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Sample records for biocontrol harlequin ladybird

  1. Invasive harlequin ladybird carries biological weapons against native competitors.

    PubMed

    Vilcinskas, Andreas; Stoecker, Kilian; Schmidtberg, Henrike; Röhrich, Christian R; Vogel, Heiko

    2013-05-17

    Invasive species that proliferate after colonizing new habitats have a negative environmental and economic impact. The reason why some species become successful invaders, whereas others, even closely related species, remain noninvasive is often unclear. The harlequin ladybird Harmonia axyridis, introduced for biological pest control, has become an invader that is outcompeting indigenous ladybird species in many countries. Here, we show that Harmonia carries abundant spores of obligate parasitic microsporidia closely related to Nosema thompsoni. These microsporidia, while not harming the carrier Harmonia, are lethal pathogens for the native ladybird Coccinella septempunctata. We propose that intraguild predation, representing a major selective force among competing ladybird species, causes the infection and ultimate death of native ladybirds when they feed on microsporidia-contaminated Harmonia eggs or larvae. PMID:23687046

  2. Invasive harlequin ladybird carries biological weapons against native competitors.

    PubMed

    Vilcinskas, Andreas; Stoecker, Kilian; Schmidtberg, Henrike; Röhrich, Christian R; Vogel, Heiko

    2013-05-17

    Invasive species that proliferate after colonizing new habitats have a negative environmental and economic impact. The reason why some species become successful invaders, whereas others, even closely related species, remain noninvasive is often unclear. The harlequin ladybird Harmonia axyridis, introduced for biological pest control, has become an invader that is outcompeting indigenous ladybird species in many countries. Here, we show that Harmonia carries abundant spores of obligate parasitic microsporidia closely related to Nosema thompsoni. These microsporidia, while not harming the carrier Harmonia, are lethal pathogens for the native ladybird Coccinella septempunctata. We propose that intraguild predation, representing a major selective force among competing ladybird species, causes the infection and ultimate death of native ladybirds when they feed on microsporidia-contaminated Harmonia eggs or larvae.

  3. Experimental evidence for the phenotypic impact of admixture between wild and biocontrol Asian ladybird (Harmonia axyridis) involved in the European invasion.

    PubMed

    Turgeon, J; Tayeh, A; Facon, B; Lombaert, E; De Clercq, P; Berkvens, N; Lundgren, J G; Estoup, A

    2011-05-01

    Hybridization can fuel evolutionary processes during biological invasions. The harlequin ladybird Harmonia axyridis has long been used as a biocontrol agent before the species became invasive worldwide. Previous analysis based on microsatellite data has shown that European invasive populations bear traces of admixture between an eastern North American source, which is at the origin of the worldwide invasion, and biocontrol strains used in Europe. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that this early admixture event may have fostered the European invasion by impacting on the phenotypes of wild European populations. Mean life history traits of experimental F(1) hybrids are compared with pure parental sources and wild European crosses. Our results reveal a biased impact whereby North American beetles benefitted from being admixed with European biocontrol strains. Resemblance between experimental hybrids and wild European invasive crosses further suggests a long-lasting effect of admixture that may still be at work and fostering invasiveness.

  4. Harmonine, a defence compound from the harlequin ladybird, inhibits mycobacterial growth and demonstrates multi-stage antimalarial activity

    PubMed Central

    Röhrich, Christian Rene; Ngwa, Che Julius; Wiesner, Jochen; Schmidtberg, Henrike; Degenkolb, Thomas; Kollewe, Christian; Fischer, Rainer; Pradel, Gabriele; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The harlequin ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis has been introduced in many countries as a biological control agent, but has become an invasive species threatening the biodiversity of native ladybirds. Its invasive success has been attributed to its vigorous resistance against diverse pathogens. This study demonstrates that harmonine ((17R,9Z)-1,17-diaminooctadec-9-ene), which is present in H. axyridis haemolymph, displays broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity that includes human pathogens. Antibacterial activity is most pronounced against fast-growing mycobacteria and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and the growth of both chloroquine-sensitive and -resistant Plasmodium falciparum strains is inhibited. Harmonine displays gametocytocidal activity, and inhibits the exflagellation of microgametocytes and zygote formation. In an Anopheles stephensi mosquito feeding model, harmonine displays transmission-blocking activity. PMID:21937493

  5. Harmonine, a defence compound from the harlequin ladybird, inhibits mycobacterial growth and demonstrates multi-stage antimalarial activity.

    PubMed

    Röhrich, Christian Rene; Ngwa, Che Julius; Wiesner, Jochen; Schmidtberg, Henrike; Degenkolb, Thomas; Kollewe, Christian; Fischer, Rainer; Pradel, Gabriele; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2012-04-23

    The harlequin ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis has been introduced in many countries as a biological control agent, but has become an invasive species threatening the biodiversity of native ladybirds. Its invasive success has been attributed to its vigorous resistance against diverse pathogens. This study demonstrates that harmonine ((17R,9Z)-1,17-diaminooctadec-9-ene), which is present in H. axyridis haemolymph, displays broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity that includes human pathogens. Antibacterial activity is most pronounced against fast-growing mycobacteria and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and the growth of both chloroquine-sensitive and -resistant Plasmodium falciparum strains is inhibited. Harmonine displays gametocytocidal activity, and inhibits the exflagellation of microgametocytes and zygote formation. In an Anopheles stephensi mosquito feeding model, harmonine displays transmission-blocking activity.

  6. Response to comments on "Invasive harlequin ladybird carries biological weapons against native competitors".

    PubMed

    Vilcinskas, Andreas; Stoecker, Kilian; Schmidtberg, Henrike; Röhrich, Christian R; Vogel, Heiko

    2013-09-20

    Comments by de Jong et al., Solter et al., and Sloggett question the ecological relevance of the abundant microsporidia found in the invasive ladybird Harmonia axyridis. We contend that there is abundant evidence that native ladybirds feed on H. axyridis eggs and that interspecific microsporidial transfer is a common phenomenon, supporting the proposed role of these parasites as biological weapons. PMID:24052293

  7. Response to comments on "Invasive harlequin ladybird carries biological weapons against native competitors".

    PubMed

    Vilcinskas, Andreas; Stoecker, Kilian; Schmidtberg, Henrike; Röhrich, Christian R; Vogel, Heiko

    2013-09-20

    Comments by de Jong et al., Solter et al., and Sloggett question the ecological relevance of the abundant microsporidia found in the invasive ladybird Harmonia axyridis. We contend that there is abundant evidence that native ladybirds feed on H. axyridis eggs and that interspecific microsporidial transfer is a common phenomenon, supporting the proposed role of these parasites as biological weapons.

  8. Comment on "Invasive harlequin ladybird carries biological weapons against native competitors".

    PubMed

    Sloggett, John J

    2013-09-20

    Vilcinskas et al. (Reports, 17 May 2013, p. 862) proposed that infectious microsporidia of the invasive ladybird Harmonia axyridis act against intraguild predators, rather than ladybird alkaloid defenses. However, as both microsporidia and the harmonine defense alkaloid were administered to predators by microinjection rather than into the gut, such a conclusion is premature. Alkaloids also provide defense when predation occurs, whereas microsporidia act much later.

  9. Comment on "Invasive harlequin ladybird carries biological weapons against native competitors".

    PubMed

    Sloggett, John J

    2013-09-20

    Vilcinskas et al. (Reports, 17 May 2013, p. 862) proposed that infectious microsporidia of the invasive ladybird Harmonia axyridis act against intraguild predators, rather than ladybird alkaloid defenses. However, as both microsporidia and the harmonine defense alkaloid were administered to predators by microinjection rather than into the gut, such a conclusion is premature. Alkaloids also provide defense when predation occurs, whereas microsporidia act much later. PMID:24052292

  10. Expression and characterization of a recombinant i-type lysozyme from the harlequin ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis.

    PubMed

    Beckert, A; Wiesner, J; Schmidtberg, H; Lehmann, R; Baumann, A; Vogel, H; Vilcinskas, A

    2016-06-01

    Lysozymes are enzymes that destroy bacterial cell walls by hydrolysing the polysaccharide component of peptidoglycan. In insects, there are two classes of lysozymes, the c-type with muramidase activity and the i-type whose prototypical members from annelids and molluscs possess both muramidase and isopeptidase activities. Many insect genes encoding c-type and i-type lysozymes have been identified during genome and transcriptome analyses, but only c-type lysozymes have been functionally characterized at the protein level. Here we produced one of five i-type lysozymes represented in the immunity-related transcriptome of the invasive harlequin ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis as recombinant protein. This was the only one containing the serine and histidine residues that are thought to be required for isopeptidase activity. This i-type lysozyme was recombinantly expressed in the yeast Pichia pastoris, but the purified protein was inactive in both muramidase and isopeptidase assays. Transcription and immunofluorescence analysis revealed that this i-type lysozyme is produced in the fat body but is not inducible by immune challenge. These data suggest that i-type lysozymes in insects may have acquired novel and as yet undetermined functions in the course of evolution. PMID:26778648

  11. Increase in male reproductive success and female reproductive investment in invasive populations of the harlequin ladybird Harmonia axyridis.

    PubMed

    Laugier, Guillaume J M; Le Moguédec, Gilles; Tayeh, Ashraf; Loiseau, Anne; Osawa, Naoya; Estoup, Arnaud; Facon, Benoît

    2013-01-01

    Reproductive strategy affects population dynamics and genetic parameters that can, in turn, affect evolutionary processes during the course of biological invasion. Life-history traits associated with reproductive strategy are therefore potentially good candidates for rapid evolutionary shifts during invasions. In a series of mating trials, we examined mixed groups of four males from invasive and native populations of the harlequin ladybird Harmonia axyridis mating freely during 48 hours with one female of either type. We recorded the identity of the first male to copulate and after the 48 h-period, we examined female fecundity and share of paternity, using molecular markers. We found that invasive populations have a different profile of male and female reproductive output. Males from invasive populations are more likely to mate first and gain a higher proportion of offspring with both invasive and native females. Females from invasive populations reproduce sooner, lay more eggs, and have offspring sired by a larger number of fathers than females from native populations. We found no evidence of direct inbreeding avoidance behaviour in both invasive and native females. This study highlights the importance of investigating evolutionary changes in reproductive strategy and associated traits during biological invasions. PMID:24204741

  12. Increase in male reproductive success and female reproductive investment in invasive populations of the harlequin ladybird Harmonia axyridis.

    PubMed

    Laugier, Guillaume J M; Le Moguédec, Gilles; Tayeh, Ashraf; Loiseau, Anne; Osawa, Naoya; Estoup, Arnaud; Facon, Benoît

    2013-01-01

    Reproductive strategy affects population dynamics and genetic parameters that can, in turn, affect evolutionary processes during the course of biological invasion. Life-history traits associated with reproductive strategy are therefore potentially good candidates for rapid evolutionary shifts during invasions. In a series of mating trials, we examined mixed groups of four males from invasive and native populations of the harlequin ladybird Harmonia axyridis mating freely during 48 hours with one female of either type. We recorded the identity of the first male to copulate and after the 48 h-period, we examined female fecundity and share of paternity, using molecular markers. We found that invasive populations have a different profile of male and female reproductive output. Males from invasive populations are more likely to mate first and gain a higher proportion of offspring with both invasive and native females. Females from invasive populations reproduce sooner, lay more eggs, and have offspring sired by a larger number of fathers than females from native populations. We found no evidence of direct inbreeding avoidance behaviour in both invasive and native females. This study highlights the importance of investigating evolutionary changes in reproductive strategy and associated traits during biological invasions.

  13. Expression and characterization of a recombinant i-type lysozyme from the harlequin ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis.

    PubMed

    Beckert, A; Wiesner, J; Schmidtberg, H; Lehmann, R; Baumann, A; Vogel, H; Vilcinskas, A

    2016-06-01

    Lysozymes are enzymes that destroy bacterial cell walls by hydrolysing the polysaccharide component of peptidoglycan. In insects, there are two classes of lysozymes, the c-type with muramidase activity and the i-type whose prototypical members from annelids and molluscs possess both muramidase and isopeptidase activities. Many insect genes encoding c-type and i-type lysozymes have been identified during genome and transcriptome analyses, but only c-type lysozymes have been functionally characterized at the protein level. Here we produced one of five i-type lysozymes represented in the immunity-related transcriptome of the invasive harlequin ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis as recombinant protein. This was the only one containing the serine and histidine residues that are thought to be required for isopeptidase activity. This i-type lysozyme was recombinantly expressed in the yeast Pichia pastoris, but the purified protein was inactive in both muramidase and isopeptidase assays. Transcription and immunofluorescence analysis revealed that this i-type lysozyme is produced in the fat body but is not inducible by immune challenge. These data suggest that i-type lysozymes in insects may have acquired novel and as yet undetermined functions in the course of evolution.

  14. Comment on "Invasive harlequin ladybird carries biological weapons against native competitors".

    PubMed

    de Jong, Peter W; van Lenteren, Joop C; Raak-van den Berg, C Lidwien

    2013-09-20

    We comment on the implications that Vilcinskas et al. (Reports, 17 May 2013, p. 862) attach to the finding that the exotic, invasive ladybird Harmonia axyridis carries microsporidia to which this species is insensitive but that is lethal to species that are native to the invaded areas. The authors suggest that these microsporidia might serve as "biological weapons" against the native competitors, but we cast doubt on the importance of this suggestion in the field.

  15. Comment on "Invasive harlequin ladybird carries biological weapons against native competitors".

    PubMed

    de Jong, Peter W; van Lenteren, Joop C; Raak-van den Berg, C Lidwien

    2013-09-20

    We comment on the implications that Vilcinskas et al. (Reports, 17 May 2013, p. 862) attach to the finding that the exotic, invasive ladybird Harmonia axyridis carries microsporidia to which this species is insensitive but that is lethal to species that are native to the invaded areas. The authors suggest that these microsporidia might serve as "biological weapons" against the native competitors, but we cast doubt on the importance of this suggestion in the field. PMID:24052290

  16. A case of ecological specialization in ladybirds: Iberorhyzobius rondensis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), potential biocontrol agent of Matsucoccus feytaudi (Hemiptera: Matsucoccidae).

    PubMed

    Tavares, C; Jactel, H; van Halder, I; Mendel, Z; Branco, M

    2014-06-01

    Specialization is an important attribute of a biological control agent. The maritime pine bast scale, Matsucoccus feytaudi Ducasse (Hemiptera Matsucoccidae), is an invasive species in Southeast France and the North of Italy. Iberorhyzobius rondensis Eizaguirre (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), is a recently described ladybird species. Both adults and larvae are predaceous, feeding on egg masses of M. feytaudi, and are strongly attracted to M. feytaudi's sex pheromone. To evaluate the potential of I. rondensis as a biocontrol agent of the scale, we studied its niche breadth and prey range with emphasis on pine forests and hemipterans as tested prey. In this study, I. rondensis was found to achieve complete development only when fed on M. feytaudi egg masses (92.9% survival) and an artificial prey: eggs of Ephestia kuehniella Zeller (27.6% survival). From the 2nd instar onwards, complete development could be achieved using other prey species, although larvae had significantly higher mortality and slower development. In choice tests, M. feytaudi was the preferred prey. Surveys of the ladybird populations in the Iberian Peninsula revealed that it was found exclusively on Pinus pinaster Aiton, the sole host of M. feytaudi. The unusual specialization of I. rondensis, among other predaceous ladybirds, makes it an appropriate candidate for classical biological control of M. feytaudi. PMID:24666751

  17. A case of ecological specialization in ladybirds: Iberorhyzobius rondensis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), potential biocontrol agent of Matsucoccus feytaudi (Hemiptera: Matsucoccidae).

    PubMed

    Tavares, C; Jactel, H; van Halder, I; Mendel, Z; Branco, M

    2014-06-01

    Specialization is an important attribute of a biological control agent. The maritime pine bast scale, Matsucoccus feytaudi Ducasse (Hemiptera Matsucoccidae), is an invasive species in Southeast France and the North of Italy. Iberorhyzobius rondensis Eizaguirre (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), is a recently described ladybird species. Both adults and larvae are predaceous, feeding on egg masses of M. feytaudi, and are strongly attracted to M. feytaudi's sex pheromone. To evaluate the potential of I. rondensis as a biocontrol agent of the scale, we studied its niche breadth and prey range with emphasis on pine forests and hemipterans as tested prey. In this study, I. rondensis was found to achieve complete development only when fed on M. feytaudi egg masses (92.9% survival) and an artificial prey: eggs of Ephestia kuehniella Zeller (27.6% survival). From the 2nd instar onwards, complete development could be achieved using other prey species, although larvae had significantly higher mortality and slower development. In choice tests, M. feytaudi was the preferred prey. Surveys of the ladybird populations in the Iberian Peninsula revealed that it was found exclusively on Pinus pinaster Aiton, the sole host of M. feytaudi. The unusual specialization of I. rondensis, among other predaceous ladybirds, makes it an appropriate candidate for classical biological control of M. feytaudi.

  18. The invasion history, distribution and colour pattern forms of the harlequin ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis (Pall.) (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae) in Slovakia, Central Europe

    PubMed Central

    Panigaj, Ľubomír; Zach, Peter; Honěk, Alois; Nedvěd, Oldřich; Kulfan, Ján; Martinková, Zdenka; Selyemová, Diana; Viglášová, Sandra; Roy, Helen E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The harlequin ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae) has invaded and established in Slovakia. Following unintentional introduction in 2008, the spread of the alien coccinellid was very fast. By the end of 2009, it was recorded across the whole country, and by the end of 2012 it was widely distributed and common in various habitats, particularly gardens, orchards and urban areas, where it was most frequent on trees. The rate of eastward spread was approximately 200 km year-1, similar to the overall rate of spread in Europe. Between 2008 and 2012, the coccinellid was recorded in a total of 153 localities, in altitudes ranging from 98 to 1,250 m. Most records of this species were made in lowlands, hilly areas and valleys separating mountain ridges. However, it was only rarely documented in areas above 700 m a.s.l. The non-melanic colour form (f. succinea) was dominant along a longitudinal transect including eight urban areas across Slovakia, with the frequency of melanic forms (f. spectabilis and f. conspicua together) between 6.3 and 19.2% and a median equal to 10.5%. The invasion history and distribution of H. axyridis in Slovakia are discussed with regard to the time sequence of records, rate of spread, altitudinal distribution, anthropogenic dispersal, effective recording, proportion of melanic forms and other relevant aspects associated with the spread of this successful invader. PMID:24899863

  19. The invasion history, distribution and colour pattern forms of the harlequin ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis (Pall.) (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae) in Slovakia, Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Panigaj, Lubomír; Zach, Peter; Honěk, Alois; Nedvěd, Oldřich; Kulfan, Ján; Martinková, Zdenka; Selyemová, Diana; Viglášová, Sandra; Roy, Helen E

    2014-01-01

    The harlequin ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae) has invaded and established in Slovakia. Following unintentional introduction in 2008, the spread of the alien coccinellid was very fast. By the end of 2009, it was recorded across the whole country, and by the end of 2012 it was widely distributed and common in various habitats, particularly gardens, orchards and urban areas, where it was most frequent on trees. The rate of eastward spread was approximately 200 km year(-1), similar to the overall rate of spread in Europe. Between 2008 and 2012, the coccinellid was recorded in a total of 153 localities, in altitudes ranging from 98 to 1,250 m. Most records of this species were made in lowlands, hilly areas and valleys separating mountain ridges. However, it was only rarely documented in areas above 700 m a.s.l. The non-melanic colour form (f. succinea) was dominant along a longitudinal transect including eight urban areas across Slovakia, with the frequency of melanic forms (f. spectabilis and f. conspicua together) between 6.3 and 19.2% and a median equal to 10.5%. The invasion history and distribution of H. axyridis in Slovakia are discussed with regard to the time sequence of records, rate of spread, altitudinal distribution, anthropogenic dispersal, effective recording, proportion of melanic forms and other relevant aspects associated with the spread of this successful invader. PMID:24899863

  20. The invasion history, distribution and colour pattern forms of the harlequin ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis (Pall.) (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae) in Slovakia, Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Panigaj, Lubomír; Zach, Peter; Honěk, Alois; Nedvěd, Oldřich; Kulfan, Ján; Martinková, Zdenka; Selyemová, Diana; Viglášová, Sandra; Roy, Helen E

    2014-01-01

    The harlequin ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae) has invaded and established in Slovakia. Following unintentional introduction in 2008, the spread of the alien coccinellid was very fast. By the end of 2009, it was recorded across the whole country, and by the end of 2012 it was widely distributed and common in various habitats, particularly gardens, orchards and urban areas, where it was most frequent on trees. The rate of eastward spread was approximately 200 km year(-1), similar to the overall rate of spread in Europe. Between 2008 and 2012, the coccinellid was recorded in a total of 153 localities, in altitudes ranging from 98 to 1,250 m. Most records of this species were made in lowlands, hilly areas and valleys separating mountain ridges. However, it was only rarely documented in areas above 700 m a.s.l. The non-melanic colour form (f. succinea) was dominant along a longitudinal transect including eight urban areas across Slovakia, with the frequency of melanic forms (f. spectabilis and f. conspicua together) between 6.3 and 19.2% and a median equal to 10.5%. The invasion history and distribution of H. axyridis in Slovakia are discussed with regard to the time sequence of records, rate of spread, altitudinal distribution, anthropogenic dispersal, effective recording, proportion of melanic forms and other relevant aspects associated with the spread of this successful invader.

  1. First finding of the parasitic fungus Hesperomyces virescens (Laboulbeniales) on native and invasive ladybirds (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae) in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Haelewaters, Danny; Minnaar, Ingrid A.; Clusella-Trullas, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Hesperomyces virescens is a fungal ectoparasite (Laboulbeniales) that infects adult ladybirds. Research has recently focused on this parasite due to the discovery of its prevalence on the globally invasive harlequin ladybird Harmonia axyridis and for its potential use in studies of co-evolution and pathogen spread. We collected adults from ten species of ladybirds in the Western Cape Province, South Africa, and screened for the presence of H. virescens. Infections with H. virescens were found in the samples of two species, H. axyridis and the native Cheilomenes propinqua. This marks the first record of H. virescens on H. axyridis from the African continent and the first record on Cheilomenes worldwide. PMID:26861616

  2. Harlequin syndrome in two athletes.

    PubMed

    Fallon, K E; May, J J

    2005-01-01

    Two cases are reported of harlequin syndrome, a disorder of the sympathetic nervous system in which sweating and flushing of the skin in response to exercise is diminished. This condition is most likely to be first noticed in sporting situations.

  3. Persecutors, Victims and Rescuers in Harlequin Romances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassencahl, Fran

    Based on a pattern of interaction, in which the interactants fulfill the roles of victim, persecutor, or rescuer, a study of ten Harlequin romantic novels was undertaken to determine what factors provided for the readers' identification with the Harlequin characters. It was found that Harlequin heroines manifested their status as victims by…

  4. Intraguild predation and successful invasion by introduced ladybird beetles.

    PubMed

    Snyder, William E; Clevenger, Garrett M; Eigenbrode, Sanford D

    2004-08-01

    Introductions of two ladybird beetle (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) species, Coccinella septempunctata and Harmonia axyridis, into North America for aphid biocontrol have been followed by declines in native species. We examined intraguild predation (IGP) between larvae of these two exotic species and larvae of the two most abundant native coccinellids in eastern Washington State, C. transversoguttata and Hippodamia convergens. In pairings between the two native species in laboratory microcosms containing pea ( Pisum sativum) plants, neither native had a clear advantage over the other in IGP. When the natives were paired with either Harmonia axyridis or C. septempunctata, the natives were more frequently the victims than perpetrators of IGP. In contrast, in pairings between the exotic species, neither had an IGP advantage, although overall rates of IGP between these two species were very high. Adding alternative prey (aphids) to microcosms did not alter the frequency and patterns of relative IGP among the coccinellid species. In observations of encounters between larvae, the introduced H. axyridis frequently survived multiple encounters with the native C. transversoguttata, whereas the native rarely survived a single encounter with H. axyridis. Our results suggest that larvae of the native species face increased IGP following invasion by C. septempunctata and H. axyridis, which may be contributing to the speed with which these exotic ladybird beetles displace the natives following invasion.

  5. Idiopathic harlequin syndrome: a pediatric case.

    PubMed

    Jain, Puneet; Arya, Ravindra; Jaryal, Ashok; Gulati, Sheffali

    2013-04-01

    Harlequin syndrome, Harlequin sign, Holmes-Adie syndrome, and Ross syndrome lie on a spectrum of partial dysautonomias affecting facial sudomotor, vasomotor, and pupillary responses. These syndromes have imprecise clinical boundaries and overlap syndromes are known. We report a 9-year-old girl who presented with anhidrosis over the right half of her face and the left side of her body, with compensatory hyperhidrosis on the contralateral side. She was noted to have bilateral tonic pupils and normal muscle stretch reflexes with other features suggestive of autonomic dysfunction. Investigations to rule out secondary causes were noncontributory. Her clinical presentation can be categorized as partial overlap between Harlequin syndrome and Holmes-Adie syndrome. PMID:22638078

  6. A switch from constitutive chemical defence to inducible innate immune responses in the invasive ladybird Harmonia axyridis.

    PubMed

    Schmidtberg, Henrike; Röhrich, Christian; Vogel, Heiko; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2013-06-23

    The harlequin ladybird, Harmonia axyridis, has emerged as a model species for invasion biology, reflecting its remarkable capacity to outcompete native ladybird species when introduced into new habitats. This ability may be associated with its prominent resistance to pathogens and intraguild predation. We recently showed that the constitutive antibacterial activity present in the haemolymph of H. axyridis beetles can be attributed to the chemical defence compound harmonine. Here, we demonstrate that H. axyridis differs from other insects, including the native ladybird Coccinella septempunctata, by reducing rather than increasing the antimicrobial activity of its haemolymph following the injection of bacteria. However, both species produce new or more abundant proteins in the haemolymph, indicating that bacterial challenge induces innate immune responses associated with the synthesis of immunity-related proteins. Our results suggest that H. axyridis beetles can switch from constitutive chemical defence to inducible innate immune responses, supporting hypothesis that inducible antimicrobial peptides protect host beetles against pathogens that survive constitutive defences. These alternative antimicrobial defence mechanisms may reflect a trade-off resulting from fitness-related costs associated with the simultaneous synthesis of harmonine and antimicrobial peptides/proteins. PMID:23466480

  7. A switch from constitutive chemical defence to inducible innate immune responses in the invasive ladybird Harmonia axyridis.

    PubMed

    Schmidtberg, Henrike; Röhrich, Christian; Vogel, Heiko; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2013-06-23

    The harlequin ladybird, Harmonia axyridis, has emerged as a model species for invasion biology, reflecting its remarkable capacity to outcompete native ladybird species when introduced into new habitats. This ability may be associated with its prominent resistance to pathogens and intraguild predation. We recently showed that the constitutive antibacterial activity present in the haemolymph of H. axyridis beetles can be attributed to the chemical defence compound harmonine. Here, we demonstrate that H. axyridis differs from other insects, including the native ladybird Coccinella septempunctata, by reducing rather than increasing the antimicrobial activity of its haemolymph following the injection of bacteria. However, both species produce new or more abundant proteins in the haemolymph, indicating that bacterial challenge induces innate immune responses associated with the synthesis of immunity-related proteins. Our results suggest that H. axyridis beetles can switch from constitutive chemical defence to inducible innate immune responses, supporting hypothesis that inducible antimicrobial peptides protect host beetles against pathogens that survive constitutive defences. These alternative antimicrobial defence mechanisms may reflect a trade-off resulting from fitness-related costs associated with the simultaneous synthesis of harmonine and antimicrobial peptides/proteins.

  8. Expansion of the antimicrobial peptide repertoire in the invasive ladybird Harmonia axyridis.

    PubMed

    Vilcinskas, Andreas; Mukherjee, Krishnendu; Vogel, Heiko

    2013-01-01

    The harlequin ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis has emerged as a model species in invasion biology because of its strong resistance against pathogens and remarkable capacity to outcompete native ladybirds. The invasive success of the species may reflect its well-adapted immune system, a hypothesis we tested by analysing the transcriptome and characterizing the immune gene repertoire of untreated beetles and those challenged with bacteria and fungi. We found that most H. axyridis immunity-related genes were similar in diversity to their counterparts in the reference beetle Tribolium castaneum, but there was an unprecedented expansion among genes encoding antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs). We identified more than 50 putative AMPs belonging to seven different gene families, and many of the corresponding genes were shown by quantitative real-time RT-PCR to be induced in the immune-stimulated beetles. AMPs with the highest induction ratio in the challenged beetles were shown to demonstrate broad and potent activity against Gram-negative bacteria and entomopathogenic fungi. The invasive success of H. axyridis can therefore be attributed at least in part to the greater efficiency of its immune system, particularly the expansion of AMP gene families and their induction in response to pathogens. PMID:23173204

  9. Expansion of the antimicrobial peptide repertoire in the invasive ladybird Harmonia axyridis.

    PubMed

    Vilcinskas, Andreas; Mukherjee, Krishnendu; Vogel, Heiko

    2013-01-01

    The harlequin ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis has emerged as a model species in invasion biology because of its strong resistance against pathogens and remarkable capacity to outcompete native ladybirds. The invasive success of the species may reflect its well-adapted immune system, a hypothesis we tested by analysing the transcriptome and characterizing the immune gene repertoire of untreated beetles and those challenged with bacteria and fungi. We found that most H. axyridis immunity-related genes were similar in diversity to their counterparts in the reference beetle Tribolium castaneum, but there was an unprecedented expansion among genes encoding antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs). We identified more than 50 putative AMPs belonging to seven different gene families, and many of the corresponding genes were shown by quantitative real-time RT-PCR to be induced in the immune-stimulated beetles. AMPs with the highest induction ratio in the challenged beetles were shown to demonstrate broad and potent activity against Gram-negative bacteria and entomopathogenic fungi. The invasive success of H. axyridis can therefore be attributed at least in part to the greater efficiency of its immune system, particularly the expansion of AMP gene families and their induction in response to pathogens.

  10. Botulinum toxin for treatment of Harlequin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Manhães, Roberta K J V; Spitz, Mariana; Vasconcellos, Luiz Felipe

    2016-02-01

    We described a patient with Harlequin syndrome, a rare neurological condition, characterized by unilateral facial sweating and flushing, who had a good response to botulinum toxin application. She had been submitted to sympathectomy a few years, however she still complained of excessive sweating in the regions mentioned and intense flushing. PMID:26750113

  11. Comment on "Invasive harlequin ladybird carries biological weapons against native competitors".

    PubMed

    Solter, Leellen F; Kyei-Poku, George K; Johny, Shajahan

    2013-09-20

    Conclusions about the nontarget effects of putatively invasive pathogens should be based on biologically relevant data. We disagree that the research experiments on a microsporidium isolated from Harmonia axyridis conducted by Vilcinskas et al. (Reports, 17 May 2013, p. 862) can explain the decline of native coccinellid species in the absence of such data. PMID:24052291

  12. Comment on "Invasive harlequin ladybird carries biological weapons against native competitors".

    PubMed

    Solter, Leellen F; Kyei-Poku, George K; Johny, Shajahan

    2013-09-20

    Conclusions about the nontarget effects of putatively invasive pathogens should be based on biologically relevant data. We disagree that the research experiments on a microsporidium isolated from Harmonia axyridis conducted by Vilcinskas et al. (Reports, 17 May 2013, p. 862) can explain the decline of native coccinellid species in the absence of such data.

  13. The "harlequin" sign and congenital Horner's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, D A; Bibby, K; Woodruff, G

    1997-01-01

    When trying to establish the likely anatomical site (preganglionic or postganglionic) of a lesion causing congenital Horner's syndrome, the distribution of facial flushing (the "harlequin" sign), may be seen. In babies and young children, facial flushing is a relatively simple clinical sign to demonstrate, compared with facial sweating. In unilateral facial flushing the areas that do not flush are almost always identical to the anhidrotic areas. However, neither facial flushing nor testing the pupil reactions with pholedrine or hydroxyamphetamine can be relied on to predict the probable site of any lesion causing congenital Horner's syndrome. Two patients with congenital Horner's syndrome are presented which demonstrated the "harlequin" sign and in whom clinical examination and pharmacological testing gave conflicting evidence for localisation of the site of the causative lesion. The presentation of congenital Horner's syndrome should be investigated and include MRI or CT to exclude a serious underlying cause. Images PMID:9219751

  14. Reproduction in Risky Environments: The Role of Invasive Egg Predators in Ladybird Laying Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Sarah C.; Pell, Judith K.; Blount, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Reproductive environments are variable and the resources available for reproduction are finite. If reliable cues about the environment exist, mothers can alter offspring phenotype in a way that increases both offspring and maternal fitness (‘anticipatory maternal effects’—AMEs). Strategic use of AMEs is likely to be important in chemically defended species, where the risk of offspring predation may be modulated by maternal investment in offspring toxin level, albeit at some cost to mothers. Whether mothers adjust offspring toxin levels in response to variation in predation risk is, however, unknown, but is likely to be important when assessing the response of chemically defended species to the recent and pervasive changes in the global predator landscape, driven by the spread of invasive species. Using the chemically defended two-spot ladybird, Adalia bipunctata, we investigated reproductive investment, including egg toxin level, under conditions that varied in the degree of simulated offspring predation risk from larval harlequin ladybirds, Harmonia axyridis. H. axyridis is a highly voracious alien invasive species in the UK and a significant intraguild predator of A. bipunctata. Females laid fewer, larger egg clusters, under conditions of simulated predation risk (P+) than when predator cues were absent (P-), but there was no difference in toxin level between the two treatments. Among P- females, when mean cluster size increased there were concomitant increases in both the mass and toxin concentration of eggs, however when P+ females increased cluster size there was no corresponding increase in egg toxin level. We conclude that, in the face of offspring predation risk, females either withheld toxins or were physiologically constrained, leading to a trade-off between cluster size and egg toxin level. Our results provide the first demonstration that the risk of offspring predation by a novel invasive predator can influence maternal investment in toxins within

  15. Reproduction in Risky Environments: The Role of Invasive Egg Predators in Ladybird Laying Strategies.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sarah C; Pell, Judith K; Blount, Jonathan D

    2015-01-01

    Reproductive environments are variable and the resources available for reproduction are finite. If reliable cues about the environment exist, mothers can alter offspring phenotype in a way that increases both offspring and maternal fitness ('anticipatory maternal effects'-AMEs). Strategic use of AMEs is likely to be important in chemically defended species, where the risk of offspring predation may be modulated by maternal investment in offspring toxin level, albeit at some cost to mothers. Whether mothers adjust offspring toxin levels in response to variation in predation risk is, however, unknown, but is likely to be important when assessing the response of chemically defended species to the recent and pervasive changes in the global predator landscape, driven by the spread of invasive species. Using the chemically defended two-spot ladybird, Adalia bipunctata, we investigated reproductive investment, including egg toxin level, under conditions that varied in the degree of simulated offspring predation risk from larval harlequin ladybirds, Harmonia axyridis. H. axyridis is a highly voracious alien invasive species in the UK and a significant intraguild predator of A. bipunctata. Females laid fewer, larger egg clusters, under conditions of simulated predation risk (P+) than when predator cues were absent (P-), but there was no difference in toxin level between the two treatments. Among P- females, when mean cluster size increased there were concomitant increases in both the mass and toxin concentration of eggs, however when P+ females increased cluster size there was no corresponding increase in egg toxin level. We conclude that, in the face of offspring predation risk, females either withheld toxins or were physiologically constrained, leading to a trade-off between cluster size and egg toxin level. Our results provide the first demonstration that the risk of offspring predation by a novel invasive predator can influence maternal investment in toxins within their

  16. Reproduction in Risky Environments: The Role of Invasive Egg Predators in Ladybird Laying Strategies.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sarah C; Pell, Judith K; Blount, Jonathan D

    2015-01-01

    Reproductive environments are variable and the resources available for reproduction are finite. If reliable cues about the environment exist, mothers can alter offspring phenotype in a way that increases both offspring and maternal fitness ('anticipatory maternal effects'-AMEs). Strategic use of AMEs is likely to be important in chemically defended species, where the risk of offspring predation may be modulated by maternal investment in offspring toxin level, albeit at some cost to mothers. Whether mothers adjust offspring toxin levels in response to variation in predation risk is, however, unknown, but is likely to be important when assessing the response of chemically defended species to the recent and pervasive changes in the global predator landscape, driven by the spread of invasive species. Using the chemically defended two-spot ladybird, Adalia bipunctata, we investigated reproductive investment, including egg toxin level, under conditions that varied in the degree of simulated offspring predation risk from larval harlequin ladybirds, Harmonia axyridis. H. axyridis is a highly voracious alien invasive species in the UK and a significant intraguild predator of A. bipunctata. Females laid fewer, larger egg clusters, under conditions of simulated predation risk (P+) than when predator cues were absent (P-), but there was no difference in toxin level between the two treatments. Among P- females, when mean cluster size increased there were concomitant increases in both the mass and toxin concentration of eggs, however when P+ females increased cluster size there was no corresponding increase in egg toxin level. We conclude that, in the face of offspring predation risk, females either withheld toxins or were physiologically constrained, leading to a trade-off between cluster size and egg toxin level. Our results provide the first demonstration that the risk of offspring predation by a novel invasive predator can influence maternal investment in toxins within their

  17. Do wintering Harlequin Ducks forage nocturnally at high latitudes?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rizzolo, D.J.; Esler, Daniel; Roby, D.D.; Jarvis, R.L.

    2005-01-01

    We monitored radio-tagged Harlequin Ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) to determine whether nocturnal feeding was part of their foraging strategy during winter in south-central Alaska. Despite attributes of our study site (low ambient temperatures, harsh weather, short day length) and study species (small body size, high daytime foraging rates) that would be expected to favor nocturnal foraging, we found no evidence of nocturnal dive-feeding. Signals from eight radio-tagged Harlequin Ducks never exhibited signal loss due to diving during a total of 780 minutes of nocturnal monitoring. In contrast, the same eight birds exhibited signal loss during 62 ± 7% (SE) of 5-minute diurnal monitoring periods (total of 365 minutes of monitoring). Our results suggest that Harlequin Ducks in south-central Alaska face a stringent time constraint on daytime foraging during midwinter. Harlequin Ducks wintering at high latitudes, therefore, may be particularly sensitive to factors that increase foraging requirements or decrease foraging efficiency.

  18. A well protected intruder: the effective antimicrobial defense of the invasive ladybird Harmonia axyridis.

    PubMed

    Gross, Jürgen; Eben, Astrid; Müller, Ina; Wensing, Annette

    2010-11-01

    The harlequin ladybird Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is a polyphagous predatory beetle native to Central and Eastern Asia. Since 2007 it has established all over Central Europe. In order to elucidate which defense strategy is responsible for its high resistance to diseases, we tested hemolymph as well as eleven main components of the headspace of H. axyridis for antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis, B. thuringiensis ssp. tenebrionis, Micrococcus luteus) and Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). While three of the volatile compounds weakly reduced the growth of microorganisms, hemolymph of adults and larvae of H. axyridis strongly inhibited the growth of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as yeast. Furthermore, we compared the antimicrobial activity in the hemolymph of H. axyridis and Coccinella septempunctata. Antimicrobial activity in H. axyridis was about a thousand times higher compared to hemolymph from C. septempunctata. In contrast to C. septempunctata, the antimicrobial activity in H. axyridis was present without prior challenge. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the hemolymph of H. axyridis was lowest against E. coli and yeast followed by B. subtilis, and was highest against entomopathogenic B. thuringiensis ssp. tenebrionidae. Furthermore, MIC values of the hemolymph obtained from live beetles were significantly lower than from frozen insects. This suggests that the active antimicrobial compound is affected by freezing and subsequent thawing of the beetles. Potential implications of our findings for the competitive advantages of H. axyridis over C. septempunctata are discussed.

  19. Predation of Ladybird Beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) by Amphibians

    PubMed Central

    Sloggett, John J.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of predation of ladybird beetles (Coccinellidae) have focused on a limited number of predator taxa, such as birds and ants, while other potential predators have received limited attention. I here consider amphibians as predators of ladybirds. Published amphibian gut analyses show that ladybirds are quite often eaten by frogs and toads (Anura), with recorded frequencies reaching up to 15% of dietary items. Salamanders (Caudata) eat ladybirds less frequently, probably as their habits less often bring them into contact with the beetles. Amphibians do not appear to be deleteriously affected by the potentially toxic alkaloids that ladybirds possess. Amphibians, especially frogs and toads, use primarily prey movement as a release cue to attack their food; it is thus likely that their ability to discriminate against ladybirds and other chemically defended prey is limited. Because of this poor discriminatory power, amphibians have apparently evolved non-specific resistance to prey defensive chemicals, including ladybird alkaloids. Although amphibian-related ladybird mortality is limited, in certain habitats it could outweigh mortality from more frequently studied predators, notably birds. The gut analyses from the herpetological literature used in this study, suggest that in studying predation of insects, entomologists should consider specialized literature on other animal groups. PMID:26466621

  20. Predation of Ladybird Beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) by Amphibians.

    PubMed

    Sloggett, John J

    2012-01-01

    Studies of predation of ladybird beetles (Coccinellidae) have focused on a limited number of predator taxa, such as birds and ants, while other potential predators have received limited attention. I here consider amphibians as predators of ladybirds. Published amphibian gut analyses show that ladybirds are quite often eaten by frogs and toads (Anura), with recorded frequencies reaching up to 15% of dietary items. Salamanders (Caudata) eat ladybirds less frequently, probably as their habits less often bring them into contact with the beetles. Amphibians do not appear to be deleteriously affected by the potentially toxic alkaloids that ladybirds possess. Amphibians, especially frogs and toads, use primarily prey movement as a release cue to attack their food; it is thus likely that their ability to discriminate against ladybirds and other chemically defended prey is limited. Because of this poor discriminatory power, amphibians have apparently evolved non-specific resistance to prey defensive chemicals, including ladybird alkaloids. Although amphibian-related ladybird mortality is limited, in certain habitats it could outweigh mortality from more frequently studied predators, notably birds. The gut analyses from the herpetological literature used in this study, suggest that in studying predation of insects, entomologists should consider specialized literature on other animal groups.

  1. Harlequin syndrome: two new cases and a management proposal.

    PubMed

    Willaert, W I M; Scheltinga, M R M; Steenhuisen, S F; Hiel, J A P

    2009-09-01

    The Harlequin syndrome is a rare autonomic disorder, characterized by unilateral diminished sweating and flushing of the face in response to heat or exercise. We present two new cases and evaluate the data of 83 patients described in the literature. We provide diagnostic and therapeutic guidelines. PMID:19902816

  2. Harlequin ichthyosis in a neonate born with assisted reproductive technology: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Farhadi, Roya; Kazemi, Seyyed Habib

    2013-01-01

    Harlequin ichthyosis is a rare and the most severe form of congenital ichthyosis. Although prenatal diagnosis isdifficult for this disorder, recently, this obstacle has markedly improved with the use of DNA-based prenataldiagnosis. Here in, we presented a neonate with harlequin ichthyosis born by assisted reproductive technology(ART). In this case, the diagnosis of harlequin ichthyosis was not established by conventional prenatal screening. PMID:24926185

  3. Ladybirds as Teaching Aids: 1 Collecting and Culturing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majerus, M. E. N.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Described are methods for locating, collecting and culturing ladybird beetles. Included are necessary equipment for feeding and breeding the insects and modifications for various species found in Great Britain. Overwintering spots of various species are also listed. (CW)

  4. Mixed release of two parasitoids and a polyphagous ladybird as a potential strategy to control the tobacco whitefly Bemisia tabaci

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiaoling; Hu, Nana; Zhang, Fan; Ramirez-Romero, Ricardo; Desneux, Nicolas; Wang, Su; Ge, Feng

    2016-01-01

    A mixed species release of parasitoids is used to suppress outbreaks of tobacco whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae); however, this biocontrol may be inhibited by interspecific interactions. We investigated the effects of mixed releases of natural enemies of B. tabaci on predation rates, parasite performance and adult parasitoid emergence under greenhouse conditions. We tested the polyphagous predatory ladybird Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) and two whitefly-specific parasitoids, namely Encarsia formosa and Encarsia sophia (both, Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae). Harmonia axyridis exhibited the lowest rates of predation when released with each parasitoid than with both parasitoid species together and showed a significant preference for non-parasitized nymphs as prey. Both E. formosa and E. sophia parasitized more B. tabaci when released with the ladybird than when the wasps were released either alone or mixed with the other parasitoid. We also found that the presence of H. axyridis significantly reduced adult parasitoid emergence; the highest rate of adult emergence was obtained with parasitoids released alone. Our results indicate that different combinations of natural enemies can influence observed rates of predation, parasitism, and parasitoid emergence. Therefore, the combination of natural enemies to be used for a particular biological control program should depend on the specific objectives. PMID:27312174

  5. Mixed release of two parasitoids and a polyphagous ladybird as a potential strategy to control the tobacco whitefly Bemisia tabaci.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaoling; Hu, Nana; Zhang, Fan; Ramirez-Romero, Ricardo; Desneux, Nicolas; Wang, Su; Ge, Feng

    2016-01-01

    A mixed species release of parasitoids is used to suppress outbreaks of tobacco whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae); however, this biocontrol may be inhibited by interspecific interactions. We investigated the effects of mixed releases of natural enemies of B. tabaci on predation rates, parasite performance and adult parasitoid emergence under greenhouse conditions. We tested the polyphagous predatory ladybird Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) and two whitefly-specific parasitoids, namely Encarsia formosa and Encarsia sophia (both, Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae). Harmonia axyridis exhibited the lowest rates of predation when released with each parasitoid than with both parasitoid species together and showed a significant preference for non-parasitized nymphs as prey. Both E. formosa and E. sophia parasitized more B. tabaci when released with the ladybird than when the wasps were released either alone or mixed with the other parasitoid. We also found that the presence of H. axyridis significantly reduced adult parasitoid emergence; the highest rate of adult emergence was obtained with parasitoids released alone. Our results indicate that different combinations of natural enemies can influence observed rates of predation, parasitism, and parasitoid emergence. Therefore, the combination of natural enemies to be used for a particular biological control program should depend on the specific objectives. PMID:27312174

  6. Facial features in Harlequin ichthyosis: Clinical findings about 4 cases.

    PubMed

    Kün-Darbois, J-D; Molin, A; Jeanne-Pasquier, C; Paré, A; Bénateau, H; Veyssière, A

    2016-02-01

    We report 4 cases of Harlequin ichthyosis, which is a rare and severe congenital ichthyosis involving the face. Facial appearance consists in severe ectropion, conjonctival edema, eclabium, flattened ears, broadened nose and large, thick, plate-like skin scales. Recent advances in neonatal care have been made, such as retinoid therapy, and have led to an increased survival rate. Early surgical correction of ectropion may be required because of ocular complications. PMID:26740202

  7. Commercialization and implementation of biocontrol.

    PubMed

    Fravel, D R

    2005-01-01

    Although the number of biocontrol products is increasing, these products still represent only about 1% of agricultural chemical sales. Yet these are important contributions because biocontrol agents offer disease management alternatives with different mechanisms of action than chemical pesticides. Trends in research include the increased use of biorational screening processes to identify microorganisms with potential for biocontrol, increased testing under semicommercial and commercial production conditions, increased emphasis on combining biocontrol strains with each other and with other control methods, integrating biocontrol into an overall system.

  8. Obstetric anesthesia for harlequin ichthyosis: a unique challenge.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Thea; Rosenbaum, Eric R; Lienhart, Kristen L; Choate, Andrea I

    2015-01-15

    Harlequin ichthyosis (HI) is a rare disorder of defective lipid transport resulting in severe epidermal hyperkeratosis producing large plate-like scales. Although mortality is high, improved treatments have allowed some with HI to survive into their third and fourth decades. However, until this case, there have been no known reports of pregnancy followed by birth of a healthy neonate to a mother with HI. We report one of the only approximately 25 known current HI survivors worldwide unique in having carried a pregnancy to full term and outline challenges for the anesthesiologist during labor and delivery. PMID:25611001

  9. Effects of ACTH, capture, and short term confinement on glucocorticoid concentrations in harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nilsson, P.B.; Hollmén, Tuula E.; Atkinson, S.; Mashburn, K.L.; Tuomi, P.A.; Esler, Daniel; Mulcahy, D.M.; Rizzolo, D.J.

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about baseline concentrations of adrenal hormones and hormonal responses to stress in sea ducks, although significant population declines documented in several species suggest that sea ducks are exposed to increased levels of environmental stress. Such declines have been observed in geographically distinct harlequin duck populations. We performed an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) challenge to evaluate adrenal function and characterize corticosterone concentrations in captive harlequin ducks and investigated the effects of capture, surgery, and short term confinement on corticosterone concentrations in wild harlequin ducks. Harlequin ducks responded to the ACTH challenge with an average three-fold increase in serum corticosterone concentration approximately 90??min post injection, and a four- to five-fold increase in fecal glucocorticoid concentration 2 to 4??h post injection. Serum corticosterone concentrations in wild harlequin ducks increased within min of capture and elevated levels were found for several hours post capture, indicating that surgery and confinement maintain elevated corticosterone concentrations in this species. Mean corticosterone concentrations in wild harlequin ducks held in temporary captivity were similar to the maximum response levels during the ACTH challenge in captive birds. However, large variation among individuals was observed in responses of wild birds, and we found additional evidence suggesting that corticosterone responses varied between hatch year and after hatch year birds. ?? 2008.

  10. Fetal inhibition of inflammation improves disease phenotypes in harlequin ichthyosis.

    PubMed

    Cottle, Denny L; Ursino, Gloria M A; Ip, Sally Chi Ieng; Jones, Lynelle K; Ditommaso, Tia; Hacking, Douglas F; Mangan, Niamh E; Mellett, Natalie A; Henley, Katya J; Sviridov, Dmitri; Nold-Petry, Claudia A; Nold, Marcel F; Meikle, Peter J; Kile, Benjamin T; Smyth, Ian M

    2015-01-15

    Harlequin ichthyosis (HI) is a severe skin disease which leads to neonatal death in ∼50% of cases. It is the result of mutations in ABCA12, a protein that transports lipids required to establish the protective skin barrier needed after birth. To better understand the life-threatening newborn HI phenotype, we analysed the developing epidermis for consequences of lipid dysregulation in mouse models. We observed a pro-inflammatory signature which was characterized by chemokine upregulation in embryonic skin which is distinct from that seen in other types of ichthyosis. Inflammation also persisted in grafted HI skin. To examine the contribution of inflammation to disease development, we overexpressed interleukin-37b to globally suppress fetal inflammation, observing considerable improvements in keratinocyte differentiation. These studies highlight inflammation as an unexpected contributor to HI disease development in utero, and suggest that inhibiting inflammation may reduce disease severity. PMID:25209981

  11. Fetal inhibition of inflammation improves disease phenotypes in harlequin ichthyosis.

    PubMed

    Cottle, Denny L; Ursino, Gloria M A; Ip, Sally Chi Ieng; Jones, Lynelle K; Ditommaso, Tia; Hacking, Douglas F; Mangan, Niamh E; Mellett, Natalie A; Henley, Katya J; Sviridov, Dmitri; Nold-Petry, Claudia A; Nold, Marcel F; Meikle, Peter J; Kile, Benjamin T; Smyth, Ian M

    2015-01-15

    Harlequin ichthyosis (HI) is a severe skin disease which leads to neonatal death in ∼50% of cases. It is the result of mutations in ABCA12, a protein that transports lipids required to establish the protective skin barrier needed after birth. To better understand the life-threatening newborn HI phenotype, we analysed the developing epidermis for consequences of lipid dysregulation in mouse models. We observed a pro-inflammatory signature which was characterized by chemokine upregulation in embryonic skin which is distinct from that seen in other types of ichthyosis. Inflammation also persisted in grafted HI skin. To examine the contribution of inflammation to disease development, we overexpressed interleukin-37b to globally suppress fetal inflammation, observing considerable improvements in keratinocyte differentiation. These studies highlight inflammation as an unexpected contributor to HI disease development in utero, and suggest that inhibiting inflammation may reduce disease severity.

  12. Harlequin ichthyosis: a case report of prolonged survival.

    PubMed

    Mithwani, Anwar A; Hashmi, Asif; Shahnawaz, Shahid; Al Ghamdi, Yasser

    2014-01-01

    Harlequin ichthyosis (HI) is a rare type of congenital ichthyosis associated with poor survival. We report, with photographic record, a male baby born with HI. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of HI in Saudi Arabia, where the child has survived beyond 7 years. The baby was born at 37 weeks of gestation from consanguineous parents with no inherited skin disorder in the family. The mother was 28 years old with three normal previous pregnancies and healthy babies. At birth, the baby's skin had thick scales separated by deep fissuring. He was managed in intensive care with supportive treatment and frequent application of lubricants, emollients and urea cream. The skin gradually became softened, and began to shed after 6 weeks. After 8 months of inpatient management, he was discharged. He is currently 7 years old and is still being treated for non-bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma. PMID:24717853

  13. Marking and retention of harlequin bug, Murgantia histrionica (Hahn) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), on pheromone baited and unbaited plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Harlequin bug (HB) is an important pest of cole crops in the USA. The sap-sucking adults and nymphs feed on aboveground plant tissues, and can seriously damage the host. Current control measures on cole crops target mainly lepidopteran pests, and the products generally used do not control harlequin ...

  14. Attraction of harlequin bug (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) to male-produced pheromone and host plants in the field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The harlequin bug is a serious stink bug pest of cruciferous vegetables. New tools are needed for vegetable growers to manage this pest with reduced or no pesticide inputs. We investigated attractants for harlequin bugs as part of a larger project to develop new traps or trap crops to manage this ...

  15. Host plant preference of harlequin bug (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), and evaluation of a trap cropping strategy for its control in collard.

    PubMed

    Wallingford, Anna K; Kuhar, Thomas P; Pfeiffer, Douglas G; Tholl, Dorothea B; Freeman, Joshua H; Doughty, Hélène B; Schultz, Peter B

    2013-02-01

    Harlequin bug, Murgantia histrionica (Hahn) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), is a piercing-sucking pest of cole crops, causing cosmetic damage in low populations, while heavy pest pressure can kill plants or entire fields. Field studies were conducted to evaluate a trap crop for control of harlequin bug in collard. Field-cage choice tests found that potential trap crop plant species, mustard (Brassica juncea 'Southern Giant Curled'), rapeseed (B. napus 'Athena'), rapini (B. rapa), and arugula (Eruca satica) attracted more harlequin bugs than collard (B. oleracea 'Champion') and a nonbrassica control, bean (Phaseolus vulgaris'Bronco'). Mustard was the most consistently selected by harlequin bug over collard in choice tests, and was found to be an effective trap crop for reducing feeding injury on collard at two experimental sites. Augmentation of the mustard trap crop with a systemic, neonicotinoid insecticide provided no added control of harlequin bug for the 10 wk duration in the spring season.

  16. Host plant preference of harlequin bug (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), and evaluation of a trap cropping strategy for its control in collard.

    PubMed

    Wallingford, Anna K; Kuhar, Thomas P; Pfeiffer, Douglas G; Tholl, Dorothea B; Freeman, Joshua H; Doughty, Hélène B; Schultz, Peter B

    2013-02-01

    Harlequin bug, Murgantia histrionica (Hahn) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), is a piercing-sucking pest of cole crops, causing cosmetic damage in low populations, while heavy pest pressure can kill plants or entire fields. Field studies were conducted to evaluate a trap crop for control of harlequin bug in collard. Field-cage choice tests found that potential trap crop plant species, mustard (Brassica juncea 'Southern Giant Curled'), rapeseed (B. napus 'Athena'), rapini (B. rapa), and arugula (Eruca satica) attracted more harlequin bugs than collard (B. oleracea 'Champion') and a nonbrassica control, bean (Phaseolus vulgaris'Bronco'). Mustard was the most consistently selected by harlequin bug over collard in choice tests, and was found to be an effective trap crop for reducing feeding injury on collard at two experimental sites. Augmentation of the mustard trap crop with a systemic, neonicotinoid insecticide provided no added control of harlequin bug for the 10 wk duration in the spring season. PMID:23448042

  17. Polyazamacrolides from ladybird beetles: ring-size selective oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, F C; Smedley, S R; Gibbons, L K; Farmer, J J; Attygalle, A B; Eisner, T; Meinwald, J

    1998-11-10

    The pupal defensive secretion of the 24-pointed ladybird beetle, Subcoccinella vigintiquatuorpunctata, consists of a mixture of macrocyclic polyamines, dominated by the three dimeric, 30-membered macrocycles 11-13, derived from the two building blocks 11-(2-hydoxyethylamino)-5-tetradecenoic acid (9) and 11-(2-hydoxyethylamino)-5,8-tetradecadienoic acid (10). Smaller amounts of the four possible cyclic trimers of 9 and 10 were also detected, corresponding to 45-membered macrocycles. Structural assignments were based on NMR-spectroscopic investigations and HPLC-MS analyses. In addition, the all-S absolute configuration of the S. vigintiquatuorpunctata macrocycles was determined by comparison of derivatives of the natural material with enantiomerically pure synthetic samples. Comparing this alkaloid mixture with that of the pupal defensive secretion in related ladybird beetle species indicates that the degree of oligomerization of the 2-hydroxyethylamino carboxylic acid building blocks can be carefully controlled by the insects.

  18. Harlequin Ichthyosis: Prenatal Diagnosis of a Rare Yet Severe Genetic Dermatosis

    PubMed Central

    David, Liji Sarah; Beck, Manisha Madhai; Bindra, Mandeep Singh; Arunachal, Gautham

    2015-01-01

    Harlequin Ichthyosis (HI) is an extremely rare genetic skin disorder. It is the most severe type of ichthyosis. It is characterized by thickened, dry, rough and armor like plates of skin with deep cracks in between. Alternative names for HI include- keratosis diffusafetalis, ichthyosis congenital, icthyosis fetalis, harlequin fetus and icthyosis congenital gravior. It is an autosomal recessive disorder with the majority of affected individuals being homozygous for mutation in the ABCA 12 gene. This condition presents with a wide range of severity and symptoms. Affected neonates usually do not survive beyond first few days of life. We are presenting prenatal diagnosis of a case of this rare condition. PMID:26675324

  19. Harlequin ichthyosis: a case report of prolonged survival

    PubMed Central

    Mithwani, Anwar A; Hashmi, Asif; Shahnawaz, Shahid; Al Ghamdi, Yasser

    2014-01-01

    Harlequin ichthyosis (HI) is a rare type of congenital ichthyosis associated with poor survival. We report, with photographic record, a male baby born with HI. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of HI in Saudi Arabia, where the child has survived beyond 7 years. The baby was born at 37 weeks of gestation from consanguineous parents with no inherited skin disorder in the family. The mother was 28 years old with three normal previous pregnancies and healthy babies. At birth, the baby's skin had thick scales separated by deep fissuring. He was managed in intensive care with supportive treatment and frequent application of lubricants, emollients and urea cream. The skin gradually became softened, and began to shed after 6 weeks. After 8 months of inpatient management, he was discharged. He is currently 7 years old and is still being treated for non-bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma. PMID:24717853

  20. Harlequin ichthyosis in an infant born to a father with eczema.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Saba; Rafiq, Ali; Majid, Zain

    2015-04-01

    Harlequin ichthyosis is characterized by thickening of the layer of the skin which contains keratin. Eczema is a chronic relapsing skin disorder which is also associated with disrupted epidermal barrier. We report the case of a 6-hour-old male patient who was brought to the neonatal intensive care unit of our hospital with crusting skin lesions all over the body, presence of a severe ectropion and deranged electrolytes. A diagnosis of harlequin ichthyosis was made, and the neonate was managed accordingly. However, the infant eventually expired on the seventh day of life. The infant's father was a patient of eczema with a chronic relapsing course and was on oral steroid therapy. As per our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an infant with harlequin ichthyosis born to a father suffering from eczema. The similarities in the pathogenesis of the two diseases and the genetic mutation of filaggrin might suggest an association between the two conditions. Harlequin ichthyosis can hence be looked out for in infants born of parents with eczema.

  1. PCB exposure in sea otters and harlequin ducks in relation to history of contamination by the Exxon Valdez oil spill

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ricca, Mark A.; Miles, A. Keith; Ballachey, Brenda E.; Bodkin, James L.; Esler, Daniel; Trust, Kimberly A.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to contaminants other than petroleum hydrocarbons could confound interpretation of Exxon Valdez oil spill effects on biota at Prince William Sound, Alaska. Hence, we investigated polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in blood of sea otters and harlequin ducks sampled during 1998. PCB concentrations characterized by lower chlorinated congeners were highest in sea otters from the unoiled area, whereas concentrations were similar among harlequin ducks from the oiled and unoiled area. Blood enzymes often elevated by xenobiotics were not related to PCB concentrations in sea otters. Only sea otters from the unoiled area had estimated risk from PCBs, and PCB composition or concentrations did not correspond to reported lower measures of population performance in sea otters or harlequin ducks from the oiled area. PCBs probably did not influence limited sea otter or harlequin duck recovery in the oiled area a decade after the spill.

  2. PCB exposure in sea otters and harlequin ducks in relation to history of contamination by the Exxon Valdez oil spill.

    PubMed

    Ricca, Mark A; Keith Miles, A; Ballachey, Brenda E; Bodkin, James L; Esler, Daniel; Trust, Kimberly A

    2010-06-01

    Exposure to contaminants other than petroleum hydrocarbons could confound interpretation of Exxon Valdez oil spill effects on biota at Prince William Sound, Alaska. Hence, we investigated polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in blood of sea otters and harlequin ducks sampled during 1998. PCB concentrations characterized by lower chlorinated congeners were highest in sea otters from the unoiled area, whereas concentrations were similar among harlequin ducks from the oiled and unoiled area. Blood enzymes often elevated by xenobiotics were not related to PCB concentrations in sea otters. Only sea otters from the unoiled area had estimated risk from PCBs, and PCB composition or concentrations did not correspond to reported lower measures of population performance in sea otters or harlequin ducks from the oiled area. PCBs probably did not influence limited sea otter or harlequin duck recovery in the oiled area a decade after the spill. PMID:20132952

  3. PCB exposure in sea otters and harlequin ducks in relation to history of contamination by the Exxon Valdez oil spill.

    PubMed

    Ricca, Mark A; Keith Miles, A; Ballachey, Brenda E; Bodkin, James L; Esler, Daniel; Trust, Kimberly A

    2010-06-01

    Exposure to contaminants other than petroleum hydrocarbons could confound interpretation of Exxon Valdez oil spill effects on biota at Prince William Sound, Alaska. Hence, we investigated polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in blood of sea otters and harlequin ducks sampled during 1998. PCB concentrations characterized by lower chlorinated congeners were highest in sea otters from the unoiled area, whereas concentrations were similar among harlequin ducks from the oiled and unoiled area. Blood enzymes often elevated by xenobiotics were not related to PCB concentrations in sea otters. Only sea otters from the unoiled area had estimated risk from PCBs, and PCB composition or concentrations did not correspond to reported lower measures of population performance in sea otters or harlequin ducks from the oiled area. PCBs probably did not influence limited sea otter or harlequin duck recovery in the oiled area a decade after the spill.

  4. Harlequin duck population recovery following the 'Exxon Valdez' oil spill: Progress, process and constraints

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Esler, Daniel; Bowman, T.D.; Trust, K.A.; Ballachey, B.E.; Dean, T.A.; Jewett, S.C.; O'Clair, C. E.

    2002-01-01

    Following the 1989 'Exxon Valdez' oil spill in Prince William Sound, Alaska, we studied the status of recovery of harlequin duck Histrionicus histrionicus populations during 1995 to 1998. We evaluated potential constraints on full recovery, including (1) exposure to residual oil; (2) food limitation; and (3) intrinsic demographic limitations on population growth rates. In this paper, we synthesize the findings from our work and incorporate information from other harlequin duck research and monitoring programs to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the response of this species to the 'Exxon Valdez' spill. We conclude that harlequin duck populations had not fully recovered by 1998. Furthermore, adverse effects continued as many as 9 yr after the oil spill, in contrast to the conventional paradigm that oil spill effects on bird populations are short-lived. These conclusions are based on the findings that (1) elevated cytochrome P450 (CYP1A) induction on oiled areas indicated continued exposure to oil in 1998; (2) adult female winter survival was lower on oiled than unoiled areas during 1995 to 1998; (3) fall population surveys by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game indicated numerical declines in oiled areas during 1995 to 1997; and (4) densities on oiled areas in 1996 and 1997 were lower than expected using models that accounted for effects of habitat attributes. Based on hypothesized links between oil contamination and demography, we suggest that harlequin duck population recovery was constrained primarily by continued oil exposure. Full population recovery will also be delayed by the time necessary for intrinsic population growth to allow return to pre-spill numbers following cessation of residual oil spill effects. Although not all wildlife species were affected by the 'Exxon Valdez' oil spill, and some others may have recovered quickly from any effects, harlequin duck life history characteristics and benthic, nearshore feeding habits make them susceptible to

  5. Nutrition-dependent phenotypes affect sexual selection in a ladybird

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jiaqin; De Clercq, Patrick; Zhang, Yuhong; Wu, Hongsheng; Pan, Chang; Pang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Environmental factors play a crucial role in influencing sexual selection in insects and the evolution of their mating systems. Although it has been reported that sexual selection in insects may change in response to varying environments, the reason for these changes remains poorly understood. Here, we focus on the mate selection process of a ladybird, Cryptolaemus montrouzieri, when experiencing low- and high-nutrition diet regimes both in its larval and adult stages. We found that female ladybirds preferred to mate with males reared under high-nutrition diet regimes, regardless of the nutritional conditions they experienced during their own larval stages, indicating that mate choice of female C. montrouzieri is non-random and phenotype-dependent. Such mate choice may depend on visual cues (body or genitalia size) and/or chemical cues (pheromones). Further, females from high-nutrition larval diet regimes produced more eggs than those from low-nutrition larval diet regimes. In addition, diet regimes during adulthood also exerted strong effects on egg production. In summary, our study provides new insight into the mate choice of C. montrouzieri as affected by seasonal changes in resources, and suggests that food availability may be a driving force in mate choice. PMID:26269214

  6. Nutrition-dependent phenotypes affect sexual selection in a ladybird.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jiaqin; De Clercq, Patrick; Zhang, Yuhong; Wu, Hongsheng; Pan, Chang; Pang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Environmental factors play a crucial role in influencing sexual selection in insects and the evolution of their mating systems. Although it has been reported that sexual selection in insects may change in response to varying environments, the reason for these changes remains poorly understood. Here, we focus on the mate selection process of a ladybird, Cryptolaemus montrouzieri, when experiencing low- and high-nutrition diet regimes both in its larval and adult stages. We found that female ladybirds preferred to mate with males reared under high-nutrition diet regimes, regardless of the nutritional conditions they experienced during their own larval stages, indicating that mate choice of female C. montrouzieri is non-random and phenotype-dependent. Such mate choice may depend on visual cues (body or genitalia size) and/or chemical cues (pheromones). Further, females from high-nutrition larval diet regimes produced more eggs than those from low-nutrition larval diet regimes. In addition, diet regimes during adulthood also exerted strong effects on egg production. In summary, our study provides new insight into the mate choice of C. montrouzieri as affected by seasonal changes in resources, and suggests that food availability may be a driving force in mate choice. PMID:26269214

  7. Nutrition-dependent phenotypes affect sexual selection in a ladybird.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jiaqin; De Clercq, Patrick; Zhang, Yuhong; Wu, Hongsheng; Pan, Chang; Pang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Environmental factors play a crucial role in influencing sexual selection in insects and the evolution of their mating systems. Although it has been reported that sexual selection in insects may change in response to varying environments, the reason for these changes remains poorly understood. Here, we focus on the mate selection process of a ladybird, Cryptolaemus montrouzieri, when experiencing low- and high-nutrition diet regimes both in its larval and adult stages. We found that female ladybirds preferred to mate with males reared under high-nutrition diet regimes, regardless of the nutritional conditions they experienced during their own larval stages, indicating that mate choice of female C. montrouzieri is non-random and phenotype-dependent. Such mate choice may depend on visual cues (body or genitalia size) and/or chemical cues (pheromones). Further, females from high-nutrition larval diet regimes produced more eggs than those from low-nutrition larval diet regimes. In addition, diet regimes during adulthood also exerted strong effects on egg production. In summary, our study provides new insight into the mate choice of C. montrouzieri as affected by seasonal changes in resources, and suggests that food availability may be a driving force in mate choice.

  8. Functional morphology and structural characteristics of wings of the ladybird beetle, Coccinella septempunctata (L.).

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jinwu; Du, Jianxun; Li, Daochun; Zhen, Chong

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, the surface morphology and microstructure of ladybird (Coccinella septempunctata) wings have been used to help design the flapping-wing micro air vehicle (FWMAV). In this study, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to verify the functional roles of the ladybird forewing and hindwing. Surface morphology and the cross-sectional microstructure of the wings are presented. Detailed morphology of ladybird forewings was observed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the composition of the wings was characterized using Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The ladybird forewing may possess different performance characteristics than the beetle, Allomyrina dichotoma. Additionally, the circular holes in the forewing might be important for decreasing the weight of the forewing and to satisfy requirements of mechanical behavior. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:550-556, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Functional morphology and structural characteristics of wings of the ladybird beetle, Coccinella septempunctata (L.).

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jinwu; Du, Jianxun; Li, Daochun; Zhen, Chong

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, the surface morphology and microstructure of ladybird (Coccinella septempunctata) wings have been used to help design the flapping-wing micro air vehicle (FWMAV). In this study, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to verify the functional roles of the ladybird forewing and hindwing. Surface morphology and the cross-sectional microstructure of the wings are presented. Detailed morphology of ladybird forewings was observed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the composition of the wings was characterized using Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The ladybird forewing may possess different performance characteristics than the beetle, Allomyrina dichotoma. Additionally, the circular holes in the forewing might be important for decreasing the weight of the forewing and to satisfy requirements of mechanical behavior. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:550-556, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27111868

  10. Ladybirds as Teaching Aids: 2. Potential for Practical and Project Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majerus, M. E. N.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Presented are several ideas for projects involving ladybird beetles. Discussed is background information about the insects; and projects involving life histories, intra-specific variation, taxonomy, genetics, behavior, ecology, habitat surveys, population biology, and overwintering biology. Lists 12 references. (CW)

  11. Bacteriophage biocontrol of foodborne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Mustafa; Annapure, Uday S

    2016-03-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that only infect bacterial cells. Phages are categorized based on the type of their life cycle, the lytic cycle cause lysis of the bacterium with the release of multiple phage particles where as in lysogenic phase the phage DNA is incorporated into the bacterial genome. Lysogeny does not result in lysis of the host. Lytic phages have several potential applications in the food industry as biocontrol agents, biopreservatives and as tools for detecting pathogens. They have also been proposed as alternatives to antibiotics in animal health. Two unique features of phage relevant for food safety are that they are harmless to mammalian cells and high host specificity, keeping the natural microbiota undisturbed. However, the recent approval of bacteriophages as food additives has opened the discussion about 'edible viruses'. This article reviews in detail the application of phages for the control of foodborne pathogens in a process known as "biocontrol". PMID:27570260

  12. Attractiveness of harlequin bug, Murgantia histrionica, aggregation pheromone: field response to isomers, ratios, and dose.

    PubMed

    Weber, Donald C; Cabrera Walsh, Guillermo; DiMeglio, Anthony S; Athanas, Michael M; Leskey, Tracy C; Khrimian, Ashot

    2014-12-01

    A two-component pheromone, (3S,6S,7R,10S)- and (3S,6S,7R,10R)-10,11-epoxy-1-bisabolen-3-ol (murgantiol), present in emissions from adult male harlequin bugs, Murgantia histrionica, is most attractive in field bioassays to adults and nymphs in the naturally occurring ratio of ca. 1.4:1. Each of the two individual synthetic stereoisomers is highly attractive to male and female adults and nymphs, but is more attractive in combination and when deployed with a harlequin bug host plant. Blends of 8 stereoisomers also are highly attractive, suggesting that isomers not found in the natural pheromone are not repellent. Deployment of an inexpensive non-stereospecific synthetic pheromone holds promise for efficient trapping and/or use in trap-crops for this important pest in North America. PMID:25380993

  13. Movements and foraging effort of Steller's Eiders and Harlequin Ducks wintering near Dutch Harbor, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, J.A.; Flint, P.L.

    2007-01-01

    We studied the movements and foraging effort of radio-marked Steller's Eiders (Polysticta stelleri) and Harlequin Ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) to evaluate habitat quality in an area impacted by industrial activity near Dutch Harbor, Alaska. Foraging effort was relatively low, with Steller's Eiders foraging only 2.7 ± 0.6 (SE) hours per day and Harlequin Ducks 4.1 ± 0.5 hours per day. Low-foraging effort during periods of high-energetic demand generally suggests high food availability, and high food availability frequently corresponds with reductions in home range size. However, the winter ranges of Harlequin Ducks did not appear to be smaller than usual, with the mean range size in our study (5.5 ± 1.1 km2) similar to that reported by previous investigators. The mean size of the winter ranges of Steller's Eiders was similar (5.1 ± 1.3 km2), but no comparable estimates are available. Eutrophication of the waters near Dutch Harbor caused by seafood processing and municipal sewage effluent may have increased populations of the invertebrate prey of these sea ducks and contributed to their low-foraging effort. The threat of predation by Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) that winter near Dutch Harbor may cause Steller's Eiders and Harlequin Ducks to move further offshore when not foraging, contributing to an increase in range sizes. Thus, the movement patterns and foraging behavior of these ducks likely represent a balance between the cost and benefits of wintering in a human-influenced environment.

  14. Chronic hydrocarbon exposure of harlequin ducks in areas affected by the Selendang Ayu oil spill at Unalaska Island, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Flint, Paul L; Schamber, Jason L; Trust, Kimberly A; Miles, A Keith; Henderson, John D; Wilson, Barry W

    2012-12-01

    We evaluated chronic exposure of harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) to hydrocarbons associated with the 2004 M/V Selendang Ayu oil spill at Unalaska Island, Alaska. We measured levels of hepatic 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity (EROD) in liver biopsy samples as an indicator of hydrocarbon exposure in three oiled bays and one reference bay in 2005, 2006, and 2008. Median EROD activity in ducks from oiled bays was significantly higher than in the reference bay in seven of nine pairwise comparisons. These results indicated that harlequin ducks were exposed to lingering hydrocarbons more than three years after the spill. PMID:22933448

  15. Chronic hydrocarbon exposure of harlequin ducks in areas affected by the Selendang Ayu oil spill at Unalaska Island, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flint, Paul L.; Schamber, J.L.; Trust, K.A.; Miles, A.K.; Henderson, J.D.; Wilson, B.W.

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated chronic exposure of harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) to hydrocarbons associated with the 2004 M/V Selendang Ayu oil spill at Unalaska Island, Alaska. We measured levels of hepatic 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity (EROD) in liver biopsy samples as an indicator of hydrocarbon exposure in three oiled bays and one reference bay in 2005, 2006, and 2008. Median EROD activity in ducks from oiled bays was significantly higher than in the reference bay in seven of nine pairwise comparisons. These results indicated that harlequin ducks were exposed to lingering hydrocarbons more than three years after the spill.

  16. Chronic hydrocarbon exposure of harlequin ducks in areas affected by the Selendang Ayu oil spill at Unalaska Island, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Flint, Paul L; Schamber, Jason L; Trust, Kimberly A; Miles, A Keith; Henderson, John D; Wilson, Barry W

    2012-12-01

    We evaluated chronic exposure of harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) to hydrocarbons associated with the 2004 M/V Selendang Ayu oil spill at Unalaska Island, Alaska. We measured levels of hepatic 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity (EROD) in liver biopsy samples as an indicator of hydrocarbon exposure in three oiled bays and one reference bay in 2005, 2006, and 2008. Median EROD activity in ducks from oiled bays was significantly higher than in the reference bay in seven of nine pairwise comparisons. These results indicated that harlequin ducks were exposed to lingering hydrocarbons more than three years after the spill.

  17. Characteristics and Drivers of High-Altitude Ladybird Flight: Insights from Vertical-Looking Entomological Radar

    PubMed Central

    Jeffries, Daniel L.; Chapman, Jason; Roy, Helen E.; Humphries, Stuart; Harrington, Richard; Brown, Peter M. J.; Handley, Lori-J. Lawson

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the characteristics and drivers of dispersal is crucial for predicting population dynamics, particularly in range-shifting species. Studying long-distance dispersal in insects is challenging, but recent advances in entomological radar offer unique insights. We analysed 10 years of radar data collected at Rothamsted Research, U.K., to investigate characteristics (altitude, speed, seasonal and annual trends) and drivers (aphid abundance, air temperature, wind speed and rainfall) of high-altitude flight of the two most abundant U.K. ladybird species (native Coccinella septempunctata and invasive Harmonia axyridis). These species cannot be distinguished in the radar data since their reflectivity signals overlap, and they were therefore analysed together. However, their signals do not overlap with other, abundant insects so we are confident they constitute the overwhelming majority of the analysed data. The target species were detected up to ∼1100 m above ground level, where displacement speeds of up to ∼60 km/h were recorded, however most ladybirds were found between ∼150 and 500 m, and had a mean displacement of 30 km/h. Average flight time was estimated, using tethered flight experiments, to be 36.5 minutes, but flights of up to two hours were observed. Ladybirds are therefore potentially able to travel 18 km in a “typical” high-altitude flight, but up to 120 km if flying at higher altitudes, indicating a high capacity for long-distance dispersal. There were strong seasonal trends in ladybird abundance, with peaks corresponding to the highest temperatures of mid-summer, and warm air temperature was the key driver of ladybird flight. Climatic warming may therefore increase the potential for long-distance dispersal in these species. Low aphid abundance was a second significant factor, highlighting the important role of aphid population dynamics in ladybird dispersal. This research illustrates the utility of radar for studying high

  18. Characteristics and drivers of high-altitude ladybird flight: insights from vertical-looking entomological radar.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, Daniel L; Chapman, Jason; Roy, Helen E; Humphries, Stuart; Harrington, Richard; Brown, Peter M J; Handley, Lori-J Lawson

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the characteristics and drivers of dispersal is crucial for predicting population dynamics, particularly in range-shifting species. Studying long-distance dispersal in insects is challenging, but recent advances in entomological radar offer unique insights. We analysed 10 years of radar data collected at Rothamsted Research, U.K., to investigate characteristics (altitude, speed, seasonal and annual trends) and drivers (aphid abundance, air temperature, wind speed and rainfall) of high-altitude flight of the two most abundant U.K. ladybird species (native Coccinella septempunctata and invasive Harmonia axyridis). These species cannot be distinguished in the radar data since their reflectivity signals overlap, and they were therefore analysed together. However, their signals do not overlap with other, abundant insects so we are confident they constitute the overwhelming majority of the analysed data. The target species were detected up to ∼1100 m above ground level, where displacement speeds of up to ∼60 km/h were recorded, however most ladybirds were found between ∼150 and 500 m, and had a mean displacement of 30 km/h. Average flight time was estimated, using tethered flight experiments, to be 36.5 minutes, but flights of up to two hours were observed. Ladybirds are therefore potentially able to travel 18 km in a "typical" high-altitude flight, but up to 120 km if flying at higher altitudes, indicating a high capacity for long-distance dispersal. There were strong seasonal trends in ladybird abundance, with peaks corresponding to the highest temperatures of mid-summer, and warm air temperature was the key driver of ladybird flight. Climatic warming may therefore increase the potential for long-distance dispersal in these species. Low aphid abundance was a second significant factor, highlighting the important role of aphid population dynamics in ladybird dispersal. This research illustrates the utility of radar for studying high-altitude insect

  19. Characteristics and drivers of high-altitude ladybird flight: insights from vertical-looking entomological radar.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, Daniel L; Chapman, Jason; Roy, Helen E; Humphries, Stuart; Harrington, Richard; Brown, Peter M J; Handley, Lori-J Lawson

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the characteristics and drivers of dispersal is crucial for predicting population dynamics, particularly in range-shifting species. Studying long-distance dispersal in insects is challenging, but recent advances in entomological radar offer unique insights. We analysed 10 years of radar data collected at Rothamsted Research, U.K., to investigate characteristics (altitude, speed, seasonal and annual trends) and drivers (aphid abundance, air temperature, wind speed and rainfall) of high-altitude flight of the two most abundant U.K. ladybird species (native Coccinella septempunctata and invasive Harmonia axyridis). These species cannot be distinguished in the radar data since their reflectivity signals overlap, and they were therefore analysed together. However, their signals do not overlap with other, abundant insects so we are confident they constitute the overwhelming majority of the analysed data. The target species were detected up to ∼1100 m above ground level, where displacement speeds of up to ∼60 km/h were recorded, however most ladybirds were found between ∼150 and 500 m, and had a mean displacement of 30 km/h. Average flight time was estimated, using tethered flight experiments, to be 36.5 minutes, but flights of up to two hours were observed. Ladybirds are therefore potentially able to travel 18 km in a "typical" high-altitude flight, but up to 120 km if flying at higher altitudes, indicating a high capacity for long-distance dispersal. There were strong seasonal trends in ladybird abundance, with peaks corresponding to the highest temperatures of mid-summer, and warm air temperature was the key driver of ladybird flight. Climatic warming may therefore increase the potential for long-distance dispersal in these species. Low aphid abundance was a second significant factor, highlighting the important role of aphid population dynamics in ladybird dispersal. This research illustrates the utility of radar for studying high-altitude insect

  20. Genetic linkage between melanism and winglessness in the ladybird beetle Adalia bipunctata.

    PubMed

    Lommen, Suzanne T E; de Jong, Peter W; Koops, Kees G; Brakefield, Paul M

    2012-06-01

    We report a case of genetic linkage between the two major loci underlying different wing traits in the two-spot ladybird beetle, Adalia bipunctata (L.) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae): melanism and winglessness. The loci are estimated to be 38.8 cM apart on one of the nine autosomes. This linkage is likely to facilitate the unravelling of the genetics of these traits. These traits are of interest in the context of the evolution of intraspecific morphological diversity, and for the application of ladybird beetles in biological control programs.

  1. Seven-spot ladybird optimization: a novel and efficient metaheuristic algorithm for numerical optimization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Zhu, Zhouquan; Huang, Shuai

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel biologically inspired metaheuristic algorithm called seven-spot ladybird optimization (SLO). The SLO is inspired by recent discoveries on the foraging behavior of a seven-spot ladybird. In this paper, the performance of the SLO is compared with that of the genetic algorithm, particle swarm optimization, and artificial bee colony algorithms by using five numerical benchmark functions with multimodality. The results show that SLO has the ability to find the best solution with a comparatively small population size and is suitable for solving optimization problems with lower dimensions. PMID:24385879

  2. Seven-spot ladybird optimization: a novel and efficient metaheuristic algorithm for numerical optimization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Zhu, Zhouquan; Huang, Shuai

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel biologically inspired metaheuristic algorithm called seven-spot ladybird optimization (SLO). The SLO is inspired by recent discoveries on the foraging behavior of a seven-spot ladybird. In this paper, the performance of the SLO is compared with that of the genetic algorithm, particle swarm optimization, and artificial bee colony algorithms by using five numerical benchmark functions with multimodality. The results show that SLO has the ability to find the best solution with a comparatively small population size and is suitable for solving optimization problems with lower dimensions.

  3. HABITAT CHARACTERISTICS ASSOCIATED WITH THE DISTRIBUTION AND ABUNDAANCE OF HISTRIONICUS HISTRIONICUS (HARLEQUIN DUCKS)WINTERING IN SOUTHERN NEW ENGLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    Harlequin ducks that winter along the east coast of North America are listed as an endangered population in Canada, and they use several coastal wintering sites in southern New England, USA that are subject to varying degrees of urbanization. We studied patterns of habitat use b...

  4. 75 FR 21568 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition to List the Harlequin...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... on a Petition to List the Harlequin Butterfly as Endangered AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service... butterfly (Atlantea tulita), a butterfly endemic to Puerto Rico, as endangered under the Endangered Species... butterfly may be warranted. Therefore, with the publication of this notice, we are initiating a review...

  5. Attractiveness of harlequin bug, Murgantia histrionica (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), aggregation pheromone: field response to isomers, ratios and dose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A two-component sesquiterpene pheromone, (3S,6S,7R,10S)- and (3S,6S,7R,10R)-10,11-epoxy-1-bisabolen-3-ol (murgantiol), present in emissions from adult male harlequin bugs Murgantia histrionica, is most attractive in field bioassays to adults and nymphs in the naturally-occurring approximately 1.4:1...

  6. Spotlight on the positive effects of the ladybird Harmonia axyridis on agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the midst of considerable negativity surrounding the ladybird Harmonia axyridis (Pallas), this paper sheds some light on the positive effects that this predator has had on agriculture. Using resources available at the USDA, National Agricultural Library (DigiTop literature database, Navigator pla...

  7. Aphid and ladybird beetle abundance depend on the interaction of spatial effects and genotypic diversity.

    PubMed

    Genung, Mark A; Crutsinger, Gregory M; Bailey, Joseph K; Schweitzer, Jennifer A; Sanders, Nathan J

    2012-01-01

    Intraspecific variation and genotypic diversity of host-plants can affect the structure of associated arthropod communities and the dynamics of populations. Similarly, neighboring plants can also affect interactions between host-plants and their associated arthropods. However, most studies on the effects of host-plant genotypes have largely ignored the potential effects of neighboring host-plants on arthropod communities. In this study, we used a common garden experiment to ask how spatial effects of neighboring patches, along with genotype identity and genotypic diversity in tall goldenrod (Solidago altissima), affect the abundances of a common goldenrod herbivore (Uroleucon nigrotuberculatum) and their dominant predator (Harmonia axyridis, a ladybird beetle). Aphid abundance varied 80-fold among genotypes, while ladybird beetle abundance was not affected by genotype identity. Additionally, there were strong effects of neighboring plots: aphid abundance in a focal plot was positively correlated to aphid abundance in nearby plots, suggesting strong spatial patterning in the abundance of aphids. Neither aphid nor ladybird beetle abundance was affected by genotypic diversity. However, focal plot genotypic diversity mediated the strength of the neighborhood effect (i.e., strong effects for genotype polyculture focal plots and weak effects for genotype monoculture focal plots). Our results show that aphids were directly influenced by host-plant genotype identity while ladybird beetles responded mainly to prey abundance, and suggest that genotypic diversity can influence the effects of spatial processes on the plant-herbivore interactions. PMID:21805301

  8. Powder from cedar heartwood affects oviposition behavior in Coleomegilla maculata: a ladybird native to the Americas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Coleomegilla maculata is a predatory ladybird inhabiting ecosystems in North, Central, and South America. The aim of our research is to discover efficient, low-cost materials that boost oviposition in mass-reared C. maculata fed non-natural foods. We tested the hypothesis that eastern ...

  9. Does the volatile hydrocarbon profile differ between the sexes: a case study on five aphidophagous ladybirds.

    PubMed

    Pattanayak, Rojalin; Mishra, Geetanjali; Omkar; Chanotiya, Chandan Singh; Rout, Prasant Kumar; Mohanty, Chandra Sekhar

    2014-11-01

    Insect hydrocarbons (HCs) primarily serve as a waterproofing cuticular layer and function extensively in chemical communication by facilitating species, sex, and colony recognition. In this study, headspace solid-phase microextraction is employed for investigating the sex-specific volatile HC profile of five ladybirds collected from Lucknow, India namely, Coccinella septempunctata (L.), Coccinella transversalis (Fabr.), Menochilus sexmaculatus (Fabr.), Propylea dissecta (Mulsant), and Anegleis cardoni (Weise) for the first time. Major compounds reported in C. septempunctata, C. transversalis, and A. cardoni are methyl-branched saturated HCs, whereas in M. sexmaculatus, and P. dissecta, they are unsaturated HCs. Other than A. cardoni, both the sexes of the other four ladybirds had similar compounds at highest peak but with statistically significant differences. However, in A. cardoni, which is a beetle with a narrow niche, the major compound in both male and female was different. The difference in volatile HC profile of the sexes of the five ladybirds indicates that gender-specific differences primarily exist due to quantitative differences in chemicals with only very few chemicals being unique to a gender. This variation in semiochemicals might have a role in behavioral or ecological aspects of the studied ladybirds. PMID:25060353

  10. Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of a phytophagous ladybird beetle, Henosepilachna pusillanima (Mulsant) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    PubMed

    Behere, G T; Firake, D M; Tay, W T; Azad Thakur, N S; Ngachan, S V

    2016-01-01

    Ladybird beetles are generally considered as agriculturally beneficial insects, but the ladybird beetles in the coleopteran subfamily Epilachninae are phytophagous and major plant feeding pest species which causes severe economic losses to cucurbitaceous and solanaceous crops. Henosepilachna pusillanima (Mulsant) is one of the important pest species of ladybird beetle. In this report, we sequenced and characterized the complete mitochondrial genome of H. pusillanima. For sequencing of the complete mitochondrial genome, we used the Ion Torrent sequencing platform. The complete circular mitochondrial genome of the H. pusillanima was determined to be 16,216 bp long. There were totally 13 protein coding genes, 22 transfer RNA, 2 ribosomal RNA and a control (A + T-rich) region estimated to be 1690 bp. The gene arrangement and orientations of assembled mitogenome were identical to the reported predatory ladybird beetle Coccinella septempunctata L. This is the first completely sequenced coleopteran mitochondrial genome from the beetle subfamily Epilachninae from India. Data generated in this study will benefit future comparative genomics studies for understanding the evolutionary relationships between predatory and phytophagous coccinellid beetles. PMID:24617459

  11. Does the volatile hydrocarbon profile differ between the sexes: a case study on five aphidophagous ladybirds.

    PubMed

    Pattanayak, Rojalin; Mishra, Geetanjali; Omkar; Chanotiya, Chandan Singh; Rout, Prasant Kumar; Mohanty, Chandra Sekhar

    2014-11-01

    Insect hydrocarbons (HCs) primarily serve as a waterproofing cuticular layer and function extensively in chemical communication by facilitating species, sex, and colony recognition. In this study, headspace solid-phase microextraction is employed for investigating the sex-specific volatile HC profile of five ladybirds collected from Lucknow, India namely, Coccinella septempunctata (L.), Coccinella transversalis (Fabr.), Menochilus sexmaculatus (Fabr.), Propylea dissecta (Mulsant), and Anegleis cardoni (Weise) for the first time. Major compounds reported in C. septempunctata, C. transversalis, and A. cardoni are methyl-branched saturated HCs, whereas in M. sexmaculatus, and P. dissecta, they are unsaturated HCs. Other than A. cardoni, both the sexes of the other four ladybirds had similar compounds at highest peak but with statistically significant differences. However, in A. cardoni, which is a beetle with a narrow niche, the major compound in both male and female was different. The difference in volatile HC profile of the sexes of the five ladybirds indicates that gender-specific differences primarily exist due to quantitative differences in chemicals with only very few chemicals being unique to a gender. This variation in semiochemicals might have a role in behavioral or ecological aspects of the studied ladybirds.

  12. Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of a phytophagous ladybird beetle, Henosepilachna pusillanima (Mulsant) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    PubMed

    Behere, G T; Firake, D M; Tay, W T; Azad Thakur, N S; Ngachan, S V

    2016-01-01

    Ladybird beetles are generally considered as agriculturally beneficial insects, but the ladybird beetles in the coleopteran subfamily Epilachninae are phytophagous and major plant feeding pest species which causes severe economic losses to cucurbitaceous and solanaceous crops. Henosepilachna pusillanima (Mulsant) is one of the important pest species of ladybird beetle. In this report, we sequenced and characterized the complete mitochondrial genome of H. pusillanima. For sequencing of the complete mitochondrial genome, we used the Ion Torrent sequencing platform. The complete circular mitochondrial genome of the H. pusillanima was determined to be 16,216 bp long. There were totally 13 protein coding genes, 22 transfer RNA, 2 ribosomal RNA and a control (A + T-rich) region estimated to be 1690 bp. The gene arrangement and orientations of assembled mitogenome were identical to the reported predatory ladybird beetle Coccinella septempunctata L. This is the first completely sequenced coleopteran mitochondrial genome from the beetle subfamily Epilachninae from India. Data generated in this study will benefit future comparative genomics studies for understanding the evolutionary relationships between predatory and phytophagous coccinellid beetles.

  13. Aphid and ladybird beetle abundance depend on the interaction of spatial effects and genotypic diversity.

    PubMed

    Genung, Mark A; Crutsinger, Gregory M; Bailey, Joseph K; Schweitzer, Jennifer A; Sanders, Nathan J

    2012-01-01

    Intraspecific variation and genotypic diversity of host-plants can affect the structure of associated arthropod communities and the dynamics of populations. Similarly, neighboring plants can also affect interactions between host-plants and their associated arthropods. However, most studies on the effects of host-plant genotypes have largely ignored the potential effects of neighboring host-plants on arthropod communities. In this study, we used a common garden experiment to ask how spatial effects of neighboring patches, along with genotype identity and genotypic diversity in tall goldenrod (Solidago altissima), affect the abundances of a common goldenrod herbivore (Uroleucon nigrotuberculatum) and their dominant predator (Harmonia axyridis, a ladybird beetle). Aphid abundance varied 80-fold among genotypes, while ladybird beetle abundance was not affected by genotype identity. Additionally, there were strong effects of neighboring plots: aphid abundance in a focal plot was positively correlated to aphid abundance in nearby plots, suggesting strong spatial patterning in the abundance of aphids. Neither aphid nor ladybird beetle abundance was affected by genotypic diversity. However, focal plot genotypic diversity mediated the strength of the neighborhood effect (i.e., strong effects for genotype polyculture focal plots and weak effects for genotype monoculture focal plots). Our results show that aphids were directly influenced by host-plant genotype identity while ladybird beetles responded mainly to prey abundance, and suggest that genotypic diversity can influence the effects of spatial processes on the plant-herbivore interactions.

  14. The influence of age on reproductive performance of the predatory ladybird beetle, Propylea dissecta.

    PubMed

    Pervez, Ahmad; Omkar; Richmond, Aaron S

    2004-01-01

    The influence of age on reproductive performance of an aphidophagous ladybird beetle, Propylea dissecta was examined using male and female beetles of varying ages (1-30 days) after a single mating stimulus. All the intermediate (10 to 20 days old) and old (30 days old) age females mated with all intermediate and old age males, while only a fraction (0.29%) of younger females, 1 to 5 days old, mated with males of similar or older age. The willingness to mate was male age dependent. It increased sigmoidally with increase in adult age. Adult males were more willing to mate with females irrespective of age. Mating duration was longest amongst older adults (30 day-old males and 20 day-old females). Male age did not contribute to shaping the fecundity of the female ladybird. Fecundity was female age dependent and it increased with age up to 20 days and thereafter decreased. 20 day-old females were most fecund producing 867 eggs after a single mating. Progeny production was male age dependent and eggs sired by 20-30 day-old males had significantly higher viability than those sired by younger males. Prolonged mating increased fecundity and egg viability. The results reveal that males of intermediate age were better mates. This information may improve our understanding of the effect of aging on reproduction in ladybirds and may help mass-multiplication of the ladybird beetles using adults of optimal age.

  15. Effect of heat shock treatment on stress tolerance and biocontrol efficacy of biocontrol yeasts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several different species of yeasts have been used as biocontrol agents against postharvest diseases of fruits and vegetables. Our current research is directed to develop a better understanding of yeast biology in relation to biocontrol activity and to develop strategies to improve the efficacy of ...

  16. Survival of captive and free-ranging Harlequin Ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) following surgical liver biopsy.

    PubMed

    Mulcahy, Daniel M; Esler, Daniel

    2010-10-01

    We measured intra- and postoperative mortality rates of captive and free-ranging Harlequin Ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) undergoing surgical liver biopsy sampling for determination of the induction of cytochrome P4501A, a biomarker of oil exposure. Liver biopsies were taken from and radio transmitters were implanted into 157 free-ranging Harlequin Ducks over three winters (55 in 2000, 55 in 2001, and 47 in 2002). No birds died during surgery, but seven (4.5%) died during recovery from anesthesia (three in 2001 and four in 2002). None of the deaths could be attributed directly to the liver biopsy. Four of the 150 (2.7%) birds that were released died in the 2 wk period after surgery. All post-release deaths occurred in 2001; no birds died after release in 2000 or 2002. No mortalities of 36 captive birds occurred during surgery or recovery or in the 2 wk period following surgery. Hemorrhage was a minor problem with one captive bird. Surgical liver biopsies appear to be a safe procedure, but anesthetic complications may occur with overwintering ducks.

  17. Evaluation of bursal depth as an indicator of age class of harlequin ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mather, D.D.; Esler, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    We contrasted the estimated age class of recaptured Harlequin Ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) (n = 255) based on bursal depth with expected age class based on bursal depth at first capture and time since first capture. Although neither estimated nor expected ages can be assumed to be correct, rates of discrepancies between the two for within-year recaptures indicate sampling error, while between-year recaptures test assumptions about rates of bursal involution. Within-year, between-year, and overall discrepancy rates were 10%, 24%, and 18%, respectively. Most (86%) between-year discrepancies occurred for birds expected to be after-third-year (ATY) but estimated to be third-year (TY). Of these ATY-TY discrepancies, 22 of 25 (88%) birds had bursal depths of 2 or 3 mm. Further, five of six between-year recaptures that were known to be ATY but estimated to be TY had 2 mm bursas. Reclassifying birds with 2 or 3 mm bursas as ATY resulted in reduction in between-year (24% to 10%) and overall (18% to 11%) discrepancy rates. We conclude that age determination of Harlequin Ducks based on bursal depth, particularly using our modified criteria, is a relatively consistent and reliable technique.

  18. Loss from harlequin ducks of abdominally implanted radio transmitters equipped with percutaneous antennas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulcahy, D.M.; Esler, Daniel; Stoskopf, M.K.

    1999-01-01

    We documented extrusion and loss of abdominally implanted radio transmitters with percutaneous antennas from adult female Harlequin Ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus). Birds were captured during wing molt (late August to mid-September) in 1995-1997. Of 44 Harlequin Ducks implanted with radios and recaptured, 7 (16%) had lost their transmitters and 5 (11%) had radios in the process of extruding. Most (11 of 12) extrusions and losses occurred in birds implanted with radios in 1996 and recaptured in 1997. We suggest that transmitter extrusions and losses were due largely to changes in transmitter design made between 1095 and 1996. Transmitters implanted in 1996 were cylindrical rather than spherical, had a flat end with an abrupt edge, and the lower portion of the antenna was reinforced. Radio losses occurred after the 7-mo monitoring period and caused no apparent harm to the birds. Investigators using implanted radios with percutaneous antennas for long-term projects should be aware of the potential for radio extrusion and should minimize the problem by using transmitters that have no sharp edges and that are wide, rather than narrow.

  19. Survival of captive and free-ranging Harlequin Ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) following surgical liver biopsy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulcahy, Daniel M.; Esler, Daniel N.

    2010-01-01

    We measured intra- and postoperative mortality rates of captive and free-ranging Harlequin Ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) undergoing surgical liver biopsy sampling for determination of the induction of cytochrome P4501A, a biomarker of oil exposure. Liver biopsies were taken from and radio transmitters were implanted into 157 free-ranging Harlequin Ducks over three winters (55 in 2000, 55 in 2001, and 47 in 2002). No birds died during surgery, but seven (4.5%) died during recovery from anesthesia (three in 2001 and four in 2002). None of the deaths could be attributed directly to the liver biopsy. Four of the 150 (2.7%) birds that were released died in the 2 wk period after surgery. All post-release deaths occurred in 2001; no birds died after release in 2000 or 2002. No mortalities of 36 captive birds occurred during surgery or recovery or in the 2 wk period following surgery. Hemorrhage was a minor problem with one captive bird. Surgical liver biopsies appear to be a safe procedure, but anesthetic complications may occur with overwintering ducks.

  20. Survival of captive and free-ranging Harlequin Ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) following surgical liver biopsy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulcahy, D.M.; Esler, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    We measured intra- and postoperative mortality rates of captive and free-ranging Harlequin Ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) undergoing surgical liver biopsy sampling for determination of the induction of cytochrome P4501A, a biomarker of oil exposure. Liver biopsies were taken from and radio transmitters were implanted into 157 free-ranging Harlequin Ducks over three winters (55 in 2000, 55 in 2001, and 47 in 2002). No birds died during surgery, but seven (4.5%) died during recovery from anesthesia (three in 2001 and four in 2002). None of the deaths could be attributed directly to the liver biopsy. Four of the 150 (2.7%) birds that were released died in the 2 wk period after surgery. All post-release deaths occurred in 2001; no birds died after release in 2000 or 2002. No mortalities of 36 captive birds occurred during surgery or recovery or in the 2 wk period following surgery. Hemorrhage was a minor problem with one captive bird. Surgical liver biopsies appear to be a safe procedure, but anesthetic complications may occur with overwintering ducks. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2010.

  1. Correlates of Harlequin Duck densities during winter in Prince William Sound, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Esler, Daniel; Bowman, T.D.; Dean, T.A.; O'Clair, C. E.; Jewett, S.C.; McDonald, L.L.

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated relationships of Harlequin Duck (Histrionicus histrionicus) densities to habitat attributes, history of habitat contamination by the 1989 exxon valdez oil spill, and prey biomass density and abundance during winters 1995-1997 in Prince William Sound, Alaska. Habitat features that explained variation in duck densities included distance to streams and reefs, degree of exposure to wind and wave action, and dominant substrate type. After accounting for these effects, densities were lower in oiled than unoiled areas, suggesting that population recovery from the oil spill was not complete, due either to lack of recovery from initial oil spill effects or continuing deleterious effects. Prey biomass density and abundance were not strongly related to duck densities after accounting for habitat and area effects. Traits of Harlequin Ducks that reflect their affiliation with naturally predictable winter habitats, such as strong site fidelity and intolerance of increased energy costs, may make their populations particularly vulnerable to chronic oil spill effects and slow to recover from population reductions, which may explain lower densities than expected on oiled areas nearly a decade following the oil spill.

  2. Snowdrop lectin (GNA) has no acute toxic effects on a beneficial insect predator, the 2-spot ladybird (Adalia bipunctata L.).

    PubMed

    Down, R E.; Ford, L; Woodhouse, S D.; Raemaekers, R J.M.; Leitch, B; Gatehouse, J A.; Gatehouse, A M.R.

    2000-04-01

    Two-spot ladybird (Adalia bipunctata L.) larvae were fed on aphids (Myzus persicae (Sulz.)) which had been loaded with snowdrop lectin (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin; GNA) by feeding on artificial diet containing the protein. Treatment with GNA significantly decreased the growth of aphids. No acute toxicity of GNA-containing aphids towards the ladybird larvae was observed, although there were small effects on development. When fed a fixed number of aphids, larvae exposed to GNA spent longer in the 4th instar, taking 6 extra days to reach pupation; however, retardation of development was not observed in ladybird larvae fed equal weights of aphids. Ladybird larvae fed GNA-containing aphids were found to be 8-15% smaller than controls, but ate a significantly greater number of aphids (approx. 40% to pupation). GNA was shown to be present on the microvilli of the midgut brush border membrane and within gut epithelial cells in ladybird larvae fed on GNA-dosed aphids, although disruption of the brush border was not observed. It is hypothesised that GNA does not have significant direct toxic or adverse effects on developing ladybird larvae, but that the effects observed may be due to the fact that the aphids fed on GNA are compromised and are thus a suboptimal food.

  3. Winter survival of adult female harlequin ducks in relation to history of contamination by the Exxon Valdez oil spill

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Esler, Daniel; Schmutz, J.A.; Jarvis, R.L.; Mulcahy, D.M.

    2000-01-01

    Harlequin duck (Histrionicus histrionicus) life-history characteristics make their populations particularly vulnerable to perturbations during nonbreeding periods. The 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill was a major perturbation to nonbreeding habitats of harlequin ducks in Prince William Sound, Alaska, which resulted in population injury. To assess the status of population recovery from the oil spill and to evaluate factors potentially constraining full recovery, we used radiotelemetry to examine survival of adult female harlequin ducks during winters of 1995-96, 1996-97, and 1997-98. We implanted 294 harlequin ducks (154 and 140 in oiled and unoiled areas, respectively) with transmitters and tracked their signals from aircraft during October through March. We examined variation in survival rates relative to area and season (early, mid, and late winter) through comparisons of models using Akaike's information criterion (AIC(c)) values. The 3 models best supported by the data indicated that survival of birds in oiled areas was lower than in unoiled areas. Inclusion of standardized body mass during wing molt in the 3 best models did not improve their fit, indicating that body mass during wing molt did not affect subsequent winter survival. In the model that best fit our data, survival was high in early winter for both areas, lower during mid and late winter seasons, and lowest in oiled areas during mid winter. Cumulative winter survival estimated from this model was 78.0% (SE = 3.3%) in oiled areas and 83.7% (SE = 2.9%) in unoiled areas. We determined that area differences in survival were more likely related to oiling history than intrinsic geographic differences. Based on a demographic model, area differences in survival offer a likely mechanism for observed declines in populations on oiled areas. Concurrent studies indicated that harlequin ducks continued to be exposed to residual Exxon Valdez oil as much as 9 years after the spill. We suggest that oil exposure

  4. Inferring the origin of populations introduced from a genetically structured native range by approximate Bayesian computation: case study of the invasive ladybird Harmonia axyridis.

    PubMed

    Lombaert, E; Guillemaud, T; Thomas, C E; Lawson Handley, L J; Li, J; Wang, S; Pang, H; Goryacheva, I; Zakharov, I A; Jousselin, E; Poland, R L; Migeon, A; Van Lenteren, J; DE Clercq, P; Berkvens, N; Jones, W; Estoup, A

    2011-11-01

    Correct identification of the source population of an invasive species is a prerequisite for testing hypotheses concerning the factors responsible for biological invasions. The native area of invasive species may be large, poorly known and/or genetically structured. Because the actual source population may not have been sampled, studies based on molecular markers may generate incorrect conclusions about the origin of introduced populations. In this study, we characterized the genetic structure of the invasive ladybird Harmonia axyridis in its native area using various population genetic statistics and methods. We found that native area of H. axyridis most probably consisted of two geographically distinct genetic clusters located in eastern and western Asia. We then performed approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) analyses on controlled simulated microsatellite data sets to evaluate (i) the risk of selecting incorrect introduction scenarios, including admixture between sources, when the populations of the native area are genetically structured and sampling is incomplete and (ii) the ability of ABC analysis to minimize such risks by explicitly including unsampled populations in the scenarios compared. Finally, we performed additional ABC analyses on real microsatellite data sets to retrace the origin of biocontrol and invasive populations of H. axyridis, taking into account the possibility that the structured native area may have been incompletely sampled. We found that the invasive population in eastern North America, which has served as the bridgehead for worldwide invasion by H. axyridis, was probably formed by an admixture between the eastern and western native clusters. This admixture may have facilitated adaptation of the bridgehead population.

  5. Two Strains of Male-Killing Wolbachia in a Ladybird, Coccinella undecimpunctata, from a Hot Climate

    PubMed Central

    Elnagdy, Sherif; Messing, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Ladybirds are a hot-spot for the invasion of male-killing bacteria. These maternally inherited endosymbionts cause the death of male host embryos, to the benefit of female sibling hosts and the bacteria that they contain. Previous studies have shown that high temperatures can eradicate male-killers from ladybirds, leaving the host free from infection. Here we report the discovery of two maternally inherited sex ratio distorters in populations of a coccinellid, Coccinella undecimpunctata, from a hot lowland region of the Middle East. DNA sequence analysis indicates that the male killing is the result of infection by Wolbachia, that the trait is tetracycline sensitive, and that two distinct strains of Wolbachia co-occur within one beetle population. We discuss the implications of these findings for theories of male-killing and suggest avenues for future field-work on this system. PMID:23349831

  6. Two strains of male-killing Wolbachia in a ladybird, Coccinella undecimpunctata, from a hot climate.

    PubMed

    Elnagdy, Sherif; Messing, Susan; Majerus, Michael E N

    2013-01-01

    Ladybirds are a hot-spot for the invasion of male-killing bacteria. These maternally inherited endosymbionts cause the death of male host embryos, to the benefit of female sibling hosts and the bacteria that they contain. Previous studies have shown that high temperatures can eradicate male-killers from ladybirds, leaving the host free from infection. Here we report the discovery of two maternally inherited sex ratio distorters in populations of a coccinellid, Coccinella undecimpunctata, from a hot lowland region of the Middle East. DNA sequence analysis indicates that the male killing is the result of infection by Wolbachia, that the trait is tetracycline sensitive, and that two distinct strains of Wolbachia co-occur within one beetle population. We discuss the implications of these findings for theories of male-killing and suggest avenues for future field-work on this system. PMID:23349831

  7. C-value estimates for 31 species of ladybird beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    PubMed

    Ryan Gregory, T; Nedved, Oldrich; Adamowicz, Sarah J

    2003-01-01

    This study provides C-value (haploid nuclear DNA content) estimates for 31 species of ladybird beetles (representing 6 subfamilies and 8 tribes), the first such data for the family Coccinellidae. Despite their unparalleled diversity, the Coleoptera have been very poorly studied in terms of genome size variation, such that even this relatively modest sample of species makes the Coccinellidae the third best studied family of beetles, behind the Tenebrionidae and Chrysomelidae. The present study provides a comparison of patterns of genome size variation with these two relatively well-studied families. No correlation was found between genome size and body size in the ladybirds, in contrast to some other invertebrate groups but in keeping with findings for other beetle families. However, there is some indication that developmental time and/or feeding ecology is related to genome size in this group. Some phylogenetic patterns and possible associations with subgenomic features are also discussed.

  8. Two strains of male-killing Wolbachia in a ladybird, Coccinella undecimpunctata, from a hot climate.

    PubMed

    Elnagdy, Sherif; Messing, Susan; Majerus, Michael E N

    2013-01-01

    Ladybirds are a hot-spot for the invasion of male-killing bacteria. These maternally inherited endosymbionts cause the death of male host embryos, to the benefit of female sibling hosts and the bacteria that they contain. Previous studies have shown that high temperatures can eradicate male-killers from ladybirds, leaving the host free from infection. Here we report the discovery of two maternally inherited sex ratio distorters in populations of a coccinellid, Coccinella undecimpunctata, from a hot lowland region of the Middle East. DNA sequence analysis indicates that the male killing is the result of infection by Wolbachia, that the trait is tetracycline sensitive, and that two distinct strains of Wolbachia co-occur within one beetle population. We discuss the implications of these findings for theories of male-killing and suggest avenues for future field-work on this system.

  9. Harlequin Duck population injury and recovery dynamics following the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill.

    PubMed

    Iverson, Samuel A; Esler, Daniel

    2010-10-01

    The 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill caused significant injury to wildlife populations in Prince William Sound, Alaska, USA. Harlequin Ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) were particularly vulnerable to the spill and have been studied extensively since, leading to one of the most thorough considerations of the consequences of a major oil spill ever undertaken. We compiled demographic and survey data collected since the spill to evaluate the timing and extent of mortality using a population model. During the immediate aftermath of the spill, we estimated a 25% decrease in Harlequin Duck numbers in oiled areas. Survival rates remained depressed in oiled areas 6-9 years after the spill and did not equal those from unoiled areas until at least 11-14 years later. Despite a high degree of site fidelity to wintering sites, immigration was important for recovery dynamics, as the relatively large number of birds from habitats outside the spill zone provided a pool of individuals to facilitate numerical increases. On the basis of these model inputs and assumptions about fecundity rates for the species, we projected a timeline to recovery of 24 years under the most-likely combination of variables, with a range of 16 to 32 years for the best-case and worst-case scenarios, respectively. Our results corroborate assertions from other studies that the effects of spilled oil on wildlife can be expressed over much longer time frames than previously assumed and that the cumulative mortality associated with chronic exposure to residual oil may actually exceed acute mortality, which has been the primary concern following most oil spills.

  10. Testing assumptions for unbiased estimation of survival of radiomarked harlequin ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Esler, Daniel; Mulcahy, D.M.; Jarvis, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    Unbiased estimates of survival based on individuals outfitted with radiotransmitters require meeting the assumptions that radios do not affect survival, and animals for which the radio signal is lost have the same survival probability as those for which fate is known. In most survival studies, researchers have made these assumptions without testing their validity. We tested these assumptions by comparing interannual recapture rates (and, by inference, survival) between radioed and unradioed adult female harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus), and for radioed females, between right-censored birds (i.e., those for which the radio signal was lost during the telemetry monitoring period) and birds with known fates. We found that recapture rates of birds equipped with implanted radiotransmitters (21.6 ?? 3.0%; x?? ?? SE) were similar to unradioed birds (21.7 ?? 8.6%), suggesting that radios did not affect survival. Recapture rates also were similar between right-censored (20.6 ?? 5.1%) and known-fate individuals (22.1 ?? 3.8%), suggesting that missing birds were not subject to differential mortality. We also determined that capture and handling resulted in short-term loss of body mass for both radioed and unradioed females and that this effect was more pronounced for radioed birds (the difference between groups was 15.4 ?? 7.1 g). However, no difference existed in body mass after recapture 1 year later. Our study suggests that implanted radios are an unbiased method for estimating survival of harlequin ducks and likely other species under similar circumstances.

  11. Harlequin Duck recovery from the Exxon Valdez oil spill: A population genetics perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanctot, R.; Goatcher, B.; Scribner, K.; Talbot, S.; Pierson, B.; Esler, Daniel; Zwiefelhofer, D.

    1999-01-01

    Concerns about Harlequin Duck (Histrionicus histrionicus) population recovery following the Exxon Valdez oil spill led biologists to ask whether birds located in different molting and wintering areas belong to genetically distinct and, thus, demographically independent populations. Owing to the lack of direct observations of movements among marine areas, three classes of genetic markers that differed in mode of inheritance were used to evaluate the degree of genetic differentiation among wintering areas within Prince William Sound (PWS) and the Alaska Peninsula and Kodiak Archipelago (APKA). We could not reject the null hypothesis that the wintering aggregations within each region are composed of a single genetically panmictic population. Differences in genotype frequencies among wintering locations within PWS and APKA were low and nonsignificant for all three classes of markers. Furthermore, we saw no evidence for deviations in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium or gametic disequilibrium between loci within a winter collection site as would be expected if these locales were composed of individuals from reproductively isolated (and genetically distinct) breeding locales. Finally, no evidence for significant structuring was noted between PWS and APKA. Lack of spatial genetic structuring could be due to the cumulative effects of low levels of gene flow over long time periods, low levels of gene flow by immature birds moving between marine habitats, or to episodic dispersal caused by habitat alteration (e.g. volcanic eruptions). Harlequin Ducks are likely to recolonize or enhance populations in areas recovering from environmental damage via emigration of birds from non-affected areas. Demographic studies suggest, however, that levels of movements are low, and that population recovery by emigration is a long-term process.

  12. Feather and faecal corticosterone concentrations predict future reproductive decisions in harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus).

    PubMed

    Hansen, Warren K; Bate, Lisa J; Landry, Devin W; Chastel, Olivier; Parenteau, Charline; Breuner, Creagh W

    2016-01-01

    Understanding sources of reproductive variation can inform management and conservation decisions, population ecology and life-history theory. Annual reproductive variation can drive population growth rate and can be influenced by factors from across the annual cycle (known as carry-over effects). The majority of studies, however, focus solely on the role of current environmental events. Past events often influence future reproductive decisions and success but can be logistically difficult to collect and quantify, especially in migratory species. Recent work indicates that glucocorticoids may prove good indicators to evaluate carry-over effects across life-history transitions. Here, we evaluated three different measures of glucocorticoid physiology (feathers, faeces and plasma) to evaluate the predictability of future breeding decision in the harlequin duck (Histrionicus histrionicus). We collected tail and back feathers, plasma and faeces for glucocorticoid analysis, and fitted female harlequin ducks with very high-frequency transmitters to track their breeding decisions. Both back feathers (moulted immediately before the current season) and faecal glucocorticoid metabolites were identified as important predictive factors of reproductive decisions; high concentrations of glucocorticoid metabolites in back feathers and faeces predicted a higher likelihood of reproductive deferral for the year. Although back and tail feather corticosterone concentrations were correlated, tail feathers (moulted at the end of the previous breeding season) did not predict breeding decisions. Plasma corticosterone concentrations were collected over too broad a time range after capture to be useful in this study. This study demonstrates the utility of non-invasive corticosterone metrics in predicting breeding decisions and supports the use of feathers to measure carry-over effects in migratory birds. With this technique, we identified the prenuptial moult as an important life

  13. Feather and faecal corticosterone concentrations predict future reproductive decisions in harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus)

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Warren K.; Bate, Lisa J.; Landry, Devin W.; Chastel, Olivier; Parenteau, Charline; Breuner, Creagh W.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding sources of reproductive variation can inform management and conservation decisions, population ecology and life-history theory. Annual reproductive variation can drive population growth rate and can be influenced by factors from across the annual cycle (known as carry-over effects). The majority of studies, however, focus solely on the role of current environmental events. Past events often influence future reproductive decisions and success but can be logistically difficult to collect and quantify, especially in migratory species. Recent work indicates that glucocorticoids may prove good indicators to evaluate carry-over effects across life-history transitions. Here, we evaluated three different measures of glucocorticoid physiology (feathers, faeces and plasma) to evaluate the predictability of future breeding decision in the harlequin duck (Histrionicus histrionicus). We collected tail and back feathers, plasma and faeces for glucocorticoid analysis, and fitted female harlequin ducks with very high-frequency transmitters to track their breeding decisions. Both back feathers (moulted immediately before the current season) and faecal glucocorticoid metabolites were identified as important predictive factors of reproductive decisions; high concentrations of glucocorticoid metabolites in back feathers and faeces predicted a higher likelihood of reproductive deferral for the year. Although back and tail feather corticosterone concentrations were correlated, tail feathers (moulted at the end of the previous breeding season) did not predict breeding decisions. Plasma corticosterone concentrations were collected over too broad a time range after capture to be useful in this study. This study demonstrates the utility of non-invasive corticosterone metrics in predicting breeding decisions and supports the use of feathers to measure carry-over effects in migratory birds. With this technique, we identified the prenuptial moult as an important life

  14. Harlequin Duck population injury and recovery dynamics following the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill.

    PubMed

    Iverson, Samuel A; Esler, Daniel

    2010-10-01

    The 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill caused significant injury to wildlife populations in Prince William Sound, Alaska, USA. Harlequin Ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) were particularly vulnerable to the spill and have been studied extensively since, leading to one of the most thorough considerations of the consequences of a major oil spill ever undertaken. We compiled demographic and survey data collected since the spill to evaluate the timing and extent of mortality using a population model. During the immediate aftermath of the spill, we estimated a 25% decrease in Harlequin Duck numbers in oiled areas. Survival rates remained depressed in oiled areas 6-9 years after the spill and did not equal those from unoiled areas until at least 11-14 years later. Despite a high degree of site fidelity to wintering sites, immigration was important for recovery dynamics, as the relatively large number of birds from habitats outside the spill zone provided a pool of individuals to facilitate numerical increases. On the basis of these model inputs and assumptions about fecundity rates for the species, we projected a timeline to recovery of 24 years under the most-likely combination of variables, with a range of 16 to 32 years for the best-case and worst-case scenarios, respectively. Our results corroborate assertions from other studies that the effects of spilled oil on wildlife can be expressed over much longer time frames than previously assumed and that the cumulative mortality associated with chronic exposure to residual oil may actually exceed acute mortality, which has been the primary concern following most oil spills. PMID:21049885

  15. Commercialization of postharvest biocontrol: barriers and opportunities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The past twenty years has seen the field of postharvest biocontrol evolve from an unknown entity with one or two novel reports in the literature to a sophisticated science with strong research programs worldwide, hundreds of publications, patented technologies, and now several commercial products. ...

  16. Last male wins the egg fertilization fight: A case study in ladybird, Menochilus sexmaculatus.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Desh Deepak; Mishra, Geetanjali; Omkar

    2016-10-01

    Sexual selection and the mechanisms involved in sperm competition have not been greatly explored in ladybird beetles. The present study was conducted to investigate the processes of sperm competition and the role of mate guarding behaviour in its regulation in ladybird beetles. We investigated these questions in polyandrous females of the ladybird, Menochilus sexmaculatus (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) using a phenotypic marker (typical and intermediate morph) to assess paternity of offspring; to determine sperm competition. We conducted two double mating experiments: (i) complete first and second matings, and (ii) disrupted first and complete second matings each using homomorphic and heteromorphic pairing in alternation. Males which mated last were found to sire up to 72% of the offspring produced, indicating last male sperm precedence. Morph itself, independent of mating order, did not have a significant effect on proportion of offspring sired. Paternity share of the last male was negatively associated with mating duration of the first male; mating duration of the first male being indicative of mate guarding. This therefore indicates that prolonged matings by first males are essentially examples of post-copulatory mate guarding to prevent last male sperm precedence. PMID:27476769

  17. Rickettsial relative associated with male killing in the ladybird beetle (Adalia bipunctata).

    PubMed

    Werren, J H; Hurst, G D; Zhang, W; Breeuwer, J A; Stouthamer, R; Majerus, M E

    1994-01-01

    A cytoplasmically inherited microorganism associated with male killing in the two-spot ladybird beetle, Adalia bipunctata, is shown to be closely related to bacteria in the genus Rickettsia. Sequencing of a PCR-amplified product of the 16S genes coding for rRNA (16S rDNA) shows the organism associated with male killing in ladybirds to share a common ancestry with the Rickettsias relative to other genera (e.g., Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, and Cowdria). The rickettsial 16S rDNA product is found in four strains of ladybird beetle showing male embryo lethality and is absent from two uninfected strains and an antibiotic-cured strain. In addition, a revertant strain that had naturally lost the male-killing trait failed to amplify the rickettsial 16S rDNA product. Use of PCR primers for a 17-kDa protein antigen which is found only in rickettsias also resulted in an amplified product from infected strains. Uninfected, cured, and revertant strains and insect species infected with related bacteria (cytoplasmic-incompatibility bacteria from Nasonia wasps) failed to amplify the product. Discovery of a close relative of rickettsias associated with sex ratio distortion in insects has implications for the evolution and population dynamics of this bacterial genus.

  18. Last male wins the egg fertilization fight: A case study in ladybird, Menochilus sexmaculatus.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Desh Deepak; Mishra, Geetanjali; Omkar

    2016-10-01

    Sexual selection and the mechanisms involved in sperm competition have not been greatly explored in ladybird beetles. The present study was conducted to investigate the processes of sperm competition and the role of mate guarding behaviour in its regulation in ladybird beetles. We investigated these questions in polyandrous females of the ladybird, Menochilus sexmaculatus (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) using a phenotypic marker (typical and intermediate morph) to assess paternity of offspring; to determine sperm competition. We conducted two double mating experiments: (i) complete first and second matings, and (ii) disrupted first and complete second matings each using homomorphic and heteromorphic pairing in alternation. Males which mated last were found to sire up to 72% of the offspring produced, indicating last male sperm precedence. Morph itself, independent of mating order, did not have a significant effect on proportion of offspring sired. Paternity share of the last male was negatively associated with mating duration of the first male; mating duration of the first male being indicative of mate guarding. This therefore indicates that prolonged matings by first males are essentially examples of post-copulatory mate guarding to prevent last male sperm precedence.

  19. Biological invasion and biological control select for different life histories.

    PubMed

    Tayeh, Ashraf; Hufbauer, Ruth A; Estoup, Arnaud; Ravigné, Virginie; Frachon, Léa; Facon, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    Biological invaders have long been hypothesized to exhibit the fast end of the life-history spectrum, with early reproduction and a short lifespan. Here, we examine the rapid evolution of life history within the harlequin ladybird Harmonia axyridis. The species, once used as a biological control agent, is now a worldwide invader. We show that biocontrol populations have evolved a classic fast life history during their maintenance in laboratories. Invasive populations also reproduce earlier than native populations, but later than biocontrol ones. Invaders allocate more resources to reproduction than native and biocontrol individuals, and their reproduction is spread over a longer lifespan. This life history is best described as a bet-hedging strategy. We assert that invasiveness cannot be explained only by invoking faster life histories. Instead, the evolution of life history within invasive populations can progress rapidly and converge to a fine-tuned evolutionary match between the invaded environment and the invader. PMID:26035519

  20. Biological invasion and biological control select for different life histories

    PubMed Central

    Tayeh, Ashraf; Hufbauer, Ruth A.; Estoup, Arnaud; Ravigné, Virginie; Frachon, Léa; Facon, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    Biological invaders have long been hypothesized to exhibit the fast end of the life-history spectrum, with early reproduction and a short lifespan. Here, we examine the rapid evolution of life history within the harlequin ladybird Harmonia axyridis. The species, once used as a biological control agent, is now a worldwide invader. We show that biocontrol populations have evolved a classic fast life history during their maintenance in laboratories. Invasive populations also reproduce earlier than native populations, but later than biocontrol ones. Invaders allocate more resources to reproduction than native and biocontrol individuals, and their reproduction is spread over a longer lifespan. This life history is best described as a bet-hedging strategy. We assert that invasiveness cannot be explained only by invoking faster life histories. Instead, the evolution of life history within invasive populations can progress rapidly and converge to a fine-tuned evolutionary match between the invaded environment and the invader. PMID:26035519

  1. Vestigial and scalloped in the ladybird beetle: a conserved function in wing development and a novel function in pupal ecdysis.

    PubMed

    Ohde, T; Masumoto, M; Morita-Miwa, M; Matsuura, H; Yoshioka, H; Yaginuma, T; Niimi, T

    2009-10-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, Vestigial (Vg) and Scalloped (Sd) form a transcription factor complex and play a crucial role in wing development. To extend our knowledge of insect wing formation, we isolated vg and sd homologues from two ladybird beetle species, Henosepilachna vigintioctopunctata and Harmonia axyridis. Although the ladybird beetle vg homologues had only low homology with D. melanogaster vg, ectopic expression of H. vigintioctopunctata vg induced wing-like tissues in antennae and legs of D. melanogaster. Subsequent larval RNA interference (RNAi) analysis in H. vigintioctopunctata demonstrated conserved functions of vg and sd in wing development, and an unexpected novel function of sd in pupal ecdysis. Furthermore, our results can be applied to the production of a flightless ladybird beetle for biological control purposes using larval RNAi.

  2. Evaluation of a Portable Automated Serum Chemistry Analyzer for Field Assessment of Harlequin Ducks, Histrionicus histrionicus.

    PubMed

    Stoskopf, Michael K; Mulcahy, Daniel M; Esler, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    A portable analytical chemistry analyzer was used to make field assessments of wild harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) in association with telemetry studies of winter survival in Prince William Sound, Alaska. We compared serum chemistry results obtained on-site with results from a traditional laboratory. Particular attention was paid to serum glucose and potassium concentrations as potential indicators of high-risk surgical candidates based on evaluation of the field data. The median differential for glucose values (N = 82) between methods was 0.6 mmol/L (quartiles 0.3 and 0.9 mmol/L) with the median value higher when assayed on site. Analysis of potassium on site returned a median of 2.7 mmol/L (N = 88; quartiles 2.4 and 3.0 mmol/L). Serum potassium values were too low for quantitation by the traditional laboratory. Changes in several serum chemistry values following a three-day storm during the study support the value of on site evaluation of serum potassium to identify presurgical patients with increased anesthetic risk.

  3. Neuroglobin Gene Therapy Prevents Optic Atrophy and Preserves Durably Visual Function in Harlequin Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lechauve, Christophe; Augustin, Sébastien; Cwerman-Thibault, Hélène; Reboussin, Élodie; Roussel, Delphine; Lai-Kuen, René; Saubamea, Bruno; Sahel, José-Alain; Debeir, Thomas; Corral-Debrinski, Marisol

    2014-01-01

    Neuroglobin (NGB) is considered as an endogenous neuroprotective molecule against stroke, since the protein alleviates the adverse effects of hypoxic and ischemic insults. We previously demonstrated the functional link between NGB and mitochondria since it is required for respiratory chain function. Thus, here, we evaluated the relevance of this effect in the Harlequin (Hq) mouse strain, which exhibits retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss and optic atrophy due to a respiratory chain complex I (CI) defect. A twofold decrease of NGB amounts was observed in Hq retinas. We constructed a recombinant adeno-associated virus which combines to the mouse NGB open reading frame, its 5′ and 3′UTR, for guarantying mRNA stability and translation capacity. The vector was administrated intravitreally to Hq mice and NGB expression was stable for up to 7 months without negative effect on retinal architecture or function. On the contrary, RGCs and their axons were substantially preserved from degeneration; consequently, CI activity in optic nerves was protected conferring improvements in vision. Hence, we established that NGB prevents respiratory chain impairment, therefore, protecting visual function otherwise compromised by mitochondrial energetic failure. PMID:24622090

  4. Species sorting and patch dynamics in harlequin metacommunities affect the relative importance of environment and space.

    PubMed

    Leibold, Mathew A; Loeuille, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    Metacommunity theory indicates that variation in local community structure can be partitioned into components including those related to local environmental conditions vs. spatial effects and that these can be quantified using statistical methods based on variation partitioning. It has been hypothesized that joint associations of community composition with environment and space could be due to patch dynamics involving colonization-extinction processes in environmentally heterogeneous landscapes but this has yet to be theoretically shown. We develop a two-patch, type-two, species competition model in such a "harlequin" landscape (where different patches have different environments) to evaluate how composition is related to environmental and spatial effects as a function of background extinction rate. Using spatially implicit analytical models, we find that the environmental association of community composition declines with extinction rate as expected. Using spatially explicit simulation models, we further find that there is an increase in the spatial structure with extinction due to spatial patterning into clusters that are not related to environmental conditions but that this increase is limited. Natural metacommunities often show both environment and spatial determination even under conditions of relatively high isolation and these could be more easily explained by our model than alternative metacommunity models. PMID:26909428

  5. Neuroglobin gene therapy prevents optic atrophy and preserves durably visual function in Harlequin mice.

    PubMed

    Lechauve, Christophe; Augustin, Sébastien; Cwerman-Thibault, Hélène; Reboussin, Élodie; Roussel, Delphine; Lai-Kuen, René; Saubamea, Bruno; Sahel, José-Alain; Debeir, Thomas; Corral-Debrinski, Marisol

    2014-06-01

    Neuroglobin (NGB) is considered as an endogenous neuroprotective molecule against stroke, since the protein alleviates the adverse effects of hypoxic and ischemic insults. We previously demonstrated the functional link between NGB and mitochondria since it is required for respiratory chain function. Thus, here, we evaluated the relevance of this effect in the Harlequin (Hq) mouse strain, which exhibits retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss and optic atrophy due to a respiratory chain complex I (CI) defect. A twofold decrease of NGB amounts was observed in Hq retinas. We constructed a recombinant adeno-associated virus which combines to the mouse NGB open reading frame, its 5' and 3'UTR, for guarantying mRNA stability and translation capacity. The vector was administrated intravitreally to Hq mice and NGB expression was stable for up to 7 months without negative effect on retinal architecture or function. On the contrary, RGCs and their axons were substantially preserved from degeneration; consequently, CI activity in optic nerves was protected conferring improvements in vision. Hence, we established that NGB prevents respiratory chain impairment, therefore, protecting visual function otherwise compromised by mitochondrial energetic failure. PMID:24622090

  6. Species sorting and patch dynamics in harlequin metacommunities affect the relative importance of environment and space.

    PubMed

    Leibold, Mathew A; Loeuille, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    Metacommunity theory indicates that variation in local community structure can be partitioned into components including those related to local environmental conditions vs. spatial effects and that these can be quantified using statistical methods based on variation partitioning. It has been hypothesized that joint associations of community composition with environment and space could be due to patch dynamics involving colonization-extinction processes in environmentally heterogeneous landscapes but this has yet to be theoretically shown. We develop a two-patch, type-two, species competition model in such a "harlequin" landscape (where different patches have different environments) to evaluate how composition is related to environmental and spatial effects as a function of background extinction rate. Using spatially implicit analytical models, we find that the environmental association of community composition declines with extinction rate as expected. Using spatially explicit simulation models, we further find that there is an increase in the spatial structure with extinction due to spatial patterning into clusters that are not related to environmental conditions but that this increase is limited. Natural metacommunities often show both environment and spatial determination even under conditions of relatively high isolation and these could be more easily explained by our model than alternative metacommunity models.

  7. Phylogeography and demography of Guianan harlequin toads (Atelopus): diversification within a refuge.

    PubMed

    Noonan, Brice P; Gaucher, Philippe

    2005-09-01

    We investigated the genetic structure of populations of Guianan harlequin toads (genus Atelopus) and their evolutionary affinities to extra-Guianan congeners. Phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial cytochrome b (cyt b) and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 (ND2) gene sequences produced well-supported clades largely corresponding to the four recognized taxa in the Guianas (Atelopus spumarius hoogmoedi, Atelopus spumarius barbotini, Atelopus franciscus, and Atelopus flavescens). Our findings suggest that the Guianan A. spumarius represent distinct evolutionary lineages that merit distinction from Amazonian conspecifics, and that the status of A. flavescens and A. franciscus is somewhat less clear. Approximately 69% of the observed genetic variation is accounted for by differences between these four recognized taxa. Coalescent-based estimates of gene flow between taxa suggest that these lineages are largely isolated from one another. Negligible rates of migration between populations and significant divergence within such close proximity suggests that although the region inhabited by these taxa is almost entirely undisturbed, significant habitat heterogeneity exists as to have produced a remarkable diversification of Atelopus within the eastern Guiana Shield. These results contradict the commonly held view of the Guiana Shield as a 'refuge' whose stability during late Tertiary and Quaternary climatic fluctuations served as a biotic reservoir. Instead, we provide evidence that climatic fluctuations during this time had a diversifying effect within the Guianan region. PMID:16101771

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Biocontrol Strain Pseudomonas fluorescens LBUM 223

    PubMed Central

    Roquigny, Roxane; Arseneault, Tanya; Gadkar, Vijay J.; Novinscak, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens LBUM 223 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) with biocontrol activity against various plant pathogens. It produces the antimicrobial metabolite phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, which is involved in the biocontrol of Streptomyces scabies, the causal agent of common scab of potato. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of P. fluorescens LBUM 223. PMID:25953163

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Biocontrol Strain Pseudomonas fluorescens LBUM223

    PubMed Central

    Roquigny, Roxane; Arseneault, Tanya; Gadkar, Vijay J.; Novinscak, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens LBUM223 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) with biocontrol activity against various plant pathogens. It produces the antimicrobial metabolite phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, which is involved in the biocontrol of Streptomyces scabies, the causal agent of common scab of potato. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of P. fluorescens LBUM223. PMID:25953163

  10. Does a change from whole to powdered food (Artemia franciscana eggs) increase oviposition in the ladybird Coleomegilla maculata?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The limited availability of alternative foods to replace natural prey hinders cost-effective mass production of ladybird beetles for augmentative biological control. We compared the effects of powdered versus whole Artemia franciscana (brine shrimp) eggs with or without a dietary supplement on devel...

  11. Evolutionary ecology of microsporidia associated with the invasive ladybird Harmonia axyridis.

    PubMed

    Vilcinskas, Andreas; Schmidtberg, Henrike; Estoup, Arnaud; Tayeh, Ashraf; Facon, Benoit; Vogel, Heiko

    2015-03-01

    Invasive species are characterized by the rapid growth and spread of their populations after establishing a foothold in new habitats, and there are now many examples of such species negatively affecting biodiversity and the economy. It is unclear why some species can become successful invaders, whereas most (even if closely related) remain noninvasive. We previously proposed a hypothesis that parasites associated with invading species can promote their invasive success if they are harmless toward the invaders but harmful to their competitors and/or predators in the newly colonized habitat. Here we discuss whether microsporidia that have recently been discovered in the invasive ladybird Harmonia axyridis contribute to its invasive success. We show that all H. axyridis beetles sourced from diverse collection sites all over the world carry abundant microsporidia. This suggests that both native and invasive H. axyridis populations are associated with these tolerated parasites, which were likely to have existed in native populations before expansion rather than being acquired in newly colonized areas. We describe the pathogenesis of the microsporidia during different developmental stages of H. axyridis and we address the possibility that the predation of its infected eggs and larvae by competing native ladybird species may lead to their infection and ultimately to their decline. Finally, we discuss our initial hypothesis: microsporidia that are tolerated by an invasive vector insect can be active against susceptible native competitors and/or predator species. PMID:25131382

  12. Evolutionary ecology of microsporidia associated with the invasive ladybird Harmonia axyridis.

    PubMed

    Vilcinskas, Andreas; Schmidtberg, Henrike; Estoup, Arnaud; Tayeh, Ashraf; Facon, Benoit; Vogel, Heiko

    2015-03-01

    Invasive species are characterized by the rapid growth and spread of their populations after establishing a foothold in new habitats, and there are now many examples of such species negatively affecting biodiversity and the economy. It is unclear why some species can become successful invaders, whereas most (even if closely related) remain noninvasive. We previously proposed a hypothesis that parasites associated with invading species can promote their invasive success if they are harmless toward the invaders but harmful to their competitors and/or predators in the newly colonized habitat. Here we discuss whether microsporidia that have recently been discovered in the invasive ladybird Harmonia axyridis contribute to its invasive success. We show that all H. axyridis beetles sourced from diverse collection sites all over the world carry abundant microsporidia. This suggests that both native and invasive H. axyridis populations are associated with these tolerated parasites, which were likely to have existed in native populations before expansion rather than being acquired in newly colonized areas. We describe the pathogenesis of the microsporidia during different developmental stages of H. axyridis and we address the possibility that the predation of its infected eggs and larvae by competing native ladybird species may lead to their infection and ultimately to their decline. Finally, we discuss our initial hypothesis: microsporidia that are tolerated by an invasive vector insect can be active against susceptible native competitors and/or predator species.

  13. Inflammatory reaction to fabric collars from percutaneous antennas attached to intracoelomic radio transmitters implanted in harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus).

    PubMed

    Mulcahy, Daniel M; Burek, K A; Esler, Daniel

    2007-03-01

    In wild birds implanted intracoelomically with radio transmitters, a synthetic fabric collar placed around the base of a percutaneous antenna is believed to function as a barrier to contamination of the coelom. We examined 13 fabric collars recovered from percutaneous antennas of radio transmitters implanted intracoelomically in harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) 12 months earlier. Both the transmitters and antenna collars were encapsulated in fibrous connective tissue, with adhesions to internal organs. Histologically, bacteria were evident at the fabric-plastic interface in 8 of 10 collars examined in cross section and along the length of the collar in 3 collars examined longitudinally. Bacteria were confined within the fibrotic sheath surrounding the transmitter and the antenna collar in all birds. No evidence of chronic systemic effects secondary to implantation was present on hematologic or serum biochemical testing. These findings indicate that antenna collars do not prevent the entry of bacteria along the percutaneous antenna but may help stabilize the antenna and minimize coelomic contamination. We conclude that radio transmitters implanted into the coelom of harlequin ducks do not appear to cause significant health problems for at least 1 year after implantation.

  14. Inflammatory reaction to fabric collars from percutaneous antennas attached to intracoelomic radio transmitters implanted in harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulcahy, D.M.; Burek, K.A.; Esler, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    In wild birds implanted intracoelomically with radio transmitters, a synthetic fabric collar placed around the base of a percutaneous antenna is believed to function as a barrier to contamination of the coelom. We examined 13 fabric collars recovered from percutaneous antennas of radio transmitters implanted intracoelomically in harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) 12 months earlier. Both the transmitters and antenna collars were encapsulated in fibrous connective tissue, with adhesions to internal organs. Histologically, bacteria were evident at the fabric-plastic interface in 8 of 10 collars examined in cross section and along the length of the collar in 3 collars examined longitudinally. Bacteria were confined within the fibrotic sheath surrounding the transmitter and the antenna collar in all birds. No evidence of chronic systemic effects secondary to implantation was present on hematologic or serum biochemical testing. These findings indicate that antenna collars do not prevent the entry of bacteria along the percutaneous antenna but may help stabilize the antenna and minimize coelomic contamination. We conclude that radio transmitters implanted into the coelom of harlequin ducks do not appear to cause significant health problems for at least 1 year after implantation.

  15. Biocontrol: Bacillus penetrans and Related Parasites of Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Sayre, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    Bacillus penetrans Mankau, 1975, previously described as Duboscqia penetrans Thorne 1940, is a candidate agent for biocontrol of nematodes. This review considers the life stages of this bacterium: vegetative growth phase, colony fragmentation, sporogenesis, soil phase, spore attachment, and penetration into larvae of root-knot nematodes. The morphology of the microthallus colonies and the unusual external features of the spore are discussed. Taxonomic affinities with the actinomycetes, particularly with the genus Pasteuria, are considered. Also discussed are other soil bacterial species that are potential biocontrol agents. Products of their bacterial fermentation in soil are toxic to nematodes, making them effective biocontrol agents. PMID:19300701

  16. Genomic Basis of Plant Pathogen Suppression by Biocontrol Pseudomonas Species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Various plant commensal bacterial species, which naturally colonize the plant rhizosphere, are able to suppress fungal, bacterial, viral and even insect plant pathogens. These biocontrol activities are elicited primarily through the production of secreted exoenzymes and secondary metabolites that ma...

  17. Responses of an aphidophagous ladybird beetle, Anegleis cardoni, to varying densities of Aphis gossypii.

    PubMed

    Omkar; Kumar, Gyanendra

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the functional and numerical responses of fourth instar larvae, adult male, and adult female ladybird beetles, Anegleis cardoni Weise (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), to different densities of aphids, Aphis gossypii Glover (Hemiptera: Aphididae), on the bottle gourd, Lagenaria vulgaris Seringe (Cucurbitales: Cucurbitaceae). The results revealed a density dependent, Type II functional response of A. cardoni. Prey consumption increased curvilinearly with an increase in prey density for all three predatory stages. Numerical responses revealed significant increases in oviposition with increases in prey density. The food exploitation efficiency and the efficiency of conversion of ingested food decreased with increases in prey density. The attack rate was highest for adult females, followed by fourth instar larvae and adult males. Prey consumption was highest and handling time lowest in fourth instar larvae, followed by adult females and males. Therefore, fourth instar larvae of A. cardoni may be considered the most efficient predatory stage in aphid management strategies. PMID:23901912

  18. Evidence for a material gradient in the adhesive tarsal setae of the ladybird beetle Coccinella septempunctata.

    PubMed

    Peisker, Henrik; Michels, Jan; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2013-01-01

    For an insect to be able to efficiently attach to surfaces, the adhesive pads on the distal parts of its legs must establish large contact areas. In case of hairy adhesive pads this requires flexibility of the contact-forming bristles, called adhesive tarsal setae. However, too flexible setae would have a low mechanical stability resulting in a decreased attachment ability of the pads. Here we show that the adhesive tarsal setae of the ladybird beetle Coccinella septempunctata feature pronounced gradients in the material composition and properties along their length. The Young's modulus ranges from 1.2 MPa at the tips, where we found the incorporation of high proportions of the elastic protein resilin, to 6.8 GPa at the bases of the setae. These gradients likely represent an evolutionary optimization, which increases the performance of the adhesive system by enabling effective adaptation to rough surfaces while simultaneously preventing lateral collapse of the setae. PMID:23552076

  19. Evidence for a material gradient in the adhesive tarsal setae of the ladybird beetle Coccinella septempunctata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peisker, Henrik; Michels, Jan; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2013-04-01

    For an insect to be able to efficiently attach to surfaces, the adhesive pads on the distal parts of its legs must establish large contact areas. In case of hairy adhesive pads this requires flexibility of the contact-forming bristles, called adhesive tarsal setae. However, too flexible setae would have a low mechanical stability resulting in a decreased attachment ability of the pads. Here we show that the adhesive tarsal setae of the ladybird beetle Coccinella septempunctata feature pronounced gradients in the material composition and properties along their length. The Young’s modulus ranges from 1.2 MPa at the tips, where we found the incorporation of high proportions of the elastic protein resilin, to 6.8 GPa at the bases of the setae. These gradients likely represent an evolutionary optimization, which increases the performance of the adhesive system by enabling effective adaptation to rough surfaces while simultaneously preventing lateral collapse of the setae.

  20. Responses of an aphidophagous ladybird beetle, Anegleis cardoni, to varying densities of Aphis gossypii.

    PubMed

    Omkar; Kumar, Gyanendra

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the functional and numerical responses of fourth instar larvae, adult male, and adult female ladybird beetles, Anegleis cardoni Weise (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), to different densities of aphids, Aphis gossypii Glover (Hemiptera: Aphididae), on the bottle gourd, Lagenaria vulgaris Seringe (Cucurbitales: Cucurbitaceae). The results revealed a density dependent, Type II functional response of A. cardoni. Prey consumption increased curvilinearly with an increase in prey density for all three predatory stages. Numerical responses revealed significant increases in oviposition with increases in prey density. The food exploitation efficiency and the efficiency of conversion of ingested food decreased with increases in prey density. The attack rate was highest for adult females, followed by fourth instar larvae and adult males. Prey consumption was highest and handling time lowest in fourth instar larvae, followed by adult females and males. Therefore, fourth instar larvae of A. cardoni may be considered the most efficient predatory stage in aphid management strategies.

  1. Evidence for a material gradient in the adhesive tarsal setae of the ladybird beetle Coccinella septempunctata.

    PubMed

    Peisker, Henrik; Michels, Jan; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2013-01-01

    For an insect to be able to efficiently attach to surfaces, the adhesive pads on the distal parts of its legs must establish large contact areas. In case of hairy adhesive pads this requires flexibility of the contact-forming bristles, called adhesive tarsal setae. However, too flexible setae would have a low mechanical stability resulting in a decreased attachment ability of the pads. Here we show that the adhesive tarsal setae of the ladybird beetle Coccinella septempunctata feature pronounced gradients in the material composition and properties along their length. The Young's modulus ranges from 1.2 MPa at the tips, where we found the incorporation of high proportions of the elastic protein resilin, to 6.8 GPa at the bases of the setae. These gradients likely represent an evolutionary optimization, which increases the performance of the adhesive system by enabling effective adaptation to rough surfaces while simultaneously preventing lateral collapse of the setae.

  2. Olfactory cues from plants infected by powdery mildew guide foraging by a mycophagous ladybird beetle.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Jun; De Moraes, Consuelo M; Mescher, Mark C

    2011-01-01

    Powdery mildews (Erysiphales) are economically important plant pathogens that attack many agricultural crops. Conventional management strategies involving fungicide application face challenges, including the evolution of resistance and concerns over impacts on non-target organisms, that call for investigation of more sustainable alternatives. Mycophagous ladybird beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) feed on powdery mildew and have considerable potential as biological control agents; however, the foraging ecology and behavior of these beetles is not well understood. Here we document the olfactory cues presented by squash plants (Cucurbita moschata) infected by powdery mildew (Podosphaera sp.) and the behavioral responses of twenty-spotted ladybird beetles (Psyllobora vigintimaculata) to these cues. Volatile analyses through gas chromatography revealed a number of volatile compounds characteristic of infected plants, including 3-octanol and its analogues 1-octen-3-ol and 3-octanone. These compounds are typical "moldy" odorants previously reported in volatiles collected from other fungi. In addition, infected plants exhibited elevated emissions of several compounds also observed in collections from healthy leaves, including linalool and benzyl alcohol, which are reported to have anti-fungal properties. In Y-tube choice assays, P. vigintimaculata beetles displayed a significant preference for the odors of infected plants compared to those of healthy plants. Moreover, beetles exhibited strong attraction to one individual compound, 1-octen-3-ol, which was the most abundant of the characteristic fungal compounds identified. These results enhance our understanding of the olfactory cues that guide foraging by mycophagous insects and may facilitate the development of integrated disease-management strategies informed by an understanding of underlying ecological mechanisms.

  3. Molecular analysis reveals two new dimorphic species of Hesperomyces (Ascomycota, Laboulbeniomycetes) parasitic on the ladybird Coleomegilla maculata (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae).

    PubMed

    Goldmann, Lauren; Weir, Alex; Rossi, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Four morphotypes of Hesperomyces (Ascomycota, Laboulbeniomycetes) were found on the ladybird Coleomegilla maculata (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae) from Costa Rica and Ecuador. Partial SSU and ITS rDNA sequence analysis revealed that these belong to two phylogenetic species, each with a pair of morphotypes displaying position specificity. Confirmation of dimorphism in Laboulbeniales highlights the need for a thorough systematic revision of species concepts within the order. The theory of 'position specificity' also needs to be revisited. PMID:24295919

  4. Two new species of the ladybird beetle Hong Ślipiński from Chile (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Microweiseinae).

    PubMed

    González, Guillermo; Escalona, Hermes E

    2013-01-01

    The ladybird beetle genus Hong Ślipiński was previously known from a single female specimen from a subtropical forest in South East Queensland, Australia. Hong guerreroi sp. nov. and H. slipinskii sp. nov. from a temperate forests of Central and Southern Chile are described and illustrated. A key for the species of the genus and complementary characters, including the first description of males, are provided. PMID:24758818

  5. Molecular analysis reveals two new dimorphic species of Hesperomyces (Ascomycota, Laboulbeniomycetes) parasitic on the ladybird Coleomegilla maculata (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae).

    PubMed

    Goldmann, Lauren; Weir, Alex; Rossi, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Four morphotypes of Hesperomyces (Ascomycota, Laboulbeniomycetes) were found on the ladybird Coleomegilla maculata (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae) from Costa Rica and Ecuador. Partial SSU and ITS rDNA sequence analysis revealed that these belong to two phylogenetic species, each with a pair of morphotypes displaying position specificity. Confirmation of dimorphism in Laboulbeniales highlights the need for a thorough systematic revision of species concepts within the order. The theory of 'position specificity' also needs to be revisited.

  6. Two new species of the ladybird beetle Hong Ślipiński from Chile (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Microweiseinae).

    PubMed

    González, Guillermo; Escalona, Hermes E

    2013-01-01

    The ladybird beetle genus Hong Ślipiński was previously known from a single female specimen from a subtropical forest in South East Queensland, Australia. Hong guerreroi sp. nov. and H. slipinskii sp. nov. from a temperate forests of Central and Southern Chile are described and illustrated. A key for the species of the genus and complementary characters, including the first description of males, are provided.

  7. Larval and female footprints as feeding deterrent cues for immature stages of two congeneric ladybird predators (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    PubMed

    Kumar, B; Mishra, G; Omkar

    2014-10-01

    In the present study predation parameters, i.e. consumption rate, conversion efficiency and growth rate, and total developmental duration of immature stages of two congeneric ladybirds, Coccinella septempunctata (L.) and Coccinella transversalis F., have been evaluated in presence of conspecific and heterospecific fourth instar larval and adult female tracks. We hypothesized that the semiochemicals within larval/adult female tracks might act as foraging/feeding deterrent pheromones (FDPs) and would reduce the predation parameters; and would prolong total developmental duration of ladybird predators. Results of the study positively affirmed our hypothesis. The deterrence in prey consumption and reduction in conversion efficiency and growth rate was density dependent with species-specific variations. Consumption rate, conversion efficiency, and growth rate of larval instars decreased and the total developmental duration of immature stages increased when exposed to an increasing density of zero, two, three, and four conspecific/heterospecific larval/adult female tracks. Between ladybird species, C. septempunctata had higher consumption rate, growth rate, and total developmental durations, whereas conversion efficiency was higher in C. transversalis. Despite the presence of semiochemical tracks as foraging barriers, early instars showed higher conversion efficiencies and growth rates, whereas fourth instars had highest consumption rate in all experimental treatments. The present study, therefore, suggests that semiochemical tracks significantly reduce the predation potential and prolong developmental duration of conspecifics and heterospecifics. They, thus behave as FDP. PMID:24963549

  8. Larval and female footprints as feeding deterrent cues for immature stages of two congeneric ladybird predators (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    PubMed

    Kumar, B; Mishra, G; Omkar

    2014-10-01

    In the present study predation parameters, i.e. consumption rate, conversion efficiency and growth rate, and total developmental duration of immature stages of two congeneric ladybirds, Coccinella septempunctata (L.) and Coccinella transversalis F., have been evaluated in presence of conspecific and heterospecific fourth instar larval and adult female tracks. We hypothesized that the semiochemicals within larval/adult female tracks might act as foraging/feeding deterrent pheromones (FDPs) and would reduce the predation parameters; and would prolong total developmental duration of ladybird predators. Results of the study positively affirmed our hypothesis. The deterrence in prey consumption and reduction in conversion efficiency and growth rate was density dependent with species-specific variations. Consumption rate, conversion efficiency, and growth rate of larval instars decreased and the total developmental duration of immature stages increased when exposed to an increasing density of zero, two, three, and four conspecific/heterospecific larval/adult female tracks. Between ladybird species, C. septempunctata had higher consumption rate, growth rate, and total developmental durations, whereas conversion efficiency was higher in C. transversalis. Despite the presence of semiochemical tracks as foraging barriers, early instars showed higher conversion efficiencies and growth rates, whereas fourth instars had highest consumption rate in all experimental treatments. The present study, therefore, suggests that semiochemical tracks significantly reduce the predation potential and prolong developmental duration of conspecifics and heterospecifics. They, thus behave as FDP.

  9. A blood survey of elements, viral antibodies, and hemoparasites in wintering Harlequin Ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) and Barrow's Goldeneyes (Bucephala islandica)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heard, D.J.; Mulcahy, D.M.; Iverson, S.A.; Rizzolo, D.J.; Greiner, E.C.; Hall, J.; Ip, H.; Esler, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Twenty-eight Harlequin Ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) and 26 Barrow's Goldeneyes (Bucephala islandica) were captured in Prince William Sound, Alaska, between 1 and 15 March 2005. Blood was collected for quantification of element concentrations, prevalence of antibodies to several viruses, and hemoparasite prevalence and identification. Although we found selenium concentrations that have been associated with selenosis in some birds (???.0 ppm ww), our findings contribute to a growing literature describing relatively high selenium in apparently healthy birds in marine environments. Avian influenza virus antibodies were detected in the plasma of 28% of the ducks. No antibodies against adenovirus, reovirus, or paramyxovirus 1 were detected. Several hemoparasite species were identified in 7% of ducks. Our findings are similar to those in other free-living marine waterfowl and do not indicate unusual concerns for the health of these species in this area in late winter. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2008.

  10. A blood survey of elements, viral antibodies, and hemoparasites in wintering Harlequin Ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) and Barrow's Goldeneyes (Bucephala islandica).

    PubMed

    Heard, Darryl J; Mulcahy, Daniel M; Iverson, Samuel A; Rizzolo, Daniel J; Greiner, Ellis C; Hall, Jeff; Ip, Hon; Esler, Daniel

    2008-04-01

    Twenty-eight Harlequin Ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) and 26 Barrow's Goldeneyes (Bucephala islandica) were captured in Prince William Sound, Alaska, between 1 and 15 March 2005. Blood was collected for quantification of element concentrations, prevalence of antibodies to several viruses, and hemoparasite prevalence and identification. Although we found selenium concentrations that have been associated with selenosis in some birds (>or=2.0 ppm ww), our findings contribute to a growing literature describing relatively high selenium in apparently healthy birds in marine environments. Avian influenza virus antibodies were detected in the plasma of 28% of the ducks. No antibodies against adenovirus, reovirus, or paramyxovirus 1 were detected. Several hemo-parasite species were identified in 7% of ducks. Our findings are similar to those in other free-living marine waterfowl and do not indicate unusual concerns for the health of these species in this area in late winter.

  11. Evaluating Group Housing Strategies for the Ex-Situ Conservation of Harlequin Frogs (Atelopus spp.) Using Behavioral and Physiological Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Cikanek, Shawna J.; Nockold, Simon; Brown, Janine L.; Carpenter, James W.; Estrada, Angie; Guerrel, Jorge; Hope, Katharine; Ibáñez, Roberto; Putman, Sarah B.; Gratwicke, Brian

    2014-01-01

    We have established ex situ assurance colonies of two endangered Panamanian harlequin frogs, Atelopus certus and Atelopus glyphus, but observed that males fought with each other when housed as a group. Housing frogs individually eliminated this problem, but created space constraints. To evaluate the potential stress effects from aggressive interactions when grouping frogs, we housed male frogs in replicated groups of one, two, and eight. We measured aggressive behavioral interactions and fecal glucocorticoid metabolite (GC) concentrations as indicators of stress in each tank. In both small and large groups, frogs initially interacted aggressively, but aggressive interactions and fecal GCs declined significantly after the first 2 weeks of being housed together, reaching the lowest levels by week 4. We conclude that aggressive interactions in same-sex groups of captive Atelopus may initially cause stress, but the frogs become habituated within a few weeks and they can safely be housed in same-sex groups for longer periods of time. PMID:24587290

  12. Evaluating group housing strategies for the ex-situ conservation of harlequin frogs (Atelopus spp.) using behavioral and physiological indicators.

    PubMed

    Cikanek, Shawna J; Nockold, Simon; Brown, Janine L; Carpenter, James W; Estrada, Angie; Guerrel, Jorge; Hope, Katharine; Ibáñez, Roberto; Putman, Sarah B; Gratwicke, Brian

    2014-01-01

    We have established ex situ assurance colonies of two endangered Panamanian harlequin frogs, Atelopus certus and Atelopus glyphus, but observed that males fought with each other when housed as a group. Housing frogs individually eliminated this problem, but created space constraints. To evaluate the potential stress effects from aggressive interactions when grouping frogs, we housed male frogs in replicated groups of one, two, and eight. We measured aggressive behavioral interactions and fecal glucocorticoid metabolite (GC) concentrations as indicators of stress in each tank. In both small and large groups, frogs initially interacted aggressively, but aggressive interactions and fecal GCs declined significantly after the first 2 weeks of being housed together, reaching the lowest levels by week 4. We conclude that aggressive interactions in same-sex groups of captive Atelopus may initially cause stress, but the frogs become habituated within a few weeks and they can safely be housed in same-sex groups for longer periods of time. PMID:24587290

  13. Tailoring biocontrol to maximize top-down effects: on the importance of underlying site fertility.

    PubMed

    Hovick, Stephen M; Carson, Walter P

    2015-01-01

    The degree to which biocontrol agents impact invasive plants varies widely across landscapes, often for unknown reasons. Understanding this variability can help optimize invasive species management while also informing our understanding of trophic linkages. To address these issues, we tested three hypotheses with contrasting predictions regarding the likelihood of biocontrol success. (1) The biocontrol effort hypothesis: invasive populations are regulated primarily by top-down effects, predicting that increased biocontrol efforts alone (e.g., more individuals of a given biocontrol agent or more time since agent release) will enhance biocontrol success. (2) The relative fertility hypothesis: invasive populations are regulated primarily by bottom-up effects, predicting that nutrient enrichment will increase dominance by invasives and thus reduce biocontrol success, regardless of biocontrol efforts. (3) The fertility-dependent biocontrol effort hypothesis: top-down effects will only regulate invasive populations if bottom-up effects are weak. It predicts that greater biocontrol efforts will increase biocontrol success, but only in low-nutrient sites. To test these hypotheses, we surveyed 46 sites across three states with prior releases of Galerucella beetles, the most common biocontrol agents used against invasive purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria). We found strong support for the fertility-dependent biocontrol effort hypothesis, as biocontrol success occurred most often with greater biocontrol efforts, but only in low-fertility sites. This result held for early stage metrics of biocontrol success (higher Galerucella abundance) and ultimate biocontrol outcomes (decreased loosestrife plant size and abundance). Presence of the invasive grass Phalaris arundinacea was also inversely related to loosestrife abundance, suggesting that biocontrol-based reductions in loosestrife made secondary invasion by P. arundinacea more likely. Our data suggest that low-nutrient sites

  14. The roles of inoculants' carbon source use in the biocontrol of potato scab disease.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pingping; Zhao, Xinbei; Shangguan, Nini; Chang, Dongwei; Ma, Qing

    2015-04-01

    Despite the application of multiple strains in the biocontrol of plant diseases, multistrain inoculation is still constrained by its inconsistency in the field. Nutrients, especially carbons, play an important role in the biocontrol processes. However, little work has been done on the systematic estimation of inoculants' carbon source use on biocontrol efficacies in vivo. In the present study, 7 nonpathogenic Streptomyces strains alone and in different combinations were inoculated as biocontrol agents against the potato scab disease, under field conditions and greenhouse treatments. The influence of the inoculants' carbon source use properties on biocontrol efficacies was investigated. The results showed that increasing the number of inoculated strains did not necessarily result in greater biocontrol efficacy in vivo. However, single strains with higher growth rates or multiple strains with less carbon source competition had positive effects on the biocontrol efficacies. These findings may shed light on optimizing the consistent biocontrol of plant disease with the consideration of inoculants' carbon source use properties. PMID:25756527

  15. Cytochrome P4501A biomarker indication of oil exposure in harlequin ducks up to 20 years after the Exxon Valdez oil spill.

    PubMed

    Esler, Daniel; Trust, Kimberly A; Ballachey, Brenda E; Iverson, Samuel A; Lewis, Tyler L; Rizzolo, Daniel J; Mulcahy, Daniel M; Miles, A Keith; Woodin, Bruce R; Stegeman, John J; Henderson, John D; Wilson, Barry W

    2010-05-01

    Hydrocarbon-inducible cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) expression was measured, as ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity, in livers of wintering harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) captured in areas of Prince William Sound, Alaska, USA, oiled by the 1989 Exxon Valdez spill and in birds from nearby unoiled areas, during 2005 to 2009 (up to 20 years following the spill). The present work repeated studies conducted in 1998 that demonstrated that in harlequin ducks using areas that received Exxon Valdez oil, EROD activity was elevated nearly a decade after the spill. The present findings strongly supported the conclusion that average levels of hepatic EROD activity were higher in ducks from oiled areas than those from unoiled areas during 2005 to 2009. This result was consistent across four sampling periods; furthermore, results generated from two independent laboratories using paired liver samples from one of the sampling periods were similar. The EROD activity did not vary in relation to age, sex, or body mass of individuals, nor did it vary strongly by season in birds collected early and late in the winter of 2006 to 2007, indicating that these factors did not confound inferences about observed differences between oiled and unoiled areas. We interpret these results to indicate that harlequin ducks continued to be exposed to residual Exxon Valdez oil up to 20 years after the original spill. This adds to a growing body of literature suggesting that oil spills have the potential to affect wildlife for much longer time frames than previously assumed.

  16. Cytochrome P4501A biomarker indication of oil exposure in harlequin ducks up to 20 years after the Exxon Valdez oil spill.

    PubMed

    Esler, Daniel; Trust, Kimberly A; Ballachey, Brenda E; Iverson, Samuel A; Lewis, Tyler L; Rizzolo, Daniel J; Mulcahy, Daniel M; Miles, A Keith; Woodin, Bruce R; Stegeman, John J; Henderson, John D; Wilson, Barry W

    2010-05-01

    Hydrocarbon-inducible cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) expression was measured, as ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity, in livers of wintering harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) captured in areas of Prince William Sound, Alaska, USA, oiled by the 1989 Exxon Valdez spill and in birds from nearby unoiled areas, during 2005 to 2009 (up to 20 years following the spill). The present work repeated studies conducted in 1998 that demonstrated that in harlequin ducks using areas that received Exxon Valdez oil, EROD activity was elevated nearly a decade after the spill. The present findings strongly supported the conclusion that average levels of hepatic EROD activity were higher in ducks from oiled areas than those from unoiled areas during 2005 to 2009. This result was consistent across four sampling periods; furthermore, results generated from two independent laboratories using paired liver samples from one of the sampling periods were similar. The EROD activity did not vary in relation to age, sex, or body mass of individuals, nor did it vary strongly by season in birds collected early and late in the winter of 2006 to 2007, indicating that these factors did not confound inferences about observed differences between oiled and unoiled areas. We interpret these results to indicate that harlequin ducks continued to be exposed to residual Exxon Valdez oil up to 20 years after the original spill. This adds to a growing body of literature suggesting that oil spills have the potential to affect wildlife for much longer time frames than previously assumed. PMID:20821550

  17. Methods for the Evaluation of the Bioactivity and Biocontrol Potential of Species of Trichoderma.

    PubMed

    Steyaert, Johanna; Hicks, Emily; Kandula, Janaki; Kandula, Diwakar; Alizadeh, Hossein; Braithwaite, Mark; Yardley, Jessica; Mendoza-Mendoza, Artemio

    2016-01-01

    Members of the genus Trichoderma comprise the majority of commercial fungal biocontrol agents of plant diseases. As such, there is a wealth of information available on the analysis of their biocontrol potential and the mechanisms behind their superior abilities. This chapter aims to summarize the most common methods utilized within a Trichoderma biocontrol program for assessing the biological properties of individual strains. PMID:27565489

  18. Biocontrol: Fungi as Nematode Control Agents

    PubMed Central

    Mankau, R.

    1980-01-01

    The fungal antagonists of nematodes consist of a great variety of organisms belonging to widely divergent orders and families of fungi. They include the nematode-trapping fungi, endoparasitic fungi, parasites of nematode eggs and cysts, and fungi which produce metabolites toxic to nematodes. The diversity, adaptations, and distribution of nematode-destroying fungi and taxonomic problems encountered in their study are reviewed. The importance of nemato-phagous fungi in soil biology, with special emphasis on their relationship to populations of plant-parasitic nematodes, is considered. While predacious fungi have long been investigated as possible biocontrol agents and have often exhibited spectacular results in vitro, their performance in field studies has generated little enthusiasm among nematologists. To date no species has demonstrated control of any plant pest to a degree achieved with nematicides, but recent studies have provided a much clearer concept of possibilities and problems in the applied use of fungal antagonists. The discovery of new species, which appear to control certain pests effectively under specific conditions, holds out some promise that fungi may be utilized as alternatives to chemical control after a more thorough and expanded study of their biology and ecology. PMID:19300699

  19. Non-competitive Inhibition of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors by Ladybird Beetle Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Leong, Ron L; Xing, Hong; Braekman, Jean-Claude; Kem, William R

    2015-10-01

    Ladybird beetles (Family Coccinellidae) secrete an alkaloid rich venom from their leg joints that protects them from predators. Coccinellines, the major venom constituents, are alkaloids composed of three fused piperidine rings that share a common nitrogen atom. Although many coccinellines have been isolated and chemically characterized, their pharmacological properties are essentially unknown. Using radioligand binding and functional assays we investigated the actions of several coccinellines on skeletal muscle and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). The alkaloids were shown to displace the specific binding of tritiated piperidyl-N-(1-(2-thienyl)cyclohexyl)-3,4-piperidine ([(3)H]-TCP), which has been shown to bind deep within the ion channel of the electric fish (Torpedo) muscle nAChR. The stereoisomers precoccinelline and hippodamine (whose nitrogens are predicted to be ionized at physiological pH) and their respective analogs N-methyl-precoccinelline and N-methyl-hippodamine (whose quaternary nitrogens are permanently charged) displayed similar IC50s for inhibition of [(3)H]-TCP binding. However, the corresponding precoccinelline and hippodamine N-oxides, coccinelline and convergine (which have an electronegative oxygen bonded to an electropositive nitrogen) displayed significantly higher binding IC50s. Finally, exochomine, a dimeric coccinelline containing the hippodamine structure, displayed the highest IC50 (lowest affinity) for displacing specific [(3)H]-TCP binding. The presence of a desensitizing concentration (10(-3) M) of carbachol (CCh) had little or no effect on the affinity of the Torpedo nAChR for the three coccinellines tested. High concentrations of the coccinellid alkaloids did not affect binding of [(3)H]-cytisine to Torpedo receptor ACh binding sites. Inhibition of the alpha7 nAChR with pre-equilibrated precoccinelline was insurmountable with respect to ACh concentration. We conclude that the coccinellines bind to one or more

  20. Non-competitive Inhibition of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors by Ladybird Beetle Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Leong, Ron L; Xing, Hong; Braekman, Jean-Claude; Kem, William R

    2015-10-01

    Ladybird beetles (Family Coccinellidae) secrete an alkaloid rich venom from their leg joints that protects them from predators. Coccinellines, the major venom constituents, are alkaloids composed of three fused piperidine rings that share a common nitrogen atom. Although many coccinellines have been isolated and chemically characterized, their pharmacological properties are essentially unknown. Using radioligand binding and functional assays we investigated the actions of several coccinellines on skeletal muscle and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). The alkaloids were shown to displace the specific binding of tritiated piperidyl-N-(1-(2-thienyl)cyclohexyl)-3,4-piperidine ([(3)H]-TCP), which has been shown to bind deep within the ion channel of the electric fish (Torpedo) muscle nAChR. The stereoisomers precoccinelline and hippodamine (whose nitrogens are predicted to be ionized at physiological pH) and their respective analogs N-methyl-precoccinelline and N-methyl-hippodamine (whose quaternary nitrogens are permanently charged) displayed similar IC50s for inhibition of [(3)H]-TCP binding. However, the corresponding precoccinelline and hippodamine N-oxides, coccinelline and convergine (which have an electronegative oxygen bonded to an electropositive nitrogen) displayed significantly higher binding IC50s. Finally, exochomine, a dimeric coccinelline containing the hippodamine structure, displayed the highest IC50 (lowest affinity) for displacing specific [(3)H]-TCP binding. The presence of a desensitizing concentration (10(-3) M) of carbachol (CCh) had little or no effect on the affinity of the Torpedo nAChR for the three coccinellines tested. High concentrations of the coccinellid alkaloids did not affect binding of [(3)H]-cytisine to Torpedo receptor ACh binding sites. Inhibition of the alpha7 nAChR with pre-equilibrated precoccinelline was insurmountable with respect to ACh concentration. We conclude that the coccinellines bind to one or more

  1. Potential biocontrol agents for biofouling on artificial structures.

    PubMed

    Atalah, Javier; Newcombe, Emma M; Hopkins, Grant A; Forrest, Barrie M

    2014-09-01

    The accumulation of biofouling on coastal structures can lead to operational impacts and may harbour problematic organisms, including non-indigenous species. Benthic predators and grazers that can supress biofouling, and which are able to be artificially enhanced, have potential value as augmentative biocontrol agents. The ability of New Zealand native invertebrates to control biofouling on marina pontoons and wharf piles was tested. Caging experiments evaluated the ability of biocontrol to mitigate established biofouling, and to prevent fouling accumulation on defouled surfaces. On pontoons, the gastropods Haliotis iris and Cookia sulcata reduced established biofouling cover by >55% and largely prevented the accumulation of new biofouling over three months. On wharf piles C. sulcata removed 65% of biofouling biomass and reduced its cover by 73%. C. sulcata also had better retention and survival rates than other agents. Augmentative biocontrol has the potential to be an effective method to mitigate biofouling on marine structures.

  2. Two c-type lysozymes boost the innate immune system of the invasive ladybird Harmonia axyridis.

    PubMed

    Beckert, Annika; Wiesner, Jochen; Baumann, Andre; Pöppel, Anne-Kathrin; Vogel, Heiko; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    The invasive ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis has a two-layered immune system, featuring the constitutive production of the low-molecular-mass antimicrobial compound harmonine and the inducible production of a broad range of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Here we show that the immune system also features two c-type lysozymes, the acidic c-lys3 (pI = 5.46) and the basic c-lys4 (pI = 8.18). The injection of bacteria into H.axyridis boosted c-lys4 gene expression 8-fold in the gut, whereas the c-lys3 gene was expressed at comparable levels in both naïve and challenged beetles. Both c-lys3 and c-lys4 were expressed in Pichia pastoris and the bacteriolytic activity of the recombinant proteins was found to be calcium-dependent with pH maxima of 6.0 and 6.5, respectively. In a Bacillus subtilis growth inhibition assay, the antimicrobial activity of harmonine and two highly-inducible H.axyridis AMPs (coleoptericins) was potentiated in the presence of c-lys4 but not c-lys3, resulting in 4-fold (harmonine) and up to 16-fold (AMP) lower minimum inhibitory concentrations. Our results suggest that two structurally and functionally distinct lysozymes contribute to innate immune responses of H.axyridis and augment the harmonine and AMP components of the immune response.

  3. Molecular cytogenetic studies in the ladybird beetle Henosepilachnaargus Geoffroy, 1762 (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Epilachninae).

    PubMed

    Mora, Pablo; Vela, Jesús; Sanllorente, Olivia; Palomeque, Teresa; Lorite, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    The ladybird Henosepilachnaargus Geoffroy, 1762 has been cytogenetically studied. In addition we have conducted a review of chromosome numbers and the chromosomal system of sex determination available in the literature in species belonging to the genus Henosepilachna and in its closely related genus Epilachna. Chromosome number of Henosepilachnaargus was 2n=18, including the sex chromosome pair, a common diploid chromosome number within the tribe Epilachnini. The study of prophase I meiotic chromosomes showed the typical Xyp "parachute" bivalent as in the majority of species of Coccinellidae. C-banding and fluorescent staining with AT-specific DAPI fluorochrome dye have been carried out for the first time in H. argus. C-banding technique revealed that heterochromatic blocks are pericentromerically located and DAPI staining showed that this heterochromatin is AT rich. Fluorescence in situ hybridizations using rDNA and the telomeric TTAGG sequence as probes have been carried out. FISH using rDNA showed that the nucleolar organizing region is located on the short arm of the X chromosome. FISH with the telomeric sequence revealed that in this species telomeres of chromosomes are composed of the pentanucleotide TTAGG repeats. This is the first study on the telomeric sequences in Coccinellidae. PMID:26312131

  4. Molecular cytogenetic studies in the ladybird beetle Henosepilachna argus Geoffroy, 1762 (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Epilachninae)

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Pablo; Vela, Jesús; Sanllorente, Olivia; Palomeque, Teresa; Lorite, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The ladybird Henosepilachna argus Geoffroy, 1762 has been cytogenetically studied. In addition we have conducted a review of chromosome numbers and the chromosomal system of sex determination available in the literature in species belonging to the genus Henosepilachna and in its closely related genus Epilachna. Chromosome number of Henosepilachna argus was 2n=18, including the sex chromosome pair, a common diploid chromosome number within the tribe Epilachnini. The study of prophase I meiotic chromosomes showed the typical Xyp “parachute” bivalent as in the majority of species of Coccinellidae. C-banding and fluorescent staining with AT-specific DAPI fluorochrome dye have been carried out for the first time in H. argus. C-banding technique revealed that heterochromatic blocks are pericentromerically located and DAPI staining showed that this heterochromatin is AT rich. Fluorescence in situ hybridizations using rDNA and the telomeric TTAGG sequence as probes have been carried out. FISH using rDNA showed that the nucleolar organizing region is located on the short arm of the X chromosome. FISH with the telomeric sequence revealed that in this species telomeres of chromosomes are composed of the pentanucleotide TTAGG repeats. This is the first study on the telomeric sequences in Coccinellidae. PMID:26312131

  5. Extreme Costs of Mating for Male Two-Spot Ladybird Beetles

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Jennifer C.; Tse, Crystal T.

    2013-01-01

    Male costs of mating are now thought to be widespread. The two-spot ladybird beetle (Adalia bipunctata) has been the focus of many studies of mating and sexual selection, yet the costs of mating for males are unknown. The mating system of A. bipunctata involves a spermatophore nuptial gift ingested by females after copulation. In this study, we investigate the cost to males of mating and of transferring spermatophores in terms of lifespan, ejaculate production and depletion of nutritional reserves. We found that males faced a strong trade-off between mating and survival, with males that were randomly assigned to mate a single time experiencing a 53% reduction in post-mating lifespan compared to non-mating males. This is among the most severe survival costs of a single mating yet reported. However, spermatophore transfer did not impact male survival. Instead, the costs associated with spermatophores appeared as a reduced ability to transfer spermatophores in successive matings. Furthermore, males ingested more food following spermatophore transfer than after matings without spermatophores, suggesting that spermatophore transfer depletes male nutritional reserves. This is to our knowledge the first report of an effect of variation in copulatory behaviour on male foraging behaviour. Overall, our study highlights the advantages of assessing mating costs using multiple currencies, and suggests that male A. bipunctata should exhibit mate choice. PMID:24339980

  6. Do defensive chemicals facilitate intraguild predation and influence invasion success in ladybird beetles?

    PubMed

    Kajita, Yukie; Obrycki, John J; Sloggett, John J; Evans, Edward W; Haynes, Kenneth F

    2014-12-01

    Egg predation and cannibalism are believed to be common phenomena among many species of aphidophagous predatory ladybird beetles despite the presence of alkaloid based defensive chemicals in all life stages. We identified defensive chemicals from eggs of three congeneric species, one introduced into North America (Coccinella septempunctata L.), and two native (C. transversoguttata richardsoni Brown, and C. novemnotata Herbst), and examined the effects of ingested defensive chemicals on first instars. Ingested congeneric alkaloids were not toxic to first instars, likely because the three congeners produce the same principal alkaloids, precoccinelline and coccinelline, in similar amounts. First instars of the three congeners accumulated alkaloids ingested through egg cannibalism and congeneric predation. Egg consumption doubled the amount of alkaloids in first instars when they fed on conspecific or congeneric eggs, in comparison to a pea aphid diet. No detrimental effects of ingested congeneric alkaloids on development or survival of first instars were observed among these congeners. Chemical defenses of eggs are therefore not likely to be important in favoring the invasive species, C. septempunctata, in interactions with these native congeneric species. Because the invasive species is the most aggressive predator, having the same types of alkaloids may facilitate disproportionate intraguild predation on native congeners by C. septempunctata thereby potentially enhancing the invasion success of this introduced species. PMID:25380992

  7. Resource partitioning in a ladybird, Menochilus sexmaculatus: function of body size and prey density.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, D D; Kumar, B; Mishra, G; Omkar

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, resource partitioning by natural conspecific size variants (small and large) of ladybird, Menochilus sexmaculatus (Fabricius) females, in response to varying prey densities was assessed using functional and numerical responses as measures of prey density. The prey provided was small (second) and large (fourth) instars of Aphis craccivora Koch. Results revealed that under choice condition, small and large females of M. sexmaculatus consumed higher number of small and large instars, respectively. Small females exhibited a modified Type II functional response on small aphid instars and a Type II functional response on fourth aphid instars. Large females exhibited a Type II functional response when provided either second or fourth aphid instars. Numerical response in terms of numbers of eggs laid by both the females increased with increase in the density of either of the aphid instars. However, in small females, oviposition had a positive correlation with the numbers of small and large aphid instars consumed; being strong for the small aphid instars. While in large females, oviposition was positively correlated with the numbers of large aphid instars consumed and not small aphid instars. It therefore seems that intraspecific resource partitioning in M. sexmaculatus occurs prominently in large females than the small females. PMID:25467186

  8. Two c-type lysozymes boost the innate immune system of the invasive ladybird Harmonia axyridis.

    PubMed

    Beckert, Annika; Wiesner, Jochen; Baumann, Andre; Pöppel, Anne-Kathrin; Vogel, Heiko; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    The invasive ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis has a two-layered immune system, featuring the constitutive production of the low-molecular-mass antimicrobial compound harmonine and the inducible production of a broad range of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Here we show that the immune system also features two c-type lysozymes, the acidic c-lys3 (pI = 5.46) and the basic c-lys4 (pI = 8.18). The injection of bacteria into H.axyridis boosted c-lys4 gene expression 8-fold in the gut, whereas the c-lys3 gene was expressed at comparable levels in both naïve and challenged beetles. Both c-lys3 and c-lys4 were expressed in Pichia pastoris and the bacteriolytic activity of the recombinant proteins was found to be calcium-dependent with pH maxima of 6.0 and 6.5, respectively. In a Bacillus subtilis growth inhibition assay, the antimicrobial activity of harmonine and two highly-inducible H.axyridis AMPs (coleoptericins) was potentiated in the presence of c-lys4 but not c-lys3, resulting in 4-fold (harmonine) and up to 16-fold (AMP) lower minimum inhibitory concentrations. Our results suggest that two structurally and functionally distinct lysozymes contribute to innate immune responses of H.axyridis and augment the harmonine and AMP components of the immune response. PMID:25479015

  9. The direct effects of male killer infection on fitness of ladybird hosts (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    PubMed

    Elnagdy, S; Majerus, M E N; Gardener, M; Lawson Handley, L-J

    2013-08-01

    Male killing bacteria are common in insects and are thought to persist in host populations primarily by indirect fitness benefits to infected females, whereas direct fitness effects are generally assumed to be neutral or deleterious. Here, we estimated the effect of male killer infection on direct fitness (number of eggs laid, as a measure of fecundity, together with survival) and other life-history traits (development time and body size) in seven ladybird host/male killer combinations. Effects of male killers on fecundity ranged, as expected, from costly to neutral; however, we found evidence of reduced development time and increased survival and body size in infected strains. Greater body size in Spiroplasma-infected Harmonia axyridis corresponded to greater ovariole number and therefore higher potential fecundity. To our knowledge, this is the first report of direct benefits of male killer infection after explicitly controlling for indirect fitness effects. Neutral or deleterious fitness effects of male killer infection should not therefore be automatically assumed. PMID:23869568

  10. Are thermal constants constant? A test using two species of ladybird.

    PubMed

    Jarošík, V; Kumar, G; Omkar; Dixon, A F G

    2014-02-01

    There is a controversy about whether the thermal constants, lower developmental threshold, rate of development and corresponding degree days required for development, change when a species is reared under different developmental conditions. We present a more precise way of measuring these constants using the linear relationship between the rate of development and temperature. First we use the equation proposed by Ikemoto and Takai (2000) to determine the linear phase of development and then a generalised linear model having a different variance at low and high temperatures, specific for each condition, to estimate the parameters of the linear relationship. Using this method, we show that providing the difference in food quality is sufficiently great, an aphidophagous ladybird develops significantly faster and starts developing at a significantly lower temperature on a good than on a poor quality diet. Adaptive significance of the thermal constants not remaining constant is discussed in terms of a trade-off between growth and rate of development, when temperature and food quality varies. PMID:24556254

  11. Effects of Rearing Density on Survival, Growth, and Development of the Ladybird Coleomegilla maculata in Culture.

    PubMed

    Riddick, Eric W; Wu, Zhixin

    2015-01-01

    Our research focuses on developing techniques to rear ladybird beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). We evaluated the effects of rearing density on survival, growth, and development of Coleomegilla maculata. The hypothesis that a low to moderate rearing density has limited or no effects on survival and development was tested. C. maculata first instars were reared to pupae at a density of 1, 5, 10, 15, or 20 individuals per arena (2.5 cm high, 9.0 cm diameter, and 159 cm3 volume) and fed powdered brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) eggs. More larvae survived at the 1 and 5 densities, but no differences were detected between the 10, 15, or 20 densities. Median survival rate was at least 90% for larvae and 100% for pupae at the 10, 15, and 20 densities. Development time, body weight, and sex ratio were unaffected by rearing density. Overall, this study suggests that C. maculata larvae can be reared successfully at a density of 20 larvae/159 cm3 (≈ 0.126 larvae/cm3) in containers provisioned with powdered A. franciscana eggs. Scaling-up the size of containers, and C. maculata density in these containers, should be possible. PMID:26466904

  12. Rapid increase in dispersal during range expansion in the invasive ladybird Harmonia axyridis.

    PubMed

    Lombaert, E; Estoup, A; Facon, B; Joubard, B; Grégoire, J-C; Jannin, A; Blin, A; Guillemaud, T

    2014-03-01

    The evolutionary trajectories associated with demographic, genetic and spatial disequilibrium have become an issue of growing interest in population biology. Invasive species provide unique opportunities to explore the impact of recent range expansion on life-history traits, making it possible to test for a spatial arrangement of dispersal abilities along the expanding range, in particular. We carried out controlled experiments in laboratory conditions to test the hypothesis of an increase in dispersal capacity with range expansion in Harmonia axyridis, a ladybird that has been invading Europe since 2001. We found a marked increase in the flight speed of the insects from the core to the front of the invasion range in two independent sampling transects. By contrast, we found that two other traits associated with dispersal (endurance and motivation to fly off) did not follow the same spatial gradient. Our results provide a striking illustration of the way in which predictable directional genetic changes may occur rapidly for some traits associated with dispersal during biological invasions. We discuss the consequences of our results for invasion dynamics and the evolutionary outcomes of spatially expanding populations. PMID:24444045

  13. Extreme costs of mating for male two-spot ladybird beetles.

    PubMed

    Perry, Jennifer C; Tse, Crystal T

    2013-01-01

    Male costs of mating are now thought to be widespread. The two-spot ladybird beetle (Adalia bipunctata) has been the focus of many studies of mating and sexual selection, yet the costs of mating for males are unknown. The mating system of A. bipunctata involves a spermatophore nuptial gift ingested by females after copulation. In this study, we investigate the cost to males of mating and of transferring spermatophores in terms of lifespan, ejaculate production and depletion of nutritional reserves. We found that males faced a strong trade-off between mating and survival, with males that were randomly assigned to mate a single time experiencing a 53% reduction in post-mating lifespan compared to non-mating males. This is among the most severe survival costs of a single mating yet reported. However, spermatophore transfer did not impact male survival. Instead, the costs associated with spermatophores appeared as a reduced ability to transfer spermatophores in successive matings. Furthermore, males ingested more food following spermatophore transfer than after matings without spermatophores, suggesting that spermatophore transfer depletes male nutritional reserves. This is to our knowledge the first report of an effect of variation in copulatory behaviour on male foraging behaviour. Overall, our study highlights the advantages of assessing mating costs using multiple currencies, and suggests that male A. bipunctata should exhibit mate choice. PMID:24339980

  14. Defensive allomones function as aggregation pheromones in diapausing Ladybird Beetles, Hippodamia convergens.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Christopher A; Cardé, Ring T

    2013-06-01

    Identification of the stimuli responsible for the formation of an aggregation can be used to distinguish between social and non-social aggregations and help in the process of identifying the adaptive benefits of the gregarious behavior. The convergent ladybird beetle, Hippodamia convergens, forms dense aggregations during winter diapause. The mechanisms of conspecific attraction and hibernacula site selection of H. convergens are not well understood. In laboratory and field bioassays, we evaluated the role of three defensive compounds in the formation of H. convergens aggregations. Diapausing H. convergens aggregated within the section of an arena exposed to alkylmethoxypyrazines. 2-Isobutyl-3-methoxypyrazine (IBMP) caused the strongest aggregative effect. Beetles also aggregated to some doses of 2-sec-butyl-3-methoxypyrazine, but appeared to be repelled at higher doses. A third constituent, 2-isopropyl-3-methoxypyrazine, generally had little effect on the distribution of beetles, although the highest dose tested was repellent. Beetles also aggregated to a blend of these alkylmethoxypyrazines at their natural ratio. During fall migration to overwintering sites, more beetles aggregated in artificial hibernacula baited with IBMP, confirming its function as an aggregation pheromone. These three pyrazines also function as warning odors that, in conjunction with other aposematic displays (contrasting red and black coloration, gregarious behavior, reflex bleeding), contribute to the multi-modal, anti-predatory defense of coccinellid beetles and some other arthropods. Confirmation of the role of some alkylmethoxypyrazines in coccinellid aggregations suggests that these defensive allomones have been co-opted for intraspecific communication. PMID:23657436

  15. Do defensive chemicals facilitate intraguild predation and influence invasion success in ladybird beetles?

    PubMed

    Kajita, Yukie; Obrycki, John J; Sloggett, John J; Evans, Edward W; Haynes, Kenneth F

    2014-12-01

    Egg predation and cannibalism are believed to be common phenomena among many species of aphidophagous predatory ladybird beetles despite the presence of alkaloid based defensive chemicals in all life stages. We identified defensive chemicals from eggs of three congeneric species, one introduced into North America (Coccinella septempunctata L.), and two native (C. transversoguttata richardsoni Brown, and C. novemnotata Herbst), and examined the effects of ingested defensive chemicals on first instars. Ingested congeneric alkaloids were not toxic to first instars, likely because the three congeners produce the same principal alkaloids, precoccinelline and coccinelline, in similar amounts. First instars of the three congeners accumulated alkaloids ingested through egg cannibalism and congeneric predation. Egg consumption doubled the amount of alkaloids in first instars when they fed on conspecific or congeneric eggs, in comparison to a pea aphid diet. No detrimental effects of ingested congeneric alkaloids on development or survival of first instars were observed among these congeners. Chemical defenses of eggs are therefore not likely to be important in favoring the invasive species, C. septempunctata, in interactions with these native congeneric species. Because the invasive species is the most aggressive predator, having the same types of alkaloids may facilitate disproportionate intraguild predation on native congeners by C. septempunctata thereby potentially enhancing the invasion success of this introduced species.

  16. Rapid increase in dispersal during range expansion in the invasive ladybird Harmonia axyridis.

    PubMed

    Lombaert, E; Estoup, A; Facon, B; Joubard, B; Grégoire, J-C; Jannin, A; Blin, A; Guillemaud, T

    2014-03-01

    The evolutionary trajectories associated with demographic, genetic and spatial disequilibrium have become an issue of growing interest in population biology. Invasive species provide unique opportunities to explore the impact of recent range expansion on life-history traits, making it possible to test for a spatial arrangement of dispersal abilities along the expanding range, in particular. We carried out controlled experiments in laboratory conditions to test the hypothesis of an increase in dispersal capacity with range expansion in Harmonia axyridis, a ladybird that has been invading Europe since 2001. We found a marked increase in the flight speed of the insects from the core to the front of the invasion range in two independent sampling transects. By contrast, we found that two other traits associated with dispersal (endurance and motivation to fly off) did not follow the same spatial gradient. Our results provide a striking illustration of the way in which predictable directional genetic changes may occur rapidly for some traits associated with dispersal during biological invasions. We discuss the consequences of our results for invasion dynamics and the evolutionary outcomes of spatially expanding populations.

  17. Are thermal constants constant? A test using two species of ladybird.

    PubMed

    Jarošík, V; Kumar, G; Omkar; Dixon, A F G

    2014-02-01

    There is a controversy about whether the thermal constants, lower developmental threshold, rate of development and corresponding degree days required for development, change when a species is reared under different developmental conditions. We present a more precise way of measuring these constants using the linear relationship between the rate of development and temperature. First we use the equation proposed by Ikemoto and Takai (2000) to determine the linear phase of development and then a generalised linear model having a different variance at low and high temperatures, specific for each condition, to estimate the parameters of the linear relationship. Using this method, we show that providing the difference in food quality is sufficiently great, an aphidophagous ladybird develops significantly faster and starts developing at a significantly lower temperature on a good than on a poor quality diet. Adaptive significance of the thermal constants not remaining constant is discussed in terms of a trade-off between growth and rate of development, when temperature and food quality varies.

  18. Molecular cytogenetic studies in the ladybird beetle Henosepilachnaargus Geoffroy, 1762 (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Epilachninae).

    PubMed

    Mora, Pablo; Vela, Jesús; Sanllorente, Olivia; Palomeque, Teresa; Lorite, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    The ladybird Henosepilachnaargus Geoffroy, 1762 has been cytogenetically studied. In addition we have conducted a review of chromosome numbers and the chromosomal system of sex determination available in the literature in species belonging to the genus Henosepilachna and in its closely related genus Epilachna. Chromosome number of Henosepilachnaargus was 2n=18, including the sex chromosome pair, a common diploid chromosome number within the tribe Epilachnini. The study of prophase I meiotic chromosomes showed the typical Xyp "parachute" bivalent as in the majority of species of Coccinellidae. C-banding and fluorescent staining with AT-specific DAPI fluorochrome dye have been carried out for the first time in H. argus. C-banding technique revealed that heterochromatic blocks are pericentromerically located and DAPI staining showed that this heterochromatin is AT rich. Fluorescence in situ hybridizations using rDNA and the telomeric TTAGG sequence as probes have been carried out. FISH using rDNA showed that the nucleolar organizing region is located on the short arm of the X chromosome. FISH with the telomeric sequence revealed that in this species telomeres of chromosomes are composed of the pentanucleotide TTAGG repeats. This is the first study on the telomeric sequences in Coccinellidae.

  19. Resource partitioning in a ladybird, Menochilus sexmaculatus: function of body size and prey density.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, D D; Kumar, B; Mishra, G; Omkar

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, resource partitioning by natural conspecific size variants (small and large) of ladybird, Menochilus sexmaculatus (Fabricius) females, in response to varying prey densities was assessed using functional and numerical responses as measures of prey density. The prey provided was small (second) and large (fourth) instars of Aphis craccivora Koch. Results revealed that under choice condition, small and large females of M. sexmaculatus consumed higher number of small and large instars, respectively. Small females exhibited a modified Type II functional response on small aphid instars and a Type II functional response on fourth aphid instars. Large females exhibited a Type II functional response when provided either second or fourth aphid instars. Numerical response in terms of numbers of eggs laid by both the females increased with increase in the density of either of the aphid instars. However, in small females, oviposition had a positive correlation with the numbers of small and large aphid instars consumed; being strong for the small aphid instars. While in large females, oviposition was positively correlated with the numbers of large aphid instars consumed and not small aphid instars. It therefore seems that intraspecific resource partitioning in M. sexmaculatus occurs prominently in large females than the small females.

  20. Development of a wingless morph in the ladybird beetle, Adalia bipunctata.

    PubMed

    Lommen, Suzanne T E; Saenko, Suzanne V; Tomoyasu, Yoshinori; Brakefield, Paul M

    2009-01-01

    Many taxa of winged insects have independently lost the ability to fly and often possess reduced wings. Species exhibiting natural variation in wing morphology provide opportunities to investigate the genetics and developmental processes underlying the evolution of alternative wing morphs. Although many wing dimorphic species of beetles are known, the underlying mechanisms of variation are not well understood in this insect order. Here, we examine wing development of wild type and natural wingless morphs of the two-spot ladybird beetle, Adalia bipunctata. We show that both pairs of wings are distally truncated in the wingless adults. A laboratory population of the wingless morph displays heritable variation in the degree of wing truncation, reflecting reduced growth of the larval wing discs. The coexistence of variable wingless morphs supports the idea that typical monomorphic wingless insects may be the result of a gradual evolution of wing loss. Gene expression patterns in wing discs suggest that the conserved gene network controlling wing development in wild-type Adalia is disrupted in the dorsoventral patterning pathway in the wingless morphs. Previous research on several species of ant has revealed that the anteroposterior wing patterning pathway is disrupted in wingless workers. Future investigations should confirm whether interruptions in both taxa are limited to the patterning pathways found thus far, or whether there are also shared interruption points. Nevertheless, our results highlight that diverse mechanisms of development are likely to underlie the evolution of wingless insects.

  1. Defensive allomones function as aggregation pheromones in diapausing Ladybird Beetles, Hippodamia convergens.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Christopher A; Cardé, Ring T

    2013-06-01

    Identification of the stimuli responsible for the formation of an aggregation can be used to distinguish between social and non-social aggregations and help in the process of identifying the adaptive benefits of the gregarious behavior. The convergent ladybird beetle, Hippodamia convergens, forms dense aggregations during winter diapause. The mechanisms of conspecific attraction and hibernacula site selection of H. convergens are not well understood. In laboratory and field bioassays, we evaluated the role of three defensive compounds in the formation of H. convergens aggregations. Diapausing H. convergens aggregated within the section of an arena exposed to alkylmethoxypyrazines. 2-Isobutyl-3-methoxypyrazine (IBMP) caused the strongest aggregative effect. Beetles also aggregated to some doses of 2-sec-butyl-3-methoxypyrazine, but appeared to be repelled at higher doses. A third constituent, 2-isopropyl-3-methoxypyrazine, generally had little effect on the distribution of beetles, although the highest dose tested was repellent. Beetles also aggregated to a blend of these alkylmethoxypyrazines at their natural ratio. During fall migration to overwintering sites, more beetles aggregated in artificial hibernacula baited with IBMP, confirming its function as an aggregation pheromone. These three pyrazines also function as warning odors that, in conjunction with other aposematic displays (contrasting red and black coloration, gregarious behavior, reflex bleeding), contribute to the multi-modal, anti-predatory defense of coccinellid beetles and some other arthropods. Confirmation of the role of some alkylmethoxypyrazines in coccinellid aggregations suggests that these defensive allomones have been co-opted for intraspecific communication.

  2. Effects of Rearing Density on Survival, Growth, and Development of the Ladybird Coleomegilla maculata in Culture.

    PubMed

    Riddick, Eric W; Wu, Zhixin

    2015-01-01

    Our research focuses on developing techniques to rear ladybird beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). We evaluated the effects of rearing density on survival, growth, and development of Coleomegilla maculata. The hypothesis that a low to moderate rearing density has limited or no effects on survival and development was tested. C. maculata first instars were reared to pupae at a density of 1, 5, 10, 15, or 20 individuals per arena (2.5 cm high, 9.0 cm diameter, and 159 cm3 volume) and fed powdered brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) eggs. More larvae survived at the 1 and 5 densities, but no differences were detected between the 10, 15, or 20 densities. Median survival rate was at least 90% for larvae and 100% for pupae at the 10, 15, and 20 densities. Development time, body weight, and sex ratio were unaffected by rearing density. Overall, this study suggests that C. maculata larvae can be reared successfully at a density of 20 larvae/159 cm3 (≈ 0.126 larvae/cm3) in containers provisioned with powdered A. franciscana eggs. Scaling-up the size of containers, and C. maculata density in these containers, should be possible.

  3. Effects of Rearing Density on Survival, Growth, and Development of the Ladybird Coleomegilla maculata in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Riddick, Eric W.; Wu, Zhixin

    2015-01-01

    Our research focuses on developing techniques to rear ladybird beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). We evaluated the effects of rearing density on survival, growth, and development of Coleomegilla maculata. The hypothesis that a low to moderate rearing density has limited or no effects on survival and development was tested. C. maculata first instars were reared to pupae at a density of 1, 5, 10, 15, or 20 individuals per arena (2.5 cm high, 9.0 cm diameter, and 159 cm3 volume) and fed powdered brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) eggs. More larvae survived at the 1 and 5 densities, but no differences were detected between the 10, 15, or 20 densities. Median survival rate was at least 90% for larvae and 100% for pupae at the 10, 15, and 20 densities. Development time, body weight, and sex ratio were unaffected by rearing density. Overall, this study suggests that C. maculata larvae can be reared successfully at a density of 20 larvae/159 cm3 (≈ 0.126 larvae/cm3) in containers provisioned with powdered A. franciscana eggs. Scaling-up the size of containers, and C. maculata density in these containers, should be possible. PMID:26466904

  4. The direct effects of male killer infection on fitness of ladybird hosts (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    PubMed

    Elnagdy, S; Majerus, M E N; Gardener, M; Lawson Handley, L-J

    2013-08-01

    Male killing bacteria are common in insects and are thought to persist in host populations primarily by indirect fitness benefits to infected females, whereas direct fitness effects are generally assumed to be neutral or deleterious. Here, we estimated the effect of male killer infection on direct fitness (number of eggs laid, as a measure of fecundity, together with survival) and other life-history traits (development time and body size) in seven ladybird host/male killer combinations. Effects of male killers on fecundity ranged, as expected, from costly to neutral; however, we found evidence of reduced development time and increased survival and body size in infected strains. Greater body size in Spiroplasma-infected Harmonia axyridis corresponded to greater ovariole number and therefore higher potential fecundity. To our knowledge, this is the first report of direct benefits of male killer infection after explicitly controlling for indirect fitness effects. Neutral or deleterious fitness effects of male killer infection should not therefore be automatically assumed.

  5. Extreme costs of mating for male two-spot ladybird beetles.

    PubMed

    Perry, Jennifer C; Tse, Crystal T

    2013-01-01

    Male costs of mating are now thought to be widespread. The two-spot ladybird beetle (Adalia bipunctata) has been the focus of many studies of mating and sexual selection, yet the costs of mating for males are unknown. The mating system of A. bipunctata involves a spermatophore nuptial gift ingested by females after copulation. In this study, we investigate the cost to males of mating and of transferring spermatophores in terms of lifespan, ejaculate production and depletion of nutritional reserves. We found that males faced a strong trade-off between mating and survival, with males that were randomly assigned to mate a single time experiencing a 53% reduction in post-mating lifespan compared to non-mating males. This is among the most severe survival costs of a single mating yet reported. However, spermatophore transfer did not impact male survival. Instead, the costs associated with spermatophores appeared as a reduced ability to transfer spermatophores in successive matings. Furthermore, males ingested more food following spermatophore transfer than after matings without spermatophores, suggesting that spermatophore transfer depletes male nutritional reserves. This is to our knowledge the first report of an effect of variation in copulatory behaviour on male foraging behaviour. Overall, our study highlights the advantages of assessing mating costs using multiple currencies, and suggests that male A. bipunctata should exhibit mate choice.

  6. Avoidance of a generalist entomopathogenic fungus by the ladybird, Coccinella septempunctata.

    PubMed

    Ormond, Emma L; Thomas, Alison P M; Pell, Judith K; Freeman, Stephen N; Roy, Helen E

    2011-08-01

    Fungal entomopathogens are ubiquitous within the environment and susceptible insects are predicted to be under strong selection pressure to detect and avoid virulent isolates. Beauveria bassiana is an entomopathogenic fungus with a wide host range including coccinellids. Seven-spot ladybirds, Coccinella septempunctata, overwinter predominantly in leaf litter and B. bassiana is one of their major mortality factors during winter in temperate regions. Behavioural assays were conducted to assess the ability of adult C. septempunctata to avoid lethal densities of B. bassiana conidia in soil or on leaves. Further assays considered avoidance by C. septempunctata of mycosed (B. bassiana) C. septempunctata cadavers compared with uninfected C. septempunctata cadavers or in vitro B. bassiana. Treatments in any bioassays entirely avoided by C. septempunctata were regarded as censored data, to overcome the difficulties associated with zeros in log-ratio analyses. Male and female C. septempunctata avoided contact with leaf surfaces and soil inoculated with B. bassiana and mycosed cadavers. The ability of C. septempunctata to detect and avoid B. bassiana conidia is an adaptation that undoubtedly increases survival and ultimately fitness. We predict that such behavioural responses are widespread and driven by the high cost of fungal infection to a host.

  7. Condition-dependent ejaculate size and composition in a ladybird beetle.

    PubMed

    Perry, Jennifer C; Rowe, Locke

    2010-12-01

    Sexually selected male ejaculate traits are expected to depend on the resource state of males. Theory predicts that males in good condition will produce larger ejaculates, but that ejaculate composition will depend on the relative production costs of ejaculate components and the risk of sperm competition experienced by low- and high-condition males. Under some conditions, when low condition leads to poorer performance in sperm competition, males in low condition may produce ejaculates with higher sperm content relative to their total ejaculate and may even transfer more sperm than high-condition males in an absolute sense. Previous studies in insects have shown that males in good condition transfer larger ejaculates or more sperm, but it has not been clear whether increased sperm content represents a shift in allocation or simply a larger ejaculate, and thus the condition dependence of ejaculate composition has been largely untested. We examined condition dependence in ejaculate by manipulating adult male condition in a ladybird beetle (Adalia bipunctata) in which males transfer three distinct ejaculate components during mating: sperm, non-sperm ejaculate retained within the female reproductive tract, and a spermatophore capsule that females eject and ingest following mating. We found that high condition males indeed transferred larger ejaculates, potentially achieved by an increased rate of ejaculate transfer, and allocated less to sperm compared with low-condition males. Low-condition males transferred ejaculates with absolutely and proportionally more sperm. This study provides the first experimental evidence for a condition-dependent shift in ejaculate composition.

  8. Grouper as a Natural Biocontrol of Invasive Lionfish

    PubMed Central

    Mumby, Peter J.; Harborne, Alastair R.; Brumbaugh, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    Lionfish (Pterois volitans/miles) have invaded the majority of the Caribbean region within five years. As voracious predators of native fishes with a broad habitat distribution, lionfish are poised to cause an unprecedented disruption to coral reef diversity and function. Controls of lionfish densities within its native range are poorly understood, but they have been recorded in the stomachs of large-bodied Caribbean groupers. Whether grouper predation of lionfish is sufficient to act as a biocontrol of the invasive species is unknown, but pest biocontrol by predatory fishes has been reported in other ecosystems. Groupers were surveyed along a chain of Bahamian reefs, including one of the region's most successful marine reserves which supports the top one percentile of Caribbean grouper biomass. Lionfish biomass exhibited a 7-fold and non-linear reduction in relation to the biomass of grouper. While Caribbean grouper appear to be a biocontrol of invasive lionfish, the overexploitation of their populations by fishers, means that their median biomass on Caribbean reefs is an order of magnitude less than in our study. Thus, chronic overfishing will probably prevent natural biocontrol of lionfishes in the Caribbean. PMID:21731769

  9. Population structure of Aspergillus flavus before and after biocontrol treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus is a fungal pathogen of many important crops worldwide. We sampled A. flavus strains from a cornfield in Rocky Mount, North Carolina, over a period of two years. Plots were inoculated at tasselling with either AF36 or NRRL 21882 (=Afla-Guard) biocontrol strains, both of which are ...

  10. Challenges and opportunities for the commercialization of postharvest biocontrol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The past twenty years has seen the field of postharvest biocontrol evolve into a sophisticated science with global research programs worldwide, numerous yearly publications, patented technologies, and the development of new commercial products. The use of these products, however, still remains limi...

  11. Grouper as a natural biocontrol of invasive lionfish.

    PubMed

    Mumby, Peter J; Harborne, Alastair R; Brumbaugh, Daniel R

    2011-01-01

    Lionfish (Pterois volitans/miles) have invaded the majority of the Caribbean region within five years. As voracious predators of native fishes with a broad habitat distribution, lionfish are poised to cause an unprecedented disruption to coral reef diversity and function. Controls of lionfish densities within its native range are poorly understood, but they have been recorded in the stomachs of large-bodied Caribbean groupers. Whether grouper predation of lionfish is sufficient to act as a biocontrol of the invasive species is unknown, but pest biocontrol by predatory fishes has been reported in other ecosystems. Groupers were surveyed along a chain of Bahamian reefs, including one of the region's most successful marine reserves which supports the top one percentile of Caribbean grouper biomass. Lionfish biomass exhibited a 7-fold and non-linear reduction in relation to the biomass of grouper. While Caribbean grouper appear to be a biocontrol of invasive lionfish, the overexploitation of their populations by fishers, means that their median biomass on Caribbean reefs is an order of magnitude less than in our study. Thus, chronic overfishing will probably prevent natural biocontrol of lionfishes in the Caribbean.

  12. Role of social and individual experience in interaction of the meadow ant Formica pratensis (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) with ladybird imagines and hoverfly larvae.

    PubMed

    Novgorodova, Tatiana A

    2015-03-01

    The ability to recognize aphidophages is one of the key points in the protection ants provide aphids against their natural enemies. Behavior of honeydew collectors from nature ("field," control) and laboratory reared "naive" ants of Formica pratensis Retzius, which had never met either "mature" workers or aphids and aphidophages, was observed during their pairwise interactions with ladybird imagines and hoverfly larvae. The majority of the "naive" ants perceived ladybirds as an enemy at their first encounter attacking them immediately without any prior antennation. Ants seem to have a certain innate "enemy image" that lets them react very quickly to protect aphids. Hoverfly larvae were rarely attacked by both "field" and "naive" ants (>15%). During tests with ladybirds ants from nature attacked them and also demonstrated the most aggressive reactions (series of bites and "death grip") less frequently than the "naive" ants. The percentage of ants avoiding aphidophages after a contact with their chemical defense (reflex bleeding and glue-like saliva) was significantly higher in the control group. Whereas the "naive" ants did not learn to avoid danger, foragers from nature usually tried to avoid negative experience and used tactics of "short bites." Overall, experience has been proved to be unimportant for displaying key behavioral reactions underlying ant-ladybird interaction. However, accumulation of experience has been assumed to play an important role in the formation of behavioral strategy that allows honeydew collectors to drive aphidophages away with lower energy costs and avoid or minimize negative consequences of aphidophages' chemical defense. PMID:24729435

  13. Suppression of leaf feeding and oviposition of phytophagous ladybird beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) by chitinase gene-transformed phylloplane bacteria and their specific bacteriophages entrapped in alginate gel beads.

    PubMed

    Otsu, Yasunari; Mori, Hirofumi; Komuta, Kenji; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Nogawa, Souta; Matsuda, Yoshinori; Nonomura, Teruo; Sakuratani, Yasuyuki; Tosa, Yukio; Mayama, Shigeyuki; Toyoda, Hideyoshi

    2003-06-01

    The chitinase gene-transformed strain KPM-007E/chi of Enterobacter cloacae was vitally entrapped in sodium alginate gel beads with its specific virulent bacteriophage EcP-01 to provide a new method for microbially digesting chitinous peritrophic membranes of phytophagous ladybird beetles Epilachna vigintioctopunctata. First, chitinase SH1 from a gram-positive bacterium Kurthia zopfii was overproduced by Escherichia coli cells and purified by affinity column chromatography. The purified enzyme effectively digested peritrophic membranes dissected from the ladybird beetles to expose epithelial tissues beneath the peritrophic membrane, and the beetles that had ingested chitinase after submergence in chitinase solution had considerably reduced their feeding on tomato leaves. KPM-007E/chi, entrapped in the alginate beads, released the chitinase. More chitinase was released when KPM-007E/chi was present with their specific virulent bacteriophage EcP-01 in the beads because of lysis of bacterial cells infected with the bacteriophages. This chitinase release from the microbial beads (containing KPM-007E/chi and EcP-01) was sufficient to digest the peritrophic membrane as well as to suppress feeding of bead-sprayed tomato leaves by the ladybird beetles. A daily supply of tomato leaves treated with the microbial beads considerably suppressed leaf feeding and oviposition by the ladybird beetles, suggesting a possible application of chitinase-secreting bacteria for suppressing herbivorous insect pests.

  14. Role of social and individual experience in interaction of the meadow ant Formica pratensis (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) with ladybird imagines and hoverfly larvae.

    PubMed

    Novgorodova, Tatiana A

    2015-03-01

    The ability to recognize aphidophages is one of the key points in the protection ants provide aphids against their natural enemies. Behavior of honeydew collectors from nature ("field," control) and laboratory reared "naive" ants of Formica pratensis Retzius, which had never met either "mature" workers or aphids and aphidophages, was observed during their pairwise interactions with ladybird imagines and hoverfly larvae. The majority of the "naive" ants perceived ladybirds as an enemy at their first encounter attacking them immediately without any prior antennation. Ants seem to have a certain innate "enemy image" that lets them react very quickly to protect aphids. Hoverfly larvae were rarely attacked by both "field" and "naive" ants (>15%). During tests with ladybirds ants from nature attacked them and also demonstrated the most aggressive reactions (series of bites and "death grip") less frequently than the "naive" ants. The percentage of ants avoiding aphidophages after a contact with their chemical defense (reflex bleeding and glue-like saliva) was significantly higher in the control group. Whereas the "naive" ants did not learn to avoid danger, foragers from nature usually tried to avoid negative experience and used tactics of "short bites." Overall, experience has been proved to be unimportant for displaying key behavioral reactions underlying ant-ladybird interaction. However, accumulation of experience has been assumed to play an important role in the formation of behavioral strategy that allows honeydew collectors to drive aphidophages away with lower energy costs and avoid or minimize negative consequences of aphidophages' chemical defense.

  15. Spatial and taxonomical overlap of fungi on phylloplanes and invasive alien ladybirds with fungal infections in tree crowns of urban green spaces.

    PubMed

    Howe, Andy G; Ravn, Hans Peter; Jensen, Annette B; Meyling, Nicolai V

    2016-09-01

    Occurrence of entomopathogenic fungi on phylloplanes in Tilia × europaea crowns between 1 and 13 m was assessed in urban parks. Prevalence of fungal infections in ladybirds (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) collected from Tilia × europaea was assessed to determine whether fungi found on phylloplanes also occurred as infections in ladybirds. Isaria spp. was most abundant on phylloplanes (mean colony forming units (CFU) per leaf ± SE, 0.33 ± 0.03) followed by Beauveria spp. (0.22 ± 0.02 CFU per leaf) and Lecanicillium spp. (0.19 ± 0.02 CFU per leaf). Densities of inoculum were higher in inner crowns and decreased with height, although Lecanicillium spp. peaked at 5-7 m. Upper phylloplane surfaces harboured higher densities of Isaria spp. and Beauveria spp. than lower surfaces, whereas Lecanicillium spp. was equally distributed. Most prevalent on ladybirds were Isaria spp. (20.6% Harmonia axyridis; 4.8% natives), Lecanicillium spp. (13.6% H. axyridis; 4.8% natives), with fewer Beauveria spp. infections (2.6% H. axyridis). Molecular identification revealed Beauveria bassiana, B. pseudobassiana, Isaria farinosa and Lecanicillium muscarium among isolates of both tree and ladybird origin. Tilia × europaea phylloplanes support a diverse assemblage of entomopathogenic fungal species with a different prevalence in coccinellids compared to their relative abundance in this habitat. PMID:27353660

  16. Quantitative Assessment of Current Risks to Harlequin Ducks in Prince William Sound, Alaska, from the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill

    PubMed Central

    Harwell, Mark A.; Gentile, John H.; Parker, Keith R.; Murphy, Stephen M.; Day, Robert H.; Bence, A. Edward; Neff, Jerry M.; Wiens, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Harlequin Ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) were adversely affected by the Exxon Valdez oil spill (EVOS) in Prince William Sound (PWS), Alaska, and some have suggested effects continue two decades later. We present an ecological risk assessment evaluating quantitatively whether PWS seaducks continue to be at-risk from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in residual Exxon Valdez oil. Potential pathways for PAH exposures are identified for initially oiled and never-oiled reference sites. Some potential pathways are implausible (e.g., a seaduck excavating subsurface oil residues), whereas other pathways warrant quantification. We used data on PAH concentrations in PWS prey species, sediments, and seawater collected during 2001–2008 to develop a stochastic individual-based model projecting assimilated doses to seaducks. We simulated exposures to 500,000 individuals in each of eight age/gender classes, capturing the variability within a population of seaducks living in PWS. Doses to the maximum-exposed individuals are ∼400–4,000 times lower than chronic toxicity reference values established using USEPA protocols for seaducks. These exposures are so low that no individual-level effects are plausible, even within a simulated population that is orders-of-magnitude larger than exists in PWS. We conclude that toxicological risks to PWS seaducks from residual Exxon Valdez oil two decades later are essentially non-existent. PMID:23723680

  17. Surgical and immediate postrelease mortality of harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) implanted with abdominal radio transmitters with percutaneous antennae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulcahy, D.M.; Esler, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    Radiotelemetry is an essential tool in the study of free-ranging bird populations, and a variety of transmitter-attachment methods have been developed. A promising new method is abdominal implantation of a transmitter with a percutaneous antenna. Researchers using this technique should be concerned about and aware of mortality during surgery and during the immediate postrelease period (the 14-day period following surgery). Of 307 radio-implant surgeries performed between 1995 and 1997 in harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus), 7 (2.3%) deaths were documented during surgery or anesthetic recovery. Of 295 birds released with implanted radios, 10 (3.4%) died during the immediate postrelease period. Modifications to anesthetic procedures used in the 204 surgeries performed in 1996 and 1997 reduced mortality to 1.5% during surgery and 1.5% during the immediate postrelease period. Anesthetic modifications included intubation of all birds, placement of birds on an elevated platform that allowed the head to rest at a level lower than the body during surgery, placement of a heated water blanket under the birds during surgery, monitoring of body temperature, and use of electrocardiogram and Doppler ultrasound to monitor heart rates and arrhythmias. Low levels of mortality associated with abdominal implantation of radio transmitters may be unavoidable, but mortality can be minimized with adjustments to anesthetic technique. Copyright 1999 by American Association of Zoo Veterinarians.

  18. Quantitative Assessment of Current Risks to Harlequin Ducks in Prince William Sound, Alaska, from the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill.

    PubMed

    Harwell, Mark A; Gentile, John H; Parker, Keith R; Murphy, Stephen M; Day, Robert H; Bence, A Edward; Neff, Jerry M; Wiens, John A

    2012-03-01

    Harlequin Ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) were adversely affected by the Exxon Valdez oil spill (EVOS) in Prince William Sound (PWS), Alaska, and some have suggested effects continue two decades later. We present an ecological risk assessment evaluating quantitatively whether PWS seaducks continue to be at-risk from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in residual Exxon Valdez oil. Potential pathways for PAH exposures are identified for initially oiled and never-oiled reference sites. Some potential pathways are implausible (e.g., a seaduck excavating subsurface oil residues), whereas other pathways warrant quantification. We used data on PAH concentrations in PWS prey species, sediments, and seawater collected during 2001-2008 to develop a stochastic individual-based model projecting assimilated doses to seaducks. We simulated exposures to 500,000 individuals in each of eight age/gender classes, capturing the variability within a population of seaducks living in PWS. Doses to the maximum-exposed individuals are ∼400-4,000 times lower than chronic toxicity reference values established using USEPA protocols for seaducks. These exposures are so low that no individual-level effects are plausible, even within a simulated population that is orders-of-magnitude larger than exists in PWS. We conclude that toxicological risks to PWS seaducks from residual Exxon Valdez oil two decades later are essentially non-existent. PMID:23723680

  19. Quantitative Assessment of Current Risks to Harlequin Ducks in Prince William Sound, Alaska, from the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill.

    PubMed

    Harwell, Mark A; Gentile, John H; Parker, Keith R; Murphy, Stephen M; Day, Robert H; Bence, A Edward; Neff, Jerry M; Wiens, John A

    2012-03-01

    Harlequin Ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) were adversely affected by the Exxon Valdez oil spill (EVOS) in Prince William Sound (PWS), Alaska, and some have suggested effects continue two decades later. We present an ecological risk assessment evaluating quantitatively whether PWS seaducks continue to be at-risk from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in residual Exxon Valdez oil. Potential pathways for PAH exposures are identified for initially oiled and never-oiled reference sites. Some potential pathways are implausible (e.g., a seaduck excavating subsurface oil residues), whereas other pathways warrant quantification. We used data on PAH concentrations in PWS prey species, sediments, and seawater collected during 2001-2008 to develop a stochastic individual-based model projecting assimilated doses to seaducks. We simulated exposures to 500,000 individuals in each of eight age/gender classes, capturing the variability within a population of seaducks living in PWS. Doses to the maximum-exposed individuals are ∼400-4,000 times lower than chronic toxicity reference values established using USEPA protocols for seaducks. These exposures are so low that no individual-level effects are plausible, even within a simulated population that is orders-of-magnitude larger than exists in PWS. We conclude that toxicological risks to PWS seaducks from residual Exxon Valdez oil two decades later are essentially non-existent.

  20. Exposure of sea otters and harlequin ducks in Prince William Sound, Alaska, USA, to shoreline oil residues 20 years after the Exxon Valdez oil spill.

    PubMed

    Neff, Jerry M; Page, David S; Boehm, Paul D

    2011-03-01

    We assessed whether sea otters and harlequin ducks in an area of western Prince William Sound, Alaska, USA (PWS), oiled by the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill (EVOS), are exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from oil residues 20 years after the spill. Spilled oil has persisted in PWS for two decades as surface oil residues (SOR) and subsurface oil residues (SSOR) on the shore. The rare SOR are located primarily on the upper shore as inert, nonhazardous asphaltic deposits, and SSOR are confined to widely scattered locations as small patches under a boulder/cobble veneer, primarily on the middle and upper shore, in forms and locations that preclude physical contact by wildlife and diminish bioavailability. Sea otters and harlequin ducks consume benthic invertebrates that they collect by diving to the bottom in the intertidal and subtidal zones. Sea otters also dig intertidal and subtidal pits in search of clams. The three plausible exposure pathways are through the water, in oil-contaminated prey, or by direct contact with SSOR during foraging. Concentrations of PAH in near-shore water off oiled shores in 2002 to 2005 were at background levels (<0.05 ng/L). Median concentrations of PAH in five intertidal prey species on oiled shores in 2002 to 2008 range from 4.0 to 34 ng/g dry weight, indistinguishable from background concentrations. Subsurface oil residues are restricted to locations on the shore and substrate types, where large clams do not occur and where sea otters do not dig foraging pits. Therefore, that sea otters and harlequin ducks continue to be exposed to environmentally significant amounts of PAH from EVOS 20 years after the spill is not plausible.

  1. Cytochrome P4501A biomarker indication of oil exposure in harlequin ducks up to 20 years after the Exxon Valdez oil spill

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Esler, Daniel; Trust, Kimberly A.; Ballachey, Brenda E.; Iverson, Samuel A.; Lewis, Tyler L.; Rizzolo, Daniel; Mulcahy, Daniel M.; Miles, A. Keith; Woodin, Bruce R.; Stegeman, John J.; Henderson, John D.; Wilson, Barry W.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrocarbon-inducible cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) expression was measured, as ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity, in livers of wintering harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) captured in areas of Prince William Sound, Alaska, USA, oiled by the 1989 Exxon Valdez spill and in birds from nearby unoiled areas, during 2005 to 2009 (up to 20 years following the spill). The present work repeated studies conducted in 1998 that demonstrated that in harlequin ducks using areas that received Exxon Valdez oil, EROD activity was elevated nearly a decade after the spill. The present findings strongly supported the conclusion that average levels of hepatic EROD activity were higher in ducks from oiled areas than those from unoiled areas during 2005 to 2009. This result was consistent across four sampling periods; furthermore, results generated from two independent laboratories using paired liver samples from one of the sampling periods were similar. The EROD activity did not vary in relation to age, sex, or body mass of individuals, nor did it vary strongly by season in birds collected early and late in the winter of 2006 to 2007, indicating that these factors did not confound inferences about observed differences between oiled and unoiled areas. We interpret these results to indicate that harlequin ducks continued to be exposed to residual Exxon Valdez oil up to 20 years after the original spill. This adds to a growing body of literature suggesting that oil spills have the potential to affect wildlife for much longer time frames than previously assumed.

  2. Exposure of sea otters and harlequin ducks in Prince William Sound, Alaska, USA, to shoreline oil residues 20 years after the Exxon Valdez oil spill.

    PubMed

    Neff, Jerry M; Page, David S; Boehm, Paul D

    2011-03-01

    We assessed whether sea otters and harlequin ducks in an area of western Prince William Sound, Alaska, USA (PWS), oiled by the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill (EVOS), are exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from oil residues 20 years after the spill. Spilled oil has persisted in PWS for two decades as surface oil residues (SOR) and subsurface oil residues (SSOR) on the shore. The rare SOR are located primarily on the upper shore as inert, nonhazardous asphaltic deposits, and SSOR are confined to widely scattered locations as small patches under a boulder/cobble veneer, primarily on the middle and upper shore, in forms and locations that preclude physical contact by wildlife and diminish bioavailability. Sea otters and harlequin ducks consume benthic invertebrates that they collect by diving to the bottom in the intertidal and subtidal zones. Sea otters also dig intertidal and subtidal pits in search of clams. The three plausible exposure pathways are through the water, in oil-contaminated prey, or by direct contact with SSOR during foraging. Concentrations of PAH in near-shore water off oiled shores in 2002 to 2005 were at background levels (<0.05 ng/L). Median concentrations of PAH in five intertidal prey species on oiled shores in 2002 to 2008 range from 4.0 to 34 ng/g dry weight, indistinguishable from background concentrations. Subsurface oil residues are restricted to locations on the shore and substrate types, where large clams do not occur and where sea otters do not dig foraging pits. Therefore, that sea otters and harlequin ducks continue to be exposed to environmentally significant amounts of PAH from EVOS 20 years after the spill is not plausible. PMID:21298711

  3. Influence of temperature on reproductive biology and phenotype of a ladybird, Menochilus sexmaculatus (Fabricius) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    PubMed

    Dubey, A; Omkar; Mishra, G

    2016-05-01

    Body melanisation in insects is polygenic, resulting from genetic polymorphism or phenotypic plasticity, with diverse implications ranging from thermal budgeting to reproductive success. In this study, we assessed the, mate choice, reproductive success, and offspring colouration of typical (T) and melanic (M) morphs of the ladybird Menochilus sexmaculatus paired at three temperatures 15°C, 25°C and 35°C. Mating success of the two morphs and the consequences for offspring fitness and offspring phenotype under these temperature regimes were evaluated. Melanic adults of both sexes achieved significantly higher mating success at 15°C and 25°C, but at 35°C no influence of adult morph on mate selection was observed. Melanic females were more fecund than typical females at all temperatures. Offspring of melanic parents developed faster than those of typicals at 15°C and 25°C, but not at 35°C. Evidence was also found of phenotypic plasticity in colour form at 15°C and 35°C. At 25°C the parents of pure (T) and (M) morphs produced offspring of the same morph. However, low temperature induced partial melanisation among the offspring of typical parents (T). Whereas at 35°C the offspring of (T) parents became paler in colour with very fine zigzag lines on elytra, i.e. they decrease the degree of melanisation. Pure melanics (M) compensated for elevated temperature stress by producing offspring that were either pure melanic but small or large with reduced melanisation. Our results on offspring phenotype variation indicate that the degree of melanism in morphs is a result of environmentally regulated expression of the parental genotype. PMID:27157332

  4. Intraguild Predation Behaviour of Ladybirds in Semi-Field Experiments Explains Invasion Success of Harmonia axyridis

    PubMed Central

    Van Lenteren, Joop C.

    2012-01-01

    Harmonia axyridis has been introduced as a biological control agent in Europe and the USA. Since its introduction, it has established and spread, and it is now regarded as an invasive alien species. It has been suggested that intraguild predation is especially important for the invasion success of H. axyridis. The aim of this study was to compare the intraguild predation behaviour of three ladybird species (Coccinella septempunctata, Adalia bipunctata, and H. axyridis). Predation behaviour was investigated in semi-field experiments on small lime trees (Tilia platyphyllos). Two fourth-instar larvae placed on a tree rarely made contact during 3-hour observations. When placed together on a single leaf in 23%–43% of the observations at least one contact was made. Of those contacts 0%–27% resulted in an attack. Harmonia axyridis attacked mostly heterospecifics, while A. bipunctata and C. septempunctata attacked heterospecifics as often as conspecifics. In comparison with A. bipunctata and C. septempunctata, H. axyridis was the most successful intraguild predator as it won 86% and 44% of heterospecific battles against A. bipunctata and C. septempunctata respectively, whilst A. bipunctata won none of the heterospecific battles and C. septempunctata won only the heterospecific battles against A. bipunctata. Coccinella septempunctata dropped from a leaf earlier and more often than the other two species but was in some cases able to return to the tree, especially under cloudy conditions. The frequency with which a species dropped did not depend on the species the larva was paired with. The results of these semi-field experiments confirm that H. axyridis is a strong intraguild predator as a consequence of its aggressiveness and good defence against predation from heterospecific species. The fact that H. axyridis is such a strong intraguild predator helps to explain its successful establishment as invasive alien species in Europe and the USA. PMID:22815790

  5. The Japanese ladybirds, Coccinula crotchi and Coccinula sinensis, are infected with very closely related strains of male-killing Flavobacterium.

    PubMed

    Elnagdy, Sherif; Messing, Susan; Majerus, Michael E N

    2014-12-01

    Male-killing is 1 of 4 known strategies that inherited parasitic endosymbionts have evolved to manipulate their host's reproduction. In early male-killing, infected male offspring are killed early in embryogenesis. Within the Insecta, male-killing bacteria have been found in a wide range of hosts. The Coccinellidae families of beetles, better known as ladybirds, are particularly prone to male-killer invasion. In samples of the coccinellid, Coccinula crotchi, from Japan, a new male-killing bacterium was revealed by phenotypic assay. Molecular genetic analysis revealed the identity to be a tetracycline-sensitive Flavobacterium that causes female-biased offspring sex ratio. Furthermore, that Flavobacterium strain was found to be closely related to the Flavobacterium causing male-killing in the congeneric Japanese coccinellid, Coccinula sinensis, which was collected from the same region. However, we found slightly different Flavobacterium strains infecting C. sinensis from regions with different environmental conditions. This may be an indication of horizontal transmission of male-killing Flavobacterium between these 2 ladybird spices. Finally, environmental conditions may affect the spread of male-killing bacteria among their hosts. PMID:24124002

  6. [Polymorphism of mitochondrial DNA and distribution of cytoplasmic symbionts in the populations of two-spot ladybird beetle Adalia bipunctata].

    PubMed

    Shaĭkevich, E V; Ivshina, E V; Zakharov, I A

    2012-05-01

    In geographically distant populations of ladybird beetle Adalia bipunctata from Eurasia mitotypes and infection with symbiotic bacteria Spiroplasma and Rickettsia were determined. All populations examined demonstrated mtDNA polymorphism and striking differences in prevalence of bacteria (from about 50% of individuals infected with Spiroplasma in St.-Petersburg population and 50% of the Rickettsia prevalence in Kem' population to complete absence of bacteria in the population from Archangelsk). In the populations studied a total of 14 mitotypes were discovered, including two mitotypes that were remarkably different from the others in nucleotide composition. Mitotype 10, which was the most different from all the others, was found in all populations from Germany to Transbaikalia, excluding the population from Tashkent. Linkage disequilibrium between mitotype 10 and the Rickettsia infection was confirmed. Infection with the Spiroplasma bacteria was typical of the individuals with haplotype 1 and relative to it. The results obtained supported the conclusion on the association between infection with Spiroplasma and Rickettsia and certain mitotype of A. bipunctata, which was the consequence of either absence or rare horizontal transfer of symbionts and ancientness of the first contact between the bacteria and A. bipunctata ladybird beetles.

  7. The Japanese ladybirds, Coccinula crotchi and Coccinula sinensis, are infected with very closely related strains of male-killing Flavobacterium.

    PubMed

    Elnagdy, Sherif; Messing, Susan; Majerus, Michael E N

    2014-12-01

    Male-killing is 1 of 4 known strategies that inherited parasitic endosymbionts have evolved to manipulate their host's reproduction. In early male-killing, infected male offspring are killed early in embryogenesis. Within the Insecta, male-killing bacteria have been found in a wide range of hosts. The Coccinellidae families of beetles, better known as ladybirds, are particularly prone to male-killer invasion. In samples of the coccinellid, Coccinula crotchi, from Japan, a new male-killing bacterium was revealed by phenotypic assay. Molecular genetic analysis revealed the identity to be a tetracycline-sensitive Flavobacterium that causes female-biased offspring sex ratio. Furthermore, that Flavobacterium strain was found to be closely related to the Flavobacterium causing male-killing in the congeneric Japanese coccinellid, Coccinula sinensis, which was collected from the same region. However, we found slightly different Flavobacterium strains infecting C. sinensis from regions with different environmental conditions. This may be an indication of horizontal transmission of male-killing Flavobacterium between these 2 ladybird spices. Finally, environmental conditions may affect the spread of male-killing bacteria among their hosts.

  8. Physiological characteristics of the biocontrol yeast Pichia anomala J121.

    PubMed

    Fredlund, Elisabeth; Druvefors, Ulrika; Boysen, Marianne E; Lingsten, Karl-Johan; Schnürer, Johan

    2002-08-01

    The yeast Pichia anomala J121 prevents mold spoilage and enhances preservation of moist grain in malfunctioning storage systems. Development of P. anomala J121 as a biocontrol agent requires in-depth knowledge about its physiology. P. anomala J121 grew under strictly anaerobic conditions, at temperatures between 3 degrees C and 37 degrees C, at pH values between 2.0 and 12.4, and at a water activity of 0.92 (NaCl) and 0.85 (glycerol). It could assimilate a wide range of C- and N-sources and produce killer toxin. A selective medium containing starch, nitrate, acetic acid, and chloramphenicol was developed for P. anomala. P. anomala was equally sensitive as Candida albicans to common antifungal compounds. Growth ability at a range of environmental conditions contributes to the competitive ability of the biocontrol yeast P. anomala J121. PMID:12702290

  9. Phages of Listeria offer novel tools for diagnostics and biocontrol

    PubMed Central

    Hagens, Steven; Loessner, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    Historically, bacteriophages infecting their hosts have perhaps been best known and even notorious for being a nuisance in dairy-fermentation processes. However, with the rapid progress in molecular microbiology and microbial ecology, a new dawn has risen for phages. This review will provide an overview on possible uses and applications of Listeria phages, including phage-typing, reporter phage for bacterial diagnostics, and use of phage as biocontrol agents for food safety. The use of phage-encoded enzymes such as endolysins for the detection and as antimicrobial agent will also be addressed. Desirable properties of candidate phages for biocontrol will be discussed. While emphasizing the enormous future potential for applications, we will also consider some of the intrinsic limitations dictated by both phage and bacterial ecology. PMID:24782847

  10. Viral biocontrol: grand experiments in disease emergence and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Di Giallonardo, Francesca; Holmes, Edward C.

    2014-01-01

    Although viral emergence is commonly associated with cross-species transmission, the processes and determinants of viral evolution in a novel host environment are poorly understood. We address key questions in virus emergence and evolution using data generated from two unique natural experiments: the deliberate release of myxoma virus (MYXV) and rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) as biological control (biocontrol) agents against the European rabbit in Australia, and which have been of enormous benefit to Australia’s ecosystem and agricultural industries. Notably, although virulence evolution in MYXV and RHDV followed different trajectories, a strongly parallel evolutionary process was observed in Australia and Europe. These biocontrol agents were also characterised by a lack of transmission to non-target host species, suggesting that there are major barriers to successful emergence. PMID:25455418

  11. Exploring antagonistic metabolites of established biocontrol agent of marine origin.

    PubMed

    Rane, Makarand Ramesh; Sarode, Prashant Diwakar; Chaudhari, Bhushan Liladhar; Chincholkar, Sudhir Bhaskarrao

    2008-12-01

    Biocontrol ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ID 4365, a biocontrol agent of groundnut phytopathogens from marine origin, was previously attributed to the production of pyoverdin type of siderophores. However, pyoverdin-rich supernatants of this organism showed better antifungal activity compared to equivalent amount of purified pyoverdin indicating presence of undetected metabolite(s) in pyoverdin rich supernatants. On the basis of observation that antagonistic activity was iron-dependent and iron-independent, an attempt was made to detect the presence of additional metabolites. In addition to pyoverdin, strain produced additional siderophores, viz. pyochelin and salicylic acid. Two broad spectrum antifungal compounds, viz. pyocyanin and phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, were detected, characterized, and activity against phytopathogens was demonstrated. Iron- and phosphate-dependent co-production of siderophores and phenazines was confirmed. Strain showed additional features like production of hydrogen cyanide, indol-3-acetic acid, and phosphate solubilization. PMID:18626581

  12. Defects in Stratum Corneum Desquamation Are the Predominant Effect of Impaired ABCA12 Function in a Novel Mouse Model of Harlequin Ichthyosis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Weiguo; Hupe, Melanie; Crumrine, Debra A.; Chen, Jiang; Elias, Peter M.; Holleran, Walter M.; Niswander, Lee; Hohl, Daniel; Williams, Trevor; Torchia, Enrique C.; Roop, Dennis R.

    2016-01-01

    Harlequin Ichthyosis is a severe skin disease caused by mutations in the human gene encoding ABCA12. Here, we characterize a novel mutation in intron 29 of the mouse Abca12 gene that leads to the loss of a 5’ splice donor site and truncation of the Abca12 RNA transcript. Homozygous mutants of this smooth skin or smsk allele die perinatally with shiny translucent skin, typical of animal models of Harlequin Ichthyosis. Characterization of smsk mutant skin showed that the delivery of glucosylceramides and CORNEODESMOSIN was defective, while ultrastructural analysis revealed abnormal lamellar bodies and the absence of lipid lamellae in smsk epidermis. Unexpectedly, mutant stratum corneum remained intact when subjected to harsh chemical dissociation procedures. Moreover, both KALLIKREIN 5 and -7 were drastically decreased, with retention of desmoplakin in mutant SC. In cultured wild type keratinocytes, both KALLIKREIN 5 and -7 colocalized with ceramide metabolites following calcium-induced differentiation. Reducing the intracellular levels of glucosylceramide with a glucosylceramide synthase inhibitor resulted in decreased secretion of KALLIKREIN proteases by wild type keratinocytes, but not by smsk mutant keratinocytes. Together, these findings suggest an essential role for ABCA12 in transferring not only lipids, which are required for the formation of multilamellar structures in the stratum corneum, but also proteolytic enzymes that are required for normal desquamation. Smsk mutant mice recapitulate many of the pathological features of HI and can be used to explore novel topical therapies against a potentially lethal and debilitating neonatal disease. PMID:27551807

  13. Defects in Stratum Corneum Desquamation Are the Predominant Effect of Impaired ABCA12 Function in a Novel Mouse Model of Harlequin Ichthyosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Ferreyros, Michael; Feng, Weiguo; Hupe, Melanie; Crumrine, Debra A; Chen, Jiang; Elias, Peter M; Holleran, Walter M; Niswander, Lee; Hohl, Daniel; Williams, Trevor; Torchia, Enrique C; Roop, Dennis R

    2016-01-01

    Harlequin Ichthyosis is a severe skin disease caused by mutations in the human gene encoding ABCA12. Here, we characterize a novel mutation in intron 29 of the mouse Abca12 gene that leads to the loss of a 5' splice donor site and truncation of the Abca12 RNA transcript. Homozygous mutants of this smooth skin or smsk allele die perinatally with shiny translucent skin, typical of animal models of Harlequin Ichthyosis. Characterization of smsk mutant skin showed that the delivery of glucosylceramides and CORNEODESMOSIN was defective, while ultrastructural analysis revealed abnormal lamellar bodies and the absence of lipid lamellae in smsk epidermis. Unexpectedly, mutant stratum corneum remained intact when subjected to harsh chemical dissociation procedures. Moreover, both KALLIKREIN 5 and -7 were drastically decreased, with retention of desmoplakin in mutant SC. In cultured wild type keratinocytes, both KALLIKREIN 5 and -7 colocalized with ceramide metabolites following calcium-induced differentiation. Reducing the intracellular levels of glucosylceramide with a glucosylceramide synthase inhibitor resulted in decreased secretion of KALLIKREIN proteases by wild type keratinocytes, but not by smsk mutant keratinocytes. Together, these findings suggest an essential role for ABCA12 in transferring not only lipids, which are required for the formation of multilamellar structures in the stratum corneum, but also proteolytic enzymes that are required for normal desquamation. Smsk mutant mice recapitulate many of the pathological features of HI and can be used to explore novel topical therapies against a potentially lethal and debilitating neonatal disease. PMID:27551807

  14. Genome Sequence of the Biocontrol Strain Pseudomonas fluorescens F113

    PubMed Central

    Redondo-Nieto, Miguel; Barret, Matthieu; Morrisey, John P.; Germaine, Kieran; Martínez-Granero, Francisco; Barahona, Emma; Navazo, Ana; Sánchez-Contreras, María; Moynihan, Jennifer A.; Giddens, Stephen R.; Coppoolse, Eric R.; Muriel, Candela; Stiekema, Willem J.; Rainey, Paul B.; Dowling, David; O'Gara, Fergal; Martín, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) that has biocontrol activity against fungal plant pathogens and is a model for rhizosphere colonization. Here, we present its complete genome sequence, which shows that besides a core genome very similar to those of other strains sequenced within this species, F113 possesses a wide array of genes encoding specialized functions for thriving in the rhizosphere and interacting with eukaryotic organisms. PMID:22328765

  15. Self-Improvement of Keratinocyte Differentiation Defects During Skin Maturation in ABCA12-Deficient Harlequin Ichthyosis Model Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yanagi, Teruki; Akiyama, Masashi; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Junko; Sakai, Kaori; Miyamura, Yuki; Naoe, Ayano; Kitahara, Takashi; Tanaka, Shinya; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Harlequin ichthyosis (HI) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the keratinocyte lipid transporter ABCA12. The patients often die in the first 1 or 2 weeks of life, although HI survivors’ phenotypes improve within several weeks after birth. In order to clarify the mechanisms of phenotypic recovery, we studied grafted skin and keratinocytes from Abca12-disrupted (Abca12−/−) mice showing abnormal lipid transport. Abca12−/− neonatal epidermis showed significantly reduced total ceramide amounts and aberrant ceramide composition. Immunofluorescence and immunoblotting of Abca12−/− neonatal epidermis revealed defective profilaggrin/filaggrin conversion and reduced protein expression of the differentiation-specific molecules, loricrin, kallikrein 5, and transglutaminase 1, although their mRNA expression was up-regulated. In contrast, Abca12−/− skin grafts kept in a dry environment exhibited dramatic improvements in all these abnormalities. Increased transepidermal water loss, a parameter representing barrier defect, was remarkably decreased in grafted Abca12−/− skin. Ten-passage sub-cultured Abca12−/− keratinocytes showed restoration of intact ceramide distribution, differentiation-specific protein expression and profilaggrin/filaggrin conversion, which were defective in primary-cultures. Using cDNA microarray analysis, lipid transporters including four ATP-binding cassette transporters were up-regulated after sub-culture of Abca12−/− keratinocytes compared with primary-culture. These results indicate that disrupted keratinocyte differentiation during the fetal development is involved in the pathomechanism of HI and, during maturation, Abca12−/− epidermal keratinocytes regain normal differentiation processes. This restoration may account for the skin phenotype improvement observed in HI survivors. PMID:20489143

  16. Responses of yeast biocontrol agents to environmental stress.

    PubMed

    Sui, Yuan; Wisniewski, Michael; Droby, Samir; Liu, Jia

    2015-05-01

    Biological control of postharvest diseases, utilizing wild species and strains of antagonistic yeast species, is a research topic that has received considerable attention in the literature over the past 30 years. In principle, it represents a promising alternative to chemical fungicides for the management of postharvest decay of fruits, vegetables, and grains. A yeast-based biocontrol system is composed of a tritrophic interaction between a host (commodity), a pathogen, and a yeast species, all of which are affected by environmental factors such as temperature, pH, and UV light as well as osmotic and oxidative stresses. Additionally, during the production process, biocontrol agents encounter various severe abiotic stresses that also impact their viability. Therefore, understanding the ecological fitness of the potential yeast biocontrol agents and developing strategies to enhance their stress tolerance are essential to their efficacy and commercial application. The current review provides an overview of the responses of antagonistic yeast species to various environmental stresses, the methods that can be used to improve stress tolerance and efficacy, and the related mechanisms associated with improved stress tolerance.

  17. Responses of Yeast Biocontrol Agents to Environmental Stress

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Yuan; Wisniewski, Michael; Droby, Samir

    2015-01-01

    Biological control of postharvest diseases, utilizing wild species and strains of antagonistic yeast species, is a research topic that has received considerable attention in the literature over the past 30 years. In principle, it represents a promising alternative to chemical fungicides for the management of postharvest decay of fruits, vegetables, and grains. A yeast-based biocontrol system is composed of a tritrophic interaction between a host (commodity), a pathogen, and a yeast species, all of which are affected by environmental factors such as temperature, pH, and UV light as well as osmotic and oxidative stresses. Additionally, during the production process, biocontrol agents encounter various severe abiotic stresses that also impact their viability. Therefore, understanding the ecological fitness of the potential yeast biocontrol agents and developing strategies to enhance their stress tolerance are essential to their efficacy and commercial application. The current review provides an overview of the responses of antagonistic yeast species to various environmental stresses, the methods that can be used to improve stress tolerance and efficacy, and the related mechanisms associated with improved stress tolerance. PMID:25710368

  18. Survival and behavioural responses of the predatory ladybird beetle, Eriopis connexa populations susceptible and resistant to a pyrethroid insecticide.

    PubMed

    Spíndola, A F; Silva-Torres, C S A; Rodrigues, A R S; Torres, J B

    2013-08-01

    The ladybird beetle, Eriopis connexa (Germar) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), is one of the commonest predators of aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae) in the cotton agroecosystem and in many other row and fruit crops in Brazil, and has been introduced into other countries such as the USA for purposes of aphid control. In addition, the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is the most serious cotton pest where it occurs, including Brazil. Controlling boll weevils and other pests such as cotton defoliators still tends to involve the intense application of insecticides to secure cotton production. The pyrethroid insecticide lambda-cyhalothrin (LCT) is commonly used, but this compound is not effective against aphids; hence, a desirable strategy would be to maintain E. connexa populations in cotton fields where LCT is applied. Using populations of E. connexa resistant (Res) and susceptible (Sus) to LCT, we compared behavioural responses on treated cotton plants and under confinement on partially and fully treated surfaces, and assessed the insects' survival on treated plants compared with that of the boll weevil. The E. connexa resistant population caged on treated plants with 15 and 75 g a.i. ha-1 exhibited ≫82% survival for both insecticide concentrations compared with ≪3% and ≪17% survival for susceptible E. connexa populations and boll weevils, respectively. The response of E. connexa Res and Sus populations when released, either on the soil or on the plant canopy, indicated avoidance towards treated plants, as measured by elapsed time to assess the plant. When compared with susceptible individuals, resistant ones took longer time to suffer insecticide knockdown, had a higher recovery rate after suffering knockdown, and spent more time in the plant canopy. Based on behavioural parameters evaluated in treated arenas, no ladybird beetles exhibited repellency. However, irritability was evident, with the susceptible population exhibiting

  19. Survival and behavioural responses of the predatory ladybird beetle, Eriopis connexa populations susceptible and resistant to a pyrethroid insecticide.

    PubMed

    Spíndola, A F; Silva-Torres, C S A; Rodrigues, A R S; Torres, J B

    2013-08-01

    The ladybird beetle, Eriopis connexa (Germar) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), is one of the commonest predators of aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae) in the cotton agroecosystem and in many other row and fruit crops in Brazil, and has been introduced into other countries such as the USA for purposes of aphid control. In addition, the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is the most serious cotton pest where it occurs, including Brazil. Controlling boll weevils and other pests such as cotton defoliators still tends to involve the intense application of insecticides to secure cotton production. The pyrethroid insecticide lambda-cyhalothrin (LCT) is commonly used, but this compound is not effective against aphids; hence, a desirable strategy would be to maintain E. connexa populations in cotton fields where LCT is applied. Using populations of E. connexa resistant (Res) and susceptible (Sus) to LCT, we compared behavioural responses on treated cotton plants and under confinement on partially and fully treated surfaces, and assessed the insects' survival on treated plants compared with that of the boll weevil. The E. connexa resistant population caged on treated plants with 15 and 75 g a.i. ha-1 exhibited ≫82% survival for both insecticide concentrations compared with ≪3% and ≪17% survival for susceptible E. connexa populations and boll weevils, respectively. The response of E. connexa Res and Sus populations when released, either on the soil or on the plant canopy, indicated avoidance towards treated plants, as measured by elapsed time to assess the plant. When compared with susceptible individuals, resistant ones took longer time to suffer insecticide knockdown, had a higher recovery rate after suffering knockdown, and spent more time in the plant canopy. Based on behavioural parameters evaluated in treated arenas, no ladybird beetles exhibited repellency. However, irritability was evident, with the susceptible population exhibiting

  20. No evidence that presence of sexually transmitted infection selects for reduced mating rate in the two spot ladybird, Adalia bipunctata

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Sophie L.; Pastok, Daria

    2015-01-01

    Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are common in animals and plants, and frequently impair individual fertility. Theory predicts that natural selection will favour behaviours that reduce the chance of acquiring a STI. We investigated whether an STI, Coccipolipus hippodamiae has selected for increased rejection of mating by female Adalia bipunctata as a mechanism to avoid exposure. We first demonstrated that rejection of mating by females did indeed reduce the chance of acquiring the mite. We then examined whether rejection rate and mating rate differed between ladybirds from mite-present and mite-absent populations when tested in a common environment. No differences in rejection intensity or remating propensity were observed between the two populations. We therefore conclude there is no evidence that STIs have driven the evolution of female mating behaviour in this species. PMID:26290801

  1. A steep cline in ladybird melanism has decayed over 25 years: a genetic response to climate change?

    PubMed

    Brakefield, P M; de Jong, P W

    2011-12-01

    A cline in the frequency of melanic morphs of the two-spot ladybird, Adalia bipunctata, was first surveyed in 1980 along a transect extending inland from the coast in the Netherlands. At that time, the frequency of melanics increased over some 40 km from 10% near the coast to nearly 60% inland. Additional surveys made in 1991 and 1995 demonstrated some progressive change in cline shape. New samples from 1998 and 2004 confirm these dynamics, and show that over a period of about 50 generations for the beetle, the cline had decayed rapidly to yield rather uniform frequencies of melanic morphs at around 20% along the whole transect by 2004. Climate data and evidence for thermal melanism in this species support our contention that these dynamics reflect a dramatic example of a rapid genetic response within populations to climate change and local selection.

  2. Divergent host plant specialization as the critical driving force in speciation between populations of a phytophagous ladybird beetle.

    PubMed

    Matsubayashi, K W; Kahono, S; Katakura, H

    2011-07-01

    Detecting the isolating barrier that arises earliest in speciation is critically important to understanding the mechanism of species formation. We tested isolating barriers between host races of a phytophagous ladybird beetle, Henosepilachna diekei (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Epilachnine), that occur sympatrically on distinct host plants. We conducted field surveys for the distribution of the beetles and host plants, rearing experiments to measure six potential isolating factors (adult host preference, adult and larval host performance, sexual isolation, egg hatchability, F(1) hybrid inviability, and sexual selection against F(1) hybrids), and molecular analyses of mitochondrial ND2 and the nuclear ITS2 sequences. We found significant genetic divergence between the host races, and extremely divergent host preference (i.e. habitat isolation) and host performance (i.e. immigrant inviability), but no other isolating barriers. The fidelity to particular host plants arises first and alone can prevent gene flow between differentiating populations of phytophagous specialists.

  3. Use of a Pollen-Based Diet to Expose the Ladybird Beetle Propylea japonica to Insecticidal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaojie; Li, Yunhe; Romeis, Jörg; Yin, Xinming; Wu, Kongming; Peng, Yufa

    2014-01-01

    A rape seed pollen-based diet was developed and found to be suitable for use in a dietary exposure assay for Propylea japonica. Using the diet, we established and validated a dietary exposure assay by using the protease inhibitor E-64 as positive control. Dose-dependent responses were documented for all observed life-table parameters of P. japonica including survival, pupation and eclosion rates, development time and adult weight. Results suggested that the dietary assay can detect the effects of insecticidal compounds on the survival and development of P. japonica. Using the established dietary assay, we subsequently tested the toxicity of Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac and Cry1F proteins that are expressed by transgenic maize, cotton or rice plants to P. japonica larvae. The diet containing E-64 was included as a positive control. Survival and development of P. japonica larvae were not adversely affected when the diet contained purified Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, or Cry1F at 500 µg/g diet representing a worst-case exposure scenario. In contrast, P. japonica larvae were adversely affected when the diet contained E-64. The bioactivity and stability of the Cry proteins in the diet and Cry protein uptake by the ladybird larvae were confirmed by bioassay with a Cry-sensitive insect species and by ELISA. The current study describes a suitable experimental system for assessing the potential effects of gut-active insecticidal compounds on ladybird beetle larvae. The experiments with the Cry proteins demonstrate that P. japonica larvae are not sensitive to Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac and Cry1F. PMID:24409328

  4. Use of a pollen-based diet to expose the ladybird beetle Propylea japonica to insecticidal proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaojie; Li, Yunhe; Romeis, Jörg; Yin, Xinming; Wu, Kongming; Peng, Yufa

    2014-01-01

    A rape seed pollen-based diet was developed and found to be suitable for use in a dietary exposure assay for Propylea japonica. Using the diet, we established and validated a dietary exposure assay by using the protease inhibitor E-64 as positive control. Dose-dependent responses were documented for all observed life-table parameters of P. japonica including survival, pupation and eclosion rates, development time and adult weight. Results suggested that the dietary assay can detect the effects of insecticidal compounds on the survival and development of P. japonica. Using the established dietary assay, we subsequently tested the toxicity of Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac and Cry1F proteins that are expressed by transgenic maize, cotton or rice plants to P. japonica larvae. The diet containing E-64 was included as a positive control. Survival and development of P. japonica larvae were not adversely affected when the diet contained purified Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, or Cry1F at 500 µg/g diet representing a worst-case exposure scenario. In contrast, P. japonica larvae were adversely affected when the diet contained E-64. The bioactivity and stability of the Cry proteins in the diet and Cry protein uptake by the ladybird larvae were confirmed by bioassay with a Cry-sensitive insect species and by ELISA. The current study describes a suitable experimental system for assessing the potential effects of gut-active insecticidal compounds on ladybird beetle larvae. The experiments with the Cry proteins demonstrate that P. japonica larvae are not sensitive to Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac and Cry1F. PMID:24409328

  5. Optimization and evaluation of microencapsulated artificial diet for mass rearing the predatory ladybird Propylea japonica (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiao-Ling; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Su; Zhang, Fan

    2015-02-01

    Artificial diet optimization is a key aspect in mass rearing of natural enemies since it influences the quality and feeding effectiveness, and thus the success of the biological control program. Here, we introduced the microencapsulation method to package liquid artificial diet for feeding of the ladybird Propylea japonica. An orthogonal test of the quality of microencapsulated artificial diets (ADMs) was performed on key variables in production; Ca-alginate concentration, chitosan concentration and weight ratio of wall material to inner diet. We compared the development and reproduction of P. japonica fed on the ADMs under different cold-stored periods with those fed on fresh aphids and liquid artificial diets, in addition to a comparison of respiration, locomotion and predation. Our results indicated that chitosan concentration and ratio of shell to core significantly influence the quality of ADMs. The optimal recipe is 1.0% Ca-alginate, 1.6% chitosan and shell : core = 1 : 2. Insects reared on fresh optimized ADMs were similar to those fed on fresh prey in all developmental and reproductive characteristics except for survival ratio and female fertility. ADMs appeared more beneficial than using a liquid artificial diet, although this may decrease with the prolonging of the cold-storage period. P. japonica fed either on fresh ADMs or fresh prey showed improved respiration and predation abilities compared to where liquid artificial diet was used. Our study indicates advantages of microencapsulation in the production of artificial diet for predatory ladybird rearing. A microencapsulated diet can directly increase the efficiency and stability of mass rearing. PMID:24376183

  6. Optimization and evaluation of microencapsulated artificial diet for mass rearing the predatory ladybird Propylea japonica (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiao-Ling; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Su; Zhang, Fan

    2015-02-01

    Artificial diet optimization is a key aspect in mass rearing of natural enemies since it influences the quality and feeding effectiveness, and thus the success of the biological control program. Here, we introduced the microencapsulation method to package liquid artificial diet for feeding of the ladybird Propylea japonica. An orthogonal test of the quality of microencapsulated artificial diets (ADMs) was performed on key variables in production; Ca-alginate concentration, chitosan concentration and weight ratio of wall material to inner diet. We compared the development and reproduction of P. japonica fed on the ADMs under different cold-stored periods with those fed on fresh aphids and liquid artificial diets, in addition to a comparison of respiration, locomotion and predation. Our results indicated that chitosan concentration and ratio of shell to core significantly influence the quality of ADMs. The optimal recipe is 1.0% Ca-alginate, 1.6% chitosan and shell : core = 1 : 2. Insects reared on fresh optimized ADMs were similar to those fed on fresh prey in all developmental and reproductive characteristics except for survival ratio and female fertility. ADMs appeared more beneficial than using a liquid artificial diet, although this may decrease with the prolonging of the cold-storage period. P. japonica fed either on fresh ADMs or fresh prey showed improved respiration and predation abilities compared to where liquid artificial diet was used. Our study indicates advantages of microencapsulation in the production of artificial diet for predatory ladybird rearing. A microencapsulated diet can directly increase the efficiency and stability of mass rearing.

  7. Use of a pollen-based diet to expose the ladybird beetle Propylea japonica to insecticidal proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaojie; Li, Yunhe; Romeis, Jörg; Yin, Xinming; Wu, Kongming; Peng, Yufa

    2014-01-01

    A rape seed pollen-based diet was developed and found to be suitable for use in a dietary exposure assay for Propylea japonica. Using the diet, we established and validated a dietary exposure assay by using the protease inhibitor E-64 as positive control. Dose-dependent responses were documented for all observed life-table parameters of P. japonica including survival, pupation and eclosion rates, development time and adult weight. Results suggested that the dietary assay can detect the effects of insecticidal compounds on the survival and development of P. japonica. Using the established dietary assay, we subsequently tested the toxicity of Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac and Cry1F proteins that are expressed by transgenic maize, cotton or rice plants to P. japonica larvae. The diet containing E-64 was included as a positive control. Survival and development of P. japonica larvae were not adversely affected when the diet contained purified Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, or Cry1F at 500 µg/g diet representing a worst-case exposure scenario. In contrast, P. japonica larvae were adversely affected when the diet contained E-64. The bioactivity and stability of the Cry proteins in the diet and Cry protein uptake by the ladybird larvae were confirmed by bioassay with a Cry-sensitive insect species and by ELISA. The current study describes a suitable experimental system for assessing the potential effects of gut-active insecticidal compounds on ladybird beetle larvae. The experiments with the Cry proteins demonstrate that P. japonica larvae are not sensitive to Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac and Cry1F.

  8. The relationship of biofilm production to biocontrol activity of Burkholderia pyrrocinia FP62

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foliar biocontrol agent (BCA) efficacy is often inconsistent due to poor colonization and survival on plant surfaces. Burkholderia pyrrocinia FP62, a superior leaf colonist and BCA of Botrytis cinerea, forms unsaturated biofilms on plant surfaces. To determine the relationship between biocontrol act...

  9. Characterization of Two ABC Transporters from Biocontrol and Phytopathogenic Fusarium oxysporus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ABC transporter genes from four strains of Fusarium oxysporum [two biocontrol and two phytopathogenic (f. sp. lycopersici Race 1) isolates] indicated that this gene is well conserved. However, sequences of promoter regions of FoABC1 differed between 8 phytopathogenic and 11 biocontrol strains of F....

  10. Discovery of secondary metabolites from Bacillus spp. biocontrol strains using genome mining and mass spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome sequencing, data mining and mass spectrometry were used to identify secondary metabolites produced by several Bacillus spp. biocontrol strains. These biocontrol strains have shown promise in managing Fusarium head blight in wheat. Draft genomes were produced and screened in silico using genom...

  11. Biology of the harlequin fish Othos dentex (Serranidae), with particular emphasis on sexual pattern and other reproductive characteristics.

    PubMed

    French, B; Potter, I C; Hesp, S A; Coulson, P G; Hall, N G

    2014-01-01

    Key biological characteristics of the harlequin fish Othos dentex, a representative of a monospecific genus of the Anthiinae (Serranidae), were determined from samples collected around reefs on the south coast of Western Australia. The females of this relatively long-lived species (maximum recorded age in this study = 37 years) attained only a slightly greater maximum total length and age than males and neither the length nor the age-frequency distributions showed a conspicuous sex-based bimodality. Furthermore, gonads from a wide size and age range of O. dentex were shown by histology, at several locations along their length, to always comprise exclusively either ovarian or testicular tissues. Thus, O. dentex is a gonochorist, a sexual pattern only previously recorded definitively for one other anthiine serranid, i.e. Epinephelides armatus, which also occurs in south-western Australia. Similar to E. armatus, O. dentex possesses 'solid' testes with a central sperm duct, thereby differing in structure from those typically found in serranids, in which there is a central membrane-bound 'ovarian' lumen and peripherally located sperm sinuses. The gonadal characteristics and sexual pattern of these two gonochoristic anthiines are not consistent with a recent proposal for the trends exhibited by the evolution of gonochorism and protogyny within the Serranidae. Othos dentex has indeterminate fecundity and a protracted spawning period (7 months) and, on the basis of underwater observations and a low gonado-somatic index (I(G)) for males, is a pair spawner, which is unusual for a gonochorist of a serranid or member of a related family. While the large spots on the lower half of the body of O. dentex are shown quantitatively to be similarly yellow in juveniles and adult females, they then become blue in males at maturity and this intensifies during the spawning period, when they presumably play an important role in agonistic interactions among males and courtship with

  12. Biocontrol in an impulsive predator-prey model.

    PubMed

    Terry, Alan J

    2014-10-01

    We study a model for biological pest control (or "biocontrol") in which a pest population is controlled by a program of periodic releases of a fixed yield of predators that prey on the pest. Releases are represented as impulsive increases in the predator population. Between releases, predator-pest dynamics evolve according to a predator-prey model with some fairly general properties: the pest population grows logistically in the absence of predation; the predator functional response is either of Beddington-DeAngelis type or Holling type II; the predator per capita birth rate is bounded above by a constant multiple of the predator functional response; and the predator per capita death rate is allowed to be decreasing in the predator functional response and increasing in the predator population, though the special case in which it is constant is permitted too. We prove that, when the predator functional response is of Beddington-DeAngelis type and the predators are not sufficiently voracious, then the biocontrol program will fail to reduce the pest population below a particular economic threshold, regardless of the frequency or yield of the releases. We prove also that our model possesses a pest-eradication solution, which is both locally and globally stable provided that predators are sufficiently voracious and that releases occur sufficiently often. We establish, curiously, that the pest-eradication solution can be locally stable whilst not being globally stable, the upshot of which is that, if we delay a biocontrol response to a new pest invasion, then this can change the outcome of the response from pest eradication to pest persistence. Finally, we state a number of specific examples for our model, and, for one of these examples, we corroborate parts of our analysis by numerical simulations.

  13. Tritrophic interactions between transgenic potato expressing snowdrop lectin (GNA), an aphid pest (peach-potato aphid; Myzus persicae (Sulz.) and a beneficial predator (2-spot ladybird; Adalia bipunctata L.).

    PubMed

    Down, Rachel E; Ford, Louise; Woodhouse, Stephen D; Davison, Gillian M; Majerus, Michael E N; Gatehouse, John A; Gatehouse, Angharad M R

    2003-04-01

    Tritrophic interactions between transgenic potato expressing the insecticidal lectin from snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin; GNA), an aphid pest, Myzus persicae (Sulz.), and a beneficial predator, the 2-spot ladybird (Adalia bipunctata L.) were investigated. Clonal plants expressing GNA at 0.1-0.2% total soluble protein in leaves were used. No significant effects on development and survival of ladybird larvae fed on aphids from these transgenic plants were observed, with larval survival in the experimental group being 90% compared to 89% for controls. There were also no effects on subsequent female or male longevity. Female fecundity was also investigated. Although no significant differences (p > 0.05) were observed in egg production between control and experimental groups, a 10%, reduction (p < 0.01) in egg viability (determined by % hatch) occurred in ladybirds fed aphids reared on transgenic plants. Additional studies were carried out using aphids fed on artificial diet containing GNA, to deliver quantified levels of the protein to ladybird adults. GNA had no deleterious effects upon adult longevity, but resulted in a consistent trend for improved fecundity. Egg production was increased by up to 70% and egg viability also increased significantly. The results suggest that GNA is not deleterious to ladybirds. Results from these studies highlight the need to discriminate between direct and indirect effects when studying tritrophic interactions between plants/pests/natural enemies. Furthermore, it emphasises the importance of demonstrating 'cause and effect'.

  14. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure in Steller's eiders (Polysticta stelleri) and Harlequin ducks (Histronicus histronicus) in the eastern Aleutian Islands, Alaska, USA.

    PubMed

    Miles, A Keith; Flint, Paul L; Trust, Kimberley A; Ricca, Mark A; Spring, Sarah E; Arrieta, Daniel E; Hollmen, Tuula; Wilson, Barry W

    2007-12-01

    Seaducks may be affected by harmful levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at seaports near the Arctic. As an indicator of exposure to PAHs, we measured hepatic enzyme 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity (EROD) to determine cytochrome P4501A induction in Steller's eiders (Polysticta stelleri) and Harlequin ducks (Histronicus histronicus) from Unalaska, Popof, and Unga Islands (AK, USA) in 2002 and 2003. We measured PAHs and organic contaminants in seaduck prey samples and polychlorinated biphenyl congeners in seaduck blood plasma to determine any relationship to EROD. Using Akaike's information criterion, species and site differences best explained EROD patterns: Activity was higher in Harlequin ducks than in Steller's eiders and higher at industrial than at nonindustrial sites. Site-specific concentrations of PAHs in blue mussels ([Mytilus trossilus] seaduck prey; PAH concentrations higher at Dutch Harbor, Unalaska, than at other sites) also was important in defining EROD patterns. Organochlorine compounds rarely were detected in prey samples. No relationship was found between polychlorinated biphenyl congeners in avian blood and EROD, which further supported inferences derived from Akaike's information criterion. Congeners were highest in seaducks from a nonindustrial or reference site, contrary to PAH patterns. To assist in interpreting the field study, 15 captive Steller's eiders were dosed with a PAH known to induce cytochrome P4501A. Dosed, captive Steller's eiders had definitive induction, but results indicated that wild Steller's eiders were exposed to PAHs or other inducing compounds at levels greater than those used in laboratory studies. Concentrations of PAHs in blue mussels at or near Dutch Harbor (approximately 1,180-5,980 ng/g) approached those found at highly contaminated sites (approximately 4,100-7,500 ng/g).

  15. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure in Steller's eiders (Polysticta stelleri) and harlequin ducks (Histronicus histronicus) in the Eastern Aleutian Islands, Alaska, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miles, A.K.; Flint, P.L.; Trust, K.A.; Ricca, M.A.; Spring, S.E.; Arrieta, D.E.; Hollmen, T.; Wilson, B.W.

    2007-01-01

    Seaducks may be affected by harmful levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at seaports near the Arctic. As an indicator of exposure to PAHs, we measured hepatic enzyme 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity (EROD) to determine cytochrome P4501A induction in Steller's eiders (Polysticta stelleri) and Harlequin ducks (Histronicus histronicus) from Unalaska, Popof, and Unga Islands (AK, USA) in 2002 and 2003. We measured PAHs and organic contaminants in seaduck prey samples and polychlorinated biphenyl congeners in seaduck blood plasma to determine any relationship to EROD. Using Akaike's information criterion, species and site differences best explained EROD patterns: Activity was higher in Harlequin ducks than in Steller's eiders and higher at industrial than at nonindustrial sites. Site-specific concentrations of PAHs in blue mussels ([Mytilus trossilus] seaduck prey; PAH concentrations higher at Dutch Harbor, Unalaska, than at other sites) also was important in defining EROD patterns. Organochlorine compounds rarely were detected in prey samples. No relationship was found between polychlorinated biphenyl congeners in avian blood and EROD, which further supported inferences derived from Akaike's information criterion. Congeners were highest in seaducks from a nonindustrial or reference site, contrary to PAH patterns. To assist in interpreting the field study, 15 captive Steller's eiders were dosed with a PAH known to induce cytochrome P4501A. Dosed, captive Steller's eiders had definitive induction, but results indicated that wild Steller's eiders were exposed to PAHs or other inducing compounds at levels greater than those used in laboratory studies. Concentrations of PAHs in blue mussels at or near Dutch Harbor (∼1,180–5,980 ng/g) approached those found at highly contaminated sites (∼4,100–7,500 ng/g).

  16. Indigenous bacteria may interfere with the biocontrol of plant diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Someya, Nobutaka; Akutsu, Katsumi

    2009-06-01

    Prodigiosin is a reddish antibiotic pigment that plays an important role in the biocontrol of plant diseases by the bacterium Serratia marcescens. However, its activity is unstable under agricultural conditions; further, it can be degraded by various environmental factors. To examine the effect of epiphytic microbes on the stability of prodigiosin used for biological control processes, we collected a total of 1,280 bacterial isolates from the phylloplane of cyclamen and tomato plants. Approximately 72% of the bacterial strains isolated from the cyclamen plants and 66% of those isolated from the tomato plants grew on minimal agar medium containing 100 μg ml-1 prodigiosin. Certain isolates obtained from both plant species exhibited prodigiosin-degrading activity. We compared the 16S rRNA gene sequences derived from the isolates with sequences in a database. The comparison revealed that the sequences determined for the prodigiosin-degrading isolates were homologous to those of the genera Pseudomonas, Caulobacter, Rhizobium, Sphingomonas, Janthinobacterium, Novosphingobium, and Rathayibacter. These results indicate that indigenous epiphytic microorganisms may interfere with the interaction between plant pathogens and biocontrol agents by degrading the antibiotics produced by the agents.

  17. Risk assessment: progress of quarantine biocontrol research on Chinese Tallow, Melaleuca, and Downy Rose Myrtle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Risk assessments of two biocontrol candidates for Chinese tallow, Triadica sebifera (Euphoriales: Euphorbiaceae), and one for Melaleuca, Melaleuca quinquenervia (Myrtales: Myrtaceae), were conducted during 2009 and continuing into 2010 by USDA scientists located at the Florida Department of Agricul...

  18. Phyllostictines A-D, Oxazatricycloalkenones Produced by Phyllosticta cirsii, A Potential Mycoherbicide for Cirsium arvense Biocontrol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phyllosticta cirsii, a fungal pathogen isolated from Cirsium arvense and proposed as biocontrol agent of this noxious perennial weed, produces in liquid cultures different phytotoxic metabolites with potential herbicidal activity. Four new oxazatricycloalkenones, named phyllostictines A-D, were isol...

  19. Effect of temperature and photoperiod on the development, reproduction, and predation of the predatory ladybird Cheilomenes sexmaculata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Su; Tan, Xiao-Ling; Guo, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Fan

    2013-12-01

    The polyphagous predatory ladybird Cheilomenes. sexmaculata (F.) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is distributed throughout southern China and has been investigated as a potential biological control agent against herbivorous insects in various agroecosystems. In the current study, we evaluated the preimaginal development, eclosion rate, reproduction, fertility, adult longevity, and prey consumption of C. sexmaculata under five temperature and five photoperiod regimens. The results showed that preadult developmental duration decreased significantly with increasing temperature and amount of daylight. Adult eclosion rate was highest at 35 degrees C and under conditions of complete darkness. Higher temperatures shortened the duration of copulation and preoviposition, prolonged the duration of oviposition, and increased the level of fecundity. Hatchability was highest at 30 degrees C. By contrast, the shortest copulation and oviposition duration and lowest level of fecundity and hatchability occurred with a completely dark photoperiod. Temperature and the gender of C. sexmaculata influenced adult longevity. In addition, there was a significant interaction effect of photoperiod and gender on adult longevity. Furthermore, prey consumption by fourth instar larvae and adult females both increased with increasing temperature and photoperiod. Our results reveal the high thermal and light sensitivities of C. sexmaculata, which highlight the importance of environment regulation in the mass rearing of this natural enemy for application as a biological control in agroecosystems in China.

  20. Effect of temperature and photoperiod on the development, reproduction, and predation of the predatory ladybird Cheilomenes sexmaculata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Su; Tan, Xiao-Ling; Guo, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Fan

    2013-12-01

    The polyphagous predatory ladybird Cheilomenes. sexmaculata (F.) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is distributed throughout southern China and has been investigated as a potential biological control agent against herbivorous insects in various agroecosystems. In the current study, we evaluated the preimaginal development, eclosion rate, reproduction, fertility, adult longevity, and prey consumption of C. sexmaculata under five temperature and five photoperiod regimens. The results showed that preadult developmental duration decreased significantly with increasing temperature and amount of daylight. Adult eclosion rate was highest at 35 degrees C and under conditions of complete darkness. Higher temperatures shortened the duration of copulation and preoviposition, prolonged the duration of oviposition, and increased the level of fecundity. Hatchability was highest at 30 degrees C. By contrast, the shortest copulation and oviposition duration and lowest level of fecundity and hatchability occurred with a completely dark photoperiod. Temperature and the gender of C. sexmaculata influenced adult longevity. In addition, there was a significant interaction effect of photoperiod and gender on adult longevity. Furthermore, prey consumption by fourth instar larvae and adult females both increased with increasing temperature and photoperiod. Our results reveal the high thermal and light sensitivities of C. sexmaculata, which highlight the importance of environment regulation in the mass rearing of this natural enemy for application as a biological control in agroecosystems in China. PMID:24498765

  1. Phylogeny, classification and evolution of ladybird beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) based on simultaneous analysis of molecular and morphological data.

    PubMed

    Seago, Ainsley E; Giorgi, Jose Adriano; Li, Jiahui; Slipiński, Adam

    2011-07-01

    Ladybird beetles (family Coccinellidae) are a species-rich, ecologically diverse group of substantial agricultural significance, yet have been consistently problematic to classify, with evolutionary relationships poorly understood. In order to identify major clades within Coccinellidae, evaluate the current classification system, and identify likely drivers of diversification in this polyphagous group, we conducted the first simultaneous Bayesian analysis of morphological and multi-locus molecular data for any beetle family. Addition of morphological data significantly improved phylogenetic resolution and support for early diverging lineages, thereby better resolving evolutionary relationships than either data type alone. On the basis of these results, we formally recognize the subfamilies Microweisinae and Coccinellinae sensuŚlipiński (2007). No significant support was found for the subfamilies Coccidulinae, Scymninae, Sticholotidinae, or Ortaliinae. Our phylogenetic results suggest that the evolutionary success of Coccinellidae is in large part attributable to the exploitation of ant-tended sternorrhynchan insects as a food source, enabled by the key innovation of unusual defense mechanisms in larvae.

  2. Complementarity of statistical treatments to reconstruct worldwide routes of invasion: the case of the Asian ladybird Harmonia axyridis.

    PubMed

    Lombaert, Eric; Guillemaud, Thomas; Lundgren, Jonathan; Koch, Robert; Facon, Benoît; Grez, Audrey; Loomans, Antoon; Malausa, Thibaut; Nedved, Oldrich; Rhule, Emma; Staverlokk, Arnstein; Steenberg, Tove; Estoup, Arnaud

    2014-12-01

    Inferences about introduction histories of invasive species remain challenging because of the stochastic demographic processes involved. Approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) can help to overcome these problems, but such method requires a prior understanding of population structure over the study area, necessitating the use of alternative methods and an intense sampling design. In this study, we made inferences about the worldwide invasion history of the ladybird Harmonia axyridis by various population genetics statistical methods, using a large set of sampling sites distributed over most of the species' native and invaded areas. We evaluated the complementarity of the statistical methods and the consequences of using different sets of site samples for ABC inferences. We found that the H. axyridis invasion has involved two bridgehead invasive populations in North America, which have served as the source populations for at least six independent introductions into other continents. We also identified several situations of genetic admixture between differentiated sources. Our results highlight the importance of coupling ABC methods with more traditional statistical approaches. We found that the choice of site samples could affect the conclusions of ABC analyses comparing possible scenarios. Approaches involving independent ABC analyses on several sample sets constitute a sensible solution, complementary to standard quality controls based on the analysis of pseudo-observed data sets, to minimize erroneous conclusions. This study provides biologists without expertise in this area with detailed methodological and conceptual guidelines for making inferences about invasion routes when dealing with a large number of sampling sites and complex population genetic structures.

  3. Does a Change from Whole to Powdered Food (Artemia franciscana eggs) Increase Oviposition in the Ladybird Coleomegilla maculata?

    PubMed Central

    Riddick, Eric W.; Wu, Zhixin

    2015-01-01

    The limited availability of alternative foods to replace natural prey hinders cost-effective mass production of ladybird beetles for augmentative biological control. We compared the effects of powdered vs. whole Artemia franciscana (A. franciscana) (brine shrimp) eggs with or without a dietary supplement on development and reproduction of Coleomegilla maculata (C. maculata) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). We tested the hypotheses that (1) powdered A. franciscana eggs are more suitable than whole eggs; and (2) palmitic acid, a common fatty acid in natural prey, i.e., aphids, is an effective dietary supplement. Development time, pre-imaginal survival, sex ratio, and body weight of adults did not differ significantly amongst individuals fed powdered vs. whole eggs, with or without 5% palmitic acid. Significantly more oviposition occurred when females were fed powdered eggs than whole eggs and powdered eggs with 5% palmitic acid than whole eggs with or without 5% palmitic acid. A weak functional relationship was found between pre-oviposition time and total oviposition by females fed powdered eggs with 5% palmitic acid; pre-oviposition time decreased as oviposition increased. Food treatments had no significant differential effect on progeny (egg) hatch rate. In conclusion, a simple change in A. franciscana egg texture and particle size (i.e., blending whole eggs into a dust-like powder) increases oviposition in C. maculata. Supplementing powdered eggs with 5% palmitic acid might accelerate oogenesis (egg maturation) in some females. PMID:26466902

  4. Does a Change from Whole to Powdered Food (Artemia franciscana eggs) Increase Oviposition in the Ladybird Coleomegilla maculata?

    PubMed

    Riddick, Eric W; Wu, Zhixin

    2015-01-01

    The limited availability of alternative foods to replace natural prey hinders cost-effective mass production of ladybird beetles for augmentative biological control. We compared the effects of powdered vs. whole Artemia franciscana (A. franciscana) (brine shrimp) eggs with or without a dietary supplement on development and reproduction of Coleomegilla maculata (C. maculata) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). We tested the hypotheses that (1) powdered A. franciscana eggs are more suitable than whole eggs; and (2) palmitic acid, a common fatty acid in natural prey, i.e., aphids, is an effective dietary supplement. Development time, pre-imaginal survival, sex ratio, and body weight of adults did not differ significantly amongst individuals fed powdered vs. whole eggs, with or without 5% palmitic acid. Significantly more oviposition occurred when females were fed powdered eggs than whole eggs and powdered eggs with 5% palmitic acid than whole eggs with or without 5% palmitic acid. A weak functional relationship was found between pre-oviposition time and total oviposition by females fed powdered eggs with 5% palmitic acid; pre-oviposition time decreased as oviposition increased. Food treatments had no significant differential effect on progeny (egg) hatch rate. In conclusion, a simple change in A. franciscana egg texture and particle size (i.e., blending whole eggs into a dust-like powder) increases oviposition in C. maculata. Supplementing powdered eggs with 5% palmitic acid might accelerate oogenesis (egg maturation) in some females.

  5. Novel Routes for Improving Biocontrol Activity of Bacillus Based Bioinoculants

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liming; Wu, Hui-Jun; Qiao, Junqing; Gao, Xuewen; Borriss, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Biocontrol (BC) formulations prepared from plant-growth-promoting bacteria are increasingly applied in sustainable agriculture. Especially inoculants prepared from endospore-forming Bacillus strains have been proven as efficient and environmental-friendly alternative to chemical pesticides due to their long shelf life, which is comparable with that of agrochemicals. However, these formulations of the first generation are sometimes hampered in their action and do not fulfill in each case the expectations of the appliers. In this review we use the well-known plant-associated Bacillus amyloliquefaciens type strain FZB42 as example for the successful application of different techniques offered today by comparative, evolutionary and functional genomics, site-directed mutagenesis and strain construction including marker removal, for paving the way for preparing a novel generation of BC agents. PMID:26696998

  6. Biological and molecular characterisation of potential biocontrol strains of Trichoderma.

    PubMed

    Turóczi, G; Fekete, C; Kerényi, Z; Nagy, R; Pomázi, A; Hornok, L

    1996-01-01

    Thirty-four strains of seven species of Trichoderma isolated from various fungal sources were compared for direct mycoparasitic activity (MPA), chitinase production and antibiotic activity (ANA) in order to choose the most appropriate partners for a strain-breeding programme. Within species genetic differences were also assesses in T. hamatum, T. harzianum and T. viride by means of random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Endochitinase activities of the Trichoderma strains ranged between 20.4 and 1264.5 units/g dry weight of mycelium. The correlation between MPA and chitinase activity was not unambiguous and no correlation existed between MPA and ANA. The RAPD patterns of T. viride strains were highly variable, while isolates of T. harzianum proved to be more uniform; T. hamatum revealed remarkable intraspecific divergence. All these three comprised certain pairs of strains that are promising participants of a strain-improving programme, since their strong genetic affinities offer good changes for combining their contrasted biocontrol traits.

  7. Induced systemic resistance and plant responses to fungal biocontrol agents.

    PubMed

    Shoresh, Michal; Harman, Gary E; Mastouri, Fatemeh

    2010-01-01

    Biocontrol fungi (BCF) are agents that control plant diseases. These include the well-known Trichoderma spp. and the recently described Sebacinales spp. They have the ability to control numerous foliar, root, and fruit pathogens and even invertebrates such as nematodes. However, this is only a subset of their abilities. We now know that they also have the ability to ameliorate a wide range of abiotic stresses, and some of them can also alleviate physiological stresses such as seed aging. They can also enhance nutrient uptake in plants and can substantially increase nitrogen use efficiency in crops. These abilities may be more important to agriculture than disease control. Some strains also have abilities to improve photosynthetic efficiency and probably respiratory activities of plants. All of these capabilities are a consequence of their abilities to reprogram plant gene expression, probably through activation of a limited number of general plant pathways.

  8. Real-time monitoring of (E)-β-farnesene emission in colonies of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, under lacewing and ladybird predation.

    PubMed

    Joachim, Christoph; Weisser, Wolfgang W

    2013-10-01

    Aphids (Homoptera) are constantly under attack by a variety of predators and parasitoids. Upon attack, most aphids release alarm pheromone that induces escape behavior in other colony members, such as dropping off the host plant. In the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum Harris (Aphididae), the only component of this alarm pheromone is the sesquiterpene (E)-β-farnesene (EBF). EBF is thought to act as a kairomone by attracting various species of parasitoids and predators including lacewings and ladybirds. Lately, it also was proposed that EBF is constantly emitted in low quantities and used by aphids as a social cue. No study has focused on emission dynamics of this compound over a long time period. Here, we present the first long-time monitoring of EBF emission in aphid colonies using real-time monitoring. We used a zNose(TM) to analyze the headspace of colonies of the pea aphid, under lacewing (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) and ladybird (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) predation, over 24 hr. We found no emission of EBF in the absence of predation. When either a ladybird adult or a lacewing larva was placed in an aphid colony, EBF was detected in the headspace of the colonies in the form of emission blocks; i.e., periods in which EBF was emitted alternating with periods without EBF emission. The number of emission blocks correlated well with the number of predation events that were determined at the end of each experiment. There was no circadian rhythm in alarm pheromone emission, and both predators were active during both night and day. Our results show that alarm pheromone emission pattern within an aphid colony is driven by the feeding behavior of a predator. PMID:24158268

  9. Real-time monitoring of (E)-β-farnesene emission in colonies of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, under lacewing and ladybird predation.

    PubMed

    Joachim, Christoph; Weisser, Wolfgang W

    2013-10-01

    Aphids (Homoptera) are constantly under attack by a variety of predators and parasitoids. Upon attack, most aphids release alarm pheromone that induces escape behavior in other colony members, such as dropping off the host plant. In the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum Harris (Aphididae), the only component of this alarm pheromone is the sesquiterpene (E)-β-farnesene (EBF). EBF is thought to act as a kairomone by attracting various species of parasitoids and predators including lacewings and ladybirds. Lately, it also was proposed that EBF is constantly emitted in low quantities and used by aphids as a social cue. No study has focused on emission dynamics of this compound over a long time period. Here, we present the first long-time monitoring of EBF emission in aphid colonies using real-time monitoring. We used a zNose(TM) to analyze the headspace of colonies of the pea aphid, under lacewing (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) and ladybird (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) predation, over 24 hr. We found no emission of EBF in the absence of predation. When either a ladybird adult or a lacewing larva was placed in an aphid colony, EBF was detected in the headspace of the colonies in the form of emission blocks; i.e., periods in which EBF was emitted alternating with periods without EBF emission. The number of emission blocks correlated well with the number of predation events that were determined at the end of each experiment. There was no circadian rhythm in alarm pheromone emission, and both predators were active during both night and day. Our results show that alarm pheromone emission pattern within an aphid colony is driven by the feeding behavior of a predator.

  10. Incidence of male-killing Rickettsia spp. (alpha-proteobacteria) in the ten-spot ladybird beetle Adalia decempunctata L. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    PubMed

    von der Schulenburg, J H; Habig, M; Sloggett, J J; Webberley, K M; Bertrand, D; Hurst, G D; Majerus, M E

    2001-01-01

    The diversity of endosymbiotic bacteria that kill male host offspring during embryogenesis and their frequencies in certain groups of host taxa suggest that the evolution of male killing and the subsequent spread of male-killing symbionts are primarily determined by host life history characteristics. We studied the 10-spot ladybird beetle, Adalia decempunctata L. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), in which male killing has not been recorded previously, to test this hypothesis, and we also assessed the evolution of the male killer identified by DNA sequence analysis. Our results show that A. decempunctata harbors male-killing Rickettsia (alpha-proteobacteria). Male-killing bacteria belonging to the genus Rickettsia have previously been reported only for the congeneric two-spot ladybird beetle, Adalia bipunctata L. Phylogenetic analysis of Rickettsia DNA sequences isolated from different populations of the two host species revealed a single origin of male killing in the genus Rickettsia. The data also indicated possible horizontal transfer of symbionts between host species. In addition, A. bipunctata is known to bear at least four different male-killing symbionts in its geographic range two of which coexist in the two locations from which A. decempunctata specimens were obtained for the present study. Since only a single male-killing taxon was found in A. decempunctata, we assume that the two closely related ladybird beetle species must differ in the number and/or geographic distribution of male killers. We discuss the importance of these findings to our understanding of the evolution and dynamics of symbiotic associations between male-killing bacteria and their insect hosts.

  11. Indirect effects of biocontrol of an invasive riparian plant (Tamarix) alters habitat and reduces herpetofauna abundance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bateman, H.L.; Merritt, D.M.; Glenn, E.P.; Nagler, P.L.

    2014-01-01

    The biological control agent (tamarisk leaf beetle, Diorhabda spp.) is actively being used to defoliate exotic saltcedar or tamarisk (Tamarix spp.) in riparian ecosystems in western USA. The Virgin River in Arizona and Nevada is a system where tamarisk leaf beetle populations are spreading. Saltcedar biocontrol, like other control methods, has the potential to affect non-target species. Because amphibians and reptiles respond to vegetation changes in habitat and forage in areas where beetles are active, herpetofauna are model taxa to investigate potential impacts of biocontrol defoliation. Our objectives related herpetofauna abundance to vegetation cover and indices (normalized difference vegetation index, NDVI; enhanced vegetation index, EVI) and timing of biocontrol defoliation. We captured herpetofauna and ground-dwelling arthropods in trap arrays and measured vegetation using remotely sensed images and on-the-ground measurements at 16–21 sites 2 years before (2009–2010) and 2 years following (2011–2012) biocontrol defoliation. Following defoliation, riparian stands (including stands mixed with native and exotic trees and stands of monotypic exotic saltcedar) had significantly lower NDVI and EVI values and fewer captures of marked lizards. Total captures of herpetofauna (toads, lizards, and snakes) were related to higher vegetation cover and sites with a lower proportion of saltcedar. Our results suggest that effects of biocontrol defoliation are likely to be site-specific and depend upon the proportion of native riparian trees established prior to biocontrol introduction and defoliation. The mechanisms by which habitat structure, microclimate, and ultimately vertebrate species are affected by exotic plant biocontrol riparian areas should be a focus of natural-resource managers.

  12. The Homeodomain Protein Ladybird Late Regulates Synthesis of Milk Proteins during Pregnancy in the Tsetse Fly (Glossina morsitans)

    PubMed Central

    Attardo, Geoffrey M.; Benoit, Joshua B.; Michalkova, Veronika; Patrick, Kevin R.; Krause, Tyler B.; Aksoy, Serap

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of tissue and development specific gene expression patterns underlies the functional specialization of organs in multi-cellular organisms. In the viviparous tsetse fly (Glossina), the female accessory gland is specialized to generate nutrients in the form of a milk-like secretion to support growth of intrauterine larva. Multiple milk protein genes are expressed specifically in the female accessory gland and are tightly linked with larval development. Disruption of milk protein synthesis deprives developing larvae of nutrients and results in extended larval development and/or in abortion. The ability to cause such a disruption could be utilized as a tsetse control strategy. Here we identify and delineate the regulatory sequence of a major milk protein gene (milk gland protein 1:mgp1) by utilizing a combination of molecular techniques in tsetse, Drosophila transgenics, transcriptomics and in silico sequence analyses. The function of this promoter is conserved between tsetse and Drosophila. In transgenic Drosophila the mgp1 promoter directs reporter gene expression in a tissue and stage specific manner orthologous to that of Glossina. Analysis of the minimal required regulatory region of mgp1, and the regulatory regions of other Glossina milk proteins identified putative homeodomain protein binding sites as the sole common feature. Annotation and expression analysis of Glossina homeodomain proteins identified ladybird late (lbl) as being accessory gland/fat body specific and differentially expressed between lactating/non-lactating flies. Knockdown of lbl in tsetse resulted in a significant reduction in transcript abundance of multiple milk protein genes and in a significant loss of fecundity. The role of Lbl in adult reproductive physiology is previously unknown. These results suggest that Lbl is part of a conserved reproductive regulatory system that could have implications beyond tsetse to other vector insects such as mosquitoes. This system is critical

  13. Establishment of transgenic lines for jumpstarter method using a composite transposon vector in the ladybird beetle, Harmonia axyridis.

    PubMed

    Kuwayama, Hisashi; Gotoh, Hiroki; Konishi, Yusuke; Nishikawa, Hideto; Yaginuma, Toshinobu; Niimi, Teruyuki

    2014-01-01

    In this post-genomic era, genome-wide functional analysis is indispensable. The recent development of RNA interference techniques has enabled researchers to easily analyze gene function even in non-model organisms. On the other hand, little progress has been made in the identification and functional analyses of cis-regulatory elements in non-model organisms. In order to develop experimental platform for identification and analyses of cis-regulatory elements in a non-model organism, in this case, the ladybird beetle, Harmonia axyridis, we established transgenic transposon-tagged lines using a novel composite vector. This vector enables the generation of two types of insertion products (jumpstarter and mutator). The jumpstarter portion carries a transposase gene, while the mutator segment carries a reporter gene for detecting enhancers. The full-composite element is flanked by functional termini (required for movement); however, the mutator region has an extra terminus making it possible for the mutator to remobilize on its own, thus leaving an immobile jumpstarter element behind. Each insertion type is stable on its own, but once crossed, jumpstarters can remobilize mutators. After crossing a jumpstarter and mutator line, all tested G2 females gave rise to at least one new insertion line in the next generation. This jumping rate is equivalent to the P-element-mediated jumpstarter method in Drosophila. These established transgenic lines will offer us the ideal experimental materials for the effective screening and identification of enhancers in this species. In addition, this jumpstarter method has the potential to be as effective in other non-model insect species and thus applicable to any organism. PMID:24959904

  14. Complementarity of statistical treatments to reconstruct worldwide routes of invasion: the case of the Asian ladybird Harmonia axyridis.

    PubMed

    Lombaert, Eric; Guillemaud, Thomas; Lundgren, Jonathan; Koch, Robert; Facon, Benoît; Grez, Audrey; Loomans, Antoon; Malausa, Thibaut; Nedved, Oldrich; Rhule, Emma; Staverlokk, Arnstein; Steenberg, Tove; Estoup, Arnaud

    2014-12-01

    Inferences about introduction histories of invasive species remain challenging because of the stochastic demographic processes involved. Approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) can help to overcome these problems, but such method requires a prior understanding of population structure over the study area, necessitating the use of alternative methods and an intense sampling design. In this study, we made inferences about the worldwide invasion history of the ladybird Harmonia axyridis by various population genetics statistical methods, using a large set of sampling sites distributed over most of the species' native and invaded areas. We evaluated the complementarity of the statistical methods and the consequences of using different sets of site samples for ABC inferences. We found that the H. axyridis invasion has involved two bridgehead invasive populations in North America, which have served as the source populations for at least six independent introductions into other continents. We also identified several situations of genetic admixture between differentiated sources. Our results highlight the importance of coupling ABC methods with more traditional statistical approaches. We found that the choice of site samples could affect the conclusions of ABC analyses comparing possible scenarios. Approaches involving independent ABC analyses on several sample sets constitute a sensible solution, complementary to standard quality controls based on the analysis of pseudo-observed data sets, to minimize erroneous conclusions. This study provides biologists without expertise in this area with detailed methodological and conceptual guidelines for making inferences about invasion routes when dealing with a large number of sampling sites and complex population genetic structures. PMID:25369988

  15. Establishment of transgenic lines for jumpstarter method using a composite transposon vector in the ladybird beetle, Harmonia axyridis.

    PubMed

    Kuwayama, Hisashi; Gotoh, Hiroki; Konishi, Yusuke; Nishikawa, Hideto; Yaginuma, Toshinobu; Niimi, Teruyuki

    2014-01-01

    In this post-genomic era, genome-wide functional analysis is indispensable. The recent development of RNA interference techniques has enabled researchers to easily analyze gene function even in non-model organisms. On the other hand, little progress has been made in the identification and functional analyses of cis-regulatory elements in non-model organisms. In order to develop experimental platform for identification and analyses of cis-regulatory elements in a non-model organism, in this case, the ladybird beetle, Harmonia axyridis, we established transgenic transposon-tagged lines using a novel composite vector. This vector enables the generation of two types of insertion products (jumpstarter and mutator). The jumpstarter portion carries a transposase gene, while the mutator segment carries a reporter gene for detecting enhancers. The full-composite element is flanked by functional termini (required for movement); however, the mutator region has an extra terminus making it possible for the mutator to remobilize on its own, thus leaving an immobile jumpstarter element behind. Each insertion type is stable on its own, but once crossed, jumpstarters can remobilize mutators. After crossing a jumpstarter and mutator line, all tested G2 females gave rise to at least one new insertion line in the next generation. This jumping rate is equivalent to the P-element-mediated jumpstarter method in Drosophila. These established transgenic lines will offer us the ideal experimental materials for the effective screening and identification of enhancers in this species. In addition, this jumpstarter method has the potential to be as effective in other non-model insect species and thus applicable to any organism.

  16. Programmed cell death of the ovarian nurse cells during oogenesis of the ladybird beetle Adalia bipunctata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    PubMed

    Mpakou, Vassiliki E; Velentzas, Athanassios D; Velentzas, Panagiotis D; Margaritis, Lukas H; Stravopodis, Dimitrios J; Papassideri, Issidora S

    2011-08-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an evolutionary conserved and genetically regulated form of cell death, in which the cell plays an active role in its own demise. It is widely recognized that PCD can be morphologically classified into three major types: type I, known as apoptosis, type II, called autophagy, and type III, specified as cytoplasmic cell death. So far, PCD has been morphologically analyzed in certain model insect species of the meroistic polytrophic ovary-type, but has never been examined before in insects carrying meroistic telotrophic ovaries. In the present study, we attempted to thoroughly describe the three different types (I, II and III) of PCD occurring during oogenesis in the meroistic telotrophic ovary of the Coleoptera species Adalia bipunctata, at different developmental ages of the adult female insects. We reveal that in the ladybird beetle A. bipunctata, the ovarian tropharia undergo age-dependent forms of apoptotic, autophagic and cytoplasmic (paraptotic-like) cell death, which seem to operate in a rather synergistic fashion, in accordance with previous observations in Diptera and Lepidoptera species. Furthermore, we herein demonstrate the occurrence of morphogenetically abnormal ovarioles in A. bipunctata female insects. These atretic ovarioles collapse and die through a PCD-mediated process that is characterized by the combined activation of all three types of PCD. Conclusively, the distinct cell death programs (I, II and III) specifically engaged during oogenesis of A. bipunctata provide strong evidence for the structural and functional conserved nature of PCD during insect evolution among meroistic telotrophic and meroistic polytrophic ovary-type insects.

  17. Differentiation and interchange of harlequin duck populations within the North Pacific. Restoration project 97161: Exxon Valdez oil spill restoration project -- Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Goatcher, B.; Zwiefelhofer, D.; Lanctot, R.; Talbot, S.; Pierson, B.

    1999-04-01

    Concerns about constraints to harlequin duck (Histrionicus histrionicus) population recovery following the Exxon Valdez oil spill led biologists to ask whether birds in different molting and wintering areas belong to genetically distinct and, thus, demographically independent population segments. Genetic markers, which differed in mode of inheritance (two sex-linked Z-specific microsatellite loci, four biparentally inherited microsatellite loci and maternally inherited mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid sequences), were used to evaluate the degree of genetic differentiation among wintering areas within Prince William Sound, Alaska Peninsula (Katmai National Park) and Kodiak Archipelago (Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge). The authors also used colored leg bands to detect population interchange within and among these regions. The authors` genetic results show that differences in genotype frequencies among wintering locations within Alaska were low and non-significant for all three classes of markers. An analysis of genetic samples collected throughout the West Coast of North America revealed significant structuring at larger geographic scales. No interchange of banded birds was observed among regions and movements within regions were uncommon.

  18. Impact of a Recombinant Biocontrol Bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens pc78, on Microbial Community in Tomato Rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Kong, Hyun Gi; Kim, Nam Hee; Lee, Seung Yeup; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2016-04-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens pc78 is an effective biocontrol agent for soil-borne fungal diseases. We previously constructed a P43-gfp tagged biocontrol bacteria P. fluorescens pc78-48 to investigate bacterial traits in natural ecosystem and the environmental risk of genetically modified biocontrol bacteria in tomato rhizosphere. Fluctuation of culturable bacteria profile, microbial community structure, and potential horizontal gene transfer was investigated over time after the bacteria treatment to the tomato rhizosphere. Tagged gene transfer to other organisms such as tomato plants and bacteria cultured on various media was examined by polymerase chain reaction, using gene specific primers. Transfer of chromosomally integrated P43-gfp from pc78 to other organisms was not apparent. Population and colony types of culturable bacteria were not significantly affected by the introduction of P. fluorescens pc78 or pc78-48 into tomato rhizosphere. Additionally, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism profiles were investigated to estimate the influence on the microbial community structure in tomato rhizosphere between non-treated and pc78-48-treated samples. Interestingly, rhizosphere soil treated with strain pc78-48 exhibited a significantly different bacterial community structure compared to that of non-treated rhizosphere soil. Our results suggest that biocontrol bacteria treatment influences microbial community in tomato rhizosphere, while the chromosomally modified biocontrol bacteria may not pose any specific environmental risk in terms of gene transfer. PMID:27147933

  19. Impact of a Recombinant Biocontrol Bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens pc78, on Microbial Community in Tomato Rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Kong, Hyun Gi; Kim, Nam Hee; Lee, Seung Yeup; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2016-04-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens pc78 is an effective biocontrol agent for soil-borne fungal diseases. We previously constructed a P43-gfp tagged biocontrol bacteria P. fluorescens pc78-48 to investigate bacterial traits in natural ecosystem and the environmental risk of genetically modified biocontrol bacteria in tomato rhizosphere. Fluctuation of culturable bacteria profile, microbial community structure, and potential horizontal gene transfer was investigated over time after the bacteria treatment to the tomato rhizosphere. Tagged gene transfer to other organisms such as tomato plants and bacteria cultured on various media was examined by polymerase chain reaction, using gene specific primers. Transfer of chromosomally integrated P43-gfp from pc78 to other organisms was not apparent. Population and colony types of culturable bacteria were not significantly affected by the introduction of P. fluorescens pc78 or pc78-48 into tomato rhizosphere. Additionally, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism profiles were investigated to estimate the influence on the microbial community structure in tomato rhizosphere between non-treated and pc78-48-treated samples. Interestingly, rhizosphere soil treated with strain pc78-48 exhibited a significantly different bacterial community structure compared to that of non-treated rhizosphere soil. Our results suggest that biocontrol bacteria treatment influences microbial community in tomato rhizosphere, while the chromosomally modified biocontrol bacteria may not pose any specific environmental risk in terms of gene transfer.

  20. Impact of a Recombinant Biocontrol Bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens pc78, on Microbial Community in Tomato Rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Hyun Gi; Kim, Nam Hee; Lee, Seung Yeup; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens pc78 is an effective biocontrol agent for soil-borne fungal diseases. We previously constructed a P43-gfp tagged biocontrol bacteria P. fluorescens pc78-48 to investigate bacterial traits in natural ecosystem and the environmental risk of genetically modified biocontrol bacteria in tomato rhizosphere. Fluctuation of culturable bacteria profile, microbial community structure, and potential horizontal gene transfer was investigated over time after the bacteria treatment to the tomato rhizosphere. Tagged gene transfer to other organisms such as tomato plants and bacteria cultured on various media was examined by polymerase chain reaction, using gene specific primers. Transfer of chromosomally integrated P43-gfp from pc78 to other organisms was not apparent. Population and colony types of culturable bacteria were not significantly affected by the introduction of P. fluorescens pc78 or pc78-48 into tomato rhizosphere. Additionally, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism profiles were investigated to estimate the influence on the microbial community structure in tomato rhizosphere between non-treated and pc78-48-treated samples. Interestingly, rhizosphere soil treated with strain pc78-48 exhibited a significantly different bacterial community structure compared to that of non-treated rhizosphere soil. Our results suggest that biocontrol bacteria treatment influences microbial community in tomato rhizosphere, while the chromosomally modified biocontrol bacteria may not pose any specific environmental risk in terms of gene transfer. PMID:27147933

  1. Biocontrol of the Potato Blackleg and Soft Rot Diseases Caused by Dickeya dianthicola

    PubMed Central

    Raoul des Essarts, Yannick; Cigna, Jérémy; Quêtu-Laurent, Angélique; Caron, Aline; Munier, Euphrasie; Beury-Cirou, Amélie

    2015-01-01

    Development of protection tools targeting Dickeya species is an important issue in the potato production. Here, we present the identification and the characterization of novel biocontrol agents. Successive screenings of 10,000 bacterial isolates led us to retain 58 strains that exhibited growth inhibition properties against several Dickeya sp. and/or Pectobacterium sp. pathogens. Most of them belonged to the Pseudomonas and Bacillus genera. In vitro assays revealed a fitness decrease of the tested Dickeya sp. and Pectobacterium sp. pathogens in the presence of the biocontrol agents. In addition, four independent greenhouse assays performed to evaluate the biocontrol bacteria effect on potato plants artificially contaminated with Dickeya dianthicola revealed that a mix of three biocontrol agents, namely, Pseudomonas putida PA14H7 and Pseudomonas fluorescens PA3G8 and PA4C2, repeatedly decreased the severity of blackleg symptoms as well as the transmission of D. dianthicola to the tuber progeny. This work highlights the use of a combination of biocontrol strains as a potential strategy to limit the soft rot and blackleg diseases caused by D. dianthicola on potato plants and tubers. PMID:26497457

  2. Regulation of morphogenesis and biocontrol properties in Trichoderma virens by a VELVET protein, Vel1.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Prasun K; Kenerley, Charles M

    2010-04-01

    Mycoparasitic strains of Trichoderma are applied as commercial biofungicides for control of soilborne plant pathogens. Although the majority of commercial biofungicides are Trichoderma based, chemical pesticides, which are ecological and environmental hazards, still dominate the market. This is because biofungicides are not as effective or consistent as chemical fungicides. Efforts to improve these products have been limited by a lack of understanding of the genetic regulation of biocontrol activities. In this study, using gene knockout and complementation, we identified the VELVET protein Vel1 as a key regulator of biocontrol, as well as morphogenetic traits, in Trichoderma virens, a commercial biocontrol agent. Mutants with mutations in vel1 were defective in secondary metabolism (antibiosis), mycoparasitism, and biocontrol efficacy. In nutrient-rich media they also lacked two types of spores important for survival and development of formulation products: conidia (on agar) and chlamydospores (in liquid shake cultures). These findings provide an opportunity for genetic enhancement of biocontrol and industrial strains of Trichoderma, since Vel1 is very highly conserved across three Trichoderma species.

  3. Surfactin triggers biofilm formation of Bacillus subtilis in melon phylloplane and contributes to the biocontrol activity.

    PubMed

    Zeriouh, Houda; de Vicente, Antonio; Pérez-García, Alejandro; Romero, Diego

    2014-07-01

    The biocontrol activity of many Bacillus species has been traditionally related to the direct antagonism of pathogens. In previous works, we reported that B. subtilis strain UMAF6614 was an efficient biocontrol agent that produced bacillomycin, fengycin and surfactin lipopeptides. Bacillomycins and fengycins were shown to have antagonistic activity towards fungal and bacterial pathogens of cucurbits; however, the functionality of surfactin remained unclear. In this study, the role of surfactin in the biocontrol activity of this strain was investigated. We observed that a deficiency in surfactin production led to a partial reduction of disease suppression by this biocontrol agent, which coincided with a defect in biofilm formation and the colonization of the melon phylloplane. These effects were due to a dramatic reduction in the production of exopolysaccharide and the TasA protein, which are the two major components of the extracellular matrix. We propose that the biocontrol activity of this strain is the result of the coordinated action of the three families of lipopeptides. B. subtilis UMAF6614 produces surfactin to trigger biofilm formation on melon phylloplane, which ensures the long-term persistence and the adequate secretion of suppressive lipopeptides, bacillomycins and fengycins, which efficiently target pathogens.

  4. Insight into tick biocontrol with special regard to fungi.

    PubMed

    Lonc, Elżbieta; Guz-Regner, Katarzyna; Kiewra, Dorota; Szczepańska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The epidemiological and epizootic importance of ticks has been known for a few decades since of the discovery of their role as vectors of many new diseases, and the better detection of those already known. Given the durability of chemical preparations in the environment and the increasing problem of developing tick resistance, natural strategies for biological control are sought. A promising alternative to chemical pesticides is the use of entomopathogenic organisms for effective integrated pest management of low environmental impact. A number of promising microbes have been identified during the search for effective means of controlling the tick population, but the knowledge about the impact of these pathogens on the environment and other non-target organisms is still insufficient. Previous research has still not provided a definite answer about the safety of their use. It is known, however,that the chemicals which are currently used have a negative impact on the environment and/or cause resistance. No efficient biocompound has yet been devised for commercial use. Potential microorganisms for tick biocontrol (mainly bacteria and fungi) are natural tick pathogens, living in the same environment. With their adhesive properties, and their ability to digest the cuticle, they may constitute an appropriate ingredient of bioacaricides. Until now, fungal insecticides have been used only to control crop pests. PMID:25281814

  5. Ochratoxin A management in vineyards by Lobesia botrana biocontrol.

    PubMed

    Cozzi, Giuseppe; Somma, Stefania; Haidukowski, Miriam; Logrieco, Antonio F

    2013-01-01

    Grape berries attacked by Lobesia botrana larvae are more easily infected by Aspergillus section Nigri (black aspergilli) ochratoxigenic species. Two-year field trials were carried out in Apulia (Italy) to evaluate a bioinsecticide control strategy against L. botrana and the indirect effect on reducing ochratoxin A (OTA) contamination in vineyards. A commercial Bacillus thuringiensis formulate and an experimental Beauveria bassiana (ITEM-1559) formulate were tested in two vineyards cultivated with the same grape variety, Negroamaro, but with two different training systems (espalier and little-arbor techniques). In both years and training systems the treatments by B. bassiana ITEM-1559 significantly controlled L. botrana larvae attacks with effectiveness similar to B. thuringensis (more than 20%). A significant reduction of OTA concentrations (up to 80% compared to untreated controls) was observed only in the first year in both training systems, when the metereological parameters prior to harvest were more favorable to the insect attack. Results of field trials showed that B. bassiana ITEM-1559 is a valid bioinsecticide against L. botrana and that grape moth biocontrol is a strategy to reduce OTA contamination in vineyard in seasons with heavy natural infestation.

  6. Ochratoxin A Management in Vineyards by Lobesia botrana Biocontrol

    PubMed Central

    Cozzi, Giuseppe; Somma, Stefania; Haidukowski, Miriam; Logrieco, Antonio F.

    2013-01-01

    Grape berries attacked by Lobesia botrana larvae are more easily infected by Aspergillus section Nigri (black aspergilli) ochratoxigenic species. Two-year field trials were carried out in Apulia (Italy) to evaluate a bioinsecticide control strategy against L. botrana and the indirect effect on reducing ochratoxin A (OTA) contamination in vineyards. A commercial Bacillus thuringiensis formulate and an experimental Beauveria bassiana (ITEM-1559) formulate were tested in two vineyards cultivated with the same grape variety, Negroamaro, but with two different training systems (espalier and little-arbor techniques). In both years and training systems the treatments by B. bassiana ITEM-1559 significantly controlled L. botrana larvae attacks with effectiveness similar to B. thuringensis (more than 20%). A significant reduction of OTA concentrations (up to 80% compared to untreated controls) was observed only in the first year in both training systems, when the metereological parameters prior to harvest were more favorable to the insect attack. Results of field trials showed that B. bassiana ITEM-1559 is a valid bioinsecticide against L. botrana and that grape moth biocontrol is a strategy to reduce OTA contamination in vineyard in seasons with heavy natural infestation. PMID:23282670

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Chryseobacterium sp. Strain GSE06, a Biocontrol Endophytic Bacterium Isolated from Cucumber (Cucumis sativus).

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin-Ju; Park, Byeong Hyeok; Park, Hongjae; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Ki Deok

    2016-06-16

    Chryseobacterium sp. strain GSE06 is a biocontrol endophytic bacterium against the destructive soilborne oomycete Phytophthora capsici, which causes Phytophthora blight of pepper. Here, we present its draft genome sequence, which contains genes related to biocontrol traits, such as colonization, antimicrobial activity, plant growth promotion, and abiotic or biotic stress adaptation.

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Chryseobacterium sp. Strain GSE06, a Biocontrol Endophytic Bacterium Isolated from Cucumber (Cucumis sativus).

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin-Ju; Park, Byeong Hyeok; Park, Hongjae; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Ki Deok

    2016-01-01

    Chryseobacterium sp. strain GSE06 is a biocontrol endophytic bacterium against the destructive soilborne oomycete Phytophthora capsici, which causes Phytophthora blight of pepper. Here, we present its draft genome sequence, which contains genes related to biocontrol traits, such as colonization, antimicrobial activity, plant growth promotion, and abiotic or biotic stress adaptation. PMID:27313310

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of a Biocontrol Rhizobacterium, Chryseobacterium kwangjuense Strain KJ1R5, Isolated from Pepper (Capsicum annuum)

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jin-Ju; Park, Hongjae; Park, Byeong Hyeok; Mannaa, Mohamed; Sang, Mee Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Strain KJ1R5 of the rhizobacterium Chryseobacterium kwangjuense is an effective biocontrol agent against Phytophthora blight of pepper caused by a destructive soilborne oomycete, Phytophthora capsici. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of strain KJ1R5, which contains genes related to biocontrol, plant growth promotion, and environmental stress adaptation. PMID:27103726

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Chryseobacterium sp. Strain GSE06, a Biocontrol Endophytic Bacterium Isolated from Cucumber (Cucumis sativus)

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jin-Ju; Park, Byeong Hyeok; Park, Hongjae

    2016-01-01

    Chryseobacterium sp. strain GSE06 is a biocontrol endophytic bacterium against the destructive soilborne oomycete Phytophthora capsici, which causes Phytophthora blight of pepper. Here, we present its draft genome sequence, which contains genes related to biocontrol traits, such as colonization, antimicrobial activity, plant growth promotion, and abiotic or biotic stress adaptation. PMID:27313310

  11. Evaluation of recycled bioplastic pellets and a sprayable formulation for application of an Aspergillus flavus biocontrol strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biocontrol of Aspergillus flavus using inoculated bioplastic granules has been proven to be effective under laboratory and field conditions. In the present study, the use of low-density pellets from recycled bioplastic as a biocontrol strain carrier was evaluated. Applying recycled bioplastic pell...

  12. Myco-Biocontrol of Insect Pests: Factors Involved, Mechanism, and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Sardul Singh; Sharma, Anil K.; Beniwal, Vikas; Goel, Gunjan; Batra, Priya; Kumar, Anil; Jaglan, Sundeep; Sharma, A. K.; Malhotra, Sonal

    2012-01-01

    The growing demand for reducing chemical inputs in agriculture and increased resistance to insecticides have provided great impetus to the development of alternative forms of insect-pest control. Myco-biocontrol offers an attractive alternative to the use of chemical pesticides. Myco-biocontrol agents are naturally occurring organisms which are perceived as less damaging to the environment. Their mode of action appears little complex which makes it highly unlikely that resistance could be developed to a biopesticide. Past research has shown some promise of the use of fungi as a selective pesticide. The current paper updates us about the recent progress in the field of myco-biocontrol of insect pests and their possible mechanism of action to further enhance our understanding about the biological control of insect pests. PMID:22567344

  13. In vitro biocontrol analysis of Alternaria alternata (Fr.) Keissler under different environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Sempere, F; Santamarina, M P

    2007-03-01

    The species Trichoderma harzianum was analyzed as possible biocontrol agent of Alternaria alternata under different environmental conditions (water activity and temperature). The strains were analyzed macroscopically to obtain the Index of Dominance. The analysis was completed using two microscopic techniques. T. harzianum showed dominance on contact over A. alternata at all testing temperatures and water activities tested except at 0.95 a(w) and 15 degrees C, at which T. harzianum inhibited A. alternata at a distance. Biocontrol was governed by different mechanisms such as competition for space and nutrients, mycoparasitism, and possible antibiosis. Temperature and water activity significantly influenced fungal growth rate. PMID:17356789

  14. Whole genome shotgun sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens TF28, a biocontrol entophytic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shumei; Jiang, Wei; Li, Jing; Meng, Liqiang; Cao, Xu; Hu, Jihua; Liu, Yushuai; Chen, Jingyu; Sha, Changqing

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens TF28 is a biocontrol endophytic bacterium that is capable of inhibition of a broad range of plant pathogenic fungi. The strain has the potential to be developed into a biocontrol agent for use in agriculture. Here we report the whole-genome shotgun sequence of the strain. The genome size of B. amyloliquefaciens TF28 is 3,987,635 bp which consists of 3754 protein-coding genes, 65 tandem repeat sequences, 47 minisatellite DNA, 2 microsatellite DNA, 63 tRNA, 7rRNA, 6 sRNA, 3 prophage and CRISPR domains. PMID:27688836

  15. Tick control: trapping, biocontrol, host management and other alternative strategies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ginsberg, Howard S.; Edited by Sonenshine, Daniel E.; Roe, R. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Biology of Ticks is the most comprehensive work on tick biology and tick-borne diseases. This second edition is a multi-authored work, featuring the research and analyses of renowned experts across the globe. Spanning two volumes, the book examines the systematics, biology, structure, ecological adaptations, evolution, genomics and the molecular processes that underpin the growth, development and survival of these important disease-transmitting parasites. Also discussed is the remarkable array of diseases transmitted (or caused) by ticks, as well as modern methods for their control. This book should serve as a modern reference for students, scientists, physicians, veterinarians and other specialists. Volume I covers the biology of the tick and features chapters on tick systematics, tick life cycles, external and internal anatomy, and others dedicated to specific organ systems, specifically, the tick integument, mouthparts and digestive system, salivary glands, waste removal, salivary glands, respiratory system, circulatory system and hemolymph, fat body, the nervous and sensory systems and reproductive systems. Volume II includes chapters on the ecology of non-nidicolous and nidicolous ticks, genetics and genomics (including the genome of the Lyme disease vector Ixodes scapularis) and immunity, including host immune responses to tick feeding and tick-host interactions, as well as the tick's innate immune system that prevents and/or controls microbial infections. Six chapters cover in depth the many diseases caused by the major tick-borne pathogens, including tick-borne protozoa, viruses, rickettsiae of all types, other types of bacteria (e.g., the Lyme disease agent) and diseases related to tick paralytic agents and toxins. The remaining chapters are devoted to tick control using vaccines, acaricides, repellents, biocontrol, and, finally, techniques for breeding ticks in order to develop tick colonies for scientific study.

  16. Bio-Control of Salmonella Enteritidis in Foods Using Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Hongduo; Zhang, Pengyu; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Yan; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Two lytic phages, vB_SenM-PA13076 (PA13076) and vB_SenM-PC2184 (PC2184), were isolated from chicken sewage and characterized with host strains Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) ATCC13076 and CVCC2184, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that they belonged to the family Myoviridae. The lytic abilities of these two phages in liquid culture showed 104 multiplicity of infection (MOI) was the best in inhibiting bacteria, with PC2184 exhibiting more activity than PA13076. The two phages exhibited broad host range within the genus Salmonella. Phage PA13076 and PC2184 had a lytic effect on 222 (71.4%) and 298 (95.8%) of the 311 epidemic Salmonella isolates, respectively. We tested the effectiveness of phage PA13076 and PC2184 as well as a cocktail combination of both in three different foods (chicken breast, pasteurized whole milk and Chinese cabbage) contaminated with SE. Samples were spiked with 1 × 104 CFU individual SE or a mixture of strains (ATCC13076 and CVCC2184), then treated with 1 × 108 PFU individual phage or a two phage cocktail, and incubated at 4 °C or 25 °C for 5 h. In general, the inhibitory effect of phage and phage cocktail was better at 4 °C than that at 25 °C, whereas the opposite result was observed in Chinese cabbage, and phage cocktail was better than either single phage. A significant reduction in bacterial numbers (1.5–4 log CFU/sample, p < 0.05) was observed in all tested foods. The two phages on the three food samples were relatively stable, especially at 4 °C, with the phages exhibiting the greatest stability in milk. Our research shows that our phages have potential effectiveness as a bio-control agent of Salmonella in foods. PMID:26305252

  17. Bacteriophage cocktail for biocontrol of Salmonella in dried pet food.

    PubMed

    Heyse, Serena; Hanna, Leigh Farris; Woolston, Joelle; Sulakvelidze, Alexander; Charbonneau, Duane

    2015-01-01

    Human salmonellosis has been associated with contaminated pet foods and treats. Therefore, there is interest in identifying novel approaches for reducing the risk of Salmonella contamination within pet food manufacturing environments. The use of lytic bacteriophages shows promise as a safe and effective way to mitigate Salmonella contamination in various food products. Bacteriophages are safe, natural, highly targeted antibacterial agents that specifically kill bacteria and can be targeted to kill food pathogens without affecting other microbiota. In this study, we show that a cocktail containing six bacteriophages had a broadspectrum activity in vitro against a library of 930 Salmonella enterica strains representing 44 known serovars. The cocktail was effective against 95% of the strains in this tested library. In liquid culture dose-ranging experiments, bacteriophage cocktail concentrations of ≥10(8) PFU/ml inactivated more than 90% of the Salmonella population (10(1) to 10(3) CFU/ml). Dried pet food inoculated with a mixture containing equal proportions of Salmonella serovars Enteritidis (ATCC 4931), Montevideo (ATCC 8387), Senftenberg (ATCC 8400), and Typhimurium (ATCC 13311) and then surface treated with the six-bacteriophage cocktail (≥2.5 ± 1.5 × 10(6) PFU/g) achieved a greater than 1-log (P < 0.001) reduction compared with the phosphate-buffered saline-treated control in measured viable Salmonella within 60 min. Moreover, this bacteriophage cocktail reduced natural contamination in samples taken from an undistributed lot of commercial dried dog food that tested positive for Salmonella. Our results indicate that bacteriophage biocontrol of S. enterica in dried pet food is technically feasible.

  18. Bio-Control of Salmonella Enteritidis in Foods Using Bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Bao, Hongduo; Zhang, Pengyu; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Yan; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Ran

    2015-08-24

    Two lytic phages, vB_SenM-PA13076 (PA13076) and vB_SenM-PC2184 (PC2184), were isolated from chicken sewage and characterized with host strains Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) ATCC13076 and CVCC2184, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that they belonged to the family Myoviridae. The lytic abilities of these two phages in liquid culture showed 104 multiplicity of infection (MOI) was the best in inhibiting bacteria, with PC2184 exhibiting more activity than PA13076. The two phages exhibited broad host range within the genus Salmonella. Phage PA13076 and PC2184 had a lytic effect on 222 (71.4%) and 298 (95.8%) of the 311 epidemic Salmonella isolates, respectively. We tested the effectiveness of phage PA13076 and PC2184 as well as a cocktail combination of both in three different foods (chicken breast, pasteurized whole milk and Chinese cabbage) contaminated with SE. Samples were spiked with 1 × 10(4) CFU individual SE or a mixture of strains (ATCC13076 and CVCC2184), then treated with 1 × 10(8) PFU individual phage or a two phage cocktail, and incubated at 4 °C or 25 °C for 5 h. In general, the inhibitory effect of phage and phage cocktail was better at 4 °C than that at 25 °C, whereas the opposite result was observed in Chinese cabbage, and phage cocktail was better than either single phage. A significant reduction in bacterial numbers (1.5-4 log CFU/sample, p < 0.05) was observed in all tested foods. The two phages on the three food samples were relatively stable, especially at 4 ºC, with the phages exhibiting the greatest stability in milk. Our research shows that our phages have potential effectiveness as a bio-control agent of Salmonella in foods.

  19. Bio-Control of Salmonella Enteritidis in Foods Using Bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Bao, Hongduo; Zhang, Pengyu; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Yan; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Ran

    2015-08-01

    Two lytic phages, vB_SenM-PA13076 (PA13076) and vB_SenM-PC2184 (PC2184), were isolated from chicken sewage and characterized with host strains Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) ATCC13076 and CVCC2184, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that they belonged to the family Myoviridae. The lytic abilities of these two phages in liquid culture showed 104 multiplicity of infection (MOI) was the best in inhibiting bacteria, with PC2184 exhibiting more activity than PA13076. The two phages exhibited broad host range within the genus Salmonella. Phage PA13076 and PC2184 had a lytic effect on 222 (71.4%) and 298 (95.8%) of the 311 epidemic Salmonella isolates, respectively. We tested the effectiveness of phage PA13076 and PC2184 as well as a cocktail combination of both in three different foods (chicken breast, pasteurized whole milk and Chinese cabbage) contaminated with SE. Samples were spiked with 1 × 10(4) CFU individual SE or a mixture of strains (ATCC13076 and CVCC2184), then treated with 1 × 10(8) PFU individual phage or a two phage cocktail, and incubated at 4 °C or 25 °C for 5 h. In general, the inhibitory effect of phage and phage cocktail was better at 4 °C than that at 25 °C, whereas the opposite result was observed in Chinese cabbage, and phage cocktail was better than either single phage. A significant reduction in bacterial numbers (1.5-4 log CFU/sample, p < 0.05) was observed in all tested foods. The two phages on the three food samples were relatively stable, especially at 4 ºC, with the phages exhibiting the greatest stability in milk. Our research shows that our phages have potential effectiveness as a bio-control agent of Salmonella in foods. PMID:26305252

  20. Cytokinin production by Pseudomonas fluorescens G20-18 determines biocontrol activity against Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Großkinsky, Dominik K.; Tafner, Richard; Moreno, María V.; Stenglein, Sebastian A.; García de Salamone, Inés E.; Nelson, Louise M.; Novák, Ondřej; Strnad, Miroslav; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Plant beneficial microbes mediate biocontrol of diseases by interfering with pathogens or via strengthening the host. Although phytohormones, including cytokinins, are known to regulate plant development and physiology as well as plant immunity, their production by microorganisms has not been considered as a biocontrol mechanism. Here we identify the ability of Pseudomonas fluorescens G20-18 to efficiently control P. syringae infection in Arabidopsis, allowing maintenance of tissue integrity and ultimately biomass yield. Microbial cytokinin production was identified as a key determinant for this biocontrol effect on the hemibiotrophic bacterial pathogen. While cytokinin-deficient loss-of-function mutants of G20-18 exhibit impaired biocontrol, functional complementation with cytokinin biosynthetic genes restores cytokinin-mediated biocontrol, which is correlated with differential cytokinin levels in planta. Arabidopsis mutant analyses revealed the necessity of functional plant cytokinin perception and salicylic acid-dependent defence signalling for this biocontrol mechanism. These results demonstrate microbial cytokinin production as a novel microbe-based, hormone-mediated concept of biocontrol. This mechanism provides a basis to potentially develop novel, integrated plant protection strategies combining promotion of growth, a favourable physiological status and activation of fine-tuned direct defence and abiotic stress resilience. PMID:26984671

  1. Cytokinin production by Pseudomonas fluorescens G20-18 determines biocontrol activity against Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Großkinsky, Dominik K; Tafner, Richard; Moreno, María V; Stenglein, Sebastian A; García de Salamone, Inés E; Nelson, Louise M; Novák, Ondřej; Strnad, Miroslav; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Plant beneficial microbes mediate biocontrol of diseases by interfering with pathogens or via strengthening the host. Although phytohormones, including cytokinins, are known to regulate plant development and physiology as well as plant immunity, their production by microorganisms has not been considered as a biocontrol mechanism. Here we identify the ability of Pseudomonas fluorescens G20-18 to efficiently control P. syringae infection in Arabidopsis, allowing maintenance of tissue integrity and ultimately biomass yield. Microbial cytokinin production was identified as a key determinant for this biocontrol effect on the hemibiotrophic bacterial pathogen. While cytokinin-deficient loss-of-function mutants of G20-18 exhibit impaired biocontrol, functional complementation with cytokinin biosynthetic genes restores cytokinin-mediated biocontrol, which is correlated with differential cytokinin levels in planta. Arabidopsis mutant analyses revealed the necessity of functional plant cytokinin perception and salicylic acid-dependent defence signalling for this biocontrol mechanism. These results demonstrate microbial cytokinin production as a novel microbe-based, hormone-mediated concept of biocontrol. This mechanism provides a basis to potentially develop novel, integrated plant protection strategies combining promotion of growth, a favourable physiological status and activation of fine-tuned direct defence and abiotic stress resilience. PMID:26984671

  2. Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 mutant with enhanced competitive colonization ability and improved biocontrol activity against fungal root pathogens.

    PubMed

    Barahona, Emma; Navazo, Ana; Martínez-Granero, Francisco; Zea-Bonilla, Teresa; Pérez-Jiménez, Rosa María; Martín, Marta; Rivilla, Rafael

    2011-08-01

    Motility is one of the most important traits for efficient rhizosphere colonization by Pseudomonas fluorescens F113rif (F113). In this bacterium, motility is a polygenic trait that is repressed by at least three independent pathways, including the Gac posttranscriptional system, the Wsp chemotaxis-like pathway, and the SadB pathway. Here we show that the kinB gene, which encodes a signal transduction protein that together with AlgB has been implicated in alginate production, participates in swimming motility repression through the Gac pathway, acting downstream of the GacAS two-component system. Gac mutants are impaired in secondary metabolite production and are unsuitable as biocontrol agents. However, the kinB mutant and a triple mutant affected in kinB, sadB, and wspR (KSW) possess a wild-type phenotype for secondary metabolism. The KSW strain is hypermotile and more competitive for rhizosphere colonization than the wild-type strain. We have compared the biocontrol activity of KSW with those of the wild-type strain and a phenotypic variant (F113v35 [V35]) which is hypermotile and hypercompetitive but is affected in secondary metabolism since it harbors a gacS mutation. Biocontrol experiments in the Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici/Lycopersicum esculentum (tomato) and Phytophthora cactorum/Fragaria vesca (strawberry) pathosystems have shown that the three strains possess biocontrol activity. Biocontrol activity was consistently lower for V35, indicating that the production of secondary metabolites was the most important trait for biocontrol. Strain KSW showed improved biocontrol compared with the wild-type strain, indicating that an increase in competitive colonization ability resulted in improved biocontrol and that the rational design of biocontrol agents by mutation is feasible. PMID:21685161

  3. [Correction of autonomic reactions parameters in organism of cosmonaut with adaptive biocontrol method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kornilova, L. N.; Cowings, P. S.; Toscano, W. B.; Arlashchenko, N. I.; Korneev, D. Iu; Ponomarenko, A. V.; Salagovich, S. V.; Sarantseva, A. V.; Kozlovskaia, I. B.

    2000-01-01

    Presented are results of testing the method of adaptive biocontrol during preflight training of cosmonauts. Within the MIR-25 crew, a high level of controllability of the autonomous reactions was characteristic of Flight Commanders MIR-23 and MIR-25 and flight Engineer MIR-23, while Flight Engineer MIR-25 displayed a weak intricate dependence of these reactions on the depth of relaxation or strain.

  4. What magnitude are observed non-target impacts from weed biocontrol?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A systematic review focused by plant on non-target impacts from agents deliberately introduced for the biological control of weeds found significant non-target impacts to be rare. The magnitude of direct impact of 43 biocontrol agents on 140 non-target plants was retrospectively categorized using a ...

  5. Yeast Biocontrol of a Fungal Plant Disease: A Model for Studying Organism Interrelationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chanchaichaovivat, Arun; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Ruenwongsa, Pintip

    2008-01-01

    An experiment on the action of the yeast, "Saccharomyces cerevisiae", against a fungal plant disease is proposed for secondary students (Grade 11) to support their study of organism interrelationship. This biocontrol experiment serves as the basis for discussing relationships among three organisms (red chilli fruit, "Saccharomyces cerevisiae," and…

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of the Commercial Biocontrol Strain Pantoea agglomerans P10c

    PubMed Central

    Rezzonico, Fabio; Blom, Jochen; Goesmann, Alexander; Abelli, Azzurra; Kron Morelli, Roberto; Vanneste, Joël L.; Duffy, Brion

    2015-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of the biocontrol strain Pantoea agglomerans P10c, composed of a draft chromosome and two plasmids: the 559-kb large Pantoea plasmid 1 (pPag3) and a 182-kb plasmid (pPag1). A genomic island containing pantocin A biosynthesis genes was identified. PMID:26659685

  7. Draft Whole-Genome Sequence of the Biocontrol Agent Trichoderma harzianum T6776.

    PubMed

    Baroncelli, Riccardo; Piaggeschi, Giulia; Fiorini, Lisa; Bertolini, Edoardo; Zapparata, Antonio; Pè, Mario Enrico; Sarrocco, Sabrina; Vannacci, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Trichoderma harzianum T6776 is a promising beneficial isolate whose effects consist of growth promotion, positive response of photosynthetic activity, hormonal signaling, and carbon partitioning in tomato, coupled with biocontrol of plant pathogens. Here, we present the first genome assembly of T6776, providing a useful platform for the scientific community. PMID:26067977

  8. Stress tolerance and biocontrol performance of the yeast antagonist, Candida diversa, change with morphology transition.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangkun; Chi, Mengshan; Chen, Huizhen; Sui, Yuan; Li, Yan; Liu, Yongsheng; Zhang, Xiaojing; Sun, Zhiqiang; Liu, Guoqing; Wang, Qi; Liu, Jia

    2016-02-01

    As an eco-friendly management method, biological control of postharvest diseases, utilizing antagonistic yeasts, is a research topic receiving considerable attention. Detailed knowledge on the biology of yeast antagonists is crucial when considering their potential application and development as biocontrol products. Changes in the growth form, such as single-cell to pseudohyphae, have been associated with the mode of action in postharvest biocontrol yeasts. In this study, the antagonistic yeast, Candida diversa, reversibly shifted from a single-cell morphology on yeast peptone dextrose (YPD) medium with 2 % agar to a pseudohyphal morphology on YPD with 0.3 % agar. The tolerance of the pseudohyphal form to heat and oxidative stresses, as well as the biocontrol efficacy against Botrytis cinerea on apple and kiwifruit stored at 25 and 4 °C, was significantly higher as compared to the single-cell form. This study provides new information on the ability of C. diversa to change its morphology and the impact of the morphology shift on stress tolerance and biocontrol performance. PMID:26637302

  9. Agar composition affects in vitro screening of biocontrol activity of antagonistic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Bosmans, L; De Bruijn, I; De Mot, R; Rediers, H; Lievens, B

    2016-08-01

    Agar-based screening assays are the method of choice when evaluating antagonistic potential of bacterial biocontrol-candidates against pathogens. We showed that when using the same medium, but different agar compositions, the activity of a bacterial antagonist against Agrobacterium was strongly affected. Consequently, results from in vitro screenings should be interpreted cautiously. PMID:27166668

  10. Testing the efficacy of eGFP-transformed Aspergillus flavus as biocontrol strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current biological control methods to prevent pre-harvest aflatoxin contamination of corn, cottonseed, and ground and tree nuts involve field inoculation of non-aflatoxigenic Aspergillus flavus. To date, the efficacy of this approach requires annual reapplication of the biocontrol agent. The reason ...

  11. Identification of Biocontrol Agents to Control the Fungal Pathogen, Geomyces destructans, in Bats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braunstein, S.; Cheng, T.

    2013-12-01

    The fungal pathogen Geomyces destructans (Gd) causes the disease White-nose Syndrome (WNS) in bats and is estimated to have killed millions of bats since its emergence in North America in 2006. Gd is predicted to cause the local extinction of at least three bat species if rates of decline continue unabated. Given the devastating impacts of Gd to bat populations, identifying a viable method for controlling the pathogen is pertinent for conservation of affected bat species. Our work focuses on identifying naturally-occurring skin bacteria on bats that are antagonistic to Gd that could potentially be used as a biocontrol. We cultured bacteria from skin swabs taken from wild bats (Myotis lucifugus, Eptesicus fuscus, Myotis sodalis, Perimyotis subflavus). We conducted challenge experiments to identify bacterial strains that inhibited Gd growth. Bacteria that exhibited antifungal properties were identified using 16S and gyrB markers. Our methods identified several bacteria in the Pseudomonas fluorescens complex as potential biocontrol agents. Future work will continue to test the viability of these bacteria as biocontrol agents via experimental treatments with live captive bats. The failure of previous non-biocontrol methods highlights the importance of developing these bacteria as a biologically-friendly method for controlling Gd. A bat infected with Geomyces destructans. Photo by West Virginia Division of Natural Resources Bacterial culture from the swab of a bat's wings

  12. Draft Whole-Genome Sequence of the Biocontrol Agent Trichoderma harzianum T6776.

    PubMed

    Baroncelli, Riccardo; Piaggeschi, Giulia; Fiorini, Lisa; Bertolini, Edoardo; Zapparata, Antonio; Pè, Mario Enrico; Sarrocco, Sabrina; Vannacci, Giovanni

    2015-06-11

    Trichoderma harzianum T6776 is a promising beneficial isolate whose effects consist of growth promotion, positive response of photosynthetic activity, hormonal signaling, and carbon partitioning in tomato, coupled with biocontrol of plant pathogens. Here, we present the first genome assembly of T6776, providing a useful platform for the scientific community.

  13. Elevated activity of dolichyl phosphate mannose synthase enhances biocontrol abilities of Trichoderma atroviride.

    PubMed

    Zembek, Patrycja; Perlinska-Lenart, Urszula; Brunner, Kurt; Reithner, Barbara; Palamarczyk, Grazyna; Mach, Robert L; Kruszewska, Joanna S

    2011-12-01

    Antagonism of Trichoderma spp. against phytopathogenic fungi is widely exploited for biocontrol of plant diseases. A crucial role in the biocontrol mechanism is attributed to cell-wall-degrading enzymes secreted by Trichoderma spp. Therefore, more efficient production and secretion of the enzymes should elevate the biocontrol abilities of Trichoderma spp. Because the majority of secretory hydrolases are glycoproteins, it has been postulated that the posttranslational modification of these proteins could constitute a bottleneck in their production and secretion. Our previous study showed that improvement of O-glycosylation elevated protein secretion by Trichoderma reesei. In this study, we enhanced the biocontrol abilities of T. atroviride P1 against plant pathogens by overexpressing the Saccharomyces cerevisiae DPM1 gene coding for dolichyl phosphate mannose (DPM) synthase, a key enzyme in the O-glycosylation pathway. The transformants we obtained showed doubled DPM synthase activity and, at the same time, significantly elevated cellulolytic activity. They also revealed an improved antifungal activity against the plant pathogen Pythium ultimum.

  14. Biocontrol potential of endophytes harbored in Radula marginata (liverwort) from the New Zealand ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Kusari, Parijat; Kusari, Souvik; Spiteller, Michael; Kayser, Oliver

    2014-10-01

    Radula marginata and Cannabis sativa L. are two phylogenetically unrelated plant species containing structurally similar secondary metabolites like cannabinoids. The major objective of our work was the isolation, identification, biocontrol efficacies, biofilm forming potential and anti-biofilm ability of endophytic microbial community of the liverwort R. marginata, as compared to bacterial endophytic isolates harbored in C. sativa plants. A total of 15 endophytic fungal and 4 endophytic bacterial isolates were identified, including the presence of a bacterial endosymbiont within an endophytic fungal isolate. The endosymbiont was visible only when the fungus containing it was challenged with two phytopathogens Botrytis cinerea and Trichothecium roseum, highlighting a tripartite microbe-microbe interaction and biocontrol potency of endophytes under biotic stress. We also observed sixteen types of endophytic fungal-pathogen and twelve types of endophytic bacterial-pathogen interactions coupled to varying degree of growth inhibitions of either the pathogen or endophyte or both. This showed the magnitude of biocontrol efficacies of endophytes in aiding plant fitness benefits under different media (environmental) conditions. Additionally, it was ecologically noteworthy to find the presence of similar endophytic bacterial genera in both Radula and Cannabis plants, which exhibited similar functional traits like biofilm formation and general anti-biofilm activities. Thus far, our work underlines the biocontrol potency and defensive functional traits (in terms of antagonism and biofilm formation) of endophytes harbored in liverwort R. marginata as compared to the endophytic community of phylogenetically unrelated but phytochemically similar plant C. sativa. PMID:25100187

  15. Antagonistic activity of Bacillus subtilis SB1 and its biocontrol effect on tomato bacterial wilt

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A potential biocontrol agent of bacterial wilt, Bacillus subtilis SB1, isolated from tomato roots, showed a broad-spectrum of antimicrobial activity in in vitro experiments. It inhibited the growth of many plant pathogens, including Ralstonia solanacearum, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, Fusarium ox...

  16. Efficacy of water dispersible formulations of biocontrol strains of Aspergillus flavus for aflatoxin management in corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field experiments were conducted in 2011 and 2012 to evaluate the efficacy of water dispersible granule (WDG) formulations of biocontrol strains of Aspergillus flavus in controlling aflatoxin contamination of corn. In 2011, when aflatoxin was present at very high levels, no WDG treatment provided s...

  17. Stress tolerance and biocontrol performance of the yeast antagonist, Candida diversa, change with morphology transition.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangkun; Chi, Mengshan; Chen, Huizhen; Sui, Yuan; Li, Yan; Liu, Yongsheng; Zhang, Xiaojing; Sun, Zhiqiang; Liu, Guoqing; Wang, Qi; Liu, Jia

    2016-02-01

    As an eco-friendly management method, biological control of postharvest diseases, utilizing antagonistic yeasts, is a research topic receiving considerable attention. Detailed knowledge on the biology of yeast antagonists is crucial when considering their potential application and development as biocontrol products. Changes in the growth form, such as single-cell to pseudohyphae, have been associated with the mode of action in postharvest biocontrol yeasts. In this study, the antagonistic yeast, Candida diversa, reversibly shifted from a single-cell morphology on yeast peptone dextrose (YPD) medium with 2 % agar to a pseudohyphal morphology on YPD with 0.3 % agar. The tolerance of the pseudohyphal form to heat and oxidative stresses, as well as the biocontrol efficacy against Botrytis cinerea on apple and kiwifruit stored at 25 and 4 °C, was significantly higher as compared to the single-cell form. This study provides new information on the ability of C. diversa to change its morphology and the impact of the morphology shift on stress tolerance and biocontrol performance.

  18. Genomic Diversity of Biocontrol Strains of Pseudomonas spp. Isolated from Aerial or Root Surfaces of Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The striking ecological, metabolic, and biochemical diversity of Pseudomonas has intrigued microbiologists for many decades. To explore the genomic diversity of biocontrol strains of Pseudomonas spp., we derived high quality draft sequences of seven strains known to suppress plant disease. The str...

  19. Draft genome sequences of the Pseudomonas fluorescens biocontrol strains Wayne1R and Wood1R.

    PubMed

    Rong, Xiaoqing; Gurel, Fulya Baysal; Meulia, Tea; McSpadden Gardener, Brian B

    2012-02-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strains Wayne1R and Wood1R have proven capacities to improve plant health. Here we report the draft genome sequences and automatic annotations of both strains. Genome comparisons reveal similarities with P. fluorescens strain Pf-5, reveal the novelty of Wood1R, and indicate some genes that may be related to biocontrol.

  20. Pantoea applied genomics to understand and improve biocontrol activity against fire blight

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pantoea agglomerans and P. vagans (ex. Erwinia herbicola) are common epiphytes of pome fruit flowers and three strains (E325, P10c, C9-1) have been commercially developed as effective biocontrol products for managing fire blight (Erwinia amylovora). Antibiotics as a standard, reliable chemical optio...

  1. Heat shock improves stress tolerance and biocontrol performance of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biological control of postharvest diseases, utilizing wild species and strains of antagonistic yeasts, is a research topic and eco-friendly management approach that has received considerable attention. A few yeast-based biocontrol products are available in the market. Ecological fitness, stress to...

  2. Biocontrol attack exacerbates pollen-limitation in the invasive plant Centaurea solstitialis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pollen-limited seed set is rarely studied in invasive plants despite the fact that >50% of the most problematic invaders in North America are pollinator-dependent. Further, pollinators are rarely considered in the use biocontrol agents to manage invaders. The ecological literature shows that herbivo...

  3. Attachment Capability of Antagonistic Yeast Rhodotorula glutinis to Botrytis cinerea Contributes to Biocontrol Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Boqiang; Peng, Huaimin; Tian, Shiping

    2016-01-01

    Rhodotorula glutinis as an antagonism show good biocontrol performance against various post-harvest diseases in fruits. In the present study, strong attachment capability of R. glutinis to spores and hyphae of Botrytis cinerea was observed. Further analysis showed that certain protein components on the yeast cell surface played critical role during the interaction between R. glutinis and B. cinerea. The components mainly distributed at the poles of yeast cells and might contain glycosylation modification, as tunicamycin treated yeast cells lost attachment capability to B. cinerea. To investigate contributions of attachment capability of R. glutinis to its biocontrol efficacy, yeast cells were mutagenized with 3% methane-sulfonic acid ethyl ester (EMS), and a mutant CE4 with stable non-attaching phenotype was obtained. No significant difference was found on colony, cell morphology, reproductive ability, and capsule formation between the mutant and wild-type. However, there was a distinct difference in India ink positive staining patterns between the two strains. Moreover, wild-type strain of R. glutinis showed better performance on inhibiting spore germination and mycelial growth of B. cinerea than CE4 strain when yeast cells and B. cinerea were co-cultured in vitro. In biocontrol assay, both wild-type and CE4 strains showed significant biocontrol efficacy against gray mold caused by B. cinerea in apple fruit, whereas, control effect of CE4 strain was lower than that of wild-type. Our findings provided new evidences that attachment capability of R. glutinis to B. cinerea contributed to its biocontrol efficacy. PMID:27199931

  4. Attachment Capability of Antagonistic Yeast Rhodotorula glutinis to Botrytis cinerea Contributes to Biocontrol Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Li, Boqiang; Peng, Huaimin; Tian, Shiping

    2016-01-01

    Rhodotorula glutinis as an antagonism show good biocontrol performance against various post-harvest diseases in fruits. In the present study, strong attachment capability of R. glutinis to spores and hyphae of Botrytis cinerea was observed. Further analysis showed that certain protein components on the yeast cell surface played critical role during the interaction between R. glutinis and B. cinerea. The components mainly distributed at the poles of yeast cells and might contain glycosylation modification, as tunicamycin treated yeast cells lost attachment capability to B. cinerea. To investigate contributions of attachment capability of R. glutinis to its biocontrol efficacy, yeast cells were mutagenized with 3% methane-sulfonic acid ethyl ester (EMS), and a mutant CE4 with stable non-attaching phenotype was obtained. No significant difference was found on colony, cell morphology, reproductive ability, and capsule formation between the mutant and wild-type. However, there was a distinct difference in India ink positive staining patterns between the two strains. Moreover, wild-type strain of R. glutinis showed better performance on inhibiting spore germination and mycelial growth of B. cinerea than CE4 strain when yeast cells and B. cinerea were co-cultured in vitro. In biocontrol assay, both wild-type and CE4 strains showed significant biocontrol efficacy against gray mold caused by B. cinerea in apple fruit, whereas, control effect of CE4 strain was lower than that of wild-type. Our findings provided new evidences that attachment capability of R. glutinis to B. cinerea contributed to its biocontrol efficacy. PMID:27199931

  5. Biocontrol potential of Trichoderma harzianum isolate T-aloe against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in soybean.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fuli; Ge, Honglian; Zhang, Fan; Guo, Ning; Wang, Yucheng; Chen, Long; Ji, Xiue; Li, Chengwei

    2016-03-01

    Sclerotinia stem rot, caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary is a major disease of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.). At present, we revealed the three-way interaction between Trichoderma harzianum T-aloe, pathogen S. sclerotiorum and soybean plants in order to demonstrate biocontrol mechanism and evaluate biocontrol potential of T-aloe against S. sclerotiorum in soybean. In our experiments, T-aloe inhibited the growth of S. sclerotiorum with an efficiency of 56.3% in dual culture tests. T-aloe hyphae grew in parallel or intertwined with S. sclerotiorum hyphae and produced hooked contact branches, indicating mycoparasitism. Plate tests showed that T-aloe culture filtrate inhibited S. sclerotiorum growth with an inhibition efficiency of 51.2% and sclerotia production. T-aloe pretreatment showed growth-promoting effect on soybean plants. The activities of peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, and catalase increased, and the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as well as the superoxide radical (O2(-)) content in soybean leaves decreased after T-aloe pretreatment in response to S. sclerotiorum pathogen challenge. T-aloe treatment diminished damage caused by pathogen stress on soybean leaf cell membrane, and increased chlorophyll as well as total phenol contents. The defense-related genes PR1, PR2, and PR3 were expressed in the leaves of T-aloe-treated plants. In summary, T-aloe displayed biocontrol potential against S. sclerotiorum. This is the first report of unraveling biocontrol potential of Trichoderma Spp. to soybean sclerotinia stem rot from the three-way interaction between the biocontrol agent, pathogen S. sclerotiorum and soybean plants. PMID:26774866

  6. Pichia angusta is an effective biocontrol yeast against postharvest decay of apple fruit caused by Botrytis cinerea and Monilia fructicola.

    PubMed

    Fiori, Stefano; Fadda, Angela; Giobbe, Sara; Berardi, Enrico; Migheli, Quirico

    2008-09-01

    The efficacy of eight isolates of Pichia angusta against three common postharvest pathogens of apple fruit was evaluated for the first time. All tested strains showed significant biocontrol activity against both Botrytis cinerea and Monilia fructicola, whereas efficacy against Penicillium expansum was poor. A leucine-auxotrophic mutant had no significant biocontrol activity against brown rot of apple, while the addition of 0.6-1.2 g L(-1) leucine in the fruit wound fully restored the biocontrol activity of this mutant against M. fructicola. Given the extremely well-developed classical and molecular genetics, the availability of genomic libraries, and its complete genomic sequence, this species can serve to elucidate the mechanisms related to biocontrol capacity.

  7. Evaluation of the sea anemone Anthothoe albocincta as an augmentative biocontrol agent for biofouling on artificial structures.

    PubMed

    Atalah, Javier; Bennett, Holly; Hopkins, Grant A; Forrest, Barrie M

    2013-01-01

    Augmentative biocontrol, defined as the use of indigenous natural enemies to control pest populations, has not been explored extensively in marine systems. This study tested the potential of the anemone Anthothoe albocincta as a biocontrol agent for biofouling on submerged artificial structures. Biofouling biomass was negatively related to anemone cover. Treatments with high anemone cover (>35%) led to significant changes in biofouling assemblages compared to controls. Taxa that contributed to these changes differed among sites, but included reductions in cover of problematic fouling organisms, such as solitary ascidians and bryozoans. In laboratory trials, A. albocincta substantially prevented the settlement of larvae of the bryozoan Bugula neritina when exposed to three levels of larval dose, suggesting predation as an important biocontrol mechanism, in addition to space pre-emption. This study demonstrated that augmentative biocontrol using anemones has the potential to reduce biofouling on marine artificial structures, although considerable further work is required to refine this tool before its application.

  8. Bio-prospecting of distillery yeasts as bio-control and bio-remediation agents.

    PubMed

    Ubeda, Juan F; Maldonado, María; Briones, Ana I; Francisco, J Fernández; González, Francisco J

    2014-05-01

    This work constitutes a preliminary study in which the capacity of non-Saccharomyces yeasts isolated from ancient distilleries as bio-control agents against moulds and in the treatment of waste waters contaminated by heavy metals-i.e. bio-remediation-is shown. In the first control assays, antagonist effect between non-Saccharomyces yeasts, their extracts and supernatants against some moulds, analysing the plausible (not exhaustive) involved factors were qualitatively verified. In addition, two enzymatic degrading properties of cell wall plant polymers, quitinolitic and pectinolitic, were screened. Finally, their use as agents of bio-remediation of three heavy metals (cadmium, chromium and lead) was analysed semi-quantitatively. The results showed that all isolates belonging to Pichia species effectively inhibited all moulds assayed. Moreover, P. kudriavzevii is a good candidate for both bio-control and bio-remediation because it inhibited moulds and accumulated the major proportion of the three tested metals. PMID:24370629

  9. Bio-prospecting of distillery yeasts as bio-control and bio-remediation agents.

    PubMed

    Ubeda, Juan F; Maldonado, María; Briones, Ana I; Francisco, J Fernández; González, Francisco J

    2014-05-01

    This work constitutes a preliminary study in which the capacity of non-Saccharomyces yeasts isolated from ancient distilleries as bio-control agents against moulds and in the treatment of waste waters contaminated by heavy metals-i.e. bio-remediation-is shown. In the first control assays, antagonist effect between non-Saccharomyces yeasts, their extracts and supernatants against some moulds, analysing the plausible (not exhaustive) involved factors were qualitatively verified. In addition, two enzymatic degrading properties of cell wall plant polymers, quitinolitic and pectinolitic, were screened. Finally, their use as agents of bio-remediation of three heavy metals (cadmium, chromium and lead) was analysed semi-quantitatively. The results showed that all isolates belonging to Pichia species effectively inhibited all moulds assayed. Moreover, P. kudriavzevii is a good candidate for both bio-control and bio-remediation because it inhibited moulds and accumulated the major proportion of the three tested metals.

  10. Combining UV-C treatment with biocontrol yeast to control postharvest decay of melon.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ke; Zou, Yong; Luo, Jie; Liu, Yiqing

    2015-09-01

    Significant losses in harvested melon can be directly attributable to decay fungi. In the present study, the use of UV-C treatment combined with biocontrol yeast, Pichia cecembensis, was evaluated for their ability to control postharvest decay of melon fruits after they were artificially inoculated with Fusarium oxysporum and Alternaria alternata. Natural infection of fruit was also assessed. As a stand-alone treatment, UV-C or P. cecembensis significantly reduced Fusarium rot and Alternaria rot, and also the level of natural infection on melon fruit, relative to the untreated control. The combination of UV-C or P. cecembensis, however, provided a superior level of decay control on artificially inoculated and naturally infected fruit, compared to either treatment alone. None of the treatments impaired fruit quality. Integrating the use of UV-C treatment with biocontrol yeast has potential as an effective method to control postharvest decay of melon.

  11. The global regulator genes from biocontrol strain Serratia plymuthica IC1270: cloning, sequencing, and functional studies.

    PubMed

    Ovadis, Marianna; Liu, Xiaoguang; Gavriel, Sagi; Ismailov, Zafar; Chet, Ilan; Chernin, Leonid

    2004-08-01

    The biocontrol activity of various fluorescent pseudomonads towards plant-pathogenic fungi is dependent upon the GacA/GacS-type two-component system of global regulators and the RpoS transcription sigma factor. In particular, these components are required for the production of antifungal antibiotics and exoenzymes. To investigate the effects of these global regulators on the expression of biocontrol factors by plant-associated bacteria other than Pseudomonas spp., gacA/gacS and rpoS homologues were cloned from biocontrol strain IC1270 of Serratia plymuthica, which produces a set of antifungal compounds, including chitinolytic enzymes and the antibiotic pyrrolnitrin. The nucleotide and deduced protein sequence alignments of the cloned gacA/gacS-like genes-tentatively designated grrA (global response regulation activator) and grrS (global response regulation sensor) and of the cloned rpoS gene revealed 64 to 93% identity with matching genes and proteins of the enteric bacteria Escherichia coli, Pectobacterium carotovora subsp. carotovora, and Serratia marcescens. grrA, grrS, and rpoS gene replacement mutants of strain IC1270 were deficient in the production of pyrrolnitrin, an exoprotease, and N-acylhomoserine lactone quorum-sensing signal molecules. However, neither mutant appeared to differ from the parental strain in the production of siderophores, and only grrA and grrS mutants were deficient in the production of a 58-kDa endochitinase, representing the involvement of other sigma factors in the regulation of strain IC1270's chitinolytic activity. Compared to the parental strain, the grrA, grrS, and rpoS mutants were markedly less capable of suppressing Rhizoctonia solani and Pythium aphanidermatum under greenhouse conditions, indicating the dependence of strain IC1270's biocontrol property on the GrrA/GrrS and RpoS global regulators.

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of the Endophytic Biocontrol Strain Bacillus velezensis CC09

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xunchao; Kang, Xingxing; Xi, Huan

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus velezensis is a heterotypic synonym of B. methylotrophicus, B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum, and Bacillus oryzicola, and has been used to control plant fungal diseases. In order to fully understand the genetic basis of antimicrobial capacities, we did a complete genome sequencing of the endophytic B. velezensis strain CC09. Genes tightly associated with biocontrol ability, including nonribosomal peptide synthetases, polyketide synthetases, iron acquisition, colonization, and volatile organic compound synthesis were identified in the genome. PMID:27688342

  13. Biocontrol agents promote growth of potato pathogens, depending on environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Cray, Jonathan A; Connor, Mairéad C; Stevenson, Andrew; Houghton, Jonathan D R; Rangel, Drauzio E N; Cooke, Louise R; Hallsworth, John E

    2016-05-01

    There is a pressing need to understand and optimize biological control so as to avoid over-reliance on the synthetic chemical pesticides that can damage environmental and human health. This study focused on interactions between a novel biocontrol-strain, Bacillus sp. JC12GB43, and potato-pathogenic Phytophthora and Fusarium species. In assays carried out in vitro and on the potato tuber, the bacterium was capable of near-complete inhibition of pathogens. This Bacillus was sufficiently xerotolerant (water activity limit for growth = 0.928) to out-perform Phytophthora infestans (~0.960) and challenge Fusarium coeruleum (~0.847) and Fusarium sambucinum (~0.860) towards the lower limits of their growth windows. Under some conditions, however, strain JC12GB43 stimulated proliferation of the pathogens: for instance, Fusarium coeruleum growth-rate was increased under chaotropic conditions in vitro (132 mM urea) by >100% and on tubers (2-M glycerol) by up to 570%. Culture-based assays involving macromolecule-stabilizing (kosmotropic) compatible solutes provided proof-of-principle that the Bacillus may provide kosmotropic metabolites to the plant pathogen under conditions that destabilize macromolecular systems of the fungal cell. Whilst unprecedented, this finding is consistent with earlier reports that fungi can utilize metabolites derived from bacterial cells. Unless the antimicrobial activities of candidate biocontrol strains are assayed over a full range of field-relevant parameters, biocontrol agents may promote plant pathogen infections and thereby reduce crop yields. These findings indicate that biocontrol activity, therefore, ought to be regarded as a mode-of-behaviour (dependent on prevailing conditions) rather than an inherent property of a bacterial strain. PMID:26880001

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of the Endophytic Biocontrol Strain Bacillus velezensis CC09.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xunchao; Kang, Xingxing; Xi, Huan; Liu, Changhong; Xue, Yarong

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus velezensis is a heterotypic synonym of B. methylotrophicus, B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum, and Bacillus oryzicola, and has been used to control plant fungal diseases. In order to fully understand the genetic basis of antimicrobial capacities, we did a complete genome sequencing of the endophytic B. velezensis strain CC09. Genes tightly associated with biocontrol ability, including nonribosomal peptide synthetases, polyketide synthetases, iron acquisition, colonization, and volatile organic compound synthesis were identified in the genome. PMID:27688342

  15. Biocontrol agents promote growth of potato pathogens, depending on environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Cray, Jonathan A; Connor, Mairéad C; Stevenson, Andrew; Houghton, Jonathan D R; Rangel, Drauzio E N; Cooke, Louise R; Hallsworth, John E

    2016-05-01

    There is a pressing need to understand and optimize biological control so as to avoid over-reliance on the synthetic chemical pesticides that can damage environmental and human health. This study focused on interactions between a novel biocontrol-strain, Bacillus sp. JC12GB43, and potato-pathogenic Phytophthora and Fusarium species. In assays carried out in vitro and on the potato tuber, the bacterium was capable of near-complete inhibition of pathogens. This Bacillus was sufficiently xerotolerant (water activity limit for growth = 0.928) to out-perform Phytophthora infestans (~0.960) and challenge Fusarium coeruleum (~0.847) and Fusarium sambucinum (~0.860) towards the lower limits of their growth windows. Under some conditions, however, strain JC12GB43 stimulated proliferation of the pathogens: for instance, Fusarium coeruleum growth-rate was increased under chaotropic conditions in vitro (132 mM urea) by >100% and on tubers (2-M glycerol) by up to 570%. Culture-based assays involving macromolecule-stabilizing (kosmotropic) compatible solutes provided proof-of-principle that the Bacillus may provide kosmotropic metabolites to the plant pathogen under conditions that destabilize macromolecular systems of the fungal cell. Whilst unprecedented, this finding is consistent with earlier reports that fungi can utilize metabolites derived from bacterial cells. Unless the antimicrobial activities of candidate biocontrol strains are assayed over a full range of field-relevant parameters, biocontrol agents may promote plant pathogen infections and thereby reduce crop yields. These findings indicate that biocontrol activity, therefore, ought to be regarded as a mode-of-behaviour (dependent on prevailing conditions) rather than an inherent property of a bacterial strain.

  16. Increasing corn for biofuel production reduces biocontrol services in agricultural landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Landis, Douglas A.; Gardiner, Mary M.; van der Werf, Wopke; Swinton, Scott M.

    2008-01-01

    Increased demand for corn grain as an ethanol feedstock is altering U.S. agricultural landscapes and the ecosystem services they provide. From 2006 to 2007, corn acreage increased 19% nationally, resulting in reduced crop diversity in many areas. Biological control of insects is an ecosystem service that is strongly influenced by local landscape structure. Here, we estimate the value of natural biological control of the soybean aphid, a major pest in agricultural landscapes, and the economic impacts of reduced biocontrol caused by increased corn production in 4 U.S. states (Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin). For producers who use an integrated pest management strategy including insecticides as needed, natural suppression of soybean aphid in soybean is worth an average of $33 ha−1. At 2007–2008 prices these services are worth at least $239 million y−1 in these 4 states. Recent biofuel-driven growth in corn planting results in lower landscape diversity, altering the supply of aphid natural enemies to soybean fields and reducing biocontrol services by 24%. This loss of biocontrol services cost soybean producers in these states an estimated $58 million y−1 in reduced yield and increased pesticide use. For producers who rely solely on biological control, the value of lost services is much greater. These findings from a single pest in 1 crop suggest that the value of biocontrol services to the U.S. economy may be underestimated. Furthermore, we suggest that development of cellulosic ethanol production processes that use a variety of feedstocks could foster increased diversity in agricultural landscapes and enhance arthropod-mediated ecosystem services. PMID:19075234

  17. Statistical media optimization for the biomass production of postharvest biocontrol yeast Rhodosporidium paludigenum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Liu, Xia; Wang, Yifei; Ruan, Hui; Zheng, XiaoDong

    2011-01-01

    A cane molasses-based medium for the biomass production of biocontrol agent Rhodosporidium paludigenum was statistically optimized. Molasses concentration (after pretreatment), yeast extract, and initial pH were identified by the Plackett-Burman design to show significant influence on the biomass production. The three factors were further optimized by central composite design and response-surface methodology. The statistical analysis indicated the optimum values of the variables were 89.98 g/L for cane molasses, 2.35 g/L for yeast extract and an initial pH of 8.48. The biomass yield at the optimal culture achieved 15.89 g/L in flask fermentation, which was 2.1 times higher than that at the initial NYDB medium. In a 10-L fermenter, 18.97 g/L of biomass was obtained after 36 hr of cultivation. Moreover, the biocontrol efficacy of the yeast was investigated after culture optimization. The results showed the yeast harvested in the optimal medium maintained its initial biocontrol properties by reducing the percentage of decayed apples to below 20%.

  18. Mechanism of H₂O₂-induced oxidative stress regulating viability and biocontrol ability of Rhodotorula glutinis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Li, Boqiang; Qin, Guozheng; Tian, Shiping

    2015-01-16

    The use of antagonistic yeasts to control postharvest pathogens is a promising alternative to fungicides. The effectiveness of the antagonists against fungal pathogens is greatly dependent on their viability, which is usually mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, we investigated the effects of H₂O₂-induced oxidative stress on the viability and biocontrol efficacy of Rhodotorula glutinis and, using flow cytometric analysis, observed the changes of ROS accumulation and apoptosis in the yeast cells with or without H₂O₂ treatment. We found that the viability of R. glutinis decreased in a time- and dose-dependent manner under H₂O₂-induced oxidative stress. Compared to the control, yeast cells exposed to oxidative stress exhibited more accumulation of ROS and higher levels of protein oxidative damage, but showed lower efficacy for biocontrol of Penicillium expansum causing blue mold rot on peach fruit. The results indicate that apoptosis is a main cause of the cell viability loss in R. glutinis, which is attributed to ROS accumulation under oxidative stress. These findings offer a plausible explanation that oxidative stress affects biocontrol efficacy of R. glutinis via regulating its viability and cell apoptosis.

  19. Isolation of Dickeya dadantii strains from potato disease and biocontrol by their bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Soleimani-Delfan, Abbas; Etemadifar, Zahra; Emtiazi, Giti; Bouzari, Majid

    2015-01-01

    One of the most economically important bacterial pathogens of plants and plant products is Dickeya dadantii. This bacterium causes soft rot disease in tubers and other parts of the potato and other plants of the Solanaceae family. The application of restricted host range bacteriophages as biocontrol agents has recently gained widespread interest. This study purposed to isolate the infectious agent of the potato and evaluate its biocontrol by bacteriophages. Two phytopathogenic strains were isolated from infected potatoes, identified based on biochemical and 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and submitted to GenBank as D. dadantii strain pis3 (accession no. HQ423668) and D. dadantii strain sip4 (accession no. HQ423669). Their bacteriophages were isolated from Caspian Sea water by enriching the water filtrate with D. dadantii strains as hosts using spot or overlay methods. On the basis of morphotypes, the isolated bacteriophages were identified as members of the Myoviridae and Siphoviridae families and could inhibit the growth of antibiotic resistant D. dadantii strains in culture medium. Moreover, in Dickeya infected plants treated with bacteriophage, no disease progression was detected. No significant difference was seen between phage-treated and control plants. Thus, isolated bacteriophages can be suggested for the biocontrol of plant disease caused by Dickeya strains. PMID:26413062

  20. Isolation of Dickeya dadantii strains from potato disease and biocontrol by their bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Soleimani-Delfan, Abbas; Etemadifar, Zahra; Emtiazi, Giti; Bouzari, Majid

    2015-01-01

    One of the most economically important bacterial pathogens of plants and plant products is Dickeya dadantii. This bacterium causes soft rot disease in tubers and other parts of the potato and other plants of the Solanaceae family. The application of restricted host range bacteriophages as biocontrol agents has recently gained widespread interest. This study purposed to isolate the infectious agent of the potato and evaluate its biocontrol by bacteriophages. Two phytopathogenic strains were isolated from infected potatoes, identified based on biochemical and 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and submitted to GenBank as D. dadantii strain pis3 (accession no. HQ423668) and D. dadantii strain sip4 (accession no. HQ423669). Their bacteriophages were isolated from Caspian Sea water by enriching the water filtrate with D. dadantii strains as hosts using spot or overlay methods. On the basis of morphotypes, the isolated bacteriophages were identified as members of the Myoviridae and Siphoviridae families and could inhibit the growth of antibiotic resistant D. dadantii strains in culture medium. Moreover, in Dickeya infected plants treated with bacteriophage, no disease progression was detected. No significant difference was seen between phage-treated and control plants. Thus, isolated bacteriophages can be suggested for the biocontrol of plant disease caused by Dickeya strains.

  1. Potential of Pseudomonas chlororaphis subsp. aurantiaca Strain Pcho10 as a Biocontrol Agent Against Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Hu, Weiqun; Gao, Qixun; Hamada, Mohamed Sobhy; Dawood, Dawood Hosni; Zheng, Jingwu; Chen, Yun; Ma, Zhonghua

    2014-12-01

    To develop an effective biocontrol strategy for management of Fusarium head blight on wheat caused by Fusarium graminearum, the bacterial biocontrol agent Pcho10 was selected from more than 1,476 wheat-head-associated bacterial strains according to its antagonistic activity in vitro. This strain was subsequently characterized as Pseudomonas chlororaphis subsp. aurantiaca based on 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis, assays of the BIOLOG microbial identification system, and unique pigment production. The major antifungal metabolite produced by Pcho10 was further identified as phenazine-1-carboxamide (PCN) on the basis of nuclear magnetic resonance data. The core PCN biosynthesis gene cluster in Pcho10 was cloned and sequenced. PCN showed strong inhibitory activity against F. graminearum conidial germination, mycelial growth, and deoxynivalenol production. Tests both under growth chamber conditions and in field trials showed that Pcho10 well colonized on the wheat head and effectively controlled the disease caused by F. graminearum. Results of this study indicate that P. chlororaphis subsp. aurantiaca Pcho10 has high potential to be developed as a biocontrol agent against F. graminearum. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the use of P. chlororaphis for the management of Fusarium head blight.

  2. Combined use of biocontrol agents to manage plant diseases in theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Xu, X-M; Jeffries, P; Pautasso, M; Jeger, M J

    2011-09-01

    Effective use of biological control agents (BCAs) is a potentially important component of sustainable agriculture. Recently, there has been an increasing interest among researchers in using combinations of BCAs to exploit potential synergistic effects among them. The methodology for investigating such synergistic effects was reviewed first and published results were then assessed for available evidence for synergy. Correct formulation of hypotheses based on the theoretical definition of independence (Bliss independence or Loewe additivity) and the subsequent and statistical testing for the independence-synergistic-antagonistic interactions have rarely been carried out thus far in studies on biocontrol of plant diseases. Thus, caution must be taken when interpreting reported "synergistic" effects without assessing the original publications. Recent theoretical modeling work suggested that disease suppression from combined use of two BCAs was, in general, very similar to that achieved by the more efficacious one, indicating no synergistic but more likely antagonistic interactions. Only in 2% of the total 465 published treatments was there evidence for synergistic effects among BCAs. In the majority of the cases, antagonistic interactions among BCAs were indicated. Thus, both theoretical and experimental studies suggest that, in combined use of BCAs, antagonistic interactions among BCAs are more likely to occur than synergistic interactions. Several research strategies, including formulation of synergy hypotheses in relation to biocontrol mechanisms, are outlined to exploit microbial mixtures for uses in biocontrol of plant diseases.

  3. Use of mixed cultures of biocontrol agents to control sheep nematodes.

    PubMed

    Baloyi, M A; Laing, M D; Yobo, K S

    2012-03-23

    Biological control is a promising non-chemical approach for the control of gastrointestinal nematodes of sheep. Use of combinations of biocontrol agents have been reported to be an effective method to increase the efficacy of biological control effects. In this study, combinations of either two Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) or Clonostachys rosea (C. rosea) isolates and Bt+C. rosea isolates were evaluated in vitro in microtitre plates for their biocontrol activity on sheep nematodes. The Baermann technique was used to extract the surviving L3 larval stages of intestinal nematodes and counted under a dissecting microscope to determine the larval counts. Results indicate that there was a significant reduction of nematode counts due to combination of biocontrol agents (P<0.001). Combinations of Bt isolates reduced nematodes counts by 72.8%, 64% and 29.8%. The results revealed a control level of 57% when C. rosea isolates P3+P8 were combined. Combination of Bt and C. rosea isolates B10+P8 caused the greatest mortality of 76.7%. Most combinations were antagonistic, with only a few combinations showing an additive effect. None were synergistic. The isolate combinations were more effective than when isolates were used alone.

  4. Potential of Pseudomonas chlororaphis subsp. aurantiaca Strain Pcho10 as a Biocontrol Agent Against Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Hu, Weiqun; Gao, Qixun; Hamada, Mohamed Sobhy; Dawood, Dawood Hosni; Zheng, Jingwu; Chen, Yun; Ma, Zhonghua

    2014-12-01

    To develop an effective biocontrol strategy for management of Fusarium head blight on wheat caused by Fusarium graminearum, the bacterial biocontrol agent Pcho10 was selected from more than 1,476 wheat-head-associated bacterial strains according to its antagonistic activity in vitro. This strain was subsequently characterized as Pseudomonas chlororaphis subsp. aurantiaca based on 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis, assays of the BIOLOG microbial identification system, and unique pigment production. The major antifungal metabolite produced by Pcho10 was further identified as phenazine-1-carboxamide (PCN) on the basis of nuclear magnetic resonance data. The core PCN biosynthesis gene cluster in Pcho10 was cloned and sequenced. PCN showed strong inhibitory activity against F. graminearum conidial germination, mycelial growth, and deoxynivalenol production. Tests both under growth chamber conditions and in field trials showed that Pcho10 well colonized on the wheat head and effectively controlled the disease caused by F. graminearum. Results of this study indicate that P. chlororaphis subsp. aurantiaca Pcho10 has high potential to be developed as a biocontrol agent against F. graminearum. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the use of P. chlororaphis for the management of Fusarium head blight. PMID:24941327

  5. Statistical media optimization for the biomass production of postharvest biocontrol yeast Rhodosporidium paludigenum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Liu, Xia; Wang, Yifei; Ruan, Hui; Zheng, XiaoDong

    2011-01-01

    A cane molasses-based medium for the biomass production of biocontrol agent Rhodosporidium paludigenum was statistically optimized. Molasses concentration (after pretreatment), yeast extract, and initial pH were identified by the Plackett-Burman design to show significant influence on the biomass production. The three factors were further optimized by central composite design and response-surface methodology. The statistical analysis indicated the optimum values of the variables were 89.98 g/L for cane molasses, 2.35 g/L for yeast extract and an initial pH of 8.48. The biomass yield at the optimal culture achieved 15.89 g/L in flask fermentation, which was 2.1 times higher than that at the initial NYDB medium. In a 10-L fermenter, 18.97 g/L of biomass was obtained after 36 hr of cultivation. Moreover, the biocontrol efficacy of the yeast was investigated after culture optimization. The results showed the yeast harvested in the optimal medium maintained its initial biocontrol properties by reducing the percentage of decayed apples to below 20%. PMID:21967338

  6. Striga Biocontrol on a Toothpick: A Readily Deployable and Inexpensive Method for Smallholder Farmers.

    PubMed

    Nzioki, Henry S; Oyosi, Florence; Morris, Cindy E; Kaya, Eylul; Pilgeram, Alice L; Baker, Claire S; Sands, David C

    2016-01-01

    Striga hermonthica (witchweed) is a parasitic weed that attacks and significantly reduces the yields of maize, sorghum, millet, and sugarcane throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Low cost management methods such as hand weeding, short crop rotations, trap cropping, or conventional biocontrol have not been effective. Likewise, Striga-tolerant or herbicide-resistant maize cultivars are higher yielding, but are often beyond the economic means of sustenance farmers. The fungal pathogen, Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. strigae, has been the object of numerous studies to develop Striga biocontrol. Under experimental conditions this pathogen can reduce the incidence of Striga infestation but field use is not extensive, perhaps because it has not been sufficiently effective in restoring crop yield and reducing the soil Striga seed bank. Here we brought together Kenyan and US crop scientists with smallholder farmers to develop and validate an effective biocontrol strategy for management of Striga on smallholder farms. Key components of this research project were the following: (1) Development of a two-step method of fungal delivery, including laboratory coating of primary inoculum on toothpicks, followed by on-farm production of secondary field inoculum in boiled rice enabling delivery of vigorous, fresh inoculum directly to the seedbed; (2) Training of smallholder farmers (85% women), to produce the biocontrol agent and incorporate it into their maize plantings in Striga-infested soils and collect agronomic data. The field tests expanded from 30 smallholder farmers to a two-season, 500-farmer plot trial including paired plus and minus biocontrol plots with fertilizer and hybrid seed in both plots and; (3) Concerted selection of variants of the pathogen identified for enhanced virulence, as has been demonstrated in other host parasite systems were employed here on Striga via pathogen excretion of the amino acids L-leucine and L-tyrosine that are toxic to Striga but innocuous to maize

  7. Striga Biocontrol on a Toothpick: A Readily Deployable and Inexpensive Method for Smallholder Farmers

    PubMed Central

    Nzioki, Henry S.; Oyosi, Florence; Morris, Cindy E.; Kaya, Eylul; Pilgeram, Alice L.; Baker, Claire S.; Sands, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Striga hermonthica (witchweed) is a parasitic weed that attacks and significantly reduces the yields of maize, sorghum, millet, and sugarcane throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Low cost management methods such as hand weeding, short crop rotations, trap cropping, or conventional biocontrol have not been effective. Likewise, Striga-tolerant or herbicide-resistant maize cultivars are higher yielding, but are often beyond the economic means of sustenance farmers. The fungal pathogen, Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. strigae, has been the object of numerous studies to develop Striga biocontrol. Under experimental conditions this pathogen can reduce the incidence of Striga infestation but field use is not extensive, perhaps because it has not been sufficiently effective in restoring crop yield and reducing the soil Striga seed bank. Here we brought together Kenyan and US crop scientists with smallholder farmers to develop and validate an effective biocontrol strategy for management of Striga on smallholder farms. Key components of this research project were the following: (1) Development of a two-step method of fungal delivery, including laboratory coating of primary inoculum on toothpicks, followed by on-farm production of secondary field inoculum in boiled rice enabling delivery of vigorous, fresh inoculum directly to the seedbed; (2) Training of smallholder farmers (85% women), to produce the biocontrol agent and incorporate it into their maize plantings in Striga-infested soils and collect agronomic data. The field tests expanded from 30 smallholder farmers to a two-season, 500-farmer plot trial including paired plus and minus biocontrol plots with fertilizer and hybrid seed in both plots and; (3) Concerted selection of variants of the pathogen identified for enhanced virulence, as has been demonstrated in other host parasite systems were employed here on Striga via pathogen excretion of the amino acids L-leucine and L-tyrosine that are toxic to Striga but innocuous to maize

  8. Is there a difference between stripy journeys and stripy ladybirds? The N400 response to semantic and world-knowledge violations during sentence processing.

    PubMed

    Dudschig, Carolin; Maienborn, Claudia; Kaup, Barbara

    2016-03-01

    The distinction between linguistic and non-linguistic knowledge is particularly relevant because it is related to the principle of compositionality during sentence comprehension. Hagoort, Hald, Bastiaansen, and Petersson (2004) challenged the distinction between linguistic and non-linguistic knowledge. Here, we investigate how linguistic and non-linguistic violations are processed in a setting adapted from Hagoort et al., whilst in contrast to Hagoort, keeping the critical word identical. In line with the findings by Hagoort et al., our results showed largest N400 amplitudes for semantic violations ('Journeys are stripy'), followed by non-linguistic world-knowledge violations ('Ladybirds are stripy') and contingent sentences ('Trousers are stripy'), and finally by correct sentences ('Zebras are stripy'). Traditional fractional area and relative criterion measures of peak and onset latencies showed no effect of violation type. Interestingly, the semantic violation condition crossed a fixed criterion earlier than the word-knowledge violation condition. In conclusion, our data suggests that the question regarding the distinction between linguistic- and non-linguistic knowledge in terms of language integration remains open. Implications for future studies addressing the difference between linguistic and non-linguistic knowledge are discussed.

  9. Is there a difference between stripy journeys and stripy ladybirds? The N400 response to semantic and world-knowledge violations during sentence processing.

    PubMed

    Dudschig, Carolin; Maienborn, Claudia; Kaup, Barbara

    2016-03-01

    The distinction between linguistic and non-linguistic knowledge is particularly relevant because it is related to the principle of compositionality during sentence comprehension. Hagoort, Hald, Bastiaansen, and Petersson (2004) challenged the distinction between linguistic and non-linguistic knowledge. Here, we investigate how linguistic and non-linguistic violations are processed in a setting adapted from Hagoort et al., whilst in contrast to Hagoort, keeping the critical word identical. In line with the findings by Hagoort et al., our results showed largest N400 amplitudes for semantic violations ('Journeys are stripy'), followed by non-linguistic world-knowledge violations ('Ladybirds are stripy') and contingent sentences ('Trousers are stripy'), and finally by correct sentences ('Zebras are stripy'). Traditional fractional area and relative criterion measures of peak and onset latencies showed no effect of violation type. Interestingly, the semantic violation condition crossed a fixed criterion earlier than the word-knowledge violation condition. In conclusion, our data suggests that the question regarding the distinction between linguistic- and non-linguistic knowledge in terms of language integration remains open. Implications for future studies addressing the difference between linguistic and non-linguistic knowledge are discussed. PMID:26812249

  10. Knockout of a transgene by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in the sawfly, Athalia rosae (Hymenoptera) and the ladybird beetle, Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera).

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, M; Yatomi, J; Sumitani, M; Takasu, Y; Sekiné, K; Niimi, T; Sezutsu, H

    2016-02-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are efficient tools for targeted genome editing and have been utilized in a number of insects. Here, we demonstrate the gene disruption (knockout) caused by TALENs targeting a transgene, 3xP3-driven enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP), that is integrated in the genome of two species, the sawfly Athalia rosae (Hymenoptera) and the ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera). Messenger RNAs of TALENs targeting the sequences adjacent to the chromophore region were microinjected into the eggs/embryos of each species. In At. rosae, when microinjection was performed at the posterior end of eggs, 15% of G(0) individuals showed a somatic mosaic phenotype for eye EGFP fluorescence. Three-quarters of the somatic mosaics produced EGFP-negative G(1) progeny. When eggs were injected at the anterior end, 63% of the G(0) individuals showed somatic mosaicism, and 17% of them produced EGFP-negative G(1) progeny. In H. axyridis, 25% of posterior-injected and 8% of anterior-injected G(0) individuals produced EGFP-negative G(1) progeny. In both species, the EGFP-negative progeny retained the EGFP gene, and various deletions were detected in the target sequences, indicating that gene disruption was successfully induced. Finally, for both species, 18-21% of G(0) founders produced gene knockout progeny sufficient for establishing knockout strains. PMID:26496859

  11. Phylogeny of epilachna, henosepilachna, and some minor genera of phytophagous ladybird beetles (coleoptera: coccinellidae: coccinellinae: epilachnini), with an analysis of ancestral biogeography and host-plant utilization.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Toru; Koji, Shinsaku; Ishida, Takahide A; Matsubayashi, Kei W; Kahono, Sih; Kobayashi, Norio; Furukawa, Kota; Viet, Bui Tuan; Vasconcellos-Neto, João; Lange, Charles N; Goergen, Georg; Nakano, Susumu; Li, Nan-Nan; Yu, Guo-Yue; Katakura, Haruo

    2014-12-01

    Ladybird beetles in the tribe Epilachnini include notorious crop pests and model species studied intensively in various fields of evolutionary biology. From a combined dataset of mitochondrial (ND2) and nuclear (28S) DNA sequences, we reconstructed the phylogeny of 46 species of Epilachnini from Asia, Africa, America, and the Australian region: 16 species in Epilachna, 24 species in Henosepilachna, and one species each in Adira, Afidenta, Afidentula, Afissula, Chnootriba, and Epiverta. In our phylogenetic trees, both Epilachna and Henosepilachna were reciprocally polyphyletic. Asian Epilachna species were monophyletic, except for the inclusion of Afissula sp. Asian and Australian Henosepilachna species likewise formed a monophyletic group, excluding H. boisduvali. African Epilachna and Henosepilachna species did not group with their respective Asian and American congeners, but were paraphyletic to other clades (Epilachna species) or formed a separate monophyletic group (Henosepilachna species) together with Chnootriba similis. The American Epilachna species were monophyletic and formed a clade with American Adira clarkii and Asian Afidentula manderstjernae bielawskii; this clade was the sister group to Asian and Australian Henosepilachna, but was distant from Asian Epilachna. Chnootriba was embedded in the African Henosepilachna clade, and Afissula in the Asian Epilachna clade. Epiverta, which is morphologically unique, was the sister group to Asian Epilachna, although with weak support. From reconstructions of biogeographical distribution and host-plant utilization at ancestral nodes, we inferred an African origin for the common ancestor of the species studied, and found the frequency of host shifts to differ greatly between the two major lineages of Epilachnini examined.

  12. Knockout of a transgene by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in the sawfly, Athalia rosae (Hymenoptera) and the ladybird beetle, Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera).

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, M; Yatomi, J; Sumitani, M; Takasu, Y; Sekiné, K; Niimi, T; Sezutsu, H

    2016-02-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are efficient tools for targeted genome editing and have been utilized in a number of insects. Here, we demonstrate the gene disruption (knockout) caused by TALENs targeting a transgene, 3xP3-driven enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP), that is integrated in the genome of two species, the sawfly Athalia rosae (Hymenoptera) and the ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera). Messenger RNAs of TALENs targeting the sequences adjacent to the chromophore region were microinjected into the eggs/embryos of each species. In At. rosae, when microinjection was performed at the posterior end of eggs, 15% of G(0) individuals showed a somatic mosaic phenotype for eye EGFP fluorescence. Three-quarters of the somatic mosaics produced EGFP-negative G(1) progeny. When eggs were injected at the anterior end, 63% of the G(0) individuals showed somatic mosaicism, and 17% of them produced EGFP-negative G(1) progeny. In H. axyridis, 25% of posterior-injected and 8% of anterior-injected G(0) individuals produced EGFP-negative G(1) progeny. In both species, the EGFP-negative progeny retained the EGFP gene, and various deletions were detected in the target sequences, indicating that gene disruption was successfully induced. Finally, for both species, 18-21% of G(0) founders produced gene knockout progeny sufficient for establishing knockout strains.

  13. Phylogeny of epilachna, henosepilachna, and some minor genera of phytophagous ladybird beetles (coleoptera: coccinellidae: coccinellinae: epilachnini), with an analysis of ancestral biogeography and host-plant utilization.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Toru; Koji, Shinsaku; Ishida, Takahide A; Matsubayashi, Kei W; Kahono, Sih; Kobayashi, Norio; Furukawa, Kota; Viet, Bui Tuan; Vasconcellos-Neto, João; Lange, Charles N; Goergen, Georg; Nakano, Susumu; Li, Nan-Nan; Yu, Guo-Yue; Katakura, Haruo

    2014-12-01

    Ladybird beetles in the tribe Epilachnini include notorious crop pests and model species studied intensively in various fields of evolutionary biology. From a combined dataset of mitochondrial (ND2) and nuclear (28S) DNA sequences, we reconstructed the phylogeny of 46 species of Epilachnini from Asia, Africa, America, and the Australian region: 16 species in Epilachna, 24 species in Henosepilachna, and one species each in Adira, Afidenta, Afidentula, Afissula, Chnootriba, and Epiverta. In our phylogenetic trees, both Epilachna and Henosepilachna were reciprocally polyphyletic. Asian Epilachna species were monophyletic, except for the inclusion of Afissula sp. Asian and Australian Henosepilachna species likewise formed a monophyletic group, excluding H. boisduvali. African Epilachna and Henosepilachna species did not group with their respective Asian and American congeners, but were paraphyletic to other clades (Epilachna species) or formed a separate monophyletic group (Henosepilachna species) together with Chnootriba similis. The American Epilachna species were monophyletic and formed a clade with American Adira clarkii and Asian Afidentula manderstjernae bielawskii; this clade was the sister group to Asian and Australian Henosepilachna, but was distant from Asian Epilachna. Chnootriba was embedded in the African Henosepilachna clade, and Afissula in the Asian Epilachna clade. Epiverta, which is morphologically unique, was the sister group to Asian Epilachna, although with weak support. From reconstructions of biogeographical distribution and host-plant utilization at ancestral nodes, we inferred an African origin for the common ancestor of the species studied, and found the frequency of host shifts to differ greatly between the two major lineages of Epilachnini examined. PMID:25483794

  14. Hrp mutant bacteria as biocontrol agents: toward a sustainable approach in the fight against plant pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hanemian, Mathieu; Zhou, Binbin; Deslandes, Laurent; Marco, Yves; Trémousaygue, Dominique

    2013-10-01

    Sustainable agriculture necessitates development of environmentally safe methods to protect plants against pathogens. Among these methods, application of biocontrol agents has been efficiently used to minimize disease development. Here we review current understanding of mechanisms involved in biocontrol of the main Gram-phytopathogenic bacteria-induced diseases by plant inoculation with strains mutated in hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity) genes. These mutants are able to penetrate plant tissues and to stimulate basal resistance of plants. Novel protection mechanisms involving the phytohormone abscisic acid appear to play key roles in the biocontrol of wilt disease induced by Ralstonia solanacearum in Arabidopsis thaliana. Fully understanding these mechanisms and extending the studies to other pathosystems are still required to evaluate their importance in disease protection.

  15. Role of gluconic acid production in the regulation of biocontrol traits of Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0.

    PubMed

    de Werra, Patrice; Péchy-Tarr, Maria; Keel, Christoph; Maurhofer, Monika

    2009-06-01

    The rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0 promotes the growth of various crop plants and protects them against root diseases caused by pathogenic fungi. The main mechanism of disease suppression by this strain is the production of the antifungal compounds 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG) and pyoluteorin (PLT). Direct plant growth promotion can be achieved through solubilization of inorganic phosphates by the production of organic acids, mainly gluconic acid, which is one of the principal acids produced by Pseudomonas spp. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of gluconic acid production in CHA0. Therefore, mutants were created with deletions in the genes encoding glucose dehydrogenase (gcd) and gluconate dehydrogenase (gad), required for the conversion of glucose to gluconic acid and gluconic acid to 2-ketogluconate, respectively. These enzymes should be of predominant importance for rhizosphere-colonizing biocontrol bacteria, as major carbon sources provided by plant root exudates are made up of glucose. Our results show that the ability of strain CHA0 to acidify its environment and to solubilize mineral phosphate is strongly dependent on its ability to produce gluconic acid. Moreover, we provide evidence that the formation of gluconic acid by CHA0 completely inhibits the production of PLT and partially inhibits that of DAPG. In the Deltagcd mutant, which does not produce gluconic acid, the enhanced production of antifungal compounds was associated with improved biocontrol activity against take-all disease of wheat, caused by Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici. This study provides new evidence for a close association of gluconic acid metabolism with antifungal compound production and biocontrol activity in P. fluorescens CHA0.

  16. Characterization of the Biocontrol Activity of Pseudomonas fluorescens Strain X Reveals Novel Genes Regulated by Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Kremmydas, Gerasimos F.; Tampakaki, Anastasia P.; Georgakopoulos, Dimitrios G.

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strain X, a bacterial isolate from the rhizosphere of bean seedlings, has the ability to suppress damping-off caused by the oomycete Pythium ultimum. To determine the genes controlling the biocontrol activity of strain X, transposon mutagenesis, sequencing and complementation was performed. Results indicate that, biocontrol ability of this isolate is attributed to gcd gene encoding glucose dehydrogenase, genes encoding its co-enzyme pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), and two genes (sup5 and sup6) which seem to be organized in a putative operon. This operon (named supX) consists of five genes, one of which encodes a non-ribosomal peptide synthase. A unique binding site for a GntR-type transcriptional factor is localized upstream of the supX putative operon. Synteny comparison of the genes in supX revealed that they are common in the genus Pseudomonas, but with a low degree of similarity. supX shows high similarity only to the mangotoxin operon of Ps. syringae pv. syringae UMAF0158. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that transcription of supX is strongly reduced in the gcd and PQQ-minus mutants of Ps. fluorescens strain X. On the contrary, transcription of supX in the wild type is enhanced by glucose and transcription levels that appear to be higher during the stationary phase. Gcd, which uses PQQ as a cofactor, catalyses the oxidation of glucose to gluconic acid, which controls the activity of the GntR family of transcriptional factors. The genes in the supX putative operon have not been implicated before in the biocontrol of plant pathogens by pseudomonads. They are involved in the biosynthesis of an antimicrobial compound by Ps. fluorescens strain X and their transcription is controlled by glucose, possibly through the activity of a GntR-type transcriptional factor binding upstream of this putative operon. PMID:23596526

  17. Biocontrol of Aspergillus flavus on peanut kernels by use of a strain of marine Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed

    Kong, Qing; Shan, Shihua; Liu, Qizheng; Wang, Xiudan; Yu, Fangtang

    2010-04-30

    A strain of marine Bacillus megaterium isolated from the Yellow Sea of East China was evaluated for its activity in reducing postharvest decay of peanut kernels caused by Aspergillus flavus in in vitro and in vivo tests. The results showed that the concentrations of antagonist had a significant effect on biocontrol effectiveness in vivo: when the concentration of the washed bacteria cell suspension was used at 1x10(9)CFU/ml, the percentage rate of rot of peanut kernels was 31.67%+/-2.89%, which was markedly lower than that treated with water (the control) after 7days of incubation at 28 degrees C. The results also showed that unwashed cell culture of B. megaterium was as effective as the washed cell suspension, and better biocontrol was obtained when longer incubation time of B. megaterium was applied. When the incubation time of B. megaterium was 60-h, the rate of decay declined to 41.67%+/-2.89%. Furthermore, relative to the expression of 18S rRNA, the mRNA abundances of aflR gene and aflS gene in the experiment group were 0.28+/-0.03 and 0.024+/-0.005 respectively, indicating that this strain of B. megaterium could significantly reduce the biosynthesis of aflatoxins and expression of aflR gene and aflS gene (p<0.01). To the best of our knowledge, this is a first report demonstrating that the marine bacterium B. megaterium could be used as a biocontrol agent against postharvest fungal disease caused by A. flavus. PMID:20156660

  18. Bio-control potential of Cladosporium sp. (MCPL-461), against a noxious weed Parthenium hysterophorus L.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anuj; Verma, V C; Gond, S K; Kumar, V; Kharwar, R N

    2009-03-01

    The phenological survey of Parthenium hysterophorus L., in and around the campus of Banaras Hindu University (BHU) was done for about two years (2004-06). During Nov 2004, a few Parthenium plants were found diseased, and symptoms were restricted to the flowers, buds, and inflorescences. The disease causes sterility and reduces seed viability, which was observed with seed germination test from infected and healthy plants. The fungal pathogen was isolated and identified as Cladosporium sp. (MCPL-461). The severity of pathogen to the reproductive organs led to serious damages of the Parthenium plants. Thus in vitro and in vivo experiments were conducted to determine the bio-control potential of Cladosporium sp. (MCPL 461) against Parthenium weed. A combinatorial effort of Cladosporium sp. (MCPL 461) bio-control potential was evaluated with different culture media, incubation periods and spores strength. Spore suspension of 10(5) to 10(12) spores ml(-1) were used to spray on healthy Parthenium plants, and it was found that severe infection symptoms were appeared at 10(10) to 10(12) spores ml(-1) suspension. LD50 was found at 10(7) spores ml(-1). To enhance the myco-herbicide activity 3% sucrose was added to the spore suspension, which further resolute the bio-control efficacy of the isolates. Only 20-30% seeds of infected plants could germinate. However the safety of non-targeted and wild plants was also tested with Lantana camera, Chromolaena odorata and found that suspension up to 10(12) spores ml(-1) were not sufficient for disease outbreak in them.

  19. Characterization of the biocontrol activity of pseudomonas fluorescens strain X reveals novel genes regulated by glucose.

    PubMed

    Kremmydas, Gerasimos F; Tampakaki, Anastasia P; Georgakopoulos, Dimitrios G

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strain X, a bacterial isolate from the rhizosphere of bean seedlings, has the ability to suppress damping-off caused by the oomycete Pythium ultimum. To determine the genes controlling the biocontrol activity of strain X, transposon mutagenesis, sequencing and complementation was performed. Results indicate that, biocontrol ability of this isolate is attributed to gcd gene encoding glucose dehydrogenase, genes encoding its co-enzyme pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), and two genes (sup5 and sup6) which seem to be organized in a putative operon. This operon (named supX) consists of five genes, one of which encodes a non-ribosomal peptide synthase. A unique binding site for a GntR-type transcriptional factor is localized upstream of the supX putative operon. Synteny comparison of the genes in supX revealed that they are common in the genus Pseudomonas, but with a low degree of similarity. supX shows high similarity only to the mangotoxin operon of Ps. syringae pv. syringae UMAF0158. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that transcription of supX is strongly reduced in the gcd and PQQ-minus mutants of Ps. fluorescens strain X. On the contrary, transcription of supX in the wild type is enhanced by glucose and transcription levels that appear to be higher during the stationary phase. Gcd, which uses PQQ as a cofactor, catalyses the oxidation of glucose to gluconic acid, which controls the activity of the GntR family of transcriptional factors. The genes in the supX putative operon have not been implicated before in the biocontrol of plant pathogens by pseudomonads. They are involved in the biosynthesis of an antimicrobial compound by Ps. fluorescens strain X and their transcription is controlled by glucose, possibly through the activity of a GntR-type transcriptional factor binding upstream of this putative operon.

  20. The role of an extracellular chitinase from Trichoderma virens Gv29-8 in the biocontrol of Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Baek, J M; Howell, C R; Kenerley, C M

    1999-02-01

    The role of extracellular chitinase in the biocontrol activity of Trichoderma virens was examined using genetically manipulated strains of this fungus. The T. virens strains in which the chitinase gene (cht42) was disrupted (KO) or constitutively over-expressed (COE) were constructed through genetic transformation. The resulting transformants were stable and showed patterns similar to the wild-type (WT) strain with respect to growth rate, sporulation, antibiotic production, colonization efficiency on cotton roots and growth/survival in soil. Biocontrol activity of the KO and COE strains were significantly decreased and enhanced, respectively against cotton seedling disease incited by Rhizoctonia solani when compared with the WT strain.

  1. [Fungal bio-control agents against ixodid tick--a review].

    PubMed

    Sun, Ming; Wang, Xiaoyan; Luo, Jianxun

    2012-08-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi as potential agents for bio-control have been widely applied in the control of insect pests in agriculture. However, the application remains in laboratory scale for the control of ectoparasites. Owing to the need to combat the short lasting period of chemical acaricides and reduction of pollution, it is urgent to develop sufficient, stable and safe measures for tick control. We reviewed the primary scientific achievements in utilization of environmental microbes for controlling of ticks. Studies conducted in this field may benefit to sustainable development, environmental protection, maintaining ecological balance and production of green products.

  2. A new method to evaluate the biocontrol potential of single spore isolates of fungal entomopathogens

    PubMed Central

    Posada, Francisco J.; Vega, Fernando E.

    2005-01-01

    Fifty Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) Vuillemin (Ascomycota: Hypocreales) strains isolated from the coffee berry borer were used to develop a novel screening method aimed at selecting strains with the highest biocontrol potential. The screening method is based on percent insect mortality, average survival time, mortality distribution, percent spore germination, fungal life cycle duration, and spore production on the insect. Based on these parameters, only 11 strains merited further study. The use of a sound scientific protocol for the selection of promising fungal entomopathogens should lead to more efficient use of time, labor, and financial resources in biological control programs. PMID:17119619

  3. Genetics Home Reference: harlequin ichthyosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... a major role in the transport of fats (lipids) in the outermost layer of skin (the epidermis ). ... small version of the protein that cannot transport lipids properly. A loss of functional ABCA12 protein disrupts ...

  4. Relationship between mycoparasites lifestyles and biocontrol behaviors against Fusarium spp. and mycotoxins production.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seon Hwa; Vujanovic, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    Global food security research is seeking eco-friendly solutions to control mycotoxins in grain infected by fungi (molds). In particular, mycotoxigenic Fusarium spp. outbreak is a chronic threat for cereal grain production, human, and animal health. In this review paper, we discuss up-to-date biological control strategies in applying mycoparasites as biological control agents (BCA) to prevent plant diseases in crops and mycotoxins in grain, food, and feed. The aim is to increase food safety and to minimize economic losses due to the reduced grain yield and quality. However, recent papers indicate that the study of the BCA specialists with biotrophic lifestyle lags behind our understanding of the BCA generalists with necrotrophic lifestyle. We examine critical behavioral traits of the two BCA groups of mycoparasites. The goal is to highlight their major characteristics in the context of future research towards an efficient biocontrol strategy against mycotoxin-producing Fusarium species. The emphasis is put on biocontrol of Fusarium graminearum, F. avenaceum, and F. culmorum causing Fusarium head blight (FHB) in cereals and their mycotoxins. PMID:27121573

  5. Phaeobacter inhibens as biocontrol agent against Vibrio vulnificus in oyster models.

    PubMed

    Porsby, Cisse Hedegaard; Gram, Lone

    2016-08-01

    Molluscan shellfish can cause food borne diseases and here we investigated if addition of Vibrio-antagonising bacteria could reduce Vibrio vulnificus in model oyster systems and prevent its establishment in live animals. Phaeobacter inhibens, which produces an antibacterial compound, tropodithietic acid (TDA), inhibited V. vulnificus as did pure TDA (MIC of 1-3.9 μM). P. inhibens DSM 17395 (at 10(6) cfu/ml) eradicated 10(5) cfu/ml V. vulnificus CMCP6 (a rifampicin resistant variant) from a co-culture oyster model system (oyster juice) whereas the pathogen grew to 10(7) cfu/ml when co-cultured with a TDA negative Phaeobacter mutant. P. inhibens grew well in oyster juice to 10(8) CFU/ml and sterile filtered samples from these cultures were inhibitory to Vibrio spp. P. inhibens established itself in live European flat oysters (Ostrea edulis) and remained at 10(5) cfu/g for five days. However, the presence of P. inhibens could not prevent subsequently added V. vulnificus from entering the live animals, likely because of too low levels of the biocontrol strain. Whilst the oyster model studies provided indication that P. inhibens DSM 17395 could be a good candidate as biocontrol agent against V. vulnificus further optimization is need in the actual animal rearing situation. PMID:27052703

  6. Diversity, Biocontrol, and Plant Growth Promoting Abilities of Xylem Residing Bacteria from Solanaceous Crops

    PubMed Central

    Achari, Gauri A.

    2014-01-01

    Eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) is one of the solanaceous crops of economic and cultural importance and is widely cultivated in the state of Goa, India. Eggplant cultivation is severely affected by bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum that colonizes the xylem tissue. In this study, 167 bacteria were isolated from the xylem of healthy eggplant, chilli, and Solanum torvum Sw. by vacuum infiltration and maceration. Amplified rDNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) grouped these xylem residing bacteria (XRB) into 38 haplotypes. Twenty-eight strains inhibited growth of R. solanacearum and produced volatile and diffusible antagonistic compounds and plant growth promoting substances in vitro. Antagonistic strains XB86, XB169, XB177, and XB200 recorded a biocontrol efficacy greater than 85% against BW and exhibited 12%–22 % increase in shoot length in eggplant in the greenhouse screening. 16S rRNA based identification revealed the presence of 23 different bacterial genera. XRB with high biocontrol and plant growth promoting activities were identified as strains of Staphylococcus sp., Bacillus sp., Streptomyces sp., Enterobacter sp., and Agrobacterium sp. This study is the first report on identity of bacteria from the xylem of solanaceous crops having traits useful in cultivation of eggplant. PMID:24963298

  7. Tamarisk biocontrol using tamarisk beetles: Potential consequences for riparian birds in the southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paxton, E.H.; Theimer, T.C.; Sogge, M.K.

    2011-01-01

    The tamarisk beetle (Diorhabda spp.), a non-native biocontrol agent, has been introduced to eradicate tamarisk (Tamarix spp.), a genus of non-native tree that has become a dominant component of riparian woodlands in the southwestern United States. Tamarisk beetles have the potential to spread widely and defoliate large expanses of tamarisk habitat, but the effects of such a widespread loss of riparian vegetation on birds remains unknown. We reviewed literature on the effects of other defoliating insects on birds to investigate the potential for tamarisk beetles to affect birds positively or negatively by changing food abundance and vegetation structure. We then combined data on the temporal patterns of tamarisk defoliation by beetles with nest productivity of a wellstudied riparian obligate, the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus), to simulate the potential demographic consequences of beetle defoliation on breeding riparian birds in both the short and long term. Our results highlight that the effects of tamarisk biocontrol on birds will likely vary by species and population, depending upon its sensitivity to seasonal defoliation by beetles and net loss of riparian habitat due to tamarisk mortality. Species with restricted distributions that include areas dominated by tamarisk may be negatively affected both in the short and long term. The rate of regeneration and/or restoration of native cottonwoods (Populus spp.) and willows (Salix spp.) relative to the rate of tamarisk loss will be critical in determining the long-term effect of this large-scale ecological experiment. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2011.

  8. Tamarisk biocontrol using tamarisk beetles: Potential consequences for riparian birds in the southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paxton, Eben H.; Theimer, Tad C.; Sogge, Mark K.

    2011-01-01

    The tamarisk beetle (Diorhabda spp.), a non-native biocontrol agent, has been introduced to eradicate tamarisk (Tamarix spp.), a genus of non-native tree that has become a dominant component of riparian woodlands in the southwestern United States. Tamarisk beetles have the potential to spread widely and defoliate large expanses of tamarisk habitat, but the effects of such a widespread loss of riparian vegetation on birds remains unknown. We reviewed literature on the effects of other defoliating insects on birds to investigate the potential for tamarisk beetles to affect birds positively or negatively by changing food abundance and vegetation structure. We then combined data on the temporal patterns of tamarisk defoliation by beetles with nest productivity of a well-studied riparian obligate, the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus), to simulate the potential demographic consequences of beetle defoliation on breeding riparian birds in both the short and long term. Our results highlight that the effects of tamarisk biocontrol on birds will likely vary by species and population, depending upon its sensitivity to seasonal defoliation by beetles and net loss of riparian habitat due to tamarisk mortality. Species with restricted distributions that include areas dominated by tamarisk may be negatively affected both in the short and long term. The rate of regeneration and/or restoration of native cottonwoods (Populus spp.) and willows (Salix spp.) relative to the rate of tamarisk loss will be critical in determining the long-term effect of this large-scale ecological experiment.

  9. Biocontrol activity of Paenibacillus polymyxa AC-1 against Pseudomonas syringae and its interaction with Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chi Eun; Kwon, Suk Yoon; Park, Jeong Mee

    2016-04-01

    Paenibacillus polymyxa AC-1 (AC-1) is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) that has been used as a soil inoculant for biocontrol of plant pathogenic fungi and to promote plant growth. In this study, we examine the effects of AC-1 on the bacterial phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae and internal colonization of AC-1 by counting bacterial populations that colonize plants. AC-1 inhibited the growth of both P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst) and P. syringae pv. tabaci (Pta) in a concentration-dependent manner in in vitro assays. Upon treatment of AC-1 dropping at root tip of axenically grown Arabidopsis, we found that most of the AC-1 was detected in interior of leaves of Arabidiopsis plants rather than roots after 5 days post infection, indicating systemic spreading of AC-1 occur. We examined further AC-1 colonization patterns in Arabidopsis mutants deficient in phytohormone signaling pathways. These results indicated that abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathways positively and negatively contributed, respectively, to AC-1 colonization of leaves, whereas epiphytic accumulation of AC-1 around root tissues was not affected. This study shows that AC-1 is an effective biocontrol agent to suppress P. syringae growth, possibly owing to its colonization patterns as a leaf-inhabiting endophyte. The results showed in this work will help to expand our understanding of the mode of action of AC-1 as a biological control agent and consequently, its application in agriculture.

  10. Catabolic pathway of gamma-caprolactone in the biocontrol agent Rhodococcus erythropolis.

    PubMed

    Barbey, Corinne; Crépin, Alexandre; Cirou, Amélie; Budin-Verneuil, Aurélie; Orange, Nicole; Feuilloley, Marc; Faure, Denis; Dessaux, Yves; Burini, Jean-François; Latour, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-caprolactone (GCL) is well-known as a food flavor and has been recently described as a biostimulant molecule promoting the growth of bacteria with biocontrol activity against soft-rot pathogens. Among these biocontrol agents, Rhodococcus erythropolis, characterized by a remarkable metabolic versatility, assimilates various γ-butyrolactone molecules with a branched-aliphatic chain, such as GCL. The assimilative pathway of GCL in R. erythropolis was investigated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled to matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. This analysis suggests the involvement of the lactonase QsdA in ring-opening, a feature confirmed by heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. According to proteome analysis, the open-chain form of GCL was degraded by β- and ω-oxidation coupled to the Krebs cycle and β-ketoadipate pathway. Ubiquity of qsdA gene among environmental R. erythropolis isolates was verified by PCR. In addition to a previous N-acyl homoserine lactone catabolic function, QsdA may therefore be involved in an intermediate degradative step of cyclic recalcitrant molecules or in synthesis of flavoring lactones. PMID:22085026

  11. Structural characterization of antibiotic self-immunity tRNA synthetase in plant tumour biocontrol agent

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Shaileja; Palencia, Andrés; Virus, Cornelia; Schulwitz, Sarah; Temple, Brenda R.; Cusack, Stephen; Reader, John

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic-producing microbes evolved self-resistance mechanisms to avoid suicide. The biocontrol Agrobacterium radiobacter K84 secretes the Trojan Horse antibiotic agrocin 84 that is selectively transported into the plant pathogen A. tumefaciens and processed into the toxin TM84. We previously showed that TM84 employs a unique tRNA-dependent mechanism to inhibit leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS), while the TM84-producer prevents self-poisoning by expressing a resistant LeuRS AgnB2. We now identify a mechanism by which the antibiotic-producing microbe resists its own toxin. Using a combination of structural, biochemical and biophysical approaches, we show that AgnB2 evolved structural changes so as to resist the antibiotic by eliminating the tRNA-dependence of TM84 binding. Mutagenesis of key resistance determinants results in mutants adopting an antibiotic-sensitive phenotype. This study illuminates the evolution of resistance in self-immunity genes and provides mechanistic insights into a fascinating tRNA-dependent antibiotic with applications for the development of anti-infectives and the prevention of biocontrol emasculation. PMID:27713402

  12. Biofertilization and Biocontrol in the fight against soilborne fungal root pathogens in Australian soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Sarah; Agnew, Linda; Pereg, Lily

    2015-04-01

    Control of soilborne fungal root pathogens that severely compromise cotton production and other crops worldwide has historically been through the use of synthetic fungicides and fertilizers, these often have hazardous implications for environmental and soil health. The search for sustainable alternatives has lead to heightened interest in biocontrol, using soil microorganisms that suppress the growth of phytopathogens directly and biofertilization, the use of microorganisms to increasing the nutrient availability in soils, increasing seedling vigour. Soil properties and consequently soil microbial properties are strongly impacted by agricultural practices, therefore we are isolating indigenous microorganisms from soils collected from ten different geographical locations within the Australian cotton-growing region. These differ vastly in soil type and management practices. Soils are being analysed to compare the abundance of phosphate solubilising, auxin producing and nitrogen cycling bacteria. Rhizospheric bacteria capable of plant growth promoting through a multiple actions are being isolated. In addition, a method for isolating soilborne fungal suppressive microbes directly from soil samples has been designed and is currently being used. Comparisons between agricultural practices and the plant growth promoting microbial component of soil microbiome will be reported on. We will discuss the microbial isolates identified, their modes of action and their potential use as biocontrol agents and/or biofertilizers in Australian cotton growing soils.

  13. Biocontrol mechanism by root-associated Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 – a review

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Soumitra Paul; Hartmann, Anton; Gao, XueWen; Borriss, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum FZB42 is a Gram-positive model bacterium for unraveling plant–microbe interactions in Bacilli. In addition, FZB42 is used commercially as biofertilizer and biocontrol agent in agriculture. Genome analysis of FZB42 revealed that nearly 10% of the FZB42 genome is devoted to synthesizing antimicrobial metabolites and their corresponding immunity genes. However, recent investigations in planta demonstrated that – except surfactin – the amount of such compounds found in vicinity of plant roots is relatively low, making doubtful a direct function in suppressing competing microflora including plant pathogens. These metabolites have been also suspected to induce changes within the rhizosphere microbial community, which might affect environment and plant health. However, sequence analysis of rhizosphere samples revealed only marginal changes in the root microbiome, suggesting that secondary metabolites are not the key factor in protecting plants from pathogenic microorganisms. On the other hand, adding FZB42 to plants compensate, at least in part, changes in the community structure caused by the pathogen, indicating an interesting mechanism of plant protection by beneficial Bacilli. Sub-lethal concentrations of cyclic lipopeptides and volatiles produced by plant-associated Bacilli trigger pathways of induced systemic resistance (ISR), which protect plants against attacks of pathogenic microbes, viruses, and nematodes. Stimulation of ISR by bacterial metabolites is likely the main mechanism responsible for biocontrol action of FZB42. PMID:26284057

  14. Potential Bio-Control Agent from Rhodomyrtus tomentosa against Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Odedina, Grace Fiyinfoluwa; Vongkamjan, Kitiya; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang Piyawan

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important foodborne pathogen implicated in many outbreaks of listeriosis. This study aimed at screening for the potential use of Rhodomyrtus tomentosa ethanolic leaf extract as a bio-control agent against L. monocytogenes. Twenty-two L. monocytogenes isolates were checked with 16 commercial antibiotics and isolates displayed resistance to 10 antibiotics. All the tested isolates were sensitive to the extract with inhibition zones ranging from 14 to 16 mm. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values ranged from 16 to 32 µg/mL and 128 to 512 µg/mL, respectively. Time-kill assay showed that the extract had remarkable bactericidal effects on L. monocytogenes. The extract at a concentration of 16 µg/mL reduced tolerance to 10% NaCl in L. monocytogenes in 4 h. Stationary phase L. monocytogenes cells were rapidly inactivated by greater than 3-log units within 30 min of contact time with R. tomentosa extract at 128 µg/mL. Electron microscopy revealed fragmentary bacteria with changes in the physical and morphological properties. Our study demonstrates the potential of the extract for further development into a bio-control agent in food to prevent the incidence of L. monocytogenes contamination. PMID:26371033

  15. Lactic acid bacteria from fresh fruit and vegetables as biocontrol agents of phytopathogenic bacteria and fungi.

    PubMed

    Trias, Rosalia; Bañeras, Lluís; Montesinos, Emilio; Badosa, Esther

    2008-12-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from fresh fruits and vegetables as biocontrol agents against the phytopathogenic and spoilage bacteria and fungi, Xanthomonas campestris, Erwinia carotovora, Penicillium expansum, Monilinia laxa, and Botrytis cinerea. The antagonistic activity of 496 LAB strains was tested in vitro and all tested microorganisms except P. expansum were inhibited by at least one isolate. The 496 isolates were also analyzed for the inhibition of P. expansum infection in wounds of Golden Delicious apples. Four strains (TC97, AC318, TM319, and FF441) reduced the fungal rot diameter of the apples by 20%; only Weissella cibaria strain TM128 decreased infection levels by 50%. Cell-free supernatants of selected antagonistic bacteria were studied to determine the nature of the antimicrobial compounds produced. Organic acids were the preferred mediators of inhibition but hydrogen peroxide was also detected when strains BC48, TM128, PM141 and FF441 were tested against E. carotovora. While previous reports of antifungal activity by LAB are scarce, our results support the potential of LAB as biocontrol agents against postharvest rot.

  16. Lactic acid bacteria from fresh fruit and vegetables as biocontrol agents of phytopathogenic bacteria and fungi.

    PubMed

    Trias, Rosalia; Bañeras, Lluís; Montesinos, Emilio; Badosa, Esther

    2008-12-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from fresh fruits and vegetables as biocontrol agents against the phytopathogenic and spoilage bacteria and fungi, Xanthomonas campestris, Erwinia carotovora, Penicillium expansum, Monilinia laxa, and Botrytis cinerea. The antagonistic activity of 496 LAB strains was tested in vitro and all tested microorganisms except P. expansum were inhibited by at least one isolate. The 496 isolates were also analyzed for the inhibition of P. expansum infection in wounds of Golden Delicious apples. Four strains (TC97, AC318, TM319, and FF441) reduced the fungal rot diameter of the apples by 20%; only Weissella cibaria strain TM128 decreased infection levels by 50%. Cell-free supernatants of selected antagonistic bacteria were studied to determine the nature of the antimicrobial compounds produced. Organic acids were the preferred mediators of inhibition but hydrogen peroxide was also detected when strains BC48, TM128, PM141 and FF441 were tested against E. carotovora. While previous reports of antifungal activity by LAB are scarce, our results support the potential of LAB as biocontrol agents against postharvest rot. PMID:19204894

  17. Systematics of the Trichoderma harzianum species complex and the re-identification of commercial biocontrol strains.

    PubMed

    Chaverri, Priscila; Branco-Rocha, Fabiano; Jaklitsch, Walter; Gazis, Romina; Degenkolb, Thomas; Samuels, Gary J

    2015-01-01

    Trichoderma harzianum is known as a cosmopolitan, ubiquitous species associated with a wide variety of substrates. It is possibly the most commonly used name in agricultural applications involving Trichoderma, including biological control of plant diseases. While various studies have suggested that T. harzianum is a species complex, only a few cryptic species are named. In the present study the taxonomy of the T. harzianum species complex is revised to include at least 14 species. Previously named species included in the complex are T. guizhouense, T. harzianum, and T. inhamatum. Two new combinations are proposed, T. lentiforme and T. lixii. Nine species are described as new, T. afarasin, T. afroharzianum, T. atrobrunneum, T. camerunense, T. endophyticum, T. neotropicale, T. pyramidale, T. rifaii and T. simmonsii. We isolated Trichoderma cultures from four commercial biocontrol products reported to contain T. harzianum. None of the biocontrol strains were identified as T. harzianum s. str. In addition, the widely applied culture 'T. harzianum T22' was determined to be T. afroharzianum. Some species in the T. harzianum complex appear to be exclusively endophytic, while others were only isolated from soil. Sexual states are rare. Descriptions and illustrations are provided. A secondary barcode, nuc translation elongation factor 1-α (TEF1) is needed to identify species in this complex.

  18. Endemic plants harbour specific Trichoderma communities with an exceptional potential for biocontrol of phytopathogens.

    PubMed

    Zachow, Christin; Berg, Christian; Müller, Henry; Monk, Jana; Berg, Gabriele

    2016-10-10

    Trichoderma strains exhibit enormous potential for applications in biotechnology, in particular as biocontrol agents against pathogens. However, little is known about the diversity of plant-associated Trichoderma communities at a global scale and their antagonistic spectrum. In order to gather information about structure and function, we compared Trichoderma biomes of endemic (Aeonium, Diospyros, Hebe, Rhododendron) and cosmopolitan plants (Zea mays) in a global study encompassing the area Northwest Africa to New Zealand via the European Alps and Madagascar. At the quantitative level we found no differences between cosmopolitan and endemic plants. Statistically significant differences were detected at the qualitative level: Trichoderma populations of endemic plants were highly specific and diverse with hot spots appearing in Madagascar and New Zealand. By contrast, maize plants from all sites shared the majority of Trichoderma species (65.5%). Interestingly, the high above ground biodiversity in ecosystems containing endemic plants was confirmed by a high below ground Trichoderma diversity. Despite the differences, we found a global Trichoderma core community shared by all analysed plants, which was dominated by T. koningii and T. koningiopsis. Amplicon-based network analyses revealed a high similarity between maize Trichoderma grown world-wide and distinct populations of endemic plants. Furthermore, Trichoderma strains from endemic plants showed a higher antagonistic activity against fungal pathogens compared to maize-associated strains. Our results showed that endemic plants are associated with a specific Trichoderma microbiome which possesses a high antagonistic activity indicating that it has potential to be used for biocontrol purposes. PMID:27039271

  19. Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR): Their potential as antagonists and biocontrol agents

    PubMed Central

    Beneduzi, Anelise; Ambrosini, Adriana; Passaglia, Luciane M.P.

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria that colonize plant roots and promote plant growth are referred to as plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR). PGPR are highly diverse and in this review we focus on rhizobacteria as biocontrol agents. Their effects can occur via local antagonism to soil-borne pathogens or by induction of systemic resistance against pathogens throughout the entire plant. Several substances produced by antagonistic rhizobacteria have been related to pathogen control and indirect promotion of growth in many plants, such as siderophores and antibiotics. Induced systemic resistance (ISR) in plants resembles pathogen-induced systemic acquired resistance (SAR) under conditions where the inducing bacteria and the challenging pathogen remain spatially separated. Both types of induced resistance render uninfected plant parts more resistant to pathogens in several plant species. Rhizobacteria induce resistance through the salicylic acid-dependent SAR pathway, or require jasmonic acid and ethylene perception from the plant for ISR. Rhizobacteria belonging to the genera Pseudomonas and Bacillus are well known for their antagonistic effects and their ability to trigger ISR. Resistance-inducing and antagonistic rhizobacteria might be useful in formulating new inoculants with combinations of different mechanisms of action, leading to a more efficient use for biocontrol strategies to improve cropping systems. PMID:23411488

  20. Secondary metabolites help biocontrol strain Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0 to escape protozoan grazing.

    PubMed

    Jousset, Alexandre; Lara, Enrique; Wall, Luis G; Valverde, Claudio

    2006-11-01

    In soil ecosystems, bacteria must cope with predation activity, which is attributed mainly to protists. The development of antipredation strategies may help bacteria maintain higher populations and persist longer in the soil. We analyzed the interaction between the root-colonizing and biocontrol strain Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0 and three different protist isolates (an amoeba, a flagellate, and a ciliate). CHA0 produces a set of antibiotics, HCN, and an exoprotease. We observed that protists cannot grow on CHA0 but can multiply on isogenic regulatory mutants that do not produce the extracellular metabolites. The in vitro responses to CHA0 cells and its exoproducts included growth inhibition, encystation, paralysis, and cell lysis. By analyzing the responses of protists to bacterial supernatants obtained from different isogenic mutants whose production of one or more exometabolites was affected and also to culture extracts with antibiotic enrichment, we observed different contributions of the phenolic antifungal compound 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG) and the extracellular protease AprA to CHA0 toxicity for protists and to the encystation-reactivation cycle. The grazing pressure artificially produced by a mixture of the three protists in a microcosm system resulted in reduced colonization of cucumber roots by a regulatory isogenic CHA0 mutant unable to produce toxins. These results suggest that exometabolite production in biocontrol strain CHA0 may contribute to avoidance of protist grazing and help sustain higher populations in the rhizosphere, which may be a desirable and advantageous trait for competition with other bacteria for available resources.

  1. Strain-level diversity of secondary metabolism in the biocontrol species Aneurinibacillus migulanus.

    PubMed

    Alenezi, Faizah N; Rekik, Imen; Bełka, Marta; Ibrahim, Abrar F; Luptakova, Lenka; Jaspars, Marcel; Woodward, Steve; Belbahri, Lassaad

    2016-01-01

    Aneurinibacillus migulanus strains Nagano and NCTC 7096 show potential in biocontrol against fungal and fungus-like plant pathogens, including a wide range of Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, and Oomycetes. Differences in terms of the range of pathogens that each strain inhibits, however, suggested that production of a single antibiotic cyclic peptide, gramicidin S (GS), by the two strains, is not the sole mechanism of inhibition. The availability of four sequenced genomes of Aneurinibacillus prompted us to apply genome mining techniques to identify the bioactive potential of A. migulanus and to provide insights into the secondary metabolite arsenal of the genus Aneurinibacillus. Up to eleven secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters were present in the three Aneurinibacillus species. Biosynthetic gene clusters specifying bacteriocins, microcins, non-ribosomal peptides, polyketides, terpenes, phosphonates, lasso peptides and linaridins were identified. Chitinolytic potential and iron metabolism regulation were also investigated. With increasing numbers of biocontrol bacterial genomes being sequenced and mined, the use of approaches similar to those described in this paper will lead to an increase in the numbers of environmentally friendly natural products available to use against plant diseases. PMID:26686620

  2. Nonribosomal Peptides, Key Biocontrol Components for Pseudomonas fluorescens In5, Isolated from a Greenlandic Suppressive Soil

    PubMed Central

    Michelsen, Charlotte F.; Watrous, Jeramie; Glaring, Mikkel A.; Kersten, Roland; Koyama, Nobuhiro

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Potatoes are cultivated in southwest Greenland without the use of pesticides and with limited crop rotation. Despite the fact that plant-pathogenic fungi are present, no severe-disease outbreaks have yet been observed. In this report, we document that a potato soil at Inneruulalik in southern Greenland is suppressive against Rhizoctonia solani Ag3 and uncover the suppressive antifungal mechanism of a highly potent biocontrol bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens In5, isolated from the suppressive potato soil. A combination of molecular genetics, genomics, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight (MALDI-TOF) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) revealed an antifungal genomic island in P. fluorescens In5 encoding two nonribosomal peptides, nunamycin and nunapeptin, which are key components for the biocontrol activity by strain In5 in vitro and in soil microcosm experiments. Furthermore, complex microbial behaviors were highlighted. Whereas nunamycin was demonstrated to inhibit the mycelial growth of R. solani Ag3, but not that of Pythium aphanidermatum, nunapeptin instead inhibited P. aphanidermatum but not R. solani Ag3. Moreover, the synthesis of nunamycin by P. fluorescens In5 was inhibited in the presence of P. aphanidermatum. Further characterization of the two peptides revealed nunamycin to be a monochlorinated 9-amino-acid cyclic lipopeptide with similarity to members of the syringomycin group, whereas nunapeptin was a 22-amino-acid cyclic lipopeptide with similarity to corpeptin and syringopeptin. PMID:25784695

  3. Potential Bio-Control Agent from Rhodomyrtus tomentosa against Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Odedina, Grace Fiyinfoluwa; Vongkamjan, Kitiya; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang Piyawan

    2015-09-07

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important foodborne pathogen implicated in many outbreaks of listeriosis. This study aimed at screening for the potential use of Rhodomyrtus tomentosa ethanolic leaf extract as a bio-control agent against L. monocytogenes. Twenty-two L. monocytogenes isolates were checked with 16 commercial antibiotics and isolates displayed resistance to 10 antibiotics. All the tested isolates were sensitive to the extract with inhibition zones ranging from 14 to 16 mm. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values ranged from 16 to 32 µg/mL and 128 to 512 µg/mL, respectively. Time-kill assay showed that the extract had remarkable bactericidal effects on L. monocytogenes. The extract at a concentration of 16 µg/mL reduced tolerance to 10% NaCl in L. monocytogenes in 4 h. Stationary phase L. monocytogenes cells were rapidly inactivated by greater than 3-log units within 30 min of contact time with R. tomentosa extract at 128 µg/mL. Electron microscopy revealed fragmentary bacteria with changes in the physical and morphological properties. Our study demonstrates the potential of the extract for further development into a bio-control agent in food to prevent the incidence of L. monocytogenes contamination.

  4. Systematics of the Trichoderma harzianum species complex and the re-identification of commercial biocontrol strains

    PubMed Central

    Jaklitsch, Walter; Gazis, Romina; Degenkolb, Thomas; Samuels, Gary J.

    2016-01-01

    Trichoderma harzianum is known as a cosmopolitan, ubiquitous species associated with a wide variety of substrates. It is possibly the most commonly used name in agricultural applications involving Trichoderma, including biological control of plant diseases. While various studies have suggested that T. harzianum is a species complex, only a few cryptic species are named. In the present study the taxonomy of the T. harzianum species complex is revised to include at least 14 species. Previously named species included in the complex are T. guizhouense, T. harzianum, and T. inhamatum. Two new combinations are proposed, T. lentiforme and T. lixii. Nine species are described as new, T. afarasin, T. afroharzianum, T. atrobrunneum, T. camerunense, T. endophyticum, T. neotropicale, T. pyramidale, T. rifaii and T. simmonsii. We isolated Trichoderma cultures from four commercial biocontrol products reported to contain T. harzianum. None of the biocontrol strains were identified as T. harzianum s. str. In addition, the widely applied culture ‘T. harzianum T22’ was determined to be T. afroharzianum. Some species in the T. harzianum complex appear to be exclusively endophytic, while others were only isolated from soil. Sexual states are rare. Descriptions and illustrations are provided. A secondary barcode, nuc translation elongation factor 1-α (TEF1) is needed to identify species in this complex. PMID:25661720

  5. Rhizoxin analogs contribute to the biocontrol activity of a newly isolated pseudomonas strain.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Kasumi; Noda, Naomi; Katayose, Yuichi; Mukai, Yoshiyuki; Numa, Hisataka; Yamada, Kosumi; Someya, Nobutaka

    2015-03-01

    Two strains of Pseudomonas sp., Os17 and St29, were newly isolated from the rhizosphere of rice and potato, respectively, by screening for 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol producers. These strains were found to be the same species and were the closest to but different from Pseudomonas protegens among the sequenced pseudomonads, based on 16S ribosomal RNA gene and whole-genome analyses. Strain Os17 was as effective a biocontrol agent as reported for P. protegens Cab57, whereas strain St29 was less effective. The whole-genome sequences of these strains were obtained: the genomes are organized into a single circular chromosome with 6,885,464 bp, 63.5% G+C content, and 6,195 coding sequences for strain Os17; and with 6,833,117 bp, 63.3% G+C content, and 6,217 coding sequences for strain St29. Comparative genome analysis of these strains revealed that the complete rhizoxin analog biosynthesis gene cluster (approximately 79 kb) found in the Os17 genome was absent from the St29 genome. In an rzxB mutant, which lacks the polyketide synthase essential for the production of rhizoxin analogs, the growth inhibition activity against fungal and oomycete pathogens and the plant protection efficacy were attenuated compared with those of wild-type Os17. These findings suggest that rhizoxin analogs are important biocontrol factors of this strain. PMID:25496595

  6. Biocontrol potential of Steinernema thermophilum and its symbiont Xenorhabdus indica against lepidopteran pests: virulence to egg and larval stages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Under laboratory conditions, the biocontrol potential of Steinernema thermophilum was tested against eggs and larval stages of two important lepidopteran insect pests, Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera litura (polyphagous pests), as well as Galleria mellonella (used as a model host) . In terms of ...

  7. Potential for bio-control of food-borne pathogens with Bacteriovorax spp. and implications for food safety

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteriovorax spp. (Bvx) are delta proteobacteria adapted to marine ecosystems where salinity concentration range from 1-3%. Due to their predation of Gram-negative bacteria, Bvx may have great potential for biocontrol of food-borne pathogens on fruits and leafy greens. The goal of this research was...

  8. Involvement of phenazines and biosurfactants in biocontrol of Pythium myriotylum root rot on cocoyam by Pseudomonas sp. CMR12A

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas sp. CMR12a was isolated from the rhizosphere of the tropical tuber crop cocoyam and produces both phenazines and cyclic lipopeptide (CLP) biosurfactants. CMR12a was shown to be an efficient biocontrol agent of P. myriotylum on cocoyam. To assess the importance of phenazine and biosurfact...

  9. Impacts of biocontrol products on Rhizoctonia disease of potato and soil microbial communities, and their persistence in soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four commercial biocontrol formulations (Bacillus subtilis GB03, Burkholderia ambifaria type Wisconsin isolate J82, Trichoderma virens Gl-21, and Trichoderma harzianum strain T-22), a chemical seed treatment (Topsin, mancozeb, and cymoxanil mixture, TMC), and a combination chemical/biological treatm...

  10. Intracellular trehalose and sorbitol synergistically promoting cell viability of a biocontrol yeast Pichia anomala for aflatoxin reduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pichia anomala WRL-076 was discovered by a visual screening bioassay for its antagonism against Aspergillus flavus. The yeast was shown to significantly inhibit aflatoxin production and the growth of A. flavus. P. anomala is a potential biocontrol agent for reduction of mycotoxin in the food chain...

  11. Combinations of Biocontrol Agents for Management of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes and Soilborne Plant-Pathogenic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Susan L. F.; Roberts, Daniel P.

    2002-01-01

    Numerous microbes are antagonistic to plant-parasitic nematodes and soilborne plant-pathogenic fungi, but few of these organisms are commercially available for management of these pathogens. Inconsistent performance of applied biocontrol agents has proven to be a primary obstacle to the development of successful commercial products. One of the strategies for overcoming inconsistent performance is to combine the disease-suppressive activity of two (or more) beneficial microbes in a biocontrol preparation. Such combinations have potential for more extensive colonization of the rhizosphere, more consistent expression of beneficial traits under a broad range of soil conditions, and antagonism to a larger number of plant pests or pathogens than strains applied individually. Conversely, microbes applied in combination also may have antagonistic interactions with each other. Increased, decreased, and unaltered suppression of the target pathogen or pest has been observed when biocontrol microbes have been applied in combination. Unfortunately, the ecological basis for increased or decreased suppression has not been determined in many cases and needs further consideration. The complexity of interactions involved in the application of multiple organisms for biological control has slowed progress toward development of successful formulations. However, this approach has potential for overcoming some of the efficacy problems that occur with application of individual biocontrol agents. PMID:19265899

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens LBUM636, a Strain with Biocontrol Capabilities against Late Blight of Potato

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Christopher K.; Novinscak, Amy; Gadkar, Vijay J.; Joly, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Herein provided is the full-genome sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens LBUM636. This strain is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) which produces phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, an antibiotic involved in the biocontrol of numerous plant pathogens, including late blight of potato caused by the plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans. PMID:27231373

  13. Survival of Salmonella enterica on soybean sprouts following treatments with gaseous chlorine dioxide and biocontrol Pseudomonas bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Control of Salmonella enterica on sprouts and minimally processed, ready-to-eat fruits and vegetables is important for food and consumer safety. The aim of this research was to assess the effects of gaseous chlorine dioxide(ClO2)and biocontrol microorganisms (Pseudomonas chlororaphis and P. fluoresc...

  14. Global changes in expression of grapefruit peel tissue in response to the yeast biocontrol agent, Metschnikowia fructicola

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To gain a better understanding of the molecular changes taking place in citrus fruit tissue following the application of the yeast biocontrol agent, Metschnikowia fructicola, microarray analysis was performed on grapefruit surface wounds using an Affymetrix Citrus GeneChip. Using a cut off of p<0.0...

  15. Potential of osmoadaptation for improving Pantoea agglomerans E325 as biocontrol agent for fire blight of apple and pear

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pantoea agglomerans biocontrol strain E325 is the active ingredient in a commercial product for fire blight, a destructive disease of apple and pear initiated by Erwinia amylovora in flowers. Osmoadaptation, involving the combination of saline osmotic stress and osmolyte amendment to growth media, w...

  16. Antifungal Activity of Isolated Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SYBC H47 for the Biocontrol of Peach Gummosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xunhang; Zhang, Yanzhou; Wei, Zhiwen; Guan, Zhengbing; Cai, Yujie; Liao, Xiangru

    2016-01-01

    The gummosis disease is caused by Botryosphaeria dothidea (Moug. ex. Fr) Ces. et de Not., and it is one of the most important diseases of stone fruits worldwide. The use of biocontrol as an alternative approach to synthetic chemical fungicides has aroused general concern about how to control plant diseases that are caused by phytopathogens. The aim of this study is to isolate Bacillus strains from raw honeys with the capacity to inhibit B. dothidea and to explore the mechanisms by which they could be used in the biocontrol of peach gummosis. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SYBC H47 was isolated and identified on the basis of its physiological and biochemical characteristics and its 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences. The cell suspension and the cell-free supernatant of its culture showed significant antifungal activity against Aspergillus niger, Mucor racemosus, Fusarium oxysporum, Penicillium citrinum, and Candida albicans by agar-diffusion assays. The primary antifungal substances were bacillomycin L, fengycin, and surfactin, which were analyzed by HPLC LC/ESI-MS/MS. Bacillomycin L showed the best inhibitory effect against conidial germination of B. dothidea, followed by fengycin and surfactin. Surfactin had limited effects on mycelial growth, contrary to those of bacillomycin L and fengycin. However, a mixture of the three lipopeptides had a synergistic effect that disrupted the structure of the conidia and mycelia. In order to reduce the production cost, the use of waste frying peanut oil and soy oil as the sole carbon source increased the lipopeptide yield levels by approximately 17% (2.42 g/L) and 110% (4.35 g/L), respectively. In a field trial, the decreases in the infected gummosis rate (IGR) and the disease severity index (DSI) through cell suspension treatments were 20% and 57.5% (in 2014), respectively, and 40% and 57.5% (in 2015), respectively, in comparison with the control. In conclusion, B. amyloliquefaciens SYBC H47 could inhibit the germination of conidia

  17. Antifungal Activity of Isolated Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SYBC H47 for the Biocontrol of Peach Gummosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanzhou; Wei, Zhiwen; Guan, Zhengbing; Cai, Yujie; Liao, Xiangru

    2016-01-01

    The gummosis disease is caused by Botryosphaeria dothidea (Moug. ex. Fr) Ces. et de Not., and it is one of the most important diseases of stone fruits worldwide. The use of biocontrol as an alternative approach to synthetic chemical fungicides has aroused general concern about how to control plant diseases that are caused by phytopathogens. The aim of this study is to isolate Bacillus strains from raw honeys with the capacity to inhibit B. dothidea and to explore the mechanisms by which they could be used in the biocontrol of peach gummosis. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SYBC H47 was isolated and identified on the basis of its physiological and biochemical characteristics and its 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences. The cell suspension and the cell-free supernatant of its culture showed significant antifungal activity against Aspergillus niger, Mucor racemosus, Fusarium oxysporum, Penicillium citrinum, and Candida albicans by agar-diffusion assays. The primary antifungal substances were bacillomycin L, fengycin, and surfactin, which were analyzed by HPLC LC/ESI-MS/MS. Bacillomycin L showed the best inhibitory effect against conidial germination of B. dothidea, followed by fengycin and surfactin. Surfactin had limited effects on mycelial growth, contrary to those of bacillomycin L and fengycin. However, a mixture of the three lipopeptides had a synergistic effect that disrupted the structure of the conidia and mycelia. In order to reduce the production cost, the use of waste frying peanut oil and soy oil as the sole carbon source increased the lipopeptide yield levels by approximately 17% (2.42 g/L) and 110% (4.35 g/L), respectively. In a field trial, the decreases in the infected gummosis rate (IGR) and the disease severity index (DSI) through cell suspension treatments were 20% and 57.5% (in 2014), respectively, and 40% and 57.5% (in 2015), respectively, in comparison with the control. In conclusion, B. amyloliquefaciens SYBC H47 could inhibit the germination of conidia

  18. Functional Investigation of a Non-coding Variant Associated with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis in Zebrafish: Elevated Expression of the Ladybird Homeobox Gene Causes Body Axis Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Long; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Kou, Ikuyo; Takimoto, Aki; Meguro-Horike, Makiko; Horike, Shin-ichi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Miura, Shigenori; Adachi, Taiji; Yamamoto, Takashi; Ikegawa, Shiro; Hiraki, Yuji; Shukunami, Chisa

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we identified an adolescent idiopathic scoliosis susceptibility locus near human ladybird homeobox 1 (LBX1) and FLJ41350 by a genome-wide association study. Here, we characterized the associated non-coding variant and investigated the function of these genes. A chromosome conformation capture assay revealed that the genome region with the most significantly associated single nucleotide polymorphism (rs11190870) physically interacted with the promoter region of LBX1-FLJ41350. The promoter in the direction of LBX1, combined with a 590-bp region including rs11190870, had higher transcriptional activity with the risk allele than that with the non-risk allele in HEK 293T cells. The ubiquitous overexpression of human LBX1 or either of the zebrafish lbx genes (lbx1a, lbx1b, and lbx2), but not FLJ41350, in zebrafish embryos caused body curvature followed by death prior to vertebral column formation. Such body axis deformation was not observed in transcription activator-like effector nucleases mediated knockout zebrafish of lbx1b or lbx2. Mosaic expression of lbx1b driven by the GATA2 minimal promoter and the lbx1b enhancer in zebrafish significantly alleviated the embryonic lethal phenotype to allow observation of the later onset of the spinal curvature with or without vertebral malformation. Deformation of the embryonic body axis by lbx1b overexpression was associated with defects in convergent extension, which is a component of the main axis-elongation machinery in gastrulating embryos. In embryos overexpressing lbx1b, wnt5b, a ligand of the non-canonical Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway, was significantly downregulated. Injection of mRNA for wnt5b or RhoA, a key downstream effector of Wnt/PCP signaling, rescued the defective convergent extension phenotype and attenuated the lbx1b-induced curvature of the body axis. Thus, our study presents a novel pathological feature of LBX1 and its zebrafish homologs in body axis deformation at various stages of

  19. Shallot aphids, Myzus ascalonicus, in strawberry: biocontrol potential of three predators and three parasitoids.

    PubMed

    Enkegaard, Annie; Sigsgaard, Lene; Kristensen, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    The parasitization capacity of 3 parasitoids and the predation capacity of 3 predators towards the shallot aphid, Myzus ascalonicus Doncaster (Homoptera: Aphididae), on strawberry, Fragaria x ananassa Duchesne (Rosales: Rosaceae) cv. Honeoye, were examined in laboratory experiments. In Petri dish assays, both Aphidius colemani Viereck (Hymenoptera: Aphidiidae) and A. ervi Haliday readily stung shallot aphids, with no significant difference in stinging frequency between the two species. A. ervi induced a significantly higher mortality (79.0 ± 7.2%) in terms of stung aphids compared with A. colemani (55.3 ± 4.1%); however, only a minor fraction (2.7 ± 1.8% and 7.1 ± 3.1%, respectively) of the killed aphids resulted in formation of mummies, presumably due to a physiological response to parasitism. The low percentage of mummification precludes the use of either Aphidius species in anything but inundative biocontrol. In similar set-ups, Aphelinus abdominalis (Dalman) (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) killed almost half (49.6 ± 5.3%) of the exposed aphids through host feeding. In addition, 23.2 ± 7.3% of non-host-fed aphids developed into mummified aphids, and 38.1 ± 13.2% of non-host-fed aphids died from other parasitoid-induced causes. However, the host feeding rate was reduced to only 1.2 ± 0.8%, and no significant parasitization mortality was observed on strawberry plants, suggesting that host plants interfered with A. abdominalis activity. This parasitoid does not, therefore, seem to be suited to either inoculative or inundative biocontrol of shallot aphids in strawberry. The three predators studied were the green lacewing, Chrysoperla carnea Steph. (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae), the two-spotted lady beetle, Adalia bipunctata L. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), and the gall midge Aphidoletes aphidimyza (Rondani) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae). Third instars of all 3 predators readily preyed upon the shallot aphid in Petri dish set-ups with significant differences in daily

  20. Production of a newly isolated Paenibacillus polymyxa biocontrol agent using monosodium glutamate wastewater and potato wastewater.

    PubMed

    Gu, Likun; Bai, Zhihui; Jin, Bo; Zhang, Jianyun; Li, Wenying; Zhuang, Guoqiang; Zhang, Hongxun

    2010-01-01

    A phyllosphere bacterial strain EBL-06 was isolated from wheat leaves. The morphology, cultural characteristics, phospholipid fatty acids, physiological and antagonistic fungus activities of this strain were investigated. A phylogenetic tree was constructed by comparing with the published 16S rDNA sequences of the relevant bacteria. The results showed that the isolate EBL-06 was a strain of Paenibacillus polymyxa; this strain performed a high level of antagonistic fungus activity toward a broad spectrum of phytopathogens, such as Botrytis cinerea, Cladosporium cucumerinum, Fusarium spp. The isolate EBL-06 can grow well using monosodium glutamate wastewater (MGW) and potato wastewater (PW) as culture medium. The maximum yield of 6.5 x 10(9) CFU/mL of the isolate EBL-06 anti-fungus biocontrol agent was reached in 15 hr cultivation at 28 degrees C, pH 6.0-7.5 using the mixture of MGW and PW (1:9).

  1. Synthesis of biocontrol macromolecules by derivative of chitosan with surfactin and antifungal evaluation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Bo; Xu, Pei-Yuan; Zhang, Yue-Ji; Wang, Pei-Pei; Yu, Hong; Jiang, Ji-Hong

    2014-05-01

    A derivative of chitosan was prepared with chitosan and β-cyclodextrins, which was synthesized by the immobilization reaction, as a carrier to adsorb surfactin produced from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and got biological macromolecules. The antifungal activity against three sapstain fungi by a combination of macromolecules was tested. The results showed that the macromolecules inhibited the mycelium growth of sapstain fungi Lasiodiplodia rubropurpurea, L. crassispora, and L. theobromae by about 73.22%, 76.72%, and 70.22%, respectively. The macromolecules were relatively thermally stable with more than 50% of the antifungal activity even after being held at 121°C for 30 min. Meanwhile, the activity of the macromolecules remained more than 55% at a pH value ranging from 4 to 12. The macromolecules were resistant to hydrolysis by most protein-denaturing detergents and other enzymes. The results indicated the macromolecules might provide an alternative bioresource for the bio-control of sapstain.

  2. Shallot aphids, Myzus ascalonicus, in strawberry: biocontrol potential of three predators and three parasitoids.

    PubMed

    Enkegaard, Annie; Sigsgaard, Lene; Kristensen, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    The parasitization capacity of 3 parasitoids and the predation capacity of 3 predators towards the shallot aphid, Myzus ascalonicus Doncaster (Homoptera: Aphididae), on strawberry, Fragaria x ananassa Duchesne (Rosales: Rosaceae) cv. Honeoye, were examined in laboratory experiments. In Petri dish assays, both Aphidius colemani Viereck (Hymenoptera: Aphidiidae) and A. ervi Haliday readily stung shallot aphids, with no significant difference in stinging frequency between the two species. A. ervi induced a significantly higher mortality (79.0 ± 7.2%) in terms of stung aphids compared with A. colemani (55.3 ± 4.1%); however, only a minor fraction (2.7 ± 1.8% and 7.1 ± 3.1%, respectively) of the killed aphids resulted in formation of mummies, presumably due to a physiological response to parasitism. The low percentage of mummification precludes the use of either Aphidius species in anything but inundative biocontrol. In similar set-ups, Aphelinus abdominalis (Dalman) (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) killed almost half (49.6 ± 5.3%) of the exposed aphids through host feeding. In addition, 23.2 ± 7.3% of non-host-fed aphids developed into mummified aphids, and 38.1 ± 13.2% of non-host-fed aphids died from other parasitoid-induced causes. However, the host feeding rate was reduced to only 1.2 ± 0.8%, and no significant parasitization mortality was observed on strawberry plants, suggesting that host plants interfered with A. abdominalis activity. This parasitoid does not, therefore, seem to be suited to either inoculative or inundative biocontrol of shallot aphids in strawberry. The three predators studied were the green lacewing, Chrysoperla carnea Steph. (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae), the two-spotted lady beetle, Adalia bipunctata L. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), and the gall midge Aphidoletes aphidimyza (Rondani) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae). Third instars of all 3 predators readily preyed upon the shallot aphid in Petri dish set-ups with significant differences in daily

  3. Selection rhizosphere-competent microbes for development of microbial products as biocontrol agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashinistova, A. V.; Elchin, A. A.; Gorbunova, N. V.; Muratov, V. S.; Kydralieva, K. A.; Khudaibergenova, B. M.; Shabaev, V. P.; Jorobekova, Sh. J.

    2009-04-01

    Rhizosphere-borne microorganisms reintroduced to the soil-root interface can establish without inducing permanent disturbance in the microbial balance and effectively colonise the rhizosphere due to carbon sources of plant root exudates. A challenge for future development of microbial products for use in agriculture will be selection of rhizosphere-competent microbes that both protect the plant from pathogens and improve crop establishment and persistence. In this study screening, collection, identification and expression of stable and technological microbial strains living in soils and in the rhizosphere of abundant weed - couch-grass Elytrigia repens L. Nevski were conducted. A total of 98 bacteria isolated from the rhizosphere were assessed for biocontrol activity in vitro against phytopathogenic fungi including Fusarium culmorum, Fusarium heterosporum, Fusarium oxysporum, Drechslera teres, Bipolaris sorokiniana, Piricularia oryzae, Botrytis cinerea, Colletothrichum atramentarium and Cladosporium sp., Stagonospora nodorum. Biocontrol activity were performed by the following methods: radial and parallel streaks, "host - pathogen" on the cuts of wheat leaves. A culture collection comprising 64 potential biocontrol agents (BCA) against wheat and barley root diseases has been established. Of these, the most effective were 8 isolates inhibitory to at least 4 out of 5 phytopathogenic fungi tested. The remaining isolates inhibited at least 1 of 5 fungi tested. Growth stimulating activity of proposed rhizobacteria-based preparations was estimated using seedling and vegetative pot techniques. Seeds-inoculation and the tests in laboratory and field conditions were conducted for different agricultural crops - wheat and barley. Intact cells, liquid culture filtrates and crude extracts of the four beneficial bacterial strains isolated from the rhizosphere of weed were studied to stimulate plant growth. As a result, four bacterial strains selected from rhizosphere of weed

  4. Isolation and identification of actinomycetes from a compost-amended soil with potential as biocontrol agents.

    PubMed

    Cuesta, Gonzalo; García-de-la-Fuente, Rosana; Abad, Manuel; Fornes, Fernando

    2012-03-01

    The search for new biocontrol strategies to inhibit the growth of phytopathogenic microorganisms has become widely widespread due to environmental concerns. Among actinomycetes, Streptomyces species have been extensively studied since they have been recognized as important sources of antibiotics. Actinomycete strains were isolated from a calcareous soil, 2 two-phase olive mill waste ('alperujo') composts, and the compost-amended soil by using selective media, and they were then co-cultured with 5 phytopathogenic fungi and 1 bacterium to perform an in vitro antagonism assay. Forty-nine actinomycete strains were isolated, 12 of them showing a great antagonistic activity towards the phytopathogenic microorganisms tested. Isolated strains were identified by 16S rDNA sequence analysis and phenotypic procedures. Eleven isolates concerned the genus Streptomyces and 1 actinomycete with chitinolytic activity belonged to the genus Lechevalieria. PMID:21190787

  5. Characterization of a new Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain NJ-15 as a potential biocontrol agent.

    PubMed

    Bano, Nazneen; Musarrat, Javed

    2003-05-01

    Phylogenetic characterization of soil isolate NJ-15, based on sequence homology of a partial 746-bp fragment of 16SrDNA amplicon, with the ribosomal database sequences (http://www.msu.edu/RDP/cgis/phylip.cgi), validated the strain as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The strain NJ-15 produced a substantial amount of indole acetic acid (IAA) in tryptophan-supplemented medium. Besides, the strain also exhibited significant production of both the siderophore and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) on chrome azurol S and King's B media, respectively. The data revealed lower HCN production under iron-limiting conditions vis-à-vis higher HCN release with iron stimulation. Significant growth inhibition of phytopathogenic fungi occurred in the order as Fusarium oxysporum > Trichoderma herizum > Alternaria alternata > Macrophomina phasiolina upon incubation with strain NJ-15 cells. Thus, the secondary metabolites producing new Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain NJ-15 exhibited innate potential of plant growth promotion and biocontrol activities in vitro.

  6. Shallot Aphids, Myzus ascalonicus, in Strawberry: Biocontrol Potential of Three Predators and Three Parasitoids

    PubMed Central

    Enkegaard, Annie; Sigsgaard, Lene; Kristensen, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    The parasitization capacity of 3 parasitoids and the predation capacity of 3 predators towards the shallot aphid, Myzus ascalonicus Doncaster (Homoptera: Aphididae), on strawberry, Fragaria x ananassa Duchesne (Rosales: Rosaceae) cv. Honeoye, were examined in laboratory experiments. In Petri dish assays, both Aphidius colemani Viereck (Hymenoptera: Aphidiidae) and A. ervi Haliday readily stung shallot aphids, with no significant difference in stinging frequency between the two species. A. ervi induced a significantly higher mortality (79.0 ± 7.2%) in terms of stung aphids compared with A. colemani (55.3 ± 4.1%); however, only a minor fraction (2.7 ± 1.8% and 7.1 ± 3.1%, respectively) of the killed aphids resulted in formation of mummies, presumably due to a physiological response to parasitism. The low percentage of mummification precludes the use of either Aphidius species in anything but inundative biocontrol. In similar set-ups, Aphelinus abdominalis (Dalman) (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) killed almost half (49.6 ± 5.3%) of the exposed aphids through host feeding. In addition, 23.2 ± 7.3% of non-host-fed aphids developed into mummified aphids, and 38.1 ± 13.2% of non-host-fed aphids died from other parasitoid-induced causes. However, the host feeding rate was reduced to only 1.2 ± 0.8%, and no significant parasitization mortality was observed on strawberry plants, suggesting that host plants interfered with A. abdominalis activity. This parasitoid does not, therefore, seem to be suited to either inoculative or inundative biocontrol of shallot aphids in strawberry. The three predators studied were the green lacewing, Chrysoperla carnea Steph. (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae), the two-spotted lady beetle, Adalia bipunctata L. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), and the gall midge Aphidoletes aphidimyza (Rondani) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae). Third instars of all 3 predators readily preyed upon the shallot aphid in Petri dish set-ups with significant differences in daily

  7. Synthesis of biocontrol macromolecules by derivative of chitosan with surfactin and antifungal evaluation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Bo; Xu, Pei-Yuan; Zhang, Yue-Ji; Wang, Pei-Pei; Yu, Hong; Jiang, Ji-Hong

    2014-05-01

    A derivative of chitosan was prepared with chitosan and β-cyclodextrins, which was synthesized by the immobilization reaction, as a carrier to adsorb surfactin produced from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and got biological macromolecules. The antifungal activity against three sapstain fungi by a combination of macromolecules was tested. The results showed that the macromolecules inhibited the mycelium growth of sapstain fungi Lasiodiplodia rubropurpurea, L. crassispora, and L. theobromae by about 73.22%, 76.72%, and 70.22%, respectively. The macromolecules were relatively thermally stable with more than 50% of the antifungal activity even after being held at 121°C for 30 min. Meanwhile, the activity of the macromolecules remained more than 55% at a pH value ranging from 4 to 12. The macromolecules were resistant to hydrolysis by most protein-denaturing detergents and other enzymes. The results indicated the macromolecules might provide an alternative bioresource for the bio-control of sapstain. PMID:24530369

  8. Interactions between conventional and organic farming for biocontrol services across the landscape.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, F J J A; Ives, A R; Schellhorn, N A

    2013-10-01

    While the area of organic crop production increases at a global scale, the potential interactions between pest management in organic and conventionally managed systems have so far received little attention. Here, we evaluate the landscape-level codependence of insecticide-based and natural enemy-based pest management using a simulation model for parasitoid-host interactions in landscapes consisting of conventionally and organically managed fields. In our simulations conventional management consists of broad-spectrum or selective insecticide application, while organic management involves no insecticides. Simulations indicate that insecticide use can easily result in lose-lose scenarios whereby both organically and conventionally managed fields suffer from increased pest loads as compared to a scenario where no insecticides are used, but that under some conditions insecticide use can be compatible with biocontrol. Simulations also suggest that the pathway to achieve the insecticide reduction without triggering additional pest pressure is not straightforward, because increasing the proportion of organically managed fields or reducing the spray frequency in conventional fields can potentially give rise to dramatic increases in pest load. The disruptive effect of insecticide use, however, can be mitigated by spatially clustering organic fields and using selective insecticides, although the effectiveness of this mitigation depends on the behavioral traits of the biocontrol agents. Poorly dispersing parasitoids and parasitoids with high attack rates required a lower amount of organically managed fields for effective pest suppression. Our findings show that the transition from a landscape dominated by conventionally managed crops to organic management has potential pitfalls; intermediate levels of organic management may lead to higher pest burdens than either low or high adoption of organic management.

  9. The importance of chorismate mutase in the biocontrol potential of Trichoderma parareesei

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Esclaudys; Rubio, M. Belén; Cardoza, Rosa E.; Gutiérrez, Santiago; Bettiol, Wagner; Monte, Enrique; Hermosa, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Species of Trichoderma exert direct biocontrol activity against soil-borne plant pathogens due to their ability to compete for nutrients and to inhibit or kill their targets through the production of antibiotics and/or hydrolytic enzymes. In addition to these abilities, Trichoderma spp. have beneficial effects for plants, including the stimulation of defenses and the promotion of growth. Here we study the role in biocontrol of the T. parareesei Tparo7 gene, encoding a chorismate mutase (CM), a shikimate pathway branch point leading to the production of aromatic amino acids, which are not only essential components of protein synthesis but also the precursors of a wide range of secondary metabolites. We isolated T. parareesei transformants with the Tparo7 gene silenced. Compared with the wild-type, decreased levels of Tparo7 expression in the silenced transformants were accompanied by reduced CM activity, lower growth rates on different culture media, and reduced mycoparasitic behavior against the phytopathogenic fungi Rhizoctonia solani, Fusarium oxysporum and Botrytis cinerea in dual cultures. By contrast, higher amounts of the aromatic metabolites tyrosol, 2-phenylethanol and salicylic acid were detected in supernatants from the silenced transformants, which were able to inhibit the growth of F. oxysporum and B. cinerea. In in vitro plant assays, Tparo7-silenced transformants also showed a reduced capacity to colonize tomato roots. The effect of Tparo7-silencing on tomato plant responses was examined in greenhouse assays. The growth of plants colonized by the silenced transformants was reduced and the plants exhibited an increased susceptibility to B. cinerea in comparison with the responses observed for control plants. In addition, the plants turned yellowish and were defective in jasmonic acid- and ethylene-regulated signaling pathways which was seen by expression analysis of lipoxygenase 1 (LOX1), ethylene-insensitive protein 2 (EIN2) and pathogenesis

  10. Biocontrol of geosmin-producing Streptomyces spp. by two Bacillus strains from Chinese liquor.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Yan; Wu, Qun; Du, Hai; Xu, Yan

    2016-08-16

    Streptomyces spp. producing geosmin have been regarded as the most frequent and serious microbial contamination causing earthy off-flavor in Chinese liquor. It is therefore necessary to control the Streptomyces community during liquor fermentation. Biological control, using the native microbiota present in liquor making, appears to be a better solution than chemical methods. The objective of this study was to isolate native microbiota antagonistic toward Streptomyces spp. and then to evaluate the possible action mode of the antagonists. Fourteen Bacillus strains isolated from different Daqu (the fermentation starter) showed antagonistic activity against Streptomyces sampsonii, which is one of the dominant geosmin producers. Bacillus subtilis 2-16 and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens 1-45 from Maotai Daqu significantly inhibited the growth of S. sampsonii by 57.8% and 84.3% respectively, and effectively prevented the geosmin production in the simulated fermentation experiments (inoculation ratio 1:1). To probe the biocontrol mode, the ability of strain 2-16 and 1-45 to produce antimicrobial metabolites and to reduce geosmin in the fermentation system was investigated. Antimicrobial substances were identified as lipopeptides by ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem electrospray ionization/quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI/Q-TOF MS) and in vitro antibiotic assay. In addition, strains 2-16 and 1-45 were able to remove 45% and 15% of the geosmin respectively in the simulated solid-state fermentation. This study highlighted the potential of biocontrol, and how the use of native Bacillus species in Daqu could provide an eco-friendly method to prevent growth of Streptomyces spp. and geosmin contamination in Chinese liquor fermentation. PMID:27161758

  11. A Novel Bacteriophage Targeting Cronobacter sakazakii Is a Potential Biocontrol Agent in Foods

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju-Hoon; Bai, Jaewoo; Shin, Hakdong; Kim, Yeran; Park, Bookyung; Heu, Sunggi

    2015-01-01

    Cronobacter sakazakii is an important pathogen that causes high mortality in infants. Due to its occasional antibiotic resistance, a bacteriophage approach might be an alternative effective method for the control of this pathogen. To develop a novel biocontrol agent using bacteriophages, the C. sakazakii-infecting phage CR5 was newly isolated and characterized. Interestingly, this phage exhibited efficient and relatively durable host lysis activity. In addition, a specific gene knockout study and subsequent complementation experiment revealed that this phage infected the host strain using the bacterial flagella. The complete genome sequence analysis of phage CR5 showed that its genome contains 223,989 bp of DNA, including 231 predicted open reading frames (ORFs), and it has a G+C content of 50.06%. The annotated ORFs were classified into six functional groups (structure, packaging, host lysis, DNA manipulation, transcription, and additional functions); no gene was found to be related to virulence or toxin or lysogen formation, but >80% of the predicted ORFs are unknown. In addition, a phage proteomic analysis using SDS-PAGE and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) revealed that seven phage structural proteins are indeed present, supporting the ORF predictions. To verify the potential of this phage as a biocontrol agent against C. sakazakii, it was added to infant formula milk contaminated with a C. sakazakii clinical isolate or food isolate, revealing complete growth inhibition of the isolates by the addition of phage CR5 when the multiplicity of infection (MOI) was 105. PMID:26497465

  12. The importance of chorismate mutase in the biocontrol potential of Trichoderma parareesei.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Esclaudys; Rubio, M Belén; Cardoza, Rosa E; Gutiérrez, Santiago; Bettiol, Wagner; Monte, Enrique; Hermosa, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Species of Trichoderma exert direct biocontrol activity against soil-borne plant pathogens due to their ability to compete for nutrients and to inhibit or kill their targets through the production of antibiotics and/or hydrolytic enzymes. In addition to these abilities, Trichoderma spp. have beneficial effects for plants, including the stimulation of defenses and the promotion of growth. Here we study the role in biocontrol of the T. parareesei Tparo7 gene, encoding a chorismate mutase (CM), a shikimate pathway branch point leading to the production of aromatic amino acids, which are not only essential components of protein synthesis but also the precursors of a wide range of secondary metabolites. We isolated T. parareesei transformants with the Tparo7 gene silenced. Compared with the wild-type, decreased levels of Tparo7 expression in the silenced transformants were accompanied by reduced CM activity, lower growth rates on different culture media, and reduced mycoparasitic behavior against the phytopathogenic fungi Rhizoctonia solani, Fusarium oxysporum and Botrytis cinerea in dual cultures. By contrast, higher amounts of the aromatic metabolites tyrosol, 2-phenylethanol and salicylic acid were detected in supernatants from the silenced transformants, which were able to inhibit the growth of F. oxysporum and B. cinerea. In in vitro plant assays, Tparo7-silenced transformants also showed a reduced capacity to colonize tomato roots. The effect of Tparo7-silencing on tomato plant responses was examined in greenhouse assays. The growth of plants colonized by the silenced transformants was reduced and the plants exhibited an increased susceptibility to B. cinerea in comparison with the responses observed for control plants. In addition, the plants turned yellowish and were defective in jasmonic acid- and ethylene-regulated signaling pathways which was seen by expression analysis of lipoxygenase 1 (LOX1), ethylene-insensitive protein 2 (EIN2) and pathogenesis

  13. Identification of bacteriophages for biocontrol of the kiwifruit canker phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae.

    PubMed

    Frampton, Rebekah A; Taylor, Corinda; Holguín Moreno, Angela V; Visnovsky, Sandra B; Petty, Nicola K; Pitman, Andrew R; Fineran, Peter C

    2014-04-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae is a reemerging pathogen which causes bacterial canker of kiwifruit (Actinidia sp.). Since 2008, a global outbreak of P. syringae pv. actinidiae has occurred, and in 2010 this pathogen was detected in New Zealand. The economic impact and the development of resistance in P. syringae pv. actinidiae and other pathovars against antibiotics and copper sprays have led to a search for alternative management strategies. We isolated 275 phages, 258 of which were active against P. syringae pv. actinidiae. Extensive host range testing on P. syringae pv. actinidiae, other pseudomonads, and bacteria isolated from kiwifruit orchards showed that most phages have a narrow host range. Twenty-four were analyzed by electron microscopy, pulse-field gel electrophoresis, and restriction digestion. Their suitability for biocontrol was tested by assessing stability and the absence of lysogeny and transduction. A detailed host range was performed, phage-resistant bacteria were isolated, and resistance to other phages was examined. The phages belonged to the Caudovirales and were analyzed based on morphology and genome size, which showed them to be representatives of Myoviridae, Podoviridae, and Siphoviridae. Twenty-one Myoviridae members have similar morphologies and genome sizes yet differ in restriction patterns, host range, and resistance, indicating a closely related group. Nine of these Myoviridae members were sequenced, and each was unique. The most closely related sequenced phages were a group infecting Pseudomonas aeruginosa and characterized by phages JG004 and PAK_P1. In summary, this study reports the isolation and characterization of P. syringae pv. actinidiae phages and provides a framework for the intelligent formulation of phage biocontrol agents against kiwifruit bacterial canker. PMID:24487530

  14. Hard Surface Biocontrol in Hospitals Using Microbial-Based Cleaning Products

    PubMed Central

    Vandini, Alberta; Temmerman, Robin; Frabetti, Alessia; Caselli, Elisabetta; Antonioli, Paola; Balboni, Pier Giorgio; Platano, Daniela; Branchini, Alessio; Mazzacane, Sante

    2014-01-01

    Background Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAIs) are one of the most frequent complications occurring in healthcare facilities. Contaminated environmental surfaces provide an important potential source for transmission of many healthcare-associated pathogens, thus indicating the need for new and sustainable strategies. Aim This study aims to evaluate the effect of a novel cleaning procedure based on the mechanism of biocontrol, on the presence and survival of several microorganisms responsible for HAIs (i.e. coliforms, Staphyloccus aureus, Clostridium difficile, and Candida albicans) on hard surfaces in a hospital setting. Methods The effect of microbial cleaning, containing spores of food grade Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus pumilus and Bacillus megaterium, in comparison with conventional cleaning protocols, was evaluated for 24 weeks in three independent hospitals (one in Belgium and two in Italy) and approximately 20000 microbial surface samples were collected. Results Microbial cleaning, as part of the daily cleaning protocol, resulted in a reduction of HAI-related pathogens by 50 to 89%. This effect was achieved after 3–4 weeks and the reduction in the pathogen load was stable over time. Moreover, by using microbial or conventional cleaning alternatively, we found that this effect was directly related to the new procedure, as indicated by the raise in CFU/m2 when microbial cleaning was replaced by the conventional procedure. Although many questions remain regarding the actual mechanisms involved, this study demonstrates that microbial cleaning is a more effective and sustainable alternative to chemical cleaning and non-specific disinfection in healthcare facilities. Conclusions This study indicates microbial cleaning as an effective strategy in continuously lowering the number of HAI-related microorganisms on surfaces. The first indications on the actual level of HAIs in the trial hospitals monitored on a continuous basis are very promising, and may pave the

  15. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi: potential biocontrol agents against the damaging root hemiparasite Pedicularis kansuensis?

    PubMed

    Sui, Xiao-Lin; Li, Ai-Rong; Chen, Yan; Zhuo, Lu; Liu, Yan-Yan

    2014-04-01

    Spatial expansion of root hemiparasitic Pedicularis kansuensis in Bayanbulak Grassland of Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region (China) has caused great loss of herbage yield and has threatened the local livestock industry. Current management practices using manual eradication and chemical control have been proved problematic. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi have been suggested to be potential biocontrol agents against a number of plant pests, but experimental evidence is lacking against weedy P. kansuensis. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that inoculation with AM fungi will cause growth depression in P. kansuensis and reduce its damage to host plants. Based on the confirmation of AM status and host community of the hemiparasite in the field, a pot cultivation experiment was conducted to test the influence of an AM fungus (Glomus mosseae) on growth of P. kansuensis and the parasitized host (Elymus nutans). AM colonization was observed in roots of P. kansuensis, but the levels were much lower than those of its adjacent host species. A negative correlation between AM levels and the numbers of haustoria was detected for the field samples of the hemiparasite. Strong suppression of haustorium formation, a significant reduction in plant dry weight (DW), as well as marked reduction in the survival rate of P. kansuensis after inoculation with AM fungi was observed. In contrast, inoculation with G. mosseae increased root DW and whole plant DW of parasitized host plants. Our findings demonstrated significantly repressive effects of AM fungi on growth performance of P. kansuensis with and without the presence of a host. The potential of AM fungi as biocontrol agents against the damaging hemiparasite was confirmed.

  16. Genome Sequencing and Comparative Analysis of the Biocontrol Agent Trichoderma harzianum sensu stricto TR274

    SciTech Connect

    Steindorff, Andrei S.; Noronha, Elilane F.; Ulhoa, Cirano J.; Kuo, Alan; Salamov, Asaf A.; Haridas, Sajeet; Riley, Robert W.; Druzhinina, Irina S.; Kubicek, Christian P.; Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2015-03-17

    Biological control is a complex process which requires many mechanisms and a high diversity of biochemical pathways. The species of Trichoderma harzianum are well known for their biocontrol activity against many plant pathogens. To gain new insights into the biocontrol mechanism used by T. harzianum, we sequenced the isolate TR274 genome using Illumina. The assembly was performed using AllPaths-LG with a maximum coverage of 100x. The assembly resulted in 2282 contigs with a N50 of 37033bp. The genome size generated was 40.8 Mb and the GC content was 47.7%, similar to other Trichoderma genomes. Using the JGI Annotation Pipeline we predicted 13,932 genes with a high transcriptome support. CEGMA tests suggested 100% genome completeness and 97.9% of RNA-SEQ reads were mapped to the genome. The phylogenetic comparison using orthologous proteins with all Trichoderma genomes sequenced at JGI, corroborates the Trichoderma (T. asperellum and T. atroviride), Longibrachiatum (T. reesei and T. longibrachiatum) and Pachibasium (T. harzianum and T. virens) section division described previously. The comparison between two Trichoderma harzianum species suggests a high genome similarity but some strain-specific expansions. Analyses of the secondary metabolites, CAZymes, transporters, proteases, transcription factors were performed. The Pachybasium section expanded virtually all categories analyzed compared with the other sections, specially Longibrachiatum section, that shows a clear contraction. These results suggests that these proteins families have an important role in their respective phenotypes. Future analysis will improve the understanding of this complex genus and give some insights about its lifestyle and the interactions with the environment.

  17. CHARACTERIZATION AND BIOCONTROL POTENT OF STREPTOMYCES SP. ISOLATED FROM THE RHIZOSPHERE OF ONONIS ANGUSTISSIMA LAM.

    PubMed

    Ghadbane, M; Belhadj, H; Medjekal, S; Harzallah, D

    2015-01-01

    A total of 40 actinomycetes isolated from rhizosphere soils of Ononis angustissima Lam. were in vitro tested for their antagonism against deferent pathogenic microorganisms by streak assay. Among the isolates, four (21, 2A26, 1B10 and 2C34) present a potent antagonism against both pathogenic bacteria and fungi, they were selected, identified by 16S rDNA sequence analysis and phenotypic properties, and tested for their antimicrobial activity as well as their biocontrol potential against Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) pathogenic fungus (Fusarium oxysporum). Cultural characteristic studies strongly suggested that these strains belong to the genus Streptomyces. The four Streptomyces sp., solubilize phosphate and produce extracellular fungal cell-wall degrading enzymes chitinase and protease, as well as a marked production of acid-β-indole acetic (AIA). The nucleotide sequence of the 16S rRNA gene of Streptomyces sp. strains 21, 2A26, 1B10 and 2C34 exhibited close similarity (62-75%) with Streptomyces parvulus MARS 16S rRNA genes. The inhibition was higher against fungi and Gram+ bacteria, while Gram- bacteria were less inhibited. The growth of the plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium oxysporum was considerably inhibited in the presence of the strains 21, 2A26, 1B10 and 2C34 culture supernatant. These studies revealed that the presence of the Streptomyces strains in the soil significantly promoted the growth of the Chickpea plants. These results indicate that the Streptomyces strains isolated for rhizosphere from Ononis angustissima Lam. growing in arid conditions in southern Algeria (Sahara) could be an interesting source for antimicrobial bioactive substances and as biocontrol agents.

  18. Native isolate of Trichoderma: a biocontrol agent with unique stress tolerance properties.

    PubMed

    Mishra, N; Khan, S S; Sundari, S Krishna

    2016-08-01

    Species of Trichoderma are widely recognized for their biocontrol abilities, but seldom studied collectively, for their plant growth promotion, abiotic stress tolerance and bioremediation properties. Our study is a concentrated effort to establish the potential of native isolate Trichoderma harzianum KSNM (T103) to tolerate biotic (root pathogens) and abiotic stresses [high salt (100-1000 mM); heavy metal (chromium, nickel and zinc: 1-10 mM); pesticides: malathion (100-600 ppm), carbofuran (100-600 ppb)], along with its ability to support plant growth. In vitro growth promotion assays with T103 treated Vigna radiata, Vigna mungo and Hordeum vulgare confirmed 'non-species specific' growth promotion effects of T103. At lower metal concentration, T103 treatment was found to completely negate the impact of metal stress [60 % increase in radicle length (RL) with no significant decrease in %germination (%G)]. Even at 10 mM metal, T103 inoculation gave 80 % increase in %G and >50 % increase in RL. In vitro experiments confirmed high metal reduction capacity (47 %-Cr, 35 %-Ni and 42 %-Zn) of T103 at concentrations as high as 4 mM. At maximum residual concentrations of malathion (440 ppm) and carbofuran (100 ppb) reported in agricultural soils, T103 maintained 80 and 100 % survivability, respectively. T103 treatment has improved %G and RL in all three hosts challenged with pesticide. Isolate T103 was found to effectively suppress growth of three major root pathogens: Macrophomina phaseolina (65.83 %) followed by Sclerotium rolfsii (19.33 %) and Fusarium oxysporum (19.18 %). In the light of these observations, native T. harzianum (T103) seems to be a competent biocontrol agent for tropical agricultural soils contaminated with residual pesticides and heavy metals.

  19. The importance of chorismate mutase in the biocontrol potential of Trichoderma parareesei.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Esclaudys; Rubio, M Belén; Cardoza, Rosa E; Gutiérrez, Santiago; Bettiol, Wagner; Monte, Enrique; Hermosa, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Species of Trichoderma exert direct biocontrol activity against soil-borne plant pathogens due to their ability to compete for nutrients and to inhibit or kill their targets through the production of antibiotics and/or hydrolytic enzymes. In addition to these abilities, Trichoderma spp. have beneficial effects for plants, including the stimulation of defenses and the promotion of growth. Here we study the role in biocontrol of the T. parareesei Tparo7 gene, encoding a chorismate mutase (CM), a shikimate pathway branch point leading to the production of aromatic amino acids, which are not only essential components of protein synthesis but also the precursors of a wide range of secondary metabolites. We isolated T. parareesei transformants with the Tparo7 gene silenced. Compared with the wild-type, decreased levels of Tparo7 expression in the silenced transformants were accompanied by reduced CM activity, lower growth rates on different culture media, and reduced mycoparasitic behavior against the phytopathogenic fungi Rhizoctonia solani, Fusarium oxysporum and Botrytis cinerea in dual cultures. By contrast, higher amounts of the aromatic metabolites tyrosol, 2-phenylethanol and salicylic acid were detected in supernatants from the silenced transformants, which were able to inhibit the growth of F. oxysporum and B. cinerea. In in vitro plant assays, Tparo7-silenced transformants also showed a reduced capacity to colonize tomato roots. The effect of Tparo7-silencing on tomato plant responses was examined in greenhouse assays. The growth of plants colonized by the silenced transformants was reduced and the plants exhibited an increased susceptibility to B. cinerea in comparison with the responses observed for control plants. In addition, the plants turned yellowish and were defective in jasmonic acid- and ethylene-regulated signaling pathways which was seen by expression analysis of lipoxygenase 1 (LOX1), ethylene-insensitive protein 2 (EIN2) and pathogenesis

  20. Biocontrol of geosmin-producing Streptomyces spp. by two Bacillus strains from Chinese liquor.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Yan; Wu, Qun; Du, Hai; Xu, Yan

    2016-08-16

    Streptomyces spp. producing geosmin have been regarded as the most frequent and serious microbial contamination causing earthy off-flavor in Chinese liquor. It is therefore necessary to control the Streptomyces community during liquor fermentation. Biological control, using the native microbiota present in liquor making, appears to be a better solution than chemical methods. The objective of this study was to isolate native microbiota antagonistic toward Streptomyces spp. and then to evaluate the possible action mode of the antagonists. Fourteen Bacillus strains isolated from different Daqu (the fermentation starter) showed antagonistic activity against Streptomyces sampsonii, which is one of the dominant geosmin producers. Bacillus subtilis 2-16 and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens 1-45 from Maotai Daqu significantly inhibited the growth of S. sampsonii by 57.8% and 84.3% respectively, and effectively prevented the geosmin production in the simulated fermentation experiments (inoculation ratio 1:1). To probe the biocontrol mode, the ability of strain 2-16 and 1-45 to produce antimicrobial metabolites and to reduce geosmin in the fermentation system was investigated. Antimicrobial substances were identified as lipopeptides by ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem electrospray ionization/quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI/Q-TOF MS) and in vitro antibiotic assay. In addition, strains 2-16 and 1-45 were able to remove 45% and 15% of the geosmin respectively in the simulated solid-state fermentation. This study highlighted the potential of biocontrol, and how the use of native Bacillus species in Daqu could provide an eco-friendly method to prevent growth of Streptomyces spp. and geosmin contamination in Chinese liquor fermentation.

  1. Native isolate of Trichoderma: a biocontrol agent with unique stress tolerance properties.

    PubMed

    Mishra, N; Khan, S S; Sundari, S Krishna

    2016-08-01

    Species of Trichoderma are widely recognized for their biocontrol abilities, but seldom studied collectively, for their plant growth promotion, abiotic stress tolerance and bioremediation properties. Our study is a concentrated effort to establish the potential of native isolate Trichoderma harzianum KSNM (T103) to tolerate biotic (root pathogens) and abiotic stresses [high salt (100-1000 mM); heavy metal (chromium, nickel and zinc: 1-10 mM); pesticides: malathion (100-600 ppm), carbofuran (100-600 ppb)], along with its ability to support plant growth. In vitro growth promotion assays with T103 treated Vigna radiata, Vigna mungo and Hordeum vulgare confirmed 'non-species specific' growth promotion effects of T103. At lower metal concentration, T103 treatment was found to completely negate the impact of metal stress [60 % increase in radicle length (RL) with no significant decrease in %germination (%G)]. Even at 10 mM metal, T103 inoculation gave 80 % increase in %G and >50 % increase in RL. In vitro experiments confirmed high metal reduction capacity (47 %-Cr, 35 %-Ni and 42 %-Zn) of T103 at concentrations as high as 4 mM. At maximum residual concentrations of malathion (440 ppm) and carbofuran (100 ppb) reported in agricultural soils, T103 maintained 80 and 100 % survivability, respectively. T103 treatment has improved %G and RL in all three hosts challenged with pesticide. Isolate T103 was found to effectively suppress growth of three major root pathogens: Macrophomina phaseolina (65.83 %) followed by Sclerotium rolfsii (19.33 %) and Fusarium oxysporum (19.18 %). In the light of these observations, native T. harzianum (T103) seems to be a competent biocontrol agent for tropical agricultural soils contaminated with residual pesticides and heavy metals. PMID:27339311

  2. Identification of Bacteriophages for Biocontrol of the Kiwifruit Canker Phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae

    PubMed Central

    Frampton, Rebekah A.; Taylor, Corinda; Holguín Moreno, Angela V.; Visnovsky, Sandra B.; Petty, Nicola K.; Pitman, Andrew R.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae is a reemerging pathogen which causes bacterial canker of kiwifruit (Actinidia sp.). Since 2008, a global outbreak of P. syringae pv. actinidiae has occurred, and in 2010 this pathogen was detected in New Zealand. The economic impact and the development of resistance in P. syringae pv. actinidiae and other pathovars against antibiotics and copper sprays have led to a search for alternative management strategies. We isolated 275 phages, 258 of which were active against P. syringae pv. actinidiae. Extensive host range testing on P. syringae pv. actinidiae, other pseudomonads, and bacteria isolated from kiwifruit orchards showed that most phages have a narrow host range. Twenty-four were analyzed by electron microscopy, pulse-field gel electrophoresis, and restriction digestion. Their suitability for biocontrol was tested by assessing stability and the absence of lysogeny and transduction. A detailed host range was performed, phage-resistant bacteria were isolated, and resistance to other phages was examined. The phages belonged to the Caudovirales and were analyzed based on morphology and genome size, which showed them to be representatives of Myoviridae, Podoviridae, and Siphoviridae. Twenty-one Myoviridae members have similar morphologies and genome sizes yet differ in restriction patterns, host range, and resistance, indicating a closely related group. Nine of these Myoviridae members were sequenced, and each was unique. The most closely related sequenced phages were a group infecting Pseudomonas aeruginosa and characterized by phages JG004 and PAK_P1. In summary, this study reports the isolation and characterization of P. syringae pv. actinidiae phages and provides a framework for the intelligent formulation of phage biocontrol agents against kiwifruit bacterial canker. PMID:24487530

  3. CHARACTERIZATION AND BIOCONTROL POTENT OF STREPTOMYCES SP. ISOLATED FROM THE RHIZOSPHERE OF ONONIS ANGUSTISSIMA LAM.

    PubMed

    Ghadbane, M; Belhadj, H; Medjekal, S; Harzallah, D

    2015-01-01

    A total of 40 actinomycetes isolated from rhizosphere soils of Ononis angustissima Lam. were in vitro tested for their antagonism against deferent pathogenic microorganisms by streak assay. Among the isolates, four (21, 2A26, 1B10 and 2C34) present a potent antagonism against both pathogenic bacteria and fungi, they were selected, identified by 16S rDNA sequence analysis and phenotypic properties, and tested for their antimicrobial activity as well as their biocontrol potential against Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) pathogenic fungus (Fusarium oxysporum). Cultural characteristic studies strongly suggested that these strains belong to the genus Streptomyces. The four Streptomyces sp., solubilize phosphate and produce extracellular fungal cell-wall degrading enzymes chitinase and protease, as well as a marked production of acid-β-indole acetic (AIA). The nucleotide sequence of the 16S rRNA gene of Streptomyces sp. strains 21, 2A26, 1B10 and 2C34 exhibited close similarity (62-75%) with Streptomyces parvulus MARS 16S rRNA genes. The inhibition was higher against fungi and Gram+ bacteria, while Gram- bacteria were less inhibited. The growth of the plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium oxysporum was considerably inhibited in the presence of the strains 21, 2A26, 1B10 and 2C34 culture supernatant. These studies revealed that the presence of the Streptomyces strains in the soil significantly promoted the growth of the Chickpea plants. These results indicate that the Streptomyces strains isolated for rhizosphere from Ononis angustissima Lam. growing in arid conditions in southern Algeria (Sahara) could be an interesting source for antimicrobial bioactive substances and as biocontrol agents. PMID:27141751

  4. [Evaluation of Trichoderma spp. as antagonist of Rhizoctonia solani in vitro and as biocontrol of greenhouse tomato plants].

    PubMed

    Durman, S; Menendez, A; Godeas, A

    1999-01-01

    Five Trichoderma isolates were compared in their ability for controlling Rhizoctonia solani attack to tomato plants in greenhouse and as antagonists of this pathogen in three independent laboratory assays. Four out of five isolates showed biocontrol ability and decreased pathogen growth and survival of its sclerotia in soil. Results suggest that dual cultures in Petri dishes and mycoparasitism assays against R. solani sclerotia may be useful for detecting isolates effective as biological control agents against this pathogen in tomato plants. PMID:10327455

  5. Improvement of the fungal biocontrol agent Trichoderma atroviride to enhance both antagonism and induction of plant systemic disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Kurt; Zeilinger, Susanne; Ciliento, Rosalia; Woo, Sheridian L; Lorito, Matteo; Kubicek, Christian P; Mach, Robert L

    2005-07-01

    Biocontrol agents generally do not perform well enough under field conditions to compete with chemical fungicides. We determined whether transgenic strain SJ3-4 of Trichoderma atroviride, which expresses the Aspergillus niger glucose oxidase-encoding gene, goxA, under a homologous chitinase (nag1) promoter had increased capabilities as a fungal biocontrol agent. The transgenic strain differed only slightly from the wild-type in sporulation or the growth rate. goxA expression occurred immediately after contact with the plant pathogen, and the glucose oxidase formed was secreted. SJ3-4 had significantly less N-acetylglucosaminidase and endochitinase activities than its nontransformed parent. Glucose oxidase-containing culture filtrates exhibited threefold-greater inhibition of germination of spores of Botrytis cinerea. The transgenic strain also more quickly overgrew and lysed the plant pathogens Rhizoctonia solani and Pythium ultimum. In planta, SJ3-4 had no detectable improved effect against low inoculum levels of these pathogens. Beans planted in heavily infested soil and treated with conidia of the transgenic Trichoderma strain germinated, but beans treated with wild-type spores did not germinate. SJ3-4 also was more effective in inducing systemic resistance in plants. Beans with SJ3-4 root protection were highly resistant to leaf lesions caused by the foliar pathogen B. cinerea. This work demonstrates that heterologous genes driven by pathogen-inducible promoters can increase the biocontrol and systemic resistance-inducing properties of fungal biocontrol agents, such as Trichoderma spp., and that these microbes can be used as vectors to provide plants with useful molecules (e.g., glucose oxidase) that can increase their resistance to pathogens.

  6. Research on biodeterioration of wood, 1987-1992. 1. Decay mechanisms and biocontrol. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Highley, T.L.; Clausen, C.A.; Croan, S.C.; Green, F.; Illman, B.L.

    1994-03-01

    Growing concerns about the environment present an urgent need for new approaches to preserving wood. Some commonly used preservatives have been banned or restricted in several countries. The research paper first describes current knowledge about how white-and-brown rot fungi decay wood and then delineates research in to problem areas: (1) control of wood decay through targeting biosynthetic and degradative pathways, and (2) biological control (biocontrol) of wood decay through non-decay micro-organisms.

  7. GFP technology for the study of biocontrol agents in tritrophic interactions: a case study with Pseudozyma flocculosa.

    PubMed

    Neveu, Bertrand; Labbé, Caroline; Bélanger, Richard R

    2007-02-01

    GFP technology was applied to the biocontrol agent (BCA) Pseudozyma flocculosa to study its development and interactions at the tritrophic level plant-powdery mildew-BCA. Transformation experiments with GFP led to the production of a strongly fluorescent strain, Act-4, that displayed biocontrol traits typical of P. flocculosa WT. Following inundative applications, growth of P. flocculosa Act-4 was closely and almost exclusively associated with the colonies of the pathogen regardless of the powdery mildew species or the host plant tested. Development of P. flocculosa Act-4 on control leaves alone was extremely limited 24 h after its application and was typical of the epiphytic growth characterizing this type of yeast-like fungus. Based on the strong correlation between the colonization pattern of the different powdery mildew species tested and the presence of P. flocculosa Act-4, as determined by its fluorescence, it seems that growth of the BCA is dependant on the presence of powdery mildews. These results demonstrate that the GFP technology can be used to study plant-pathogen-BCA interactions and fulfill a wide array of purposes ranging from fundamental observations of the biocontrol behavior of a BCA to very applied ones serving some of the requirements for the registration of BCA's such as defining their environmental fate. PMID:17028024

  8. Integrated effect of gamma radiation and biocontrol agent on quality parameters of apple fruit: An innovative commercial preservation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahari Mostafavi, Hossein; Mahyar Mirmajlessi, Seyed; Fathollahi, Hadi; Shahbazi, Samira; Mohammad Mirjalili, Seyed

    2013-10-01

    Effects of gamma irradiation and biocontrol agent (Pseudomonas fluorescens) on the physico-chemical parameters (including moisture, total soluble solids, antioxidant activity, phenolic content and firmness) of cv. Golden Delicious apples were investigated for their ability to avoid the post-harvest blue mold caused by Penicillium expansum during cold storage. Freshly harvested apples were inoculated with P. expansum. Treated fruits were irradiated at doses of 0, 200, 400, 600 and 800 Gy and then inoculated with P. fluorescens suspension. Samples were evaluated at 3 month intervals. The results demonstrated a clear link between antioxidant activity and phenolic content, so that dose range of 200-400 Gy significantly increased phenolic content and antioxidant activity. Effect of P. fluorescens was similar to irradiation at 200 and 400 Gy that could prevent lesion diameter in pathogen-treated apples. As dose and storage time increased firmness decreased but, combination of P. fluorescens as well as irradiation (at 200-400 Gy) could decrease softening apple fruits during storage. In all parameters, P. fluorescens (as biocontrol agent) inhibited P. expansum similar to irradiation at 200-400 Gy. So, integrated treatment of irradiation and biocontrol agent explored the potential dual benefit of low doses (200 and 400 Gy) as a suitable method to sustain physico-chemical quality and conclusively reduce apple fruits losses during post-harvest preservation.

  9. Biocontrol of Alternaria alternata on cherry tomato fruit by use of marine yeast Rhodosporidium paludigenum Fell & Tallman.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yifei; Bao, Yihong; Shen, Danhong; Feng, Wu; Yu, Ting; Zhang, Jia; Zheng, Xiao Dong

    2008-04-30

    The basidiomycetous yeast Rhodosporidium paludigenum Fell & Tallman isolated from the south of East China Sea was evaluated for its activity in reducing postharvest decay of cherry tomatoes caused by Alternaria alternata in vitro and in vivo tests. The results showed that washed cell suspension of R. paludigenum provided better control of A. alternata than any other treatment, while the autoclaved cell culture failed to provide protection against the pathogen. The concentration of antagonist had significant effect on biocontrol effectiveness in vivo: when the concentration of the washed yeast cell suspension was used at 1 x 10(9)cells/ml, the percentage rate of black rot of cherry tomato fruit was only 37%, which was remarkably lower than that treated with water (the control) after 5days of incubation at 25 degrees C. Furthermore, a great biocontrol efficacy of R. paludigenum was observed when it was applied prior to inoculation with A. alternata: the longer the incubation time of R. paludigenum, the lower disease incidence would be. However, there was little efficacy when R. paludigenum was applied after A. alternata inoculation. In addition, on the wounds of cherry tomato, it was observed that R. paludigenum grew rapidly increasing 50-fold during the first 12h at 25 degrees C. To the best of our knowledge, this is a first report concerning that the marine yeast R. paludigenum could be used as a biocontrol agent of postharvest fungal disease.

  10. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Pseudomonas chlororaphis PCL1606 Reveals New Insight into Antifungal Compounds Involved in Biocontrol.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Claudia E; Ramos, Cayo; de Vicente, Antonio; Cazorla, Francisco M

    2015-03-01

    Pseudomonas chlororaphis PCL1606 is a rhizobacterium that has biocontrol activity against many soilborne phytopathogenic fungi. The whole genome sequence of this strain was obtained using the Illumina Hiseq 2000 sequencing platform and was assembled using SOAP denovo software. The resulting 6.66-Mb complete sequence of the PCL1606 genome was further analyzed. A comparative genomic analysis using 10 plant-associated strains within the fluorescent Pseudomonas group, including the complete genome of P. chlororaphis PCL1606, revealed a diverse spectrum of traits involved in multitrophic interactions with plants and microbes as well as biological control. Phylogenetic analysis of these strains using eight housekeeping genes clearly placed strain PCL1606 into the P. chlororaphis group. The genome sequence of P. chlororaphis PCL1606 revealed the presence of sequences that were homologous to biosynthetic genes for the antifungal compounds 2-hexyl, 5-propyl resorcinol (HPR), hydrogen cyanide, and pyrrolnitrin; this is the first report of pyrrolnitrin encoding genes in this P. chlororaphis strain. Single-, double-, and triple-insertional mutants in the biosynthetic genes of each antifungal compound were used to test their roles in the production of these antifungal compounds and in antagonism and biocontrol of two fungal pathogens. The results confirmed the function of HPR in the antagonistic phenotype and in the biocontrol activity of P. chlororaphis PCL1606.

  11. Biocontrol of blue and gray mold diseases of pear fruit by integration of antagonistic yeast with salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ting; Chen, Jishuang; Chen, Rongle; Huang, Bin; Liu, Donghong; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2007-05-30

    This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of the biocontrol yeast Cryptococcus laurentii and salicylic acid (SA) in suppressing the blue and gray mould rots in pear fruit and to explore possible mode of action involved. Our results showed that the combined treatment of pear fruit with C. laurentii with SA at 100 microg ml(-1) resulted in a remarkably improved control of Penicillium expansum and Botrytis cinerea infections, including the pre-inoculated P. expansum, in comparison with the application of C. laurentii or SA alone. The biocontrol yeast C. laurentii proliferated rapidly within the first 24 h of incubation in pear fruit wounds. Although SA at 100 microg ml(-1) neither affected the population growth of C. laurentii nor directly inhibited the blue mold when the inoculation concentrations of P. expansum were above 5 x 10(2) spore per ml in vivo, it induced the fruit resistance to the blue and gray mold rots when the time interval between SA treatment and pathogens inoculation was more than 48 h, being associated with a rapid and strong activation of the peroxidase activity in pear fruit. Thus we assume that SA may be regarded as a secondary defense line in a combination of C. laurentii and SA, which could reinforce the biocontrol efficacy of C. laurentii by induction of the fruit natural resistance.

  12. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Pseudomonas chlororaphis PCL1606 Reveals New Insight into Antifungal Compounds Involved in Biocontrol.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Claudia E; Ramos, Cayo; de Vicente, Antonio; Cazorla, Francisco M

    2015-03-01

    Pseudomonas chlororaphis PCL1606 is a rhizobacterium that has biocontrol activity against many soilborne phytopathogenic fungi. The whole genome sequence of this strain was obtained using the Illumina Hiseq 2000 sequencing platform and was assembled using SOAP denovo software. The resulting 6.66-Mb complete sequence of the PCL1606 genome was further analyzed. A comparative genomic analysis using 10 plant-associated strains within the fluorescent Pseudomonas group, including the complete genome of P. chlororaphis PCL1606, revealed a diverse spectrum of traits involved in multitrophic interactions with plants and microbes as well as biological control. Phylogenetic analysis of these strains using eight housekeeping genes clearly placed strain PCL1606 into the P. chlororaphis group. The genome sequence of P. chlororaphis PCL1606 revealed the presence of sequences that were homologous to biosynthetic genes for the antifungal compounds 2-hexyl, 5-propyl resorcinol (HPR), hydrogen cyanide, and pyrrolnitrin; this is the first report of pyrrolnitrin encoding genes in this P. chlororaphis strain. Single-, double-, and triple-insertional mutants in the biosynthetic genes of each antifungal compound were used to test their roles in the production of these antifungal compounds and in antagonism and biocontrol of two fungal pathogens. The results confirmed the function of HPR in the antagonistic phenotype and in the biocontrol activity of P. chlororaphis PCL1606. PMID:25679537

  13. Augmentative Biocontrol in Natural Marine Habitats: Persistence, Spread and Non-Target Effects of the Sea Urchin Evechinus chloroticus

    PubMed Central

    Atalah, Javier; Hopkins, Grant A.; Forrest, Barrie M.

    2013-01-01

    Augmentative biocontrol aims to control established pest populations through enhancement of their indigenous enemies. To our knowledge, this approach has not been applied at an operational scale in natural marine habitats, in part because of the perceived risk of adverse non-target effects on native ecosystems. In this paper, we focus on the persistence, spread and non-target effects of the sea urchin Evechinus chloroticus when used as biocontrol agent to eradicate an invasive kelp from Fiordland, New Zealand. Rocky reef macrobenthic assemblages were monitored over 17 months in areas where the indigenous algal canopy was either removed or left intact prior to the translocation of a large number of urchins (>50 ind.·m−2). Urchin densities in treated areas significantly declined ∼9 months after transplant, and began spreading to adjacent sites. At the end of the 17-month study, densities had declined to ∼5 ind.·m−2. Compared to controls, treatment sites showed persistent shifts from kelp forest to urchin barrens, which were accompanied by significant reductions in taxa richness. Although these non-target effects were pronounced, they were considered to be localised and reversible, and arguably outweigh the irreversible and more profound ecological impacts associated with the establishment of an invasive species in a region of high conservation value. Augmentative biocontrol, used in conjunction with traditional control methods, represents a promising tool for the integrated management of marine pests. PMID:24260376

  14. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi for the Biocontrol of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes: A Review of the Mechanisms Involved

    PubMed Central

    Schouteden, Nele; De Waele, Dirk; Panis, Bart; Vos, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are obligate root symbionts that can protect their host plant against biotic stress factors such as plant-parasitic nematode (PPN) infection. PPN consist of a wide range of species with different life styles that can cause major damage in many important crops worldwide. Various mechanisms have been proposed to play a role in the biocontrol effect of AMF against PPN. This review presents an overview of the different mechanisms that have been proposed, and discusses into more detail the plausibility of their involvement in the biocontrol against PPN specifically. The proposed mechanisms include enhanced plant tolerance, direct competition for nutrients and space, induced systemic resistance (ISR) and altered rhizosphere interactions. Recent studies have emphasized the importance of ISR in biocontrol and are increasingly placing rhizosphere effects on the foreground as well, both of which will be the focal point of this review. Though AMF are not yet widely used in conventional agriculture, recent data help to develop a better insight into the modes of action, which will eventually lead toward future field applications of AMF against PPN. The scientific community has entered an exciting era that provides the tools to actually unravel the underlying molecular mechanisms, making this a timely opportunity for a review of our current knowledge and the challenges ahead. PMID:26635750

  15. [Colonization characteristics of endophytic bacteria NJ13 in Panax ginseng and its biocontrol efficiency against Alternaria leaf spot of ginseng].

    PubMed

    Chen, Chang-Qing; Li, Tong; Li, Xin-Lian; Jiang, Yun; Tian, Lei; Xu, Peng

    2014-05-01

    To reveal the colonization characteristics in host of endophytic biocontrol bacteria NJ13 isolated from Panax ginseng, this study obtained the marked strain NJ13-R which was double antibiotic resistant to rifampicin and streptomycin through enhancing the method of inducing antibiotic. The colonization characteristics in ginseng and its biocontrol efficiency against Alternaria spot of ginseng in the field were studied. The results showed that the strain could colonize in root, stem and leaf of ginseng and the colonization amount was positive correlated with inoculation concentration. Meanwhile, the strain could infect and then transfer in different tissues of ginseng The colonization amount of strain in roots and leaves of ginseng increased first and then decreased. However, the tendency of colonization amount of strain in stems was ascend at first and then descend slowly, and was more than that in roots and leaves along with time, which had a preference to specific tissue of its host. In field experiment, the endophytic bacteria NJ13 was proved to be effective in controlling Alternaria leaf spot of ginseng. The biocontrol efficiency of fermentation broth at the concentration of 0.76 x 10(8) cfu x mL(-1) reached 75.62%, which was close to the controlling level (73.06%) of 0.67 mg x L(-1) 50% cyprodinil WG.

  16. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi for the Biocontrol of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes: A Review of the Mechanisms Involved.

    PubMed

    Schouteden, Nele; De Waele, Dirk; Panis, Bart; Vos, Christine M

    2015-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are obligate root symbionts that can protect their host plant against biotic stress factors such as plant-parasitic nematode (PPN) infection. PPN consist of a wide range of species with different life styles that can cause major damage in many important crops worldwide. Various mechanisms have been proposed to play a role in the biocontrol effect of AMF against PPN. This review presents an overview of the different mechanisms that have been proposed, and discusses into more detail the plausibility of their involvement in the biocontrol against PPN specifically. The proposed mechanisms include enhanced plant tolerance, direct competition for nutrients and space, induced systemic resistance (ISR) and altered rhizosphere interactions. Recent studies have emphasized the importance of ISR in biocontrol and are increasingly placing rhizosphere effects on the foreground as well, both of which will be the focal point of this review. Though AMF are not yet widely used in conventional agriculture, recent data help to develop a better insight into the modes of action, which will eventually lead toward future field applications of AMF against PPN. The scientific community has entered an exciting era that provides the tools to actually unravel the underlying molecular mechanisms, making this a timely opportunity for a review of our current knowledge and the challenges ahead. PMID:26635750

  17. ppGpp controlled by the Gac/Rsm regulatory pathway sustains biocontrol activity in Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Kasumi; Yamada, Kosumi; Haas, Dieter

    2012-11-01

    In Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0 and other fluorescent pseudomonads, the Gac/Rsm signal transduction pathway is instrumental for secondary metabolism and biocontrol of root pathogens via the expression of regulatory small RNAs (sRNAs). Furthermore, in strain CHA0, an imbalance in the Krebs cycle can affect the strain's ability to produce extracellular secondary metabolites, including biocontrol factors. Here, we report the metabolome of wild-type CHA0, a gacA-negative mutant, which has lost Gac/Rsm activities, and a retS-negative mutant, which shows strongly enhanced Gac/Rsm-dependent activities. Capillary electrophoresis-based metabolomic profiling revealed that the gacA and retS mutations had opposite effects on the intracellular levels of a number of central metabolites, suggesting that the Gac/Rsm pathway regulates not only secondary metabolism but also primary metabolism in strain CHA0. Among the regulated metabolites identified, the alarmone guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp) was characterized in detail by the construction of relA (for ppGpp synthase) and spoT (for ppGpp synthase/hydrolase) deletion mutants. In a relA spoT double mutant, ppGpp synthesis was completely abolished, the expression of Rsm sRNAs was attenuated, and physiological functions such as antibiotic production, root colonization, and plant protection were markedly diminished. Thus, ppGpp appears to be essential for sustaining epiphytic fitness and biocontrol activity of strain CHA0.

  18. Augmentative biocontrol in natural marine habitats: persistence, spread and non-target effects of the sea urchin Evechinus chloroticus.

    PubMed

    Atalah, Javier; Hopkins, Grant A; Forrest, Barrie M

    2013-01-01

    Augmentative biocontrol aims to control established pest populations through enhancement of their indigenous enemies. To our knowledge, this approach has not been applied at an operational scale in natural marine habitats, in part because of the perceived risk of adverse non-target effects on native ecosystems. In this paper, we focus on the persistence, spread and non-target effects of the sea urchin Evechinus chloroticus when used as biocontrol agent to eradicate an invasive kelp from Fiordland, New Zealand. Rocky reef macrobenthic assemblages were monitored over 17 months in areas where the indigenous algal canopy was either removed or left intact prior to the translocation of a large number of urchins (>50 ind.·m(-2)). Urchin densities in treated areas significantly declined ∼9 months after transplant, and began spreading to adjacent sites. At the end of the 17-month study, densities had declined to ∼5 ind.·m(-2). Compared to controls, treatment sites showed persistent shifts from kelp forest to urchin barrens, which were accompanied by significant reductions in taxa richness. Although these non-target effects were pronounced, they were considered to be localised and reversible, and arguably outweigh the irreversible and more profound ecological impacts associated with the establishment of an invasive species in a region of high conservation value. Augmentative biocontrol, used in conjunction with traditional control methods, represents a promising tool for the integrated management of marine pests.

  19. RpoN (sigma54) controls production of antifungal compounds and biocontrol activity in Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0.

    PubMed

    Péchy-Tarr, Maria; Bottiglieri, Mélanie; Mathys, Sophie; Lejbølle, Kirsten Bang; Schnider-Keel, Ursula; Maurhofer, Monika; Keel, Christoph

    2005-03-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0 is an effective biocontrol agent of root diseases caused by fungal pathogens. The strain produces the antibiotics 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG) and pyoluteorin (PLT) that make essential contributions to pathogen suppression. This study focused on the role of the sigma factor RpoN (sigma54) in regulation of antibiotic production and biocontrol activity in P. fluorescens. An rpoN in-frame-deletion mutant of CHAO had a delayed growth, was impaired in the utilization of several carbon and nitrogen sources, and was more sensitive to salt stress. The rpoN mutant was defective for flagella and displayed drastically reduced swimming and swarming motilities. Interestingly, the rpoN mutant showed a severalfold enhanced production of DAPG and expression of the biosynthetic gene phlA compared with the wild type and the mutant complemented with monocopy rpoN+. By contrast, loss of RpoN function resulted in markedly lowered PLT production and plt gene expression, suggesting that RpoN controls the balance of the two antibiotics in strain CHA0. In natural soil microcosms, the rpoN mutant was less effective in protecting cucumber from a root rot caused by Pythium ultimum. Remarkably, the mutant was not significantly impaired in its root colonization capacity, even at early stages of root infection by Pythium spp. Taken together, our results establish RpoN for the first time as a major regulator of biocontrol activity in Pseudomonas fluorescens.

  20. Biocontrol of avocado dematophora root rot by antagonistic Pseudomonas fluorescens PCL1606 correlates with the production of 2-hexyl 5-propyl resorcinol.

    PubMed

    Cazorla, Francisco M; Duckett, Simon B; Bergström, Ed T; Noreen, Sadaf; Odijk, Roeland; Lugtenberg, Ben J J; Thomas-Oates, Jane E; Bloemberg, Guido V

    2006-04-01

    A collection of 905 bacterial isolates from the rhizospheres of healthy avocado trees was obtained and screened for antagonistic activity against Dematophora necatrix, the cause of avocado Dematophora root rot (also called white root rot). A set of eight strains was selected on the basis of growth inhibitory activity against D. necatrix and several other important soilborne phytopathogenic fungi. After typing of these strains, they were classified as belonging to Pseudomonas chlororaphis, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Pseudomonas putida. The eight antagonistic Pseudomonas spp. were analyzed for their secretion of hydrogen cyanide, hydrolytic enzymes, and antifungal metabolites. P. chlororaphis strains produced the antibiotic phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and phenazine-1-carboxamide. Upon testing the biocontrol ability of these strains in a newly developed avocado-D. necatrix test system and in a tomato-F oxysporum test system, it became apparent that P. fluorescens PCL1606 exhibited the highest biocontrol ability. The major antifungal activity produced by strain P. fluorescens PCL1606 did not correspond to any of the major classes of antifungal antibiotics produced by Pseudomonas biocontrol strains. This compound was purified and subsequently identified as 2-hexyl 5-propyl resorcinol (HPR). To study the role of HPR in biocontrol activity, two Tn5 mutants of P. fluorescens PCL1606 impaired in antagonistic activity were selected. These mutants were shown to impair HRP production and showed a decrease in biocontrol activity. As far as we know, this is the first report of a Pseudomonas biocontrol strain that produces HPR in which the production of this compound correlates with its biocontrol activity.

  1. Nontarget herbivory by a weed biocontrol insect is limited to spillover, reducing the chance of population-level impacts.

    PubMed

    Catton, Haley A; Lalonde, Robert G; De Clerck-Floate, Rosemarie A

    2015-03-01

    Insects approved for classical biocontrol of weeds are often capable of using close relatives of their target weed for feeding, oviposition, or larval development, with reduced preference and performance. When nontarget herbivory occurs and is suspected to reduce survival, growth, or fecundity of individual plants, and insects are capable of reproducing on their nontarget host, characterization of spatial and temporal patterns of the occurrence and intensity of herbivory is valuable for predicting potential population-level effects. Here, we perform a novel post-release manipulative field experiment with a root-feeding biocontrol weevil, Mogulones crucifer, released in Canada to control the rangeland weed Cynoglossum officinale, to test for its ability to establish on the nontarget plant Hackelia micrantha. After Cynoglossum, M. crucifer exhibits its highest preference for and performance on Hackelia spp. We released M. crucifer on Canadian rangeland sites with naturally occurring populations of H. micrantha growing interspersed with the target weed or in the near absence of the target weed. Adult weevil feeding on surrounding plants was monitored for three summers after release (years 0, 1, and 2), and, subsequently, subsets of plants were destructively sampled to determine M. crucifer oviposition levels. Additional oviposition and larval development data were obtained from seven non-experimental sites where weevils were released zero, three, or four years earlier. M. crucifer was not detected on experimental sites without C. officinale after two years, and nontarget herbivory was restricted to rare, low-level spillover. Visible evidence of adult herbivory (i.e., scars on shoots) was associated with oviposition in 90% of targets but only 30% of nontarget plants. We infer, through ecological refuge theory, that nontarget population-level impacts from M. crucifer spillover are unlikely because of temporal, spatial, and probabilistic refuges from herbivory, and make

  2. Comparative transcriptome analysis of the biocontrol strain Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 as response to biofilm formation analyzed by RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Kröber, Magdalena; Verwaaijen, Bart; Wibberg, Daniel; Winkler, Anika; Pühler, Alfred; Schlüter, Andreas

    2016-08-10

    The strain Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 is a plant growth promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) and biocontrol agent known to keep infections of lettuce (Lactuca sativa) by the phytopathogen Rhizoctonia solani down. Several mechanisms, including the production of secondary metabolites possessing antimicrobial properties and induction of the host plant's systemic resistance (ISR), were proposed to explain the biocontrol effect of the strain. B. amyloliquefaciens FZB42 is able to form plaques (biofilm-like structures) on plant roots and this feature was discussed to be associated with its biocontrol properties. For this reason, formation of B. amyloliquefaciens biofilms was studied at the transcriptional level using high-throughput sequencing of whole transcriptome cDNA libraries from cells grown under biofilm-forming conditions vs. planktonic growth. Comparison of the transcriptional profiles of B. amyloliquefaciens FZB42 under these growth conditions revealed a common set of highly transcribed genes mostly associated with basic cellular functions. The lci gene, encoding an antimicrobial peptide (AMP), was among the most highly transcribed genes of cells under both growth conditions suggesting that AMP production may contribute to biocontrol. In contrast, gene clusters coding for synthesis of secondary metabolites with antimicrobial properties were only moderately transcribed and not induced in biofilm-forming cells. Differential gene expression revealed that 331 genes were significantly up-regulated and 230 genes were down-regulated in the transcriptome of B. amyloliquefaciens FZB42 under biofilm-forming conditions in comparison to planktonic cells. Among the most highly up-regulated genes, the yvqHI operon, coding for products involved in nisin (class I bacteriocin) resistance, was identified. In addition, an operon whose products play a role in fructosamine metabolism was enhanced in its transcription. Moreover, genes involved in the production of the extracellular

  3. The Potential Use of Wolbachia-Based Mosquito Biocontrol Strategies for Japanese Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, Claire L; Walker, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a zoonotic pathogen transmitted by the infectious bite of Culex mosquitoes. The virus causes the development of the disease Japanese encephalitis (JE) in a small proportion of those infected, predominantly affecting children in eastern and southern Asia. Annual JE incidence estimates range from 50,000-175,000, with 25%-30% of cases resulting in mortality. It is estimated that 3 billion people live in countries in which JEV is endemic. The virus exists in an enzootic transmission cycle, with mosquitoes transmitting JEV between birds as reservoir hosts and pigs as amplifying hosts. Zoonotic infection occurs as a result of spillover events from the main transmission cycle. The reservoir avian hosts include cattle egrets, pond herons, and other species of water birds belonging to the family Ardeidae. Irrigated rice fields provide an ideal breeding ground for mosquitoes and attract migratory birds, maintaining the transmission of JEV. Although multiple vaccines have been developed for JEV, they are expensive and require multiple doses to maintain efficacy and immunity. As humans are a "dead-end" host for the virus, vaccination of the human population is unlikely to result in eradication. Therefore, vector control of the principal mosquito vector, Culex tritaeniorhynchus, represents a more promising strategy for reducing transmission. Current vector control strategies include intermittent irrigation of rice fields and space spraying of insecticides during outbreaks. However, Cx. Tritaeniorhynchus is subject to heavy exposure to pesticides in rice fields, and as a result, insecticide resistance has developed. In recent years, significant advancements have been made in the potential use of the bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia for mosquito biocontrol. The successful transinfection of Wolbachia strains from Drosophila flies to Aedes (Stegomyia) mosquitoes has resulted in the generation of "dengue-refractory" mosquito lines. The successful

  4. The Potential Use of Wolbachia-Based Mosquito Biocontrol Strategies for Japanese Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Jeffries, Claire L.; Walker, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a zoonotic pathogen transmitted by the infectious bite of Culex mosquitoes. The virus causes the development of the disease Japanese encephalitis (JE) in a small proportion of those infected, predominantly affecting children in eastern and southern Asia. Annual JE incidence estimates range from 50,000–175,000, with 25%–30% of cases resulting in mortality. It is estimated that 3 billion people live in countries in which JEV is endemic. The virus exists in an enzootic transmission cycle, with mosquitoes transmitting JEV between birds as reservoir hosts and pigs as amplifying hosts. Zoonotic infection occurs as a result of spillover events from the main transmission cycle. The reservoir avian hosts include cattle egrets, pond herons, and other species of water birds belonging to the family Ardeidae. Irrigated rice fields provide an ideal breeding ground for mosquitoes and attract migratory birds, maintaining the transmission of JEV. Although multiple vaccines have been developed for JEV, they are expensive and require multiple doses to maintain efficacy and immunity. As humans are a “dead-end” host for the virus, vaccination of the human population is unlikely to result in eradication. Therefore, vector control of the principal mosquito vector, Culex tritaeniorhynchus, represents a more promising strategy for reducing transmission. Current vector control strategies include intermittent irrigation of rice fields and space spraying of insecticides during outbreaks. However, Cx. Tritaeniorhynchus is subject to heavy exposure to pesticides in rice fields, and as a result, insecticide resistance has developed. In recent years, significant advancements have been made in the potential use of the bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia for mosquito biocontrol. The successful transinfection of Wolbachia strains from Drosophila flies to Aedes (Stegomyia) mosquitoes has resulted in the generation of “dengue-refractory” mosquito lines

  5. Characterization of Biocontrol Traits in Heterorhabditis floridensis: A Species with Broad Temperature Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro-Ilan, David I.; Blackburn, Dana; Duncan, Larry; El-Borai, Fahiem E.; Koppenhöfer, Heather; Tailliez, Patrick; Adams, Byron J.

    2014-01-01

    Biological characteristics of two strains of the entomopathogenic nematode, Heterorhabditis floridensis (332 isolated in Florida and K22 isolated in Georgia) were described. The identity of the nematode’s symbiotic bacteria was elucidated and found to be Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. luminescens. Beneficial traits pertinent to biocontrol (environmental tolerance and virulence) were characterized. The range of temperature tolerance in the H. floridensis strains was broad and showed a high level of heat tolerance. The H. floridensis strains caused higher mortality or infection in G. mellonella at 30°C and 35°C compared with S. riobrave (355), a strain widely known to be heat tolerant, and the H. floridensis strains were also capable of infecting at 17°C whereas S. riobrave (355) was not. However, at higher temperatures (37°C and 39°C), though H. floridensis readily infected G. mellonella, S. riobrave strains caused higher levels of mortality. Desiccation tolerance in H. floridensis was similar to Heterorhabditis indica (Hom1) and S. riobrave (355) and superior to S. feltiae (SN). H. bacteriophora (Oswego) and S. carpocapsae (All) exhibited higher desiccation tolerance than the H. floridensis strains. The virulence of H. floridensis to four insect pests (Aethina tumida, Conotrachelus nenuphar, Diaprepes abbreviatus, and Tenebrio molitor) was determined relative to seven other nematodes: H. bacteriophora (Oswego), H. indica (Hom1), S. carpocapsae (All), S. feltiae (SN), S. glaseri (4-8 and Vs strains), and S. riobrave (355). Virulence to A. tumida was similar among the H. floridensis strains and other nematodes except S. glaseri (Vs), S. feltiae, and S. riobrave failed to cause higher mortality than the control. Only H. bacteriophora, H. indica, S. feltiae, S. riobrave, and S. glaseri (4-8) caused higher mortality than the control in C. nenuphar. All nematodes were pathogenic to D. abbreviatus though S. glaseri (4-8) and S. riobrave (355) were the most

  6. Environmental Factors Modulating Antibiotic and Siderophore Biosynthesis by Pseudomonas fluorescens Biocontrol Strains

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Brion K.; Défago, Geneviève

    1999-01-01

    Understanding the environmental factors that regulate the biosynthesis of antimicrobial compounds by disease-suppressive strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens is an essential step toward improving the level and reliability of their biocontrol activity. We used liquid culture assays to identify several minerals and carbon sources which had a differential influence on the production of the antibiotics 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (PHL), pyoluteorin (PLT), and pyrrolnitrin and the siderophores salicylic acid and pyochelin by the model strain CHA0, which was isolated from a natural disease-suppressive soil in Switzerland. Production of PHL was stimulated by Zn2+, NH4Mo2+, and glucose; the precursor compound mono-acetylphloroglucinol was stimulated by the same factors as PHL. Production of PLT was stimulated by Zn2+, Co2+, and glycerol but was repressed by glucose. Pyrrolnitrin production was increased by fructose, mannitol, and a mixture of Zn2+ and NH4Mo2+. Pyochelin production was increased by Co2+, fructose, mannitol, and glucose. Interestingly, production of its precursor salicylic acid was increased by different factors, i.e., NH4Mo2+, glycerol, and glucose. The mixture of Zn2+ and NH4Mo2+ with fructose, mannitol, or glycerol further enhanced the production of PHL and PLT compared with either the minerals or the carbon sources used alone, but it did not improve siderophore production. Extending fermentation time from 2 to 5 days increased the accumulation of PLT, pyrrolnitrin, and pyochelin but not of PHL. When findings with CHA0 were extended to an ecologically and genetically diverse collection of 41 P. fluorescens biocontrol strains, the effect of certain factors was strain dependent, while others had a general effect. Stimulation of PHL by Zn2+ and glucose was strain dependent, whereas PLT production by all strains that can produce this compound was stimulated by Zn2+ and transiently repressed by glucose. Inorganic phosphate reduced PHL production by CHA0 and seven

  7. The Potential Use of Wolbachia-Based Mosquito Biocontrol Strategies for Japanese Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, Claire L; Walker, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a zoonotic pathogen transmitted by the infectious bite of Culex mosquitoes. The virus causes the development of the disease Japanese encephalitis (JE) in a small proportion of those infected, predominantly affecting children in eastern and southern Asia. Annual JE incidence estimates range from 50,000-175,000, with 25%-30% of cases resulting in mortality. It is estimated that 3 billion people live in countries in which JEV is endemic. The virus exists in an enzootic transmission cycle, with mosquitoes transmitting JEV between birds as reservoir hosts and pigs as amplifying hosts. Zoonotic infection occurs as a result of spillover events from the main transmission cycle. The reservoir avian hosts include cattle egrets, pond herons, and other species of water birds belonging to the family Ardeidae. Irrigated rice fields provide an ideal breeding ground for mosquitoes and attract migratory birds, maintaining the transmission of JEV. Although multiple vaccines have been developed for JEV, they are expensive and require multiple doses to maintain efficacy and immunity. As humans are a "dead-end" host for the virus, vaccination of the human population is unlikely to result in eradication. Therefore, vector control of the principal mosquito vector, Culex tritaeniorhynchus, represents a more promising strategy for reducing transmission. Current vector control strategies include intermittent irrigation of rice fields and space spraying of insecticides during outbreaks. However, Cx. Tritaeniorhynchus is subject to heavy exposure to pesticides in rice fields, and as a result, insecticide resistance has developed. In recent years, significant advancements have been made in the potential use of the bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia for mosquito biocontrol. The successful transinfection of Wolbachia strains from Drosophila flies to Aedes (Stegomyia) mosquitoes has resulted in the generation of "dengue-refractory" mosquito lines. The successful

  8. Characterization of Biocontrol Traits in Heterorhabditis floridensis: A Species with Broad Temperature Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Shapiro-Ilan, David I; Blackburn, Dana; Duncan, Larry; El-Borai, Fahiem E; Koppenhöfer, Heather; Tailliez, Patrick; Adams, Byron J

    2014-12-01

    Biological characteristics of two strains of the entomopathogenic nematode, Heterorhabditis floridensis (332 isolated in Florida and K22 isolated in Georgia) were described. The identity of the nematode's symbiotic bacteria was elucidated and found to be Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. luminescens. Beneficial traits pertinent to biocontrol (environmental tolerance and virulence) were characterized. The range of temperature tolerance in the H. floridensis strains was broad and showed a high level of heat tolerance. The H. floridensis strains caused higher mortality or infection in G. mellonella at 30°C and 35°C compared with S. riobrave (355), a strain widely known to be heat tolerant, and the H. floridensis strains were also capable of infecting at 17°C whereas S. riobrave (355) was not. However, at higher temperatures (37°C and 39°C), though H. floridensis readily infected G. mellonella, S. riobrave strains caused higher levels of mortality. Desiccation tolerance in H. floridensis was similar to Heterorhabditis indica (Hom1) and S. riobrave (355) and superior to S. feltiae (SN). H. bacteriophora (Oswego) and S. carpocapsae (All) exhibited higher desiccation tolerance than the H. floridensis strains. The virulence of H. floridensis to four insect pests (Aethina tumida, Conotrachelus nenuphar, Diaprepes abbreviatus, and Tenebrio molitor) was determined relative to seven other nematodes: H. bacteriophora (Oswego), H. indica (Hom1), S. carpocapsae (All), S. feltiae (SN), S. glaseri (4-8 and Vs strains), and S. riobrave (355). Virulence to A. tumida was similar among the H. floridensis strains and other nematodes except S. glaseri (Vs), S. feltiae, and S. riobrave failed to cause higher mortality than the control. Only H. bacteriophora, H. indica, S. feltiae, S. riobrave, and S. glaseri (4-8) caused higher mortality than the control in C. nenuphar. All nematodes were pathogenic to D. abbreviatus though S. glaseri (4-8) and S. riobrave (355) were the most virulent

  9. Ecology of Anti-Biofilm Agents II: Bacteriophage Exploitation and Biocontrol of Biofilm Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Abedon, Stephen T.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages are the viruses of bacteria. In the guise of phage therapy they have been used for decades to successfully treat what are probable biofilm-containing chronic bacterial infections. More recently, phage treatment or biocontrol of biofilm bacteria has been brought back to the laboratory for more rigorous assessment as well as towards the use of phages to combat environmental biofilms, ones other than those directly associated with bacterial infections. Considered in a companion article is the inherent ecological utility of bacteriophages versus antibiotics as anti-biofilm agents. Discussed here is a model for phage ecological interaction with bacteria as they may occur across biofilm-containing ecosystems. Specifically, to the extent that individual bacterial types are not highly abundant within biofilm-containing environments, then phage exploitation of those bacteria may represent a “Feast-or-famine” existence in which infection of highly localized concentrations of phage-sensitive bacteria alternate with treacherous searches by the resulting phage progeny virions for new concentrations of phage-sensitive bacteria to infect. An updated synopsis of the literature concerning laboratory testing of phage use to combat bacterial biofilms is then provided along with tips on how “Ecologically” such phage-mediated biofilm control can be modified to more reliably achieve anti-biofilm efficacy. PMID:26371011

  10. AMF-induced biocontrol against plant parasitic nematodes in Musa sp.: a systemic effect.

    PubMed

    Elsen, A; Gervacio, D; Swennen, R; De Waele, D

    2008-07-01

    Although mycorrhizal colonization provides a bioprotectional effect against a broad range of soil-borne pathogens, including plant parasitic nematodes, the commercial use of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) as biocontrol agents is still in its infancy. One of the main reasons is the poor understanding of the modes of action. Most AMF mode of action studies focused on AMF-bacterial/fungal pathogens. Only few studies so far examined AMF-plant parasitic nematode interactions. Therefore, the aim of the study was to determine whether the AMF Glomus intraradices was able to incite systemic resistance in banana plants towards Radopholus similis and Pratylenchus coffeae, two plant parasitic nematodes using a split-root compartmental set-up. The AMF reduced both nematode species by more than 50%, even when the AMF and the plant parasitic nematodes were spatially separated. The results obtained demonstrate for the first time that AMF have the ability to induce systemic resistance against plant parasitic nematodes in a root system.

  11. Host-Range Dynamics of Cochliobolus lunatus: From a Biocontrol Agent to a Severe Environmental Threat

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Bengyella; Waikhom, Sayanika Devi; Roy, Pranab; Bhardwaj, Pardeep Kumar; Sharma, Chandradev K.; Singh, Mohendro Wakambam; Talukdar, Narayan Chandra

    2014-01-01

    We undertook an investigation to advance understanding of the host-range dynamics and biocontrol implications of Cochliobolus lunatus in the past decade. Potato (Solanum tuberosum L) farms were routinely surveyed for brown-to-black leaf spot disease caused by C. lunatus. A biphasic gene data set was assembled and databases were mined for reported hosts of C. lunatus in the last decade. The placement of five virulent strains of C. lunatus causing foliar necrosis of potato was studied with microscopic and phylogenetic tools. Analysis of morphology showed intraspecific variations in stromatic tissues among the virulent strains causing foliar necrosis of potato. A maximum likelihood inference based on GPDH locus separated C. lunatus strains into subclusters and revealed the emergence of unclustered strains. The evolving nutritional requirement of C. lunatus in the last decade is exhibited by the invasion of vertebrates, invertebrates, dicots, and monocots. Our results contribute towards a better understanding of the host-range dynamics of C. lunatus and provide useful implications on the threat posed to the environment when C. lunatus is used as a mycoherbicide. PMID:24987680

  12. The advantages of mosquito biocontrol by stocking edible fish in rice paddies.

    PubMed

    Wu, N; Liao, G H; Li, D F; Luo, Y L; Zhong, G M

    1991-09-01

    Edible fish stocked in rice fields at a density of 600-800 fry per mu (1 mu = 1/15 hectare) for 150-170 days may act as an effective mosquito biocontrol agent. Common carp (Cyprinus carpio), grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella) and Tilopia spp. killed late stage larvae and pupae of Anopheles sinensis and Culex tritaeniorrhyncus in laboratory and field trials. Stocking of fish in experimental rice fields decreased larval numbers significantly in comparison with control areas. Expansion of fish stocking in rice fields on a large scale over several years correlated with a marked decrease in malaria transmission. The addition of fish to the rice fields also resulted in increased yields. A ditch-ridge system of field arrangements is described for optimization of fish handling. Preliminary cost-benefit analysis indicates that this approach to mosquito control conveys considerable economic advantage and thus provides incentive to the community to participate in vector control programs. Farmers' experience in Guangxi over a number of years indicates that the use of edible fish for this purpose can be carried on a large, commercially viable scale.

  13. A putative role for fusaric acid in biocontrol of the parasitic angiosperm Orobanche ramosa.

    PubMed

    Bouizgarne, Brahim; El-Maarouf-Bouteau, Hayat; Madiona, Karine; Biligui, Bernadette; Monestiez, Michèle; Pennarun, Anne Marie; Amiar, Zahia; Rona, Jean Pierre; Ouhdouch, Yedir; El Hadrami, Ismaïl; Bouteau, François

    2006-05-01

    Fusarium spp. are ubiquitous fungi found in soil worldwide as both pathogenic and nonpathogenic strains. The signals leading to disease or the absence of disease are poorly understood. We recently showed that fusaric acid (FA), a nonspecific toxin produced by most Fusarium spp., could elicit various plant defense responses at 100 nM without toxic effect. In this study, we checked for the effect of FA on root and root hairs, probable first site of contact between the fungi and the host. Large FA concentrations reduce root and root-hair growth and induce a rapid transient membrane hyperpolarization, followed by a large depolarization, due to the inhibition of H(+)-ATPase currents. Nanomolar concentrations of FA induced only an early transient membrane hyperpolarization of root hairs compatible with the induction of a signal transduction pathway. FA at 10(-7) M failed to induce salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid/ethylene-dependent defense-related genes but inhibited the germination of the angiosperm parasite Orobanche ramosa in contact of FA-pretreated Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. These data suggest that FA at nontoxic concentrations could activate signal transduction components necessary for plant-defense responses that could contribute to biocontrol activity of Fusarium spp.

  14. The toolbox of Trichoderma spp. in the biocontrol of Botrytis cinerea disease.

    PubMed

    Vos, Christine M F; De Cremer, Kaat; Cammue, Bruno P A; De Coninck, Barbara

    2015-05-01

    Botrytis cinerea is a necrotrophic fungal pathogen causing disease in many plant species, leading to economically important crop losses. So far, fungicides have been widely used to control this pathogen. However, in addition to their detrimental effects on the environment and potential risks for human health, increasing fungicide resistance has been observed in the B. cinerea population. Biological control, that is the application of microbial organisms to reduce disease, has gained importance as an alternative or complementary approach to fungicides. In this respect, the genus Trichoderma constitutes a promising pool of organisms with potential for B. cinerea control. In the first part of this article, we review the specific mechanisms involved in the direct interaction between the two fungi, including mycoparasitism, the production of antimicrobial compounds and enzymes (collectively called antagonism), and competition for nutrients and space. In addition, biocontrol has also been observed when Trichoderma is physically separated from the pathogen, thus implying an indirect systemic plant defence response. Therefore, in the second part, we describe the consecutive steps leading to induced systemic resistance (ISR), starting with the initial Trichoderma-plant interaction and followed by the activation of downstream signal transduction pathways and, ultimately, the defence response resulting in ISR (ISR-prime phase). Finally, we discuss the ISR-boost phase, representing the effect of ISR priming by Trichoderma spp. on plant responses after additional challenge with B. cinerea.

  15. Characterization of Novel Trichoderma asperellum Isolates to Select Effective Biocontrol Agents Against Tomato Fusarium Wilt

    PubMed Central

    El_Komy, Mahmoud H.; Saleh, Amgad A.; Eranthodi, Anas; Molan, Younes Y.

    2015-01-01

    The use of novel isolates of Trichoderma with efficient antagonistic capacity against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (FOL) is a promising alternative strategy to pesticides for tomato wilt management. We evaluated the antagonistic activity of 30 isolates of T. asperellum against 4 different isolates of FOL. The production of extracellular cell wall degrading enzymes of the antagonistic isolates was also measured. The random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method was applied to assess the genetic variability among the T. asperellum isolates. All of the T. asperellum isolates significantly reduced the mycelial growth of FOL isolates but the amount of growth reduction varied significantly as well. There was a correlation between the antagonistic capacity of T. asperellum isolates towards FOL and their lytic enzyme production. Isolates showing high levels of chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase activities strongly inhibited the growth of FOL isolates. RAPD analysis showed a high level of genetic variation among T. asperellum isolates. The UPGMA dendrogram revealed that T. asperellum isolates could not be grouped by their anta- gonistic behavior or lytic enzymes production. Six isolates of T. asperellum were highly antagonistic towards FOL and potentially could be used in commercial agriculture to control tomato wilt. Our results are consistent with the conclusion that understanding the genetic variation within Trichoderma isolates and their biochemical capabilities are required for the selection of effective indigenous fungal strains for the use as biocontrol agents. PMID:25774110

  16. Amendment with peony root bark improves the biocontrol efficacy of Trichoderma harzianum against Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae Ok; Khan, Zakaullah; Kim, Sang Gyu; Kim, Young Ho

    2008-09-01

    We tested Trichoderma harzianum as a biocontrol agent for Rhizoctonia solani AG2-1, using six natural antifungal materials to improve its efficacy. Among the six materials tested, peony (Paeonia suffruticosa) root bark (PRB) showed the strongest antifungal activity against R. solani AG2-1, and was not antagonistic to T. harzianum. Scanning electron microscopy showed that treatment with PRB extract resulted in shortened and deformed R. solani AG2-1 hyphal cells. The control of radish damping-off caused by R. solani AG2-1 was greatly increased by combined treatments of T. harzianum and PRB, as compared with either of the two treatments alone, with the control effect increased from 42.3-51.5% to 71.4-87.6%. The antifungal compound in PRB, which was isolated in chloroform and identified as paeonol by mass spectrometry, 1H NMR, and 13C NMR analyses, inhibited the growth of R. solani AG2-1 but not that of T. harzianum. Thus, PRB powder or extract may be used as a safe additive to T. harzianum to improve the control of the soil borne diseases caused by R. solani AG2-1.

  17. Transcriptomic response of Arabidopsis thaliana after 24 h incubation with the biocontrol fungus Trichoderma harzianum.

    PubMed

    Morán-Diez, Eugenia; Rubio, Belén; Domínguez, Sara; Hermosa, Rosa; Monte, Enrique; Nicolás, Carlos

    2012-04-15

    Trichoderma harzianum is a fungus used as biocontrol agent using its antagonistic abilities against phytopathogenic fungi, although it has also direct effects on plants, increasing or accelerating their growth and resistance to diseases and the tolerance to abiotic stresses. We analyzed Arabidopsis thaliana gene expression changes after 24 h of incubation in the presence of T. harzianum T34 using the Affymetrix GeneChip Arabidopsis ATH1. Because this microarray contains more than 22,500 probe sets representing approximately 24,000 genes, we were able to construct a global picture of the molecular physiology of the plant at 24 h of T. harzianum-Arabidopsis interaction. We identified several differentially expressed genes that are involved in plant responses to stress, regulation of transcription, signal transduction or plant metabolism. Our data support the hypothesis that salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid-related genes were down-regulated in A. thaliana after 24 h of incubation in the presence of T. harzianum T34, while several genes related to abiotic stress responses were up-regulated. These systemic changes elicited by T. harzianum in Arabidopsis are discussed.

  18. Biocontrol and plant growth-promoting activity of rhizobacteria from Chinese fields with contaminated soils

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuefei; Mavrodi, Dmitri V; Ke, Linfeng; Mavrodi, Olga V; Yang, Mingming; Thomashow, Linda S; Zheng, Na; Weller, David M; Zhang, Jibin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to inventory the types of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) present in the rhizosphere of plants grown in soils contaminated with heavy metals, recalcitrant organics, petroleum sewage or salinity in China. We screened 1223 isolates for antifungal activity and about 24% inhibited Rhizoctonia solani or Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Twenty-four strains inhibitory to R. solani, Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici and/or S. sclerotiorum and representing the dominant morphotypes were assayed for PGPR activity. Seven strains contained phlD, prnD, pltC or phzF genes and produced the antibiotics 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol, pyrrolnitrin, pyoluteorin and phenazines respectively. Six strains contained acdS, which encodes 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA and phlD, phzF and acdS genes demonstrated that some strains identified as Pseudomonas were similar to model PGPR strains Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5, Pseudomonas chlororaphis subsp. aureofaciens 30–84 and P. brassicacearum Q8r1-96. Pseudomonas protegens- and P. chlororaphis-like strains had the greatest biocontrol activity against Rhizoctonia root rot and take-all of wheat. Pseudomonas protegens and P. brassicacearum-like strains showed the greatest promotion of canola growth. Our results indicate that strains from contaminated soils are similar to well-described PGPR found in agricultural soils worldwide. Growth-promoting rhizobacteria in polluted soils PMID:25219642

  19. Native Killer Yeasts as Biocontrol Agents of Postharvest Fungal Diseases in Lemons

    PubMed Central

    Garnica, Nydia Mercedes; Fernández-Zenoff, María Verónica; Farías, María Eugenia; Sepulveda, Milena; Ramallo, Jacqueline; Dib, Julián Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Economic losses caused by postharvest diseases represent one of the main problems of the citrus industry worldwide. The major diseases affecting citrus are the "green mold" and "blue mold", caused by Penicillium digitatum and P. italicum, respectively. To control them, synthetic fungicides are the most commonly used method. However, often the emergence of resistant strains occurs and their use is becoming more restricted because of toxic effects and environmental pollution they generate, combined with trade barriers to international markets. The aim of this work was to isolate indigenous killer yeasts with antagonistic activity against fungal postharvest diseases in lemons, and to determine their control efficiency in in vitro and in vivo assays. Among 437 yeast isolates, 8.5% show to have a killer phenotype. According to molecular identification, based on the 26S rDNA D1/D2 domain sequences analysis, strains were identified belonging to the genera Saccharomyces, Wickerhamomyces, Kazachstania, Pichia, Candida and Clavispora. Killers were challenged with pathogenic molds and strains that caused the maximum in vitro inhibition of P. digitatum were selected for in vivo assays. Two strains of Pichia and one strain of Wickerhamomyces depicted a significant protection (p <0.05) from decay by P. digitatum in assays using wounded lemons. Thus, the native killer yeasts studied in this work showed to be an effective alternative for the biocontrol of postharvest fungal infections of lemons and could be promising agents for the development of commercial products for the biological control industry. PMID:27792761

  20. Biocontrol agent Bacillus amyloliquefaciens LJ02 induces systemic resistance against cucurbits powdery mildew

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunlong; Gu, Yilin; Li, Juan; Xu, Mingzhu; Wei, Qing; Wang, Yuanhong

    2015-01-01

    Powdery mildew is a fungal disease found in a wide range of plants and can significantly reduce crop yields. Bacterial strain LJ02 is a biocontrol agent (BCA) isolated from a greenhouse in Tianjin, China. In combination of morphological, physiological, biochemical and phylogenetic analyses, strain LJ02 was classified as a new member of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. Greenhouse trials showed that LJ02 fermentation broth (LJ02FB) can effectively diminish the occurrence of cucurbits powdery mildew. When treated with LJ02FB, cucumber seedlings produced significantly elevated production of superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase and phenylalanine ammonia lyase as compared to that of the control. We further confirmed that the production of free salicylic acid (SA) and expression of one pathogenesis-related (PR) gene PR-1 in cucumber leaves were markedly elevated after treating with LJ02FB, suggesting that SA-mediated defense response was stimulated. Moreover, LJ02FB-treated cucumber leaves could secrete resistance-related substances into rhizosphere that inhibit the germination of fungi spores and the growth of pathogens. Finally, we separated bacterium and its fermented substances to test their respective effects and found that both components have SA-inducing activity and bacterium plays major roles. Altogether, we identified a BCA against powdery mildew and its mode of action by inducing systemic resistance such as SA signaling pathway. PMID:26379654

  1. Ecophysiological requirements and survival of a Trichoderma atroviride isolate with biocontrol potential.

    PubMed

    Longa, Claudia Maria Oliveira; Pertot, Ilaria; Tosi, Solveig

    2008-08-01

    Trichoderma atroviride SC1, isolated from decayed hazelnut wood in northern Italy in 2000, is a promising fungal agent for biological control of soil-borne plant pathogens. The objective of this research was to characterize the biology and ecology of this fungus, in order to determine its environmental parameter tolerance levels and its behavior in the phylloplane and soil systems. To better characterize T. atroviride SC1, the influences of pH, temperature, water activity and different nitrogen and carbon sources on its in vitro growth were evaluated. T. atroviride SC1 survival was assessed on strawberry leaves under controlled conditions in a greenhouse and in sterilized and non-sterilized soil samples kept at room temperature. Results showed that isolate SC1 is mesophilic and grows best at 25 degrees C. The fungus tolerates a wide range of pH levels, but growth was reduced on alkaline media (pH >or= 8). The nitrogen and carbon sources peptone, tryptone, nitrate, mannose, galactose and sucrose were associated with the highest mycelial biomass production, as compared with other potential sources of nitrogen and carbon. The fungus survived on strawberry leaves under greenhouse conditions (25 +/- 2 degrees C, RH = 60 +/- 10%) and grew in sterilized soils at room temperature (23 +/- 2 degrees C) for 45 d. However, no increase in mycelial dry weight was observed in non-sterilized soils. T. atroviride SC1 survived under the test conditions, showing a good potential for use in soil and foliar biocontrol applications.

  2. A Mathematical Model for Biocontrol of the Invasive Weed Fallopia japonica.

    PubMed

    Gourley, Stephen A; Li, Jing; Zou, Xingfu

    2016-08-01

    We propose a mathematical model for biocontrol of the invasive weed Fallopia japonica using one of its co-evolved natural enemies, the Japanese sap-sucking psyllid Aphalara itadori. This insect sucks the sap from the stems of the plant thereby weakening it. Its diet is highly specific to F. japonica. We consider a single isolated knotweed stand, the plant's size being described by time-dependent variables for total stem and rhizome biomass. It is the larvae of A. itadori that damage the plant most, so the insect population is described in terms of variables for the numbers of larvae and adults, using a stage-structured modelling approach. The dynamics of the model depends mainly on a parameter h, which measures how long it takes for an insect to handle (digest) one unit of F. japonica stem biomass. If h is too large, then the model does not have a positive equilibrium and the plant biomass and insect numbers both grow together without bound, though at a lower rate than if the insects were absent. If h is sufficiently small, then the model possesses a positive equilibrium which appears to be locally stable. The results based on our model imply that satisfactory long-term control of the knotweed F. japonica using the insect A. itadori is only possible if the insect is able to consume and digest knotweed biomass sufficiently quickly; if it cannot, then the insect can only slow down the growth which is still unbounded.

  3. [Impact of biocontrol agent Bacillus subtilis on bacterial communities in tobacco rhizospheric soil].

    PubMed

    You, Cai; Zhang, Li-Meng; Ji, Si-Gui; Gao, Jia-Ming; Zhang, Cheng-Sheng; Kong, Fan-Yu

    2014-11-01

    The impact of inoculation with the biocontrol agent Bacillus subtilis on bacterial communities and bacterial diversity in rhizospheric soil of Nicotiana tabacum was assessed by constructing a 16S rRNA gene clone library and conducting amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA). The bacterial diversity was evaluated by coverage value (C), Shannon index (H), Pielou evenness index (E) and Margalef richness index (R). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the inoculation significantly affected the composition of bacterial communities in tobacco rhizospheric soil. A total of twelve bacterial groups including Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria (including α-, β-, δ-, γ-Proteobacteria) , Planctomycetes, Firmicutes, Nitrospirae, Gemmatimonadetes, Actinobacteria, Chloroflexi and Bacteroidetes were detected to be shared by inoculated soil and control soil. The community composition and proportions of different bacteria in the communities showed significant variations between the two samples. The dominant bacteria were Acidobacteria (27.1%) and Proteobacteria (26.5%) in control soil, while in the inoculated soil Proteobacteria (38.0%) and Acidobacteria (29.6%) were dominant. B. subtilis inoculation increased the numbers of γ-Proteobacteria and α-Proteobacteria but reduced the numbers of bacterial groups such as β-Proteobacteria, Planctomycetes, Firmicutes. Diversity analysis showed that bacterial diversity was rich for both soil samples, and soil bacterial Shannon index and Margalef richness index were promoted after inoculation.

  4. Rhizospheric bacteria of maize with potential for biocontrol of Fusarium verticillioides.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-López, Alejandro Miguel; Cordero-Ramírez, Jesús Damián; Martínez-Álvarez, Juan Carlos; López-Meyer, Melina; Lizárraga-Sánchez, Glenda Judith; Félix-Gastélum, Rubén; Castro-Martínez, Claudia; Maldonado-Mendoza, Ignacio Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    The stalk, ear and root rot (SERR) of maize caused by Fusarium verticillioides (Fv) severely impacts crop production in tropical and subtropical regions. The aim of the present work was to screen bacterial isolates in order to find novel native biocontrol agents against Fv. A culturable bacterial collection consisting of 11,520 isolates enriched in Firmicutes and Proteobacteria was created from rhizosphere samples taken from SERR symptomatic or asymptomatic maize plants. The complete collection was screened for potential activity against Fv using a liquid antagonism assay followed by dual cultures in solid medium, selecting for 42 bacteria (Bacillus, Pseudomonas and Paenibacillus) that inhibit Fv growth (>45 %). In planta assays demonstrated that three Bacillus isolates: B. megaterium (B5), B. cereus sensu lato (B25) and Bacillus sp. (B35) displayed the highest antagonistic activity against Fv. Pot experiments performed in a greenhouse with Bacillus cereus sensu lato B25 confirmed these findings and showed a reduction of Fv disease severity and incidence on plants. Antagonistic activity analysis revealed that these strains produce glucanases, proteases or chitinases, as well as siderophores and auxins and suggests these as possible control mechanisms against Fv.

  5. Biocontrol and plant growth-promoting activity of rhizobacteria from Chinese fields with contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuefei; Mavrodi, Dmitri V; Ke, Linfeng; Mavrodi, Olga V; Yang, Mingming; Thomashow, Linda S; Zheng, Na; Weller, David M; Zhang, Jibin

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to inventory the types of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) present in the rhizosphere of plants grown in soils contaminated with heavy metals, recalcitrant organics, petroleum sewage or salinity in China. We screened 1223 isolates for antifungal activity and about 24% inhibited Rhizoctonia solani or Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Twenty-four strains inhibitory to R. solani, Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici and/or S. sclerotiorum and representing the dominant morphotypes were assayed for PGPR activity. Seven strains contained phlD, prnD, pltC or phzF genes and produced the antibiotics 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol, pyrrolnitrin, pyoluteorin and phenazines respectively. Six strains contained acdS, which encodes 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA and phlD, phzF and acdS genes demonstrated that some strains identified as Pseudomonas were similar to model PGPR strains Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5, Pseudomonas chlororaphis subsp. aureofaciens 30-84 and P. brassicacearum Q8r1-96. Pseudomonas protegens- and P. chlororaphis-like strains had the greatest biocontrol activity against Rhizoctonia root rot and take-all of wheat. Pseudomonas protegens and P. brassicacearum-like strains showed the greatest promotion of canola growth. Our results indicate that strains from contaminated soils are similar to well-described PGPR found in agricultural soils worldwide.

  6. Three small RNAs jointly ensure secondary metabolism and biocontrol in Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0.

    PubMed

    Kay, Elisabeth; Dubuis, Christophe; Haas, Dieter

    2005-11-22

    In many Gram-negative bacteria, the GacS/GacA two-component system positively controls the expression of extracellular products or storage compounds. In the plant-beneficial rhizosphere bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0, the GacS/GacA system is essential for the production of antibiotic compounds and hence for biological control of root-pathogenic fungi. The small (119-nt) RNA RsmX discovered in this study, together with RsmY and RsmZ, forms a triad of GacA-dependent small RNAs, which sequester the RNA-binding proteins RsmA and RsmE and thereby antagonize translational repression exerted by these proteins in strain CHA0. This small RNA triad was found to be both necessary and sufficient for posttranscriptional derepression of biocontrol factors and for protection of cucumber from Pythium ultimum. The same three small RNAs also positively regulated swarming motility and the synthesis of a quorum-sensing signal, which is unrelated to N-acyl-homoserine lactones, and which autoinduces the Gac/Rsm cascade. Expression of RsmX and RsmY increased in parallel throughout cell growth, whereas RsmZ was produced during the late growth phase. This differential expression is assumed to facilitate fine tuning of GacS/A-controlled cell population density-dependent regulation in P. fluorescens.

  7. Selection rhizosphere-competent microbes for development of microbial products as biocontrol agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashinistova, A. V.; Elchin, A. A.; Gorbunova, N. V.; Muratov, V. S.; Kydralieva, K. A.; Khudaibergenova, B. M.; Shabaev, V. P.; Jorobekova, Sh. J.

    2009-04-01

    Rhizosphere-borne microorganisms reintroduced to the soil-root interface can establish without inducing permanent disturbance in the microbial balance and effectively colonise the rhizosphere due to carbon sources of plant root exudates. A challenge for future development of microbial products for use in agriculture will be selection of rhizosphere-competent microbes that both protect the plant from pathogens and improve crop establishment and persistence. In this study screening, collection, identification and expression of stable and technological microbial strains living in soils and in the rhizosphere of abundant weed - couch-grass Elytrigia repens L. Nevski were conducted. A total of 98 bacteria isolated from the rhizosphere were assessed for biocontrol activity in vitro against phytopathogenic fungi including Fusarium culmorum, Fusarium heterosporum, Fusarium oxysporum, Drechslera teres, Bipolaris sorokiniana, Piricularia oryzae, Botrytis cinerea, Colletothrichum atramentarium and Cladosporium sp., Stagonospora nodorum. Biocontrol activity were performed by the following methods: radial and parallel streaks, "host - pathogen" on the cuts of wheat leaves. A culture collection comprising 64 potential biocontrol agents (BCA) against wheat and barley root diseases has been established. Of these, the most effective were 8 isolates inhibitory to at least 4 out of 5 phytopathogenic fungi tested. The remaining isolates inhibited at least 1 of 5 fungi tested. Growth stimulating activity of proposed rhizobacteria-based preparations was estimated using seedling and vegetative pot techniques. Seeds-inoculation and the tests in laboratory and field conditions were conducted for different agricultural crops - wheat and barley. Intact cells, liquid culture filtrates and crude extracts of the four beneficial bacterial strains isolated from the rhizosphere of weed were studied to stimulate plant growth. As a result, four bacterial strains selected from rhizosphere of weed

  8. Plot- and landscape-level changes in climate and vegetation following defoliation of exotic saltcedar (Tamarix sp.) from the biocontrol agent Diorhabda carinulata along a stream in the Mojave Desert (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bateman, H.L.; Nagler, P.L.; Glenn, E.P.

    2013-01-01

    The biocontrol agent, northern tamarisk beetle (Diorhabda carinulata), has been used to defoliate non-native saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) in USA western riparian systems since 2001. Biocontrol has the potential to impact biotic communities and climatic conditions in affected riparian areas. To determine the relationships between biocontrol establishment and effects on vegetation and climate at the plot and landscape scales, we measured temperature, relative humidity, foliage canopy, solar radiation, and used satellite imagery to assess saltcedar defoliation and evapotranspiration (ET) along the Virgin River in the Mojave Desert. Following defoliation solar radiation increased, daily humidity decreased, and maximum daily temperatures tended to increase. MODIS and Landsat satellite imagery showed defoliation was widespread, resulting in reductions in ET and vegetation indices. Because biocontrol beetles are spreading into new saltcedar habitats on arid western rivers, and the eventual equilibrium between beetles and saltcedar is unknown, it is necessary to monitor trends for ecosystem functions and higher trophic-level responses in habitats impacted by biocontrol.

  9. Evaluation of yeasts obtained from Antarctic soil samples as biocontrol agents for the management of postharvest diseases of apple (Malus × domestica).

    PubMed

    Vero, Silvana; Garmendia, Gabriela; González, M Belén; Bentancur, Oscar; Wisniewski, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Psychrotrophic yeasts were isolated from Antarctic soils, selected based on their ability to grow in apple juice at low temperatures, and were evaluated as potential biocontrol agents for the management of postharvest diseases of apple during cold storage. Among the species recovered, an isolate of Leucosporidium scottii, designated At17, was identified as a good biocontrol agent for blue and gray mold of two apple cultivars. The selected isolate produced soluble and volatile antifungal substances that were inhibitory to apple pathogens. Siderophore production was also demonstrated, but it did not appear to play a role in pathogen inhibition. The selected yeast had the capacity to form a biofilm when grown in apple juice, which is considered an important attribute of postharvest antagonists to successfully colonize wounds and intact fruit surfaces. At17 was resistant to commonly used postharvest fungicides, so application of a combination of low-dose fungicide along with the biocontrol agent could be used as an integrated management practice.

  10. Selection and characterization of Argentine isolates of Trichoderma harzianum for effective biocontrol of Septoria leaf blotch of wheat.

    PubMed

    Stocco, Marina C; Mónaco, Cecilia I; Abramoff, Cecilia; Lampugnani, Gladys; Salerno, Graciela; Kripelz, Natalia; Cordo, Cristina A; Consolo, Verónica F

    2016-03-01

    Species of the genus Trichoderma are economically important as biocontrol agents, serving as a potential alternative to chemical control. The applicability of Trichoderma isolates to different ecozones will depend on the behavior of the strains selected from each zone. The present study was undertaken to isolate biocontrol populations of Trichoderma spp. from the Argentine wheat regions and to select and characterize the best strains of Trichoderma harzianum by means of molecular techniques. A total of 84 out of the 240 strains of Trichoderma were able to reduce the disease severity of the leaf blotch of wheat. Thirty-seven strains were selected for the reduction equal to or greater than 50% of the severity, compared with the control. The percentage values of reduction of the pycnidial coverage ranged between 45 and 80%. The same last strains were confirmed as T. harzianum by polymerase chain reaction amplification of internal transcribed spacers, followed by sequencing. Inter-simple sequence repeat was used to examine the genetic variability among isolates. This resulted in a total of 132 bands. Further numerical analysis revealed 19 haplotypes, grouped in three clusters (I, II, III). Shared strains, with different geographical origins and isolated in different years, were observed within each cluster. The origin of the isolates and the genetic group were partially related. All isolates from Paraná were in cluster I, all isolates from Lobería were in cluster II, and all isolates from Pergamino and Santa Fe were in cluster III. Our results suggest that the 37 native strains of T. harzianum are important in biocontrol programs and could be advantageous for the preparation of biopesticides adapted to the agroecological conditions of wheat culture. PMID:26873560

  11. PtrA Is Functionally Intertwined with GacS in Regulating the Biocontrol Activity of Pseudomonas chlororaphis PA23

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nidhi; Klaponski, Natasha; Selin, Carrie; Rudney, Rachel; Fernando, W. G. Dilantha; Belmonte, Mark F.; de Kievit, Teresa R.

    2016-01-01

    In vitro inhibition of the fungal pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum by Pseudomonas chlororaphis PA23 is reliant upon a LysR-type transcriptional regulator (LTTR) called PtrA. In the current study, we show that Sclerotinia stem rot and leaf infection are significantly increased in canola plants inoculated with the ptrA-mutant compared to the wild type, establishing PtrA as an essential regulator of PA23 biocontrol. LTTRs typically regulate targets that are upstream of and divergently transcribed from the LTTR locus. We identified a short chain dehydrogenase (scd) gene immediately upstream of ptrA. Characterization of a scd mutant revealed that it is phenotypically identical to the wild type. Moreover, scd transcript abundance was unchanged in the ptrA mutant. These findings indicate that PtrA regulation does not involve scd, rather this LTTR controls genes located elsewhere on the chromosome. Employing a combination of complementation and transcriptional analysis we investigated whether connections exist between PtrA and other regulators of biocontrol. Besides ptrA, gacS was the only gene able to partially rescue the wild-type phenotype, establishing a connection between PtrA and the sensor kinase GacS. Transcriptomic analysis revealed decreased expression of biosynthetic (phzA, prnA) and regulatory genes (phzI, phzR, rpoS, gacA, rsmX, rsmZ, retS) in the ptrA mutant; conversely, rsmE, and rsmY were markedly upregulated. The transcript abundance of ptrA was nine-fold higher in the mutant background indicating that this LTTR negatively autoregulates itself. In summary, PtrA is an essential regulator of genes required for PA23 biocontrol that is functionally intertwined with GacS. PMID:27713742

  12. Phytohormone profiles induced by trichoderma isolates correspond with their biocontrol and plant growth-promoting activity on melon plants.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Medina, Ainhoa; Del Mar Alguacil, Maria; Pascual, Jose A; Van Wees, Saskia C M

    2014-07-01

    The application of Trichoderma strains with biocontrol and plant growth-promoting capacities to plant substrates can help reduce the input of chemical pesticides and fertilizers in agriculture. Some Trichoderma isolates can directly affect plant pathogens, but they also are known to influence the phytohormonal network of their host plant, thus leading to an improvement of plant growth and stress tolerance. In this study, we tested whether alterations in the phytohormone signature induced by different Trichoderma isolates correspond with their ability for biocontrol and growth promotion. Four Trichoderma isolates were collected from agricultural soils and were identified as the species Trichoderma harzianum (two isolates), Trichoderma ghanense, and Trichoderma hamatum. Their antagonistic activity against the plant pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis was tested in vitro, and their plant growth-promoting and biocontrol activity against Fusarium wilt on melon plants was examined in vivo, and compared to that of the commercial strain T. harzianum T-22. Several growth- and defense-related phytohormones were analyzed in the shoots of plants that were root-colonized by the different Trichoderma isolates. An increase in auxin and a decrease in cytokinins and abscisic acid content were induced by the isolates that promoted the plant growth. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to evaluate the relationship between the plant phenotypic and hormonal variables. PCA pointed to a strong association of auxin induction with plant growth stimulation by Trichoderma. Furthermore, the disease-protectant ability of the Trichoderma strains against F. oxysporum infection seems to be more related to their induced alterations in the content of the hormones abscisic acid, ethylene, and the cytokinin trans-zeatin riboside than to the in vitro antagonism activity against F. oxysporum. PMID:25023078

  13. Selection and characterization of Argentine isolates of Trichoderma harzianum for effective biocontrol of Septoria leaf blotch of wheat.

    PubMed

    Stocco, Marina C; Mónaco, Cecilia I; Abramoff, Cecilia; Lampugnani, Gladys; Salerno, Graciela; Kripelz, Natalia; Cordo, Cristina A; Consolo, Verónica F

    2016-03-01

    Species of the genus Trichoderma are economically important as biocontrol agents, serving as a potential alternative to chemical control. The applicability of Trichoderma isolates to different ecozones will depend on the behavior of the strains selected from each zone. The present study was undertaken to isolate biocontrol populations of Trichoderma spp. from the Argentine wheat regions and to select and characterize the best strains of Trichoderma harzianum by means of molecular techniques. A total of 84 out of the 240 strains of Trichoderma were able to reduce the disease severity of the leaf blotch of wheat. Thirty-seven strains were selected for the reduction equal to or greater than 50% of the severity, compared with the control. The percentage values of reduction of the pycnidial coverage ranged between 45 and 80%. The same last strains were confirmed as T. harzianum by polymerase chain reaction amplification of internal transcribed spacers, followed by sequencing. Inter-simple sequence repeat was used to examine the genetic variability among isolates. This resulted in a total of 132 bands. Further numerical analysis revealed 19 haplotypes, grouped in three clusters (I, II, III). Shared strains, with different geographical origins and isolated in different years, were observed within each cluster. The origin of the isolates and the genetic group were partially related. All isolates from Paraná were in cluster I, all isolates from Lobería were in cluster II, and all isolates from Pergamino and Santa Fe were in cluster III. Our results suggest that the 37 native strains of T. harzianum are important in biocontrol programs and could be advantageous for the preparation of biopesticides adapted to the agroecological conditions of wheat culture.

  14. Phytohormone profiles induced by trichoderma isolates correspond with their biocontrol and plant growth-promoting activity on melon plants.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Medina, Ainhoa; Del Mar Alguacil, Maria; Pascual, Jose A; Van Wees, Saskia C M

    2014-07-01

    The application of Trichoderma strains with biocontrol and plant growth-promoting capacities to plant substrates can help reduce the input of chemical pesticides and fertilizers in agriculture. Some Trichoderma isolates can directly affect plant pathogens, but they also are known to influence the phytohormonal network of their host plant, thus leading to an improvement of plant growth and stress tolerance. In this study, we tested whether alterations in the phytohormone signature induced by different Trichoderma isolates correspond with their ability for biocontrol and growth promotion. Four Trichoderma isolates were collected from agricultural soils and were identified as the species Trichoderma harzianum (two isolates), Trichoderma ghanense, and Trichoderma hamatum. Their antagonistic activity against the plant pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis was tested in vitro, and their plant growth-promoting and biocontrol activity against Fusarium wilt on melon plants was examined in vivo, and compared to that of the commercial strain T. harzianum T-22. Several growth- and defense-related phytohormones were analyzed in the shoots of plants that were root-colonized by the different Trichoderma isolates. An increase in auxin and a decrease in cytokinins and abscisic acid content were induced by the isolates that promoted the plant growth. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to evaluate the relationship between the plant phenotypic and hormonal variables. PCA pointed to a strong association of auxin induction with plant growth stimulation by Trichoderma. Furthermore, the disease-protectant ability of the Trichoderma strains against F. oxysporum infection seems to be more related to their induced alterations in the content of the hormones abscisic acid, ethylene, and the cytokinin trans-zeatin riboside than to the in vitro antagonism activity against F. oxysporum.

  15. Controlling Instability in gacS-gacA Regulatory Genes during Inoculant Production of Pseudomonas fluorescens Biocontrol Strains

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Brion K.; Défago, Geneviève

    2000-01-01

    Secondary metabolism in fluorescent pseudomonads is globally regulated by gacS, which encodes a membrane-bound sensor kinase, and gacA, which encodes a transcriptional response regulator. Spontaneous mutation in either gene blocked biosynthesis of the antimicrobial compounds hydrogen cyanide, 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol, pyoluteorin, and pyrrolnitrin by the model biocontrol strain Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0. Spontaneous mutants also had altered abilities to utilize several carbon sources and to increase medium pH compared with the wild type, suggesting that gacS and gacA influence primary as well as secondary bacterial metabolism. Inoculant efficacy for biocontrol was significantly reduced by contamination with regulatory mutants which accumulated during inoculum production. Spontaneous mutants accumulated in all 192 separate liquid cultures examined, typically at a frequency of 1% or higher after 12 days. During scale-up in a simulated industrial fermentation process, mutants increased exponentially and accounted for 7, 23, and 61% of the total viable cells after transfer to 20-, 100-, and 500-ml preparations, respectively. GacS− and GacA− mutants had identical phenotypes and occurred at the same frequency, indicating that the selective pressures for the two mutants were similar. We developed a simple screening method for monitoring inoculant quality based on the distinctive appearance of mutant colonies (i.e., orange color, enlarged diameter, hyperfluorescence). Mutant competitiveness was favored in a nutrient-rich medium with a high electrolyte concentration (nutrient broth containing yeast extract). We were able to control mutant accumulation and to clean up contaminated cultures by using certain mineral amendments (i.e., zinc, copper, cobalt, manganese, and ammonium molybdate) or by diluting media 1/10. Spontaneous mutants and genetic constructs had the same response to culture conditions. Zinc and medium dilution were also effective for improving the

  16. [Construction and function analysis of Bac operon mutants of bio-control strain Bacillus subtilis Bs-916].

    PubMed

    Luo, Chuping; Chen, Zhiyi; Liu, Yongfeng; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Youzhou; Wang, Xiaoyu; Nie, Yafeng

    2009-04-01

    Bacillus subtilis Bs-916 is an effective biocontrol agent in control rice sheath blight caused by Rhizoctonia solani. We identified and analyzed the operon Bac in Bs-916 responsible for synthesis of iturin-like lipopeptides. The research plays an important part in genetic engineered Bs-916 for further improving its bio-control activity. Taking advantage of homologous recombination method, the one mutant obtained by replacement of the Bac original promoter by a constitutive promoter P (repU) and designated BGG104; the other mutant was obtained by disruption of the Bac promoter by insertion and designated BGG105. The biological activities results showed the mutant BGG104 enhanced antagonistic activities against several pathogenic fungi and also clearly increased in hemolytic activities. However, the mutant BGG105 decreased clearly in both antagonistic activities and hemolytic activities. Crude lipopeptides were extracted with methanol from precipitates, which were obtained by adding 6 mol/L HCl to the cell-free culture broth. The results of reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of crude lipopeptides showed lipopeptides produced by Bs-916 have a different retention time compared to iturinA. The mutant BGG104 produced up to 3-fold more lipopeptides than Bs-916. However, the mutant BGG105 has not been detected countpart lipopeptides production. The molecular weights of the lipopeptides synthesized by Bac determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MS) were 1007.7 Da, 1021.7 Da and 1035.7 Da. They were presumed to belong to homologues differed by a structure of --CH2 and their molecular weights were not the same as the other iturin-like liopeptides', such as iturinA, mycosubtilin and bacillomycin, molecular weights. In conclusion, this paper showed the lipopeptides synthesized by Bac play crucial part in Bs-916 antifungal activities and the lipopeptides overproduction were able to enhance Bs

  17. Biocontrol and Rapid Detection of Food-Borne Pathogens Using Bacteriophages and Endolysins

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jaewoo; Kim, You-Tae; Ryu, Sangryeol; Lee, Ju-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages have been suggested as natural food preservatives as well as rapid detection materials for food-borne pathogens in various foods. Since Listeria monocytogenes-targeting phage cocktail (ListShield) was approved for applications in foods, numerous phages have been screened and experimentally characterized for phage applications in foods. A single phage and phage cocktail treatments to various foods contaminated with food-borne pathogens including E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica, Campylobacter jejuni, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Cronobacter sakazakii, and Vibrio spp. revealed that they have great potential to control various food-borne pathogens and may be alternative for conventional food preservatives. In addition, phage-derived endolysins with high host specificity and host lysis activities may be preferred to food applications rather than phages. For rapid detection of food-borne pathogens, cell-wall binding domains (CBDs) from endolysins have been suggested due to their high host-specific binding. Fluorescence-tagged CBDs have been successfully evaluated and suggested to be alternative materials of expensive antibodies for various detection applications. Most recently, reporter phage systems have been developed and tested to confirm their usability and accuracy for specific detection. These systems revealed some advantages like rapid detection of only viable pathogenic cells without interference by food components in a very short reaction time, suggesting that these systems may be suitable for monitoring of pathogens in foods. Consequently, phage is the next-generation biocontrol agent as well as rapid detection tool to confirm and even identify the food-borne pathogens present in various foods. PMID:27092128

  18. Assessment of Virally Vectored Autoimmunity as a Biocontrol Strategy for Cane Toads

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Anthony J.; Venables, Daryl; Voysey, Rhonda D.; Boyle, Donna G.; Shanmuganathan, Thayalini; Hardy, Christopher M.; Siddon, Nicole A.; Hyatt, Alex D.

    2011-01-01

    Background The cane toad, Bufo (Chaunus) marinus, is one of the most notorious vertebrate pests introduced into Australia over the last 200 years and, so far, efforts to identify a naturally occurring B. marinus-specific pathogen for use as a biological control agent have been unsuccessful. We explored an alternative approach that entailed genetically modifying a pathogen with broad host specificity so that it no longer caused disease, but carried a gene to disrupt the cane toad life cycle in a species specific manner. Methodology/Principal Findings The adult beta globin gene was selected as the model gene for proof of concept of autoimmunity as a biocontrol method for cane toads. A previous report showed injection of bullfrog tadpoles with adult beta globin resulted in an alteration in the form of beta globin expressed in metamorphs as well as reduced survival. In B. marinus we established for the first time that the switch from tadpole to adult globin exists. The effect of injecting B. marinus tadpoles with purified recombinant adult globin protein was then assessed using behavioural (swim speed in tadpoles and jump length in metamorphs), developmental (time to metamorphosis, weight and length at various developmental stages, protein profile of adult globin) and genetic (adult globin mRNA levels) measures. However, we were unable to detect any differences between treated and control animals. Further, globin delivery using Bohle iridovirus, an Australian ranavirus isolate belonging to the Iridovirus family, did not reduce the survival of metamorphs or alter the form of beta globin expressed in metamorphs. Conclusions/Significance While we were able to show for the first time that the switch from tadpole to adult globin does occur in B. marinus, we were not able to induce autoimmunity and disrupt metamorphosis. The short development time of B. marinus tadpoles may preclude this approach. PMID:21283623

  19. Biocontrol and Rapid Detection of Food-Borne Pathogens Using Bacteriophages and Endolysins.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jaewoo; Kim, You-Tae; Ryu, Sangryeol; Lee, Ju-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages have been suggested as natural food preservatives as well as rapid detection materials for food-borne pathogens in various foods. Since Listeria monocytogenes-targeting phage cocktail (ListShield) was approved for applications in foods, numerous phages have been screened and experimentally characterized for phage applications in foods. A single phage and phage cocktail treatments to various foods contaminated with food-borne pathogens including E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica, Campylobacter jejuni, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Cronobacter sakazakii, and Vibrio spp. revealed that they have great potential to control various food-borne pathogens and may be alternative for conventional food preservatives. In addition, phage-derived endolysins with high host specificity and host lysis activities may be preferred to food applications rather than phages. For rapid detection of food-borne pathogens, cell-wall binding domains (CBDs) from endolysins have been suggested due to their high host-specific binding. Fluorescence-tagged CBDs have been successfully evaluated and suggested to be alternative materials of expensive antibodies for various detection applications. Most recently, reporter phage systems have been developed and tested to confirm their usability and accuracy for specific detection. These systems revealed some advantages like rapid detection of only viable pathogenic cells without interference by food components in a very short reaction time, suggesting that these systems may be suitable for monitoring of pathogens in foods. Consequently, phage is the next-generation biocontrol agent as well as rapid detection tool to confirm and even identify the food-borne pathogens present in various foods.

  20. Biocontrol treatments confer protection against Verticillium dahliae infection of potato by inducing antimicrobial metabolites.

    PubMed

    El Hadrami, A; Adam, L R; Daayf, F

    2011-03-01

    Verticillium wilt, caused by Verticillium dahliae Kleb., is a serious potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) disease worldwide, and biocontrol represents a promising eco-friendly strategy to reduce its impact. We used extracts from Canada milk vetch (CMV) and a set of four V. dahliae-antagonistic bacterial strains to coat potato seeds at planting and examined the degree of protection provided against V. dahliae as well as accumulation of soluble phenolics as markers for induced resistance. All tested treatments were effective in reducing disease severity, and CMV showed the highest level of protection. In this treatment, flavonol-glycoside rutin was a highly abundant compound induced in potato tissues, with levels two to three times higher than those detected in noninoculated controls and V. dahliae-inoculated plants. We investigated dose-dependent effects of rutin on V. dahliae growth and sporulation in vitro and in planta. The effect of rutin on mycelial growth was inconsistent between disk assay and amended medium experiments. On the other hand, significant reduction of V. dahliae sporulation in vitro was consistently observed starting at 300 and 100 μM for isolates Vd-9 and Vd-21, respectively. We successfully detected 2-protocatechuoylphloroglucinolcarboxylic acid (2-PCPGCA) using ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, indicating that V. dahliae dioxygenally oxidizes quercetin. Quercetin, as an aglycone, is freed from the sugar moiety by glucosidases and rhamnosidases produced by the fungus and is a substrate for quercetinases. The occurrence of quercetinases in V. dahliae provides a background to formulate a hypothesis about how by-product 2-PCPGCA may be interfering with potato defenses.

  1. Integrated management of foot rot of lentil using biocontrol agents under field condition.

    PubMed

    Hannan, M A; Hasan, M M; Hossain, I; Rahman, S M E; Ismail, Alhazmi Mohammed; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2012-07-01

    The efficacy of cowdung, Bangladesh Institute of Nuclear Agriculture (BINA)-biofertilizer, and Bangladesh Agricultural University (BAU)-biofungicide, alone or in combination, was evaluated for controlling foot rot disease of lentil. The results exhibited that BINA-biofertilizer and BAUbiofungicide (peat soil-based Rhizobium leguminosarum and black gram bran-based Trichoderma harzianum) are compatible and have combined effects in controlling the pathogenic fungi Fusarium oxysporum and Sclerotium rolfsii, which cause the root rot of lentil. Cowdung mixing with soil (at 5 t/ha) during final land preparation and seed coating with BINA-biofertilizer and BAU-biofungicide (at 2.5% of seed weight) before sowing recorded 81.50% field emergence of lentil, which showed up to 19.85% higher field emergence over the control. Post-emergence deaths of plants due to foot rot disease were significantly reduced after combined seed treatment with BINA-biofertilizer and BAU-biofungicide. Among the treatments used, only BAU-biofungicide as the seed treating agent resulted in higher plant stand (84.82%). Use of BINA-biofertilizer and BAU-biofungicide as seed treating biocontrol agents and application of cowdung in the soil as an organic source of nutrient resulted in higher shoot and root lengths, and dry shoot and root weights of lentil. BINA-biofertilizer significantly increased the number of nodules per plant and nodules weight of lentil. Seeds treating with BAUbiofungicide and BINA-biofertilizer and soil amendment with cowdung increased the biomass production of lentil up to 75.56% over the control.

  2. Amblyseius swirskii: what made this predatory mite such a successful biocontrol agent?

    PubMed

    Calvo, F Javier; Knapp, Markus; van Houten, Yvonne M; Hoogerbrugge, Hans; Belda, José E

    2015-04-01

    The predatory mite Amblyseius swirskii quickly became one of the most successful biocontrol agents in protected cultivation after its introduction into the market in 2005 and is now released in more than 50 countries. There are several key factors contributing to this success: (1) it can control several major pests including the western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis, the whiteflies Bemisia tabaci and Trialeurodes vaporariorum and the broad mite, Polyphagotarsonemus latus, simultaneously in vegetables and ornamental crops; (2) it can develop and reproduce feeding on non-prey food sources such as pollen, which allows populations of the predator to build up on plants before the pests are present and to persist in the crop during periods when prey is scarce or absent; and (3) it can be easily reared on factitious prey, which allows economic mass production. However, despite the fact that A. swirskii provides growers with a robust control method, external demands were initially a key factor in promoting the use of this predator, particularly in Spain. In 2006, when exports of fresh vegetables from Spain were stopped due to the presence of pesticide residues, growers were forced to look for alternatives to chemical control. This resulted in the massive adoption of biological control-based integrated pest management programmes based on the use of A. swirskii in sweet pepper. Biological control increased from 5 % in 2005, 1 year before A. swirskii was commercially released, to almost 100 % of a total 6,000 ha of protected sweet pepper in Spain within 3 years. Later, it was demonstrated that A. swirskii was equally effective in other crops and countries, resulting in extensive worldwide use of A. swirskii in greenhouses.

  3. What magnitude are observed non-target impacts from weed biocontrol?

    PubMed

    Suckling, David Maxwell; Sforza, René François Henri

    2014-01-01

    A systematic review focused by plant on non-target impacts from agents deliberately introduced for the biological control of weeds found significant non-target impacts to be rare. The magnitude of direct impact of 43 biocontrol agents on 140 non-target plants was retrospectively categorized using a risk management framework for ecological impacts of invasive species (minimal, minor, moderate, major, massive). The vast majority of agents introduced for classical biological control of weeds (>99% of 512 agents released) have had no known significant adverse effects on non-target plants thus far; major effects suppressing non-target plant populations could be expected to be detectable. Most direct non-target impacts on plants (91.6%) were categorized as minimal or minor in magnitude with no known adverse long-term impact on non-target plant populations, but a few cacti and thistles are affected at moderate (n = 3), major (n = 7) to massive (n = 1) scale. The largest direct impacts are from two agents (Cactoblastis cactorum on native cacti and Rhinocyllus conicus on native thistles), but these introductions would not be permitted today as more balanced attitudes exist to plant biodiversity, driven by both society and the scientific community. Our analysis shows (as far as is known), weed biological control agents have a biosafety track record of >99% of cases avoiding significant non-target impacts on plant populations. Some impacts could have been overlooked, but this seems unlikely to change the basic distribution of very limited adverse effects. Fewer non-target impacts can be expected in future because of improved science and incorporation of wider values. Failure to use biological control represents a significant opportunity cost from the certainty of ongoing adverse impacts from invasive weeds. It is recommended that a simple five-step scale be used to better communicate the risk of consequences from both action (classical biological control) and no

  4. Biocontrol and Rapid Detection of Food-Borne Pathogens Using Bacteriophages and Endolysins.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jaewoo; Kim, You-Tae; Ryu, Sangryeol; Lee, Ju-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages have been suggested as natural food preservatives as well as rapid detection materials for food-borne pathogens in various foods. Since Listeria monocytogenes-targeting phage cocktail (ListShield) was approved for applications in foods, numerous phages have been screened and experimentally characterized for phage applications in foods. A single phage and phage cocktail treatments to various foods contaminated with food-borne pathogens including E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica, Campylobacter jejuni, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Cronobacter sakazakii, and Vibrio spp. revealed that they have great potential to control various food-borne pathogens and may be alternative for conventional food preservatives. In addition, phage-derived endolysins with high host specificity and host lysis activities may be preferred to food applications rather than phages. For rapid detection of food-borne pathogens, cell-wall binding domains (CBDs) from endolysins have been suggested due to their high host-specific binding. Fluorescence-tagged CBDs have been successfully evaluated and suggested to be alternative materials of expensive antibodies for various detection applications. Most recently, reporter phage systems have been developed and tested to confirm their usability and accuracy for specific detection. These systems revealed some advantages like rapid detection of only viable pathogenic cells without interference by food components in a very short reaction time, suggesting that these systems may be suitable for monitoring of pathogens in foods. Consequently, phage is the next-generation biocontrol agent as well as rapid detection tool to confirm and even identify the food-borne pathogens present in various foods. PMID:27092128

  5. Three New Pierce's Disease Pathogenicity Effectors Identified Using Xylella fastidiosa Biocontrol Strain EB92-1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shujian; Chakrabarty, Pranjib K; Fleites, Laura A; Rayside, Patricia A; Hopkins, Donald L; Gabriel, Dean W

    2015-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa (X. fastidiosa) infects a wide range of plant hosts and causes economically serious diseases, including Pierce's Disease (PD) of grapevines. X. fastidiosa biocontrol strain EB92-1 was isolated from elderberry and is infectious and persistent in grapevines but causes only very slight symptoms under ideal conditions. The draft genome of EB92-1 revealed that it appeared to be missing genes encoding 10 potential PD pathogenicity effectors found in Temecula1. Subsequent PCR and sequencing analyses confirmed that EB92-1 was missing the following predicted effectors found in Temecula1: two type II secreted enzymes, including a lipase (LipA; PD1703) and a serine protease (PD0956); two identical genes encoding proteins similar to Zonula occludens toxins (Zot; PD0915 and PD0928), and at least one relatively short, hemagglutinin-like protein (PD0986). Leaves of tobacco and citrus inoculated with cell-free, crude protein extracts of E. coli BL21(DE3) overexpressing PD1703 exhibited a hypersensitive response (HR) in less than 24 hours. When cloned into shuttle vector pBBR1MCS-5, PD1703 conferred strong secreted lipase activity to Xanthomonas citri, E. coli and X. fastidiosa EB92-1 in plate assays. EB92-1/PD1703 transformants also showed significantly increased disease symptoms on grapevines, characteristic of PD. Genes predicted to encode PD0928 (Zot) and a PD0986 (hemagglutinin) were also cloned into pBBR1MCS-5 and moved into EB92-1; both transformants also showed significantly increased symptoms on V. vinifera vines, characteristic of PD. Together, these results reveal that PD effectors include at least a lipase, two Zot-like toxins and a possibly redundant hemagglutinin, none of which are necessary for parasitic survival of X. fastidiosa populations in grapevines or elderberry. PMID:26218423

  6. Bacteriophage biocontrol of Listeria monocytogenes on soft ripened white mold and red-smear cheeses

    PubMed Central

    Guenther, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Soft-ripened cheeses belong to the type of food most often contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, and they have been implicated in several outbreaks of listeriosis. Bacteriophages represent an attractive way to combat foodborne pathogens without affecting other properties of the food. We used the broad host range, virulent Listeria phage A511 for control of L. monocytogenes during the production and ripening phases of both types of soft-ripened cheeses, white mold (Camembert-type) cheese, as well as washed-rind cheese with a red-smear surface (Limburger-type). The surfaces of young, unripened cheese were inoculated with 101–103 cfu/cm2 L. monocytogenes strains Scott A (serovar 4b) or CNL 103/2005 (serovar 1/2a). Phage was applied at defined time points thereafter, in single or repeated treatments, at 3 × 108 or 1 × 109 pfu/cm2. With Scott A (103 cfu/cm2) and a single dose of A511 (3 × 108 pfu/cm2) on camembert-type cheese, viable counts dropped 2.5 logs at the end of the 21 day ripening period. Repeated phage application did not further inhibit the bacteria, whereas a single higher dose (1 × 109 pfu/cm2) was found to be more effective. On red-smear cheese ripened for 22 days, Listeria counts were down by more than 3 logs. Repeated application of A511 further delayed re-growth of Listeria, but did not affect bacterial counts after 22 days. With lower initial Listeria contamination (101–102 cfu/cm2), viable counts dropped below the limit of detection, corresponding to more than 6 logs reduction compared to the control. Our data clearly demonstrate the potential of bacteriophage for biocontrol of L. monocytogenes in soft cheese. PMID:22334865

  7. Plant growth-promoting traits of biocontrol potential bacteria isolated from rice rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Subramaniam; Upadhyaya, Hd; Vadlamudi, Srinivas; Humayun, Pagidi; Vidya, Meesala Sree; Alekhya, Gottumukkala; Singh, Amit; Vijayabharathi, Rajendran; Bhimineni, Ratna Kumari; Seema, Murali; Rathore, Abhishek; Rupela, Om

    2012-12-01

    Seven isolates of bacteria (SRI-156, SRI-158, SRI-178, SRI-211, SRI-229, SRI-305 and SRI-360) were earlier reported by us as having potential for biocontrol of charcoal rot of sorghum and plant growth promotion (PGP) of the plant. In the present study, the seven isolates were characterized for their physiological traits (tolerance to salinity, pH, temperature and resistance to antibiotics and fungicides) and further evaluated in the field for their PGP of rice. All the seven isolates were able to grow at pH values between 5 and 13, in NaCl concentrations of up to 8% (except SRI-156 and SRI-360), temperatures between 20 and 40°C and were resistant to ampicillin (>100 ppm; except SRI-158 and SRI-178) but sensitive (<10 ppm) to chloramphenicol, kanamycin, nalidixic acid, streptomycin (except SRI-156 and SRI-211) and tetracycline. They were tolerant to fungicides benlate and captan, except SRI-158 and SRI-178, bavistin and sensitive to thiram (except SRI-156 and SRI-211) at field application level. In the field, four of the seven isolates (SRI-158, SRI-211, SRI-229 and SRI-360) significantly enhanced the tiller numbers, stover and grain yields, total dry matter, root length, volume and dry weight over the un-inoculated control. In the rhizosphere soil at harvest, all the isolates significantly enhanced microbial biomass carbon (except SRI-156), microbial biomass nitrogen and dehydrogenase activity (up to 33%, 36% and 39%, respectively) and total N, available P and% organic carbon (up to 10%, 38% and 10%, respectively) compared to the control. This investigation further confirms that the SRI isolates have PGP properties.

  8. Chitinases from the Plant Disease Biocontrol Agent, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia C3.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Yuen, G Y; Sarath, G; Penheiter, A R

    2001-02-01

    ABSTRACT Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strain C3, a biocontrol agent of Bipolaris sorokiniana in turfgrass, produced chitinases in broth media containing chitin. Chitinases were partially purified from culture fluid by ammonium sulfate precipitation and chitin affinity chromatography. The chromatography fraction with the highest specific chitinase activity was inhibitory to conidial germination and germ-tube elongation of B. sorokiniana, but it was less inhibitory than the protein fraction or the raw culture filtrate. The fraction exhibited strong exochitinase and weak endo-chitinase activity. Optimum temperature and pH for chitinase activity were 45 to 50 degrees C and 4.5 to 5.0, respectively. Chitinase activity was inhibited by Hg(2+) and Fe(3+), but not by other metal ions or enzyme inhibitors. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of the chromatography fraction revealed the presence of five protein bands of 25, 32, 48, 65, and 75 kDa. Partial amino acid sequences of the 32-, 65-, and 75-kDa proteins indicated that they are homologous to known bacterial chitinases. There was no homology found in the partial amino acid sequences of the 25- and 48-kDa proteins to any known chitinases. Five chitinase-active proteins were detected in the protein and chromatography fractions by activity gels, but when each protein was extracted and re-electrophoresed separately under denaturing conditions, only 32- or 48-kDa proteins were revealed. It was concluded that strain C3 produces at least two chitinases that are antifungal.

  9. Comparison of real-time PCR and microscopy to evaluate sclerotial colonisation by a biocontrol fungus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Gwan; Knudsen, Guy R

    2011-01-01

    The biocontrol agent Trichoderma harzianum colonises sclerotia of the plant pathogenic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Plating of sclerotia typically has been used to determine the incidence of mycoparasitism, but does not quantify the extent to which individual sclerotia are colonised. We developed a specific PCR primer/probe set for the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transformant T. harzianum ThzID1-M3, which exhibited high precision and reproducibility. Quantitative real-time PCR was evaluated along with epifluorescence microscopy and image analysis to investigate dynamics of colonisation of sclerotia in non-sterile soil. Amounts of ThzID1-M3 DNA and S. sclerotiorum DNA from entire individual sclerotia were quantified using real-time PCR. Epifluorescence micrographs were captured from sclerotial thin-section samples, and GFP fluorescence from these was quantified using computer image analysis in order to estimate colonisation on a per-sclerotium basis. As determined by either method, ThzID1-M3 colonised sclerotia in soil, and both methods quantified colonisation dynamics over time. In a separate experiment, colonisation of sclerotia on agar plates was observed using confocal laser scanning microscopy to view the GFP-fluorescing hyphae of ThzID1-M3. This method, while highly labour-intensive, provided high spatial resolution of colonisation dynamics. Thus, each method has advantages: microscopy combined with image analysis can provide useful information on the spatial and temporal dynamics of colonisation, while real-time PCR can provide a more precise assessment of the extent of sclerotial colonisation over time and can more easily be used to sample entire sclerotia. PMID:21530913

  10. Three New Pierce's Disease Pathogenicity Effectors Identified Using Xylella fastidiosa Biocontrol Strain EB92-1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shujian; Chakrabarty, Pranjib K.; Fleites, Laura A.; Rayside, Patricia A.; Hopkins, Donald L.; Gabriel, Dean W.

    2015-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa (X. fastidiosa) infects a wide range of plant hosts and causes economically serious diseases, including Pierce's Disease (PD) of grapevines. X. fastidiosa biocontrol strain EB92-1 was isolated from elderberry and is infectious and persistent in grapevines but causes only very slight symptoms under ideal conditions. The draft genome of EB92-1 revealed that it appeared to be missing genes encoding 10 potential PD pathogenicity effectors found in Temecula1. Subsequent PCR and sequencing analyses confirmed that EB92-1 was missing the following predicted effectors found in Temecula1: two type II secreted enzymes, including a lipase (LipA; PD1703) and a serine protease (PD0956); two identical genes encoding proteins similar to Zonula occludens toxins (Zot; PD0915 and PD0928), and at least one relatively short, hemagglutinin-like protein (PD0986). Leaves of tobacco and citrus inoculated with cell-free, crude protein extracts of E. coli BL21(DE3) overexpressing PD1703 exhibited a hypersensitive response (HR) in less than 24 hours. When cloned into shuttle vector pBBR1MCS-5, PD1703 conferred strong secreted lipase activity to Xanthomonas citri, E. coli and X. fastidiosa EB92-1 in plate assays. EB92-1/PD1703 transformants also showed significantly increased disease symptoms on grapevines, characteristic of PD. Genes predicted to encode PD0928 (Zot) and a PD0986 (hemagglutinin) were also cloned into pBBR1MCS-5 and moved into EB92-1; both transformants also showed significantly increased symptoms on V. vinifera vines, characteristic of PD. Together, these results reveal that PD effectors include at least a lipase, two Zot-like toxins and a possibly redundant hemagglutinin, none of which are necessary for parasitic survival of X. fastidiosa populations in grapevines or elderberry. PMID:26218423

  11. Biocontrol of Ralstonia solanacearum by Treatment with Lytic Bacteriophages ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Akiko; Fujisawa, Mariko; Hamasaki, Ryosuke; Kawasaki, Takeru; Fujie, Makoto; Yamada, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is a Gram-negative bacterium and the causative agent of bacterial wilt in many important crops. We treated R. solanacearum with three lytic phages: φRSA1, φRSB1, and φRSL1. Infection with φRSA1 and φRSB1, either alone or in combination with the other phages, resulted in a rapid decrease in the host bacterial cell density. Cells that were resistant to infection by these phages became evident approximately 30 h after phage addition to the culture. On the other hand, cells infected solely with φRSL1 in a batch culture were maintained at a lower cell density (1/3 of control) over a long period. Pretreatment of tomato seedlings with φRSL1 drastically limited penetration, growth, and movement of root-inoculated bacterial cells. All φRSL1-treated tomato plants showed no symptoms of wilting during the experimental period, whereas all untreated plants had wilted by 18 days postinfection. φRSL1 was shown to be relatively stable in soil, especially at higher temperatures (37 to 50°C). Active φRSL1 particles were recovered from the roots of treated plants and from soil 4 months postinfection. Based on these observations, we propose an alternative biocontrol method using a unique phage, such as φRSL1, instead of a phage cocktail with highly virulent phages. Using this method, φRSL1 killed some but not all bacterial cells. The coexistence of bacterial cells and the phage resulted in effective prevention of wilting. PMID:21498752

  12. Evaluation of yeasts from Tibetan fermented products as agents for biocontrol of blue mold of Nashi pear fruits*

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hao; Xu, Yang; Lu, Huang-ping; Xiao, Rui; Zheng, Xiao-dong; Yu, Ting

    2015-01-01

    A total of 20 strains of yeast isolated from Tibetan fermented products were screened for antagonism against blue mold of pear caused by Penicillium expansum. Six isolates that inhibited incidence of postharvest decay by 35% or more were selected for further screening. Among them, the most effective was Rhodotorula mucilaginosa. The results showed that washed cell suspensions of R. mucilaginosa yielded better antagonistic efficacy than unwashed cell-culture mixtures, cell-free culture filtrates, and autoclaved cell cultures. Biocontrol activity improved with increasing concentrations of incubated cells. The best concentration was 1×108 cells/ml, at which the incidence of decay was only 16.7% after 6 d of incubation. The germination of conidia of P. expansum in vitro was significantly inhibited by both washed cell-suspensions and unwashed cell-culture mixtures. Rapid colonization by yeast at different concentrations showed a relationship between yeast-cell concentration and biocontrol activity. Although the titratable acidity of pear fruits increased after treatment, R. mucilaginosa did not affect the total soluble solids or ascorbic acid content. This is the first study to report that the yeast R. mucilaginosa from Tibet Autonomous Region of China may have potential as an antagonist to control the postharvest decay of pear fruits. PMID:25845361

  13. Phytic Acid Enhances Biocontrol Activity of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa against Penicillium expansum Contamination and Patulin Production in Apples

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qiya; Zhang, Hongyin; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Zheng, Xiangfeng; Qian, Jingya

    2015-01-01

    The effect of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa in combination with phytic acid (PA) on blue mold decay and patulin contamination of apples was investigated. Results from this study show that different concentrations of PA were effective in reducing the disease incidence of apples and that PA at concentration of 4 μmol/mL, decreased the incidence of blue mold decay in apples from 86.1 to 62.5%, and showed higher control efficacy compared to untreated, control fruit during storage at 20°C. However, R. mucilaginosa combined with PA (4 μmol/mL) showed better control efficacy of blue mold decay than R. mucilaginosa used as single treatment, the disease incidence was reduced to 62.5% and lesion diameter on apples was reduced to 16.59 cm. In in vitro experiments, the addition of PA enhanced the biocontrol effect of R. mucilaginosa against the growth of Penicillium expansum and reduced patulin level when compared with either R. mucilaginosa or PA used separately. R. mucilaginosa together with PA, improved the inhibition of patulin production in wounded apples, decreasing the content of patulin by 89.6% compared to the control, under experimental conditions. Both R. mucilaginosa and R. mucilaginosa in combination with PA degraded patulin in vitro. In conclusion, the appropriate combination of R. mucilaginosa and PA may provide an effective biocontrol method for reducing postharvest decay of apples. PMID:26635764

  14. Novel approach of using a cocktail of designed bacteriophages against gut pathogenic E. coli for bacterial load biocontrol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study was conducted to explore new approaches of animal biocontrol via biological control feed. Method White rats were subjected to 140 highly lytic designed phages specific against E. coli. Phages were fed via drinking water, oral injection, and vegetable capsules. Phage feeding was applied by 24 h feeding with 11d monitoring and 20d phage feeding and monitoring. Group of rats received external pathogenic E. coli and another group did not, namely groups A and B. Results Phage feeding for 20d via vegetable capsules yielded the highest reduction of fecal E. coli, 3.02 and 4.62 log, in rats group A and B respectively. Second best, feeding for 20d via drinking water with alkali yielded 2.78 and 4.08 log in rats groups A and B respectively. The peak reduction in E. coli output was 5–10 d after phage feeding. Phage control declined after 10th day of feeding. Conclusions The use of cocktail of designed phages succeeded in suppressing flora or external E. coli. The phage feed biocontrol is efficient in controlling E. coli at the pre-harvest period, precisely at the 6th-8th day of phage feeding when the lowest E. coli output found. PMID:25062829

  15. Antifungal modes of action of Saccharomyces and other biocontrol yeasts against fungi isolated from sour and grey rots.

    PubMed

    Nally, M C; Pesce, V M; Maturano, Y P; Rodriguez Assaf, L A; Toro, M E; Castellanos de Figueroa, L I; Vazquez, F

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the putative modes of action of 59 viticultural yeasts (31 Saccharomyces and 28 non-Saccharomyces) that inhibited fungi isolated from sour and grey rot in grapes. Inhibition of fungal mycelial growth by metabolites, enzyme activities (laminarinases, chitinases), antifungal volatiles, competition for nutrients (siderophores, Niche Overlap Index (NOI)), inhibition of fungal spore germination and decreased germinal tube length and induction of resistance were assayed. Biofungicide yeasts were classified into "antifungal patterns", according to their mechanisms of action. Thirty isolates presented at least two of the mechanisms assayed. We propose that inhibition of fungal mycelial growth by metabolites, laminarinases, competition for nutrients, inhibition of fungal spore germination and decreased germinal tube length, and antifungal volatiles by Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces viticultural yeasts is used as putative biocontrol mechanisms against phytopathogenic fungi. Twenty-four different antifungal patterns were identified. Siderophore production (N)and a combination of siderophore production and NOI>0.92 (M)were the most frequent antifungal patterns observed in the biofungicide yeasts assayed. Elucidation of these mechanisms could be useful for optimization of an inoculum formulation, resulting in a more consistent control of grey and sour rot with Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces biocontrol yeasts. PMID:25863340

  16. Genetic Responses Induced in Olive Roots upon Colonization by the Biocontrol Endophytic Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7

    PubMed Central

    Schilirò, Elisabetta; Ferrara, Massimo; Nigro, Franco; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge on the genetic basis underlying interactions between beneficial bacteria and woody plants is still very limited, and totally absent in the case of olive. We aimed to elucidate genetic responses taking place during the colonization of olive roots by the native endophyte Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7, an effective biocontrol agent against Verticillium wilt of olive. Roots of olive plants grown under non-gnotobiotic conditions were collected at different time points after PICF7 inoculation. A Suppression Subtractive Hybridization cDNA library enriched in induced genes was generated. Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis validated the induction of selected olive genes. Computational analysis of 445 olive ESTs showed that plant defence and response to different stresses represented nearly 45% of genes induced in PICF7-colonized olive roots. Moreover, quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis confirmed induction of lipoxygenase, phenylpropanoid, terpenoids and plant hormones biosynthesis transcripts. Different classes of transcription factors (i.e., bHLH, WRKYs, GRAS1) were also induced. This work highlights for the first time the ability of an endophytic Pseudomonas spp. strain to mount a wide array of defence responses in an economically-relevant woody crop such as olive, helping to explain its biocontrol activity. PMID:23144916

  17. Killer activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains: partial characterization and strategies to improve the biocontrol efficacy in winemaking.

    PubMed

    de Ullivarri, Miguel Fernández; Mendoza, Lucía M; Raya, Raúl R

    2014-11-01

    Killer yeasts are considered potential biocontrol agents to avoid or reduce wine spoilage by undesirable species. In this study two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains (Cf8 and M12) producing killer toxin were partially characterized and new strategies to improve their activity in winemaking were evaluated. Killer toxins were characterized by biochemical tests and growth inhibition of sensitive yeasts. Also genes encoding killer toxin were detected in the chromosomes of both strains by PCR. Both toxins showed optimal activity and production at conditions used during the wine-making process (pH 3.5 and temperatures of 15-25 °C). In addition, production of both toxins was higher when a nitrogen source was added. To improve killer activity different strategies of inoculation were studied, with the sequential inoculation of killer strains the best combination to control the growth of undesired yeasts. Sequential inoculation of Cf8-M12 showed a 45 % increase of killer activity on sensitive S. cerevisiae and spoilage yeasts. In the presence of ethanol (5-12 %) and SO2 (50 mg/L) the killer activity of both toxins was increased, especially for toxin Cf8. Characteristics of both killer strains support their future application as starter cultures and biocontrol agents to produce wines of controlled quality.

  18. Intracellular trehalose and sorbitol synergistically promoting cell viability of a biocontrol yeast, Pichia anomala, for aflatoxin reduction.

    PubMed

    Hua, Sui Sheng T; Hernlem, Bradley J; Yokoyama, Wallace; Sarreal, Siov Bouy L

    2015-05-01

    Pichia anomala (Wickerhamomyces anomalus) WRL-076 was discovered by a visual screening bioassay for its antagonism against Aspergillus flavus. The yeast was shown to significantly inhibit aflatoxin production and the growth of A. flavus. P. anomala is a potential biocontrol agent for reduction of aflatoxin in the food chain. Maintaining the viability of biocontrol agents in formulated products is a great challenge for commercial applications. Four media, NYG, NYGS, NYGT and NYGST are described which support good growth of yeast cells and were tested as storage formulations. Post growth supplement of 5 % trehalose to NYGST resulted in 83 % viable yeast cells after 12 months in cold storage. Intracellular sorbitol and trehalose concentrations were determined by HPLC analysis at the beginning of the storage and at the end of 12 month. Correlation of cell viability to both trehalose and sorbitol suggested a synergistic effect. Bonferroni (Dunn) t Test, Tukey's Studentized Range (HSD) Test and Duncan's Multiple Range Test, all showed that yeast cell viability in samples with both intracellular trehalose and sorbitol were significantly higher than those with either or none, at a 95 % confidence level. DiBAC4(5) and CFDA-AM were used as the membrane integrity fluorescent stains to create a two-color vital staining scheme with red and green fluorescence, respectively. Yeast cells stored in formulations NYG and NYGS with no detectable trehalose, displayed mostly red fluorescence. Yeast cells in NYGST+5T showed mostly green fluorescence. PMID:25700743

  19. Intracellular trehalose and sorbitol synergistically promoting cell viability of a biocontrol yeast, Pichia anomala, for aflatoxin reduction.

    PubMed

    Hua, Sui Sheng T; Hernlem, Bradley J; Yokoyama, Wallace; Sarreal, Siov Bouy L

    2015-05-01

    Pichia anomala (Wickerhamomyces anomalus) WRL-076 was discovered by a visual screening bioassay for its antagonism against Aspergillus flavus. The yeast was shown to significantly inhibit aflatoxin production and the growth of A. flavus. P. anomala is a potential biocontrol agent for reduction of aflatoxin in the food chain. Maintaining the viability of biocontrol agents in formulated products is a great challenge for commercial applications. Four media, NYG, NYGS, NYGT and NYGST are described which support good growth of yeast cells and were tested as storage formulations. Post growth supplement of 5 % trehalose to NYGST resulted in 83 % viable yeast cells after 12 months in cold storage. Intracellular sorbitol and trehalose concentrations were determined by HPLC analysis at the beginning of the storage and at the end of 12 month. Correlation of cell viability to both trehalose and sorbitol suggested a synergistic effect. Bonferroni (Dunn) t Test, Tukey's Studentized Range (HSD) Test and Duncan's Multiple Range Test, all showed that yeast cell viability in samples with both intracellular trehalose and sorbitol were significantly higher than those with either or none, at a 95 % confidence level. DiBAC4(5) and CFDA-AM were used as the membrane integrity fluorescent stains to create a two-color vital staining scheme with red and green fluorescence, respectively. Yeast cells stored in formulations NYG and NYGS with no detectable trehalose, displayed mostly red fluorescence. Yeast cells in NYGST+5T showed mostly green fluorescence.

  20. The type III secretion system of biocontrol Pseudomonas fluorescens KD targets the phytopathogenic Chromista Pythium ultimum and promotes cucumber protection.

    PubMed

    Rezzonico, Fabio; Binder, Christian; Défago, Geneviève; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan

    2005-09-01

    The type III secretion system (TTSS) is used by Proteobacteria for pathogenic or symbiotic interaction with plant and animal hosts. Recently, TTSS genes thought to originate from the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae were evidenced in Pseudomonas fluorescens KD, which protects cucumber from the oomycete Pythium ultimum (kingdom Chromista/Stramenopila). However, it is not known whether the TTSS contributes to plant protection by the bacterium and, if so, whether it targets the plant or the phytopathogen. Inactivation of TTSS gene hrcV following the insertion of an omega cassette strongly reduced the biocontrol activity of the pseudomonad against P. ultimum on cucumber when compared with the wild type, but had no effect on its root-colonization ability. Analysis of a plasmid-based transcriptional hrpJ'-inaZ reporter fusion revealed that expression in strain KD of the operon containing hrcV was strongly stimulated in vitro and in situ by the oomycete and not by the plant. In vitro, both strain KD and its hrcV mutant reduced the activity level of the pectinase polygalacturonase (a key pathogenicity factor) from P. ultimum, but the reduction was much stronger with the wild type. Together, these results show that the target range of bacterial TTSS is not restricted to plants and animals but also can include members of Chromista/Stramenopila, and suggest that virulence genes acquired horizontally from phytopathogenic bacteria were functionally recycled in biocontrol saprophytic Pseudomonas spp., resulting in enhanced plant protection by the latter.

  1. Pseudomonas protegens sp. nov., widespread plant-protecting bacteria producing the biocontrol compounds 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol and pyoluteorin.

    PubMed

    Ramette, Alban; Frapolli, Michele; Fischer-Le Saux, Marion; Gruffaz, C; Meyer, Jean-Marie; Défago, Geneviève; Sutra, Laurent; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan

    2011-05-01

    Fluorescent Pseudomonas strains producing the antimicrobial secondary metabolite 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (Phl) play a prominent role in the biocontrol of plant diseases. A subset of Phl-producing fluorescent Pseudomonas strains, which can additionally synthesize the antimicrobial compound pyoluteorin (Plt), appears to cluster separately from other fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. based on 16S rRNA gene analysis and shares at most 98.4% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity with any other Pseudomonas species. In this study, a polyphasic approach based on molecular and phenotypic methods was used to clarify the taxonomy of representative Phl(+) Plt(+) strains isolated from tobacco, cotton or wheat on different continents. Phl(+) Plt(+) strains clustered separately from their nearest phylogenetic neighbors (i.e. species from the 'P. syringae', 'P. fluorescens' and 'P. chlororaphis' species complexes) based on rpoB, rpoD or gyrB phylogenies. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments clarified that Phl(+) Plt(+) strains formed a tight genomospecies that was distinct from P. syringae, P. fluorescens, or P. chlororaphis type strains. Within Phl(+) strains, the Phl(+) Plt(+) strains were differentiated from other biocontrol fluorescent Pseudomonas strains that produced Phl but not Plt, based on phenotypic and molecular data. Discriminative phenotypic characters were also identified by numerical taxonomic analysis and siderotyping. Altogether, this polyphasic approach supported the conclusion that Phl(+) Plt(+) fluorescent Pseudomonas strains belonged to a novel species for which the name Pseudomonas protegens is proposed, with CHA0(T) (=CFBP 6595(T), =DSM 19095(T)) as the type strain.

  2. Phytic Acid Enhances Biocontrol Activity of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa against Penicillium expansum Contamination and Patulin Production in Apples.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiya; Zhang, Hongyin; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Zheng, Xiangfeng; Qian, Jingya

    2015-01-01

    The effect of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa in combination with phytic acid (PA) on blue mold decay and patulin contamination of apples was investigated. Results from this study show that different concentrations of PA were effective in reducing the disease incidence of apples and that PA at concentration of 4 μmol/mL, decreased the incidence of blue mold decay in apples from 86.1 to 62.5%, and showed higher control efficacy compared to untreated, control fruit during storage at 20°C. However, R. mucilaginosa combined with PA (4 μmol/mL) showed better control efficacy of blue mold decay than R. mucilaginosa used as single treatment, the disease incidence was reduced to 62.5% and lesion diameter on apples was reduced to 16.59 cm. In in vitro experiments, the addition of PA enhanced the biocontrol effect of R. mucilaginosa against the growth of Penicillium expansum and reduced patulin level when compared with either R. mucilaginosa or PA used separately. R. mucilaginosa together with PA, improved the inhibition of patulin production in wounded apples, decreasing the content of patulin by 89.6% compared to the control, under experimental conditions. Both R. mucilaginosa and R. mucilaginosa in combination with PA degraded patulin in vitro. In conclusion, the appropriate combination of R. mucilaginosa and PA may provide an effective biocontrol method for reducing postharvest decay of apples. PMID:26635764

  3. Screening of bacterial biocontrols against sapstain fungus (Lasiodiplodia theobromae Pat.) of rubberwood (Hevea brasiliensis Muell.Arg.).

    PubMed

    Sajitha, K L; Maria Florence, E J; Dev, Suma Arun

    2014-09-01

    Diverse bacterial biocontrol agents from various sources of aerobic composts against the sapstain fungus Lasiodiplodia theobromae in rubberwood (Hevea brasiliensis) were isolated, screened and identified by various morphological, biochemical and molecular techniques. The inhibitory effect of seventeen bacterial isolates was examined and seven exhibited inhibition towards the sapstain fungus. Among the seven antagonists, six were conclusively identified as Bacillus subtilis and one as Paenibacillus polymyxa using 16S rRNA-encoding gene sequencing. This is the first report on the occurrence of P. polymyxa, a potent biofertilizer and antagonist in vermicompost. HiCrome Bacillus agar was identified as an effective medium for differentiation of B. subtilis from other Bacillus species. The present work demonstrates the efficacy of the antagonistic property of B. subtilis strains against rubberwood sapstain fungus. Culture-based antagonistic inhibition displayed by B. subtilis can be extended to cater to the biocontrol requirements of wood-based industries against the stain fungus. The study showed the utility of an integrated approach, employing morphological, biochemical and molecular tools for conclusive identification of several bacterial isolates present in aerobic composts from diverse sources. PMID:25049165

  4. The S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase gene ahcY of Agrobacterium radiobacter K84 is required for optimal growth, antibiotic production, and biocontrol of crown gall disease.

    PubMed

    Penyalver, Ramón; Oger, Phil M; Su, Shengchang; Alvarez, Belén; Salcedo, Carmina I; López, María M; Farrand, Stephen K

    2009-06-01

    Agrobacterium radiobacter K84 is a commercial agent used worldwide to control crown gall disease caused by pathogenic isolates of A. tumefaciens. More than 2,000 transposon insertion derivatives of strain K84 were screened by a standardized greenhouse bioassay to identify mutants defective in biocontrol. Three mutants affected in biocontrol properties were identified. All three mutants displayed normal levels of attachment to tomato seed and root colonization. One of these mutants, M19-164, exhibited partial biocontrol and did not produce detectable levels of agrocin 84. In this mutant, the transposon is located in the agn locus of pAgK84, which codes for agrocin 84 biosynthesis. The second mutant, M19-158, also exhibited partial biocontrol and produced reduced amounts of agrocin 84 as a result of a mutation in a chromosomal gene of unknown function. The third mutant, M9-22, failed to biocontrol, was impaired in both growth in minimal medium and siderophore production, and failed to produce detectable levels of agrocin 84. The chromosomal gene ahcY, which encodes S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine hydrolase, was disrupted in this mutant. Expression of a functional copy of ahcY in M9-22 restored all of the altered phenotypes. The fact that all identified biocontrol mutants exhibited a partial or total defect in production of agrocin 84 indicates that this antibiotic is required for optimum biocontrol. This study also identified two chromosomally encoded genes required for agrocin 84 production. That a mutation in ahcY abolishes biocontrol suggests that the intracellular ratio of S-adenosyl-l-methionine to S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine is an important factor for agrocin 84 biosynthesis. Finally, we demonstrate that the ahcY gene in strain K84 is also required for optimal growth as well as for antibiotic production and biocontrol of crown gall disease.

  5. Response of tomato wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum to the volatile organic compounds produced by a biocontrol strain Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SQR-9

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Waseem; Ling, Ning; Yang, Liudong; Huang, Qiwei; Shen, Qirong

    2016-01-01

    It is important to study the response of plant pathogens to the antibiosis traits of biocontrol microbes to design the efficient biocontrol strategies. In this study, we evaluated the role of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by a biocontrol strain Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SQR-9 on the growth and virulence traits of tomato wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum (RS). The VOCs of SQR-9 significantly inhibited the growth of RS on agar medium and in soil. In addition, the VOCs significantly inhibited the motility traits, production of antioxidant enzymes and exopolysaccharides, biofilm formation and tomato root colonization by RS. The strain SQR-9 produced 22 VOCs, but only nine VOCs showed 1–11% antibacterial activity against RS in their corresponding amounts; however, the consortium of all VOCs showed 70% growth inhibition of RS. The proteomics analysis showed that the VOCs of SQR-9 downregulated RS proteins related to the antioxidant activity, virulence, carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, protein folding and translation, while the proteins involved in the ABC transporter system, amino acid synthesis, detoxification of aldehydes and ketones, methylation, protein translation and folding, and energy transfer were upregulated. This study describes the significance and effectiveness of VOCs produced by a biocontrol strain against tomato wilt pathogen. PMID:27103342

  6. Response of tomato wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum to the volatile organic compounds produced by a biocontrol strain Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SQR-9.

    PubMed

    Raza, Waseem; Ling, Ning; Yang, Liudong; Huang, Qiwei; Shen, Qirong

    2016-01-01

    It is important to study the response of plant pathogens to the antibiosis traits of biocontrol microbes to design the efficient biocontrol strategies. In this study, we evaluated the role of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by a biocontrol strain Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SQR-9 on the growth and virulence traits of tomato wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum (RS). The VOCs of SQR-9 significantly inhibited the growth of RS on agar medium and in soil. In addition, the VOCs significantly inhibited the motility traits, production of antioxidant enzymes and exopolysaccharides, biofilm formation and tomato root colonization by RS. The strain SQR-9 produced 22 VOCs, but only nine VOCs showed 1-11% antibacterial activity against RS in their corresponding amounts; however, the consortium of all VOCs showed 70% growth inhibition of RS. The proteomics analysis showed that the VOCs of SQR-9 downregulated RS proteins related to the antioxidant activity, virulence, carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, protein folding and translation, while the proteins involved in the ABC transporter system, amino acid synthesis, detoxification of aldehydes and ketones, methylation, protein translation and folding, and energy transfer were upregulated. This study describes the significance and effectiveness of VOCs produced by a biocontrol strain against tomato wilt pathogen. PMID:27103342

  7. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas fluorescens Strains SF39a and SF4c, Potential Plant Growth Promotion and Biocontrol Agents

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Lindsey K.; Underwood, Grace E.; McCully, Lucy M.; Bitzer, Adam S.; Godino, Agustina; Bucci, Vanni; Brigham, Christopher J.; Príncipe, Analía; Fischer, Sonia E.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens SF4c and SF39a, strains isolated from wheat rhizosphere, have potential applications in plant growth promotion and biocontrol of fungal diseases of crop plants. We report the draft genome sequences of SF4c and SF39a with estimated sizes of 6.5 Mb and 5.9 Mb, respectively. PMID:25814613

  8. Evaluation of yeasts obtained from Antarctic soil samples as biocontrol agents for the management of postharvest diseases of apple (Malus x domestica)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Psychrotrophic yeasts isolated from soils collected in Antarctica and selected by its capacity of growing in apple juice at low temperatures were evaluated for their potential as biocontrol agents for the management of postharvest diseases of apple during cold storage. Among the species recovered, ...

  9. Role of 2-hexyl, 5-propyl resorcinol production by Pseudomonas chlororaphis PCL1606 in the multitrophic interactions in the avocado rhizosphere during the biocontrol process.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Claudia E; de Vicente, Antonio; Cazorla, Francisco M

    2014-07-01

    Different bacterial traits can contribute to the biocontrol of soilborne phytopathogenic fungus. Among others, (1) antagonism, (2) competition for nutrients and niches, (3) induction of systemic resistance of the plants and (4) predation and parasitism are the most studied. Pseudomonas chlororaphis PCL1606 is an antagonistic rhizobacterium that produces the antifungal metabolite 2-hexyl, 5-propyl resorcinol (HPR). This bacterium can biologically control the avocado white root rot caused by Rosellinia necatrix. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of the avocado rhizosphere revealed that this biocontrol bacterium and the fungal pathogen compete for the same niche and presumably also for root exudate nutrients. The use of derivative mutants in the geners related to HPR biosynthesis (dar genes) revealed that the lack of HPR production by P. chlororaphis PCL1606 negatively influences the bacterial colonisation of the avocado root surface. Microscopical analysis showed that P. chlororaphis PCL1606 closely interacts and colonises the fungal hyphae, which may represent a novel biocontrol mechanism in this pseudomonad. Additionally, the presence of HPR-producing biocontrol bacteria negatively affects the ability of the fungi to infect the avocado root. HPR production negatively affects hyphal growth, leading to alterations in the R. necatrix physiology visible under microscopy, including the curling, vacuolisation and branching of hyphae, which presumably affects the colonisation and infection abilities of the fungus. This study provides the first report of multitrophic interactions in the avocado rhizosphere, advancing our understanding of the role of HPR production in those interactions.

  10. RNA interference of endochitinases in the sugarcane endophyte Trichoderma virens 223 reduces its fitness as a biocontrol agent of pineapple disease.

    PubMed

    Romão-Dumaresq, Aline S; de Araújo, Welington Luiz; Talbot, Nicholas J; Thornton, Christopher R

    2012-01-01

    The sugarcane root endophyte Trichoderma virens 223 holds enormous potential as a sustainable alternative to chemical pesticides in the control of sugarcane diseases. Its efficacy as a biocontrol agent is thought to be associated with its production of chitinase enzymes, including N-acetyl-ß-D-glucosaminidases, chitobiosidases and endochitinases. We used targeted gene deletion and RNA-dependent gene silencing strategies to disrupt N-acetyl-ß-D-glucosaminidase and endochitinase activities of the fungus, and to determine their roles in the biocontrol of soil-borne plant pathogens. The loss of N-acetyl-ß-D-glucosaminidase activities was dispensable for biocontrol of the plurivorous damping-off pathogens Rhizoctonia solani and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, and of the sugarcane pathogen Ceratocystis paradoxa, the causal agent of pineapple disease. Similarly, suppression of endochitinase activities had no effect on R. solani and S. sclerotiorum disease control, but had a pronounced effect on the ability of T. virens 223 to control pineapple disease. Our work demonstrates a critical requirement for T. virens 223 endochitinase activity in the biocontrol of C. paradoxa sugarcane disease, but not for general antagonism of other soil pathogens. This may reflect its lifestyle as a sugarcane root endophyte.

  11. Identification of a new biocontrol gene in Trichoderma atroviride: the role of an ABC transporter membrane pump in the interaction with different plant-pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Ruocco, Michelina; Lanzuise, Stefania; Vinale, Francesco; Marra, Roberta; Turrà, David; Woo, Sheridan Lois; Lorito, Matteo

    2009-03-01

    Successful biocontrol interactions often require that the beneficial microbes involved are resistant or tolerant to a variety of toxicants, including antibiotics produced by themselves or phytopathogens, plant antimicrobial compounds, and synthetic chemicals or contaminants. The ability of Trichoderma spp., the most widely applied biocontrol fungi, to withstand different chemical stresses, including those associated with mycoparasitism, is well known. In this work, we identified an ATP-binding cassette transporter cell membrane pump as an important component of the above indicated resistance mechanisms that appears to be supported by an extensive and powerful cell detoxification system. The encoding gene, named Taabc2, was cloned from a strain of Trichoderma atroviride and characterized. Its expression was found to be upregulated in the presence of pathogen-secreted metabolites, specific mycotoxins and some fungicides, and in conditions that stimulate the production in Trichoderma spp. of antagonism-related factors (toxins and enzymes). The key role of this gene in antagonism and biocontrol was demonstrated by the characterization of the obtained deletion mutants. They suffered an increased susceptibility to inhibitory compounds either secreted by pathogenic fungi or possibly produced by the biocontrol microbe itself and lost, partially or entirely, the ability to protect tomato plants from Pythium ultimum and Rhizoctonia solani attack.

  12. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas fluorescens Strains SF39a and SF4c, Potential Plant Growth Promotion and Biocontrol Agents.

    PubMed

    Ly, Lindsey K; Underwood, Grace E; McCully, Lucy M; Bitzer, Adam S; Godino, Agustina; Bucci, Vanni; Brigham, Christopher J; Príncipe, Analía; Fischer, Sonia E; Silby, Mark W

    2015-03-26

    Pseudomonas fluorescens SF4c and SF39a, strains isolated from wheat rhizosphere, have potential applications in plant growth promotion and biocontrol of fungal diseases of crop plants. We report the draft genome sequences of SF4c and SF39a with estimated sizes of 6.5 Mb and 5.9 Mb, respectively.

  13. Regulation of aflatoxin biosynthesis and branched-chain amino acids metabolism in Aspergillus flavus by 2-phenylethanol reveal biocontrol mechanism of Pichia anomala

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pichia anomala WRL-076 is a biocontrol yeast which has been shown to inhibit growth and aflatoxin production of A. flavus. Using the SPME-GC/MS analysis we identified that the volatile, 2-phenylethanol (2-PE) produced by this yeast and demonstrated that the compound inhibited aflatoxin production. W...

  14. Polysaccharide Production Benefits Dry Storage Survival of the Biocontrol Agent Pseudomonas fluorescens S11:P:12 Effective Against Several Maladies of Stored Potatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas fluorescens S11:P:12 (NRRL B-21133) is a biological control agent able to suppress several potato diseases and sprouting. Notably, it produces a polysaccharide during liquid cultivation; and the objective of this work was to determine the role of this material in the bio-control process...

  15. Detection and quantification by PCR assay of the biocontrol agent Pantoea agglomerans CPA-2 on apples.

    PubMed

    Soto-Muñoz, Lourdes; Teixidó, Neus; Usall, Josep; Viñas, Inmaculada; Torres, Rosario

    2014-04-01

    The registration of biological control agents requires the development of monitoring systems to detect and quantify the agent in the environment. Pantoea agglomerans CPA-2 is an effective biocontrol agent for postharvest diseases of citrus and pome fruits. The monitoring of CPA-2 in postharvest semi-commercial trials was evaluated by Rodac impression plates and the colonies isolated were confirmed by conventional PCR using the SCAR primers PAGA1 and PAGB1. Samples were taken from different surfaces that had contact with CPA-2, the surrounding environment and working clothes worn by handlers. Moreover, population dynamics of the strain CPA-2 were determined on apple surfaces using both the classical plating technique and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). A qPCR assay using a 3'-minor groove-binding (MGB) probe was developed for the specific detection and quantification of P. agglomerans strain CPA-2. Based on the nucleotide sequence of a SCAR fragment of CPA-2, one primer set and TaqMan MGB probe were designed. The primers SP2-F/SP2-R and the TaqMan MGB probe showed a specific detection of strain CPA-2 on apple surfaces, which was verified tested against purified DNA from 17 strains of P. agglomerans, 4 related Pantoea species, and 21 bacterial strains from other genera isolated from whole and also freshly-cut fruit and vegetables. The detection level was approximately 10(3) cells per reaction, and the standard curve was linear within a range of 5log units. Results from semi-commercial trials showed that CPA-2 had a low impact. The maximum persistence of P. agglomerans CPA-2 was not longer than 5days in plastic boxes stored at 0°C. Significant differences in CPA-2 population level dynamics were observed in results obtained by qPCR and dilution plating. These differences may indicate the presence of non-degraded DNA from non-viable cells. In conclusion, qPCR is a novel potential tool to quickly and specifically monitor recent surface colonisation by CPA-2

  16. Detection and quantification by PCR assay of the biocontrol agent Pantoea agglomerans CPA-2 on apples.

    PubMed

    Soto-Muñoz, Lourdes; Teixidó, Neus; Usall, Josep; Viñas, Inmaculada; Torres, Rosario

    2014-04-01

    The registration of biological control agents requires the development of monitoring systems to detect and quantify the agent in the environment. Pantoea agglomerans CPA-2 is an effective biocontrol agent for postharvest diseases of citrus and pome fruits. The monitoring of CPA-2 in postharvest semi-commercial trials was evaluated by Rodac impression plates and the colonies isolated were confirmed by conventional PCR using the SCAR primers PAGA1 and PAGB1. Samples were taken from different surfaces that had contact with CPA-2, the surrounding environment and working clothes worn by handlers. Moreover, population dynamics of the strain CPA-2 were determined on apple surfaces using both the classical plating technique and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). A qPCR assay using a 3'-minor groove-binding (MGB) probe was developed for the specific detection and quantification of P. agglomerans strain CPA-2. Based on the nucleotide sequence of a SCAR fragment of CPA-2, one primer set and TaqMan MGB probe were designed. The primers SP2-F/SP2-R and the TaqMan MGB probe showed a specific detection of strain CPA-2 on apple surfaces, which was verified tested against purified DNA from 17 strains of P. agglomerans, 4 related Pantoea species, and 21 bacterial strains from other genera isolated from whole and also freshly-cut fruit and vegetables. The detection level was approximately 10(3) cells per reaction, and the standard curve was linear within a range of 5log units. Results from semi-commercial trials showed that CPA-2 had a low impact. The maximum persistence of P. agglomerans CPA-2 was not longer than 5days in plastic boxes stored at 0°C. Significant differences in CPA-2 population level dynamics were observed in results obtained by qPCR and dilution plating. These differences may indicate the presence of non-degraded DNA from non-viable cells. In conclusion, qPCR is a novel potential tool to quickly and specifically monitor recent surface colonisation by CPA-2

  17. Distribution and Biocontrol Potential of phlD(+) Pseudomonads in Corn and Soybean Fields.

    PubMed

    McSpadden Gardener, Brian B; Gutierrez, Laura J; Joshi, Raghavendra; Edema, Richard; Lutton, Elizabeth

    2005-06-01

    these findings to natural and augmentative biocontrol of root pathogens by these bacteria is discussed. PMID:18943789

  18. Combinative effects of a bacterial type-III effector and a biocontrol bacterium on rice growth and disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Ren, Haiying; Gu, Ganyu; Long, Juying; Yin, Qian; Wu, Tingquan; Song, Tao; Zhang, Shujian; Chen, Zhiyi; Dong, Hansong

    2006-12-01

    Expression of HpaG(Xoo), a bacterial type-III effector, in transgenic plants induces disease resistance. Resistance also can be elicited by biocontrol bacteria. In both cases, plant growth is often promoted. Here we address whether biocontrol bacteria and HpaG(Xoo) can act together to provide better results in crop improvement. We studied effects of Pseudomonas cepacia on the rice variety R109 and the hpaG(Xoo)-expressing rice line HER1. Compared to R109, HER1 showed increased growth, grain yield, and defense responses toward diseases and salinity stress. Colonization of roots by P. cepacia caused 20% and 13% increase, in contrast to controls, in root growth of R109 and HER1. Growth of leaves and stems also increased in R109 but that of HER1 was inhibited. When P. cepacia colonization was subsequent to plant inoculation with Rhizoctonia solani, a pathogen that causes sheath blight, the disease was less severe than controls in both R109 and HER1; HER1, nevertheless, was more resistant, suggesting that P. cepacia and HpaG(Xoo) cooperate in inducing disease resistance. Several genes that critically regulate growth and defense behaved differentially in HER1 and R109 while responding to P. cepacia. In R109 leaves, the OsARF1 gene, which regulates plant growth, was expressed in consistence with growth promotion by P. cepacia. Inversely, OsARF1 expression was coincident with inhibition in growth of HER1 leaves. In both plants, the expression of OsEXP1, which encodes an expansin protein involved in plant growth,was concomitant with growth promotion in leaves instead of roots,in response to P. cepacia . We also studied OsMAPK, a gene that encodes a mitogen-activated protein kinase and controls defense responses toward salinity and infection by pathogens in rice. In response to P. cepacia, an early expression of OsMAPK was coincident with R109 resistance to the disease, while HER1 expressed the gene similarly whether P. cepacia was present or not. Evidently, P. cepacia and G

  19. Yeasts from native Brazilian Cerrado plants: Occurrence, diversity and use in the biocontrol of citrus green mould.

    PubMed

    Sperandio, Eugenio Miranda; do Vale, Helson Mario Martins; Moreira, Geisianny Augusta Monteiro

    2015-11-01

    Yeasts are some of the most important postharvest biocontrol agents. Postharvest oranges frequently deteriorate due to green mould (Penicillium digitatum), which causes significant losses. The aims of this study were to determine the composition and diversity of yeasts on plants of the Brazilian Cerrado and to explore their potential for inhibiting citrus green mould. Leaves and fruit of Byrsonima crassifolia and Eugenia dysenterica were collected from Cerrado conservation areas, and thirty-five yeasts were isolated and identified by sequencing the D1-D2 domain of the rDNA large subunit (26S). The isolates represented the Aureobasidium, Meyerozyma, Candida, and Pichia genera. Three isolates identified as Aureobasidium pullulans exhibited potential for the control of P. digitatum in both in vitro and in vivo tests; these isolates reduced the incidence of disease and increased the storage time of fruit. Aureobasidium. pullulans has immense potential for the biological control of filamentous fungi.

  20. Antagonistic and Biocontrol Potential of Trichoderma asperellum ZJSX5003 Against the Maize Stalk Rot Pathogen Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaqian; Sun, Ruiyan; Yu, Jia; Saravanakumar, Kandasamy; Chen, Jie

    2016-09-01

    The efficacy of seven strains of Trichoderma asperellum collected from the fields in Southern China was assessed against Fusarium graminearum (FG) the causal agent of corn stalk rot of maize were in vitro for their antagonistic properties followed by statistical model of principal compound analysis to identify the beneficial antagonist T. asperellum strain. The key factors of antagonist activity were attributed to a total of 13 factors including cell wall degrading enzymes (chitnase, protease and β-glucanases), secondary metabolites and peptaibols and these were analyzed from eight strains of Trichoderma. A linear regression model demonstrated that interaction of enzymes and secondary metabolites of T. asperellum strain ZJSX5003 enhanced the antagonist activity against FG. Further, this strain displayed a disease reduction of 71 % in maize plants inoculated with FG compared to negative control. Pointing out that the T. asperellum strain ZJSX5003 is a potential source for the development of a biocontrol agent against corn stalk rot. PMID:27407296