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Sample records for biodegradation symposium hamburg

  1. The Benign Hamburger.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peaslee, Graham; Lantz, Juliette M.; Walczak, Mary M.

    1998-01-01

    Uses a case study of food poisoning from hamburgers at the fictitious Jill-at-the-Grill to teach the nuclear science behind food irradiation. Includes case teaching notes on the benign hamburger. (ASK)

  2. Hamburger hazards and emotions.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Nina Veflen; Røssvoll, Elin; Langsrud, Solveig; Scholderer, Joachim

    2014-07-01

    Previous studies indicate that many consumers eat rare hamburgers and that information about microbiological hazards related to undercooked meat not necessarily leads to more responsible behavior. With this study we aim to investigate whether consumers' willingness to eat hamburgers depends on the emotions they experience when confronted with the food. A representative sample of 1046 Norwegian consumers participated in an online experiment. In the first part, participants were randomly divided into two groups. One group was confronted with a picture of a rare hamburger, whereas the other group was confronted with a picture of a well-done hamburger. The respondents were instructed to imagine that they were served the hamburger on the picture and then to indicate which emotions they experienced: fear, disgust, surprise, interest, pleasure, or none of these. In part two, all respondents were confronted with four pictures of hamburgers cooked to different degrees of doneness (rare, medium rare, medium well-done, well-done), and were asked to state their likelihood of eating. We analyzed the data by means of a multivariate probit model and two linear fixed-effect models. The results show that confrontation with rare hamburgers evokes more fear and disgust than confrontation with well-done hamburgers, that all hamburgers trigger pleasure and interest, and that a consumer's willingness to eat rare hamburgers depends on the particular type of emotion evoked. These findings indicate that emotions play an important role in a consumer's likelihood of eating risky food, and should be considered when developing food safety strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Microbiological studies on hamburgers

    PubMed Central

    Tamminga, S. K.; Beumer, R. R.; Kampelmacher, E. H.

    1982-01-01

    One hundred and eighty-two raw, 112 pre-cooked and 750 cooked hamburgers composed mainly of beef or beef and pork were subjected to microbiological examination. Raw hamburgers gave total bacterial counts from 106 to 108 per g, counts of Enterobacteriaceae from 104 to 106 per g, of Escherichia coli from 103 to 105, of group D streptococci from 102 to 104, of Staphylococcus aureus from 3 to 102 and of Clostridium perfringens less than 10 bacteria per g. Of the samples, 32% contained salmonellas; the highest most probable number was 102 per g but most estimates were below 1 per g. Corresponding figures for the pre-cooked samples were 2-3 log cycles lower, and only one sample contained salmonella. Yersinia enterocolitica was not isolated from any raw or pre-cooked sample. Three hundred and ninety-five of the cooked hamburgers were prepared by grilling raw hamburgers for between 2 and 5·5 min. These gave total bacterial counts from 105 to 107 per g, and counts of Enterobacteriaceae from 102 to 105 per g. Of the samples, 9·4% contained salmonellas, always in numbers below 1 per g. The remaining 355 cooked hamburgers were prepared from samples pre-cooked for 10 min at 80 °C. Some were grilled and some fat fried. The total bacterial counts were from 103 to 105 per g, and counts of Enterobacteriaceae below 102 per g. Salmonellae, again in small numbers only, were recovered from 3·5% of samples. When hamburgers were artificially contaminated with Salmonella typhimurium it took 5·5 min on a commercial grill, 2·25 min frying in a frying pan and 1·75 min on a household grill to reliably reduce the salmonella count one hundredfold. This means that at many vending places hamburgers are often cooked for too short a time. D-values were determined for S. typhimurium in hamburger meat at 50, 55, 60, 65 and 70 °C, these values were 7·1, 5·1, 1·2, 0·9 and 0·6 min respectively. It can be concluded that the heating action in the centre of the hamburgers will take place more

  4. Microbiological studies on hamburgers.

    PubMed

    Tamminga, S K; Beumer, R R; Kampelmacher, E H

    1982-02-01

    One hundred and eighty-two raw, 112 pre-cooked and 750 cooked hamburgers composed mainly of beef or beef and pork were subjected to microbiological examination.Raw hamburgers gave total bacterial counts from 10(6) to 10(8) per g, counts of Enterobacteriaceae from 10(4) to 10(6) per g, of Escherichia coli from 10(3) to 10(5), of group D streptococci from 10(2) to 10(4), of Staphylococcus aureus from 3 to 10(2) and of Clostridium perfringens less than 10 bacteria per g. Of the samples, 32% contained salmonellas; the highest most probable number was 10(2) per g but most estimates were below 1 per g. Corresponding figures for the pre-cooked samples were 2-3 log cycles lower, and only one sample contained salmonella. Yersinia enterocolitica was not isolated from any raw or pre-cooked sample.Three hundred and ninety-five of the cooked hamburgers were prepared by grilling raw hamburgers for between 2 and 5.5 min. These gave total bacterial counts from 10(5) to 10(7) per g, and counts of Enterobacteriaceae from 10(2) to 10(5) per g. Of the samples, 9.4% contained salmonellas, always in numbers below 1 per g. The remaining 355 cooked hamburgers were prepared from samples pre-cooked for 10 min at 80 degrees C. Some were grilled and some fat fried. The total bacterial counts were from 10(3) to 10(5) per g, and counts of Enterobacteriaceae below 10(2) per g. Salmonellae, again in small numbers only, were recovered from 3.5% of samples.When hamburgers were artificially contaminated with Salmonella typhimurium it took 5.5 min on a commercial grill, 2.25 min frying in a frying pan and 1.75 min on a household grill to reliably reduce the salmonella count one hundredfold. This means that at many vending places hamburgers are often cooked for too short a time.D-values were determined for S. typhimurium in hamburger meat at 50, 55, 60, 65 and 70 degrees C, these values were 7.1, 5.1, 1.2, 0.9 and 0.6 min respectively. It can be concluded that the heating action in the centre of the

  5. Flooding near Hamburg, Iowa

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    NASA image acquired July 17, 2011 In mid-July 2011, more than a month after the Missouri River broke through two levees and flooded fields near Hamburg, Iowa, muddy water lingered near the city. Hamburg residents were relieved, however, that a newly built levee had spared the town from flooding. On July 17, 2011, the Advanced Land Imager (ALI) on NASA’s Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) satellite captured this natural-color image. Compared to an image acquired on June 24, flooding has apparently receded slightly in some areas. Sediment-choked water nevertheless lingers on large swaths of land. On July 13, 2011, KETV of Omaha, Nebraska, reported that a newly built, 2-mile levee designed to protect Hamburg already exceeded federal standards. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers handed control of the levee over to city officials on July 12. In the end, the levee was expected to cost the Army Corps $6 million, and the city of Hamburg about $800,000. On July 18, 2011, the Advanced Hydrological Prediction Service reported moderate flooding along the Missouri River not far from Hamburg, Iowa. In the northwest, the river reached 24.37 feet (7.43 meters) at Nebraska City. In the southeast, the river reached 38.98 feet (11.88 meters) at Brownville, Nebraska. NASA Earth Observatory image created by Jesse Allen and Robert Simmon, using EO-1 ALI data provided courtesy of the NASA EO-1 team. Caption by Michon Scott. Instrument: EO-1 - ALI Credit: NASA Earth Observatory NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  6. Rapid detection of irradiated frozen hamburgers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delincée, Henry

    2002-03-01

    DNA comet assay can be employed as a rapid and inexpensive screening test to check whether frozen ground beef patties (hamburgers) have been irradiated as a means to increase their safety by eliminating pathogenic bacteria, e.g. E. coli O157:H7. Such a detection procedure will provide an additional check on compliance with existing regulations, e.g. enforcement of labelling and rules in international trade. Frozen ready prepared hamburgers from the market place were `electron irradiated' with doses of 0, 1.3, 2.7, 4.5 and 7.2kGy covering the range of potential commercial irradiation. DNA fragmentation in the hamburgers was made visible within a few hours using the comet assay, and non-irradiated hamburgers could be easily discerned from the irradiated ones. Even after 9 months of frozen storage, irradiated hamburgers could be identified. Since DNA fragmentation may also occur with other food processes (e.g. temperature abuse), positive screening tests shall be confirmed using a validated method to specifically prove an irradiation treatment, e.g. EN 1784 or EN 1785.

  7. Solar Eclipse Expeditions of Hamburg Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfschmidt, Gudrun

    2012-09-01

    Total solar eclipses had -- and still have, in spite of the maximum duration of eight minutes -- an important meaning for astronomical research. For a long time in the 19th century astronomers were searching for a planet inside the orbit of Mercury. But especially, the solar atmosphere was studied: during an eclipse the bright photosphere is covered by the moon and enables the observation of the chromosphere with the prominences and the flash spectrum. George Rümker (1832--1900), the third director of Hamburg Observatory, made a solar eclipse expedition to Spain in 1860. He used only small instruments like a 4-foot Fraunhofer telescope and a comet seeker. Richard Schorr (1867--1951), the director of the new Hamburg Observatory in Bergedorf, observed in 1905 the solar eclipse in Algeria and put the emphasis on astrophysical research, investigation of the inner corona and the prominences. A horizontal telescope with 20-m focal length and an equatorial double refractor were acquired, both instruments made by Carl Zeiss of Jena. This instrumentation and many smaller instruments were used for all the expeditions in the 1920s, like in 1922 -- Java, in 1923 -- Mexico, in 1925 -- Atlantic Ocean, in 1927 -- Jokkmokk, Sweden, and in 1929 -- Philippines. These Hamburg solar expeditions of the 1920s put the emphasis on two topics: to solve the so-called riddle of coronium, or mystery of coronium -- the nature of the green emission line -- and to measure the deviation of light for verifying Einstein's general theory of relativity.

  8. Symposium melds past and future polar research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Leonard

    An international symposium, Perspectives of Modern Polar Research, was convened in Bad Durkeim, Germany to celebrate the 175th anniversary of the birth of Georg von Neumayer, the noted polar explorer and facilitator of German and international polar science. Neumayer, who lived from 1826 to 1909, began his career as a seaman in the merchant marine. Through his skill in geophysics and meteorology, he rose to become the founder and director of the Flagstaff Observatory in Melbourne, Australia, hydrographer to the German Navy, and director of the Hamburg Oceanic Observatory. He was instrumental in organizing the first International Polar Year (IPY) in 1882-1883.

  9. A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rachal, John R.

    2003-01-01

    Uses the framework of a symposium to present an imagined discussion by historical figures about whether and how knowledge might be acquired. Discussants include Democritus, Protagoras, Heraclitus, Socrates, Jesus, Gorgias, Nietzsche, Buddha, and Kierkegaard. (Contains 40 endnotes.) (SK)

  10. A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rachal, John R.

    2003-01-01

    Uses the framework of a symposium to present an imagined discussion by historical figures about whether and how knowledge might be acquired. Discussants include Democritus, Protagoras, Heraclitus, Socrates, Jesus, Gorgias, Nietzsche, Buddha, and Kierkegaard. (Contains 40 endnotes.) (SK)

  11. STEM Symposium

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-28

    U.S. Congresswoman Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-TX) addresses the Symposium on Supporting Underrepresented Minority Males in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), Tuesday, February 28, 2012 at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  12. Climate Education at the University of Hamburg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilly, Oliver; Stammer, Detlef; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria

    2010-05-01

    The new graduate School of Integrated Climate Sciences (www.sicss.de) at the KlimaCampus of the University of Hamburg was opened at October 20, 2009 and includes a 2-yr MSc (120 ECTS, 30 compulsory, 90 eligible) and 3-yr doctoral program (12 ECTS). About 40 students were enrolled in early 2010. The interdisciplinary MSc program is based on a number of disciplines such as meteorology, geophysics, oceanography, geosciences and also economics and social sciences. These disciplines are required to address the faced key issues related to climate change effectively. The graduate school is guiding pupils and BSc students with competence in maths and physics on how to become a climate expert. Acquisition is done internationally at fairs, uni days and dircectly at schools and intuitions for higher education. BSc degree in the disciplines listed above is set for positive application. Climate experts are needed for both research and the professional world outside the university and research institutions. In accordance, connection within and outside the university are continuously explored and soft skills for the communication to politics and the public's are included in the MSc and PhD curricula. Since the graduate school was established within the cluster of excellence ‘Integrated Climate Analysis and Predication' (www.clisap.de), this school represents a prototype for graduate programs at the University of Hamburg. Advantages and limitations of this Climate System School concept will be discussed.

  13. The End of Hamburg's Anglophilia: Wilhelmine Hamburg Attitudes Viewed through School Examination Essays and a University Lecture (1912-1914)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gärtner, Niko

    2014-01-01

    Late nineteenth-century German-English rivalry changed attitudes in Hamburg. Previously, the once fiercely independent city and its burgeoning mercantile middle class had developed an Anglophilia that justified Hamburg being labelled a "London suburb" and "the most British town on the Continent". The affinity for all things…

  14. The End of Hamburg's Anglophilia: Wilhelmine Hamburg Attitudes Viewed through School Examination Essays and a University Lecture (1912-1914)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gärtner, Niko

    2014-01-01

    Late nineteenth-century German-English rivalry changed attitudes in Hamburg. Previously, the once fiercely independent city and its burgeoning mercantile middle class had developed an Anglophilia that justified Hamburg being labelled a "London suburb" and "the most British town on the Continent". The affinity for all things…

  15. Symposium: Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anson, Chris M.; Perelman, Les; Poe, Mya; Sommers, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article presents four symposium papers on assessment. It includes: (1) "Closed Systems and Standardized Writing Tests" (Chris M. Anson); (2) "Information Illiteracy and Mass Market Writing Assessments" (Les Perelman); (3) "Genre, Testing, and the Constructed Realities of Student Achievement" (Mya Poe); and (4)…

  16. STEM Symposium

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-28

    Carl Wieman, Associate Director, Office of Science and Technology Policy, The White House, speaks at the Symposium on Supporting Underrepresented Minority Males in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), Tuesday, February 28, 2012 at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  17. STEM Symposium

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-28

    Christine Keller, right, Director of Research, APLU (Association of Public and Land-grant Universities) presents STEM initiative report findings at the Symposium on Supporting Underrepresented Minority Males in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), Tuesday, February 28, 2012 at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  18. STEM Symposium

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-28

    Woodrow Whitlow, NASA Associate Administrator, Mission Support Directorate, gives opening remarks at the Symposium on Supporting Underrepresented Minority Males in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), Tuesday, February 28, 2012 at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  19. STEM Symposium

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-28

    Christine Keller, Director of Research, APLU (Association of Public and Land-grant Universities) presents STEM initiative report findings at the Symposium on Supporting Underrepresented Minority Males in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), Tuesday, February 28, 2012 at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  20. STEM Symposium

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-28

    J. Keith Motley, Chancellor, University of Massachusetts Boston, and Chair, APLU (Association of Public and Land-grant Universities) Commission on Access, Diversity and Excellence, speaks at the Symposium on Supporting Underrepresented Minority Males in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), Tuesday, February 28, 2012 at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  1. STEM Symposium

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-28

    Leland Melvin, Associate Administrator, Office of Education and former astronaut, gives opening remarks at the Symposium on Supporting Underrepresented Minority Males in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), Tuesday, February 28, 2012 at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  2. STEM Symposium

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-28

    Lorenzo L. Esters, Vice President, APLU (Association of Public and Land-grant Universities), and Project Director, MMSI (Minority Male STEM Initiative) addresses STEM initiative report findings at the Symposium on Supporting Underrepresented Minority Males in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), Tuesday, February 28, 2012 at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  3. Learning by Doing: Science Education at the Hamburg Observatory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfschmidt, Gudrun

    2015-01-01

    In my contribution I would like to offer three different examples: the activities of the association "Förderverein Hamburger Sternwarte", science education in the "astronomy workshop", and the teaching of the history of science and technology for university students.

  4. Learning by Doing: Science Education at the Hamburg Observatory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfschmidt, Gudrun

    2015-01-01

    In my contribution I would like to offer three different examples: the activities of the association "Förderverein Hamburger Sternwarte", science education in the "astronomy workshop", and the teaching of the history of science and technology for university students.

  5. Biodegradable Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Vroman, Isabelle; Tighzert, Lan

    2009-01-01

    Biodegradable materials are used in packaging, agriculture, medicine and other areas. In recent years there has been an increase in interest in biodegradable polymers. Two classes of biodegradable polymers can be distinguished: synthetic or natural polymers. There are polymers produced from feedstocks derived either from petroleum resources (non renewable resources) or from biological resources (renewable resources). In general natural polymers offer fewer advantages than synthetic polymers. The following review presents an overview of the different biodegradable polymers that are currently being used and their properties, as well as new developments in their synthesis and applications.

  6. A New Type of German University Takes Root in Hamburg.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bollag, Burton

    1999-01-01

    The Technical University of Hamburg-Harburg (Germany), a member of a new European consortium of innovative universities, has been broadening its revenue base by conducting research and training for industry and local government and marketing the technical advances developed in its own laboratories. An interdisciplinary approach to research is…

  7. Insecure Identities: Unaccompanied Minors as Refugees in Hamburg

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses the financial circumstances and social income of nearly one hundred unaccompanied minors who have come to Hamburg as refugees from various regions of Africa. It is based on extensive qualitative surveys, analysing their objective conditions of life and in particular their legal situation. A wide range of interview material and…

  8. [Quality in nursing care--action research in "Hamburger Behindertenhilfe"/Hamburg to disabled care].

    PubMed

    Jahncke-Latteck, Anne-Dorte; Weber, Petra

    2005-08-01

    A two year action research program with the title "Quality in Nursing Care" was carried out by a large institute for disabled care in Hamburg. Presently, the importance of quality in nursing as a profession is seen to be secondary to that of pedagogy in the area of disabled care. A major explanation for this could be the fact that 150 years ago the treatment and care of disabled people lay predominately in the field of theology and only later in that of medicine. In the second half of the 20th century, in the 60ies and 70ies to be precise, starting with an investigative commission "Psychiatryenquete "pedagogical science began to focus on the education of disabled people and their integration within society. At this point in time, seen from the pedagogical point of view, the care of disabled people in theory and practice freed itself from being a medicine concentrated profession and from the dominance of nursing care. However in today's society due to the increasing number of disabled people requiring expert nursing care there is a necessity to examine care related needs of assistance. With the research project "Quality in Nursing Care" an institute for disabled care has looked at different nursing care interventions and methods that our society may require for the changing situation we are presently being confronted with. An analysis of the requirements, the content and evaluation of the three chosen project related interventions, (the individual consulting of inhabitants with regard to the broadening of the competence skills, the development of expert nursing competence through further and continuous education of multipliers, and the development of codes and guidelines for activities) will be introduced. Beginning with the basic and primary principle of the action research, the researchers have developed, with the participating members of the institutions, the specific aims of the work undertaken and the interventions studied and executed. The most important

  9. Oak Symposium Proceedings

    Treesearch

    Northeastern Forest Experiment Station

    1971-01-01

    As "tall oaks from little acorns grow", the germ of an idea blossomed into this symposium on the five upland oaks. Called simply the "Oak Symposium", that's what it's all about - a meeting to bring together a summation of the advances made on the silviculture, management, and utilization of the upland oaks. Part of this process is the...

  10. Flight Mechanics Symposium 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walls, Donna M. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    This conference publication includes papers and abstracts presented at the Flight Mechanics Symposium. This symposium featured technical papers on a wide range of issues related to orbit-attitude prediction, determination, and control; attitude sensor calibration; attitude determination error analysis; attitude dynamics; and orbit decay and maneuver strategy. Government, industry, and the academic community participated in the preparation and presentation of these papers.

  11. Biodegradable polydepsipeptides.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yakai; Guo, Jintang

    2009-02-01

    This paper reviews the synthesis, characterization, biodegradation and usage of bioresorbable polymers based on polydepsipeptides. The ring-opening polymerization of morpholine-2,5-dione derivatives using organic Sn and enzyme lipase is discussed. The dependence of the macroscopic properties of the block copolymers on their structure is also presented. Bioresorbable polymers based on polydepsipeptides could be used as biomaterials in drug controlled release, tissue engineering scaffolding and shape-memory materials.

  12. Biodegradable Polydepsipeptides

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yakai; Guo, Jintang

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the synthesis, characterization, biodegradation and usage of bioresorbable polymers based on polydepsipeptides. The ring-opening polymerization of morpholine-2,5-dione derivatives using organic Sn and enzyme lipase is discussed. The dependence of the macroscopic properties of the block copolymers on their structure is also presented. Bioresorbable polymers based on polydepsipeptides could be used as biomaterials in drug controlled release, tissue engineering scaffolding and shape-memory materials. PMID:19333423

  13. [Acute ethanol intoxication among children and adolescents in Hamburg, Germany].

    PubMed

    Stolle, M; Sack, P-M; Spieles, H; Thomasius, R

    2010-09-01

    By using an anonymous postcard reporting system, data of n=358 children, adolescents, and young adults who were treated in 26 emergency departments because of acute alcohol intoxication were collected. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of acute alcohol intoxications in Hamburg, compare these data with the official hospital diagnosis register, and analyze the circumstances that led to the intoxication. A total of 358 cases were reported by the postcard system. Age ranged from 11-21 years, with 64.5% being 14-17 years old. Data were collected in the municipal area of Hamburg during the calendar year of 2008. The percentage of female patients was 65.6% in the age group from 11-17 years and decreased in the age group of patients being 18 years and older. A vast majority of patients were admitted by ambulance and were reported as being a"first offender". On average, male patients showed a higher level of blood alcohol when being admitted (2.02 ‰) than female patients (1.76 ‰). The older the age group, the higher the blood alcohol level. Among drinking circumstances, the situation"drank together with friends" was most frequently reported. In comparison with the official hospital diagnosis register, prevalence was 31.6% higher. This could mean that the prevalence reported in the official hospital diagnosis register is an underestimation of the actual case numbers.

  14. [Health Care for Refugees: Challenges and Opportunities in Hamburg].

    PubMed

    Jakubowski, Elke; Rau, Cornelius; Quellhorst, Sibylle; Sothmann, Peter; Plenge-Bönig, Anita; Niessen, Johannes

    2017-08-01

    The massive increase in the number of refugees represents a great challenge to German cities. In Hamburg, 40 868 asylum seekers were registered in 2015, of which 22 315 remained in the city. The goal of the health administration is to provide primary medical care in response to specific health risks and needs of refugees while allowing them to be swiftly integrated into the standard health care system. Public authorities, charities and civil society are working hand in hand. In all reception centres in Hamburg, medical consultations with translation services are offered in fully equipped medical container practices. For every 1 000 refugees, a full-time doctor and a medical assistant are available. In addition to contractual staff, employees of contractually integrated hospitals are participating in the provision of medical care. Systematic collection of data on the health condition of the refugees as well as strengthening public health services are key factors in the planning and improvement of services in the future. Healthier living conditions and access to the standard health care system provide an opportunity to facilitate successful integration of refugees into society. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Consumer preferences, internal color and reduction of shigatoxigenic Escherichia coli in cooked hamburgers.

    PubMed

    Røssvoll, Elin; Sørheim, Oddvin; Heir, Even; Møretrø, Trond; Olsen, Nina Veflen; Langsrud, Solveig

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to relate consumer preferences and preparation of hamburgers to color change, internal temperature and reduction of shigatoxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) serogroups O157 and the "Big Six" (O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, O145) under two ground beef packaging scenarios: 75% O2 MAP and vacuum. 75% O2 MAP hamburgers cooked to 60 °C core temperature appeared done and showed less internal red color (lower a*) than corresponding vacuum hamburgers. Similar STEC reduction (<4 log10) was found for both hamburgers at core temperatures ≤ 66 °C. In a representative survey (N=1046) most consumers reported to judge hamburger doneness by the color and many preferred undercooked hamburgers. Premature browning of 75% O2 MAP hamburgers represents a risk of foodborne illness, when considering consumers' food handling practices. The risk is even greater if such ground beef is prepared by consumers who prefer undercooked hamburgers and judge doneness by color.

  16. 57. Photocopy of illustration 'Landungsplatz der HamburgAmerika Linie in Hoboken ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    57. Photocopy of illustration 'Landungsplatz der Hamburg-Amerika Linie in Hoboken (1899)'. VIEW OF HAMBURG-AMERICAN TERMINAL AND PIERS, LOOKING EAST. (From an unidentified source. Artist unknown, circa 1899) - Hoboken Piers Headhouse, River Street at Hudson River, Hoboken, Hudson County, NJ

  17. Space Symposium/76

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A symposium dealing with career opportunities in the aerospace program for minorities was conducted and evaluated. The symposium was attended by students from eleven predominantly minority colleges and universities in and around Washington, D. C. and the eastern region, and from high schools in five jurisdictions of the Washington metropolitan area. Speakers included representatives of Howard University, NASA, and private industry. On display during the symposium was a NASA exhibit of moon rocks, space shuttles, a lunar module, command module, pacemaker, LANDSAT, and other items of interest.

  18. Ninteenth Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The proceedings of the 19th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. Technological areas covered include space lubrication, bearings, aerodynamic devices, spacecraft/Shuttle latches, deployment, positioning, and pointing. Devices for spacecraft docking and manipulator and teleoperator mechanisms are also described.

  19. Symposium on thermal anemometry

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    These proceedings collect papers given at a symposium on thermal anemometry. Topics include: wind turbines x-probe measurements in turbine wakes, air flow metering, fluid flow, and hot-film and hot-wire anemometers.

  20. Efficacy of bomb shelters: with lessons from the Hamburg firestorm.

    PubMed

    Lucas, K A; Orient, J M; Robinson, A; Maccabee, H; Morris, P; Looney, G; Klinghoffer, M

    1990-07-01

    Shelters for protection against the effects of nuclear weapons are often stated to be useless, largely because of firestorms. Recent models purport to show that nuclear weapons are more likely to cause firestorms than previously thought. These controversial models are based on uncertain assumptions, which are difficult or impossible to test. Regardless of the predictive validity of fire models, conclusions about the ability of shelters to protect their occupants against firestorms, if they occur, are based primarily on historical experience. A review of the original data from the Hamburg firestorm shows that almost all persons in adequate shelters survived, contradicting a currently prevailing belief that all died. The results of the strategic bombing during World War II and of nuclear weapons tests show that a considerable level of population protection can be achieved through attention to proper shelter design.

  1. Efficacy of bomb shelters: With lessons from the Hamburg firestorm

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, K.A.; Orient, J.M.; Robinson, A.; Maccabee, H.; Morris, P.; Looney, G.; Klinghoffer, M. )

    1990-07-01

    Shelters for protection against the effects of nuclear weapons are often stated to be useless, largely because of firestorms. Recent models purport to show that nuclear weapons are more likely to cause firestorms than previously thought. These controversial models are based on uncertain assumptions, which are difficult or impossible to test. Regardless of the predictive validity of fire models, conclusions about the ability of shelters to protect their occupants against firestorms, if they occur, are based primarily on historical experience. A review of the original data from the Hamburg firestorm shows that almost all persons in adequate shelters survived, contradicting a currently prevailing belief that all died. The results of the strategic bombing during World War II and of nuclear weapons tests show that a considerable level of population protection can be achieved through attention to proper shelter design.

  2. [Neonaticides in Hamburg, Germany, from 1998 to 2008].

    PubMed

    Krohn, Julia; Anders, Sven; Püschel, Klaus; Schröder, Ann Sophie

    2011-01-01

    In the analyzed period from 1998 to 2008, the autopsies performed at the Hamburg Institute of Legal Medicine included 13 cases in which an investigation for neonaticide had been initiated by the public prosecutor. The killed neonates showed a nearly equal distribution between both sexes. The most common method of neonaticide was suffocation. Most of the perpetrators were young, unmarried primipara with an average educational background. Almost all of them were suffering under psychological stress and had negated their pregnancy. In most cases, birth and neonaticide happened alone in their flat, and there was no medical attendance in any case. In the cases brought to court the women were charged with manslaughter (Section 212 German Criminal Code) and those found guilty were always granted a mitigated sentence pursuant to Section 213 Criminal Code.

  3. [Telematics and quality. Implementation of a telematic platform in Hamburg].

    PubMed

    Niemeyer, A; Stettin, J

    2005-07-01

    Since the end of the year 2000 a group of interested people has been working on the subject of quality improvement in breast cancer. Within this framework the project "improvement of breast cancer treatment by telemedicine" was started. Based on a workflow analysis and interviews with patients as well as health professionals, it turned out that there are gaps and flaws in the communication process. These problems occurred between health professionals involved in the treatment of patients and between health professionals and patients as well. As a result a telemedicine network has been developed which is based on MPLS technology. Within this network a central communication unit facilitates optimization of the workflow for the treatment of breast cancer. It will also be possible to set up groups for integrated care. Currently the system is being evaluated in specific breast centres in Hamburg. As the net is based on a positive business plan, it can be foreseen that a broad implementation will follow.

  4. 1999 Flight Mechanics Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, John P. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This conference publication includes papers and abstracts presented at the Flight Mechanics Symposium held on May 18-20, 1999. Sponsored by the Guidance, Navigation and Control Center of Goddard Space Flight Center, this symposium featured technical papers on a wide range of issues related to orbit-attitude prediction, determination, and control; attitude sensor calibration; attitude determination error analysis; attitude dynamics; and orbit decay and maneuver strategy. Government, industry, and the academic community participated in the preparation and presentation of these papers.

  5. ACS Symposium Support

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth D. Jordan

    2010-02-20

    The funds from this DOE grant were used to help cover the travel costs of five students and postdoctoral fellows who attended a symposium on 'Hydration: From Clusters to Aqueous Solutions' held at the Fall 2007 American Chemical Society Meeting in Boston, MA, August 19-23. The Symposium was sponsored by the Physical Chemistry Division, ACS. The technical program for the meeting is available at http://phys-acs.org/fall2007.html.

  6. An Amazonia Symposium: Mixed Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huerta, Gloria; Shand, Hope

    1978-01-01

    Reporting on the second symposium on "Amazonia: Extinction or Survival" (Madison, Wisconsin, 1978), this article summarizes papers presented on colonization, health, education, law, etc., and presents the symposium's six resolutions. (JC)

  7. 32nd Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, S. W. (Compiler); Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler)

    1998-01-01

    The proceedings of the 32nd Aerospace Mechanism Symposium are reported. NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) hosted the symposium that was held at the Hilton Oceanfront Hotel in Cocoa Beach, Florida on May 13-15, 1998. The symposium was cosponsored by Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space and the Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium Committee. During these days, 28 papers were presented. Topics included robotics, deployment mechanisms, bearing, actuators, scanners, boom and antenna release, and test equipment.

  8. [Madness and malaria--intersections and boundary blurring between psychiatry and tropical medicine in Hamburg].

    PubMed

    Wulf, Stefan; Schmiedebach, Heinz-Peter

    2014-01-01

    The object of this article is to point out and to discuss the significant intersections and boundary blurring between psychiatry and tropical medicine while treating malaria in the German "colonial metropolis" Hamburg. The focus of this study is the Hamburg asylum at Friedrichsberg and the Institute for Maritime and Tropical Diseases (Hamburg Tropical Institute). Under analysis are two groups of patients as well as the means with which their doctors treated them: 1. patients who have been sent back from the German colonies in Africa after mental disorders had been diagnosed, and 2. patients suffering from general paralysis and treated in Friedrichsberg after 1919 using the then newly developed malaria fever therapy (according to Wagner-Jauregg). The implementation of this latter led to an intensification of the cooperation between psychiatry and tropical medicine in Hamburg which prior to this had been only very sporadic.

  9. [Improving Mental Health Literacy and Mental Illness Stigma in the Population of Hamburg].

    PubMed

    Lambert, Martin; Härter, Martin; Arnold, Detlef; Dirmaier, Jörg; Tlach, Lisa; Liebherz, Sarah; Sänger, Sylvia; Karow, Anne; Brandes, Andreas; Sielaff, Gyöngyver; Bock, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Evidence shows that poor mental health literacy and stigmatization have negative consequences on mental health. However, studies on interventions to improve both are often heterogenic in methodology and results. The psychenet-campaign in Hamburg was developed and implemented in collaboration with patients and relatives and comprised multidimensional interventions focusing on education and contact to patients. The main goals were the improvement of mental health literacy and destigmatization and the long-term implementation within Hamburg's mental health care system.

  10. Biodegradable thermogels.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Hee; Joo, Min Kyung; Choi, Bo Gyu; Jeong, Byeongmoon

    2012-03-20

    All living creatures respond to external stimuli. Similarly, some polymers undergo conformational changes in response to changes in temperature, pH, magnetic field, electrical field, or the wavelength of light. In one type of stimuli-responsive polymer, thermogel polymers, the polymer aqueous solution undergoes sol-to-gel transition as the temperature increases. Drugs or cells can be mixed into the polymer aqueous solution when it is in its lower viscosity solution state. After injection of the solution into a target site, heating prompts the formation of a hydrogel depot in situ, which can then act as a drug releasing system or a cell growing matrix. In this Account, we describe key materials developed in our laboratory for the construction of biodegradable thermogels. We particularly emphasize recently developed polypeptide-based materials where the secondary structure and nanoassembly play an important role in the determining the material properties. This Account will provide insights for controlling parameters, such as the sol-gel transition temperature, gel modulus, critical gel concentration, and degradability of the polymer, when designing a new thermogel system for a specific biomedical application. By varying the stereochemistry of amino acids in polypeptides, the molecular weight of hydrophobic/hydrophilic blocks, the composition of the polypeptides, the hydrophobic end-capping of the polypeptides, and the microsequences of a block copolymer, we have controlled the thermosensitivity and nanoassembly patterns of the polymers. We have investigated a series of thermogel biodegradable polymers. Polymers such as poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid), polycaprolactone, poly(trimethylene carbonate), polycyanoacrylate, sebacic ester, polypeptide were used as hydrophobic blocks, and poly(ethylene glycol) and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) were used as hydrophilic blocks. To prepare a polymer sensitive to pH and temperature, carboxylic acid or amine groups were introduced

  11. 2001 Flight Mechanics Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, John P. (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    This conference publication includes papers and abstracts presented at the Flight Mechanics Symposium held on June 19-21, 2001. Sponsored by the Guidance, Navigation and Control Center of Goddard Space Flight Center, this symposium featured technical papers on a wide range of issues related to attitude/orbit determination, prediction and control; attitude simulation; attitude sensor calibration; theoretical foundation of attitude computation; dynamics model improvements; autonomous navigation; constellation design and formation flying; estimation theory and computational techniques; Earth environment mission analysis and design; and, spacecraft re-entry mission design and operations.

  12. From Holland to Hamburg: The Experimental and Community Schools of Hamburg Seen through the Eyes of Dutch Observers (1919-1933)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braster, Sjaak

    2014-01-01

    In the period 1919-1933 the experimental and community schools in Hamburg tried to put into practice a new model of schooling without a set curriculum that was based on providing a considerable amount of freedom for pupils and teachers. These experiences were introduced in the Netherlands by way of magazines published by the New Education…

  13. From Holland to Hamburg: The Experimental and Community Schools of Hamburg Seen through the Eyes of Dutch Observers (1919-1933)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braster, Sjaak

    2014-01-01

    In the period 1919-1933 the experimental and community schools in Hamburg tried to put into practice a new model of schooling without a set curriculum that was based on providing a considerable amount of freedom for pupils and teachers. These experiences were introduced in the Netherlands by way of magazines published by the New Education…

  14. European Cosmic Ray Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    2008-04-01

    13me Symposium qui se déroule du 27 au 31 juillet pour la première fois au Cern. Brian Pattison ouvre la cérémonie et donne la parole à Dr.Ugland (qui représente le DG C.Rubbia excusé) et d'autres intervenants

  15. AERA Symposium Papers 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coldeway, Dan O.; And Others

    Five American Educational Research Association symposium papers (1979) are provided. "The Program Analysis Phase of Instructional Systems Design: Details of Phase II" (E. Curtis) describes the program analysis subsystem within the context of a systematic approach to instructional design, and reviews the process of carrying out such an…

  16. University HRD Programs. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This symposium is comprised of four papers on university human resource development (HRD) programs. "Passions for Excellence: HRD Graduate Programs at United States Universities" (K. Peter Kuchinke) presents an analysis of case studies that reveals convergent and divergent themes related to the genesis of programs and subsequent…

  17. Standards and Certification. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on standards and certification in human resource development (HRD). "Implementing Management Standards in the UK" (Jonathan Winterton, Ruth Winterton) reports on a study that explored the implementation of management standards in 16 organizations and identified 36 key themes and…

  18. Issues of HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on issues of human resource development (HRD). "The Complex Roots of Human Resource Development" (Monica Lee) discusses the roots of HRD within the framework of the following views of management: (1) classic (the view that managers must be able to create appropriate rules and…

  19. ASSA Symposium 2012 Abstracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-10-01

    of papers presented at the ASSA Symposium held in Cape Town 12-14 October 2012. Videos are available on You tube. See http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8odLrzpzMkHS-cSEfPFIr3YLPAq4d5MU for a playlist.

  20. Issues of Gender. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This symposium is comprised of three papers on issues of gender in human resource development (HRD). "The Impact of Awareness and Action on the Implementation of a Women's Network" (Laura L. Bierema) reports on research to examine how gender consciousness emerges through the formation of in-company networks to promote corporate women's…

  1. Recruitment and Training. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on recruitment and training. "College Choice: The State of Marketing and Effective Student Recruitment Strategies" (Fredrick Muyia Nafukho, Michael F. Burnett) reports on a study of the recruitment strategies used by Louisiana State University's admissions office and College of…

  2. Technical Entrepreneurship: A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Arnold C., Ed.; Komives, John L., Ed.

    Contained in this document are papers presented at the Symposium on Technical Entrepreneurship at Purdue University by researchers who were then or had previously been engaged in research in the area. Because formal research in this area was in its infancy, there was a particular need to afford investigators in the field opportunities to compare…

  3. Quality of Life Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces. New Mexico Environmental Inst.

    Comments, speeches, and questions delivered at the Quality of Life Symposium are compiled in these proceedings. As an exploratory session, the conference objectives were to (1) become better informed about New Mexico--its resource base, the economy, social and cultural base, and the environment; and (2) to evaluate and discuss the role of New…

  4. Birch symposium proceedings

    Treesearch

    W.T. Doolittle; P.E. Bruns

    1969-01-01

    This symposium on yellow and paper birch is the third in a series of meetings devoted to discussion of our fine hardwood timber species. The first meeting, held at Carbondale, Illinois, in 1966, dealt with black walnut. The second, held at Houghton, Michigan, in 1968, dealt with sugar maple. The purpose of this third meeting is to bring together our present knowledge...

  5. Online Learning. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on online learning that was conducted as part of a conference on human resource development (HRD). "An Instructional Strategy Framework for Online Learning Environments" (Scott D. Johnson, Steven R. Aragon) discusses the pitfalls of modeling online courses after traditional instruction…

  6. Globalism and HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on globalization and human resource development (HRD). "Challenges and Strategies of Developing Human Resources in the Surge of Globalization: A Case of the People's Republic of China" (De Zhang, Baiyin Yang, Yichi Zhang) analyzes the challenges and strategies of HRD in China and…

  7. Research Symposium I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The proceedings of this symposium consist of abstracts of talks presented by interns at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The interns assisted researchers at GRC in projects which primarily address the following topics: aircraft engines and propulsion, spacecraft propulsion, fuel cells, thin film photovoltaic cells, aerospace materials, computational fluid dynamics, aircraft icing, management, and computerized simulation.

  8. Tools in HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on tools in human resource development (HRD). "Game Theory Methodology in HRD" (Thomas J. Chermack, Richard A. Swanson) explores the utility of game theory in helping the HRD profession address the complexity of integrating multiple theories for disciplinary understanding and…

  9. Team Based Work. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on team-based work in human resource development (HRD). "Toward Transformational Learning in Organizations: Effects of Model-II Governing Variables on Perceived Learning in Teams" (Blair K. Carruth) summarizes a study that indicated that, regardless of which Model-II variable (valid…

  10. Values: A Symposium Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, T. A., Ed.

    This publication brings together a set of four papers prepared for a symposium on values at the 1972 annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association. The first paper, by Fred N. Kerlinger, establishes a rationale for values research. The discussion focuses on the definition of values, relationship between values and attitudes,…

  11. Competencies in HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This symposium is comprised of three papers on competencies in human resource development (HRD). "The Development of a Competency Model and Assessment Instrument for Public Sector Leadership and Management Development" (Sharon S. Naquin, Elwood F. Holton III) reports on a streamlined methodology and process used to develop a competency…

  12. Fifth Cooley's anemia symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, A.; Anderson, W.F.; Zaino, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses the topics presented at the symposium on the subject of 'Thalassemia'. Sickle cell anemia is also briefly discussed. The aspects discussed are chromosomal defects of anemias particularly globin synthesis, and the role of messenger RNA and other chromosomes.

  13. AERA Symposium Papers 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coldeway, Dan O.; And Others

    Five American Educational Research Association symposium papers (1979) are provided. "The Program Analysis Phase of Instructional Systems Design: Details of Phase II" (E. Curtis) describes the program analysis subsystem within the context of a systematic approach to instructional design, and reviews the process of carrying out such an…

  14. Biodegradable synthetic bone composites

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Gao; Zhao, Dacheng; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2013-01-01

    The invention provides for a biodegradable synthetic bone composition comprising a biodegradable hydrogel polymer scaffold comprising a plurality of hydrolytically unstable linkages, and an inorganic component; such as a biodegradable poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate)/hydroxyapatite (pHEMA/HA) hydrogel composite possessing mineral content approximately that of human bone.

  15. [Habitus, capital and fields: the search for an acting head of the Hamburg Asylum Friedrichsberg in 1897].

    PubMed

    Sammet, Kai

    2005-01-01

    In 1897 Hamburg was in search of an Oberarzt for the asylum Friedrichsberg who should function as the acting head of the head Wilhelm Reye (1833-1912). This search was part of the intended reformation of the outmoded psychiatric care in Hamburg. During this application procedure the Hamburg Physikus John Wahncau examined all possible candidates and applicants. The article explores the election process by using some sociological categories developed by Pierre Bourdieu (habitus, capital, field). The author argues that not only meritocratic attributes led to the choice of one candidate, but also his functional "fitting" into the field in Hamburg.

  16. Towards biodegradable wireless implants.

    PubMed

    Boutry, Clémentine M; Chandrahalim, Hengky; Streit, Patrick; Schinhammer, Michael; Hänzi, Anja C; Hierold, Christofer

    2012-05-28

    A new generation of partially or even fully biodegradable implants is emerging. The idea of using temporary devices is to avoid a second surgery to remove the implant after its period of use, thereby improving considerably the patient's comfort and safety. This paper provides a state-of-the-art overview and an experimental section that describes the key technological challenges for making biodegradable devices. The general considerations for the design and synthesis of biodegradable components are illustrated with radiofrequency-driven resistor-inductor-capacitor (RLC) resonators made of biodegradable metals (Mg, Mg alloy, Fe, Fe alloys) and biodegradable conductive polymer composites (polycaprolactone-polypyrrole, polylactide-polypyrrole). Two concepts for partially/fully biodegradable wireless implants are discussed, the ultimate goal being to obtain a fully biodegradable sensor for in vivo sensing.

  17. [Biodegradation of polyethylene].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Song, Yi-ling; Qin, Xiao-yan

    2007-05-01

    Plastic material is one of the most serious solid wastes pollution. More than 40 million tons of plastics produced each year are discarded into environment. Plastics accumulated in the environment is highly resistant to biodegradation and not be able to take part in substance recycle. To increase the biodegradation efficiency of plastics by different means is the main research direction. This article reviewed the recent research works of polyethylene biodegradation that included the modification and pretreatment of polyethylene, biodegradation pathway, the relevant microbes and enzymes and the changes of physical, chemical and biological properties after biodegradation. The study directions of exploiting the kinds of life-forms of biodegradation polyethylene except the microorganisms, isolating and cloning the key enzymes and gene that could produce active groups, and enhancing the study on polyethylene biodegradation without additive were proposed.

  18. Spread of Measles Virus D4-Hamburg, Europe, 2008–2011

    PubMed Central

    Mihneva, Zefira; Gold, Hermann; Baumgarte, Sigrid; Baillot, Armin; Helble, Rudolph; Roggendorf, Hedwig; Bosevska, Golubinka; Nedeljkovic, Jasminka; Makowka, Agata; Hutse, Veronik; Holzmann, Heidemarie; Aberle, Stefan W.; Cordey, Samuel; Necula, Gheorghe; Mentis, Andreas; Korukluoğlu, Gulay; Carr, Michael; Brown, Kevin E.; Hübschen, Judith M.; Muller, Claude P.; Mulders, Mick N.; Santibanez, Sabine

    2011-01-01

    A new strain of measles virus, D4-Hamburg, was imported from London to Hamburg in December 2008 and subsequently spread to Bulgaria, where an outbreak of >24,300 cases was observed. We analyzed spread of the virus to demonstrate the importance of addressing hard-to-reach communities within the World Health Organization European Region regarding access to medical care and vaccination campaigns. The D4-Hamburg strain appeared during 2009–2011 in Poland, Ireland, Northern Ireland, Austria, Greece, Romania, Turkey, Macedonia, Serbia, Switzerland, and Belgium and was repeatedly reimported to Germany. The strain was present in Europe for >27 months and led to >25,000 cases in 12 countries. Spread of the virus was prevalently but not exclusively associated with travel by persons in the Roma ethnic group; because this travel extends beyond the borders of any European country, measures to prevent the spread of measles should be implemented by the region as a whole. PMID:21801615

  19. Unconventional gas recovery symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The objective of the SPE and DOE in organizing this symposium has been to bring together in a single annual meeting the best of the professional community engaged in unconventional gas recovery technology. The first venture will focus on discussions of the realities and potentials of unconventional gas sources and an exchange of technology developments. Unconventional gas sources are expected to have an important impact on new gas supplies as technological developments rapidly emerge and become mature technologies in the recovery of natural gas from coal, tight formations, Devonian shale geopressured reservoirs and other alternative high-cost gas sources. It is hoped that this symposium will provide a state-of-art perspective on geology, exploration and production research, recovery technology and field test results. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual articles for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  20. Microgravity Fluid Management Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The NASA Microgravity Fluid Management Symposium, held at the NASA Lewis Research Center, September 9 to 10, 1986, focused on future research in the microgravity fluid management field. The symposium allowed researchers and managers to review space applications that require fluid management technology, to present the current status of technology development, and to identify the technology developments required for future missions. The 19 papers covered three major categories: (1) fluid storage, acquisition, and transfer; (2) fluid management applications, i.e., space power and thermal management systems, and environmental control and life support systems; (3) project activities and insights including two descriptions of previous flight experiments and a summary of typical activities required during development of a shuttle flight experiment.

  1. 1979 DOE statistical symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Gardiner, D.A.; Truett T.

    1980-09-01

    The 1979 DOE Statistical Symposium was the fifth in the series of annual symposia designed to bring together statisticians and other interested parties who are actively engaged in helping to solve the nation's energy problems. The program included presentations of technical papers centered around exploration and disposal of nuclear fuel, general energy-related topics, and health-related issues, and workshops on model evaluation, risk analysis, analysis of large data sets, and resource estimation.

  2. European Cosmic Ray Symposium

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    13me Symposium qui se déroule du 27 au 31 juillet pour la première fois au Cern. Brian Pattison ouvre la cérémonie et donne la parole à Dr.Ugland (qui représente le DG C.Rubbia excusé) et d'autres intervenants

  3. Space 2000 Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the Space 2000 Symposium is to present the creativity and achievements of key figures of the 20th century. It offers a retrospective discussion on space exploration. It considers the future of the enterprise, and the legacy that will be left for future generations. The symposium includes panel discussions, smaller session meetings with some panelists, exhibits, and displays. The first session entitled "From Science Fiction to Science Facts" commences after a brief overview of the symposium. The panel discussions include talks on space exploration over many decades, and the missions of the millennium to search for life on Mars. The second session, "Risks and Rewards of Human Space Exploration," focuses on the training and health risks that astronauts face on their exploratory mission to space. Session three, "Messages and Messengers Informing and Inspire Space Exploration and the Public," focuses on the use of TV medium by educators and actors to inform and inspire a wide variety of audiences with adventures of space exploration. Session four, "The Legacy of Carl Sagan," discusses the influences made by Sagan to scientific research and the general public. In session five, "Space Exploration for a new Generation," two student speakers and the NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin address the group. Session six, "Destiny or Delusion? -- Humankind's Place in the Cosmos," ends the symposium with issues of space exploration and some thought provoking questions. Some of these issues and questions are: what will be the societal implications if we discover the origin of the universe, stars, or life; what will be the impact if scientists find clear evidence of life outside the domains of the Earth; should there be limits to what humans can or should learn; and what visionary steps should space-faring people take now for future generations.

  4. Simulation 󈨔 Symposium.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-21

    on the methodological and technological sessions. The report is divided into four topical areas: (1) methodological issues, (2) computing hardware, (3...SYMPOSIUM S[Ar Cn Richard E. Nance* 21 November 1980BRANCH OFFICE *Department of Management Science, Imperial College LONDON of Science and Technology ...nimber) 𔃻Bond graphs Language comparison Computer aided modeling Methodology fDistributed systems Software * Ha~dware 20. V~tRACT (Continue an rovers

  5. Space 2000 Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the Space 2000 Symposium is to present the creativity and achievements of key figures of the 20th century. It offers a retrospective discussion on space exploration. It considers the future of the enterprise, and the legacy that will be left for future generations. The symposium includes panel discussions, smaller session meetings with some panelists, exhibits, and displays. The first session entitled "From Science Fiction to Science Facts" commences after a brief overview of the symposium. The panel discussions include talks on space exploration over many decades, and the missions of the millennium to search for life on Mars. The second session, "Risks and Rewards of Human Space Exploration," focuses on the training and health risks that astronauts face on their exploratory mission to space. Session three, "Messages and Messengers Informing and Inspire Space Exploration and the Public," focuses on the use of TV medium by educators and actors to inform and inspire a wide variety of audiences with adventures of space exploration. Session four, "The Legacy of Carl Sagan," discusses the influences made by Sagan to scientific research and the general public. In session five, "Space Exploration for a new Generation," two student speakers and the NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin address the group. Session six, "Destiny or Delusion? -- Humankind's Place in the Cosmos," ends the symposium with issues of space exploration and some thought provoking questions. Some of these issues and questions are: what will be the societal implications if we discover the origin of the universe, stars, or life; what will be the impact if scientists find clear evidence of life outside the domains of the Earth; should there be limits to what humans can or should learn; and what visionary steps should space-faring people take now for future generations.

  6. LHC Nobel Symposium Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekelöf, Tord

    2013-12-01

    In the summer of 2012, a great discovery emerged at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva. A plethora of new precision data had already by then been collected by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at LHC, providing further extensive support for the validity of the Standard Model of particle physics. But what now appeared was the first evidence for what was not only the last unverified prediction of the Standard Model, but also perhaps the most decisive one: the prediction made already in 1964 of a unique scalar boson required by the theory of François Englert and Peter Higgs on how fundamental particles acquire mass. At that moment in 2012, it seemed particularly appropriate to start planning a gathering of world experts in particle physics to take stock of the situation and try to answer the challenging question: what next? By May 2013, when the LHC Nobel Symposium was held at the Krusenberg Mansion outside Uppsala in Sweden, the first signs of a great discovery had already turned into fully convincing experimental evidence for the existence of a scalar boson of mass about 125 GeV, having properties compatible with the 50-year-old prediction. And in October 2013, the evidence was deemed so convincing that the Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics to Englert and Higgs for their pioneering work. At the same time the search at the LHC for other particles, beyond those predicted by the Standard Model, with heavier masses up to—and in some cases beyond—1 TeV, had provided no positive result. The triumph of the Standard Model seems resounding, in particular because the mass of the discovered scalar boson is such that, when identified with the Higgs boson, the Standard Model is able to provide predictions at energies as high as the Planck mass, although at the price of accepting that the vacuum would be metastable. However, even if there were some feelings of triumph, the ambience at the LHC Nobel Symposium was more one of

  7. Trinations aging symposium.

    PubMed

    Kaeberlein, Matt; Kennedy, Brian K; Liu, Xinguang; Suh, Yousin; Zhou, Zhongjun

    2011-01-01

    The "Trinations Aging Symposium" was held on the campus of Guangdong Medical College in Dongguan, China from April 28 to 30, 2011. The goal was to promote interaction, collaboration, and exchange of ideas between scientists in the field of aging research from Japan, South Korea, and China. Aging research is on the rise in Asia. This represents an important development, since Korea and Japan are the two longest-lived countries in the world, and life expectancy is increasing rapidly in China and other Asian countries. The world will see a greater percentage of people over age 65 in coming years than any period in human history. Developing therapeutic approaches to increase healthspan has the potential not only to enhance quality of life, but would also help stem the looming economic crisis associated with a high percentage of elderly. The focus of the Trinations Aging Symposium was on the basic biology of aging, and topics discussed included genome maintenance, metabolism and aging, longevity genes and interventions, and new therapies for age-related diseases. The meeting finished with a commitment for another symposium next year that will include additional Asian countries and the formation of a new scientific organization, the Asian Association for Aging Research.

  8. 35th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler); Doty, Laura W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The proceedings of the 35th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. Ames Research Center hosted the conference, which was held at the Four Points Sheraton, Sunnyvale, California, on May 9-11, 2001. The symposium was sponsored by the Mechanisms Education Association. Technology areas covered included bearings and tribology; pointing, solar array, and deployment mechanisms; and other mechanisms for spacecraft and large space structures.

  9. 41st Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Editor)

    2012-01-01

    The proceedings of the 41st Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. JPL hosted the conference, which was held in Pasadena Hilton, Pasadena, California on May 16-18, 2012. Lockheed Martin Space Systems cosponsored the symposium. Technology areas covered include gimbals and positioning mechanisms, components such as hinges and motors, CubeSats, tribology, and Mars Science Laboratory mechanisms.

  10. 33rd Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler); Litty, Edward C. (Compiler); Sevilla, Donald R. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    The proceedings of the 33rd Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. JPL hosted the conference, which was held at the Pasadena Conference and Exhibition Center, Pasadena, California, on May 19-21, 1999. Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space cosponsored the symposium. Technology areas covered include bearings and tribology; pointing, solar array and deployment mechanisms; orbiter/space station; and other mechanisms for spacecraft.

  11. Expert systems in government symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Karna, K.N.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a symposium on various applications of expert systems. Topics considered at the symposium included knowledge-based reasoning, new directions in knowledge acquisition, software, programming languages, systems engineering, intelligent information retrieval, reactor safety assessment, medical applications, uncertainty management, algorithms, parallel processing, and artificial intelligence.

  12. Characterization of biodegraded coals

    SciTech Connect

    Bean, R.M.; Franz, J.A.; Campbell, J.C.; Linehan, J.C.; Stewart, D.L.; Thomas, B.L.

    1988-04-01

    We have been able to accomplish the biodegradation of bituminous Illinois No. 6 coal after a pretreatment consisting of air oxidation, using a culture of the fungus Penicillium sp. We report in this paper results of chemical and spectrometric analyses of the starting materials and products from Illinois No. 6 coal biodegradation, and compare the results with those previously reported from the biodegradation of leonardite. 13 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  13. Biodegradability of plastics.

    PubMed

    Tokiwa, Yutaka; Calabia, Buenaventurada P; Ugwu, Charles U; Aiba, Seiichi

    2009-08-26

    Plastic is a broad name given to different polymers with high molecular weight, which can be degraded by various processes. However, considering their abundance in the environment and their specificity in attacking plastics, biodegradation of plastics by microorganisms and enzymes seems to be the most effective process. When plastics are used as substrates for microorganisms, evaluation of their biodegradability should not only be based on their chemical structure, but also on their physical properties (melting point, glass transition temperature, crystallinity, storage modulus etc.). In this review, microbial and enzymatic biodegradation of plastics and some factors that affect their biodegradability are discussed.

  14. Biodegradability of Plastics

    PubMed Central

    Tokiwa, Yutaka; Calabia, Buenaventurada P.; Ugwu, Charles U.; Aiba, Seiichi

    2009-01-01

    Plastic is a broad name given to different polymers with high molecular weight, which can be degraded by various processes. However, considering their abundance in the environment and their specificity in attacking plastics, biodegradation of plastics by microorganisms and enzymes seems to be the most effective process. When plastics are used as substrates for microorganisms, evaluation of their biodegradability should not only be based on their chemical structure, but also on their physical properties (melting point, glass transition temperature, crystallinity, storage modulus etc.). In this review, microbial and enzymatic biodegradation of plastics and some factors that affect their biodegradability are discussed. PMID:19865515

  15. Local effects of global climate change on the urban drainage system of Hamburg.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Klaus; Kuchenbecker, Andreas; Hüffmeyer, Nina; Verworn, Hans-Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    The Hamburg Water Group owns and operates a sewer network with a total length of more than 5,700 km. There has been increasing attention paid to the possible impacts of predicted changes in precipitation patterns on the sewer network infrastructure. The primary objective of the work presented in this paper is an estimation of the hydraulic impacts of climate change on the Hamburg drainage system. As a first step, simulated rainfalls based on the regional climate model REMO were compared and validated with long-term precipitation measurements. In the second step, the hydraulic effects on the sewer network of Hamburg have been analyzed based on simulated long-term rainfall series for the period of 2000-2100. Simulation results show a significant increase in combined sewer overflows by 50% as well as an increase in surcharges of storm sewer manholes. However, there is still a substantial amount of uncertainty resulting from model uncertainty and unknown development of future greenhouse gas emissions. So far, there seems to be no sound basis for the implementation of an overall climate factor for sewer dimensioning for the Hamburg region. Nevertheless, possible effects of climate change should be taken into account within the planning process for major sewer extensions or modifications.

  16. Achievement Inequalities in Hamburg Schools: How Do They Change as Students Get Older?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caro, Daniel H.; Lehmann, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    A handful of studies have found evidence of a gap in academic achievement between students of high- and low-socioeconomic status (SES) families. Furthermore, some scholars argue that the gap tends to widen as students get older. Evidence is, however, inconclusive and relies mostly on limited methodological designs. Drawing on the Hamburg School…

  17. Spectator Democracy: An Intersectional Analysis of Education Reform in Hamburg, Germany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bale, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    This article uses the theoretical framework of intersectionality to analyze a partially failed school reform measure in Hamburg, Germany and the political conflict over it between 2008 and 2010. The analysis focuses on "the extent to which" and the "mechanisms by which" the interests of marginalized members of the proreform…

  18. From the Quixotic to the Pragmatic: The "Hamburg Declaration", Adult Education, and Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Amy

    2013-01-01

    The "Hamburg Declaration" (UNESCO, 1997) is perhaps most quixotic and prescient in laying out the changing world of work as envisioned in 1997. It includes particular commitments to promote the rights to work and to work-related adult learning, to increase access to work-related adult learning for different target groups, and to…

  19. [Urban Health (StadtGesundheit): The Wider Perspective Exemplified by the City State of Hamburg].

    PubMed

    Fehr, R; Fertmann, R; Stender, K-P; Lettau, N; Trojan, A

    2016-09-01

    Public health and city planning have common roots, and in many places they are now reuniting under the heading of urban health. To organize this field adequately requires a broad, integrative view of medical care, health promotion, and health in all urban policies. Given current crises and developments including climate change and globalization, such a wider perspective should also be useful for Germany. Using the City State of Hamburg as an example and combining historic and systematic approaches, we explore the preconditions for in-depth analyses. Our results show that health is a significant topic of Hamburg urban policy, featuring a broad range of structures, processes and actors, both within the health sector and far beyond. Health promotion over the last 30 years evolved notably from a niche topic into an established field with remarkable cooperative structures. The tradition of comprehensive reporting on urban health in Hamburg that was initiated more than 200 years ago is no longer alive today. However, local health reporting keeps integrating a wide range of diverse topics. Communication among the Hamburg health actors - beyond straightforward medical quality assurance - does not seem to focus on critical evaluations, e. g. concerning social and ecologic sustainability. A prerequisite for in-depth analyses including external comparisons is to secure permanent access to relevant sources. Robust approaches to this end, however, seem to be lacking.

  20. Spectator Democracy: An Intersectional Analysis of Education Reform in Hamburg, Germany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bale, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    This article uses the theoretical framework of intersectionality to analyze a partially failed school reform measure in Hamburg, Germany and the political conflict over it between 2008 and 2010. The analysis focuses on "the extent to which" and the "mechanisms by which" the interests of marginalized members of the proreform…

  1. IAU Symposium 317 Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratton, Raffaele G.

    2016-08-01

    The assembly of the halo yields fundamental information on the formation and evolution of galaxies: this was quite exhaustively discussed at this very important symposium. I present a brief personal summary of the meeting, outlining those points that I found more exciting and suggestive. I also remarked a few areas that were possibly not enough expanded. I found this research field extremely interesting and I think there are great expectations for new developments in the next few years, thanks to the new large spectroscopic surveys and the ESA GAIA satellite.

  2. RICIS Symposium 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Integrated Environments for Large, Complex Systems is the theme for the RICIS symposium of 1988. Distinguished professionals from industry, government, and academia have been invited to participate and present their views and experiences regarding research, education, and future directions related to this topic. Within RICIS, more than half of the research being conducted is in the area of Computer Systems and Software Engineering. The focus of this research is on the software development life-cycle for large, complex, distributed systems. Within the education and training component of RICIS, the primary emphasis has been to provide education and training for software professionals.

  3. Biodegradation of plastics.

    PubMed

    Shimao, M

    2001-06-01

    Widespread studies on the biodegradation of plastics have been carried out in order to overcome the environmental problems associated with synthetic plastic waste. Recent work has included studies of the distribution of synthetic polymer-degrading microorganisms in the environment, the isolation of new microorganisms for biodegradation, the discovery of new degradation enzymes, and the cloning of genes for synthetic polymer-degrading enzymes.

  4. Epidemiological and Ecological Characterization of the EHEC O104:H4 Outbreak in Hamburg, Germany, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Tahden, Maike; Manitz, Juliane; Baumgardt, Klaus; Fell, Gerhard; Kneib, Thomas; Hegasy, Guido

    2016-01-01

    In 2011, a large outbreak of entero-hemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) occurred in Germany. The City of Hamburg was the first focus of the epidemic and had the highest incidences among all 16 Federal States of Germany. In this article, we present epidemiological characteristics of the Hamburg notification data. Evaluating the epicurves retrospectively, we found that the first epidemiological signal of the outbreak, which was in form of a HUS case cluster, was received by local health authorities when already 99 EHEC and 48 HUS patients had experienced their first symptoms. However, only two EHEC and seven HUS patients had been notified. Middle-aged women had the highest risk for contracting the infection in Hamburg. Furthermore, we studied timeliness of case notification in the course of the outbreak. To analyze the spatial distribution of EHEC/HUS incidences in 100 districts of Hamburg, we mapped cases' residential addresses using geographic information software. We then conducted an ecological study in order to find a statistical model identifying associations between local socio-economic factors and EHEC/HUS incidences in the epidemic. We employed a Bayesian Poisson model with covariates characterizing the Hamburg districts as well as incorporating structured and unstructured spatial effects. The Deviance Information Criterion was used for stepwise variable selection. We applied different modeling approaches by using primary data, transformed data, and preselected subsets of transformed data in order to identify socio-economic factors characterizing districts where EHEC/HUS outbreak cases had their residence. PMID:27723830

  5. The first Brazilian Dinosaur Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Anjos Candeiro, Carlos Roberto; da Silva Marinho, Thiago

    2015-08-01

    The 1st Brazilian Dinosaur Symposium gathered paleontologists, geologists, and paleoartists in the city of Ituiutaba, Minas Gerais State, Brazil, from April 21st to 24th, 2013. The Dinosaur Symposium in the Pontal Campus of the Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Minas Gerais State, Brazil provided an opportunity to share many new results of dinosaur research being conducted around the world. The symposium coincided with a new dawn of scientific advances in dinosaur paleontology further expanding its importance, interest and credibility worldwide.

  6. Women's technical and professional symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Budil, K; Mack, L

    1999-10-01

    This is the fourth LLNL-sponsored Women's Technical and Professional Symposium. This year's theme: ''Excellence through the Millennium,'' focuses on the cutting edge work being done at LLNL and the many contributions of women to our science and technology mission. We hope this Symposium gives each person attending a better idea of the broad scope of the Laboratory's mission and their place within the organization. It is easy to lose sight of the fact that we all work in support of science and technology despite the diversity of our experience. This Symposium provides an opportunity to reflect on our past and to begin to plan our future.

  7. Modernization of the graphics post-processors of the Hamburg German Climate Computer Center Carbon Cycle Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, E.J.; McNeilly, G.S.

    1994-03-01

    The existing National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) code in the Hamburg Oceanic Carbon Cycle Circulation Model and the Hamburg Large-Scale Geostrophic Ocean General Circulation Model was modernized and reduced in size while still producing an equivalent end result. A reduction in the size of the existing code from more than 50,000 lines to approximately 7,500 lines in the new code has made the new code much easier to maintain. The existing code in Hamburg model uses legacy NCAR (including even emulated CALCOMP subrountines) graphics to display graphical output. The new code uses only current (version 3.1) NCAR subrountines.

  8. Research symposium proceedings. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1991-12-31

    THE research symposium was organized to present the cutting edge research for PET by individuals from leading institutions throughout the world. The Institute for Clinical PET (ICP) has focused its annual meeting on the clinical applications of PET.

  9. Trees for Reclamation Symposium Proceedings

    Treesearch

    Northeastern Forest Experiment Station

    1980-01-01

    A collection of 30 papers presented at the symposium on trees for reclamation in the Eastern United States held October 27-29, 1980, Lexington, Kentucky, and sponsored by the USDA Forest Service and Interstate Mining Compact Commission.

  10. Fourth symposium on macrocyclic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, J. J.; Izatt, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    Both theoretical and experimental aspects of the properties and behavior of synthetic and naturally occurring macrocyclic compounds are covered in this symposium. This document contains abstracts of the papers. (DLC)

  11. Grey water biodegradability.

    PubMed

    Ghunmi, Lina Abu; Zeeman, Grietje; Fayyad, Manar; van Lier, Jules B

    2011-02-01

    Knowing the biodegradability characteristics of grey water constituents is imperative for a proper design and operation of a biological treatment system of grey water. This study characterizes the different COD fractions of dormitory grey water and investigates the effect of applying different conditions in the biodegradation test. The maximum aerobic and anaerobic biodegradability and conversion rate for the different COD fractions is determined. The results show that, on average, dormitory grey water COD fractions are 28% suspended, 32% colloidal and 40% dissolved. The studied factors incubation time, inoculum addition and temperature are influencing the determined biodegradability. The maximum biodegradability and biodegradation rate differ between different COD fractions, viz. COD(ss), COD(col) and COD(diss). The dissolved COD fraction is characterised by the lowest degradation rate, both for anaerobic and aerobic conditions. The maximum biodegradability for aerobic and anaerobic conditions is 86 and 70% respectively, whereas the first order conversion rate constant, k₂₀, is 0.119 and 0.005 day⁻¹, respectively. The anaerobic and aerobic conversion rates in relation to temperature can be described by the Arrhenius relation, with temperature coefficients of 1.069 and 1.099, respectively.

  12. 30th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Obie H., Jr. (Compiler); Rogers, John F. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    The proceedings of the 30th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. NASA Langley Research Center hosted the proceedings held at the Radisson Hotel in Hampton, Virginia on May 15-17, 1996, and Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space Company, Inc. co-sponsored the symposium. Technological areas covered include bearings and tribology; pointing, solar array, and deployment mechanisms; orbiter/space station; and other mechanisms for spacecraft.

  13. 30th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, O.H. Jr.; Rogers, J.F.

    1996-05-01

    The proceedings of the 30th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. NASA Langley Research Center hosted the proceedings held at the Radisson Hotel in Hampton, Virginia on May 15-17, 1996, and Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space Company, Inc. co-sponsored the symposium. Technological areas covered include bearings and tribology; pointing, solar array, and deployment mechanisms; orbiter/space station; and other mechanisms for spacecraft. Separate abstracts have been indexed into the database for some articles from this proceedings.

  14. Global Environmental Change Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Susan M.

    The global environmental warming issue has been catapulted to the forefront of media attention as a result of the drought of 1988 and extremely warm temperatures. NASA scientist James Hansen testified last year that the warming trend has begun and that part of the temperature rise is due to gases such as carbon dioxide, methane, and chlorofluro-carbons (CFCs) being released into the atmosphere by human activity.In response to recent scientific speculation on the issue, the National Academy of Sciences, Washington, D.C., hosted the symposium Global Environmental Change April 24 as part of their annual meeting. Speakers included Bert Bolin, University of Stockholm; Robert White, National Academy of Engineering; Stephen Schneider, National Center for Atmospheric Research; and Peter Raven, Missouri Botanical Garden. Moderator was Russell Train, World Wildlife Fund.

  15. Action Theory, Control and Motivation: A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckensberger, L. H.; Meacham, J. A., Eds.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the symposium on action theory presented at the 1983 meeting of the International Society for the Study of Behavioral Development in Munich. The symposium included reactions to action theory from a variety of theoretical perspectives. (Author/RH)

  16. The 1986 Get Away Special Experimenter's Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Lawrence R. (Editor); Mosier, Frances L. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The 1986 Get Away Special (GAS) Experimenter's Symposium will provide a formal opportunity for GAS Experimenter's to share the results of their projects. The focus of this symposium is on payloads that will be flown in the future.

  17. Niobium - Proceedings of the international symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, H.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a symposium on niobium. Topics considered at the symposium included niobium mining, ore processing, uses, fabrication, microstructure, mechanical properties, physical properties, corrosion, physical radiation effects, and marketing.

  18. Characterization of biodegraded coals

    SciTech Connect

    Bean, R.M.; Franz, J.A.; Campbell, J.A.; Linehan, J.C.; Stewart, D.L.; Thomas, B.L.

    1988-01-01

    Microbial degradation of coals to materials that are soluble in water has been a topic of intensive research for the last few years. The potential for economical recovery of low-grade coals, coupled with possibilities for further upgrading by microbial desulfurization or methanation has spurred intensive research at a number of laboratories. Until very recently, coal biodegradation has been accomplished using low-grade, naturally oxidized coals such as leonardiate, or coals subjected to pretreatment with oxidizing chemicals. The authors have been able to accomplish the biodegradation of bituminous Illinois 6 coal after a pretreatment consisting of air oxidation, using a culture of the fungus Penicillium sp. They report in this paper results of chemical and spectrometric analyses of the starting materials and products from Illinois 6 coal biodegradation, and compare the results with those previously reported from the biodegradation of leonardite.

  19. 69th International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-17

    69th International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy The proceedings from the 69th International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy , held June 16...ADDRESS (ES) U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 International, Symposium, Molecular Spectroscopy REPORT...reviewed journals: Final Report: 69th International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy Report Title The proceedings from the 69th International

  20. A model output statistics system to forecast the 2 metre temperature at the "Wettermast Hamburg" site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Tobias Sebastian; Ament, Felix

    2016-04-01

    The model output statistics (MOS) method is frequently used to downscale and improve numerical weather models for specific measurement sites. One of these is the "Wettermast Hamburg" (http://wettermast-hamburg.zmaw.de/) in the south-east of Hamburg. It is operated by the Meteorological Institute of the University of Hamburg. The MOS approach was used to develop a not yet existing 2 metre temperature forecasting system for this site. The forecast system is based on the 0 UTC control run of the legacy "global ensemble forecast system". The multiple linear equations were calculated using a training period of 2 years (01.03.2012-28.02.2014), while the developed models were evaluated using the following year (01.03.2014-28.02.2015). During the development process it was found that a combination of forward and backward selection together with the "Bayesian information criterion", a warm-cold splitting and a five-fold cross-validation was the best automated method to minimize the risk of overfitting. To further reduce the risk, the number of predictors were limited to 6. Also the first 3 possible predictors were selected by hand. In comparison to the fully automated method, the error was not changed significantly through this restrictions for the evaluation period. The analysis of the importance of selected predictors shows that the global weather model has problems characterizing specific weather phenomena. Large model errors by misrepresenting the boundary layer were highlighted through the 10 metre wind speed, the surface temperature and the 1000 hPa temperature as frequently selected predictors. The final forecast system has a root-mean-square error minimum of 1.15 K for the initialization and a maximum 2.2 K at the 84 hour lead time. Compared to the direct model output this is a mean improvement of ˜ 22%. The main error reduction is achieved in the first 24 hours of the forecast, especially at the initialization (up to 45% error reduction).

  1. [SVM-based qualitative analysis of Muscat Hamburg wine produced in Tianjin region].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Wang, Fang; Wei, Ji-Ping; Li, Chang-Wen; Yang, Hua; Shao, Chun-Fu; Zhang, Fu-Qing; Yin, Ji-Tai; Xiao, Dong-Guang

    2011-01-01

    The purpose was to achieve the identification of Muscat Hamburg wines produced in Tianjin region through scanning and analyzing dry white wine samples of different grape varieties and regions by infrared spectroscopy technology. A support vector machine (SVM) based method was introduced to analyze infrared spectra of dry white wines. The pretreatment processes of the IR spectra were also elaborated, including baseline adjustment, noise Elimination, standard normalization and eliminating the main component of abnormal sample points. The authors selected great quantity of dry white wine samples of different grape regions including 511 Muscat Hamburg wine samples, 438 Italian Riesling wine samples, 307 Chardonnay wine samples, 29 Ugni Blanc wine samples, 44 Rkatsiteli wine samples, 31 longan wine samples and 79 ZeHong wine samples. According to different classification problems, 80% of IR spectra of the wine samples were used to establish discrimination models with SVM-based method, and the remaining 20% of IR spectra were used for the validation of the discrimination models. Experimental results showed that the proposed method is effective, since high classification accuracy, identification rate and rejecting rate were achieved: over 97% for the white wine samples of different grape varieties, meanwhile over 98% for the Muscat Hamburg wine samples produced in different regions. So the method developed in this paper played a good role in the qualitative classification and discrimination of Muscat Hamburg wines produced in Tianjin region. This novel method has a considerable potential and a rosy application future due to the expeditiousness, stability and easy-operation of FTIR method, as well as the veracity and credibility of SVM method.

  2. The Schoolwide Symposium: A Model for Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cottingham, Walt

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the first schoolwide symposium at Hendersonville High School (North Carolina) in which, for one week, students and faculty were immersed in the culture and history of the Vietnam War era. Explains that because this first symposium was so successful in gaining student enthusiasm, the school organized three more symposiums. (CMK)

  3. Molecularly Imprinted Biodegradable Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gagliardi, Mariacristina; Bertero, Alice; Bifone, Angelo

    2017-01-10

    Biodegradable polymer nanoparticles are promising carriers for targeted drug delivery in nanomedicine applications. Molecu- lar imprinting is a potential strategy to target polymer nanoparticles through binding of endogenous ligands that may promote recognition and active transport into specific cells and tissues. However, the lock-and-key mechanism of molecular imprinting requires relatively rigid cross-linked structures, unlike those of many biodegradable polymers. To date, no fully biodegradable molecularly imprinted particles have been reported in the literature. This paper reports the synthesis of a novel molecularly- imprinted nanocarrier, based on poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and acrylic acid, that combines biodegradability and molec- ular recognition properties. A novel three-arm biodegradable cross-linker was synthesized by ring-opening polymerization of glycolide and lactide initiated by glycerol. The resulting macromer was functionalized by introduction of end-functions through reaction with acryloyl chloride. Macromer and acrylic acid were used for the synthesis of narrowly-dispersed nanoparticles by radical polymerization in diluted conditions in the presence of biotin as template molecule. The binding capacity of the imprinted nanoparticles towards biotin and biotinylated bovine serum albumin was twentyfold that of non-imprinted nanoparti- cles. Degradation rates and functional performances were assessed in in vitro tests and cell cultures, demonstrating effective biotin-mediated cell internalization.

  4. Molecularly Imprinted Biodegradable Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliardi, Mariacristina; Bertero, Alice; Bifone, Angelo

    2017-01-01

    Biodegradable polymer nanoparticles are promising carriers for targeted drug delivery in nanomedicine applications. Molecu- lar imprinting is a potential strategy to target polymer nanoparticles through binding of endogenous ligands that may promote recognition and active transport into specific cells and tissues. However, the lock-and-key mechanism of molecular imprinting requires relatively rigid cross-linked structures, unlike those of many biodegradable polymers. To date, no fully biodegradable molecularly imprinted particles have been reported in the literature. This paper reports the synthesis of a novel molecularly- imprinted nanocarrier, based on poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and acrylic acid, that combines biodegradability and molec- ular recognition properties. A novel three-arm biodegradable cross-linker was synthesized by ring-opening polymerization of glycolide and lactide initiated by glycerol. The resulting macromer was functionalized by introduction of end-functions through reaction with acryloyl chloride. Macromer and acrylic acid were used for the synthesis of narrowly-dispersed nanoparticles by radical polymerization in diluted conditions in the presence of biotin as template molecule. The binding capacity of the imprinted nanoparticles towards biotin and biotinylated bovine serum albumin was twentyfold that of non-imprinted nanoparti- cles. Degradation rates and functional performances were assessed in in vitro tests and cell cultures, demonstrating effective biotin-mediated cell internalization.

  5. Molecularly Imprinted Biodegradable Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Gagliardi, Mariacristina; Bertero, Alice; Bifone, Angelo

    2017-01-01

    Biodegradable polymer nanoparticles are promising carriers for targeted drug delivery in nanomedicine applications. Molecu- lar imprinting is a potential strategy to target polymer nanoparticles through binding of endogenous ligands that may promote recognition and active transport into specific cells and tissues. However, the lock-and-key mechanism of molecular imprinting requires relatively rigid cross-linked structures, unlike those of many biodegradable polymers. To date, no fully biodegradable molecularly imprinted particles have been reported in the literature. This paper reports the synthesis of a novel molecularly- imprinted nanocarrier, based on poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and acrylic acid, that combines biodegradability and molec- ular recognition properties. A novel three-arm biodegradable cross-linker was synthesized by ring-opening polymerization of glycolide and lactide initiated by glycerol. The resulting macromer was functionalized by introduction of end-functions through reaction with acryloyl chloride. Macromer and acrylic acid were used for the synthesis of narrowly-dispersed nanoparticles by radical polymerization in diluted conditions in the presence of biotin as template molecule. The binding capacity of the imprinted nanoparticles towards biotin and biotinylated bovine serum albumin was twentyfold that of non-imprinted nanoparti- cles. Degradation rates and functional performances were assessed in in vitro tests and cell cultures, demonstrating effective biotin-mediated cell internalization. PMID:28071745

  6. 1992 STEP Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lui, Tony

    The year 1992 marks the quincentenary jubilee of the famous voyage of Christopher Columbus to the New World, a trip which initiated sustained contact between Europe and the American continent. Courageous explorations often lead to advancement of mankind, be they in uncharted territory or science. As much as Columbus was unaware of what lay in store for his voyage, we were just as poorly informed about what lay beyond our home planet when we began space exploration about three decades ago. There is much similarity among the pioneering spirits characteristic of both endeavors. It is thus fitting to celebrate this quincentenary occasion by declaring 1992 International Space Year (ISY).In conjunction with the COSPAR Meeting and the International Convention of the World Space Congress to be held in Washington, D.C., from August to September 1992, a 4-day symposium on the initial results from the Solar-Terrestrial Energy Program (STEP) Facilities and Theory Campaigns will be held at Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Md., August 24-27. 1992.

  7. 43rd Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is the reporting of problems and solutions associated with the development and flight certification of new mechanisms. Sponsored and organized by the Mechanisms Education Association, responsibility for hosting the AMS is shared by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC). Now in its 43rd symposium, the AMS continues to be well attended, attracting participants from both the U.S. and abroad. The 43rd AMS was held in Santa Clara, California on May 4, 5 and 6, 2016. During these three days, 42 papers were presented. Topics included payload and positioning mechanisms, components such as hinges and motors, CubeSats, tribology, and mechanism testing. Hardware displays during the supplier exhibit gave attendees an opportunity to meet with developers of current and future mechanism components. The high quality of this symposium is a result of the work of many people, and their efforts are gratefully acknowledged. This extends to the voluntary members of the symposium organizing committee representing the eight NASA field centers, LMSSC, and the European Space Agency. Appreciation is also extended to the session chairs, the authors, and particularly the personnel at ARC responsible for the symposium arrangements and the publication of these proceedings. A sincere thank you also goes to the symposium executive committee who is responsible for the year-to-year management of the AMS, including paper processing and preparation of the program. The use of trade names of manufacturers in this publication does not constitute an official endorsement of such products or manufacturers, either expressed or implied, by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  8. LHC Symposium 2003: Summary Talk

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey A. Appel

    2003-08-12

    This summary talk reviews the LHC 2003 Symposium, focusing on expectations as we prepare to leap over the current energy frontier into new territory. We may learn from what happened in the two most recent examples of leaping into new energy territory. Quite different scenarios appeared in those two cases. In addition, they review the status of the machine and experiments as reported at the Symposium. Finally, I suggest an attitude which may be most appropriate as they look forward to the opportunities anticipated for the first data from the LHC.

  9. Symposium Summary and the Scope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajino, Toshitaka

    It was a great pleasure for us to organize the 14th International Symposium on Nuclei in the Cosmos (NIC-XIV) in Niigata Japan, which shall illuminate the new horizon of nuclear astrophysics and related fields. This was co-hosted by National Astronomical Observatory of Japan and RIKEN Nishina Center, supported by IUPAP, JINA-CEE, JSPS, JEC Fund, Niigata Prefecture and Niigata City, and many other institutes and associations, and also sponsored by PTEP, Bourbone, and many other companies. I feel highly honored to have hosted this symposium as the Chair of NIC-XIV.

  10. Mining and Reclamation Technology Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    None Available

    1999-06-24

    The Mining and Reclamation Technology Symposium was commissioned by the Mountaintop Removal Mining/Valley Fill Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) Interagency Steering Committee as an educational forum for the members of the regulatory community who will participate in the development of the EIS. The Steering Committee sought a balanced audience to ensure the input to the regulatory community reflected the range of perspectives on this complicated and emotional issue. The focus of this symposium is on mining and reclamation technology alternatives, which is one of eleven topics scheduled for review to support development of the EIS. Others include hydrologic, environmental, ecological, and socio-economic issues.

  11. Proceedings of the 1986 International Symposium on Biofouled Aquifers: Prevention and restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Cullimore, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    Biofouled aquifers have only recently been recognized as a natural phenomenon of considerable potential importance. The obvious connotation is that the effects of this biological activity are deleterious to the functioning of the aquifer. This is indeed supported by both the reduced flow resulting from copious biofilm and freely suspended microorganisms present in the system. Favorable features of biofouling include the ability of the intrinsic flora to undertake the biodegradation of organic pollutants and remove various specific inorganic components (eg., iron, manganese) from the aqueous. The International Symposium on Biofouled Aquifers: Prevention and Restoration was organized by the American Water Resources Association held in November 1986. It represented a serious effort to come to terms with the various factors interacting both positively and negatively within a biofouled aquifer and potential to control them. The proceedings of this symposium represents an attempt to interject the microbiological and biochemical aspects into the more hydrological aspects of biofouling in aquifers.

  12. The Third International Symposium on Space Terahertz Technology: Symposium proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Papers from the symposium are presented that are relevant to the generation, detection, and use of the terahertz spectral region for space astronomy and remote sensing of the Earth's upper atmosphere. The program included thirteen sessions covering a wide variety of topics including solid-state oscillators, power-combining techniques, mixers, harmonic multipliers, antennas and antenna arrays, submillimeter receivers, and measurement techniques.

  13. Editorial: Biodegradable Materials

    PubMed Central

    Schaschke, Carl; Audic, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    This Special Issue “Biodegradable Materials” features research and review papers concerning recent advances on the development, synthesis, testing and characterisation of biomaterials. These biomaterials, derived from natural and renewable sources, offer a potential alternative to existing non-biodegradable materials with application to the food and biomedical industries amongst many others. In this Special Issue, the work is expanded to include the combined use of fillers that can enhance the properties of biomaterials prepared as films. The future application of these biomaterials could have an impact not only at the economic level, but also for the improvement of the environment. PMID:25421242

  14. Study on the synergic effect of natural compounds on the microbial quality decay of packed fish hamburger.

    PubMed

    Corbo, M R; Speranza, B; Filippone, A; Granatiero, S; Conte, A; Sinigaglia, M; Del Nobile, M A

    2008-10-31

    The effectiveness of natural compounds in slowing down the microbial quality decay of refrigerated fish hamburger is addressed in this study. In particular, the control of the microbiological spoilage by combined use of three antimicrobials, and the determination of their optimal composition to extend the fish hamburger Microbiological Stability Limit (MAL) are the main objectives of this work. Thymol, grapefruit seed extract (GFSE) and lemon extract were tested for monitoring the cell growth of the main fish spoilage microorganisms (Pseudomonas fluorescens, Photobacterium phosphoreum and Shewanella putrefaciens), inoculated in fish hamburgers, and the growth of mesophilic and psychrotrophic bacteria. A Central Composite Design (CCD) was developed to highlight a possible synergic effect of the above natural compounds. Results showed an increase in the MAL value for hamburgers mixed with the antimicrobial compounds, compared to the control sample. The optimal antimicrobial compound composition, which corresponds to the maximal MAL value determined in this study, is: 110 mgL(-1) of thymol, 100 mgL(-1) of GFSE and 120 mgL(-1) of lemon extract. The presence of the natural compounds delay the sensorial quality decay without compromising the flavor of the fish hamburgers.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Hamburg/RASS Cat. of optical identifications (HRC) (Bade+, 1998)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bade, N.; Engels, D.; Voges, W.; Beckmann, V.; Boller, T.; Cordis, L.; Dahlem, M.; Englhauser, J.; Molthagen, K.; Nass, P.; Studt, J.; Reimers, D.

    2001-03-01

    The file rassid2.cat provides information on optical identifications to X-ray positions of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS). The file was created by correlating the Bright Source Catalogue of ROSAT (Voges et al., 1996, Cat. ) and the Hamburg/RASS Catalogue of Optical Identifications (HRC) (Bade et al., 1996, in prep.). In the current state (Version 2.0) the catalogue contains 4665 positions in the extragalactic northern sky. For each X-ray position optical information taken from HQS objective prism and direct Schmidt plates (Hagen et al., 1995A&AS..111..195H) is given and a finding chart derived from digitized direct plates as gzipped Postscript file is provided (sky.ps file). If possible, the most likely optical counterpart is marked in the catalogue and on the finding chart. For many of the newly processed HQS fields of Version 2.0 no direct Schmidt plates from the HQS exists. In these cases we put finding charts generated from the STScI Digitized Sky Survey on the ftp server, ftp.hs.uni-hamburg.de, pub/outgoing/rass-id. We remind the reader that the STScI Digitized Sky Survey and HQS prism plates have different epochs. This has to be taken into account for stellar identifications. Furthermore the spectral sensitivity of the STScI Digitized Sky Survey and the HQS prism plates is different. The finding chart for each X-ray position is stored as a gzipped Postscript file and they can be found in the directories d-10 to d+80 at ftp.hs.uni-hamburg.de, pub/outgoing/rass-id. These directories arrange the files into declination belts. Names of finding charts generated by the STScI Digitized Sky Survey begin with a 'p'. (4 data files).

  16. Symposium: What Is College English?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Lynn Z.; White, Edward M.; Enoch, Jessica; Hawk, Byron

    2013-01-01

    This symposium explores the role(s) College English has (or has not) had in the scholarly work of four scholars. Lynn Bloom explores the many ways College English influenced her work and the work of others throughout their scholarly lives. Edward M. White examines four articles he has published in College English and draws connections between…

  17. Learning on the Job. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains two papers from a symposium on learning on the job. "Professional Crisis Workers: Impact of Repeated Exposure to Human Pain and Destructiveness" (Lynn Atkinson-Tovar) examines the following topics: (1) the secondary and vicarious traumatic stress disorder that affects many professional crisis workers who are…

  18. Learning at the Top. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on learning at the top that was conducted as part of a conference on human resource development (HRD). "Learning at the Top: An Investigation of Nonprofit CEOs' (Chief Executive Officers') Learning Experiences" (John J. Sherlock) reports on a study that used Mezirow's theory of adult…

  19. Cross-Cultural HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    The first of three papers from this symposium on cross-cultural human resource development (HRD), "Determinants of Supply of Technical Training Opportunities for Human Capital Development in Kenya" (Moses Waithanji Ngware, Fredrick Muyia Nafukho) reports findings from interviews of technical training institute department heads in Kenya…

  20. Unconventional gas recovery symposium. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    This conference contains 51 papers and 4 abstracts of papers presented at the symposium on unconventional gas recovery. Some of the topics covered are: coalbed methane; methane recovery; gas hydrates; hydraulic fracturing treatments; geopressured systems; foam fracturing; evaluation of Devonian shales; tight gas sands; propping agents; and economics of natural gas production. All papers have been abstracted and indexed for the Energy Data Base.

  1. Symposium: What Is College English?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Lynn Z.; White, Edward M.; Enoch, Jessica; Hawk, Byron

    2013-01-01

    This symposium explores the role(s) College English has (or has not) had in the scholarly work of four scholars. Lynn Bloom explores the many ways College English influenced her work and the work of others throughout their scholarly lives. Edward M. White examines four articles he has published in College English and draws connections between…

  2. Arena Symposium: Dearing and Geography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalkley, Brian; Quigley, George; Toyne, Peter; Johnston, Ron; Butlin, Robin A.; Beer, Andrew; Cutler, Cecile

    1998-01-01

    Presents eight papers delivered at a symposium on the impact of the Dearing Report on geography instruction in the United Kingdom. The Dearing Report reviews higher education and charts the course of curriculum and instruction for the next 20 years. The papers address standards, regional applications, and criticisms. (MJP)

  3. Black Women in Film Symposium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Barbara

    1974-01-01

    Describes a symposium sponsored in April of last year by the Afro-American and American Studies Departments at Boston University on "Black Image in Films, Stereotyping and Self-Perception"; participants included Susan Batson, Cynthia Belgrave, Ruby Dee, Beah Richards, and Cicely Tyson. (Author/JM)

  4. Sudden oak death online symposium

    Treesearch

    S.D. Cohen; J., eds Juzwik

    2003-01-01

    This symposium is being made available to all who have an interest in the recent appearance of Sudden Oak Death, a plant disease with the potential to severely impact nursery growers, shippers, the lumber and wood products industry, landscapers, government programs and others. Scientific presentations dealing with the current status of the disease and ongoing research...

  5. Women and Career Development. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    Three papers comprise this symposium on women and career development. "Enhancing the Career Success of Women Faculty: Mentoring as a Human Resource Development (HRD) Initiative in Higher Education" (Sharon K. Gibson) explores mentoring of women faculty, focusing on the key dimensions of roles and functions, outcomes, gender, and formal…

  6. HRD Future and Trends. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on the future of human resource development (HRD) and trends in HRD. "Searching for the Future of Human Resource Development" (Wendy E.A. Ruona, Susan A. Lynham, Tom Chermack) reports on a survey of 55 HRD and HRD-related practitioners and academics that examined trends in the HRD…

  7. Creative Literature in Canada Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buller, Grace, Ed.; McDonough, Irma, Ed.

    The contents of this booklet were presented at a symposium on Canadian creative literature at the University of Toronto in March 1974. Included are five papers, summaries of two talks (one by Bill Sault on the oral tradition of Canada's native peoples and one by Robert Weaver on discovering and encouraging Canadian writers) and of a panel…

  8. 1999 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daelemans, Gerard (Editor); Mosier, Frances L. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The 1999 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium is a combined symposia of the Get Away Special (GAS), Space Experiment Module (SEM), and Hitchhiker programs, and is proposed to continue as an annual conference. The focus of this conference is to educate potential Space Shuttle Payload Bay users as to the types of carrier systems provided and for current users to share experiment concepts.

  9. Black Women in Film Symposium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Barbara

    1974-01-01

    Describes a symposium sponsored in April of last year by the Afro-American and American Studies Departments at Boston University on "Black Image in Films, Stereotyping and Self-Perception"; participants included Susan Batson, Cynthia Belgrave, Ruby Dee, Beah Richards, and Cicely Tyson. (Author/JM)

  10. Adult Learning and HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This symposium on adult learning and human resource development consists of three presentations. "Adult Learning Principles and Concepts in the Workplace: Implications for Training in HRD" (Margot B. Weinstein) reports on findings from interviews with restaurant employees who reported that training practices using adult learning…

  11. SYMPOSIUM ON PLANT PROTEIN PHOSPHORYLATION

    SciTech Connect

    JOHN C WALKER

    2011-11-01

    Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation play key roles in many aspects of plant biology, including control of cell division, pathways of carbon and nitrogen metabolism, pattern formation, hormonal responses, and abiotic and biotic responses to environmental signals. A Symposium on Plant Protein Phosphorylation was hosted on the Columbia campus of the University of Missouri from May 26-28, 2010. The symposium provided an interdisciplinary venue at which scholars studying protein modification, as it relates to a broad range of biological questions and using a variety of plant species, presented their research. It also provided a forum where current international challenges in studies related to protein phosphorylation could be examined. The symposium also stimulated research collaborations through interactions and networking among those in the research community and engaged students and early career investigators in studying issues in plant biology from an interdisciplinary perspective. The proposed symposium, which drew 165 researchers from 13 countries and 21 States, facilitated a rapid dissemination of acquired knowledge and technical expertise regarding protein phosphorylation in plants to a broad range of plant biologists worldwide.

  12. The Symposium on Integration Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyers, Mary, Ed.

    This symposium of the ad hoc committee on integration of the Ontario (Canada) Teachers of English as a Second Language (TESL) reports educators' concerns with providing adequate support for immigrant and refugee students, maintaining the integrity, voice, and visibility of ESL education in school boards, and advocating and providing guidelines for…

  13. Technological Change and HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on technological change and human resource development. "New Technologies, Cognitive Demands, and the Implications for Learning Theory" (Richard J. Torraco) identifies four specific characteristics of the tasks involved in using new technologies (contingent versus deterministic tasks,…

  14. Diversity in the Workplace. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    Three papers comprise this symposium on diversity in the workplace. "Factors That Assist and Barriers That Hinder the Success of Diversity Initiatives in Multinational Corporations" (Rose Mary Wentling) reports that factors that assisted in the success were classified under diversity department, human, and work environment; barriers were…

  15. Learning and Job Satisfaction. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This symposium is comprised of three papers on learning and job satisfaction. "The Relationship Between Workplace Learning and Job Satisfaction in United States Small to Mid-Sized Businesses" (Robert W. Rowden) reports findings that revealed sufficient evidence to conclude that learning is pervasive in the small to mid-sized businesses…

  16. Creative Literature in Canada Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buller, Grace, Ed.; McDonough, Irma, Ed.

    The contents of this booklet were presented at a symposium on Canadian creative literature at the University of Toronto in March 1974. Included are five papers, summaries of two talks (one by Bill Sault on the oral tradition of Canada's native peoples and one by Robert Weaver on discovering and encouraging Canadian writers) and of a panel…

  17. Consumer and Homemaking Education Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Anza Coll., Cupertino, CA.

    Six contributions from the Consumer and Homemaking Education Symposium (March 1, 1974) are included. Elaine Shudlick discussed the role of the consumer education teacher, particularly in relation to a management of personal and family finance course, illustrated by a course outline including course description, prerequisities, text and references,…

  18. Phthalates biodegradation in the environment.

    PubMed

    Liang, Da-Wei; Zhang, Tong; Fang, Herbert H P; He, Jianzhong

    2008-08-01

    Phthalates are synthesized in massive amounts to produce various plastics and have become widespread in environments following their release as a result of extensive usage and production. This has been of an environmental concern because phthalates are hepatotoxic, teratogenic, and carcinogenic by nature. Numerous studies indicated that phthalates can be degraded by bacteria and fungi under aerobic, anoxic, and anaerobic conditions. This paper gives a review on the biodegradation of phthalates and includes the following aspects: (1) the relationship between the chemical structure of phthalates and their biodegradability, (2) the biodegradation of phthalates by pure/mixed cultures, (3) the biodegradation of phthalates under various environments, and (4) the biodegradation pathways of phthalates.

  19. Endstation for ultrafast magnetic scattering experiments at the free-electron laser in Hamburg

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, L.; Gutt, C.; Streit-Nierobisch, S.; Walther, M.; Gruebel, G.; Schaffert, S.; Pfau, B.; Flewett, S.; Geilhufe, J.; Eisebitt, S.; Buettner, F.; Guenther, C. M.; Kobs, A.; Hille, M.; Stickler, D.; Froemter, R.; Oepen, H. P.; Luening, J.

    2013-01-15

    An endstation for pump-probe small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments at the free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) is presented. The endstation houses a solid-state absorber, optical incoupling for pump-probe experiments, time zero measurement, sample chamber, and detection unit. It can be used at all FLASH beamlines in the whole photon energy range offered by FLASH. The capabilities of the setup are demonstrated by showing the results of resonant magnetic SAXS measurements on cobalt-platinum multilayer samples grown on freestanding Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} membranes and pump-laser-induced grid structures in multilayer samples.

  20. Endstation for ultrafast magnetic scattering experiments at the free-electron laser in Hamburg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, L.; Gutt, C.; Streit-Nierobisch, S.; Walther, M.; Schaffert, S.; Pfau, B.; Geilhufe, J.; Büttner, F.; Flewett, S.; Günther, C. M.; Eisebitt, S.; Kobs, A.; Hille, M.; Stickler, D.; Frömter, R.; Oepen, H. P.; Lüning, J.; Grübel, G.

    2013-01-01

    An endstation for pump-probe small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments at the free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) is presented. The endstation houses a solid-state absorber, optical incoupling for pump-probe experiments, time zero measurement, sample chamber, and detection unit. It can be used at all FLASH beamlines in the whole photon energy range offered by FLASH. The capabilities of the setup are demonstrated by showing the results of resonant magnetic SAXS measurements on cobalt-platinum multilayer samples grown on freestanding Si_3N_4 membranes and pump-laser-induced grid structures in multilayer samples.

  1. The VLT Opening Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-02-01

    Scientists Meet in Antofagasta to Discuss Front-Line Astrophysics To mark the beginning of the VLT era, the European Southern Observatory is organizing a VLT Opening Symposium which will take place in Antofagasta (Chile) on 1-4 March 1999, just before the start of regular observations with the ESO Very Large Telescope on April 1, 1999. The Symposium occupies four full days and is held on the campus of the Universidad Catolica del Norte. It consists of plenary sessions on "Science in the VLT Era and Beyond" and three parallel Workshops on "Clusters of Galaxies at High Redshift" , "Star-way to the Universe" and "From Extrasolar Planets to Brown Dwarfs" . There will be many presentations of recent work at the major astronomical facilities in the world. The meeting provides a very useful forum to discuss the latest developments and, in this sense, contributes to the planning of future research with the VLT and other large telescopes. The symposium will be opened with a talk by the ESO Director General, Prof. Riccardo Giacconi , on "Paranal - an observatory for the 21st century". It will be followed by reports about the first scientific results from the main astronomical instruments on VLT UT1, FORS1 and ISAAC. The Symposium participants will see the VLT in operation during special visits to the Paranal Observatory. Press conferences are being arranged each afternoon to inform about the highlights of the conference. After the Symposium, there will be an Official Inauguration Ceremony at Paranal on 5 March Contributions from ESO ESO scientists will make several presentations at the Symposium. They include general reviews of various research fields as well as important new data and results from the VLT that show the great potential of this new astronomical facility. Some of the recent work is described in this Press Release, together with images and spectra of a large variety of objects. Note that all of these data will soon become publicly available via the VLT Archive

  2. Fungal biodegradation of lignocelluloses

    Treesearch

    Annele Hatakka; Kenneth E. Hammel

    2010-01-01

    Uncertainties in the basic structures of especially lignin but also other components in lignocellulose make fungal biodegradation studies a challenging task. The following properties are important in terms of microbial or enzymatic attack: (1) lignin polymers have compact structures that are insoluble in water and difficult to penetrate by microbes or enzymes, (2) the...

  3. Biodegradable Sonobuoy Decelerators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    material. Two materials studied were polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH) and polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA). Single and multilayered PVOH films were evaluated as well...readiness point for technology transition. 15. SUBJECT TERMS biodegrade, decelerator, sonobuoy, polyvinyl alcohol , polyhydroxyalkanoate, marine...Association PVOH polyvinyl alcohol SPAWARS Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command VIMS Virginia Institute of Marine Science VOC volatile organic

  4. Systemic approaches to biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Trigo, Almudena; Valencia, Alfonso; Cases, Ildefonso

    2009-01-01

    Biodegradation, the ability of microorganisms to remove complex chemicals from the environment, is a multifaceted process in which many biotic and abiotic factors are implicated. The recent accumulation of knowledge about the biochemistry and genetics of the biodegradation process, and its categorization and formalization in structured databases, has recently opened the door to systems biology approaches, where the interactions of the involved parts are the main subject of study, and the system is analysed as a whole. The global analysis of the biodegradation metabolic network is beginning to produce knowledge about its structure, behaviour and evolution, such as its free-scale structure or its intrinsic robustness. Moreover, these approaches are also developing into useful tools such as predictors for compounds' degradability or the assisted design of artificial pathways. However, it is the environmental application of high-throughput technologies from the genomics, metagenomics, proteomics and metabolomics that harbours the most promising opportunities to understand the biodegradation process, and at the same time poses tremendous challenges from the data management and data mining point of view.

  5. Hamburger Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trent, Ann

    2004-01-01

    While babysitting or preparing home meals, young people (and adults too) sometimes overlook cleanliness procedures. One of the first employment opportunities for teenagers is often in a fast-food restaurant where the safe handling and proper cooking of foods is essential. To teach students about food safety practices, the U.S. Food and Drug…

  6. Hamburger Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trent, Ann

    2004-01-01

    While babysitting or preparing home meals, young people (and adults too) sometimes overlook cleanliness procedures. One of the first employment opportunities for teenagers is often in a fast-food restaurant where the safe handling and proper cooking of foods is essential. To teach students about food safety practices, the U.S. Food and Drug…

  7. Report on the 2009 ESO Fellows Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emsellem, Eric; West, Michael; Leibundgut, Bruno

    2009-09-01

    The fourth ESO Fellows Symposium took place in Garching from 8-10 June 2009. This year's symposium brought together 28 ESO Fellows from Chile and Germany to meet their colleagues from across the ocean, discuss their research and provide feedback on ESO's Fellowship programme. This year's symposium also included training workshops to enhance the practical skills of ESO Fellows in today's competitive job market.

  8. [Suicide among physicians--a current analysis for the City of Hamburg].

    PubMed

    Naumovska, Katerina; Gehl, Axel; Friedrich, Peter; Püschell, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    According to the literature, physicians have an increased risk of committing suicide, which can partly be explained by occupational stress. A retrospective analysis of the deaths investigated by the Hamburg office of Criminal Investigation and documents of the Hamburg Institute of Forensic Medicine for the years 2001 to 2013 showed that the average suicide rate among physicians is not significantly higher than that of the total population, it is 0.021% for physicians, 0.023% for dentists and 0.013% for the general public; thus the difference is not statistically significant (p: 0.57 for physicians and 0.74 for dentists). Drug intoxication has been found to be the most common method of suicide committed by physicians. However, these results must be interpreted with caution in view of the fact that a detailed evaluation of data was often not possible, especially because information as to the profession of the deceased and the motive for the suicide were missing or insufficiently documented.

  9. A study of the glow discharge plasma jet of the novel Hamburger-electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenzheng Ma, Chuanlong Yang, Xiao; Cui, Weisheng; Chen, Xiuyang

    2016-08-15

    To generate atmospheric pressure glow discharge plasma jets (APGDPJs), a novel Hamburger-electrode was proposed. Through the study on electric field distributions, flow field distributions, and characteristics of the discharge and jet, we found that adopting the mode of dielectric barrier discharge with non-uniform thickness of dielectric, it was easy to form the strong electric field areas which were conducive to generate discharge and electric field distributions with large electric field intensity in the narrow gap and weak electric field intensity in the wide gap that were not inclined to form a filament discharge. Using the structure of evenly distributed inner electrodes, it was easy to weaken the pressure of strong electric field areas and form flow field distributions which is beneficial for taking out the high density charged particles and generating APGDPJs. Stable APGDPJs in nitrogen with 3.5 mm in diameter and 9 mm in length were formed by using the novel Hamburger-electrode.

  10. Migrants' educational success through innovation: The case of the Hamburg bilingual schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Joana

    2011-12-01

    Although Germany has experienced net in-migration for the past five decades, this fact has only recently been officially acknowledged. Furthermore, Germany is marked by a general monolingual self-concept very much attached to the idea of a nation-state with one homogeneous language. However, in large urban areas of Germany about 35 per cent of the population has a migration background, as has almost every second child enrolling in primary school. Hence the country is marked by this dichotomy between a monolingual policy discourse and a multilingual society, manifested in everyday life and, as a consequence, in educational institutions. The fact is that this political attitude towards Germany's own migration history and migrants has led to an educational gap between students with a migration background and their monolingual peers. In 2000, a project was started in Hamburg, aiming to overcome this educational gap and involving the creation of bilingual schools for some of the largest migrant languages. Bilingual classes were thus set up for the following language combinations: German-Portuguese, German-Italian, German-Spanish and German-Turkish, and were evaluated by the University of Hamburg. This paper reports on the model used and the specific school outcomes of the students attending these classes.

  11. Hans Jacob and brain research on Hamburg "euthanasia" victims: "Awaiting further brains!"

    PubMed

    Zeidman, Lawrence A

    2017-03-14

    Several neuropathologists conducted brain research on victims of so-called euthanasia programs carried out by the National Socialist (Nazi) regime in Germany from 1940 to 1945. Some published their results in German journals or books during and after the war. One of these neuropathologists was Hans Jacob of Hamburg, a former Nazi party member and the leader of the same laboratory previously run by Alfons Jakob (Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease). Though much has been published on the unethical actions of Jacob's fellow neuropathologist from Berlin, Julius Hallervorden, Jacob's actions were remarkably similar and have not been previously analyzed in the neuroscience literature. Jacob dissected at least 42 patient brains from euthanasia centers near Hamburg, and saved the specimens from at least 17 of them. He published a 1956 book chapter featuring 2 such specimens. Jacob was denazified, had a notable career, and never publicly addressed his actions during the war. His ethical violations may not have been on the same scale as Hallervorden's, but the effect of his work echoes to the modern era. As responsible researchers, we must always be conscious of the provenance of material provided and not succumb to opportunistic temptation despite the ethical consequences. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  12. A guide for authors of symposium papers

    Treesearch

    Edwin vH. Larson

    1971-01-01

    Suggestions for preparing a symposium paper for publication, including length, general style, manuscript format, and details of handling tables, illustrations, footnotes, literature references, etc. Also suggestions for typing.

  13. Learning to Fly: Family-Oriented Literacy Education in Schools. Celebrating the Tenth Anniversary of Hamburg's Family Literacy Project 2004-2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabkin, Gabriele, Ed.; Roche, Stephen, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    This book was published to mark the tenth anniversary of Hamburg's award-winning Family Literacy project (FLY). It includes contributions from key stakeholders--academics, teachers, parents and children--participating in the conceptualization and implementation of FLY in the city of Hamburg. FLY mainly targets people from socially disadvantaged…

  14. [Hamburg model-project for minors who are at risk for sexual offending: co-operation between the institutions in Hamburg, Germany].

    PubMed

    Spehr, Aranke; Driemeyer, Wiebke; Briken, Peer

    2010-01-01

    When children and adolescents show deviant sexual behavior, co-operation between institutions of the youth welfare service is necessary in order to prevent further assaults. As a part of the Hamburg model project for minors who are at risk for sexual offending we evaluated the existing case-unspecific co-operation between the city's institutions. Selection of the sample resulted in a diagram of co-operation between institutions that have or might have contact to sexual deviant children or juveniles. By analyzing 147 online-surveys, comprising quantitative as well as qualitative questions, revealed a comprehensive system rich in resources but only little case-unspecific cooperation. Highest average rating in co-operation was given to the non-governmental institutions and the police. The inquiry of reasons for the co-operation indicated a demand for specialized diagnostics and advice. Positively evaluated were an efficient and fast processing, an unbureaucratic handling of the case and constant availability. Pointed out negatively were "not-reacting", trivializing and a lack of capacities. In order to improve the level of information and the range of intervention programs, training of professionals in school and the youth welfare service is needed.

  15. Biodegradation of Cyanuric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Saldick, Jerome

    1974-01-01

    Cyanuric acid biodegrades readily under a wide variety of natural conditions, and particularly well in systems of either low or zero dissolved-oxygen level, such as anaerobic activated sludge and sewage, soils, muds, and muddy streams and river waters, as well as ordinary aerated activated sludge systems with typically low (1 to 3 ppm) dissolved-oxygen levels. Degradation also proceeds in 3.5% sodium chloride solution. Consequently, there are degradation pathways widely available for breaking down cyanuric acid discharged in domestic effluents. The overall degradation reaction is merely a hydrolysis; CO2 and ammonia are the initial hydrolytic breakdown products. Since no net oxidation occurs during this breakdown, biodegradation of cyanuric acid exerts no primary biological oxygen demand. However, eventual nitrification of the ammonia released will exert its usual biological oxygen demand. PMID:4451360

  16. Biodegradable mesostructured polymer membranes

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Bozhi; Shankarappa, Sahadev; Chang, Homer H.; Tong, Rong; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) has a quasi-ordered reticular mesostructure with feature sizes on the order of tenths of to a few hundred nanometers. Approaches to preparing biodegradable synthetic scaffolds for engineered tissues that have the critical mesostructure to mimic ECM are few. Here we present a simple and general solvent evaporation-induced self-assembly (EISA) approach to preparing concentrically reticular mesostructured polyol-polyester membranes. The mesostructures were formed by a novel self-assembly process without covalent or electrostatic interactions, which yielded feature sizes matching those of ECM. The mesostructured materials were nonionic, hydrophilic, and water-permeable, and could be shaped into arbitrary geometries such as conformally-molded tubular sacs and micropatterned meshes. Importantly, the mesostructured polymers were biodegradable, and were used as ultrathin temporary substrates for engineering vascular tissue constructs. PMID:23964960

  17. Biodegradable mesostructured polymer membranes.

    PubMed

    Tian, Bozhi; Shankarappa, Sahadev A; Chang, Homer H; Tong, Rong; Kohane, Daniel S

    2013-09-11

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) has a quasi-ordered reticular mesostructure with feature sizes on the order of tenths of to a few hundred nanometers. Approaches to preparing biodegradable synthetic scaffolds for engineered tissues that have the critical mesostructure to mimic ECM are few. Here we present a simple and general solvent evaporation-induced self-assembly (EISA) approach to preparing concentrically reticular mesostructured polyol-polyester membranes. The mesostructures were formed by a novel self-assembly process without covalent or electrostatic interactions, which yielded feature sizes matching those of ECM. The mesostructured materials were nonionic, hydrophilic, and water-permeable and could be shaped into arbitrary geometries such as conformally molded tubular sacs and micropatterned meshes. Importantly, the mesostructured polymers were biodegradable and were used as ultrathin temporary substrates for engineering vascular tissue constructs.

  18. Safe biodegradable fluorescent particles

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Sue I.; Fergenson, David P.; Srivastava, Abneesh; Bogan, Michael J.; Riot, Vincent J.; Frank, Matthias

    2010-08-24

    A human-safe fluorescence particle that can be used for fluorescence detection instruments or act as a safe simulant for mimicking the fluorescence properties of microorganisms. The particle comprises a non-biological carrier and natural fluorophores encapsulated in the non-biological carrier. By doping biodegradable-polymer drug delivery microspheres with natural or synthetic fluorophores, the desired fluorescence can be attained or biological organisms can be simulated without the associated risks and logistical difficulties of live microorganisms.

  19. Biodegradable Ureteral Stents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, Ben H.; Hadaschik, Boris A.; Paterson, Ryan F.; Lange, Dirk

    2008-09-01

    Ureteral stents have been associated with painful symptoms and require a secondary procedure for removal if the suture tether is removed. Biodegradable stents have been attempted in the past, but are no longer used since they resulted in histological inflammation or unpredictable variability in degradation time. This article reviews past degradable materials used in both the prostatic urethra and ureter as well as identifies a new degradable ureteral stent that lasts between 2 to 4 weeks in a porcine model.

  20. 39th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, E. A. (Compiler)

    2008-01-01

    The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production, and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is the reporting of problems and solutions associated with the development and flight certification of new mechanisms. Organized by the Mechanisms Education Association, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) share the responsibility for hosting the AMS. Now in its 39th symposium, the AMS continues to be well attended, attracting participants from both the United States and abroad. The 39th AMS was held in Huntsville, Alabama, May 7-9, 2008. During these 3 days, 34 papers were presented. Topics included gimbals and positioning mechanisms, tribology, actuators, deployment mechanisms, release mechanisms, and sensors. Hardware displays during the supplier exhibit gave attendees an opportunity to meet with developers of current and future mechanism components.

  1. 38th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler)

    2006-01-01

    The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is the reporting of problems and solutions associated with the development and flight certification of new mechanisms. Organized by the Mechanisms Education Association, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) share the responsibility for hosting the AMS. Now in its 38th symposium, the AMS continues to be well attended, attracting participants from both the U.S. and abroad. The 38th AMs, hosted by the NASA Langley Research Center in Williamsburg, Virginia, was held May 17-19, 2006. During these three days, 34 papers were presented. Topics included gimbals, tribology, actuators, aircraft mechanisms, deployment mechanisms, release mechanisms, and test equipment. Hardware displays during the supplier exhibit gave attendees an opportunity to meet with developers of current and future mechanism components.

  2. The 1975 Ride Quality Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A compilation is presented of papers reported at the 1975 Ride Quality Symposium held in Williamsburg, Virginia, August 11-12, 1975. The symposium, jointly sponsored by NASA and the United States Department of Transportation, was held to provide a forum for determining the current state of the art relative to the technology base of ride quality information applicable to current and proposed transportation systems. Emphasis focused on passenger reactions to ride environment and on implications of these reactions to the design and operation of air, land, and water transportation systems acceptable to the traveling public. Papers are grouped in the following five categories: needs and uses for ride quality technology, vehicle environments and dynamics, investigative approaches and testing procedures, experimental ride quality studies, and ride quality modeling and criteria.

  3. 37th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler)

    2004-01-01

    The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is reporting problems and solutions associated with the development and flight certification of new mechanisms. Organized by the Mechanisms Education Association, NASA and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) share the responsibility for hosting the AMS. Now in its 37th symposium, the AMS continues to be well attended, attracting participants from both the U.S. and abroad. The 37th AMS, hosted by the Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Galveston, Texas, was held May 19, 20 and 21, 2004. During these three days, 34 papers were presented. Topics included deployment mechanisms, tribology, actuators, pointing and optical mechanisms, Space Station and Mars Rover mechanisms, release mechanisms, and test equipment. Hardware displays during the supplier exhibit gave attendees an opportunity to meet with developers of current and future mechanism components.

  4. Ninth international symposium on radiopharmacology

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The goal of this Symposium is to provide a forum for those international scientists involved in applying the principles of pharmacology and radiation biology to the development of agents for the diagnosis and treatment of disease. The program will highlight state-of-the-art progress in the development of those agents used in conjunction with some form of radiation such as radiopharmaceuticals, radiopaques, photo- and radiosensitizing drugs, and neutron capture agents. An underlying pharmacokinetic parameter associated with all these agents is the need for site-specific delivery to an organ or tumor. Therefore, a major goal of the symposium will be to address those pharmacologic principles for targeting molecules to specific tissue sites. Accordingly, session themes will include receptor-mediated processes, membrane transporters, antibody interactions, metabolic trapping, and oligonucleotide-antisense mechanisms.

  5. Integration of bioinformatics to biodegradation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Bioinformatics and biodegradation are two primary scientific fields in applied microbiology and biotechnology. The present review describes development of various bioinformatics tools that may be applied in the field of biodegradation. Several databases, including the University of Minnesota Biocatalysis/Biodegradation database (UM-BBD), a database of biodegradative oxygenases (OxDBase), Biodegradation Network-Molecular Biology Database (Bionemo) MetaCyc, and BioCyc have been developed to enable access to information related to biochemistry and genetics of microbial degradation. In addition, several bioinformatics tools for predicting toxicity and biodegradation of chemicals have been developed. Furthermore, the whole genomes of several potential degrading bacteria have been sequenced and annotated using bioinformatics tools. PMID:24808763

  6. Microwaves and Thermoregulation: A Symposium.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    realization that body -a~rtne Increase Ip an experimental animl exposed to microwaves lirplies a breakdown of thenirulatory mechanisms. On the other hand, low...febrile states, cardiovascular adjustments, behavioral mechanisms, and models of human thermoregulation participated in the Symposium program. Their...refinement of simulation models of human ther- moregulation on the one hand and of the deposition of microwave energy in humans on the other hand. Recent

  7. First symposium of ichthyosis experts.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Martín, A; Torrelo-Fernández, A; de Lucas-Laguna, R; Casco, F; González-Sarmiento, R; Vega, A; Pedreira-Massa, J L; de Unamuno-Pérez, P; Larcher, F; Arroyo, I; Traupe, H

    2013-12-01

    On June 22, 2012 the First Symposium of Ichthyosis Experts in Spain was held at the Hospital Niño de Jesús in Madrid. It was a one-day symposium for dermatologists, pediatricians, and physicians-in-training interested in this disease, as well as for other health care professionals involved in the care of patients with ichthyosis. The aim of the meeting was to try to structure the care of ichthyosis patients in Spain. As happens in other rare diseases, because of the low prevalence of ichthyosis and the absence of designated referral centers, the number of patients treated in each center is very low and few dermatologists have any real clinical experience with this condition or know how to order diagnostic genetic tests. This article summarizes the presentations given at the symposium and is intended as a reference for anyone interested in the subject. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  8. 2nd SEDI Symposium Held

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loper, D.

    Geomagnetism and paleomagnetism were the emphasis of the second SEDI (Study of the Earth's Deep Interior) symposium, “Reversals, Secular Variation and Dynamo Theory,” convened by Gary Glatzmaier and Paul Roberts at St. Johns College, Santa Fe, N.Mex., August, 6-10, 1990. The program included sessions on structure of the core and lower mantle and on mineral physics.The organizers and participants of the meeting wish to thank the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics and the Center for Nonlinear Studies at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Center for Earth and Planetary Interiors at the University of California, Los Angeles, and the Geophysics Program of the Earth Sciences Division of the National Science Foundation for their support of the symposium. What follows is a condensed summary of some of the highlights of the symposium, compiled by J . Bloxham, M. Brown, J . Cain, D. Fearn, D. Loper, and R. Merrill. A more complete summary is available from David Loper, Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Institute, B-153, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-3017.

  9. Feedback of forest distribution on the simulated climate of the metropolitan region of Hamburg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Juliane; Gálos, Borbála; Rechid, Diana

    2013-04-01

    Regional climate change projections show a changing climate in the metropolitan region of Hamburg for the end of the century: The temperature could increase and the precipitation in summer could decrease. To cope with the probably longer lasting and hotter summer conditions in Europe there are different possible adaptation measures in land management practice, e.g. forest conversion. That means the conversion of mostly coniferous forest monocultures to deciduous and mixed forests. Mixed forests are generally more adaptable in comparison to conifer forests. They ensure an increased groundwater recharge because of less canopy interception and reduced transpiration outside the growing season. An interesting question is how forest conversion would feedback to the regional climate under different climate conditions. To explore climate feedbacks, REMO (regional climate model at the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg) is applied. To get a more realistic representation of the land surface, a current dataset from a digital basis landscape model of the Federal Agency for Cartography and Geodesy is used instead of the standard representation of the land surface in REMO. In some areas of the metropolitan region of Hamburg the updated land surface increases the forest fraction. Additionally, all coniferous forest types are converted into broadleaf forest types to study the maximum impact on the simulated near surface climate. This set-up is used for a climate simulation with REMO, forced by ERA-INTERIM reanalysis data for the period of 1990-2008. Selected climate variables are analyzed and the associated processes are investigated: The different forest distributions affect particularly the evapotranspiration and thus the water- and energy cycle of the soil and the lower atmosphere. Especially, the effects in the very hot and dry year 2003 and in the wet year 2002 are analyzed. To study the impacts of the forest distributions under different climate conditions, a

  10. How different are the Liège and Hamburg atlases of the solar spectrum?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerr, H.-P.; Vitas, N.; Fabbian, D.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The high-fidelity solar spectral atlas prepared by http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1973apds.book.....D Delbouille et al. (Liège atlas, 1973) and the atlas by http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999SoPh..184..421N Neckel (Hamburg atlas, 1999, Sol. Phys., 184, 421) are widely recognised as the most important collection of reference spectra of the Sun at disc centre in the visible wavelength range. The two datasets serve as fundamental resources for many researchers, in particular for chemical abundance analyses. But despite their similar published specifications (spectral resolution and noise level), the shapes of the spectral lines in the two atlases differ significantly and systematically. Aims: Knowledge of any instrumental degradations is imperative to fully exploit the information content of spectroscopic data. We seek to investigate the magnitude of these differences and explain the possible sources. We provide the wavelength-dependent correction parameters that need to be taken into account when the spectra are to be compared with synthetic data, for instance. Methods: A parametrically degraded version of the Hamburg spectrum was fitted to the Liège spectrum. The parameters of the model (wavelength shift, broadening, intensity scaling, and intensity offset) represent the different characteristics of the respective instruments, observational strategies, and data processing. Results: The wavelength scales of the Liège and Hamburg atlases differ on average by 0.5 mÅ with a standard deviation of ± 2 mÅ, except for a peculiar region around 5500 Å. The continuum levels are offset by up to 18% below 5000 Å, but remain stably at a 0.8% difference towards the red. We find no evidence for spectral stray light in the Liège spectrum. Its resolving power is almost independent of wavelength but limited to about 216 000, which is between two to six times lower than specified. When accounting for the degradations determined in this work, the spectra of the two

  11. Pitch and Harmony in Gyorgy Ligeti's "Hamburg Concerto" and "Syzygy" for String Quartet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corey, Charles

    The analysis component of this dissertation focuses on intricate and complex pitch relationships in Gyorgy Ligeti's last work, the Hamburg Concerto. This piece uses two distinct tuning systems---twelve tone equal temperament and just intonation---throughout its seven movements. Often, these two systems are used simultaneously, creating complex harmonic relationships. This combination allows Ligeti to exploit the unique features of each system and explore their relationships to each other. Ligeti's just intonation in the Hamburg Concerto comes mainly from the five French horns, who are instructed to keep their hands out of the bell to allow the instrument to sound its exact harmonics. The horns themselves, however, are tuned to varying different fundamentals, creating a constantly changing series of just-intoned pitches anchored above an equal-tempered bass. This method of generating just-intoned intervals adds a second layer to the relationship between equal temperament and just intonation. This paper focuses on creating ways to understand this relationship, and describing the ramifications of these tunings as they unfold throughout the piece. Ligeti very carefully crafts this work in a way that creates a balance between the systems. Research done at the Paul Sacher Stiftung has uncovered a significant collection of errors in the published score. Clearing up these discrepancies allows for a much more accurate and more informed analysis. Throughout this dissertation, mistakes are corrected, and several aspects of the score are clarified. The tuning systems are described, and a likely tuning scheme for the horns is posited. (The analytical component of the dissertation delves into the many varying intervals which all fit into one interval class---a feature that is best explored when two distinct tuning systems are juxtaposed.) A language is created herein to better understand these pitch relationships that fit neither into equal temperament nor just intonation. The

  12. Antibacterial Effect of Garlic Aqueous Extract on Staphylococcus aureus in Hamburger

    PubMed Central

    Mozaffari Nejad, Amir Sasan; Shabani, Shahrokh; Bayat, Mansour; Hosseini, Seyed Ebrahim

    2014-01-01

    Background: Using garlic is widespread in Iran and other countries as a medicine and a natural spice. Garlic is a potential inhibitor for food pathogens. Foods contaminated with pathogens pose a potential danger to the consumer’s health. The use of garlic can increase the shelf life and decrease the possibilities of food poisoning and spoilage in processed foods. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial effect of garlic aqueous extract on growth of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. Materials and Methods: In this study, the garlic aqueous extract was prepared under sterile conditions and was added in 1, 2, and 3 mL to 100g hamburger samples. A group of samples was prepared to be used as treatment sample, while a group was stored at 4°C and -18°C. The samples were kept in refrigerator for one and two weeks and they were frozen for one, two and three months and then subjected to microbial tests. Results: Statistical evaluation of the first and second week samples indicated a significant growth decreased by all the 1, 2, and 3-mL extracts. In treatment of one, two and three-month samples, the growth of S. aureus was significantly decreased by the 2 and 3-mL extracts. The 1-mL extract was effective in decreasing the growth, and a significant difference was observed in treatments with 2 and 3-mL extracts. However, there was no significant difference between the two and three-month samples, though they were significantly different from the one-month samples. After evaluations, treatment with the 2-mL extract was found to be the best one. Conclusions: Garlic aqueous extract has antibacterial properties against S. aureus present in hamburger. Moreover, garlic aqueous extract can be used not only as a flavor but also as a natural additive for hamburger. In addition, garlic has antibacterial properties against other Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, which must be investigated in further studies. PMID:25774277

  13. Biodegradable Polymers for the Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Richard A.; Kalra, Bhanu

    2002-08-01

    Biodegradable polymers are designed to degrade upon disposal by the action of living organisms. Extraordinary progress has been made in the development of practical processes and products from polymers such as starch, cellulose, and lactic acid. The need to create alternative biodegradable water-soluble polymers for down-the-drain products such as detergents and cosmetics has taken on increasing importance. Consumers have, however, thus far attached little or no added value to the property of biodegradability, forcing industry to compete head-to-head on a cost-performance basis with existing familiar products. In addition, no suitable infrastructure for the disposal of biodegradable materials exists as yet.

  14. Biodegradable polymers for the environment.

    PubMed

    Gross, Richard A; Kalra, Bhanu

    2002-08-02

    Biodegradable polymers are designed to degrade upon disposal by the action of living organisms. Extraordinary progress has been made in the development of practical processes and products from polymers such as starch, cellulose, and lactic acid. The need to create alternative biodegradable water-soluble polymers for down-the-drain products such as detergents and cosmetics has taken on increasing importance. Consumers have, however, thus far attached little or no added value to the property of biodegradability, forcing industry to compete head-to-head on a cost-performance basis with existing familiar products. In addition, no suitable infrastructure for the disposal of biodegradable materials exists as yet.

  15. Engaging Stakeholders in a Sustainability Context: The Regional Centre of Expertise on Education for Sustainable Development in Hamburg and Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filho, Walter Leal; Schwarz, Jens

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the experiences of RCE Hamburg, one of the latest Regional Centres of Excellence (RCE) to be created. It outlines the activities performed by the RCE and describes its relationships with the various stakeholders. Design/methodology/approach: A description of the region where the RCE is located is…

  16. Engaging Stakeholders in a Sustainability Context: The Regional Centre of Expertise on Education for Sustainable Development in Hamburg and Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filho, Walter Leal; Schwarz, Jens

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the experiences of RCE Hamburg, one of the latest Regional Centres of Excellence (RCE) to be created. It outlines the activities performed by the RCE and describes its relationships with the various stakeholders. Design/methodology/approach: A description of the region where the RCE is located is…

  17. The 1988 Get Away Special Experimenter's Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Lawrence R. (Editor); Mosier, Frances L. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The Get Away Special (GAS) Experimenter's Symposium was held to provide a formal opportunity for GAS experimenters to share the results of their projects. The focus of this symposium is on payloads that have been flown on shuttle missions and on GAS payloads that will be flown in the future. Experiment design and payload integration issues are also examined.

  18. The Second Spaceborne Imaging Radar Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Summaries of the papers presented at the Second Spaceborne Imaging Radar Symposium are presented. The purpose of the symposium was to present an overwiew of recent developments in the different scientific and technological fields related to spaceborne imaging radars and to present future international plans.

  19. The 1987 Get Away Special Experimenter's Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelme, Neal (Editor); Mosier, Frances L. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The 1987 Get Away Special (GAS) Experimenter's symposium provides a formal opportunity for GAS Experimenter's to share the results of their projects. The focus of this symposium was on payloads that were flown on Shuttle missions, and on GAS payloads that will be flown in the future.

  20. The 1992 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Lawrence R. (Editor); Mosier, Frances L. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The 1992 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium is a continuation of the Get Away Special Symposium convened from 1984 through 1988, and is proposed to continue as an annual conference. The focus of this conference is to educate potential Space Shuttle Payload Bay users as to the types of carrier systems provided and for current users to share experiment concepts.

  1. Proceedings of the Symposium on Cable Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers, Inc., New York, NY.

    The papers given at a symposium on cable television (CATV) are collected in this volume. The chairman of the symposium notes that "the phrase 'cable television' is not totally pertinent since we are talking about a wired-city concept that may encompass many services other than television." He prefers the term "broadband communications network,"…

  2. Conserving biodiversity on native rangelands: Symposium proceedings

    Treesearch

    Daniel W. Uresk; Greg L. Schenbeck; James T. O' Rourke

    1997-01-01

    These proceedings are the result of a symposium, "Conserving biodiversity on native rangelands" held on August 17, 1995 in Fort Robinson State Park, NE. The purpose of this symposium was to provide a forum to discuss how elements of rangeland biodiversity are being conserved today. We asked, "How resilient and sustainable are rangeland systems to the...

  3. Proceedings of the pipeline engineering symposium - 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Seiders, E.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a symposium on the transport of petroleum and natural gas through pipelines. Topics considered at the symposium included explosion welding, flash-butt welding, computerized welding, flow improvers, carbon dioxide pipelines, submarine pipelines, computer-aided design, repair, reinforced concrete, monitoring, storage, waste processing, and gas condensate pipelines.

  4. Summary of the forest recreation symposium

    Treesearch

    Northeastern Forest Experiment Station

    1972-01-01

    Those who attended the Forest Recreation Symposium held 12-14 Octoher 1971 at Syracuse, New York, heard 26 papers about various aspects of forest recreation. Those papers have already been printed, in Proceedings made available at the Symposium, and also available upon request from the Northeastern Forest Experiment Station, 6816 Market Street, Upper Darby, Pa. 19082...

  5. International Symposium for Literacy: Declaration of Persepolis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Convergence, 1975

    1975-01-01

    The full text of the Declaration of Persepolis, adopted by the International Symposium for Literacy, is presented. The Symposium considers literacy to be not only the process of attaining reading, writing, and arithmetic skills, but also a contribution to the liberation and development of the human race. (LH)

  6. Proceedings of the Symposium on Cable Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers, Inc., New York, NY.

    The papers given at a symposium on cable television (CATV) are collected in this volume. The chairman of the symposium notes that "the phrase 'cable television' is not totally pertinent since we are talking about a wired-city concept that may encompass many services other than television." He prefers the term "broadband communications network,"…

  7. First Annual Symposium. Volume 1: Plenary Session

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Presentations from the symposium are presented. The progress of the Center for Space Construction is reviewed to promote technology transfer from the University of Colorado at Boulder to the national aerospace community. This symposium was heavily weighted toward plans and methodology.

  8. The 21st Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    During the symposium technical topics addressed included deployable structures, electromagnetic devices, tribology, actuators, latching devices, positioning mechanisms, robotic manipulators, and automated mechanisms synthesis. A summary of the 20th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium panel discussions is included as an appendix. However, panel discussions on robotics for space and large space structures which were held are not presented herein.

  9. Hass avocado modulates postprandial vascular reactivity and postprandial inflammatory responses to a hamburger meal in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaoping; Wong, Angela; Henning, Susanne M; Zhang, Yanjun; Jones, Alexis; Zerlin, Alona; Thames, Gail; Bowerman, Susan; Tseng, Chi-Hong; Heber, David

    2013-02-26

    Hass avocados are rich in monounsaturated fatty acids (oleic acid) and antioxidants (carotenoids, tocopherols, polyphenols) and are often eaten as a slice in a sandwich containing hamburger or other meats. Hamburger meat forms lipid peroxides during cooking. After ingestion, the stomach functions as a bioreactor generating additional lipid peroxides and this process can be inhibited when antioxidants are ingested together with the meat. The present pilot study was conducted to investigate the postprandial effect of the addition of 68 g of avocado to a hamburger on vasodilation and inflammation. Eleven healthy subjects on two separate occasions consumed either a 250 g hamburger patty alone (ca. 436 cal and 25 g fat) or together with 68 grams of avocado flesh (an additional 114 cal and 11 g of fat for a total of 550 cal and 36 g fat), a common culinary combination, to assess effects on vascular health. Using the standard peripheral arterial tonometry (PAT) method to calculate the PAT index, we observed significant vasoconstriction 2 hours following hamburger ingestion (2.19 ± 0.36 vs. 1.56 ± 0.21, p = 0.0007), which did not occur when the avocado flesh was ingested together with the burger (2.17 ± 0.57 vs. 2.08 ± 0.51, NS p = 0.68). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from postprandial blood samples and the Ikappa-B alpha (IκBα) protein concentration was determined to assess effects on inflammation. At 3 hours, there was a significant preservation of IκBα (131% vs. 58%, p = 0.03) when avocado was consumed with the meat compared to meat alone, consistent with reduced activation of the NF-kappa B (NFκB) inflammatory pathway. IL-6 increased significantly at 4 hours in postprandial serum after consumption of the hamburger, but no change was observed when avocado was added. Postprandial serum triglyceride concentration increased, but did not further increase when avocado was ingested with the burger compared to burger alone despite the added fat and

  10. A model for simultaneous crystallisation and biodegradation of biodegradable polymers.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaoxiao; Pan, Jingzhe

    2009-01-01

    This paper completes the model of biodegradation for biodegradable polymers that was previously developed by Wang et al. (Wang Y, Pan J, Han X, Sinka, Ding L. A phenomenological model for the degradation of biodegradable polymers. Biomaterials 2008;29:3393-401). Crystallisation during biodegradation was not considered in the previous work which is the topic of the current paper. For many commonly used biodegradable polymers, there is a strong interplay between crystallisation and hydrolysis reaction during biodegradation - the chain cleavage caused by the hydrolysis reaction provides an extra mobility for the polymer chains to crystallise and the resulting crystalline phase becomes more resistant to further hydrolysis reaction. This paper presents a complete theory to describe this interplay. The fundamental equations in the Avrami's theory for crystallisation are modified and coupled to the diffusion-reaction equations that were developed in our previous work. The mathematical equations are then applied to three biodegradable polymers for which long term degradation data are available in the literature. It is shown that the model can capture the behavior of the major biodegradable polymers very well.

  11. Outcome and complications of 540 microvascular free flaps: the Hamburg experience.

    PubMed

    Pohlenz, Philipp; Blessmann, Marco; Blake, Felix; Li, Lei; Schmelzle, Rainer; Heiland, Max

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyze surgical outcome and complications of 540 free flap procedures performed at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery of the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf during 1987-2005. A total of 532 patients were reconstructed with 540 flaps: 32% were latissimus dorsi flaps, 23% were radial forearm flaps, 21% were iliac crest flaps, 10% were fibula flaps, 6% were jejunal flaps, and 8% were other flaps. Thrombosis of one of the vessels and hematoma were the most frequent causes of failure in microvascular free tissue transfer. A total free flap failure occurred in 34 (6.2%) and a partial flap failure in 42 (7.7%) patients. The most reliable flap in regard to survival was the radial forearm flap. The present study confirms that free flaps are extremely reliable in achieving successful reconstruction of the head and neck.

  12. Quantitative risk assessment for Escherichia coli O157:H7 in ground beef hamburgers.

    PubMed

    Cassin, M H; Lammerding, A M; Todd, E C; Ross, W; McColl, R S

    1998-05-05

    Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA) is a methodology used to organize and analyze scientific information to estimate the probability and severity of an adverse event. Applied to microbial food safety, the methodology can also help to identify those stages in the manufacture, distribution, handling, and consumption of foods that contribute to an increased risk of foodborne illness, and help focus resources and efforts to most effectively reduce the risk of foodborne pathogens. The term Process Risk Model (PRM) is introduced in this paper to describe the integration and application of QRA methodology with scenario analysis and predictive microbiology to provide an objective assessment of the hygienic characteristics of a manufacturing process. The methodology was applied to model the human health risk associated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 in ground beef hamburgers. The PRM incorporated two mathematical submodels; the first was intended to described the behaviour of the pathogen from the production of the food through processing, handling, and consumption to predict human exposure. The exposure estimate was then used as input to a dose-response model to estimate the health risk associated with consuming food from the process. Monte Carlo simulation was used to assess the effect of the uncertainty and variability in the model parameters on the predicted human health risk. The model predicted a probability of Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome of 3.7 x 10(-6) and a probability of mortality of 1.9 x 10(-7) per meal for the very young. These estimates are likely high for all hamburger meals, but may be reasonable for the home-prepared hamburgers described by this model. The efficacy of three risk mitigation strategies were evaluated by modifying the values of the predictive factors and comparing the new predicted risk. The average probability of illness was predicted to be reduced by 80% under a hypothetical mitigation strategy directed at reducing microbial growth during retail

  13. Inactivation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis during cooking of hamburger patties.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Philipp; Walte, Hans-Georg C; Matzen, Sönke; Hensel, Jann; Kiesner, Christian

    2013-07-01

    The role of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in Crohn's disease in humans has been debated for many years. Milk and milk products have been suggested as possible vectors for transmission since the beginning of this debate, whereas recent publications show that slaughtered cattle and their carcasses, meat, and organs can also serve as reservoirs for MAP transmission. The objective of this study was to generate heat-inactivation data for MAP during the cooking of hamburger patties. Hamburger patties of lean ground beef weighing 70 and 50 g were cooked for 6, 5, 4, 3, and 2 min, which were sterilized by irradiation and spiked with three different MAP strains at levels between 10² and 10⁶ CFU/ml. Single-sided cooking with one flip was applied, and the temperatures within the patties were recorded by seven thermocouples. Counting of the surviving bacteria was performed by direct plating onto Herrold's egg yolk medium and a three-vial most-probable-number method by using modified Dubos medium. There was considerable variability in temperature throughout the patties during frying. In addition, the log reduction in MAP numbers showed strong variations. In patties weighing 70 g, considerable bacterial reduction of 4 log or larger could only be achieved after 6 min of cooking. For all other cooking times, the bacterial reduction was less than 2 log. Patties weighing 50 g showed a 5-log or larger reduction after cooking times of 5 and 6 min. To determine the inactivation kinetics, a log-linear regression model was used, showing a constant decrease of MAP numbers over cooking time.

  14. The new Hamburg Broadband Oceanbottom Seismometer: experiences from a longterm-deployment in the Tyrrhenian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahm, T.; Herber, R.; Thorwart, M.

    2001-12-01

    Since winter 2000 the Geophysical Institute of the University of Hamburg, Germany, has developed 4 new broadband free-fall oceanbottom stations which are available for longterm experiments in oceanbottom seismology. The modular system consists of a flat and broad frame and anchor, holding commercially available components as datalogger (Send-MLS, < 200 sps, 24 bit), releaser (Mors-Oceano), sensors (PMD Scientific 21233m LP seismometer and E-2PD hydrophone), and location tools (Novatec flashlight and radio antenna). The broadband sensor is mounted into a passively gravity-levelled oil-damped gimbal in one of the four buoyancy glass-spheres (17''), which itself is fixed in close contact to the anchor of the station. The station can be alternatively equipped with a 4.5 Hz sensor hosted in an external pack and a SEND-MBS datalogger, for use in high-frequency seismics. The frame and anchor is designed to have a good coupling to ground below 10 Hz and a low sensitivity to flow and differential-motion induced tilt. Two pressure tubes are available for the data-acquisition system, the power, and possible additional equipment. The maximal deployment depth is 6000 m. It is possible to continously record 4 channels with 50 sps for one year. A first 6-month deployment has been in the Tyrrhenian Sea, within a cooperational project with GEOMAR, Kiel, and GEOSTAR of INGV, Rome, in order to study teleseismic phases and the local seismicity from the Ionian slab and the Aeolian Island volcanic chain. Several M>7 events have been recorded. The Hamburg stations show, in most cases, low tilt-noise and high-quality teleseismic and local recordings, also on the horizontal components, indicating a good coupling in the frequency range of interest. We found that the compact and simple design of the free-fall station is well suited for oceanbottom broadband seismology.

  15. The Hamburg klippe: Record of the destruction of the proto-North American continental margin

    SciTech Connect

    Lash, G.G. . Dept. of Geosciences)

    1993-03-01

    The Hamburg klippe, a Taconic allochthon in the central Appalachian orogen of southeastern Pennsylvania, has long been in the focus of debate. Although initially interpreted by some to be either autochthonous or simply a facies of the parautochthonous Martinsburg Formation, essentially all workers now agree that rocks of the Hamburg klippe comprise a far-travelled sequence of deep-marine deposits thrust onto the proto-North American platform in Ordovician time. The klippe is composed of two tectonic slices that contain rocks that formed in very different tectonic environments. The structurally lowest slice, the Greenwich slice, is interpreted to be an ancient subduction complex that formed in Cambrian-Ordovician time. This slice consists chiefly of turbidite sandstone and hemipelagic mudstone of Middle Ordovician age (85%) underlain by relatively thin sequences of red and light-green pelagic mudstone, deep-water limestone and chert of Early to Middle Ordovician age (14%). The vertical stratigraphy of the deposits of the Greenwich slice is interpreted to reflect migration of a site on oceanic lithosphere from an abyssal plain setting toward and ultimately into a trench southeast of the proto-North American continental margin by Middle Ordovician time. The tectonically highest slice, the Richmond slice, is composed predominantly of Middle Ordovician carbonate turbidites and black shale interpreted to have accumulated on the subsiding proto-North American continental margin as it approached the trench to the southeast. Eventually the Richmond slice was thrust to the northwest over the subduction complex which was, by this time, on the continental platform. Similar rock types in other allochthons in the Appalachian orogen may reflect an analogous mode of origin.

  16. Effects of diets supplemented with sunflower or flax seeds on quality and fatty acid profile of hamburgers made with perirenal or subcutaneous fat.

    PubMed

    Turner, T D; Aalhus, J L; Mapiye, C; Rolland, D C; Larsen, I L; Basarab, J A; Baron, V S; McAllister, T A; Block, H C; Uttaro, B; Dugan, M E R

    2015-01-01

    Steers were fed grass hay or red clover silage based diets containing flaxseed or sunflower seed as sources of 18:3n-3 and 18:2n-6 respectively. Hamburgers were made from triceps brachii and perirenal or subcutaneous fat. Perirenal-hamburgers contained more polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), several PUFA biohydrogenation intermediates (BHI), and 18:0 (P<0.05). Oxidative stability was similar across hamburgers (P>0.05). Sensory differences were found due to hamburger fat source, but were < one panel unit. Within perirenal-hamburgers, feeding flaxseed increased 18:3n-3 and its BHI (P<0.05), and feeding sunflower seed increased 18:2n-6 and its BHI (P<0.05). Feeding flaxseed increased off-flavour intensity and oxidation in perirenal-hamburgers (P<0.05). Feeding oilseeds in forage based diets while using perirenal fat to make hamburgers provides opportunities to increase PUFA and BHI with potential to impact human health, but control measures need to be explored to limit oxidation and off-flavours when feeding flaxseed. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Biodegradation of perfluorinated compounds.

    PubMed

    Parsons, John R; Sáez, Monica; Dolfing, Jan; de Voogt, Pim

    2008-01-01

    The information available in the literature provides evidence for the biodegradation of some poly- and per-fluorinated compounds, but such biodegradation is incomplete and may not result in mineralization. Recent publications have demonstrated that 8:2 fluorotelomer alcohol, for example, can be degraded by bacteria from soil and wastewater treatment plants to perfluorooctanoic acid. Similarly, 2-N-ethyl(perfluorooctane sulfonamido)ethanol can be degraded by wastewater treatment sludge to perfluorooctanesulfonate. It is presently unclear whether these two products are degraded further. Therefore, the question remains as to whether there is a potential for defluorination and biodegradation of PFCs that contributes significantly to their environmental fate. The lack of mineralization observed is probably caused by the stability of the C-F bond, although there are examples of microbially catalyzed defluorination reactions. As is the case with reductive dechlorination or debromination, reductive defluorination is energetically favorable under anaerobic conditions and releases more energy than that available from sulfate reduction or methanogenesis. Consequently, we should consider the possibility that bacteria will adapt to utilize this source of energy, although evolving mechanisms to overcome the kinetic barriers to degradation of these compounds may take some time. The fact that such reactions are absent for some PFCs, to date, may be because too little time has passed for microorganisms to adapt to these potential substrates. Hence, the situation may be comparable to that of chlorinated organic compounds several decades ago. For many years, organochlorine compounds were considered to be catabolically recalcitrant; today, reductive chlorination reactions of many organochlorines, including PCBs and dioxins, are regularly observed in anaerobic environments. Hence, it is opportune and important to continue studying the potential degradation of perfluorinated compounds

  18. Space Transportation Propulsion Technology Symposium. Volume 2: Symposium proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Space Transportation Propulsion Symposium was held to provide a forum for communication within the propulsion technology developer and user communities. Emphasis was placed on propulsion requirements and initiatives to support current, next generation, and future space transportation systems, with the primary objectives of discerning whether proposed designs truly meet future transportation needs and identifying possible technology gaps, overlaps, and other programmatic deficiencies. Key space transportation propulsion issues were addressed through four panels with government, industry, and academia membership. The panels focused on systems engineering and integration; development, manufacturing and certification; operational efficiency; and program development and cultural issues.

  19. Computational Framework for Predictive Biodegradation

    PubMed Central

    Finley, Stacey D.; Broadbelt, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    As increasing amounts of anthropogenic chemicals are released into the environment, it is vital to human health and the preservation of ecosystems to evaluate the fate of these chemicals in the environment. It is useful to predict whether a particular compound is biodegradable and if alternate routes can be engineered for compounds already known to be biodegradable. In this work, we describe a computational framework (called BNICE) that can be used for the prediction of novel biodegradation pathways of xenobiotics. The framework was applied to 4-chlorobiphenyl, phenanthrene, γ-hexachlorocyclohexane, and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene, compounds representing various classes of xenobiotics with known biodegradation routes. BNICE reproduced the proposed biodegradation routes found experimentally, and in addition, it expanded the biodegradation reaction networks through the generation of novel compounds and reactions. The novel reactions involved in the biodegradation of 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene were studied in depth, where pathway and thermodynamic analyses were performed. This work demonstrates that BNICE can be applied to generate novel pathways to degrade xenobiotic compounds that are thermodynamically feasible alternatives to known biodegradation routes and attractive targets for metabolic engineering. PMID:19650084

  20. Modelling the emissions from ships in ports and their impact on air quality in the metropolitan area of Hamburg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramacher, Martin; Karl, Matthias; Aulinger, Armin; Bieser, Johannes; Matthias, Volker; Quante, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Exhaust emissions from shipping contribute significantly to the anthropogenic burden of air pollutants such as nitrogen oxides (NOX) and particulate matter (PM). Ships emit not only when sailing on open sea, but also when approaching harbors, during port manoeuvers and at berth to produce electricity and heat for the ship's operations. This affects the population of harbor cities because long-term exposure to PM and NOX has significant effects on human health. The European Union has therefore has set air quality standards for air pollutants. Many port cities have problems meeting these standards. The port of Hamburg with around 10.000 ship calls per year is Germany's largest seaport and Europe's second largest container port. Air quality standard reporting in Hamburg has revealed problems in meeting limits for NO2 and PM10. The amount and contribution of port related ship emissions (38% for NOx and 17% for PM10) to the overall emissions in the metropolitan area in 2005 [BSU Hamburg (2012): Luftreinhalteplan für Hamburg. 1. Fortschreibung 2012] has been modelled with a bottom up approach by using statistical data of ship activities in the harbor, technical vessel information and specific emission algorithms [GAUSS (2008): Quantifizierung von gasförmigen Emissionen durch Maschinenanlagen der Seeschiffart an der deutschen Küste]. However, knowledge about the spatial distribution of the harbor ship emissions over the city area is crucial when it comes to air quality standards and policy decisions to protect human health. Hence, this model study examines the spatial distribution of harbor ship emissions (NOX, PM10) and their deposition in the Hamburg metropolitan area. The transport and chemical transformation of atmospheric pollutants is calculated with the well-established chemistry transport model TAPM (The Air Pollution Model). TAPM is a three-dimensional coupled prognostic meteorological and air pollution model with a condensed chemistry scheme including

  1. Symposium: "Oncology Leadership in Asia".

    PubMed

    Noh, Dong-Young; Roh, Jae Kyung; Kim, Yeul Hong; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Baba, Hideo; Samson-Fernando, Marie Cherry Lynn; Misra, Sanjeev; Aziz, Zeba; Umbas, Rainy; P Singh, Yogendra; Shu Kam Mok, Tony; Yang, Han-Kwang; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2017-03-09

    The Symposium on "Oncology Leadership in Asia" was held as part of the official program of the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Korean Cancer Association. Given the increasing incidence of cancer in all countries and regions of Asia, regardless of developmental stage, and also in light of the recognized need for Asian countries to enhance collaboration in cancer prevention, research, treatment and follow-up, the symposium was held with the aim of bringing together oncology specialists from eight countries and regions in Asia to present the status in their own national context and discuss the key challenges and requirements in order to establish a greater Asian presence in the area of cancer control and research. The task of bringing together diverse countries and regions is made all the more urgent in that while Asia now accounts for more than half of all new cancer cases globally, clinical guidelines are based predominantly on practices adopted in western countries, which may not be optimized for unique ethnic, pharmacogenomic and cultural characteristics in Asia. Recognizing the need for Asia to better gather information and data for the compilation of Asia-specific clinical guidelines, the participants discussed the current status in Asia in the national and regional contexts and identified future steps towards integrated and collaborative initiatives in Asia. A key outcome of the symposium was a proposal to combine and integrate the activities of existing pan-Asian societies, including the Asia Pacific Federation of Organizations for Cancer Research and Control (APFOCC) and Asian Clinical Oncology Society (ACOS). Further proposals included the expansion of pan-Asian society membership to include individuals and the essential need to encourage the participation of young researchers in order to ensure self-sustainability of cancer control efforts in the future.

  2. Microbial biosurfactants and biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Ward, Owen P

    2010-01-01

    Microbial biosurfactants are amphipathic molecules having typical molecular weights of 500-1500 Da, made up of peptides, saccharides or lipids or their combinations. In biodegradation processes they mediate solubilisation, mobilization and/or accession of hydrophobic substrates to microbes. They may be located on the cell surface or be secreted into the extracellular medium and they facilitate uptake of hydrophobic molecules through direct cellular contact with hydrophobic solids or droplets or through micellarisation. They are also involved in cell physiological processes such as biofilm formation and detachment, and in diverse biofilm associated processes such as wastewater treatment and microbial pathogenesis. The protection of contaminants in biosurfactants micelles may also inhibit uptake of contaminants by microbes. In bioremediation processes biosurfactants may facilitate release of contaminants from soil, but soils also tend to bind surfactants strongly which makes their role in contaminant desorption more complex. A greater understanding of the underlying roles played by biosurfactants in microbial physiology and in biodegradative processes is developing through advances in cell and molecular biology.

  3. Marine Oil Biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Hazen, Terry C; Prince, Roger C; Mahmoudi, Nagissa

    2016-03-01

    Crude oil has been part of the marine environment for millions of years, and microbes that use its rich source of energy and carbon are found in seawater, sediments, and shorelines from the tropics to the polar regions. Catastrophic oil spills stimulate these organisms to "bloom" in a reproducible fashion, and although oil does not provide bioavailable nitrogen, phosphorus or iron, there are enough of these nutrients in the sea that when dispersed oil droplets dilute to low concentrations these low levels are adequate for microbial growth. Most of the hydrocarbons in dispersed oil are degraded in aerobic marine waters with a half-life of days to months. In contrast, oil that reaches shorelines is likely to be too concentrated, have lower levels of nutrients, and have a far longer residence time in the environment. Oil that becomes entrained in anaerobic sediments is also likely to have a long residence time, although it too will eventually be biodegraded. Thus, data that encompass everything from the ecosystem to the molecular level are needed for understanding the complicated process of petroleum biodegradation in marine environments.

  4. Marine Oil Biodegradation

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, Terry C.; Prince, Roger; Mahmoudi, Nagissa

    2015-12-23

    Crude oil has been part of the marine environment for millions of years, and microbes that use its rich source of energy and carbon are found in seawater, sediments and shorelines from the tropics to the polar regions. Catastrophic oil spills stimulate these organisms to ‘bloom’ in a reproducible fashion, and although oil does not provide bioavailable nitrogen, phosphorus or iron, there are enough of these nutrients in the sea that when dispersed oil droplets dilute to low concentrations these low levels are adequate for microbial growth. Most of the hydrocarbons in dispersed oil are degraded in aerobic marine waters with a half-life of days to months. In contrast, oil that reaches shorelines is likely to be too concentrated, have lower levels of nutrients, and have a far longer residence time in the environment. Oil that becomes entrained in anaerobic sediments is also likely to have a long residence time, although it too will eventually be biodegraded. Thus, data that encompass everything from the ecosystem to the molecular level are needed for understanding the complicated process of petroleum biodegradation in marine environments.

  5. Marine Oil Biodegradation

    DOE PAGES

    Hazen, Terry C.; Prince, Roger; Mahmoudi, Nagissa

    2015-12-23

    Crude oil has been part of the marine environment for millions of years, and microbes that use its rich source of energy and carbon are found in seawater, sediments and shorelines from the tropics to the polar regions. Catastrophic oil spills stimulate these organisms to ‘bloom’ in a reproducible fashion, and although oil does not provide bioavailable nitrogen, phosphorus or iron, there are enough of these nutrients in the sea that when dispersed oil droplets dilute to low concentrations these low levels are adequate for microbial growth. Most of the hydrocarbons in dispersed oil are degraded in aerobic marine watersmore » with a half-life of days to months. In contrast, oil that reaches shorelines is likely to be too concentrated, have lower levels of nutrients, and have a far longer residence time in the environment. Oil that becomes entrained in anaerobic sediments is also likely to have a long residence time, although it too will eventually be biodegraded. Thus, data that encompass everything from the ecosystem to the molecular level are needed for understanding the complicated process of petroleum biodegradation in marine environments.« less

  6. Biodegradation of crude oils.

    PubMed

    Bosecker, K; Teschner, M; Wehner, H

    1989-01-01

    Petroleum from well sites in the Gifhorn Trough (Lower Saxony, NW-Germany) and the Maracaibo Basin (Venezuela) contained various types of microorganisms capable of degrading crude oils. Genetically related oils were inoculated with the isolated microorganisms and the degradation of the oils was followed by chromatographic techniques. Parameters important for the reactions (pH, supply of oxygen, nitrogen and phosphorus, reaction medium) were monitored and optimized. The degradation of n-alkanes was followed closely. Microorganisms active in degradation (yeast, bacteria) easily survived a period of inactivity due to missing nutrients and were reactivated within hours to degrade newly added crude oil. Under substrate-limiting conditions selectivity of degradation was found, destroying medium-chain n-alkanes (C20, C21) at a faster rate than long-chain n-alkanes (C30, C31). During degradation the physical parameters of the crude oils (e.g. density, viscosity, average molecular weight) were altered and shifted into the direction of heavy oil. In vitro degraded oil is very similar to oil degraded in nature. Aromatic hydrocarbons and biomarker molecules (steranes and triterpanes) were not degraded under the conditions used. Pyrolysis-GC analysis of asphaltenes revealed no significant changes in the composition of pyrolyzates during biodegradation. There is sufficient evidence that heavy oils - besides some other effects - are generated by the in situ-biodegradation of conventional oils.

  7. Space Station Freedom Evolution Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, Richard H.

    1991-01-01

    Information on the Space Station Freedom Evolution Symposium is given in viewgraph form. Topics covered include industry development needs and the Office of Commercial Programs strategy, the three-phase program to develop commercial space, Centers for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS), key provisions of the Joint Endeavor agreement, current commercial flight experiment requirements, the CCDS expendable launch vehicle program, the Commercial Experiment Transporter (COMET) program, commercial launch dates, payload sponsors, the commercial roles of the Space Station Freedom, and a listing of the Office of Commercial Programs Space Station Freedom payloads.

  8. Symposium: Neuroergonomics, technology, and cognition.

    PubMed

    Parasuraman, Raja; Baldwin, Carryl L; Knott, Benjamin; Warm, Joel S; Finomore, Victor; Boehm-Davis, Deborah; Galster, Scott M

    2012-01-01

    This symposium describes collaborative research on neuroergonomics, technology, and cognition being conducted at George Mason University and the US Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) as part of the Center of Excellence in Neuroergonomics, Technology, and Cognition (CENTEC). Six presentations describe the latest developments in neuroergonomics research conducted by CENTEC scientists. The individual papers cover studies of: (1) adaptive learning systems; (2) neurobehavioral synchronicity during team performance; (3) genetics and individual differences in decision making; (4) vigilance and mindlessness; (5) interruptions and multi-tasking; and (6) development of a simulation capability that integrates measures across these domains and levels of analysis.

  9. Spring, 1980, DECUS symposium review

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.J.; Duffy, J.M.; McDonald, W.M.; Oppenheimer, J.L.; Brandt, J.J.; Grant, C.W.; O'Brien, D.W.; VanLehn, A.L.

    1980-10-24

    The Digital Equipment Computer Users Society (DECUS) holds biannual symposia where its membership and the host company can exchange ideas, problems, and solutions. This report by the newly formed DECUS Local User Group at LLL collects information gathered at the Spring '80 symposium in Chicago on April 22-25. Information is presented for the following special interest groups (SIGs): RSX/IAS SIG, VAX/VSM SIG, PASCAL (languages) SIG, networks SIG, TECO SIG, LSI-11 SIG, RT-11 SIG, site manager SIG, and database SIG. (RWR)

  10. Preparation of a biodegradable oil absorber and its biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Su-Yong; Daud, Wan Mohd Ashri Wan; Lee, Min-Gyu

    2012-01-01

    The biodegradable oil absorption resin (B-PEHA) was prepared by suspension polymerization, and its preparation was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared analysis. The oil absorption capacities of the prepared B-PEHA were: chloroform 30.88, toluene 19.75, xylene, 18.78, THF 15.96, octane 11.43, hexane 9.5, diesel oil 12.80, and kerosene 13.79 g/g. The biodegradation of the prepared B-PEHA was also investigated by determination of reduced sugar produced after enzymatic hydrolysis, thermogravimetric analysis, and incubation with Aspergillus niger. The biodegradation of B-PEHA was ~18%.

  11. The Eighth International Symposium On Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemonnier, Denis; Webb, Brent W.; Mengüç, M. Pınar

    2017-08-01

    This Special Issue of The Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer is based on the papers selected from RAD-16, the Eighth International Symposium on Radiative Transfer, which was held June 2016, in Cappadocia, Turkey. This Symposium is a follow-up of the seven previous meetings held in Kuşadası in 1995, 1997, and 2013; Antalya in 2001 and 2010; Istanbul in 2004; and Bodrum in 2007, all in Turkey. The Symposium was another enjoyable opportunity for the international radiation transfer community to assemble in a comfortable setting to present and discuss the state-of-the-art in research and application.

  12. 2009 Santa Fe Bone symposium.

    PubMed

    Lewiecki, E Michael; Bilezikian, John P; Laster, Andrew J; Miller, Paul D; Recker, Robert R; Russell, R Graham G; Whyte, Michael P

    2010-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a common skeletal disease with serious clinical consequences because of fractures. Despite the availability of clinical tools to diagnose osteoporosis and assess fracture risk, and drugs proven to reduce fracture risk, it remains a disease that is underdiagnosed and undertreated. When treatment is started, it is commonly not taken correctly or long enough to be effective. Recent advances in understanding of the regulators and mediators of bone remodeling have led to new therapeutic targets and the development of drugs that may offer advantages over current agents in reducing the burden of osteoporotic fractures. Many genetic factors that play a role in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis and metabolic bone disease have now been identified. At the 2009 Santa Fe Bone Symposium, held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA, the links between advances in genetics, basic bone science, recent clinical trials, and new and emerging therapeutic agents were presented and explored. Socioeconomic challenges and opportunities in the care of osteoporosis were discussed. This is a collection of medical essays based on key presentations at the 2009 Santa Fe Bone Symposium. Copyright (c) 2010 The International Society for Clinical Densitometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Biodegradation of Polypropylene Nonwovens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keene, Brandi Nechelle

    The primary aim of the current research is to document the biodegradation of polypropylene nonwovens and filament under composting environments. To accelerate the biodegradat ion, pre-treatments and additives were incorporated into polypropylene filaments and nonwovens. The initial phase (Chapter 2) of the project studied the biodegradation of untreated polypropylene with/without pro-oxidants in two types of composting systems. Normal composting, which involved incubation of samples in food waste, had little effect on the mechanical properties of additive-free spunbond nonwovens in to comparison prooxidant containing spunbond nonwovens which were affected significantly. Modified composting which includes the burial of samples with food and compressed air, the polypropylene spunbond nonwovens with/without pro-oxidants displayed an extreme loss in mechanical properties and cracking on the surface cracking. Because the untreated spunbond nonwovens did not completely decompose, the next phase of the project examined the pre-treatment of gamma-irradiation or thermal aging prior to composting. After exposure to gamma-irradiation and thermal aging, polypropylene is subjected to oxidative degradation in the presence of air and during storage after irradiat ion. Similar to photo-oxidation, the mechanism of gamma radiation and thermal oxidative degradation is fundamentally free radical in nature. In Chapter 3, the compostability of thermal aged spunbond polypropylene nonwovens with/without pro-oxidant additives. The FTIR spectrum confirmed oxidat ion of the polypropylene nonwovens with/without additives. Cracking on both the pro-oxidant and control spunbond nonwovens was showed by SEM imaging. Spunbond polypropylene nonwovens with/without pro-oxidants were also preirradiated by gamma rays followed by composting. Nonwovens with/without pro-oxidants were severely degraded by gamma-irradiation after up to 20 kGy exposure as explained in Chapter 4. Furthermore (Chapter 5), gamma

  14. Biodegradable plastics from renewable sources.

    PubMed

    Flieger, M; Kantorová, M; Prell, A; Rezanka, T; Votruba, J

    2003-01-01

    Plastic waste disposal is a huge ecotechnological problem and one of the approaches to solving this problem is the development of biodegradable plastics. This review summarizes data on their use, biodegradability, commercial reliability and production from renewable resources. Some commercially successful biodegradable plastics are based on chemical synthesis (i.e. polyglycolic acid, polylactic acid, polycaprolactone, and polyvinyl alcohol). Others are products of microbial fermentations (i.e. polyesters and neutral polysaccharides) or are prepared from chemically modified natural products (e.g., starch, cellulose, chitin or soy protein).

  15. Escherichia coli O157:H7 reduction in hamburgers with regard to premature browning of minced beef, colour score and method for determining doneness.

    PubMed

    Boqvist, Sofia; Fernström, Lise-Lotte; Alsanius, Beatrix W; Lindqvist, Roland

    2015-12-23

    This study investigated the effect of premature browning (PMB) on the survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in beef hamburgers after cooking with respect to interior colour of the hamburger and recommendations to cook hamburgers to a core temperature of 71 °C. Assessment of doneness by visual inspection or measurement of internal temperature was compared in terms of survival and the increased relative risk of illness due to PMB was estimated. At the last consume-by-day, hamburgers made from minced meat packaged in 80/20 O2/CO2 (MAP hamburger) and from meat minced at retail packaged in atmospheric condition (control hamburger) were inoculated with a gfp-tagged strain of E. coli O157:H7 (E. coli O157:H7gfp+). Hamburgers were cooked for different times during assessment of the core temperature every 30s and cut in halves after cooking. Doneness was evaluated based on visual judgement of the internal colour using a score chart (C-score) from 'uncooked' (score 1) to 'tan with no evidence of pink' (score 5). An alternative five point score chart (TCC-score) including texture of the meat, clarity of meat juice and internal colour was also developed. Enumeration of viable E. coli O157:H7gfp+ in cooked hamburgers was based on fluorescent colonies recovered from plates. Results showed that MAP hamburgers developed PMB when compared with controls (P=0.0003) and that the shortest cooking time for the highest C-score was 6 and 11 min for MAP and control hamburgers, respectively. The mean temperature in the MAP hamburger was then 60.3 °C. The TCC-score reduced the difference between MAP and control hamburgers. It was also shown that the survival of E. coli O157:H7gfp+ was highest in MAP hamburgers. The predicted absolute risks for illness were highest for MAP hamburgers for all C-scores and the relative risk associated with PMB increased with doneness. For a C-score of 4 (slightly pink) the predicted relative risk for illness was 300 times higher for MAP hamburger than for

  16. Interdisciplinary MSc and Doctoral Education in Climate System Science at the University of Hamburg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilly, Oliver; Stammer, Detlef; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria

    2010-05-01

    Modern education in climate system sciences is based on a number of disciplines such as meteorology, geophysics, oceanography, geosciences and also economics and social sciences. Facts across these disciplines are required to address the faced key issues related to climate change effectively. Climate experts need to have profound knowledge that can only be achieved in interdisciplinary MSc and PhD programs. In Europe, graduate students who completed a BSc degree are typically proceeding with MSc programs to increase knowledge and qualification. Afterwards, the participation in a doctoral program may follow. Many doctoral programs include courses supporting disciplinary methodological and scientific background in particular. Those courses derive either from advanced MSc programs or specific trainings. Typically, interdisciplinary exchange is difficult to achieve at any stage of disciplinary graduate programs. Recent developments showed the need to educate climate experts in interdisciplinary MSc programs in climate system sciences for both researchers and professionals outside the university. The University of Hamburg offers an interdisciplinary 2-yr MSc program in Integrated System Sciences with 120 ECTS (30 compulsory, 90 eligible) in English language. If the MSc student decides to proceed with a PhD thesis, he/she may not necessarily complete the MSc program but may start to work on a specific and disciplinary doctoral thesis for 3 years. Each doctoral student is guided by an advisory panel (AP) which meets at least bi-annually. The AP consists of a Principal Advisor, a Co-Advisor and a Chair of the panel who come from neighboring disciplines. The structured doctoral program with only 12 CPs includes interdisciplinary compulsory courses and tailor-made eligible expert courses. Summer schools and soft skill courses add to both MSc and doctoral programs. Accordingly, the new graduate school concepts in climate system sciences at the University of Hamburg supports

  17. The heliosphere during the declining solar cycle; Symposium D1.1 of COSPAR Scientific Assembly, 30th, Hamburg, Germany, July 11-21, 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shea, M. A. (Editor); Page, D. E. (Editor); Smart, D. F. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The conference discussed the heliosphere during the declining solar cycle. Topics covered included: manifestations of solar activity, the solar wind, ion pick-up and anomalous cosmic rays, the interplanetary magnetic field, cosmic ray modulation, co-rotating interaction regions, and the heliosphere boundary, as well as several related topics.

  18. Gamma ray astronomy; E2 Symposium of COSPAR Scientific Commission E, COSPAR Scientific Assembly, 30th, Hamburg, Germany, July 11-21, 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This issue on gamma ray astronomy presents many results from observations made with the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) and other spaceborne experiments and includes studies of Seyfert galaxies, X-ray binaries, neutron stars, diffuse cosmic background radiation, pulsars, blazars, gamma ray bursts, the galactic center, and the distribution of Aluminum-26 in the galaxy. The issue begins with a survey of Compton Telescope (COMPTEL) results and concludes with future prospects for the field.

  19. Biodegradation of propellant ingredients

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.Z.; Sundaram, S.T.; Sharma, A.

    1995-12-31

    This paper summarizes efforts to degrade nitrocellulose (NC) and nitroglycerin (NG) with fungi. Screening experiments were performed to determine the ability of mycelial fungi to biodegrade NC. The greatest amount of NC degradation was obtained with Sclerotium rolfsii ATCC 24459 and Fusarium solani IFO 31093. These fungi were then tested for NG degradation. It was found that the combined culture aerobically degraded 100% of the NG to form a mixture of 55% dinitroglycerin (DNG) and 5% of mononitroglycerin (MNG) in two days, with no further change observed afterward. In the presence of 1.2% glucose and 0.05% ammonium nitrate, NG was completely degraded in two days and a mixture of 20% DNG and 16% MNG was formed after 11 days. Based on these results, it appears that the combination of the fungi in a one to one ratio can be used to degrade both of these energetic compounds.

  20. Biodegradation of biodiesel fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Haws, R.; Wright, B.; Reese, D.; Moeller, G.; Peterson, C.

    1995-12-31

    Biodiesel fuel test substances Rape Ethyl Ester (REE), Rape Methyl Ester (RME), Neat Rape Oil (NR), Say Methyl Ester (SME), Soy Ethyl Ester (SEE), Neat Soy Oil (NS), and proportionate combinations of RME/diesel and REE/diesel were studied to test the biodegradability of the test substances in an aerobic aquatic environment using the EPA 560/6-82-003 Shake Flask Test Method. A concurrent analysis of Phillips D-2 Reference Diesel was also performed for comparison with a conventional fuel. The highest rates of percent CO{sub 2} evolution were seen in the esterified fuels, although no significant difference was noted between them. Ranges of percent CO{sub 2} evolution for esterified fuels were from 77% to 91%. The neat rape and neat soy oils exhibited 70% to 78% CO{sub 2} evolution. These rates were all significantly higher than those of the Phillips D-2 reference fuel which evolved from 7% to 26% of the organic carbon to CO{sub 2}. The test substances were examined for BOD{sub 5} and COD values as a relative measure of biodegradability. Water Accommodated Fraction (WAF) was experimentally derived and BOD{sub 5} and COD analyses were carried out with a diluted concentration at or below the WAF. The results of analysis at WAF were then converted to pure substance values. The pure substance BOD{sub 5} and COD values for test substances were then compared to a control substance, Phillips D-2 Reference fuel. No significant difference was noted for COD values between test substances and the control fuel. (p > 0.20). The D-2 control substance was significantly lower than all test substances for BCD, values at p << 0.01. RME was also significantly lower than REE (p < 0.05) and MS (p < 0.01) for BOD{sub 5} value.

  1. The 24th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The proceedings of the symposium are reported. Technological areas covered include actuators, aerospace mechanism applications for ground support equipment, lubricants, latches, connectors, and other mechanisms for large space structures.

  2. Progress In Electromagnetics Research Symposium (PIERS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The third Progress In Electromagnetics Research Symposium (PIERS) was held 12-16 Jul. 1993, at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California. More than 800 presentations were made, and those abstracts are included in this publication.

  3. Symposium on unsaturated flow and transport modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, E.M.; Gee, G.W.; Nelson, R.W.

    1982-09-01

    This document records the proceedings of a symposium on flow and transport processes in partially saturated groundwater systems, conducted at the Battelle Seattle Research Center on March 22-24, 1982. The symposium was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for the purpose of assessing the state-of-the-art of flow and transport modeling for use in licensing low-level nuclear waste repositories in partially saturated zones. The first day of the symposium centered around research in flow through partially saturated systems. Papers were presented with the opportunity for questions following each presentation. In addition, after all the talks, a formal panel discussion was held during which written questions were addressed to the panel of the days speakers. The second day of the Symposium was devoted to solute and contaminant transport in partially saturated media in an identical format. Individual papers are abstracted.

  4. Symposium on Recent Results in Infrared Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyal, P. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    Abstracts of papers presented at a symposium titled Recent Results in Infrared Astrophysics are set forth. The abstracts emphasize photometric, spectroscopic, polarization, and theoretical results on a broad range of current topics in infrared astrophysics.

  5. Plant-Incorporated Protectants Data Symposium

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA held a public symposium on data that support registration of plant incorporated protectants (PIPs). It provided firsthand information on the scope of the scientific review process regarding the safety of PIPs and on the pesticide registration process.

  6. Bolden Speaks at the URC Virtual Symposium

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden delivered a welcome address via video to support the NASA University Research Centers inaugural Virtual Poster Session and Symposium event November 8, 2012. A dive...

  7. Performance, Productivity and Continuous Improvement. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on performance, productivity, and continuous improvement. "Investigating the Association between Productivity and Quality Performance in Two Manufacturing Settings" (Constantine Kontoghiorghes, Robert Gudgel) summarizes a study that identified the following quality management variables…

  8. Quality of life of Turkish type 2 diabetics in Germany and Turkey--a comparison between Hamburg and Istanbul.

    PubMed

    Kofahl, Christopher; Doğan, Mustafa; Doğan, Gülsün; Mnich, Eva; von dem Knesebeck, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    The analyses address the following research questions: (1) Do Turkish diabetics in Germany and Turkey differ in terms of quality of life? (2) If yes, can these differences (in part) be explained by social factors (age, gender, education, household size), functional limitations and availability of support? (3) Are social factors, functional limitations and availability of support differently associated with quality of life among Turkish diabetics in Germany and Turkey? For this comparative cross-sectional study, 111 patients with type 2 diabetes were personally interviewed in Istanbul (Turkey) and 294 Turkish patients in Hamburg (Germany). For quality of life measurement we have used the Turkish version of the WHOQOL-Bref-26. Sociodemographics included age, sex, education and household-size. Health related functional limitations were assessed on the basis of an index of (instrumental) activities of daily living including the availability of help. Statistical analyses were conducted on group comparisons with Chi-square- and T-tests as well as linear regressions. There are no significant differences between Turkish diabetics in Germany and Turkey in the physical and the psychological dimensions of the WHOQOL-Bref. However, in the WHOQOL-domains 'social QoL' and 'environmental QoL' Turkish diabetics living in Hamburg have a significantly better quality of life than their counterparts in Istanbul. These differences cannot be explained by individual sociodemographic factors, functional limitations and availability of support. Furthermore, we found much stronger positive associations between education and quality of life in Istanbul than in Hamburg. Beyond strong similarities between the two samples in sociodemographics, physical and mental health the social and environmental quality of life was significantly assessed better by the Turkish diabetics living in Hamburg. This is most likely an effect of public investment in social security, infrastructure and health care

  9. Antioxidant-rich spice added to hamburger meat during cooking results in reduced meat, plasma, and urine malondialdehyde concentrations.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaoping; Henning, Susanne M; Zhang, Yanjun; Zerlin, Alona; Li, Luyi; Gao, Kun; Lee, Ru-Po; Karp, Hannah; Thames, Gail; Bowerman, Susan; Heber, David

    2010-05-01

    Emerging science has shown the effect of oxidation products and inflammation on atherogenesis and carcinogenesis. Cooking hamburger meat can promote the formation of malondialdehyde that can be absorbed after ingestion. We studied the effect of an antioxidant spice mixture on malondialdehyde formation while cooking hamburger meat and its effects on plasma and urinary malondialdehyde concentrations. Eleven healthy volunteers consumed 2 kinds of burgers in a randomized order: one burger was seasoned with a spice blend, and one burger was not seasoned with the spice blend. The production of malondialdehyde in burgers and malondialdehyde concentrations in plasma and urine after ingestion were measured by HPLC. Rosmarinic acid from oregano was monitored to assess the effect of cooking on spice antioxidant content. Forty percent (19 mg) of the added rosmarinic acid remained in the spiced burger (SB) after cooking. There was a 71% reduction in the malondialdehyde concentration (mean +/- SD: 0.52 +/- 0.02 micromol/250 g) in the meat of the SBs compared with the malondialdehyde concentration (1.79 +/- 0.17 micromol/250 g) in the meat of the control burgers (CBs). The plasma malondialdehyde concentration increased significantly in the CB group as a change from baseline (P = 0.026). There was a significant time-trend difference (P = 0.013) between the 2 groups. Urinary malondialdehyde concentrations (micromol/g creatinine) decreased by 49% (P = 0.021) in subjects consuming the SBs compared with subjects consuming the CBs. The overall effect of adding the spice mixture to hamburger meat before cooking was a reduction in malondialdehyde concentrations in the meat, plasma, and urine after ingestion. Therefore, cooking hamburgers with a polyphenol-rich spice mixture can significantly decrease the concentration of malondialdehyde, which suggests potential health benefits for atherogenesis and carcinogenesis. This trial was registered at clinical trials.gov as NCT01027052.

  10. The Zoology Department at Washington University (1944-1954): from undergraduate to graduate studies with Viktor Hamburger.

    PubMed

    Dunnebacke, T H

    2001-04-01

    Beginning from an undergraduate's perspective and continuing through graduate school, this student's experiences in the Department of Zoology at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri was a time of many rewarding experiences. Now, on this occasion of his 100th birthday, I wish to express my appreciation to the Chairman, Dr. Viktor Hamburger, for his teachings, his encouragement, and his friendship that has lasted over the past 56 years.

  11. The 1992 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, L.R.; Mosier, F.L.

    1992-10-01

    The 1992 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium is a continuation of the Get Away Special Symposium convened from 1984 through 1988, and is proposed to continue as an annual conference. The focus of this conference is to educate potential Space Shuttle Payload Bay users as to the types of carrier systems provided and for current users to share experiment concepts. Separate abstracts have been prepared for papers in this report.

  12. The 1996 IDA Cost Research Symposium.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-08-01

    Planning Research 7 5. Research Categories 8 A. INTRODUCTION On 23 May 1996, representatives from selected offices and organizations that sponsor...defense cost research symposium. This symposium facilitates the exchange of research findings, leads to avoidance of costly duplication of effort...to the highest priority, avoids duplication of effort, and facilitates sharing of results among the DoD Components. Further, the CAIG is to make

  13. 2005 Non-Lethal Defense VI Symposium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-16

    Untitled Document 2005 Non Lethal Defense VI Symposium.html[8/22/2016 9:24:13 AM] Non- Lethal Defense "VI" Symposium “Non- Lethal Weapon Options in...Current and Desired Capabilities Forum Army Non- Lethal Requirements, Brigadier General Coker, USA, TRADOC Successful Non- Lethal Illegal Alien...Interdiction Case, Rear Admiral Kunkle, USCG, Non Lethal IPT Member Luncheon Keynote Speaker, by Lieutenant General Jan Huly, USMC, Deputy Commandant for Plans

  14. Proceedings of the third international pump symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a symposium on centrifugal pumps. Topics considered at the symposium included power recovery turbines for the process industry, gas-liquid flow through centrifugal pumps, the development of an advanced gas turbine driven high-speed centrifugal pump for injection services at oil fields, cavitation, structural resonance problems, electric motors, nozzles, and rotodynamic developments for high speed multistage pumps.

  15. Flight Mechanics/Estimation Theory Symposium 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greatorex, Scott (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    This conference publication includes 34 papers and abstracts presented at the Flight Mechanics/ Estimation Theory Symposium on May 14-16, 1996. Sponsored by the Flight Dynamics Division of Goddard Space Flight Center, this symposium featured technical papers on a wide range of issues related to orbit-attitude prediction, determination, and control; attitude sensor calibration; attitude determination error analysis; attitude dynamics; and orbit decay and maneuver strategy. Government, industry, and the academic community participated in the preparation and presentation of these papers.

  16. International Symposium on Fast Glacier Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingle, Craig S.

    1990-01-01

    Cryospheric Sciences Program "International Symposium on Fast Glacier Flow" (PI, C. Lingle) provided partial support for publication of Annals of Glaciology 36 by the International Glaciological Society. Annals of Glaciology is a peer-reviewed journal. Annals 36, which was published in 2003, contains 39 peer-reviewed and edited papers from the International Symposium on Fast Glacier Flow, which was held in Yakutat, Alaska, 10-14 June 2002.

  17. Flight Mechanics/Estimation Theory Symposium 1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, Kathy R. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This conference publication includes 41 papers and abstracts presented at the Flight Mechanics/ Estimation Theory Symposium on May 16-18, 1995. Sponsored by the Flight Dynamics Division of Goddard Space Flight Center, this symposium featured technical papers on a wide range of issues related to orbit-attitude prediction, determination, and control; attitude sensor calibration; attitude determination error analysis; attitude dynamics; and orbit decay and maneuver strategy. Government, industry, and the academic community participated in the preparation and presentation of these papers.

  18. The Fifth NASA Symposium on VLSI Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The fifth annual NASA Symposium on VLSI Design had 13 sessions including Radiation Effects, Architectures, Mixed Signal, Design Techniques, Fault Testing, Synthesis, Signal Processing, and other Featured Presentations. The symposium provides insights into developments in VLSI and digital systems which can be used to increase data systems performance. The presentations share insights into next generation advances that will serve as a basis for future VLSI design.

  19. Effects of Lemon Balm on the Oxidative Stability and the Quality Properties of Hamburger Patties during Refrigerated Storage.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Joo; Choi, You-Jung; Choi, Yang-Il; Lee, Jae-Joon

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effects of lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.) on various quality and antioxidant activity of hamburger patties. Lemon balm extract (LBE) showed the highest amount of total polyphenol (801.00 mg TAE/g DW) and flavonoids (65.05 mg RA/g DW). The IC50 value of DPPH hydroxyl scavenging of LBE was 132 μg/mL. The hamburger patties were prepared by 0% (N), 0.1% (L1), 0.5% (L2), and 1.0% (L3) of the lemon balm powder. The addition of lemon balm powder increased the chewiness value, but did not affect the hardness, cohesiveness, and springiness values. Lemon balm powder had positive effects on sensory evaluation of patties. The pH of all patties decreased with longer storage period. 2-Thiobarbituric acid value, volatile basic nitrogen content, and the total microbial counts of hamburger patties in the L3 group were lower, compared to those of the normal (N group). In conclusion, the L3 group had significantly delayed lipid peroxidation compared to other treatment groups. However, the addition of lemon balm powder into patties showed no significantly influence on proximate composition, calorie contents, water holding capacity and cooking loss of patties. Therefore, lemon balm might be a useful natural antioxidant additive in meat products.

  20. Effects of Lemon Balm on the Oxidative Stability and the Quality Properties of Hamburger Patties during Refrigerated Storage

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Joo; Choi, Yang-Il

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effects of lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.) on various quality and antioxidant activity of hamburger patties. Lemon balm extract (LBE) showed the highest amount of total polyphenol (801.00 mg TAE/g DW) and flavonoids (65.05 mg RA/g DW). The IC50 value of DPPH hydroxyl scavenging of LBE was 132 μg/mL. The hamburger patties were prepared by 0% (N), 0.1% (L1), 0.5% (L2), and 1.0% (L3) of the lemon balm powder. The addition of lemon balm powder increased the chewiness value, but did not affect the hardness, cohesiveness, and springiness values. Lemon balm powder had positive effects on sensory evaluation of patties. The pH of all patties decreased with longer storage period. 2-Thiobarbituric acid value, volatile basic nitrogen content, and the total microbial counts of hamburger patties in the L3 group were lower, compared to those of the normal (N group). In conclusion, the L3 group had significantly delayed lipid peroxidation compared to other treatment groups. However, the addition of lemon balm powder into patties showed no significantly influence on proximate composition, calorie contents, water holding capacity and cooking loss of patties. Therefore, lemon balm might be a useful natural antioxidant additive in meat products. PMID:26761292

  1. The Comparative Effect of Carrot and Lemon Fiber as a Fat Replacer on Physico-chemical, Textural, and Organoleptic Quality of Low-fat Beef Hamburger

    PubMed Central

    Soncu, Eda Demirok; Kolsarıcı, Nuray; Çiçek, Neslihan; Öztürk, Görsen Salman; Akoğlu, ilker T.; Arıcı, Yeliz Kaşko

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the usability of lemon fiber (LF-2%, 4%, 6%) and carrot fiber (CF-2%, 4%, 6%) to produce low-fat beef hamburgers. To that end, a certain amount of fat was replaced with each fiber. The proximate composition, pH value, cholesterol content, cooking characteristics, color, texture profile, and sensory properties of low-fat beef hamburgers were investigated. LF increased moisture content and cooking yield due to its better water binding properties, while CF caused higher fat and cholesterol contents owing to its higher fat absorption capacity (p<0.05). LF resulted in a lighter, redder, and more yellow color (p<0.05). Hardness, gumminess, springiness, and chewiness parameters decreased when the usage level of both fibers increased (p<0.05). However, more tender, gummy, springy, and smoother hamburgers were produced by the addition of CF in comparison with LF (p<0.05). Moreover, hamburgers including CF were rated with higher sensory scores (p<0.05). In conclusion, LF demonstrated better technological results in terms of cooking yield, shrinkage, moisture retention, and fat retention. However it is suggested that CF produces better low-fat hamburgers since up to 2% CF presented sensory and textural properties similar to those of regular hamburgers. PMID:26761851

  2. The Comparative Effect of Carrot and Lemon Fiber as a Fat Replacer on Physico-chemical, Textural, and Organoleptic Quality of Low-fat Beef Hamburger.

    PubMed

    Soncu, Eda Demirok; Kolsarıcı, Nuray; Çiçek, Neslihan; Öztürk, Görsen Salman; Akoğlu, Ilker T; Arıcı, Yeliz Kaşko

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the usability of lemon fiber (LF-2%, 4%, 6%) and carrot fiber (CF-2%, 4%, 6%) to produce low-fat beef hamburgers. To that end, a certain amount of fat was replaced with each fiber. The proximate composition, pH value, cholesterol content, cooking characteristics, color, texture profile, and sensory properties of low-fat beef hamburgers were investigated. LF increased moisture content and cooking yield due to its better water binding properties, while CF caused higher fat and cholesterol contents owing to its higher fat absorption capacity (p<0.05). LF resulted in a lighter, redder, and more yellow color (p<0.05). Hardness, gumminess, springiness, and chewiness parameters decreased when the usage level of both fibers increased (p<0.05). However, more tender, gummy, springy, and smoother hamburgers were produced by the addition of CF in comparison with LF (p<0.05). Moreover, hamburgers including CF were rated with higher sensory scores (p<0.05). In conclusion, LF demonstrated better technological results in terms of cooking yield, shrinkage, moisture retention, and fat retention. However it is suggested that CF produces better low-fat hamburgers since up to 2% CF presented sensory and textural properties similar to those of regular hamburgers.

  3. The architecture of Hamburg-Bergedorf Observatory 1906 - 1912, compared with other observatories (German Title: Die Architektur der Hamburg-Bergedorfer Sternwarte 1906 - 1912 im Vergleich mit anderen Observatorien)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Peter

    The foundation of the astrophysical observatories in Potsdam-Telegrafenberg in 1874, in Meudon near Paris in 1875 and in Mount Hamilton in California in 1875 resulted in a complete change of observatory architecture. Astrometry had become irrelevant; meridian halls, i.e. an exact north-south orientation, were no longer necessary. The location in the centre of a (university) town was disadvantageous, due to vibrations caused by traffic and artificial light at night. New principles were defined: considerable distance (from the city center), secluded and exposed position (on a mountain) and construction of pavilions: inside a park a pavilion was built for each instrument. Other observatories of this type are: Pic du Midi in the French Alps, built as from 1878 as the first permanent observatory in the high mountains; Nice, Mont Gros, (1879); Brussels, Uccle (1883); Edinburgh, Blackford Hill (1892); Heidelberg, Königstuhl (1896); Barcelona, Monte Tibidado (1902). The original Hamburg Observatory was a modest rectangular building near the Millernrtor; in 1833 it became a State institute. As from 1906 erection of a spacious complex in Bergedorf, 20 km northeast of the city center, took place. Except for the unavailable position on a mountain, this complex fulfilled all principles of a modern observatory: in a park pavilion architecture in an elegant neo-baroque style designed by Albert Erbe (architect of the new Hamburger Kunsthalle with cupola). At the Hamburg Observatory the domed structures were cleverly hierarchised leaving an open view to the south. At the beginning astrometry and astrophysics were equally important; there was still a meridian circle. Apart from that, the instruments were manifold: a large refractor 0.60 m (installed by Repsold/Hamburg, 9 m focal length) and a large reflector 1 m (Zeiss/Jena, 3m focal length). Both were the largest instruments of their kind in the German Empire. In addition, there was the Lippert Astrograph on an elegant polar

  4. Taking advantage of natural biodegradation

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, W.A.; Bartlett, C.L.

    1995-12-31

    A chemical manufacturing facility in central New Jersey evaluated alternatives to address low levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in groundwater. Significant natural attenuation of VOCs was observed in groundwater, and is believed to be the result of natural biodegradation, commonly referred to as intrinsic bioremediation. A study consisting of groundwater sampling and analysis, field monitoring, and transport modeling was conducted to evaluate and confirm this phenomenon. The primary conclusion that can be drawn from the study is that observed natural attenuation of VOCs in groundwater is due to natural biodegradation. Based on the concept that natural biodegradation will minimize contaminant migration, bioventing has been implemented to remove the vadose-zone source of VOCs to groundwater. Taking advantage of natural biodegradation has resulted in significant cost savings compared to implementing a conventional groundwater pump-and-treat system, while still protecting human health and the environment.

  5. Integrated study of provenience and state of preservation: Jewish cemetery in Hamburg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegesmund, S.; Weiss, T.; Ruedrich, J.

    2003-04-01

    Different types of marble and limestone are used as tombstones at the Jewish cemetery in Hamburg Altona (Germany). The tombstones are flat lying cuboids with an even or tent-like surface. Especially the marbles, which are supposed to be from the Carrara area, suffer from strong weathering. While the limestones only show a degradation by solution of the uppermost surface, the marbles show a strong deterioration in form of granular disintegration. The state of preservation of the marble tombstones is widely unknown. Different artificial treatments in the past led to a reinforced loss of relief structure within the last fifteen years. The penetration depth of this degradation is largely unknown. To characterize the provenience of the marbles microfabric analyses and C-/O-Isotope studies have been used. These investigations reveal that the marbles indeed originate from Carrara. The state of preservation has been determined by a macroscopic damage analysis and ultrasonic wave velocities. Ultrasonic wave velocities were measured on-site and in the laboratory. Due to the position of the tombstones in-situ, they are at least partially water-saturated which may mask ultrasonic diagnostics. Thus, laboratory investigations on specimens taken from the tombstones are used which allow the determination of ultrasonic wave velocities at certain well defined sample conditions. They reveal, in contrast to the on-site observations, that the state of degradation of the marbles is critical. Special recommendations are given for the preservation of these tombstones.

  6. Presence and formation of fluorescence carbon dots in a grilled hamburger.

    PubMed

    Li, Yao; Bi, Jingran; Liu, Shan; Wang, Haitao; Yu, Chenxu; Li, Dongmei; Zhu, Bei-Wei; Tan, Mingqian

    2017-07-19

    The presence of nanomaterials during food processing has attracted significant concern due to the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials. In this study, the presence and formation of nitrogen-containing fluorescence carbon dots (C-dots) in a grilled hamburger at different temperatures (220, 260, and 300 °C) were investigated during the pyrolysis process. The size and morphology of the C-dots were found to be highly dependent on the heating temperatures, which again affected the functional groups on their surface. The C-dots are strongly fluorescent with multicolor emission accompanied by a gradual decrease in fluorescence intensity. The fluorescence quantum yield of the C-dots produced at 260 °C was measured to be 23.25%. The potential cytotoxicity and biodistribution of the C-dots within live organisms were examined with the mouse osteoblasts cell line and mung bean sprout, respectively. The cell viability after 24 h incubation remained 79% for the C-dots obtained at 300 °C at a concentration of 3.2 mg mL(-1), and no obvious phytotoxicity in the growing mung bean sprout was observed. The results showed an increased cytotoxicity of the C-dots formed at higher temperatures.

  7. The Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite Data - HOAPS-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, A.; Fennig, K.; Klepp, C.; Bakan, S.; Graßl, H.; Schulz, J.

    2010-09-01

    The availability of microwave instruments on satellite platforms allows the retrieval of essential water cycle components at high quality for improved understanding and evaluation of water processes in climate modelling. HOAPS-3, the latest version of the satellite climatology "Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite Data" provides fields of turbulent heat fluxes, evaporation, precipitation, freshwater flux and related atmospheric variables over the global ice-free ocean. This paper describes the content, methodology and retrievals of the HOAPS climatology. A sophisticated processing chain, including all available Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) instruments aboard the satellites of the Defense Meteorological Satellites Program (DMSP) and careful inter-sensor calibration, ensures a homogeneous time-series with dense data sampling and hence detailed information of the underlying weather situations. The completely reprocessed data set with a continuous time series from 1987 to 2005 contains neural network based algorithms for precipitation and wind speed and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) based SST fields. Additionally, a new 85 GHz synthesis procedure for the defective SSM/I channels on DMSP F08 from 1988 on has been implemented. Freely available monthly and pentad means, twice daily composites and scan-based data make HOAPS-3 a versatile data set for studying ocean-atmosphere interaction on different temporal and spatial scales. HOAPS-3 data products are available via http://www.hoaps.org.

  8. The Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite Data - HOAPS-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, A.; Fennig, K.; Klepp, C.; Bakan, S.; Graßl, H.; Schulz, J.

    2010-05-01

    The availability of microwave instruments on satellite platforms allows the retrieval of essential water cycle components at high quality for improved understanding and evaluation of water processes in climate modelling. HOAPS-3, the latest version of the satellite climatology "Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite Data" provides fields of turbulent heat fluxes, evaporation, precipitation, freshwater flux and related atmospheric variables over the global ice-free ocean. This paper describes the content, methodology and retrievals of the HOAPS climatology. A sophisticated processing chain, including all available Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) instruments aboard the satellites of the Defense Meteorological Satellites Program (DMSP) and careful inter-sensor calibration, ensures a homogeneous time-series with dense data sampling and hence detailed information of the underlying weather situations. The completely reprocessed data set with a continuous time series from 1987 to 2005 contains neural network based algorithms for precipitation and wind speed and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) based SST fields. Additionally, a new 85 GHz synthesis procedure for the defective SSM/I channels on DMSP F08 from 1989 on has been implemented. Freely available monthly and pentad means, twice daily composites and scan-based data make HOAPS-3 a versatile data set for studying ocean-atmosphere interaction on different temporal and spatial scales. HOAPS-3 data products are available via http://www.hoaps.org.

  9. Performance Evaluation of the Approaches and Algorithms using Hamburg Airport Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Zhifan; Lee, Hanbong; Jung, Yoon; Okuniek, Nikolai; Gerdes, Ingrid; Schier, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    The German Aerospace Center (DLR) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) have been independently developing and testing their own concepts and tools for airport surface traffic management. Although these concepts and tools have been tested individually for European and US airports, they have never been compared or analyzed side-by-side. This paper presents the collaborative research devoted to the evaluation and analysis of two different surface management concepts. Hamburg Airport was used as a common test bed airport for the study. First, two independent simulations using the same traffic scenario were conducted: one by the DLR team using the Controller Assistance for Departure Optimization (CADEO) and the Taxi Routing for Aircraft58; Creation and Controlling (TRACC) in a real-time simulation environment, and one by the NASA team based on the Spot and Runway Departure Advisor (SARDA) in a fast-time simulation environment. A set of common performance metrics was defined. The simulation results showed that both approaches produced operational benefits in efficiency, such as reducing taxi times, while maintaining runway throughput. Both approaches generated the gate pushback schedule to meet the runway schedule, such that the runway utilization was maximized. The conflict-free taxi guidance by TRACC helped avoid taxi conflicts and reduced taxiing stops, but the taxi benefit needed be assessed together with runway throughput to analyze the overall performance objective.

  10. Viticultural and chemical characteristics of Muscat Hamburg preselected clones grown for table grapes.

    PubMed

    Vujović, Dragan; Maletić, Radojka; Popović-Đorđević, Jelena; Pejin, Boris; Ristić, Renata

    2017-01-01

    Clonal selection is one of the tools used for grapevine improvement and therefore is very important for obtaining clones with better characteristics than the variety population. The aim of this study was to select superior grapevines of Vitis vinifera L. cv. Muscat Hamburg grown for fresh consumption. The viticultural parameters and fruit composition of 35 selected vines were determined during a 5-year period. The evaluated parameters showed high variability among selected vines. The significant effect of vintage was observed for all descriptors with the exception of the number of seeds per berry and sugar concentration. Additionally, all vines were examined for their tolerance to low temperatures and the results showed 73% and 90% of primary bud injury at -20 and -25 °C, respectively. In relation to berry classification, the percentage of first-class grapes ranged from 60% to 69% for all selected grapevines. Multivariate statistical analysis was performed to classify grapevines based on their performance. Fourteen grapevines were identified as the most promising among the 35 vines initially planted, based on high yield, bunch and berry weight, sugar content and percentage of first-grade grapes. Those grapevines were selected for the next phase of the clonal selection. This study highlighted the importance of clonal selection for improvement of the variety population. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. [Transfer of Care Innovations from the Hamburg Network for Mental Health to other Health Regions].

    PubMed

    Tokar, Oksana; Dörbecker, Regine; Böhmann, Tilo; Härter, Martin

    2015-07-01

    The goal of this paper is to present the research conducted for systemizing network elements and analyzing their interconnection that emerged during the establishment and functioning of health care innovation project of psychenet - the Hamburg Network for Mental Health.Semi-structured manual-based face-to-face interviews with project researchers and leaders were conducted. The gathered data was validated and updated several times during the project duration. The results include a systematic description of 186 network elements developed during the overall project and respective subprojects. The elements were consolidated in a web-based database and integrated into the psychenet.de public website. A clustering of elements was conducted and modules of elements were generated based on the interconnection between the related elements.The systematic description of network elements as well as determination of their interconnection and dependency can play an important role in understanding the emergence and functioning of integrated mental health networks. The innovative medical networks prove to be complex service systems and urge for a grounded application of integration techniques in order to be successfully transferred and adopted in other regions. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Megninia ginglymura feather mite infestation in a Hamburg poultry flock in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Van Poucke, Stefaan; Creighton, Robin; Baker, Anne S

    2016-04-01

    A flock of rare breed poultry was heavily infested with small white mites. Although apparently not harming the birds, the mites were identified in order to access data on veterinary/medical significance and to decide upon appropriate treatment. To determine the identity of the mites, assess their potential impact on the host birds and to apply a chemical treatment regime. Twelve, 5-month-old Hamburg large fowl kept on a UK farm owned by the second author. They were housed together on shavings in an indoor pen with a grass outdoor run. All were hatched on the farm and never left it. Mites were identified using taxonomic identification keys and morphological descriptions. Nine birds were treated topically with 0.25% fipronil at 8 mL/kg on one occasion, while three birds were separated and left untreated as a control. The infesting species was the feather mite Megninia ginglymura. Treated birds were mite-free after three weeks, whereas untreated ones were still heavily infested. This is the first published report of such a heavy infestation of M. ginglymura in poultry in the UK and the first time topical fipronil has been used to eradicate these mites. The case is highlighted because, although asymptomatic in this instance, such infestations may be injurious to birds in different rearing regimes. © 2016 ESVD and ACVD.

  13. [Escherichia coli O157:H7 detection in fresh ground beef and hamburgers].

    PubMed

    Marzocca, M A; Marucci, P L; Sica, M G; Alvarez, E E

    2006-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 is an emergent pathogen associated with food transmitted diseases. In 1982, Escherichia coli O157:H7 was for the first time identified as the cause of two hemorrhagic colitis outbreaks in the United States. It is now well known that most cases of hemolytic uremic syndrome are caused by these bacteria. The objective of this work was to detect the microorganism in fresh ground beef and hamburgers. From April 2003 to August 2004 samples were taken at sale points of our supermarket chain, totalling 37 and 43, respectively. These samples were processed using the EC selective enrichment broth containing novobiocin, then followed by the application of an immunocapture method (TECRA E. COLI O157 IMMUNOCAPTURE ECOICM 20), and later isolation in MacConkey sorbitol agar with cefixime and potassium tellurite, in a chromogenic medium. The suspected strains were genotypically characterized by PCR detection of the stx1, stx2, eaeA, and EHEC-hlyA genes, and by a colony blot hybridization assay. Serotyping, antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, and production of Stx by a specific cytotoxicity assay on Vero cells were also determined. E coli O157:H7 was isolated in only one fresh ground beef sample (2,7%), identified as gene eae (+)/ stx2/EHEC-hlyA.

  14. EUV Hartmann sensor for wavefront measurements at the Free-electron LASer in Hamburg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flöter, Bernhard; Juranić, Pavle; Kapitzki, Svea; Keitel, Barbara; Mann, Klaus; Plönjes, Elke; Schäfer, Bernd; Tiedtke, Kai

    2010-08-01

    A compact, self-supporting Hartmann wavefront sensor was developed for the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray range. The device is adapted to the characteristics of the Free-electron LASer in Hamburg (FLASH). It operates in a wavelength range from 6 to 30 nm with the capability to measure the wavefront quality of individual free-electron laser (FEL) pulses for beam characterization as well as for beamline alignment and monitoring behind user experiments. We report on online-Hartmann wavefront measurements at beamline BL2 with λ13.5 nm/90 accuracy for wavefront rms (wrms). The results were used to align the ellipsoidal focusing mirror at the beamline, decreasing the residual root mean square (rms) wavefront aberrations by more than a factor of 3 to 2.6 nm. The spot size of 31 μm (x) and 27 μm (y) full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) as well as other beam parameters evaluated from wavefront and intensity data are consistent with independent profile measurements in the focal region, employing both a high-resolution EUV camera and poly(methyl metacrylate) (PMMA) imprints.

  15. [Home treatment--a treatment model of integrated care in Hamburg].

    PubMed

    Schöttle, Daniel; Ruppelt, Friederike; Karow, Anne; Lambert, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Treatment models like "Crisis Resolution and Hometreatment (CRHT)" or "Assertive Community Treatment" (ACT), were found to be effective, enhancing the qualitative level of treatment for patients with severe mental disorders. In Germany, these are implemented only sporadically until today, often as part of a cross-sectoral Integrated Care (IC) treatment system. We will present the implementation of an "Assertive Community Treatment" embedded into an IC-treatment model in Hamburg and discuss the 3-year-outcomes. The IC-treatment model has been designed for severe mentally ill patients with psychotic disorders. Since May 2007 the model is financed by different health insurances as a managed-care "capitation-model" and its effectiveness gets continuously evaluated. The model proved to be effective in earlier studies were compared with standard care low rates of service disengagement were found as well as significantly improved psychopathology, psychosocial functioning, quality of life, satisfaction with care and adherence, while being cost effective. The rates of involuntary admissions declined to 10% in comparison to the years before. In 2011 the model was specified to the indication "first-episode adolescents and young adults in the age of 12-29" in a government-funded study "Integrated Care in Early Psychosis, ICEP Study". In this study an interdisciplinary team of child, adolescent and adult psychiatrists was implemented and since 2012 it is financed by the involved health insurances throughout an expansion of the §140 SGB V agreement.

  16. Performance Evaluation of the Approaches and Algorithms for Hamburg Airport Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Zhifan; Jung, Yoon; Lee, Hanbong; Schier, Sebastian; Okuniek, Nikolai; Gerdes, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    In this work, fast-time simulations have been conducted using SARDA tools at Hamburg airport by NASA and real-time simulations using CADEO and TRACC with the NLR ATM Research Simulator (NARSIM) by DLR. The outputs are analyzed using a set of common metrics collaborated between DLR and NASA. The proposed metrics are derived from International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO)s Key Performance Areas (KPAs) in capability, efficiency, predictability and environment, and adapted to simulation studies. The results are examined to explore and compare the merits and shortcomings of the two approaches using the common performance metrics. Particular attention is paid to the concept of the close-loop, trajectory-based taxi as well as the application of US concept to the European airport. Both teams consider the trajectory-based surface operation concept a critical technology advance in not only addressing the current surface traffic management problems, but also having potential application in unmanned vehicle maneuver on airport surface, such as autonomous towing or TaxiBot [6][7] and even Remote Piloted Aircraft (RPA). Based on this work, a future integration of TRACC and SOSS is described aiming at bringing conflict-free trajectory-based operation concept to US airport.

  17. Performance Evaluation of the Approaches and Algorithms for Hamburg Airport Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Zhifan; Okuniek, Nikolai; Gerdes, Ingrid; Schier, Sebastian; Lee, Hanbong; Jung, Yoon

    2016-01-01

    The German Aerospace Center (DLR) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) have been independently developing and testing their own concepts and tools for airport surface traffic management. Although these concepts and tools have been tested individually for European and US airports, they have never been compared or analyzed side-by-side. This paper presents the collaborative research devoted to the evaluation and analysis of two different surface management concepts. Hamburg Airport was used as a common test bed airport for the study. First, two independent simulations using the same traffic scenario were conducted: one by the DLR team using the Controller Assistance for Departure Optimization (CADEO) and the Taxi Routing for Aircraft: Creation and Controlling (TRACC) in a real-time simulation environment, and one by the NASA team based on the Spot and Runway Departure Advisor (SARDA) in a fast-time simulation environment. A set of common performance metrics was defined. The simulation results showed that both approaches produced operational benefits in efficiency, such as reducing taxi times, while maintaining runway throughput. Both approaches generated the gate pushback schedule to meet the runway schedule, such that the runway utilization was maximized. The conflict-free taxi guidance by TRACC helped avoid taxi conflicts and reduced taxiing stops, but the taxi benefit needed be assessed together with runway throughput to analyze the overall performance objective.

  18. Proceedings of the TOUGH Symposium 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, George J.; Doughty, Christine; Finsterle, Stefan; Sonnenthal, Eric

    2009-10-01

    Welcome to the TOUGH Symposium 2009. Within this volume are the Symposium Program for eighty-nine papers to be presented in both oral and poster formats. The full papers are available as pdfs linked from the Symposium Program posted on the TOUGH Symposium 2009 website http://esd.lbl.gov/newsandevents/events/toughsymposium09/program.html Additional updated information including any changes to the Program will also be available at the website. The papers cover a wide range of application areas and reflect the continuing trend toward increased sophistication of the TOUGH codes. A CD containing the proceedings papers will be published immediately following the Symposium and sent to all participants. As in the prior Symposium, selected papers will be invited for submission to a number of journals for inclusion in Special Issues focused on applications and developments of the TOUGH codes. These journals include, Transport in Porous Media, Geothermics, Energy Conversion and Management, Journal of Nuclear Science and Technology, and the Vadose Zone Journal.

  19. Symposium on "Space and education"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-03-01

    The purpose of the symposium is to encourage agencies, businessmen and teachers from all countries to share their ideas, programmes and strategies to meet the needs of primary and secondary school pupils and university students and provide in-service training for professionals in the space industry. States are constantly required to meet the challenge of ensuring that educational methods keep pace with a changing world. The new technologies loom ever larger in our daily lives and we must all be given an opportunity to familiarise ourselves with this aspect of the modern world and extend the boundaries of our knowledge by taking part in the rapid advances in this area. Space applications too play an increasing part in our lives, pointing the way to the future. Space can be an excellent adjunct to education, contributing to a better understanding of the world around us and providing young people with the basic knowledge that is an essential part of their training. Space activities play a key role in prompting explorers, pioneers and inventors to press forward, to provide a source of innovation at the service of mankind and improve our quality of life. The space industry and space agencies can contribute to national education by providing and maintaining programmes at all levels and using the most effective teaching methods to foster enthusiasm for space among the young and encourage them to work in that sector later. The symposium will open with an official ceremony at 9.30 on Monday 3 April, and end with a formal dinner on Wednesday 5 April. The programme will include plenary sessions and workshops, starting with four plenary sessions: two on Monday, at which representatives of space firms and agencies will speak, and two on Tuesday morning, at which teachers, students and pupils, will have their say. These will be followed by five workshops, to be held on Tuesday afternoon and Wednesday morning. Media representatives wishing to attend the Symposium are asked to

  20. Biodegradable Peptide-Silica Nanodonuts.

    PubMed

    Maggini, Laura; Travaglini, Leana; Cabrera, Ingrid; Castro-Hartmann, Pablo; De Cola, Luisa

    2016-03-07

    We report hybrid organosilica toroidal particles containing a short peptide sequence as the organic component of the hybrid systems. Once internalised in cancer cells, the presence of the peptide allows for interaction with peptidase enzymes, which attack the nanocarrier effectively triggering its structural breakdown. Moreover, these biodegradable nanovectors are characterised by high cellular uptake and exocytosis, showing great potential as biodegradable drug carriers. To demonstrate this feature, doxorubicin was employed and its delivery in HeLa cells investigated.

  1. Sixth BHD Symposium and First International Upstate Kidney Cancer Symposium: latest scientific and clinical discoveries.

    PubMed

    Bratslavsky, Gennady; Woodford, Mark R; Daneshvar, Michael; Mollapour, Mehdi

    2016-03-29

    The Sixth BHD Symposium and First International Upstate Kidney Cancer Symposium concluded in September 2015, in Syracuse, NY, USA. The program highlighted recent findings in a variety of areas, including drug development, therapeutics and surgical management of patients with BHD and multi-focal renal tumors, as well as multidisciplinary approaches for patients with localized, locally advanced and metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

  2. 34th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler)

    2000-01-01

    The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is the reporting of problems and solutions associated with the development and flight certification of new mechanisms. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) share the responsibility for organizing the AMS. Now in its 34th year, the AMS continues to be well attended, attracting participants from both the U.S. and abroad. The 34th AMS, hosted by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Maryland, was held May 10, 11 and 12, 2000. During these three days, 34 papers were presented. Topics included deployment mechanisms, bearings, actuators, pointing and optical mechanisms, Space Station mechanisms, release mechanisms, and test equipment. Hardware displays during the vendor fair gave attendees an opportunity to meet with developers of current and future mechanism components.

  3. Aarhus Regenerative Orthopaedics Symposium (AROS)

    PubMed Central

    Foldager, Casper B; Bendtsen, Michael; Berg, Lise C; Brinchmann, Jan E; Brittberg, Mats; Bunger, Cody; Canseco, Jose; Chen, Li; Christensen, Bjørn B; Colombier, Pauline; Deleuran, Bent W; Edwards, James; Elmengaard, Brian; Farr, Jack; Gatenholm, Birgitta; Gomoll, Andreas H; Hui, James H; Jakobsen, Rune B; Joergensen, Natasja L; Kassem, Moustapha; Koch, Thomas; Kold, Søren; Krogsgaard, Michael R; Lauridsen, Henrik; Le, Dang; Le Visage, Catherine; Lind, Martin; Nygaard, Jens V; Olesen, Morten L; Pedersen, Michael; Rathcke, Martin; Richardson, James B; Roberts, Sally; Rölfing, Jan H D; Sakai, Daisuke; Toh, Wei Seong; Urban, Jill; Spector, Myron

    2016-01-01

    The combination of modern interventional and preventive medicine has led to an epidemic of ageing. While this phenomenon is a positive consequence of an improved lifestyle and achievements in a society, the longer life expectancy is often accompanied by decline in quality of life due to musculoskeletal pain and disability. The Aarhus Regenerative Orthopaedics Symposium (AROS) 2015 was motivated by the need to address regenerative challenges in an ageing population by engaging clinicians, basic scientists, and engineers. In this position paper, we review our contemporary understanding of societal, patient-related, and basic science-related challenges in order to provide a reasoned roadmap for the future to deal with this compelling and urgent healthcare problem. PMID:28271925

  4. Symposium on accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    The area of accelerator mass spectrometry has expanded considerably over the past few years and established itself as an independent and interdisciplinary research field. Three years have passed since the first meeting was held at Rochester. A Symposium on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry was held at Argonne on May 11-13, 1981. In attendance were 96 scientists of whom 26 were from outside the United States. The present proceedings document the program and excitement of the field. Papers are arranged according to the original program. A few papers not presented at the meeting have been added to complete the information on the status of accelerator mass spectrometry. Individual papers were prepared separately for the data base.

  5. NASA Space Sciences Symposium-1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The primary objective of the symposium was to motivate American Indians and other minority youths and women to select science and engineering as viable career choices, thereby making them available to the technical work force. Other objectives were: (1) to determine how aerospace technology careers and aerospace activities can be made more relevant to minorities and women; (2) to provide an opportunity for key NASA officials to interact with teachers and counselors of the participating schools; (3) to stimulate a greater interest among American Indian organizations and students in NASA's research and development programs; (4) to help NASA's efforts in the recruiting of minorities and women into its work force; and (5) to provide opportunities for minority aerospace scientists and engineers to interact with the minority community, particularly with youths at the junior high school and high school levels.

  6. Proceedings: 1987 Symposium on Chemistry in High-Temperature Water

    SciTech Connect

    1990-03-01

    This report summarizes each symposium session and includes complete papers or abstracts. Attracting an international audience, the symposium created the opportunity for presentations and discussions on the latest laboratory and field developments.

  7. 77 FR 21785 - Medical Countermeasures Initiative Regulatory Science Symposium

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Medical Countermeasures Initiative Regulatory Science... Administration (FDA) is announcing the following meeting: Medical Countermeasures Initiative Regulatory Science Symposium. The symposium is intended to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas for medical countermeasure...

  8. Biodegradation of nitroaromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Spain, J C

    1995-01-01

    Nitroaromatic compounds are released into the biosphere almost exclusively from anthropogenic sources. Some compounds are produced by incomplete combustion of fossil fuels; others are used as synthetic intermediates, dyes, pesticides, and explosives. Recent research revealed a number of microbial systems capable of transforming or biodegrading nitroaromatic compounds. Anaerobic bacteria can reduce the nitro group via nitroso and hydroxylamino intermediates to the corresponding amines. Isolates of Desulfovibrio spp. can use nitroaromatic compounds as their source of nitrogen. They can also reduce 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene to 2,4,6-triaminotoluene. Several strains of Clostridium can catalyze a similar reduction and also seem to be able to degrade the molecule to small aliphatic acids. Anaerobic systems have been demonstrated to destroy munitions and pesticides in soil. Fungi can extensively degrade or mineralize a variety of nitroaromatic compounds. For example, Phanerochaete chrysosporium mineralizes 2,4-dinitrotoluene and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene and shows promise as the basis for bioremediation strategies. The anaerobic bacteria and the fungi mentioned above mostly transform nitroaromatic compounds via fortuitous reactions. In contrast, a number of nitroaromatic compounds can serve as growth substrates for aerobic bacteria. Removal or productive metabolism of nitro groups can be accomplished by four different strategies. (a) Some bacteria can reduce the aromatic ring of dinitro and trinitro compounds by the addition of a hydride ion to form a hydride-Meisenheimer complex, which subsequently rearomatizes with the elimination of nitrite. (b) Monooxygenase enzymes can add a single oxygen atom and eliminate the nitro group from nitrophenols. (c) Dioxygenase enzymes can insert two hydroxyl groups into the aromatic ring and precipitate the spontaneous elimination of the nitro group from a variety of nitroaromatic compounds. (d) Reduction of the nitro group to the corresponding

  9. Biodegradation of Polyethoxylated Nonylphenols

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Yassellis; Medina, Luis; Borusiak, Margarita; Ramos, Nairalith; Pinto, Gilberto; Valbuena, Oscar

    2013-01-01

    Polyethoxylated nonylphenols, with different ethoxylation degrees (NPEOx), are incorporated into many commercial and industrial products such as detergents, domestic disinfectants, emulsifiers, cosmetics, and pesticides. However, the toxic effects exerted by their degradation products, which are persistent in natural environments, have been demonstrated in several animal and invertebrate aquatic species. Therefore, it seems appropriate to look for indigenous bacteria capable of degrading native NPEOx and its derivatives. In this paper, the isolation of five bacterial strains, capable of using NPEO15, as unique carbon source, is described. The most efficient NPEO15 degrader bacterial strains were identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens (strain Yas2) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (strain Yas1). Maximal growth rates were reached at pH 8, 27°C in a 5% NPEO15 medium. The NPEO15 degradation extension, followed by viscometry assays, reached 65% after 54.5 h and 134 h incubation times, while the COD values decreased by 95% and 85% after 24 h for the Yas1 and Yas2 systems, respectively. The BOD was reduced by 99% and 99.9% levels in 24 h and 48 h incubations. The viscosity data indicated that the NPEO15 biodegradation by Yas2 follows first-order kinetics. Kinetic rate constant (k) and half life time (τ) for this biotransformation were estimated to be 0.0072 h−1 and 96.3 h, respectively. PMID:23936727

  10. Literacy on Our Minds: A Student-Inspired Symposium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albers, Peggy; Cowan, Kay

    2006-01-01

    In the context of an imagined symposium, this article addresses the literacy practices of elementary students ranging from first through sixth grade. The arguments the students make throughout the symposium, as well as the practices they relate, are drawn from arts-based literacy research conducted by the two authors. The imagined symposium begins…

  11. Proceedings of the fifth annual forest inventory and analysis symposium

    Treesearch

    Ronald E. McRoberts; Gregory A. Reams; Paul C. Van Deusen; William H., eds. McWilliams

    2005-01-01

    The Fifth Annual Forest Inventory and Analysis Symposium was held in New Orleans, Louisiana, the second consecutive year at this location. Given the positive response to the 2002 symposium in New Orleans, we decided to return in 2003. Each year of this symposium series the range of presentations has increased; 2003 was no exception, with several presentations related...

  12. Biodegradation of sorbed chemicals in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Scow, K.M.; Fan, S.; Johnson, C.; Ma, G.M.

    1995-06-01

    Rates of biodegradation of sorbed chemicals are usually lower in soil than in aqueous systems, in part because sorption reduces the availability of the chemical to microorganisms. Biodegradation, sorption, and diffusion occur simultaneously and are tightly coupled. In soil, the rate of biodegradation is a function of a chemical`s diffusion coefficient, sorption partition coefficient, the distance it must diffuse from the site of sorption to microbial populations that can degrade it, and its biodegradation rate constant. A model (DSB model) was developed that describes biodegradation of chemicals limited in the availability by sorption and diffusion. Different kinetics expressions describe biodegradation depending on whether the reaction is controlled by mass transfer (diffusion and sorption) or the intrinsic biodegradation rate, and whether biodegradation begins during or after the majority of sorption has occurred. We tested the hypothesis that there is a direct relationship between how strongly a chemical is sorbed and the chemical`s biodegradation rate. In six soils with different organic carbon contents, there was no relationship between the extent or rate of biodegradation and the sorption partition coefficient for phenanthrene. Aging of phenanthrene residues in soil led to a substantial reduction in the rate of biodegradation compared to biodegradation rates of recently added phenanthrene. Considerable research has focused on identification and development of techniques for enhancing in situ biodegradation of sorbed chemicals. Development of such techniques, especially those involving inoculation with microbial strains, should consider physical mass transfer limitations and potential decreases in bioavailability over time. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. An analysis of DA white dwarfs from the Hamburg Quasar Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homeier, D.; Koester, D.; Hagen, H.-J.; Jordan, S.; Heber, U.; Engels, D.; Reimers, D.; Dreizler, S.

    1998-10-01

    Follow-up spectroscopy of several hundred hot stars detected by the Hamburg Quasar Survey (HQS) has been carried out between 1989 and 1996. We present the analysis of 80 DA white dwarfs using model atmospheres and theoretical cooling tracks to derive the atmospheric parameters T_eff and log g, masses and absolute magnitudes. The HQS turned out to be sensitive to the detection of hydrogen-rich white dwarfs in a wide temperature range, from 10 000 K upwards. Star counts within four HQS fields for magnitudes B<= 16fm 4 exceed those from the Palomar Green survey by about 50%. The more recent observation campaigns emphasized the detection of very hot degenerates, yielding a large fraction of DA stars with T_eff > 50 000 K compared to other surveys. The mean mass of our DA sample is M=0.61{M}_{\\odot}, with three massive DA stars exceeding 1{M}_{\\odot} and three DA stars with masses significantly below the assummed lower mass limit for single white dwarf evolution of 0.45{M}_{\\odot}. Among the cool DA stars, thirteen are potential ZZ Ceti candidates because their effective temperatures lie close to the instability strip. Based on observations collected at the German-Spanish Astronomical Center (DSAZ), Calar Alto, operated by the Max-Plank-Institut für Astronomie Heidelberg jointly with the Spanish National Commission for Astronomy; with the International Ultraviolet Explorer satellite (IUE) collected at Villafranca, Spain, and with the ROSAT X-ray telescope.

  14. Walter Baade, Dynamical Astronomer at Goettingen, Hamburg, Mount Wilson, and Palomar Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterbrock, D. E.

    2002-09-01

    Walter Baade, famous for his astrophysical discoveries, also made many contributions in dynamical astronomy. His thesis at Goettingen University on the spectroscopic orbit of β Lyrae was based on spectrograms his teacher, Johannes Hartmann, had taken at Potsdam years earlier. Immediately on receiving his Ph.D. in 1919, Baade joined the Hamburg Bergedorf Observatory staff, and soon was the sole observer with its 1-m reflector, the largest telescope in Europe. Under its director, Richard Schorr, Baade's main job at first was to obtain direct plates of asteroids and comets for positional measurements. As an incidental part of this observing he discovered many asteroids, eight of which were eventually named, including 966 Muschi (his wife's nickname), 944 Hidalgo, with large orbital semi-major axis, eccentricity, and inclination, and 1036 Ganymed, whose orbit extends inside that of Mars. Baade also discovered a new comet, 1922 II. During the close approach of Eros in 1930 Baade measured its period of light variation, its color, and its mean magnitude. After Pluto was discovered in 1930 he measured its position assiduously, following it as far from opposition as he could. In 1931 Baade moved to Mount Wilson, where he concentrated almost entirely on globular-cluster, supernova, and galaxy research. He saw many asteroid trails on his long exposures but did not report them except for one, 7448 (still not named), which showed a very long trail on a 3-hr exposure of the Crab nebula. At Palomar, using the 48-in Schmidt soon after it went into operation, he dicovered and reported 1566 Icarus, with a very small perihelion distance, and later his second comet, 1955 VI.

  15. Lead exposure by drinking water: an epidemiologial study in Hamburg, Germany.

    PubMed

    Fertmann, Regina; Hentschel, Stefan; Dengler, Dorothee; Janssen, Ulrich; Lommel, Annette

    2004-07-01

    Study objective was to investigate the extent of lead exposure via tap water in Hamburg and the relevance of preventive strategies. Two hundred and forty-eight non-smoking young women participated in the cross-sectional study program and 52 women completed the intervention program. In the cross-sectional study program most women (N = 178) didn't know anything about the material of the plumbing system at their homes. Participants with lead in the tap water above the detection limit of 5 microg/l (N = 142) showed significantly higher blood lead levels (median 31 microg/l) compared to those with no detectable lead in the tap water (N = 106; median blood lead 24 microg/l, p < = 0.001). There is a close correlation between the average lead concentration in the tap water and blood lead concentrations (N = 142 value pairs, Spearman's rho 0.43, p < = 0.0001). In the intervention program, the women were asked to minimize exposure by flushing water or to exclude it by consuming bottled water. Intervention lowered blood lead-level significantly (median decrease of 11 microg/l, p < = 0.001). "Minimizers" could lower their blood lead levels by about 21% of the initial value, "excluders" by about 37% (ns, p < = 0.17). The majority judged neither minimizing nor excluding tap water as practicable health preventive behaviour pattern in the long run. Lead in tap water stands for an avoidable surplus exposure. These results underline the relevance of health care preventive measures for the most sensitive groups.

  16. Dioxin/POPs legacy of pesticide production in Hamburg: part 1--securing of the production area.

    PubMed

    Weber, Roland; Varbelow, Hans Gerhard

    2013-04-01

    α-Hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), β-HCH, and γ-HCH (lindane) were recently included as new persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the Stockholm Convention. Therefore, the chemicals need to be globally addressed, including the disposal of historic wastes. At most sites, the approximately 85% of HCH waste isomers were dumped. At a former lindane factory in Hamburg and some other factories the HCH, waste was recycled producing residues with high polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran (PCDD/PCDF) levels. The soil and ground water under the former pesticide factory was/is highly contaminated with HCH (260 tons), chlorobenzenes (550 tons), and PCDD/PCDF (6 kg toxic equivalents (TEQ)). This contamination did not result from disposal operations but from spillages and leakages during the 30 years of the factory's production history. A containment wall has been constructed around the production area to prevent the dispersal of the pollutants. The ground water is managed by a pump and treat system. Over the last 15 years, approximately 10-30 tons of this pollution reservoir has been pumped and incinerated. For the contaminated production buildings, specific assessment and demolition technologies have been applied. In addition to their HCH waste isomer deposition, former lindane/HCH productions need to be assessed for possible recycling practice of HCH and related PCDD/PCDF contamination of the production area and buildings. Since such recycling activities have taken place at several factories in different countries, the experience of assessment and management of the described production area and contaminated buildings could be valuable. Such assessment could be addressed within the frame of the Stockholm Convention.

  17. Monitoring the Soil Water Availability of Young Urban Trees in Hamburg, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titel, Selina; Gröngröft, Alexander; Eschenbach, Annette

    2017-04-01

    In large cities numerous trees have to be planted each year to replace died off or cut down trees or for greening of constructed roads and newly built quarters. The typical age of planted trees is between five and fifteen years. Often the planting takes place in special planting pits to stimulate the tree growth under the restricted urban conditions. Consequently, trees are surrounded by different soil substrates: the soil from the nursery in the root ball, the special planting pit substrate and the surrounding urban soil which is often anthropogenic influenced. Being relocated in the city, trees have to cope with the warmer urban climate, the soil sealing and compaction and the low water storage capacity of the substrate. All factors together increase the probability of dry phases for roadside trees. The aim of this study is to monitor the soil water availability at sites of planted roadside trees during the first years after planting. Therefore, a measuring design was developed, which works automatically and takes the complex below ground structure of the soil into account. This approach consists of 13 soil water tension sensors inside and outside of each planting pit up to one meter depth connected to a data logger. The monitoring devices will finally be installed at 20 roadside trees (amongst others Quercus cerris, Quercus robur, Acer platanoides 'Fairview') in Hamburg, Germany, to identify phases of drought stress. The young trees were mainly planted in spring 2016. Data of the first year of measurements show, that the water tension varied between the different soil substrates and the depth. In the first year of tree growth in the city, soil in the tree root ball became significantly drier than the surrounding soil material. In late summer 2016 the water tension in the topsoil had the potential to cause drought stress below some trees.

  18. Childhood Leukemia in the Vicinity of the Geesthacht Nuclear Establishments near Hamburg, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Terschueren, Claudia; Richardson, David B.

    2007-01-01

    Background During 1990–1991 a childhood leukemia cluster was observed in the sparsely populated region surrounding two nuclear establishments southeast of Hamburg, Germany. Since then, several new cases have been reported. Recently a possible accidental release of radionuclides in 1986 was hypothesized. Objective The objective of this study was to analyze the childhood leukemia incidence in this area since 1990. Methods All incident cases (< 15 years of age) were ascertained during 1990–2005 within a 5-km radius of the Krümmel nuclear power plant. We derived standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) using county and national leukemia incidence rates as referents. We stratified analyses by calendar period and attained age, and by subdividing the study region into areas north versus south of the Elbe river. Results Fourteen cases were ascertained in the study area, whereas 4.0 were expected based on national referent rates [1990–2005: SIR = 3.5; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.9–5.9]. The excess was not confined to the early 1990s; for the more recent time period 1999–2005, the SIR is still elevated (SIR = 2.7; 95% CI, 0.9–6.2). SIRs of greatest magnitude were observed for children 0–4 years of age (SIR = 4.9; 95% CI, 2.4–9.0) and for residents south of the Elbe (SIR = 7.5; 95% CI, 2.8–16.4). Conclusions The incidence in this region is significantly higher than the childhood leukemia incidence for Germany as a whole. To date, no unique hazards have been identified in this population. The fact that the elevated rates have persisted in this community for > 15 years warrants further investigation. PMID:17589605

  19. [Characteristics of children and adolescents with gender dysphoria referred to the Hamburg Gender Identity Clinic].

    PubMed

    Becker, Inga; Gjergji-Lama, Voltisa; Romer, Georg; Möller, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    Given the increasing demand for counselling in gender dysphoria in childhood in Germany, there is a definite need for empirical data on characteristics and developmental trajectories of this clinical group. This study aimed to provide a first overview by assessing demographic characteristics and developmental trajectories of a group of gender variant boys and girls referred to the specialised Gender Identity Clinic in Hamburg. Data were extracted from medical charts, transcribed and analysed using qualitative content analysis methods. Categories were set up by inductive-deductive reasoning based on the patients' parents' and clinicians' information in the files. Between 2006 and 2010, 45 gender variant children and adolescents were seen by clinicians; 88.9% (n = 40) of these were diagnosed with gender identity disorder (ICD-10). Within this group, the referral rates for girls were higher than for boys (1:1.5). Gender dysphoric girls were on average older than the boys and a higher percentage of girls was referred to the clinic at the beginning of adolescence (> 12 years of age). At the same time, more girls reported an early onset age. More girls made statements about their (same-sex) sexual orientation during adolescence and wishes for gender confirming medical interventions. More girls than boys revealed self-mutilation in the past or present as well as suicidal thoughts and/or attempts. Results indicate that the presentation of clinically referred gender dysphoric girls differs from the characteristics boys present in Germany; especially with respect to the most salient age differences. Therefore, these two groups require different awareness and individual treatment approaches.

  20. Bright Metal-Poor Stars from the Hamburg/ESO Survey. II. A Chemodynamical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beers, Timothy C.; Placco, Vinicius M.; Carollo, Daniela; Rossi, Silvia; Lee, Young Sun; Frebel, Anna; Norris, John E.; Dietz, Sarah; Masseron, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    We obtain estimates of stellar atmospheric parameters for a previously published sample of 1777 relatively bright (9< B< 14) metal-poor candidates from the Hamburg/ESO Survey. The original Frebel et al. analysis of these stars was able to derive estimates of [Fe/H] and [C/Fe] only for a subset of the sample, due to limitations in the methodology then available. A new spectroscopic analysis pipeline has been used to obtain estimates of {T}{eff}, {log} g, [Fe/H], and [C/Fe] for almost the entire data set. This sample is very local—about 90% of the stars are located within 0.5 kpc of the Sun. We consider the chemodynamical properties of these stars in concert with a similarly local sample of stars from a recent analysis of the Bidelman and MacConnell “weak metal” candidates by Beers et al. We use this combined sample to identify possible members of the halo stream of stars suggested by Helmi et al. and Chiba & Beers, as well as stars that may be associated with stripped debris from the putative parent dwarf of the globular cluster Omega Centauri, suggested to exist by previous authors. We identify a clear increase in the cumulative frequency of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars with declining metallicity, as well as an increase in the fraction of CEMP stars with distance from the Galactic plane, consistent with previous results. We also identify a relatively large number of CEMP stars with kinematics consistent with the metal-weak thick-disk population, with possible implications for its origin.

  1. Effects of the Biodegradation on Biodegradable Polymer Blends and Polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, R. C. T.; Franchetti, S. M. M.; Agnelli, J. A. M.; Mattoso, L. H. C.

    2008-08-01

    The large use of plastics in the world generates a large amount of waste which persists around 200 years in the environment. To minimize this effect is important to search some new polymer materials: the blends of biodegradable polymers with synthetic polymers. It is a large area that needs an intensive research to investigate the blends properties and its behavior face to the different treatments to aim at the biodegradation. The blends used in this work are: some biodegradable polymers such as: poly(hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) and poly(ɛ-polycaprolactone) (PCL) with a synthetic polymer, polypropylene (PP), in lower concentration. These blends were prepared using an internal mixer (Torque Rheometer), and pressed. These films were submitted to fungus biotreatment. The films analyses will be carried out by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), UV-Vis absorption (UV-Vis), Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM), DSC and TGA.

  2. Toward human organ printing: Charleston Bioprinting Symposium.

    PubMed

    Mironov, Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    The First Annual Charleston Bioprinting Symposium was organized by the Bioprinting Research Center of the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) and convened July 21, 2006, in Charleston, South Carolina. In broad terms, bioprinting is the application of rapid prototyping technology to the biomedical field. More specifically, it is defined as the layer by layer deposition of biologically relevant material. The 2006 Symposium included four sessions: Computer-aided design and Bioprinting, Bioprinting Technologies; Hydrogel for Bioprinting and, finally, a special session devoted to ongoing research projects at the MUSC Bioprinting Research Center. The Symposium highlight was the presentation of the multidisciplinary Charleston Bioengineered Kidney Project. This symposium demonstrated that bioprinting or robotic biofabrication is one of the most exciting and fast-emerging branches in the tissue engineering field. Robotic biofabrication will eventually lead to industrial production of living human organs suitable for clinical transplantation. The symposium demonstrated that although there are still many technological challenges, organ printing is a rapidly evolving feasible technology.

  3. Developments in metallic biodegradable stents.

    PubMed

    Hermawan, H; Dubé, D; Mantovani, D

    2010-05-01

    Interest in metallic degradable biomaterials research has been growing in the last decade. Both scientific journals and patent databases record a high increase in publications in this area. Biomedical implants with temporary function, such as coronary stents, are the targeted applications for this novel class of biomaterials. It is expected that stents made of degradable biomaterials, named biodegradable stents, will provide a temporary opening into a narrowed arterial vessel until the vessel remodels and will progressively disappear thereafter. Biodegradable stents made of metal have recently been progressed into preclinical tests in humans after their first introduction in early 2000s. By referring to patents and journal publications, this paper reviews the developments in biodegradable stents, with emphasis on those made of metals, starting from the first design ideas to validation testing.

  4. Petroleum biodegradation in marine environments.

    PubMed

    Harayama, S; Kishira, H; Kasai, Y; Shutsubo, K

    1999-08-01

    Petroleum-based products are the major source of energy for industry and daily life. Petroleum is also the raw material for many chemical products such as plastics, paints, and cosmetics. The transport of petroleum across the world is frequent, and the amounts of petroleum stocks in developed countries are enormous. Consequently, the potential for oil spills is significant, and research on the fate of petroleum in a marine environment is important to evaluate the environmental threat of oil spills, and to develop biotechnology to cope with them. Crude oil is constituted from thousands of components which are separated into saturates, aromatics, resins and asphaltenes. Upon discharge into the sea, crude oil is subjected to weathering, the process caused by the combined effects of physical, chemical and biological modification. Saturates, especially those of smaller molecular weight, are readily biodegraded in marine environments. Aromatics with one, two or three aromatic rings are also efficiently biodegraded; however, those with four or more aromatic ring are quite resistant to biodegradation. The asphaltene and resin fractions contain higher molecular weight compounds whose chemical structures have not yet been resolved. The biodegradability of these compounds is not yet known. It is known that the concentrations of available nitrogen and phosphorus in seawater limit the growth and activities of hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms in a marine environment. In other words, the addition of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizers to an oil-contaminated marine environment can stimulate the biodegradation of spilled oil. This notion was confirmed in the large-scale operation for bioremediation after the oil spill from the Exxon Valdez in Alaska. Many microorganisms capable of degrading petroleum components have been isolated. However, few of them seem to be important for petroleum biodegradation in natural environments. One group of bacteria belonging to the genus

  5. Formulation and evaluation on human skin of a water-in-oil emulsion containing Muscat hamburg black grape seed extract.

    PubMed

    Sharif, A; Akhtar, N; Khan, M S; Menaa, A; Menaa, B; Khan, B A; Menaa, F

    2015-04-01

    Vitis vinifera 'muscat hamburg' (Vitaceae) is a blue-black grape variety commonly found in Pakistan. It has been consumed and used in traditional medicine for centuries. Compared to other grapes, M. hamburg records one of the greatest amount of polyphenols and displays potent antioxidant activities, which make it a great candidate for its exploitation in the development of stable cream emulsions destined to improve the skin appearance. Evaluate the effects of stable water-in-oil (W/O) emulsion containing 2% M. hamburg grape seed extract ('formulation') on human cheek skin in comparison with the placebo ('base'). An occlusive patch test, containing either the formulation or the base, was topically tested for 8 weeks during a winter period in young adult and healthy Pakistani male volunteers. The subjects were instructed to use twice a day the base and the formulation on their right and left cheek skin, respectively. Non-invasive measurements on these skin areas were carried out every week to assess any effects produced on melanin, elasticity and sebum. Skin compatibility assay (Burchard test) was used to report any potential skin reactivity. ANOVA, paired sample t-test and LSD test were applied to determine the statistical data significance. Significant differences (P ≤ 0.05) were found between the placebo and the formulation in terms of their respective skin effects elicited on melanin, elasticity and sebum content. Nevertheless, placebo and formulation exerted similar effects on skin erythema and moisture contents. Importantly, no skin hypersensitivity cases were reported during the whole course of the study. The developed grape-based cream could be efficiently and safely applied to improve a number of skin conditions (e.g. hyper-pigmentation, premature ageing, acne). © 2014 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  6. A Haptics Symposium Retrospective: 20 Years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colgate, J. Edward; Adelstein, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    The very first "Haptics Symposium" actually went by the name "Issues in the Development of Kinesthetic Displays of Teleoperation and Virtual environments." The word "Haptic" didn't make it into the name until the next year. Not only was the most important word absent but so were RFPs, journals and commercial markets. And yet, as we prepare for the 2012 symposium, haptics is a thriving and amazingly diverse field of endeavor. In this talk we'll reflect on the origins of this field and on its evolution over the past twenty years, as well as the evolution of the Haptics Symposium itself. We hope to share with you some of the excitement we've felt along the way, and that we continue to feel as we look toward the future of our field.

  7. IDEAL Symposium on the East African Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, T. C.; Kelts, K.; Lehman, J. T.; Wuest, A.

    A vast array of interdisciplinary problems presented by the African Great Lakes were highlighted at the International Symposium on the Limnology, Climatology and Paleoclimatology of the East African Lakes, organized by the International Decade for the East African Lakes (IDEAL) February 17-21 in Jinja, Uganda. Approximately 125 scientists attended from North America, Europe, Africa, and New Zealand. Jinja is located on the northern shore of Lake Victoria at the head-waters of the Nile and is the site of the host institution for the symposium, the Uganda Freshwater Fisheries Research Organization (UFFRO). The conveners of the symposium were Tom Johnson of Duke University, George Kitaka of UNESCO-ROSTA, and Eric Odada of the University of Nairobi.

  8. International Equine Ophthalmology Consortium (IEOC) Symposium.

    PubMed

    Gilger, B C; Brooks, D E

    2009-07-01

    This first IEOC symposium met its goals of gathering a group of leading equine ophthalmology clinicians and researchers to identify the challenges of the field. To facilitate collaboration, notes from round-table discussions, including the ideas and plans that were discussed are being complied and will be distributed to the attendees. Development of an IEOC membership organisation and website was discussed and supported by the group in an effort further to advance the science of equine ophthalmology. To present results from the collaborations made at this first IEOC meeting, an IEOC mini-symposium will be held at the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists Annual Meeting in Chicago Illinois, on 6th November 2009. The second annual IEOC symposium will be held in Vienna, Austria on 4th and 5th June 2010.

  9. Selected Rapporteur Summaries from the XX World Congress of Psychiatric Genetics, Hamburg, Germany, October 14-18, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Anderson-Schmidt, Heike; Beltcheva, Olga; Brandon, Mariko D; Byrne, Enda M; Diehl, Eric J; Duncan, Laramie; Gonzalez, Suzanne D; Hannon, Eilis; Kantojärvi, Katri; Karagiannidis, Iordanis; Kos, Mark Z; Kotyuk, Eszter; Laufer, Benjamin I; Mantha, Katarzyna; McGregor, Nathaniel W; Meier, Sandra; Nieratschker, Vanessa; Spiers, Helen; Squassina, Alessio; Thakur, Geeta A; Tiwari, Yash; Viswanath, Biju; Way, Michael J; Wong, Cybele CP; O'Shea, Anne; DeLisi, Lynn E

    2014-01-01

    The XXth World Congress of Psychiatric Genetics (WCPG), sponsored by The International Society of Psychiatric Genetics (ISPG) took place in Hamburg, Germany on October 14-18, 2012. Approximately 600 participants gathered to discuss the latest findings in this rapidly advancing field. The following report was written by student travel awardees. Each was assigned sessions as rapporteurs. This manuscript represents topics covered in most, but not all, oral presentations during the conference, and some of the major notable new findings reported at this 2012 WCPG. PMID:23341144

  10. An updated list of type material of Ephemeroptera Hyatt & Arms, 1890, deposited at the Zoological Museum of Hamburg (ZMH)

    PubMed Central

    Sartori, Michel; Kubiak, Martin; Rajaei, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The type specimens of Ephemeroptera (Insecta) housed at the Zoological Museum of Hamburg (ZMH) are compiled in this document. The current nomenclature of all species is given. In total, Ephemeroptera type material of ZMH encompasses 161 species. Fifty-one holotypes and five lectotypes are present. Forty-one species are represented by syntypes, 85 by paratypes and five by paralectotypes. Material of two species (Cinygma asiaticum Ulmer, 1924 and Pseudocloeon klapaleki Müller-Liebenau, 1982) is missing. The present catalogue is an updated version of Weidner (1964a). PMID:27551230

  11. An updated list of type material of Ephemeroptera Hyatt & Arms, 1890, deposited at the Zoological Museum of Hamburg (ZMH).

    PubMed

    Sartori, Michel; Kubiak, Martin; Rajaei, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    The type specimens of Ephemeroptera (Insecta) housed at the Zoological Museum of Hamburg (ZMH) are compiled in this document. The current nomenclature of all species is given. In total, Ephemeroptera type material of ZMH encompasses 161 species. Fifty-one holotypes and five lectotypes are present. Forty-one species are represented by syntypes, 85 by paratypes and five by paralectotypes. Material of two species (Cinygma asiaticum Ulmer, 1924 and Pseudocloeon klapaleki Müller-Liebenau, 1982) is missing. The present catalogue is an updated version of Weidner (1964a).

  12. Nonpetroleum vehicular fuels: symposium papers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    A three day symposium on Nonpetroleum Vehicular Fuels was held in Arlington, Virginia, February 11 to 13, 1980. The central theme of the conference was the exchange of information on the successful use of nonpetroleum vehicular fuels and the identification of problems which might hinder the acceptance of these alternative fuels. Presentations and discussions included: current domestic and foreign activities to develop nonconventional vehicular energy; research and development efforts to provide new engines, vehicles and on-board hardware for economical, safe, and environmentally acceptable operation; programs to produce, market, and utilize such fuels; institutional constraints such as tax laws, environmental and safety regulations which may slow acceptance; programs needed to speed growth of the nongasoline alternative and increase customer acceptance; and commercial applications. In attendance were experts on fuels, engines, electric vehicles, energy delivery systems, government regulations, and environmental regulations. The papers presented are reproduced in full in this volume. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual papers for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  13. Fourth international radiopharmaceutical dosimetry symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Schlafke-Stelson, A.T.; Watson, E.E.

    1986-04-01

    The focus of the Fourth International Radiopharmaceutical Dosimetry Symposium was to explore the impact of current developments in nuclear medicine on absorbed dose calculations. This book contains the proceedings of the meeting including the edited discussion that followed the presentations. Topics that were addressed included the dosimetry associated with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies and blood elements, ultrashort-lived radionuclides, and positron emitters. Some specific areas of discussion were variations in absorbed dose as a result of alterations in the kinetics, the influence of radioactive contaminants on dose, dose in children and in the fetus, available instrumentation and techniques for collecting the kinetic data needed for dose calculation, dosimetry requirements for the review and approval of new radiopharmaceuticals, and a comparison of the effect on the thyroid of internal versus external irradiation. New models for the urinary blader, skeleton including the active marrow, and the blood were presented. Several papers dealt with the validity of traditional ''average-organ'' dose estimates to express the dose from particulate radiation that has a short range in tissue. These problems are particularly important in the use of monoclonal antibodies and agents used to measure intracellular functions. These proceedings have been published to provide a resource volume for anyone interested in the calculation of absorbed radiation dose.

  14. 2016 AMS Mario J. Molina Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Renyi

    2016-11-29

    A named symposium to honor Dr. Mario J. Molina was held 10–14 January 2016, as part of the 96th American Meteorological Society (AMS) Annual Meeting in New Orleans, Louisiana. Dr. Molina first demonstrated that industrially produced chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) decompose in the stratosphere and release chlorine atoms, leading to catalytic ozone destruction. His research in stratospheric chemistry was instrumental to the establishment of the 1987 United Nations Montreal Protocol to ban ozone-depleting substances worldwide. Dr. Molina’s contributions to preserving the planet Earth not only save the atmospheric ozone layer, but also protect the climate by reducing the emissions of greenhouse gases. He was awarded the 1995 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his pioneering research in understanding the stratospheric ozone loss mechanism. In 2013, President Barack Obama announced Dr. Molina as a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom. The 2016 AMS Molina Symposium honored Dr. Molina’s distinguished contributions to research related to atmospheric chemistry. The symposium contained an integrated theme related to atmospheric chemistry, climate, and policy. Dr. Molina delivered a keynote speech at the Symposium. The conference included invited keynote speeches and invited and contributed oral and poster sessions, and a banquet was held on Tuesday January 12, 2016. The symposium covered all aspects of atmospheric chemistry, with topics including (1) Stratospheric chemistry, (2) Tropospheric chemistry, (3) Aerosol nucleation, growth, and transformation, (4) Aerosol properties, (5) Megacity air pollution, and (6) Atmospheric chemistry laboratory, field, and modeling studies. This DOE project supported 14 scientists, including graduate students, post docs, junior research scientists, and non-tenured assistant professors to attend this symposium.

  15. International Symposium on Advanced Materials (ISAM 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-06-01

    This proceeding is a compilation of peer reviewed papers presented at the 13th International Symposium on Advanced Materials (ISAM 2013) held from September 23-27, 2013, at Islamabad, Pakistan. In my capacity as ISAM-2013 Secretary, I feel honoured that the symposium has ended on a positive note. The ever increasing changes and intricacies that characterize modern industry necessitate a growing demand for technical information on advanced materials. ISAM and other similar forums serve to fulfill this need. The five day deliberations of ISAM 2013, consisted of 19 technical sessions and 2 poster sessions. In all, 277 papers were presented, inclusive of 80 contributory, invited and oral presentations. The symposium also hosted panel discussions led by renowned scientists and eminent researchers from foreign as well as local institutes. The ultimate aim of this proceeding is to record in writing the new findings in the field of advanced materials. I hope that the technical data available in this publication proves valuable to young scientists and researchers working in this area of science. At the same time, I wish to acknowledge Institute of Physics (IOP) Publishing UK, for accepting the research papers from ISAM-2013 for publication in the IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering. The proceeding will be available on the IOP website as an online open access document. I am profoundly thankful to the Symposium Chairman for his steadfast support and valuable guidance without which ISAM 2013 could not have been the mega event that it turned out to be. My gratitude to all our distinguished participants, session chairs/co-chairs, and reviewers for their active role in the symposium. I appreciate the entire organizing committee for the zest and ardor with which each committee fulfilled its obligations to ISAM. Last yet not the least, my thankfulness goes to all our sponsors for wilfully financing the event. Dr. Sara Qaisar Symposium Secretary Further

  16. Flight Mechanics/Estimation Theory Symposium, 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, Kathy R. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    This conference publication includes 41 papers and abstracts presented at the Flight Mechanics/Estimation Theory Symposium on May 17-19, 1994. Sponsored by the Flight Dynamics Division of Goddard Space Flight Center, this symposium featured technical papers on a wide range of issues related to orbit-attitude prediction, determination and control; attitude sensor calibration; attitude determination error analysis; attitude dynamics; and orbit decay and maneuver strategy. Government, industry, and the academic community participated in the preparation and presentation of these papers.

  17. Fifth International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P.

    2000-01-01

    In order to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension and to review recent developments in sensors, controls, superconducting magnet technology, and design/implementation practices, the Fifth International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology was held at the Radisson Hotel Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California, on December 1-3, 1999. The symposium included 18 sessions in which a total of 53 papers were presented. The technical sessions covered the areas of bearings, controls, modeling, electromagnetic launch, magnetic suspension in wind tunnels, applications flywheel energy storage, rotating machinery, vibration isolation, and maglev. A list of attendees is included in the document.

  18. Flight Mechanics/Estimation Theory Symposium 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengle, Thomas (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    This conference publication includes 28 papers and abstracts presented at the Flight Mechanics/Estimation Theory Symposium on May 10 to 11, 1988. Sponsored by the Flight Dynamics Division of Goddard Space Flight Center, this symposium features technical papers on a wide range of issue related to orbit-attitude prediction, determination and control; attitude sensor calibration; attitude determination error analysis; attitude dynamics; and orbit decay and maneuver strategy. Government, industry, and the academic community participated in the preparation and presentation of these papers.

  19. Fourth International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    In order to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension and to review recent developments in sensors, controls, superconducting magnet technology, and design/implementation practices, the Fourth International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology was held at The Nagaragawa Convention Center in Gifu, Japan, on October 30 - November 1, 1997. The symposium included 13 sessions in which a total of 35 papers were presented. The technical sessions covered the areas of maglev, controls, high critical temperature (T(sub c)) superconductivity, bearings, magnetic suspension and balance systems (MSBS), levitation, modeling, and applications. A list of attendees is included in the document.

  20. Flight Mechanics/Estimation Theory Symposium, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengle, Thomas (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    This conference publication includes 32 papers and abstracts presented at the Flight Mechanics/Estimation Theory Symposium on May 22-25, 1990. Sponsored by the Flight Dynamics Division of Goddard Space Flight Center, this symposium features technical papers on a wide range of issues related to orbit-attitude prediction, determination and control; attitude sensor calibration; attitude determination error analysis; attitude dynamics; and orbit decay and maneuver strategy. Government, industry, and the academic community participated in the preparation and presentation of these papers.

  1. Flight Mechanics/Estimation Theory Symposium, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengle, Thomas H. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This conference publication includes 40 papers and abstracts presented at the Flight Mechanics/Estimation Theory Symposium on May 5-7, 1992. Sponsored by the Flight Dynamics Division of Goddard Space Flight Center, this symposium featured technical papers on a wide range of issues related to orbit-attitude prediction, determination, and control; attitude sensor calibration; attitude determination error analysis; attitude dynamics; and orbit decay and maneuver strategy. Government, industry, and the academic community participated in the preparation and presentation of these papers.

  2. Symposium on high temperature and materials chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    This volume contains the written proceedings of the Symposium on High Temperature and Materials Chemistry held in Berkeley, California on October 24--25, 1989. The Symposium was sponsored by the Materials and Chemical Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and by the College of Chemistry of the University of California at Berkeley to discuss directions, trends, and accomplishments in the field of high temperature and materials chemistry. Its purpose was to provide a snapshot of high temperature and materials chemistry and, in so doing, to define status and directions.

  3. Third International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    In order to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension and to review recent developments in sensors, controls, superconducting magnet technology, and design/implementation practices, the Third International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology was held at the Holiday Inn Capital Plaza in Tallahassee, Florida on 13-15 Dec. 1995. The symposium included 19 sessions in which a total of 55 papers were presented. The technical sessions covered the areas of bearings, superconductivity, vibration isolation, maglev, controls, space applications, general applications, bearing/actuator design, modeling, precision applications, electromagnetic launch and hypersonic maglev, applications of superconductivity, and sensors.

  4. Parameters and Kinematics of Carbon Enhanced Metal Poor (CEMP) Stars from the Hamburg/ESO Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirupathi, Sivarani; Beers, T. C.; Lee, Y. S.; Kennedy, C.; Carollo, D.; Masseron, T.; Plez, B.; Norris, J. E.; Bessell, M.; Rossi, S.

    2007-12-01

    Several hundred CEMP stars have been selected from the Christlieb et al (2001, A&A 375, 366) catalog of carbon-rich stars, which is based on the Hamburg/ESO objective prism survey. Medium resolution (R = 2000) optical spectra were obtained for these stars covering a wavelength range of 3800-4800 A. The estimates of Teff, [Fe/H], and [C/Fe] for this sample is already available, based on application of the Rossi et al. (2005, AJ 130, 2804 ), which uses the strength of the CaII K line, the CH G-band, and J-K colors. Here we present an automated method to estimate the full set of atmospheric parameters for these data (including logg) based on synthetic spectra and photometry. For this purpose, we have generated a set of synthetic grids with carbon enhanced atmospheres with the MARCS code (Plez et al. 1992, A&A 256,551; Asplund et al. 1997, A&A 318, 521; Gustafsson et al. 2003, ASP Conf. Ser. 288, 331), which is particularly important for cool CEMP stars (for which the atmospheric structure changes with increasing carbon abundance (Masseron et al. 2006 A&A 455, 1059). More than one hundred stars of our prpogram stars have already been observed at high spectral resolution (R = 20000-25000), during the course of the HERES survey (Barklem et al. 2005, A&A 439,129; Lucatello et al. 2006 ApJ 652, 37L), which allow us to calibrate our methods. Here we describe our new methods for estimation and validation of Teff, logg, [Fe/H], [C/Fe]. We also comment on the possible origin of CEMP stars in this sample based on these derived parameters and on the inferred kinematics. TS, TCB, YSL, and CK acknowledge support from grant PHY 02-16783; Physics Frontier Center/Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA), awarded by the U.S. National Science Foundation and NSF grant AST 07-07776

  5. Biodegradable Pectin/clay Aerogels

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biodegradable, foamlike materials based on renewable pectin and sodium montmorillonite clay were fabricated through a simple, environmentally friendly freeze-drying process. Addition of multivalent cations (Ca2+ and Al3+) resulted in apparent crosslinking of the polymer, and enhancement of aerogel p...

  6. Concomitant aerobic biodegradation of benzene and thiophene

    SciTech Connect

    Dyreborg, S.; Arvin, E.; Broholm, K.

    1998-05-01

    The concomitant aerobic biodegradation of benzene and thiophene was investigated in microcosm experiments using a groundwater enrichment culture. Benzene was biodegraded within 1 d, whereas thiophene could not be biodegraded as the sole source of carbon and energy. Some interesting phenomena were observed when both benzene and thiophene were present. In most cases, removal of thiophene was observed, and the removal occurred concomitantly with the biodegradation of benzene, suggesting that benzene was used as a primary substrate in the cometabolic biodegradation of thiophene. No biodegradation of the two compounds was observed for some combinations of concentrations, suggesting that thiophene could act as an inhibitor to benzene biodegradation. However, this effect could be overcome if more benzene was added to the microcosm. Residual concentrations of benzene and thiophene were observed in some microcosms and the data indicated that the biodegradation of the two compounds stopped when a critical threshold ratio between the concentrations of thiophene and benzene was reached. This ratio varied between 10 and 20. Results from modeling the biodegradation data suggested that thiophene was cometabolized concomitantly with the biodegradation of benzene and that the biodegradation may be described by a modified model based on a traditional model with an inhibition term incorporated.

  7. [Comparability of studies of epidemiological research on aging : Results from the Longitudinal Urban Cohort Ageing Study (LUCAS) and three representative Hamburg cross-sectional studies of healthy aging].

    PubMed

    Dapp, Ulrike; Dirksen-Fischer, Martin; Rieger-Ndakorerwa, Gudrun; Fertmann, Regina; Stender, Klaus-Peter; Golgert, Stefan; von Renteln-Kruse, Wolfgang; Minder, Christoph E

    2016-05-01

    Participants of the Longitudinal Urban Cohort Ageing Study (LUCAS) were recruited from patients 60 years and older from general practitioner's offices in Hamburg. This is different from the usual methods of drawing representative samples. The research question addressed the comparability of LUCAS results with those from cross-sectional surveys with participants randomly chosen from a population list. Therefore, the LUCAS data collected in four waves during the first 12 years were compared with data (age, gender) from the Hamburg Statistics Office (HSO), and selected characteristics (socio-demography, health, mobility) from three representative cross-sectional surveys in older Hamburg citizens. First, HSO data compiled in population pyramids for older men and women were compared with equivalent pyramids based on the LUCAS data at recruitment (2000/01) and in waves 2 to 4. Second, characteristics worded identically in the cross-sectional surveys and the simultaneous LUCAS waves were compared. The LUCAS population pyramids were in good accordance at all time points with those of the general older population in Hamburg (except ages 60-64 in men in 2000). Good comparability was also found for health related characteristics from the three representative studies and simultaneous LUCAS waves (e. g. need of nursing care in 2012: LUCAS 7.1 %; Hamburg 7.4 %). Information on health in old age generated periodically in the LUCAS cohort was largely comparable with that from representative cross-sectional studies and statistics registries. Older people are frequently under-represented in epidemiological studies. Therefore, the LUCAS data may provide useful information for Hamburg and similar metropolitan areas in Germany.

  8. Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and co-infections with Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Rickettsia spp. in Ixodes ricinus in Hamburg, Germany.

    PubMed

    May, K; Jordan, D; Fingerle, V; Strube, C

    2015-12-01

    To obtain initial data on Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (Spirochaetales: Spirochaetaceae) in Ixodes ricinus (Ixodida: Ixodidae) ticks in Hamburg, Germany, 1400 questing ticks were collected by flagging at 10 different public recreation areas in 2011 and analysed using probe-based quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The overall rate of infection with B. burgdorferi s.l. was 34.1%; 30.0% of adults were infected (36.7% of females and 26.0% of males), as were 34.5% of nymphs. Significant differences in tick infection rates were observed between the spring and summer/autumn months, as well as among sampling locations. Borrelia genospecies identification by reverse line blotting was successful in 43.6% of positive tick samples. The most frequent genospecies was Borrelia garinii/Borrelia bavariensis, followed by Borrelia afzelii, Borrelia valaisiana, B. burgdorferi sensu stricto, Borrelia spielmanii, Borrelia bissettii and Borrelia lusitaniae. Based on previously published data, co-infection of Borrelia and Rickettsiales spp. was determined in 25.8% of ticks. Overall, 22.9% of ticks were co-infected with Rickettsia spp. (Rickettsiales: Rickettsiaceae), 1.7% with Anaplasma phagocytophilum (Rickettsiales: Anaplasmataceae), and 1.2% with both pathogens. Study results show a high prevalence of Borrelia-positive ticks in recreation areas in the northern German city of Hamburg and the potential health risk to humans in these areas should not be underestimated.

  9. "History had taken such a large piece out of my life" - Neuroscientist refugees from Hamburg during National Socialism.

    PubMed

    Zeidman, Lawrence A; von Villiez, Anna; Stellmann, Jan-Patrick; van den Bussche, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 9,000 physicians were uprooted for so-called "racial" or "political" reasons by the Nazi regime and 6,000 fled Germany. These refugees are often seen as survivors who contributed to a "brain drain" from Germany. About 432 doctors (all specialties, private and academic) were dismissed from the major German city of Hamburg. Of these, 16 were Hamburg University faculty members dismissed from their government-supported positions for "racial" reasons, and, of these, five were neuroscientists. In a critical analysis, not comprehensively done previously, we will demonstrate that the brain drain did not equal a "brain gain." The annihilation of these five neuroscientists' careers under different but similar auspices, their shameful harassment and incarceration, financial expropriation by Nazi ransom techniques, forced migration, and roadblocks once reaching destination countries stalled and set back any hopes of research and quickly continuing once-promising careers. A major continuing challenge is finding ways to repair an open wound and obvious vacuum in the German neuroscience community created by the largely collective persecution of colleagues 80 years ago.

  10. The role of forensic medicine and forensic dentistry in estimating the chronological age of living individuals in Hamburg, Germany.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Hussam; Fuhrmann, Andreas; Paradowski, Ioana; van Well, Eilin Jopp; Püschel, Klaus

    2017-03-01

    Age estimation represents one of the primary responsibilities of forensic medicine and forensic dentistry. It is an integral procedure aiming to estimate the chronological age of an individual, whose age is either unknown or doubtful, by means of assessing the stage of dental, skeletal, and physical development. The present publication reviews the methods and procedures used in estimating the age of young living individuals as well as the experiences of the Institute of Legal Medicine in Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany, during the last 25 years. From 1990 to 2015, 4223 age estimations were carried out in Hamburg. During this time, forensic age estimation was requested by different concerned authorities including courts, the foreigners' registration office (Zentrale Ausländerbehörde), and the state office of education and consultation (Landesbetrieb Erziehung und Beratung). In the context of judicial proceedings, orthopantomograms, as well as X-ray examinations of both the left hand and the medial clavicular epiphyses were carried out in accordance with AGFAD recommendations. For investigations not associated with judicial proceedings, orthopantomogram examinations play a key role in the process of age estimation, due to their high diagnostic value and low radiation exposure. Since 2009, mainly unaccompanied young refugees were examined for age estimation. Orthopantomograms and clinical-physical examinations have been used as essential steps in this context to determine whether an individual is 18 years or less. Additional X-ray examinations of the left hand and the medial clavicular epiphyses have been used less frequently.

  11. Effect of the addition of chia's by-product on the composition of fatty acids in hamburgers through chemometric methods.

    PubMed

    Souza, Aloisio H P; Gohara, Aline K; Rotta, Eliza M; Chaves, Marcia A; Silva, Claudia M; Dias, Lucia F; Gomes, Sandra T M; Souza, Nilson E; Matsushita, Makoto

    2015-03-30

    Hamburger is a meat-based food that is easy to prepare and is widely consumed. It can be enriched using different ingredients, such as chia's by-product, which is rich in omega-3. Chemometrics is a very interesting tool to assess the influence of ingredients in the composition of foods. A complete factorial design 2(2) (two factors in two levels) with duplicate was performed to investigate the influence of the factors (1) concentration of textured soy proteins (TSP) and (2) concentration of chia flour partially defatted (CFPD) as a partial replacement for the bovine meat and porcine fat mix in hamburgers. The results of proximal composition, lipid oxidation, fatty acids sums, ratios, and nutritional indexes were used to propose statistical models. The factors TSP and CFPD were significant, and the increased values contributed to improve the composition in fatty acids, crude protein, and ash. Principal components analysis distinguished the samples with a higher content of chia. In desirability analysis, the highest level of TSP and CFPD was described as the optimal region, and it was not necessary to make another experimental point. The addition of chia's by-product is an alternative to increase the α-linolenic contents and to obtain nutritionally balanced food. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. ["Anti-stigma campaign from below" at schools--experience of the initiative "Irre menschlich Hamburg e.V."].

    PubMed

    Bock, Thomas; Naber, Dieter

    2003-10-01

    In the process of stigmatisation psychiatry is not neutral but it is up-to-date as well as historically involved. That is why it is responsible to influence not only the social perception of psychiatry but also the public picture of mentally disturbed people in a positive way. Doing so it is dependent on the help of psychosis-experienced persons and relatives. Only working together a plausible enlightenment, that points beyond the status quo, can be achieved. Anti-stigma work must critically reflect the interactions in psychiatry itself. After an analysis of the different concepts of stigmatisation and anti-stigma work there follows the evaluation of an information campaign at schools in Hamburg, which emerged from the Hamburg psychosis seminar. The personal meeting of students and psychosis experienced persons is of immediate importance. In addition to that media about the subject "being different, madness, mental disturbation" are being placed at the teachers disposal according to their wishes. In the meantime experience is there of more then 50 teaching units in primary advanced and secondary education as well as of a special open day attended by over 500 students. The response of students and teachers is definitely positive. For the psychosis experienced persons involved there is a special benefit in the sense of empowerment. The more health politically based motives of the anti-stigma work have meanwhile been completed by educational justifications. This way of open meeting is also being discussed as a completion to the symptom based early diagnosis.

  13. Indoor viable mold spores--a comparison between two cities, Erfurt (eastern Germany) and Hamburg (western Germany).

    PubMed

    Koch, A; Heilemann, K J; Bischof, W; Heinrich, J; Wichmann, H E

    2000-02-01

    In eastern Germany, the prevalence of allergies is lower than in western Germany for both children and adults. Several reasons for this fact have been discussed, although it is still not completely understood. One purpose of the epidemiologic study "Indoor and genetic factors in asthma and allergy" (INGA) is to compare exposure to mold spores in two German cities. Therefore, 405 homes in Erfurt (east) and Hamburg (west) were visited twice by trained investigators between June 1995 and May 1997. Samples of settled dust were taken by vacuuming from the carpet in the living room. Sieved house dust was diluted and plated on DG18 agar. The analyses were carried out in duplicate in the same laboratory. No significant difference could be shown for the total and for single genera (Alternaria, Aspergillus, Cladosporium, and Penicillium) in concentration of spores of viable fungi in settled house dust between Erfurt and Hamburg. Seasonal variation of the mold picture, with highest values in August, could be identified both indoors and outdoors. Because outdoor concentration is the main influence on indoor concentration of mold spores from June to October, we recommend sampling from November to May to evaluate exposure to indoor mold spores.

  14. [Transfer and Implementation of Innovative Awareness and Education Measures, e-Mental Health and Care Models in psychenet - Hamburg Network for Mental Health].

    PubMed

    Lambert, Martin; Härter, Martin; Brandes, Andreas; Hillebrandt, Bernd; Schlüter, Catarina; Quante, Susanne

    2015-07-01

    The Hamburg Network for Mental Health belongs to the healthcare regions in Germany, funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research from 2011 to 2015. More than 330 partners from research, health care, health industry and government are promoting innovative health care models and products to improve mental health care in Hamburg. The main objectives comprise the sustained implementation of the Network itself and of successful health care models and products. The article describes current and future implementation possibilities and the present state of the implementation process. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Modelling the urban air quality in Hamburg with the new city-scale chemistry transport model CityChem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karl, Matthias; Ramacher, Martin; Aulinger, Armin; Matthias, Volker; Quante, Markus

    2017-04-01

    Air quality modelling plays an important role by providing guidelines for efficient air pollution abatement measures. Currently, most urban dispersion models treat air pollutants as passive tracer substances or use highly simplified chemistry when simulating air pollutant concentrations on the city-scale. The newly developed urban chemistry-transport model CityChem has the capability of modelling the photochemical transformation of multiple pollutants along with atmospheric diffusion to produce pollutant concentration fields for the entire city on a horizontal resolution of 100 m or even finer and a vertical resolution of 24 layers up to 4000 m height. CityChem is based on the Eulerian urban dispersion model EPISODE of the Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU). CityChem treats the complex photochemistry in cities using detailed EMEP chemistry on an Eulerian 3-D grid, while using simple photo-stationary equilibrium on a much higher resolution grid (receptor grid), i.e. close to industrial point sources and traffic sources. The CityChem model takes into account that long-range transport contributes to urban pollutant concentrations. This is done by using 3-D boundary concentrations for the city domain derived from chemistry-transport simulations with the regional air quality model CMAQ. For the study of the air quality in Hamburg, CityChem was set-up with a main grid of 30×30 grid cells of 1×1 km2 each and a receptor grid of 300×300 grid cells of 100×100 m2. The CityChem model was driven with meteorological data generated by the prognostic meteorology component of the Australian chemistry-transport model TAPM. Bottom-up inventories of emissions from traffic, industry, households were based on data of the municipality of Hamburg. Shipping emissions for the port of Hamburg were taken from the Clean North Sea Shipping project. Episodes with elevated ozone (O3) were of specific interest for this study, as these are associated with exceedances of the World

  16. The publication of sponsored symposiums in medical journals.

    PubMed

    Bero, L A; Galbraith, A; Rennie, D

    1992-10-15

    An increasing proportion of spending by the pharmaceutical industry has gone to funding symposiums that are published by peer-reviewed medical journals. This study tests the hypothesis that such sponsorship, particularly by a single pharmaceutical company, is associated with a promotional orientation of the symposium and a distortion of the peer-review process. We counted the symposiums published in 58 journals of clinical medicine and surveyed the journal editors regarding their policies for symposium issues. We analyzed the symposium issues that appeared in the 11 journals that published the most symposiums in order to determine the sponsor or sponsors, the topics, whether the titles were misleading, whether brand names were used, and whether the featured drugs were classified by the Food and Drug Administration as innovative or approved. The number of symposiums published per year increased steadily from 1966 through 1989. Forty-two percent of those analyzed (262 of 625) had a single pharmaceutical company as the sponsor. These symposiums were more likely than those with other sponsors to have misleading titles (P less than 0.001) and to use brand names (P less than 0.001), and less likely to be peer-reviewed in the same manner as other articles in the parent journal (P less than 0.001). Of the 161 symposiums that focused on a single drug, 51 percent concerned unapproved therapies; 14 percent concerned drugs classified as bringing important therapeutic gains. Symposiums sponsored by drug companies often have promotional attributes and are not peer-reviewed. Financial relations among symposium participants, sponsors, and journals should be completely disclosed, symposiums should be clearly identified, and journal editors should maintain editorial control over contributions from symposiums.

  17. The 27th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mancini, Ron (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    The proceedings of the 27th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium, which was held at ARC, Moffett Field, California, on 12-14 May 1993, are reported. Technological areas covered include the following: actuators, aerospace mechanism applications for ground support equipment, lubricants, latches, connectors, robotic mechanisms, and other mechanisms for large space structures.

  18. PROCEEDINGS OF "THE LEAD REMEDIATION EFFECTIVENESS SYMPOSIUM"

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Symposium on Lead Remediation Effectiveness, sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency, was held at Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, USA from 22-25 May, 2000. International participants from various levels of government, educational institutions, industry, and community represen...

  19. Competencies: Fuzzy Concepts to Context. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium titled "Competence: Fuzzy Concepts to Context.""Sales Superstars: Defining Competencies Needed for Sales Performance" (Darlene Russ-Eft, Edward Del Gaizo, Jeannie Moulton, Ruth Pangilinan) discusses a study in which an analysis of 1,688 critical incidents revealed 16…

  20. Training Retail Managers--A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, F. G., Ed.

    This symposium focuses on training programs for managers of department stores, multiple shops, supermarkets and self-service stores, and small independent shops. The authors of each of the four sections in the publication have had experience in training managers in the retail trade. For conceptual and managerial aspects of the manager's job,…

  1. Organizational Change. Symposium 19. [AHRD Conference, 2001].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This symposium on organizational change consists of three presentations. "Institutionalizing Organizational Change Through Cascade Training: Implications for Human Resource Development (HRD) Research" (Ronald L. Jacobs, Darlene Russ-Eft, Suhail Zidan) proposes the institutionalization of change should be addressed as a major part of the…

  2. The 1995 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, Frann (Editor); Mosier, Frances L. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The 1995 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium is a combined symposia of the Get Away Special (GAS) and Hitchhiker programs, and is proposed to continue as an annual conference. The focus of this conference is to educate potential Space Shuttle Payload Bay users as to the types of carrier systems provided and for current users to share experiment concepts.

  3. Intergas `95: International unconventional gas symposium. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    The International Unconventional Gas Symposium was held on May 14--20, 1995 in Tuscaloosa, Alabama where 52 reports were presented. These reports are grouped in this proceedings under: geology and resources; mine degasification and safety; international developments; reservoir characterization/coal science; and environmental/legal and regulatory. Each report has been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  4. The 31st Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, C. L. (Compiler); Boesiger, E. A. (Compiler)

    1997-01-01

    The proceedings of the 31st Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. Topics covered include: robotics, deployment mechanisms, bearings, actuators, scanners, boom and antenna release, and test equipment. A major focus is the reporting of problems and solutions associated with the development and flight certification of new mechanisms.

  5. Achievement and Its Correlates: Symposium III A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ismail, Maznah; And Others

    This symposium contains a report of a study which (1) examined the relationship between Malaysian children's perception of control and their academic achievement, by Maznah Ismail and Choo Piang Foong, and two abstracts of studies which (2) investigated achievement motivation and attribution of success in rural and urban Malaysian ethnic groups,…

  6. Self Directed Learning and Self Management. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on self-directed learning and self-management. "Validating a More-Dimensional Conception of Self-Directed Learning" (Gerald A. Straka, Cornelia Schaefer) discusses the development and validation of a conception of self-directed learning as a dynamic interplay between behavior,…

  7. Board of Regents Symposium on Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany.

    As discussed in several addresses at a New York State Board of Regents symposium, the task of continuing education in New York State includes adult basic education, job training, and other forms of involvement by educators and other segments of society in efforts to enable individuals, communities, and organizations to function effectively in a…

  8. The 22nd Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The proceedings of the symposium, which was held at the NASA Langley Research Center, on May 4 to 6, 1988, are reported. Technological areas covered include space lubrication, bearings, aerodynamic devices, spacecraft latches, deployment, positioning, and pointing. Devices for space station docking and manipulator and teleoperator mechanisms are also described.

  9. Fifth International Symposium on Liquid Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, R. (Compiler)

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the fiollowing: Theme: Life-life Combustion Devices Technology. Technical Sessions: International Perspectives. System Level Effects. Component Level Processes. Material Considerations. Design Environments -- Predictions. Injector Design Technology. Design Environments -- Measurements. Panel Discussion: Views on future research and development needs and Symposium observations. Aquarium Welcome and Southern Belle Riverboat Recognition Banquet evening events.

  10. Aircraft Piston Engine Exhaust Emission Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A 2-day symposium on the reduction of exhaust emissions from aircraft piston engines was held on September 14 and 15, 1976, at the Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. Papers were presented by both government organizations and the general aviation industry on the status of government contracts, emission measurement problems, data reduction procedures, flight testing, and emission reduction techniques.

  11. Symposium: Aesthetic Education in Japan Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okazaki, Ako; Masuda, Kingo; Kaneda, Takuya; Hino, Yoko; Okamoto, Yasuaki; Fukumoto, Kinichi; Nagamori, Motoki; Yamada, Kazumi; Motomura, Kenta; Ishizaki, Kazhiro; Okada, Masashi; Kaneko, Yoshimasa; Naoe, Toshio; Fujie, Mitsuru; Iwano, Masako

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this symposium is to provide readers with a general understanding of Japanese art and aesthetics education and its interaction with other cultures. The essays cover a variety of topics, including historical, cross-cultural, theoretical, and practical perspectives. Following an introduction by Ako Okazaki, the following papers are…

  12. Continuing the Development of Career: A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiedeman, David V., Ed.

    Following a brief introduction by the editor, four symposium papers are presented on continuing the development of career: "Career Development in Adults. Why do People 35 and Over Change Jobs?" Nancy K. Schlossberg; "Applying Vocational Theory to Adult Problems," John L. Holland; "Career Development of Adults: Why, When, Where, How," Elinor…

  13. The 26th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    The proceedings of the 26th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium, which was held at the Goddard Space Flight Center on May 13, 14, and 15, 1992 are reported. Technological areas covered include actuators, aerospace mechanism applications for ground support equipment, lubricants, latches, connectors and other mechanisms for large space structures.

  14. The 27th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, R.

    1993-05-01

    The proceedings of the 27th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium, which was held at ARC, Moffett Field, California, on 12-14 May 1993, are reported. Technological areas covered include the following: actuators, aerospace mechanism applications for ground support equipment, lubricants, latches, connectors, robotic mechanisms, and other mechanisms for large space structures. Separate abstracts have been prepared for articles from this report.

  15. University Programs. Symposium 20. [AHRD Conference, 2001].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This symposium on university programs consists of three presentations. "Institutional and Curricular Characteristics of Leading Graduate Human Resource Development (HRD) Programs in the United States" (K. Peter Kuchinke) reports a study on institutional arrangements, student enrollments, and core curriculum content and found a large…

  16. Abstracts, Third Space Processing Symposium, Skylab results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Skylab experiments results are reported in abstracts of papers presented at the Third Space Processing Symposium. Specific areas of interest include: exothermic brazing, metals melting, crystals, reinforced composites, glasses, eutectics; physics of the low-g processes; electrophoresis, heat flow, and convection demonstrations flown on Apollo missions; and apparatus for containerless processing, heating, cooling, and containing materials.

  17. Life Affirming Work and Social Justice. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on life-affirming work and social justice that was conducted as part of a conference on human resource development (HRD). "Doing Good or Doing Well? A Counter-story of Continuing Professional Education (CPE)" (Laurel Jeris, Linda Armacost) reports on an exploratory study in which a…

  18. The 17th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The proceedings of the Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. Technological areas covered include space lubrication, aerodynamic devices, spacecraft/Shuttle latches, deployment, positioning, and pointing. Devices for spacecraft tether, magnetic bearing suspension, explosive welding, and a deployable/retractable mast are also described.

  19. Upland Oak Ecology Symposium: A Synthesis

    Treesearch

    Martin A. Spetich

    2004-01-01

    Recent changes in upland forests of the Interior Highlands have raised the interest of and questions from professional resource specialists and the public. This renewed interest in Interior Highland forests provided researchers an opportunity to update resource specialists on new knowledge regarding upland oak ecology. Symposium presentations and the papers presented...

  20. The 26th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The proceedings of the 26th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium, which was held at the Goddard Space Flight Center on May 13, 14, and 15, 1992 are reported. Technological areas covered include actuators, aerospace mechanism applications for ground support equipment, lubricants, latches, connectors and other mechanisms for large space structures.

  1. The 1985 Get Away Special Experimenter's Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, L. R. (Editor); Mosier, F. L. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The 1985 Get Away Special (GAS) Experimenter's Symposium provided a formal opportunity for GAS experimenters to share the results of their projects. The focus is on payloads that have been flown on Shuttle missions, and on GAS payloads that will be flown in the near future.

  2. Approaches to Measuring Library Effectiveness. A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershfield, Allan F., Ed.; Boone, Morell D., Ed.

    A symposium was held in 1971 at Syracuse University on the topic of measuring library effectiveness. The first speaker, Allen Hershfield, introduced the topic with emphasis on the importance and critical need for measurements of library effectiveness. The next speaker, Ernest DeProspo, was concerned with methodological problems and the relation…

  3. Achievement and Its Correlates: Symposium III A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ismail, Maznah; And Others

    This symposium contains a report of a study which (1) examined the relationship between Malaysian children's perception of control and their academic achievement, by Maznah Ismail and Choo Piang Foong, and two abstracts of studies which (2) investigated achievement motivation and attribution of success in rural and urban Malaysian ethnic groups,…

  4. Symposium: A Beginning in the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Peter; Fry, Paul H.; Carnochan, W. B.; Culler, Jonathan; Lerer, Seth; Marshall, Donald G.; Johnson, Barbara; Steiner, Wendy; Haack, Susan; Nussbaum, Martha C.

    2002-01-01

    2001 marked Yale's 300th birthday. It seemed an opportunity for reflection on the evolution of the institution, and particularly on the vicissitudes of the humanities over those three centuries. This article presents essays which represent a selection from the symposium, "Beginning With the Humanities," held at the Whitney Humanities Center on…

  5. Cost Analysis, Evaluation and Feedback. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on cost analysis, evaluation, and feedback in human resource development. "Training Evaluation with 360-Degree Feedback" (Froukje A. Jellema) reports on a quasi-experimental study that examined the effectiveness of 360-degree feedback in evaluating the training received by nurses in a…

  6. Emotional Intelligence, Identity Salience, and Metaphors. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on emotional intelligence, identity salience, and metaphors in human resource development (HRD). "Applying Client and Consultant Generated Metaphors in HRD: Lessons from Psychotherapy" (Darren Short) reviews some techniques that psychotherapists have devised for using their own…

  7. Summation of the Symposium on Arkansas Forests

    Treesearch

    B.G. Blackmon

    2001-01-01

    This brings us to the conclusion of a wonderful 2 days together--the culmination of the symposium on Arkansas Forests. We heard from a wide range of speakers who presented details of the forest survey and those who interpreted that information in light of the important resource issues in Arkansas and the region. My task here is to summarize and possibly interpret the...

  8. Highlights of the heavy ion fusion symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.

    1986-07-01

    The current status and prospects for inertial confinement fusion based on the use of intense beams of heavy ions will be described in the light of results presented at the International Symposium on Heavy Ion Fusion, (Washington, DC, May 27-29, 1986).

  9. Symposium on Massive Open Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, Steven D.; Rice, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    In this Symposium focused on MOOCs, this journal carries forward a tradition of attending to the technologies associated with composing and the teaching of composing. In the May 1983 issue of "College Composition and Communication," for example, most of the articles focus on composing and include a mix of inquiries, from Jack Selzer's on the…

  10. Women in Librarianship: Melvil's Rib Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Margaret, Ed.; Scarborough, Mayra, Ed.

    In April 1973, the Graduate School of Library Service Alumni Association and the Graduate School of Library Service at Rutgers University jointly sponsored a symposium on the position of women in the library profession. Three major presentations, and the discussions which followed, dealt with various aspects of this issue. The first presentation,…

  11. The 29th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, William C. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The proceedings of the 29th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium, which was hosted by NASA Johnson Space Center and held at the South Shore Harbour Conference Facility on May 17-19, 1995, are reported. Technological areas covered include actuators, aerospace mechanism applications for ground support equipment, lubricants, pointing mechanisms joints, bearings, release devices, booms, robotic mechanisms, and other mechanisms for spacecraft.

  12. Learning Organization. Symposium 36. [AHRD Conference, 2001].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This symposium on learning organization consists of three presentations. "Perception of Learning Culture and Concerns About the Innovation on Use of Innovation: A Question of Level of Analysis" (Rebecca Fatima Sta. Maria, Karen E. Watkins) reports a study of the relationship between organizational members' perception of learning culture…

  13. Center for Space Construction Third Annual Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs from presentations given at the symposium are presented. The topics covered include the following: orbital assembly, large space structures, space stations, expert systems, lunar regolith and structure mechanics, lunar shelter construction from lunar resources, telerobotic rovers, lunar construction equipment, lunar based equipment, and lunar construction.

  14. HRD Effectiveness and Transfer of Learning. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on human resource development (HRD) effectiveness and transfer of learning. "Factors Affecting Transfer of Training in Thailand" (Siriporn Yamnill, Gary N. McLean) discusses how the Learning Transfer System Inventory was validated in Thailand by administering it to 1,029 employers and…

  15. Leadership Development. Symposium 13. [AHRD Conference, 2001].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This symposium on leadership development consists of three presentations. "Organizational Performance: The Future Focus of Leadership Development Programs" (Doris B. Collins) reports research that analyzed 54 leadership studies from 1984-2000 and confirmed that organizations have begun to take a more systemic approach to leadership…

  16. The 28th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohn, Douglas A. (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    The proceedings of the 28th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium, which was hosted by the NASA Lewis Research Center and held at the Cleveland Marriott Society Center on May 18, 19, and 20, 1994, are reported. Technological areas covered include actuators, aerospace mechanism applications for ground support equipment, lubricants, pointing mechanisms joints, bearings, release devices, booms, robotic mechanisms, and other mechanisms for spacecraft.

  17. Organization Development. Symposium 16. [AHRD Conference, 2001].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This symposium on organization development (OD) consists of three presentations. "A Study of Gender Management Preferences as Related to Predicted Organizational Management Paradigms for the Twenty-First Century" (Cathy Bolton McCullough) reports a study that found that access to diverse management preferences and the manner in which the…

  18. Theory Building. Symposium 21. [AHRD Conference, 2001].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This symposium on theory building consists of three presentations. "A Multilevel Theory of Organizational Performance: Seeing the Forest and the Trees" (Susan Reynolds Fisher) presents the process used to develop this theory and analyzes emergent insights. It discusses how the theory succeeds in mapping relationships across aspects and…

  19. The Second International Symposium on Plant Cryopreservation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Second International Symposium on Plant Cryopreservation was held in Fort Collins, Colorado, USA, from August 11-14, 2013, under the auspices of the International Society for Horticultural Science. The town of Fort Collins is home to the USDA-ARS, National Center for Genetic Resources Preservati...

  20. Eighth international symposium on radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Eckelman, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    The Eighth International Symposium on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry was held on June 25--29, in Princeton, New Jersey. Topics covered in the meeting include: Technetium Chemistry; Perfusion Agents; Radionuclide Production; Synthetic Precursors; Analysis/Automation; Antibodies; Receptors; Metabolism, DOPA FDG; Receptors, D2 D1; Metabolism; and Metabolism, Cancer. Individual papers in each of these areas are abstracted separately. (MHB)

  1. Approaches to Research in HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on approaches to research in human resource development (HRD). "HRD, Feminism, and Adult Education: A Foundation for Collaborative Approaches to Research and Practice" (Yvonne M. Johnson) identifies common interests among HRD professionals, feminists, and practitioners in the field of…

  2. SIAM symposium on control problems in industry

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    This symposium focused on industrial control applications that have benefited from recent mathematical and technological developments. The themes featured included: applications of control techniques in aerospace industry, automotive industry, environmental sciences, manufacturing processes, and petroleum industry; optimal shape design in aerospace applications; optimal design of micro-optics; robust control and H-infinity methods.

  3. Job Demands and Worker Health. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, John R., Jr.; And Others

    Seventeen years ago a group of researchers at the University of Michigan became interested in the possibility that occupational health may be determined by psychological as well as physical hazards in the work environment. This symposium reports on current work in testing a unified theory of the effects of psychosocial stresses on mental and…

  4. Emotional and Personality Development: Symposium III C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durrani, Naeem; And Others

    This symposium reports an investigation of correlates of self-disclosure among Indian college students, by Sarla Jawa, and provides abstracts of both a Pakistani perspective on personality and moral development, by Naeem Durrani, and a study of Indian students' attitudes toward sex, by Premala S. Kale. Findings of the study of correlates of…

  5. Movement Studies. AAHPER Research Consortium Symposium Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbin, Charles B., Ed.

    This collection of symposium papers provides current synthesis of research in the field of physical education and health. The importance of movement, body coordination, and physical activity in promoting better understanding and relationships between different ethnic groups is discussed. The hopeful possibilities provided by motor activities for…

  6. The ninth international veterinary immunology symposium

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This Introduction to the special issue of Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology summarizes the Proceedings of the 9th International Veterinary Immunology Symposium (9th IVIS) held August, 2010, in Tokyo, Japan. Over 340 delegates from 30 countries discussed research progress analyzing the immune...

  7. 1989 SYMPOSIUM ON STATIONARY COMBUSTION NOX CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper summarizes information and results presented at the 1989 Symposium on Stationary Combustion NOX Control, held March 6-9, 1989 in San Francisco. Cosponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the symposiu...

  8. Counselling and Career Planning: Symposium V A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awang, Amir; And Others

    Focusing generally on counseling and career planning, this symposium provides (1) a review and critique of guidance and counseling in Malaysian schools, by Amir Awang and Latiff Mirasa; (2) a discussion of the needs of Malaysian youth, by Mohd. Yunus Mohd. Noor; and (3) an abstract of the findings of a study of some aspects of student development…

  9. Expanding Perspectives on HRD Research. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on expanding perspectives in human resource development (HRD) research. "The Concept of Culture in International and Comparative HRD Research: Methodological Problems and Possible Solutions" (Alexander Ardichvili, K. Peter Kuchinke) discusses the following topics: (1) alternative…

  10. Dissection Symposium: A Meeting of Minds?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Pat

    1997-01-01

    Educators at a symposium on dissection shared a variety of views on dissection through their personal experiences as educators and as students. For example, one was turned off to science because of dissection. Another mentioned the frivolous attitudes of students who are insensitive to animals. Another indicated that most people perceive their…

  11. Computer Simulation in Undergraduate Instruction: A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Street, Warren R.; And Others

    These symposium papers discuss the instructional use of computers in psychology, with emphasis on computer-produced simulations. The first, by Rich Edwards, briefly outlines LABSIM, a general purpose system of FORTRAN programs which simulate data collection in more than a dozen experimental models in psychology and are designed to train students…

  12. Emotional and Personality Development: Symposium III C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durrani, Naeem; And Others

    This symposium reports an investigation of correlates of self-disclosure among Indian college students, by Sarla Jawa, and provides abstracts of both a Pakistani perspective on personality and moral development, by Naeem Durrani, and a study of Indian students' attitudes toward sex, by Premala S. Kale. Findings of the study of correlates of…

  13. Proceedings of Plenary Session: The LACIE Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A technology assessment of the LACIE data processing and information systems was discussed during the Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment Symposium. Crop inventories of wheat yield in the United States as well as several other nations (such as the U.S.S.R., Canada, etc.) were discussed, along with the methodology involved in acquiring this data.

  14. Income Tax Reform and Agriculture: A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Economic Research Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Five papers are provided from a symposium organized to present several economic studies relating to income tax structure and reform in agriculture. "Toward an Optimal Income Tax Policy for Southern and U.S. Agriculture" (Harold F. Breimyer) is a structured argument for comprehensive tax reform that increases the equity of the income tax…

  15. Values: Relations and Implications. Symposium V C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Wit, Jan; Keats, D. M.

    Reported at a symposium generally concerned with values and adolescents are discussions of (1) socialization issues and the impact of values on adolescents, and (2) dimensions of Asian youths' confrontation with the problem of modernization. In the first study (by Jan de Witt), the conceptual shift in socialization research to a focus on…

  16. Ethics Scenarios: A Critical Theory Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Jane; And Others

    This symposium chaired by John C. Belland addressed the ethical position of educational communications and technology in society. Presenters created ethics scenarios and applied critical theory to provide insight. Intended to stimulate questions, the approach was philosophical, literary, and sociopolitical, and reflected Derrida, Foucault, and…

  17. Cognition and Written Language: A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purves, Alan, Ed.

    Originally presented at a symposium on cognition and written language, the 14 papers in this collection discuss research findings regarding reading and writing processes, ways that the development of effective reading and writing can be abetted by instruction, and research needs in the area of cognition and written language. The papers focus on…

  18. HRD: Past, Present and Future. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on the past, present, and future of human resource development (HRD). "Revisiting the New Deal: A Longitudinal Case Study" (Judy Pate, Graeme Martin, Jim McGoldrick) draws upon data from a longitudinal case study of the links between job security and HRD to examine the new…

  19. Symposium on Massive Open Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, Steven D.; Rice, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    In this Symposium focused on MOOCs, this journal carries forward a tradition of attending to the technologies associated with composing and the teaching of composing. In the May 1983 issue of "College Composition and Communication," for example, most of the articles focus on composing and include a mix of inquiries, from Jack Selzer's on the…

  20. Approaches to Measuring Library Effectiveness. A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershfield, Allan F., Ed.; Boone, Morell D., Ed.

    A symposium was held in 1971 at Syracuse University on the topic of measuring library effectiveness. The first speaker, Allen Hershfield, introduced the topic with emphasis on the importance and critical need for measurements of library effectiveness. The next speaker, Ernest DeProspo, was concerned with methodological problems and the relation…

  1. Proceedings of the Sierra Nevada Science Symposium

    Treesearch

    Dennis D. Murphy; Peter A. Stine

    2004-01-01

    Land and resource management issues in the Sierra Nevada are becoming increasingly complex and controversial. The objective of the Sierra Nevada Science Symposium was to provide a synoptic overview of the current state of scientific knowledge related to key management issues. Attempts were made to tie recent scientific findings to applications in land management and...

  2. Ethics Scenarios: A Critical Theory Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Jane; And Others

    This symposium chaired by John C. Belland addressed the ethical position of educational communications and technology in society. Presenters created ethics scenarios and applied critical theory to provide insight. Intended to stimulate questions, the approach was philosophical, literary, and sociopolitical, and reflected Derrida, Foucault, and…

  3. Conflict Management and Decision Making. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This symposium on conflict management and decision making is comprised of three papers. "Two Approaches to Conflict Management in Teams: A Case Study" (Mychal Coleman, Gary N. McLean) describes a study that provided conflict management training to two employee teams using the traditional lecture method and cooperative learning (CL).…

  4. Organizational Learning, Change and Socialization. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This symposium is comprised of three papers on organizational learning, change, and socialization. "A Study of the Organizational Learning Profile (OLP)" (Rae Dorai, Adela J. McMurray) reports findings that show the OLP (Pace et al. 1998) is a reliable instrument for measuring organizational learning and its content validity is high.…

  5. Third LDEF Post-Retrieval Symposium Abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Arlene S. (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    This volume is a compilation of abstracts submitted to the Third Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Post-Retrieval Symposium. The abstracts represent the data analysis of the 57 experiments flown on the LDEF. The experiments include materials, coatings, thermal systems, power and propulsion, science (cosmic ray, interstellar gas, heavy ions, micrometeoroid, etc.), electronics, optics, and life science.

  6. The Special Child: Symposium II C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khaneja, Gurvinder Kaur; And Others

    Focusing on the exceptional child, this symposium contains a study which reports findings concerning the adjustment problems of the Malaysian visually handicapped student, by Chua Tee Tee, an abstract on adjustment and personality patterns in normal and problem children by Gurvinder Kaur Khaneja and Gopa Bharawaj, and an abstract of a study on…

  7. Counselling and Career Planning: Symposium V A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awang, Amir; And Others

    Focusing generally on counseling and career planning, this symposium provides (1) a review and critique of guidance and counseling in Malaysian schools, by Amir Awang and Latiff Mirasa; (2) a discussion of the needs of Malaysian youth, by Mohd. Yunus Mohd. Noor; and (3) an abstract of the findings of a study of some aspects of student development…

  8. Symposium: A Beginning in the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Peter; Fry, Paul H.; Carnochan, W. B.; Culler, Jonathan; Lerer, Seth; Marshall, Donald G.; Johnson, Barbara; Steiner, Wendy; Haack, Susan; Nussbaum, Martha C.

    2002-01-01

    2001 marked Yale's 300th birthday. It seemed an opportunity for reflection on the evolution of the institution, and particularly on the vicissitudes of the humanities over those three centuries. This article presents essays which represent a selection from the symposium, "Beginning With the Humanities," held at the Whitney Humanities Center on…

  9. Work Ethic and Values in HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on work ethic and values in human resource development (HRD). "Value Priorities of HRD Scholars and Practitioners" (Reid Bates, Hsin Chih Chen, Tim Hatcher) presents the results of a study that identified and analyzed six HRD values reflecting two value facets (locus of HRD influence…

  10. Symposium: Aesthetic Education in Japan Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okazaki, Ako; Masuda, Kingo; Kaneda, Takuya; Hino, Yoko; Okamoto, Yasuaki; Fukumoto, Kinichi; Nagamori, Motoki; Yamada, Kazumi; Motomura, Kenta; Ishizaki, Kazhiro; Okada, Masashi; Kaneko, Yoshimasa; Naoe, Toshio; Fujie, Mitsuru; Iwano, Masako

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this symposium is to provide readers with a general understanding of Japanese art and aesthetics education and its interaction with other cultures. The essays cover a variety of topics, including historical, cross-cultural, theoretical, and practical perspectives. Following an introduction by Ako Okazaki, the following papers are…

  11. Characteristics Orientation, Needs and Expectations. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on characteristics orientation, needs, and expectations. "Characteristics Orientation of Emerging Professions: Implications for Research, Policy, and Practice of Continuing Professional Education" (William H. Young, Margot B. Weinstein) reports on a qualitative study that examined…

  12. Mental Health and Adjustment: Symposium IV B.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garside, Jayne G.; And Others

    This symposium contains reports on two studies on the following topics: (1) ways of helping children manage stress, by Jayne G. Garside, (2) psychological stress and coping in adolescent victims of sexual abuse in Singapore, by Colleen Ward, and (3) an abstract of a study on estrangement, by Jaya Nagaraja. The article on stress management…

  13. Women on Campus: 1970; A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor. Center for Continuing Education for Women.

    The symposium: Women on Campus, 1970, held at Michigan University on October 14, 1970, centered on 3 major topics: "Toward a New Psychology of Women"; "The Case of the Woman Graduate Student"; and "The University and Women." The papers that were presented concerning the first topic included: "Internal Barriers to…

  14. PROCEEDINGS OF "THE LEAD REMEDIATION EFFECTIVENESS SYMPOSIUM"

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Symposium on Lead Remediation Effectiveness, sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency, was held at Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, USA from 22-25 May, 2000. International participants from various levels of government, educational institutions, industry, and community represen...

  15. Training Retail Managers--A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, F. G., Ed.

    This symposium focuses on training programs for managers of department stores, multiple shops, supermarkets and self-service stores, and small independent shops. The authors of each of the four sections in the publication have had experience in training managers in the retail trade. For conceptual and managerial aspects of the manager's job,…

  16. The 42nd Aerospace Mechanism Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Editor); Hakun, Claef (Editor)

    2014-01-01

    The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production, and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is the reporting of problems and solutions associated with the development, and flight certification of new mechanisms.

  17. The 1993 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Lawrence R. (Editor); Mosier, Frances L. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The 1993 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium is a combined symposia of the Get Away Special (GAS), Hitchhiker, and Complex Autonomous Payloads (CAP) programs, and is proposed to continue as an annual conference. The focus of this conference is to educate potential Space Shuttle Payload Bay users as to the types of carrier systems provided and for current users to share experiment concepts.

  18. Philosophy and Education--A Symposium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirst, Paul; Carr, Wilfred

    2005-01-01

    This symposium begins with a critique by Paul Hirst of Wilfred Carr's "Philosophy and Education" ("Journal of Philosophy of Education, 2004, 38.1"), where Carr argues that philosophy of education should be concerned with practical philosophy rather than "theoretical philosophy." Hirst argues that the philosophy of education is best understood as a…

  19. PREFACE: Third International Symposium on Atomic Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasumori, Atsuo

    2009-09-01

    The International Symposium on Atomic Technology (ISAT) is held every year. The Third Symposium (ISAT-3) was held on 5-6 March 2009 at the Tokyo International Exchange Center, Tokyo, Japan jointed with the Third Polyscale Technology Workshop (PTW-3). The ISAT-3 symposium was intended to offer a forum for the discussion of the latest progress in atomic technologies, which was successively held after ISAT-1 at Tsukuba and ISAT-2 at Awaji in 2007. The symposium was attended by 136 participants. There were 12 invited and 4 oral presentations. The number of poster presentations was 101. From all the contributions, 32 papers selected through review process are contained in this volume. The 'Atomic Technology Project' and the 'Polyscale Technology Project' were started in 2006 as the joint project of three institutions; (1) Center for Atomic and Molecular Technologies, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University (CAMT), (2) Tsukuba Research Center for Interdisciplinary Materials Science, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba (TIMS) and (3) Polyscale Technology Research Center, Research Institute for Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science (PTRC), each of which were independently pursuing atomic and polyscale technologies. The project is funded by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. The goal of these projects is to contribute to the development of atomic and polyscale science and technologies. In this symposium, four research fields were focused on: Biomedical Applications, Fabrication for Advanced Materials and Devices, Magnetic Applications, and Quantum and Molecular Engineering for Advanced Technologies. Atsuo Yasumori Conference Chair Polyscale Technology Research Center, Research Institute for Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda, Chiba 278-8510, Japan.

  20. Biobased and biodegradable polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Kaiyan

    In this dissertation, various noncrosslinked and crosslinked biobased and biodegradable polymer nanocomposites were fabricated and characterized. The properties of these polymer nanocomposites, and their relating mechanisms and corresponding applications were studied and discussed in depth. Chapter 1 introduces the research background and objectives of the current research. Chapter 2 presents the development of a novel low cost carbon source for bacterial cellulose (BC) production and fabrication and characterization of biobased polymer nanocomposites using produced BC and soy protein based resins. The carbon source, soy flour extract (SFE), was obtained from defatted soy flour (SF) and BC yield achieved using SFE medium was high. The results of this study showed that SFE consists of five sugars and Acetobacter xylinum metabolized sugars in a specific order. Chapter 3 discusses the fabrication and characterization of biodegradable polymer nanocomposites using BC and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). These polymer nanocomposites had excellent tensile and thermal properties. Crosslinking of PVA using glutaraldehyde (GA) not only increased the mechanical and thermal properties but the water-resistance. Chapter 4 describes the development and characterization of microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) based biodegradable polymer nanocomposites by blending MFC suspension with PVA. Chemical crosslinking of the polymer nanocomposites was carried out using glyoxal to increase the mechanical and thermal properties as well as to make the PVA partially water-insoluble. Chapter 5 reports the development and characterization of halloysite nanotube (HNT) reinforced biodegradable polymer nanocomposites utilizing HNT dispersion and PVA. Several separation techniques were used to obtain individualized HNT dispersion. The results indicated uniform dispersion of HNTs in both PVA and malonic acid (MA) crosslinked PVA resulted in excellent mechanical and thermal properties of the materials, especially

  1. Recent advances in biodegradable nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Jitendra K; Kumar, A Pratheep; Misra, Manjusri; Mohanty, Amar K; Drzal, Lawrence T; Singh, Raj Pal

    2005-04-01

    There is growing interest in developing bio-based products and innovative process technologies that can reduce the dependence on fossil fuel and move to a sustainable materials basis. Biodegradable bio-based nanocomposites are the next generation of materials for the future. Renewable resource-based biodegradable polymers including cellulosic plastic (plastic made from wood), corn-derived plastics, and polyhydroxyalkanoates (plastics made from bacterial sources) are some of the potential biopolymers which, in combination with nanoclay reinforcement, can produce nanocomposites for a variety of applications. Nanocomposites of this category are expected to possess improved strength and stiffness with little sacrifice of toughness, reduced gas/water vapor permeability, a lower coefficient of thermal expansion, and an increased heat deflection temperature, opening an opportunity for the use of new, high performance, lightweight green nanocomposite materials to replace conventional petroleum-based composites. The present review addresses this green material, including its technical difficulties and their solutions.

  2. Manned Space Flight Experiments Symposium: Gemini Missions III and IV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    This is a compilation of papers on in-flight experiments presented at the first symposium of a series, Manned Space Flight Experiments Symposium, sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The results of experiments conducted during the Gemini Missions III and IV are covered. These symposiums are to be conducted for the scientific community at regular intervals on the results of experiments carried out in conjunction with manned space flights.

  3. PREFACE: XV Chilean Physics Symposium, 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Leopoldo; Moreno, José; Ávila, Ricardo; Cubillos, Karla

    2008-02-01

    The Chilean Physics Symposium is the main gathering of Physics in Chile, and its organization is one of the central activities of the Chilean Physical Society (Sociedad Chilena de Física, SOCHIFI). The Symposium assembles the largest number of Chilean and foreign physicists resident in the country. Recent advances in the various research areas in Physics are presented, by researchers from Universities and national research centres. At the same time this is an occasion for the participation of Physics students from both the pre- and post-graduate programs. The Symposium has gathered continuously every two years, since 1978. The organization of the XV symposium was in charge of the Thermonuclear Plasma Department of the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission, and it took place on 15-17 November 2006, at La Reina Nuclear Studies Centre, in the city of Santiago, Chile. During this symposium the relation of research in Physics with education and with the productive sector in the country was also analysed. During the Symposium, 121 abstracts were submitted, from 255 authors. All authors were invited to submit articles for publication in the Symposium Proceedings. The articles received were reviewed by the Symposium Scientific Committee and by invited peers. The criteria for review focussed on the demand for a consistent piece of research, and a clear statement of results. Most of the articles received report the work of research groups where advanced students and young investigators are prominent. Thanks to their enthusiasm, 52 articles are presented in this issue. We would like to express our appreciation to their authors. Finally, my personal apology is in order regarding my delay in publishing these proceedings. A sequence of personal and professional highly demanding circumstances have been in the way. I would like to thank Journal of Physics: Conference Series for providing very fast publication of the proceedings, having published them online less than 4 weeks after my

  4. Aerobic biodegradation of selected monoterpenes.

    PubMed

    Misra, G; Pavlostathis, S G; Perdue, E M; Araujo, R

    1996-07-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to assess the biotransformation potential of four hydrocarbon monoterpenes (d-limonene, alpha-pinene, gamma-terpinene, and terpinolene) and four alcohols (arbanol, linalool, plinol, and alpha-terpineol) under aerobic conditions at 23 degrees C. Both forest-soil extract and enriched cultures were used as inocula for the biodegradation experiments conducted first without, then with prior microbial acclimation to the monoterpenes tested. All four hydrocarbons and two alcohols were readily degraded. The increase in biomass and headspace CO2 concentrations paralleled the depletion of monoterpenes, thus confirming that terpene disappearance was the result of biodegradation accompanied by microbial growth and mineralization. Plinol resisted degradation in assays using inocula from diverse sources, while arbanol degraded very slowly. A significant fraction of d-limonene-derived carbon was accounted for as non-extractable, dissolved organic carbon, whereas terpineol exhibited a much higher degree of utilization. The rate and extent of monoterpene biodegradation were not significantly affected by the presence of dissolved natural organic matter.

  5. Engineering Flame Retardant Biodegradable Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shan; Yang, Kai; Guo, Yichen; Zhang, Linxi; Pack, Seongchan; Davis, Rachel; Lewin, Menahem; Ade, Harald; Korach, Chad; Kashiwagi, Takashi; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2013-03-01

    Cellulose-based PLA/PBAT polymer blends can potentially be a promising class of biodegradable nanocomposites. Adding cellulose fiber reinforcement can improve mechanical properties of biodegradable plastics, but homogeneously dispersing hydrophilic cellulose in the hydrophobic polymer matrix poses a significant challenge. We here show that resorcinol diphenyl phosphates (RDP) can be used to modify the surface energy, not only reducing phase separation between two polymer kinds but also allowing the cellulose particles and the Halloysite clay to be easily dispersed within polymer matrices to achieve synergy effect using melt blending. Here in this study we describe the use of cellulose fiber and Halloysite clay, coated with RDP surfactant, in producing the flame retardant polymer blends of PBAT(Ecoflex) and PLA which can pass the stringent UL-94 V0 test. We also utilized FTIR, SEM and AFM nanoindentation to elucidate the role RDP plays in improving the compatibility of biodegradable polymers, and to determine structure property of chars that resulted in composites that could have optimized mechanical and thermal properties. Supported by Garcia Polymer Center and NSF Foundation.

  6. Proceedings of the Third Spaceborne Imaging Radar Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This publication contains summaries of the papers presented at the Third Spaceborne Imaging Radar Symposium held at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology, in Pasadena, California, on 18-21 Jan. 1993. The purpose of the symposium was to present an overview of recent developments in the different scientific and technological fields related to spaceborne imaging radars and to present future international plans. This symposium is the third in a series of 'Spaceborne Imaging Radar' symposia held at JPL. The first symposium was held in Jan. 1983 and the second in 1986.

  7. Proceedings of the Twelfth International Symposium on Space Terahertz Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehdi, Imran (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    The Twelfth International Symposium on Space Terahertz Technology was held February 14-16, 2001 in San Diego, California, USA. This symposium was jointly sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology. The symposium featured sixty nine presentations covering a wide variety of technical topics relevant to Terahertz Technology. The presentations can be divided into five broad technology areas: Hot Electron Bolometers, superconductor insulator superconductor (SIS) technology, local oscillator (LO) technology, Antennas and Measurements, and Direct Detectors. The symposium provides scientists, engineers, and researchers working in the terahertz technology and science fields to engineers their work and exchange ideas with colleagues.

  8. The History of the UNESCO International Conferences on Adult Education--From Helsingor (1949) to Hamburg (1997): International Education Policy through People and Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoll, Joachim H.

    2007-01-01

    This paper starts with the founding of UNESCO and the fundamental belief that humanitarian, social and political deficits in given societies can be corrected by means of education. The history of the UNESCO International Conferences on Adult Education (Elsinore, Montreal, Tokyo, Paris and Hamburg, 1949-1997) demonstrates the changes in perceptions…

  9. The "Hamburger Connection" as Ecologically Unequal Exchange: A Cross-National Investigation of Beef Exports and Deforestation in Less-Developed Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Kelly

    2010-01-01

    This study explores Norman Myers's concept of the "hamburger connection" as a form of ecologically unequal exchange, where more-developed nations are able to transfer the environmental costs of beef consumption to less-developed nations. I used ordinary least squares (OLS) regression to test whether deforestation in less-developed…

  10. Die Integrative Grundschule im sozialen Brennpunkt. Ergebnisse empirischer Langsschnittuntersuchungen des Hamburger Schulversuchs (The Integrative Elementary School at the Focus of the Social Debate).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katzenbach, Dieter; Rauer, Wulf; Schuck, Karl Dieter; Wudtke, Hubert

    1999-01-01

    Presents results of a study of the school experiment "Integrative Elementary School" carried out in Hamburg (Germany) that aimed at keeping children with learning, language, or behavioral problems in the (regular) elementary school, which is furnished with additional teachers trained in special education. (CMK)

  11. The "Hamburger Connection" as Ecologically Unequal Exchange: A Cross-National Investigation of Beef Exports and Deforestation in Less-Developed Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Kelly

    2010-01-01

    This study explores Norman Myers's concept of the "hamburger connection" as a form of ecologically unequal exchange, where more-developed nations are able to transfer the environmental costs of beef consumption to less-developed nations. I used ordinary least squares (OLS) regression to test whether deforestation in less-developed…

  12. A Comparison of the Motor Ability of 8 and 9 Year Old Primary School Children in Hamburg, Melbourne and Cape Town--An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kretschmer, Jurgen; Saunders, John; Bressan, Liz; Erhorn, Jan; Wirszing, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    An increasing worldwide concern about a decline in the quality of the motor ability of children was the motivation for this exploratory comparative study. It involves a comparison of the motor ability of children aged 8 and 9 years from Hamburg (n = 774), Melbourne (n = 141) and Cape Town (n = 81). Since each of these global cities represents a…

  13. The History of the UNESCO International Conferences on Adult Education--From Helsingor (1949) to Hamburg (1997): International Education Policy through People and Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoll, Joachim H.

    2007-01-01

    This paper starts with the founding of UNESCO and the fundamental belief that humanitarian, social and political deficits in given societies can be corrected by means of education. The history of the UNESCO International Conferences on Adult Education (Elsinore, Montreal, Tokyo, Paris and Hamburg, 1949-1997) demonstrates the changes in perceptions…

  14. Circulation and Internationalisation of Pedagogical Concepts and Practices in the Discourse of Education: The Hamburg School Reform Experiment (1919-1933)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Christine

    2014-01-01

    In the context of the international exchange of school reform ideas and concepts, the new schools in Hamburg were recognised as exemplary instances of a revolutionary and forceful reform in the public elementary school systems. Based on studies of transfer and their premise that the transnational transfer of ideas, practices and objects does not…

  15. Third International Kharkov Symposium "Physics and Engineering of Millimeter and Submillimeter Waves" MSMW󈨦 Symposium Proceedings, Volume 1,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    1 Jf» Third International Kharkov Symposium "Physics and Engineering of Millimeter and Submillimeter Waves" Kharkov, Ukraine September 15-17...34PHYSICS AND ENGINEERING OF MILLIMETER AND SUBMILLIMETER WAVES" MSMW󈨦 Symposium Volume 1 Kharkov, Ukraine September 15-17,1998 DISTRIBUTION...STATEMENT A Approved for Public Release Distribution Unlimited THIRD INTERNATIONAL KHARKOV SYMPOSIUM "PHYSICS AND ENGINEERING OF MILLIMETER AND

  16. Anaerobic Biodegradation of Soybean Biodiesel and Diesel ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Biotransformation of soybean biodiesel and the inhibitory effect of petrodiesel were studied under methanogenic conditions. Biodiesel removal efficiency of more than 95% was achieved in a chemostat with influent biodiesel concentrations up to 2.45 g/L. The kinetics of anaerobic biodegradation of soybean biodiesel B100 (biodiesel only) with different petrodiesel loads were studied using biomass pre-acclimated to B100 and B80 (80% biodiesel and 20 petrodiesel). The results indicated that the biodiesel fraction of the blend could be effectively biodegraded, whereas petrodiesel was not biodegraded at all under methanogenic conditions. The presence of petrodiesel in blends with biodiesel had a greater inhibitory effect on the rate of biodegradation than the biodegradation efficiency (defined as the efficiency of methane production). Both the biodegradation rate coefficient and the methane production efficiency increased almost linearly with the increasing fraction of biodiesel. With the increasing fraction of petrodiesel, the biodegradation rate and efficiency were correlated with the concentration of soluble FAMEs in the water. The objective of this study was to investigate the anaerobic biodegradation of soybean biodiesel blends under methanogenic conditions. Biological methane potential (BMP) tests were conducted in serum bottles to determine the anaerobic biodegradation kinetics of biodiesel in the absence and presence of different concentrations of petrod

  17. Biodegradation of high molecular weight polylactic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stloukal, Petr; Koutny, Marek; Sedlarik, Vladimir; Kucharczyk, Pavel

    2012-07-01

    Polylactid acid seems to be an appropriate replacement of conventional non-biodegradable synthetic polymer primarily due to comparable mechanical, thermal and processing properties in its high molecular weight form. Biodegradation of high molecular PLA was studied in compost for various forms differing in their specific surface area. The material proved its good biodegradability under composting conditions and all investigated forms showed to be acceptable for industrial composting. Despite expectations, no significant differences in resulting mineralizations were observed for fiber, film and powder sample forms with different specific surface areas. The clearly faster biodegradation was detected only for the thin coating on porous material with high specific surface area.

  18. Phenanthrene biodegradation kinetics in unsaturated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.R.; Scow, K.M.

    1995-12-31

    Organic compounds when sorbed to soil solids are thought to be unavailable to soil microorganisms. The biodegradation kinetics of sorbed chemicals should thus be influenced by sorption/desorption processes as well as by the metabolic capacities of soil microbes. In the research, phenanthrene, a hydrophobic polyaromatic hydrocarbon, was used as a model compound to investigate the biodegradation kinetics of strongly sorbing organic compounds in soil. Biodegradation kinetics for phenanthrene in seven soils with moisture contents near field capacity were measured during a six and one half month experiment. Phenanthrene biodegradation rates initially increased in all soils and then declined. The declining portion of the biodegradation rate versus time plots exhibited either first order or biphasic kinetics. Both first order and biphasic kinetics are consistent with models which link microbial degradation to substrate sorption/desorption from equilibrium and kinetically controlled sorption sites. No single rate constant or analytical expression adequately captured the complexity of the observed biodegradation rates. This result is again consonant with a process derived from coupled biological and physical systems. Biodegradation kinetics were quantified using a combination of fitted and descriptive parameters. Significant correlations exist between several of the descriptive parameters. The correlations observed between descriptive biodegradation parameters mirror correlations expected from the hypothesized underlying biological process and help evince the influence this underlying process exerts on observed biodegradation kinetics.

  19. A review of plastic waste biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ying; Yanful, Ernest K; Bassi, Amarjeet S

    2005-01-01

    With more and more plastics being employed in human lives and increasing pressure being placed on capacities available for plastic waste disposal, the need for biodegradable plastics and biodegradation of plastic wastes has assumed increasing importance in the last few years. This review looks at the technological advancement made in the development of more easily biodegradable plastics and the biodegradation of conventional plastics by microorganisms. Additives, such as pro-oxidants and starch, are applied in synthetic materials to modify and make plastics biodegradable. Recent research has shown that thermoplastics derived from polyolefins, traditionally considered resistant to biodegradation in ambient environment, are biodegraded following photo-degradation and chemical degradation. Thermoset plastics, such as aliphatic polyester and polyester polyurethane, are easily attacked by microorganisms directly because of the potential hydrolytic cleavage of ester or urethane bonds in their structures. Some microorganisms have been isolated to utilize polyurethane as a sole source of carbon and nitrogen source. Aliphatic-aromatic copolyesters have active commercial applications because of their good mechanical properties and biodegradability. Reviewing published and ongoing studies on plastic biodegradation, this paper attempts to make conclusions on potentially viable methods to reduce impacts of plastic waste on the environment.

  20. A new era in science at Washington University, St. Louis: Viktor Hamburger's zoology department in the 1940's.

    PubMed

    Carson, H L

    2001-04-01

    In the early 1940s, the administration of the College of Arts and Sciences at Washington University, St. Louis was firmly in the hands of classical scholars who were not inclined to promote the development of modern research on scientific subjects. Funds supporting research in biology favored the School of Medicine and the Missouri Botanical Garden. Viktor Hamburger arrived at Washington University in 1935. At about the time he became the Acting Chairman of Zoology in 1942, research work in the biological departments began a dramatic surge that has continued to this day. For 65 years under his counsel and leadership, basic biology has thrived at this fine institution. As an early faculty recruit, I recount here a few personal recollections from those formative years.

  1. Monitoring the FLASH Cryomodule Transportation from DESY Hamburg to CEA Saclay: Coupler Contact, Vacuum, Acceleration and Vibration Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Barbanotti, S.; Bosotti, A.; Fusetti, M.; Michelato, P.; Bertolini, A.; Berry, S.; Dorlot, M.; Madec, C.; Napoly, O.; Amirikas, R.; Boehnert, M.; /DESY /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    With a view to the series production of one hundred, 12 m long XFEL 1.3 GHz cryomodules and their transportation from the assembly site at CEA Saclay (F) to the installation site at DESY Hamburg (D) a test transportation of a FLASH cryomodule has been performed, in the condition foreseen for the mass transportation. The present study examines the stresses induced on the module and verifies the damping capabilities of the transport frame in order to minimize risk of damage to the most critical components. During the transportation, acceleration and vibration have been monitored as well as coupler antenna contacts and vacuum performances. This paper describes the analysis performed and compares those results to the data of a similar transportation study at Fermilab for the CM1 cryomodule.

  2. [Medical care for asylum seekers and refugees at the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf--A case series].

    PubMed

    Sothmann, Peter; Schmedt auf der Günne, Nina; Addo, Marylyn; Lohse, Ansgar; Schmiedel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    As the number of refugees rises, medical care for refugees, asylum seekers and people with unclear residence status becomes a priority task for our health system. While access to health care is restricted for these groups of people in many German states, Hamburg provides unrestricted access to healthcare for refugees by handing out health insurance cards on arrival. Daily practice shows, however, that adequate medical care is still not always easy to achieve. In this case series we demonstrate that barriers to health care still exist on many levels. We discuss these barriers and further propose strategies to improve and to secure access to adequate health care. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Utilisation of energy from digester gas and sludge incineration at Hamburg's Köhlbrandhöft WWTP.

    PubMed

    Thierbach, R D; Hanssen, H

    2002-01-01

    At Hamburg's Köhlbrandhöft WWTP the demand for external energy supply is minimised by state of the art sludge treatment. The sludge is subjected to thickening, anaerobic digestion, dewatering, drying and incineration. The digester gas is used in a combined gas and steam turbine process. The sludge incineration also produces steam, which is also used in the steam turbine that follows the gas turbine. The turbines produce electricity, partially expanded steam is used for the sludge drying process. Heat from the condensation of vapours from sludge drying is used to heat the anaerobic digesters. The overall process requires no external heat or fuel and produces 60% of the WWTP's electricity demand.

  4. The Preference and Actual Use of Different Types of Rural Recreation Areas by Urban Dwellers—The Hamburg Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Boll, Thiemen; von Haaren, Christina; von Ruschkowski, Eick

    2014-01-01

    In the wake of urbanisation processes and the constitution of metropolitan regions, the role of the city's rural surroundings is receiving more attention from researchers and planners as rural areas offer various (cultural) ecosystem services for the urban population. Urban dwellers increasingly desire recreation and landscape experience. Although this need for recreation is generally recognized, few studies have focused on the question of people's preferences for certain types and characteristics of outdoor recreation areas in relation to the frequency of use. In order to acquire baseline data on this subject, the main objectives of this study were to explore recreation preferences of urban dwellers and the relation between actual use and perceived value of recreation areas in a case study in the Hamburg Metropolitan Region (Germany). In a social survey, Hamburg residents (n = 400) were asked about their preferences and use of four important regional recreation areas with different landscape characteristics in face-to-face interviews in different locations in the city. We found that both outdoor recreation within and outside of the city were fairly or very important for more than 70% of the questioned urban dwellers. Interestingly, the preference for a recreation area outside of the city did not depend on the frequency of use, which indicates that certain recreation areas had a symbolic value besides their use value. When people were questioned on the characteristics of recreation areas, perceived naturalness was found to be strongly related to preference. Respondents considered the diversity, uniqueness, and naturalness of the landscape to be far more important than the accessibility of the recreation areas and the provision of service facilities. PMID:25314002

  5. Management of risk of microbial cross-contamination from uncooked frozen hamburgers by alcohol-based hand sanitizer.

    PubMed

    Schaffner, Donald W; Schaffner, Kristin M

    2007-01-01

    This research was undertaken to determine the effectiveness of an alcohol-based hand sanitizer on hands contaminated with a nonpathogen surrogate for Escherichia coli O157:H7, where the source of the contamination was frozen hamburger patties. A nonpathogenic nalidixic acid-resistant food-grade strain of Enterobacter aerogenes was used to inoculate frozen hamburger patties composed of 76% lean beef and 24% fat. Thirty-two individuals participated to produce the data used in this study. Each participant handled nine patties at least three times, a sample for microbiological analysis was collected from the surface of one hand, the participant sanitized both hands, and a sample was collected from the other hand. Burger handling created perceptible and visible food debris on the hands of most participants. Computer simulations also were used to perform a variety of risk calculations. The average reduction in bacteria from the use of sanitizer on hands contaminated by frozen burgers containing E. aerogenes was 2.6 +/- 0.7 log CFU per hand. An experiment designed to simultaneously test the effect of sanitizer on E. aerogenes and E. coli O157:H7 also revealed no significant difference in sanitizer effectiveness against the two organisms. The results of the real-world risk estimation calculations (using the actual prevalence and concentration of E. coli O157:H7 in ground beef) predict that once in 1 million trials, a single pathogen cell will be transferred to a single lettuce piece. The effectiveness of this sanitizer intervention was similar to that for hand washing and glove use previously reported. The person-to-person microbial reduction variability from sanitizer use is similar to published data for glove use and was less variable than published data on hand washing effectiveness.

  6. Introduction to the Paper Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, D. K.

    1996-05-01

    Most students of physical chemistry, as well as their teachers, regard equilibrium chemical thermodynamics as an impressive, useful, and stable subject that was "finished" long ago. As part of their education, students in physical chemistry have been taught the importance and the usefulness of the Gibbs function (formerly called the Gibbs free energy function). The antiquity of the subject and the presumed mastery of its basics by physical chemistry teachers are taken for granted as given parts of the educational and scientific scene in chemical education. It comes as a surprise to occasionally discover that even those who teach this venerable subject sometimes disagree, not merely in matters of style or organization of the subject, or in matters of mathematical elegance, but in matters of real substance. The following four papers are examples of this. My role here is simply to introduce this set of papers and to provide some orientation regarding their contents. The authors have been in private communication with each other for a period of over four years about the use and the proper definition of the Gibbs function. The lengthy period of correspondence has not resulted in any significant agreement. The Editor of this Journal was unable to settle the resulting controversy by normal review procedures. In an attempt to break the deadlock he asked me, as an impartial outsider to the situation, for assistance in deciding an appropriate literary form in which the authors could present their own points of view as well as comments on the views of the other authors. The original hope was that agreement could eventually be reached on disputed points by the give and take of the interchange of further correspondence, and that the outcome would be published in the form of a "paper symposium" on the subject, with me as the "chairman" of the symposium. It must be said at the outset that the prolonged correspondence has not produced much agreement among the authors. This is

  7. PREFACE: XXXV Symposium on Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla-Rodal, E.; Bijker, R.

    2012-09-01

    Conference logo The XXXV Symposium on Nuclear Physics was held at Hotel Hacienda Cocoyoc, Morelos, Mexico from January 3-6 2012. Conceived in 1978 as a small meeting, over the years and thanks to the efforts of various organizing committees, the symposium has become a well known international conference on nuclear physics. To the best of our knowledge, the Mexican Symposium on Nuclear Physics represents the conference series with longest tradition in Latin America and one of the longest-running annual nuclear physics conferences in the world. The Symposium brings together leading scientists from all around the world, working in the fields of nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, physics with radioactive ion beams, hadronic physics, nuclear astrophysics, neutron physics and relativistic heavy-ion physics. Its main goal is to provide a relaxed environment where the exchange of ideas, discussion of new results and consolidation of scientific collaboration are encouraged. To celebrate the 35th edition of the symposium 53 colleagues attended from diverse countries including: Argentina, Australia, Canada, Japan, Saudi Arabia and USA. We were happy to have the active participation of Eli F Aguilera, Eduardo Andrade, Octavio Castaños, Alfonso Mondragón, Stuart Pittel and Andrés Sandoval who also participated in the first edition of the Symposium back in 1978. We were joined by old friends of Cocoyoc (Stuart Pittel, Osvaldo Civitarese, Piet Van Isacker, Jerry Draayer and Alfredo Galindo-Uribarri) as well as several first time visitors that we hope will come back to this scientific meeting in the forthcoming years. The scientific program consisted of 33 invited talks, proposed by the international advisory committee, which nicely covered the topics of the Symposium giving a balanced perspective between the experimental and the theoretical work that is currently underway in each line of research. Fifteen posters complemented the scientific sessions giving the opportunity

  8. First LDEF Post-Retrieval Symposium abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Arlene S. (Compiler)

    1991-01-01

    The LDE facility was designed to better understand the environments of space and the effects of prolonged exposure in these environments on future spacecraft. The symposium abstracts presented here are organized according to the symposium agenda into five sessions. The first session provides an overview of the LDEF, the experiments, the mission, and the natural and induced environments the spacecraft and experiments encountered during the mission. The second session presents results to date from studies to better define the environments of near-Earth space. The third session addresses studies of the effects of the space environments on spacecraft materials. The fourth session addresses studies of the effects of the space environments on spacecraft systems. And the fifth session addresses other subjects such as results of the LDEF life science and crystal growth experiments.

  9. Tenth international symposium on environmental biogeochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, H.L.

    1992-01-01

    The primary task of this Symposium on Environmental Biogeochemistry was to examine our current understanding of GLOBAL CHANGE AND THE BIOGEOCHEMISTRY OF RADIATIVE TRACE GASES. The symposium was divided into 12 non-overlapping sessions: Paleoatmospheres and paleoclimates; Global distributions and atmospheric reactions; Poster presentations on the topics of sessions 1, 2, 4, 5, and 7; Terrestrial systems and land use change - 1; Terrestrial and land use change - 11; Fluxes and cycling in aquatic systems; Metals, organics, and depositional environments; Poster presentations on the topics of sessions 6, 9, 10 and 12; Biological Mechanisms of formation and destruction - 1; Biological mechanisms of formation and destruction - 11; High latitude systems; and Global sources, sinks, and feedbacks.

  10. John B. Little Center Annual Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Demple, Bruce F.

    2007-11-02

    The Annual Symposium of the John B. Little Center for Radiation Sciences and Environmental Health at the Harvard School of Public Health seeks to educate radiobiologists and biomedical scientists in related areas on the leading research related to the effects of ionizing radiation and related environmental agents in biological systems. This effort seeks to further the training of individuals in this field, and to foment productive interactions and collaborations among scientists at Harvard and with other institutions. The Symposium attracts world-class scientists as speakers, and a broad cross-section of attendees from academic, government, and industrial research centers, as well as editorial staff from leading scientific publications. In order to maintain this quality, funding to support the travel and local expenses of invited speakers is sought, along with funds to allow use of appropriate conference facilities.

  11. Future high energy colliders symposium. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z. |

    1996-12-31

    A `Future High Energy Colliders` Symposium was held October 21-25, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics (ITP) in Santa Barbara. This was one of the 3 symposia hosted by the ITP and supported by its sponsor, the National Science Foundation, as part of a 5 month program on `New Ideas for Particle Accelerators`. The long term program and symposia were organized and coordinated by Dr. Zohreh Parsa of Brookhaven National Laboratory/ITP. The purpose of the symposium was to discuss the future direction of high energy physics by bringing together leaders from the theoretical, experimental and accelerator physics communities. Their talks provided personal perspectives on the physics objectives and the technology demands of future high energy colliders. Collectively, they formed a vision for where the field should be heading and how it might best reach its objectives.

  12. IAHS/AGU symposium on groundwater contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abriola, Linda M.; Bahr, Jean M.

    1991-05-01

    Papers presented at a two-day jointly sponsored IAHS/AGU symposium on groundwater contamination are briefly summarized. This international symposium was held 11 12 May, 1989, in Baltimore, Maryland. Presentations encompassed recent research developments in three general areas: abiotic and biotic processes governing contaminant transport; aquifer rehabilitation; and the influence of agricultural practices and nonpoint sources on aquifer quality. Contributions offered an interesting mixture of theoretical, mathematical, laboratory, and field studies. In the first session, transport processes explored ranged from dispersion and fingering to nonequilibrium sorption, metals complexation, and bacteria migration. The use of optimization modeling in the design of remediation strategies was the focus of another session. Here theoretical studies were presented alongside case histories of aquifer rehabilitation. In a final session, a number of models for agricultural management were described. These presentations were complemented by case studies of actual aquifer degradation resulting from land-use and management practices.

  13. Preface: The Ninth International Flatfish Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loher, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    The papers contained in this volume of the Journal of Sea Research, and in a second issue to be published subsequently, represent research findings that were presented in whole or in part at the Ninth International Flatfish Symposium (IFS), convened in Cle Elum, Washington, USA, in November of 2014. This conference represented the most recent in a series that was begun nearly three decades ago (see Berghahn, this issue), and established to bring together the world's leading flatfish scientists, as well as students and researchers just beginning to embark upon flatfish research, to share emerging results, exchange ideas, and foster greater international collaboration and understanding of this taxon. For each symposium, an overarching theme is chosen and papers are presented within a series of Topic Sessions that both encompass the general theme while allowing unfettered presentation of research that may lie outside of that primary focus.

  14. Special Issue International CAWSES-II Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, Mamoru; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Nakamura, Takuji; Gopalswamy, Nat

    2016-01-01

    This special issue gathered papers from the International CAWSES-II Symposium (November 18-22, 2013 at Nagoya University, Japan). Climate and Weather of the Sun-Earth System II (CAWSES-II) is an international scientific program sponsored by Scientific Committee on Solar-Terrestrial Physics (SCOSTEP) that continued from 2009 to 2013. The program was established with the aim of significantly enhancing our understanding of the space environment and its impacts on life and society. The International CAWSES-II Symposium was successful with 388 presentations; and from that, 38 papers were published in this special issue. In this preface, we briefly discuss the contents of the special issue as well as the CAWSES-II review papers published in Progress in Earth and Planetary Science (PEPS) in 2014-2015.

  15. FINDINGS OF A SYMPOSIUM ON COAL QUALITY.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schweinfurth, Stanley P.; Garbini, Susan

    1985-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been doing research on coal quality for almost a century. Most of the work of the USGS regarding coal went into efforts to assess the quantity of coal in the United States, not the quality. On April 9-11, 1985, the U. S. Geological Survey, along with cosponsors - the Association of American State Geologists, the U. S. Department of Energy, the Electric Power Research Institute, and the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency - convened a symposium on coal quality at the headquarters of the USGS in Reston, Virginia. The coal-quality symposium provided a forum for the discussion of a wide variety of topics with regard to coal-quality research and related activities. The coal community took advantage of that opportunity to recommend a large agenda of coal-research needs, not only for the USGS but for the entire spectrum of organizations that either actively pursue or fund research on coal quality.

  16. The 1993 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, L.R.; Mosier, F.L.

    1993-10-01

    The 1993 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium is a combined symposia of the Get Away Special (GAS), Hitchhiker, and Complex Autonomous Payloads (CAP) programs, and is proposed to continue as an annual conference. The focus of this conference is to educate potential Space Shuttle Payload Bay users as to the types of carrier systems provided and for current users to share experiment concepts. Separate abstracts have been prepared for articles from this report.

  17. The 1995 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, F.; Mosier, F.L.

    1995-09-01

    The 1995 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium is a combined symposia of the Get Away Special (GAS) and Hitchhiker programs, and is proposed to continue as an annual conference. The focus of this conference is to educate potential Space Shuttle Payload Bay users as to the types of carrier systems provided and for current users to share experiment concepts. Separate abstracts have been submitted for contributions to this report.

  18. Artiss Symposium 2014: Psychiatry and Pain Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    ORGANIZATION NAME{S) AND ADDRESS{ES) -Department of Psychiatry, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, 8901 Wisconsin Ave, Bethesda, MD 20814 -Center...National Military Medical Center, 8901 Wsconsin Ave, Bethesda, MD 20814 Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress; Dept. of Psychiatry, Uniformed Services...SYMPOSIUM 2014 Psychiatry and Pain Management Department of Psychiatry, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center National Intrepid Center of

  19. Climate Symposium 2014: Findings and Recommendations

    DOE PAGES

    Asrar, Ghassem; Bony, Sandrine; Boucher, Olivier; ...

    2015-10-05

    Here, the Climate Symposium 2014, organized by the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) and the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP), with support from the European Commission (EC), European Space Agency (ESA), and other agencies, took place in Darmstadt, Germany, from 13 to 17 October 2014. Around 500 participants from 49 countries attended the event and represented over 200 organizations. Another 500 individuals participated remotely via “live streaming.”

  20. Assessing a Science Graduate School Recruitment Symposium

    PubMed Central

    González-Espada, Wilson; Díaz-Muñoz, Greetchen; Feliú-Mójer, Mónica; Flores-Otero, Jacqueline; Fortis-Santiago, Yaihara; Guerrero-Medina, Giovanna; López-Casillas, Marcos; Colón-Ramos, Daniel A.; Fernández-Repollet, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Ciencia Puerto Rico, a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting science, research and scientific education among Latinos, organized an educational symposium to provide college science majors the tools, opportunities and advice to pursue graduate degrees and succeed in the STEM disciplines. In this article we share our experiences and lessons learned, for others interested in developing large-scale events to recruit underrepresented minorities to STEM and in evaluating the effectiveness of these efforts. PMID:26770074

  1. 24th International Symposium on Ballistics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-26

    by changed projectile shape , which leads to enhanced plugging failure. • Importance of in-situ testing!!! • Be careful with norms and standards...shown). Mach 0.7 Mach 1.25 24th Int’l Symposium on Ballistics, 22-26 Sep 2008 14 Conclusions & Future Work • Projectile base shape is an important...strength is the parameter that permits the projectile to maintain the designed armor-piercing shape during the penetration process. – The projectile

  2. Eleventh international symposium on radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This document contains abstracts of papers which were presented at the Eleventh International Symposium on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry. Sessions included: radiopharmaceuticals for the dopaminergic system, strategies for the production and use of labelled reactive small molecules, radiopharmaceuticals for measuring metabolism, radiopharmaceuticals for the serotonin and sigma receptor systems, labelled probes for molecular biology applications, radiopharmaceuticals for receptor systems, radiopharmaceuticals utilizing coordination chemistry, radiolabelled antibodies, radiolabelling methods for small molecules, analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry, and analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry.

  3. PREFACE: Fourth International Symposium on Atomic Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Shigefumi

    2010-04-01

    The International Symposium on Atomic Technology (ISAT) is held every year. The 4th Symposium (ISAT-4) was held on November 18-19, 2009 at the Seaside Hotel MAIKO VILLA KOBE, Kobe City, Japan presided by the "Atomic Technology Project". The ISAT-4 symposium was intended to offer a forum for the discussion on the latest progress in the atomic technologies. The symposium was attended by 107 delegates. There were 10 invited and 6 oral presentations. The number of poster presentations was 69. From all the contributions, 22 papers selected through review process are contained in this volume. The "Atomic Technology Project" was started in 2006 as a joint project of three institutions; (1) the Center for Atomic and Molecular Technologies, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University (CAMT), (2) the Tsukuba Research Center for Interdisciplinary Materials Science, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba (TIMS) and (3) the Polyscale Technology Research Center, Research Institute for Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science (PTRC), each of which were independently pursuing nano-technologies and was developing atomic scale operation and diagnostics, functional materials, micro processing and device. The project is funded by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. The goal of the project is to contribute to the development of atomic-scale science and technologies such as functional molecules, biomaterials, and quantum functions of atomic-scale structures. Shigefumi Okada Conference Chair Center for Atomic and Molecular Technologies, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita-city, Osaka 565-0871, Japan. Conference photograph Kobe photograph

  4. Assessing a Science Graduate School Recruitment Symposium.

    PubMed

    González-Espada, Wilson; Díaz-Muñoz, Greetchen; Feliú-Mójer, Mónica; Flores-Otero, Jacqueline; Fortis-Santiago, Yaihara; Guerrero-Medina, Giovanna; López-Casillas, Marcos; Colón-Ramos, Daniel A; Fernández-Repollet, Emma

    2015-12-01

    Ciencia Puerto Rico, a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting science, research and scientific education among Latinos, organized an educational symposium to provide college science majors the tools, opportunities and advice to pursue graduate degrees and succeed in the STEM disciplines. In this article we share our experiences and lessons learned, for others interested in developing large-scale events to recruit underrepresented minorities to STEM and in evaluating the effectiveness of these efforts.

  5. PREFACE: XXXIV Symposium on Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrón-Palos, Libertad; Bijker, Roelof

    2011-10-01

    In the present volume of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series we publish the proceedings of the 'XXXIV Symposium on Nuclear Physics', which was held from 4-7 January 2011 at the Hacienda Cocoyoc, Morelos, Mexico. The proceedings consist of 19 contributions that were presented as invited talks at the meeting. The abstracts of all contributions, plenary talks and posters were published in the Conference Handbook. The Symposium on Nuclear Physics has a long and distinguished history. From the beginning it was intended to be a relatively small meeting designed to bring together some of the leading nuclear scientists in the field. Its most distinctive feature is to provide a forum for specialists in different areas of nuclear physics, both theorists and experimentalists, students, postdocs and senior scientists, in a relaxed and informal environment providing them with a unique opportunity to exchange ideas. From the first meeting in Oaxtepec in 1978, the Symposium has been organized every year without interruption, which makes the present Symposium the 34th in a row. The scientific program consisted of 27 invited talks and 17 posters on a wide variety of hot topics in contemporary nuclear physics, ranging from the traditional fields of nuclear structure (Draayer, Pittel, Van Isacker, Fraser, Lerma, Cejnar, Hirsch, Stránský and Rath) and nuclear reactions (Aguilera, Gómez-Camacho, Scheid, Navrátil and Yennello) to radioactive beams (Padilla-Rodal and Galindo-Uribarri), nuclear astrophysics (Aprahamian, Civitarese and Escher), hadronic physics (Bijker, Valcarce and Hess), fundamental symmetries (Liu, Barrón-Palos and Baessler) and LHC physics (Menchaca-Rocha and Paic). The high quality of the talks, the prestige of the speakers and the broad spectrum of subjects covered in the meeting, shows that nuclear physics is a very active area at the frontier of scientific research which establishes bridges between many different disciplines. Libertad Barr

  6. Sixth underground coal-conversion symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The sixth annual underground coal conversion symposium was held at Shangri-la near Afton, Oklahoma, July 13 to 17, 1980. Sessions were developed to: Doe Field Programs, Major Industry Activity, Mathematical Modeling, Laboratory Studies, Environmental Studies, Economics, Instruments and Controls, and General Topics. Fifty-two papers from the proceedings have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. Thirteen papers had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

  7. Proceedings of the DMS medical ethics symposium.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, D J

    2011-12-01

    This article presents the proceedings of a symposium on medical ethics held at the Royal Centre for Defence Medicine in October 2010. The nature of current operations continually generates challenging ethical problems, many of which are unique to the military environment. This article is intended to generate a debate on these difficult issues and readers are encouraged to contribute to this debate by emailing the Editor.

  8. PREFACE: The International Symposium on Atomic Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirai, Yasuharu

    2008-03-01

    The International Symposium on Atomic Technology (ISAT) is held every year. The Second Symposium (ISAT-2) was held on 1-2 October 2007 at the Awaji Yumebutai Conference Center, Awaji City, Japan presided by the `Atomic Technology Project'. The ISAT-2 symposium was intended to offer a forum for the discussion of the latest progress in atomic technologies. The symposium was attended by 106 delegates. There were 9 invited and 5 oral presentations. The number of poster presentations was 73. From all the contributions, 24 papers selected through review process are contained in this volume. The `Atomic Technology Project' was started in 2006 as a joint project of three institutions; (1) Center for Atomic and Molecular Technologies, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University (CAMT), (2) Tsukuba Research Center for Interdisciplinary Materials Science, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba (TIMS) and (3) Polyscale Technology Research Center, Research Institute for Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science (PTRC), each of which were independently pursuing nano-technologies and were developing atomic scale operation and diagnostics, functional materials, micro processing and devices. The project is funded by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. The goal of the project is to contribute to the development of atomic-scale science and technologies such as functional molecules, biomaterials, and quantum functions of atomic-scale structures. Yasuharu Shirai Conference Chair Center for Atomic Technologies, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita-city, Osaka 565-0871, Japan. Conference photograph

  9. Symposium on Human-Computer Information Retrieval.

    PubMed

    Tunkelang, Daniel; Capra, Robert; Golovchinsky, Gene; Kules, Bill; Smith, Catherine; White, Ryen

    2013-03-01

    Human-computer information retrieval (HCIR) is the study of information retrieval techniques that integrate human intelligence and algorithmic search to help people explore, understand, and use information. Since 2007, we have held an annual gathering of researchers and practitioners to advance the state of the art in this field. This meeting report summarizes the history of the HCIR symposium and emphasizes its relevance to the data science community.

  10. Structure-biodegradability study and computer-automated prediction of aerobic biodegradation of chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Klopman, G.; Tu, M.

    1997-09-01

    It is shown that a combination of two programs, MultiCASE and META, can help assess the biodegradability of industrial organic materials in the ecosystem. MultiCASE is an artificial intelligence computer program that had been trained to identify molecular substructures believed to cause or inhibit biodegradation and META is an expert system trained to predict the aerobic biodegradation products of organic molecules. These two programs can be used to help evaluate the fate of disposed chemicals by estimating their biodegradability and the nature of their biodegradation products under conditions that may model the environment.

  11. Land Subsidence International Symposium held in Venice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Third International Symposium on Land Subsidence was held March 18-25, 1984, in Venice, Italy. Sponsors were the Ground-Water Commission of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS), the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the Italian National Research Council (CNR), the Italian Regions of Veneto and Emilia-Romagna, the Italian Municipalities of Venice, Ravenna, and Modena, the Venice Province, and the European Research Office. Cosponsors included the International Association of Hydrogeologists (IAH), the International Society for Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering (ISSMFE), and the Association of Geoscientists for International Development (AGID).Organized within the framework of UNESCO's International Hydrological Program, the symposium brought together over 200 international interdisciplinary specialists in the problems of land subsidence due to fluid and mineral withdrawal. Because man's continuing heavy development of groundwater, gas, oil, and minerals is changing the natural regime and thus causing more and more subsiding areas in the world, there had been sufficient new land subsidence occurrence, problems, research, and remedial measures since the 1976 Second International Symposium held in Anaheim, California, to develop a most interesting program of nearly 100 papers from about 30 countries. The program consisted of papers covering case histories of fluid and mineral withdrawal, engineering theory and analysis, karst “sink-hole”-type subsidence, subsidence due to dewatering of organic deposits or due to application of water (hydrocompaction), instrumentation, legal, socioeconomic, and environmental effects of land subsidence, and remedial works.

  12. Final report, International Symposium on Environmental Biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, Donald L.

    2000-03-20

    This meeting included technical presentations of state-of-the-art research which were integrated with tutorials and workshops by practicing technologies in the broad field of environmental biotechnology. This meeting was designed to be, in every respect, truly global. Over 150 excellent abstracts from around the world were accepted. For example, presentations were heard from technical workers in Southeast Asia, Russia, China, Europe, North Africa, India, and the US. By having these selected presenters, as well as identified experienced tutors with focused workshops, all participants benefited from this interactive symposium. A number of social events further promoted informal exchange of ideas, discussions of technical problems, and exploration of new applications. This international symposium on environmental biotechnology was on the campus of Northeastern University but all Boston area universities were included and participated using designed conference Co-Chairs. This symposium, with an attendance of several hundred people, was considered a major success. Workers with experience in one area of environmental biotechnology learned from the wealth of established backgrounds of those in other areas of environmental biotechnology. To formally disseminate conference results, it was pre-arranged that all technical presentations were reviewed for formal publications.

  13. Reduced liquid movement subject of Denver Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reduction of subsurface movement of liquids was the subject of a 1-day symposium sponsored by Committee D-18 on Soil and Rock of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) and cosponsored by the U.S. Committee on Large Dams (USCOLD) of the International Commission on Large Dams. The Symposium on Impermeable Barriers for Soil and Rock, the first specialized symposium of its kind, was held in Denver, Colorado, on June 25, 1984. The program emphasized the interaction of the environmental system of soil and rock containment, impermeable barriers, and enclosed liquids. The theory, testing, and design considerations of such interactive systems was explored in relation to slurry walls and clay and earth additive linings as applied to geotechnical engineering projects such as tailings and waste containment ponds, landfills, solar and biomass ponds, ditches, canals, and reservoirs. A number of papers presented research results on the interaction of various chemical and hazardous wastes with the soil and rock materials and lining or slurry materials.

  14. What scientists can learn from Plato's Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Emmerik, Tim

    2015-04-01

    Conferences and scientific meetings are as old as science itself. The ancient Greeks where (in)famous for organizing so-called symposiums. During a symposium (from Greek, drinking together), attendees followed a program that contained both social and scientific aspects, focused around a certain topic. Whilst drinking and eating, all participants were expected to share their vision on the topic of interest by giving an oral presentation. The goal of these meetings was to arrive at a new common understanding and to come closer to the truth. Plato et al. knew very well how to organize an effective scientific conference, which should make use overthink the way we are organizing present-day conferences. Scientific meetings aim to connect researchers, share research and unravel the truth. The question is now: how do we get this done effectively? Plato knew that discussing science with strangers is difficult and he believed that talking about heavy matter could be done best when combined with social events. What if we try to go back to the times of Plato and model our conferences after the ancient symposiums? We might drop laying on couches and covering ourselves in ivy and flowers. However, a mix of social and scientific events will contribute to achieving the ultimate goal of why scientists go to conferences: to connect, to share and to unravel the truth.

  15. PREFACE: XXXVII Symposium on Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijker, R.; Lerma, S.; Lizcano, D.

    2015-01-01

    The Symposium on Nuclear Physics is an international meeting organized every year since 1978 by the Division of Nuclear Physics of the Mexican Physical Society. The 37th edition was held at the Hotel Hacienda Cocoyoc in the state of Morelos, Mexico, from 6-9 January, 2014. The symposium is intended to be a relatively small meeting designed to bring together some of the leading nuclear scientists in different areas of nuclear physics (nuclear astrophysics, nuclear structure, neutrino physics, hadron physics and nuclear reactions among others). Both theorists and experimentalists, students, postdocs and senior scientists gathered in a relaxed and informal environment providing them with a unique opportunity to exchange ideas. The symposium was organized in plenary sessions with invited talks and a poster session. In this edition the program consisted of 26 invited talks and 19 posters, whose subjects reflected the active areas and interests of the mexican nuclear physics community. The organization encouraged the participation of young scientist as speakers in the plenary sessions. Seven of the 26 invited talks were given by postdoctoral and doctoral students working in different institutions from Mexico, USA and Europe. The proceedings collect a total of 16 manuscripts from the invited speakers.

  16. Physiology and Endocrinology Symposium. Factors controlling puberty in beef heifers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Physiology and Endocrinology Symposium on “Factors controlling puberty in beef heifers” was held at the joint annual meeting of the American Dairy Science Association and the American Society of Animal Science in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, July 10 to 14, 2011. The objective of the symposium w...

  17. STATIONARY COMBUSTION NOX CONTROL: A SUMMARY OF THE 1991 SYMPOSIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 1991 Symposium on Stationary Combustion NOX Control was held March 25-28,1991 in Washington, DC. The sixth meeting in a biennial series, the Symposium was cosponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Approxima...

  18. Meeting the Government's Technology Challenge: Results of a GAO Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Information Management and Technology Div.

    In October, 1989, the General Accounting Office sponsored a symposium, "Meeting the Government's Technology Challenge," that brought together leaders from industry and government to explore ways of better using information technology to meet the demands facing the government into the next century. Building on the symposium's results to provide a…

  19. System analysis in forest resources: proceedings of the 2003 symposium.

    Treesearch

    Michael Bevers; Tara M. Barrett

    2005-01-01

    The 2003 symposium of systems analysis in forest resources brought together researchers and practitioners who apply methods of optimization, simulation, management science, and systems analysis to forestry problems. This was the 10th symposium in the series, with previous conferences held in 1975, 1985, 1988, 1991, 1993, 1994, 1997, 2000, and 2002. The forty-two papers...

  20. Proceedings of the SPE unconventional gas technology symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a symposium on the recovery of natural gas from unconventional sources. Topics considered at the symposium included tight sandstones, Devonian shales, hydraulic fracturing, coalbed methane, gas hydrates, interference testing, naturally fractured reservoirs, gas condensate wells, formation damage, hydraulic fracture mechanics, and computerized simulation.

  1. Comparative gut physiology symposium: The microbe-gut-brain axis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Comparative Gut Physiology Symposium titled “The Microbe-Gut-Brain Axis” was held at the Joint Annual Meeting of the American Society of Animal Science and the American Dairy Science Association on Thursday, July 21, 2016, in Salt Lake City Utah. The goal of the symposium was to present basic r...

  2. Programming, Managing, and Judging Science Symposium Poster Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    The Pacific Region Junior Science and Humanities Symposium has operated for 14 years as a region of the National Junior Science and Humanities Symposium. In response to the trend among professional science and science education societies to include both formal research report presentations and informal poster presentations, the Pacific Region…

  3. A Symposium on Career Information Systems: Issues for Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gerald C.; And Others

    The document consists of three symposium addresses, pertaining to the provision and use of career information systems. Gerald C. Smith, Department of Labor, opened the symposium with an address on "Occupational Information systems: Uses, Developments, and Issues", which focused on career information systems currently being developed by the…

  4. 76 FR 17137 - Pregnancy and Prescription Medication Use Symposium

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pregnancy and Prescription Medication Use Symposium AGENCY... announcing the following meeting: Pregnancy and Prescription Medication Use Symposium. The topic to be discussed is ``Prescription Drug Use in Pregnancy.'' Date and Time: The meeting will be held on May 17, 2011...

  5. Proceedings of the materials processing symposium. Volume 38

    SciTech Connect

    Metzbower, E.A.

    1983-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a symposium on materials working using lasers. Topics considered at the symposium included preionization techniques, beam profiles of carbon dioxide lasers, beam focusing, laser welding, porosity decrease in laser welds of stainless steel, underwater welding, laser surface treatments, and laser hardening of carbon steels.

  6. Go Tell Alcibiades: Tragedy, Comedy, and Rhetoric in Plato's "Symposium"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crick, Nathan; Poulakos, John

    2008-01-01

    Plato's "Symposium" is a significant but neglected part of his elaborate and complex attitude toward rhetoric. Unlike the intellectual discussion of the "Gorgias" or the unscripted conversation of the "Phaedrus," the "Symposium" stages a feast celebrating and driven by the forces of "Eros." A luxuriously stylish performance rather than a rational…

  7. The Humanities in the Schools: A Contemporary Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Harold, Ed.

    A symposium at the University of Kentucky in 1965 brought together 15 educators and six writers concerned with cultural values in an attempt to develop ideas for improving arts and humanities instruction in the public secondary schools. The papers presented in the symposium comprise this publication. In an introductory essay, Harold Taylor surveys…

  8. PROCEEDINGS: THE 1992 GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS AND MITIGATION RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report documents the 1992 Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Research Symposium held in Washington, DC, August 18-20, 1992. The symposium provided a forum for exchange of technical information on global change emissions and potential mitigation technologies. The primary ...

  9. 78 FR 10180 - Annual Computational Science Symposium; Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Annual Computational Science Symposium; Conference AGENCY... public conference entitled ``The FDA/PhUSE Annual Computational Science Symposium.'' The purpose of the conference is to help the broader community align and share experiences to advance computational science. At...

  10. Welcome to the sudden oak death third science symposium

    Treesearch

    Susan J. Frankel

    2008-01-01

    On behalf of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)-Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station and the California Oak Mortality Task Force, it is my pleasure to welcome you to the Sudden Oak Death Third Science Symposium. Looking back at the first sudden oak death science symposium held in Monterey in December 2002, it is amazing to see how far we...

  11. Laser induced damage in optical materials: 8th ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1977-05-01

    The Eighth Annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was hosted by the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, from 13 to 15 July 1976. The Symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Energy Research and Development Administration, and the Office of Naval Research. About 160 scientists attended the Symposium, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, and Brazil. The Symposium was divided into five half-day sessions concerning Bulk Material Properties and Thermal Behavior, Mirrors and Surfaces, Thin Film Properties, Thin Film Damage, and Scaling Laws and Fundamental Mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the Symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to new materials for use at 10.6 microm in mirror substrates, windo s, and coatings. New techniques in film deposition and advances in diamond-turning of optics were described. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength were discussed. Alexander J. Glass of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory were co-chairpersons of the Symposium. The Ninth Annual Symposium is scheduled for 4-6 October 1977 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado.

  12. Go Tell Alcibiades: Tragedy, Comedy, and Rhetoric in Plato's "Symposium"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crick, Nathan; Poulakos, John

    2008-01-01

    Plato's "Symposium" is a significant but neglected part of his elaborate and complex attitude toward rhetoric. Unlike the intellectual discussion of the "Gorgias" or the unscripted conversation of the "Phaedrus," the "Symposium" stages a feast celebrating and driven by the forces of "Eros." A luxuriously stylish performance rather than a rational…

  13. The fescue toxicosis symposium: introduction to the proceedings

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fescue Toxicosis was a symposium presented at the 2008 joint meetings of the Amercian Forage and Grssland Council and the Society for Range Management in Louisville, Kentucky. The purpose of the symposium was to: 1) provide updated information on toxic and non-toxic endophyte interactions with her...

  14. The 16th James L. Waters Annual Symposium: Electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Adrian C.

    2007-04-01

    The 16th Annual James L. Waters Symposium focused on electrochemistry, with emphasis on methods involving the flow of current. The speakers in this year's symposium are uniquely qualified to review the history of electroanalytical chemistry starting with Heyrovsky's initial studies and culminating with the present state of the art. Each has contributed significantly to the scientific, technical, and commercial development of the field.

  15. Proceedings of the Symposium on Nondestructive Testing of Wood.

    Treesearch

    1964-01-01

    This report summarizes the main points considered and the conclusions reached during the Symposium on Nondestructive Testing, October 7 to 9, 1963, at the Forest Products Laboratory. The purpose of this symposium was to bring research and industry leaders together to examine what is being done in nondestructive testing and discuss its applications to the wood products...

  16. STATIONARY COMBUSTION NOX CONTROL: A SUMMARY OF THE 1991 SYMPOSIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 1991 Symposium on Stationary Combustion NOX Control was held March 25-28,1991 in Washington, DC. The sixth meeting in a biennial series, the Symposium was cosponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Approxima...

  17. CPTAC Scientific Symposium Highlights - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    The first CPTAC Public Scientific Symposium was recently held on November 13, 2013 at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, MD. The symposium brought together a record number of registrants, 450 scientists, who shared and discussed novel biological discoveries, analytical methods, and translational approaches using CPTAC data.

  18. PROCEEDINGS: THE 1992 GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS AND MITIGATION RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report documents the 1992 Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Research Symposium held in Washington, DC, August 18-20, 1992. The symposium provided a forum for exchange of technical information on global change emissions and potential mitigation technologies. The primary ...

  19. Symposium on Population and Human Rights.

    PubMed

    1981-06-01

    The objectives of the Symposium on Population and Human Rights, held at the Vienna International Center during June 1981, included the following: to review the progress or lack thereof in the observance of human rights in the context of demographic, economic and social conditions and changes since the Amsterdam Symposium of 1974; to review leading population trends and policy changes since 1974 and also examine some possible implications of recent development in the field of medicine, biology, and genetic engineering; and to identify which conceptions of human rights relating to demographic phenomenon are appropriate for today's population problems and to formulate guidelines and standards suitable for these problems. The agenda for the Symposium, attended by about 27 distinguished jurists and demographers, covered the following items: human rights and population trends and policies; morbidity/mortality and human rights; fertility and human rights; internal migration and human rights; status of women, population, and human rights; and new institutional functions in the area of human rights and population. The following were among the main themes and recommendations of the Symposium: 1) the problems of human rights should be contextually handled in such a way as to take adequate account of prevailing socioeconomic and cultural conditions; 2) the realization of a positive right to individual and social development is often impeded, particularly in developing areas, by the prevalence of high mortality, malnutrition, and inadequate health services; 3) policies designed to influence fertility should, within the framework of general population policies, be part of the national strategy for general development; 4) the Symposium recognized the problems of monitoring and appraising the observance or violation of human rights as they relate to the rights of the individual to free movement and residence and the rights to work and decent living; 5) considering the significant

  20. PREFACE: Nobel Symposium 129 on Neutrino Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergström, Lars; Botner, Olga; Carlson, Per; Hulth, Per Olof; Ohlsson, Tommy

    2005-01-01

    Nobel Symposium 129 on Neutrino Physics was held at Haga Slott in Enköping, Sweden during August 19 24, 2004. Invited to the symposium were around 40 globally leading researchers in the field of neutrino physics, both experimental and theoretical. In addition to these participants, some 30 local researchers and graduate students participated in the symposium. The dominant theme of the lectures was neutrino oscillations, which after several years were recently verified by results from the Super-Kamiokande detector in Kamioka, Japan and the SNO detector in Sudbury, Canada. Discussion focused especially on effects of neutrino oscillations derived from the presence of matter and the fact that three different neutrinos exist. Since neutrino oscillations imply that neutrinos have mass, this is the first experimental observation that fundamentally deviates from the standard model of particle physics. This is a challenge to both theoretical and experimental physics. The various oscillation parameters will be determined with increased precision in new, specially designed experiments. Theoretical physics is working intensively to insert the knowledge that neutrinos have mass into the theoretical models that describe particle physics. It will probably turn out that the discovery of neutrino oscillations signifies a breakthrough in the description of the very smallest constituents of matter. The lectures provided a very good description of the intensive situation in the field right now. The topics discussed also included mass models for neutrinos, neutrinos in extra dimensions as well as the `seesaw mechanism', which provides a good description of why neutrino masses are so small. Also discussed, besides neutrino oscillations, was the new field of neutrino astronomy. Among the questions that neutrino astronomy hopes to answer are what the dark matter in the Universe consists of and where cosmic radiation at extremely high energies comes from. For this purpose, large neutrino