhesion of resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI) to composite resin has a very important role in the durability of sandwich restorations. Hydroxyapatite is an excellent candidate as a filler material for improving the mechanical properties of glass ionomer cement. Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the effect of adding micro- and nano-hydroxyapatite (HA) powder to RMGI on the shear bond strength (SBS) of nanofilled and silorane-based composite resins bonded to RMGI containing micro- and nano-HA. Materials and Method Sixty cylindrical acrylic blocks containing a hole of 5.5×2.5 mm (diameter × height) were prepared and randomly divided into 6 groups as Group 1 with RMGI (Fuji II LC) plus Adper Single Bond/Z350 composite resin (5.5×3.5 mm diameter × height); Group 2 with RMGI containing 25 wt% of micro-HA plus Adper Single Bond/Z350 composite resin; Group3 with RMGI containing 25 wt% of nano-HA plus Adper Single Bond/Z350 composite resin; Group 4 with RMGI plus P90 System Adhesive/P90 Filtek composite resin (5.5×3.5 mm diameter × height); Group 5 with RMGI containing 25 wt% of micro-HA plus P90 System Adhesive/P90Filtek composite resin; and Group 6 with RMGI containing 25 wt% of nano-HA plus P90 System Adhesive/P90 Filtek composite resin. The specimens were stored in water (37° C, 1 week) and subjected to 1000 thermal cycles (5°C/55°C). SBS test was performed by using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (p< 0.05). Results There were significant differences between groups 1 and 4 (RMGI groups, p= 0.025), and groups 3 and 6 (RMGI+ nano-HA groups, p= 0.012). However, among Z350 and P90 specimens, no statistically significant difference was detected in the SBS values (p= 0.19, p= 0.083, respectively). Conclusion RMGI containing HA can improve the bond strength to methacrylate-based in comparison to silorane-based composite resins. Meanwhile, RMGI

  3. The biocompatibility of calcium phosphate cements containing alendronate-loaded PLGA microparticles in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu-Hua; Wang, Zhen-Dong; Wang, Wei; Ding, Chang-Wei; Zhang, Hao-Xuan

    2015-01-01

    The composite of poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) and calcium phosphate cements (CPC) are currently widely used in bone tissue engineering. However, the properties and biocompatibility of the alendronate-loaded PLGA/CPC (APC) porous scaffolds have not been characterized. APC scaffolds were prepared by a solid/oil/water emulsion solvent evaporation method. The morphology, porosity, and mechanical strength of the scaffolds were characterized. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) from rabbit were cultured, expanded and seeded on the scaffolds, and the cell morphology, adhesion, proliferation, cell cycle and osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs were determined. The results showed that the APC scaffolds had a porosity of 67.43 ± 4.2% and pore size of 213 ± 95 µm. The compressive strength for APC was 5.79 ± 1.21 MPa, which was close to human cancellous bone. The scanning electron microscopy, cell counting kit-8 assay, flow cytometry and ALP activity revealed that the APC scaffolds had osteogenic potential on the BMSCs in vitro and exhibited excellent biocompatibility with engineered bone tissue. APC scaffolds exhibited excellent biocompatibility and osteogenesis potential and can potentially be used for bone tissue engineering. PMID:25877763

  4. Caries-Preventive Effect of High-Viscosity Glass Ionomer and Resin-Based Fissure Sealants on Permanent Teeth: A Systematic Review of Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Mickenautsch, Steffen; Yengopal, Veerasamy

    2016-01-01

    Background Glass-ionomers are traditionally regarded to be inferior to resin as fissure sealants in protecting teeth from dental caries, due to their comparatively lower retention rate. Unlike low-viscosity glass-ionomers, high-viscosity glass-ionomer cements (HVGIC) are placed as sealants by pressing the material into pits and fissures with a petroleum-jelly-coated index finger. Hence, HVGIC sealants are assumed to penetrate pits and fissures deeper, resulting in a higher material retention rate, which may increase its caries-preventive effect. Methods The aim of this review was to answer the question as to whether, in patients with fully erupted permanent molar teeth, HVGIC based fissure sealants are less effective to protect against dental carious lesions in occlusal pits and fissures than resin-based fissure sealants? A systematic literature search in eight databases was conducted. Heterogeneity of accepted trials and imprecision of the established evidence were assessed. Extracted sufficiently homogenous datasets were pooled by use of a random-effects meta-analysis. Internal trial validity was evaluated. The protocol of this systematic review was registered with the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (PROSPERO / Nr.: CRD42015016007). Results Seven clinical trials were provisionally included for further review. Of these, one was excluded. Seven trial reports reporting on six trials were accepted. From these, 11 datasets were extracted and pooled in four meta-analyses. The results suggest no statistically significant differences after up to 48 months and borderline significant differences in favour of HVGIC sealants after 60 months (RR 0.29; 95% CI: 0.09–0.95; p = 0.04 / RD -0.07; 95% CI: -0.14, -0.01). The point estimates and upper confidence levels after 24, 36, 48 and 60 months of RR 1.36; RR 0.90; RR 0.62; RR 0.29 and 2.78; 1.67; 1.21; 0.95, respectively, further suggest a chronological trend in favour of HVGIC above resin

  5. [Clinical examination of the gingival effects of three glass ionomer restorative materials (GC Fuji IX GP, GC Fuji IX GP EXTRA és GC EQUIA)].

    PubMed

    Horváth, Attila; Papp, Zsuzsanna; Dobó-Nagy, Csaba; Gera, István

    2014-12-01

    The restoration of cervical abrasions, erosions or cervical carious lesions is still challenging because of their unpredictable adhesion and possible negative effects on the marginal plaque accumulation. The impact of three different glass ionomer cements (GIC) on the marginal gingiva and root sensitivity was studied. Furthermore, it was investigated in details, whether or not a recently developed light curing varnish (GC Coat - EQUIA) had any additional effect on the gingival tissue. A total number of 30 non-smokers with healthy gingiva having at least one cervical supra/paragingival abrasion/erosion/abfraction defects were enrolled in the present study. The cervical defects were randomly restored by using one of the three GIC and the gingival parameters were recorded and evaluated at baseline, 6 weeks and 6 months. According to our results root sensitivity were substantially decreased in all the three groups. Plaque scores were also reduced in all groups with the greatest improvement at the sites where the new varnish were applied. Although this improvement was not reflected by the gingival parameters, such as bleeding on probing and crevicular fluid flow, since both were slightly increased in the varnish group. However, neither the intra-group, nor the intergroup differences reached statistical significance. Consequently, the three investigated GIC did not significantly affect the gingival health, therefore they might serve as alternative for the treatment of such cervical lesions. Nevertheless, the new light cure varnish-coated GIC did not seem to be either clinically or statistical significantly more favorable.

  6. Clinical performance of a resin-modified glass-ionomer and two polyacid-modified resin composites in cervical lesions restorations: 1-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Chinelatti, M A; Ramos, R P; Chimello, D T; Palma-Dibb, R G

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical performance of a resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (Vitremer) and two polyacid-modified resin composites (F2000 and Freedom) over 1 year. Nineteen patients with at least three cervical lesions were selected, providing an initial sample size of 87 restorations (29 per material), being 78 to non-carious and nine to carious lesions. Restorations were evaluated at baseline, 6 months and 1 year after placement, using modified US Public Health Service criteria: colour match, marginal discoloration, caries, anatomical form, marginal integrity and surface texture. At baseline, restorations were considered as acceptable for all criteria. At 1-year recall, 21 restorations per material were re-examined. Freedom was rated Bravo or Charlie for all the examined criteria and Vitremer earned an Alfa rating solely for the criterion caries. On the contrary, F2000 showed the best overall results, although presenting significant alteration in colour match. Statistical analysis of data was performed using chi-square and Mc Nemar tests. As to the evaluated periods, significant difference was observed solely between baseline and 1-year recall. Freedom and Vitremer were statistically different (P < 0.01) as to anatomical form and surface texture. For F2000, significant difference (P < 0.05) was noticed as to colour match and anatomical form. After 1-year follow-up, F2000 showed the most acceptable results as to the analysed criteria.

  7. Methods and preliminary findings of a cost-effectiveness study of glass-ionomer-based and composite resin sealant materials after 2 yr.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Ann S; Chen, Xi; Fan, Mingwen; Frencken, Jo E

    2014-06-01

    The cost-effectiveness of glass-carbomer, conventional high-viscosity glass-ionomer cement (HVGIC) [without or with heat (light-emitting diode (LED) thermocuring) application], and composite resin sealants were compared after 2 yr in function. Estimated net costs per sealant were obtained from data on personnel time (measured with activity sampling), transportation, materials, instruments and equipment, and restoration costs for replacing failed sealants from a community trial involving 7- to 9-yr-old Chinese children. Cost data were standardized to reflect the placement of 1,000 sealants per group. Outcomes were the differences in the number of dentine caries lesions that developed between groups. The average sealant application time ranged from 5.40 min (for composite resin) to 8.09 min (for LED thermocured HVGIC), and the average cost per sealant for 1,000 performed per group (simulation sample) ranged from $US3.73 (for composite resin) to $US7.50 (for glass-carbomer). The incremental cost-effectiveness of LED thermocured HVGIC to prevent one additional caries lesion per 1,000 sealants performed was $US1,106 compared with composite resin. Sensitivity analyses showed that differences in the cost of materials across groups had minimal impact on the overall cost. Cost and effectiveness data enhance policymakers' ability to address issues of availability, access, and compliance associated with poor oral-health outcomes, particularly when large numbers of children are excluded from care, in economies where oral health services are still developing.

  8. Evaluation of surface roughness and hardness of different glass ionomer cements

    PubMed Central

    Bala, Oya; Arisu, Hacer Deniz; Yikilgan, Ihsan; Arslan, Seda; Gullu, Abdulkadir

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate surface roughness and hardness of a nanofiller GIC, a resin-modified GIC, three conventional GICs, and a silver-reinforced GIC. Methods: For each material, 11 spcecimens were prepared and then stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 24 h. The surface roughness of 5 specimens was measured using a surface profilometer before polishing and after polishing with coarse, medium, fine, superfine aluminum oxide abrasive Sof-Lex discs respectively. The hardness of the upper surfaces of the remaining 6 specimens was measured with a Vickers microhardness measuring instrument. Results: All tested GICs showed lower surface roughness values after the polishing procedure. Surface finish of nanofiller GIC was smoother than the other tested GICs after polishing. This was followed by resin-modified GIC, Fuji II LC; then silver-reinforced GIC, Argion Molar, conventional GICs, Aqua Ionofil Plus, Fuji IX, and Ionofil Molar, respectively. The result of the hardness test indicated that the microhardness value of silver-reinforced GIC was greater than that of the other GICs. When the hardness values of all tested GICs were compared, the differences between materials (except Aqua Ionofil Plus with Ionofil Molar and Ketac N100 with Fuji II LC (P>.05)) were found statistically significant (P<.05). Conclusions: According to the results of this study, it can be concluded that the differences in the composition of GICs may affect their surface roughness and hardness. PMID:22229011

  9. The impact of zirconium oxide nanoparticles on the hydration chemistry and biocompatibility of white Portland cement.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiu; Deacon, Andrew D; Coleman, Nichola J

    2013-01-01

    Zirconium oxide (ZrO2) has been nominated as a radiopacifying agent for use in MTA-like Portland cement-based root-filling materials. This research examines the impact of 20 wt% ZrO2 nanoparticles in the size range 50 to 75 nm on the early hydration chemistry of white Portland cement. Nano-ZrO2 was found to accelerate the degree of hydration by 26% within the first 24 h by presenting efficient nucleation sites for the precipitation and growth of the early C-S-H gel products. The presence of nano-ZrO2 was also found to divert the fate of the aluminium-bearing reaction products by lowering the ettringite to monosulphate ratio, reducing the size of the ettringite crystals and by increasing the Al:Si ratio of the C-S-H gel phase. The chemical and microstructural changes conferred upon the cement matrix by the nano-ZrO2 particles had a positive impact on in vitro biocompatibility with respect to MG63 osteosarcoma cells (via MTT assay).

  10. Experimental studies on a new bioactive material: HAIonomer cements.

    PubMed

    Yap, A U J; Pek, Y S; Kumar, R A; Cheang, P; Khor, K A

    2002-02-01

    The lack of exotherm during setting, absence of monomer and improved release of incorporated therapeutic agents has resulted in the development of glass ionomer cements (GICs) for biomedical applications. In order to improve biocompatibility and biomechanically match GICs to bone, hydroxyapatite-ionomer (HAIonomer) hybrid cements were developed. Ultra-fine hydroxyapatite (HA) powders were produced using a new induction spraying technique that utilizes a radio-frequency source to spheriodize an atomized suspension containing HA crystallites. The spheriodized particulates were then held at 800 degrees C for 4 h in a carbolite furnace using a heating and cooling rate of 25 degrees C/min to obtain almost fully crystalline HA powders. The heat-treated particles were characterized and introduced into a commercial glass ionomer cement. 4 (H4), 12 (H12) and 28 (H28) vol% of fluoroalumino silicate were substituted by crystalline HA particles that were dispersed using a high-speed dispersion technique. The HAIonomer cements were subjected to hardness, compressive and diametral tensile strength testing based upon BS6039:1981. The storage time were extended to one week to investigate the effects of cement maturation on mechanical properties. Commercially available capsulated GIC (GC) and GIC at maximum powder:liquid ratio (GM) served as comparisons. Results were analyzed using factorial ANOVA/Scheffe's post-hoc tests and independent samples t-test at significance level 0.05. The effect of time on hardness was material dependent. With the exception of H12, a significant increase in hardness was observed for all materials at one week. A significant increase in compressive strength was, however, observed for H12 over time. At 1 day and 1 week, the hardness of H28 was significantly lower than for GM, H4, and H12. No significant difference in compression and diametral tensile strengths were observed between materials at both time intervals. Results show that HAIonomers is a

  11. Restoration of endodontically treated anterior teeth: an evaluation of coronal microleakage of glass ionomer and composite resin materials.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Arnold, A M; Wilcox, L R

    1990-12-01

    A glass ionomer material was evaluated for coronal microleakage in permanent lingual access restorations of endodontically treated anterior teeth. The material was tested as a restoration, placed over a zinc oxide-eugenol base, and as a base with an acid-etched composite resin veneer and a dentinal bonding agent. Restored teeth were thermocycled, immersed in silver nitrate, developed, and sectioned to assess microleakage. Significant coronal leakage was observed with all materials used.

  12. An evaluation of microleakage of various glass ionomer based restorative materials in deciduous and permanent teeth: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Teena; Pandit, I.K.; Srivastava, Nikhil; Gugnani, Neeraj; Gupta, Monika

    2011-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the microleakage of recently available glass ionomer based restorative materials (GC Fuji IX GP, GC Fuji VII, and Dyract) and compare their microleakage with the previously existing glass ionomer restorative materials (GC Fuji II LC) in primary and permanent teeth. Method One hundred and fifty (75 + 75) non-carious deciduous and permanent teeth were restored with glass ionomer based restorative materials after making class I cavities. Samples were subjected to thermocycling after storing in distilled water for 24 h. Two coats of nail polish were applied 1 mm short of restorative margins and samples sectioned buccolingually after storing in methylene blue dye for 24 h. Microleakage was assessed using stereomicroscope. Result Significant differences (P < 0.05) were found when inter group comparisons were done. Except when GC Fuji VII (Group III) was compared with GC Fuji II LC (Group II) and Dyract (Group IV), non-significant differences (P > 0.05) were observed. It was found that there was no statistically significant difference when the means of microleakage of primary teeth were compared with those of permanent teeth. Conclusions GC Fuji IX GP showed maximum microleakage and GC Fuji VII showed least microleakage. PMID:23960526

  13. Comparative in vitro microradiographic effects of resin-modified and autopolymerizing glass ionomers on demineralization of primary and permanent enamel.

    PubMed

    Wandera, A; Garcia, G

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare in vitro effects of resin-modified and autopolymerizing glass ionomer restorative materials on demineralization of primary and permanent human enamel. Thirty primary and permanent enamel specimens measuring approximately 3 x 4 x 4 mm were sectioned and plano-paralleled before random placement of materials: Photac-Fil, a resin-modified glass ionomer; Ketac-Fil, an autopolymerizing glass ionomer; and Tytin, a silver amalgam. After incubation for twenty-four hours, the samples were pH cycled for eight hours at pH 5.0 and sixteen hours at pH 7.2 for a total of two weeks, all at 37 degrees C. The specimens were then subjected to an artificial caries challenge at pH 5.0 for 196 hours. The specimens were embeded in Epon 812 and incubated at 55 degrees C for thirty-six hours. Microsections were produced from each sample and subjected to microradiography and quantitative microdensitometry. Data on lesion depth and mineral content were analyzed by Two Way ANOVA and Student Newman-Keuls Pairwise Multiple Comparison tests. There were significant differences in lesion depth and mineral content between groups (p < 0.05) and between permanent and primary enamel. This study demonstrates that Photac-Fil and Ketac-Fil prevent in vitro demineralization at varying levels in primary and permanent enamel.

  14. Retentive strength, disintegration, and marginal quality of luting cements.

    PubMed

    Gorodovsky, S; Zidan, O

    1992-08-01

    This study evaluated the retention of complete crowns by using five different methods of cementation. Complete crowns were prepared with standardized dimensions on extracted human molars. Metal crowns were cast with a high noble gold ceramic alloy and were cemented with zinc phosphate cement, glass ionomer cement, composite resin cement, composite resin cement with a dentinal bonding agent, and adhesive resin cement. The retention was measured by subjecting the specimens to tensile load until fracture occurred. The disintegration was measured according to American Dental Association Specification No. 8, and the condition of the cements at the margins of crowns was analyzed by use of a scanning electron microscope. Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance revealed statistically significant differences between the mean retentive strengths. The retention of the zinc phosphate and the glass ionomer groups was significantly different from that of the adhesive resin group. The retention of the adhesive resin cement was 65% greater than the retention of the composite resin and the composite resin/dentinal bonding agent group, but the Mann-Whitney Wilcoxon rank sum test did not depict this difference as significant. The mean +/- SD of the disintegration for the zinc phosphate, the glass ionomer cement, and the composite resin cement was 0.025 +/- 0.013, 0.023 +/- 0.011, and 0.017 +/- 0.001, respectively. The scanning electron microscope analysis of the margins revealed that the composite resin cement was almost intact, the zinc phosphate was subjected to limited disintegration, and the glass ionomer displayed the worst marginal integrity.

  15. Biocompatibility of Portland Cement Modified with Titanium Oxide and Calcium Chloride in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Hoshyari, Narjes; Labbaf, Hossein; Jalayer Naderi, Nooshin; Kazemi, Ali; Bastami, Farshid; Koopaei, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the biocompatibility of two modified formulations of Portland cement (PC) mixed with either titanium oxide or both titanium oxide and calcium chloride. Methods and Materials: Polyethylene tubes were filled with modified PCs or Angelus MTA as the control; the tubes were then implanted in 28 Wistar rats subcutaneously. One tube was left empty as a negative control in each rat. Histologic samples were taken after 7, 15, 30 and 60 days. Sections were assessed histologically for inflammatory responses and presence of fibrous capsule and granulation tissue formation. Data were analyzed using the Fisher’s exact and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Result: PC mixed with titanium oxide showed the highest mean scores of inflammation compared with others. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean inflammatory grades between all groups in each of the understudy time intervals. Conclusion: The results showed favorable biocompatibility of these modified PC mixed with calcium chloride and titanium oxide. PMID:27141221

  16. [Dentin bonding of cements. The bonding of cements with dentin in combination with various indirect restorative materials].

    PubMed

    Peutzfeldt, Anne; Sahafi, Alireza; Flury, Simon

    2011-01-01

    The number of both luting agents and restorative materials available on the market has rapidly increased. This study compared various types of luting agents when used to bond different indirect, laboratory restorative materials to dentin. Cylinders were produced of six restorative materials (gold alloy, titanium, feldspathic porcelain, leucite-glass ceramic, zirconia, and an indirect resin composite). Following relevant pretreatment, the end surface of the cylinders were luted to ground, human dentin with eight different luting agents (DeTrey Zinc [zinc phosphate cement], Fuji I [conventional glass ionomer cement], Fuji Plus [resin-modified glass ionomer cement], Variolink II [conventional etch-and-rinse resin cement], Panavia F2.0 and Multilink [self-etch resin cements], RelyX Unicem Aplicap and Maxcem [self-adhesive resin cements]). After water storage at 37 °C for one week, the shear bond strength of the specimens was measured and the fracture mode was examined stereo-microscopically. Restorative material and luting agent both had a significant effect on bond strength and there was a significant interaction between the two variables. The zinc phosphate cement and the glass ionomer cements resulted in the lowest bond strengths, whereas the highest bond strengths were found with the two self-etch and one of the self-adhesive resin cements.

  17. Do Laboratory Results Concerning High-Viscosity Glass-Ionomers versus Amalgam for Tooth Restorations Indicate Similar Effect Direction and Magnitude than that of Controlled Clinical Trials? - A Meta-Epidemiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Mickenautsch, Steffen; Yengopal, Veerasamy

    2015-01-01

    Background A large percentage of evidence concerning dental interventions is based on laboratory research. The apparent wealth of laboratory evidence is sometimes used as basis for clinical inference and recommendations for daily dental practice. In this study two null-hypotheses are tested: whether trial results from laboratory and controlled clinical trials concerning the comparison of high-viscosity glass-ionomer cements (HVGIC) to amalgam for restorations placed in permanent posterior teeth have: (i) similar effect direction and (ii) similar effect magnitude. Methods 7 electronic databases were searched, as well as reference lists. Odds ratios (OR) and Standardised Mean Differences (SMD) with 95% Confidence intervals were computed for extracted dichotomous and continuous data, respectively. Pooled effect estimates for laboratory and clinical data were computed to test for effect direction. Odds ratios were converted into SMDs. SMDs from laboratory and clinical data were statistically compared to test for differences in effect magnitude. The analysed results were further investigated within the context of potential influencing or confounding factors using a Directed acyclic graph. Results Of the accepted eight laboratory and nine clinical trials, 13 and 21 datasets could be extracted, respectively. The pooled results of the laboratory datasets were highly statistically significant in favor of amalgam. No statistically significant differences, between HVGICs and amalgam, were identified for clinical data. For effect magnitude, statistically significant differences between clinical and laboratory trial results were found. Both null-hypotheses were rejected. Conclusion Laboratory results concerning high-viscosity glass-ionomers versus amalgam for tooth restorations do not indicate similar effect direction and magnitude than that of controlled clinical trials. PMID:26168274

  18. Repairability of three resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, R A; Charlton, D G; Hermesch, C B

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the repair shear bond strengths of three resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative materials repaired at two different times. Thirty specimens of Fuji II LC, Vitremer, and Photac-Fil were prepared in cavities (2 mm x 7 mm) cut into acrylic resin cylinders. After the initial fill, half of the specimens were repaired 5 minutes later and half 1 week later. The specimens were stored in 37 degrees C distilled water when not being repaired or tested. Repairs were made without any surface preparation of the initial fill. Each specimen was mixed according to the manufacturer's directions, placed in the preparation in 1-mm increments and photocured for 40 seconds. The last increment was covered with a plastic strip and a glass slide before curing to create a smooth surface. Repairs were accomplished by drying the specimen for 10 seconds, then adding the new material to the unprepared surface using a 3-mm-thick polytetrafluoroethylene mold. The specimens were thermocycled 500 times, stored in 37 degrees C distilled water for 1 week, then loaded to failure in shear at a rate of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed using a one-way ANOVA and Z-value multiple comparison test to determine significant differences at the 0.05 significance level. Vitremer showed no significant difference in shear bond strength for 5-minute and 1-week repair periods, while Fuji II LC and Photac-Fil did. Repair bond strength of Vitremer was significantly greater than Fuji II LC and Photac-Fil at both repair times. This study showed that time of repair significantly affected the bond strength of two of the materials tested.

  19. Effects of delayed polymerization time and bracket manipulation on orthodontic resin modified glass ionomer adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Danielle Wiggins

    This study examined the effect of varying delayed polymerization times in combination with bracket manipulation on shear bond strength (SBS), degree of conversion (DC), and adhesive remnant index (ARI) score when using a resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI) adhesive. Specimens were divided into three groups of clinically relevant delay times (0.5, 2, and 4-min) to simulate the delay that frequently occurs between bracket placement and manipulation and subsequent light curing. Based on an analysis of variance (alpha=.05), the SBS was not significantly different between the three groups. While one of the goals of this study was to be the first study to quantify DC of RMGI using Raman microspectroscopy, several challenges, including weak peak signal with and without fluorescence, were encountered and as a result, DC could not be determined. A significant difference (p<0.05) in ARI score was detected between the 0.5-min and 4.0-min delay groups with more adhesive remaining on the bracket with increasing delay time. A Spearman correlation between SBS and ARI indicated no positive association between SBS and ARI measures across delay times. The results of this study suggest that clinically relevant delay times of 0.5, 2, and 4-min do not negatively impact the SBS of a RMGI adhesive. However, with increasing delay time, the results suggest that more adhesive might remain on the bracket during debonding. With more adhesive remaining on the bracket, this could be beneficial in that less adhesive needs to be removed from enamel by grinding at the time of bracket removal when orthodontic treatment is completed.

  20. Shear Bond Strength of Two Types of Glass Ionomer to Bleached Dentin: Effect of Delayed Bonding and Antioxidant Agent

    PubMed Central

    Omrani, Ladan Ranjbar; Sabouri, Parastoo; Abbasi, Mehdi; Ahmadi, Elham; Ghavam, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies have shown a reduction in bond strength of composites and glass ionomer to bleached enamel and dentin. Several methods have been proposed to reverse compromised bond strength. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of delayed bonding and application of antioxidant agent on the bond strength of reinforced self-cured (Fuji IX) and light-cured glass ionomers (Fuji II LC) to bleached dentin. Material: Eighty extracted third molars were randomly divided into 8 groups. Buccal dentin surfaces received different treatments: Two control groups: no treatment + bonding Fuji IX or Fuji II LC. Two immediate bonding groups: bleaching + bonding Fuji IX or Fuji II LC. Two delayed bonding groups: bleaching + 7 days delay + bonding Fuji IX or Fuji II LC. Two sodium ascorbate application groups: Bleaching + application of 10% sodium ascorbate + bonding Fuji IX or Fuji II LC. All samples were tested for shear bond strength. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare the mean and standard deviations among groups, followed by the Tukey’s test for significant interaction. Results: No statistically significant difference was detected in shear bond strength of Fuji IX to bleached or normal dentin. Although a significant reduction was found shear bond strength values of Fuji II LC to bleached dentin, no significant difference was observed between no bleaching group and those treated with 10% sodium ascorbate or 7 days of delay in bonding for both types of glass ionomer. Conclusion: Bleaching had no significant effect on shear bond strength of Fuji IX to dentin; this type of GI can be used immediately after bleaching. PMID:28217187

  1. The effect of Coca-Cola and fruit juices on the surface hardness of glass-ionomers and 'compomers'.

    PubMed

    Aliping-McKenzie, M; Linden, R W A; Nicholson, J W

    2004-11-01

    The interaction of tooth-coloured dental restorative materials (a conventional glass-ionomer, two resin-modified glass-ionomers and two compomers) with acidic beverages has been studied with the aim of investigating how long-term contact affects solution pH and specimen surface hardness. For each material (ChemFil Superior, ChemFlex, Vitremer Core Build-Up/Restorative, Fuji II LC, Dyract AP and F2000) disc-shaped specimens were prepared and stored in sets of six in the following storage media: 0.9% NaCl (control), Coca-Cola, apple juice and orange juice. After time intervals of 1 day, 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, 4 months, 6 months and 1 year, solution pH and Vickers Hardness Number were determined for each individual specimen. Differences were analysed by anova followed by Student-Newman-Keuls post hoc analysis. All materials were found to reduce the pH of the 0.9% NaCl, but to increase the pH of the acidic beverages. The conventional glass-ionomers dissolved completely in apple juice and orange juice, but survived in Coca-Cola, albeit with a significantly reduced hardness after 1 year. The other materials survived in apple juice and orange juice, but showed greater reductions in surface hardness in these beverages than in Coca-Cola. Fruit juices were thus shown to pose a greater erosive threat to tooth coloured materials than Coca-Cola, a finding which is similar to those concerning dentine and enamel towards these drinks.

  2. Effect of two prophylaxis methods on marginal gap of Cl Vresin-modified glass-ionomer restorations

    PubMed Central

    Kimyai, Soodabeh; Pournaghi-Azar, Fatemeh; Daneshpooy, Mehdi; Abed Kahnamoii, Mehdi; Davoodi, Farnaz

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study evaluated the effect of two prophylaxis techniques on the marginal gap of CI V resin-modified glass-ionomer restorations. Methods. Standard Cl V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 48 sound bovine mandibular incisors in this in vitro study. After restoration of the cavities with GC Fuji II LC resin-modified glass-ionomer, the samples were randomly assigned to 3 groups of 16. In group 1, the prophylactic procedures were carried out with rubber cup and pumice powder and in group 2 with air-powder polishing device (APD). In group 3 (control), the samples did not undergo any prophylactic procedures. Then the marginal gaps were measured. Two-way ANOVA was used to compare marginal gaps at the occlusal and gingival margins between the groups. Post hoc Tukey test was used for two-by-two comparisons. Statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results. There were significant differences in the means of marginal gaps in terms of prophylactic techniques (P < 0.001), with significantly larger marginal gaps in the APD group compared to the pumice and rubber cup group, which in turn exhibited significantly larger marginal gaps compared to the control group (P < 0.0005). In addition, the means of marginal gaps were significant in terms of the margin type (P < 0.001), with significantly larger gaps at gingival margins compared to the occlusal margins (P < 0.0005). Conclusion. The prophylactic techniques used in this study had a negative effect on the marginal gaps of Cl V resin-modified glass-ionomer restorations. PMID:27092211

  3. Effect of addition of Nano hydroxyapatite particles on wear of resin modified glass ionomer by tooth brushing simulation

    PubMed Central

    Poorzandpoush, Kiana; Jafarnia, Shiva H.; Golkar, Parisa; Atai, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Background Recently, incorporation of nanohydroxyapatite (NHA) has been suggested to improve the mechanical properties of glass ionomers (GIs). This study aimed to assess the effect of addition of NHA on wear of resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI) by tooth brushing simulation. Material and Methods In this in vitro, experimental study, NHA in 1, 2, 5, 7 and 10wt% concentrations was added to Fuji II LC RMGI powder, and 48 samples (5×5mm) in five experimental and one control group (n=8) were fabricated. After polishing, cleaning and incubation at 37°C for three weeks, the samples were weighed and subjected to tooth brushing simulation in a toothpaste slurry according to ISO14569-1. Then, they were weighed again and the weight loss was calculated. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results The highest and the lowest weight loss was found in the 0% NHA (-1.052±0.176) and 5% NHA (-0.370±0.143) groups, respectively. Wear was significantly higher in 0% NHA group (P<0.05). No difference was detected in wear between 2 and 5wt% NHA or among 1, 7 and 10wt% NHA groups. Significant differences were noted in wear between 2 and 5wt% NHA and 1, 7 and 10wt% NHA groups (P<0.001). Conclusions Incorporation of up to 10wt% of NHA increases the wear resistance of Fuji II LC RMGI. This increase was the highest when 2 and 5wt% NHA were added. Key words:Glass ionomer, hydroxyapatites, nanoparticles, dental restoration wear. PMID:28298977

  4. Efficiency of Amorphous Calcium Phosphate–Containing Orthodontic Composite and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer on Demineralization Evaluated By a New Laser Fluorescence Device

    PubMed Central

    Uysal, Tancan; Amasyali, Mihri; Koyuturk, Alp Erdin; Sagdic, Deniz

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the efficacy of Amorphous Calcium Phosphate (ACP)-containing orthodontic composite and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) on enamel demineralization adjacent to orthodontic brackets evaluated by a new laser fluorescence device. Methods: Sixty extracted maxillary premolars were used in the present study. Twenty orthodontic brackets were bonded with ACP-containing orthodontic adhesive (Aegis-Ortho), 20 were bonded with RMGIC (Fuji Ortho LC) and 20 were bonded with Transbond XT composite as the control. All samples were then cycled for 21 days through a daily procedure of demineralization for 6 hours and remineralization for 17 hours. After this procedure, demineralization evaluations were undertaken by a pen-type laser fluorescence device (DIAGNO-dent Pen). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey test was used for statistical evaluation, at P<.05 level. Results: According to ANOVA, significant demineralization variations (ΔD) were determined among groups (F=6.650; P<.01). The ACP-containing composite showed the lowest (mean: 8.98±2.38) and the control composite showed the highest (mean:12.15±3.83) ΔD, during 21 days demineralization process (P<.01). Significant difference was also observed between the ΔD scores of the RMGIC (mean: 9.24±2.73) and control (P<.05). No significant differences was found in preventive effects of ACP-containing composite and RMGIC (P<.05) against demineralization. Conclusions: The use of both ACP-containing orthodontic composite and RMGIC should be recommended for any at-risk orthodontic patient to provide preventive actions and potentially remineralize subclinical enamel demineralization. PMID:19421393

  5. A study on the radiopacity of different shades of resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Marouf, N; Sidhu, S K

    1998-01-01

    There are several resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative materials available to the dental profession today. The commercially available brands are presented in a range of shades. There is little information on their radiopacity and whether this varies with differences in shade. While the general radiopacity of various products may have been studied, only assumptions are available regarding their consistency between shades. The purpose of this study was to investigate if there were any significant differences in the radiopacity of the shades available within each commercial product. The products evaluated were Fuji II LC, Vitremer, and Photac-Fil. The optical densities of standardized radiographs of samples of these materials were determined and radiopacity values of materials expressed in millimeter equivalents of aluminum. Of the three resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative materials tested, Fuji II LC was the most radiopaque and Photac-Fil the least. Fuji II LC and Vitremer showed radiopacity values equivalent to > 2.5 mm and > 1.5 mm aluminum respectively; Photac-Fil demonstrated very low radiopacity values (equivalent to < 0.6 mm aluminum). Statistical analysis revealed that there was no significant difference in radiopacity among the shades within each of these brands.

  6. Biocompatibility of calcium phosphate bone cement with optimised mechanical properties: an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Iwan; Nelson, John; Schatton, Wolfgang; Dunne, Nicholas J; Buchanan, Fraser; Clarke, Susan A

    2016-12-01

    This work establishes the in vivo performance of modified calcium phosphate bone cements for vertebroplasty of spinal fractures using a lapine model. A non-modified calcium phosphate bone cement and collagen-calcium phosphate bone cements composites with enhanced mechanical properties, utilising either bovine collagen or collagen from a marine sponge, were compared to a commercial poly(methyl methacrylate) cement. Conical cement samples (8 mm height × 4 mm base diameter) were press-fit into distal femoral condyle defects in New Zealand White rabbits and assessed after 5 and 10 weeks. Bone apposition and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity around cements were assessed. All implants were well tolerated, but bone apposition was higher on calcium phosphate bone cements than on poly(methyl methacrylate) cement. Incorporation of collagen showed no evidence of inflammatory or immune reactions. Presence of positive tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining within cracks formed in calcium phosphate bone cements suggested active osteoclasts were present within the implants and were actively remodelling within the cements. Bone growth was also observed within these cracks. These findings confirm the biological advantages of calcium phosphate bone cements over poly(methyl methacrylate) and, coupled with previous work on enhancement of mechanical properties through collagen incorporation, suggest collagen-calcium phosphate bone cement composite may offer an alternative to calcium phosphate bone cements in applications where low setting times and higher mechanical stability are important.

  7. Influence of Acoustic and Electromagnetic Actions on the Properties of Aqueous Nanoparticle Dispersions Used as Tempering Liquids for Dental Cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azharonok, V. V.; Belous, N. Kh.; Rodtsevich, S. P.; Goncharik, S. V.; Chubrik, N. N.; Koshevar, V. D.; Lopat‧ko, K. G.; Aftandilyants, E. G.; Veklich, A. N.; Boretskii, V. F.; Orlovich, A. I.

    2016-05-01

    The authors have studied the physicochemical properties of aqueous dispersions containing carbon, silver, and iron nanoparticles which were produced by elastic-spark synthesis under the conditions of subaqueous spark discharge, and also the influence of preliminary acoustic and high-frequency electromagnetic action on them and the change in the functional indices of the glass-ionomer cement tempered by these dispersions.

  8. Influence of bismuth oxide concentration on the pH level and biocompatibility of white Portland cement

    PubMed Central

    MARCIANO, Marina Angélica; GARCIA, Roberto Brandão; CAVENAGO, Bruno Cavalini; MINOTTI, Paloma Gagliardi; MIDENA, Raquel Zanin; GUIMARÃES, Bruno Martini; ORDINOLA-ZAPATA, Ronald; DUARTE, Marco Antonio Hungaro

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate if there is a relation between the increase of bismuth oxide and the decrease of pH levels and an intensification of toxicity in the Portland cement. Material and Methods White Portland cement (WPC) was mixed with 0, 15, 20, 30 and 50% bismuth oxide, in weight. For the pH level test, polyethylene tubes were filled with the cements and immersed in Milli-Q water for 15, 30 and 60 days. After each period, the increase of the pH level was assessed. For the biocompatibility, two polyethylene tubes filled with the cements were implanted in ninety albino rats (n=6). The analysis of the intensity of the inflammatory infiltrate was performed after 15, 30 and 60 days. The statistical analysis was performed using the Kruskal-Wallis, Dunn and Friedman tests for the pH level and the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests for the biological analysis (p<0.05). Results The results showed an increase of the pH level after 15 days, followed by a slight increase after 30 days and a decrease after 60 days. There were no significant statistical differences among the groups (p>0.05). For the inflammatory infiltrates, no significant statistical differences were found among the groups in each period (p>0.05). The 15% WPC showed a significant decrease of the inflammatory infiltrate from 15 to 30 and 60 days (p<0.05). Conclusions The addition of bismuth oxide into Portland cement did not affect the pH level and the biological response. The concentration of 15% of bismuth oxide resulted in significant reduction in inflammatory response in comparison with the other concentrations evaluated. PMID:25141197

  9. In vitro comparative fluoride release, and weight and volume change in light-curing and self-curing glass ionomer materials.

    PubMed

    Wandera, A; Spencer, P; Bohaty, B

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare in vitro fluoride release from and weight and volume changes of Photac-Fil, a light-curing polymaleinate restorative glass ionomer, with Ketac-Fil, a self-curing glass ionomer, and Ketac-Silver, a metal reinforced glass ionomer. Five discs of each material, measuring 2 mm height and 5 mm diameter, were suspended in separate vials of distilled water and laboratory artificial saliva. Fluoride release into the solutions was measured using a calibrated fluoride-sensitive ion meter initially at 24 hr and then weekly from 1 to 9 weeks. These results were evaluated statistically using repeated measures analysis of variance. Volumes and weights were recorded at the start and end of the experiment and analyzed using the paired t-test. Photac-Fil released similar amounts of fluoride to Ketac-Silver, but significantly less than Ketac-Fil in distilled water (P < or = 0.05). In artificial saliva, Photac-Fil released similar amounts to Ketac-Fil, but significantly more than Ketac-Silver (P < or = 0.05). Photac-Fil volume increased in distilled water and artificial saliva (P < or = 0.05) as did Ketac-Fil and Ketac-Silver in artificial saliva (P < or = 0.05). The only material that demonstrated significant net weight increase was Ketac-Silver in artificial saliva (P < or = 0.05). In summary, differences in fluoride release between these three glass ionomer materials varied as a function of the media in which they were stored. Whereas Ketac-Fil exhibited significantly greater fluoride release than the other materials in distilled water, in artificial saliva Ketac-Fil and Photac-Fil exhibited comparable fluoride release. Dimensional change, as evaluated by volume and weight differences, was also affected by storage media.

  10. Failure Rate of Direct High-Viscosity Glass-Ionomer Versus Hybrid Resin Composite Restorations in Posterior Permanent Teeth - a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Mickenautsch, Steffen; Yengopal, Veerasamy

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Traditionally, resin composite restorations are claimed by reviews of the dental literature as being superior to glass-ionomer fillings in terms of restoration failures in posterior permanent teeth. The aim of this systematic review is to answer the clinical question, whether conventional high-viscosity glass-ionomer restorations, in patients with single and/or multi-surface cavities in posterior permanent teeth, have indeed a higher failure rate than direct hybrid resin composite restorations. Methods Eight databases were searched until December 02, 2013. Trials were assessed for bias risks, in-between datasets heterogeneity and statistical sample size power. Effects sizes were computed and statistically compared. A total of 55 citations were identified through systematic literature search. From these, 46 were excluded. No trials related to high-viscosity glass-ionomers versus resin composite restorations for direct head-to-head comparison were found. Three trials related to high-viscosity glass-ionomers versus amalgam and three trials related to resin composite versus amalgam restorations could be included for adjusted indirect comparison, only. Results The available evidence suggests no difference in the failure rates between both types of restoration beyond the play of chance, is limited by lack of head-to-head comparisons and an insufficient number of trials, as well as by high bias and in-between-dataset heterogeneity risk. The current clinical evidence needs to be regarded as too poor in order to justify superiority claims regarding the failure rates of both restoration types. Sufficiently large-sized, parallel-group, randomised control trials with high internal validity are needed, in order to justify any clinically meaningful judgment to this topic. PMID:26962372

  11. Bond Strength of Silorane- and Methacrylate-Based Composites to Resin-Modified Glass Ionomers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-13

    Mine et al., 2010). Yaman et al. (2010) examined premolars marked for extraction due to orthodontics , bonded either Filtek Supreme XT with Adper...337-44. Li Y, Lee S, Zhang W, Zunt S, Rohrer M. Dentin/ Pulp Biocompatibility of an Adhesive System for Silorane Restorative. IADR 2008, abstract

  12. Effect of cement type on the color attributes of a zirconia ceramic

    PubMed Central

    Namdari, Mahshid; Mahshid, Minoo

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This in vitro study evaluated the effects of four different cements on the color attributes of a zirconia ceramic. MATERIALS AND METHODS 40 zirconia ceramic disk specimens (0.5 mm thickness, 10 mm diameter, 0.1 mm cement space) were fabricated by a computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing system. The specimens were divided into 4 groups of 10 specimens and cemented to composite substrates using four different cements including: Glass Ionomer, Panavia F2.0, Zinc Phosphate, and TempBond. The L*, a*, and b* color attributes of the specimens were measured before and after cementation by a spectrophotometer. Additionally, ΔE values were measured to determine color changes for the groups and then compared with the perceptional threshold of ΔE = 3.3. Repeated Measures ANOVA, Tukey Post Hoc, Bonferroni, One-way ANOVA, and One-sample t-test tests were used to analyze the data. All tests were carried out at the 0.05 level of significance. RESULTS Statistically significant differences were detected in the ΔE values for Zinc Phosphate (P<.0001) and TempBond (P<.0001) groups. However, there were no statistically significant differences in this respect for Glass Ionomer (P=.99) and Panavia F2.0 (P=1) groups. The means and standard deviations of the ΔE values for Glass Ionomer, Panavia F2.0, Zinc Phosphate, and Tempbond groups were 2.11±0.66, 0.94±0.39, 5.77±0.83, and 7.50±1.16 Unit, respectively. CONCLUSION Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that Zinc Phosphate and Tempbond cements affected the color attributes of the tested zirconia ceramic beyond the perceptional threshold. However, Glass Ionomer and Panavia F2.0 cements created acceptable color changes. PMID:28018562

  13. SEALING ABILITY OF CEMENTS IN ROOT CANALS PREPARED FOR INTRARADICULAR POSTS

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Dirce Haruko; Garcia, Roberto Brandão; Bramante, Clóvis Monteiro; de Moraes, Ivaldo Gomes; Bernadineli, Norberti

    2006-01-01

    This research evaluated the sealer ability of 2 temporary filling materials (white Cimpat and IRM) and 1 restorative cement (glass ionomer), in canals prepared for root posts. Sixty human palatal roots of maxillary first molars were used. They were divided into 3 groups, according to the cements used: Group I (Cimpat), Group II (IRM) and Group III (glass ionomer). The roots were rendered impermeable, filled with the respective cements and soon after immersed into 0.2% Rhodamine B dye and maintained for 72 hours in an oven for 37°C. Microleakage was measured with a light microscope, cutting the roots longitudinally in buccolingual direction. The results showed that Group I presented significantly more leakage than Groups II and III, which were not significantly different from each other. PMID:19089266

  14. [The biocompatibility of temporary cements. Longitudinal in-vitro analyses of the pH values].

    PubMed

    Scotti, R; De Felice, R; Catapano, S

    1995-04-01

    In this longitudinal study the authors analyse the acid-basal characteristics in vitro of seven cements used in dentistry for a period of three weeks. The cements tested were subdivided into three groups based on their composition, whereas Life was presented separately since it is generally used as a sub-base for fillings in conservative treatment. All the materials studied alter the pH of the matter in which they are imbedded. Life and Tempbond present the highest and lowest pH values recorded during the study in vitro. The authors discuss the biological implications of these results.

  15. Morphological Changes Of The Root Surface And Fracture Resistance After Treatment Of Root Fracture By CO2 Laser And Glass Ionomer Or Mineral Trioxide Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badr, Y. A.; Abd El-Gawad, L. M.; Ghaith, M. E.

    2009-09-01

    This in vitro study evaluates the morphological changes of the root surface and fracture resistance after treatment of root cracks by CO2 laser and glass Ionomer or mineral trioxide aggregates (MTA). Fifty freshly extracted human maxillary central incisor teeth with similar dimension were selected. Crowns were sectioned at the cemento-enamel junction, and the lengths of the roots were adjusted to 13 mm. A longitudinal groove with a dimension of 1×5 mm2 and a depth of 1.5 mm was prepared by a high speed fissure bur on the labial surface of the root. The roots were divided into 5 groups: the 10 root grooves in group 1 were remained unfilled and were used as a control group. The 10 root grooves in group 2 were filled with glass Ionomer, 10 root grooves in group 3 were filled with MTA, the 10 root grooves in group 4 were filled with glass Ionomer and irradiated by CO2 laser and the 10 root grooves in group 5 were filled with MTA and irradiated with CO2 laser. Scanning electron microscopy was performed for two samples in each group. Tests for fracture strength were performed using a universal testing machine and a round tip of a diameter of 4 mm. The force was applied vertically with a constant speed of 1 mm min 1. For each root, the force at the time of fracture was recorded in Newtons. Results were evaluated statistically with ANOVA and Turkey's Honestly Significant Difference (HSD) tests. SEM micrographs revealed that the melted masses and the plate-like crystals formed a tight Chemical bond between the cementum and glass Ionomer and melted masses and globular like structure between cementum and MTA. The mean fracture resistance was the maximum fracture resistance in group 5 (810.8 N). Glass Ionomer and MTA with the help of CO2 laser can be an alternative to the treatment of tooth crack or fracture. CO2 laser increase the resistance of the teeth to fracture.

  16. Comparative study of fluoride released and recharged from conventional pit and fissure sealants versus surface prereacted glass ionomer technology

    PubMed Central

    Salmerón-Valdés, Elias Nahum; Scougall-Vilchis, Rogelio J; Alanis-Tavira, Jorge; Morales-Luckie, Raúl Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Context: The fluoride release of sealants in vitro shows a marked decrease. Giomers are distinguishable from manufactured resin-based sealants and contain prereacted glass-ionomer particles (PRG). Aims: To compare the amounts of fluoride released from the main pit and fissure of a resin-based sealant with that from a Giomer and to assess the abilities of the sealant and the Giomer to recharge when exposed to regular use of fluoride rinse. Materials and Methods: The readings for the fluoride concentration were carried out for 60 days using a fluoride ion-specific electrode. After this period, the samples were recharged using a fluoride mouth rinse. The amount of fluoride released after this recharge was determined for 5 days. The data were analyzed using Student's t- and analysis of variance tests. Results: In general, all materials presented higher fluoride release in the first 24 h; G1 and G4 showed a higher fluoride release in this period. On the other hand, G3 and G1 presented the most constant fluoride release until the 8th day, wherein all the sealants considerably decreased in the amount of fluoride released. Conclusion: G1 and G3 released higher concentrations of fluoride, although no significant differences were found. Giomers recharged in the first 24 h after polymerization presented an improved and sustained fluoride release. PMID:26957792

  17. Fluoride release and recharge characteristics of denture base resins containing surface pre-reacted glass-ionomer filler.

    PubMed

    Kamijo, Kazuko; Mukai, Yoshiharu; Tominaga, Takatoshi; Iwaya, Izumi; Fujino, Fukue; Hirata, Yukio; Teranaka, Toshio

    2009-03-01

    The flexural strength, flexural modulus, and the amount of fluoride released from four experimental denture base resins containing 5, 10, 20 and 30 wt% surface pre-reacted glass-ionomer (S-PRG) filler added to the powder were evaluated. The mean flexural strength of the experimental resins, except the 30 wt%, and the flexural modulus of all the resins, complied with ISO 1567 requirements. In the 20 wt% resin, the amount of fluoride released in the initial phase was 1.88 microg/cm2/day, after which the level decreased. After recharging in a 9000 ppm fluoride solution for eight hours, the level of released fluoride increased markedly to 40.21 microg/cm2/16 hrs. Our results show that fluoride levels increased as a function of the S-PRG filler content. After the almost completely discharged resins were recharged, similar fluoride release occurred again. These results suggest that denture base resins containing S-PRG filler have great recharge and release capabilities which may assist in preventing root caries of abutment teeth.

  18. Evaluation of micro-shear bond strength of resin modified glass-ionomer to composite resins using various bonding systems

    PubMed Central

    Kasraie, Shahin; Shokripour, Mohadese; Safari, Mahin

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to compare the micro-shear bond strength between composite and resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI) by different adhesive systems. Materials and Methods: A total of 16 discs of RMGI with a diameter of 15 mm and a thickness of 2 mm were randomly divided into four groups (n = 4). Four cylinders of composite resin (z250) were bonded to the RMGI discs with Single Bond, Clearfil SE Bond and Clearfil S3 Bond in Groups 1-3, respectively. The fourth group was the control. Samples were tested by a mechanical testing machine with a strain rate of 0.5 mm/min. Failure mode was assessed under a stereo-microscope. Results: The means of micro-shear bond strength values for Groups 1-4 were 14.45, 23.49, 16.23 and 5.46 MPa, respectively. Using a bonding agent significantly increased micro-shear bond strength (P = 0.0001). Conclusion: Micro-shear bond strength of RMGI to composite increased significantly with the use of adhesive resin. The bond strength of RMGI to composite resin could vary depending upon the type of adhesive system used. PMID:24347892

  19. Effect of modification degree of nanohydroxyapatite on biocompatibility and mechanical property of injectable poly(methyl methacrylate)-based bone cement.

    PubMed

    Quan, Changyun; Tang, Yong; Liu, Zhenzhen; Rao, Minyu; Zhang, Wei; Liang, Peiqing; Wu, Nan; Zhang, Chao; Shen, Huiyong; Jiang, Qing

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study is to prepare a biocompatible nanohydroxyapatite/poly(methyl methacrylate) (HA/PMMA) composite bone cement, which has good mechanical property and can be used for vertebroplasty. Up to 40 wt % of nanohydroxyapatite (nano-HA) in the power, which was surface modified with poly(methylmethacrylate-co-γ-methacryloxypropyl timethoxysilane) [P(MMA-co-MPS)] copolymer, was incorporated into the composite bone cement. The content of P(MMA-co-MPS) on the surface of nano-HA (18.7%, 22.8%, and 26%) was determined through thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The morphology of biomineralized surface of composite bone cement was observed under scanning electron microscope (SEM). The mechanical measurements of the composite cements implied that the interfacial interaction between the HA and PMMA matrix may be greatly enhanced after surface modification of HA. Biochemical assays indicated that the HA/PMMA bone cement had no cytotoxicity and induced no hemolysis. The cell adhesion and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity assays indicated that the biocompatibility of HA/PMMA bone cement could be promoted, demonstrating that it can be used as an ideal weight-bearing bone repair materials on clinical application.

  20. Cements for use in esthetic dentistry.

    PubMed

    Pegoraro, Thiago A; da Silva, Nelson R F A; Carvalho, Ricardo M

    2007-04-01

    Dental cements are designed to retain restorations, appliances, and post and cores in a stable and, presumably, long-lasting position in the oral environment. Conventional glass ionomer and zinc phosphate cements are among the most popular materials for luting metallic restorations and posts, whereas resin-based cements are preferred for esthetic applications. Successful cementation of esthetic restorations is largely dependent on the appropriate treatment and silane application to the internal surface of the restoration. Clinicians are frequently advised to use three-step total-etch or two-step self-etch adhesive for luting purposes to avoid problems of incompatibility between adhesives and chemical- or dual-cure cements. A reliable cementation procedure can only be achieved if the operator is aware of the mechanisms involved and the material limitations.

  1. Comparative Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Luting Cements to Different Core Buildup Materials in Lactic Acid Buffer Solution

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Siddharam M.; Desai, Raviraj G.; Arabbi, Kashinath C.; Prakash, Ved

    2015-01-01

    Aim and Objectives The core buildup material is used to restore badly broken down tooth to provide better retention for fixed restorations. The shear bond strength of a luting agent to core buildup is one of the crucial factors in the success of the cast restoration. The aim of this invitro study was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of luting cements with different core buildup materials in lactic acid buffer solution. Materials and Methods Two luting cements {Traditional Glass Ionomer luting cement (GIC) and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer luting cement (RMGIC)} and five core buildup materials {Silver Amalgam, Glass ionomer (GI), Glass Ionomer Silver Reinforced (GI Silver reinforced), Composite Resin and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer(RMGIC)} were selected for this study. Total 100 specimens were prepared with 20 specimens for each core buildup material using a stainless steel split metal die. Out of these 20 specimens, 10 specimens were bonded with each luting cement. All the bonded specimens were stored at 370c in a 0.01M lactic acid buffer solution at a pH of 4 for 7days. Shear bond strength was determined using a Universal Testing Machine at a cross head speed of 0.5mm/min. The peak load at fracture was recorded and shear bond strength was calculated. The data was statistically analysed using Two-way ANOVA followed by HOLM-SIDAK method for pair wise comparison at significance level of p<0.05. Results Two-Way ANOVA showed significant differences in bond strength of the luting cements (p<0.05) and core materials (p<0.05) and the interactions (p<0.05). Pairwise comparison of luting cements by HOLM-SIDAK test, showed that the RMGIC luting cement had higher shear bond strength values than Traditional GIC luting cement for all the core buildup materials. RMGIC core material showed higher bond strength values followed by Composite resin, GI silver reinforced, GI and silver amalgam core materials for both the luting agents. Conclusion Shear bond strength of

  2. Fracture mechanics analysis of the dentine-luting cement interface.

    PubMed

    Ryan, A K; Mitchell, C A; Orr, J F

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the fracture toughness of adhesive interfaces between dentine and clinically relevant, thin layers of dental luting cements. Cements tested included a conventional glass-ionomer, F (Fuji 1), a resin-modified glass-ionomer, FP (Fuji Plus) and a compomer cement, D (DyractCem). Ten miniature short-bar chevron notch specimens were manufactured for each cement, each comprising a 40 microm thick chevron of lute, between two 1.5 mm thick blocks of bovine dentine, encased in resin composite. The interfacial K(IC) results (MN/m3/2) were median (range): F; 0.152 (0.14-0.16), FP; 0.306 (0.27-0.37), D; 0.351 (0.31-0.37). Non-parametric statistical analysis showed that the fracture toughness of F was significantly lower (p <0.05) than those of FP or D, and all were significantly lower than values for monolithic cement specimens. Scanning electron microscopy of the specimens suggested crack propagation along the interface. However, energy dispersive X-ray analysis indicated that failure was cohesive within the cement. It is concluded that the fracture toughness of luting cement was lowered by cement-dentine interactions.

  3. Biomechanical three-dimensional finite element analysis of monolithic zirconia crown with different cement type

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of various cement types on the stress distribution in monolithic zirconia crowns under maximum bite force using the finite element analysis. MATERIALS AND METHODS The models of the prepared #46 crown (deep chamfer margin) were scanned and solid models composed of the monolithic zirconia crown, cement layer, and prepared tooth were produced using the computer-aided design technology and were subsequently translated into 3-dimensional finite element models. Four models were prepared according to different cement types (zinc phosphate, polycarboxylate, glass ionomer, and resin). A load of 700 N was applied vertically on the crowns (8 loading points). Maximum principal stress was determined. RESULTS Zinc phosphate cement had a greater stress concentration in the cement layer, while polycarboxylate cement had a greater stress concentration on the distal surface of the monolithic zirconia crown and abutment tooth. Resin cement and glass ionomer cement showed similar patterns, but resin cement showed a lower stress distribution on the lingual and mesial surface of the cement layer. CONCLUSION The test results indicate that the use of different luting agents that have various elastic moduli has an impact on the stress distribution of the monolithic zirconia crowns, cement layers, and abutment tooth. Resin cement is recommended for the luting agent of the monolithic zirconia crowns. PMID:26816578

  4. Discoloration of dental cements and composites in a sulfide solution.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, A; Antonucci, J M; Paffenbarger, G C; Nishiyama, M

    1991-03-01

    In an early study the discoloration of certain hardened silicate cements, after exposure to an atmosphere of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) for 24 h at room temperature, was ascribed to the formation of dark-colored sulfides of base metal impurities (Paffenbarger et al. JADA 25,32,1938). A recent study noted that, in general, silicate and glass ionomer cements were more prone to color shifts than composites after exposure to H2S for 9 weeks (Sugawara, Ph. D. Thesis, Nihon Univ.). The aim of the present study was to devise a simple, aqueous sulfide exposure test for esthetic restorative materials. The general procedure was to expose specimen disks to a 0.1% (w/v) sodium sulfide solution, adjusted to pH 9, for 1-7 days at 37 degrees or 55 degrees C. The 55 degrees C-Na2S exposure was designed as an accelerated test. Materials studied included: 1 silicate and 2 silicophosphate cements of known lead content, a glass ionomer cement (FIIF), several commercial composites and an experimental, hydrophilic composite. Known amounts of base metal contaminants in the form of appropriate salt solutions were added to the liquid components of FIIF and the composites. Specimens exposed to distilled water under the same conditions served as controls. Exposure to the aqueous sulfide medium resulted in the following ranking in order of decreasing discoloration: Glass ionomer cement greater than silicophosphate cement greater than silicate cement greater than hydrophilic composite greater than hydrophobic composite. Generally, the results of the aq. Na2S test paralleled those obtained with H2S. The degree of discoloration is dependent on a number of factors: the nature, concentration and leachability of the metal impurities, and the hydrophilicity and permeability to sulfide of the esthetic restoratives.

  5. Effect of ultrasound application during setting on the mechanical properties of high viscous glass-ionomers used for ART restorations.

    PubMed

    Daifalla, Lamia E; Mobarak, Enas H

    2015-11-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of ultrasound application on the surface microhardness (VHN) and diametral tensile strength (DTS) of three high viscous glass-ionomer restorative materials (HVGIRMs). For each test (VHN and DTS), a total of 180 specimens were prepared from three HVGIRMs (Ketac-Molar Aplicap, Fuji IX GP Fast, and ChemFil Rock). Specimens of each material (n = 60) were further subdivided into three subgroups (n = 20) according to the setting modality whether ultrasound (20 or 40 s) was applied during setting or not (control). Specimens within each subgroup were then equally divided (n = 10) and tested at 24 h or 28 days. For the VHN measurement, five indentations, with a 200 g load and a dwell time for 20 s, were made on the top surface of each specimen. The DTS test was done using Lloyd Testing machine at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Ultrasound application had no significant effect on the VHN. Fuji IX GP Fast revealed the highest VHN value, followed by Ketac-Molar Aplicap, and the least was recorded for ChemFil Rock. Fuji IX GP Fast and Ketac-Molar Aplicap VHN values were significantly increased by time. ChemFil Rock recorded the highest DTS value at 24 h and was the only material that showed significant improvement with both US application times. However, this improvement did not sustain till 28 days. The ultrasound did not enhance the surface microhardness, but its positive effect on the diametral tensile strength values was material and time dependent.

  6. Effect of ultrasound application during setting on the mechanical properties of high viscous glass-ionomers used for ART restorations

    PubMed Central

    Daifalla, Lamia E.; Mobarak, Enas H.

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of ultrasound application on the surface microhardness (VHN) and diametral tensile strength (DTS) of three high viscous glass-ionomer restorative materials (HVGIRMs). For each test (VHN and DTS), a total of 180 specimens were prepared from three HVGIRMs (Ketac-Molar Aplicap, Fuji IX GP Fast, and ChemFil Rock). Specimens of each material (n = 60) were further subdivided into three subgroups (n = 20) according to the setting modality whether ultrasound (20 or 40 s) was applied during setting or not (control). Specimens within each subgroup were then equally divided (n = 10) and tested at 24 h or 28 days. For the VHN measurement, five indentations, with a 200 g load and a dwell time for 20 s, were made on the top surface of each specimen. The DTS test was done using Lloyd Testing machine at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Ultrasound application had no significant effect on the VHN. Fuji IX GP Fast revealed the highest VHN value, followed by Ketac-Molar Aplicap, and the least was recorded for ChemFil Rock. Fuji IX GP Fast and Ketac-Molar Aplicap VHN values were significantly increased by time. ChemFil Rock recorded the highest DTS value at 24 h and was the only material that showed significant improvement with both US application times. However, this improvement did not sustain till 28 days. The ultrasound did not enhance the surface microhardness, but its positive effect on the diametral tensile strength values was material and time dependent. PMID:26644916

  7. Practical clinical considerations of luting cements: A review

    PubMed Central

    Lad, Pritam P; Kamath, Maya; Tarale, Kavita; Kusugal, Preethi B

    2014-01-01

    The longevity of fixed partial denture depends on the type of luting cement used with tooth preparation. The clinician’s understating of various cements, their advantages and disadvantages is of utmost importance. In recent years, many luting agents cements have been introduced claiming clinically better performance than existing materials due to improved characteristics. Both conventional and contemporary dental luting cements are discussed here. The various agents discussed are: Zinc phosphate, Zinc polycarboxylate, Zinc oxide-eugenol, Glass-ionomer, Resin modified GIC, Compomers and Resin cement. The purpose of this article is to provide a discussion that provides a clinical perspective of luting cements currently available to help the general practitioner make smarter and appropriate choices. How to cite the article: Lad PP, Kamath M, Tarale K, Kusugal PB. Practical clinical considerations of luting cements: A review. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(1):116-20. PMID:24653615

  8. Effect of blood contamination on shear bond strength of brackets bonded with a self-etching primer combined with a resin-modified glass ionomer.

    PubMed

    Cacciafesta, Vittorio; Sfondrini, Maria Francesca; Scribante, Andrea; De Angelis, Marco; Klersy, Catherine

    2004-12-01

    This study assessed the effect of blood contamination on the shear bond strength and bond failure site of a resin-modified glass ionomer (Fuji Ortho LC, GC Europe, Leuven, Belgium) used with 3 enamel conditioners (10% polyacrylic acid, 37% phosphoric acid, and self-etching primer). One hundred twenty bovine permanent mandibular incisors were randomly divided into 8 groups; each group consisted of 15 specimens. Two enamel surface conditions were studied: dry and contaminated with blood. One hundred twenty stainless steel brackets were bonded with the resin-modified glass ionomer. After bonding, all samples were stored in distilled water for 24 hours and then tested in shear mode on a testing machine. The groups conditioned with self-etching primer and 37% phosphoric acid had the highest bond strengths for both dry and blood-contaminated enamel. The groups conditioned with 10% polyacrylic acid showed significantly lower shear bond strength value, and the unconditioned groups had the lowest bond strengths. For each enamel conditioner, no significant difference was reported between dry and blood-contaminated groups. Significant differences in debond locations were found among the groups bonded with the different conditioners. Blood contamination of enamel during the bonding procedure of Fuji Ortho LC did not affect its bond strength values, no matter which enamel conditioner was used.

  9. Marginal microleakage of a resin-modified glass-ionomer restoration: Interaction effect of delayed light activation and surface pretreatment

    PubMed Central

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Yousefipour, Bahareh; Farhadpour, Hajar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite widespread clinical uses of resin-modified glass-ionomers (RMGIs), their sealing ability is still a concern. This study evaluated the effect of delayed light activation (DLA) of RMGI on marginal sealing in differently pretreated cavities. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, two standardized Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of 56 sound maxillary premolars at the cementoenamel junction. The cavities were randomly divided into eight equal groups. In groups 1-4 (immediate light activation [ILA]), no pretreatment (negative control [NC]) and three surface pretreatments were used, respectively as follows: Cavity conditioner, Vitremer primer, cavity conditioner plus and casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP). Fuji II LC (GC, Japan) was prepared and placed in the cavities and immediately light-cured according to manufacturer's instructions. In groups 5-8 (DLA), the same pretreatments were applied, respectively. After placing Fuji II LC in the cavities, the restorations were light-cured after a 3-min delay. After finishing the restorations, the specimens were placed in water for 1-week and thermocycled. Microleakage scores were determined using the dye penetration technique. Kruskal–Wallis test and Mann–Whitney U-test were used to analyze the obtained data (α = 0.05). Results: At the dentin margins, DLA resulted in a lower microleakage for no treatment (NC), cavity conditioner and cavity conditioner plus ACP-CPP pretreatments groups (P ≤ 0.004); however, no difference was observed for Vitremer group (P > 0.05). At the enamel margins, no difference was observed between DLA and ILA for all groups (P > 0.05); only NC group exhibited a lower microleakage in case of DLA (P = 0.007). Conclusion: Delayed light activation of RMGI may lead to different effects on marginal sealing, depending on pretreatment procedures used in the cavity. It might improve dentin sealing when no treatment and

  10. The Effect of Temperature on Compressive and Tensile Strengths of Commonly Used Luting Cements: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Suneel G; Sajjan, MC Suresh; Patil, Rekha

    2015-01-01

    Background: The luting cements must withstand masticatory and parafunctional stresses in the warm and wet oral environment. Mouth temperature and the temperature of the ingested foods may induce thermal variation and plastic deformation within the cements and might affect the strength properties. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of temperature on the compressive and diametral tensile strengths of two polycarboxylate, a conventional glass ionomer and a resin modified glass ionomer luting cements and, to compare the compressive strength and the diametral tensile strength of the selected luting cements at varying temperatures. Materials and Methods: In this study, standardized specimens were prepared. The temperature of the specimens was regulated prior to testing them using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Six specimens each were tested at 23°C, 37°C and 50°C for both the compressive and diametral tensile strengths, for all the luting cements. Results: All the luting cements showed a marginal reduction in their compressive and diametral tensile strengths at raised temperatures. Fuji Plus was strongest in compression, followed by Fuji I > Poly F > Liv Carbo. Fuji Plus had the highest diametral tensile strength values, followed by Poly F = Fuji I = Liv Carbo, at all temperatures. Conclusion: An increase in the temperature caused no significant reduction in the compressive and diametral tensile strengths of the cements evaluated. The compressive strength of the luting cements differed significantly from one another at all temperatures. The diametral tensile strength of resin modified glass ionomers differed considerably from the other cements, whereas there was no significant difference between the other cements, at all the temperatures. PMID:25859100

  11. Effects of conventional and high-intensity light-curing on enamel shear bond strength of composite resin and resin-modified glass-ionomer.

    PubMed

    Sfondrini, M F; Cacciafesta, V; Pistorio, A; Sfondrini, G

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strengths of a composite resin (Transbond XT; 3M/Unitek, Monrovia, Calif) and a resin-modified glass ionomer (Fuji Ortho LC; GC America Inc, Alsip, Ill) cured with 2 different light-curing units: a conventional visible light unit (Ortholux XT; 3M Dental Products, St Paul, Minn) and a xenon arc light unit (Plasma Arc Curing [PAC] System; American Dental Technologies, Corpus Christi, Texas). One hundred twenty freshly extracted bovine permanent mandibular incisors were randomly divided into 1 of 8 groups; each group consisted of 15 specimens. Two groups (1 group for each type of adhesive) were exposed to the visible light for 20 seconds (Transbond XT) and 40 seconds (Fuji Ortho LC), respectively, and used as control groups. The remaining 6 groups (3 for each adhesive) were cured with the xenon arc light for 2, 5, and 10 seconds. After bonding, all samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 24 hours and subsequently tested in a shear mode on an Instron universal testing machine (Instron Corp, Canton, Mass). For the groups bonded with Transbond XT, no statistically significant differences (P =.868) were found between the shear bond strength of the control group cured with Ortholux XT and those of the groups cured with the PAC System for 2, 5, or 10 seconds. When the shear bond strengths of the groups bonded with Fuji Ortho LC were evaluated, no statistically significant differences (P =.087) were found between the control group that was cured with Ortholux XT and those cured with the PAC System. The bond strength of the composite resin was significantly higher than that of the resin-modified glass ionomer in all the groups tested (P <.0001). The present findings indicate that, compared with visible light-curing, the xenon arc light enables the clinician to significantly reduce the curing time of both bonding agents, without affecting their shear bond strengths. Therefore, xenon arc light

  12. Shear Bond Strength of Acidic Primer, Light-Cure Glass Ionomer, Light-Cure and Self Cure Composite Adhesive Systems - An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    D, Krishnakanth Reddy; V, Kishore M S; Safeena, Safeena

    2013-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to determine shear bond strength and the effect on the bracket/ adhesive failure mode when an acidic primer and other etchants were used to condition the enamel surface before bonding. Materials & Methods: Group I: Brackets bonded with Ultimate cure-on-light Light-cure composite adhesive system. Group II: Brackets bonded with Ortho-one no-mix. Self-cure composite adhesive system. Group III: Brackets bonded with Light-cure glass ionomer adhesive system. Group IV: Brackets bonded with Transbond plus self etching primer. Results: The results of this study indicated that the shear bond strength when using Transbond plus self etching primer showed the highest bond strength Group- IV(8.69 2.54 MPa) followed by Ultimate cure-on-light Group-I (8.62 1.84 MPa), Ortho-one no-mix (Bisco Inc. USA)Group-II (8.07 1.72 MPa), and least bond strength was seen in G.C. Fuji Ortho L.C. Group-III (6.01 1.6) MPa Conclusion: Use of self etching primer saves chairside time and satisfactory high bond strength was obtained. Care should be taken during debonding of ceramic brackets How to cite this article: Reddy K D, Kishore M S V, Safeena S. Shear Bond Strength of Acidic Primer, Light-Cure Glass Ionomer, Light-Cure and Self Cure Composite Adhesive Systems - An In Vitro Study. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(3):73-78. PMID:24155606

  13. Radiographic appearance of commonly used cements in implant dentistry.

    PubMed

    Pette, Gregory A; Ganeles, Jeffrey; Norkin, Frederic J

    2013-01-01

    Cement-retained restorations allow for a conventional fixed partial denture approach to restoring dental implants. However, inadequate removal of excess cement at the time of cementation may introduce a severe complication: cement-induced peri-implantitis. Radiopaque cements are more easily detected on radiographs and should improve the recognition of extravasated cement at the time of insertion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiopacity of commercially available cements in vitro. Eighteen different cements commonly used for luting restorations to implants were tested at both 0.5- and 1.0-mm thicknesses. The cements examined were zinc oxide eugenol, zinc oxide, zinc polycarboxylate, zinc phosphate, resin-reinforced glass ionomer, urethane resin, resin, and composite resin. Two samples of each cement thickness underwent standardized radiography next to an aluminum step wedge as a reference. The mean grayscale value of each of the nine 1-mm steps in the step wedge were used as reference values and compared to each of the cement samples. Temp Bond Clear (resin), IMProv (urethane resin), Premier Implant Cement (resin), and Temrex NE (resin) were not radiographically detectable at either sample thickness. Cements containing zinc were the most detectable upon radiographic analysis. There are significant differences in the radiopacity of many commonly used cements. Since cementinduced peri-implantitis can lead to late implant failure, cements that can be visualized radiographically may reduce the incidence of this problem.

  14. Bioactive glass incorporation in calcium phosphate cement-based injectable bone substitute for improved in vitro biocompatibility and in vivo bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sadiasa, Alexander; Sarkar, Swapan Kumar; Franco, Rose Ann; Min, Young Ki; Lee, Byong Taek

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we fabricated injectable bone substitutes modified with the addition of bioactive glass powders synthesized via ultrasonic energy-assisted hydrothermal method to the calcium phosphate-based bone cement to improve its biocompatibility. The injectable bone substitutes was initially composed of a powder component (tetracalcium phosphate, dicalcium phosphate dihydrate and calcium sulfate dehydrate) and a liquid component (citric acid, chitosan and hydroxyl-propyl-methyl-cellulose) upon which various concentrations of bioactive glass were added: 0%, 10%, 20% and 30%. Setting time and compressive strength of the injectable bone substitutes were evaluated and observed to improve with the increase of bioactive glass content. Surface morphologies were observed via scanning electron microscope before and after submersion of the samples to simulated body fluid and increase in apatite formation was detected using x-ray diffraction machine. In vitro biocompatibility of the injectable bone substitutes was observed to improve with the addition of bioactive glass as the proliferation/adhesion behavior of cells on the material increased. Human gene markers were successfully expressed using real time-polymerase chain reaction and the samples were found to promote cell viability and be more biocompatible as the concentration of bioactive glass increases. In vivo biocompatibility of the samples containing 0% and 30% bioactive glass were evaluated using Micro-CT and histological staining after 3 months of implantation in male rabbits' femurs. No inflammatory reaction was observed and significant bone formation was promoted by the addition of bioactive glass to the injectable bone substitute system.

  15. In vitro bond strength and fatigue stress test evaluation of different adhesive cements used for fixed space maintainer cementation

    PubMed Central

    Cantekin, Kenan; Delikan, Ebru; Cetin, Secil

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purposes of this research were to (1) compare the shear-peel bond strength (SPBS) of a band of a fixed space maintainer (SM) cemented with five different adhesive cements; and (2) compare the survival time of bands of SM with each cement type after simulating mechanical fatigue stress. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five teeth were used to assess retentive strength and another 50 teeth were used to assess the fatigue survival time. SPBS was determined with a universal testing machine. Fatigue testing was conducted in a ball mill device. Results: The mean survival time of bands cemented with R & D series Nova Glass-LC (6.2 h), Transbond Plus (6.7 h), and R & D series Nova Resin (6.8 h) was significantly longer than for bands cemented with Ketac-Cem (5.4 h) and GC Equia (5.2 h) (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Although traditional glass ionomer cement (GIC) cement presented higher retentive strength than resin-based cements (resin, resin modified GIC, and compomer cement), resin based cements, especially dual cure resin cement (nova resin cement) and compomer (Transbond Plus), can be expected to have lower failure rates for band cementation than GIC (Ketac-Cem) in the light of the results of the ball mill test. PMID:25202209

  16. Influence of cementation and cement type on the fracture load testing methodology of anterior crowns made of different materials.

    PubMed

    Stawarczyk, Bogna; Beuer, Florian; Ender, Andreas; Roos, Malgorzata; Edelhoff, Daniel; Wimmer, Timea

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of cementation on fracture load of anterior crowns made of CAD/CAM-resin-blocks (ART), leucite-reinforced glass-ceramics (LRG), lithium disilicate ceramics (LIT), veneered zirconia (ZRO) and veneered alloy (DEG). Each crown group (n=15/subgroup) was cemented on the metal abutment as follows: i. using glass ionomer, ii. using self-adhesive resin cement, and iii. not cemented. Crowns were tested and analyzed with 2-way and 1-way ANOVA (Scheffé test), and Weibull statistics (p<0.05). Within LRG, self-adhesive cemented subgroup showed higher fracture load compared to other groups (p<0.001). Among DEG, lower results were measured for non-cemented crowns than for cemented (p<0.001). For ART, LIT and ZRO no influence of cementation was observed. For fracture load test methodology, metal ceramic crowns should be generally cemented. Glass-ceramic crowns should be cemented using adhesive cement. Cementation and cement type did not have an influence on the fracture load results for resin, zirconia or lithium disilicate crowns.

  17. A biocompatible and bioactive replacement for dentine: is this a reality? The properties and uses of a novel calcium-based cement.

    PubMed

    Bachoo, I K; Seymour, D; Brunton, P

    2013-01-01

    As part of the continuing evolution towards conservative dentistry there has been a drive to push further and investigate the possibility of inducing the repair and regeneration of lost dental hard tissue. Until recently, the prospect of repair and regeneration had been confined to laboratory studies and hypothesised scientific models. In 2009, a new product was launched claiming to be a revolutionary material capable of offering a bioactive and biocompatible replacement for dentine. The calcium-based cement is reported to preserve pulp vitality, promote pulp healing and provide a natural substitute for dentine through bioactive stimulation of the dentino-pulpal complex. Its clinical indications are extensive, described as a restorative material suitable for use wherever dentine replacement is required. In this article the physical, mechanical, chemical and biological properties of this novel material are presented, together with the results of experimental laboratory-based investigations and on-going clinical in vivo investigations.

  18. Comparison of Biocompatibility of Cemented vs. Cementless Hip Joint Endoprostheses Based on Postoperative Evaluation of Proinflammatory Cytokine Levels

    PubMed Central

    Szypuła, Jan; Cabak, Anna; Kiljański, Marek; Boguszewski, Dariusz; Tomaszewski, Wiesław

    2016-01-01

    Background The yearly increase in the number of procedures involving implantation of hip joint endoprostheses forces prosthetics manufacturers to search for biologically neutral implants. The goal of this study was to assess the concentration of Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and its correlation with C-reactive protein (CRP), depending on the type of hip joint endoprosthesis (cemented or cementless endoprosthesis) in order to determine implant biotolerance during the early postoperative period. Material/Methods The sample comprised 200 patients [mean age=64 (31–81) years] with coxarthrosis. All patients underwent hip joint arthroplasty using a cemented or cementless endoprosthesis. Blood samples were collected 3 times: before the procedure, on the first day after the procedure, and after 6 weeks. IL-6 and CRP levels were assayed using immunoenzymatic methods. The results were subjected to statistical analysis using the Shapiro-Wilk test. Results On the 1st day after the procedure, CRP and IL-6 concentration increased rapidly after implantation of both cemented and cementless endoprostheses. At 6 weeks postoperatively, the CRP value remained at a similar level in patients after cemented arthroplasty and was almost 2-fold lower in patients who underwent cementless arthroplasty. The IL-6 value returned to the baseline level in patients after cementless arthroplasty and showed an ongoing increasing tendency in patients after cemented arthroplasty. Conclusions 1. The measurement of C-reactive protein and Interleukin-6 is a high-sensitivity test, assessing implant biotolerance. 2. The implantation of a cemented endoprosthesis induces a higher increase in the level of proinflammatory cytokines as compared with a cementless endoprosthesis. 3. For a complete assessment of both early and later body responses to implantation and the related surgical procedure, further studies using available approaches and tools are recommended. PMID:27935873

  19. Influence of the temperature on the cement disintegration in cement-retained implant restorations.

    PubMed

    Linkevicius, Tomas; Vindasiute, Egle; Puisys, Algirdas; Linkeviciene, Laura; Svediene, Olga

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the average disintegration temperature of three dental cements used for the cementation of the implant-supported prostheses. One hundred and twenty metal frameworks were fabricated and cemented on the prosthetic abutments with different dental cements. After heat treatment in the dental furnace, the samples were set for the separation to test the integration of the cement. Results have shown that resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RGIC) exhibited the lowest disintegration temperature (p<0.05), but there was no difference between zinc phosphate cement (ZPC) and dual cure resin cement (RC) (p>0.05). Average separation temperatures: RGIC - 306 ± 23 °C, RC - 363 ± 71 °C, it could not be calculated for the ZPC due to the eight unseparated specimens. Within the limitations of the study, it could be concluded that RGIC cement disintegrates at the lowest temperature and ZPC is not prone to break down after exposure to temperature.

  20. Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate and glass ionomer show distinct effects in the remineralization of proximal artificial caries lesion in situ.

    PubMed

    Thepyou, Rathapong; Chanmitkul, Wanvipa; Thanatvarakorn, Ornnicha; Hamba, Hidenori; Chob-Isara, Wanwalai; Trairatvorakul, Chutima; Tagami, Junji

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the ability of casein-phosphopeptide amorphous-calcium-phosphate (CPP-ACP) and glass-ionomer (GI) in remineralizing proximal artificial caries lesions (ACLs). Molar enamel-slabs were divided into: original-lesion control, intra-oral controls, and experimental (CPP-ACP or GI) groups. Specimens received ACLs and were bonded on subject maxillary first molars. After 4-weeks, mineral density (MD) was analyzed by μCT. Compared to control, CPP-ACP increased MD at 0-38/68-84 microns and the GI group had an increase at 0-68 microns, with a greater increase in MD compared to the CPP-ACP group from 0-53 microns. The mean percent remineralization (%R) showed differences between the GI, CPP-ACP groups and their paired controls. GI tended to increase remineralization more than CPP-ACP. In conclusion, CPP-ACP and GI demonstrated distinct remineralizing ability. GI induced greater remineralization in the superficial lesion, while CPP-ACP remineralized the lesion body. Their effects on percent remineralization and reducing lesion depth of proximal ACLs were similar.

  1. Effect of light-cure initiation time on polymerization and orthodontic bond strength with a resin-modified glass-ionomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Jess

    Introduction: The polymerization and acid-base reactions in resin-modified glass-ionomers (RMGI) are thought to compete with and inhibit one another. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of visible light-cure (VLC) delay on the polymerization efficiency and orthodontic bond strength of a dual-cured RMGI. Methods: An RMGI light-cured immediately, 2.5, 5, or 10 minutes after mixing comprised the experimental groups. Isothermal and dynamic temperature scan differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis of the RMGI was performed to determine extents of VLC polymerization and acid-base reaction exotherms. Human premolars (n = 18/group) were bonded with the RMGI. Shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were determined. Results: DSC results showed the 10 minute delay RMGI group experienced significantly (P <0.05) lower VLC polymerization compared to the other groups. Acid-base reaction exotherms were undetected in all groups except the 10 minute delay group. No significant differences (P >0.05) were noted among the groups for mean shear bond strength. A chi-square test showed no significant difference (P = 0.428) in ARI scores between groups. Conclusions: Delay in light-curing may reduce polymerization efficiency and alter the structure of the RMGI, but orthodontic shear bond strength does not appear to be compromised.

  2. Effect of the CO2 laser on the microleakage of conventional and laser apicetomized teeth retrofilled with glass ionomer: in vitro study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.; Martorelli, Sergio B. F.

    2000-03-01

    There is a need for further improvement on the level of apical sealing. The use of lasers on apical surgery is still not fully understood, however some good results have been reported. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of the use of the CO2 laser following conventional apicoectomy and retrofilling with glass ionomer using different combinations of power and types of emission 'In Vitro.' Seventy extracted human upper anterior teeth were used on this study. The teeth after conventional apicoectomy were retrofilled with VitremerTM. The samples were randomized into seven groups of 10, Group I acted as negative control. Groups II, III and IV were lased on defocused mode with superpulsed CO2 laser on CW with power output of 0,5; 3 and 7 Watts during 5 seconds respectively. Groups V, VI e VII were lased on defocused mode with continuous emission on CW mode with power output of 1, 10 and 20 Watts during 5 seconds respectively. All specimens were immersed on 2% Methylene Blue solution during 48 h, washed in running tap water and longitudinally sectioned. Three calibrated examiners regarding apical infiltration graded the samples. The results showed difference between groups, where Group II showed smaller level of apical infiltration. It is concluded that improving on apical sealing is better achieved by using 0.5 W on superpulsed on CW.

  3. Brushing abrasion of luting cements under neutral and acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Buchalla, W; Attin, T; Hellwig, E

    2000-01-01

    Four resin based materials (Compolute Aplicap, ESPE; Variolink Ultra, Vivadent; C&B Metabond, Parkell and Panavia 21, Kuraray), two carboxylate cements (Poly-F Plus, Dentsply DeTrey and Durelon Maxicap, ESPE), two glass-ionomer cements (Fuji I, GC and Ketac-Cem Aplicap, ESPE), one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitremer, 3M) one polyacid-modified resin composite (Dyract Cem, Dentsply DeTrey) and one zinc phosphate cement (Harvard, Richter & Hoffmann) were investigated according to their brushing resistance after storage in neutral and acidic buffer solutions. For this purpose 24 cylindrical acrylic molds were each filled with the materials. After hardening, the samples were stored for seven days in 100% relative humidity and at 37 degrees C. Subsequently, they were ground flat and polished. Then each specimen was covered with an adhesive tape leaving a 4 mm wide window on the cement surface. Twelve samples of each material were stored for 24 hours in a buffer solution with a pH of 6.8. The remaining 12 samples were placed in a buffer with a pH of 3.0. All specimens were then subjected to a three media brushing abrasion (2,000 strokes) in an automatic brushing machine. Storage and brushing were performed three times. After 6,000 brushing strokes per specimen, the tape was removed. Brushing abrasion was measured with a computerized laser profilometer and statistically analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey's Standardized Range Test (p < or = 0.05). The highest brushing abrasion was found for the two carboxylate cements. The lowest brushing abrasion was found for one resin based material, Compolute Aplicap. With the exception of three resin-based materials, a lower pH led to a higher brushing abrasion.

  4. A study on provisional cements, cementation techniques, and their effects on bonding of porcelain laminate veneers.

    PubMed

    Vinod Kumar, G; Soorya Poduval, T; Bipin Reddy; Shesha Reddy, P

    2014-03-01

    Minimal tooth preparation is required for porcelain laminate veneers, but interim restorations are a must to protect their teeth against thermal insult, chemical irritation, and to provide aesthetics. Cement remaining after the removal of the provisional restoration can impair the etching quality of the tooth surface and fit and final bonding of the porcelain laminate veneer. This in vitro study examined the tooth surface for remaining debris of cement after removal of a provisional restoration. Determine the presence of cement debris on prepared tooth surface subsequent to the removal of provisional restoration. Determine the cement with the least residue following the cleansing procedures. Determine the effect of smear layer on the amount of residual luting cement. Eighty-four extracted natural anterior teeth were prepared for porcelain laminate veneers. For half of the teeth, the smear layer was removed before luting provisional restorations. Veneer provisional restorations were fabricated and luted to teeth with six bonding methods: varnish combined with glass ionomer cement (GIC), varnish combined with resin modified GIC, varnish, spot etching combined with dual-cure luting cement, adhesive combined with GIC, adhesive combined with resin modified GIC, and adhesive, spot etching combined with dual-cure luting cement. After removal of provisional restorations 1 week later, the tooth surface was examined for residual luting material with SEM. Traces of cement debris were found on all the prepared teeth surfaces for all six groups which were cemented with different methods. Cement debris was seen on teeth subsequent to the removal of provisional's. Dual-cure cement had the least residue following the cleansing procedures. Presence of smear layer had no statistical significance in comparison with cement residue. With the use of adhesive the cement debris was always found to be more than with the use of varnish. GIC showed maximum residual cement followed by dual-cure.

  5. Composition-structure-property relationships for non-classical ionomer cements formulated with zinc-boron germanium-based glasses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaofang; Werner-Zwanziger, Ulrike; Boyd, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Non-classical ionomer glasses like those based on zinc-boron-germanium glasses are of special interest in a variety of medical applications owning to their unique combination of properties and potential therapeutic efficacy. These features may be of particular benefit with respect to the utilization of glass ionomer cements for minimally invasive dental applications such as the atruamatic restorative treatment, but also for expanded clinical applications in orthopedics and oral-maxillofacial surgery. A unique system of zinc-boron-germanium-based glasses (10 compositions in total) has been designed using a Design of Mixtures methodology. In the first instance, ionomer glasses were examined via differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, and (11)B MAS NMR spectroscopy to establish fundamental composition - structure-property relationships for the unique system. Secondly, cements were synthesized based on each glass and handling characteristics (working time, Wt, and setting time, St) and compression strength were quantified to facilitate the development of both experimental and mathematical composition-structure-property relationships for the new ionomer cements. The novel glass ionomer cements were found to provide Wt, St, and compression strength in the range of 48-132 s, 206-602 s, and 16-36 MPa, respectively, depending on the ZnO/GeO2 mol fraction of the glass phase. A lower ZnO mol fraction in the glass phase provides higher glass transition temperature, higher N4 rate, and in combination with careful modulation of GeO2 mol fraction in the glass phase provides a unique approach to extending the Wt and St of glass ionomer cement without compromising (in fact enhancing) compression strength. The data presented in this work provide valuable information for the formulation of alternative glass ionomer cements for applications within and beyond the dental clinic, especially where conventional approaches to modulating working time and strength exhibit co

  6. Effect of cements on fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia crowns

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Mouhat, Mathieu; Nergård, John Magnus; Lægreid, Solveig Jenssen; Kanno, Taro; Milleding, Percy; Örtengren, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The present study investigated the effect of cements on fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia crowns in relation to their compressive strength. Materials and methods Four different cements were tested: zinc phosphate cement (ZPC), glass-ionomer cement (GIC), self-adhesive resin-based cement (SRC) and resin-based cement (RC). RC was used in both dual cure mode (RC-D) and chemical cure mode (RC-C). First, the compressive strength of each cement was tested according to a standard (ISO 9917-1:2004). Second, load-to-failure test was performed to analyze the crown fracture resistance. CAD/CAM-produced monolithic zirconia crowns with a minimal thickness of 0.5 mm were prepared and cemented to dies with each cement. The crown–die samples were loaded until fracture. Results The compressive strength of SRC, RC-D and RC-C was significantly higher than those of ZPC and GIC (p < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference in the fracture load of the crown between the groups. Conclusion The values achieved in the load-to-failure test suggest that monolithic zirconia crowns with a minimal thickness of 0.5 mm may have good resistance against fracture regardless of types of cements. PMID:27335900

  7. The Effect of the Pre-Conditioning Step on the Shear Bond Strength of Nano-Filled Resin-Modified Glass-Ionomer to Dentin

    PubMed Central

    El-Askary, Farid S; Nassif, Mohammed S

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the pre-conditioning step using different dentin conditioners on the shear bond strength (SBS) of the nano-filled resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI) to dentin. Methods: Twenty-four human molars were used in this study. Subsequent to teeth sectioning in the mesio-distal direction and creation of the smear layer, the teeth were divided into six groups with and without the pre-conditioning step. Dentin surfaces were restored with RMGI cylinders and the specimens were stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 24 hours. SBS test were performed using a Universal Testing Machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. Statistical analysis was performed using One-Way ANOVA followed by Duncan’s Multiple Range Test. RMGI/dentin interface was evaluated using SEM operated at 12 Kv at 2000X magnification. Results: 35% phosphoric acid and EDTA yielded significantly higher SBS (12.0±1.8 and 11.9±4.4 MPa, respectively), compared to all tested groups. In addition, 25% polyacrylic acid (8.6±3.1 MPa) reported significantly higher SBS than the nano-filled RMGI when applied according to manufacturer instructions (5.5±2.2 MPa). When nano-filled RMGI was applied without its nano-primer, or directly over 25% polyacrylic acid conditioned dentin exhibited 100% pre-test failure, and their SBS were expressed as 0.0±0.0 MPa. SEM revealed that the nano-primer was unable to decalcify and hybridize the dentin surface. Conclusions: Based on the results of the current study, the pre-conditioning step effectively improves the SBS of nano-filled RMGI to dentin. The self-adhesiveness of nano-filled RMGI was not proved in this study. PMID:21494381

  8. Two-year clinical performance of glass ionomer and resin composite restorations in xerostomic head- and neck-irradiated cancer patients.

    PubMed

    De Moor, Roeland J G; Stassen, Inge G; van 't Veldt, Yoke; Torbeyns, Dries; Hommez, Geert M G

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of adhesive filling materials in class V cavities in xerostomic head- and neck-irradiated cancer patients, in terms of marginal adaptation, anatomical form and recurrent caries. We selected 35 high-caries-risk, post-radiation, xerostomic adults with ≥3 cervical carious lesions in the same arch. Every patient received a KetacFil (KF), PhotacFil (PF) and Herculite XRV (HX) restoration. Patients were instructed to use a neutral 1% sodium fluoride gel in custom trays, on a daily basis. After 6, 12, 18 and 24 months, the restorations were examined for material loss, marginal integrity and recurrent caries. Fluoride compliance was determined at each recall appointment and recorded as the percentage of recommended use during that interval [compliance of ≤50% = NFUs, >50% = FUs]. Only 30 patients were available for recall at 6 months, with 28 patients at 12 and 18 months, and 27 patients at 24 months. In the NFU group, differences in recurrent caries were found between KF and HX at all observation times (p < 0.05). Differences (p < 0.05) in adaptation and/or anatomical form were found between KF and PF in NFUs after 18 and 24 months. In FUs, significant differences were observed between KF and PF, and KF and HX after 6 and 12 months, between KF and HX, PF and HX after 18 and 24 months. In summary, glass ionomers (especially the conventionally setting formulation) provide clinical caries inhibition but erode easily, while composite resin provides greater structural integrity.

  9. Effect of 10% sodium ascorbate hydrogel and delayed bonding on shear bond strength of composite resin and resin-modified glass ionomer to bleached enamel

    PubMed Central

    Danesh-Sani, Seyed Amir; Esmaili, Maryam

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to comparatively investigate the neutralizing effect of antioxidant treatment and delayed bonding after bleaching with hydrogen peroxide on the shear bond strength of a composite resin (CR) and resin-modified glass ionomer (RmGI) to enamel. Materials and Methods: Ninety-six freshly extracted human 3rd molars with flat enamel surfaces were divided into six experimental groups (n=12/group) and two control groups (n=12/group). After initial preparation, specimens in Groups 1 and 5 (control groups) were not bleached and the buccal enamel surface of specimens were bonded immediately with CR and RmGI. The samples of the remaining groups were all bleached six hours a day for seven days consecutively. Immediately after bleaching, groups two and six specimens were bonded with CR and RmGI. Groups 3 and 7 specimens were immersed in distilled water at 37°C for 7 days and the specimens in Groups 4 and 8 were treated with 10% sodium ascorbate as an antioxidant agent after bleaching. Specimens in Groups 3 and 4 were bonded with CR and Groups 7 and 8 specimens were bonded with RmGI immediately. After specimens were bonded, the shear bond strength (SBS) was measured. The SBS data analyses were subjected to one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey test for comparison of specific mean values. Results: The mean SBS value in Group 2 (immediately bonded with CR after bleaching) was significantly lower than other CR groups (P=0.045). RmGI did not bond to buccal enamel surface of specimens in group 6. There was no significant difference between other groups bonded with RmGI (P>0.05). Conclusions: Applying 10% sodium ascorbate hydrogel and one week delay before bonding resulted in reversal of reduced bond strength of CR and RmGI to bleached enamel. PMID:22025826

  10. Zirconia: cementation of prosthetic restorations. Literature review

    PubMed Central

    GARGARI, M.; GLORIA, F.; NAPOLI, E.; PUJIA, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Aim of the work Aim of the work was to execute a review of the international literature about the cementation of zirconia restorations, analyzing the properties of the cements most commonly used in clinical activities. Materials and methods It was performed, through PubMed, a bibliographic search on the international literature of the last 10 years using the following limits: studies in English, in vitro studies, randomized clinical trial, reviews, meta-analysis, guide-lines. Were excluded from the search: descriptive studies, case reports, discussion articles, opinion’s leader. Results From studies results that common surface treatments (silanization, acid etching) are ineffective on zirconia because it has an inert surface without glassy component (on which this surface treatments act primarily), instead the sandblasting at 1atm with aluminium oxide (Al2O3) results significantly effective for the resulting roughening that increase the surface energy and the wettability of the material. Furthermore it has been shown that zinc phosphate-based cements, Bis-GMA-based and glass-ionomer cements can’t guarantee a stable long-term adhesion, instead resin cements containing phosphate monomer 10-methacryloyloxyidecyl-dihyidrogenphosphate (MDP) have shown higher adhesion and stability values than the other cements. In particular, it has seen that bond strength of zirconia copings on dentin, using MDP-based cement, is about 6,9MPa; this value is comparable to that obtained with gold copings cementation. Conclusions Analyzed studies have led to the following conclusions: sandblasting with aluminium oxide (Al2O3) is the best surface treatment to improve adhesion between resin cements and zirconia; resin cements containing phosphate ester monomers 10-methacryloyloxyidecyl-dihyidrogenphosphate (MDP) have shown in the studies an higher bond strength and stability after ageing treatment; the best procedure for cementing zirconia restorations results the combination of

  11. Influence of marginal fit and cement types on microleakage of all-ceramic crown systems.

    PubMed

    Yüksel, Ece; Zaimoğlu, Ali

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of both marginal fit and cementing with different luting agents on the microleakage of all-ceramic crown systems. Thirty-six extracted upper central incisors were prepared for full-coverage crowns and were divided into three groups. Group 1: CAD/CAM-fabricated ZrO2, Group 2: Heat-pressed lithium-disilicate, and Group 3: Cast Cr-Co copings as the control group. Copings were made following standard techniques, and groups were assigned cementation with either self-adhesive resin cement (A) or glass-ionomer luting cement (B). The specimens were subjected to thermocycling, immersed in basic fuchsin solution, sectioned mesiodistally and buccolingually. The surface of each section was digitally photographed under a stereomicroscope. Microleakage was scored using a five-point scale, and the marginal gap was measured using image analysis software. Data were statistically analyzed using 2-way ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann-Whitney U tests (α: 0.05). The marginal discrepancy of each group was 82.7 ± 7 µm, 92.6 ± 4 µm and 96.5 ± 7 µm respectively. Group 1 showed significantly smaller gaps than Group 3 (P = 0.042). Self-adhesive resin cement (A) showed a lower level of microleakage than glass-ionomer luting cement (B) in all groups (P = 0.029). Microleakage scores of '0' were 83% for 1A, 50% for 1B, 50% for 2A, 16% for 2B, 33% for 3A and none for 3B. Marginal discrepancy and cement type both had significant effects on microleakage. Lower levels of microleakage were recorded with self-adhesive resin cement, while CAD/CAM-fabricated ZrO2 copings showed smaller marginal discrepancy and less microleakage in comparison to cast Cr-Co.

  12. Effect of cement type and water storage time on the push-out bond strength of a glass fiber post.

    PubMed

    Reis, Kátia Rodrigues; Spyrides, George Miguel; Oliveira, Jonas Alves de; Jnoub, Alexandre Abrão; Dias, Kátia Regina Hostilio Cervantes; Bonfantes, Gerson

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of the cement type and the water storage time on the push-out bond strength of a glass fiber post. Glass fiber posts (Fibrekor, Jeneric Pentron) were luted to post spaces using a self-cured resin cement (C&B Cement [CB]), a glass ionomer cement (Ketac Cem [KC]) or a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (GC FujiCEM [FC]) according to the manufacturers' instructions. For each luting agent, the specimens were exposed to one of the following water storage times (n=5): 1 day (T1), 7 days (T7), 90 days (T90) and 180 days (T180). Push-out tests were performed after the storage times. Control specimens were not exposed to water storage, but subjected to the push-out test 10 min after post cementation. Data (in MPa) were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn`s test (α=0.05). Cement type and water storage time had a significant effect (p<0.05) on the push-out bond strength. CB showed significantly higher values of retention (p<0.05) than KC and FC, irrespective of the water storage time. Water storage increased significantly the push-out bond strength in T7 and T90, regardless of the cement type (p<0.05). The results showed that fiber posts luted to post spaces with the self-cured resin cement exhibited the best bonding performance throughout the 180-day water storage period. All cements exhibited a tendency to increase the bond strength after 7 and 90 days of water storage, decreasing thereafter.

  13. Cytotoxicity of commonly used luting cements -An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Trumpaite-Vanagiene, Rita; Bukelskiene, Virginija; Aleksejuniene, Jolanta; Puriene, Alina; Baltriukiene, Daiva; Rutkunas, Vygandas

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to 1) evaluate the cytotoxicity of luting cements: Hoffmann's Zinc Phosphate (Hoffmann's ZP), GC Fuji Plus Resin Modified Glass Ionomer (Fuji Plus RMGI) and 3M ESPE RelyX Unicem Resin Cement (RelyX Unicem RC) and 2) test if pre-washing reduces the cements' cytotoxicity. In vitro human gingival fibroblast (HGF) culture model was chosen. The cytotoxicity was evaluated by MTT test, the cell viability -by staining the cells with AO/EB dye mixture. The means±SD of Cell Survival Ratio (CSR%) were compared among different cement types under two testing conditions, with or without cement pre-washing. The CSR%s were compared by ANOVA and linear multiple regression (LMR). Hoffmann's ZPC was less cytotoxic, while Fuji Plus RMGIC and RelyX Unicem RC were more cytotoxic (ANOVA, p<0.001). The type of cement and cement pre-washing jointly explained 90% of cell survival (LMR, p<0.001, adjusted squared R=0.889). The commonly used luting cements such as Hoffmann's ZP, Fuji Plus RMGI and RelyX Unicem RC may have a cytotoxic potential.

  14. An investigation of thermal changes of various permanent dental cements.

    PubMed

    Duymus, Zeynep Yesil; Yilmaz, Baykal; Karaalioglu, F Osman

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the temperature rises which occurred during the setting reactions of different permanent cements used to lute fixed partial prosthodontics. In this study, four cements were used. They were mixed in three different proportions: according to manufacturers' recommendations, at doubled powder ratio, and at doubled liquid ratio. With a thermocouple, the temperature rises which occurred during the setting reactions were measured. For each proportion, the measurement was repeated five times such that a total of 60 measurements were done for the four different cements. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA). ANOVA results showed that cement type and the interaction between cement type and the powder-liquid ratio were statistically significant factors (p<0.001). Similarly, the powder-liquid ratio was a statistically significant (p<0.01) factor. Among the dental cements tested, zinc phosphate cement showed the highest temperature rise during setting reaction, whereas glass ionomer cement showed the lowest.

  15. Evaluation of mechanical properties of five cements for orthodontic band cementation.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Diego Andrei; Ritter, Daltro Enéas; Rocha, Roberto; Locks, Arno; Borgatto, Adriano Ferreti

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the flexural, compressive and diametral tensile strengths of five cements used in orthodontics for band cementation. Twelve specimens of each cement were tested: 1 - GC Fuji Ortho Band (FJ), GC America Inc.; 2 - Meron (MR), Voco; 3 - Multi-Cure Glass Ionomer Band Cement (MC), 3M Unitek; 4 - Band-Lok (BL), Reliance Orthodontic Products; and 5 - Ketac Cem (KC), 3M ESPE. The results (mean) for diametral tensile strength were: 10.51 MPa (FJ), 9.60 MPa (MR), 20.04 MPa (MC), 42.80 MPa (BL), and 4.08 MPa (KC). The results for compressive strength were (in the same order): 64.50 MPa, 77.71 MPa, 94.21 MPa, 193.88 MPa, and 81.93 MPa. The results for flexural strength were (in the same order): 20.72 MPa, 25.84 MPa, 53.41 MPa, 137.41 MPa, and 20.50 MPa. The statistical analysis was performed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey tests with p-value £ 0.05. In terms of diametral tensile strength, BL showed the highest strength statistically, and MC, the second highest. In terms of compressive tensile strength, BL showed the highest strength statistically, and FJ did not attain the minimum recommended strength. In terms of flexural tensile strength, BL cement was superior to MC, and MR, FJ and KC were equivalent and inferior to BL and MC.

  16. In Vitro Evaluation of Planktonic Growth on Experimental Cement-Retained Titanium Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Balci, Nur; Cakan, Umut; Aksu, Burak; Akgul, Oncu; Ulger, Nurver

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of selected cements, or their combination with titanium, on the growth of two periodontopathic bacteria: Prevotella intermedia (Pi) and Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn). Material/Methods This study was comprised of several experimental groups: 1) Dental luting cements (glass ionomer cement, methacrylate-based resin cement, zinc-oxide eugenol cement, eugenol-free zinc oxide cement; 2) titanium discs; and 3) titanium combination cement discs. The disks were submerged in bacterial suspensions of either Fn or Pi. Planktonic bacterial growth within the test media was measured by determining the optical density of the cultures (OD600). Mean and standard deviations were calculated for planktonic growth from three separate experiments. Results Intergroup comparison of all experimental groups revealed increased growth of Pi associated with cement-titanium specimens in comparison with cement specimens. Regarding the comparison of all groups for Fn, there was an increased amount of bacterial growth in cement-titanium specimens although the increase was not statistically significant. Conclusions The combination of cement with titanium may exacerbate the bacterial growth capacity of Pi and Fn in contrast to their sole effect. PMID:27058704

  17. In Vitro Evaluation of Planktonic Growth on Experimental Cement-Retained Titanium Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Balci, Nur; Cakan, Umut; Aksu, Burak; Akgul, Oncu; Ulger, Nurver

    2016-04-08

    BACKGROUND The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of selected cements, or their combination with titanium, on the growth of two periodontopathic bacteria: Prevotella intermedia (Pi) and Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn). MATERIAL AND METHODS This study was comprised of several experimental groups: 1) Dental luting cements (glass ionomer cement, methacrylate-based resin cement, zinc-oxide eugenol cement, eugenol-free zinc oxide cement; 2) titanium discs; and 3) titanium combination cement discs. The disks were submerged in bacterial suspensions of either Fn or Pi. Planktonic bacterial growth within the test media was measured by determining the optical density of the cultures (OD600). Mean and standard deviations were calculated for planktonic growth from three separate experiments. RESULTS Intergroup comparison of all experimental groups revealed increased growth of Pi associated with cement-titanium specimens in comparison with cement specimens. Regarding the comparison of all groups for Fn, there was an increased amount of bacterial growth in cement-titanium specimens although the increase was not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS The combination of cement with titanium may exacerbate the bacterial growth capacity of Pi and Fn in contrast to their sole effect.

  18. Cytotoxicity of a calcium aluminate cement in comparison with other dental cements and resin-based materials.

    PubMed

    Franz, Alexander; Konradsson, Katarina; König, Franz; Van Dijken, Jan W V; Schedle, Andreas

    2006-02-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the cytotoxic effects of a calcium aluminate cement with several currently used direct restorative materials. Specimens of three composites (QuiXfil, Tetric Ceram, Filtek Supreme), one zinc phosphate cement (Harvard Cement), one glass ionomer cement (Ketac Molar), and one calcium aluminate cement (DoxaDent), were used fresh or after 7-days' preincubation in cell culture medium at 37 degrees C, pH 7.2. PVC strips for ISO 10993-5 cytotoxicity test were used as positive control and glass specimens as negative control. L-929 fibroblasts (5-ml aliquots, containing 3 x 10(4) cells/ml), cultivated in DMEM with 10% FCS, 1% glutamine, and 1% penicillin/streptomycin at 37 degrees C/5% CO2 and trypsinized, were exposed to the specimens for 72 h. The cells were harvested, centrifuged, and resuspended in 500 microl DMEM and then counted in 500 microl DMEM for 30 s with a flow cytometer at 488 nm. The analysis of variance comparing the six materials showed different influences on L-929 fibroblast cytotoxicity (p <0.0001). The cytotoxicity of all specimens diminished with increasing preincubation time (p <0.0001). Fresh DoxaDent exhibited the lowest cytotoxicity, followed by QuiXfil. Ketac Molar showed the highest cytotoxicity. After 7 days of preincubation, Harvard Cement and Filtek Supreme demonstrated more cytotoxicity than the other materials (p <0.005).

  19. 3D FEA of cemented glass fiber and cast posts with various dental cements in a maxillary central incisor.

    PubMed

    Madfa, Ahmed A; Al-Hamzi, Mohsen A; Al-Sanabani, Fadhel A; Al-Qudaimi, Nasr H; Yue, Xiao-Guang

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to analyse and compare the stability of two dental posts cemented with four different luting agents by examining their shear stress transfer through the FEM. Eight three-dimensional finite element models of a maxillary central incisor restored with glass fiber and Ni-Cr alloy cast dental posts. Each dental post was luted with zinc phosphate, Panavia resin, super bond C&B resin and glass ionomer materials. Finite element models were constructed and oblique loading of 100 N was applied. The distribution of shear stress was investigated at posts and cement/dentine interfaces using ABAQUS/CAE software. The peak shear stress for glass fiber post models minimized approximately three to four times of those for Ni-Cr alloy cast post models. There was negligible difference in peak of shear stress when various cements were compared, irrespective of post materials. The shear stress had same trend for all cement materials. This study found that the glass fiber dental post reduced the shear stress concentration at interfacial of post and cement/dentine compared to Ni-Cr alloy cast dental post.

  20. A clinical retrospective evaluation of 2 orthodontic band cements.

    PubMed

    Millett, D T; Hallgren, A; McCluskey, L A; McAuley, F; Fornell, A C; Love, J; Christie, H

    2001-12-01

    This study aimed to compare the time to first failure of stainless steel orthodontic first permanent molar bands cemented with either a modified composite (Band-Lok, Reliance Orthodontic Products) or a conventional glass ionomer cement (AquaCem, De Trey Dentsply). The effect of patient sex, patient age at the start of treatment, the presenting malocclusion, treatment mechanics, and the operator proficiency on band survival was also assessed. Data for 219 bands cemented with Band-Lok in 108 patients and for 395 bands cemented with AquaCem in 183 patients were analyzed. For each case, a single molar band, either the band that was first to fail or the band that had the shortest follow-up time, was chosen for analysis. For each cement, whether headgear was used or not, there was no significant difference in time to first band failure (P = .398). Twenty-six percent of patients had at least one band failure with Band-Lok, and 30% of patients had at least one band failure with AquaCem, representing an 18% band failure rate for each cement. There was no significant difference in time to first band failure for either cement with respect to sex of the patient (P = .842), patient age at the start of treatment (P = .257), presenting malocclusion (P = .319), or operator proficiency (P = .062). The use of headgear, however, reduced significantly the time to first band failure irrespective of cement type (P = .0069). Headgear use was identified as a predictor of first permanent molar band survival. Clinical performance of bands cemented with either cement appears to be similar and was influenced significantly by the use of headgear.

  1. The Retentive Strength of Cemented Zirconium Oxide Crowns after Dentin Pretreatment with Desensitizing Paste Containing 8% Arginine and Calcium Carbonate

    PubMed Central

    Pilo, Raphael; Harel, Noga; Nissan, Joseph; Levartovsky, Shifra

    2016-01-01

    The effect of dentin pretreatment with Desensitizing Paste containing 8% arginine and calcium carbonate on the retention of zirconium oxide (Y-TZP) crowns was tested. Forty molar teeth were mounted and prepared using a standardized protocol. Y-TZP crowns were produced using computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) technology. The 40 prepared teeth were either pretreated with Desensitizing Paste or not pretreated. After two weeks, each group was subdivided into two groups, cemented with either Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (RMGIC) or Self Adhesive Resin Cement (SARC)). Prior to cementation, the surface areas of the prepared teeth were measured. After aging, the cemented crown-tooth assemblies were tested for retentive strength using a universal testing machine. The debonded surfaces of the teeth and crowns were examined microscopically at 10× magnification. Pretreating the dentin surfaces with Desensitizing Paste prior to cementation did not affect the retention of the Y-TZP crowns. The retentive values for RMGIC (3.04 ± 0.77 MPa) were significantly higher than those for SARC (2.28 ± 0.58 MPa). The predominant failure modes for the RMGIC and SARC were adhesive cement-dentin and adhesive cement-crown, respectively. An 8.0% arginine and calcium carbonate in-office desensitizing paste can be safely used to reduce post-cementation sensitivity without reducing the retentive strength of Y-TZP crowns. PMID:27023532

  2. The Retentive Strength of Cemented Zirconium Oxide Crowns after Dentin Pretreatment with Desensitizing Paste Containing 8% Arginine and Calcium Carbonate.

    PubMed

    Pilo, Raphael; Harel, Noga; Nissan, Joseph; Levartovsky, Shifra

    2016-03-25

    The effect of dentin pretreatment with Desensitizing Paste containing 8% arginine and calcium carbonate on the retention of zirconium oxide (Y-TZP) crowns was tested. Forty molar teeth were mounted and prepared using a standardized protocol. Y-TZP crowns were produced using computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) technology. The 40 prepared teeth were either pretreated with Desensitizing Paste or not pretreated. After two weeks, each group was subdivided into two groups, cemented with either Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (RMGIC) or Self Adhesive Resin Cement (SARC)). Prior to cementation, the surface areas of the prepared teeth were measured. After aging, the cemented crown-tooth assemblies were tested for retentive strength using a universal testing machine. The debonded surfaces of the teeth and crowns were examined microscopically at 10× magnification. Pretreating the dentin surfaces with Desensitizing Paste prior to cementation did not affect the retention of the Y-TZP crowns. The retentive values for RMGIC (3.04 ± 0.77 MPa) were significantly higher than those for SARC (2.28 ± 0.58 MPa). The predominant failure modes for the RMGIC and SARC were adhesive cement-dentin and adhesive cement-crown, respectively. An 8.0% arginine and calcium carbonate in-office desensitizing paste can be safely used to reduce post-cementation sensitivity without reducing the retentive strength of Y-TZP crowns.

  3. Effect of a calcium-silicate-based restorative cement on pulp repair.

    PubMed

    Tran, X V; Gorin, C; Willig, C; Baroukh, B; Pellat, B; Decup, F; Opsahl Vital, S; Chaussain, C; Boukpessi, T

    2012-12-01

    In cases of pulp injury, capping materials are used to enhance tertiary dentin formation; Ca(OH)(2) and MTA are the current gold standards. The aim of this study was to evaluate the capacity of a new calcium-silicate-based restorative cement to induce pulp healing in a rat pulp injury model. For that purpose, cavities with mechanical pulp exposure were prepared on maxillary first molars of 27 six-week-old male rats, and damaged pulps were capped with either the new calcium-silicate-based restorative cement (Biodentine), MTA, or Ca(OH)(2). Cavities were sealed with glass-ionomer cement, and the repair process was assessed at several time-points. At day 7, our results showed that both the evaluated cement and MTA induced cell proliferation and formation of mineralization foci, which were strongly positive for osteopontin. At longer time-points, we observed the formation of a homogeneous dentin bridge at the injury site, secreted by cells displaying an odontoblastic phenotype. In contrast, the reparative tissue induced by Ca(OH)(2) showed porous organization, suggesting a reparative process different from those induced by calcium silicate cements. Analysis of these data suggests that the evaluated cement can be used for direct pulp-capping.

  4. Atomic and vibrational origins of mechanical toughness in bioactive cement during setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Kun V.; Yang, Bin; Yue, Yuanzheng; Bowron, Daniel T.; Mayers, Jerry; Donnan, Robert S.; Dobó-Nagy, Csaba; Nicholson, John W.; Fang, De-Cai; Greer, A. Lindsay; Chass, Gregory A.; Greaves, G. Neville

    2015-11-01

    Bioactive glass ionomer cements (GICs) have been in widespread use for ~40 years in dentistry and medicine. However, these composites fall short of the toughness needed for permanent implants. Significant impediment to improvement has been the requisite use of conventional destructive mechanical testing, which is necessarily retrospective. Here we show quantitatively, through the novel use of calorimetry, terahertz (THz) spectroscopy and neutron scattering, how GIC's developing fracture toughness during setting is related to interfacial THz dynamics, changing atomic cohesion and fluctuating interfacial configurations. Contrary to convention, we find setting is non-monotonic, characterized by abrupt features not previously detected, including a glass-polymer coupling point, an early setting point, where decreasing toughness unexpectedly recovers, followed by stress-induced weakening of interfaces. Subsequently, toughness declines asymptotically to long-term fracture test values. We expect the insight afforded by these in situ non-destructive techniques will assist in raising understanding of the setting mechanisms and associated dynamics of cementitious materials.

  5. Failure load of teeth restored by use of alumina copings: Influence of residual tooth structure and cementation.

    PubMed

    Schmitter, Marc; Posavec, Tomislav; Mueller, Denise; Mussotter, Katrin; Rammelsberg, Peter; Rues, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate failure loads of teeth restored by use of alumina-coping, and to assess the effects of different amounts of residual tooth structure and different cements, standardized artificial alumina copings were fabricated on seventy-two molars. 24 of the copings were cemented by use of an adhesive resin cement (P-group), n=24 by use of glass-ionomer cement (K-group), and n=24 by use of a self-adhesive modified composite resin-cement (R-group). After artificial ageing (10,000 thermal-cycles between 6.5 and 60°C; 1,200,000 chewing cycles with Fmax=64 N), the specimens were loaded until failure (cross-head-speed: 0.5 mm/min). In the K-group 83% of the specimens failed during chewing simulation. Statistical analysis included chi-squared-test, unpaired-to-sample-t-test, and ANOVA. For severely damaged teeth, loads to failure in the P-group (384 N) were significantly (p=0.03) higher than in the R-group (295 N). For severely damaged teeth, use of composite resin cement resulted in higher loads to failure than use of other cements.

  6. Zinc polycarboxylate dental cement for the controlled release of an active organic substance: proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mohammad Naseem; Edwards, Mark; Nicholson, John W

    2010-04-01

    The potential of employing zinc polycarboxylate dental cement as a controlled release material has been studied. Benzalkonium chloride was used as the active ingredient, and incorporated at concentrations of 1, 2 and 3% by mass within the cement. At these levels, there was no observable effect on the speed of setting. Release was followed using an ion-selective electrode to determine changes in chloride ion concentration with time. This technique showed that the additive was released when the cured cement was placed in water, with release occurring by a diffusion mechanism for the first 3 h, but continuing beyond that for up to 1 week. Diffusion coefficients were in the range 5.62 x 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1) (for 1% concentration) to 10.90 x 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1) (for 3% concentration). Up to 3% of the total loading of benzalkonium chloride was released from the zinc polycarboxylate after a week, which is similar to that found in previous studies with glass-ionomer cement. It is concluded that zinc polycarboxylate cement is capable of acting as a useful material for the controlled release of active organic compounds.

  7. Comparative evaluation of compressive strength, diametral tensile strength and shear bond strength of GIC type IX, chlorhexidine-incorporated GIC and triclosan-incorporated GIC: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Jaidka, Shipra; Somani, Rani; Singh, Deepti J.; Shafat, Shazia

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To comparatively evaluate the compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and shear bond strength of glass ionomer cement type IX, chlorhexidine-incorporated glass ionomer cement, and triclosan-incorporated glass ionomer cement. Materials and Methods: In this study, glass ionomer cement type IX was used as a control. Chlorhexidine diacetate, and triclosan were added to glass ionomer cement type IX powder, respectively, in order to obtain 0.5, 1.25, and 2.5% concentrations of the respective experimental groups. Compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and shear bond strength were evaluated after 24 h using Instron Universal Testing Machine. The results obtained were statistically analyzed using the independent t-test, Dunnett test, and Tukey test. Results: There was no statistical difference in the compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and shear bond strength of glass ionomer cement type IX (control), 0.5% triclosan-glass ionomer cement, and 0.5% chlorhexidine-glass ionomer cement. Conclusion: The present study suggests that the compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and shear bond strength of 0.5% triclosan-glass ionomer cement and 0.5% chlorhexidine-glass ionomer cement were similar to those of the glass ionomer cement type IX, discernibly signifying that these can be considered as viable options for use in pediatric dentistry with the additional value of antimicrobial property along with physical properties within the higher acceptable range. PMID:27195231

  8. Antibacterial effect and shear bond strength of an orthodontic adhesive cement containing Galla chinensis extract

    PubMed Central

    WANG, LU-FEI; LUO, FENG; XUE, CHAO-RAN; DENG, MENG; CHEN, CHEN; WU, HAO

    2016-01-01

    Galla chinensis extract (GCE), a naturally-derived agent, has a significant inhibitory effect on cariogenic bacteria. The present study aims to evaluate the antibacterial effect and shear bond strength of an orthodontic adhesive cement containing GCE. A resin-modified glass ionomer cement incorporated GCE at five mass fractions (0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, and 0.8%) to prepare GCE-containing cement for analysis. For the agar diffusion test, cement specimens were placed on agar disk inoculated with Streptococcus mutans (strain ATCC 25175). Following 48 h incubation, the inhibition halo diameter was measured. To assess bacteria colonization susceptibility, S. mutans adhesion to cement specimens was detected by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) following 48 h incubation. To evaluate bond strength, a total of 50 metal brackets were bonded on premolar surfaces by using cement (10 teeth/group). Following immersion in an artificial saliva for 3 days, shear bond strength (SBS) was measured. The results demonstrated that GCE-containing samples exhibited a larger bacterial inhibition halo than control, and the inhibition zone increased as the GCE mass fraction increased. SEM analysis demonstrated that S. mutans presented a weaker adherent capacity to all GCE-containing cements compared with control, but the difference between each GCE-containing group was not significant. SBS values of each GCE-containing group exhibited no difference compared with the control. In conclusion, GCE-containing adhesive cement exhibits a promising inhibitory effect on S. mutans growth and adhesion. Without compromising bond strength, adding GCE in adhesive cement may be an attractive option for preventing white spot lesions during orthodontic treatment. PMID:27073642

  9. Carboxymethylation of ulvan and chitosan and their use as polymeric components of bone cements.

    PubMed

    Barros, A A A; Alves, A; Nunes, C; Coimbra, M A; Pires, R A; Reis, R L

    2013-11-01

    Ulvan, extracted from the green algae Ulva lactuca, and chitosan, extracted from Loligo forbesis squid-pen, were carboxymethylated, yielding polysaccharides with an average degree of substitution of ∼98% (carboxymethyl ulvan, CMU) and ∼87% (carboxymethyl chitosan, N,O-CMC). The carboxymethylation was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and quantified by conductimetric titration and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance. The average molecular weight increased with the carboxymethylation (chitosan, Mn 145→296 kDa and Mw 227→416 kDa; ulvan, Mn 139→261 kDa and Mw 368→640 kDa), indicating successful chemical modifications. Mixtures of the modified polysaccharides were tested in the formulation of polyacrylic acid-free glass-ionomer bone cements. Mechanical and in vitro bioactivity tests indicate that the inclusion of CMU in the cement formulation, i.e. 0.50:0.50 N,O-CMC:CMU, enhances its mechanical performance (compressive strength 52.4±8.0 MPa and modulus 2.3±0.3 GPa), generates non-cytotoxic cements and induces the diffusion of Ca and/or P-based moieties from the surface to the bulk of the cements.

  10. Conservative approach of a symptomatic carious immature permanent tooth using a tricalcium silicate cement (Biodentine): a case report

    PubMed Central

    Grosgogeat, Brigitte; Seux, Dominique; Farge, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    The restorative management of deep carious lesions and the preservation of pulp vitality of immature teeth present real challenges for dental practitioners. New tricalcium silicate cements are of interest in the treatment of such cases. This case describes the immediate management and the follow-up of an extensive carious lesion on an immature second right mandibular premolar. Following anesthesia and rubber dam isolation, the carious lesion was removed and a partial pulpotomy was performed. After obtaining hemostasis, the exposed pulp was covered with a tricalcium silicate cement (Biodentine, Septodont) and a glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX extra, GC Corp.) restoration was placed over the tricalcium silicate cement. A review appointment was arranged after seven days, where the tooth was asymptomatic with the patient reporting no pain during the intervening period. At both 3 and 6 mon follow up, it was noted that the tooth was vital, with normal responses to thermal tests. Radiographic examination of the tooth indicated dentin-bridge formation in the pulp chamber and the continuous root formation. This case report demonstrates a fast tissue response both at the pulpal and root dentin level. The use of tricalcium silicate cement should be considered as a conservative intervention in the treatment of symptomatic immature teeth. PMID:24303363

  11. Simulations reveal the role of composition into the atomic-level flexibility of bioactive glass cements.

    PubMed

    Tian, Kun Viviana; Chass, Gregory A; Di Tommaso, Devis

    2016-01-14

    Bioactive glass ionomer cements (GICs), the reaction product of a fluoro-alumino-silicate glass and polyacrylic acid, have been in effective use in dentistry for over 40 years and more recently in orthopaedics and medical implantation. Their desirable properties have affirmed GIC's place in the medical materials community, yet are limited to non-load bearing applications due to the brittle nature of the hardened composite cement, thought to arise from the glass component and the interfaces it forms. Towards helping resolve the fundamental bases of the mechanical shortcomings of GICs, we report the 1st ever computational models of a GIC-relevant component. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations were employed to generate and characterise three fluoro-alumino-silicate glasses of differing compositions with focus on resolving the atomic scale structural and dynamic contributions of aluminium, phosphorous and fluorine. Analyses of the glasses revealed rising F-content leading to the expansion of the glass network, compression of Al-F bonding, angular constraint at Al-pivots, localisation of alumino-phosphates and increased fluorine diffusion. Together, these changes to the structure, speciation and dynamics with raised fluorine content impart an overall rigidifying effect on the glass network, and suggest a predisposition to atomic-level inflexibility, which could manifest in the ionomer cements they form.

  12. An in vitro study on the retentive strength of orthodontic bands cemented with CPP-ACP-containing GIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heravi, Farzin; Bagheri, Hossein; Rangrazi, Abdolrasoul; Mojtaba Zebarjad, Seyed

    2016-12-01

    Caries and white spot lesions around orthodontic bands are well known occurrences in fixed orthodontic treatment. There are several methods to overcome these problems. One of these includes modification of the band cement with remineralizing agents such as casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP). However, it should be evaluated that the cement modification has no significant negative effects on the retentive strength of the cemented orthodontic bands. In a continuation of our previous studies on the effects of the addition of CPP-ACP on the mechanical properties of luting and lining glass ionomer cement (GIC), this study aimed to investigate the retentive strength of orthodontic bands cemented with CPP-ACP containing GIC. Sixty extracted human pre molars teeth were embedded in acrylic resin and randomly divided into two groups of 30 specimens. In group 1, bands were cemented to the tooth with a GIC. In group 2, CPP-ACP (1.56% w/w) was added to the GIC before cementation. The retentive strength of each groups was determined with a universal testing machine. Further, the amount of cement remaining on the tooth surface was evaluated under a stereomicroscope, and the adhesive remnant index (ARI) score was determined. Results of this study showed that there were no significant differences between the groups in retentive strength and ARI score. In conclusion, modification of GIC with 1.56% w/w CPP-ACP had no negative effects on the retentive strength of the bands so can be used during fixed orthodontic treatment.

  13. Film Thickness and Flow Properties of Resin-Based Cements at Different Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, R

    2013-01-01

    Statement of Problem: For a luting agent to allow complete seating of prosthetic restorations, it must obtain an appropriate flow rate maintaining a minimum film thickness. The performance of recently introduced luting agents in this regard has not been evaluated. Purpose: To measure and compare the film thickness and flow properties of seven resin-containing luting cements at different temperatures (37°C, 25°C and10°C). Material and Methods: Specimens were prepared from five resin luting cements; seT (SDI), Panavia F (Kuraray), Varioloink II (Ivoclar), Maxcem (Kerr), Nexus2 (Kerr) and two resin-modified glass-ionomer luting cements (RM-GICs); GC Fuji Plus (GC Corporation), and RelyX Luting 2 (3 M/ESPE). The film thickness and flow rate of each cement (n=15) was determined using the test described in ISO at three different temperatures. Results: There was a linear correlation between film thickness and flow rate for most of the materials. Cooling increased fluidity of almost all materials while the effect of temperature on film thickness was material dependent. At 37°C, all products revealed a film thickness of less than 25µm except for GC Fuji Plus. At 25°C, all cements produced a film thickness of less than 27 µm except for seT. At 10°C, apart from seT and Rely X Luting 2, the remaining cements showed a film thickness smaller than 20 µm. Conclusion: Cooling increased fluidity of almost all materials, however. the film thickness did not exceed 35 µm in either condition, in spite of the lowest film thickness being demonstrated at the lowest temperature. PMID:24724120

  14. A bioactive dental luting cement--its retentive properties and 3-year clinical findings.

    PubMed

    Jefferies, Steven R; Pameijer, Cornelis H; Appleby, David C; Boston, Daniel; Lööf, Jesper

    2013-02-01

    A clinical validation study was conducted to determine the performance of a new bioactive dental cement (Ceramir C&B, Doxa Dental AB) for permanent cementation. The cement is a new formulation class, which is a hybrid material comprised of calcium aluminate and glass-ionomer components. A total of 38 crowns and bridges were cemented in 17 patients; 31 of the abutment teeth were vital and seven were non-vital. Six restorations were bridges with a total of 14 abutment teeth (12 vital/ two non-vital). One fixed splint comprising two abutment teeth was also included. Preparation parameters were recorded, as well as cement characteristics such as working time, setting time, seating characteristics, and ease of cement removal. Baseline data were recorded for the handling of the cement, gingival inflammation, and pre-cementation sensitivity. Post-cementation parameters included post-cementation sensitivity, gingival tissue reaction, marginal integrity, and discoloration. All patients were seen for recall examinations at 30 days and 6 months. Fifteen of 17 subjects and 13 of 17 patients were also available for subsequent comprehensive 1- and 2-year recall examination, and 13 patients were available for a 3-year recall examination. Restorations available for the 3-year recall examination included 14 single-unit full-coverage crown restorations, four three-unit bridges comprising eight abutments, and one two-unit splint. Three-year recall data yielded no loss of retention, no secondary caries, no marginal discolorations, and no subjective sensitivity. All restorations rated excellent for marginal integrity. Average visual analogue scale (VAS) score for tooth sensitivity decreased from 7.63 mm at baseline to 0.44 mm at 6-month recall, 0.20 mm at 1-year recall, and 0.00 mm at 2- and 3-year recall. Average gingival index (GI) score for gingival inflammation decreased from 0.56 at baseline to 0.11 at 6-month recall, 0.16 at 1-year recall, 0.21 at 2-year recall, and 0.07 at 3

  15. The Influence of Root-End Filling Materials on Bone Healing – An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    KUI, ANDREEA GULIE; BERAR, ANTONELA; LASCU, LIANA; BOLFA, POMPEI; BOSCA, BIANCA; MIHU, CARMEN; BACIUT, MIHAELA; AVRAM, RAMONA; BADEA, MÂNDRA

    2014-01-01

    Aims. The aim of this experimental study is to assess the bone healing phenomenon produced in the presence of several dental materials: a polycarboxylate cement, a glass-ionomer cement, a composite resin and MTA (mineral trioxide aggregate) based cement. Methods. The biocompatibility of four root-end fillings materials, used in periapical surgery was investigated after intra-osseous implantation of the materials in rats’ calvaria. Tissue reaction was studied at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 weeks after implantation. We took into consideration the presence of inflammatory cells (polymorphonuclear leukocytes, macrophages, plasma cells, lymphocytes and giant cells) and classified the aspects of the histological samples according to the following scale: 0 - no inflammation, 1 – mild, isolated inflammation, 2 - moderate, localized inflammatory reaction, 3 - severe, diffuse and intense inflammatory reaction. Results. The inflammatory reaction was present at the six intervals for all the tested materials, but at 12 week interval, the reaction was minimal in all cases. Also, a dissolution reaction was observed for all the materials, less intense for glass-ionomer cement and polycarboxilate cement. Conclusions. At the end of the experimental period, glass-ionomer cement and polycarboxilate cement suffered a lesser dissolution reaction as compared to the second group of tested materials. PMID:26528034

  16. Expansive Cements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1970-10-01

    either burned simultaneously with a portland ce4nt or !r;terground with portland cement clinker ; Type M - a mixture of portland cement, calcium-aluminate... clinker that is interground with portland clinker or blended with portland cement or, alternately, it may be formed simul- taneously vrith the portland ... clinker compounds during the burning process. 3. Expansive cement, Type M is either a mixture of portland cement, calcium aluminate cement, and calcium

  17. Laser treatment of dental ceramic/cement layers: transmitted energy, temperature effects and surface characterisation.

    PubMed

    Pich, Olena; Franzen, René; Gutknecht, Norbert; Wolfart, Stefan

    2015-02-01

    In the present paper, we investigate the behaviour of different dental materials under laser irradiation. We have used e.max Ceram, e.max ZirCAD, and e.max Press dental ceramics and glass ionomer cement Ketac Cem in the present study. The dental ceramics were prepared in the form of samples with thickness of 0.5-2 mm. We used two lasers [solid-state laser (Er:YAG, Fidelis III+, Fotona) and an 810- nm diode laser (FOX, A.R.C)] for the transillumination of ceramic samples. It has been shown that the laser energy transmitted through the ceramic material decreases to 30-40% of the original values along with an increase in the thickness of the irradiated sample. Pigmented ceramic samples show more laser energy loss compared to the samples containing no pigment. We investigated the temperature evolution in composite sandwiched ceramic/cement samples under laser treatment. The increase in the irradiation time and laser power led to a temperature increase of up to 80 °C. The surfaces of irradiated ceramic samples were examined with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to evaluate changes in chemical composition, such as a decrease in the C signal, accompanied by a strong increase in the Zr peak for the Er:YAG laser, while the 810-nm diode laser showed no change in the ratio of elements on the surface.

  18. Ion release from copper phosphate cement and influence on Streptococcus mutans growth in vitro: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Foley, Jennifer; Blackwell, Alison

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of a black copper cement (BCC), an established restorative material (a conventional glass ionomer cement) and two temporary restorative materials (a zinc phosphate and a zinc polycarboxylate cement) on the growth of Streptococcus mutans in vitro, and to correlate bacterial growth with ion release from each material. Test specimens were eluted in either 0.1 M lactic acid, pH 4, or 0.1 M sodium chloride, pH 7. At 2 days, 7 days, 28 days and 6 months, eluates were inoculated with S. mutans and bacterial growth was recorded. Metal ion (Cu(2+), Zn(2+ )and Mg(2+)) and fluoride release were measured. At most immersion times, the different materials had a statistically significant inhibitory effect on bacterial growth compared to the respective control, at both pH levels. The inhibitory effect decreased with time and in most cases was associated with high levels of ion release at the beginning of the experimental period, followed by significantly lower levels. For BCC, there were statistically significant relationships between the median rates of growth of S. mutans in the presence of BCC eluates and the median values for release of copper and zinc, although not magnesium. Of the different materials, BCC demonstrated greatest antibacterial activity.

  19. Antibacterial and protein-repellent orthodontic cement to combat biofilms and white spot lesions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Chen, Chen; Weir, Michael D.; Bai, Yuxing; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives White spot lesions are the most undesired side-effect of fixed orthodontic treatments. The objectives of this study were to combine nanoparticles of silver (NAg) with 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) to develop a modified resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGI) as orthodontic cement with double benefits of antibacterial and protein-repellent capabilities for the first time. Methods NAg and MPC were incorporated into a commercial RMGI. Another commercial orthodontic adhesive also served as control. Enamel shear bond strengths (SBS) were determined. Protein adsorption was measured via a micro bicinchoninic acid method. A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model with human saliva as inoculum was tested. Biofilms adherent on the cement samples and planktonic bacteria in the culture medium away from the cement surfaces were both evaluated for bacterial metabolic activity, colony-forming units (CFU), and lactic acid production. Results Adding 0.1% NAg and 3% MPC to RMGI, and water-aging for 30 days, did not adversely affect the SBS, compared to the unmodified RMGI control (p>0.1). The modified RMGI containing 0.1% NAg and 3% MPC achieved the greatest reduction in protein adsorption, bacterial adhesion, CFU, metabolic activity and lactic acid production. The RMGI containing 0.1% NAg and 3% MPC inhibited not only the bacteria on its surface, but also the bacteria away from the surface in the culture medium. Conclusions The incorporation of double agents (antibacterial NAg + protein-repellent MPC) into RMGI achieved much stronger inhibition of biofilms than using each agent alone. The novel antibacterial and protein-repellent RMGI with substantially-reduced biofilm acids is promising as an orthodontic cement to combat white spot lesions in enamel. PMID:26427311

  20. Effects of surface treatments and storage times on the tensile bond strength of adhesive cements to noble and base metal alloys.

    PubMed

    Burmann, Paulo Afonso; Santos, Jose Fortunato Ferreira; May, Liliana Gressler; Pereira, Joao Eduardo da Silva; Cardoso, Paulo Eduardo Capel

    2008-01-01

    This work evaluated two resin cements and a glass-ionomer cement and their bond strength to gold-palladium (Au-Pd), silver-palladium (Ag-Pd), and nickel-chromium-beryllium (Ni-Cr-Be) alloys, utilizing three surface treatments over a period of six months. Eight hundred ten pieces were cast (in a button shape flat surfaces) in one of three alloys. Each alloy group was assigned to three other groups, based on the surface treatment utilized. Specimens were fabricated by bonding similar buttons in using one of three adhesive cements. The 405 pairs were thermocycled and stored in saline solution (0.9% NaCl) at 37 degrees C. The tensile bond strengths were measured in a universal testing machine after storage times of 2, 90, or 180 days. The highest mean bond strength value was obtained with the base metal alloy (10.9 +/- 8.6 MPa). In terms of surface treatment, oxidation resulted in the highest mean bond strength (13.7 +/- 7.3 MPa), followed by sandblasting (10.3 +/- 5.5 MPa) and polishing (3.0 +/- 6.4 MPa). Panavia Ex (13.2 +/- 9.3 MPa) showed significantly higher bond strengths than the other two cements, although the storage time reduced all bond strengths significantly.

  1. Biocompatibility of surgical implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaelble, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Method of selecting biocompatible materials for surgical implants uses fracture mechanic relationships and surface energies of candidate materials in presence of blood plasma. Technique has been used to characterize 190 materials by parameters that reflect their biocompatibility.

  2. Microleakage of Four Dental Cements in Metal Ceramic Restorations With Open Margins

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhar Ashtiani, Reza; Farzaneh, Babak; Azarsina, Mohadese; Aghdashi, Farzad; Dehghani, Nima; Afshari, Aisooda; Mahshid, Minu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fixed prosthodontics is a routine dental treatment and microleakage is a major cause of its failure. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the marginal microleakage of four cements in metal ceramic restorations with adapted and open margins. Materials and Methods: Sixty sound human premolars were selected for this experimental study performed in Tehran, Iran and prepared for full-crown restorations. Wax patterns were formed leaving a 300 µm gap on one of the proximal margins. The crowns were cast and the samples were randomly divided into four groups based on the cement used. Copings were cemented using zinc phosphate cement (Fleck), Fuji Plus resin-modified glass ionomer, Panavia F2.0 resin cement, or G-Cem resin cement, according to the manufacturers’ instructions. Samples were immersed in 2% methylene blue solution. After 24 hours, dye penetration was assessed under a stereomicroscope and analyzed using the respective software. Data were analyzed using ANOVA, paired t-tests, and Kruskal-Wallis, Wilcoxon, and Mann-Whitney tests. Results: The least microleakage occurred in the Panavia F2.0 group (closed margin, 0.18 mm; open margin, 0.64 mm) and the maximum was observed in the Fleck group (closed margin, 1.92 mm; open margin, 3.32 mm). The Fleck group displayed significantly more microleakage compared to the Fuji Plus and Panavia F2.0 groups (P < 0.001) in both closed and open margins. In open margins, differences in microleakage between the Fuji Plus and G-Cem as well as between the G-Cem and Panavia F2.0 groups were significant (P < 0.001). In closed margins, only the G-Cem group displayed significantly more microleakage as compared to the Panavia F2.0 group (P < 0.05). Paired t-test results showed significantly more microleakage in open margins compared to closed margins, except in the Fuji Plus group (P = 0.539). Conclusions: Fuji Plus cement exhibited better sealing ability in closed and open margins compared to G-Cem and Fleck

  3. Leakage in roots coronally sealed with different temporary fillings.

    PubMed

    Barthel, C R; Strobach, A; Briedigkeit, H; Göbel, U B; Roulet, J F

    1999-11-01

    This study was aimed at determining the ability of different coronal temporary fillings to prevent corono-apical penetration of bacteria. A total of 103 human teeth, including three controls, were instrumented, obturated with gutta-percha, coronally sealed with either Cavit, Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM), glass-ionomer cement, Cavit/glass-ionomer cement, or IRM/glass-ionomer cement, respectively. Each root was fixed with wax between two chambers: the coronal chamber harboring soy broth with 10(8) colony-forming units of Streptococcus mutans/ml, the apical chamber containing sterile soy broth. The latter was checked daily for turbidity, indicating corono-apical penetration of bacteria. The Cavit group, the IRM group, and the Cavit/glass-ionomer cement group showed significantly more leakage than the glass-ionomer cement group of the IRM/glass-ionomer cement group. If a sample leaked, all except one (IRM/glass-ionomer cement) leaked before day 12. This in vitro study seems to indicate that only glass-ionomer cement and IRM combined with glass-ionomer cement may prevent bacterial penetration to the periapex of root-filled teeth over a 1-month period.

  4. Biological evaluation of a new pulp capping material developed from Portland cement.

    PubMed

    Negm, Ahmed M; Hassanien, Ehab E; Abu-Seida, Ashraf M; Nagy, Mohamed M

    2017-03-02

    This study evaluates the biological properties of a new pulp capping material developed from Portland cement. This study was conducted on 48 teeth in 4 dogs (12 teeth/dog). The dogs were classified into two equal groups (n=24 teeth) according to the evaluation period including: group A (3 weeks) and group B (3 months). Each group was further subdivided into three equal subgroups (n=8 teeth) according to the capping material including: subgroup 1: mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), subgroup2: Portland cement+10% calcium hydroxide+20% bismuth oxide (Port Cal) and subgroup 3: Portland cement+bismuth oxide. After general anesthesia, a class V buccal cavity was prepared coronal to the gingival margin. After pulp exposure and hemostasis,the capping materials and glass ionomer filling were placed on the exposure sites. All histopathological findings, inflammatory cell count and dentin bridge formation were recorded. Data were analyzed statistically. After 3 months, the histopathological picture of the pulp in subgroup 1 showed normal pulp, continuous odontoblastic layer and complete dentin bridge formation while subgroup 2 showed partial and complete dentin bridge over a normal and necrotic pulps. Subgroup 3 showed loss of normal architecture, areas of necrosis, complete, or incomplete dentin bridge formation, attached and detached pulp stones and fatty degeneration in group B. For group A, MTA subgroup showed the least number of inflammatory cell infiltrate followed by Port Cal subgroup. While subgroup 3 showed the highest number of inflammatory cell infiltrate. For group B, the mean inflammatory cell count increased with the three tested materials with no statistical difference. Regarding dentin bridge formation at group A, no significant differences was found between subgroups, while at group B, MTA subgroup exhibited significantly higher scores than other subgroups. In conclusion, addition of calcium hydroxide to Portland cement improves the dentin bridge formation

  5. Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Portland Cement for Direct Pulp Capping in Dog: A Histopathological Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Bidar, Maryam; Naghavi, Neda; Mohtasham, Nooshin; Sheik-Nezami, Mahshid; Fallahrastegar, Amir; Afkhami, Farzaneh; Attaran Mashhadi, Negin; Nargesi, Iman

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Mineral trioxide aggregate and calcium hydroxide are considered the gold standard pulp-capping materials. Recently, Portland cement has been introduced with properties similar to those of mineral trioxide aggregate. Histopathological effects of direct pulp capping using mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cements on dog dental pulp tissue were evaluated in the present study. Materials and methods. This histopatological study was carried out on 64 dog premolars. First, the pulp was exposed with a sterile bur. Then, the exposed pulp was capped with white or gray mineral trioxide aggregates and white or gray Portland cements in each quadrant and sealed with glass-ionomer. The specimens were evaluated under a light microscope after 6 months. Statistical analysis was carried out using Kruskal-Wallis test. Statistical significance was defined at α=5%. Results. There was no acute inflammation in any of the specimens. Chronic inflammation in white and gray mineral trioxide aggregates and white and gray Portland cements was reported to be 45.5%, 27.3%, 57.1% and 34.1%, respectively. Although the differences were not statistically significant, severe inflammation was observed mostly adjacent to white mineral trioxide aggregate. The largest extent of increased vascularization (45%) and the least increase in fibrous tissue were observed adjacent to white mineral trioxide aggregate, with no significant differences. In addition, the least calcified tissue formed adjacent to white mineral trioxide aggregate, although the difference was not significant. Conclusion. The materials used in this study were equally effective as pulp protection materials following direct pulp capping in dog teeth. PMID:25346831

  6. Mineral trioxide aggregate and portland cement for direct pulp capping in dog: a histopathological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bidar, Maryam; Naghavi, Neda; Mohtasham, Nooshin; Sheik-Nezami, Mahshid; Fallahrastegar, Amir; Afkhami, Farzaneh; Attaran Mashhadi, Negin; Nargesi, Iman

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Mineral trioxide aggregate and calcium hydroxide are considered the gold standard pulp-capping materials. Recently, Portland cement has been introduced with properties similar to those of mineral trioxide aggregate. Histopathological effects of direct pulp capping using mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cements on dog dental pulp tissue were evaluated in the present study. Materials and methods. This histopatological study was carried out on 64 dog premolars. First, the pulp was exposed with a sterile bur. Then, the exposed pulp was capped with white or gray mineral trioxide aggregates and white or gray Portland cements in each quadrant and sealed with glass-ionomer. The specimens were evaluated under a light microscope after 6 months. Statistical analysis was carried out using Kruskal-Wallis test. Statistical significance was defined at α=5%. Results. There was no acute inflammation in any of the specimens. Chronic inflammation in white and gray mineral trioxide aggregates and white and gray Portland cements was reported to be 45.5%, 27.3%, 57.1% and 34.1%, respectively. Although the differences were not statistically significant, severe inflammation was observed mostly adjacent to white mineral trioxide aggregate. The largest extent of increased vascularization (45%) and the least increase in fibrous tissue were observed adjacent to white mineral trioxide aggregate, with no significant differences. In addition, the least calcified tissue formed adjacent to white mineral trioxide aggregate, although the difference was not significant. Conclusion. The materials used in this study were equally effective as pulp protection materials following direct pulp capping in dog teeth.

  7. Bone cement

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Chauhan, Mayank; Vaish, Abhishek

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge about the bone cement is of paramount importance to all Orthopaedic surgeons. Although the bone cement had been the gold standard in the field of joint replacement surgery, its use has somewhat decreased because of the advent of press-fit implants which encourages bone in growth. The shortcomings, side effects and toxicity of the bone cement are being addressed recently. More research is needed and continues in the field of nanoparticle additives, enhanced bone–cement interface etc. PMID:26403875

  8. Atomic and vibrational origins of mechanical toughness in bioactive cement during setting

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Kun V.; Yang, Bin; Yue, Yuanzheng; Bowron, Daniel T.; Mayers, Jerry; Donnan, Robert S.; Dobó-Nagy, Csaba; Nicholson, John W.; Fang, De-Cai; Greer, A. Lindsay; Chass, Gregory A.; Greaves, G. Neville

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive glass ionomer cements (GICs) have been in widespread use for ∼40 years in dentistry and medicine. However, these composites fall short of the toughness needed for permanent implants. Significant impediment to improvement has been the requisite use of conventional destructive mechanical testing, which is necessarily retrospective. Here we show quantitatively, through the novel use of calorimetry, terahertz (THz) spectroscopy and neutron scattering, how GIC's developing fracture toughness during setting is related to interfacial THz dynamics, changing atomic cohesion and fluctuating interfacial configurations. Contrary to convention, we find setting is non-monotonic, characterized by abrupt features not previously detected, including a glass–polymer coupling point, an early setting point, where decreasing toughness unexpectedly recovers, followed by stress-induced weakening of interfaces. Subsequently, toughness declines asymptotically to long-term fracture test values. We expect the insight afforded by these in situ non-destructive techniques will assist in raising understanding of the setting mechanisms and associated dynamics of cementitious materials. PMID:26548704

  9. Antimicrobial Activity of Glass lonomer Cement Incorporated with Chlorhexidine-Loaded Zeolite Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Jin; Son, Jun Sik; Kim, Kyo-Han; Kwon, Tae-Yub

    2016-02-01

    A functional dental restorative system with antimicrobial properties was developed using zeolite (ZE) nanoparticles (NPs) as a drug delivery carrier. ZE NPs loaded with chlorhexidine (CHX) were prepared using the ionic immobilization method. The resulting CHX-loaded ZE NPs were then incorporated into commercial dental glass ionomer cement (GIC). The average size of the CHX-loaded ZE NPs was about 100 to 200 nm, and the NPs were dispersed homogeneously in the GIC. The in vitro release profile of encapsulated GIC containing CHX showed an early release burst of approximately 30% of the total CHX by day 7, whereas GIC containing CHX-loaded ZE NPs showed a sustained release of CHX without the early release burst in a 4-week immersion study. The agar diffusion test results showed that the GIC incorporated with CHX-loaded ZE NPs showed a larger growth inhibition zone of Streptococcus mutans than GIC alone, indicating that this innovative delivery platform potently imparted antimicrobial activity to the GIC. Moreover, these findings suggest that a range of antimicrobial drugs that inhibit the growth of oral bacteria can be incorporated efficiently into dental GIC using CHX-loaded ZE NPs.

  10. Shear Bond Strength of Calcium Enriched Mixture Cement and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate to Composite Resin with Two Different Adhesive Systems

    PubMed Central

    Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Bahari, Mahmoud; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Motahhari, Paria; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar; Asgary, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Immediate restoration after vital pulp therapy is essential in order to create and maintain effective coronal seal. Purpose of Study: The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of recently used pulp capping materials: white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), and calcium enriched mixture cement (CEM) to composite resin with the use of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems and compare them with the bond strength of commonly used resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI) cement. Materials and Methods: Forty specimens from each test material were fabricated, measuring 4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in depth. The specimens of each material were divided into 2 groups of 20 specimens according to the adhesive system (Single Bond vs. Clearfil SE Bond) used for bonding of resin composite. The shear bond strength values were measured at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min and fractured surfaces were examined. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey’s test (P<0.05). Results: Analysis of data showed a significantly higher bond strength for RMGI compared to MTA and CEM (P<0.001); however, no significant differences were observed in the bond strength values of MTA and CEM (P=0.9). Furthermore, there were no significant differences in relation to the type of the adhesive system irrespective of the type of the material used (P=0.95) All the failures were of cohesive type in RMGI, MTA and CEM. Conclusion: Bond strength of RMGI cement to composite resin was higher than that of MTA or CEM cement irrespective of the type of the adhesive system. PMID:25628696

  11. Restorative dentistry for children.

    PubMed

    Donly, Kevin J

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses contemporary pediatric restorative dentistry. Indications and contraindications for the choice of different restorative materials in different clinical situations, including the risk assessment of the patient, are presented. The specific use of glass ionomer cement or resin-modified glass ionomer cement, resin-based composite, and stainless steel crowns is discussed so that preparation design and restoration placement is understood.

  12. Squeeze cementing

    SciTech Connect

    Ewert, D.P.; Kundert, D.P.; Dahl, J.A.; Dalrymple, E.D.; Gerke, R.R.

    1992-06-16

    This patent describes a method for terminating the flow of fluid from a portion of a subterranean formation into a wellbore. It comprises: placing within the wellbore adjacent the portion a volume of a slurry of hydraulic cement, permitting the volume to penetrate into the portion; and maintaining the slurry in the portion for a time sufficient to enable the slurry to form a rigid mass of cement in the portion.

  13. Cement Burns

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Munir; Moynagh, M.; Lawlor, C.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Cement burns account for relatively few admissions to a burn unit; however, these burns deserve separate consideration because of special features of diagnosis and management. Cement burns, even though potentially disabling, have rarely been reported in literature. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of all patients admitted with cement burns injuries to the national burns unit at the St James's Hospital in Dublin, Ireland, over a 10-year period for the years 1996–2005. Results: A total of 46 patients with cement burns were admitted. The majority of patients were aged 16–74 years (mean age = 32 years). Eighty-seven percent of injuries occurred in an industrial and 13% in a domestic setting. The upper and lower extremities were involved in all the patients, and the mean total body surface area affected was 6.5%. The mean length of hospital stay was 21 days with a range of 1–40 days. Thirty-eight (82%) were surgically managed involving debridement and split-thickness skin graft (SSG) and four (9%) were conservatively managed. A further four did not have data available. Conclusion: Widespread inexperience in dealing with this group of cement burns patients and delays in referral to burns unit highlights the potential for greater levels of general awareness and knowledge in both prevention and treatment of these burns. As well, early debridement and split-thickness skin grafting at diagnosis constitutes the best means of reducing the high socioeconomic costs and allows for early return to work. PMID:18091981

  14. The influence of fatigue loading on the quality of the cement layer and retention strength of carbon fiber post-resin composite core restorations.

    PubMed

    Bolhuis, Peter; de Gee, Anton; Feilzer, Albert

    2005-01-01

    Clinical studies have shown that endodontically treated teeth restored with short posts or deficient ferrules show a high failure risk. This study. evaluated the influence of fatigue loading on the quality of the cement layer between prefabricated quartz coated carbon fiber posts with restricted length and the root canal wall in maxillary pre-molars. Two adhesive resin composite cements, chemical-cured Panavia 21 (Group 1) and dual-cured RelyX-ARC (Group 2), and one resin-modified glass-ionomer cement, chemical-cured RelyX (Group 3), delta were selected for this study. Post- and-core restorations were made on single-rooted human maxillary premolars from which the coronal sections were removed at the level of the proximal cemento-enamel junction (CEJ). Following endodontic treatment, a post-and-core restoration with 6-mm post length was prepared for each tooth. The posts were directly cemented into the root canal and, after applying an adhesive (Clearfil Photo Bond), they were built up with a core build-up composite (Clearfil Photo Core). For each group (n=8), half of the specimens were exposed to fatigue loading (10(6) load cycles) almost perpendicular to the axial axis (85 degrees), while the other half were used as the control. Three parallel, transverse root sections, 1.5-mm thick, were cut from each specimen at the apical, medial and coronal location. These sections were examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) to evaluate the integrity of the cement layer, while the retention strength of the cemented post sections was determined with the push-out test. The multivariate results of MANOVA showed that the condition main effect (fatigue or control) was not significant (p=0.059); the two other main effects, type of cement and section location, were significant (p=0.001 and p=0.008). For both the push-out strength and SEM evaluation of the cement layer integrity, the results significantly improved from RelyX to RelyX-ARC to Panavia 21 and also from apical to

  15. Biocompatible implant surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Pattanaik, Bikash; Pawar, Sudhir; Pattanaik, Seema

    2012-01-01

    Surface plays a crucial role in biological interactions. Surface treatments have been applied to metallic biomaterials in order to improve their wear properties, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. A systematic review was performed on studies investigating the effects of implant surface treatments on biocompatibility. We searched the literature using PubMed, electronic databases from 1990 to 2009. Key words such as implant surface topography, surface roughness, surface treatment, surface characteristics, and surface coatings were used. The search was restricted to English language articles published from 1990 to December 2009. Additionally, a manual search in the major dental implant journals was performed. When considering studies, clinical studies were preferred followed by histological human studies, animal studies, and in vitro studies. A total of 115 articles were selected after elimination: clinical studies, 24; human histomorphometric studies, 11; animal histomorphometric studies, 46; in vitro studies, 34. The following observations were made in this review: · The focus has shifted from surface roughness to surface chemistry and a combination of chemical manipulations on the porous structure. More investigations are done regarding surface coatings. · Bone response to almost all the surface treatments was favorable. · Future trend is focused on the development of osteogenic implant surfaces. Limitation of this study is that we tried to give a broader overview related to implant surface treatments. It does not give any conclusion regarding the best biocompatible implant surface treatment investigated till date. Unfortunately, the eventually selected studies were too heterogeneous for inference of data.

  16. Marginal Integrity of Glass Ionomer and All Ceramic Restorations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    irregular microstructure of the glass matrix infused with fillers, they do not possess fracture resistance comparable to natural teeth. This limited ACRs...content and lower glass content, these ceramics have greater fracture resistance. These improved ceramics can be used in areas with significant lateral...Reitz, 1999). The polycrystalline structure has a much 3 higher resistance to fracture than the less dense and irregular composition of glass

  17. Lunar cement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agosto, William N.

    1992-01-01

    With the exception of water, the major oxide constituents of terrestrial cements are present at all nine lunar sites from which samples have been returned. However, with the exception of relatively rare cristobalite, the lunar oxides are not present as individual phases but are combined in silicates and in mixed oxides. Lime (CaO) is most abundant on the Moon in the plagioclase (CaAl2Si2O8) of highland anorthosites. It may be possible to enrich the lime content of anorthite to levels like those of Portland cement by pyrolyzing it with lunar-derived phosphate. The phosphate consumed in such a reaction can be regenerated by reacting the phosphorus product with lunar augite pyroxenes at elevated temperatures. Other possible sources of lunar phosphate and other oxides are discussed.

  18. Cryogenics with cement microscopy redefines cement behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, S.; Jones, R. ); Caveny, B. )

    1994-10-03

    Cement microscopy (CM), cryogenics, environmental scanning microscopy (ESM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and other technologies are leading investigators to change their views on cement gelation, hydration, and retardation. Cement samples frozen in a nitrogen slush and viewed with an SEM present a more accurate picture of the setting process. Observations made through this technique have revolutionized ARCO Exploration and Production Technology's and Halliburton Energy Services' oil field cement procurement and slurry design. Findings from this joint study are expected to lead to: optimized waiting on cement (WOC) times; reduced planning and design time; optimized slurry retarder additions; optimized gel times to fit given situations; especially applicable to squeeze operations; improved cement selection (from vendors) for peak performance; and improved cement manufacture. The paper discusses the measuring methods and the findings on the following: cement voids, cement gelation, and retardation mechanisms. It also briefly discusses the impact these discoveries have on operations.

  19. Sculpting with Cement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lynn

    1983-01-01

    Cement offers many creative possibilities for school art programs. Instructions are given for sculpting with fiber-cement and sand-cement, as well as for finishing processes and the addition of color. Safety is stressed. (IS)

  20. Biocompatibility of composite resins

    PubMed Central

    Mousavinasab, Sayed Mostafa

    2011-01-01

    Dental materials that are used in dentistry should be harmless to oral tissues, so they should not contain any leachable toxic and diffusible substances that can cause some side effects. Reports about probable biologic hazards, in relation to dental resins, have increased interest to this topic in dentists. The present paper reviews the articles published about biocompatibility of resin-restorative materials specially resin composites and monomers which are mainly based on Bis-GMA and concerns about their degradation and substances which may be segregated into oral cavity. PMID:23372592

  1. Cementing multilateral wells with latex cement

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    A multilateral well is a well with one or more branches or lateral sections extending from its main wellbore. The laterals can be openhole or cased hole. When laterals are cased hole, the cement integrity for casing support and zonal isolation is very important. When cementing the lateral sections of multilateral wells, it is important to use a cement with high strength and durability to support the liner throughout the life of the well and to support the lateral section. The cement column is subjected to various stresses when the cemented inner stub is cut. High tensile strength, flexural strength, and crack resistance are required. These properties are necessary to make a clean cut through the cement sheath that does not induce cracks in the cement column. Latex cement is commonly used for its gas-migration-control property.

  2. Biocompatibility of Graphene Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kan; Ruan, Jing; Song, Hua; Zhang, Jiali; Wo, Yan; Guo, Shouwu; Cui, Daxiang

    2011-12-01

    Herein, we report the effects of graphene oxides on human fibroblast cells and mice with the aim of investigating graphene oxides' biocompatibility. The graphene oxides were prepared by the modified Hummers method and characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscope and atomic force microscopy. The human fibroblast cells were cultured with different doses of graphene oxides for day 1 to day 5. Thirty mice divided into three test groups (low, middle, high dose) and one control group were injected with 0.1, 0.25, and 0.4 mg graphene oxides, respectively, and were raised for 1 day, 7 days, and 30 days, respectively. Results showed that the water-soluble graphene oxides were successfully prepared; graphene oxides with dose less than 20 μg/mL did not exhibit toxicity to human fibroblast cells, and the dose of more than 50 μg/mL exhibits obvious cytotoxicity such as decreasing cell adhesion, inducing cell apoptosis, entering into lysosomes, mitochondrion, endoplasm, and cell nucleus. Graphene oxides under low dose (0.1 mg) and middle dose (0.25 mg) did not exhibit obvious toxicity to mice and under high dose (0.4 mg) exhibited chronic toxicity, such as 4/9 mice death and lung granuloma formation, mainly located in lung, liver, spleen, and kidney, almost could not be cleaned by kidney. In conclusion, graphene oxides exhibit dose-dependent toxicity to cells and animals, such as inducing cell apoptosis and lung granuloma formation, and cannot be cleaned by kidney. When graphene oxides are explored for in vivo applications in animal or human body, its biocompatibility must be considered.

  3. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-07-30

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, a comparison study of the three cement systems examined the effect that cement drillout has on the three cement systems. Testing to determine the effect of pressure cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. This report discusses testing that was performed to analyze the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  4. Cement design based on cement mechanical response

    SciTech Connect

    Thiercelin, M.J.; Dargaud, B.; Baret, J.F.; Rodriquez, W.J.

    1998-12-01

    The disappearance of cement bond log response as a result of variations of downhole conditions has been observed in numerous wells. This observation has led to concern about the loss of proper zonal isolation. Stresses induced in the cement, through deformation of the cemented casing resulting from the variation of downhole conditions, are the cause of this damage. The authors present an analysis of the mechanical response of set cement in a cased wellbore to quantify this damage and determine the key controlling parameters. The results show that the thermo-elastic properties of the casing, cement, and formation play a significant role. The type of failure, either cement debonding or cement cracking, is a function of the nature of the downhole condition variations. This analysis allows one to propose appropriate cement mechanical properties to avoid cement failure and debonding. The authors show that the use of high compressive strength cement is not always the best solution and, in some cases, flexible cements are preferred.

  5. Beta-tricalcium phosphate release from brushite cement surface.

    PubMed

    Alkhraisat, M Hamdan; Mariño, F Tamimi; Retama, J Rubio; Jerez, L Blanco; López-Cabarcos, E

    2008-03-01

    Different in vivo studies demonstrated that brushite cements are biocompatible, bioresorbable, and osteoconductive. However, the decay of brushite cements has been scarcely studied even though it may be of great concern for clinical applications in highly blood-perfused regions. This work was elaborated to elucidate factors that determine brushite cement surface disintegration. For that, brushite cements were modified using in their preparation different aqueous solutions of phosphoric, glycolic, tartaric, and citric acids in concentrations that were reported to improve the cement properties. Two-viscosity enhancing polysaccharides, chondroitin-4 sulfate and hyaluronic acid, were also assayed. Thereafter, pre- and set cement samples were immersed in distilled water for 24 h. The cement-solid weight loss, microstructure, liquid phase viscosity, mean size of the released particles, and zeta potential were analyzed using X-ray diffraction, FTIR spectroscopy, light scattering, scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy. It was found that the particles released from the cement surface were beta-TCP, and their amount depends on the carboxylic acid used in the preparation of the cement. The addition of hyaluronic acid and chondroitin-4 sulfate decreased the amount of released particles from the surface of the set brushite cement made with citric acid. Furthermore, the hyaluronic acid increased significantly the viscosity of the citric acid solution and the cement paste prepared with this liquid phase showed a pronounced step down in particle release. In this study, we showed that the water solubility of calcium carboxylate and the viscosity of mixing liquid may dictate the superficial disintegration of brushite cements.

  6. Radiopacity of portland cement associated with different radiopacifying agents.

    PubMed

    Húngaro Duarte, Marco Antonio; de Oliveira El Kadre, Guâniara D'arc; Vivan, Rodrigo Ricci; Guerreiro Tanomaru, Juliane Maria; Tanomaru Filho, Mário; de Moraes, Ivaldo Gomes

    2009-05-01

    This study evaluated the radiopacity of Portland cement associated with the following radiopacifying agents: bismuth oxide, zinc oxide, lead oxide, bismuth subnitrate, bismuth carbonate, barium sulfate, iodoform, calcium tungstate, and zirconium oxide. A ratio of 20% radiopacifier and 80% white Portland cement by weight was used for analysis. Pure Portland cement and dentin served as controls. Cement/radiopacifier and dentin disc-shaped specimens were fabricated, and radiopacity testing was performed according to the ISO 6876/2001 standard for dental root sealing materials. Using Insight occlusal films, the specimens were radiographed near to a graduated aluminum stepwedge varying from 2 to 16 mm in thickness. The radiographs were digitized and radiopacity compared with the aluminum stepwedge using Digora software (Orion Corporation Soredex, Helsinki, Finland). The radiographic density data were converted into mmAl and analyzed statistically by analysis of variance and Tukey-Kramer test (alpha = 0.05). The radiopacity of pure Portland cement was significantly lower (p < 0.05) than that of dentin, whereas all cement/radiopacifier mixtures were significantly more radiopaque than dentin and Portland cement alone (p < 0.05). Portland cement/bismuth oxide and Portland cement/lead oxide presented the highest radiopacity values and differed significantly from the other materials (p < 0.05), whereas Portland cement/zinc oxide presented the lowest radiopacity values of all mixtures (p < 0.05). All tested substances presented higher radiopacity than that of dentin and may potentially be added to the Portland cement as radiopacifying agents. However, the possible interference of the radiopacifiers with the setting chemistry, biocompatibility, and physical properties of the Portland cement should be further investigated before any clinical recommendation can be done.

  7. Surface studies on acrylic bone cement.

    PubMed

    Bettencourt, A; Calado, A; Amaral, J; Alfaia, A; Vale, F M; Monteiro, J; Montemor, M F; Ferreira, M G S; Castro, M

    2004-06-18

    Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) is used to fill the gap between the prosthesis and the surrounding bone in cemented arthroplasties. Biocompatibility problems related to bone cement application limit the clinical success of these cemented arthroplasties. Being the cement surface in close connection with the living bone, it is reasonable to assume that surface properties such as, surface composition and surface energy, will play a role in the biomaterial performance. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis and surface energy studies were carried out during 4 months, in order to assess a possible correlation between aging time and surface changes. The aging of PMMA, in a biological model fluid, strongly influences the composition and wettability of the cement surface. These changes may be explained through the hydrolysis of PMMA ester groups and the subsequent hydrogen bonding. Although our study does not exactly reproduce the in vivo environment surrounding a prosthesis, it suggests that the changes in the composition and wettability of the surface may modulate the host response towards the implant, thus contributing to its loosening.

  8. Electrospinning of Biocompatible Nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, Andrew J.; Queen, Hailey A.; McCullen, Seth D.; Krause, Wendy E.

    2006-03-01

    Artificial scaffolds for growing cells can have a wide range of applications including wound coverings, supports in tissue cultures, drug delivery, and organ and tissue transplantation. Tissue engineering is a promising field which may resolve current problems with transplantation, such as rejection by the immune system and scarcity of donors. One approach to tissue engineering utilizes a biodegradable scaffold onto which cells are seeded and cultured, and ideally develop into functional tissue. The scaffold acts as an artificial extracellular matrix (ECM). Because a typical ECM contains collagen fibers with diameters of 50-500 nm, electrostatic spinning (electrospinning) was used to mimic the size and structure of these fibers. Electrospinning is a novel way of spinning a nonwoven web of fibers on the order of 100 nm, much like the web of collagen in an ECM. We are investigating the ability of several biocompatible polymers (e.g., chitosan and polyvinyl alcohol) to form defect-free nanofiber webs and are studying the influence of the zero shear rate viscosity, molecular weight, entanglement concentration, relaxation time, and solvent on the resulting fiber size and morphology.

  9. Biocompatible nanoparticles and biopolyelectrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zribi, Olena

    The research presented in this manuscript encompasses a merger of two research directions: a study of aqueous nanoparticle colloids and a study of biological polyelectrolytes. The majority of biomedical applications of nanoparticles require stable aqueous colloids of nanoparticles as a starting point. A new one-step method of preparation of aqueous solutions of ultra-fine ferroelectric barium titanate nanoparticles was developed and generalized to the preparation of stable aqueous colloids of semiconductor nanoparticles. This high-energy ball milling technique is low cost, environmentally friendly, and allows for control of nanoparticle size by changing milling time. Aqueous colloids of BaTiO3 nanoparticles are stable over time, maintain ferroelectricity and can be used as second harmonic generating nanoprobes for biomedical imaging. Biopolyelectrolytes exhibit a variety of novel liquid-crystalline phases in aqueous solutions where their electrolytic nature is a driving force behind phase formation. We study medically relevant mixtures of F-actin, DNA and oppositely charged ions (such as multivalent salts and antibiotic drugs) and map out phase diagrams and laws that govern phase transitions. We combine these research directions in studies of the condensation behavior in aqueous solutions of biocompatible nanoparticles and biopolyelectrolytes.

  10. Critical review: Injectability of calcium phosphate pastes and cements.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, R; McCarthy, H O; Montufar, E B; Ginebra, M-P; Wilson, D I; Lennon, A; Dunne, N

    2017-03-01

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPC) have seen clinical success in many dental and orthopaedic applications in recent years. The properties of CPC essential for clinical success are reviewed in this article, which includes properties of the set cement (e.g. bioresorbability, biocompatibility, porosity and mechanical properties) and unset cement (e.g. setting time, cohesion, flow properties and ease of delivery to the surgical site). Emphasis is on the delivery of calcium phosphate (CaP) pastes and CPC, in particular the occurrence of separation of the liquid and solid components of the pastes and cements during injection; and established methods to reduce this phase separation. In addition a review of phase separation mechanisms observed during the extrusion of other biphasic paste systems and the theoretical models used to describe these mechanisms are discussed.

  11. [Ionomer cement as bone substitute in the middle ear of the rabbit].

    PubMed

    Geyer, G

    1997-04-01

    Ionomer-based cements are obtained by the reaction of an aluminum-fluoro-silicate glass with a polyalcenoic acid. During setting and hardening the cement bonds closely with adjacent hard tissue. The previous implantation of this material in the baboon tibia has held great promise as a possible use in bone replacement. In the present study the cement was tested concerning its biocompatibility and biostability in the middle ears of 64 rabbits. Viscid cement paste was inserted into the epitympanic space of each animal. A preformed cement strut was then placed to serve as a columella between the eardrum and stapes footplate. During a subsequent interval of 28 days up to 2 years middle ear specimens were evaluated under a surgical microscope, following which histologic sections were studied under light microscopic conditions. Findings demonstrated that after insertion of freshly mixed cement a firm adhesion to bone developed that proved to be biocompatible and biostable over time. After 28 days the preformed and fully hardened implants were overgrown by a delicate mucosa normally present in the middle ear. No evidence for any rejection of the implants could be found. The experience available to date indicates that ionomer cement is biocompatible and biostable, easy to handle and workable without splintering. With appropriate use it represents a useful implant material in surgery of the head and neck.

  12. Cement mixing with vibrator

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T.E.

    1991-07-09

    This patent describes a method of cementing a casing string in a bore hole of a well. It comprises introducing water and dry cement material into a mixing vessel; mixing the water and dry cement material in the mixing vessel to form a cement slurry, the slurry including lumps of the dry cement material, the mixing including steps of: agitating the slurry; and while agitating the slurry, transmitting vibrational energy into the slurry and thereby aiding disintegration and subsequent wetting of the lumps of the dry cement material in the slurry; and pumping the slurry into an annulus between the casing string and the bore hole.

  13. [Effect of water storage and intrapulpal pressure on microleakage of three restorative materials].

    PubMed

    Balogh, A E; Bouter, D; Fazekas, A; Degrange, M

    2000-09-01

    Three different restorative materials, Z100 composite, F2000 compomer and Vitremer glass ionomer cement are currently proposed for Class V restorations. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of water storage and the simulated intrapulpal pressure (sIP) on the quality of the margins of class V restorations located both in enamel and dentin. The water resorption of restorative materials containing hydrophilic groups (compomers and glass ionomer cements) can favourably modify the marginal sealing ability by hydroscopic expansion. The influence of the sIP was specific to the material. While F2000 compomer and Vitremer glass ionomer cement were un-influenced by sIP, with Z100 composite a significant difference could be observed. It was concluded that F2000 compomer and Vitremer glass ionomer cement showed significantly less microleakage, which means a better marginal sealing ability than Z100 composite.

  14. Asphalt cement poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... petroleum material that hardens when it cools. Asphalt cement poisoning occurs when someone swallows asphalt. If hot ... found in: Road paving materials Roofing materials Tile cements Asphalt may also be used for other purposes.

  15. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2003-10-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra- lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  16. Solidification of Portland Cement.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Solidification of materials is introduced, and the constitution and hydration of portland cement is reviewed. Microstructural zones are introduced...100, 171, and 384 days age. Similar micrographs for tricalcium silicate pastes and commercial portland cement pastes are shown and discussed. The...hardening of portland cement is discussed as a solidification process. The potential flaws and stress concentrators within the cement paste are identified and their effect on mechanical properties is discussed. (Author)

  17. Acrylic bone cements with bismuth salicylate: Behavior in simulated physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Hernández, L; Vázquez, B; López-Bravo, A; Parra, J; Goñi, I; Gurruchaga, M

    2007-02-01

    In a previous work, we reported the development of acrylic bone cement formulations for application in percutaneous vertebroplasty, by using bismuth salicylate (BS) as the radiopaque agent. Our objective was to obtain high radiopacity along with a therapeutical effect produced by the release of salicylic acid in situ. To follow that study, the setting kinetics and static and dynamical mechanical properties of the BS cements were studied in simulated physiological conditions. Moreover, radiopacity after various times of immersion in saline and the wettability of the cements surfaces were determined. The study finished with the analysis of the biological response. From the results, it can be concluded that physiological conditions did not affect negatively to the cements performance, since all BS-loaded cements fulfilled the ISO standard requirements. Radiopacity of the formulations was maintained over time and cements with BS were found to be biocompatible.

  18. Elimination of barium sulphate from acrylic bone cements. Use of two iodine-containing monomers.

    PubMed

    Artola, A; Gurruchaga, M; Vázquez, B; San Román, J; Goñi, I

    2003-10-01

    The aim of this work is to present a new approach to joint arthroplasty failure related to bone cement mantle. As barium sulphate is considered one of the main causes of mechanical weakness in the cement, we substituted this inorganic radiopacifier of the solid component for radiopaque monomers in the liquid component. We obtained two different cements, one containing 5 vol% 2-[2',3',5'-triiodobenzoyl] ethyl methacrylate (TIBMA) and the other containing 3,5-diiodine salicylic methacrylate (DISMA). In both cases, the mechanical properties of these new cements were better than those of the barium sulphate-containing cement. The radiopacity obtained was comparable to that of the aforementioned cement and all the samples showed good biocompatibility.

  19. Calcium phosphate cements with strontium halides as radiopacifiers.

    PubMed

    López, Alejandro; Montazerolghaem, Maryam; Engqvist, Håkan; Ott, Marjam Karlsson; Persson, Cecilia

    2014-02-01

    High radiopacity is required to monitor the delivery and positioning of injectable implants. Inorganic nonsoluble radiopacifiers are typically used in nondegradable bone cements; however, their usefulness in resorbable cements is limited due to their low solubility. Strontium halides, except strontium fluoride, are ionic water-soluble compounds that possess potential as radiopacifiers. In this study, we compare the radiopacity, mechanical properties, composition, and cytotoxicity of radiopaque brushite cements prepared with strontium fluoride (SrF2 ), strontium chloride (SrCl2 ·6H2 O), strontium bromide (SrBr2 ), or strontium iodide (SrI2 ). Brushite cements containing 10 wt % SrCl2 ·6H2 O, SrBr2 , or SrI2 exhibited equal to or higher radiopacity than commercial radiopaque cements. Furthermore, the brushite crystal lattice in cements that contained the ionic radiopacifiers was larger than in unmodified cements and in cements that contained SrF2 , indicating strontium substitution. Despite the fact that the strontium halides increased the solubility of the cements and affected their mechanical properties, calcium phosphate cements containing SrCl2 ·6H2 O, SrBr2 , and SrI2 showed no significant differences in Saos-2 cell viability and proliferation with respect to the control. Strontium halides: SrCl2 ·6H2 O, SrBr2 , and SrI2 may be potential candidates as radiopacifiers in resorbable biomaterials although their in vivo biocompatibility, when incorporated into injectable implants, is yet to be assessed.

  20. In Vitro and In Vivo Response to Low-Modulus PMMA-Based Bone Cement

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, Elin; Mestres, Gemma; Treerattrakoon, Kiatnida; López, Alejandro; Karlsson Ott, Marjam; Larsson, Sune; Persson, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    The high stiffness of acrylic bone cements has been hypothesized to contribute to the increased number of fractures encountered after vertebroplasty, which has led to the development of low-modulus cements. However, there is no data available on the in vivo biocompatibility of any low-modulus cement. In this study, the in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo biocompatibility of two types of low-modulus acrylic cements, one modified with castor oil and one with linoleic acid, were evaluated using human osteoblast-like cells and a rodent model, respectively. While the in vitro cytotoxicity appeared somewhat affected by the castor oil and linoleic acid additions, no difference could be found in the in vivo response to these cements in comparison to the base, commercially available cement, in terms of histology and flow cytometry analysis of the presence of immune cells. Furthermore, the in vivo radiopacity of the cements appeared unaltered. While these results are promising, the mechanical behavior of these cements in vivo remains to be investigated. PMID:26366415

  1. Method of making biocompatible electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Wollam, John S.

    1992-01-01

    A process of improving the sensing function of biocompatible electrodes and the product so made are disclosed. The process is designed to alter the surfaces of the electrodes at their tips to provide increased surface area and therefore decreased contact resistance at the electrode-tissue interface for increased sensitivity and essentially includes rendering the tips atomically clean by exposing them to bombardment by ions of an inert gas, depositing an adhesion layer on the cleaned tips, forming a hillocked layer on the adhesion layer by increasing the temperature of the tips, and applying a biocompatible coating on the hillocked layer. The resultant biocompatible electrode is characterized by improved sensitivity, minimum voltage requirement for organ stimulation and a longer battery life for the device in which it is employed.

  2. The influence of various conditioner agents on the interdiffusion zone and microleakage of a glass lonomer cement with a high viscosity in primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Yucel; Gurbuz, Taskin; Kocogullari, M Elcin

    2005-01-01

    The smear layer, which occurs during cavity preparation procedures, does not constitute a stable substructure in the bond of restorative material to dental hard tissues. Depending on the dissolution of this material in the course of time, microleakage occurs between the tooth and restorative material. This study evaluated the effects of different conditioner agents (Fuji Cavity Conditioner, 10% maleic acid, 35% phosphoric acid and 3% hydrogen peroxide) on Fuji IX microleakage, Fuji IX-enamel and Fuji IX-dentin combination in Class I cavities prepared to standards having the dimensions of 4x3x2 mm3 in extracted primary molars. The restorations were then subjected to thermocycling procedures and soaked in the 0.5% basic-fuchsin dye for 24 hours. Some sections were taken, parallel to the long axis of the tooth in a mesio-distal direction, and evaluated under a stereo-microscope for leakage. Also, two samples of Fuji IX-enamel and dentin combinations were chosen randomly from each group for evaluation in scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The distribution of microleakage occurred as follows: Control Group > Hydrogen Peroxide > 10% Maleic acid > Fuji Cavity Conditioner = Phosphoric acid. The difference between microleakage scores obtained from the groups was statistically significant (p<0.05). The SEM evaluation revealed a close interface connection in all groups except for the control and hydrogen peroxide groups in the Fuji IX-enamel combination. In the Fuji IX-dentin combination, however, a close interface connection was observed except in the control group. In conclusion, the application of conditioner agents to Class I cavities restored with glass ionomer cement with a high viscosity in vitro either diminishes or completely eliminates microleakage.

  3. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2001-04-15

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultralight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Problems and Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements. Results reported this quarter include a review and summary of Halliburton Energy Services (HES) and BJ Services historical performance data for lightweight cement applications. These data are analyzed and compared to ULHS cement and foamed cement performances. Similar data is expected from Schlumberger, and an analysis of this data will be completed in the following phases of the project. Quality control testing of materials used to formulate ULHS cements in the laboratory was completed to establish baseline material performance standards. A testing protocol was developed employing standard procedures as well as procedures tailored to evaluate ULHS and foamed cement. This protocol is presented and discussed. Results of further testing of ULHS cements are presented along with an analysis to establish cement performance design criteria to be used during the remainder of the project. Finally, a list of relevant literature on lightweight cement performance is compiled for review during the next quarter.

  4. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-04-29

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, comparison studies of the three cement systems examined several properties: tensile strength, Young's modulus, and shear bond. Testing to determine the effect of temperature cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. In addition, the stress-strain behavior of the cement types was studied. This report discusses a software program that is being developed to help design ULHS cements and foamed cements.

  5. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-10-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, a comparison study of the three cement systems examined the effect that cement drillout has on the three cement systems. Testing to determine the effect of pressure cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. This report discusses testing that will be performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries, as well as the results of Field Tests 1 and 2.

  6. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2001-07-18

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Issues, Task 2: Review Russian Ultra-Lightweight Cement Literature, Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements, and Task 8: Develop Field ULHS Cement Blending and Mixing Techniques. Results reported this quarter include: preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; laboratory tests comparing ULHS slurries to foamed slurries and sodium silicate slurries for two different applications; and initial laboratory studies with ULHS in preparation for a field job.

  7. Biocompatibility of implantable biomedical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Suping

    2008-03-01

    Biomedical devices have been broadly used to treat human disease, especially chronic diseases where pharmaceuticals are less effective. Heart valve and artificial joint are examples. Biomedical devices perform by delivering therapies such as electric stimulations, mechanical supports and biological actions. While the uses of biomedical devices are highly successful they can trigger adverse biological reactions as well. The property that medical devices perform with intended functions but not causing unacceptable adverse effects was called biocompatibility in the early time. As our understanding of biomaterial-biological interactions getting broader, biocompatibility has more meanings. In this talk, I will present some adverse biological reactions observed with implantable biomedical devices. Among them are surface fouling of implantable sensors, calcification with vascular devices, restenosis with stents, foreign particle migration and mechanical fractures of devices due to inflammation reactions. While these effects are repeatable, there are very few quantitative data and theories to define them. The purpose of this presentation is to introduce this biocompatibility concept to biophysicists to stimulate research interests at different angles. An open question is how to quantitatively understand the biocompatibility that, like many other biological processes, has not been quantified experimentally.

  8. Polymerized supramolecular assemblies and biocompatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, David F.

    2001-03-01

    The creation of durable, biomembrane-mimetic coatings for inorganic and polymeric surfaces that are biocompatible, i.e. resistant to nonspecific protein adsorption, remains an important goal that is expected to impact numerous fields. It has already been shown that the physical stability of lipid bilayer vesicles can be dramatically enhanced by cross-linking polymerization of reactive lipids, such as phosphatidylcholines. Bilayers of these same lipids on clean silicon dioxide surfaces can be formed by fusion of small bilayer vesicles with the surface. Radical initiated polymerization of these supported bilayers yields a stable poly(lipid) film that is not perturbed upon exposure to surfactant. Moreover, the cross-linked bilayer film can be removed from water into air with retention of the poly(lipid) bilayer structure. These polymerized bilayer films could be repeatedly transferred from water to air to water with no obvious change in their biocompatibility. The supported bilayer films were equally resistant to non-specific protein adsorption before and after polymerization. This indicates that biocompatible nature of the phosphorylcholine head group of the lipids was not compromised by polymerization of the lipids. The ability to maintain surface biocompatibility of membranes while substantially increasing their stability would appear to extend the technological uses of supramolecular assemblies of lipids.

  9. Improvement of casing cementation of deep and ultradeep wells. Part 2: Oilfield cements and cement additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arens, K. H.; Akstinat, M.

    1982-07-01

    Oilfield cements and cement additives were investigated in order to improve the casing cementation of deep and ultradeep wells. Characterization and evaluation of the main oil field cements commercially available were studied. The testing was carried out according to American Petroleum Institute API standards and nonstandardized test methods (dynamic modulus of elasticity, expansion/shrinkage), especially the rheology, thickening time and the influence of pressure, temperature and water-cement ratio, were considered. The main emphasis in the field of cement additives was on the evaluation of cement retarders for high temperatures, accelerators, and additives for cement expansion. Furthermore oil field cements were tested, and their properties are described.

  10. Abyssal seep site cementation

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann, A.C.; Paull, C.K.; Commeau, R.; Commeau, J.

    1988-01-01

    The deepest submarine cements known so far occur along the 3,300-m deep base of the Florida escarpment and are associated with methane-bearing brine seeps, which emanate there. These deep Holocene carbonates, which occur as surficial and buried crusts, burrow fillings, and friable horizons, were sampled via ALVIN. The carbonates form irregular halos extending up to 20 m from seeps colonized by chemosynthetic fauna. Mussels, gastropods, and clams, the carbonate components of the community, produce a shell hash that is locally cemented by coarsely crystalline low-Mg calcite. Halos of palisade calcite are reminiscent of ancient examples of marine cements. Also present are carbonate hemipelagics cemented by micrite into crusts and burrow fillings. The degree of cementation varies from pervasive to light. Slabs of cemented crust up to 30 cm thick contrast with typical shallow crusts and exhibit irregular tops and smooth bottoms indicating different chemical gradients and pathways.

  11. Cementation of indirect restorations: an overview of resin cements.

    PubMed

    Stamatacos, Catherine; Simon, James F

    2013-01-01

    The process of ensuring proper retention, marginal seal, and durability of indirect restorations depends heavily on effective cementation. Careful consideration must be made when selecting an adhesive cement for a given application. This article provides information on resin cements that can guide clinicians in determining which type of cement is best suited to their clinical needs regarding cementation of indirect restorations. Emphasis is placed on successful cementation of all-ceramic restorations.

  12. Stretchable biocompatible electronics by embedding electrical circuitry in biocompatible elastomers.

    PubMed

    Jahanshahi, Amir; Salvo, Pietro; Vanfleteren, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Stretchable and curvilinear electronics has been used recently for the fabrication of micro systems interacting with the human body. The applications range from different kinds of implantable sensors inside the body to conformable electrodes and artificial skins. One of the key parameters in biocompatible stretchable electronics is the fabrication of reliable electrical interconnects. Although very recent literature has reported on the reliability of stretchable interconnects by cyclic loading, work still needs to be done on the integration of electrical circuitry composed of rigid components and stretchable interconnects in a biological environment. In this work, the feasibility of a developed technology to fabricate simple electrical circuits with meander shaped stretchable interconnects is presented. Stretchable interconnects are 200 nm thin Au layer supported with polyimide (PI). A stretchable array of light emitting diodes (LEDs) is embedded in biocompatible elastomer using this technology platform and it features a 50% total elongation.

  13. Mechanical and fracture behavior of calcium phosphate cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jew, Victoria Chou

    Apatite-based calcium phosphate cements are currently employed to a limited extent in the biomedical and dental fields. They present significant potential for a much broader range of applications, particularly as a bone mineral substitute for fracture fixation. Specifically, hydroxyapatite (HA) is known for its biocompatibility and non-immunogenicity, attributed to its similarity to the mineral phase of natural bone. The advantages of a cement-based HA include injectability, greater resorbability and osteoconductivity compared to sintered HA, and an isothermal cement-forming reaction that avoids necrosis during cement setting. Although apatite cements demonstrate good compressive strength, tensile properties are very weak compared to natural bone. Applications involving normal weight-bearing require better structural integrity than apatite cements currently provide. A more thorough understanding of fracture behavior can elucidate failure mechanisms and is essential for the design of targeted strengthening methods. This study investigated a hydroxyapatite cement using a fracture mechanics approach, focusing on subcritical crack growth properties. Subcritical crack growth can lead to much lower load-bearing ability than critical strength values predict. Experiments show that HA cement is susceptible to crack growth under both cyclic fatigue-crack growth and stress corrosion cracking conditions, but only environmental, not mechanical, mechanisms contribute to crack extension. This appears to be the first evidence ever presented of stress corrosion crack growth behavior in calcium phosphate cements. Stress corrosion cracking was examined for a range of environmental conditions. Variations in pH have surprisingly little effect. Behavior in water at elevated temperature (50°C) is altered compared to water at ambient temperature (22°C), but only for crack-growth velocities below 10-7 m/s. However, fracture resistance of dried HA cement in air increases significantly

  14. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2003-01-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. DOE joined the Materials Management Service (MMS)-sponsored joint industry project ''Long-Term Integrity of Deepwater Cement under Stress/Compaction Conditions.'' Results of the project contained in two progress reports are also presented in this report.

  15. Biomechanical parameters of the BP-enriched bone cement.

    PubMed

    Matuszewski, Łukasz; Olchowik, Grażyna; Mazurkiewicz, Tomasz; Kowalczyk, Bartłomiej; Zdrojewska, Agata; Matuszewska, Anna; Ciszewski, Andrzej; Gospodarek, Małgorzata; Morawik, Iwona

    2014-05-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are well-known substances with very efficient antiresorptive properties. Their beneficial actions are useful not only in achieving better bone mineral density but also in improving bone microarchitecture, strength and, consequently, its quality. Surgical cement, being a polymer composite, is required to be highly biocompatible and biotolerant. The goal of the presented study was to assess whether the enrichment of cement with pamidronate has changed its biomechanical properties. We compared the biomechanical parameters of clean bone cement and BP-enriched bone cement, which were both used formerly in our rat models. Biomechanical properties of BP-enriched bone cement are defined by two basic terms: stress and strain, which are caused by the influence of external force. In the investigatory process of the bone's biomechanical parameters, the compressive test and the three-point flexural tests were used. During the three-point flexural investigation, the sample was supported at both ends and loaded in the middle, resulting in a flexure. After a specific range of flexure, the sample was fractured. In obtained results, there were no significant differences in the values of the stress determined at the point of maximal load and the energy stored in the samples for proportional stress-strain limit (elastic region). There were also no significant differences in the density of the samples. The study shows that the enrichment of bisphosphonates causes yielding of the bone cement material. In the presented data, we conclude that use of pamidronate implanted in bone cement did not have a detrimental effect on its biomechanical properties. Therefore, the obtained results encouraged us to perform further in vivo experiments which assess the biomechanical properties of bones implanted with BP-enriched bone cement.

  16. Comparison of the physical and mechanical properties of MTA and portland cement.

    PubMed

    Islam, Intekhab; Chng, Hui Kheng; Yap, Adrian U Jin

    2006-03-01

    This study evaluated and compared the pH, radiopacity, setting time, solubility, dimensional change, and compressive strength of ProRoot MTA (PMTA), ProRoot MTA (tooth colored formula) (WMTA), white Portland cement (WP), and ordinary Portland cement (OP). The results showed that PMTA and Portland cement have very similar physical properties. However, the radiopacity of Portland cement is much lower than that of PMTA. The compressive strength of PMTA was greater than Portland cement at 28 days. The major constituent of PMTA is Portland cement. Given the low cost of Portland cement and similar properties when compared to PMTA, it is reasonable to consider Portland cement as a possible substitute for PMTA in endodontic applications. However, industrially manufactured Portland cement is not approved currently for use in the United States and therefore no clinical recommendation can be made for its use in the human body. Further in vitro and in vivo tests, especially with regards its biocompatibility, should be conducted to ascertain if it meets the FDA requirements for use as a medical device.

  17. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2004-01-30

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  18. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-01-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems: foamed and sodium silicate slurries. Comparison studies of the three cement systems examined several properties: tensile strength, Young's modulus, water permeability, and shear bond. Testing was also done to determine the effect that temperature cycling has on the shear bond properties of the cement systems. In addition, analysis was carried out to examine alkali silica reactivity of slurries containing ULHS. Data is also presented from a study investigating the effects of mixing and pump circulation on breakage of ULHS. Information is also presented about the field application of ULHS in cementing a 7-in. intermediate casing in south Texas.

  19. Timing of syntaxial cement

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R.D.

    1985-02-01

    Echinodermal fragments are commonly overgrown in ancient limestones, with large single crystals growing in optical continuity over their skeletal hosts (i.e., syntaxial overgrowths). Such syntaxial cements are usually considered to have precipitated from meteoric pore waters associated with a later stage of subaerial exposure. Although several examples have been reported from ancient carbonates where petrographic relationships may indicate an early submarine formation of syntaxial cement, no occurrences have been noted in Holocene submarine-cemented rocks. Syntaxial cements of submarine origin have been found in Bermuda beachrock where isopachous high-magnesian calcite cements merge with large optically continuous crystals growing on echinodermal debris. Examination of other Holocene sediments cemented by magnesian calcite indicates that echinodermal fragments are not always overgrown syntaxially, but may be rimmed by microcrystalline calcite. The reason for this difference is not clear, although it may be a function of the spacing of nucleation sites and rates of crystal growth. A review of syntaxial cements from several localities in ancient carbonate sequences reveals that many are best interpreted as having formed in the submarine setting, whereas it is more clear that others formed from meteoric precipitation. These occurrences suggest that care should be exercised in inferring meteoric diagenesis from syntaxial overgrowths and that the possibility of submarine formation should be considered.

  20. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2003-07-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. Laboratory testing during the eleventh quarter focused on evaluation of the alkali-silica reaction of eight different cement compositions, four of which contain ULHS. This report provides a progress summary of ASR testing. The original laboratory procedure for measuring set cement expansion resulted in unacceptable erosion of the test specimens. In subsequent tests, a different expansion procedure was implemented and an alternate curing method for cements formulated with TXI Lightweight cement was employed to prevent sample failure caused by thermal shock. The results obtained with the modified procedure showed improvement over data obtained with the original procedure, but data for some compositions were still questionable. Additional modification of test procedures for compositions containing TXI Lightweight cement were implemented and testing is ongoing.

  1. A biomimetic gelatin-calcium phosphate bone cement.

    PubMed

    Bigi, A; Torricelli, P; Fini, M; Bracci, B; Panzavolta, S; Sturba, L; Giardino, R

    2004-08-01

    The interest in new bone substitutes is rapidly increasing in the field of orthopedic surgery. A variety of calcium phosphate bone cement has been developed and different additives have been used to improve their biocompatibility and bioactivity. Following a biomimetic strategy aimed at reproducing bone characteristics, this study investigates the biological properties of a new gelatin enriched calcium phosphate cement (GEL-CP) that exhibits improved mechanical properties with respect to cement prepared without gelatin (C-CP). Human osteoblast MG63 were cultured on the surfaces of GEL-CP and were compared to cells cultured on C-CP samples, and on polystyrene of plate culture as control (C). Cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation were evaluated up to 21 days. SEM revealed that osteoblasts grown on GEL-CP showed a normal morphology and biological tests demonstrated very good rate of proliferation and viability in every experimental time. The presence of gelatin stimulated alkaline phosphatase activity, collagen and transforming growth factor 31 production. The data indicate that the new cement GEL-CP favors osteoblast proliferation, activation of their metabolism and differentiation. The remarkable improvement of the setting properties of the calcium phosphate cement due to the presence of gelatin suggest that the biomimetic composite material could be successfully applied as bone substitute.

  2. Osseous penetration rate into implants pretreated with bone cement.

    PubMed

    Albrektsson, T

    1984-01-01

    The titanium bone growth chamber consists of two titanium disks held together by two screws. At the level of the intersection between the disks, a 1 mm wide canal penetrates the implant. After implantation, in e.g. the rabbit, tibial metaphysis bone and vessels will grow through this canal, the contents of which are collected four weeks after surgery. Microradiography and a computer-based analysis give a numerical representation of the amount of newly formed bone in the canal. When the bone ingrowth into two identical titanium implants, one inserted in the left and the other in the right tibia, was compared, only small and insignificant differences were found in the same animal. However, when one animal was compared to another, greater differences in the bone-forming capacity were found, in spite of the fact that the rabbits were controlled with respect to race, age and sex. The osseous penetration rate into titanium canals was compared to the bone ingrowth in equally sized pipes of polymerized acrylic cement which had been inserted in the titanium chamber. In these cases there was significantly less bone formed in the cement pipes compared to the titanium controls. Poor biocompatibility of the cement compared to titanium is suggested to be one factor responsible for the reduced bone formation in the cement environment. This may be one reason for the fibrous tissue capsule generally seen around cemented implants.

  3. Cement and concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corley, Gene; Haskin, Larry A.

    1992-01-01

    To produce lunar cement, high-temperature processing will be required. It may be possible to make calcium-rich silicate and aluminate for cement by solar heating of lunar pyroxene and feldspar, or chemical treatment may be required to enrich the calcium and aluminum in lunar soil. The effects of magnesium and ferrous iron present in the starting materials and products would need to be evaluated. So would the problems of grinding to produce cement, mixing, forming in vacuo and low gravity, and minimizing water loss.

  4. Biocompatibility of plasma nanostructured biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slepičková Kasálková, N.; Slepička, P.; Bačáková, L.; Sajdl, P.; Švorčík, V.

    2013-07-01

    Many areas of medicine such as tissue engineering requires not only mastery of modification techniques but also thorough knowledge of the interaction of cells with solid state substrates. Plasma treatment can be used to effective modification, nanostructuring and therefore can significantly change properties of materials. In this work the biocompatibility of the plasma nanostructured biopolymers substrates was studied. Changes in surface chemical structure were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The morphology pristine and modified samples were determined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The surface wettability was determined by goniometry from contact angle. Biocompatibility was determined by in vitro tests, the rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were cultivated on the pristine and plasma modified biopolymer substrates. Their adhesion, proliferation, spreading and homogeneous distribution on polymers was monitored. It was found that the plasma treatment leads to rapid decrease of contact angle for all samples. Contact angle decreased with increasing time of modification. XPS measurements showed that plasma treatment leads to changes in ratio of polar and non-polar groups. Plasma modification was accompanied by a change of surface morphology. Biological tests found that plasma treatment have positive effect on cells adhesion and proliferation cells and affects the size of cell's adhesion area. Changes in plasma power or in exposure time influences the number of adhered and proliferated cells and their distribution on biopolymer surface.

  5. Ossiculoplasty with hydroxyapatite bone cement: our reconstruction philosophy.

    PubMed

    Gérard, Jean-Marc; De Bie, Gersende; Franceschi, Daniel; Deggouj, Naima; Gersdorff, Michel

    2015-07-01

    The main objective of this study is to analyze results obtained with hydroxyapatite bone cement (HABC) ossiculoplasties. This is a retrospective study of a case series. This study was conducted in an academic hospital and tertiary referral center. A total of 127 ossiculoplasties using HABC were evaluated. Ears were divided into three groups according to procedure: group 1 involved reinforcement of the incudostapedial joint with cement and reconstruction of an incus long process defect with cement. Group 2 involved partial ossicular reconstruction between the stapes and malleus handle with HABC. Group 3 was divided into two subgroups. Group 3B entailed reconstruction of the stapes with a mobile footplate (Austin-Kartush type B = group 3B) and group 3F with a fixed footplate (Austin-Kartush type F = group 3F) using a K-Helix piston (Grace Medical, Memphis, TN, USA) or a classical titanium piston (Kurz, Fuerth, Germany) glued to the incus remnant or malleus handle with cement. Anatomical and pre- and postoperative audiological results were assessed. The mean follow-up was 26 ± 14 months. Percentages of average postoperative air-bone gap ≤ 20 dB were 95, 82.5, 50 and 83.3%, and for air-bone gap ≤ 1 0 dB, 80, 50.9, 16.6 and 50% for groups 1, 2, 3B and 3F, respectively. No complications related to the cement or extrusion occurred. Hearing outcomes also remained stable over time. In our experience, ossiculoplasty with cement provides good and stable functional results, is safe, cost effective, and easy to use. HABC with or without biocompatible ossicular prostheses allows repair of different types of ossicular defects with preservation of the anatomical and physiological ossicular chain, as well as improved stability. Reconstruction of the incus long process or incudostapedial joint defect with cement is preferred over partial ossicular reconstruction.

  6. Environmentally compatible spray cement

    SciTech Connect

    Loeschnig, P.

    1995-12-31

    Within the framework of a European research project, Heidelberger Zement developed a quickly setting and hardening binder for shotcrete, called Chronolith S, which avoids the application of setting accelerators. Density and strength of the shotcrete produced with this spray cement correspond to those of an unaccelerated shotcrete. An increased hazard for the heading team and for the environment, which may occur when applying setting accelerators, can be excluded here. Owing to the special setting properties of a spray cement, the process engineering for its manufacturing is of great importance. The treatment of a spray cement as a dry concrete with kiln-dried aggregates is possible without any problems. The use of a naturally damp pre-batched mixture is possible with Chronolith S but requires special process engineering; spray cement and damp aggregate are mixed with one another immediately before entering the spraying machinery.

  7. Thermodynamics and cement science

    SciTech Connect

    Damidot, D.; Lothenbach, B.; Herfort, D.; Glasser, F.P.

    2011-07-15

    Thermodynamics applied to cement science has proved to be very valuable. One of the most striking findings has been the extent to which the hydrate phases, with one conspicuous exception, achieve equilibrium. The important exception is the persistence of amorphous C-S-H which is metastable with respect to crystalline calcium silicate hydrates. Nevertheless C-S-H can be included in the scope of calculations. As a consequence, from comparison of calculation and experiment, it appears that kinetics is not necessarily an insuperable barrier to engineering the phase composition of a hydrated Portland cement. Also the sensitivity of the mineralogy of the AFm and AFt phase compositions to the presence of calcite and to temperature has been reported. This knowledge gives a powerful incentive to develop links between the mineralogy and engineering properties of hydrated cement paste and, of course, anticipates improvements in its performance leading to decreasing the environmental impacts of cement production.

  8. Magnesium-based bone cement and bone void filler: preliminary experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Schendel, Stephen A; Peauroi, John

    2009-03-01

    Bone cement has great potential in craniofacial surgery in the repair of osseous defects secondary to surgery or trauma. This includes the use of bone cement as a bone void filler for full-thickness cranial defects and as augmentation of deficient bones. Ideally, this material should be easily available, biocompatible, resorbable, bone inductive, and have adhesive qualities to bone. Calcium-based bone cements have some of these qualities but have a higher than desirable failure rate. OsteoCrete, a new magnesium-based bone cement and bone void filler, was compared to Norian in critical-sized skull defects and cementing bone flaps in rabbits. Both materials were successful; however, OsteoCrete had a faster resorption and replacement by bone rate than Norian. Bone flap position and apparent stability were also superior with OsteoCrete. There were no adverse reactions to either cement. A magnesium-based bone cement presents with advantages when compared with a comparator calcium-based cement in craniofacial surgery.

  9. Surface characterisation of various bone cements prepared with functionalised methacrylates/bioactive ceramics in relation to HOB behaviour.

    PubMed

    Salih, Vehid; Mordan, Nicky; Abou Neel, Ensanya A; Armitage, David A; Jones, Frances H; Knowles, Jonathan C; Nazhat, Showan N; Vargas-Coronado, R; Cauich-Rodriguez, Juan V

    2006-03-01

    This study reports the relationship between the biocompatibility and surface properties of experimental bone cements. The effect of hydroxyapatite (HA) or alpha-tri-calcium phosphate (alpha-TCP) incorporated into bone cements prepared with methyl methacrylate as base monomer and either methacrylic acid or diethyl amino ethyl methacrylate (DEAEMA) as comonomers was investigated. The in vitro biocompatibility of these composite cements was assessed in terms of the interaction of primary human osteoblasts grown on the materials over a period of 5 days and compared with a control surface. These results were related to the surface properties investigated through a number of techniques, namely Fourier transform infrared, contact angle measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays. Complementary techniques of thermal analysis and ion chromatography were also performed. Biocompatibility results showed that the addition of alpha-TCP improves biocompatibility regardless of comonomer type. This is in contrast to HA-based cements where cell proliferation was significantly lower. Surface characterisations showed that structural integrity of the materials was maintained in the presence of the acid and base comonomers, and water contact angles were reduced particularly in DEAEMA containing materials. Furthermore, ion chromatography confirmed higher Ca2+ and PO4(3-) ion release by both types of ceramics, particularly for those containing DEAEMA. In conclusion, the incorporation of acidic and basic comonomers to either HA or alpha-TCP ceramics containing bone cements can have differential effects upon the attachment and proliferation of bone cells in vitro. Moreover, those cements consisting of alpha-TCP and containing DEAEMA comonomer indicated the most favourable biocompatibility.

  10. Nanostructure of biocompatible titania/hydroxyapatite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, Aleksandr A.; Rodionov, Igor V.; Steinhauer, Aleksey B.; Fomina, Marina A.; Petrova, Natalia V.; Zakharevich, Andrey M.; Skaptsov, Aleksandr A.; Gribov, Andrey N.; Atkin, Vsevolod S.

    2014-01-01

    The article describes prospective composite biocompatible titania coatings modified with hydroxyapatite nanoparticles and obtained on intraosseous implants fabricated from commercially pure titanium VT1-00. Consistency changes of morphological characteristics, crystalline structure, physical and mechanical properties and biocompatibility of experimental titanium implant coatings obtained by the combination of oxidation and surface modification with hydroxyapatite during induction heat treatment are defined.

  11. Polycrystalline Silicon: a Biocompatibility Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Pecheva, E.; Fingarova, D.; Pramatarova, L.; Hikov, T.; Laquerriere, P.; Bouthors, Sylvie; Dimova-Malinovska, D.; Montgomery, P.

    2010-01-21

    Polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) layers were functionalized through the growth of biomimetic hydroxyapatite (HA) on their surface. HA is the mineral component of bones and teeth and thus possesses excellent bioactivity and biocompatibility. MG-63 osteoblast-like cells were cultured on both HA-coated and un-coated poly-Si surfaces for 1, 3, 5 and 7 days and toxicity, proliferation and cell morphology were investigated. The results revealed that the poly-Si layers were bioactive and compatible with the osteoblast-like cells. Nevertheless, the HA coating improved the cell interactions with the poly-Si surfaces based on the cell affinity to the specific chemical composition of the bone-like HA and/or to the higher HA roughness.

  12. Enhanced Biocompatibility of Porous Nitinol

    PubMed Central

    Munroe, Norman; Pulletikurthi, Chandan; Haider, Waseem

    2009-01-01

    Porous Nitinol (PNT) has found vast applications in the medical industry as interbody fusion devices, synthetic bone grafts, etc. However, the tendency of the PNT to corrode is anticipated to be greater as compared to solid nitinol since there is a larger surface area in contact with body fluids. In such cases, surface preparation is known to play a major role in a material’s biocompatibility. In an effort to check the effect of surface treatments on the in vitro corrosion properties of PNT, in this investigation, they were subjected to different surface treatments such as boiling in water, dry heating, and passivation. The localized corrosion resistance of alloys before and after each treatment was evaluated in phosphate buffer saline solution (PBS) using cyclic polarization tests in accordance with ASTM F 2129-08. PMID:19956797

  13. Preparation, physical-chemical characterization, and cytocompatibility of polymeric calcium phosphate cements.

    PubMed

    Khashaba, Rania M; Moussa, Mervet; Koch, Christopher; Jurgensen, Arthur R; Missimer, David M; Rutherford, Ronny L; Chutkan, Norman B; Borke, James L

    2011-01-01

    Aim. Physicochemical mechanical and in vitro biological properties of novel formulations of polymeric calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) were investigated. Methods. Monocalcium phosphate, calcium oxide, and synthetic hydroxyapatite were combined with either modified polyacrylic acid, light activated polyalkenoic acid, or polymethyl vinyl ether maleic acid to obtain Types I, II, and III CPCs. Setting time, compressive and diametral strength of CPCs was compared with zinc polycarboxylate cement (control). Specimens were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and infrared spectroscopy. In vitro cytotoxicity of CPCs and control was assessed. Results. X-ray diffraction analysis showed hydroxyapatite, monetite, and brushite. Acid-base reaction was confirmed by the appearance of stretching peaks in IR spectra of set cements. SEM revealed rod-like crystals and platy crystals. Setting time of cements was 5-12 min. Type III showed significantly higher strength values compared to control. Type III yielded high biocompatibility. Conclusions. Type III CPCs show promise for dental applications.

  14. Preparation of acrylic bone cements for vertebroplasty with bismuth salicylate as radiopaque agent.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Lidia; Fernández, Mar; Collía, Francisco; Gurruchaga, Mariló; Goñi, Isabel

    2006-01-01

    One of the problems of percutaneous vertebroplasty attributed to the use of acrylic cements is related to the radiopacity of the formulation. The use of bismuth salicylate as the radiopaque agent is proposed in this work, taking into account the high radiopacity of organobismuth compounds used in dental applications and the possible analgesic effect of salicylic acid. Various cements formulated with this compound (some of them modified with polyethylene oxide) were examined. Setting parameters, mechanical properties, rheological behaviour, injectability, radiopacity and biocompatibility were studied for a variety of formulations, showing that the cement formulations containing bismuth salicylate have a higher radiopacity and better injection properties than commercial bone cement preparations and present good mechanical properties.

  15. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2001-10-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses tasks performed in the fourth quarter as well as the other three quarters of the past year. The subjects that were covered in previous reports and that are also discussed in this report include: Analysis of field laboratory data of active cement applications from three oil-well service companies; Preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; Summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; and Comparison of compressive strengths of ULHS systems using ultrasonic and crush methods Results reported from the fourth quarter include laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems--foamed and sodium silicate slurries. These comparison studies were completed for two different densities (10.0 and 11.5 lb/gal) and three different field application scenarios. Additional testing included the mechanical properties of ULHS systems and other lightweight systems. Studies were also performed to examine the effect that circulation by centrifugal pump during mixing has on breakage of ULHS.

  16. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2003-06-16

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. Laboratory testing during the tenth quarter focused on evaluation of the alkali-silica reaction of eight different cement compositions, four of which contain ULHS. The original laboratory procedure for measuring set cement expansion resulted in test specimen erosion that was unacceptable. A different expansion procedure is being evaluated. This report provides a progress summary of ASR testing. The testing program initiated in November produced questionable initial results so the procedure was modified slightly and the testing was reinitiated. The results obtained with the modified procedure showed improvement over data obtained with the original procedure, but questionable data were obtained from several of the compositions. Additional modification of test procedures for compositions containing TXI Lightweight cement are being implemented and testing is ongoing.

  17. [Aluminous cement for dental application (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Takeda, S

    1982-01-01

    The various materials such as zinc oxide eugenol pastes, calcium hydroxide slurry and self hardening polymers have been used for the root canal filling and pulp capping. However, those materials have various problems in terms of biocompatibility and physical properties in clinical use. The development of root canal filling and pulp capping materials has been carried out with powder-liquid system which consisted of aluminous cement added to 20 wt% Ca (OH)2 and polyvinylalcohol solutions. The influence of polyvinylalcohol concentrations and L/P ratio on physical properties and biocompatibility were investigated. The results were as follows: 1. The initial setting time was showed between 3 and 20 minutes according to polyvinylalcohol concentration and L/P ratio and delayed linearly by increasing the L/P ratio. 2. The consistency was indicated between 18 and 51 mm with polyvinylalcohol concentration and L/P ratio. The lower the L/P ratio, the thicker was the consistency. 3. The solubilities in distilled water were 2.7-7.3% and 3.9-8.4%, respectively, after storage for 24 hours and 1 week, while those values in 199 medium were 2.9-6.2% and 4.4-9.9%, respectively, after storage for 24 hours and 1 week. 4. The pH values in distilled water were indicated high alkaline conditions of about 11.5 after storage for 24 hours and was not influenced by the repeated immersions. On the other hand, the pH values in 199 medium were showed high alkaline conditions of about 11.0 after storage for 24 hours, but decreased rapidly to the neutral conditions of about 8.0 with the repeated immersion. 5. The compressive strengths were increased by the use of higher polyvinylalcohol concentration and lower L/P ratio and indicated from 26 kg/cm2 and 278 kg/cm2. 6. By the use of the tissue culture method, mild response with the un-set cement was recognized from the morphological observation. In the case of the set cement, the cell morphological changes showed no significant difference in the

  18. Small-particle-size cement

    SciTech Connect

    Ewert, D.P.; Almond, S.W.; Blerhaus, W.M. II )

    1991-05-01

    Successful remedial cementing has historically been difficult in wells with large-interval, multizone, gravel-packed completions. The reason is the inability of conventional oilfield cements to penetrate gravel packs adequately. Small-particle-size cement (SPSC) was developed to penetrate gravel packs and to provide the zonal isolation required. This paper details the laboratory work, job design, and field implementation of this new cement.

  19. Introduction of gelatin microspheres into an injectable calcium phosphate cement.

    PubMed

    Habraken, W J E M; de Jonge, L T; Wolke, J G C; Yubao, L; Mikos, A G; Jansen, J A

    2008-12-01

    For tissue engineered bone constructs, calcium phosphate cement (CPC) has a high potential as scaffold material because of its biocompatibility and osteoconductivity. However, in vivo resorption and tissue ingrowth is slow. To address these issues, microspheres can be incorporated into the cement, which will create macroporosity after in situ degradation. The goal of this study was to investigate the handling properties and degradation characteristics of CPC containing gelatin microspheres. Setting time and injectability were determined and an in vitro degradation study was performed. Samples were assayed on mass, compression strength, E-modulus, and morphology. A supplementary degradation test with gelatin microspheres was performed to investigate the influence of physical conditions inside the cement on microsphere stability. The gelatin microsphere CPCs were easy to inject and showed initial setting times of less than 3 min. After 12-weeks in vitro degradation no increase in macroporosity was observed, which was supported by the small mass loss and stabilizing mechanical strength. Even a clear densification of the composite was observed. Explanations for the lack of macroporosity were recrystallization of the cement onto or inside the gelatin spheres and a delayed degradation of gelatin microspheres inside the scaffold. The supplementary degradation test showed that the pH is a factor in the delayed gelatin microsphere degradation. Also differences in degradation rate between types of gelatin were observed. Overall, the introduction of gelatin microspheres into CPC renders composites with good handling properties, though the degradation characteristics should be further investigated to generate a macroporous scaffold.

  20. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi.

    1989-10-03

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed. 3 figs.

  1. Cement Mason's Curriculum. Instructional Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendirx, Laborn J.; Patton, Bob

    To assist cement mason instructors in providing comprehensive instruction to their students, this curriculum guide treats both the skills and information necessary for cement masons in commercial and industrial construction. Ten sections are included, as follow: related information, covering orientation, safety, the history of cement, and applying…

  2. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1989-01-01

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed.

  3. Reducing cement's CO2 footprint

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2011-01-01

    The manufacturing process for Portland cement causes high levels of greenhouse gas emissions. However, environmental impacts can be reduced by using more energy-efficient kilns and replacing fossil energy with alternative fuels. Although carbon capture and new cements with less CO2 emission are still in the experimental phase, all these innovations can help develop a cleaner cement industry.

  4. Cementing a wellbore using cementing material encapsulated in a shell

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Duoss, Eric B.; Floyd, III, William C.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Vericella, John J.; Cowan, Kenneth Michael

    2017-03-14

    A system for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a pipe extends. A cement material is positioned in the space between the wellbore and the pipe by circulated capsules containing the cement material through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The capsules contain the cementing material encapsulated in a shell. The capsules are added to a fluid and the fluid with capsules is circulated through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The shell is breached once the capsules contain the cementing material are in position in the space between the wellbore and the pipe.

  5. Cementing a wellbore using cementing material encapsulated in a shell

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Duoss, Eric B.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Cowan, Kenneth Michael

    2016-08-16

    A system for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a pipe extends. A cement material is positioned in the space between the wellbore and the pipe by circulated capsules containing the cement material through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The capsules contain the cementing material encapsulated in a shell. The capsules are added to a fluid and the fluid with capsules is circulated through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The shell is breached once the capsules contain the cementing material are in position in the space between the wellbore and the pipe.

  6. Characterization of modified calcium-silicate cements exposed to acidic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Camilleri, Josette

    2011-01-15

    Portland cement which is used as a binder in concrete in the construction industry has been developed into a biomaterial. It is marketed as mineral trioxide aggregate and is used in dentistry. This material has been reported to be very biocompatible and thus its use has diversified. The extended use of this material has led to developments of newer versions with improved physical properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of acidic environments found in the oral cavity on fast setting calcium silicate cements with improved physical properties using a combination of techniques. Two fast setting calcium silicate cements (CSA and CFA) and two cement composites (CSAG and CFAG) were assessed by subjecting the materials to lactic acid/sodium lactate buffer gel for a period of 28 days. At weekly intervals the materials were viewed under the tandem scanning confocal microscope (TSM), and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The two prototype cements exhibited changes in their internal chemistry with no changes in surface characteristics. Since the changes observed were mostly sub-surface evaluation of surface characteristics of cement may not be sufficient in the determination of chemical changes occurring. - Research Highlights: {yields} An acidic environment affects modified fast setting calcium silicate-based cements. {yields} No surface changes are observed in acidic environment. {yields} An acidic environment causes sub-surface changes in the material chemistry which are only visible in fractured specimens. {yields} A combination of techniques is necessary in order to evaluate the chemical changes occurring.

  7. Biocompatibility of crystalline opal nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Silica nanoparticles are being developed as a host of biomedical and biotechnological applications. For this reason, there are more studies about biocompatibility of silica with amorphous and crystalline structure. Except hydrated silica (opal), despite is presents directly and indirectly in humans. Two sizes of crystalline opal nanoparticles were investigated in this work under criteria of toxicology. Methods In particular, cytotoxic and genotoxic effects caused by opal nanoparticles (80 and 120 nm) were evaluated in cultured mouse cells via a set of bioassays, methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium-bromide (MTT) and 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU). Results 3T3-NIH cells were incubated for 24 and 72 h in contact with nanocrystalline opal particles, not presented significant statistically difference in the results of cytotoxicity. Genotoxicity tests of crystalline opal nanoparticles were performed by the BrdU assay on the same cultured cells for 24 h incubation. The reduction of BrdU-incorporated cells indicates that nanocrystalline opal exposure did not caused unrepairable damage DNA. Conclusions There is no relationship between that particles size and MTT reduction, as well as BrdU incorporation, such that the opal particles did not induce cytotoxic effect and genotoxicity in cultured mouse cells. PMID:23088559

  8. SURFACE CHEMISTRY INFLUENCE IMPLANT BIOCOMPATIBILITY

    PubMed Central

    Thevenot, Paul; Hu, Wenjing; Tang, Liping

    2011-01-01

    Implantable medical devices are increasingly important in the practice of modern medicine. Unfortunately, almost all medical devices suffer to a different extent from adverse reactions, including inflammation, fibrosis, thrombosis and infection. To improve the safety and function of many types of medical implants, a major need exists for development of materials that evoked desired tissue responses. Because implant-associated protein adsorption and conformational changes thereafter have been shown to promote immune reactions, rigorous research efforts have been emphasized on the engineering of surface property (physical and chemical characteristics) to reduce protein adsorption and cell interactions and subsequently improve implant biocompatibility. This brief review is aimed to summarize the past efforts and our recent knowledge about the influence of surface functionality on protein:cell:biomaterial interactions. It is our belief that detailed understandings of bioactivity of surface functionality provide an easy, economic, and specific approach for the future rational design of implantable medical devices with desired tissue reactivity and, hopefully, wound healing capability. PMID:18393890

  9. Biocompatibility testing of branched and linear polyglycidol.

    PubMed

    Kainthan, Rajesh Kumar; Janzen, Johan; Levin, Elena; Devine, Dana V; Brooks, Donald E

    2006-03-01

    Polyglycidols are flexible hydrophilic polyethers that are potentially biocompatible polymers based on their similarities to the well-studied poly(ethyleneglycol). Polyglycidols can be prepared as branched or linear polymers by suitable synthetic methods. Biocompatibility testing of these polymers conducted in vitro as well as in vivo are reported here. The in vitro studies included hemocompatibility testing for effects on coagulation (PT and APTT), complement activation, red blood cell aggregation, and whole blood viscosity measurements. In vitro cytotoxicity experiments were also conducted. The results were compared with some of the common biocompatible polymers already in human use. Results from these studies show that polyglycidols are highly biocompatible. Hyperbranched polyglycidols were found to be well tolerated by mice even when injected in high doses.

  10. Synthetic cornea: biocompatibility and optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parel, Jean-Marie A.; Kaminski, Stefan; Fernandez, Viviana; Alfonso, E.; Lamar, Peggy; Lacombe, Emmanuel; Duchesne, Bernard; Dubovy, Sander; Manns, Fabrice; Rol, Pascal O.

    2002-06-01

    Purpose. Experimentally find a method to provide a safe surgical technique and an inexpensive and long lasting mesoplant for the restoration of vision in patients with bilateral corneal blindness due to ocular surface and stromal diseases. Methods. Identify the least invasive and the safest surgical technique for synthetic cornea implantation. Identify the most compatible biomaterials and the optimal shape a synthetic cornea must have to last a long time when implanted in vivo. Results. Penetrating procedures were deemed too invasive, time consuming, difficult and prone to long term complications. Therefore a non-penetrating delamination technique with central trephination was developed to preserve the integrity of Descemet's membrane and the anterior segment. Even though this approach limits the number of indications, it is acceptable since the majority of patients only have opacities in the stroma. The prosthesis was designed to fit in the removed tissue plane with its skirt fitted under the delaminated stroma. To improve retention, the trephination wall was made conical with the smallest opening on the anterior surface and a hat-shaped mesoplant was made to fit. The skirt was perforated in its perimeter to allow passage of nutrients and tissues ingrowths. To simplify the fabrication procedure, the haptic and optic were made of the same polymer. The intrastromal biocompatibility of several hydrogels was found superior to current clinically used PMMA and PTFE materials. Monobloc mesoplants made of 4 different materials were implanted in rabbits and followed weekly until extrusion occurred. Some remained optically clear allowing for fundus photography. Conclusions. Hydrogel synthetic corneas can be made to survive for periods longer than 1 year. ArF excimer laser photoablation studies are needed to determine the refractive correction potential of these mesoplants. A pilot FDA clinical trial is needed to assess the mesoplant efficacy and very long-term stability.

  11. Carbon Fiber Biocompatibility for Implants

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Carbon fibers have multiple potential advantages in developing high-strength biomaterials with a density close to bone for better stress transfer and electrical properties that enhance tissue formation. As a breakthrough example in biomaterials, a 1.5 mm diameter bisphenol-epoxy/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite rod was compared for two weeks in a rat tibia model with a similar 1.5 mm diameter titanium-6-4 alloy screw manufactured to retain bone implants. Results showed that carbon-fiber-reinforced composite stimulated osseointegration inside the tibia bone marrow measured as percent bone area (PBA) to a great extent when compared to the titanium-6-4 alloy at statistically significant levels. PBA increased significantly with the carbon-fiber composite over the titanium-6-4 alloy for distances from the implant surfaces of 0.1 mm at 77.7% vs. 19.3% (p < 10−8) and 0.8 mm at 41.6% vs. 19.5% (p < 10−4), respectively. The review focuses on carbon fiber properties that increased PBA for enhanced implant osseointegration. Carbon fibers acting as polymer coated electrically conducting micro-biocircuits appear to provide a biocompatible semi-antioxidant property to remove damaging electron free radicals from the surrounding implant surface. Further, carbon fibers by removing excess electrons produced from the cellular mitochondrial electron transport chain during periods of hypoxia perhaps stimulate bone cell recruitment by free-radical chemotactic influences. In addition, well-studied bioorganic cell actin carbon fiber growth would appear to interface in close contact with the carbon-fiber-reinforced composite implant. Resulting subsequent actin carbon fiber/implant carbon fiber contacts then could help in discharging the electron biological overloads through electrochemical gradients to lower negative charges and lower concentration. PMID:26966555

  12. Carbon Fiber Biocompatibility for Implants.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Richard

    Carbon fibers have multiple potential advantages in developing high-strength biomaterials with a density close to bone for better stress transfer and electrical properties that enhance tissue formation. As a breakthrough example in biomaterials, a 1.5 mm diameter bisphenol-epoxy/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite rod was compared for two weeks in a rat tibia model with a similar 1.5 mm diameter titanium-6-4 alloy screw manufactured to retain bone implants. Results showed that carbon-fiber-reinforced composite stimulated osseointegration inside the tibia bone marrow measured as percent bone area (PBA) to a great extent when compared to the titanium-6-4 alloy at statistically significant levels. PBA increased significantly with the carbon-fiber composite over the titanium-6-4 alloy for distances from the implant surfaces of 0.1 mm at 77.7% vs. 19.3% (p < 10(-8)) and 0.8 mm at 41.6% vs. 19.5% (p < 10(-4)), respectively. The review focuses on carbon fiber properties that increased PBA for enhanced implant osseointegration. Carbon fibers acting as polymer coated electrically conducting micro-biocircuits appear to provide a biocompatible semi-antioxidant property to remove damaging electron free radicals from the surrounding implant surface. Further, carbon fibers by removing excess electrons produced from the cellular mitochondrial electron transport chain during periods of hypoxia perhaps stimulate bone cell recruitment by free-radical chemotactic influences. In addition, well-studied bioorganic cell actin carbon fiber growth would appear to interface in close contact with the carbon-fiber-reinforced composite implant. Resulting subsequent actin carbon fiber/implant carbon fiber contacts then could help in discharging the electron biological overloads through electrochemical gradients to lower negative charges and lower concentration.

  13. Cement composition and sulfate attack

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, Natalya; Zayed, Abla . E-mail: zayed@eng.usf.edu

    2007-04-15

    Four cements were used to address the effect of tricalcium silicate content of cement on external sulfate attack in sodium sulfate solution. The selected cements had similar fineness and Bogue-calculated tricalcium aluminate content but variable tricalcium silicates. Durability was assessed using linear expansion and compressive strength. Phases associated with deterioration were examined using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Mineralogical phase content of the as-received cements was studied by X-ray diffraction using two methods: internal standard and Rietveld analysis. The results indicate that phase content of cements determined by X-ray mineralogical analysis correlates better with the mortar performance in sulfate environment than Bogue content. Additionally, it was found that in cements containing triclacium aluminate only in the cubic form, the observed deterioration is affected by tricalcium silicate content. Morphological similarities between hydration products of high tricalcium aluminate and high tricalcium silicate cements exposed to sodium sulfate environment were also observed.

  14. New cement formulation helps solve deep cementing problems

    SciTech Connect

    Brothers, L.E.; DeBlanc, F.X.

    1989-06-01

    Invert-emulsion muds are used in most deep, hot wells. The internal aqueous phase of these muds frequently contains high concentrations of salts. It is desirable to complete these wells with a cement slurry containing salt concentrations up to and including saturation to minimize compatibility problems between cement slurry and mud. Above their effective temperature range, however, saturated salt cements - though still considered desirable for their other properties - pose design difficulties regarding thickening time, fluid loss, and rheology. High salt concentrations tend to decrease the effectiveness of most common cement additives - e.g., retarders, fluid-loss additives, and dispersants. At high temperatures, concentrations of these additives can become unacceptably large, while the additives themselves are not as effective under these conditions. Development of and field experience with a new cementing formulation for deep, high-temperature, saturated-salt applications have helped resolve the cement design problems encountered in south Texas and southern and offshore Louisiana. A single synthetic-polymer additive provides cement retardation, fluid-loss control, and dispersant properties with normal design considerations as opposed to the lengthy design requirements of other cement systems. A particular benefit derived from use of the new cement system involves cementing of long liners. Such liners frequently require squeeze cementing at the liner top because the cement is designed for conditions at the bottom of the liner and is thus frequently over-retarded for the cooler temperatures encountered at the top of the liner. This over-retardation tendency is alleviated greatly by use of the new saturated-salt cement additive.

  15. MARGINAL ADAPTATION AND PERFORMANCE OF BIOACTIVE DENTAL RESTORATIVE MATERIALS IN DECIDUOUS AND YOUNG PERMANENT TEETH

    PubMed Central

    Gjorgievska, Elizabeta; Nicholson, John W.; Iljovska, Snezana; Slipper, Ian J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the adaptation of different types of restorations towards deciduous and young permanent teeth. Materials and Methods: Class V cavities were prepared in deciduous and young permanent teeth and filled with different materials (a conventional glass-ionomer, a resin-modified glass-ionomer, a poly-acid-modified composite resin and a conventional composite resin). Specimens were aged in artificial saliva for 1, 6, 12 and 18 months, then examined by SEM. Results: The composite resin and the polyacid-modified composite had better marginal adaptation than the glass-ionomers, though microcracks developed in the enamel of the tooth. The glass-ionomers showed inferior marginal quality and durability, but no microcracking of the enamel. The margins of the resin-modified glass-ionomer were slightly superior to the conventional glass-ionomer. Conditioning improved the adaptation of the composite resin, but the type of tooth made little or no difference to the performance of the restorative material. All materials were associated with the formation of crystals in the gaps between the filling and the tooth; the quantity and shape of these crystals varied with the material. Conclusions: Resin-based materials are generally better at forming sound, durable margins in deciduous and young permanent teeth than cements, but are associated with microcracks in the enamel. All fluoride-releasing materials give rise to crystalline deposits. PMID:19089281

  16. Mineral resource of the month: hydraulic cement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2012-01-01

    Hydraulic cements are the binders in concrete and most mortars and stuccos. Concrete, particularly the reinforced variety, is the most versatile of all construction materials, and most of the hydraulic cement produced worldwide is portland cement or similar cements that have portland cement as a basis, such as blended cements and masonry cements. Cement typically makes up less than 15 percent of the concrete mix; most of the rest is aggregates. Not counting the weight of rein