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Sample records for biogenic iron microminerals

  1. Formation and Reactivity of Biogenic Iron Microminerals

    SciTech Connect

    Beveridge, Terrance J.; Ferris, F. Grant

    2001-08-15

    The overall purpose of the project was to explore and quantify the processes that control the formation and reactivity of biogenic iron microminerals and their impact on the solubility of metal contaminants. The research addressed how surface components of bacterial cells, extracellular organic material, and the aqueous geochemistry of the DIRB microenvironment impacts the mineralogy, chemical state and micromorphology of reduced iron phases.

  2. Formation and Reactivity of Biogenic Iron Microminerals

    SciTech Connect

    Beveridge, Terrance J.; Glasauer, Susan; Korenevsky, Anton; Ferris, F. Grant

    2000-08-08

    The overall purpose of the project is to explore and quantify the processes that control the formation and reactivity of biogenic iron microminerals and their impact on the solubility of metal contaminants. The research addresses how surface components of bacterial cells, extracellular organic material, and the aqueous geochemistry of the DIRB microenvironment impacts the mineralogy, chemical state and micromorphology of reduced iron phases.

  3. Formation and Reactivity of Biogenic Iron Microminerals

    SciTech Connect

    Beveridge, Terrance J.; Ferris, F. Grant

    1999-06-01

    The overall purpose of the project is to explore and quantify the processes that control the formation and reactivity of biogenic iron microminerals, and the impact of these processes on the solubility of metal contaminants, e.g., uranium, chromium and nickel. The research addresses how surface components of bacterial cells, extracellular organic material, and the aqueous geochemistry of the DIRB microenvironment impacts the mineralogy, chemical state and micromorphology of reduced iron phases.

  4. Formation and Reactivity of Biogenic Iron Microminerals

    SciTech Connect

    Beveridge, Terrance J.; Ferris, F. Grant

    2002-08-10

    Radionuclide and heavy metal contaminants at DOE sites pose immediate and long-term environmental problems. Under the NABIR program, bacteria are being considered for their role in the cycling of these contaminants because they influence many redox reactions in the subsurface. Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) are particularly important to controlling the biogeochemistry of subsurface environments through enzymatic reduction of iron and manganese minerals. During reduction of FeIII, biogenic FeII phases form at the cell-mineral interface which may profoundly influence metal reduction.

  5. Nutritional care of premature infants: microminerals.

    PubMed

    Domellöf, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Microminerals, including iron, zinc, copper, selenium, manganese, iodine, chromium and molybdenum, are essential for a remarkable array of critical functions and need to be supplied in adequate amounts to preterm infants. Very low birth weight (VLBW) infants carry a very high risk of developing iron deficiency which can adversely affect neurodevelopment. However, a too high iron supply in iron-replete VLBW infants may induce adverse effects such as increased infection risks and impaired growth. Iron needs are influenced by birth weight, growth rates, blood losses (phlebotomy) and blood transfusions. An enteral iron intake of 2 mg/kg/day for infants with a birth weight of 1,500-2,500 g and 2-3 mg/kg/day for VLBW infants is recommended. Higher doses up to 6 mg/kg/day are needed in infants receiving erythropoietin treatment. Regular monitoring of serum ferritin during the hospital stay is advisable. Routine provision of iron with parenteral nutrition for VLBW infants is not recommended. Less certainty exists for the advisable intakes of other microminerals. It appears prudent to provide enterally fed VLBW infants with daily amounts per kilogram body weight of 1.4-2.5 mg zinc, 100-230 μg copper, 5-10 μg selenium, 1-15 μg manganese, 10-55 μg iodine, 0.03-2.25 μg chromium, and 0.3-5 μg molybdenum. Future scientific findings may justify deviations from these suggested ranges.

  6. Biogenic synthesis of nanostructured iron compounds: applications and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Seabra, Amedea B; Haddad, Paula; Duran, Nelson

    2013-09-01

    'Green nanotechnology' has attracted increasing attention in recent years because of the possibility to reduce and/or eliminate toxic substances. Indeed, biogenic syntheses of nanomaterials, such as nanoparticles (NPs), are considered economic and valuable alternatives for the production of metallic NPs for diverse applications. Recent studies have revealed that the development of eco-friendly technologies in material science is under extensive investigation in the field of nanobiotechnology. Considering this scenario, this review highlights the recent advances in the biogenic syntheses of metallic iron, iron sulphides and iron oxide NPs for a wide range of applications. Moreover, this review also discusses the medical, environmental and technological applications of biogenically synthesised NPs, and the challenges to be faced to optimise the eco-friendly production of these important nanomaterials.

  7. The Irony of Iron - Biogenic Iron Oxides as an Iron Source to the Ocean.

    PubMed

    Emerson, David

    2015-01-01

    Primary productivity in at least a third of the sunlit open ocean is thought to be iron-limited. Primary sources of dissolved iron (dFe) to the ocean are hydrothermal venting, flux from the sediments along continental margins, and airborne dust. This article provides a general review of sources of hydrothermal and sedimentary iron to the ocean, and speculates upon the role that iron-cycling microbes play in controlling iron dynamics from these sources. Special attention is paid to iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) that live by oxidizing iron and producing biogenic iron oxides as waste products. The presence and ubiquity of FeOB both at hydrothermal systems and in sediments is only beginning to be appreciated. The biogenic oxides they produce have unique properties that could contribute significantly to the dynamics of dFe in the ocean. Changes in the physical and chemical characteristics of the ocean due to climate change and ocean acidification will undoubtedly impact the microbial iron cycle. A better understanding of the contemporary role of microbes in the iron cycle will help in predicting how these changes could ultimately influence marine primary productivity.

  8. The Irony of IronBiogenic Iron Oxides as an Iron Source to the Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, David

    2016-01-01

    Primary productivity in at least a third of the sunlit open ocean is thought to be iron-limited. Primary sources of dissolved iron (dFe) to the ocean are hydrothermal venting, flux from the sediments along continental margins, and airborne dust. This article provides a general review of sources of hydrothermal and sedimentary iron to the ocean, and speculates upon the role that iron-cycling microbes play in controlling iron dynamics from these sources. Special attention is paid to iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) that live by oxidizing iron and producing biogenic iron oxides as waste products. The presence and ubiquity of FeOB both at hydrothermal systems and in sediments is only beginning to be appreciated. The biogenic oxides they produce have unique properties that could contribute significantly to the dynamics of dFe in the ocean. Changes in the physical and chemical characteristics of the ocean due to climate change and ocean acidification will undoubtedly impact the microbial iron cycle. A better understanding of the contemporary role of microbes in the iron cycle will help in predicting how these changes could ultimately influence marine primary productivity. PMID:26779157

  9. Formation and Reactivity of Biogenic Iron Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Ferris, F. Grant

    2002-06-01

    Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (DIRB) play an important role in regulating the aqueous geochemistry of iron and other metals in anaerobic, non-sulfidogenic groundwater environments; however, little work has directly assessed the cell surface electrochemistry of DIRB, or the nature of the interfacial environment around individual cells. The electrochemical properties of particulate solids are often inferred from titrations in which net surface charge is determined, assuming electroneutrality, as the difference between known added amounts of acid and base and measured proton concentration. The resultant titration curve can then be fit to a speciation model for the system to determine pKa values and site densities of reactive surface sites. Moreover, with the development of non-contact electrostatic force microscopy (EFM), it is now possible to directly inspect and quantify charge development on surfaces. A combination of acid-base titrations and EFM are being used to assess the electrochemical surface properties of the groundwater DIRB, Shewanella putrefaciens. The pKa spectra and EFM data show together that a high degree of electrochemical heterogeneity exists within the cell wall and at the cell surface of S. putrefaciens. Recognition of variations in the nature and spatial distribution of reactive sites that contribute to charge development on these bacteria implies further that the cell surface of these Fe(III)-reducing bacteria functions as a highly differentiated interfacial system capable of supporting multiple intermolecular interactions with both solutes and solids. These include surface complexation reactions involving dissolved metals, as well as adherence to mineral substrates such as hydrous ferric oxide through longer-range electrostatic interactions, and surface precipitation of secondary reduced-iron minerals.

  10. Comparative study of biogenic and abiotic iron-containing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkezova-Zheleva, Z.; Shopska, M.; Paneva, D.; Kovacheva, D.; Kadinov, G.; Mitov, I.

    2016-12-01

    Series of iron-based biogenic materials prepared by cultivation of Leptothrix group of bacteria in different feeding media ( Sphaerotilus-Leptothrix group of bacteria isolation medium, Adler, Lieske and silicon-iron-glucose-peptone) were studied. Control samples were obtained in the same conditions and procedures but the nutrition media were not infected with bacteria, i.e. they were sterile. Room and low temperature Mössbauer spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and infrared spectroscopy (IRS) were used to reveal the composition and physicochemical properties of biomass and respective control samples. Comparative analysis showed differences in their composition and dispersity of present phases. Sample composition included different ratio of nanodimensional iron oxyhydroxide and oxide phases. Relaxation phenomena such as superparamagnetism or collective magnetic excitation behaviour were registered for some of them. The experimental data showed that the biogenic materials were enriched in oxyhydroxides of high dispersion. Catalytic behaviour of a selected biomass and abiotic material were studied in the reaction of CO oxidation. In situ diffuse-reflectance (DR) IRS was used to monitor the phase transformations in the biomass and CO conversion.

  11. Biogenic Fabrication of Iron/Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and Their Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqi, Khwaja Salahuddin; ur Rahman, Aziz; Tajuddin; Husen, Azamal

    2016-11-01

    Enshrined in this review are the biogenic fabrication and applications of coated and uncoated iron and iron oxide nanoparticles. Depending on their magnetic properties, they have been used in the treatment of cancer, drug delivery system, MRI, and catalysis and removal of pesticides from potable water. The polymer-coated iron and iron oxide nanoparticles are made biocompatible, and their slow release makes them more effective and lasting. Their cytotoxicity against microbes under aerobic/anaerobic conditions has also been discussed. The magnetic moment of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles changes with their interaction with biomolecules as a consequence of which their size decreases. Their biological efficacy has been found to be dependent on the shape, size, and concentration of these nanoparticles.

  12. Biogenic iron mineralization at Iron Mountain, CA with implications for detection with the Mars Curiosity rover

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Amy J.; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Alpers, Charles N.; Campbell, Kate M.; Nordstrom, D. Kirk

    2014-01-01

    (Introduction) Microbe-mineral interactions and biosignature preservation in oxidized sulfidic ore bodies (gossans) are prime candidates for astrobiological study. Such oxidized iron systems have been proposed as analogs for some Martian environments. Recent studies identified microbial fossils preserved as mineral-coated filaments. This study documents microbially-mediated mineral biosignatures in hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) and ferric oxyhydroxysulfates (FOHS) in three environments at Iron Mountain, CA. We investigated microbial community preservation via HFO and FOHS precipitation and the formation of filamentous mineral biosignatures. These environments included 1) actively precipitating (1000's yrs), naturally weathered HFO from in situ gossan, and 3) remobilized iron deposits, which contained lithified clastics and zones of HFO precipitate. We used published biogenicity criteria as guidelines to characterize the biogenicity of mineral filaments. These criteria included A) an actively precipitating environment where microbes are known to be coated in minerals, B) presence of extant microbial communities with carbon signatures, C) structures observable as a part of the host rock, and D) biological morphology, including cellular lumina, multiple member population, numerous taxa, variable and 3-D preservation, biological size ranges, uniform diameter, and evidence of flexibility. This study explores the relevance and detection of these biosignatures to possible Martian biosignatures. Similar filamentous biosignatures are resolvable by the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) onboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover, Curiosity, and may be identifiable as biogenic if present on Mars.

  13. Arsenic Bioremediation by Biogenic Iron Oxides and Sulfides

    PubMed Central

    Couture, Raoul-Marie; Van Cappellen, Philippe; Corkhill, Claire L.; Charnock, John M.; Polya, David A.; Vaughan, David; Vanbroekhoven, Karolien; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2013-01-01

    Microcosms containing sediment from an aquifer in Cambodia with naturally elevated levels of arsenic in the associated groundwater were used to evaluate the effectiveness of microbially mediated production of iron minerals for in situ As remediation. The microcosms were first incubated without amendments for 28 days, and the release of As and other geogenic chemicals from the sediments into the aqueous phase was monitored. Nitrate or a mixture of sulfate and lactate was then added to stimulate biological Fe(II) oxidation or sulfate reduction, respectively. Without treatment, soluble As concentrations reached 3.9 ± 0.9 μM at the end of the 143-day experiment. However, in the nitrate- and sulfate-plus-lactate-amended microcosms, soluble As levels decreased to 0.01 and 0.41 ± 0.13 μM, respectively, by the end of the experiment. Analyses using a range of biogeochemical and mineralogical tools indicated that sorption onto freshly formed hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) and iron sulfide mineral phases are the likely mechanisms for As removal in the respective treatments. Incorporation of the experimental results into a one-dimensional transport-reaction model suggests that, under conditions representative of the Cambodian aquifer, the in situ precipitation of HFO would be effective in bringing groundwater into compliance with the World Health Organization (WHO) provisional guideline value for As (10 ppb or 0.13 μM), although soluble Mn release accompanying microbial Fe(II) oxidation presents a potential health concern. In contrast, production of biogenic iron sulfide minerals would not remediate the groundwater As concentration below the recommended WHO limit. PMID:23666325

  14. Biogenicity of an Early Quaternary iron formation, Milos Island, Greece.

    PubMed

    Chi Fru, E; Ivarsson, M; Kilias, S P; Frings, P J; Hemmingsson, C; Broman, C; Bengtson, S; Chatzitheodoridis, E

    2015-05-01

    A ~2.0-million-year-old shallow-submarine sedimentary deposit on Milos Island, Greece, harbours an unmetamorphosed fossiliferous iron formation (IF) comparable to Precambrian banded iron formations (BIFs). This Milos IF holds the potential to provide clues to the origin of Precambrian BIFs, relative to biotic and abiotic processes. Here, we combine field stratigraphic observations, stable isotopes of C, S and Si, rock petrography and microfossil evidence from a ~5-m-thick outcrop to track potential biogeochemical processes that may have contributed to the formation of the BIF-type rocks and the abrupt transition to an overlying conglomerate-hosted IF (CIF). Bulk δ(13) C isotopic compositions lower than -25‰ provide evidence for biological contribution by the Calvin and reductive acetyl-CoA carbon fixation cycles to the origin of both the BIF-type and CIF strata. Low S levels of ~0.04 wt.% combined with δ(34) S estimates of up to ~18‰ point to a non-sulphidic depository. Positive δ(30) Si records of up to +0.53‰ in the finely laminated BIF-type rocks indicate chemical deposition on the seafloor during weak periods of arc magmatism. Negative δ(30) Si data are consistent with geological observations suggesting a sudden change to intense arc volcanism potentially terminated the deposition of the BIF-type layer. The typical Precambrian rhythmic rocks of alternating Fe- and Si-rich bands are associated with abundant and spatially distinct microbial fossil assemblages. Together with previously proposed anoxygenic photoferrotrophic iron cycling and low sedimentary N and C potentially connected to diagenetic denitrification, the Milos IF is a biogenic submarine volcano-sedimentary IF showing depositional conditions analogous to Archaean Algoma-type BIFs. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Biogenic nanosized iron oxides obtained from cultivation of iron bacteria from the genus Leptothrix.

    PubMed

    Nedkov, I; Slavov, L; Angelova, R; Blagoev, B; Kovacheva, D; Abrashev, M V; Iliev, M; Groudeva, V

    2016-10-01

    A detailed investigation of nanostructured iron oxides/(oxy)hydroxides gathered after cultivation of bacteria from the genus Leptothrix as iron (II) oxidizers is presented. A specific type of medium is selected for the cultivation of the bacteria. Results for sediment powder and bio-film on glass substrate samples from the same media are discussed. XRD, Raman spectroscopy, SEM, and TEM images and PPMS measurements are used to prove the exact composition of the biogenic products and to interpret the oxidation process. Analysis of the data collected shows that around 80 % of the iron (II) from the growth medium has been transformed into iron (III) in the form of different (oxy)hydroxides, with the rest found to be in a mixed 2,5 valence in magnetite. Our investigation shows that the bio-film sample has a phase content different from that of the powdered biomass and that lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) is the predominant and the initial biogenic phase in both samples. Magnetite nanoparticles are a secondary product in the bio-film, part of which possesses a defective quasi-maghemite surface layer. In the powdered biomass, the oxidation steps are not fully completed. The initial products are non-stoichiometric and due to the mixed ferric and ferrous ions present, they develop into: (i) lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) as a basic sediment, (ii) magnetite (Fe3O4) and (iii) goethite (α-FeOOH) in small quantities. The average size of all iron-bearing particles is found to be below 30 nm. The magnetic measurements performed show a superparamagnetic behavior of the material at room temperature.

  16. Deposition of biogenic iron minerals in a methane oxidizing microbial mat.

    PubMed

    Wrede, Christoph; Kokoschka, Sebastian; Dreier, Anne; Heller, Christina; Reitner, Joachim; Hoppert, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The syntrophic community between anaerobic methanotrophic archaea and sulfate reducing bacteria forms thick, black layers within multi-layered microbial mats in chimney-like carbonate concretions of methane seeps located in the Black Sea Crimean shelf. The microbial consortium conducts anaerobic oxidation of methane, which leads to the formation of mainly two biomineral by-products, calcium carbonates and iron sulfides, building up these chimneys. Iron sulfides are generated by the microbial reduction of oxidized sulfur compounds in the microbial mats. Here we show that sulfate reducing bacteria deposit biogenic iron sulfides extra- and intracellularly, the latter in magnetosome-like chains. These chains appear to be stable after cell lysis and tend to attach to cell debris within the microbial mat. The particles may be important nuclei for larger iron sulfide mineral aggregates.

  17. Morphology of biogenic iron oxides records microbial physiology and environmental conditions: toward interpreting iron microfossils.

    PubMed

    Krepski, S T; Emerson, D; Hredzak-Showalter, P L; Luther, G W; Chan, C S

    2013-09-01

    Despite the abundance of Fe and its significance in Earth history, there are no established robust biosignatures for Fe(II)-oxidizing micro-organisms. This limits our ability to piece together the history of Fe biogeochemical cycling and, in particular, to determine whether Fe(II)-oxidizers played a role in depositing ancient iron formations. A promising candidate for Fe(II)-oxidizer biosignatures is the distinctive morphology and texture of extracellular Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide stalks produced by mat-forming microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing micro-organisms. To establish the stalk morphology as a biosignature, morphologic parameters must be quantified and linked to the microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing metabolism and environmental conditions. Toward this end, we studied an extant model organism, the marine stalk-forming Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium, Mariprofundus ferrooxydans PV-1. We grew cultures in flat glass microslide chambers, with FeS substrate, creating opposing oxygen/Fe(II) concentration gradients. We used solid-state voltammetric microelectrodes to measure chemical gradients in situ while using light microscopy to image microbial growth, motility, and mineral formation. In low-oxygen (2.7-28 μm) zones of redox gradients, the bacteria converge into a narrow (100 μm-1 mm) growth band. As cells oxidize Fe(II), they deposit Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide stalks in this band; the stalks orient directionally, elongating toward higher oxygen concentrations. M. ferrooxydans stalks display a narrow range of widths and uniquely biogenic branching patterns, which result from cell division. Together with filament composition, these features (width, branching, and directional orientation) form a physical record unique to microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizer physiology; therefore, stalk morphology is a biosignature, as well as an indicator of local oxygen concentration at the time of formation. Observations of filamentous Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide microfossils from a ~170 Ma marine Fe

  18. Sorption of ferric iron from ferrioxamine B to synthetic and biogenic layer type manganese oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duckworth, Owen W.; Bargar, John R.; Sposito, Garrison

    2008-07-01

    Siderophores are biogenic chelating agents produced in terrestrial and marine environments that increase the bioavailability of ferric iron. Recent work has suggested that both aqueous and solid-phase Mn(III) may affect siderophore-mediated iron transport, but scant information appears to be available about the potential roles of layer type manganese oxides, which are relatively abundant in soils and the oligotrophic marine water column. To probe the effects of layer type manganese oxides on the stability of aqueous Fe-siderophore complexes, we studied the sorption of ferrioxamine B [Fe(III)HDFOB +, an Fe(III) chelate of the trihydroxamate siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB)] to two synthetic birnessites [layer type Mn(III,IV) oxides] and a biogenic birnessite produced by Pseudomonas putida GB-1. We found that all of these predominantly Mn(IV) oxides greatly reduced the aqueous concentration of Fe(III)HDFOB + at pH 8. Analysis of Fe K-edge EXAFS spectra indicated that a dominant fraction of Fe(III) associated with the Mn(IV) oxides is not complexed by DFOB as in solution, but instead Fe(III) is specifically adsorbed to the mineral structure at multiple sites, thus indicating that the Mn(IV) oxides displaced Fe(III) from the siderophore complex. These results indicate that layer type manganese oxides, including biogenic minerals, may sequester iron from soluble ferric complexes. We conclude that the sorption of iron-siderophore complexes may play a significant role in the bioavailability and biogeochemical cycling of iron in marine and terrestrial environments.

  19. Sorption of Ferric Iron from Ferrioxamine B to Synthetic and Biogenic Layer Type Manganese Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duckworth, O.; John, B.; Sposito, G.

    2006-12-01

    Siderophores are biogenic chelating agents produced in terrestrial and marine environments to increase the bioavailablity of ferric iron. Recent work has suggested that both aqueous and solid-phase Mn(III) may affect siderophore-mediated iron transport, but no information appears to be available about the effect of solid-phase Mn(IV). To probe the effects of predominantly Mn(IV) oxides, we studied the sorption reaction of ferrioxamine B [Fe(III)HDFOB+, an Fe(III) chelate of the trihydroxamate siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB)] with two synthetic birnessites [layer type Mn(III, IV) oxides] and a biogenic birnessite produced by Pseudomonas putida MnB1. We found that all of these predominantly Mn(IV) oxides greatly reduced the aqueous concentration of Fe(III)HDFOB+ over at pH 8. After 72 hours equilibration time, the sorption behavior for the synthetic birnessites could be accurately described by a Langmuir isotherm; for the biogenic oxide, a Freundlich isotherm was best utilized to model the sorption data. To study the molecular nature of the interaction between the Fe(III)HDFOB+ complex and the oxide surface, Fe K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy was employed. Analysis of the EXAFS spectra indicated that Fe(III) associated with the Mn(IV) oxides is not complexed by DFOB as in solution, but instead Fe(III) is specifically adsorbed to into the mineral structure at multiple sites with no evidence of DFOB complexation, thus indicating that the Mn(IV) oxides displaced Fe(III) from the siderophore complex. These results indicate that manganese oxides, including biominerals, may strongly sequester iron from soluble ferric complexes and thus may play a significant role in the biogeochemical cycling of iron in marine and terrestrial environments.

  20. Biogenic oxides from neutrophilic iron bacteria and possibilities for application in the nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelova, R.; Blagoev, B.; Slavov, L.; Iliev, M.; Groudeva, V.; Nedkov, I.

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study is to obtain and characterize the ferric oxides/(oxy)hydroxides formed after cultivation of bacteria under laboratory conditions. The pure cultures of these bacteria isolated from natural habitats are identified by the methods of classical and molecular taxonomy as strains of the Leptothrix genus. Adler (AM) and Silicon iron glucose peptone (SIGP) media are the most appropriate ones for obtaining the iron oxides. The characterization of the oxides and sheaths is performed by different physical methods. The sheaths are formed in a SIGP medium. Light micrograph images and SEM revealed the average size and diameter of the sheaths. The XRD measurements showed the composition of the oxides obtained, as well as the average size of the iron particles (up to 30 nm). The TEM micrographs showed the shape of the biogenic nanoparticles, while the magnetic measurements demonstrated the superparamagnetic character of the magnetic part of the biomaterials. The new biogenic materials are promising for application in magneto electronic for building biosensors.

  1. Interactions of proteins with biogenic iron oxyhydroxides and a new culturing technique to increase biomass yields of neutrophilic, iron-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Barco, Roman A; Edwards, Katrina J

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophilic, bacterial iron-oxidation remains one of the least understood energy-generating biological reactions to date. One of the reasons it remains under-studied is because there are inherent problems with working with iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB), including low biomass yields and interference from the iron oxides in the samples. In an effort to circumvent the problem of low biomass, a new large batch culturing technique was developed. Protein interactions with biogenic iron oxides were investigated confirming that such interactions are strong. Therefore, a protein extraction method is described to minimize binding of proteins to biogenic iron oxides. The combination of these two methods results in protein yields that are appropriate for activity assays in gels and for proteomic profiling.

  2. Interactions of proteins with biogenic iron oxyhydroxides and a new culturing technique to increase biomass yields of neutrophilic, iron-oxidizing bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Barco, Roman A.; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophilic, bacterial iron-oxidation remains one of the least understood energy-generating biological reactions to date. One of the reasons it remains under-studied is because there are inherent problems with working with iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB), including low biomass yields and interference from the iron oxides in the samples. In an effort to circumvent the problem of low biomass, a new large batch culturing technique was developed. Protein interactions with biogenic iron oxides were investigated confirming that such interactions are strong. Therefore, a protein extraction method is described to minimize binding of proteins to biogenic iron oxides. The combination of these two methods results in protein yields that are appropriate for activity assays in gels and for proteomic profiling. PMID:24910632

  3. Characterization of biogenic iron oxides collected by the newly designed liquid culture method using diffusion chambers.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, S; Makita, H; Takai, K; Yamaguchi, N; Takahashi, Y

    2014-03-01

    We designed a new culture method for neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria using liquid medium (i) to study the formation and mineralogical characteristics of biogenic iron oxides (BIOS) and (ii) to apply BIOS to various scientific and engineering applications. An iron-oxidizing bacterium, Mariprofundus ferrooxydans PV-1(T) (ATCC, BAA-1020), was cultured using a set of diffusion chambers to prepare a broad anoxic-oxic interface, upon which BIOS formation is typically observed in natural environments. Iron oxide precipitates were generated in parallel with bacterial growth. A scanning electron microscopy analysis indicated that the morphological features of the iron oxide precipitates in the medium (in vitro BIOS) were similar to those of BIOS collected from natural deep-sea hydrothermal environments in the Northwest Eifuku Seamount field in the northern Mariana Arc (in situ BIOS). Further chemical speciation of both the in vitro and in situ BIOS was examined with X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). A bulk XAFS analysis showed that the minerals in both BIOS were mainly ferrihydrite and oligomeric stages of amorphous iron oxyhydroxides with edge-sharing octahedral linkages. The amount of in vitro BIOS produced with the diffusion-chamber method was greater than those produced previously with other culture methods, such as gel-stabilized gradient and batch liquid culture methods. The larger yields of BIOS produced with the new culture method will allow us to clarify in the future the mineralization mechanisms during bacterial growth and to examine the physicochemical properties of BIOS, such as their adsorption to and coprecipitation with various elements and substances. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Self Assembly of Biogenic Surfactants at Mineral Surfaces and Their Effect on Biological Iron Acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraemer, S. M.

    2005-12-01

    Microorganisms exude biogenic surfactants to modify the physical and chemical properties of mineral-water interfaces. Surfactants with negatively charged hydrophilic head groups interact strongly with oppositely charged mineral surfaces such as iron or aluminum oxides. Surfactant self assembly at mineral surfaces can result in the formation of admicelles that have a significant effect on the surface charge and hydrophobicity. These effects are exploited by microorganisms to facilitate attachment to mineral surfaces. Similarly, plants exude surfactants into the rhizosphere and change the surface tension and flow of soil water. Other surface active compounds that are typically found in soils and surface waters are humic substances and fatty acids that are produced by degradation of biomass. In general, surface active compounds are ubiquitous in natural systems. In this study we investigated how surfactants influence bio-mineral interactions using the example of siderophore promoted iron acquisition. Siderophore promoted iron acquisition involves the adsorption of a biogenic iron specific ligand (i.e. the siderophore) to iron oxides and the subsequent siderophore promoted iron oxide dissolution. The hypothesis of this project is that the modification of the iron oxide surface charge and hydrophobicity by adsorbed surfactants will have an important effect on siderophore adsorption and dissolution kinetics. We approached this subject by investigating the adsorption of a natural surfactant (rhamnolipids: RhL) and the synthetic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate: SDS) on goethite (α-FeOOH, a common pedogenic iron oxide) and observing the effect of surfactant self assembly on the properties of the mineral water interface. We observed fast adsorption kinetics at pH 3 and slow adsorption at pH 6. The adsorbed surfactants reversed the surface potential of goethite (as evidenced by electrophoretic mobility measurements) at soluble surfactant concentrations below 10 μM (SDS

  5. Sorption of arsenic to biogenic iron (oxyhydr)oxides produced in circumneutral environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowers, Tyler D.; Harrington, James M.; Polizzotto, Matthew L.; Duckworth, Owen W.

    2017-02-01

    Arsenic (As) is a widespread and problematic pollutant that can be derived from natural or anthropogenic sources. Iron (oxyhydr)oxides readily sorb As and thus play critical roles in As cycling in terrestrial environments; however, little is known about the affinity and mechanism of As sorption by biogenic iron (oxyhydr)oxides formed in circumneutral environments. To investigate this, we conducted sorption isotherm and kinetics experiments to compare As(V) and As(III) sorption to synthetic 2-line ferrihydrite and iron biominerals harvested from the hyporheic zone of an uncontaminated creek. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used to quantify both As(V) and As(III), and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was utilized to obtain As and Fe K-edge spectra for As(V) and As(III) sorbed to environmentally collected and laboratory produced Fe(III) minerals. All environmental Fe(III) biominerals were determined to be structurally similar to 2-line ferrihydrite. However, environmental Fe(III) biominerals have a surface area normalized affinity for As(V) and for As(III) that is greater than or equivalent to synthetic 2-line ferrihydrite. Whereas the extent of sorption was similar for As(III) on all minerals, As(V) sorption to environmental Fe(III) biominerals was approximately three times higher than what was observed for synthetic 2-line ferrihydrite. Structural modeling of EXAFS spectra revealed that the same surface complexation structure was formed by As(V) and by As(III) on environmental Fe(III) biominerals and ferrihydrite. These results suggest that, despite similarities in binding mechanisms, Fe(III) biominerals may be more reactive sorbents that synthetic surrogates often used to model environmental reactivity.

  6. Modeling responses of diatom productivity and biogenic silica export to iron enrichment in the equatorial Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, F.; Jiang, M.-S.; Chao, Y.; Dugdale, R. C.; Chavez, F.; Barber, R. T.

    2007-09-01

    Using a three-dimensional physical-biogeochemical model, we have investigated the modeled responses of diatom productivity and biogenic silica export to iron enrichment in the equatorial Pacific, and compared the model simulation with in situ (IronEx II) iron fertilization results. In the eastern equatorial Pacific, an area of 540,000 km2 was enhanced with iron by changing the photosynthetic efficiency and silicate and nitrogen uptake kinetics of phytoplankton in the model for a period of 20 days. The vertically integrated Chl a and primary production increased by about threefold 5 days after the start of the experiment, similar to that observed in the IronEx II experiment. Diatoms contribute to the initial increase of the total phytoplankton biomass, but decrease sharply after 10 days because of mesozooplankton grazing. The modeled surface nutrients (silicate and nitrate) and TCO2 anomaly fields, obtained from the difference between the "iron addition" and "ambient" (without iron) concentrations, also agreed well with the IronEx II observations. The enriched patch is tracked with an inert tracer similar to the SF6 used in the IronEx II. The modeled depth-time distribution of sinking biogenic silica (BSi) indicates that it would take more than 30 days after iron injection to detect any significant BSi export out of the euphotic zone. Sensitivity studies were performed to establish the importance of fertilized patch size, duration of fertilization, and the role of mesozooplankton grazing. A larger size of the iron patch tends to produce a broader extent and longer-lasting phytoplankton blooms. Longer duration prolongs phytoplankton growth, but higher zooplankton grazing pressure prevents significant phytoplankton biomass accumulation. With the same treatment of iron fertilization in the model, lowering mesozooplankton grazing rate generates much stronger diatom bloom, but it is terminated by Si(OH)4 limitation after the initial rapid increase. Increasing

  7. Iron and Carbon Dynamics during Aging and Reductive Transformation of Biogenic Ferrihydrite.

    PubMed

    Cismasu, A Cristina; Williams, Kenneth H; Nico, Peter S

    2016-01-05

    Natural organic matter is often associated with Fe(III) oxyhydroxides, and may be stabilized as a result of coprecipitation or sorption to their surfaces. However, the significance of this association in relation to Fe and C dynamics and biogeochemical cycling, and the mechanisms responsible for organic matter stabilization as a result of interaction with minerals under various environmental conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, etc.) are not entirely understood. The preservation of mineral-bound OM may be affected by OM structure and mineral identity, and bond types between OM and minerals may be central to influencing the stability, transformation and composition of both organic and mineral components under changing environmental conditions. Here we use bulk and submicron-scale spectroscopic synchrotron methods to examine the in situ transformation of OM-bearing, biogenic ferrihydrite stalks (Gallionella ferruginea-like), which formed following injection of oxygenated groundwater into a saturated alluvial aquifer at the Rifle, CO field site. A progression from oxidizing to reducing conditions during an eight-month period triggered the aging and reductive transformation of Gallionella-like ferrihydrite stalks to Fe (hydroxy)carbonates and Fe sulfides, as well as alteration of the composition and amount of OM. Spectromicroscopic measurements showed a gradual decrease in reduced carbon forms (aromatic/alkene, aliphatic C), a relative increase in amide/carboxyl functional groups and a significant increase in carbonate in the stalk structures, and the appearance of organic globules not associated with stalk structures. Biogenic stalks lost ∼30% of their initial organic carbon content. Conversely, a significant increase in bulk organic matter accompanied these transformations. The character of bulk OM changed in parallel with mineralogical transformations, showing an increase in aliphatic, aromatic and amide functional groups. These changes likely occurred as a result of an

  8. Bio-current as an indicator for biogenic Fe(II) generation driven by dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chunhua; Yue, Xianjun; Li, Fangbai; Wei, Chaohai

    2013-01-15

    Microbial reduction of insoluble iron minerals by dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria (DIRB) is an important environment process in the iron biogeochemical cycle. We reported that the bio-current generated from oxidation of organic matter by these bacteria in the presence of iron oxides can be used as an indicator for microbial dissolution of insoluble iron oxides. Bioelectrochemical experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of the specific bacteria and the phase identity of iron oxides on bio-current generation by recording the current response as a result of a poised constant potential. Experimental results indicated that the bio-current generation can be greatly enhanced by iron oxide addition under all the conditions varying in the type of pure culture or iron oxide. The increase in the bio-current was linearly correlated with the increased concentration of biogenic Fe(II) detected either by chemical analysis or cyclic voltammetry (CV) tests. This can be understood based on the proposed mechanism that the Fe(II)/Fe(III) couple functions as the electron mediator shuttling electrons from the microbes to the electrodes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Rates of microbial sulfate reduction control the sizes of biogenic iron sulfide aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Q.

    2005-12-01

    Sulfide minerals occur widely in freshwater and marine sediments as byproducts of microbial sulfate reduction and as end products of heavy metal bioremediation. They form when metals in the environments combine with sulfide produced from the metabolism of sulfate reducing bacteria. We used chemostat bioreactors to study sizes and crystal structures of iron sulfide (FeS) minerals produced by Desulfovibrio vulgaris, D. desulfuricans strain G20, and subspecies desulfuricans. FeS nanoparticles and their aggregates are characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and dynamic light scattering (DLS). FeS nanoparticles produced by sulfate reducing bacteria are extremely small, usually less than around 10 nm in diameter. Nanoparticles do not occur as individual nanoparticles, but as aggregates. The sizes of FeS aggregates are affected by sulfate reduction rates, Fe(II) concentration, pH, ionic strength, organic matter concentration, bacterial species, etc. Aggregate size ranges from about 500 nm at very large sulfate reduction rates to about 1,500 nm at very small rates. Variations in Fe(II) concentration also lead to a difference up to 500 nm in FeS aggregate size. Different bacterial species produce nanoparticle aggregates of different sizes under similar growth conditions. For example, D. vulgaris produces FeS aggregates with sizes 500 nm smaller than those by strain G20. The inverse relationship between FeS aggregate sizes and sulfate reduction rates is important in evaluating metal bioremediation strategies. Previous approaches have focused on stimulating microbial activities in natural environments. However, our experimental results suggest that increasing metabolic rates may decrease the aggregate size, increasing the mobility of colloidal aggregates. Therefore, the balance between microbial activities and sizes of biogenic aggregates may be an important consideration in the design and

  10. The effect of heat acclimation on sweat microminerals: Artifact of surface contamination

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Heat acclimation (HA) reportedly conveys conservation in sweat micromineral concentrations when sampled from arm sweat, but time course is unknown. The observation that comprehensive cleaning of the skin surface negates sweat micromineral reductions during prolonged sweating raises the question of w...

  11. Study on the Composition of Biogenic Iron-Containing Materials Obtained Under Cultivation of the Leptothrix sp. on Different Media.

    PubMed

    Shopska, M; Paneva, D; Kadinov, G; Cherkezova-Zheleva, Z; Mitov, I; Iliev, M

    2017-03-01

    The biogenic iron oxide/hydroxide materials possess useful combination of physicochemical properties and are considered for application in various areas. Their production does not require special investments because these compounds are formed during cultivation of neurophilic iron bacteria. Bacteria from genus Leptothrix develop intensively in the Sphaerotilus-Leptothrix group of bacteria isolation medium and feeding media of Fedorov and Lieske. These media are different in their composition which determined the present study as an attempt to clear up the reasons that define the differences in the composition of the laboratory-obtained biomasses and the natural biomass finds. FTIRS, Mössbauer spectroscopy, and XRD were used in the research. Comparative analysis showed that the biomass and control samples contain iron compounds (α-FeOOH, γ-FeOOH, β-FeOOH, γ-Fe2O3) in different ratios. The biomass samples were enriched in oxyhydroxides of higher dispersion. Organic residuals of bacterial origin, SO4, CO3, and PO4 groups were registered in the biogenic materials.

  12. Preliminary characterization and biological reduction of putative biogenic iron oxides (BIOS) from the Tonga-Kermadec Arc, southwest Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Langley, S; Igric, P; Takahashi, Y; Sakai, Y; Fortin, D; Hannington, M D; Schwarz-Schampera, U

    2009-01-01

    Sediment samples were obtained from areas of diffuse hydrothermal venting along the seabed in the Tonga sector of the Tonga-Kermadec Arc, southwest Pacific Ocean. Sediments from Volcano 1 and Volcano 19 were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and found to be composed primarily of the iron oxyhydroxide mineral, two-line ferrihydrite. XRD also suggested the possible presence of minor amounts of more ordered iron (hydr)oxides (including six-line ferrihydrite, goethite/lepidocrocite and magnetite) in the biogenic iron oxides (BIOS) from Volcano 1; however, Mössbauer spectroscopy failed to detect any mineral phases more crystalline than two-line ferrihydrite. The minerals were precipitated on the surfaces of abundant filamentous microbial structures. Morphologically, some of these structures were similar in appearance to the known iron-oxidizing genus Mariprofundus spp., suggesting that the sediments are composed of biogenic iron oxides. At Volcano 19, an areally extensive, active vent field, the microbial cells appeared to be responsible for the formation of cohesive chimney-like structures of iron oxyhydroxide, 2-3 m in height, whereas at Volcano 1, an older vent field, no chimney-like structures were apparent. Iron reduction of the sediment material (i.e. BIOS) by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 was measured, in vitro, as the ratio of [total Fe(II)]:[total Fe]. From this parameter, reduction rates were calculated for Volcano 1 BIOS (0.0521 day(-1)), Volcano 19 BIOS (0.0473 day(-1)), and hydrous ferric oxide, a synthetic two-line ferrihydrite (0.0224 day(-1)). Sediments from both BIOS sites were more easily reduced than synthetic ferrihydrite, which suggests that the decrease in effective surface area of the minerals within the sediments (due to the presence of the organic component) does not inhibit subsequent microbial reduction. These results indicate that natural, marine BIOS are easily reduced in the presence of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria, and that the

  13. Biogenic iron oxyhydroxide formation at mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal vents: Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Toner, Brandy M.; Santelli, Cara M.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Wirth, Richard; Chan, Clara S.; McCollom, Thomas; Bach, Wolfgang; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2008-05-22

    Here we examine Fe speciation within Fe-encrusted biofilms formed during 2-month seafloor incubations of sulfide mineral assemblages at the Main Endeavor Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The biofilms were distributed heterogeneously across the surface of the incubated sulfide and composed primarily of particles with a twisted stalk morphology resembling those produced by some aerobic Fe-oxidizing microorganisms. Our objectives were to determine the form of biofilm-associated Fe, and identify the sulfide minerals associated with microbial growth. We used micro-focused synchrotron-radiation X-ray fluorescence mapping (mu XRF), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (mu EXAFS), and X-ray diffraction (mu XRD) in conjunction with focused ion beam (FIB) sectioning, and highresolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The chemical and mineralogical composition of an Fe-encrusted biofilm was queried at different spatial scales, and the spatial relationship between primary sulfide and secondary oxyhydroxide minerals was resolved. The Fe-encrusted biofilms formed preferentially at pyrrhotite-rich (Fe1-xS, 0<_ x<_ 0.2) regions of the incubated chimney sulfide. At the nanometer spatial scale, particles within the biofilm exhibiting lattice fringing and diffraction patterns consistent with 2-line ferrihydrite were identified infrequently. At the micron spatial scale, Fe mu EXAFS spectroscopy and mu XRD measurements indicate that the dominant form of biofilm Fe is a short-range ordered Fe oxyhydroxide characterized by pervasive edge-sharing Fe-O6 octahedral linkages. Double corner-sharing Fe-O6 linkages, which are common to Fe oxyhydroxide mineral structures of 2-line ferrihydrite, 6-line ferrihydrite, and goethite, were not detected in the biogenic iron oxyhydroxide (BIO). The suspended development of the BIO mineral structure is consistent with Fe(III) hydrolysis and polymerization in the presence of high concentrations of Fe-complexing ligands. We hypothesize that

  14. Biogenic iron oxyhydroxide formation at mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal vents: Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toner, Brandy M.; Santelli, Cara M.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Wirth, Richard; Chan, Clara S.; McCollom, Thomas; Bach, Wolfgang; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2009-01-01

    Here we examine Fe speciation within Fe-encrusted biofilms formed during 2-month seafloor incubations of sulfide mineral assemblages at the Main Endeavor Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The biofilms were distributed heterogeneously across the surface of the incubated sulfide and composed primarily of particles with a twisted stalk morphology resembling those produced by some aerobic Fe-oxidizing microorganisms. Our objectives were to determine the form of biofilm-associated Fe, and identify the sulfide minerals associated with microbial growth. We used micro-focused synchrotron-radiation X-ray fluorescence mapping (μXRF), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (μΕXAFS), and X-ray diffraction (μXRD) in conjunction with focused ion beam (FIB) sectioning, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The chemical and mineralogical composition of an Fe-encrusted biofilm was queried at different spatial scales, and the spatial relationship between primary sulfide and secondary oxyhydroxide minerals was resolved. The Fe-encrusted biofilms formed preferentially at pyrrhotite-rich (Fe 1-xS, 0 ⩽ x ⩽ 0.2) regions of the incubated chimney sulfide. At the nanometer spatial scale, particles within the biofilm exhibiting lattice fringing and diffraction patterns consistent with 2-line ferrihydrite were identified infrequently. At the micron spatial scale, Fe μEXAFS spectroscopy and μXRD measurements indicate that the dominant form of biofilm Fe is a short-range ordered Fe oxyhydroxide characterized by pervasive edge-sharing Fe-O 6 octahedral linkages. Double corner-sharing Fe-O 6 linkages, which are common to Fe oxyhydroxide mineral structures of 2-line ferrihydrite, 6-line ferrihydrite, and goethite, were not detected in the biogenic iron oxyhydroxide (BIO). The suspended development of the BIO mineral structure is consistent with Fe(III) hydrolysis and polymerization in the presence of high concentrations of Fe-complexing ligands. We hypothesize that

  15. Effect of dietary organic microminerals on starter pig performance, tissue mineral concentrations, and liver and plasma enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Martin, R E; Mahan, D C; Hill, G M; Link, J E; Jolliff, J S

    2011-04-01

    Weanling pigs (n = 160) were used to evaluate dietary essential microminerals (Cu, Fe, Mn, Se, and Zn) on performance, tissue minerals, and liver and plasma enzymatic activities during a 35-d postweaning period. A randomized complete block design with 5 treatments and 8 replicates was used in this study. Organic microminerals were added to complex nursery diets at 0 (basal), 50, 100, or 150% of the requirements of microminerals listed by the 1998 NRC. A fifth treatment contained inorganic microminerals at 100% NRC and served as the positive control. Pigs were bled at intervals with hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), glutathione peroxidase, and ceruloplasmin activities determined. Six pigs at weaning and 1 pig per pen at d 35 were killed, and the liver, heart, loin, kidney, pancreas, and the frontal lobe of the brain were collected for micromineral analysis. The liver was frozen in liquid N for determination of enzymatic activities. The analyzed innate microminerals in the basal diet met the NRC requirement for Cu and Mn but not Fe, Se, and Zn. Performance was not affected from 0 to 10 d postweaning, but when microminerals were added to diets, ADG, ADFI, and G:F improved (P < 0.01) from 10 to 35 d and for the overall 35-d period. Pigs fed the basal diet exhibited parakeratosis-like skin lesions, whereas those fed the supplemental microminerals did not. This skin condition was corrected after a diet with the added microminerals was fed. When the basal diet was fed, Hb and Hct declined, but supplemental microminerals increased Hb and Hct values. Liver catalase activity increased (P < 0.01) when microminerals were fed. The Mn superoxide dismutase activity tended to decline quadratically (P = 0.06) when supplemental microminerals were fed above that of the basal diet. Liver plasma glutathione peroxidase activities were greater (P < 0.01) when dietary organic and inorganic micromineral were fed. Liver concentrations of microminerals increased linearly (P < 0.01) as

  16. In-Situ Study of Chemical Versus Biogenic Iron Mineral (Trans)formation with the Miniaturized Backscattering Mössbauer Spectrometer MIMOS II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovski, C.; Byrne, J.; Schröder, C.; Kappler, A.; Klingelhöfer, G.

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop new methods of monitoring biogenic and chemical iron (oxyhydr)oxide mineral transformations in-situ, with the eventual aim of searching for clues of biological processes which may have once occurred on Mars.

  17. Microbial Communities Associated with Biogenic Iron Oxide Mineralization in Circumneutral pH Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, C. S.; Banfield, J. F.

    2002-12-01

    Lithotrophic growth on iron is a metabolism that has been found in a variety of neutral pH environments and is likely important in sustaining life in microaerophilic solutions, especially those low in organics. The composition of the microbial communities, especially the organisms that are responsible for iron oxidation, and carbon and nitrogen fixation, are not known, yet the ability to recognize these contributions is vital to our understanding of iron cycling in natural environments. Our approach has been to study the microbial community structure, mineralogy, and geochemistry of ~20 cm thick, 100's meters long, fluffy iron oxide-encrusted biological mats growing in the Piquette Mine tunnel, and to compare the results to those from geochemically similar environments. In situ measurements (Hydrolab) and geochemical characterization of bulk water samples and peepers (dialysis sampling vials) indicate that the environment is microaerobic, with micromolar levels of iron, high carbonate and sulfate, and typical groundwater nitrate and nitrite concentrations. 16S rDNA clone libraries show that the microbial mat and water contain communities with considerable diversity within the Bacterial domain, a large proportion of Nitrospira and Betaproteobacteria, and no Archaea. Because clone library data are not necessarily indicative of actual abundance, fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) was performed on water, mat, and sediment samples from the Piquette mine and two circumneutral iron- and carbonate-rich springs in the Oregon Cascade Range. Domain- and phylum-level probes were chosen based on the clone library results (Nitrospira, Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Chloroflexi, and Planctomyces). FISH data reveal spatial associations between specific microbial groups and mineralized structures. The organisms responsible for making the mineralized sheaths that compose the bulk of the iron oxide mat are Betaproteobacteria (probably Leptothrix

  18. Marine sulfate-reducing bacteria cause serious corrosion of iron under electroconductive biogenic mineral crust.

    PubMed

    Enning, Dennis; Venzlaff, Hendrik; Garrelfs, Julia; Dinh, Hang T; Meyer, Volker; Mayrhofer, Karl; Hassel, Achim W; Stratmann, Martin; Widdel, Friedrich

    2012-07-01

    Iron (Fe(0) ) corrosion in anoxic environments (e.g. inside pipelines), a process entailing considerable economic costs, is largely influenced by microorganisms, in particular sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The process is characterized by formation of black crusts and metal pitting. The mechanism is usually explained by the corrosiveness of formed H(2) S, and scavenge of 'cathodic' H(2) from chemical reaction of Fe(0) with H(2) O. Here we studied peculiar marine SRB that grew lithotrophically with metallic iron as the only electron donor. They degraded up to 72% of iron coupons (10 mm × 10 mm × 1 mm) within five months, which is a technologically highly relevant corrosion rate (0.7 mm Fe(0) year(-1) ), while conventional H(2) -scavenging control strains were not corrosive. The black, hard mineral crust (FeS, FeCO(3) , Mg/CaCO(3) ) deposited on the corroding metal exhibited electrical conductivity (50 S m(-1) ). This was sufficient to explain the corrosion rate by electron flow from the metal (4Fe(0)  → 4Fe(2+)  + 8e(-) ) through semiconductive sulfides to the crust-colonizing cells reducing sulfate (8e(-)  + SO(4) (2-)  + 9H(+)  → HS(-)  + 4H(2) O). Hence, anaerobic microbial iron corrosion obviously bypasses H(2) rather than depends on it. SRB with such corrosive potential were revealed at naturally high numbers at a coastal marine sediment site. Iron coupons buried there were corroded and covered by the characteristic mineral crust. It is speculated that anaerobic biocorrosion is due to the promiscuous use of an ecophysiologically relevant catabolic trait for uptake of external electrons from abiotic or biotic sources in sediments.

  19. Marine sulfate-reducing bacteria cause serious corrosion of iron under electroconductive biogenic mineral crust

    PubMed Central

    Enning, Dennis; Venzlaff, Hendrik; Garrelfs, Julia; Dinh, Hang T; Meyer, Volker; Mayrhofer, Karl; Hassel, Achim W; Stratmann, Martin; Widdel, Friedrich

    2012-01-01

    Iron (Fe0) corrosion in anoxic environments (e.g. inside pipelines), a process entailing considerable economic costs, is largely influenced by microorganisms, in particular sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The process is characterized by formation of black crusts and metal pitting. The mechanism is usually explained by the corrosiveness of formed H2S, and scavenge of ‘cathodic’ H2 from chemical reaction of Fe0 with H2O. Here we studied peculiar marine SRB that grew lithotrophically with metallic iron as the only electron donor. They degraded up to 72% of iron coupons (10 mm × 10 mm × 1 mm) within five months, which is a technologically highly relevant corrosion rate (0.7 mm Fe0 year−1), while conventional H2-scavenging control strains were not corrosive. The black, hard mineral crust (FeS, FeCO3, Mg/CaCO3) deposited on the corroding metal exhibited electrical conductivity (50 S m−1). This was sufficient to explain the corrosion rate by electron flow from the metal (4Fe0 → 4Fe2+ + 8e−) through semiconductive sulfides to the crust-colonizing cells reducing sulfate (8e− + SO42− + 9H+ → HS− + 4H2O). Hence, anaerobic microbial iron corrosion obviously bypasses H2 rather than depends on it. SRB with such corrosive potential were revealed at naturally high numbers at a coastal marine sediment site. Iron coupons buried there were corroded and covered by the characteristic mineral crust. It is speculated that anaerobic biocorrosion is due to the promiscuous use of an ecophysiologically relevant catabolic trait for uptake of external electrons from abiotic or biotic sources in sediments. PMID:22616633

  20. Responses in Micro-Mineral Metabolism in Rainbow Trout to Change in Dietary Ingredient Composition and Inclusion of a Micro-Mineral Premix.

    PubMed

    Antony Jesu Prabhu, P; Geurden, Inge; Fontagné-Dicharry, Stéphanie; Veron, Vincent; Larroquet, Laurence; Mariojouls, Catherine; Schrama, Johan W; Kaushik, Sadasivam J

    2016-01-01

    Responses in micro-mineral metabolism to changes in dietary ingredient composition and inclusion of a micro-mineral premix (Fe, Cu, Mn, Zn and Se) were studied in rainbow trout. In a 2 x 2 factorial design, triplicate groups of rainbow trout (initial weight: 20 g) were fed over 12 weeks at 17°C a fishmeal-based diet (M) or a plant-ingredient based diet (V), with or without inclusion of a mineral premix. Trout fed the V vs. M diet had lower feed intake, growth, hepato-somatic index, apparent availability coefficient (AAC) of Fe, Cu, Mn and Zn and also lower whole body Se and Zn concentration, whereas whole body Fe and Cu and plasma Fe concentrations were higher. Feeding the V diet increased intestinal ferric reductase activity; at transcriptional level, hepatic hepcidin expression was down-regulated and ferroportin 1 was up-regulated. Transcription of intestinal Cu-transporting ATPases and hepatic copper transporter1 were higher in V0 compared to other groups. Among the hepatic metalo-enzyme activities assayed, only Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase was affected, being lower in V fed fish. Premix inclusion reduced the AAC of Fe, Cu and Zn; increased the whole body concentration of all micro- minerals; up-regulated hepatic hepcidin and down-regulated intestinal ferroportin 1 transcription; and reduced the transcription of Cu-transporting ATPases in the intestine. Overall, the regulation of micro-mineral metabolism in rainbow trout, especially Fe and Cu, was affected both by a change in ingredient composition and micro-mineral premix inclusion.

  1. Responses in Micro-Mineral Metabolism in Rainbow Trout to Change in Dietary Ingredient Composition and Inclusion of a Micro-Mineral Premix

    PubMed Central

    Antony Jesu Prabhu, P.; Geurden, Inge; Fontagné-Dicharry, Stéphanie; Veron, Vincent; Larroquet, Laurence; Mariojouls, Catherine; Schrama, Johan W.; Kaushik, Sadasivam J.

    2016-01-01

    Responses in micro-mineral metabolism to changes in dietary ingredient composition and inclusion of a micro-mineral premix (Fe, Cu, Mn, Zn and Se) were studied in rainbow trout. In a 2 x 2 factorial design, triplicate groups of rainbow trout (initial weight: 20g) were fed over 12 weeks at 17°C a fishmeal-based diet (M) or a plant-ingredient based diet (V), with or without inclusion of a mineral premix. Trout fed the V vs. M diet had lower feed intake, growth, hepato-somatic index, apparent availability coefficient (AAC) of Fe, Cu, Mn and Zn and also lower whole body Se and Zn concentration, whereas whole body Fe and Cu and plasma Fe concentrations were higher. Feeding the V diet increased intestinal ferric reductase activity; at transcriptional level, hepatic hepcidin expression was down-regulated and ferroportin 1 was up-regulated. Transcription of intestinal Cu-transporting ATPases and hepatic copper transporter1 were higher in V0 compared to other groups. Among the hepatic metalo-enzyme activities assayed, only Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase was affected, being lower in V fed fish. Premix inclusion reduced the AAC of Fe, Cu and Zn; increased the whole body concentration of all micro- minerals; up-regulated hepatic hepcidin and down-regulated intestinal ferroportin 1 transcription; and reduced the transcription of Cu-transporting ATPases in the intestine. Overall, the regulation of micro-mineral metabolism in rainbow trout, especially Fe and Cu, was affected both by a change in ingredient composition and micro-mineral premix inclusion. PMID:26895186

  2. The Biochemical Role of Macro and Micro-Minerals in the Management of Diabetes Mellitus and its Associated Complications: A Review.

    PubMed

    Mwiti Kibiti, Cromwell; Jide Afolayan, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic physiological glucose metabolic disorder. Its high prevalence globally has a significant impact on the quality of life. The management of diabetes includes non-pharmacological and glucose lowering agents. Although these methods are effective, they have drawbacks. This has led to a search for alternative therapy in macro and micro-minerals from dietary foods and plants. There is therefore a need to review, identify and classify their modes of action in diabetes mellitus therapy. This review was carried out using comprehensive literature reports on the use of mineral elements in the management of diabetes. Empirical online searches were conducted for different elements that have been studied for their anti-diabetic potentials both in vivo and in vitro. The University of Fort Hare's online database was also used. The results indicate that magnesium, molybdenum, zinc, vanadium and manganese facilitate glucose catabolism. Chromium, vanadium, zinc, molybdenum and magnesium can enhance insulin activity while molybdenum, manganese and zinc stimulate lipogenesis. Zinc and iron can modulate glucose, metabolizing enzymes in the gastrointestinal tract and limit oxidative stress, respectively. These agents have similar mechanisms to conventional drugs in ameliorating diabetic status and other associated complications. The mechanisms of these elements are well known, however, the synergetic effects of their combinations are still obscure. Literature on their safe dose(s) is still scanty. Evaluation of other useful macro and micro-minerals should also be undertaken. It is envisaged that the use of mineral supplements will promote good health in diabetics.

  3. Stability of Commercial Lead in the Presence of Iron(III)-Sequestering Biogenic Ligands: Implications for Metal Mobility and Bioavailability in Natural Iron-Rich Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornejo-Garrido, H.; Fernández-Lomelin, P.; Guzman-Mendoza, J.; Sedov, S.; Cervini-Silva, J.

    2007-05-01

    Mexico is a leader in the production of lead. Exposure of soils contaminated with lead ore waste, ingestion of contaminated waters, or inhalation of suspended particles, among others are examples of common routes of exposure. Solubility often becomes limiting for Pb bioavailability, therein the need to further characterize natural processes that contribute to its mobility in the environment. In oxic environments, such as highly weathered soils or surficial seawater, microorganisms and higher plants produce biogenic ligands such as siderophores to mobilize Fe that otherwise would be unavailable. Siderophores ligands facilitate the dissolution of natural particles that represent a primary reservoir of iron. On the other hand, lead sorbs strongly to minerals, particularly to those bearing high contents of iron. Siderophore ligands have been identified to influence the adsorption behavior of Pb(II) on iron mineral surfaces. Yet, little is known on how siderophore ligands may affect the stability of Pb(0). In this paper we study the stability of Pb(0) in the presence of desferrioxamine (DFO-B), a common siderophore ligand. Batch dissolution experiments of Pb(0) (1 g L-1) in the presence of DFO-B ([DFO-B]0 ? 200M) at pH 5 were conducted for 7 days. The adsorption behavior of DFO-B was also characterized. Corresponding experiments in the absence of DFO-B for the purpose of comparison were also conducted. Analyses for soluble Pb were conducted by AA and ICP-AES. Solid characterization was conducted by XRD and SEM-EDX. Analyses for soluble Pb reveal concentrations of up to ca. 40 ppm. White small-sized particles were identified after reaction, regardless of the presence of DFO-B. The suspension chemical composition influenced colloidal stability. In the presence of DFO-B, forming solids showed small aspect ratio ( < 2m), while remained suspended in supernatant solutions. In the absence of DFO-B, solids formed showed varied in size. The were found to remain associated with

  4. Dissolution Kinetics of Arsenopyrite in the Presence of Iron(III)-Sequestering Biogenic Ligands at pH 5.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornejo-Garrido, H.; Fernandez-Lomelin, P.; Guzman-Mendoza, J.; Sedov, S.; Cervini-Silva, J.

    2007-05-01

    Arsenopyrite is one of the most important natural sources of Arsenic on Earth. Arsenopyrite is relatively insoluble in pure water. That is not the case if it is exposed to environmental conditions. Notably, arsenopyrite surfaces exposed to biological activity undergo changes in lattice energy, surface morphology, particle size, and other properties, typical of mineral dissolution. Iron biogeochemical cycling is pivotal to electron transferring in nature. Therein, the need to further scrutinize on the mechanism of arsenopyrite dissolution induced by biological activity. In oxic environments, such as highly weathered soils or surficial seawater, microorganisms and higher plants produce biogenic ligands such as siderophores to mobilize Fe that otherwise would be unavailable. Siderophores ligands facilitate the dissolution of natural particles that represent a primary reservoir of iron. In this paper we study the stability of arsenopyrite in the presence of desferrioxamine (DFO-B), a common siderophore ligand, at pH 5. Arsenopyrite specimens from mines from Panasqueira, Portugal, were used for this study. Batch dissolution experiments of arsenopyrite (1 g L-1) in the presence of DFO-B ([DFO-B]0 - 200 ?M) were conducted for 7 days. The initial pH was adjusted to 5. Samples were stirred at 150 rpm. Sieving was conducted to homogeneized the particle size 0.149-0.1mm before conducting the dissolution experiments. Corresponding experiments in the absence of DFO-B for the purpose of comparison were also conducted. Analyses for soluble metals were conducted by AA and ICP-AES. Surface characterization was conducted by XRD and SEM-EDX. Incrustations of Pb(0) were detected in the arsenopyrite samples used for this study. In the presence of DFO-B, releases of Fe, As, and Pb showed positive trends with time. A shallower dependency was observed for release of Fe, As, and Pb in the presence of water only under similar experimental conditions. Detected concentrations of Fe, As, and

  5. INVESTIGATION OF THE TRANSFORMATION OF URANIUM UNDER IRON-REDUCING CONDITIONS: REDUCTION OF UVI BY BIOGENIC FEII/FEIII HYDROXIDE (GREEN RUST)

    SciTech Connect

    O'Loughlin, Edward J.; Scherer, Michelle M.; Kemner, Kenneth M.

    2006-12-31

    The recent identification of green rusts (GRs) as products of the reduction of FeIII oxyhydroxides by dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria, coupled with the ability of synthetic (GR) to reduce UVI species to insoluble UO2, suggests that biogenic green rusts (BioGRs) may play an important role in the speciation (and thus mobility) of U in FeIII-reducing environments. The objective of our research was to examine the potential for BioGR to affect the speciation of U under FeIII-reducing conditions. To meet this objective, we designed and executed a hypothesis-driven experimental program to identify key factors leading to the formation of BioGRs as products of dissimilatory FeIII reduction, to determine the key factors controlling the reduction of UVI to UIV by GRs, and to identify the resulting U-bearing mineral phases. The results of this research significantly increase our understanding of the coupling of biotic and abiotic processes with respect to the speciation of U in iron-reducing environments. In particular, the reduction of UVI to UIV by BioGR with the subsequent formation of U-bearing mineral phases may be effective for immobilizing U in suboxic subsurface environments. This information has direct applications to contaminant transport modeling and bioremediation engineering for natural or enhanced in situ remediation of subsurface contamination.

  6. Binding of heavy metal ions in aggregates of microbial cells, EPS and biogenic iron minerals measured in-situ using metal- and glycoconjugates-specific fluorophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Likai; Guo, Yuan; Byrne, James M.; Zeitvogel, Fabian; Schmid, Gregor; Ingino, Pablo; Li, Jianli; Neu, Thomas R.; Swanner, Elizabeth D.; Kappler, Andreas; Obst, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Aggregates consisting of bacterial cells, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and Fe(III) minerals formed by Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria are common at bulk or microscale chemical interfaces where Fe cycling occurs. The high sorption capacity and binding capacity of cells, EPS, and minerals controls the mobility and fate of heavy metals. However, it remains unclear to which of these component(s) the metals will bind in complex aggregates. To clarify this question, the present study focuses on 3D mapping of heavy metals sorbed to cells, glycoconjugates that comprise the majority of EPS constituents, and Fe(III) mineral aggregates formed by the phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria Rhodobacter ferrooxidans SW2 using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) in combination with metal- and glycoconjugates-specific fluorophores. The present study evaluated the influence of glycoconjugates, microbial cell surfaces, and (biogenic) Fe(III) minerals, and the availability of ferrous and ferric iron on heavy metal sorption. Analyses in this study provide detailed knowledge on the spatial distribution of metal ions in the aggregates at the sub-μm scale, which is essential to understand the underlying mechanisms of microbe-mineral-metal interactions. The heavy metals (Au3+, Cd2+, Cr3+, CrO42-, Cu2+, Hg2+, Ni2+, Pd2+, tributyltin (TBT) and Zn2+) were found mainly sorbed to cell surfaces, present within the glycoconjugates matrix, and bound to the mineral surfaces, but not incorporated into the biogenic Fe(III) minerals. Statistical analysis revealed that all ten heavy metals tested showed relatively similar sorption behavior that was affected by the presence of sorbed ferrous and ferric iron. Results in this study showed that in addition to the mineral surfaces, both bacterial cell surfaces and the glycoconjugates provided most of sorption sites for heavy metals. Simultaneously, ferrous and ferric iron ions competed with the heavy metals for sorption sites on the organic

  7. 2-Nitrophenol reduction promoted by S. putrefaciens 200 and biogenic ferrous iron: the role of different size-fractions of dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhenke; Tao, Liang; Li, Fangbai

    2014-08-30

    The reduction of nitroaromatic compounds (listed as a priority pollutant) in natural subsurface environments typically coexists with dissimilatory reduction of iron oxides effected by dissolved organic matter (DOM). Investigating the impact of the DOM that influences those reduction processes is crucial for understanding and predicting the geochemical fate of these environmental species. This study investigated the impact of different molecular weight DOM fractions (DMWDs) on the 2-nitrophenol (2-NP) reduction by S. putrefaciens 200 (SP200) and α-Fe2O3 with lactate (excluding electron donor interference). Kinetic measurements demonstrated that 2-NP reduction rates were affected by the redox reactivity of active species under DMWDs (denoted as L-DOM, M-DOM, and H-DOM). The enhanced reduction rates are consistent with the negative shifts in peak oxidation potential values, the increases in HA-like/FA-like values, aromaticity index values and electron transfer capacity values. L-DOM acted mainly as ligands to complex Fe(II), whereas the significant role of H-DOM in reductive reactions should be acting as an electron shuttle, transferring electrons from SP200 to Fe(III) and 2-NP and from biogenic Fe(II) to 2-NP, further accelerating the 2-NP reductions. Those observations provide valuable insights into the role of DOM in the biogeochemical redox processes and the remediation of contaminated soil in a natural environment.

  8. Macro- and micromineral composition of fetal pigs and their accretion rates during fetal development.

    PubMed

    Mahan, D C; Watts, M R; St-Pierre, N

    2009-09-01

    Twenty-six crossbreed (Yorkshire x Landrace) sows bred to Duroc boars were used to determine fetal measurements and mineral compositions at various stages of gestation. Sows were fed a vitamin and mineral fortified 15% CP corn soybean meal gestation diet fed at 2.1 kg daily with dietary minerals meeting or in excess of NRC requirements. Sow and litter measurements were evaluated at 5 periods postcoitum (45, 62, 80, 100, 115 d). The experiment was conducted as a completely randomized design with 3 to 6 observations per mean. Uterine fluid and fetal tissue were collected upon slaughter from the sows during the first 4 measurement periods. The empty uterus and uterine fluid contents were weighed. Individual fetuses were weighed and their length measured. Neonatal pigs from 6 sows were killed by electric shock before colostrum consumption. The fetuses and neonates were subsequently frozen, ground, and analyzed for water, protein, ash, and fat. The mineral profile was determined for the entire litter by inductively coupled plasma analysis technology. The sow and litter was each considered the experimental unit for all measurements and mineral compositions with regression analysis determined from 45 to 115 d of gestation. Results demonstrated that fetal weight increased quadratically (P < 0.01) and uterine fluid increased quadratically (P < 0.01) from 45 to 62 d, but then declined to 100 d postcoitum. The water, protein, ash, and lipid content of the fetus increased quadratically (P < 0.01) from 45 to 115 d of development, with the greatest increase of each component occurring during the last 15 d of development. Each of the macro- and microminerals increased curvilinearly (P < 0.01) as fetal development progressed with approximately 50% of the total litter and fetal macro- and micromineral contents occurring during the last 15 d of gestation. These results indicate that there is a large increase in mineral contents of fetal pigs during late gestation and that there may

  9. Composition and arsenic-attenuating capacity of biogenic iron (hydr)oxide flocs at the Lava Cap Mine Superfund Site, Nevada County, CA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, A. L.; Ona-Nguema, G.; Tufano, K.; Brown, G. E.

    2008-12-01

    The Lava Cap Mine Site (LCMS) is on the National Priority List due to the elevated human health risk presented by the catastrophic release of several thousand cubic meters of arsenic (As) enriched tailings (average: 500 ppm As ) from the site. These tailings were released into a creek and lake (former tailings retention pond) in a low-density residential area where ground water is the primary source of drinking water. Although oxidation of iron (Fe) sulfides (pyrite and arsenopyrite) from tailings are the main sources of As and Fe, buffering by carbonate minerals prevents formation of acidic waters. Macroscopic accumulations of fluffy Fe (hydr)oxide are observed suspended in the water column or at the sediment-water interface in creeks, ponds, and seeps of the LCMS. Microscopic analysis indicates that the Fe (hydr)oxide is predominantly associated with the sheaths of bacteria identified as members of the genus Leptothrix, which are known to enzymatically oxidize Fe and manganese (Mn) under oligotrophic, near-neutral, sub oxic conditions. Both Fe- encrusted Leptothrix sheaths (which are largely devoid of cells) and free aggolmerations of Fe hydr(oxide) support morphologically distinct Eubacteria whose identity is currently under investigation. Dried biogenic Fe (hydr)oxide averages 4.4 % organic carbon, 20.2 % Fe, and 0.91% As (9100 ppm), making it attractive as a potential natural biosorbent for As and Fe. Water flow rate is a very important control on the amount of As retained in biogenic Fe (hydr)oxide flocs, based on monitoring of a natural passive bioreactor system. In addition, a pond with nearly stagnant water accumulated approximately one order of magnitude more As (dried) than a seep site with faster-running water, even though there was only a 5-fold difference in their median filtered (0.45 micron) arsenic concentrations. Most Probable Number estimates and analysis of PCR amplicons of Eubacterial DNA indicate that populations of Fe-, As-, and sulfate

  10. Biogenic nano-magnetite and nano-zero valent iron treatment of alkaline Cr(VI) leachate and chromite ore processing residue

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, Mathew P.; Coker, Victoria S.; Parry, Stephen A.; Pattrick, Richard A. D.; Thomas, Russell A. P.; Kalin, Robert; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2014-12-11

    Highly reactive nano-scale biogenic magnetite (BnM), synthesized by the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens, was tested for the potential to remediate alkaline Cr(VI) contaminated waters associated with chromite ore processing residue (COPR). The performance of this biomaterial, targeting aqueous Cr(VI) removal, was compared to a synthetic alternative, nano-scale zero valent iron (nZVI). Samples of highly contaminated alkaline groundwater and COPR solid waste were obtained from a contaminated site in Glasgow, UK. During batch reactivity tests, Cr(VI) removal from groundwater was inhibited by ~25% (BnM) and ~50% (nZVI) when compared to the treatment of less chemically complex model pH 12 Cr(VI) solutions. In both the model Cr(VI) solutions and contaminated groundwater experiments the surface of the nanoparticles became passivated, preventing complete coupling of their available electrons to Cr(VI) reduction. To investigate this process, the surfaces of the reacted samples were analyzed by TEM-EDX, XAS and XPS, confirming Cr(VI) reduction to the less soluble Cr(III) on the nanoparticle surface. In groundwater reacted samples the presence of Ca, Si and S was also noted on the surface of the nanoparticles, and is likely responsible for earlier onset of passivation. Treatment of the solid COPR material in contact with water, by addition of increasing weight % of the nanoparticles, resulted in a decrease in aqueous Cr(VI) concentrations to below detection limits, via the addition of ≥5% w/w BnM or ≥1% w/w nZVI. XANES analysis of the Cr K edge, showed that the % Cr(VI) in the COPR dropped from 26% to a minimum of 4–7% by the addition of 5% w/w BnM or 2% w/w nZVI, with higher additions unable to reduce the remaining Cr(VI). The treated materials exhibited minimal re-mobilization of soluble Cr(VI) by re-equilibration with atmospheric oxygen, with the bulk of the Cr remaining in the solid fraction. Both nanoparticles exhibited a considerable

  11. Biogenic nano-magnetite and nano-zero valent iron treatment of alkaline Cr(VI) leachate and chromite ore processing residue

    DOE PAGES

    Watts, Mathew P.; Coker, Victoria S.; Parry, Stephen A.; ...

    2014-12-11

    Highly reactive nano-scale biogenic magnetite (BnM), synthesized by the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens, was tested for the potential to remediate alkaline Cr(VI) contaminated waters associated with chromite ore processing residue (COPR). The performance of this biomaterial, targeting aqueous Cr(VI) removal, was compared to a synthetic alternative, nano-scale zero valent iron (nZVI). Samples of highly contaminated alkaline groundwater and COPR solid waste were obtained from a contaminated site in Glasgow, UK. During batch reactivity tests, Cr(VI) removal from groundwater was inhibited by ~25% (BnM) and ~50% (nZVI) when compared to the treatment of less chemically complex model pH 12 Cr(VI) solutions.more » In both the model Cr(VI) solutions and contaminated groundwater experiments the surface of the nanoparticles became passivated, preventing complete coupling of their available electrons to Cr(VI) reduction. To investigate this process, the surfaces of the reacted samples were analyzed by TEM-EDX, XAS and XPS, confirming Cr(VI) reduction to the less soluble Cr(III) on the nanoparticle surface. In groundwater reacted samples the presence of Ca, Si and S was also noted on the surface of the nanoparticles, and is likely responsible for earlier onset of passivation. Treatment of the solid COPR material in contact with water, by addition of increasing weight % of the nanoparticles, resulted in a decrease in aqueous Cr(VI) concentrations to below detection limits, via the addition of ≥5% w/w BnM or ≥1% w/w nZVI. XANES analysis of the Cr K edge, showed that the % Cr(VI) in the COPR dropped from 26% to a minimum of 4–7% by the addition of 5% w/w BnM or 2% w/w nZVI, with higher additions unable to reduce the remaining Cr(VI). The treated materials exhibited minimal re-mobilization of soluble Cr(VI) by re-equilibration with atmospheric oxygen, with the bulk of the Cr remaining in the solid fraction. Both nanoparticles exhibited a considerable

  12. Biogenic nano-magnetite and nano-zero valent iron treatment of alkaline Cr(VI) leachate and chromite ore processing residue.

    PubMed

    Watts, Mathew P; Coker, Victoria S; Parry, Stephen A; Pattrick, Richard A D; Thomas, Russell A P; Kalin, Robert; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2015-03-01

    Highly reactive nano-scale biogenic magnetite (BnM), synthesized by the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens, was tested for the potential to remediate alkaline Cr(VI) contaminated waters associated with chromite ore processing residue (COPR). The performance of this biomaterial, targeting aqueous Cr(VI) removal, was compared to a synthetic alternative, nano-scale zero valent iron (nZVI). Samples of highly contaminated alkaline groundwater and COPR solid waste were obtained from a contaminated site in Glasgow, UK. During batch reactivity tests, Cr(VI) removal from groundwater was inhibited by ∼25% (BnM) and ∼50% (nZVI) when compared to the treatment of less chemically complex model pH 12 Cr(VI) solutions. In both the model Cr(VI) solutions and contaminated groundwater experiments the surface of the nanoparticles became passivated, preventing complete coupling of their available electrons to Cr(VI) reduction. To investigate this process, the surfaces of the reacted samples were analyzed by TEM-EDX, XAS and XPS, confirming Cr(VI) reduction to the less soluble Cr(III) on the nanoparticle surface. In groundwater reacted samples the presence of Ca, Si and S was also noted on the surface of the nanoparticles, and is likely responsible for earlier onset of passivation. Treatment of the solid COPR material in contact with water, by addition of increasing weight % of the nanoparticles, resulted in a decrease in aqueous Cr(VI) concentrations to below detection limits, via the addition of ⩾5% w/w BnM or ⩾1% w/w nZVI. XANES analysis of the Cr K edge, showed that the % Cr(VI) in the COPR dropped from 26% to a minimum of 4-7% by the addition of 5% w/w BnM or 2% w/w nZVI, with higher additions unable to reduce the remaining Cr(VI). The treated materials exhibited minimal re-mobilization of soluble Cr(VI) by re-equilibration with atmospheric oxygen, with the bulk of the Cr remaining in the solid fraction. Both nanoparticles exhibited a considerable capacity

  13. Biogenic nano-magnetite and nano-zero valent iron treatment of alkaline Cr(VI) leachate and chromite ore processing residue

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Mathew P.; Coker, Victoria S.; Parry, Stephen A.; Pattrick, Richard A.D.; Thomas, Russell A.P.; Kalin, Robert; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Highly reactive nano-scale biogenic magnetite (BnM), synthesized by the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens, was tested for the potential to remediate alkaline Cr(VI) contaminated waters associated with chromite ore processing residue (COPR). The performance of this biomaterial, targeting aqueous Cr(VI) removal, was compared to a synthetic alternative, nano-scale zero valent iron (nZVI). Samples of highly contaminated alkaline groundwater and COPR solid waste were obtained from a contaminated site in Glasgow, UK. During batch reactivity tests, Cr(VI) removal from groundwater was inhibited by ∼25% (BnM) and ∼50% (nZVI) when compared to the treatment of less chemically complex model pH 12 Cr(VI) solutions. In both the model Cr(VI) solutions and contaminated groundwater experiments the surface of the nanoparticles became passivated, preventing complete coupling of their available electrons to Cr(VI) reduction. To investigate this process, the surfaces of the reacted samples were analyzed by TEM-EDX, XAS and XPS, confirming Cr(VI) reduction to the less soluble Cr(III) on the nanoparticle surface. In groundwater reacted samples the presence of Ca, Si and S was also noted on the surface of the nanoparticles, and is likely responsible for earlier onset of passivation. Treatment of the solid COPR material in contact with water, by addition of increasing weight % of the nanoparticles, resulted in a decrease in aqueous Cr(VI) concentrations to below detection limits, via the addition of ⩾5% w/w BnM or ⩾1% w/w nZVI. XANES analysis of the Cr K edge, showed that the % Cr(VI) in the COPR dropped from 26% to a minimum of 4–7% by the addition of 5% w/w BnM or 2% w/w nZVI, with higher additions unable to reduce the remaining Cr(VI). The treated materials exhibited minimal re-mobilization of soluble Cr(VI) by re-equilibration with atmospheric oxygen, with the bulk of the Cr remaining in the solid fraction. Both nanoparticles exhibited a considerable

  14. Investigation of the Transformation of Uranium under Iron-Reducing Conditions: Reduction of UVI by Biogenic FeII/FeIII Hydroxide (Green Rust)

    SciTech Connect

    Edward O’Loughlin; Michelle Scherer; Kenneth Kemner; Shelly Kelly

    2004-03-17

    The research we are proposing addresses fundamental aspects of the effects of coupled biotic and abiotic processes on U speciation in subsurface environments where Fe redox cycling is significant. The long-term objective of this research is to evaluate whether reduction of U{sup VI} by biogenic GRs is a significant immobilization mechanism in subsurface environments. Our preliminary experiments have shown that biogenic GRs can reduce U{sup VI} to U{sup IV}; however, little is known about how biogeochemical conditions (such as pH, U concentration, carbonate concentration, and the presence of cocontaminants) and GR composition affect the rate and products of U{sup VI} reduction by GRs. It is also unclear which biogeochemical conditions favor formation of GR over other non-reactive Fe-bearing biomineralization products from the reduction of Fe{sup III} by DIRB. To address these issues, the following objectives are proposed: (1) Identify the geochemical conditions that favor the formation of biogenic GRs from the reduction of Fe{sup III} oxyhydroxides by DIRB (e.g., Shewanella and Geobacter species). (2) Characterize the chemical composition of biogenic GRs (e.g., Fe{sup II}:Fe{sup III} ratios and interlayer anions) and the effects of compositional variability on the rate and extent of U{sup VI} reduction. (3) Evaluate the effects of variations in geochemical conditions--particularly pH, U concentration, carbonate concentration, the presence of organic ligands, and the presence of reducible co-contaminants--both on the kinetics of U{sup VI} reduction by biogenic GR and on the composition of U-bearing mineral phases. Particular attention will be given to examining geochemical conditions relevant to conditions at DOE field sites. (4) Determine the potential for coupling the reduction of Fe{sup III} by DIRB to the reduction of U{sup VI} via biogenic Fe{sup II} species (including biogenic GRs). The objectives outlined above will be achieved by testing the following

  15. Impact of the natural Fe-fertilization on the magnitude, stoichiometry and efficiency of particulate biogenic silica, nitrogen and iron export fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaitre, N.; Planquette, H.; Dehairs, F.; van der Merwe, P.; Bowie, A. R.; Trull, T. W.; Laurenceau-Cornec, E. C.; Davies, D.; Bollinger, C.; Le Goff, M.; Grossteffan, E.; Planchon, F.

    2016-11-01

    The Kerguelen Plateau is characterized by a naturally Fe-fertilized phytoplankton bloom that extends more than 1000 km downstream in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. During the KEOPS2 study, in austral spring, we measured particulate nitrogen (PN), biogenic silica (BSi) and particulate iron (PFe) export fluxes in order to investigate how the natural fertilization impacts the stoichiometry and the magnitude of export fluxes and therefore the efficiency of the biological carbon pump. At 9 stations, we estimated elemental export fluxes based on element concentration to 234Th activity ratios for particulate material collected with in-situ pumps and 234Th export fluxes (Planchon et al., 2015). This study revealed that the natural Fe-fertilization increased export fluxes but to variable degrees. Export fluxes for the bloom impacted area were compared with those of a high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll (HNLC), low-productive reference site located to the south-west of Kerguelen and which had the lowest BSi and PFe export fluxes (2.55 mmol BSi m-2 d-1 and 1.92 μmol PFem-2 d-1) and amongst the lowest PN export flux (0.73 mmol PN m-2 d-1). The impact of the Fe fertilization was the greatest within a meander of the polar front (PF), to the east of Kerguelen, with fluxes reaching 1.26 mmol PN m-2 d-1; 20.4 mmol BSi m-2 d-1 and 22.4 μmol PFe m-2 d-1. A highly productive site above the Kerguelen Plateau, on the contrary, was less impacted by the fertilization with export fluxes reaching 0.72 mmol PN m-2 d-1; 4.50 mmol BSi m-2 d-1 and 21.4 μmol PFe m-2 d-1. Our results suggest that ecosystem features (i.e. type of diatom community) could play an important role in setting the magnitude of export fluxes of these elements. Indeed, for the PF meander, the moderate productivity was sustained by the presence of large and strongly silicified diatom species while at the higher productivity sites, smaller and slightly silicified diatoms dominated. Interestingly, our results suggest that

  16. Biogenic Iron-Rich Filaments in the Quartz Veins in the Uppermost Ediacaran Qigebulake Formation, Aksu Area, Northwestern Tarim Basin, China: Implications for Iron Oxidizers in Subseafloor Hydrothermal Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiqiang; Chen, Daizhao; Tang, Dongjie; Dong, Shaofeng; Guo, Chuan; Guo, Zenghui; Zhang, Yanqiu

    2015-07-01

    Fe-(oxyhydr)oxide-encrusted filamentous microstructures produced by microorganisms have been widely reported in various modern and ancient extreme environments; however, the iron-dependent microorganisms preserved in hydrothermal quartz veins have not been explored in detail because of limited materials available. In this study, abundant well-preserved filamentous microstructures were observed in the hydrothermal quartz veins of the uppermost dolostones of the terminal-Ediacaran Qigebulake Formation in the Aksu area, northwestern Tarim Basin, China. These filamentous microstructures were permineralized by goethite and hematite as revealed by Raman spectroscopy and completely entombed in chalcedony and quartz cements. Microscopically, they are characterized by biogenic filamentous morphologies (commonly 20-200 μm in length and 1-5 μm in diameter) and structures (curved, tubular sheath-like, segmented, and mat-like filaments), similar to the Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) living in modern and ancient hydrothermal vent fields. A previous study revealed that quartz-barite vein swarms were subseafloor channels of low-temperature, silica-rich, diffusive hydrothermal vents in the earliest Cambrian, which contributed silica to the deposition of the overlying bedded chert of the Yurtus Formation. In this context, this study suggests that the putative filamentous FeOB preserved in the quartz veins might have thrived in the low-temperature, silica- and Fe(II)-rich hydrothermal vent channels in subseafloor mixing zones and were rapidly fossilized by subsequent higher-temperature, silica-rich hydrothermal fluids in response to waning and waxing fluctuations of diffuse hydrothermal venting. In view of the occurrence in a relatively stable passive continental margin shelf environment in Tarim Block, the silica-rich submarine hydrothermal vent system may represent a new and important geological niche favorable for FeOB colonization, which is different from their traditional

  17. Iron

    MedlinePlus

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  18. Biogenic catalysis of soil formation on Mars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, J. L.

    1998-01-01

    The high iron abundance and the weak ferric iron spectral features of martian surface material are consistent with nanophase (nm-sized) iron oxide minerals as a major source of iron in the bright region soil on Mars. Nanophase iron oxide minerals, such as ferrihydrite and schwertmannite, and nanophase forms of hematite and goethite are formed by both biotic and abiotic processes on Earth. The presence of these minerals on Mars does not indicate biological activity on Mars, but it does raise the possibility. This work includes speculation regarding the possibility of biogenic soils on Mars based on previous observations and analyses. A remote sensing goal of upcoming missions should be to determine if nanophase iron oxide minerals, clay silicates and carbonates are present in the martian surface material. These minerals are important indicators for exobiology and their presence on Mars would invoke a need for further investigation and sample return from these sites.

  19. Biogenic metals in advanced water treatment.

    PubMed

    Hennebel, Tom; De Gusseme, Bart; Boon, Nico; Verstraete, Willy

    2009-02-01

    Microorganisms can change the oxidation state of metals and concomitantly deposit metal oxides and zerovalent metals on or into their cells. The microbial mechanisms involved in these processes have been extensively studied in natural environments, and researchers have recently gained interest in the applications of microbe-metal interactions in biotechnology. Because of their specific characteristics, such as high specific surface areas and high catalytic reactivity, biogenic metals offer promising perspectives for the sorption and (bio)degradation of contaminants. In this review, the precipitation of biogenic manganese and iron species and the microbial reduction of precious metals, such as palladium, platinum, silver and gold, are discussed with specific attention to the application of these biogenic metals in innovative remediation technologies in advanced water treatment.

  20. Biogenic Emission Sources

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Biogenic emissions sources come from natural sources and need to accounted for in photochemical grid models. They are computed using a model which utilizes spatial information on vegetation and land use.

  1. Biogenic green synthesis of monodispersed gum kondagogu (Cochlospermum gossypium) iron nanocomposite material and its application in germination and growth of mung bean (Vigna radiata) as a plant model.

    PubMed

    Raju, Dugyala; Mehta, Urmil J; Beedu, Sashidhar Rao

    2016-06-01

    An eco-friendly green and one-pot synthesis of highly monodispersed iron (Fe) nanoparticles (NPs) by using a natural biopolymer, gum kondagogu (GK) as reducing and capping agent is proposed. The NPs synthesised were characterised by ultra-violet-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. As the concentration of gum and time increases, the intensity of NPs formation increased. The NPs were highly monodispersed with uniform circular shapes of 2-6 nm in size. The formed NPs were crystalline in nature which was confirmed by diffraction analysis. The conversion ratio of Fe ionic form to NPs was 21% which was quantified by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). Fe is essential for plant growth and development. A study was conducted to examine the effect of these NPs on the growth of mung bean (Vigna radiata). The radical length and biomass was increased in seeds exposed to Fe NPs than the ions. The uptake of Fe NPs by the sprouts was also quantified by ICP-MS, in which Fe was more in mung bean seeds exposed to NPs. The α-amylase activity was increased in the seeds exposed to NPs. The observed increase in the biomass by Fe NPs and seed germination may facilitate its application in the agriculture as an important cost-effective method for plant growth.

  2. Photochemistry of biogenic gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joel S.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between the biosphere and the atmosphere is examined, emphasizing the composition and photochemistry and chemistry of the troposphere and stratosphere. The reactions of oxygen, ozone, and hydroxyl are reviewed and the fate of the biogenic gases ammonia, methane, reduced sulfur species, reduced halogen species, carbon monoxide, nitric oxide, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide are described. A list is given of the concentration and sources of the various gases.

  3. Abiotic reductive immobilization of U(VI) by biogenic mackinawite.

    PubMed

    Veeramani, Harish; Scheinost, Andreas C; Monsegue, Niven; Qafoku, Nikolla P; Kukkadapu, Ravi; Newville, Matt; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Pruden, Amy; Murayama, Mitsuhiro; Hochella, Michael F

    2013-03-05

    During subsurface bioremediation of uranium-contaminated sites, indigenous metal and sulfate-reducing bacteria may utilize a variety of electron acceptors, including ferric iron and sulfate that could lead to the formation of various biogenic minerals in situ. Sulfides, as well as structural and adsorbed Fe(II) associated with biogenic Fe(II)-sulfide phases, can potentially catalyze abiotic U(VI) reduction via direct electron transfer processes. In the present work, the propensity of biogenic mackinawite (Fe 1+x S, x = 0 to 0.11) to reduce U(VI) abiotically was investigated. The biogenic mackinawite produced by Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN32 was characterized by employing a suite of analytical techniques including TEM, SEM, XAS, and Mössbauer analyses. Nanoscale and bulk analyses (microscopic and spectroscopic techniques, respectively) of biogenic mackinawite after exposure to U(VI) indicate the formation of nanoparticulate UO2. This study suggests the relevance of sulfide-bearing biogenic minerals in mediating abiotic U(VI) reduction, an alternative pathway in addition to direct enzymatic U(VI) reduction.

  4. Abiotic Reductive Immobilization of U(VI) by Biogenic Mackinawite

    SciTech Connect

    Veeramani, Harish; Scheinost, Andreas; Monsegue, Niven; Qafoku, Nikolla; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Newville, Mathew; Lanzirotti, Anthony; Pruden, Amy; Murayama, Mitsuhiro; Hochella, Michael F.

    2013-03-01

    During subsurface bioremediation of uranium-contaminated sites, indigenous metal and sulfate-reducing bacteria may utilize a variety of electron acceptors, including ferric iron and sulfate that could lead to the formation of various biogenic minerals in-situ. Sulfides, as well as structural and adsorbed Fe(II) associated with biogenic Fe(II)-sulfide phases, can potentially catalyze abiotic U6+ reduction via direct electron transfer processes. In the present work, the propensity of biogenic mackinawite (Fe1+xS, x = 0 to 0.11) to reduce U6+ abiotically was investigated. The biogenic mackinawite produced by Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN32 was characterized by employing a suite of analytical techniques including TEM, SEM, XAS and Mössbauer analyses. Nanoscale and bulk analyses (microscopic and spectroscopic techniques, respectively) of biogenic mackinawite after exposure to U6+ indicate the formation of nanoparticulate UO2. This study suggests the relevance of Fe(II) and sulfide bearing biogenic minerals in mediating abiotic U6+ reduction, an alternative pathway in addition to direct enzymatic U6+ reduction.

  5. Formation and Reactivity of Biogenic Iron Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Ferris, F. Grant

    2003-06-01

    In the current study we aimed to determine how the cell surface polymers, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and capsular material, of a number of strains of Shewanella influenced surface proton binding behavior. An investigation of this kind is pertinent as surface proton binding site reactivity may influence a number of important eco-physiological factors. For example, proton binding sites may sequester Fe2+, as well as other metals like Ni2+, and thus inhibit the supply and metabolic reduction of Fe3+.(Parmar et al. 2001) Further understanding the cell surface reactivity of Shewanella is also important as this may influence the ability of the microorganism to adhere and interact with metal oxides and hydroxides. This study combined acid-base titration analyses to determine proton binding behavior with SDS-PAGE analysis of LPS.

  6. Terrigenous Fe input and biogenic sedimentation in the glacial and interglacial equatorial Pacific Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, R.W.; Leinen, M.; Knowlton, C.W.

    1995-12-01

    This study was performed to determine the relationship of particulate iron from land erosion to the accumulation of biogenic matter in the equatorial Pacific Ocean. Sediment cores representing the last six glacial-interglacial cycles and previously published mineralogic records were used as data input. Total iron, terrigenous, and biogenic components were determined for three sediment cores. The study determined that there is no relationship between terrigenous iron input and sedimentary carbon sequestering. This is based on chemical, spectral, and stratigraphic anlyses which showed: (1) no consistent pattern of terrigenous input during glacial or interglacial periods, (2) a close relationshipe between the accumulation of particulate iron and the accumulation of terrigenous matter, (3) no coherent spectral correlations between glacial periodicity and iron input, (4) an inverse correlation of iron input and calcium carbonate, and (5) no spectral or linear relationship between iron accumulation and calcium carbonate, organic carbon, or opal. 55 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. The Moon: Biogenic elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; Chang, Sherwood

    1992-01-01

    The specific objectives of the organic chemical exploration of the Moon involve the search for molecules of possible biological or prebiological origin. Detailed knowledge of the amount, distribution, and exact structure of organic compounds present on the Moon is extremely important to our understanding of the origin and history of the Moon and to its relationship to the history of the Earth and solar system. Specifically, such knowledge is essential for determining whether life on the Moon exists, ever did exist, or could develop. In the absence of life or organic matter, it is still essential to determine the abundance, distribution, and origin of the biogenic elements (e.g., H, C, O, N, S, P) in order to understand how the planetary environment may have influenced the course of chemical evolution. The history and scope of this effort is presented.

  8. Biogenic inputs to ocean mixing.

    PubMed

    Katija, Kakani

    2012-03-15

    Recent studies have evoked heated debate about whether biologically generated (or biogenic) fluid disturbances affect mixing in the ocean. Estimates of biogenic inputs have shown that their contribution to ocean mixing is of the same order as winds and tides. Although these estimates are intriguing, further study using theoretical, numerical and experimental techniques is required to obtain conclusive evidence of biogenic mixing in the ocean. Biogenic ocean mixing is a complex problem that requires detailed understanding of: (1) marine organism behavior and characteristics (i.e. swimming dynamics, abundance and migratory behavior), (2) mechanisms utilized by swimming animals that have the ability to mix stratified fluids (i.e. turbulence and fluid drift) and (3) knowledge of the physical environment to isolate contributions of marine organisms from other sources of mixing. In addition to summarizing prior work addressing the points above, observations on the effect of animal swimming mode and body morphology on biogenic fluid transport will also be presented. It is argued that to inform the debate on whether biogenic mixing can contribute to ocean mixing, our studies should focus on diel vertical migrators that traverse stratified waters of the upper pycnocline. Based on our understanding of mixing mechanisms, body morphologies, swimming modes and body orientation, combined with our knowledge of vertically migrating populations of animals, it is likely that copepods, krill and some species of gelatinous zooplankton and fish have the potential to be strong sources of biogenic mixing.

  9. Biogenic Emission Inventory System (BEIS)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Biogenic Emission Inventory System (BEIS) estimates volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from vegetation and nitric oxide (NO) emission from soils. Recent BEIS development has been restricted to the SMOKE system

  10. Controlled cobalt doping in biogenic magnetite nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, J. M.; Coker, V. S.; Moise, S.; Wincott, P. L.; Vaughan, D. J.; Tuna, F.; Arenholz, E.; van der Laan, G.; Pattrick, R. A. D.; Lloyd, J. R.; Telling, N. D.

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt-doped magnetite (CoxFe3 −xO4) nanoparticles have been produced through the microbial reduction of cobalt–iron oxyhydroxide by the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens. The materials produced, as measured by superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry, X-ray magnetic circular dichroism, Mössbauer spectroscopy, etc., show dramatic increases in coercivity with increasing cobalt content without a major decrease in overall saturation magnetization. Structural and magnetization analyses reveal a reduction in particle size to less than 4 nm at the highest Co content, combined with an increase in the effective anisotropy of the magnetic nanoparticles. The potential use of these biogenic nanoparticles in aqueous suspensions for magnetic hyperthermia applications is demonstrated. Further analysis of the distribution of cations within the ferrite spinel indicates that the cobalt is predominantly incorporated in octahedral coordination, achieved by the substitution of Fe2+ site with Co2+, with up to 17 per cent Co substituted into tetrahedral sites. PMID:23594814

  11. Hydropower's Biogenic Carbon Footprint.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Laura; Pfister, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Global warming is accelerating and the world urgently needs a shift to clean and renewable energy. Hydropower is currently the largest renewable source of electricity, but its contribution to climate change mitigation is not yet fully understood. Hydroelectric reservoirs are a source of biogenic greenhouse gases and in individual cases can reach the same emission rates as thermal power plants. Little is known about the severity of their emissions at the global scale. Here we show that the carbon footprint of hydropower is far higher than previously assumed, with a global average of 173 kg CO2 and 2.95 kg CH4 emitted per MWh of electricity produced. This results in a combined average carbon footprint of 273 kg CO2e/MWh when using the global warming potential over a time horizon of 100 years (GWP100). Nonetheless, this is still below that of fossil energy sources without the use of carbon capture and sequestration technologies. We identified the dams most promising for capturing methane for use as alternative energy source. The spread among the ~1500 hydropower plants analysed in this study is large and highlights the importance of case-by-case examinations.

  12. Hydropower's Biogenic Carbon Footprint

    PubMed Central

    Pfister, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Global warming is accelerating and the world urgently needs a shift to clean and renewable energy. Hydropower is currently the largest renewable source of electricity, but its contribution to climate change mitigation is not yet fully understood. Hydroelectric reservoirs are a source of biogenic greenhouse gases and in individual cases can reach the same emission rates as thermal power plants. Little is known about the severity of their emissions at the global scale. Here we show that the carbon footprint of hydropower is far higher than previously assumed, with a global average of 173 kg CO2 and 2.95 kg CH4 emitted per MWh of electricity produced. This results in a combined average carbon footprint of 273 kg CO2e/MWh when using the global warming potential over a time horizon of 100 years (GWP100). Nonetheless, this is still below that of fossil energy sources without the use of carbon capture and sequestration technologies. We identified the dams most promising for capturing methane for use as alternative energy source. The spread among the ~1500 hydropower plants analysed in this study is large and highlights the importance of case-by-case examinations. PMID:27626943

  13. Biogenic VOC and Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and ozone are short-lived contributors to radiative forcing that can drive relatively rapid changes in climate. They are not emitted into the atmosphere but are formed from precursors including biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) that are emitted from terrestrial ecosystems. BVOC can also impact longer-lived climate-relevant compounds by acting as a sink for the oxidants that remove moderately reactive gases such as methane and by being a source of carbon dioxide. Emissions of BVOC are highly temperature sensitive, and some also respond to light, and so there is a potential feedback coupling between climate and BVOC emissions. Another potential feedback is associated with the water cycle since SOA can influence precipitation by serving as cloud condensation nuclei and because VOC emissions are sensitive to water availability. Anthropogenic air pollutants add to the complexity of this coupled system by enhancing the production of ozone and SOA from BVOC. The role of BVOC in the land-atmosphere-climate system and potential feedback couplings is conceptually clear but developing an accurate quantitative representation is challenging. Our current understanding of the role of BVOC in the climate system and potential feedback couplings will be presented and the major uncertainties will be discussed. Advances in observations for constraining models, including long-term measurements and recent multi-scale studies, will be presented and priorities for continued advances will be discussed.

  14. Non-enzymatic U(VI) interactions with biogenic mackinawite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veeramani, H.; Qafoku, N. P.; Kukkadapu, R. K.; Murayama, M.; Hochella, M. F.

    2011-12-01

    Reductive immobilization of hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] by stimulation of dissimilatory metal and/or sulfate reducing bacteria (DMRB or DSRB) has been extensively researched as a remediation strategy for subsurface U(VI) contamination. These bacteria derive energy by reducing oxidized metals as terminal electron acceptors, often utilizing organic substrates as electron donors. Thus, when evaluating the potential for in-situ uranium remediation in heterogeneous subsurface media, it is important to understand how the presence of alternative electron acceptors such as Fe(III) and sulfate affect U(VI) remediation and the long term behavior and reactivity of reduced uranium. Iron, an abundant subsurface element, represents a substantial sink for electrons from DMRB, and the reduction of Fe(III) leads to the formation of dissolved Fe(II) or to reactive biogenic Fe(II)- and mixed Fe(II)/Fe(III)- mineral phases. Consequently, abiotic U(VI) reduction by reactive forms of biogenic Fe(II) minerals could be a potentially important process for uranium immobilization. In our study, the DMRB Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 was used to synthesize a biogenic Fe(II)-bearing sulfide mineral: mackinawite, that has been characterized by XRD, SEM, HRTEM and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Batch experiments involving treated biogenic mackinawite and uranium (50:1 molar ratio) were carried out at room temperature under strict anoxic conditions. Following complete removal of uranium from solution, the biogenic mackinawite was analyzed by a suite of analytical techniques including XAS, HRTEM and Mössbauer spectroscopy to determine the speciation of uranium and investigate concomitant Fe(II)-phase transformation. Determining the speciation of uranium is critical to success of a remediation strategy. The present work elucidates non-enzymatic/abiotic molecular scale redox interactions between biogenic mackinawite and uranium.

  15. Effect of dietary calcium and phosphorus levels on the total tract digestibility of innate and supplemental organic and inorganic microminerals in a corn-soybean meal based diet of grower pigs.

    PubMed

    Jolliff, J S; Mahan, D C

    2013-06-01

    The effects of Ca and P (CaP) levels and micromineral sources on mineral digestibility were evaluated in growing pigs. Treatments consisted of 2 levels of CaP and 3 trace mineral (TM) treatments arranged as a 2 × 3 factorial in a randomized complete block design with 8 replicates. The CaP levels evaluated were: 1) 0.65% Ca and 0.55% P [standard CaP (Std CaP)], and 2) 1.00% Ca and 0.85% P (High CaP). The TM treatments were: 1) Basal, without supplemental TM, 2) Basal supplemented with organic TM, and 3) Basal supplemented with inorganic TM. Both organic and inorganic TM premixes added 15 mg Cu, 150 mg Fe, 10 mg Mn, 0.3 mg Se, and 140 mg Zn/kg diet. Diets were formulated using corn soybean meal with a Ca to P ratio of 1.18 in both CaP treatments. Barrows with an initial BW of 45 kg were acclimated to stainless steel metabolism crates where diets were fed for 14 d before a 10-d collection period. Pigs within replicates were fed equivalent amounts of feed at 0800 and 1600 h each day with water provided free choice. Total feces, urine, and feed orts were collected daily. Essential macro- and microminerals were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma analysis. Increasing dietary CaP decreased the digestibility of Ca and Zn. Phosphorus digestibility did not change when the P inclusion level increased from 0.55 to 0.85% Ptotal. The High CaP level resulted in a lower urinary excretion of most minerals, particularly Cu (P < 0.05) and Mn (P < 0.05), as dietary CaP level increased but the others were not statistically significant. A summary of the ATTD for each of the experimental variables was statistically analyzed and averaged for the experiment. Although there were few statistical differences with individual minerals, they generally demonstrated a decline in digestibility when the High CaP was fed, averaging a 3% lower digestibility consistently than when the Std CaP level was fed. Organic TM averaged an approximately 5% greater digestibility than the average inorganic

  16. IMPROVING BIOGENIC EMISSION ESTIMATES WITH SATELLITE IMAGERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will review how existing and future applications of satellite imagery can improve the accuracy of biogenic emission estimates. Existing applications of satellite imagery to biogenic emission estimates have focused on characterizing land cover. Vegetation dat...

  17. IMPROVING BIOGENIC EMISSION ESTIMATES WITH SATELLITE IMAGERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will review how existing and future applications of satellite imagery can improve the accuracy of biogenic emission estimates. Existing applications of satellite imagery to biogenic emission estimates have focused on characterizing land cover. Vegetation dat...

  18. Serum antioxidant micromineral (Cu, Zn, Fe) status of drug dependent subjects: Influence of illicit drugs and lifestyle

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Kazi Jahangir; Kamal, Md Mustafa; Ahsan, Monira; Islam, SK Nazrul

    2007-01-01

    Background Use of illicit drugs induces multiple nutrient deficiencies. Drug habit, sexual practice and socioeconomic factors influence the nutrient profile of drug dependent subjects. The literature on this issue is still insufficient. This study has tested the hypothesis that illicit drug use and lifestyle impair mineral status. To test this hypothesis, 253 men multiple drug users of age 18–45 years were recruited to investigate their serum copper, zinc and iron levels. Influence of illicit drugs and their lifestyle on the mineral levels was also examined. The study subjects were drug dependent who had shared needles and had sexual activity with multiple partners. Serum concentrations of the minerals were estimated by atomic absorption flame spectrometry. Results Results showed a significant increase in serum copper and zinc concentrations, and decrease in iron level in drug dependent subjects. The increase of copper level was found to be much higher than that of zinc. Period of drug abuse had made a significant positive influence on the copper and iron levels, but it was apparently reversed for zinc concentration. Multiple sexual partnerships had significant influence on zinc status. There also were significant relationships observed between body mass index (BMI) as well as certain socioeconomic factors, and mineral status of drug dependent subjects and non-drug dependent controls. A series of multiple linear regression analysis predicted mineral values for education, age and BMI. The group (drug dependent subject = 1, non-drug dependent control = 2) had a significant influence on these parameters. However, after controlling these factors, it was shown that illicit drug use significantly contributed to influence the serum mineral levels. Conclusion Illicit drug use impairs serum mineral value causing an increase in copper and zinc and a decrease in iron. Lifestyle and nutritional status of drug dependent subjects influence serum mineral concentrations. PMID

  19. Products of abiotic U(VI) reduction by biogenic magnetite and vivianite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veeramani, Harish; Alessi, Daniel S.; Suvorova, Elena I.; Lezama-Pacheco, Juan S.; Stubbs, Joanne E.; Sharp, Jonathan O.; Dippon, Urs; Kappler, Andreas; Bargar, John R.; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2011-05-01

    Reductive immobilization of uranium by the stimulation of dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB) has been investigated as a remediation strategy for subsurface U(VI) contamination. In those environments, DMRB may utilize a variety of electron acceptors, such as ferric iron which can lead to the formation of reactive biogenic Fe(II) phases. These biogenic phases could potentially mediate abiotic U(VI) reduction. In this work, the DMRB Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN32 was used to synthesize two biogenic Fe(II)-bearing minerals: magnetite (a mixed Fe(II)-Fe(III) oxide) and vivianite (an Fe(II)-phosphate). Analysis of abiotic redox interactions between these biogenic minerals and U(VI) showed that both biogenic minerals reduced U(VI) completely. XAS analysis indicates significant differences in speciation of the reduced uranium after reaction with the two biogenic Fe(II)-bearing minerals. While biogenic magnetite favored the formation of structurally ordered, crystalline UO 2, biogenic vivianite led to the formation of a monomeric U(IV) species lacking U-U associations in the corresponding EXAFS spectrum. To investigate the role of phosphate in the formation of monomeric U(IV) such as sorbed U(IV) species complexed by mineral surfaces, versus a U(IV) mineral, uranium was reduced by biogenic magnetite that was pre-sorbed with phosphate. XAS analysis of this sample also revealed the formation of monomeric U(IV) species suggesting that the presence of phosphate hinders formation of UO 2. This work shows that U(VI) reduction products formed during in situ biostimulation can be influenced by the mineralogical and geochemical composition of the surrounding environment, as well as by the interfacial solute-solid chemistry of the solid-phase reductant.

  20. Effects of vitamins, probiotics, and protein level on semen traits and some seminal plasma macro- and microminerals of male broiler breeders after zinc-induced molting.

    PubMed

    Khan, Rifat Ullah; Zia-Ur-Rahman; Javed, Ijaz; Muhammad, Faqir

    2012-07-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of vitamin E, vitamin C, probiotics, dietary protein level, and their combination on semen traits and seminal plasma macro- and microminerals in 65-week-old male broiler breeders after zinc-induced molting. One hundred eighty birds were induced to molt by mixing zinc oxide (3,000 mg/kg) in the diet. The birds were divided into six groups (five replicates) by completely randomized design. One group was kept as control (16% CP), while the other five were supplemented with vitamin E (100 IU/kg feed), vitamin C (500 IU/kg feed) probiotics (50 mg/L), protein level (14% CP), and their combination. Semen samples were weekly collected for determination of semen volume, sperm concentration, motility, and dead sperm percentage. Analyses of Na, K, Ca and Mg, Zn, Fe, Mn, and Cu in seminal plasma were also performed. Overall, mean semen volume was significantly high in vitamin E and C supplemented groups compared to control. Overall mean sperm motility was significantly higher in vitamin E supplemented group, whereas dead sperm percentage was significantly lower in the vitamin C group compared to control. Mineral analyses revealed that overall mean seminal plasma Mg increased significantly in vitamin E and C supplemented groups compared to control. Similarly, significantly high overall mean seminal plasma Cu concentration was observed in vitamins E and C and combination groups. It can be concluded that vitamins have a vital role in improving semen quality and bioavailability of Mg and Cu in seminal plasma of the post-molt cockerels.

  1. Linking biogenic hydrocarbons to biogenic aerosol in the Borneo rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, J. F.; Alfarra, M. R.; Robinson, N.; Ward, M. W.; Lewis, A. C.; McFiggans, G. B.; Coe, H.; Allan, J. D.

    2013-07-01

    Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds are though to contribute significantly to secondary organic aerosol formation in the tropics, but understanding the process of these transformations has proved difficult, due to the complexity of the chemistry involved and very low concentrations. Aerosols from above a South East Asian tropical rainforest in Borneo were characterised using liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry, high resolution aerosol mass spectrometry and fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICRMS) techniques. Oxygenated compounds were identified in ambient organic aerosol that could be directly traced back to isoprene, monoterpenes and sesquiterpene emissions, by combining field data on chemical structures with mass spectral data generated from synthetically produced products created in a simulation chamber. Eighteen oxygenated species of biogenic origin were identified in the rainforest aerosol from the precursors isoprene, α-pinene, limonene, α-terpinene and β-caryophyllene. The observations provide the unambiguous field detection of monoterpene and sesquiterpene oxidation products in SOA above a pristine tropical rainforest. The presence of 2-methyltetrol organosulfates and an associated sulfated dimer provides direct evidence that isoprene in the presence of sulfate aerosol can make a contribution to biogenic organic aerosol above tropical forests. High-resolution mass spectrometry indicates that sulfur can also be incorporated into oxidation products arising from monoterpene precursors in tropical aerosol.

  2. Linking biogenic hydrocarbons to biogenic aerosol in the Borneo rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, J. F.; Alfarra, M. R.; Robinson, N.; Ward, M. W.; Lewis, A. C.; McFiggans, G. B.; Coe, H.; Allan, J. D.

    2013-11-01

    Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds are though to contribute significantly to secondary organic aerosol formation in the tropics, but understanding these transformation processes has proved difficult, due to the complexity of the chemistry involved and very low concentrations. Aerosols from above a Southeast Asian tropical rainforest in Borneo were characterised using liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry, high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICRMS) techniques. Oxygenated compounds were identified in ambient organic aerosol that could be directly traced back to isoprene, monoterpenes and sesquiterpene emissions, by combining field data on chemical structures with mass spectral data generated from synthetically produced products created in a simulation chamber. Eighteen oxygenated species of biogenic origin were identified in the rainforest aerosol from the precursors isoprene, α-pinene, limonene, α-terpinene and β-caryophyllene. The observations provide the unambiguous field detection of monoterpene and sesquiterpene oxidation products in SOA above a pristine tropical rainforest. The presence of 2-methyl tetrol organosulfates and an associated sulfated dimer provides direct evidence that isoprene in the presence of sulfate aerosol can make a contribution to biogenic organic aerosol above tropical forests. High-resolution mass spectrometry indicates that sulfur can also be incorporated into oxidation products arising from monoterpene precursors in tropical aerosol.

  3. Biogenic syngenetic pyrite from tuffaceous sedimentary RF3-V rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyreva, Irina; Nikulova, Natalia

    2015-04-01

    Biogenic framboidal pyrite was found in intraformational tuffaceous sedimentary gravelites, within basic volcanites (RF3-V) in Subpolar Urals (Sablya Ridge). Pyrite grains (Fe 44.07-44,33, S 50.22-53.31 wt. %) are composed of ball-like microconcretions, sometimes intergrown with crystals of pentagondodecahedron and cubic habit. The microconcretions (20 to 40 mcm) are roundish and composed of microcrystals, which end faces form spherical surface. The nuclei of the microconcretions are represented by frambohedrons 4-5 mcm in size, which are pyritized cells of sulphate-reducing colonial coccoid microfossils. The formation of the frambohedrons occurred synchronously to sedimentation in stagnant reducing environment at interaction of biogenic hydrogen sulphide with water-dissolved iron. The biogenic hydrogen sulphide is reduced by microorganisms in the conditions of free and unrestricted access of dissolved sulphate ions sourced from sulphur of fumarole gases. Iron came from washed-out basic volcanites. The growth of outer radial parts of microconcretions occurred during compaction of sediments in diagenetic stage. The quantity of dissolved sulphate and iron during pyrite formation exceeded possibilitites of bacterial "starters" which resulted in the formation of pyrites of other morphological varieties. This is confirmed by the accretion of concentric rays of the concretions and cubic microcrystals of pyrite in the aggregate grains. The formation of tuffaceous sediments occurred during temporary decrease of volcanic activity in a continuous linear water flow with stagnant areas composed of water-displaced pebbles from underlying metaterrigenous rocks (RF 1-2), which were exposed beyond the development area of volcanic strata, unchanged clasts of recent and synchronously formed basic and medium volcanites with participation of air-driven ashes and influence of volcanic gases in the presence of sulphate-reducing bacteria. The work is financially supported by the Program

  4. Antiaggregant effects of biogenic chloramines.

    PubMed

    Murina, M A; Roshchupkin, D I; Kravchenko, N N; Petrova, A O; Sergienko, V I

    2007-09-01

    Alanine and taurine sharply potentiate antiaggregant effects of hypochlorite on platelets in platelet-rich plasma. This effect is determined by more pronounced action of chloramine derivatives, products of interaction of added amino acids with hypochlorite. Platelets are more sensitive to the inhibitory effects of amino acid chloramine derivatives (biogenic chloramines) compared to erythrocytes and neutrophils. The antiaggregant effects of biobenic amines, as covalent platelet inhibitors, in platelet-rich plasma are characterized by their increased reaction capacity with molecular targets in cells. Quantitative parameter of this initial selectivity (ratio of rate constant of inactivation of platelet receptors to rate constant of side reaction with plasma proteins) far surpasses 1. N,N-Dichlorotaurine is a perspective antiaggreant among the studied biogenic chloramines. This agent is stable and exhibits specific pharmacological activity in all test systems, including animal model of thrombosis.

  5. Unconventional shallow biogenic gas systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shurr, G.W.; Ridgley, J.L.

    2002-01-01

    Unconventional shallow biogenic gas falls into two distinct systems that have different attributes. Early-generation systems have blanketlike geometries, and gas generation begins soon after deposition of reservoir and source rocks. Late-generation systems have ringlike geometries, and long time intervals separate deposition of reservoir and source rocks from gas generation. For both types of systems, the gas is dominantly methane and is associated with source rocks that are not thermally mature. Early-generation biogenic gas systems are typified by production from low-permeability Cretaceous rocks in the northern Great Plains of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Montana. The main area of production is on the southeastern margin of the Alberta basin and the northwestern margin of the Williston basin. The huge volume of Cretaceous rocks has a generalized regional pattern of thick, non-marine, coarse clastics to the west and thinner, finer grained marine lithologies to the east. Reservoir rocks in the lower part tend to be finer grained and have lower porosity and permeability than those in the upper part. Similarly, source beds in the units have higher values of total organic carbon. Patterns of erosion, deposition, deformation, and production in both the upper and lower units are related to the geometry of lineament-bounded basement blocks. Geochemical studies show that gas and coproduced water are in equilibrium and that the fluids are relatively old, namely, as much as 66 Ma. Other examples of early-generation systems include Cretaceous clastic reservoirs on the southwestern margin of Williston basin and chalks on the eastern margin of the Denver basin. Late-generation biogenic gas systems have as an archetype the Devonian Antrim Shale on the northern margin of the Michigan basin. Reservoir rocks are fractured, organic-rich black shales that also serve as source rocks. Although fractures are important for production, the relationships to specific geologic structures are

  6. Size distribution of biogenic aerosol particles from the amazon basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, Paulo; Hansson, Hans-Christen

    The size distribution and elemental composition of natural background aerosol particles from the tropical rain forest of the Amazon Basin were measured. A 45 m high tower installed in an undisturbed forest near Manaus was used and aerosol was sampled in three levels of the tower. Single orifice Batelle-type cascade impactors with 5 stages and backup filter were used. A total of 50 complete cascade impactor sets was sampled in April and May 1987, during the wet season, when no forest burning occurs. Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) was used to measure elemental concentrations of 20 elements (Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Rb, Sr, Zr and Pb). Absolute factor analysis was used to interpret the large data set of the trace element concentrations and to obtain quantitative elemental source profiles. The identified components in all size ranges comprise biogenic aerosol naturally released by the forest, mineral dust aerosol particles and sea salt. The elements associated with the biogenic component were potassium, phosphorus, sulphur, zinc, strontium and others in smaller proportions. The mineral dust component comprises most of the concentration of aluminium, silicon, calcium, titanium, manganese and iron. Chlorine was found to be associated with the aeolean dust component because of the long-range transport of Sahara dust over the Atlantic ocean, bringing Cl together with mineral dust particles. The size distribution of the elements associated with the windblown dust (Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe and Cl) shows in the coarse mode, with an average aerodynamic diameter of 4 μm. Two different biogenic aerosol components were observed. A fine mode component ( d50 ≈ 0.5 μm), characterised by the the elements S, Zn and Sr and the mode biogenic component ( d50 ≈ 3.0 μm) characterised by the presence of P, K, Cl and Sr. The coarse biogenic (P, K, Cl, Sr) component is predominant at ground level under the forest canopy. The fine mode biogenic

  7. Framework for Assessing Biogenic CO2 Emissions from Stationary Sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    This revision of the 2011 report, Accounting Framework for Biogenic CO2 Emissions from Stationary Sources, evaluates biogenic CO2 emissions from stationary sources, including a detailed study of the scientific and technical issues associated with assessing biogenic carbon dioxide...

  8. Framework for Assessing Biogenic CO2 Emissions from Stationary Sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    This revision of the 2011 report, Accounting Framework for Biogenic CO2 Emissions from Stationary Sources, evaluates biogenic CO2 emissions from stationary sources, including a detailed study of the scientific and technical issues associated with assessing biogenic carbon dioxide...

  9. A comparison between acoustic properties and heat effects in biogenic (magnetosomes) and abiotic magnetite nanoparticle suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Józefczak, A.; Leszczyński, B.; Skumiel, A.; Hornowski, T.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles show unique properties and find many applications because of the possibility to control their properties using magnetic field. Magnetic nanoparticles are usually synthesized chemically and modification of the particle surface is necessary. Another source of magnetic nanoparticles are various magnetotactic bacteria. These biogenic nanoparticles (magnetosomes) represent an attractive alternative to chemically synthesized iron oxide particles because of their unique characteristics and a high potential for biotechnological and biomedical applications. This work presents a comparison between acoustic properties of biogenic and abiotic magnetite nanoparticle suspensions. Experimental studies have shown the influence of a biological membrane on the ultrasound properties of magnetosomes suspension. Finally the heat effect in synthetic and biogenic magnetite nanoparticles is also discussed. The experimental study shows that magnetosomes present good heating efficiency.

  10. Improved dewatering of CEPT sludge by biogenic flocculant from Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jonathan W C; Murugesan, Kumarasamy; Yu, Shuk Man; Kurade, Mayur B; Selvam, Ammaiyappan

    2016-01-01

    Bioleaching using an iron-oxidizing bacterium, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, and its biogenic flocculants was evaluated to improve the dewaterability of chemically enhanced primary treatment (CEPT) sewage sludge. CEPT sludge in flasks was inoculated with A. ferrooxidans culture, medium-free cells and the cell-free culture filtrate with and without the energy substance Fe(2+), and periodically the sludge samples were analysed for the dewaterability. This investigation proves that bioleaching effectively improved the sludge dewaterability as evidenced from drastic reduction in capillary suction time (≤20 seconds) and specific resistance to filtration (≥90%); however, it requires an adaptability period of 1-2 days. On the other hand, the biogenic flocculant produced by A. ferrooxidans greatly decreased the time-to-filtration and facilitated the dewaterability within 4 h. Results indicate that rapid dewatering of CEPT sludge by biogenic flocculants provides an opportunity to replace the synthetic organic polymer for dewatering.

  11. The role of biogenic structures on the biogeochemical functioning of mangrove constructed wetlands sediments--a mesocosm approach.

    PubMed

    Penha-Lopes, Gil; Kristensen, Erik; Flindt, Mogens; Mangion, Perrine; Bouillon, Steven; Paula, José

    2010-04-01

    Benthic metabolism (measured as CO(2) production) and carbon oxidation pathways were evaluated in 4 mangrove mesocosms subjected daily to seawater or 60% sewage in the absence or presence of mangrove trees and biogenic structures (pneumatophores and crab burrows). Total CO(2) emission from darkened sediments devoid of biogenic structures at pristine conditions was comparable during inundation (immersion) and air exposure (emersion), although increased 2-7 times in sewage contaminated mesocosms. Biogenic structures increased low tide carbon gas emissions at contaminated (30%) and particularly pristine conditions (60%). When sewage was loaded into the mesocosms under unvegetated and planted conditions, iron reduction was substituted by sulfate reduction and contribution of aerobic respiration to total metabolism remained above 50%. Our results clearly show impacts of sewage on the partitioning of electron acceptors in mangrove sediment and confirm the importance of biogenic structures for biogeochemical functioning but also on greenhouse gases emission.

  12. Electron transfer from humic substances to biogenic and abiogenic Fe(III) oxyhydroxide minerals.

    PubMed

    Piepenbrock, Annette; Schröder, Christian; Kappler, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Microbial humic substance (HS) reduction and subsequent abiotic electron transfer from reduced HS to poorly soluble Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides, a process named electron shuttling, significantly increases microbial Fe(III) mineral reduction rates. However, the importance of electron shuttling in nature and notably the electron transfer from HS to biogenic Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides have thus far not been determined. In this study, we have quantified the rate and extent of electron transfer from reduced and nonreduced Pahokee Peat humic acids (PPHA) and fresh soil organic matter (SOM) extracts to both synthetic and environmentally relevant biogenic Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides. We found that biogenic Fe(III) minerals were reduced faster and to an equal or higher degree than their abiogenic counterparts. Differences were attributed to differences in crystallinity and the association of bacterial biomass with biogenic minerals. Compared to purified PPHA, SOM extract transferred fewer electrons per milligram of carbon and electron transfer was observed only to poorly crystalline ferrihydrite but not to more crystalline goethite. This indicates a difference in redox potential distribution of the redox-active functional groups in extracted SOM relative to the purified PPHA. Our results suggest that HS electron shuttling can also contribute to iron redox processes in environments where biogenic Fe(III) minerals are present.

  13. Biogenic Methane and the Rise of Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catling, David; McKay, Christopher

    2001-01-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis does not make the rise of oxygen inevitable. What is required is that reductant and oxygen be separated and permanently segregated. The usual picture for Earth is that oxygenic photosynthesis split CO2 into carbon and oxygen, with the carbon buried in sediments and the oxygen mostly taken up by oxides of iron and sulfur. The relatively small atmospheric reservoir of O2 is regulated by the carbon burial rate, reaction with volcanic and metamorphic gases, and oxidation of reduced carbon released as old sediments weather. Absent from this picture is a distinction between the Archean and modern times: on average, carbon burial fluxes would have been matched by oxygen losses then as now. Separation of reductant from oxidant is only provisional. No net oxidation of the continents occurs, and so no change of diagenetic, metamorphic, or volcanic gases is expected. Nor would any change in oxidative weathering be expected. Something more than carbon burial is required to make the Archean different. The escape of hydrogen to space permanently separates the reductant from the oxidant. Hydrogen escape is widely believed to have led to the present highly oxidized states of Mars and Venus. Hydrogen escape has usually been thought small for Archaean Earth, because water vapor is cold-trapped at the troposphere and thus held to levels of a few ppmv in the stratosphere. This cold trapping renders hydrogen escape negligible. However, methane is not cold trapped, and its expected abundance in the Archaean, given low oxygen levels and a biogenic source, would have been high, probably more than 100 times present. At such levels methane would have driven geologically significant levels of hydrogen escape. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  14. Biogenic Methane and the Rise of Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catling, David; McKay, Christopher

    2001-01-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis does not make the rise of oxygen inevitable. What is required is that reductant and oxygen be separated and permanently segregated. The usual picture for Earth is that oxygenic photosynthesis split CO2 into carbon and oxygen, with the carbon buried in sediments and the oxygen mostly taken up by oxides of iron and sulfur. The relatively small atmospheric reservoir of O2 is regulated by the carbon burial rate, reaction with volcanic and metamorphic gases, and oxidation of reduced carbon released as old sediments weather. Absent from this picture is a distinction between the Archean and modern times: on average, carbon burial fluxes would have been matched by oxygen losses then as now. Separation of reductant from oxidant is only provisional. No net oxidation of the continents occurs, and so no change of diagenetic, metamorphic, or volcanic gases is expected. Nor would any change in oxidative weathering be expected. Something more than carbon burial is required to make the Archean different. The escape of hydrogen to space permanently separates the reductant from the oxidant. Hydrogen escape is widely believed to have led to the present highly oxidized states of Mars and Venus. Hydrogen escape has usually been thought small for Archaean Earth, because water vapor is cold-trapped at the troposphere and thus held to levels of a few ppmv in the stratosphere. This cold trapping renders hydrogen escape negligible. However, methane is not cold trapped, and its expected abundance in the Archaean, given low oxygen levels and a biogenic source, would have been high, probably more than 100 times present. At such levels methane would have driven geologically significant levels of hydrogen escape. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  15. From urban municipalities to polar bioremediation: the characterisation and contribution of biogenic minerals for water treatment.

    PubMed

    Freidman, Benjamin L; Northcott, Kathy A; Thiel, Peta; Gras, Sally L; Snape, Ian; Stevens, Geoff W; Mumford, Kathryn A

    2017-06-01

    Minerals of biological origin have shown significant potential for the separation of contaminants from water worldwide. This study details the contribution of biologically derived minerals to water treatment operations, with a focus on filtration media from urban municipalities and remote cold regions. The results support biofilm-embedded iron and manganese to be the building blocks of biogenic mineral development on activated carbon and nutrient-amended zeolites. The presence of similar iron and manganese oxidising bacterial species across all filter media supports the analogous morphologies of biogenic minerals between sites and suggests that biological water treatment processes may be feasible across a range of climates. This is the first time the stages of biogenic mineral formation have been aligned with comprehensive imaging of the biofilm community and bacterial identification; especially with respect to cold regions. Where biogenic mineral formation occurs on filter media, the potential exists for enhanced adsorption for a range of organic and inorganic contaminants and improved longevity of filter media beyond the adsorption or exchange capacities of the raw material.

  16. Quantifying Global Marine Biogenic NO Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Hang; Wang, Siwen; Lin, Jintai; Hao, Nan; Pöschl, Ulrich; Cheng, Yafang

    2017-04-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx) are among the most important molecules in atmospheric chemistry and nitrogen cycle. We suggest that biogenic NO production in ocean water can be a source of atmospheric NOx. Nitrification and denitrification in the ocean produces nitrites which can be further reduced to NO through microbiological processes. We report global distributions of marine biogenic NO emission. This new source improves the agreement between satellite observations and model simulations over large areas. Our model simulations show that the new biogenic NO source increases the atmospheric oxidative capacity and aerosol formation rate showing a closer link between atmospheric chemistry and ocean microbiology.

  17. Biogenic emissions modeling for Southeastern Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Estes, M.; Jacob, D.; Jarvie, J.

    1996-12-31

    The Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC) modeling staff performed biogenic hydrocarbon emissions modeling in support of gridded photochemical modeling for ozone episodes in 1992 and 1993 for the Coastal Oxidant Assessment for Southeast Texas (COAST) modeling domain. This paper summarizes the results of the biogenic emissions modeling and compares preliminary photochemical modeling results to ambient air monitoring data collected during the 1993 COAST study. Biogenic emissions were estimated using BIOME, a gridded biogenic emissions model that uses region-specific land use and biomass density data, and plant species-specific emission factor data. Ambient air monitoring data were obtained by continuous automated gas chromatography at two sites, one-hour canister samples at 5 sites, and 24-hour canister samples at 13 other sites. The concentrations of Carbon Bond-IV species (as determined from urban airshed modeling) were compared to measured hydrocarbon concentrations. In this paper, we examined diurnal and seasonal variations, as well as spatial variations.

  18. Biogenic gas: Controls, habitats, and resource potential

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, D.D. )

    1993-01-01

    As much as 20 percent of the world's natural-gas resource is estimated to have been generated by the decomposition of organic matter by anaerobic microbes at low temperatures. This gas is commonly referred to as biogenic gas. Most biogenic gas was generated early in the burial history of sediments. Some biogenic gas was also generated in relatively recent geologic time and is associated with groundwater flow. The factors that favor significant generation of biogenic gas are anoxic conditions, low sulfate content, low temperature, abundant organic matter, and sufficient pore space for the microbes to thrive. Conditions beneficial for the accumulation of biogenic gas include stratigraphic or early structural traps, adequate seals, low permeability, low pressure, early dissolution of the gas, and formation of gas hydrates. Rapid sediment deposition is critical to both the generation and the accumulation of biogenic gas generated during the early stage. Biogenic gas is distinguished by its molecular and isotopic composition. The hydrocarbon fraction is generally more than 99 percent methane, and the diagnostic isotopic composition of the methane component is as follows: [delta][sup 13]C values are generally lighter than -55 parts per thousand (permil), and [delta]D values are usually in the range of -150 to -250 permil. This isotopic composition indicates that the methane generally resulted from CO[sub 2] reduction. Significant accumulations of ancient biogenic gas have been discovered in Africa, Asia, Europe, North America, and South America. These accumulations occur in Mississippian and younger rocks, at burial depths as much as 4,600 m. They are associated with a variety of rock types (carbonate, clastic, and coal), and occur in a variety of marine and nonmarine depositional settings generally characterized by rapid deposition. 111 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Anisotropic lattice distortions in biogenic aragonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokroy, Boaz; Quintana, John P.; Caspi, El'ad N.; Berner, Alex; Zolotoyabko, Emil

    2004-12-01

    Composite biogenic materials produced by organisms have a complicated design on a nanometre scale. An outstanding example of organic-inorganic composites is provided by mollusc seashells, whose superior mechanical properties are due to their multi-level crystalline hierarchy and the presence of a small amount (0.1-5 wt%) of organic molecules. The presence of organic molecules, among other characteristics, can influence the coherence length for X-ray scattering in biogenic crystals. Here we show the results of synchrotron high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction measurements in biogenic and non-biogenic (geological) aragonite crystals. On applying the Rietveld refinement procedure to the high-resolution diffraction spectra, we were able to extract the aragonite lattice parameters with an accuracy of 10 p.p.m. As a result, we found anisotropic lattice distortions in biogenic aragonite relative to the geological sample, maximum distortion being 0.1% along the c axis of the orthorhombic unit cell. The organic molecules could be a source of these structural distortions in biogenic crystals. This finding may be important to the general understanding of the biomineralization process and the development of bio-inspired 'smart' materials.

  20. Virus Removal by Biogenic Cerium

    SciTech Connect

    De Gusseme, B.; Du Laing, G; Hennebel, T; Renard, P; Chidambaram, D; Fitts, J; Bruneel, E; Van Driessche, I; Verbeken, K; et. al.

    2010-01-01

    The rare earth element cerium has been known to exert antifungal and antibacterial properties in the oxidation states +III and +IV. This study reports on an innovative strategy for virus removal in drinking water by the combination of Ce(III) on a bacterial carrier matrix. The biogenic cerium (bio-Ce) was produced by addition of aqueous Ce(III) to actively growing cultures of either freshwater manganese-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) Leptothrix discophora or Pseudomonas putida MnB29. X-ray absorption spectroscopy results indicated that Ce remained in its trivalent state on the bacterial surface. The spectra were consistent with Ce(III) ions associated with the phosphoryl groups of the bacterial cell wall. In disinfection assays using a bacteriophage as model, it was demonstrated that bio-Ce exhibited antiviral properties. A 4.4 log decrease of the phage was observed after 2 h of contact with 50 mg L{sup -1} bio-Ce. Given the fact that virus removal with 50 mg L{sup -1} Ce(III) as CeNO{sub 3} was lower, the presence of the bacterial carrier matrix in bio-Ce significantly enhanced virus removal.

  1. Biogenic Magnetite and EMF Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschvink, Joseph L.

    1996-03-01

    Magnetite biomineralization is a genetically-controlled biochemical process through which organisms make perfect ferrimagnetic crystals, usually of single magnetic domain size. This process is an ancient one, having evolved about 2 billion years ago in the magnetotactic bacteria, and presumably was incorporated in the genome of higher organisms, including humans. During this time, DNA replication, protein synthesis, and many other biochemical processes have functioned in the presence of strong static fields of up to 400 mT adjacent to these magnetosomes without any obvious deleterious effects. Recent behavioral experiments using short but strong magnetic pulses in honeybees and birds demonstrates that ferromagnetic materials are involved in the sensory transduction of geomagnetic field information to the nervous system, and both behavioral and direct electrophysiological experiments indicate sensitivity thresholds to DC magnetic fields down to a few nT. However, far more biogenic magnetite is present in animal tissues than is needed for magnetoreception, and the biological function of this extra material is unknown. The presence of ferromagnetic materials in biological systems could provide physical transduction mechanisms for ELF magnetic fields, as well for microwave radiation in the .5 to 10 GHz band where magnetite has its peak ferromagnetic resonance. Elucidation of the cellular ultrastructure and biological function(s) of magnetite might help resolve the question of whether anthropogenic EMFs can cause deleterious biological effects. This work has been supported by grants from the NIH and EPRI.

  2. Acute inhibition of iron bioavailability by zinc: studies in humans.

    PubMed

    Olivares, Manuel; Pizarro, Fernando; Ruz, Manuel; de Romaña, Daniel López

    2012-08-01

    Iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) deficiencies constitute two of the most important nutritional and public health problems affecting developing countries. Combined supplementation or fortification with Zn and Fe are strategies that can be used to improve the Zn and Fe status of a population. However, there is concern about potential negative interactions between these two micronutrients due to a competitive binding to DMT1 and Zip14 transporter. Studies performed in humans have shown an inhibitory effect of Zn on Fe absorption when both minerals are given together as a solution in fasting conditions. We found that at low doses of iron (0.5 mg) the threshold for the inhibition of iron bioavailability was at a Zn:Fe wt/wt ratio ≥5.9:1, whereas at higher doses of Fe (10 mg) this inhibition occurred at 1:1 Zn:Fe wt/wt ratio. This differential response could be explained by the variation in the abundance of both cations as they compete for a limited number of shared transporters at the enterocyte. Conflicting results have been obtained when this interaction was studied in different food matrices. A negative interaction was not observed when Fe and Zn were provided in a composite hamburger meal, premature formula, human milk, or cow milk. A decrease on Fe absorption was observed in only 1 of 3 studies when Fe and Zn were supplied in wheat flour. The possibility of a negative interaction should be considered for supplementation or fortification programs with both microminerals.

  3. A Darwinian mechanism for biogenic ocean mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katija, Kakani; Dabiri, John

    2009-11-01

    Recent observations of biogenic turbulence in the ocean have led to conflicting ideas regarding the contribution of animal swimming to ocean mixing. Previous measurements indicate elevated turbulent dissipation in the vicinity of large populations of planktonic animals swimming in concert. However, elevated turbulent dissipation is by itself insufficient proof of substantial biogenic mixing. We conducted field measurements of mixing efficiency by individual Mastigias sp. (a Palauan jellyfish) using a self-contained underwater velocimetry apparatus. These measurements revealed another mechanism that contributes to animal mixing besides wake turbulence. This mechanism was first described by Sir Charles Galton Darwin and is in fact the dominant mechanism of mixing by swimming animals. The efficiency of Darwin's mechanism (or drift) is dependent on animal shape rather than fluid length scale and, unlike turbulent wake mixing, is enhanced by the fluid viscosity. Therefore, it provides a means of biogenic mixing that can be equally effective in small plankton and large mammals.

  4. The ABAG biogenic emissions inventory project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson-Henry, C. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The ability to identify the role of biogenic hydrocarbon emissions in contributing to overall ozone production in the Bay Area, and to identify the significance of that role, were investigated in a joint project of the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) and NASA/Ames Research Center. Ozone, which is produced when nitrogen oxides and hydrocarbons combine in the presence of sunlight, is a primary factor in air quality planning. In investigating the role of biogenic emissions, this project employed a pre-existing land cover classification to define areal extent of land cover types. Emission factors were then derived for those cover types. The land cover data and emission factors were integrated into an existing geographic information system, where they were combined to form a Biogenic Hydrocarbon Emissions Inventory. The emissions inventory information was then integrated into an existing photochemical dispersion model.

  5. Biogenic amines and microbial quality of sprouts.

    PubMed

    Simon-Sarkadi, L; Holzapfel, W H

    1995-04-01

    Changes in the biogenic amine content relative to microbial activities in mung bean, lentil and radish sprouts were investigated in prepacked and "home-grown" products. Biogenic amines were determined by ion-exchange chromatography. The major groups of micro-organisms were enumerated by aerobic plate count procedures, using universal and selective media. Putrescine, cadaverine, spermidine, agmatine and spermine were detected in different concentrations, depending on the type of sprouts. In prepacked retail products the total biogenic amine content was higher than in home-grown samples (mung bean 106 micrograms/g compared to 87 micrograms/g; lentil 316 micrograms/g compared to 181 micrograms/g; radish 1486 micrograms/g compared to 252 micrograms/g). It is concluded that sprouting time and storage conditions play a major part in the hygienic quality of legume sprouts.

  6. Biogenic hydroxysulfate green rust, a potential electron acceptor for SRB activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zegeye, Asfaw; Huguet, Lucie; Abdelmoula, Mustapha; Carteret, Cédric; Mullet, Martine; Jorand, Frédéric

    2007-11-01

    Microbiological reduction of a biogenic sulfated green rust (GR2(SO42-)), was examined using a sulfate reducing bacterium ( Desulfovibrio alaskensis). Experiments investigated whether GR2(SO42-) could serve as a sulfate source for D. alaskensis anaerobic respiration by analyzing mineral transformation. Batch experiments were conducted using lactate as the electron donor and biogenic GR2(SO42-) as the electron acceptor, at circumneutral pH in unbuffered medium. GR2(SO42-) transformation was monitored with time by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission Mössbauer Spectroscopy (TMS), Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The reduction of sulfate anions and the formation of iron sulfur mineral were clearly identified by XPS analyses. TMS showed the formation of additional mineral as green rust (GR) and vivianite. XRD analyses discriminated the type of the newly formed GR as GR1. The formed GR1 was GR1(CO32-) as indicated by DRIFTS analysis. Thus, the results presented in this study indicate that D. alaskensis cells were able to use GR2(SO42-) as an electron acceptor. GR1(CO32-), vivianite and an iron sulfur compound were formed as a result of GR2(SO42-) reduction by D. alaskensis. Hence, in environments where geochemical conditions promote biogenic GR2(SO42-) formation, this mineral could stimulate the anaerobic respiration of sulfate reducing bacteria.

  7. Ancient microspheres - Abiogenic, protobiogenic, or biogenic?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Syren, R. M.; Ingram, M.; Price, B. J.; Costello, J.

    1983-01-01

    Criteria of biogenicity of microspheroidal objects, which have been interpreted as microfossils, are here reviewed in the light of additional data. Much weight has been placed by some commentators on constrained heterogeneity as a primary criterion of biogenicity. The data from the field and laboratory suggest the need for continuing reservation in the interpretation of these objects. On the basis of these and other data, reasons are given for the alternative explanation that the objects are lithified relics of protobiotic assemblages. The question remains open as to whether the early Archean spheroidal objects are abiotic, protobiotic, or biotic in origin.

  8. Mineralogical sinks for biogenic elements on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, J. L.

    1989-01-01

    The efficacy of biochemical reactions on Mars should depend not only on concentrations of the biogenic elements H, C, N, O, and S but also on the forms (compounds and water-souble ions) that are available to those elements. It is possible that mineralogical reactions could act to lock biogenic elements into relatively inaccessible inorganic forms or, alternatively, to shelter sensitive organic compounds from chemically hostile environments. Recognition of these competing pathways is essential in planning sampling mission and in situ experiments directed toward assessing the biological potential of Mars.

  9. Sorption of Ferrioxime B to Synthetic and Biogenic layer type Mn Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duckworth, O. W.; Bargar, J. R.; Sposito, G.

    2005-12-01

    Siderophores are biogenic chelating agents produced in terrestrial and marine environments to increase the bioavailablity of ferric iron. Recent work has suggested that both aqueous and solid-phase Mn(III) may affect siderophore-mediated iron transport, but no information appears to be available about the effect of solid-phase Mn(IV). To probe the effect of solid-phase Mn(IV), we studied the sorption reaction of ferrioxamine B [principally the species, Fe(III)HDFOB+, an Fe(III) chelate of the trihydroxamate siderophore, desferrioxamine B (DFOB)] with two synthetic birnessites [layer type Mn(IV) oxides] and a biogenic birnessite produced by Pseudomonas putida MnB1. We found that all of these predominantly Mn(IV) oxides greatly reduced the aqueous concentration of Fe(III)HDFOB+ over the pH range between 5 and 9. After 72 h equilibration time at pH 8, the sorption behavior for the synthetic birnessites could be accurately described by a Langmuir isotherm; for the biogenic oxide, a Freundlich isotherm was best utilized to model the sorption data. To study the molecular nature of the interaction between the Fe(III)HDFOB+ complex and the oxide surface, Fe K-edge extended X-Ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy was employed. Analysis of the X-ray absorption spectra indicated that Fe(III) associated with the Mn(IV) oxides is not complexed with DFOB, but instead is incorporated into the mineral structure, thus implying that the Mn(IV) oxides displaced Fe(III) from the siderophore complex. These results indicate that manganese oxides, including biominerals, may strongly sequester iron from soluble ferric complexes and thus may play a significant role in the biogeochemical cycling of iron.

  10. Biogenic Origin for Earth's Oldest Putative Microfossils

    SciTech Connect

    De Gregorio, B.; Sharp, T; Flynn, G; Wirick, S; Hervig, R

    2009-01-01

    Carbonaceous microbe-like features preserved within a local chert unit of the 3.5 Ga old Apex Basalt in Western Australia may represent some of the oldest evidence of life on Earth. However, the biogenicity of these putative microfossils has been called into question, primarily because the sample collection locality is a black, carbon-rich, brecciated chert dike representing an Archean submarine hydrothermal spring, suggesting a formation via an abiotic organic synthesis mechanism. Here we describe the macromolecular hydrocarbon structure, carbon bonding, functional group chemistry, and biotic element abundance of carbonaceous matter associated with these filamentous features. These characteristics are similar to those of biogenic kerogen from the ca. 1.9 Ga old Gunflint Formation. Although an abiotic origin cannot be entirely ruled out, it is unlikely that known abiotic synthesis mechanisms could recreate both the structural and compositional complexity of this ancient carbonaceous matter. Thus, we find that a biogenic origin for this material is more likely, implying that the Apex microbe-like features represent authentic biogenic organic matter.

  11. Organosulfate Formation in Biogenic Secondary Organic Aerosol

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organosulfates of isoprene, α-pinene, and β-pinene have recently been identified in both laboratory-generated and ambient secondary organic aerosol (SOA). In this study, the mechanism and ubiquity of organosulfate formation in biogenic SOA is investigated by a comprehensive seri...

  12. Climate impacts of biogenic organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Kamalika; Gordon, Hamish; Almeida, Joao; Rap, Alex; Scott, Catherine; Pringle, Kirsty; Carslaw, Ken

    2016-04-01

    Currently the most uncertain driver of climate change, impact of anthropogenic aerosols on earth's radiative balance depends significantly on estimates of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), representation of the pre-industrial atmosphere among others. Nearly 90% of aerosols in the tropics are organic in nature of which a major part comes from biogenic sources. About 45% of the CCN in the atmosphere are formed in-situ via nucleation. Understanding the role of biogenic organic compounds in particle formation and their subsequent growth is hence imperative in order to quantify the climate impact of aerosols. The CLOUD experiment at CERN, which measures particle formation and growth rates in a uniquely clean chamber under atmospherically relevant conditions, found evidence of a nucleation mechanism involving only biogenic organic compounds. This mechanism significantly changes our pre-industrial estimates. The experimental results have been parameterized and included in a global aerosol microphysics model, GLOMAP, to quantify the impact of pure biogenic nucleation on CCN formation and their climatic impact. Further the treatment of secondary organic compounds in GLOMAP has been improved and the sensitivity of our estimates of radiative forcing to the same has been evaluated.

  13. Organosulfate Formation in Biogenic Secondary Organic Aerosol

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organosulfates of isoprene, α-pinene, and β-pinene have recently been identified in both laboratory-generated and ambient secondary organic aerosol (SOA). In this study, the mechanism and ubiquity of organosulfate formation in biogenic SOA is investigated by a comprehensive seri...

  14. Biogenic UO2 - Characterization and Surface Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, David M.; Farges, Francois; Brown, Gordon E. Jr.

    2007-02-02

    Nano-scale biogenic UO2 is easier to oxidize and more reactive to aqueous metal ions than bulk UO2. In an attempt to understand these differences in properties, we have used a suite of bulk and surface characterization techniques to examine differences in the reactivity of biogenic UO2 versus bulk UO2 with respect to aqueous Zn(II). Precipitation of biogenic UO2 was mediated by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32, and the precipitates were washed using two protocols: (1) 5% NaOH, followed by 4 mM KHCO3/KCl (NA-wash; 'NAUO2', to remove surface organic matter), and (2) 4 mM KHCO3-KCl (BI-wash; 'BIUO2', to remove soluble uranyl species). BET surface areas of biogenic-UO2 prepared using the two protocols are 128.63 m2g-1 and 92.56 m2g-1, respectively; particle sizes range from 2-10 nm as determined by FEG-SEM. Surface composition was probed using XPS, which showed a strong carbon 1s signal for the BI-washed samples; surface uranium is > 90% U(IV) for both washing protocols. U LIII-edge XANES spectra also indicate that U(IV) is the dominant oxidation state in the biogenic UO2 samples. Fits of the EXAFS spectra of these samples yielded half the number of uranium second-shell neighbors relative to bulk UO2, and no detectable oxygen neighbors beyond the first shell. At pH 7, the sorption of Zn(II) onto both biogenic and bulk UO2 is independent of electrolyte concentration, suggesting that Zn(II) sorption complexes are dominantly inner-sphere. Fits of Zn K-edge EXAFS spectra for biogenic UO2 indicate that Zn(II) sorption is dependent on the washing protocol. Zn-U pair correlations are observed for the NA-washed samples, but not for the BI-washed ones, suggesting that Zn(II) sorbs directly to the UO2 surface in the first case, and possibly to organic matter in the latter. Further work is required to elucidate the binding mechanism of Zn(II) to bulk UO2.

  15. How iron controls iron.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Lukas C

    2009-12-01

    Cells regulate iron homeostasis by posttranscriptional regulation of proteins responsible for iron uptake and storage. This requires RNA-binding activity of iron-regulatory proteins, IRP1 and IRP2. Two studies recently published in Science by Vashisht et al. (2009) and Salahudeen et al. (2009) reveal how cells adjust IRP2 activity.

  16. Potential of Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 for in situ resource utilization from basalt by determining the molecular micro-mineral interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byloos, Bo; Van Houdt, Rob; Boon, Nico; Leys, Natalie

    In order to maintain a persistent human presence in space, materials must either be provided from Earth or generated from material already present in space, in a process referred to as 'in situ resource utilization (ISRU)'. Microorganisms can biomine useful elements from extra-terrestrial materials for use as nutrients in a life support system or to aid in the creation of soil. To effectively use bacteria in an ISRU process more needs to be known about the molecular mechanisms behind microbe-mineral interaction and the influence of microgravity and radiation that affect bioleaching. The aim of this research project is to define the microbe-mineral interactions on basalt, which is a major constituent of Lunar or Martian regolith, the mechanisms that are important in bioleaching and how this process will be altered by space flight conditions. In particular, the research will be focussed on the determination of the genes and proteins involved in the biosynthesis of metallophores and exopolysaccharides (EPS), and biofilm formation. Iron, copper and phosphate uptake mechanisms are investigated in detail because these have been shown to be essential for life and bacteria are faced with limitation of these nutrients in the environment. In this study the bacterium Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 is used to study these interactions. C. metallidurans CH34 is a soil bacterium which is resistant to up to 20 different heavy metal ions. Its behaviour in space has already been determined with earlier flight experiments to the ISS. It was recently discovered that C. metallidurans forms a biofilm and is capable of leaching calcium, magnesium and iron from basalt to sustain its growth First, C. metallidurans was grown in conditions with and without basalt, iron, copper and phosphate and the production of EPS and metallophores was examined. The iron, copper and phosphate concentrations which are limiting and optimal to allow C. metallidurans cell proliferation could be determined as

  17. Arsenic(V) Incorporation in Vivianite during Microbial Reduction of Arsenic(V)-Bearing Biogenic Fe(III) (Oxyhydr)oxides.

    PubMed

    Muehe, E Marie; Morin, Guillaume; Scheer, Lukas; Pape, Pierre Le; Esteve, Imène; Daus, Birgit; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    The dissolution of arsenic-bearing iron(III) (oxyhydr)oxides during combined microbial iron(III) and arsenate(V) reduction is thought to be the main mechanism responsible for arsenic mobilization in reducing environments. Besides its mobilization during bioreduction, arsenic is often resequestered by newly forming secondary iron(II)-bearing mineral phases. In phosphate-bearing environments, iron(II) inputs generally lead to vivianite precipitation. In fact, in a previous study we observed that during bioreduction of arsenate(V)-bearing biogenic iron(III) (oxyhydr)oxides in phosphate-containing growth media, arsenate(V) was immobilized by the newly forming secondary iron(II) and iron(II)/iron(III)mineral phases, including vivianite. In the present study, changes in arsenic redox state and binding environment in these experiments were analyzed. We found that arsenate(V) partly replaced phosphate in vivianite, thus forming a vivianite-symplesite solid solution identified as Fe3(PO4)1.7(AsO4)0.3·8H2O. Our data suggests that in order to predict the fate of arsenic during the bioreduction of abiogenic and biogenic iron(III) (oxyhydr)oxides in arsenic-contaminated environments, the formation of symplesite-vivianite minerals needs to be considered. Indeed, such mineral phases could contribute to a delayed and slow release of arsenic in phosphate-bearing surface and groundwater environments.

  18. Recent biogenic phosphorite: Concretions in mollusk kidneys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doyle, L.J.; Blake, N.J.; Woo, C.C.; Yevich, P.

    1978-01-01

    Phosphorite concretions have been detected in the kidneys of two widespread species ofmollusks, Mercenaria mercenaria and Argopecten irradians, which have relatively high population densities. These concretions are thefirst documentation of the direct biogenic formation of phosphorite grains. The concretions are principally amorphous calcium phosphate, which upon being heated yields an x-ray diffraction pattern which is essentially that of chlorapatite. These concretions appear to be a normal formation of the excretory process of mollusks under reproductive, environmental, or pollutant-induced stress. Biogenic production of phosphorite concretions over long periods of time and diagenetic change from amorphous to crystalline structure, coupled with secondary enrichment, may account for the formation of some marine phosphorite desposits which are not easily explained by the chemical precipitation- replacement hypothesis. Copyright ?? 1978 AAAS.

  19. Biogenic Mn-Oxides in Subseafloor Basalts

    PubMed Central

    Ivarsson, Magnus; Broman, Curt; Gustafsson, Håkan; Holm, Nils G.

    2015-01-01

    The deep biosphere of the subseafloor basalts is recognized as a major scientific frontier in disciplines like biology, geology, and oceanography. Recently, the presence of fungi in these environments has involved a change of view regarding diversity and ecology. Here, we describe fossilized fungal communities in vugs in subseafloor basalts from a depth of 936.65 metres below seafloor at the Detroit Seamount, Pacific Ocean. These fungal communities are closely associated with botryoidal Mn oxides composed of todorokite. Analyses of the Mn oxides by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy (EPR) indicate a biogenic signature. We suggest, based on mineralogical, morphological and EPR data, a biological origin of the botryoidal Mn oxides. Our results show that fungi are involved in Mn cycling at great depths in the seafloor and we introduce EPR as a means to easily identify biogenic Mn oxides in these environments. PMID:26107948

  20. Formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stolper, D.A.; Lawson, M.; Davis, C.L.; Ferreira, A.A.; Santos Neto, E. V.; Ellis, G.S.; Lewan, M.D.; Martini, A.M.; Tang, Y.; Schoell, M.; Sessions, A.L.; Eiler, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and energy resource generated dominantly by methanogens at low temperatures and through the breakdown of organic molecules at high temperatures. However, methane-formation temperatures in nature are often poorly constrained. We measured formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane using a “clumped isotope” technique. Thermogenic gases yield formation temperatures between 157° and 221°C, within the nominal gas window, and biogenic gases yield formation temperatures consistent with their comparatively lower-temperature formational environments (<50°C). In systems where gases have migrated and other proxies for gas-generation temperature yield ambiguous results, methane clumped-isotope temperatures distinguish among and allow for independent tests of possible gas-formation models.

  1. Iron Chelation

    MedlinePlus

    ... iron overload and need treatment. What is iron overload? Iron chelation therapy is used when you have ... may want to perform: How quickly does iron overload happen? This is different for each person. It ...

  2. Biogenic amines in the Caenorhabditis briggsae.

    PubMed

    Kisiel, M J; Deubert, K H; Zuckerman, B M

    1976-01-01

    Dopamine, epinephrine, norepinephrine and serotonin were demonstrated from homogenates of Caenrohabditis briggsae by two-dimensional thin layer chromotography and the identification confirmed by gas liquid chromtography. In Vitro studies with 14C precursors of these biogenic amines demonstrate the ability of C. briggsae to synthesize each compound. The results provide required preliminary data for studying the neurophysiology of aging utilizing the nematode as a model.

  3. Biogenic Methane from Coal: The Oxidation Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, L. K.; Glossner, A. W.; Landkamer, L.; Figueroa, L. A.; Mandernack, K. W.; Munakata Marr, J.

    2011-12-01

    Vast reserves of coal represent an untapped resource that can be used to produce methane gas, a cleaner energy alternative compared to standard fossil fuels. Microorganisms have demonstrated the ability to utilize coal as a carbon source, producing biogenic methane. With increasing demand for cleaner energy resources, understanding and enhancing biogenic methane production has become an area of active research. The conversion of coal to methane by microorganisms has been demonstrated experimentally by a number of research groups, but the state of the coal used as a substrate has not always been reported and may impact biogenic methane production. Microcosm experiments were designed in order to assess how the oxidation state of coal might influence methane production (e.g. as in a dewatered coal-bed natural gas system). Oxidized and un-oxidized coal samples from the Powder River Basin were incubated in microcosms inoculated with an enrichment culture that was derived from coal. Microcosms were characterized by headspace gas analysis, organic acid production, functional gene abundance (qPCR), and pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Although the microbial consortium demonstrated the ability to utilize both oxidized and un-oxidized coal as a sole carbon source to generate methane, it was produced in higher quantities from the un-oxidized coal. This microbial community was dominated by Methanobacteriaceae (45%), epsilon-Proteobacteria (32%) and delta-Proteobacteria (13%). The results of this study provide a basis to develop strategies to enhance biogenic methane production from coal, as well as demonstrate the need for careful substrate preparation for inter-study comparisons.

  4. Biogenic Magnetite in Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Bazylinski, Dennis; Wentworth, Susan J.; McKay, David S.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Clemett, Simon J.; Bell, Mary Sue; Golden, D. C.

    1999-01-01

    Fine-grained magnetite (Fe3O4) in martian meteorite ALH84001, generally less than 200 microns in size, is located primarily in the rims that surround the carbonate globules. There are two populations of ALH84001 magnets, which are likely formed at low temperature by inorganic and biogenic processes. Nearly 27/o of ALH84001 magnetite particles. also called elongated prisms, have characteristics which make them uniquely identifiable as biological precipitates.

  5. Biogenic Magnetite in Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Bazylinski, Dennis; Wentworth, Susan J.; McKay, David S.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Clemett, SImon J.; Bell, Mary Sue; Golden, D. C.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Fine-grained magnetite (Fe3O4) in martian meteorite ALH84001, generally less than 200 nm in size, is located primarily in the rims that surround the carbonate globules. There are two populations of ALH84001 magnetites, which are likely formed at low temperature by inorganic and biogenic processes. Nearly 27% of ALH84001 magnetite particles, also called elongated prisms, have characteristics which make them uniquely identifiable as biological precipitates. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Relative Reactivity of Biogenic and Chemogenic Uraninite and Biogenic Non Crystalline U(IV)

    PubMed Central

    Cerrato, José M.; Ashner, Matthew N.; Alessi, Daniel S.; Lezama-Pacheco, Juan S.; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; Bargar, John R.; Giammar, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    Aqueous chemical extractions and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) analyses were conducted to investigate the reactivity of chemogenic uraninite, nanoparticulate biogenic uraninite, and biogenic monomeric U(IV) species. The analyses were conducted in systems containing a total U concentration that ranged from 1.48 to 2.10 mM. Less than 0.02% of the total U was released to solution in extractions that targeted water soluble and ion exchangeable fractions. Less than 5% of the total U was solubilized via complexation with a 0.1 M solution of NaF. Greater than 90% of the total U was extracted from biogenic uraninite and monomeric U(IV) after 6 hours of reaction in an oxidizing solution of 50 mM K2S2O8. Additional oxidation experiments with lower concentrations (2 mM and 10 mM) of K2S2O8 and 8.2 mg L−1 dissolved oxygen suggested that monomeric U(IV) species are more labile than biogenic uraninite; chemogenic uraninite was much less susceptible to oxidation than either form of biogenic U(IV). These results suggest that non-crystalline forms of U(IV) may be more labile than uraninite in subsurface environments. This work helps fill critical gaps in our understanding of the behavior of solid-associated U(IV) species in bioremediated sites and natural uranium ore deposits. PMID:23906226

  7. Framework for Assessing Biogenic CO2 Emissions from ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This revision of the 2011 report, Accounting Framework for Biogenic CO2 Emissions from Stationary Sources, evaluates biogenic CO2 emissions from stationary sources, including a detailed study of the scientific and technical issues associated with assessing biogenic carbon dioxide emissions from stationary sources. EPA developed the revised report, Framework for Assessing Biogenic CO2 Emissions from Stationary Sources, to present a methodological framework for assessing the extent to which the production, processing, and use of biogenic material at stationary sources for energy production results in a net atmospheric contribution of biogenic CO2 emissions. Biogenic carbon dioxide emissions are defined as CO2 emissions related to the natural carbon cycle, as well as those resulting from the production, harvest, combustion, digestion, decomposition, and processing of biologically-based materials. The EPA is continuing to refine its technical assessment of biogenic CO2 emissions through another round of targeted peer review of the revised study with the EPA Science Advisory Board (SAB). This study was submitted to the SAB's Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel in February 2015. http://yosemite.epa.gov/sab/sabproduct.nsf/0/3235dac747c16fe985257da90053f252!OpenDocument&TableRow=2.2#2 The revised report will inform efforts by policymakers, academics, and other stakeholders to evaluate the technical aspects related to assessments of biogenic feedstocks used for energy at s

  8. Framework for Assessing Biogenic CO2 Emissions from ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This revision of the 2011 report, Accounting Framework for Biogenic CO2 Emissions from Stationary Sources, evaluates biogenic CO2 emissions from stationary sources, including a detailed study of the scientific and technical issues associated with assessing biogenic carbon dioxide emissions from stationary sources. EPA developed the revised report, Framework for Assessing Biogenic CO2 Emissions from Stationary Sources, to present a methodological framework for assessing the extent to which the production, processing, and use of biogenic material at stationary sources for energy production results in a net atmospheric contribution of biogenic CO2 emissions. Biogenic carbon dioxide emissions are defined as CO2 emissions related to the natural carbon cycle, as well as those resulting from the production, harvest, combustion, digestion, decomposition, and processing of biologically-based materials. The EPA is continuing to refine its technical assessment of biogenic CO2 emissions through another round of targeted peer review of the revised study with the EPA Science Advisory Board (SAB). This study was submitted to the SAB's Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel in February 2015. http://yosemite.epa.gov/sab/sabproduct.nsf/0/3235dac747c16fe985257da90053f252!OpenDocument&TableRow=2.2#2 The revised report will inform efforts by policymakers, academics, and other stakeholders to evaluate the technical aspects related to assessments of biogenic feedstocks used for energy at s

  9. Biogenic Activity in Selected Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; McKay, David S.; Thomas-Keprta, Kathie; Westall, Frances

    1999-01-01

    Criteria are well established within the scientific community for the acceptance of evidence for biogenic activity within samples from the early Earth. The eight criteria are: (1) geologic context, (2) age and stratigraphic location, (3) cellular morphology, (4) colonies, (v) biominerals, (6) isotope patterns, (7) organic biosignatures, and (8) features indigenous to sample. In the case of samples from Mars, we must also apply the same criteria. For the martian meteorite ALH84001, we have presented evidence which indicates possible biogenic activity associated with the 3.94 b.y. old, fracture-bound carbonate deposits. Subsequent major criticism of our hypothesis concerned the fact that many of the biogenic features could have been introduced during the time the meteorite was in Antarctica, prior to its collection. We address the possibility of Antarctic contamination and compare our evidence with accepted criteria for establishing the presence of past life. Although, we are close to matching some of the required criteria (likely biominerals, organic biomarkers, bacterial appendages, microfossils and indigenous features), there are others (well-documented geologic context, and evidence for colonies) which have not yet been met. It is not yet possible to come to a definitive conclusion concerning life on early Mars, but it is hoped that continued research will provide more relevant information.

  10. Rett syndrome - Stimulation of endogenous biogenic amines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelligra, R.; Norton, R. D.; Wilkinson, R.; Leon, H. A.; Matson, W. R.

    1992-01-01

    Transient hypercapnic hyperoxemia was induced in two Rett syndrome children by the administration of a gaseous mixture of 80 percent O2 and 20 percent CO2. Time course studies of neurotransmitters and their metabolites showed an immediate and marked increase in central biogenic amine turnover following inhalation of the gas mixture. The increased turnover of biogenic amines was associated with improved clinical changes. This suggests a coupled relationship and provides further support for an etiological role of neurotransmitter dysfunction in Rett syndrome. In a complementary study, elevation of pulmonary CO2 by application of a simple rebreathing device resulted in improvement of abnormal blood gases and elimination of the Cheyne-Stokes-like respiratory pattern of the Rett syndrome. Near normalization of the EEG occurred when a normal respiratory pattern was imposed by means of a respirator. Taken together, these results lead to the preliminary conclusion that cerebral hypoxemia secondary to abnormal respiratory function may contribute to diminished production of biogenic amines in Rett syndrome.

  11. Biogenic Activity in Selected Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; McKay, David S.; Thomas-Keprta, Kathie; Westall, Frances

    1999-01-01

    Criteria are well established within the scientific community for the acceptance of evidence for biogenic activity within samples from the early Earth. The eight criteria are: (1) geologic context, (2) age and stratigraphic location, (3) cellular morphology, (4) colonies, (v) biominerals, (6) isotope patterns, (7) organic biosignatures, and (8) features indigenous to sample. In the case of samples from Mars, we must also apply the same criteria. For the martian meteorite ALH84001, we have presented evidence which indicates possible biogenic activity associated with the 3.94 b.y. old, fracture-bound carbonate deposits. Subsequent major criticism of our hypothesis concerned the fact that many of the biogenic features could have been introduced during the time the meteorite was in Antarctica, prior to its collection. We address the possibility of Antarctic contamination and compare our evidence with accepted criteria for establishing the presence of past life. Although, we are close to matching some of the required criteria (likely biominerals, organic biomarkers, bacterial appendages, microfossils and indigenous features), there are others (well-documented geologic context, and evidence for colonies) which have not yet been met. It is not yet possible to come to a definitive conclusion concerning life on early Mars, but it is hoped that continued research will provide more relevant information.

  12. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of biogenic silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, R.; Feitosa, L. O.; Ballottin, D.; Marcato, P. D.; Tasic, L.; Durán, N.

    2013-04-01

    Biogenic silver nanoparticles with 40.3 ± 3.5 nm size and negative surface charge (- 40 mV) were prepared with Fusarium oxysporum. The cytotoxicity of 3T3 cell and human lymphocyte were studied by a TaliTM image-based cytometer and the genotoxicity through Allium cepa and comet assay. The results of BioAg-w (washed) and BioAg-nw (unwashed) biogenic silver nanoparticles showed cytotoxicity exceeding 50 μg/mL with no significant differences of response in 5 and 10 μg/mL regarding viability. Results of genotoxicity at concentrations 5.0 and 10.0 ug/mL show some response, but at concentrations 0.5 and 1.0 μg/mL the washed and unwashed silver nanoparticles did not present any effect. This in an important result since in tests with different bacteria species and strains, including resistant, MIC (minimal inhibitory concentration) had good answers at concentrations less than 1.9 μg/mL. This work concludes that biogenic silver nanoparticles may be a promising option for antimicrobial use in the range where no cyto or genotoxic effect were observed. Furthermore, human cells were found to have a greater resistance to the toxic effects of silver nanoparticles in comparison with other cells.

  13. Enhanced reductive degradation of carbon tetrachloride by biogenic vivianite and Fe(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Sungjun; Lee, Woojin

    2012-05-01

    We demonstrated that reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride (CT) can be enhanced by iron-bearing soil minerals (IBSMs) in the presence of Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 (CN32) due to the formation of biogenic vivianite and Fe(II). The bioreduction efficiency of magnetite was the highest (51.1%), followed by lepidocrocite (25.7%), goethite (3.6%), and hematite (1.8%). The dechlorination kinetic of CT by lepidocrocite (0.043 d-1) in the presence of CN32 was three times faster than that by microbial transformation with CN32 (0.014 d-1). Chloroform (16.1-29.4%), carbon monoxide (2.4-23.8%), and formate (0-58.0%) were measured as main products for the degradation of CT by magnetite and lepidocrocite in the presence of CN32. X-ray diffraction and electron microscope analyses revealed that the biogenic vivianite can form during the CT degradation in magnetite and lepidocrocite suspensions with CN32. The dechlorination kinetics of CT by chemogenic vivianite was much faster than that by magnetite and lepidocrocite with CN32. The highest formate production (84.2%) was observed during a full degradation of CT by the chemogenic vivianite. The experimental results showed that biogenic vivianite and sorbed Fe(II) formed during the bioreduction of IBSMs played a pivotal role for the reductive dechlorination of CT.

  14. The Recycling of Biogenic Material at the Seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, W. R.; Sayles, F. L.

    2003-12-01

    water, results in the observed layered structure, with a different dominant electron acceptor for organic matter oxidation in each layer. Oxygen, whose reaction with organic matter yields the most energy, is used first, followed by the nitrogen bound in NO3-, manganese oxides, iron oxides, and the sulfur in SO42-. The consequence of this sequence of reactions is that dissolved oxygen is completely removed from pore waters in the upper few millimeters to centimeters of sediments on continental margins throughout the oceans. Therefore, processes, which are rare and localized in the marine water column - most importantly, denitrification and sulfate reduction - are widespread and quantitatively significant in continental margin sediments. These sedimentary processes have important consequences for geochemical cycles at the Earth's surface.The reactions affecting the balance between preservation and dissolution of biogenic materials in sediments have been studied using measurements of solid-phase and pore-water constituents as well as direct measurements of solute fluxes across the sediment-seawater interface. Each type of measurement has advantages and disadvantages. In this review, we focus on the use of pore-water solute profiles for the study of the fate of biogenic materials in sediments. Pore-water solute concentrations are the most sensitive indicator of sedimentary reactions. Solid-phase concentrations are often quite high, so that reactions, which leave clear signals in pore waters, are not always readily observed in the solid phase. The duration of benthic flux chamber deployments is limited by practical considerations, so that, in low-flux environments, concentration changes in the water in flux chambers can be near the limits of detection. In addition, flux chambers yield only depth-integrated reaction rates. Although, especially in the presence of nondiffusive solute exchange across the sediment-seawater interface, they may give better flux estimates than can

  15. Biosafety of the application of biogenic nanometal powders in husbandry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anatolievna Nazarova, Anna; Dmitrievna Polischuk, Svetlana; Anatolievna Stepanova, Irina; Ivanovich Churilov, Gennady; Chau Nguyen, Hoai; Buu Ngo, Quoc

    2014-03-01

    Effects of iron and copper nanopowders (particle size of 20-40 nm) were investigated on rabbits of 1 month age and heifers of 6 months. For introduction of nanometals into the animal's ration, the mixed fodder was treated with the nanometal powder suspension in such a way: 0.08 mg of nanoiron per kg of animal's body weight and 0.04 mg kg-1 for nanocopper. The weight gain of the heifers who received nanoiron and nanocopper after 8 months was 22.4 and 10.7% higher than that of the control, respectively. For the rabbits who received nano Fe and Cu after 3 months, the weight gain was 11.7 and 7.3% compared to the control, respectively. Under the action of metal nanopowders morphological indices of blood were changed in comparison with the control: after 8 months the quantity of erythrocytes increased by 19.6%, hemoglobin by 17.1% and leukocytes by 7.6%. There was a realignment in leukocytic formula: the quantity of lymphocytes increased by 9% compared to the control. Biogenic metals in superdispersive state were able to stimulate immune, enzymatic and humoral systems of the animal's organism, promoting metabolism. Adding Co and Cu metal nanopowders to the bull-calves’ fodder rations increased content of Ca by 31.8 and 0%, Fe by 38.8 and 37.5%, K by 19.2 and 15.3%, Mg by 17.6 and 23.5%, Mn by 9.8 and 45% and Na by 20.5 and 8.8%, respectively, compared to control. Metal nanopowders improved the quality indices and meat productivity of black-white bull-calves, expressed in intensive growth of muscle, tissue and more nutritious meat. The conducted veterinary-sanitary expertise showed that the supplements based on iron, cobalt and copper nanopowders can be used as safe bioactive supplements in animal husbandry.

  16. Use of Bacteria To Stabilize Archaeological Iron.

    PubMed

    Comensoli, Lucrezia; Maillard, Julien; Albini, Monica; Sandoz, Frederic; Junier, Pilar; Joseph, Edith

    2017-05-01

    Iron artifacts are common among the findings of archaeological excavations. The corrosion layer formed on these objects requires stabilization after their recovery, without which the destruction of the item due to physicochemical damage is likely. Current technologies for stabilizing the corrosion layer are lengthy and generate hazardous waste products. Therefore, there is a pressing need for an alternative method for stabilizing the corrosion layer on iron objects. The aim of this study was to evaluate an alternative conservation-restoration method using bacteria. For this, anaerobic iron reduction leading to the formation of stable iron minerals in the presence of chlorine was investigated for two strains of Desulfitobacterium hafniense (strains TCE1 and LBE). Iron reduction was observed for soluble Fe(III) phases as well as for akaganeite, the most troublesome iron compound in the corrosion layer of archaeological iron objects. In terms of biogenic mineral production, differential efficiencies were observed in assays performed on corroded iron coupons. Strain TCE1 produced a homogeneous layer of vivianite covering 80% of the corroded surface, while on the coupons treated with strain LBE, only 10% of the surface was covered by the same mineral. Finally, an attempt to reduce iron on archaeological objects was performed with strain TCE1, which led to the formation of both biogenic vivianite and magnetite on the surface of the artifacts. These results demonstrate the potential of this biological treatment for stabilizing archaeological iron as a promising alternative to traditional conservation-restoration methods.IMPORTANCE Since the Iron Age, iron has been a fundamental material for the building of objects used in everyday life. However, due to its reactivity, iron can be easily corroded, and the physical stability of the object built is at risk. This is particularly true for archaeological objects on which a potentially unstable corrosion layer is formed during

  17. Quantification of Biogenic Magnetite by Synchrotron X-ray Microscopy During the PETM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Kent, D. V.; Chen-Wiegart, Y. C. K.

    2014-12-01

    Exceptionally large biogenic magnetite crystals, including spearhead-like and spindle-like ones up to 4 microns, have been reported in clay-rich sediments recording the ~56 Ma Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) and carbon isotope excursion (CIE) in a borehole at Ancora, NJ and along with magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) chains, were suggested [Schumann et al. 2008 PNAS; Kopp et al. 2009 Paleoceanography] to account for the distinctive single domain (SD) rock magnetic properties of these sediments [Lanci et al. 2002 JGR]. However, because uncalibrated magnetic extraction techniques were used to provide material for TEM imaging of the biogenic magnetite, it is difficult to quantitatively analyze their concentration in the bulk clay. In this study, we use a synchrotron transmission X-ray microscope to image bulk CIE clay. We first take mosaic images of sub-millimeter-sized bulk clay samples, in which we can identify many of the various types of giant biogenic magnetite crystals, as well as several other types of iron minerals, such as pyrite framboids, siderite, and detrital magnetite. However, limited by the instrument resolution (~50 nm), we are not able to identify MTB chains let alone isolated magnetic nanoparticles that may be abundant the clay. To quantitatively estimate the concentration of the giant biogenic magnetite, we re-deposited the bulk clay sample in an alcohol solution on a silicon nitride membrane for 2D X-ray scans. After scanning a total area of 0.55 mm2 with average clay thickness of 4 μm, we identified ~40 spearheads, ~5 spindles and a few elongated rods and estimated their total magnetization as SD particles to be less than about 10% of the mass normalized clay for the scanned area. This result suggests that the giant biogenic magnetite is not a major source of the SD signal for the clay and is in good agreement with rock magnetic analyses using high-resolution first-order reversal curves and thermal fluctuation tomography on bulk CIE clay

  18. Biogenic Hydroxyapatite: A New Material for the Preservation and Restoration of the Built Environment.

    PubMed

    Turner, Ronald J; Renshaw, Joanna C; Hamilton, Andrea

    2017-09-20

    Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) is by weight the world's most produced man-made material and is used in a variety of applications in environments ranging from buildings, to nuclear wasteforms, and within the human body. In this paper, we present for the first time the direct deposition of biogenic hydroxyapatite onto the surface of OPC in a synergistic process which uses the composition of the cement substrate. This hydroxyapatite is very similar to that found in nature, having a similar crystallite size, iron and carbonate substitution, and a semi-crystalline structure. Hydroxyapatites with such a structure are known to be mechanically stronger and more biocompatible than synthetic or biomimetic hydroxyapatites. The formation of this biogenic hydroxyapatite coating therefore has significance in a range of contexts. In medicine, hydroxyapatite coatings are linked to improved biocompatibility of ceramic implant materials. In the built environment, hydroxyapatite coatings have been proposed for the consolidation and protection of sculptural materials such as marble and limestone, with biogenic hydroxyapatites having reduced solubility compared to synthetic apatites. Hydroxyapatites have also been established as effective for the adsorption and remediation of environmental contaminants such as radionuclides and heavy metals. We identify that in addition to providing a biofilm scaffold for nucleation, the metabolic activity of Pseudomonas fluorescens increases the pH of the growth medium to a suitable level for hydroxyapatite formation. The generated ammonia reacts with phosphate in the growth medium, producing ammonium phosphates which are a precursor to the formation of hydroxyapatite under conditions of ambient temperature and pressure. Subsequently, this biogenic deposition process takes place in a simple reaction system under mild chemical conditions and is cheap and easy to apply to fragile biological or architectural surfaces.

  19. To what extent can biogenic SOA be controlled?

    PubMed

    Carlton, Annmarie G; Pinder, Robert W; Bhave, Prakash V; Pouliot, George A

    2010-05-01

    The implicit assumption that biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is natural and can not be controlled hinders effective air quality management. Anthropogenic pollution facilitates transformation of naturally emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the particle phase, enhancing the ambient concentrations of biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA). It is therefore conceivable that some portion of ambient biogenic SOA can be removed by controlling emissions of anthropogenic pollutants. Direct measurement of the controllable fraction of biogenic SOA is not possible, but can be estimated through 3-dimensional photochemical air quality modeling. To examine this in detail, 22 CMAQ model simulations were conducted over the continental U.S. (August 15 to September 4, 2003). The relative contributions of five emitted pollution classes (i.e., NO(x), NH(3), SO(x), reactive non methane carbon (RNMC) and primary carbonaceous particulate matter (PCM)) on biogenic SOA were estimated by removing anthropogenic emissions of these pollutants, one at a time and all together. Model results demonstrate a strong influence of anthropogenic emissions on predicted biogenic SOA concentrations, suggesting more than 50% of biogenic SOA in the eastern U.S. can be controlled. Because biogenic SOA is substantially enhanced by controllable emissions, classification of SOA as biogenic or anthropogenic based solely on VOC origin is not sufficient to describe the controllable fraction.

  20. Reactive oxygen species-related activities of nano-iron metal and nano-iron oxides.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haohao; Yin, Jun-Jie; Wamer, Wayne G; Zeng, Mingyong; Lo, Y Martin

    2014-03-01

    Nano-iron metal and nano-iron oxides are among the most widely used engineered and naturally occurring nanostructures, and the increasing incidence of biological exposure to these nanostructures has raised concerns about their biotoxicity. Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced oxidative stress is one of the most accepted toxic mechanisms and, in the past decades, considerable efforts have been made to investigate the ROS-related activities of iron nanostructures. In this review, we summarize activities of nano-iron metal and nano-iron oxides in ROS-related redox processes, addressing in detail the known homogeneous and heterogeneous redox mechanisms involved in these processes, intrinsic ROS-related properties of iron nanostructures (chemical composition, particle size, and crystalline phase), and ROS-related bio-microenvironmental factors, including physiological pH and buffers, biogenic reducing agents, and other organic substances. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. The Clumped Isotope Composition of Biogenic Methane.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sessions, A. L.; Douglas, P. M.; Eiler, J. M.; Stolper, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The excess or lack of 13CH3D, a doubly substituted ("clumped") isotopologue of methane, relative to that expected for a random distribution of isotopes across molecules, is a function of the processes that generated the methane. For high-temperature thermogenic methane, which typically achieves internal equilibrium, an excess of 13CH3D is expected and the amount of excess can serve as a thermometer. In contrast, biogenic methane often - though not always - has a smaller excess of clumped isotopologues, and sometimes even a deficit of clumped species ("anti-clumped"). The effect presumably arises from kinetic isotope effects accompanying enzymatic reactions in the methanogenic pathway, though the particular reaction(s) has not yet been positively identified. The decrease in clumping is also known to correlate with both the reversibility of the pathway and the methane flux. In this talk, we will present recent data bearing on the origin and utility of biologic fractionations of clumped isotopologues in methane. Preliminary data suggest that methane deriving from the fermentative pathway is enriched in D-bearing isotopologues, at the same level of clumping, relative to that derived from the CO2-reductive pathway. This property offers another potential means to distinguish biogenic methane sources in the environment. Recently, we have also begun to measure the 12CH2D2 isotopologue, for which equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects are predicted to be distinct from 13CH3D. Preliminary data suggest that the combination of both doubly-substituted isotopologues will be especially useful for disentangling mixtures containing biogenic gas.

  2. Carbonate Biogenic Structures in Storrs Lake, Bahamas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrne, Monica; Morris, Penny A.; Wentworth, Susan J.; Brigmon, Robin L.; McKay, David S.

    2001-01-01

    Storr's Lake, an inland hypersaline lake on San Salvador Island, Bahamas, contains calcium carbonate-rich lithified mats of filamentous microorganisms, diatoms, associated photosynthetic and chemotrophic bacteria, and trapped sediment. In addition, 16S rRNA analysis indicates the presence of five sulfur-reducing genera of bacteria. These microbes are potential modern-day analogs to some ancient stromatolitic structures. The goals of this study are to identify unique compositional and biogenic features, possibly correlating some of these with some of the sulfate-reducing bacteria. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  3. Carbonate Biogenic Structures in Storrs Lake, Bahamas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrne, Monica; Morris, Penny A.; Wentworth, Susan J.; Brigmon, Robin L.; McKay, David S.

    2001-01-01

    Storr's Lake, an inland hypersaline lake on San Salvador Island, Bahamas, contains calcium carbonate-rich lithified mats of filamentous microorganisms, diatoms, associated photosynthetic and chemotrophic bacteria, and trapped sediment. In addition, 16S rRNA analysis indicates the presence of five sulfur-reducing genera of bacteria. These microbes are potential modern-day analogs to some ancient stromatolitic structures. The goals of this study are to identify unique compositional and biogenic features, possibly correlating some of these with some of the sulfate-reducing bacteria. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  4. Iron and Fungal Physiology: A Review of Biotechnological Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Comensoli, L; Bindschedler, S; Junier, P; Joseph, E

    2017-01-01

    Iron is an essential inorganic micronutrient. Because of its low toxicity only a few studies have dealt with the importance of iron in fungal physiology. Most of the studies published so far focus on iron sequestration by animal fungal pathogens, iron uptake by mycorrhizal fungi, or iron redox activities by fungal wood degraders. However, a general overview on the relationship between fungal physiology and iron is still lacking. In this review we present a summary of the types of physiological activities that participate in iron homeostasis in fungi and how these activities can be used for the development of original biotechnological applications in relationship to iron-containing matrices. Concrete examples of biotechnological applications involving iron and fungi are also discussed. In the last part, a specific research project in biotechnology focusing on the use of fungi for the conservation of archaeological objects in iron is described in detail. This project aims at developing a new conservation-restoration method to preserve archaeological iron artifacts exploiting the ability of fungi to transform and uptake iron. Preliminary results obtained in this project regarding iron-reduction, iron uptake, and biogenic formation of iron minerals are presented and discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Kerogen Characterization of Microfossils in Precambrian Cherts: Evidence for Biogenicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gregorio, B. T.; Sharp, T. G.

    2002-12-01

    Currently, much of our oldest evidence of life on this planet has been called into question. It is not enough for a possible microfossil to have bacterial morphology. In addition, it must also be composed of material with an unquestionably biogenic origin. Once an organism dies, the carbon it contains is altered through diagenesis and metamorphism. Most organic material is removed or remineralized, but insoluble amorphous carbon, known as kerogen, may remain. With additional heating and pressure, this kerogen is transformed into graphite, eliminating the structural biosignature of the material. No known biological process creates graphite as a product. Oxides, which form on the external surface of bacterial cell walls, may also remain after fossilization. Many microfossils are defined not by kerogen but by arrangements of small iron or manganese oxide crystals, even though kerogen may still be associated with them. Cherts from Mink Mountain locality of the Gunflint Formation (2.0 Ga) contain black, brown, and red filaments composed of both hematite crystallites up to 1 μm and kerogen. The amount of kerogenous material determines the color of the microfossil. Those with little associated kerogen appear red, the color of hematite, while those with much associated kerogen appear black. Brown microfossils are the result of remnant carbon with little or no hematite. Kerogen is also found abundantly outside of microfossils and may possibly be the remains of ancient biofilm. The crystallinity of carbon, grading from amorphous carbon to graphite, can be measured via a variety of methods, including X-ray diffractometry (XRD), Raman spectrometry, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and electron energy loss spectrometry (EELS) in TEM. However, EELS may be the best method when dealing with small patches of carbon associated with microfossils, especially if high-resolution imaging is not possible. Information about the crystallinity is given by the

  6. Biogenic organic emissions, air quality and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    Living organisms produce copious amounts of a diverse array of metabolites including many volatile organic compounds that are released into the atmosphere. These compounds participate in numerous chemical reactions that influence the atmospheric abundance of important air pollutants and short-lived climate forcers including organic aerosol, ozone and methane. The production and release of these organics are strongly influenced by environmental conditions including air pollution, temperature, solar radiation, and water availability and they are highly sensitive to stress and extreme events. As a result, releases of biogenic organics to the atmosphere have an impact on, and are sensitive to, air quality and climate leading to potential feedback couplings. Their role in linking air quality and climate is conceptually clear but an accurate quantitative representation is needed for predictive models. Progress towards this goal will be presented including numerical model development and assessments of the predictive capability of the Model of Emission of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN). Recent studies of processes controlling the magnitude and variations in biogenic organic emissions will be described and observations of their impact on atmospheric composition will be shown. Recent advances and priorities for future research will be discussed including laboratory process studies, long-term measurements, multi-scale regional studies, global satellite observations, and the development of a next generation model for simulating land-atmosphere chemical exchange.

  7. Rare earth elements in old biogenic apatites

    SciTech Connect

    Grandjean-Lecuyer, P.; Albarede, F. ); Feist, R. )

    1993-06-01

    The REE distributions in individual Upper Devonian conodonts have been measured by ion probe. The patterns of all analyzed conodonts are enriched in middle REE (Eu-Gd) and have a weak or no Ce anomaly. Concentrations and La/Yb or La/Sm ratios vary very little within or among individuals from the same zone, which suggests that uptake or labile REE from sediments was essentially quantitative. Therefore, the REE signature of the primary carriers, probably organic and oxyhydroxides particulates from marine suspensions, was efficiently transferred to biogenic apatites and survived late diagenetic processes. REE patterns of conodonts do not resemble those of present-day seawater and post-Cretaceous biogenic phosphates, which are typically depleted in Nd and Sm with a negative Ce anomaly. Since REE distributions in the modern water column mimic those of nutrients, the authors assume that, in pre-Cretaceous seawater, they were not controlled by surface biological activity. They assume instead that REE in pre-Cretaceous seawater can be explained by mechanisms of desorption-adsorption on particle surfaces. Progressive extraction of LREE from river water by oxyhydroxides leads to precipitates enriched in middle REE. A simple quantitative model was calculated in order to illustrate the proposed mechanism. 43 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Phase transitions in biogenic amorphous calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yutao

    Geological calcium carbonate exists in both crystalline phases and amorphous phases. Compared with crystalline calcium carbonate, such as calcite, aragonite and vaterite, the amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is unstable. Unlike geological calcium carbonate crystals, crystalline sea urchin spicules (99.9 wt % calcium carbonate and 0.1 wt % proteins) do not present facets. To explain this property, crystal formation via amorphous precursors was proposed in theory. And previous research reported experimental evidence of ACC on the surface of forming sea urchin spicules. By using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM), we studied cross-sections of fresh sea urchin spicules at different stages (36h, 48h and 72h after fertilization) and observed the transition sequence of three mineral phases: hydrated ACC → dehydrated ACC → biogenic calcite. In addition, we unexpectedly found hydrated ACC nanoparticles that are surrounded by biogenic calcite. This observation indicates the dehydration from hydrated ACC to dehydrated ACC is inhibited, resulting in stabilization of hydrated ACC nanoparticles. We thought that the dehydration was inhibited by protein matrix components occluded within the biomineral, and we designed an in vitro assay to test the hypothesis. By utilizing XANES-PEEM, we found that SM50, the most abundant occluded matrix protein in sea urchin spicules, has the function to stabilize hydrated ACC in vitro.

  9. Biogenically formed petroleum should be considered

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, J.W.

    1987-06-01

    This article argues that the currently popular thermal maturation theory for source beds holds that significant quantities of petroleum (oil and/or gas that can be produced, captured and used as fuel or feedstock) cannot be generated at temperatures less than about 200/sup 0/F, which typically require burial depths of about 10,000 ft. On the contrary, physical geologic evidence often indicates that petroleum was generated within a few hundred feet vertically (stratigraphically) of its present occurrence and at significantly lower temperatures and shallower depths than held by thermal maturation theory. Further, it is known that at least some methane (such as ''swamp gas'') can be derived from immature sources; these are commonly called biogenic gases. So, perhaps most petroleum is formed under this old concept of biogenic petroleum, aided, but not limited by, the heating of kerogens. That is, perhaps most petroleum is produced by the activities of bacteria, and/or other life forms, on the remains of plants and animals. Certainly both procedures can produce petroleum; there is no need to universally accept one an reject the other.

  10. Dissolution Kinetics of Biogenic Carbonates in Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subhas, A.; Erez, J.; Rollins, N.; Adkins, J. F.; Berelson, W.; Ziveri, P. P. I.; Langer, G.

    2016-02-01

    We present here laboratory-based dissolution kinetic studies of inorganic, foraminiferal, and coccolith calcite, as well as high-Mg calcite from the soft coral Rhythismia fulvum. Dissolution rate measurements were conducted using a novel 13C-based tracer measurement, which traces mass loss via isotopic enrichment in a closed system of calcite and seawater. Inorganic calcite dissolution rates are highly nonlinear with respect to saturation state, and imply multiple dissolution mechanisms. Our work validates early characterizations of highly nonlinear dissolution rates, and also agrees with far-from-equilibrium rate determinations. Dissolution rates of biogenic materials are also highly nonlinear, although the relationship between undersaturation and dissolution rate often does not resemble that of inorganic calcite. Coccoliths dissolve slowly compared to inorganic calcite after surface area normalization, even when treated with bleach to remove their organic matter. High-Mg calcite from soft corals dissolves quickly, and the relationship between dissolution rate and undersaturation seems to be complicated by the presence of two (Mg-carbonate and Ca-carbonate) phases. These biogenic dissolution rates provide a new constraint on the sensitivities of these minerals to saturation state, both in the deep ocean water column and in the surface ocean as saturation state is decreasing due to ocean acidification.

  11. Evidence of structural variability among synthetic and biogenic vaterite.

    PubMed

    Falini, Giuseppe; Fermani, Simona; Reggi, Michela; Njegić Džakula, Branka; Kralj, Damir

    2014-12-18

    Recently, the results of experimental and theoretical investigations have revealed that, in vaterite, two or even more crystalline structures coexist. In this communication we report evidence of diverse vaterite structures in biogenic samples of different origin. In addition, it is shown that the synthetic vaterite precipitated in the presence of poly-l-aspartate has structures similar to those of biogenic samples.

  12. Biogenic silver for disinfection of water contaminated with viruses.

    PubMed

    De Gusseme, Bart; Sintubin, Liesje; Baert, Leen; Thibo, Ellen; Hennebel, Tom; Vermeulen, Griet; Uyttendaele, Mieke; Verstraete, Willy; Boon, Nico

    2010-02-01

    The presence of enteric viruses in drinking water is a potential health risk. Growing interest has arisen in nanometals for water disinfection, in particular the use of silver-based nanotechnology. In this study, Lactobacillus fermentum served as a reducing agent and bacterial carrier matrix for zerovalent silver nanoparticles, referred to as biogenic Ag(0). The antiviral action of biogenic Ag(0) was examined in water spiked with an Enterobacter aerogenes-infecting bacteriophage (UZ1). Addition of 5.4 mg liter(-1) biogenic Ag(0) caused a 4.0-log decrease of the phage after 1 h, whereas the use of chemically produced silver nanoparticles (nAg(0)) showed no inactivation within the same time frame. A control experiment with 5.4 mg liter(-1) ionic Ag+ resulted in a similar inactivation after 5 h only. The antiviral properties of biogenic Ag(0) were also demonstrated on the murine norovirus 1 (MNV-1), a model organism for human noroviruses. Biogenic Ag(0) was applied to an electropositive cartridge filter (NanoCeram) to evaluate its capacity for continuous disinfection. Addition of 31.25 mg biogenic Ag(0) m(-2) on the filter (135 mg biogenic Ag(0) kg(-1) filter medium) caused a 3.8-log decline of the virus. In contrast, only a 1.5-log decrease could be obtained with the original filter. This is the first report to demonstrate the antiviral efficacy of extracellular biogenic Ag(0) and its promising opportunities for continuous water disinfection.

  13. Ice Nuclei in Marine Air: Biogenic Particles or Dust?

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, Susannah M.; Hoose, C.; Poschl, U.; Lawrence, M.

    2013-01-11

    Ice nuclei impact clouds, but their sources and distribution in the atmosphere are still not well known. Particularly little attention has been paid to IN sources in marine environments, although evidence from field studies suggests that IN populations in remote marine regions may be dominated by primary biogenic particles associated with sea spray. In this exploratory model study, we aim to bring attention to this long-neglected topic and identify promising target regions for future field campaigns. We assess the likely global distribution of marine biogenic ice nuclei using a combination of historical observations, satellite data and model output. By comparing simulated marine biogenic immersion IN distributions and dust immersion IN distributions, we predict strong regional differences in the importance of marine biogenic IN relative to dust IN. Our analysis suggests that marine biogenic IN are most likely to play a dominant role in determining IN concentrations in near-surface-air over the Southern Ocean, so future field campaigns aimed at investigating marine biogenic IN should target that region. Climate related changes in the abundance and emission of biogenic marine IN could affect marine cloud properties, thereby introducing previously unconsidered feedbacks that influence the hydrological cycle and the Earth’s energy balance. Furthermore, marine biogenic IN may be an important aspect to consider in proposals for marine cloud brightening by artificial sea spray production.

  14. Iron Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... are used together to detect and help diagnose iron deficiency or iron overload. In people with anemia , these ... help determine whether the condition is due to iron deficiency or another cause, such as chronic blood loss ...

  15. Title: Biogenic Magnetite Prevails in Oxic Pelagic Red Clay Core in the South Pacific Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimono, T.; Yamazaki, T.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria have been observed in wide variety of environments, including soils, freshwater lakes, and marine sediments, since Blakemore (1975) first described in 1975. Magnetotactic bacteria, which most commonly live within the oxic-anoxic transition zone (OATZ) of aquatic environments, produce intracellular crystals of magnetic minerals, specifically magnetite or greigite. It is considered that the magnetite/greigite crystals facilitate the bacteria's search for optimal conditions within the sharp chemical gradients of the OATZ. Petermann and Bleil (1993) reported living magnetotactic bacteria in pelagic and hemipelagic sediments near OATZ in the eastern South Atlantic at water depths to about 3,000 m, but they couldn't find actively swimming magnetotactic bacteria in sediments of deeper water depths. The South Pacific Gyre (SPG) is far from continents and the lowest productivity region on Earth. IODP site U1365 (water depth ~5,700 m) cored pelagic red clay of 75.5 m thick above ~100 Ma basement (except for the chart layer from ~42 to 63.5 m) in the western edge of the SPG. The core mainly consists of iron rich clay. The color is dark reddish and/or dark brown throughout the core. We conducted a paleomagnetic and environmental rock magnetic study of the pelagic clay core. The magnetostratigraphy revealed the top 5 m sediments cover the last 5 My, and sedimentation rate decreases downward from 1.7 to 0.6 m/m.y. Geochemical measurements of pore water indicate that dissolved oxygen was present throughout the core (>50 μM). Thus oxygen penetrates through the entire sediment column to the sediment/basalt interface, and there is no OATZ. Magnetic mineral assemblage of this core is dominated by biogenic magnetite despite no OATZ. First-order reversal curve (FORC) diagrams of all specimens have a narrow central ridge along the Hc axis with very small vertical spread. This indicates very weak magnetostatic interaction (Roberts et al., 2000), and is the

  16. Terrigenous Fe input and biogenic sedimentation in the glacial and interglacial equatorial Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, R. W.; Leinen, M.; Murray, D. W.; Mix, A. C.; Knowlton, C. W.

    1995-12-01

    Many ocean regions important to the global carbon budget, including the equatorial Pacific Ocean, have low chlorophyll concentrations despite high levels of conventional nutrients. Iron may instead be the limiting nutrient, and elevated input of terrigenous Fe during windy glacial episodes has been hypothesized to stimulate oceanic productivity through time and thus regulate the oceanic and atmospheric CO2 balance. To test whether particulate Fe input is related to the accumulation of biogenic matter in one important low chlorophyll-high nutrient area, that is, the equatorial Pacific Ocean, we present results from a suite of sediment cores that collectively record biogenic deposition through the last six glacial-interglacial cycles (˜600,000 years). Our data set includes new chemical data on total Fe, terrigenous, and biogenic components in three cores as well as previously published mineralogic records of eolian input to the region. Chemical, spectral, and stratigraphic analysis indicates that (1) terrigenous input to the region shows no consistent pattern of either glacial or interglacial maxima, (2) the accumulation of particulate Fe is closely related to the accumulation of terrigenous matter (linear r2 = 0.81-0.98), (3) there are no coherent spectral relationships between Fe input and glacial periodicity (i.e., δ18O) in any of the orbital frequency bands, (4) the linear and cross-spectral correlations between Fe or eolian input and CaCO3 concentration are most commonly the strongest observed relationships between Fe and any biogenic component, yet indicate a largely inverse pattern, with higher Fe being associated with low CaCO3, (5) there is no consistent linear r2 correlation or spectral coherence between the accumulation of Fe and that of CaCO3, Corg, or opal. Thus in total there is no relationship between terrigenous Fe input and sedimentary sequestering of carbon. Additionally, although we cannot specifically address the potential for changes in

  17. Biogenic and Synthetic Polyamines Bind Cationic Dendrimers

    PubMed Central

    Mandeville, Jean-Sebastian; Bourassa, Phillipe; Thomas, Thekkumkattil John; Tajmir-Riahi, Heidar-Ali

    2012-01-01

    Biogenic polyamines are essential for cell growth and differentiation, while polyamine analogues exert antitumor activity in multiple experimental model systems, including breast and lung cancer. Dendrimers are widely used for drug delivery in vitro and in vivo. We report the bindings of biogenic polyamines, spermine (spm), and spermidine (spmd), and their synthetic analogues, 3,7,11,15-tetrazaheptadecane.4HCl (BE-333) and 3,7,11,15,19-pentazahenicosane.5HCl (BE-3333) to dendrimers of different compositions, mPEG-PAMAM (G3), mPEG-PAMAM (G4) and PAMAM (G4). FTIR and UV-visible spectroscopic methods as well as molecular modeling were used to analyze polyamine binding mode, the binding constant and the effects of polyamine complexation on dendrimer stability and conformation. Structural analysis showed that polyamines bound dendrimers through both hydrophobic and hydrophilic contacts with overall binding constants of Kspm-mPEG-G3 = 7.6×104 M−1, Kspm-mPEG-PAMAM-G4 = 4.6×104 M−1, Kspm-PAMAM-G4 = 6.6×104 M−1, Kspmd-mPEG-G3 = 1.0×105 M−1, Kspmd-mPEG-PAMAM-G4 = 5.5×104 M−1, Kspmd-PAMAM-G4 = 9.2×104 M−1, KBE-333-mPEG-G3 = 4.2×104 M−1, KBe-333-mPEG-PAMAM-G4 = 3.2×104 M−1, KBE-333-PAMAM-G4 = 3.6×104 M−1, KBE-3333-mPEG-G3 = 2.2×104 M−1, KBe-3333-mPEG-PAMAM-G4 = 2.4×104 M−1, KBE-3333-PAMAM-G4 = 2.3×104 M−1. Biogenic polyamines showed stronger affinity toward dendrimers than those of synthetic polyamines, while weaker interaction was observed as polyamine cationic charges increased. The free binding energies calculated from docking studies were: −3.2 (spermine), −3.5 (spermidine) and −3.03 (BE-3333) kcal/mol, with the following order of binding affinity: spermidine-PAMAM-G-4>spermine-PAMMAM-G4>BE-3333-PAMAM-G4 consistent with spectroscopic data. Our results suggest that dendrimers can act as carrier vehicles for delivering antitumor polyamine analogues to target tissues. PMID:22558341

  18. Biogenic and synthetic polyamines bind cationic dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Mandeville, Jean-Sebastian; Bourassa, Phillipe; Thomas, Thekkumkattil John; Tajmir-Riahi, Heidar-Ali

    2012-01-01

    Biogenic polyamines are essential for cell growth and differentiation, while polyamine analogues exert antitumor activity in multiple experimental model systems, including breast and lung cancer. Dendrimers are widely used for drug delivery in vitro and in vivo. We report the bindings of biogenic polyamines, spermine (spm), and spermidine (spmd), and their synthetic analogues, 3,7,11,15-tetrazaheptadecane.4HCl (BE-333) and 3,7,11,15,19-pentazahenicosane.5HCl (BE-3333) to dendrimers of different compositions, mPEG-PAMAM (G3), mPEG-PAMAM (G4) and PAMAM (G4). FTIR and UV-visible spectroscopic methods as well as molecular modeling were used to analyze polyamine binding mode, the binding constant and the effects of polyamine complexation on dendrimer stability and conformation. Structural analysis showed that polyamines bound dendrimers through both hydrophobic and hydrophilic contacts with overall binding constants of K(spm-mPEG-G3) = 7.6 × 10(4) M(-1), K(spm-mPEG-PAMAM-G4) = 4.6 × 10(4) M(-1), K(spm-PAMAM-G4) = 6.6 × 10(4) M(-1), K(spmd-mPEG-G3) = 1.0 × 10(5) M(-1), K(spmd-mPEG-PAMAM-G4) = 5.5 × 10(4) M(-1), K(spmd-PAMAM-G4) = 9.2 × 10(4) M(-1), K(BE-333-mPEG-G3) = 4.2 × 10(4) M(-1), K(Be-333-mPEG-PAMAM-G4) = 3.2 × 10(4) M(-1), K(BE-333-PAMAM-G4) = 3.6 × 10(4) M(-1), K(BE-3333-mPEG-G3) = 2.2 × 10(4) M(-1), K(Be-3333-mPEG-PAMAM-G4) = 2.4 × 10(4) M(-1), K(BE-3333-PAMAM-G4) = 2.3 × 10(4) M(-1). Biogenic polyamines showed stronger affinity toward dendrimers than those of synthetic polyamines, while weaker interaction was observed as polyamine cationic charges increased. The free binding energies calculated from docking studies were: -3.2 (spermine), -3.5 (spermidine) and -3.03 (BE-3333) kcal/mol, with the following order of binding affinity: spermidine-PAMAM-G-4>spermine-PAMMAM-G4>BE-3333-PAMAM-G4 consistent with spectroscopic data. Our results suggest that dendrimers can act as carrier vehicles for delivering antitumor polyamine analogues to target tissues.

  19. Interaction of biogenic amines with ethanol.

    PubMed

    Smith, A A

    1975-01-01

    Ethanol through its primary catabolite, acetaldehyde, competitively inhibits oxidation of aldehyde dehydrogenase substrates. As a consequence biogenic amines form increased quantities of alcohols rather than the corresponding acids. During this biotransformation, condensation reactions between deaminated and intact amines may occur which can yield tetrahydropapaverolines. These compounds are closely related to precursors of opioids which is cause to link ethanol abuse to morphine addiction. There is, however, no pharmacological or clinical evidence suggesting similarities between ethanol dependence or opiod addiction. Acetaldehyde plays an additional role in alkaloidal formation in vitro. Biogenic amines may react with acetaldehyde to form isoquinoline or carboline compounds. Some of these substances have significant pharmacological activity. Furthermore, they may enter neural stores and displace the natural neurotransmitter. Thus, they can act as false neurotransmitters. Some investigators believe that chronic ethanol ingestion leads to significant formation of such aberrant compounds which may then upset autonomic nervous system balance. This disturbance may explain the abnormal sympathetic activity seen in withdrawal. While these ideas about the etiology of alcohol abuse have a definite appeal, they are naturally based on in vitro preliminary work. Much study of the quantitative pharmacology of these compounds in animals is required before judgement can be made as to the merits of the proposed hypotheses. In the meantime, pharmacological studies on the ability of ethanol to depress respiration in the mouse has revealed that unlike opioids or barbituates, respiratory depression induced by ethanol requires the presence in brain of serotonin. This neurotransmitter also mediates the respiratory effects of several other alcohols but curiously, not chloral hydrate, yet this compound is purported to alter biogenic amine metabolism much like ethanol. Thus, the response

  20. Biogenic amines in silage. 2. The dynamics of the formation of biogenic amines in silage.

    PubMed

    Krízek, M

    1993-01-01

    When analysing a series of laboratory silages made from orchardgrass, red clover and oats, the fluctuating dynamics of biogenic amines were observed. For levels of putrescine and cadaverine, a rapid exponential increase culminating approximately 30-50 days after ensiling is typical. A small decrease, reaching the minimum at approximately the 100th day, is sometimes followed by a second increase in amine concentrations achieving its maximum approximately 200-230 days after ensiling. Irregular curves of the dynamics probably originate in the simultaneous decarboxylation and deamination reactions along with other relevant amine degradation processes. The dynamics of other biogenic amines-spermidine, spermine and histamine are more difficult to predict. The changes in histamine levels resembled those in the diamines. Some 200 days after ensiling, considerable increases in this toxic amine were observed. The dynamics of some quality criteria, especially the degree of proteolysis, were in many cases similar to those of the amines.

  1. Controls on biogenic silica burial in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, Zanna; Kohfeld, Karen E.; Matsumoto, Katsumi

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the controls on opal export in the Southern Ocean can inform both the prediction of how the leakage of silicic acid from the Southern Ocean responds to climate and the interpretation of paleo-proxies. We have compiled a database of 185 230Thorium-normalized opal burial rates and 493 opal concentration measurements in Southern Ocean sediments and matched these with environmental climatologies. By subdividing the Southern Ocean on the basis of oceanographic regions and interpolating the opal burial rates, we estimate a total biogenic Si burial south of 40°S of 2.3 ± 1.0 Tmol Si yr-1. In both the seasonally ice-covered and permanently ice-free regions we can explain 73% of opal burial variability from surface ocean properties. Where sea ice is present for at least part of the year, the length of the ice-free season determines the upper limit of opal burial in the underlying sediments. In the ice-free regions of the Southern Ocean, the supply of silicic acid through winter mixing is the most important factor. Our results do not support a strong role of iron in controlling opal burial. We do however find that satellite-derived net primary production increases with increasing (modeled) dust delivery. These findings support the decoupling between carbon and opal fluxes in the Southern Ocean. When corrected for opal dissolution, the observed opal fluxes are in reasonable agreement with fluxes simulated using an ocean biogeochemical model. However, the results suggest current preservation algorithms for opal could be improved by incorporating the composition of particle flux, not only its magnitude.

  2. On the Biogenic Origins of Homochirality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojo, Victor

    2015-06-01

    Homochirality, the single-handedness of optically asymmetric chemical structures, is present in all major biological macromolecules. Terrestrial life's preference for one isomer over its mirror image in D-sugars and L-amino acids has both fascinated and puzzled biochemists for over a century. But the contrasting case of the equally fundamental phospholipids has received less attention. Although the phospholipid glycerol headgroups of archaea and bacteria are both exclusively homochiral, the stereochemistries between the two domains are opposite. Here I argue that the reason for this "dual homochirality" was a simple evolutionary choice at the independent origin of the two synthesizing enzymes. More broadly, this points to a trivial biogenic cause for the evolution of homochirality: the enzymatic processes that produce chiral biomolecules are stereospecific in nature. Once an orientation has been favored, shifting to the opposite is both difficult and unnecessary. Homochirality is thus the simplest and most parsimonious evolutionary case.

  3. Analyzing method on biogenic volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, J. H.; Wang, M. X.; Hu, F.; Greenberg, J. P.; Guenther, A. B.

    2002-02-01

    In order to analyze biogenic volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere, an automated gas chromatography is developed and employed at the laboratory of National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) during January to July, 2000. A small refrigerator was used so as to remove water in the air sample from gas line, and get accurate concentrations of volatile organic compounds. At 5degreesC, good water removing efficiency can be obtained at controlled flow rate. Air samples were collected around the building of Mesa Lab. of NCAR and analyzed by this gas chromatography system. This paper reports this gas chromatography system and results of air samples. The experimental results show that this gas chromatography system has a good reproducibility and stability, and main interesting volatile organic compounds such as isoprene, monoterpenes have an evident diurnal variation.

  4. Effect of Nitrate on Biogenic Sulfide Production

    PubMed Central

    Jenneman, Gary E.; McInerney, M. J.; Knapp, Roy M.

    1986-01-01

    The addition of 59 mM nitrate inhibited biogenic sulfide production in dilute sewage sludge (10% [vol/vol]) amended with 20 mM sulfate and either acetate, glucose, or hydrogen as electron donors. Similar results were found when pond sediment or oil field brines served as the inoculum. Sulfide production was inhibited for periods of at least 6 months and was accompanied by the oxidation of resazurin from its colorless reduced state to its pink oxidized state. Lower amounts of nitrate (6 or 20 mM) and increased amounts of sewage sludge resulted in only transient inhibition of sulfide production. The addition of 156 mM sulfate to bottles with 59 mM nitrate and 10% (vol/vol) sewage sludge or pond sediment resulted in sulfide production. Nitrate, nitrite, and nitrous oxide were detected during periods where sulfide production was inhibited, whereas nitrate, nitrite, and nitrous oxide were below detectable levels at the time sulfide production began. The oxidation of resazurin was attributed to an increase in nitrous oxide which persisted in concentration of about 1.0 mM for up to 5 months. The numbers of sulfate-reducing organisms decreased from 106 CFU ml−1 sludge to less than detectable levels after prolonged incubation of oxidized bottles. The addition of 10 mM glucose to oxidized bottles after 14.5 weeks of incubation resulted in rereduction of the resazurin and subsequent sulfide production. The prolonged inhibition of sulfide production was attributed to an increase in oxidation-reduction potential due to biogenic production of nitrous oxide, which appeared to have a cytotoxic effect on sulfate-reducing populations. PMID:16347078

  5. Biogenic amines in Portuguese traditional foods and wines.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Isabel M P L V O; Pinho, Olívia

    2006-09-01

    The presence of biogenic amines in foodstuffs is an important food safety problem because of the implication of these compounds in food intolerance and intoxication. The separation and quantification of biogenic amines in foods is normally performed by chromatographic techniques. This review contains descriptions of the quantification of biogenic amines in Portuguese traditional fermented and/or ripened foods and wines, including Protected Denomination of Origin cheeses, dry-cured sausages, and Portuguese wines (including Port wines), using different analytical methods based on high-pressure liquid chromatography (UV or diode array and/or fluorometric detectors) and gas chromatography (with a mass spectrometry detector). The evolution of biogenic amines during fermentation, ripening, aging, or storage of those products was also evaluated. Biogenic amine concentrations ranged widely within individual food items, and storage, transport, and handling conditions can influence to some extent the biogenic amines present and their concentrations. Traditional foods are an important part of the Portuguese diet, and a high intake of harmful amounts of biogenic amines from traditional Portuguese fermented foods is possible. However, extensive research is needed to extend the current limited database.

  6. Magnetic sorbents biomineralization on the basis of iron sulphides.

    PubMed

    Jencarova, Jana; Luptakova, Alena; Vitkovska, Nikola; Matysek, Dalibor; Jandacka, Petr

    2017-08-30

    Biomineralization means mineral formation under the influence of organisms. Sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) constitute an essential role of iron sulphide minerals precipitation. Their composition involves amorphous, non-stoichiometric or crystalline iron sulphides, weakly or strongly magnetic. Variation in environmental conditions can alter the reactive iron species within the mineral, potentially modifying their magnetic properties. Biogenic iron sulphide minerals can be used as heavy metals and toxic ions adsorbents in soil or water remediation. For these reasons, a series of laboratory-scale iron sulphide synthesis experiments with the aim to study the chemical composition, mineralogy and magnetic properties of iron sulphide precipitates were carried out using SRB under various cultivation mode and nutrient medium composition. Energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) showed formation of iron sulphides in all biogenic samples and iron phosphates in abiotic controls. Results of X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) in biomineralized samples confirmed nanocrystalline greigite, mackinawite and sulphur alpha. Magnetic measurements showed that sample prepared by static cultivation without addition of fresh nutrient medium was the most magnetic, magnetic hysteresis of sample formed under semicontinuous mode without any nutrient supply was the lowest. Abiotic samples contained only vivianite and they did not prove any significant response to magnetic field.

  7. To What Extent Can Biogenic SOA Be Controlled?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anthropogenic pollution facilitates transformation of naturally emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the particle phase, enhancing the ambient concentrations of material commonly referred to as biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA). It is therefore conceivable that som...

  8. BIOGENIC HYDROCARBONS IN THE ATMOSPHERIC BOUNDARY LAYER: A REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonmethane hydrocarbons are ubiquitous trace atmospheric constituents yet they control the oxidation capacity of the atmosphere. Both anthropogenic and biogenic processes contribute to the release of hydrocarbons to the atmosphere. In this manuscript, the state of the science ...

  9. A BIOGENIC ROLE IN EXPOSURE TO TWO TOXIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biogenic sources play an important role in ozone and particulate concentrations through emissions of volatile organic compounds. The same emissions also contribute to chronic toxic exposures from formaldehyde and acetaldehyde because each compound arises through primary and se...

  10. Origin of organism-dependent biogenic silica quartz formation.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kiminori

    2011-12-15

    Organism-dependent biogenic quartz formation in the steady-state environment is a phenomenon that can address the global environmental issues such as diagenetic evolution, biogeochemical cycling, and reservoir formation, but detailed studies have not been performed so far. Here, steady-state quartz formation is studied for amorphous silica of different biogenic origin on the basis of the recently established mechanistic model [Sato et al., J. Phys. Chem. C 2011, 115, 18131]. Amorphous silica originated from rice husks possesses angstrom-scale pores larger by 1.3 Å than those originated from diatom algae. The slight difference of pore size dramatically reduces activation energies of water diffusion by 78% and reactions of water molecules at pore surfaces by 47%, resulting in the reduction of activation energy of biogenic quartz formation by 64%. The present findings evidence that angstrom-scale pores intrinsically residing in the amorphous matrix are the organism-dependent origin of steady-state biogenic quartz formation.

  11. A BIOGENIC ROLE IN EXPOSURE TO TWO TOXIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biogenic sources play an important role in ozone and particulate concentrations through emissions of volatile organic compounds. The same emissions also contribute to chronic toxic exposures from formaldehyde and acetaldehyde because each compound arises through primary and se...

  12. Biogenic mineralformation of platinoids in plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalevskii, A. L.; Kovalevskaya, O. M.; Prokopchuk, S. I.

    The data obtained by present on mineral particles being likely microbioliths of all 6 platinoids Pt, Pd, Ir, Os, Rh and Ru in plants are considered for the first time. Microbioliths of the studied platinoids are peculiar for "old" parts of wood plants, i.e. wood of old, including rotten stumps of pine ordinary (Pinus silvestris), larch dahurian (Larix dahurica) and plane-leaved birch (Betula platyphylla), corked cones of pine and outer crust layers of trunks, branches, roots of pine, larch and birch; roots of aspen (Populus tremula). All six platinoids form mineral particles (microbioliths) 0,5-20 mkm in size in these bioobjects that are easily registered by modern scintillation emission spectral analysis (SESA) The mentioned bioobjects are high informative and non-barrier related to bulk and mineral forms of platinoids that makes it possible to use high productive and economic, recently automatized scintillation emission spectral analysis (SESA) for mass analyses of these bioobjects for platinoids The data obtained by SESA allow to suggest predomination of monoelement microbioliths Pt, Pd, Ir, Rh, Os, Au in plant ash and much more rare bi-platinoid biogenic minerals including Pt+Pd, Pd+Rh and Pt+Rh. The maximum size of biogenic platinoid minerals can reach 15-20 mkm by SESA data. The minimum size of these microbioliths registered by standard SESA equals 2-3 mkm for Pd, 3-4 mkm for Pt, Os and Rh, 4 mkm for Ru and 3-4 mkm for Ir. Small mineral particles 0,5-10 mkm in size i.e. microbioliths of platinoids have been found in plant ash by SESA in the mentioned "old" parts of wood plants and some parts of middle age, for instance, in branches. Their distribution in various bioobjects of plants is similar to that of Au microbioliths. Average size of platinoid microbioliths in plant ash is less than that of corresponding mineral particles in lithogeochemical samples. There fore reproducibility of various analytical methods of plant ash is better than lithogeochemical

  13. Biogenic Amines in Italian Pecorino Cheese

    PubMed Central

    Schirone, Maria; Tofalo, Rosanna; Visciano, Pierina; Corsetti, Aldo; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    The quality of distinctive artisanal cheeses is closely associated with the territory of production and its traditions. Pedoclimatic characteristics, genetic autochthonous variations, and anthropic components create an environment so specific that it would be extremely difficult to reproduce elsewhere. Pecorino cheese is included in this sector of the market and is widely diffused in Italy (∼62.000t of production in 2010). Pecorino is a common name given to indicate Italian cheeses made exclusively from pure ewes’ milk characterized by a high content of fat matter and it is mainly produced in the middle and south of Italy by traditional procedures from raw or pasteurized milk. The microbiota plays a major role in the development of the organoleptic characteristics of the cheese but it can also be responsible for the accumulation of undesirable substances, such as biogenic amines (BA). Bacterial amino acid decarboxylase activity and BA content have to be investigated within the complex microbial community of raw milk cheese for different cheese technologies. The results emphasize the necessity of controlling the indigenous bacterial population responsible for high production of BA and the use of competitive adjunct cultures could be suggested. Several factors can contribute to the qualitative and quantitative profiles of BA’s in Pecorino cheese such as environmental hygienic conditions, pH, salt concentration, water activity, fat content, pasteurization of milk, decarboxylase microorganisms, starter cultures, temperature and time of ripening, storage, part of the cheese (core, edge), and the presence of cofactor (pyridoxal phosphate, availability of aminases and deaminases). In fact physico-chemical parameters seem to favor biogenic amine-positive microbiota; both of these environmental factors can easily be modulated, in order to control growth of undesirable microorganisms. Generally, the total content of BA’s in Pecorino cheeses can range from about 100

  14. Dissolution Kinetics of Biogenic Magnesian Calcites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, R.; Guidry, M.; Mackenzie, F. T.; De Carlo, E. H.

    2014-12-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) is a serious concern for the health of calcifying ecosystems in the near future. During the past century, surface ocean pH has decreased by ~0.1 pH units, and is expected to decrease further by 0.3-0.4 pH units by the end of this century. The process of OA will likely result in both decreased calcification rates and increased rates of carbonate mineral dissolution, particularly involving the magnesian calcite (Mg-calcite) calcifiers found in shallow-water reef and other carbonate environments. Many Mg-calcite compositions are the most soluble of the carbonate phases commonly found in reef environments (often comprising much of the cementation and structure within a reef), and are therefore potentially the most susceptible to dissolution processes associated with OA. However, the dissolution kinetics of these phases is poorly known, limiting our ability to understand their behavior in nature. Laboratory experiments designed to investigate the mechanisms and dissolution rates of biogenic Mg-calcite mineral phases in distilled water and seawater over a range of CO2 and T conditions were conducted employing both batch and fluidized-bed reactor systems and using a variety of cleaned and annealed biogenic Mg-calcite phases. Our initial results have shown that the dissolution rate at 298 K and a pCO2 of ~350 ppm of the crustose coralline alga Amphiroa rigida (~20 mol% MgCO3) in seawater undersaturated with respect to this phase is 3.6 μmol g-1 hr-1, nearly 50% greater than that under similar conditions for aragonite. This rate and the derived experimental rate law are consistent with the preliminary findings of Walter and Morse (1985). Additional kinetic (and also solubility) data will be presented for the following species: Chiton tuberculatus (~0-4 mol% MgCO3); Echinometra mathei and/or Lytechinus variegatus (~8-12 mol% MgCO3); Homotrema rubrum (12-16 mol% MgCO3); and Lithothamnion sp. (~18-24 mol% MgCO3). Quantification of the rates of

  15. Organosulfate formation in biogenic secondary organic aerosol.

    PubMed

    Surratt, Jason D; Gómez-González, Yadian; Chan, Arthur W H; Vermeylen, Reinhilde; Shahgholi, Mona; Kleindienst, Tadeusz E; Edney, Edward O; Offenberg, John H; Lewandowski, Michael; Jaoui, Mohammed; Maenhaut, Willy; Claeys, Magda; Flagan, Richard C; Seinfeld, John H

    2008-09-11

    Organosulfates of isoprene, alpha-pinene, and beta-pinene have recently been identified in both laboratory-generated and ambient secondary organic aerosol (SOA). In this study, the mechanism and ubiquity of organosulfate formation in biogenic SOA is investigated by a comprehensive series of laboratory photooxidation (i.e., OH-initiated oxidation) and nighttime oxidation (i.e., NO3-initiated oxidation under dark conditions) experiments using nine monoterpenes (alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, d-limonene, l-limonene, alpha-terpinene, gamma-terpinene, terpinolene, Delta(3)-carene, and beta-phellandrene) and three monoterpenes (alpha-pinene, d-limonene, and l-limonene), respectively. Organosulfates were characterized using liquid chromatographic techniques coupled to electrospray ionization combined with both linear ion trap and high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Organosulfates are formed only when monoterpenes are oxidized in the presence of acidified sulfate seed aerosol, a result consistent with prior work. Archived laboratory-generated isoprene SOA and ambient filter samples collected from the southeastern U.S. were reexamined for organosulfates. By comparing the tandem mass spectrometric and accurate mass measurements collected for both the laboratory-generated and ambient aerosol, previously uncharacterized ambient organic aerosol components are found to be organosulfates of isoprene, alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, and limonene-like monoterpenes (e.g., myrcene), demonstrating the ubiquity of organosulfate formation in ambient SOA. Several of the organosulfates of isoprene and of the monoterpenes characterized in this study are ambient tracer compounds for the occurrence of biogenic SOA formation under acidic conditions. Furthermore, the nighttime oxidation experiments conducted under highly acidic conditions reveal a viable mechanism for the formation of previously identified nitrooxy organosulfates found in ambient nighttime aerosol samples. We estimate

  16. Biogenic amine production by lactic acid bacteria isolated from cider.

    PubMed

    Garai, G; Dueñas, M T; Irastorza, A; Moreno-Arribas, M V

    2007-11-01

    To study the occurrence of histidine, tyrosine and ornithine decarboxylase activity in lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from natural ciders and to examine their potential to produce detrimental levels of biogenic amines. The presence of biogenic amines in a decarboxylase synthetic broth and in cider was determined by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Among the 54 LAB strains tested, six (five lactobacilli and one oenococci) were biogenic amine producers in both media. Histamine and tyramine were the amines formed by the LAB strains investigated. Lactobacillus diolivorans were the most intensive histamine producers. This species together with Lactobacillus collinoides and Oenococcus oeni also seemed to produce tyramine. No ability to form histamine, tyramine or putrescine by Pediococus parvulus was observed, although it is a known biogenic amine producer in wines and beers. This study demonstrated that LAB microbiota growing in ciders had the ability to produce biogenic amines, particularly histamine and tyramine, and suggests that this capability might be strain-dependent rather than being related to a particular bacterial species. Production of biogenic amines by food micro-organisms has continued to be the focus of intensive study because of their potential toxicity. The main goal was to identify the microbial species capable of producing these compounds in order to control their presence and metabolic activity in foods.

  17. Climate Change Impacts on Biogenic Emissions in the Central Hardwoods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, A. M.; Ferguson, D.; Fraser, J. S.; Guenther, A. B.; Geron, C. D.; Thompson, F.; Steiner, A. L.

    2016-12-01

    Climate change is shifting the range of suitable habitat for forests species across the United States. Consequently, the distribution of biogenic precursors to atmospheric pollutants, such as ozone and aerosols, are likely to change as forest composition changes. In this study, we explore the changing temperature and precipitation patterns and the cascading impacts on forest composition and biogenic emissions in the Central Hardwoods Forest Region, covering the United States' mid-section from Oklahoma to Ohio. To accomplish this, we analyzed tree density output from a forest ecosystem model driven by current and future climate conditions, and applied genus-average biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emission potentials to estimate the change in emissions. We then correlated the tree density changes with the spatial distribution of temperature and precipitation changes for each species to determine the primary climate driver of the changes in species distribution. Finally, we examined the impact of forest distribution change on biogenic emissions in the region. We identified precipitation as the primary driver of ecosystem change in the region over temperature. Of the 19 tree species explored, about 5 species controlled most of the change in biogenic emissions. We will discuss the specific changes in biogenic VOC distributions we observed and their potential consequences on air quality, including impacts on ozone, aerosols, and the oxidation capacity of the atmosphere.

  18. Biogenic amine metabolism in juvenile neurocardiogenic syncope with dysautonomia

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Ian J; Lankford, Jeremy E; Hashmi, Syed Shahrukh; Numan, Mohammed T

    2014-01-01

    Objective Biogenic amine brain levels and their cerebral metabolism are frequently studied by quantitation of biogenic amine metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compared to age-matched controls. There is a paucity of studies in adolescents and young adults investigating the potential role of disordered cerebral biogenic amine metabolism in young patients who have dysautonomia based on abnormal head-up tilt table (HUTT). Methods In a cohort of juvenile patients with neurocardiogenic syncope and dysautonomia documented by abnormal HUTT, biogenic amine metabolites of dopamine and serotonin were quantitated in 18 patients (15 females). HUTT testing is an effective clinical method to evaluate posturally induced physiological events in patients suspected of neurocardiogenic syncope with dysautonomia. Results Levels of the dopamine metabolite (homovanillic acid: HVA) and/or the serotonin metabolite (5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid: 5HIAA) were significantly reduced in 13 patients compared to age-matched controls. Interpretation Peripheral biogenic amines and their metabolites have been extensively studied in adults with dysautonomia due to various neurodegenerative disorders (Parkinson disease, multiple system atrophy, primary autonomic failure). Our findings indicate that more than two-thirds of this cohort of young patients with dysautonomia of variable severity have a defect in cerebral biogenic amines, particularly in dopamine and serotonin metabolism. PMID:25590038

  19. Gigantism in unique biogenic magnetite at the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Schumann, Dirk; Raub, Timothy D.; Kopp, Robert E.; Guerquin-Kern, Jean-Luc; Wu, Ting-Di; Rouiller, Isabelle; Smirnov, Aleksey V.; Sears, S. Kelly; Lücken, Uwe; Tikoo, Sonia M.; Hesse, Reinhard; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Vali, Hojatollah

    2008-01-01

    We report the discovery of exceptionally large biogenic magnetite crystals in clay-rich sediments spanning the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) in a borehole at Ancora, NJ. Aside from previously described abundant bacterial magnetofossils, electron microscopy reveals novel spearhead-like and spindle-like magnetite up to 4 μm long and hexaoctahedral prisms up to 1.4 μm long. Similar to magnetite produced by magnetotactic bacteria, these single-crystal particles exhibit chemical composition, lattice perfection, and oxygen isotopes consistent with an aquatic origin. Electron holography indicates single-domain magnetization despite their large crystal size. We suggest that the development of a thick suboxic zone with high iron bioavailability—a product of dramatic changes in weathering and sedimentation patterns driven by severe global warming—drove diversification of magnetite-forming organisms, likely including eukaryotes. PMID:18936486

  20. Are aragonite nanocrystals in modern microbialites biogenic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzerara, K.; Menguy, N.; Lopez-Garcia, P.; Kazmierczack, J.; Guyot, F.; Brown, G. E.

    2006-12-01

    Microbialites are sedimentary deposits associated with microbial mat communities, and are thought to be evidence of some of the oldest life on Earth. Despite extensive studies of such deposits, little is known about the role of microorganisms in their formation. In addition, unambiguous criteria proving their biogenicity have yet to be established. We focused on modern microbialites formed in the alkaline Lake Van, Turkey. Lake Van microbialites have a fine-grained micritic texture similar to most carbonate microbialites, and consist of nanometer-sized aragonite crystals, which display unusal clustered spherical morphologies in the 30-100 nm size range nm. In order to better document the relationships between microbes, organics and aragonite nanocrystals, we combined X-ray and electron microscopies at the nm scale. We describe a simple way to locate microorganisms and organics entombed in calcium carbonate precipitates. We observed that nanometer-sized aragonite crystals, which comprise the largest part of the microbialites, are surrounded by a 10-nm thick amorphous calcium carbonate layer containing organic molecules and are embedded in an organic matrix, likely consisting of polysaccharides, which, based on experimental results from the literature, helps explain the unusual sizes and shapes of these crystals. This study illustrates a methodological approach that brings valuable information on interaction between organics and minerals at the submicron scale. The results question existing models of the role of microorganisms in carbonate precipitation and provide new biosignatures for these deposits.

  1. Biogenic Amines in Raw and Processed Seafood

    PubMed Central

    Visciano, Pierina; Schirone, Maria; Tofalo, Rosanna; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    The presence of biogenic amines (BAs) in raw and processed seafood, associated with either time/temperature conditions or food technologies is discussed in the present paper from a safety and prevention point of view. In particular, storage temperature, handling practices, presence of microbial populations with decarboxylase activity and availability of free amino acids are considered the most important factors affecting the production of BAs in raw seafood. On the other hand, some food technological treatments such as salting, ripening, fermentation, or marination can increase the levels of BAs in processed seafood. The consumption of high amount of BAs, above all histamine, can result in food borne poisoning which is a worldwide problem. The European Regulation established as maximum limits for histamine, in fishery products from fish species associated with high histidine amounts, values ranging from 100 to 200 mg/kg, while for products which have undergone enzyme maturation treatment in brine, the aforementioned limits rise to 200 and 400 mg/kg. Preventive measures and emerging methods aiming at controlling the production of BAs are also reported for potential application in seafood industries. PMID:22675321

  2. Biogenic nanoscale colloids in wastewater effluents.

    PubMed

    Song, Guixue; Wang, Jun; Chiu, Chao-An; Westerhoff, Paul

    2010-11-01

    The size, surface area, metal complexation capacity, organic pollutant sorption potential, reactivity with disinfectants, and elevated nitrogen content of biogenic organic nanoscale material (BONM) can potentially affect aquatic environments. BONM in effluents from 11 full-scale wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), which use a range of biological processes, were characterized in two ways. First, BONM was measured by hydrodynamic size-exclusion chromatography coupled with an online organic carbon and UV detector. Second, BONM was isolated from the wastewater using rotary evaporation and dialysis and then characterized by elemental analysis, transmission electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The wastewaters contained 6-10 mg/L of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). BONM accounted for 5%-50% of the DOC in wastewater effluent organic matter, and the largest size fraction (>10 kDa) of organic carbon correlated with the organic carbon content determined after rotary evaporation and dialysis. Membrane bioreactor WWTPs had the lowest fraction of BONM (<10% of the DOC), followed by conventional activated sludge (10% to 30% of the DOC), with other processes (e.g., trickling filters, aerated lagoons) containing larger BONM percentages. BONM had a lower carbon to nitrogen ratio (6.2 ± 1.7) compared with the literature values for humic or fulvic acids, exhibited chemical bonds that were indicative of amides and polysaccharides, and contained fibril entangled networks. This work has important implications for operations efficiency of WWTPs, including controlling membrane fouling and release of organic nitrogen into sensitive environments.

  3. Nitrate radicals and biogenic volatile organic compounds ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) by the nitrate radical (NO3) represents one of the important interactions between anthropogenic emissions related to combustion and natural emissions from the biosphere. This interaction has been recognized for more than 3 decades, during which time a large body of research has emerged from laboratory, field, and modeling studies. NO3-BVOC reactions influence air quality, climate and visibility through regional and global budgets for reactive nitrogen (particularly organic nitrates), ozone, and organic aerosol. Despite its long history of research and the significance of this topic in atmospheric chemistry, a number of important uncertainties remain. These include an incomplete understanding of the rates, mechanisms, and organic aerosol yields for NO3-BVOC reactions, lack of constraints on the role of heterogeneous oxidative processes associated with the NO3 radical, the difficulty of characterizing the spatial distributions of BVOC and NO3 within the poorly mixed nocturnal atmosphere, and the challenge of constructing appropriate boundary layer schemes and non-photochemical mechanisms for use in state-of-the-art chemical transport and chemistry–climate models. This review is the result of a workshop of the same title held at the Georgia Institute of Technology in June 2015. The first half of the review summarizes the current literature on NO3-BVOC chemistry, with a particular focus on recent advances in

  4. Biogenic antimicrobial silver nanoparticles produced by fungi.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Alexandre G; Ping, Liu Yu; Marcato, Priscyla D; Alves, Oswaldo L; Silva, Maria C P; Ruiz, Rita C; Melo, Itamar S; Tasic, Ljubica; De Souza, Ana O

    2013-01-01

    Aspergillus tubingensis and Bionectria ochroleuca showed excellent extracellular ability to synthesize silver nanoparticles (Ag NP), spherical in shape and 35 ± 10 nm in size. Ag NP were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and photon correlation spectroscopy for particle size and zeta potential. Proteins present in the fungal filtrate and in Ag NP dispersion were analyzed by electrophoresis (sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis). Ag NP showed pronounced antifungal activity against Candida sp, frequently occurring in hospital infections, with minimal inhibitory concentration in the range of 0.11-1.75 μg/mL. Regarding antibacterial activity, nanoparticles produced by A. tubingensis were more effective compared to the other fungus, inhibiting 98.0 % of Pseudomonas. aeruginosa growth at 0.28 μg/mL. A. tubingensis synthesized Ag NP with surprisingly high and positive surface potential, differing greatly from all known fungi. These data open the possibility of obtaining biogenic Ag NP with positive surface potential and new applications.

  5. Biogenic volatile emissions from the soil.

    PubMed

    Peñuelas, J; Asensio, D; Tholl, D; Wenke, K; Rosenkranz, M; Piechulla, B; Schnitzler, J P

    2014-08-01

    Volatile compounds are usually associated with an appearance/presence in the atmosphere. Recent advances, however, indicated that the soil is a huge reservoir and source of biogenic volatile organic compounds (bVOCs), which are formed from decomposing litter and dead organic material or are synthesized by underground living organism or organs and tissues of plants. This review summarizes the scarce available data on the exchange of VOCs between soil and atmosphere and the features of the soil and particle structure allowing diffusion of volatiles in the soil, which is the prerequisite for biological VOC-based interactions. In fact, soil may function either as a sink or as a source of bVOCs. Soil VOC emissions to the atmosphere are often 1-2 (0-3) orders of magnitude lower than those from aboveground vegetation. Microorganisms and the plant root system are the major sources for bVOCs. The current methodology to detect belowground volatiles is described as well as the metabolic capabilities resulting in the wealth of microbial and root VOC emissions. Furthermore, VOC profiles are discussed as non-destructive fingerprints for the detection of organisms. In the last chapter, belowground volatile-based bi- and multi-trophic interactions between microorganisms, plants and invertebrates in the soil are discussed.

  6. Biogenic amines in silage. 1. The occurrence of biogenic amines in silage.

    PubMed

    Krízek, M

    1993-01-01

    In laboratory silages made from orchardgrass, red clover and oats, significant levels of toxic biogenic amines were found. The most widespread were putrescine and cadaverine, concentrations of spermidine, spermine and histamine were ten times lower on average. Of the amines considered, putrescine content seems to be the most sensitive indicator of the extent of putrefaction in silages. A relationship between the putrescine contents and the degree of proteolysis was found. The biogenic amine content is closely connected with both the variety of crop ensiled and even more so with the method and the efficiency of preservation. Neither the application of formic acid nor wilting suppressed the formation of any of the amines in silages selectively. Formic acid suppressed the total concentration of amines to 23% as compared with controls. The highest levels of amines were found in orchardgrass and oat silages; smaller amounts were detected in clover silages. In the case of very poorly preserved silage 100-150 g of toxic amines can be consumed by a cow in a day. This could have a deleterious effect on the physiological condition and the performance of livestock.

  7. Biogenic and non-biogenic Si pools in terrestrial ecosystems: results from a novel analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barao, Lucia; Vandevenne, Floor; Clymans, Wim; Meire, Patrick; Frings, Patrick; Conley, Daniel; Struyf, Eric

    2015-04-01

    Silicon (Si) is a chemical element frequently associated with highly abundant silicate minerals in the Earth crust. Over millions of years, the interaction of such minerals with the atmosphere and hydrosphere produces a myriad of processed compounds, and the mineral weathering consumes CO2 during the process. The weathering of minerals also triggers the export of dissolved Si (DSi) to coastal waters and the ocean. Here, DSi is deposited in diatom frustules, in an amorphous biogenic form (BSi). Diatoms account for 50% of the primary production and are crucial for the export of carbon into the deep sea. In recent years, it was acknowledged that terrestrial systems filter the Si transition from the terrestrial mineral to the marine and coastal biological pool, by the incorporation of DSi into plants. In this process, DSi is taken up by roots together with other nutrients and precipitates in plant cells in amorphous structures named phytoliths. After dead, plant tissues become mixed in the top soil, where BSi is available for dissolution and will control the DSi availability in short time scales. Additionally, Si originated from soil forming processes can also significantly interfere with the global cycle. The Si cycle in terrestrial ecosystems is a key factor to coastal ecology, plant ecology, biogeochemistry and agro-sciences, but the high variability of different biogenic and non-biogenic Si pools remains as an obstacle to obtain accurate measurements. The traditional methods, developed to isolate diatoms in ocean sediments, only account for simple mineral corrections. In this dissertation we have adapted a novel continuous analysis method (during alkaline extraction) that uses Si-Al ratios and reactivity to differ biogenic from non-biogenic fractions. The method was originally used in marine sediments, but we have developed it to be applicable in a wide range of terrestrial, aquatic and coastal ecosystems. We first focused on soils under strong human impact in

  8. Biogenic U(IV) oxidation by dissolved oxygen and nitrate in sediment after prolonged U(VI)/Fe(III)/SO42- reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, H. S.; Komlos, J.; Jaffé, P. R.

    2009-02-01

    Sediment column experiments were performed to quantify the effect of biogenic iron sulfide precipitates on the stability of bioreduced uranium during and after a simulated bioremediation scenario. In particular, this study examined the effect of different oxidants (dissolved oxygen and nitrate) on biogenic U(IV) oxidation in sediment that experienced significant sulfate reduction in addition to Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction. The experimental set-up included five replicate columns (each 5 cm in diameter, 15 cm long and packed with background sediment from a site contaminated with uranium) that were bioreduced for 70 days by injecting a nutrient media containing 3 mM acetate and 6 mM sulfate prior to oxidation. Upon oxidation, iron sulfide precipitates formed during bioreduction acted as a buffer to partially prevent biogenic U(IV) oxidation. The iron sulfides were more effective at protecting biogenic U(IV) from oxidation when dissolved oxygen was the oxidant compared to nitrate. A constant supply of 0.25 mM and 1.6 mM nitrate over a 50 day period resulted in uranium resolubilization of 11% and 60%, respectively, while less than 1% of the uranium was resolubilized in the column supplied 0.27 mM dissolved oxygen during the same time period. Over time, oxidation increased pore water channeling, which was more pronounced during oxidation with nitrate. Finally, increased channeling with time of oxidation could affect the transport of an oxidant through the previously reduced zone, and hence the oxidation dynamics of the reduced species.

  9. Arsenic species in weathering mine tailings and biogenic solids at the Lava Cap Mine Superfund Site, Nevada City, CA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, Andrea L.; Ashley, Roger P.; Rytuba, James J.

    2011-01-01

    Sub- to anoxic conditions minimize dissolution of arsenopyrite at the LCMS site, but may accelerate the dissolution of As-bearing secondary iron phases such as Fe3+-oxyhydroxides and arseniosiderite, if sufficient organic matter is present to spur anaerobic microbial activity. Oxidizing, dry conditions favor the stabilization of secondary phases, while promoting oxidative breakdown of the primary sulfides. The stability of both primary and secondary As phases is likely to be at a minimum under cyclic wet-dry conditions. Biogenic iron (hydr)oxide flocs can sequester significant amounts of arsenic; this property may be useful for treatment of perpetual sources of As such as mine adit water, but the fate of As associated with natural accumulations of floc material needs to be assessed.

  10. Presumably bacterial remains in banded iron formations: beginning of investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astafieva, M.

    2014-04-01

    Ancient Archaean and Protherozoic rocks are the model objects for investigation of rocks comprising astromaterials. Judging by their age these terrestrial rocks are the nearest to the rocks of meteorites. They are represented as a rule by deeply metamorphized layers of volcanogenic and volcanogenic-sedimentary rocks and bacterial-paleontological investigations of these rocks usually meet some difficulties. But paleontological studies of these rocks usually meet some difficulties. One of these difficulties is usual high metamorphization of rocks. That is why investigation of Archaean banded iron formations is of great importance. Banded iron formations are known everywhere. The oldest banded iron formations are met in Archaean. Their widest distribution was in Proterozoic. They are constituent part of metamorphic complexes of all ancient shields. Formation of these units ended in Phanerozoic. Peculiarity of their development in time, thin layering, rhythmyc repetitiveness are reasons of great interest to these formations. Banded iron formations are sedimentary rocks. Interbedding of ferrigenous (magnetite, hematite, siderite etc.) interlayers and siliceous layers are typical to these formations. Stratificatification is thin, thickness of interlayers is less than 1-2 mm. Iron content exceeds 15%. Potentially all minerals of ferrigenous interlayers could be of biogenic nature because both for oxygenized (hematite) and reduced (magnetite and siderite) minerals direct mechanism of bacterial production is established by microbiologists. Basic ore mineral of banded iron formations is magnetite. But magnetite origin is not clear till nowadays and this problem is very actual [2]. Nevertheless bacterial remains by themselves have not been found and it is not surprising. It is proved that finely dispersed non-completely formed magnetite compose basic mass of magnetite formed for example by thermophylic iron-reducing bacteria. Processes of structure arrangement and crystal

  11. Biogenic amines in Rett syndrome: the usual suspects.

    PubMed

    Roux, Jean-Christophe; Villard, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe postnatal neurological disorder caused by mutations in the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene. In affected children, most biological parameters, including brain structure, are normal (although acquired microcephaly is usually present). However, in recent years, a deficit in bioaminergic metabolism has been identified at the cellular and molecular levels, in more than 200 patients. Recently available transgenic mouse strains with a defective Mecp2 gene also show abnormalities, strongly suggesting that there is a direct link between the function of the MECP2 protein and the metabolism of biogenic amines. Biogenic amines appear to have an important role in the pathophysiology of Rett syndrome, for several reasons. Firstly, biogenic amines modulate a large number of autonomic and cognitive functions. Secondly, many of these functions are affected in RTT patients. Thirdly, biogenic amines are the only neurotransmitters that have repeatedly been found to be altered in RTT patients. Importantly, pharmacological interventions can be envisaged to try to counteract the deficits observed. Here, we review the available human and mouse data and present how they have been and could be used in the development of pharmacological treatments for children affected by the syndrome. Given our current knowledge and the tools available, modulating biogenic amine metabolism may prove to be the most promising strategy for improving the life quality of Rett syndrome patients in the short term.

  12. Accounting for urban biogenic fluxes in regional carbon budgets.

    PubMed

    Hardiman, Brady S; Wang, Jonathan A; Hutyra, Lucy R; Gately, Conor K; Getson, Jackie M; Friedl, Mark A

    2017-03-18

    Many ecosystem models incorrectly treat urban areas as devoid of vegetation and biogenic carbon (C) fluxes. We sought to improve estimates of urban biomass and biogenic C fluxes using existing, nationally available data products. We characterized biogenic influence on urban C cycling throughout Massachusetts, USA using an ecosystem model that integrates improved representation of urban vegetation, growing conditions associated with urban heat island (UHI), and altered urban phenology. Boston's biomass density is 1/4 that of rural forests, however 87% of Massachusetts' urban landscape is vegetated. Model results suggest that, kilogram-for-kilogram, urban vegetation cycles C twice as fast as rural forests. Urban vegetation releases (RE) and absorbs (GEE) the equivalent of 11 and 14%, respectively, of anthropogenic emissions in the most urban portions of the state. While urban vegetation in Massachusetts fully sequesters anthropogenic emissions from smaller cities in the region, Boston's UHI reduces annual C storage by >20% such that vegetation offsets only 2% of anthropogenic emissions. Asynchrony between temporal patterns of biogenic and anthropogenic C fluxes further constrains the emissions mitigation potential of urban vegetation. However, neglecting to account for biogenic C fluxes in cities can impair efforts to accurately monitor, report, verify, and reduce anthropogenic emissions.

  13. Biogenic silver nanoparticles for cancer treatment: an experimental report.

    PubMed

    Jeyaraj, M; Sathishkumar, G; Sivanandhan, G; MubarakAli, D; Rajesh, M; Arun, R; Kapildev, G; Manickavasagam, M; Thajuddin, N; Premkumar, K; Ganapathi, A

    2013-06-01

    A generation of nanoparticles research has discussed recently. It is mandatory to elaborate the applications of biogenic nanoparticles in general and anticancereous property in particular. The present study was aimed to investigate the in vitro cytotoxicity effect of biogenic silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) against human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells towards the development of anticancer agent. Biogenic AgNPs were achieved by employing Sesbania grandiflora leaf extract as a novel reducing agent. It was well characterized by FESEM, EDAX and spectral studies showed spherical shaped nanoparticles in the size of 22 nm in slightly agglomerated form. It was surprising that biogenic AgNPs showed cytotoxic effect against MCF-7 cell lines were confirmed by MTT, AO-EB, Hochest and COMET assays. There was an immediate induction of cellular damage in terms of loss of cell membrane integrity, oxidative stress and apoptosis were found in the cell which treated with AgNPs. This may be a first report on anti-MCF-7 property of biogenic AgNPs in the fourth generation of nanoparticles research. It is necessary to study the formulation and clinical trials to establish the nano drug to treat cancer cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Seasonal trends of biogenic terpene emissions.

    PubMed

    Helmig, Detlev; Daly, Ryan Woodfin; Milford, Jana; Guenther, Alex

    2013-09-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions from six coniferous tree species, i.e. Pinus ponderosa (Ponderosa Pine), Picea pungens (Blue Spruce), Pseudotsuga menziesii (Rocky Mountain Douglas Fir) and Pinus longaeva (Bristlecone Pine), as well as from two deciduous species, Quercus gambelii (Gamble Oak) and Betula occidentalis (Western River Birch) were studied over a full annual growing cycle. Monoterpene (MT) and sesquiterpene (SQT) emissions rates were quantified in a total of 1236 individual branch enclosure samples. MT dominated coniferous emissions, producing greater than 95% of BVOC emissions. MT and SQT demonstrated short-term emission dependence with temperature. Two oxygenated MT, 1,8-cineol and piperitone, were both light and temperature dependent. Basal emission rates (BER, normalized to 1000μmolm(-2)s(-1) and 30°C) were generally higher in spring and summer than in winter; MT seasonal BER from the coniferous trees maximized between 1.5 and 6.0μgg(-1)h(-1), while seasonal lows were near 0.1μgg(-1)h(-1). The fractional contribution of individual MT to total emissions was found to fluctuate with season. SQT BER measured from the coniferous trees ranged from <0.01 to 0.15μgg(-1)h(-1). BER of up to 1.2μgg(-1)h(-1) of the SQT germacrene B were found from Q. gambelii, peaking in late summer. The β-factor, used to define temperature dependence in emissions modeling, was not found to exhibit discernible growth season trends. A seasonal correction factor proposed by others in previous work to account for a sinusoidal shaped emission pattern was applied to the data. Varying levels of agreement were found between the data and model results for the different plant species seasonal data sets using this correction. Consequently, the analyses on this extensive data set suggest that it is not feasible to apply a universal seasonal correction factor across different vegetation species. A modeling exercise comparing two case scenarios, (1) without and (2

  15. Biogenic emissions from Citrus species in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fares, Silvano; Gentner, Drew R.; Park, Jeong-Hoo; Ormeno, Elena; Karlik, John; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2011-09-01

    Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (BVOC) emitted from plants are the dominant source of reduced carbon chemicals to the atmosphere and are important precursors to the photochemical production of ozone and secondary organic aerosols. Considering the extensive land used for agriculture, cultivated Citrus plantations may play an important role in the chemistry of the atmosphere especially in regions such as the Central Valley of California. Moreover, the BVOC emissions from Citrus species have not been characterized in detail and more species-specific inputs for regional models of BVOC emissions are needed. In this study, we measured the physiological parameters and emissions of the most relevant BVOC (oxygenated compounds, monoterpenes, and sesquiterpenes) for four predominant Citrus species planted in California ( Citrus sinensis var. 'Parent Navel', Citrus limon var. 'Meyer', Citrus reticulata var. 'W. Murcott' and 'Clementine'). We used two analytical techniques to measure a full range of BVOC emitted: Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) and gas chromatography with mass spectrometry. Methanol, followed by acetone and acetaldehyde, were the dominant BVOC emitted from lemon and mandarin trees (basal emission rates up to 300 ng(C) g(DW) -1 h -1), while oxygenated monoterpenes, monoterpenes, and sesquiterpenes were the main BVOC emitted from orange trees (basal emission rates up to = 2500 ng(C) g(DW) -1 h -1). Light and temperature-dependent algorithms were better predictors of methanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, isoprene and monoterpenes for all the Citrus species. Whereas, temperature-dependent algorithms were better predictors of oxygenated monoterpenes, and sesquiterpenes. We observed that flowering increased emissions from orange trees by an order of magnitude with the bulk of BVOC emissions being comprised of monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and oxygenated monoterpenes. Chemical speciation of BVOC emissions show that the various classes of terpene

  16. Technologies for the utilisation of biogenic waste in the bioeconomy.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    A brief review has been done of technologies involved in the exploitation of biogenic wastes, in order to provide an introduction to the subject from the technological perspective. Biogenic waste materials and biomass have historically been utilised for thousands of years, but a new conversation is emerging on the role of these materials in modern bioeconomies. Due to the nature of the products and commodities now required, a modern bioeconomy is not simply a rerun of former ones. This new dialogue needs to help us understand how technologies for managing and processing biogenic wastes--both established and novel--should be deployed and integrated (or not) to meet the requirements of the sustainability, closed-loop and resource-security agendas that evidently sit behind the bioeconomy aspirations now being voiced in many countries and regions of the world. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Measuring biogenic silica in marine sediments and suspended matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMaster, David J.

    Measuring the biogenic silica content of marine sediments and suspended matter is essential for a variety of geochemical, biological, and sedimentological studies. Biota forming siliceous skeletal material account for as much as one third of the primary productivity in the ocean [Lisitzin, 1972] and a significant portion (2 to 70% by weight) of open-ocean sediments. Biogenic silica measurements reveal important information concerning the bulk chemistry of suspended material or sediment and are essential in any type of silica flux study in the water column or seabed. Analyses of this biogenic phase in marine plankton are useful in characterizing the basic types of biota present and in comparing the distributions of particulate and dissolved silicate when evaluating nutrient dynamics [Nelson and Smith, 1986]. In the marine environment, diatoms, radiolaria, sponges, and silicoflagellates are the common types of siliceous biota.

  18. Relationship between analgesia and turnover of brain biogenic amines.

    PubMed

    Bensemana, D; Gascon, A L

    1978-10-01

    The analgesic activity of morphine, delta9THC, and sodium salicylate was studied concomitantly with changes in brainstem and cortex turnover of dopamine (DA), noradrenaline (NA), and serotonin (5HT). The results show that a correlation exists between the presence of analgesia and the increased turnover rates of the three biogenic amines. Morphine and sodium salicylate induced analgesia is accompanied by an increased turnover rate of all three biogenic amines; delta9THC-induced analgesia is accompanied by an increased turnover rate of DA and 5HT only. There is, however, no consistent relationship between the degree of analgesia and the degree of change in the turnover rates. The existence of the endogenous morphine-like substances, endorphines, may explain why morphine analgesia is distinct from that of delta9THC and sodium salicylate. The possible relationship between this morphine-like substance and biogenic amines is discussed.

  19. Metabolism of biogenic monoamines in the ciliated protozoan, Tetrahymena pyriformis.

    PubMed

    Takeda, N; Sugiyama, K

    1993-09-01

    1. The three-dimensional HPLC system was used to detect the presence and determine the levels of biogenic monoamines, including precursor amino acids and metabolites, simultaneously in an extract of the ciliated protozoan, Tetrahymena pyriformis. 2. Representative biogenic monoamines, such as dopamine (DA), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), epinephrine (E) and kynurenine (KYN) were found to be synthesized in Tetrahymena and released into the growth medium. 3. The following metabolic pathways were suggested to be operative: (L-DOPA)-DA-(Epinine)-E-dihydroxyphenylethyleneglycol (DOPEG)-vanillylmandelic acid (VMA) and tyrosine-4 (TYR-4)-tyramine (TYRA)-hydroxyphenylacetic acid-4 (HPAC-4) in the case of catecholamines, and tryptophan (TRP)-5-HT and TRP-KYN-xanthurenic acid (XA) in the case of indolalkylamines. 4. As judged from the released metabolites, systems for generation of biogenic monoamines in Tetrahymena seem to be active during the logarithmic phase of its growth.

  20. Silica burial enhanced by iron limitation in oceanic upwelling margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichevin, L. E.; Ganeshram, R. S.; Geibert, W.; Thunell, R.; Hinton, R.

    2014-07-01

    In large swaths of the ocean, primary production by diatoms may be limited by the availability of silica, which in turn limits the biological uptake of carbon dioxide. The burial of biogenic silica in the form of opal is the main sink of marine silicon. Opal burial occurs in equal parts in iron-limited open-ocean provinces and upwelling margins, especially the eastern Pacific upwelling zone. However, it is unclear why opal burial is so efficient in this margin. Here we measure fluxes of biogenic material, concentrations of diatom-bound iron and silicon isotope ratios using sediment traps and a sediment core from the Gulf of California upwelling margin. In the sediment trap material, we find that periods of intense upwelling are associated with transient iron limitation that results in a high export of silica relative to organic carbon. A similar correlation between enhanced silica burial and iron limitation is evident in the sediment core, which spans the past 26,000 years. A global compilation also indicates that hotspots of silicon burial in the ocean are all characterized by high silica to organic carbon export ratios, a diagnostic trait for diatoms growing under iron stress. We therefore propose that prevailing conditions of silica limitation in the ocean are largely caused by iron deficiency imposing an indirect constraint on oceanic carbon uptake.

  1. Ratios of Biogenic Elements for Distinguishing Recent from Fossil Microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2007-01-01

    The ability to distinguish possible microfossils from recent biological contaminants is of great importance to Astrobiology. In this paper we discuss the application of the ratios of life critical biogenic elements (C/O; C/N; and C/S) as determined by Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) to this problem. Biogenic element ratios will be provided for a wide variety of living cyanobacteria and other microbial extremophiles, preserved herbarium materials, and ancient biota from the Antarctic Ice Cores and Siberian and Alaskan Permafrost for comparison with megafossils and microfossils in ancient terrestrial rocks and carbonaceous meteorites.

  2. Biomass burning - Combustion emissions, satellite imagery, and biogenic emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joel S.; Cofer, Wesley R., III; Winstead, Edward L.; Rhinehart, Robert P.; Cahoon, Donald R., Jr.; Sebacher, Daniel I.; Sebacher, Shirley; Stocks, Brian J.

    1991-01-01

    After detailing a technique for the estimation of the instantaneous emission of trace gases produced by biomass burning, using satellite imagery, attention is given to the recent discovery that burning results in significant enhancement of biogenic emissions of N2O, NO, and CH4. Biomass burning accordingly has an immediate and long-term impact on the production of atmospheric trace gases. It is presently demonstrated that satellite imagery of fires may be used to estimate combustion emissions, and could be used to estimate long-term postburn biogenic emission of trace gases to the atmosphere.

  3. Processes occurring in reservoirs receiving biogenic and polluting substances

    SciTech Connect

    Vasil'ev, Yu.S.; Rolle, N.N.

    1988-04-01

    Various aspects of biogenic pollution on the water quality of reservoirs and its effect on ichthyofauna were analyzed. The effects of fertilizer runoffs and other pollutant pathways, such as the decay of flooded vegetation, into reservoirs were addressed. The dependence of fish survival times on nitrite concentrations was charted. On the basis of an optimization model for the economic development of drainage basins with ecological limitations, the Leningrad Polytechnic Institute developed instructions for calculating the removal of biogenic elements and selecting water protection measures which were tested on a number of streams of the Lake Ladoga Basin and other areas and which provide engineering means for evaluating and controlling the eutrophication of reservoirs.

  4. Spectral features of biogenic calcium carbonates and implications for astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, B. L.; Ronholm, J.; Applin, D. M.; Mann, P.; Izawa, M.; Cloutis, E. A.; Whyte, L. G.

    2014-09-01

    The ability to discriminate biogenic from abiogenic calcium carbonate (CaCO3) would be useful in the search for extant or extinct life, since CaCO3 can be produced by both biotic and abiotic processes on Earth. Bioprecipitated CaCO3 material was produced during the growth of heterotrophic microbial isolates on medium enriched with calcium acetate or calcium citrate. These biologically produced CaCO3, along with natural and synthetic non-biologically produced CaCO3 samples, were analysed by reflectance spectroscopy (0.35-2.5 μm), Raman spectroscopy (532 and 785 nm), and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (365 and 405 nm excitation). Optimal instruments for the discrimination of biogenic from abiogenic CaCO3 were determined to be reflectance spectroscopy, and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Multiple absorption features in the visible light region occurred in reflectance spectra for most biogenic CaCO3 samples, which are likely due to organic pigments. Multiple fluorescence peaks occurred in emission spectra (405 nm excitation) of biogenic CaCO3 samples, which also are best attributed to the presence of organic compounds; however, further analyses must be performed in order to better determine the cause of these features to establish criteria for confirming the origin of a given CaCO3 sample. Raman spectroscopy was not useful for discrimination since any potential Raman peaks in spectra of biogenic carbonates collected by both the 532 and 785 nm lasers were overwhelmed by fluorescence. However, this also suggests that biogenic carbonates may be identified by the presence of this organic-associated fluorescence. No reliable spectroscopic differences in terms of parameters such as positions or widths of carbonate-associated absorption bands were found between the biogenic and abiogenic carbonate samples. These results indicate that the presence or absence of organic matter intimately associated with carbonate minerals is the only potentially useful

  5. July 2010: Call for Information on GHG Emissions Associated with Bioenegy and Other Biogenic Sources

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Data about biogenic sources of carbon dioxide, technical comments on accounting for biogenic CO2, and comments on developing an approach for such emissions under the Prevention of Significant Deterioration and Title V Programs under the Clean Air Act.

  6. Carbon tetrachloride transformation on the surface of nanoscale biogenic magnetite particles.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Michael L; Adriaens, Peter

    2004-02-15

    Iron-reducing conditions in subsurface environments promote dechlorination reactions via both biotic and abiotic pathways, the latter often mediated via biologically activated minerals formed by dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (DIRB). Here we report the major products and pathways associated with the abiotic transformation of carbon tetrachloride (CT) by nanoscale biogenic magnetite/maghemite particles produced by the DIRB Geobacter metallireducens. Product formation and free radical/carbene trapping studies indicate that CT transformation occurs via three parallel pathways. The first pathway (hydrogenolysis) results in the formation of chloroform (45-50%) via a trichloromethyl free radical (*CCl3) and possibly a trichloromethyl carbanion (**CCl3-). The second and third pathways involve a dichlorocarbene intermediate (**CCl2), which either hydrolyzes to form CO (approximately 38%) (carbene hydrolysis), or undergoes further reduction to yield methane (8-10%) (carbene reduction). The mechanism of methane formation from **CCl2 is not known, but is speculated to involve a sequence of surface coordinated carbenoid and free radical complexes. The large fraction of relatively benign products formed by the carbene-mediated pathways suggests that magnetite/maghemite particles may have a beneficial application in the remediation of CT contaminated environments.

  7. Iron biomineralization of brain tissue and neurodegenerative disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhaylova (Mikhailova), Albina

    The brain is an organ with a high concentration of iron in specific areas, particularly in the globus pallidus, the substantia nigra, and the red nucleus. In certain pathological states, such as iron overload disease and neurodegenerative disorders, a disturbed iron metabolism can lead to increased accumulation of iron not only in these areas, but also in the brain regions that are typically low in iron content. Recent studies of the physical and magnetic properties of metalloproteins, and in particular the discovery of biogenic magnetite in human brain tissue, have raised new questions about the role of biogenic iron formations in living organisms. Further investigations revealed the presence of magnetite-like crystalline structures in human ferritin, and indicated that released ferritin iron might act as promoter of oxidative damage to tissue, therefore contributing to pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. The purpose of this work was to examine the elemental composition and structure of iron deposits in normal brain tissue as well as tissue affected by neurodegenerative disorders. Employing the methods of X-ray microfocus fluorescence mapping, X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES), X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy (XAFS), and light and electron microscopic examinations allows one to obtain qualitative as well as quantitative data with respect to the cellular distribution and chemical state of iron at levels not detected previously. The described tissue preparation technique allows not only satisfactory XAS iron elemental imaging in situ but also multimodal examination with light and electron microscopes of the same samples. The developed protocol has assured consistent and reproducible results on relatively large sections of flat-embedded tissue. The resulting tissue samples were adequate for XAS examination as well as sufficiently well-preserved for future microscopy studies

  8. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in adulthood. The disease is refractory to oral iron treatment but shows a slow response to intravenous iron injections and partial correction of the anemia. To date, 40 different Matriptase-2 mutations have been reported, affecting all the functional domains of the large ectodomain of the protein. In vitro experiments on transfected cells suggest that Matriptase-2 cleaves Hemojuvelin, a major regulator of hepcidin expression and that this function is altered in this genetic form of anemia. In contrast to the low/undetectable hepcidin levels observed in acquired iron deficiency, in patients with Matriptase-2 deficiency, serum hepcidin is inappropriately high for the low iron status and accounts for the absent/delayed response to oral iron treatment. A challenge for the clinicians and pediatricians is the recognition of the disorder among iron deficiency and other microcytic anemias commonly found in pediatric patients. The current treatment of iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is based on parenteral iron administration; in the future, manipulation of the hepcidin pathway with the aim of suppressing it might become an alternative therapeutic approach. PMID:23729726

  9. 76 FR 80368 - Notification of Teleconferences of the Science Advisory Board Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-23

    ... of the Science Advisory Board Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... Board (SAB) Staff Office announces two teleconferences of the SAB Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel to... to FACA and EPA policy, notice is hereby given that the SAB Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel will...

  10. Biogenic volatile organic compounds - small is beautiful

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, S. M.; Asensio, D.; Li, Q.; Penuelas, J.

    2012-12-01

    While canopy and regional scale flux measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds (bVOCs) are essential to obtain an integrated picture of total compound reaching the atmosphere, many fascinating and important emission details are waiting to be discovered at smaller scales, in different ecological and functional compartments. We concentrate on bVOCs below ground to <2m above ground level. Emissions at leaf scale are well documented and widely presented, and are not discussed here. Instead we describe some details of recent research on rhizosphere bVOCs, and bVOCs associated with pollination of flowers. Although bVOC emissions from soil surfaces are small, bVOCs are exuded by roots of some plant species, and can be extracted from decaying litter. Naturally occurring monoterpenes in the rhizosphere provide a specialised carbon source for micro-organisms, helping to define the micro-organism community structure, and impacting on nutrient cycles which are partly controlled by microorganisms. Naturally occurring monoterpenes in the soil system could also affect the aboveground structure of ecosystems because of their role in plant defence strategies and as mediating chemicals in allelopathy. A gradient of monoterpene concentration was found in soil around Pinus sylvestris and Pinus halepensis, decreasing with distance from the tree. Some compounds (α-pinene, sabinene, humulene and caryophyllene) in mineral soil were linearly correlated with the total amount of each compound in the overlying litter, indicating that litter might be the dominant source of these compounds. However, α-pinene did not fall within the correlation, indicating a source other than litter, probably root exudates. We also show that rhizosphere bVOCs can be a carbon source for soil microbes. In a horizontal gradient from Populus tremula trees, microbes closest to the tree trunk were better enzymatically equipped to metabolise labeled monoterpene substrate. Monoterpenes can also increase the

  11. BIOGENIC SOURCES FOR FORMALDEHYDE AND ACETALDEHYDE DURING SUMMER MONTHS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Photochemical modeling estimated contributions to ambient concentrations of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde from biogenic emissions over the continental United States during January 2001 (Eos Trans. AGU, 83(47), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract A52B-0117). Results showed that maximum co...

  12. Effect of matrix on recovery of biogenic amines in fish.

    PubMed

    Richard, Nicole; Pivarnik, Lori; Ellis, P Christopher; Lee, Chong

    2008-01-01

    Biogenic amines, such as putrescine, cadaverine, and histamine, in fish can be indicators of spoilage and/or safety. Methanol extraction used for AOAC Official Methods 996.07 and 977.13 has resulted in low amine recoveries in fish. Extraction methodology was evaluated to improve recovery from fish tissue. Samples were evaluated for recovery of known quantities of biogenic amines added to tissue prior to extraction. Addition of 25% 0.4 N HCI to the 75% methanol-water extraction solvent (according to AOAC Official Methods 996.07 and 977.13) resulted in higher recoveries (P < 0.05) of the biogenic amines. Putrescine recovery increased from 44 +/- 2 to 100 +/- 14% in flounder and scup, and from 53 +/- 21 to 119 +/- 27% in mackerel and butterfish; cadaverine recovery increased from 47 +/- 4 to 106 +/- 15% (flounder/scup) and 58 +/- 24 to 113 +/- 9% (mackerel/butterfish); histamine recovery increased from 54 +/- 13 to 89 +/- 28% (mackerel). MeOH extraction resulted in comparable recovery from canned tuna, indicating that protein denaturation from processing may eliminate possible matrix interference. Acidification of the solvent resulted in a more complete extraction of the added amines to fresh/frozen fish tissue. This finding could indicate that current extraction procedures may cause biogenic amines to be underestimated.

  13. The differnces between bond lengths in biogenic and geologocal calcite.

    SciTech Connect

    Zlotoyabko, E.; Caspi, E. N.; Fieramosca, J. S.; Von Dreele, R. B.; Marin, F.; Mor, G.; Politi, Y.; Addadi, L.; Weiner, S.

    2010-01-01

    We used high-resolution neutron powder diffraction to accurately measure the atomic positions and bond lengths in biogenic and geological calcite. A special procedure for data analysis was developed in order to take into account the considerable amounts of magnesium present in all the investigated samples. As a result, in biogenic calcite we found some atomic bonds to have significantly different lengths as compared to those in geological calcite, after the contribution of magnesium is accounted for. The maximum effect (elongation up to 0.7%) was found for the C-O bonds. We also analyzed changes in frequencies and spectral widths of normal vibrations of carbonate groups in biogenic calcite (as compared to geological calcite) measured by Raman and Fourier transform IR techniques. Surprisingly, the frequency shifts after subtracting the magnesium contribution are close to zero. At the same time, substantial spectral broadening (up to 1.2%) in biogenic calcite as compared to geological samples was detected. Possible explanations for the experimental findings are discussed.

  14. Biogenic amine formation and bacterial contribution in Natto products.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bitna; Byun, Bo Young; Mah, Jae-Hyung

    2012-12-01

    Twenty-one Natto products currently distributed in Korea were analysed for biogenic amine contents and tested to determine physicochemical and bacterial contributions to biogenic amine formation. Among them, nine products (about 43%) had β-phenylethylamine or tyramine contents greater than the toxic dose (30mg/kg and 100mg/kg, respectively) of each amine, although no products showed total amounts of biogenic amines above the harmful level (1000mg/kg), which indicates that the amounts of biogenic amines in some Natto products are not within the safe level for human health. From four different Natto products, that contained noticeable levels of β-phenylethylamine and tyramine, 80 bacterial strains were isolated. All the strains were identified to be Bacillus subtilis and highly capable of producing β-phenylethylamine and tyramine. Therefore, it seems likely that the remarkable contents of β-phenylethylamine and tyramine in Natto predominantly resulted from the strains highly capable of producing those amines present in the food. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. MMPI and MIT Discriminators of Biogenic and Psychogenic Impotence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beutler, Larry E.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Male patients complaining of impotence (N=32) were administered the Male Impotence Test (MIT) and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). The results suggested that the MIT is without value for differentiating between psychogenic and biogenic impotence, whereas two rules from the MMPI appropriately classified 90 percent of the…

  16. Biogenic Magnetite in Humans and New Magnetic Resonance Hazard Questions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strbak, O.; Kopcansky, P.; Frollo, I.

    2011-01-01

    The widespread use of magnetic resonance (MR) techniques in clinical practice, and recent discovery of biogenic ferrimagnetic substances in human tissue, open new questions regarding health hazards and MR. Current studies are restricted just to the induction of Faraday currents and consequent thermal effects, or ‘inoffensive’ interaction with static magnetic field. We outlined that magnetic energies associated with interaction of ferrimagnetic particles and MR magnetic fields can be dangerous for sensitive tissues like the human brain is. To simulate the interaction mechanism we use our. ‘Cube’ model approach, which allows more realistic calculation of the particle's magnetic moments. Biogenic magnetite nanoparticles face during MR examination three principal fields: (i) main B0 field, (ii) gradient field, and (iii) B1 field. Interaction energy of biogenic magnetite nanoparticle with static magnetic field B0 exceeds the covalent bond energy 5 times for particles from 4 nm up to 150 nm. Translation energy in gradient field exceeds biochemical bond energy for particles bigger than 50 nm. Biochemical bond disruption and particle release to the tissue environment, in the presence of all MR fields, are the most critical points of this interaction. And together with relaxation processes after application of RF pulses, they make biogenic magnetite nanoparticles a potential MR health hazard issue.

  17. BIOGENIC SOURCES FOR FORMALDEHYDE AND ACETALDEHYDE DURING SUMMER MONTHS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Photochemical modeling estimated contributions to ambient concentrations of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde from biogenic emissions over the continental United States during January 2001 (Eos Trans. AGU, 83(47), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract A52B-0117). Results showed that maximum co...

  18. BIOGENIC CONTRIBUTIONS TO ATMOSPHERIC VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN AZUSA CA

    EPA Science Inventory

    An objective of the 1997 Southern California Ozone Study (SCOS97) was to provide an up-to-date assessment of the importance of biogenic emissions for tropospheric ozone production in the South Coast Air Basin. To this end ambient air samples were collected during September 199...

  19. BIOGENIC CONTRIBUTIONS TO ATMOSPHERIC VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN AZUSA CA

    EPA Science Inventory

    An objective of the 1997 Southern California Ozone Study (SCOS97) was to provide an up-to-date assessment of the importance of biogenic emissions for tropospheric ozone production in the South Coast Air Basin. To this end ambient air samples were collected during September 199...

  20. MMPI and MIT Discriminators of Biogenic and Psychogenic Impotence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beutler, Larry E.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Male patients complaining of impotence (N=32) were administered the Male Impotence Test (MIT) and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). The results suggested that the MIT is without value for differentiating between psychogenic and biogenic impotence, whereas two rules from the MMPI appropriately classified 90 percent of the…

  1. Biogenic Magnetite Formation through Anaerobic Biooxidation of Fe(II)

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Swades K.; Lack, Joseph G.; Coates, John D.

    2001-01-01

    The presence of isotopically light carbonates in association with fine-grained magnetite is considered to be primarily due to the reduction of Fe(III) by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria in the environment. Here, we report on magnetite formation by biooxidation of Fe(II) coupled to denitrification. This metabolism offers an alternative environmental source of biogenic magnetite. PMID:11375205

  2. Links between iron input and opal deposition in the Pleistocene equatorial Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Richard W.; Leinen, Margaret; Knowlton, Christopher W.

    2012-04-01

    Increases in overall marine primary productivity and export production in high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll regions of the ocean have, particularly during dry and dusty glacial periods, been hypothesized to be linked to the enhanced delivery of iron. In the modern ocean, iron availability limits production in high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll regions, and may be important in lower-nutrient settings as well. Here, we assess the relationship between productivity and iron in sedimentary records from the high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll region of the equatorial Pacific Ocean over the past million years. We find strong links between iron input, the export and burial of biogenic silica (opal) and total export production. Our data demonstrate that iron accumulation was more closely tied to the accumulation of opal than any other biogenic component, with high iron input associated with substantially increased opal sedimentation. The strong links between iron and opal accumulation over the past one million years are in agreement with the modern biogeochemical behaviour of iron and silica, and the response of the diatom community to their mutual availablity. Our data support earlier suggestions of a biological response to iron delivery over geologic timescales.

  3. Post-Biostimulation Biogenic U(IV) Stability and Microbial Community Structure that Affects its Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, P. R.; Long, P. E.; Moon, H.; N'Guessan, L.; Peacock, A.; Sinha, M.; Tan, H.; Traub, D.; Williams, K. H.

    2010-12-01

    Flow-through sediment column experiments were conducted to determine the stability of biogenic U(IV) after biostimulation has been discontinued, and to isolate the key biogeochemical processes that affect the post-biostimulation U(IV) stability. Columns, packed with sediments from an UMTRA site (Rifle Colorado) were biostimulated for two months by injecting groundwater containing 3 mM acetate and 20 uM U(VI) at flow rates typically encountered at the Rifle site. After the biostimulation period, acetate injection was discontinued, and groundwater containing dissolved oxygen was allowed to enter the columns. Columns were then sacrificed at two week intervals to examine the sediment geochemistry and associated microbial community. Results showed that iron sulfide precipitates, that formed during the bioreduction phase, acted as a buffer to partially prevent biogenic U(IV) oxidation during the month post stimulation period. Groundwater and sediment microbial community compositions were analyzed over a period of one month post-biostimulation. The results indicate that two distinct biological processes, characterized by oxygen utilization, played important roles during this period. Within two weeks post stimulation, organisms such as Hydrogenophaga sp. and Thiobacillus sp. were observed in the columns. These bacteria, are able to use Fe(II), sulfide, or thiosulfate as their electron donor in the presence of O2. Furthermore, organisms closely related to Lysobacter sp. and Sterolibacterium sp. were also detected in the groundwater and sediment. It was suggested that these organisms may be feeding on decaying biomass and consuming O2 in the process. The presence of these oxidizing and spoilage bacteria is thought to have resulted in the consumption of oxygen, therefore protecting the biogenic U(IV) from being reoxidized in the sediment columns. To simulate the in situ U(IV) stability under post biostimulation conditions, columns bioreduced in the laboratory, as described

  4. Serum iron test

    MedlinePlus

    ... test if you have: Signs of low iron (iron deficiency) Signs of too much iron Anemia caused by ... Brittenham GM. Disorders of iron homeostasis: iron deficiency and ... Basic Principles and Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  5. Biogenic UO2 — Characterization and Surface Reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, David M.; Farges, François; Brown, Gordon E.

    2007-02-01

    Nano-scale biogenic UO2 is easier to oxidize and more reactive to aqueous metal ions than bulk UO2. In an attempt to understand these differences in properties, we have used a suite of bulk and surface characterization techniques to examine differences in the reactivity of biogenic UO2 versus bulk UO2 with respect to aqueous Zn(II). Precipitation of biogenic UO2 was mediated by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32, and the precipitates were washed using two protocols: (1) 5% NaOH, followed by 4 mM KHCO3/KCl (NA-wash; "NAUO2", to remove surface organic matter), and (2) 4 mM KHCO3-KCl (BI-wash; "BIUO2", to remove soluble uranyl species). BET surface areas of biogenic-UO2 prepared using the two protocols are 128.63 m2g-1 and 92.56 m2g-1, respectively; particle sizes range from 2-10 nm as determined by FEG-SEM. Surface composition was probed using XPS, which showed a strong carbon 1s signal for the BI-washed samples; surface uranium is > 90% U(IV) for both washing protocols. U LIII-edge XANES spectra also indicate that U(IV) is the dominant oxidation state in the biogenic UO2 samples. Fits of the EXAFS spectra of these samples yielded half the number of uranium second-shell neighbors relative to bulk UO2, and no detectable oxygen neighbors beyond the first shell. At pH 7, the sorption of Zn(II) onto both biogenic and bulk UO2 is independent of electrolyte concentration, suggesting that Zn(II) sorption complexes are dominantly inner-sphere. Fits of Zn K-edge EXAFS spectra for biogenic UO2 indicate that Zn(II) sorption is dependent on the washing protocol. Zn-U pair correlations are observed for the NA-washed samples, but not for the BI-washed ones, suggesting that Zn(II) sorbs directly to the UO2 surface in the first case, and possibly to organic matter in the latter. Further work is required to elucidate the binding mechanism of Zn(II) to bulk UO2.

  6. Induction of biogenic magnetization and redox control by a component of the target of rapamycin complex 1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Keiji; Silver, Pamela A

    2012-01-01

    Most organisms are simply diamagnetic, while magnetotactic bacteria and migratory animals are among organisms that exploit magnetism. Biogenic magnetization not only is of fundamental interest, but also has industrial potential. However, the key factor(s) that enable biogenic magnetization in coordination with other cellular functions and metabolism remain unknown. To address the requirements for induction and the application of synthetic bio-magnetism, we explored the creation of magnetism in a simple model organism. Cell magnetization was first observed by attraction towards a magnet when normally diamagnetic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were grown with ferric citrate. The magnetization was further enhanced by genetic modification of iron homeostasis and introduction of ferritin. The acquired magnetizable properties enabled the cells to be attracted to a magnet, and be trapped by a magnetic column. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry confirmed and quantitatively characterized the acquired paramagnetism. Electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy showed electron-dense iron-containing aggregates within the magnetized cells. Magnetization-based screening of gene knockouts identified Tco89p, a component of TORC1 (Target of rapamycin complex 1), as important for magnetization; loss of TCO89 and treatment with rapamycin reduced magnetization in a TCO89-dependent manner. The TCO89 expression level positively correlated with magnetization, enabling inducible magnetization. Several carbon metabolism genes were also shown to affect magnetization. Redox mediators indicated that TCO89 alters the intracellular redox to an oxidized state in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, we demonstrated that synthetic induction of magnetization is possible and that the key factors are local redox control through carbon metabolism and iron supply.

  7. Modeling biogenic and anthropogenic secondary organic aerosol in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jianlin; Wang, Peng; Ying, Qi; Zhang, Hongliang; Chen, Jianjun; Ge, Xinlei; Li, Xinghua; Jiang, Jingkun; Wang, Shuxiao; Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Yu; Zhang, Yingyi

    2017-01-01

    A revised Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model with updated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yields and a more detailed description of SOA formation from isoprene oxidation was applied to study the spatial and temporal distribution of SOA in China in the entire year of 2013. Predicted organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon and volatile organic compounds agreed favorably with observations at several urban areas, although the high OC concentrations in wintertime in Beijing were under-predicted. Predicted summer SOA was generally higher (10-15 µg m-3) due to large contributions of isoprene (country average, 61 %), although the relative importance varies in different regions. Winter SOA was slightly lower and was mostly due to emissions of alkane and aromatic compounds (51 %). Contributions of monoterpene SOA was relatively constant (8-10 %). Overall, biogenic SOA accounted for approximately 75 % of total SOA in summer, 50-60 % in autumn and spring, and 24 % in winter. The Sichuan Basin had the highest predicted SOA concentrations in the country in all seasons, with hourly concentrations up to 50 µg m-3. Approximately half of the SOA in all seasons was due to the traditional equilibrium partitioning of semivolatile components followed by oligomerization, while the remaining SOA was mainly due to reactive surface uptake of isoprene epoxide (5-14 %), glyoxal (14-25 %) and methylglyoxal (23-28 %). Sensitivity analyses showed that formation of SOA from biogenic emissions was significantly enhanced due to anthropogenic emissions. Removing all anthropogenic emissions while keeping the biogenic emissions unchanged led to total SOA concentrations of less than 1 µg m-3, which suggests that manmade emissions facilitated biogenic SOA formation and controlling anthropogenic emissions would result in reduction of both anthropogenic and biogenic SOA.

  8. Formation of nano-crystalline todorokite from biogenic Mn oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiong Han; Zhu, Mengqiang; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Ni, Chaoying; Parikh, Sanjai J.; Sparks, Donald L.

    2010-06-01

    Todorokite, as one of three main Mn oxide phases present in oceanic Mn nodules and an active MnO 6 octahedral molecular sieve (OMS), has garnered much interest; however, its formation pathway in natural systems is not fully understood. Todorokite is widely considered to form from layer structured Mn oxides with hexagonal symmetry, such as vernadite (δ-MnO 2), which are generally of biogenic origin. However, this geochemical process has not been documented in the environment or demonstrated in the laboratory, except for precursor phases with triclinic symmetry. Here we report on the formation of a nanoscale, todorokite-like phase from biogenic Mn oxides produced by the freshwater bacterium Pseudomonas putida strain GB-1. At long- and short-range structural scales biogenic Mn oxides were transformed to a todorokite-like phase at atmospheric pressure through refluxing. Topotactic transformation was observed during the transformation. Furthermore, the todorokite-like phases formed via refluxing had thin layers along the c∗ axis and a lack of c∗ periodicity, making the basal plane undetectable with X-ray diffraction reflection. The proposed pathway of the todorokite-like phase formation is proposed as: hexagonal biogenic Mn oxide → 10-Å triclinic phyllomanganate → todorokite. These observations provide evidence supporting the possible bio-related origin of natural todorokites and provide important clues for understanding the transformation of biogenic Mn oxides to other Mn oxides in the environment. Additionally this method may be a viable biosynthesis route for porous, nano-crystalline OMS materials for use in practical applications.

  9. Formation of Nano-crystalline Todorokite from Biogenic Mn Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, X.; Zhu, M; Ginder-Vogel, M; Ni, C; Parikh, S; Sparks, D

    2010-01-01

    Todorokite, as one of three main Mn oxide phases present in oceanic Mn nodules and an active MnO{sub 6} octahedral molecular sieve (OMS), has garnered much interest; however, its formation pathway in natural systems is not fully understood. Todorokite is widely considered to form from layer structured Mn oxides with hexagonal symmetry, such as vernadite ({delta}-MnO{sub 2}), which are generally of biogenic origin. However, this geochemical process has not been documented in the environment or demonstrated in the laboratory, except for precursor phases with triclinic symmetry. Here we report on the formation of a nanoscale, todorokite-like phase from biogenic Mn oxides produced by the freshwater bacterium Pseudomonas putida strain GB-1. At long- and short-range structural scales biogenic Mn oxides were transformed to a todorokite-like phase at atmospheric pressure through refluxing. Topotactic transformation was observed during the transformation. Furthermore, the todorokite-like phases formed via refluxing had thin layers along the c* axis and a lack of c* periodicity, making the basal plane undetectable with X-ray diffraction reflection. The proposed pathway of the todorokite-like phase formation is proposed as: hexagonal biogenic Mn oxide {yields} 10-{angstrom} triclinic phyllomanganate {yields} todorokite. These observations provide evidence supporting the possible bio-related origin of natural todorokites and provide important clues for understanding the transformation of biogenic Mn oxides to other Mn oxides in the environment. Additionally this method may be a viable biosynthesis route for porous, nano-crystalline OMS materials for use in practical applications.

  10. The Potential of the Yeast Debaryomyces hansenii H525 to Degrade Biogenic Amines in Food

    PubMed Central

    Bäumlisberger, Mathias; Moellecken, Urs; König, Helmut; Claus, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-six yeasts from different genera were investigated for their ability to metabolize biogenic amines. About half of the yeast strains produced one or more different biogenic amines, but some strains of Debaryomyces hansenii and Yarrowia lipolytica were also able to degrade such compounds. The most effective strain D. hanseniii H525 metabolized a broad spectrum of biogenic amines by growing and resting cells. Degradation of biogenic amines by this yeast isolate could be attributed to a peroxisomal amine oxidase activity. Strain H525 may be useful as a starter culture to reduce biogenic amines in fermented food. PMID:27682120

  11. The Potential of the Yeast Debaryomyces hansenii H525 to Degrade Biogenic Amines in Food.

    PubMed

    Bäumlisberger, Mathias; Moellecken, Urs; König, Helmut; Claus, Harald

    2015-11-06

    Twenty-six yeasts from different genera were investigated for their ability to metabolize biogenic amines. About half of the yeast strains produced one or more different biogenic amines, but some strains of Debaryomyces hansenii and Yarrowia lipolytica were also able to degrade such compounds. The most effective strain D. hanseniii H525 metabolized a broad spectrum of biogenic amines by growing and resting cells. Degradation of biogenic amines by this yeast isolate could be attributed to a peroxisomal amine oxidase activity. Strain H525 may be useful as a starter culture to reduce biogenic amines in fermented food.

  12. Reducing biogenic-amine-producing bacteria, decarboxylase activity, and biogenic amines in raw milk cheese by high-pressure treatments.

    PubMed

    Calzada, Javier; del Olmo, Ana; Picón, Antonia; Gaya, Pilar; Nuñez, Manuel

    2013-02-01

    Biogenic amines may reach concentrations of public health concern in some cheeses. To minimize biogenic amine buildup in raw milk cheese, high-pressure treatments of 400 or 600 MPa for 5 min were applied on days 21 and 35 of ripening. On day 60, counts of lactic acid bacteria, enterococci, and lactobacilli were 1 to 2 log units lower in cheeses treated at 400 MPa and 4 to 6 log units lower in cheeses treated at 600 MPa than in control cheese. At that time, aminopeptidase activity was 16 to 75% lower in cheeses treated at 400 MPa and 56 to 81% lower in cheeses treated at 600 MPa than in control cheese, while the total free amino acid concentration was 35 to 53% higher in cheeses treated at 400 MPa and 3 to 15% higher in cheeses treated at 600 MPa, and decarboxylase activity was 86 to 96% lower in cheeses treated at 400 MPa and 93 to 100% lower in cheeses treated at 600 MPa. Tyramine, putrescine, and cadaverine were the most abundant amines in control cheese. The total biogenic amine concentration on day 60, which reached a maximum of 1.089 mg/g dry matter in control cheese, was 27 to 33% lower in cheeses treated at 400 MPa and 40 to 65% lower in cheeses treated at 600 MPa. On day 240, total biogenic amines attained a concentration of 3.690 mg/g dry matter in control cheese and contents 11 to 45% lower in cheeses treated at 400 MPa and 73 to 76% lower in cheeses treated at 600 MPa. Over 80% of the histidine and 95% of the tyrosine had been converted into histamine and tyramine in control cheese by day 60. Substrate depletion played an important role in the rate of biogenic amine buildup, becoming a limiting factor in the case of some amino acids.

  13. Reducing Biogenic-Amine-Producing Bacteria, Decarboxylase Activity, and Biogenic Amines in Raw Milk Cheese by High-Pressure Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Calzada, Javier; del Olmo, Ana; Picón, Antonia; Gaya, Pilar

    2013-01-01

    Biogenic amines may reach concentrations of public health concern in some cheeses. To minimize biogenic amine buildup in raw milk cheese, high-pressure treatments of 400 or 600 MPa for 5 min were applied on days 21 and 35 of ripening. On day 60, counts of lactic acid bacteria, enterococci, and lactobacilli were 1 to 2 log units lower in cheeses treated at 400 MPa and 4 to 6 log units lower in cheeses treated at 600 MPa than in control cheese. At that time, aminopeptidase activity was 16 to 75% lower in cheeses treated at 400 MPa and 56 to 81% lower in cheeses treated at 600 MPa than in control cheese, while the total free amino acid concentration was 35 to 53% higher in cheeses treated at 400 MPa and 3 to 15% higher in cheeses treated at 600 MPa, and decarboxylase activity was 86 to 96% lower in cheeses treated at 400 MPa and 93 to 100% lower in cheeses treated at 600 MPa. Tyramine, putrescine, and cadaverine were the most abundant amines in control cheese. The total biogenic amine concentration on day 60, which reached a maximum of 1.089 mg/g dry matter in control cheese, was 27 to 33% lower in cheeses treated at 400 MPa and 40 to 65% lower in cheeses treated at 600 MPa. On day 240, total biogenic amines attained a concentration of 3.690 mg/g dry matter in control cheese and contents 11 to 45% lower in cheeses treated at 400 MPa and 73 to 76% lower in cheeses treated at 600 MPa. Over 80% of the histidine and 95% of the tyrosine had been converted into histamine and tyramine in control cheese by day 60. Substrate depletion played an important role in the rate of biogenic amine buildup, becoming a limiting factor in the case of some amino acids. PMID:23241980

  14. 76 FR 61100 - Notification of a Public Meeting of the Science Advisory Board Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-03

    ... AGENCY Notification of a Public Meeting of the Science Advisory Board Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel... of the SAB Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel to review EPA's draft Accounting Framework for Biogenic CO... that the SAB Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel will hold a public meeting to review EPA's...

  15. Probing tRNA interaction with biogenic polyamines.

    PubMed

    Ouameur, Amin Ahmed; Bourassa, Philippe; Tajmir-Riahi, Heidar-Ali

    2010-10-01

    Biogenic polyamines are found to modulate protein synthesis at different levels. This effect may be explained by the ability of polyamines to bind and influence the secondary structure of tRNA, mRNA, and rRNA. We report the interaction between tRNA and the three biogenic polyamines putrescine, spermidine, spermine, and cobalt(III)hexamine at physiological conditions, using FTIR spectroscopy, capillary electrophoresis, and molecular modeling. The results indicated that tRNA was stabilized at low biogenic polyamine concentration, as a consequence of polyamine interaction with the backbone phosphate group. The main tRNA reactive sites for biogenic polyamine at low concentration were guanine-N7/O6, uracil-O2/O4, adenine-N3, and 2'OH of the ribose. At high polyamine concentration, the interaction involves guanine-N7/O6, adenine-N7, uracil-O2 reactive sites, and the backbone phosphate group. The participation of the polycation primary amino group, in the interaction and the presence of the hydrophobic contact, are also shown. The binding affinity of biogenic polyamine to tRNA molecule was in the order of spermine > spermidine > putrescine with K(Spm) = 8.7 × 10(5) M(-1), K(Spd) = 6.1 × 10(5) M(-1), and K(Put) = 1.0 × 10(5) M(-1), which correlates with their positively charged amino group content. Hill analysis showed positive cooperativity for the biogenic polyamines and negative cooperativity for cobalt-hexamine. Cobalt(III)hexamine contains high- and low-affinity sites in tRNA with K(1) = 3.2 × 10(5) M(-1) and K(2) = 1.7 × 10(5) M(-1), that have been attributed to the interactions with guanine-N7 sites and the backbone PO(2) group, respectively. This mechanism of tRNA binding could explain the condensation phenomenon observed at high Co(III) content, as previously shown in the Co(III)-DNA complexes.

  16. METABOLISM OF IRON STORES

    PubMed Central

    SAITO, HIROSHI

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Remarkable progress was recently achieved in the studies on molecular regulators of iron metabolism. Among the main regulators, storage iron, iron absorption, erythropoiesis and hepcidin interact in keeping iron homeostasis. Diseases with gene-mutations resulting in iron overload, iron deficiency, and local iron deposition have been introduced in relation to the regulators of storage iron metabolism. On the other hand, the research on storage iron metabolism has not advanced since the pioneering research by Shoden in 1953. However, we recently developed a new method for determining ferritin iron and hemosiderin iron by computer-assisted serum ferritin kinetics. Serum ferritin increase or decrease curves were measured in patients with normal storage iron levels (chronic hepatitis C and iron deficiency anemia treated by intravenous iron injection), and iron overload (hereditary hemochromatosis and transfusion dependent anemia). We thereby confirmed the existence of two iron pathways where iron flows followed the numbered order (1) labile iron, (2) ferritin and (3) hemosiderin in iron deposition and mobilization among many previously proposed but mostly unproven routes. We also demonstrated the increasing and decreasing phases of ferritin iron and hemosiderin iron in iron deposition and mobilization. The author first demonstrated here the change in proportion between pre-existing ferritin iron and new ferritin iron synthesized by removing iron from hemosiderin in the course of iron removal. In addition, the author disclosed the cause of underestimation of storage iron turnover rate which had been reported by previous investigators in estimating storage iron turnover rate of normal subjects. PMID:25741033

  17. Biogenic nitrogen and carbon in Fe-Mn-oxyhydroxides from an Archean chert, Marble Bar, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinti, Daniele L.; Hashizume, Ko; Orberger, Beate; Gallien, Jean-Paul; Cloquet, Christophe; Massault, Marc

    2007-02-01

    To quantify and localize nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) in Archean rocks from the Marble Bar formation, Western Australia, and to gain insights on their origin and potential biogenicity, we conducted nuclear reaction analyses (NRA) and carbon and nitrogen isotope ratio measurements on various samples from the 3460-Myr-old Fe-rich Marble Bar chert. The Marble Bar chert formed during the alteration of basaltic volcanoclastic rocks with Fe- and Si-rich hydrothermal fluids, and the subsequent precipitation of magnetite, carbonates, massive silica, and, locally, sulfides. At a later stage, the magnetite, sulfides, and carbonates were replaced by Fe-Mn-oxyhydroxides. Nuclear reaction analyses indicate that most of the N and C resides within these Fe-Mn-oxyhydroxides, but a minor fraction is found in K-feldspars and Ba-mica dispersed in the silica matrix. The N and C isotopic composition of Fe-oxides suggests the presence of a unique biogenic source with δ 15NAIR values from +6.0 +/- 0.5‰ to 7.3 +/- 1.1‰ and a δ 13CPDB value of -19.9 +/- 0.1‰. The C and N isotope ratios are similar to those observed in Proterozoic and Phanerozoic organic matter. Diffusion-controlled fractionation of N and C released during high combustion temperatures indicates that these two elements are firmly embedded within the iron oxides, with activation energies of 18.7 +/- 3.7 kJ/mol for N and 13.0 +/- 3.8 kJ/mol for C. We propose that N and C were chemisorbed on iron and were subsequently embedded in the crystals during iron oxidation and crystal growth. The Fe-isotopic composition of the Marble Bar chert (δ 56Fe = -0.38 +/- 0.02‰) is similar to that measured in iron oxides formed by direct precipitation of iron from hydrothermal plumes in contact with oxygenated waters. To explain the N and C isotopic composition of Marble Bar chert, we propose either (1) a later addition of N and C at the end of Archean when oxygen started to rise or (2) an earlier development of localized oxygenated

  18. Biogenic Films at the Mouth of the Suez Canal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Astronauts aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery used the sunglint off the surface of the Mediterranean Sea to reveal biogenic films on the ocean surface. ('Biogenic film' refers to a thin layer of biologically-produced film resting on the surface. Click for more details.) The films dampen surface capillary waves, creating brighter and darker reflections, which, in turn, trace the complex surface water movements along the coast. The sunglint also highlights coastal features (jetties, submerged coastal areas) near the Port of Suez. Image STS105-331-18, taken in August 2001, was provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA-JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth.

  19. Biogenic volatile organic compounds in the Earth system.

    PubMed

    Laothawornkitkul, Jullada; Taylor, Jane E; Paul, Nigel D; Hewitt, C Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds produced by plants are involved in plant growth, development, reproduction and defence. They also function as communication media within plant communities, between plants and between plants and insects. Because of the high chemical reactivity of many of these compounds, coupled with their large mass emission rates from vegetation into the atmosphere, they have significant effects on the chemical composition and physical characteristics of the atmosphere. Hence, biogenic volatile organic compounds mediate the relationship between the biosphere and the atmosphere. Alteration of this relationship by anthropogenically driven changes to the environment, including global climate change, may perturb these interactions and may lead to adverse and hard-to-predict consequences for the Earth system.

  20. Biogenic Contributions to Aromatic Hydrocarbon Production over Continental North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sive, B. C.; Russo, R.; Zhou, Y.; Swarthout, R.; Hart, A.

    2011-12-01

    A comprehensive suite of temporally and vertically resolved volatile organic compound (VOC) measurements were conducted at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) in Erie, Colorado from 18 February to 13 March 2011 as part of the Nitrogen, Aerosol Composition, and Halogens on a Tall Tower (NACHTT) campaign. Specifically, this work investigates and quantifies the contribution of monoterpene oxidation to the secondary production of aromatic hydrocarbons and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) precursor gases. To date, this area of research has been largely unexplored; however, recent results from laboratory experiments have suggested that biogenic VOC (BVOC) oxidation should be considered as an important source of aromatic hydrocarbons, especially in rural and remote environments. The VOC measurements conducted during the NACHTT campaign provide diurnally and vertically resolved speciated monoterpene data over mid-latitude North America. New insight on biogenic emissions, their subsequent chemical transformations and influences on oxidant cycling will be explored.

  1. Gas formation. Formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane.

    PubMed

    Stolper, D A; Lawson, M; Davis, C L; Ferreira, A A; Santos Neto, E V; Ellis, G S; Lewan, M D; Martini, A M; Tang, Y; Schoell, M; Sessions, A L; Eiler, J M

    2014-06-27

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and energy resource generated dominantly by methanogens at low temperatures and through the breakdown of organic molecules at high temperatures. However, methane-formation temperatures in nature are often poorly constrained. We measured formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane using a "clumped isotope" technique. Thermogenic gases yield formation temperatures between 157° and 221°C, within the nominal gas window, and biogenic gases yield formation temperatures consistent with their comparatively lower-temperature formational environments (<50°C). In systems where gases have migrated and other proxies for gas-generation temperature yield ambiguous results, methane clumped-isotope temperatures distinguish among and allow for independent tests of possible gas-formation models.

  2. Modeling Global Biogenic Emission of Isoprene: Exploration of Model Drivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Susan E.; Potter, Christopher S.; Coughlan, Joseph C.; Klooster, Steven A.; Lerdau, Manuel T.; Chatfield, Robert B.; Peterson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Vegetation provides the major source of isoprene emission to the atmosphere. We present a modeling approach to estimate global biogenic isoprene emission. The isoprene flux model is linked to a process-based computer simulation model of biogenic trace-gas fluxes that operates on scales that link regional and global data sets and ecosystem nutrient transformations Isoprene emission estimates are determined from estimates of ecosystem specific biomass, emission factors, and algorithms based on light and temperature. Our approach differs from an existing modeling framework by including the process-based global model for terrestrial ecosystem production, satellite derived ecosystem classification, and isoprene emission measurements from a tropical deciduous forest. We explore the sensitivity of model estimates to input parameters. The resulting emission products from the global 1 degree x 1 degree coverage provided by the satellite datasets and the process model allow flux estimations across large spatial scales and enable direct linkage to atmospheric models of trace-gas transport and transformation.

  3. Biogenic and anthropogenic organic components of Saharan sands.

    PubMed

    Balducci, Catia; Ladji, Riad; Muto, Valeria; Romagnoli, Paola; Yassaa, Nourredine; Cecinato, Angelo

    2014-07-01

    Till now, the Sahara desert sands have scarcely characterized for their organic contents, despite they are known to heavily affect Europe and America when transported by winds. In this study, the composition of sands collected in ten oasis lying in two regions of the Algerian Sahara during 2011 was investigated with regards to organic fraction. Attention was paid to anthropogenic and biogenic sources of organics associated to sands, through the characterization of n-alkanes, n-alkanoic and n-alkanedioic acids, n-alkanols, sterols, PAHs and caffeine. The organic fraction load on sands associable to natural sources was higher in the Region of Biskra than in that of Ouargla. The biogenic contribution to the total amount of organics in sands exceeded that of the anthropogenic sources. The composition of sands from Hassi Messaoud, compared to that observed there in 2006, showed that the anthropic impact over the region was not changed.

  4. Biogenic hydrocarbon contribution to the ambient air of selected areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnts, Robert R.; Meeks, Sarah A.

    In response to suggestions that biogenic emissions are responsible for high hydrocarbon concentrations described in several reports, a short-term sampling program was initiated in the reported areas to test this hypothesis. Limited numbers of whole-air samples were collected in Tedlar bags and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) with flame ionization detection. Tulsa air was found to contain an average of 0.2% isoprene of the total nonmethane hydrocarbon (TNMHC) load. Rio Blanco County, Colorado, and Smoky Mountain air, respectively, averaged about 2 % and 4 % biogenic hydrocarbon of the total nonmethane hydrocarbon loads. Isoprene appears to be a dominant olefin in rural and remote areas. Although the tests were of short duration, results suggest monoterpenes and isoprene constitute only minor components in these areas relative to anthropogenic hydrocarbons.

  5. Biogenic Films at the Mouth of the Suez Canal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Astronauts aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery used the sunglint off the surface of the Mediterranean Sea to reveal biogenic films on the ocean surface. ('Biogenic film' refers to a thin layer of biologically-produced film resting on the surface. Click for more details.) The films dampen surface capillary waves, creating brighter and darker reflections, which, in turn, trace the complex surface water movements along the coast. The sunglint also highlights coastal features (jetties, submerged coastal areas) near the Port of Suez. Image STS105-331-18, taken in August 2001, was provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA-JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth.

  6. Contributions of biogenic and anthropogenic hydrocarbons to photochemical smog formation

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, S.E.

    1991-01-01

    Photochemical oxidation of biogenic (Isoprene) and anthropogenic (1-octene) hydrocarbons are examined. Experiments studied the individual daylight reactions of both isoprene and 1-octene, including those of OH, O{sub 3}, O({sup 3}P), and NO{sub 2}. The O{sub 3} reactions are found to produce significant quantities of OH, O({sup 3}P), and carbonyl yields that total about 100%. Isomerization is found to be an important channel for both isoprene and 1-octene. O({sup 3}P) reactions are found to have relatively minor decomposition pathways, resulting instead in epoxide formation. Results from both the smog chamber experiments and computer kinetic modeling were then used to develop photochemical oxidation mechanisms for each hydrocarbon. Aerosol formed by isoprene and another biogenic, {beta}-pinene, are characterized.

  7. An amorphous solid state of biogenic secondary organic aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, Annele; Joutsensaari, Jorma; Koop, Thomas; Kannosto, Jonna; Yli-Pirilä, Pasi; Leskinen, Jani; Mäkelä, Jyrki M; Holopainen, Jarmo K; Pöschl, Ulrich; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Laaksonen, Ari

    2010-10-14

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles are formed in the atmosphere from condensable oxidation products of anthropogenic and biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs). On a global scale, biogenic VOCs account for about 90% of VOC emissions and of SOA formation (90 billion kilograms of carbon per year). SOA particles can scatter radiation and act as cloud condensation or ice nuclei, and thereby influence the Earth's radiation balance and climate. They consist of a myriad of different compounds with varying physicochemical properties, and little information is available on the phase state of SOA particles. Gas-particle partitioning models usually assume that SOA particles are liquid, but here we present experimental evidence that they can be solid under ambient conditions. We investigated biogenic SOA particles formed from oxidation products of VOCs in plant chamber experiments and in boreal forests within a few hours after atmospheric nucleation events. On the basis of observed particle bouncing in an aerosol impactor and of electron microscopy we conclude that biogenic SOA particles can adopt an amorphous solid-most probably glassy-state. This amorphous solid state should provoke a rethinking of SOA processes because it may influence the partitioning of semi-volatile compounds, reduce the rate of heterogeneous chemical reactions, affect the particles' ability to accommodate water and act as cloud condensation or ice nuclei, and change the atmospheric lifetime of the particles. Thus, the results of this study challenge traditional views of the kinetics and thermodynamics of SOA formation and transformation in the atmosphere and their implications for air quality and climate.

  8. Ion probe measurement of rare earth elements in biogenic phosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Grandjean, P.; Albarede, F. )

    1989-12-01

    The rare earth element (REE) distributions in individuals fish teeth and conodonts have been measured by ion probe. Concentrations and La/Yb ratios show little variations, except in the enamel, which suggests that REE uptake from the sedimented biogenic debris takes place at the water-sediment interface as an essentially quantitative process without fractionation. Late diagenetic disturbances remained of marginal importance. Hence, REE in phosphatic debris might reflect the input from the overlying water column.

  9. Ocean acidification can mediate biodiversity shifts by changing biogenic habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunday, Jennifer M.; Fabricius, Katharina E.; Kroeker, Kristy J.; Anderson, Kathryn M.; Brown, Norah E.; Barry, James P.; Connell, Sean D.; Dupont, Sam; Gaylord, Brian; Hall-Spencer, Jason M.; Klinger, Terrie; Milazzo, Marco; Munday, Philip L.; Russell, Bayden D.; Sanford, Eric; Thiyagarajan, Vengatesen; Vaughan, Megan L. H.; Widdicombe, Stephen; Harley, Christopher D. G.

    2017-01-01

    The effects of ocean acidification (OA) on the structure and complexity of coastal marine biogenic habitat have been broadly overlooked. Here we explore how declining pH and carbonate saturation may affect the structural complexity of four major biogenic habitats. Our analyses predict that indirect effects driven by OA on habitat-forming organisms could lead to lower species diversity in coral reefs, mussel beds and some macroalgal habitats, but increases in seagrass and other macroalgal habitats. Available in situ data support the prediction of decreased biodiversity in coral reefs, but not the prediction of seagrass bed gains. Thus, OA-driven habitat loss may exacerbate the direct negative effects of OA on coastal biodiversity; however, we lack evidence of the predicted biodiversity increase in systems where habitat-forming species could benefit from acidification. Overall, a combination of direct effects and community-mediated indirect effects will drive changes in the extent and structural complexity of biogenic habitat, which will have important ecosystem effects.

  10. `Guanigma': the revised structure of biogenic anhydrous guanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Anna; Gur, Dvir; Polishchuk, Iryna; Levy, Davide; Pokroy, Boaz; Cruz-Cabeza, Aurora J.; Addadi, Lia; Kronik, Leeor; Leiserowitz, Leslie

    Living organisms display a spectrum of colors, produced by pigmentation, structural coloration, or both. A relatively well-studied system, which produces colors via an array of alternating anhydrous guanine crystals and cytoplasm, is responsible for the metallic luster of many fish. The structure of biogenic anhydrous guanine was believed to be the same as that of the synthetic one - a monoclinic polymorph. Here we re-examine the structure of biogenic guanine, using experimental X-ray and electron diffraction (ED) data exposing troublesome inconsistencies - namely, a 'guanigma'. To address this, we sought alternative candidate polymorphs using symmetry and packing considerations, then used first principles calculations to determine whether the selected candidates could be energetically stable. We identified theoretically a different monoclinic polymorph, were able to synthesize it, and to confirm using X-ray diffraction that it is this polymorph that occurs in biogenic samples. However, the ED data were still not consistent with this polymorph, but rather with a theoretically generated orthorhombic polymorph. This apparent inconsistency was resolved by showing how the ED pattern could be affected by crystal structural faults composed of offset molecular layers.

  11. The degree of biogenicity of micrites and terrestrial Mars analogues .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Elia, M.; Blanco, A.; Orofino, V.; Fonti, S.; Mastandrea, A.; Guido, A.; Tosti, F.; Russo, F.

    A number of indications, as the past presence of water, a denser atmosphere and a mild climate on early Mars, suggest that environmental conditions favorable to the emergence of life must have been present on that planet in the first hundred million years, or even more recently. If life actually existed on Mars, biomarkers could be still preserved with some degree of degradation. In previous laboratory works we have investigated the infrared spectral modifications induced by thermal processing on different carbonate samples, in the form of recent shells and fossils of different ages, whose biogenic origin is indisputable. The goal was to develop a method able to discriminate carbonate biogenic samples from their abiogenic counterparts. The method has been successfully applied to microbialites, i.e. bio-induced carbonates deposits, and particularly to stromatolites, the laminated fabric of microbialites, some of which can be ascribed among the oldest traces of biological activity known on Earth. This result is of valuable importance since such carbonates are linked to primitive living organisms which can be considered as good analogues for putative Martian life forms. In this work we show that, studying different parts of the same carbonate rock sample, we are able to distinguish, on the base of the degree of biogenicity, the various micrite types (i.e. detrital vs autochthonous).

  12. Exploitation of marine algae: biogenic compounds for potential antifouling applications.

    PubMed

    Bhadury, Punyasloke; Wright, Phillip C

    2004-08-01

    Marine algae are one of the largest producers of biomass in the marine environment. They produce a wide variety of chemically active metabolites in their surroundings, potentially as an aid to protect themselves against other settling organisms. These active metabolites, also known as biogenic compounds, produced by several species of marine macro- and micro-algae, have antibacterial, antialgal, antimacrofouling and antifungal properties, which are effective in the prevention of biofouling, and have other likely uses, e.g. in therapeutics. The isolated substances with potent antifouling activity belong to groups of fatty acids, lipopeptides, amides, alkaloids, terpenoids, lactones, pyrroles and steroids. These biogenic compounds have the potential to be produced commercially using metabolic engineering techniques. Therefore, isolation of biogenic compounds and determination of their structure could provide leads for future development of, for example, environmentally friendly antifouling paints. This paper mainly discusses the successes of such research, and the future applications in the context of understanding the systems biology of micro-algae and cyanobacteria.

  13. Biogenic amines in rhizobia and legume root nodules.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Shinsuke

    2009-01-01

    Root-nodule bacteria (rhizobia) are of great importance for nitrogen acquisition through symbiotic nitrogen fixation in a wide variety of leguminous plants. These bacteria differ from most other soil microorganisms by taking dual forms, i.e. a free-living form in soils and a symbiotic form inside of host legumes. Therefore, they should have a versatile strategy for survival, whether inhabiting soils or root nodules formed through rhizobia-legume interactions. Rhizobia generally contain large amounts of the biogenic amine homospermidine, an analog of spermidine which is an essential cellular component in most living systems. The external pH, salinity and a rapid change in osmolarity are thought to be significant environmental factors affecting the persistence of rhizobia. The present review describes the regulation of homospermidine biosynthesis in response to environmental stress and its possible functional role in rhizobia. Legume root nodules, an alternative habitat of rhizobia, usually contain a variety of biogenic amines besides homospermidine and the occurrence of some of these amines is closely associated with rhizobial infections. In the second half of this review, novel biogenic amines found in certain legume root nodules and the mechanism of their synthesis involving cooperation between the rhizobia and host legume cells are also described.

  14. BAECC Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate

    SciTech Connect

    Petäjä, Tuukka; Moisseev, Dmitri; Sinclair, Victoria; O'Connor, Ewan J.; Manninen, Antti J.; Levula, Janne; Väänänen, Riikka; Heikkinen, Liine; Äijälä, Mikko; Aalto, Juho; Bäck, Jaana

    2015-11-01

    Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate (BAECC)”, featured the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program’s 2nd Mobile Facility (AMF2) in Hyytiälä, Finland. It operated for an 8-month intensive measurement campaign from February to September 2014. The main research goal was to understand the role of biogenic aerosols in cloud formation. One of the reasons to perform BAECC study in Hyytiälä was the fact that it hosts SMEAR-II (Station for Measuring Forest Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations), which is one of the world’s most comprehensive surface in-situ observation sites in a boreal forest environment. The station has been measuring atmospheric aerosols, biogenic emissions and an extensive suite of parameters relevant to atmosphere-biosphere interactions continuously since 1996. The BAECC enables combining vertical profiles from AMF2 with surface-based in-situ SMEAR-II observations and allows the processes at the surface to be directly related to processes occurring throughout the entire tropospheric column. With the inclusion of extensive surface precipitation measurements, and intensive observation periods involving aircraft flights and novel radiosonde launches, the complementary observations of AMF2 and SMEAR-II provide a unique opportunity for investigating aerosol-cloud interactions, and cloud-to-precipitation processes. The BAECC dataset will initiate new opportunities for evaluating and improving models of aerosol sources and transport, cloud microphysical processes, and boundary-layer structures.

  15. Diversity of bacterial iron mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konhauser, Kurt O.

    1998-05-01

    Bacterial cells, growing naturally in freshwater and marine environments or experimentally in culture, can precipitate a variety of authigenic iron minerals. With the vast majority of bacteria biomineralization is a two-step process: initially metals are electrostatically bound to the anionic surfaces of the cell wall and surrounding organic polymers, where they subsequently serve as nucleation sites for crystal growth. The biogenic minerals have crystal habits and chemical compositions similar to those produced by precipitation from inorganic solutions because they are governed by the same equilibrium principles that control mineralization of their inorganic counterparts. As the latter stages of mineralization are inorganically driven, the type of biomineral formed is inevitably dependent on the available counter-ions, and hence, the chemical composition of the waters in which the microorganisms are growing. In oxygenated waters, iron hydroxides are a common precipitate and can form passively through the binding of dissolved ferric species to negatively charged polymers or when soluble ferrous iron spontaneously reacts with dissolved oxygen to precipitate as ferric hydroxide on available nucleation sites (e.g. bacteria). Alternatively, the metabolic activity of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria can induce ferric hydroxide precipitation as a secondary by-product. Ferric hydroxide may then serve as a precursor for more stable iron oxides, such as goethite and hematite via dissolution-reprecipitation or dehydration, respectively, or it may react with dissolved silica, phosphate or sulphate to form other authigenic mineral phases. Under suboxic to anoxic conditions, ferric hydroxide may be converted to magnetite, siderite, and iron sulphides through various reductive processes associated with organic matter mineralization. Under biologically controlled conditions, where mineralization is completely regulated, magnetotactic bacteria form magnetite and greigite as navigational

  16. Impact of biogenic emissions on air quality over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagaris, Efthimios; Sotiropoulou, Rafaella-Eleni P.; Gounaris, Nikos; Andronopoulois, Spyros

    2013-04-01

    The impact of biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions on air quality over Europe is assessed for a summer month (i.e., July, 2006) using Models-3 (i.e., CMAQ, MM5, SMOKE) modeling system. The Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) v4.7 Modeling System with the Carbon Bond mechanism (CB05) is used for the regional air quality modeling. Meteorological fields are derived using the Penn State/NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5). Emissions are processed by the Sparse Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions (SMOKE v2.6) modeling system for converting the resolution of the emission inventory data to the resolution needed by the air quality model. TNO has provided a gridded anthropogenic emissions database for the year 2006 over Europe in a 0.1 × 0.1 degrees resolution. The Biogenic Emission Inventory System, version 3 (BEIS3) is used for processing biogenic source emissions. Gridded land use data in 1 km resolution provided by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the default summer and winter emission factors and meteorological fields are used to create hourly model-ready biogenic emissions estimates. Results suggest that biogenic emissions increase simulated daily maximum 8 hours ozone average (Max8hrO3) concentrations over Europe by 5.6% for July 2006. BVOC emissions increase Max8hrO3 concentrations more than 5ppbV in a big part of Europe while locally it is more than 10ppbV. Despite the general trend of reduction in PM2.5 concentrations (about -2% on average over Europe during July 2006) there are regions where PM2.5 concentrations are simulated higher due to BVOC emissions. This is related to the change in PM2.5 component concentrations: an increase in organic carbon concentration and a decrease in sulfate concentration are simulated (13.6% and -5.6% on average over Europe during July 2006, respectively) while changes in nitrate concentrations are noted regionally. This work was supported by the National Strategic Reference Framework (NSRF) 2007-2013 grand No 09SYN-31-667.

  17. Global Biogenic Emission of Carbon Dioxide from Landfills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, R.; Nolasco, D.; Meneses, W.; Salazar, J.; Hernández, P.; Pérez, N.

    2002-12-01

    Human-induced increases in the atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gas components have been underway over the past century and are expected to drive climate change in the coming decades. Carbon dioxide was responsible for an estimated 55 % of the antropogenically driven radiactive forcing of the atmosphere in the 1980s and is predicted to have even greater importance over the next century (Houghton et al., 1990). A highly resolved understanding of the sources and sinks of atmospheric CO2, and how they are affected by climate and land use, is essential in the analysis of the global carbon cycle and how it may be impacted by human activities. Landfills are biochemical reactors that produce CH4 and CO2 emissions due to anaerobic digestion of solid urban wastes. Estimated global CH4 emission from landfills is about 44 millions tons per year and account for a 7.4 % of all CH4 sources (Whiticar, 1989). Observed CO2/CH4 molar ratios from landfill gases lie within the range of 0.7-1.0; therefore, an estimated global biogenic emission of CO2 from landfills could reach levels of 11.2-16 millions tons per year. Since biogas extraction systems are installed for extracting, purifying and burning the landfill gases, most of the biogenic gas emission to the atmosphere from landfills occurs through the surface environment in a diffuse and disperse form, also known as non-controlled biogenic emission. Several studies of non-controlled biogenic gas emission from landfills showed that CO2/CH4 weight ratios of surface landfill gases, which are directly injected into the atmosphere, are about 200-300 times higher than those observed in the landfill wells, which are usually collected and burned by gas extraction systems. This difference between surface and well landfill gases is mainly due to bacterial oxidation of the CH4 to CO2 inducing higher CO2/CH4 ratios for surface landfill gases than those well landfill gases. Taking into consideration this observation, the global biogenic

  18. Transformation of Strontium during formation of biogenic calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnuki, T.; Kozai, N.; Sakamoto, F.; Yamashita, M.; Horiieke, T.; Utsunomiya, S.

    2016-12-01

    Some amounts of radionuclides contaminated water containing 90Sr generated in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant were leaked to sea water in the port. One of the possible method to eliminate 90Sr is co-precipitated with biogenic carbonates minerals (CCM). Specific bacteria are known to form biogenic CCM in groundwater. In the present study, we have screened specific bacterium to form CCM in saline water, and studied transformation of Sr during biogenic CCM. A marine microbe of strain TK2d, which is screened from Tokyo bay to form CCM in saline solution, was grown in the medium solution contained urea and Sr. The concentratuion of Sr2+ in the solution was monitored by ICP-OES (ICP-OES; 720 Agilent Technologies, Inc., USA) during the formation of biogenic CCM. The precipitates were analyzed by SEM, TEM, and XAFS. When 1.0 mM Sr was dissolved in the medium solution, the concentration of Sr decreased up to 0.02 mM within 10 days, indicating that most of Sr in the solution was eliminated within 10 days. SEM and TEM analyses showed that needle shaped CCM containing Ca and Sr were formed. The CCM was not single crystalline, but poly-crystalline of calcite and aragonite. The elemental mapping showed that Sr was present at the same position of Ca, indicating that Sr was coprecipitated with Ca. The XANES analysis of Sr in the precipitates showed that the XANES spectrum was not the same as that of Sr coprecipitated with an abiotic Ca carbonates. Linear combination fitting of XANES spectra by those of SrCl2 and SrCO3 showed that both Sr2+ and SrCO3 were present in CCM. Longer contact time resulted in higher content of SrCO3, indicating that Sr was incorporated gradually with time into CCM structure. Thus, Sr was changed its chemical species from adsorbed one to the incorporated one in biogenic CCM in saline solution. This work was partially supported by a research grant from the Japan Science and Technology Agency, Japan (research grant No. 260502).

  19. Time Resolved Measurements of Primary Biogenic Aerosol Particles in Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollny, A. G.; Garland, R.; Pöschl, U.

    2009-04-01

    Biogenic aerosols are ubiquitous in the Earth's atmosphere and they influence atmospheric chemistry and physics, the biosphere, climate, and public health. They play an important role in the spread of biological organisms and reproductive materials, and they can cause or enhance human, animal, and plant diseases. Moreover, they influence the Earth's energy budget by scattering and absorbing radiation, and they can initiate the formation of clouds and precipitation as cloud condensation and ice nuclei. The composition, abundance, and origin of biogenic aerosol particles and components are, however, still not well understood and poorly quantified. Prominent examples of primary biogenic aerosol particles, which are directly emitted from the biosphere to the atmosphere, are pollen, bacteria, fungal spores, viruses, and fragments of animals and plants. During the Amazonian Aerosol Characterization Experiment (AMAZE-08) a large number of aerosol and gas-phase measurements were taken on a remote site close to Manaus, Brazil, during a period of five weeks in February and March 2008. This presented study is focused on data from an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UVAPS, TSI inc.) that has been deployed for the first time in Amazonia. In this instrument, particle counting and aerodynamic sizing over the range of 0.5-20 µm are complemented by the measurement of UV fluorescence at 355 nm (excitation) and 420-575 nm (emission), respectively. Fluorescence at these wavelengths is characteristic for reduced pyridine nucleotides (e.g., NAD(P)H) and for riboflavin, which are specific for living cells. Thus particles exhibiting fluorescence signals can be regarded as "viable aerosols" or "fluorescent bioparticles" (FBAP), and their concentration can be considered as lower limit for the actual abundance of primary biogenic aerosol particles. Data from the UVAPS were averaged over 5 minute time intervals. The presence of bioparticles in the observed size range has been

  20. Total iron binding capacity

    MedlinePlus

    ... iron supplies are low. This can occur with: Iron deficiency anemia Pregnancy (late) Lower-than-normal TIBC may ... Brittenham GM. Disorders of iron homeostasis: iron deficiency and ... Basic Principles and Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  1. Quantifying Rates of Complete Microbial Iron Redox Cycling in Acidic Hot Springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St Clair, B.; Pottenger, J. W.; Shock, E.

    2013-12-01

    Large accumulations of iron oxide commonly occur in shallow outflows of acidic hot springs, and culturing, molecular techniques, and microscopy by others indicate that this iron oxide (often ferrihydrite) is largely biogenic in Yellowstone National Park. The hot springs that support iron mats have several consistent geochemical features including combinations of pH, temperature, sulfide, dissolved oxygen, depth and ferrous iron concentration appropriate to support iron oxidation. These springs nearly always have a point source leading to a large shallow outflow apron. Microbial zones often, but not always, include a small clear zone near the source, followed by a sulfide oxidation zone, iron mat, and finally photosynthesis. The yellow sulfide oxidation zone is separated from the red iron mat by a sharp transition resulting from increasing dissolved oxygen from atmospheric contact and microbial depletion of sulfide. The iron mat is typically the largest microbial zone in the feature by area. Further down the outflow, iron oxidation appears to be outcompeted by phototrophs as the temperature cools. Occasionally there is overlap in these zones, but one metabolism always appears dominant. Our experiments at diverse hot springs indicate that microbial reduction is less geochemically restricted than oxidation, requiring only organic carbon, ferric minerals and an anoxic environment. With iron oxidizers fixing carbon and producing layers of ferric minerals that become rapidly anoxic with depth, iron reduction is invariably proximal to where biogenic iron oxides are forming. To characterize the interplay of oxidation and reduction rates that permit oxide accumulation, we conducted rate experiments at geochemically diverse Yellowstone hot springs featuring visible iron oxides in thermal areas throughout the park. These experiments were performed during two summer field seasons to determine in situ and maximum rates of iron oxidation and reduction by measuring changing

  2. Hexagonal Platelet-like Magnetite as a Biosignature of Thermophilic Iron-Reducing Bacteria and Its Applications to the Exploration of the Modern Deep, Hot Biosphere and the Emergence of Iron-Reducing Bacteria in Early Precambrian Oceans

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria are able to enzymatically reduce ferric iron and couple to the oxidation of organic carbon. This mechanism induces the mineralization of fine magnetite crystals characterized by a wide distribution in size and irregular morphologies that are indistinguishable from authigenic magnetite. Thermoanaerobacter are thermophilic iron-reducing bacteria that predominantly inhabit terrestrial hot springs or deep crusts and have the capacity to transform amorphous ferric iron into magnetite with a size up to 120 nm. In this study, I first characterize the formation of hexagonal platelet-like magnetite of a few hundred nanometers in cultures of Thermoanaerobacter spp. strain TOR39. Biogenic magnetite with such large crystal sizes and unique morphology has never been observed in abiotic or biotic processes and thus can be considered as a potential biosignature for thermophilic iron-reducing bacteria. The unique crystallographic features and strong ferrimagnetic properties of these crystals allow easy and rapid screening for the previous presence of iron-reducing bacteria in deep terrestrial crustal samples that are unsuitable for biological detection methods and, also, the search for biogenic magnetite in banded iron formations that deposited only in the first 2 billion years of Earth with evidence of life. Key Words: Biosignatures—Magnetite—Iron-reducing bacteria—Deep subsurface biosphere—Banded iron formation. Astrobiology 12, 1100–1108. PMID:23145573

  3. Preserved filamentous microbial biosignatures in the Brick Flat gossan, Iron Mountain, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Amy J.; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Alpers, Charles N.; Karunatillake, Suniti; Hofmann, Beda A

    2015-01-01

    A variety of actively precipitating mineral environments preserve morphological evidence of microbial biosignatures. One such environment with preserved microbial biosignatures is the oxidized portion of a massive sulfide deposit, or gossan, such as that at Iron Mountain, California. This gossan may serve as a mineralogical analogue to some ancient martian environments due to the presence of oxidized iron and sulfate species, and minerals that only form in acidic aqueous conditions, in both environments. Evaluating the potential biogenicity of cryptic textures in such martian gossans requires an understanding of how microbial textures form biosignatures on Earth. The iron-oxide-dominated composition and morphology of terrestrial, nonbranching filamentous microbial biosignatures may be distinctive of the underlying formation and preservation processes. The Iron Mountain gossan consists primarily of ferric oxide (hematite), hydrous ferric oxide (HFO, predominantly goethite), and jarosite group minerals, categorized into in situ gossan, and remobilized iron deposits. We interpret HFO filaments, found in both gossan types, as HFO-mineralized microbial filaments based in part on (1) the presence of preserved central filament lumina in smooth HFO mineral filaments that are likely molds of microbial filaments, (2) mineral filament formation in actively precipitating iron-oxide environments, (3) high degrees of mineral filament bending consistent with a flexible microbial filament template, and (4) the presence of bare microbial filaments on gossan rocks. Individual HFO filaments are below the resolution of the Mars Curiosity and Mars 2020 rover cameras, but sinuous filaments forming macroscopic matlike textures are resolvable. If present on Mars, available cameras may resolve these features identified as similar to terrestrial HFO filaments and allow subsequent evaluation for their biogenicity by synthesizing geochemical, mineralogical, and morphological analyses. Sinuous

  4. Preserved Filamentous Microbial Biosignatures in the Brick Flat Gossan, Iron Mountain, California.

    PubMed

    Williams, Amy J; Sumner, Dawn Y; Alpers, Charles N; Karunatillake, Suniti; Hofmann, Beda A

    2015-08-01

    A variety of actively precipitating mineral environments preserve morphological evidence of microbial biosignatures. One such environment with preserved microbial biosignatures is the oxidized portion of a massive sulfide deposit, or gossan, such as that at Iron Mountain, California. This gossan may serve as a mineralogical analogue to some ancient martian environments due to the presence of oxidized iron and sulfate species, and minerals that only form in acidic aqueous conditions, in both environments. Evaluating the potential biogenicity of cryptic textures in such martian gossans requires an understanding of how microbial textures form biosignatures on Earth. The iron-oxide-dominated composition and morphology of terrestrial, nonbranching filamentous microbial biosignatures may be distinctive of the underlying formation and preservation processes. The Iron Mountain gossan consists primarily of ferric oxide (hematite), hydrous ferric oxide (HFO, predominantly goethite), and jarosite group minerals, categorized into in situ gossan, and remobilized iron deposits. We interpret HFO filaments, found in both gossan types, as HFO-mineralized microbial filaments based in part on (1) the presence of preserved central filament lumina in smooth HFO mineral filaments that are likely molds of microbial filaments, (2) mineral filament formation in actively precipitating iron-oxide environments, (3) high degrees of mineral filament bending consistent with a flexible microbial filament template, and (4) the presence of bare microbial filaments on gossan rocks. Individual HFO filaments are below the resolution of the Mars Curiosity and Mars 2020 rover cameras, but sinuous filaments forming macroscopic matlike textures are resolvable. If present on Mars, available cameras may resolve these features identified as similar to terrestrial HFO filaments and allow subsequent evaluation for their biogenicity by synthesizing geochemical, mineralogical, and morphological analyses. Sinuous

  5. Preserved Filamentous Microbial Biosignatures in the Brick Flat Gossan, Iron Mountain, California

    PubMed Central

    Sumner, Dawn Y.; Alpers, Charles N.; Karunatillake, Suniti; Hofmann, Beda A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A variety of actively precipitating mineral environments preserve morphological evidence of microbial biosignatures. One such environment with preserved microbial biosignatures is the oxidized portion of a massive sulfide deposit, or gossan, such as that at Iron Mountain, California. This gossan may serve as a mineralogical analogue to some ancient martian environments due to the presence of oxidized iron and sulfate species, and minerals that only form in acidic aqueous conditions, in both environments. Evaluating the potential biogenicity of cryptic textures in such martian gossans requires an understanding of how microbial textures form biosignatures on Earth. The iron-oxide-dominated composition and morphology of terrestrial, nonbranching filamentous microbial biosignatures may be distinctive of the underlying formation and preservation processes. The Iron Mountain gossan consists primarily of ferric oxide (hematite), hydrous ferric oxide (HFO, predominantly goethite), and jarosite group minerals, categorized into in situ gossan, and remobilized iron deposits. We interpret HFO filaments, found in both gossan types, as HFO-mineralized microbial filaments based in part on (1) the presence of preserved central filament lumina in smooth HFO mineral filaments that are likely molds of microbial filaments, (2) mineral filament formation in actively precipitating iron-oxide environments, (3) high degrees of mineral filament bending consistent with a flexible microbial filament template, and (4) the presence of bare microbial filaments on gossan rocks. Individual HFO filaments are below the resolution of the Mars Curiosity and Mars 2020 rover cameras, but sinuous filaments forming macroscopic matlike textures are resolvable. If present on Mars, available cameras may resolve these features identified as similar to terrestrial HFO filaments and allow subsequent evaluation for their biogenicity by synthesizing geochemical, mineralogical, and morphological analyses

  6. Iron and alloys of iron. [lunar resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastri, Sankar

    1992-01-01

    All lunar soil contains iron in the metallic form, mostly as an iron-nickel alloy in concentrations of a few tenths of 1 percent. Some of this free iron can be easily separated by magnetic means. It is estimated that the magnetic separation of 100,000 tons of lunar soil would yield 150-200 tons of iron. Agglutinates contain metallic iron which could be extracted by melting and made into powder metallurgy products. The characteristics and potential uses of the pure-iron and iron-alloy lunar products are discussed. Processes for working iron that might be used in a nonterrestrial facility are also addressed.

  7. Control of Biogenic Amines in Fermented Sausages: Role of Starter Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Latorre-Moratalla, M.L.; Bover-Cid, Sara; Veciana-Nogués, M.T.; Vidal-Carou, M.C.

    2012-01-01

    Biogenic amines show biological activity and exert undesirable physiological effects when absorbed at high concentrations. Biogenic amines are mainly formed by microbial decarboxylation of amino acids and thus are usually present in a wide range of foods, fermented sausages being one of the major biogenic amine sources. The use of selected starter cultures is one of the best technological measures to control aminogenesis during meat fermentation. Although with variable effectiveness, several works show the ability of some starters to render biogenic amine-free sausages. In this paper, the effect of different starter culture is reviewed and the factors determining their performance discussed. PMID:22586423

  8. Significant Biogenic Silica Retention from Reverse Weathering in Non-deltaic Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, J. W.; Larson, A. M.; Darrow, E. S.; Carmichael, R. H.

    2014-12-01

    Coastal biogeochemical processes exert important controls on the net delivery of silicon to the ocean. Reverse weathering of biogenic silica by authigenic transformation has been suggested to be an important processes for silicon retention in coastal sediments. Many reported sediment biogenic silica measurements may underestimate this authigenically-transformed fraction; for example, the incorporation of metal hydroxides with the biogenic silica matrix suppresses the ability to distinguish it from mineral silica when using a traditional alkaline leach. Most studies demonstrating the importance of reverse weathering on biogenic silica have examined deltaic sediments in river dominated systems (e.g. Mississippi, Amazon), but this has not been examined in sediments which lack strong fluvial input. Using sediment cores from the outside the Mississippi River plume, we adapted a method which lessens the interference of metal hydroxides on biogenic silica by using an initial acid leach. The addition of this step increased the measured biogenic silica up to five-fold above that detected using a traditional alkaline digestion method. The magnitude of authigenically-altered biogenic silica in these cores was significant, representing a majority of the sediment biogenic silica pool at most depths. These findings confirm the importance of reverse-weathered biogenic silica as a mechanism for silicon retention and suggest the significance of this process may be more widespread.

  9. Control of biogenic amines in fermented sausages: role of starter cultures.

    PubMed

    Latorre-Moratalla, M L; Bover-Cid, Sara; Veciana-Nogués, M T; Vidal-Carou, M C

    2012-01-01

    Biogenic amines show biological activity and exert undesirable physiological effects when absorbed at high concentrations. Biogenic amines are mainly formed by microbial decarboxylation of amino acids and thus are usually present in a wide range of foods, fermented sausages being one of the major biogenic amine sources. The use of selected starter cultures is one of the best technological measures to control aminogenesis during meat fermentation. Although with variable effectiveness, several works show the ability of some starters to render biogenic amine-free sausages. In this paper, the effect of different starter culture is reviewed and the factors determining their performance discussed.

  10. Distribution and accumulation of biogenic silica in the intertidal sediments of the Yangtze Estuary.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lijun; Liu, Min; Xu, Shiyuan; Yan, Huimin; Ou, Dongni; Cheng, Shubo; Lin, Xiao

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Sedimentary biogenic silica is known to be an important parameter to understand biogeochemical processes and paleoenviromental records in estuarine and coastal ecosystems. Consequently, it is of great significance to investigate accumulation and distribution of biogenic silica in sediments. The two-step mild acid-mild alkaline extraction procedure was used to leach biogenic silica and its early diagenetic products in intertidal sediments of the Yangtze Estuary. The results showed that total biogenic silica (t-BSi) in the intertidal sediments varied from 237.7-419.4 micromol Si/g, while the mild acid leachable silica (Si-HCl) and the mild alkaline leachable silica (Si-Alk) were in the range of 25.1-72.9 micromol Si/g and 208.1-350.4 micromol Si/g, respectively. Significant correlations were observed for the grain size distributions of sediments and different biogenic silica pools in intertidal sediments. This confirms that grain size distribution can significantly affect biogenic silica contents in sediments. Close relationships of biogenic silica with organic carbon and nitrogen were also found, reflecting that there is a strong coupling between biogenic silica and organic matter biogeochemical cycles in the intertidal system of the Yangtze Estuary. Additionally, the early diagenetic changes of biogenic silica in sediments are discussed in the present study.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , ...

  12. Iron and iron derived radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1987-04-01

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fastexclamation Think smallexclamation In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Biogenic Emissions of Light Alkenes from a Coniferous Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhew, R. C.; Turnipseed, A. A.; Martinez, L.; Shen, S.; De Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.; Koss, A.; Lerner, B. M.; Miller, B. R.; Smith, J. N.; Guenther, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Alkenes are reactive hydrocarbons that play important roles in the photochemical production of tropospheric ozone and in the formation of secondary organic aerosols. The light alkenes (C2-C4) originate from both biogenic and anthropogenic sources and include C2H4 (ethene), C3H6 (propene) and C4H8 (1-butene, 2-butene, 2-methylpropene). Light alkenes are used widely as chemical feedstocks because their double bond makes them versatile for industrial reactions. Their biogenic sources are poorly characterized, with most global emissions estimates relying on laboratory-based studies; net ecosystem emissions have been measured at only one site thus far. Here we report net ecosystem fluxes of light alkenes and isoprene from a semi-arid ponderosa pine forest in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado, USA. Canopy scale fluxes were measured using relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) techniques on the 28-meter NCAR tower in the Manitou Experimental Forest Observatory. Updrafts and downdrafts were determined by sonic anemometry and segregated into 'up' and 'down' reservoirs over the course of an hour. Samples were then measured on two separate automated gas chromatographs (GCs). The first GC measured light hydrocarbons (C2-C6 alkanes and C2-C5 alkenes) by flame ionization detection (FID). The second GC measured halocarbons (methyl chloride, CFC-12, and HCFC-22) by electron capture detection (ECD). Additional air measurements from the top of the tower included hydrocarbons and their oxidation products by Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS). Three field intensives were conducted during the summer of 2014. The REA flux measurements showed that ethene, propene and the butene emissions have significant diurnal cycles, with maximum emissions at midday. The light alkenes contribute significantly to the overall biogenic source of reactive hydrocarbons and have a temporal variability that may be associated with physical and biological parameters. These ecosystem scale measurements

  14. Biogenic and synthetic polyamines bind bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Dubeau, S; Bourassa, P; Thomas, T J; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2010-06-14

    Biogenic polyamines are found to modulate protein synthesis at different levels, while polyamine analogues have shown major antitumor activity in multiple experimental models, including breast cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the interaction of bovine serum albumin (BSA) with biogenic polyamines, spermine and spermidine, and polyamine analogues 3,7,11,15-tetrazaheptadecane x 4 HCl (BE-333) and 3,7,11,15,19-pentazahenicosane x 5 HCl (BE-3333) in aqueous solution at physiological conditions. FTIR, UV-visible, CD, and fluorescence spectroscopic methods were used to determine the polyamine binding mode and the effects of polyamine complexation on protein stability and secondary structure. Structural analysis showed that polyamines bind BSA via both hydrophilic and hydrophobic interactions. Stronger polyamine-protein complexes formed with biogenic than synthetic polyamines with overall binding constants of K(spm) = 3.56 (+/-0.5) x 10(5) M(-1), K(spmd) = 1.77 (+/-0.4) x 10(5) M(-1), K(BE-333) = 1.11 (+/-0.3) x 10(4) M(-1) and K(BE-3333) = 3.90 (+/-0.7) x 10(4) M(-1) that correlate with their positively charged amino group contents. Major alterations of protein conformation were observed with reduction of alpha-helix from 63% (free protein) to 55-33% and increase of turn 12% (free protein) to 28-16% and random coil from 6% (free protein) to 24-17% in the polyamine-BSA complexes, indicating a partial protein unfolding. These data suggest that serum albumins might act as polyamine carrier proteins in delivering polyamine analogues to target tissues.

  15. Redefining the isotopic boundaries of biogenic methane: Methane from endoevaporites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tazaz, Amanda M.; Bebout, Brad M.; Kelley, Cheryl A.; Poole, Jennifer; Chanton, Jeffrey P.

    2013-06-01

    The recent reports of methane in the atmosphere of Mars, as well as the findings of hypersaline paleoenvironments on that planet, have underscored the need to evaluate the importance of biological (as opposed to geological) trace gas production and consumption, particularly in hypersaline environments. Methane in the atmosphere of Mars may be an indication of extant life, but it may also be a consequence of geologic activity and/or the thermal alteration of ancient organic matter. On Earth these methane sources can be distinguished using stable isotopic analyses and the ratio of methane (C1) to C2 and C3 alkanes present in the gas source (C1/(C2 + C3)). We report here that methane produced in hypersaline environments on Earth has an isotopic composition and alkane content outside the values presently considered to indicate a biogenic origin. Methane-rich bubbles released from sub-aqueous substrates contained δ13CCH4 and δ2HCH4 values ranging from -65‰ to -35‰ and -350‰ to -140‰ respectively. Higher salinity endoevaporites yielded what would be considered non-biogenic methane based upon stable isotopic and alkane content, however incubation of crustal and algal mat samples resulted in methane production with similar isotopic values. Radiocarbon analysis indicated that the production of the methane was from recently fixed carbon. An extension of the isotopic boundaries of biogenic methane is necessary in order to avoid the possibility of false negatives returned from measurements of methane on Mars and other planetary bodies.

  16. Post-speleogenetic biogenic modification of Gomantong Caves, Sabah, Borneo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundberg, Joyce; McFarlane, Donald A.

    2012-07-01

    The Gomantong cave system of eastern Sabah, Malaysia, is well-known as an important site for harvesting edible bird-nests and, more recently, as a tourist attraction. Although the biology of the Gomantong system has been repeatedly studied, very little attention has been given to the geomorphology. Here, we report on the impact of geobiological modification in the development of the modern aspect of the cave, an important but little recognized feature of tropical caves. Basic modeling of the metabolic outputs from bats and birds (CO2, H2O, heat) reveals that post-speleogenetic biogenic corrosion can erode bedrock by between ~ 3.0 mm/ka (1 m/~300 ka) and ~ 4.6 mm/ka (1 m/~200 ka). Modeling at high densities of bats yields rates of corrosion of ~ 34 mm/ka (or 1 m/~30 ka). Sub-aerial corrosion creates a previously undescribed speleological feature, the apse-flute, which is semicircular in cross-section and ~ 80 cm wide. It is vertical regardless of rock properties, developing in parallel but apparently completely independently, and often unbroken from roof to floor. They end at a blind hemi-spherical top with no extraneous water source. Half-dome ceiling conch pockets are remnants of previous apse-fluting. Sub-cutaneous corrosion creates the floor-level guano notch formed by organic acid dissolution of bedrock in contact with guano. Speleogenetic assessment suggests that as much as 70-95% of the total volume of the modern cave may have been opened by direct subaerial biogenic dissolution and biogenically-induced collapse, and by sub-cutaneous removal of limestone, over a timescale of 1-2 Ma.

  17. The influence of marine biogenic particles on ice phase initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpert, P. A.; Radway, J.; Aller, J. Y.; Knopf, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    Aerosol particles vary in composition with many being biogenic and of terrestrial or marine origin. Efficient ice forming biogenic particles are typically thought to be of terrestrial origin; however, recent data demonstrate that marine biogenic particles can act as ice nuclei (IN) in both immersion and deposition modes, with and without association of NaCl. These results are significant given that ocean derived particles including phytoplankton, microorganisms, transparent exopolymers, and colloidal gels become aerosolized from the sea surface microlayer through wave breaking and bubble bursting. Such particles typically include sea salt, but in situ observations of air masses associated with phytoplankton blooms have identified organic compounds as significant mass contributors to aerosol loading. Here we present results from experiments with Thalassiosira pseudonana, Emiliania huxleyi, and Nanochloris atomus, phytoplankton with distinctly different cell walls: silica, calcite, and cellulose fibrils, respectively, as efficient IN in immersion and deposition modes at typical tropospheric conditions. In a separate set of experiments, submicron size particles with and without organics are generated through bubble bursting in a custom built seawater tank. Subsequently collected, these particles are observed using a coupled cooling stage/optical microscope, for their ice nucleation potential as a function of particle temperature (T), water activity (aw), relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice), droplet volume, and particle surface area. In the immersion mode, fragmented and intact cells of T. pseudonana and N. atomus enhance ice nucleation in aqueous NaCl solution droplets by ~10-30 K and 10-20 K above the homogeneous freezing limit, and for a range of aw of 1.0-0.8, while E. huxleyi do not enhance freezing temperatures. In the deposition mode, all three species nucleate ice for RHice as low as ~120%, however, for each, different nucleation modes occur at warmer

  18. Extracellular Proteins Limit the Dispersal of BiogenicNanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Moreau, John W.; Weber, Peter K.; Martin, Michael C.; Gilbert,Benjamin; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2007-04-27

    High spatial-resolution secondaryion microprobespectrometry, synchrotron radiation Fourier-transform infraredspectroscopy and polyacrylamide gel analysis demonstrate the intimateassociation of proteins with spheroidal aggregates of biogenic zincsulfide nanocrystals, an example of extracellular biomineralization.Experiments involving synthetic ZnS nanoparticles and representativeamino acids indicate a driving role for cysteine in rapid nanoparticleaggregation. These findings suggest that microbially-derivedextracellular proteins can limit dispersal of nanoparticulatemetal-bearing phases, such as the mineral products of bioremediation,that may otherwise be transported away from their source by subsurfacefluid flow.

  19. Biogenic amines and acute thermal stress in the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, B. A.; Moberg, G. P.

    1975-01-01

    A study is summarized which demonstrates that depletion of the biogenic amines 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) or norepinephrine (NE) alters the normal thermoregulatory responses to acute temperature stress. Specifically, NE depletion caused a significant depression in equilibrium rectal temperature at 22 C and a greater depression in rectal temperature than controls in response to cold (6 C) stress; NE depletion also resulted in a significantly higher rectal temperature response to acute heat (38 C) stress. Depletion of 5-HT had less severe effects. It remains unclear whether the primary site of action of these agents is central or peripheral.

  20. Extracellular proteins limit the dispersal of biogenic nanoparticles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moreau, J.W.; Weber, P.K.; Martin, M.C.; Gilbert, B.; Hutcheon, I.D.; Banfield, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    High-spatial-resolution secondary ion microprobe spectrometry, synchrotron radiation-based Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and polyacrylamide gel analysis demonstrated the intimate association of proteins with spheroidal aggregates of biogenic zinc sulfide nanocrystals, an example of extracellular biomineralization. Experiments involving synthetic zinc sulfide nanoparticles and representative amino acids indicated a driving role for cysteine in rapid nanoparticle aggregation. These findings suggest that microbially derived extracellular proteins can limit the dispersal of nanoparticulate metal-bearing phases, such as the mineral products of bioremediation, that may otherwise be transported away from their source by subsurface fluid flow.

  1. Pulmonary extraction of biogenic amines during septic shock

    SciTech Connect

    Kerstein, M.D.; Kohler, J.; Gould, S.; Moseley, P.

    1982-10-01

    The effect of live Escherichia coli on the pulmonary extraction of the biogenic amines /sup 14/C 5-hydroxytryptamine, (5-HT) and /sup 3/H-epinephrine was investigated. The labeled isotopes were injected into a central venous catheter and collected from an aortic catheter. One hundred per cent of the labeled epinephrine was recovered in the control and septic state. Only 32.8 +/- 3.6% SEM of the 5-hydroxytryptamine was recovered before sepsis and 42.5 +/- 4.9% SEM after sepsis. During sepsis, mean arterial pressure fell to 58 mm Hg from 121 mm Hg. Pulmonary shunt increased from .7 +/- .05 SEM to .33 +/- .09 SEM.

  2. Lithogenic vs Biogenic Stream Water Chemistry: Following the Solute Flush

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, D. J.; Anderson, S.; Bullen, T.; Fitzpatrick, J.; Schulz, M.; Vivit, D.; White, A.

    2005-12-01

    Mediterranean hydrologic systems are driven by strong intra-annual variation in precipitation. Summer drought is followed by a pronounced solute flush at the beginning of the wet season. Solutes accumulate near the soil surface during dry periods via evapoconcentration and dry deposition. In a set of nested watersheds draining the Santa Cruz, California marine terraces, a differentiation between shallow soil water with biogenic solutes (enriched via evapotranspiration and biologic nutrient cycling) and deep soil water with lithogenic solutes (imprinted by chemical weathering) allows interpretation of flow pathways to the stream. The shallow soil waters are more concentrated than deep soil waters at the beginning of the wet season. Stream chemistry is a mixture of lithogenic deep soil water and biogenic shallow soil water; we expect the lithogenic component to increase downstream. However, the composition of the water along a downstream transect shows no clear shift to lithogenic compositions downstream, especially in the early wet season. The lithogenic water influence may be minimal as most flow paths are lateral across a thick argillic horizon and rarely encounter lithogenic zones. However, the continued influence of biogenic solutes seems to result from movement of evapoconcentrated water through the flow system. Simultaneous collection of groundwater and soil water along the transect shows the slow movement of flushed solutes through the system. Soil waters generally are most concentrated during the first precipitation events and become increasingly diluted throughout the remainder of the wet season. Immediately following the flushing of shallow soils, a concentration peak is observed in perched groundwater near the drainage divide. A similar peak appears in perched groundwater sequentially downstream, finally appearing in groundwater near the base of the catchment after several months. This pattern of flushed solutes in perched groundwaters may result from the

  3. Trace element geochemistry of marine biogenic particulate matter

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, R.W.

    1981-02-01

    Plankton samples were investigated for physical and chemical leaching decomposition to identify the major and trace element composition of particulate carrier phases. The identification of trace element/major element ratios in the biogenic materials was emphasized. The majority of the trace elements in the samples were directly associated with the nonskeletal organic phases of the plankton. Calcium carbonate and opal were not significant carriers for any of the trace elements studied. A refractory phase containing Al and Fe in terrigenous ratios was present in all samples, even from the more remote marine locations.

  4. Low-order models of biogenic ocean mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabiri, J. O.; Rosinelli, D.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2009-12-01

    Biogenic ocean mixing, the process whereby swimming animals may affect ocean circulation, has primarily been studied using order-of-magnitude theoretical estimates and a small number of field observations. We describe numerical simulations of arrays of simplified animal shapes migrating in inviscid fluid and at finite Reynolds numbers. The effect of density stratification is modeled in the fluid dynamic equations of motion by a buoyancy acceleration term, which arises due to perturbations to the density field by the migrating bodies. The effects of fluid viscosity, body spacing, and array configuration are investigated to identify scenarios in which a meaningful contribution to ocean mixing by swimming animals is plausible.

  5. FeCycle: Attempting an iron biogeochemical budget from a mesoscale SF6 tracer experiment in unperturbed low iron waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, P. W.; Law, C. S.; Hutchins, D. A.; Abraham, E. R.; Croot, P. L.; Ellwood, M.; Frew, R. D.; Hadfield, M.; Hall, J.; Handy, S.; Hare, C.; Higgins, J.; Hill, P.; Hunter, K. A.; Leblanc, K.; Maldonado, M. T.; McKay, R. M.; Mioni, C.; Oliver, M.; Pickmere, S.; Pinkerton, M.; Safi, K.; Sander, S.; Sanudo-Wilhelmy, S. A.; Smith, M.; Strzepek, R.; Tovar-Sanchez, A.; Wilhelm, S. W.

    2005-12-01

    An improved knowledge of iron biogeochemistry is needed to better understand key controls on the functioning of high-nitrate low-chlorophyll (HNLC) oceanic regions. Iron budgets for HNLC waters have been constructed using data from disparate sources ranging from laboratory algal cultures to ocean physics. In summer 2003 we conducted FeCycle, a 10-day mesoscale tracer release in HNLC waters SE of New Zealand, and measured concurrently all sources (with the exception of aerosol deposition) to, sinks of iron from, and rates of iron recycling within, the surface mixed layer. A pelagic iron budget (timescale of days) indicated that oceanic supply terms (lateral advection and vertical diffusion) were relatively small compared to the main sink (downward particulate export). Remote sensing and terrestrial monitoring reveal 13 dust or wildfire events in Australia, prior to and during FeCycle, one of which may have deposited iron at the study location. However, iron deposition rates cannot be derived from such observations, illustrating the difficulties in closing iron budgets without quantification of episodic atmospheric supply. Despite the threefold uncertainties reported for rates of aerosol deposition (Duce et al., 1991), published atmospheric iron supply for the New Zealand region is ˜50-fold (i.e., 7- to 150-fold) greater than the oceanic iron supply measured in our budget, and thus was comparable (i.e., a third to threefold) to our estimates of downward export of particulate iron. During FeCycle, the fluxes due to short term (hours) biological iron uptake and regeneration were indicative of rapid recycling and were tenfold greater than for new iron (i.e. estimated atmospheric and measured oceanic supply), giving an "fe" ratio (uptake of new iron/uptake of new + regenerated iron) of 0.17 (i.e., a range of 0.06 to 0.51 due to uncertainties on aerosol iron supply), and an "Fe" ratio (biogenic Fe export/uptake of new + regenerated iron) of 0.09 (i.e., 0.03 to 0.24).

  6. Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA).

    PubMed

    Heeney, Matthew M; Finberg, Karin E

    2014-08-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is a common global problem whose etiology is typically attributed to acquired inadequate dietary intake and/or chronic blood loss. However, in several kindreds multiple family members are affected with iron deficiency anemia that is unresponsive to oral iron supplementation and only partially responsive to parenteral iron therapy. The discovery that many of these cases harbor mutations in the TMPRSS6 gene led to the recognition that they represent a single clinical entity: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA). This article reviews clinical features of IRIDA, recent genetic studies, and insights this disorder provides into the regulation of systemic iron homeostasis.

  7. Detection, identification and mapping of iron anomalies in brain tissue using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhaylova, A.; Davidson, M.; Toastmann, H.; Channell, J.E.T.; Guyodo, Y.; Batich, C.; Dobson, J.

    2008-06-16

    This work describes a novel method for the detection, identification and mapping of anomalous iron compounds in mammalian brain tissue using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. We have located and identified individual iron anomalies in an avian tissue model associated with ferritin, biogenic magnetite and haemoglobin with a pixel resolution of less than 5 {micro}m. This technique represents a breakthrough in the study of both intra- and extra-cellular iron compounds in brain tissue. The potential for high-resolution iron mapping using microfocused X-ray beams has direct application to investigations of the location and structural form of iron compounds associated with human neurodegenerative disorders - a problem which has vexed researchers for 50 years.

  8. Biogenic amines in silage, apparent postruminal passage, and the relationship between biogenic amines and digestive function and intake by steers.

    PubMed

    Phuntsok, T; Froetschel, M A; Amos, H E; Zheng, M; Huang, Y W

    1998-08-01

    A 4 x 4 Latin square experiment was conducted to examine abomasal passage of biogenic amines in steers fed silage and their related effects on intake, digestibility, and digestive function. Thirty percent of the dry matter (DM) in the diets consisted of alfalfa forage, which was fed as either hay or silage. The DM from alfalfa silage DM was substituted at 0, 33, 67, and 100% for DM from alfalfa hay and was fed to four ruminally and abomasally cannulated steers. The roughage component of the diet constituted 50% of the DM and consisted of 60% alfalfa silage or hay and 40% tropical corn silage. The concentrate was composed mainly of ground corn. The concentrations of putrescine and cadaverine in abomasal digesta increased as alfalfa silage in the diet increased. Abomasal recovery of biogenic amines, a product of their concentration in abomasal digesta and the passage of DM through the abomasum, was negatively correlated with intake. Abomasal recovery of most amines was 5 to 20% of intake. Abomasal recovery of cadaverine was correlated with depressed intake. Total DM intake was reduced 8.3 to 25.8% as the proportion of alfalfa silage in the diet increased. Frequency of reticular contractions, intake, ruminal DM digestibility, ruminal outflow, volatile fatty acids, and total tract DM digestibility decreased in steers fed diets that contained more alfalfa silage. Ruminal fluid pH and NH3 concentration increased in steers fed more alfalfa silage; however, mass and the DM percentage of ruminal contents decreased linearly. Postprandial insulin concentrations were quadratically related to the proportion of alfalfa hay or silage in the diet. Intraruminal metabolism of biogenic amines is extensive based on the relatively low quantities recovered in abomasal digesta; however, the amounts recovered in abomasal digesta were related to intake depression and associated physiological effects.

  9. Biogenic and biomass burning sources of acetone to the troposphere

    SciTech Connect

    Atherton, C.S.

    1997-04-01

    Acetone may be an important source of reactive odd hydrogen in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. This source of odd hydrogen may affect the concentration of a number of species, including ozone, nitrogen oxides, methane, and others. Traditional, acetone had been considered a by-product of the photochemical oxidation of other species, and had not entered models as a primary emission. However, recent work estimates a global source term of 40-60 Tg acetone/year. Of this, 25% is directly emitted during biomass burning, and 20% is directly emitted by evergreens and other plants. Only 3% is due to anthropogenic/industrial emissions. The bulk of the remainder, 51% of the acetone source, is a secondary product from the oxidation of propane, isobutane, and isobutene. Also, while it is speculated that the oxidation of pinene (a biogenic emission) may also contribute about 6 Tg/year, this term is highly uncertain. Thus, the two largest primary sources of acetone are biogenic emission and biomass burning, with industrial/anthropogenic emissions very small in comparison.

  10. Cloud condensation nucleus activation properties of biogenic secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanreken, Timothy M.; Ng, Nga L.; Flagan, Richard C.; Seinfeld, John H.

    2005-04-01

    Organic aerosols in general and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in particular are known to contribute significantly to the atmospheric population of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). However, current knowledge is limited with respect to the nature of this contribution. This study presents a series of experiments wherein the potential for biogenically derived SOA to act as CCN is explored. Five compounds were studied: four monoterpenes (α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, and Δ3-carene) and one terpenoid alcohol (terpinene-4-ol). In each case the aerosol formation was driven by the reaction of ozone with the biogenic precursor. The SOA produced in each experiment was allowed to age for several hours, during which CCN concentrations were periodically measured at four supersaturations: S = 0.27%, 0.32%, 0.54%, and 0.80%. The calculated relationships between particle dry diameter and critical supersaturation were found to fall in the range of previously reported data for single-component organic aerosols; of the systems studied, α-pinene SOA was the least CCN active, while limonene SOA exhibited the strongest CCN activity. Interestingly, the inferred critical supersaturation of the SOA products was considerably more sensitive to particle diameter than was found in previous studies. Furthermore, the relationships between particle size and critical supersaturation for the monoterpene SOA shifted considerably over the course of the experiments, with the aerosol becoming less hygroscopic over time. These results are consistent with the progressive oligomerization of the SOA.

  11. Analytical electron microscopy of biogenic and inorganic carbonates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David F.

    1989-01-01

    In the terrestrial sedimentary environment, the mineralogically predominant carbonates are calcite-type minerals (rhombohedral carbonates) and aragonite-type minerals (orthorhombic carbonates). Most common minerals precipitating either inorganically or biogenically are high magnesium calcite and aragonite. High magnesium calcite (with magnesium carbonate substituting for more than 7 mole percent of the calcium carbonate) is stable only at temperatures greater than 700 C or thereabouts, and aragonite is stable only at pressures exceeding several kilobars of confining pressure. Therefore, these carbonates are expected to undergo chemical stabilization in the diagenetic environment to ultimately form stable calcite and dolomite. Because of the strong organic control of carbonate deposition in organisms during biomineralization, the microchemistry and microstructure of invertebrate skeletal material is much different than that present in inorganic carbonate cements. The style of preservation of microstructural features in skeletal material is therefore often quite distinctive when compared to that of inorganic carbonate even though wholesale recrystallization of the sediment has taken place. Microstructural and microchemical comparisons are made between high magnesium calcite echinoderm skeletal material and modern inorganic high magnesium calcite inorganic cements, using analytical electron microscopy and related techniques. Similar comparisons are made between analogous materials which have undergone stabilization in the diagenetic environment. Similar analysis schemes may prove useful in distinguishing between biogenic and inorganic carbonates in returned Martian carbonate samples.

  12. Manganese carbonates as possible biogenic relics in Archean settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincón-Tomás, Blanca; Khonsari, Bahar; Mühlen, Dominik; Wickbold, Christian; Schäfer, Nadine; Hause-Reitner, Dorothea; Hoppert, Michael; Reitner, Joachim

    2016-07-01

    Carbonate minerals such as dolomite, kutnahorite or rhodochrosite are frequently, but not exclusively generated by microbial processes. In recent anoxic sediments, Mn(II)carbonate minerals (e.g. rhodochrosite, kutnahorite) derive mainly from the reduction of Mn(IV) compounds by anaerobic respiration. The formation of huge manganese-rich (carbonate) deposits requires effective manganese redox cycling in an oxygenated atmosphere. However, putative anaerobic pathways such as microbial nitrate-dependent manganese oxidation, anoxygenic photosynthesis and oxidation in ultraviolet light may facilitate manganese cycling even in an early Archean environment, without the availability of oxygen. In addition, manganese carbonates precipitate by microbially induced processes without change of the oxidation state, e.g. by pH shift. Hence, there are several ways how these minerals could have been formed biogenically and deposited in Precambrian sediments. We will summarize microbially induced manganese carbonate deposition in the presence and absence of atmospheric oxygen and we will make some considerations about the biogenic deposition of manganese carbonates in early Archean settings.

  13. Structural Characterization of Biogenic Manganese Oxides Produced in Sea Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, S. M.; Bargar, J. R.; Tebo, B. M.

    2003-12-01

    Manganese oxides have been coined as the "scavengers of the sea" and play important roles in both marine and freshwater systems. Natural manganese oxide nanoparticles and grain coatings are ubiquitous in the environment and profoundly impact the quality of sediments via their ability to degrade and sequester contaminants. These oxides are believed to form dominantly via oxidation of Mn(II) by marine and freshwater bacteria and have extremely high sorptive capacities for heavy metals. We have used XANES, EXAFS, and synchrotron (SR)-XRD techniques to study biogenic manganese oxides produced by spores of the marine Bacillus sp., strain SG-1 in seawater as a function of reaction time under fully in-situ conditions. The primary biogenic solid-phase Mn oxide product is a hexagonal layered phyollomanganate with an oxidation state similar to that in delta-MnO2. XRD data show the biooxides to have a phyllomanganate 10 basal plane spacing, suggesting the interlayer is hydrated and contains calcium. As the experiment continues, the initial biooxide changes to show triclinic symmetry. Fits to these EXAFS spectra suggest the octahedral layers have low Mn octahedral site vacancies in the lattice and the latyers bend to accommodate Jahn-Teller distortions creating the change in symmetry. The oxides observed in this study as models of Mn(II) bio-oxidation may be representative of the most abundant manganese oxide phase suspended in the oxic and sub-oxic zones of the oceanic water column.

  14. Factors Influencing Biogenic Amines Accumulation in Dairy Products

    PubMed Central

    Linares, Daniel M.; del Río, Beatriz; Ladero, Victor; Martínez, Noelia; Fernández, María; Martín, María Cruz; Álvarez, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    Fermented foods are among the food products more often complained of having caused episodes of biogenic amines (BA) poisoning. Concerning milk-based fermented foods, cheese is the main product likely to contain potentially harmful levels of BA, specially tyramine, histamine, and putrescine. Prompted by the increasing awareness of the risks related to dietary uptake of high biogenic amine loads, in this review we report all those elaboration and processing technological aspects affecting BA biosynthesis and accumulation in dairy foods. Improved knowledge of the factors involved in the synthesis and accumulation of BA should lead to a reduction in their incidence in milk products. Synthesis of BA is possible only when three conditions converge: (i) availability of the substrate amino acids; (ii) presence of microorganisms with the appropriate catabolic pathway activated; and (iii) environmental conditions favorable to the decarboxylation activity. These conditions depend on several factors such as milk treatment (pasteurization), use of starter cultures, NaCl concentration, time, and temperature of ripening and preservation, pH, temperature, or post-ripening technological processes, which will be discussed in this chapter. PMID:22783233

  15. Plio-Pleistocene Biogenic Opal Deposition in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, G.; Gersonde, R.

    2002-12-01

    About 2/3 of the annual supply of silicic acid to the World Ocean is buried in the Southern Ocean as biogenic silica (BSi), formed by diatoms and radiolaria in surface waters and exported to the seafloor. Main BSi accumulation occurs in an area between the sea ice edge and the Polar Front Zone and seems to be steered by a complex interaction of biological and physical parameters governing the modern Southern Ocean ecosystem. Sediment cores recovered during Ocean Drilling Program Leg 177 and expeditions with RV POLARSTERN reveal the history of the opal deposition in the Atlantic and Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean during the Pliocene and the Pleistocene. This period is characterized by distinct changes and variability in global climate and ocean circulation that can be related to the spatial-temporal distribution of BSi deposition on long and short time scales. Changes in ocean circulation, water mass structure, sea ice and climatic variability that impact the distribution of silicic acid and the development of coarsly silicified diatoms (e.g. Actinocyclus ingens, Thalassiosira antarctica, Fragilariopsis kerguelensis), presenting the major carriers of biogenic opal, control past BSi deposition in the Southern Ocean. Major deposition in the area of the modern Southern Ocean opal belt starts at the Plio/Pleistocene transition. Such strong export of BSi and related organic carbon might have reinforced the trend of global cooling observed since the Mid-Pliocene climate optimum.

  16. Biogenic and anthropogenic trace gases in the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasseur, G. P.; Prinn, R. G.

    1992-01-01

    This paper illustrates the importance of biogenic and anthropogenic trace gases for the global environment and for the climate system. The paper briefly reviews the currently available estimates of sources and strengths of the biogenic and anthropogenic gases on the global scale. One of the major concerns for the global environment is the rapid increase in the concentration of long-lived trace gases such as CO2, CH4, N2O and the chlorofluorocarbons. The trend in the carbon dioxide concentration, as a result of fossil-fuel burning, is of the order of 0.4 percent per year, and this trend is related to the CO2 uptake by the ocean and by terrestrial ecosystems, which are likely to be modified if the planet warms up in the forthcoming decades. The concentrations of methane and nitrous oxide are increasing by 0.9 and 0.25 percent per year, respectively. In the case of the most widely used chlorofluorocarbons, trends as large as 10 percent per year or more are being measured.

  17. Biogenic reefs as structuring factor in Pleuronectes platessa (Plaice) nursery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabaut, M.; Van de Moortel, L.; Vincx, M.; Degraer, S.

    2010-07-01

    The structural distribution of juvenile flatfish in nursery areas is generally studied on a larger scale on which the effects of abiotic factors such as sediment characteristics, beach profile, tides, and turbidity dominate. The biotic structuring factor has never before been investigated from a very small scale-perspective. The latter is the subject of the present study. In an in situ experimental sampling design, the structuring effect of biogenic reefs on the distribution of Pleuronectes platessa (Plaice) in an intertidal nursery area is investigated. The density distribution of this flatfish species is significantly ( p < 0.0001) explained by the presence of reefs built up by the polychaete Lanice conchilega. The importance of this reef builder has been highlighted before in other studies but present study demonstrates that not only the benthic biodiversity is affected by L. conchilega reefs, but that the distribution pattern of P. platessa is structured by them as well. This structuring impact of small-scale benthic reefs creating a patchy environment in nursery areas potentially plays an important role in other marine environments and indicates the need for further research on the ecological function of benthic reef environments for several flatfish species. Further modification of these biogenic habitats may lead to a loss of one or more ecosystem functions which flatfish species depend on.

  18. The BOND project: Biogenic aerosols and air quality in Athens and Marseille greater areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulou, R. E. P.; Tagaris, E.; Pilinis, C.; Andronopoulos, S.; Sfetsos, A.; Bartzis, J. G.

    2004-03-01

    The role of Secondary Biogenic Organic Aerosol in aerosol budget is examined using the Atmospheric Dispersion of Pollutants over Complex Terrain-Urban Airshed Model-Aerosols (ADREA-I/UAM-AERO) modeling system in two representative Mediterranean areas. The areas have been selected, because of their elevated biogenic emission levels and the sufficient degree of meteorological and land use diversity characterizing the locations. Comparison of the model results with and without biogenic emissions reveals the significant role biogenic emissions play in modulating ozone and aerosol concentrations. Biogenic emissions are predicted to affect the concentrations of organic aerosol constituents through the reactions of terpenes with O3, OH and NO3. The ozonolysis of terpenes is predicted to cause an increase in OH radical concentrations that ranges from 10% to 78% for Athens, and from 20% to 95% for Marseilles, depending on the location, compared to the predictions without biogenic emissions. The reactions of this extra hydroxyl radical with SO2 and NOx have as final products increased concentrations of sulfates and nitrates in the particulate phase. As a result, biogenic emissions are predicted to affect the concentrations not only of organic aerosols, but those of inorganic aerosols as well. Thus biogenic emissions should be taken into consideration when models for the prediction and enforcement of abatement strategies of atmospheric pollution are applied.

  19. 78 FR 50135 - Soil Biogenics Ltd., File No. 500-1; Order of Suspension of Trading

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Soil Biogenics Ltd., File No. 500-1; Order of Suspension of Trading August 14, 2013. It appears to... concerning the securities of Soil Biogenics Ltd. because it has not filed ] any periodic reports since...

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF SEASONAL AND ANNUAL BIOGENIC EMISSIONS INVENTORIES FOR THE U.S. AND CANADA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the development of a biogenic emissions inventory for the U.S. and Canada, to assess the role of biogenic emissions in ozone formation. Emission inventories were developed at hourly and grid (1/4 x 116 degree) level from input data at the same scales. Emissio...

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF SEASONAL AND ANNUAL BIOGENIC EMISSIONS INVENTORIES FOR THE U.S. AND CANADA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the development of a biogenic emissions inventory for the U.S. and Canada, to assess the role of biogenic emissions in ozone formation. Emission inventories were developed at hourly and grid (1/4 x 116 degree) level from input data at the same scales. Emissio...

  2. Genome Sequence Analysis of the Biogenic Amine-Degrading Strain Lactobacillus casei 5b.

    PubMed

    Ladero, Victor; Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Martinez, Noelia; Del Río, Beatriz; Linares, Daniel M; Fernández, María; Martín, María Cruz; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2014-01-16

    We here report a 3.02-Mbp annotated draft assembly of the Lactobacillus casei 5b genome. The sequence of this biogenic amine-degrading dairy isolate may help identify the mechanisms involved in the catabolism of biogenic amines and perhaps shed light on ways to reduce the presence of these toxic compounds in food.

  3. Measurement of carbon storage in landfills from the biogenic carbon content of excavated waste samples.

    PubMed

    De la Cruz, Florentino B; Chanton, Jeffrey P; Barlaz, Morton A

    2013-10-01

    Landfills are an anaerobic ecosystem and represent the major disposal alternative for municipal solid waste (MSW) in the U.S. While some fraction of the biogenic carbon, primarily cellulose (Cel) and hemicellulose (H), is converted to carbon dioxide and methane, lignin (L) is essentially recalcitrant. The biogenic carbon that is not mineralized is stored within the landfill. This carbon storage represents a significant component of a landfill carbon balance. The fraction of biogenic carbon that is not reactive in the landfill environment and therefore stored was derived for samples of excavated waste by measurement of the total organic carbon, its biogenic fraction, and the remaining methane potential. The average biogenic carbon content of the excavated samples was 64.6±18.0% (average±standard deviation), while the average carbon storage factor was 0.09±0.06g biogenic-C stored per g dry sample or 0.66±0.16g biogenic-C stored per g biogenic C. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Transdermal iron replenishment therapy.

    PubMed

    Modepalli, Naresh; Shivakumar, H N; Kanni, K L Paranjothy; Murthy, S Narasimha

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is one of the major nutritional deficiency disorders. Iron deficiency anemia occurs due to decreased absorption of iron from diet, chronic blood loss and other associated diseases. The importance of iron and deleterious effects of iron deficiency anemia are discussed briefly in this review followed by the transdermal approaches to deliver iron. Transdermal delivery of iron would be able to overcome the side effects associated with conventional oral and parenteral iron therapy and improves the patient compliance. During preliminary investigations, ferric pyrophosphate and iron dextran were selected as iron sources for transdermal delivery. Different biophysical techniques were explored to assess their efficiency in delivering iron across the skin, and in vivo studies were carried out using anemic rat model. Transdermal iron delivery is a promising approach that could make a huge positive impact on patients suffering with iron deficiency.

  5. [Iron dysregulation and anemias].

    PubMed

    Ikuta, Katsuya

    2015-10-01

    Most iron in the body is utilized as a component of hemoglobin that delivers oxygen to the entire body. Under normal conditions, the iron balance is tightly regulated. However, iron dysregulation does occasionally occur; total iron content reductions cause iron deficiency anemia and overexpression of the iron regulatory peptide hepcidin disturbs iron utilization resulting in anemia of chronic disease. Conversely, the presence of anemia may ultimately lead to iron overload; for example, thalassemia, a common hereditary anemia worldwide, often requires transfusion, but long-term transfusions cause iron accumulation that leads to organ damage and other poor outcomes. On the other hand, there is a possibility that iron overload itself can cause anemia; iron chelation therapy for the post-transfusion iron overload observed in myelodysplastic syndrome or aplastic anemia improves dependency on transfusions in some cases. These observations reflect the extremely close relationship between anemias and iron metabolism.

  6. Isolation of iron bacteria from terrestrial and aquatic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Bertram; Szewzyk, Ulrich

    2010-05-01

    Bacteria, which are capable of iron oxidation or at least iron deposition are widely distributed in environments where zones of dissolved ferrous iron and oxygen gradients are overlapping [1]. They take part in the biological cycling of iron and influence other cycles of elements for example carbon [2]. Manganese can be used for similar metabolic purposes as iron, because it can be biologically oxidized by chemolithotrophs or can be reduced by respirating bacteria as well [3, 4]. Bacterial activity is responsible for the accumulation of ferric iron compounds in their surroundings. The formation of bog ore is a well known example for a soil horizon, with an extreme enrichment of biogenic ferric iron [5]. We focused on the isolation of neutrophilic iron bacteria and bacteria capable of manganese oxidation. We used samples from Tierra del Fuego (Argentina) the National Park "Unteres Odertal" (Germany) and Berlin ground water wells. Microscopic examination of the samples revealed a considerable diversity of iron encrusted structures of bacterial origin. Most of these morphologic types are already well known. The taxonomic classification of many of these organisms is based on morphologic features and is not reliable compared to recent methods of molecular biology. That is mainly due to the fact, that most of these bacteria are hardly culturable or do not show their characteristic morphologic features under culture conditions. We established a collection of more than 300 iron depositing strains. Phylogenetic analyses showed that we have many yet uncultured strains in pure culture. We obtained many isolates which form distinct branches within long known iron bacteria groups like the Sphaerotilus-Leptothrix cluster. But some of the strains belong to groups, which have not yet been associated with iron oxidation activity. The strains deposit high amounts of oxidized iron and manganese compounds under laboratory conditions. However it is unclear if these precipitations are

  7. Pharmacology of Iron Transport

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Shaina L.; Krishnamurthy, Divya; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Elucidating the molecular basis for the regulation of iron uptake, storage, and distribution is necessary to understand iron homeostasis. Pharmacological tools are emerging to identify and distinguish among different iron transport pathways. Stimulatory or inhibitory small molecules with effects on iron uptake can help characterize the mechanistic elements of iron transport and the roles of the transporters involved in these processes. In particular, iron chelators can serve as potential pharmacological tools to alleviate diseases of iron overload. This review focuses on the pharmacology of iron transport, introducing iron transport membrane proteins and known inhibitors. PMID:23020294

  8. Pharmacology of iron transport.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Shaina L; Krishnamurthy, Divya; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Elucidating the molecular basis for the regulation of iron uptake, storage, and distribution is necessary to understand iron homeostasis. Pharmacological tools are emerging to identify and distinguish among different iron transport pathways. Stimulatory or inhibitory small molecules with effects on iron uptake can help characterize the mechanistic elements of iron transport and the roles of the transporters involved in these processes. In particular, iron chelators can serve as potential pharmacological tools to alleviate diseases of iron overload. This review focuses on the pharmacology of iron transport, introducing iron transport membrane proteins and known inhibitors.

  9. Arsenic species in weathering mine tailings and biogenic solids at the Lava Cap Mine Superfund Site, Nevada City, CA

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A realistic estimation of the health risk of human exposure to solid-phase arsenic (As) derived from historic mining operations is a major challenge to redevelopment of California's famed "Mother Lode" region. Arsenic, a known carcinogen, occurs in multiple solid forms that vary in bioaccessibility. X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (XAFS) was used to identify and quantify the forms of As in mine wastes and biogenic solids at the Lava Cap Mine Superfund (LCMS) site, a historic "Mother Lode" gold mine. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to assess variance within water chemistry, solids chemistry, and XAFS spectral datasets. Linear combination, least-squares fits constrained in part by PCA results were then used to quantify arsenic speciation in XAFS spectra of tailings and biogenic solids. Results The highest dissolved arsenic concentrations were found in Lost Lake porewater and in a groundwater-fed pond in the tailings deposition area. Iron, dissolved oxygen, alkalinity, specific conductivity, and As were the major variables in the water chemistry PCA. Arsenic was, on average, 14 times more concentrated in biologically-produced iron (hydr)oxide than in mine tailings. Phosphorous, manganese, calcium, aluminum, and As were the major variables in the solids chemistry PCA. Linear combination fits to XAFS spectra indicate that arsenopyrite (FeAsS), the dominant form of As in ore material, remains abundant (average: 65%) in minimally-weathered ore samples and water-saturated tailings at the bottom of Lost Lake. However, tailings that underwent drying and wetting cycles contain an average of only 30% arsenopyrite. The predominant products of arsenopyrite weathering were identified by XAFS to be As-bearing Fe (hydr)oxide and arseniosiderite (Ca2Fe(AsO4)3O3•3H2O). Existence of the former species is not in question, but the presence of the latter species was not confirmed by additional measurements, so its identification is less certain. The

  10. Arsenic species in weathering mine tailings and biogenic solids at the Lava Cap Mine Superfund Site, Nevada City, CA.

    PubMed

    Foster, Andrea L; Ashley, Roger P; Rytuba, James J

    2011-01-24

    A realistic estimation of the health risk of human exposure to solid-phase arsenic (As) derived from historic mining operations is a major challenge to redevelopment of California's famed "Mother Lode" region. Arsenic, a known carcinogen, occurs in multiple solid forms that vary in bioaccessibility. X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (XAFS) was used to identify and quantify the forms of As in mine wastes and biogenic solids at the Lava Cap Mine Superfund (LCMS) site, a historic "Mother Lode" gold mine. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to assess variance within water chemistry, solids chemistry, and XAFS spectral datasets. Linear combination, least-squares fits constrained in part by PCA results were then used to quantify arsenic speciation in XAFS spectra of tailings and biogenic solids. The highest dissolved arsenic concentrations were found in Lost Lake porewater and in a groundwater-fed pond in the tailings deposition area. Iron, dissolved oxygen, alkalinity, specific conductivity, and As were the major variables in the water chemistry PCA. Arsenic was, on average, 14 times more concentrated in biologically-produced iron (hydr)oxide than in mine tailings. Phosphorous, manganese, calcium, aluminum, and As were the major variables in the solids chemistry PCA. Linear combination fits to XAFS spectra indicate that arsenopyrite (FeAsS), the dominant form of As in ore material, remains abundant (average: 65%) in minimally-weathered ore samples and water-saturated tailings at the bottom of Lost Lake. However, tailings that underwent drying and wetting cycles contain an average of only 30% arsenopyrite. The predominant products of arsenopyrite weathering were identified by XAFS to be As-bearing Fe (hydr)oxide and arseniosiderite (Ca2Fe(AsO4)3O3•3H2O). Existence of the former species is not in question, but the presence of the latter species was not confirmed by additional measurements, so its identification is less certain. The linear combination

  11. Mg coordination in biogenic carbonates constrained by theoretical and experimental XANES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Toshihiro; Tamenori, Yusuke; Takahashi, Osamu; Nguyen, Luan T.; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Iwasaki, Nozomu; Kuroyanagi, Azumi; Suzuki, Atsushi; Kawahata, Hodaka

    2015-07-01

    Incorporation of magnesium into biogenic calcium carbonate is widely used to infer the conditions of mineral growth. From a mineralogical perspective, the dominant chemical environment of Mg and whether Mg replaces calcium by ideal substitution in biogenic CaCO3 are still debated, however. Here we show that energy positions and resonance features in experimental and theoretical XANES spectra can be used to identify the dominant molecular host site. In all biogenic calcite, which is produced by foraminifera, corals, bivalves, and brachiopods, the local environment of Mg indicated that it is incorporated primarily as a structural substitute for calcium in the crystal lattice, but in aragonitic coral and bivalves a pronounced effect of the organic fraction or disordered phases was observed. These differences among CaCO3 polymorphs suggest that physicochemical parameters affect the final composition of biogenic calcite, but in aragonite-secreting organisms, there may be physiological controls on Mg concentrations in biogenic aragonite.

  12. Occurrence of gigantic biogenic magnetite during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, D.; Raub, T. D.; Kopp, R. E.; Guerquin-Kern, J. L.; Wu, T. D.; Rouiller, I.; Smirnov, A. V.; Sears, S. K.; Lücken, U.; Tikoo, S. M.; Hesse, R.; Kirschvink, J. L.; Vali, H.

    2009-04-01

    crystals up to 4 μm long (eight times larger than magnetite produced by magnetotactic bacteria) and elongated hexaoctahedra up to 1.4 μm long. Similar to magnetite produced by magnetotactic bacteria, these single-crystal particles exhibit chemical composition and lattice perfection consistent with a biogenic origin. The oxygen isotopic composition of indiviual particles supports a low temperature aquatic origin. Electron holography indicates single-domain magnetization despite the large crystal size. In a few cases, we observed apparently intact, tip-outward spherical assemblages of spearhead-like particles that possibly represent the preserved original biological arrangement of these crystals in a hitherto unknown magnetite producing organism. The discovery of these exceptionally large biogenic magnetite crystals that possibly represent the remains of a new microorganism that appeared and disappeared with the PETM sheds some light upon the ecological response to biogeochemical changes that occurred during this warming event. The abundance of fossil magnetotactic bacteria on the Atlantic Coastal Plain during the PETM could be explained by enhanced production, enhanced preservation, or both. The presence of novel magnetofossils, however, argues that changes in growth conditions are a major part of the explanation. Considering that other bacterial magnetofossils are present (although less abundant) and well-preserved in sediments below and above the PETM clay, as well as in a sand lens within the PETM clay [Kopp et al., 2007], suggests that the new magnetofossils are unlikely to be a preservation artefact. We conclude, therefore, that the development of a thick suboxic zone with high iron bioavailability - a product of dramatic changes in weathering and sedimentation patterns driven by severe global warming - resulted in diversification of magnetite-forming organisms, likely including eukaryotes. In this study we extended the search for these new magnetofossils [Schumann

  13. Formation of magnetite and iron-rich carbonates by thermophilic iron-reducing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, C.; Liu, S.; Roh, Y.; Cole, D.; Phelps, T.; Vali, H.; Kirschvink, J.L.; Onsttot, T.; McKay, D.

    1997-06-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed to study the formation of iron minerals by a thermophilic (45 to 75 C) fermentative iron-reducing bacterial culture (TOR39) obtained from the deep subsurface. Using amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxide as an electron acceptor and glucose as an electron donor, TOR39 produced magnetite and iron-rich carbonates at conditions consistent, on a thermodynamic basis, with Eh ({minus}200 mV to {minus}415 mV) and pH (6.2 to 7.7) values determined for these experiments. Analyses of the precipitating solid phases by X-ray diffraction showed that the starting amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxide was nearly completely converted to magnetite and Fe-rich carbonate after 20 days of incubation. Increasing bicarbonate concentration in the chemical milieu resulted in increased proportions of siderite relative to magnetite and the addition of MgCl{sub 2} caused the formation of magnesium-rich carbonate in addition to siderite. The results suggest that the TOR39 bacterial culture may have the capacity to form magnetite and iron-rich carbonates in a variety of geochemical conditions. These results may have significant implications for studying the past biogenic activities in the Martian meteorite ALH84001.

  14. INTEGRATION OF THE BIOGENIC EMISSIONS INVENTORY SYSTEM (BEIS3) INTO THE COMMUNITY MULTISCALE AIR QUALITY MODELING SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The importance of biogenic emissions for regional air quality modeling is generally recognized [Guenther et al., 2000]. Since the 1980s, biogenic emission estimates have been derived from algorithms such as the Biogenic Emissions Inventory System (BEIS) [Pierce et. al., 1998]....

  15. INTEGRATION OF THE BIOGENIC EMISSIONS INVENTORY SYSTEM (BEIS3) INTO THE COMMUNITY MULTISCALE AIR QUALITY MODELING SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The importance of biogenic emissions for regional air quality modeling is generally recognized [Guenther et al., 2000]. Since the 1980s, biogenic emission estimates have been derived from algorithms such as the Biogenic Emissions Inventory System (BEIS) [Pierce et. al., 1998]....

  16. Iron and Your Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... get iron by eating foods like meat and dark green leafy vegetables. Iron is also added to ... tofu dried beans and peas dried fruits leafy dark green vegetables iron-fortified breakfast cereals, breads, and ...

  17. Iron metabolism and toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Papanikolaou, G.; Pantopoulos, K. . E-mail: kostas.pantopoulos@mcgill.ca

    2005-01-15

    Iron is an essential nutrient with limited bioavailability. When present in excess, iron poses a threat to cells and tissues, and therefore iron homeostasis has to be tightly controlled. Iron's toxicity is largely based on its ability to catalyze the generation of radicals, which attack and damage cellular macromolecules and promote cell death and tissue injury. This is lucidly illustrated in diseases of iron overload, such as hereditary hemochromatosis or transfusional siderosis, where excessive iron accumulation results in tissue damage and organ failure. Pathological iron accumulation in the liver has also been linked to the development of hepatocellular cancer. Here we provide a background on the biology and toxicity of iron and the basic concepts of iron homeostasis at the cellular and systemic level. In addition, we provide an overview of the various disorders of iron overload, which are directly linked to iron's toxicity. Finally, we discuss the potential role of iron in malignant transformation and cancer.

  18. 13C Tracer Insights into Biogenic Calcite Dissolution Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subhas, A.; Adkins, J. F.; Berelson, W.; Rollins, N.; Erez, J.

    2016-12-01

    We present here dissolution kinetics of inorganic and various biogenic calcites in seawater. Our rate determinations are conducted using a novel isotope tracer approach, in which 13C-labeled carbonates are placed in a closed system of natural seawater of a pre-determined saturation state. The increase of seawater δ13C over time is a direct measure of mass transfer from solid to solution. Another advantage of our system is that the isotopic boundary conditions of the solid (pure 13C) and solution (99% 12C) are distinct. This isotopic gradient allows us to parse apart the net dissolution rate into gross dissolution and precipitation fluxes. Dissolution from the solid and precipitation from solution can be qualitatively assessed using a simple box model of gross fluxes at the mineral surface. Surprisingly, fitting our data using this model necessitates a thick ( 5 nm or 10 calcite monolayers) solid layer that interacts with seawater. To test this prediction, we measured vertical profiles of reacted and unreacted calcite surfaces using a Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometer (SIMS). Carbon isotope ratios through the surfaces of large, 13C-labeled calcites reacted in undersaturated and supersaturated water were compared to an unreacted control, and showed a precipitation signal of 12C from the surrounding seawater on the calcite surface, even in undersaturated conditions. The penetration of this 12C precipitation signal confirms the depth of the reactive calcite layer, and allows us to model semi-quantitatively the gross dissolution and precipitation fluxes for inorganic and biogenic calcites for which net dissolution rates have been measured using our isotopic tracer method. We show that for all biogenic carbonates measured — mixed benthic and planktonic foraminifera and the coccolith E. huxleyi — the net dissolution rate is a nonlinear function of saturation state (1-Omega). However, each class of carbonate exhibits a distinct curve of δ13C versus time at a single

  19. Offline identification and characterization of biogenic primary emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzetti, Carlo; El-Haddad, Imad; Dällenbach, Kaspar Rudolf; Sciare, Jean; Kasper-Giebl, Anne; Hueglin, Christoph; Canonaco, Francesco; Flasch, Mira; Wolf, Robert; Krepelova, Adela; Gates Slowik, Jay; Baltensperger, Urs; Prévôt, André Stéphan Henry

    2014-05-01

    Primary biological particles (e.g. pollen, spores) are known to have adverse influence on human health. Several studies illustrated also their ice-nuclei activity (Vali et al., 1976) showing their potential role in the climate changes. Nevertheless, the contribution and the chemical characterization of the biogenic emissions are poorly understood. The Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS, Aerodyne) has significantly advanced real-time PM1 monitoring. The AMS provides both quantitative measurements of the non-refractory (NR) components (organic aerosol (OA), Cl-, NO3-, NH4+, SO42-) and organic fraction mass spectra of the submicron fraction. Application of the positive matrix factorization (PMF) and other statistical tools such as ME-2 (Paatero, 1999; Canonaco et al., 2013) demonstrated that OA AMS mass spectra contain enough information to differentiate several factors subsequently associated with different aerosol sources (Jimenez et al., 2009). However, AMS measurements are restricted to the PM1 fraction and the AMS deployment remains complex and expensive, limiting long-term sampling and the spatial coverage. We explored a novel offline AMS application (Dällenbach et al., 2014) including a water extraction of the particulate matter from quartz filters by sonication. The resulting liquid extracts are nebulized generating an aerosol analyzed by High-Resolution-Time-of-Flight-AMS. The approach allows registering mass spectra and monitoring different particle size fractions not available by normal online AMS measurement (e.g. PM10). Moreover it broadens the sampling coverage since the filters are relatively easy and inexpensive to be collected and stored, furthermore filter samples are already routinely collected at many air quality stations worldwide. PM1, PM2.5, and PM10 filter samples from Payerne (a rural site on the Swiss Plateau)were collected both in summer and in winter. We clearly identified using PMF the contribution of biogenic primary emissions in

  20. A biogenic source of oxalic acid in marine aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facchini, M.; Rinaldi, M.; Ceburnis, D.; O'Dowd, C.; Sciare, J.; Burrows, J. P.

    2010-12-01

    Oxalic acid has been often observed in marine aerosol, nevertheless, given the ubiquitous character and the high concentrations found in polluted environments, its origin has often been attributed to continental sources. In this work, we present the results of oxalic acid analyses, on aerosol samples collected at Mace Head (Ireland, 53°20’N, 9°54’W) and Amsterdam Island (Indian Ocean, 37°48’S, 77°34’E), supporting the existence of a biogenic source of oxalic acid over the oceans. Measurements cover the year 2006, at the Northern Hemisphere site, and the period 2003-2007, at the Southern Hemisphere one. Aerosol oxalic acid was detected in clean marine air masses in concentrations ranging from 2.7 to 39 ng m-3, at Mace Head, and from 0.31 to 17 ng m-3, at Amsterdam Island. In both hemispheres, oxalic acid concentration showed a clear seasonal trend, with maxima in spring-summer and minima in the fall-winter period, in analogy with other marine biogenic aerosol components (e.g., MSA and amines). Oxalic acid was distributed along the whole aerosol size spectrum, with the major contribution given by the 1.0-2.0 µm size range, and by the lower accumulation mode (0.25-0.5 µm). Given the observed size distributions, marine aerosol oxalic acid can be assumed as the result of the combination of different formation processes, among which in-cloud oxidation of gaseous precursors [1] and photochemical degradation of biogenic unsaturated fatty acids [2] are likely the most important. Among aerosol oxalic acid precursors, glyoxal is the most likely candidate in the marine boundary layer, as a source of glyoxal over the oceans has recently been discovered by satellite observations [3] and confirmed by in situ measurements [4]. In support of this hypothesis, SCIAMACHY satellite retrieved glyoxal column concentrations, over the two sampling sites, resulted characterized by a clear seasonal trend, resembling the aerosol oxalic acid one. [1] Warneck, Atmospheric

  1. Emissions of biogenic sulfur gases from Alaskan tundra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Mark E.; Morrison, Michael C.

    1992-01-01

    Fluxes of the biogenic sulfur gases carbonyl sulfide (COS), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), methyl mercaptan (MeSH), and carbon disulfide (CS2) were determined for several freshwater and coastal marine tundra habitats using a dynamic enclosure method and gas chromatography. In the freshwater tundra sites, highest emissions, with a mean of 6.0 nmol/m(sup -2)H(sup -1) (1.5-10) occurred in the water-saturated wet meadow areas inhabited by grasses, sedges, and Sphagnum mosses. In the drier upland tundra sites, highest fluxes occurred in areas inhabited by mixed vegetation and labrador tea at 3.0 nmol/m(sup -2)h(sup -1) (0-8.3) and lowest fluxes were from lichen-dominated areas at 0.9 nmol/m(sup -2)h(sup -1). Sulfur emissions from a lake surface were also low at 0.8 nmol/m(sup -2)h(sup -1). Of the compounds measured, DMS was the dominant gas emitted from all of these sites. Sulfure emissions from the marine sites were up to 20-fold greater than fluxes in the freshwater habitats and were also dominated by DMS. Emissions of DMS were highest from intertidal soils inhabited by Carex subspathacea (150-250 nmol/m(sup -2)h(sup -1)). This Carex sp. was grazed thoroughly by geese and DMS fluxes doubled when goose feces were left within the flux chamber. Emissions were much lower from other types of vegetation which were more spatially dominant. Sulfure emissions from tundra were among the lowest reported in the literature. When emission data were extrapolated to include all tundra globally, the global flux of biogenic sulfur from this biome is 2-3 x 10(exp 8) g/yr. This represents less than 0.001 percent of the estimated annual global flux (approximately 50 Tg) of biogenic sulfur and less than 0.01 percent of the estimated terrestrial flux. The low emissions are attributed to the low availability of sulfate, certain hydrological characteristics of tundra, and the tendency for tundra to accumulate organic matter.

  2. Emissions of biogenic sulfur gases from Alaskan tundra

    SciTech Connect

    Hines, M.E.; Morrison, M.C.

    1992-10-30

    Fluxes of the biogenic sulfur gases carbonyl sulfide (COS), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), methyl mercaptan (MeSH), and carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}) were determined from several freshwater and coastal marine tundra habitats using a dynamic enclosure method and gas chromatography. In the freshwater tundra sites, highest emissions, with a mean of 6.0 nmol m{sup {minus}2}h{sup {minus}1} (1.5-10) occurred in the water-saturated wet meadow areas inhabited by grasses, sedges, and Shpagnum mosses. In the drier upland tundra sites, highest fluxes occurred in areas inhabited by mixed vegetation and labrador tea at 3.0 nmol m{sup {minus}2}h{sup {minus}1} (0-8.3) and lowest fluxes were from lichen-dominated areas at 0.8 nmol m{sup {minus}2}h{sup {minus}1}. Sulfur emissions from a lake surface were also low at 0.8 nmol m{sup {minus}2}h{sup {minus}1}. Of the compounds measured, DMS was the dominant gas emitted from all of these sites. Sulfur emissions from the marine sites were up to 20-fold greater than fluxes in the freshwater habitats and were also dominated by DMS. Emissions of DMS were highest from intertidal soils inhabited by Carex subspathacea. This Carex sp. was grazed thoroughly by geese and DMS fluxes doubled when goose feces were left within the flux chamber. Emissions were much lower from other types of vegetation which were more spatially dominant. Sulfur emissions from tundra were among the lowest reported in the literature. When emission data were extrapolated to include all tundra globally, the global flux of biogenic sulfur from this biome is 2-3 x 10{sup 8} g yr{sup {minus}1}. This represents less than 0.001% of the estimated annual global flux of biogenic sulfur and <0.01% of the estimated terrestrial flux. The low emissions are attributed to the low availability of sulfate, certain hydrological characteristics of tundra, and the tendency for tundra to accumulate organic matter. 31 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  3. Quantification of Iron Reoxidation in Microbially Reduced Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komlos, J.; Jaffe, P. R.; Kukkadapu, R. K.; Zachara, J. M.

    2005-12-01

    Microbial reduction of iron has been shown to be important in the transformation and remediation of contaminated sediments. Re-oxidation of microbially reduced iron may occur in sediments that experience cycles of oxidation and reduction and can thus impact the fate and extent of contaminant remediation, yet little research has been performed to quantitatively measure the rate of iron re-oxidation and changes in iron phases. The purpose of this research was to measure rates and extent of iron oxidation in a flow-through column filled with previously reduced sediment. In addition, the iron phases in the re-oxidized sediment were compared to the original sediment as well as the biologically reduced sediment. A unsaturated background sediment containing both Fe(III)-oxides and silicate Fe(II)/Fe(III) was biologically reduced in phosphate buffered (PB) medium at circumneutral pH utilizing the indigenous microbial population of the sediment in a long-term (500 day) column experiment in which acetate was supplied as the electron donor. Long-term iron reduction resulted in partial reduction of silicate Fe(III) and some goethite biotransformation, based on Mossbauer spectroscopy study. There was no evidence of vivianite formation -- a ferrous phosphate. This reduced sediment was treated with an oxygenated PB solution in a flow-through column resulting in the re-oxidation of 38% of the biogenic Fe(II), mainly silicate Fe(II). Additional batch experiments show that the Fe(III) in the reoxidized sediment was more quickly reduced compared to the initial sediment, which was attributed to the higher Mn(VI) concentrations in the original sediment. This indicates that re-oxidation of sediment not only regenerated Fe(III) but also enhanced iron reduction compared to the initial sediment and may be a viable method to extend iron reducing conditions during in-situ bioremediation scenarios.

  4. Hexagonal platelet-like magnetite as a biosignature of thermophilic iron-reducing bacteria and its applications to the exploration of the modern deep, hot biosphere and the emergence of iron-reducing bacteria in early precambrian oceans.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi-Liang

    2012-12-01

    Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria are able to enzymatically reduce ferric iron and couple to the oxidation of organic carbon. This mechanism induces the mineralization of fine magnetite crystals characterized by a wide distribution in size and irregular morphologies that are indistinguishable from authigenic magnetite. Thermoanaerobacter are thermophilic iron-reducing bacteria that predominantly inhabit terrestrial hot springs or deep crusts and have the capacity to transform amorphous ferric iron into magnetite with a size up to 120 nm. In this study, I first characterize the formation of hexagonal platelet-like magnetite of a few hundred nanometers in cultures of Thermoanaerobacter spp. strain TOR39. Biogenic magnetite with such large crystal sizes and unique morphology has never been observed in abiotic or biotic processes and thus can be considered as a potential biosignature for thermophilic iron-reducing bacteria. The unique crystallographic features and strong ferrimagnetic properties of these crystals allow easy and rapid screening for the previous presence of iron-reducing bacteria in deep terrestrial crustal samples that are unsuitable for biological detection methods and, also, the search for biogenic magnetite in banded iron formations that deposited only in the first 2 billion years of Earth with evidence of life.

  5. Parenteral iron therapy options.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Scott B; Rodgers, George M

    2004-05-01

    Parenteral iron therapy is occasionally necessary for patients intolerant or unresponsive to oral iron therapy, for receiving recombinant erythropoietin therapy, or for use in treating functional iron deficiency. There are now three parenteral iron products available: iron dextran, ferric gluconate, and iron sucrose. We summarize the advantages and disadvantages of each product, including risk of anaphylaxis and hypersensitivity, dosage regimens, and costs. The increased availability of multiple parenteral iron preparations should decrease the need to use red cell transfusions in patients with iron-deficiency anemia.

  6. Iron and vegetarian diets.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Angela V; Craig, Winston J; Baines, Surinder K; Posen, Jennifer S

    2013-08-19

    Vegetarians who eat a varied and well balanced diet are not at any greater risk of iron deficiency anaemia than non-vegetarians. A diet rich in wholegrains, legumes, nuts, seeds, dried fruits, iron-fortified cereals and green leafy vegetables provides an adequate iron intake. Vitamin C and other organic acids enhance non-haem iron absorption, a process that is carefully regulated by the gut. People with low iron stores or higher physiological need for iron will tend to absorb more iron and excrete less. Research to date on iron absorption has not been designed to accurately measure absorption rates in typical Western vegetarians with low ferritin levels.

  7. Modeling the dynamical sinking of biogenic particles in oceanic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monroy, Pedro; Hernández-García, Emilio; Rossi, Vincent; López, Cristóbal

    2017-06-01

    We study the problem of sinking particles in a realistic oceanic flow, with major energetic structures in the mesoscale, focussing on the range of particle sizes and densities appropriate for marine biogenic particles. Our aim is to evaluate the relevance of theoretical results of finite size particle dynamics in their applications in the oceanographic context. By using a simplified equation of motion of small particles in a mesoscale simulation of the oceanic velocity field, we estimate the influence of physical processes such as the Coriolis force and the inertia of the particles, and we conclude that they represent negligible corrections to the most important terms, which are passive motion with the velocity of the flow, and a constant added vertical velocity due to gravity. Even if within this approximation three-dimensional clustering of particles can not occur, two-dimensional cuts or projections of the evolving three-dimensional density can display inhomogeneities similar to the ones observed in sinking ocean particles.

  8. Biogenic synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles by seed plants.

    PubMed

    Iyer, R Indira; Panda, Tapobrata

    2014-02-01

    Nanoparticles have an enormous range of biomedical and environmental applications and can be used for development of various nanodevices for diagnostics and drug delivery. Biogenic production of nanoparticles, that is of silver and gold, by seed plants, especially flowering plants, has evoked considerable interest in the last decade. Different organs of plants as well as callus cultures have been used for the production of these metal nanoparticles. It is possible to regulate the geometry of the nanoparticles by modifying the experimental parameters. In many cases the phytosynthesized gold and silver nanoparticles have been demonstrated to be potentially useful for treatment of various diseases. The production of gold and silver nanoparticles by diverse species of seed plants and their biological activity are discussed in this article.

  9. Monitoring biogenic volatile compounds emitted by Eucalyptus citriodora using SPME.

    PubMed

    Zini, C A; Augusto, F; Christensen, T E; Smith, B P; Caramão, E B; Pawliszy, J

    2001-10-01

    A procedure to monitor BVOC emitted by living plants using SPME technique is presented. For this purpose, a glass sampling chamber was designed. This device was employed for the characterization of biogenic volatile compounds emitted by leaves of Eucalyptus citriodora. After extraction with SPME fibers coated with PDMS/ DVB, it was possible to identify or detect 33 compounds emitted by this plant. A semiquantitative approach was applied to monitor the behavior of the emitted BVOC during 9 days. Circadian profiles of the variation in the concentration of isoprene were plotted. Using diffusion-based SPME quantitation, a recently introduced analytical approach, with extraction times as short as 15 s, it was possible to quantify subparts-per-billion amounts of isoprene emitted by this plant.

  10. Emissions of biogenic sulfur gases from northern bogs and fens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demello, William Zamboni; Hines, Mark E.; Bayley, Suzanne E.

    1992-01-01

    Sulfur gases are important components of the global cycle of S. They contribute to the acidity of precipitation and they influence global radiation balance and climate. The role of terrestrial sources of biogenic S and their effect on atmospheric chemistry remain as major unanswered questions in our understanding of the natural S cycle. The role of northern wetlands as sources and sinks of gaseous S by measuring rates of S gas exchange as a function of season, hydrologic conditions, and gradients in tropic status was investigated. Experiments were conducted in wetlands in New Hampshire, particularly a poor fen, and in Mire 239, a poor fen at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) in Ontario. Emissions were determined using Teflon enclosures, gas cryotrapping methods and gas chromatography (GC) with flame photometric detection. Dynamic (sweep flow) and static enclosures were employed which yielded similar results. Dissolved S gases and methane were determined by gas stripping followed by GC.

  11. Emissions of biogenic sulfur gases from northern bogs and fens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demello, William Zamboni; Hines, Mark E.; Bayley, Suzanne E.

    1992-01-01

    Sulfur gases are important components of the global cycle of S. They contribute to the acidity of precipitation and they influence global radiation balance and climate. The role of terrestrial sources of biogenic S and their effect on atmospheric chemistry remain as major unanswered questions in our understanding of the natural S cycle. The role of northern wetlands as sources and sinks of gaseous S by measuring rates of S gas exchange as a function of season, hydrologic conditions, and gradients in tropic status was investigated. Experiments were conducted in wetlands in New Hampshire, particularly a poor fen, and in Mire 239, a poor fen at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) in Ontario. Emissions were determined using Teflon enclosures, gas cryotrapping methods and gas chromatography (GC) with flame photometric detection. Dynamic (sweep flow) and static enclosures were employed which yielded similar results. Dissolved S gases and methane were determined by gas stripping followed by GC.

  12. Impact of biogenic emissions on feedbacks in the climate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Olaf

    2017-04-01

    Impact of biogenic emissions on feedbacks in the climate system Bio-geophysical feedback between marine or continental ecosystems and the atmosphere potentially can alter climate change. A prominent feedback loop which is under discussion since 1983 bases on the emission of biologically produced gases - molecular oxygen, sulphur containing compounds and possibly isoprene, supersaturated in oceanic waters - into the marine troposphere. These by-products of phytoplankton metabolism lead to aerosol production and procure sustained influence on climate via modulation of cloud optical properties. In this contribution some findings related to the above mentioned climate processes are presented with special emphasis on marine ecosystems. A comparison of marine and continental ecosystems is made and different processes with major impact on feedbacks in the climate system are discussed.

  13. Hydrogen generation from biogenic and fossil fuels by autothermal reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampe, Thomas; Heinzel, Angelika; Vogel, Bernhard

    Hydrogen generation for fuel cell systems by reforming technologies from various fuels is one of the main fields of investigation of the Fraunhofer ISE. Suitable fuels are, on the one hand, gaseous hydrocarbons like methane, propane but also, on the other hand, liquid hydrocarbons like gasoline and alcohols, e.g., ethanol as biogenic fuel. The goal is to develop compact systems for generation of hydrogen from fuel being suitable for small-scale membrane fuel cells. The most recent work is related to reforming according to the autothermal principle — fuel, air and steam is supplied to the reactor. Possible applications of such small-scale autothermal reformers are mobile systems and also miniature fuel cell as co-generation plant for decentralised electricity and heat generation. For small stand-alone systems without a connection to the natural gas grid liquid gas, a mixture of propane and butane is an appropriate fuel.

  14. Effect of biogenic amines on phagocytosis in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Quiñones-Maldonado, V; Renaud, F L

    1987-11-01

    Stimulation of phagocytosis by serotonin and catecholamines in Tetrahymena grown in proteose-peptone medium proved to be concentration dependent, the optimal concentrations being approximately 0.1 to 1.0 microM. The serotonergic antagonists, spiperone, and metergoline, also stimulated the process, whereas the beta- and alpha-adrenergic antagonists, propranolol, alprenolol, and ergocryptine, had no effect or inhibited phagocytosis. A wide variety of derivatives of the biogenic amines had no effect on phagocytosis, demonstrating the specificity of recognition mechanism for neurohormones in Tetrahymena. Such hormones act by at least two independent mechanisms, one for adrenergic agonists, another for dopamine. Presumably, recognition mechanisms for hormones in protozoa resemble in some respects those in multicellular organisms, therefore bespeaking a common origin.

  15. Dissolution Rates of Biogenic Carbonate Sediments from the Bermuda Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlay, A. J.; Andersson, A. J.

    2016-02-01

    The contribution of biogenic carbonate sediment dissolution rates to overall net reef accretion/erosion (under both present and future oceanic pCO2 levels) has been strikingly neglected, despite experimental results indicating that sediment dissolution might be more sensitive to ocean acidification (OA) than calcification. Dissolution of carbonate sediments could impact net reef accretion rates as well as the formation and preservation of valuable marine and terrestrial ecosystems. Bulk sediment dissolution rates of samples from the Bermuda carbonate platform were measured in natural seawater at pCO2 values ranging from approximately 3500 μatm to 9000 μatm. This range of pCO2 levels incorporates values currently observed in porewaters on the Bermuda carbonate platform as well as a potential future increase in porewater pCO2 levels due to OA. Sediment samples from two different stations on the reef platform were analyzed for grain size and mineralogy. Dissolution rates of sediments in the dominant grain size fraction of the platform (500-1000 μm) from both stations ranged between 16.25 and 47.19 (± 0.27 to 0.79) μmoles g-1 hr-1 and are comparable to rates previously obtained from laboratory experiments on other natural carbonate sediments. At a pCO2 of 3500 μatm, rates from both samples were similar, despite their differing mineralogy. However, at pCO2 levels above 3500 μatm, the sediment sample with a greater weight percent of Mg-calcite had slightly higher dissolution rates. Despite many laboratory studies on biogenic carbonate dissolution, a significant disparity still exists between laboratory measurements and field observations. Performing additional controlled, laboratory experiments on natural sediment may help to elucidate the reasons for this disparity.

  16. CO2 Biogenic vs Anthropogenic Sectoral Contribution for INFLUX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Coto, I.; Prasad, K.; Hu, H.; Whetstone, J. R.; Miles, N. L.; Richardson, S.; Lauvaux, T.; Davis, K. J.; Turnbull, J. C.; Karion, A.; Sweeney, C.; Brewer, A.; Hardesty, M.; Cambaliza, M. O. L.; Shepson, P. B.; Patarasuk, R.; Gurney, K. R.

    2014-12-01

    The Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX) aims to use a top-down inversion methodology to quantify sources of Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions over an urban domain with high spatial and temporal resolution. This project is an experimental test bed which is intended to establish reliable methods for quantifying and validating GHG emissions independently of the inventory methods typically used for Measurement, Reporting and Verification (MRV) of pollution sources. Analyzing the contribution of different source types or sectors is a fundamental step in order to achieve an accuracy level desired for such MRV applications. This is especially challenging when attempting to determine anthropogenic emissions during the growing season since biological GHG fluxes reach a maximum at this time. To this end, the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF-ARW) version 3.5.1 was used along with a modified version of the Green House Gases chemistry module for simulating the CO2 mole fraction transport during September and October 2013. Sectoral anthropogenic CO2 emissions were obtained from Hestia 2012 and from Vulcan 2002 beyond the spatial coverage of Hestia. Biogenic CO2 emissions were simulated by using an augmented version of the "Vegetation Photosynthesis and Respiration Model" (VPRM) included in WRF-CHEM. An implementation of the unconstrained nonlinear global optimization method of Nelder and Mead was employed to find the optimum values for the VPRM parameters for each vegetation category by using data from Ameriflux eddy covariance flux towers. Here we present a preliminary assessment of the relative contribution of biological vs sectoral anthropogenic CO2 fluxes on the INFLUX measurements network. The simulations are compared to tower and aircraft measurements that include trace gases with the capacity to distinguish observationally anthropogenic and biogenic CO2 sources and sinks. In addition, an evaluation of the sensitivity of the sectoral attribution to meteorological

  17. Coprecipitation and isotopic fractionation of boron in modern biogenic carbonates

    SciTech Connect

    Vengosh, A. Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem ); Chivas, A.R.; McCulloch, M.T. ); Kolodny, Y.; Starinsky, A. )

    1991-10-01

    The abundances and isotopic composition of boron in modern, biogenic calcareous skeletons from the Gulf of Elat, Israel, the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, and in deep-sea sediments have been examined by negative thermal-ionization mass spectrometry. The selected species (Foraminifera, Pteropoda, corals, Gastropoda, and Pelecypoda) yield large variations in boron concentration that range from 1 ppm in gastropod shells to 80 ppm in corals. The variations of {delta}{sup 11}B may be controlled by isotopic exchange of boron species in which {sup 10}B is preferentially partitioned into the tetrahedral species, and coprecipitation of different proportions of trigonal and tetrahedral species in the calcium carbonates. The B content and {delta}{sup 11}B values of deep-sea sediments, Foraminifera tests, and corals are used to estimate the global oceanic sink of elemental boron by calcium carbonate deposition. As a result of enrichment of B in corals, a substantially higher biogenic sink of 6.4 {plus minus} 0.9 {times} 10{sup 10} g/yr is calculated for carbonates. This is only slightly lower than the sink for desorbable B in marine sediments (10 {times} 10{sup 10} g/yr) and approximately half that of altered oceanic crust (14 {times} 10{sup 10} g/yr). Thus, carbonates are an important sink for B in the oceans being {approximately}20% of the total sinks. The preferential incorporation of {sup 10}B into calcium carbonate results in oceanic {sup 11}B-enrichment, estimated as 1.2 {plus minus} 0.3 {times} 10{sup 12} per mil {center dot} g/yr. The boron-isotope composition of authigenic, well-preserved carbonate skeletons may provide a useful tool to record secular boron-isotope variations in seawater at various times in the geological record.

  18. The MUMBA campaign: measurements of urban, marine and biogenic air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paton-Walsh, Clare; Guérette, Élise-Andrée; Kubistin, Dagmar; Humphries, Ruhi; Wilson, Stephen R.; Dominick, Doreena; Galbally, Ian; Buchholz, Rebecca; Bhujel, Mahendra; Chambers, Scott; Cheng, Min; Cope, Martin; Davy, Perry; Emmerson, Kathryn; Griffith, David W. T.; Griffiths, Alan; Keywood, Melita; Lawson, Sarah; Molloy, Suzie; Rea, Géraldine; Selleck, Paul; Shi, Xue; Simmons, Jack; Velazco, Voltaire

    2017-06-01

    The Measurements of Urban, Marine and Biogenic Air (MUMBA) campaign took place in Wollongong, New South Wales (a small coastal city approximately 80 km south of Sydney, Australia) from 21 December 2012 to 15 February 2013. Like many Australian cities, Wollongong is surrounded by dense eucalyptus forest, so the urban airshed is heavily influenced by biogenic emissions. Instruments were deployed during MUMBA to measure the gaseous and aerosol composition of the atmosphere with the aim of providing a detailed characterisation of the complex environment of the ocean-forest-urban interface that could be used to test the skill of atmospheric models. The gases measured included ozone, oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane and many of the most abundant volatile organic compounds. The aerosol characterisation included total particle counts above 3 nm, total cloud condensation nuclei counts, mass concentration, number concentration size distribution, aerosol chemical analyses and elemental analysis.The campaign captured varied meteorological conditions, including two extreme heat events, providing a potentially valuable test for models of future air quality in a warmer climate. There was also an episode when the site sampled clean marine air for many hours, providing a useful additional measure of the background concentrations of these trace gases within this poorly sampled region of the globe. In this paper we describe the campaign, the meteorology and the resulting observations of atmospheric composition in general terms in order to equip the reader with a sufficient understanding of the Wollongong regional influences to use the MUMBA datasets as a case study for testing a chemical transport model. The data are available from PANGAEA (http://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.871982).

  19. Biophysics of Magnetic Orientation: Radical Pairs, Biogenic Magnetite, or both?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschvink, Joe

    2011-03-01

    Two major biophysical mechanisms for magnetoreception in terrestrial animals, one based on biogenic magnetite and another on radical-pair biochemical reactions, have been the subject of experiment and debate for the past 30 years. The magnetite hypothesis has stood the test of time: biogenic magnetite is synthesized biochemically in Bacteria, Protists, and numerous Animal phyla, as well as in some plants. Chains of single-domain crystals have been detected by clean-lab based SQUID magnetometry in animal tissues in all major phyla, followed by high-resolution TEM in selected model organisms, as well as by electrophysiological studies demonstrating the role of the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve in the magnetoreceptive process. Pulse-remagnetization - configured to uniquely flip the polarity of single-domain ferromagnets - has dramatic effects on the behavior of many birds, honeybees, mole rats, turtles, and bats, to cite a growing list. Magnetite-containing cells in the vicinity of these neurons in fish are now the subject of intense study by our consortium. The existence of a specialized class of magnetite-containing magnetoreceptor cells in animal tissues is no longer controversial. In contrast, less success has been achieved in gaining experimental support across a range of taxa for the radical-pair hypothesis. Although this mechanism was proposed to explain an early observation that birds would not respond to complete inversion of the magnetic vector, many organisms (even some birds) do indeed respond to the field polarity. We also note that few, if any, of these critical experiments have been done using fully double-blind methods. This is joint work with: M. M. Walker (University of Auckland, New Zealand) and M. Winklhofer (LMU Munich, Germany).

  20. Binding of biogenic and synthetic polyamines to β-lactoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Essemine, J; Hasni, I; Carpentier, R; Thomas, T J; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2011-08-01

    The bindings of biogenic polyamines spermine (spm), spermidine (spmd) and synthetic polyamines 3,7,11,15-tetrazaheptadecane·4HCl (BE-333) and 3,7,11,15,19-pentazahenicosane·5HCl (BE-3333) with β-lactoglobulin (β-LG) were determined in aqueous solution. FTIR, UV-vis, CD and fluorescence spectroscopic methods as well as molecular modeling were used to determine the polyamine binding sites and the effect of polyamine complexation on protein stability and secondary structure. Structural analysis showed that polyamines bind β-LG via both hydrophilic and hydrophobic contacts. Stronger polyamine-protein complexes formed with synthetic polyamines than biogenic polyamines, with overall binding constants of K(spm-β-LG)=3.2(±0.6)×10(4) M(-1), K(spmd-β-LG)=1.8(±0.5)×10(4) M(-1), K(BE-333-β-LG)=5.8(±0.3)×10(4) M(-1) and K(BE-3333-β-LG)=6.2(±0.05)×10(4) M(-1). Molecular modeling showed the participation of several amino acids in the polyamine complexes with the following order of polyamine-protein binding affinity: BE-3333>BE-333>spermine>spermidine, which correlates with their positively charged amino group content. Alteration of protein conformation was observed with a reduction of β-sheet from 57% (free protein) to 55-51%, and a major increase of turn structure from 13% (free protein) to ∼21% in the polyamine-β-LG complexes, indicating a partial protein unfolding.

  1. Rapid Detection and Identification of Biogenic Aerosol Releases and Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, J.; Macher, J.; Ghosal, S.; Ahmed, K.; Hemati, K.; Wall, S.; Kumagai, K.

    2011-12-01

    Biogenic aerosols can be important contributors to aerosol chemistry, cloud droplet and ice nucleation, absorption and scattering of radiation, human health and comfort, and plant, animal, and microbial ecology. Many types of bioaerosols, e.g., fungal spores, are released into the atmosphere in response to specific climatological and meteorological conditions. The rapid identification of bioaerosol releases is thus important for better characterization of the above phenomena, as well as enabling public officials to respond quickly and appropriately to releases of infectious agents or biological toxins. One approach to rapid and accurate bioaerosol detection is to employ sequential, automated samples that can be fed directly into an image acquisition and data analysis device. Raman spectroscopy-based identification of bioaerosols, automated analysis of microscopy images, and automated detection of near-monodisperse peaks in aerosol size-distribution data were investigated as complementary approaches to traditional, manual methods for the identification and counting of fungal and actinomycete spores. Manual light microscopy is a widely used analytical technique that is compatible with a number of air sample formats and requires minimal sample preparation. However, a major drawback is its dependence on a human analyst's ability to distinguish particles and accurately count, size, and identify them. Therefore, automated methods, such as those evaluated in this study, have the potential to provide cost-effective and rapid alternatives if demonstrated to be accurate and reliable. An exploratory examination of individual spores for several macro- and microfungi (those with and without large fruiting bodies) by Raman microspectroscopy found unique spectral features that were used to identify fungi to the genus level. Automated analyses of digital spore images accurately recognized and counted single fungal spores and clusters. An automated procedure to discriminate near

  2. Modeling biogenic gas bubbles formation and migration in coarse sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, S.

    2011-12-01

    Shujun Ye Department of Hydrosciences, School of Earth Sciences and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, China; sjye@nju.edu.cn Brent E. Sleep Department of Civil Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 1A4 CANADA; sleep@ecf.utoronto.ca Methane gas generation in porous media was investigated in an anaerobic two-dimensional sand-filled cell. Inoculation of the lower portion of the cell with a methanogenic culture and addition of methanol to the bottom of the cell led to biomass growth and formation of a gas phase. The formation, migration, distribution and saturation of gases in the cell were visualized by the charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. Gas generated at the bottom of the cell in the biologically active zone moved upwards in discrete fingers, so that gas phase saturations (gas-filled fraction of void space) in the biologically active zone at the bottom of the cell did not exceed 40-50%, while gas accumulation at the top of the cell produced gas phase saturations as high as 80%. Macroscopic invasion percolation (MIP) at near pore scale[Glass, et al., 2001; Kueper and McWhorter, 1992]was used to model gas bubbles growth in porous media. The nonwetting phase migration pathway can be yielded directly by MIP. MIP was adopted to simulate the expansion, fragmentation, and mobilization of gas clusters in the cell. The production of gas, and gas phash saturations were simulated by a continuum model - compositional simulator (COMPSIM) [Sleep and Sykes, 1993]. So a combination of a continuum model and a MIP model was used to simulate the formation, fragmentation and migration of biogenic gas bubbles. Key words: biogenic gas; two dimensional; porous media; MIP; COMPSIM

  3. Constraining Anthropogenic and Biogenic Emissions Using Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Kathleen M.

    Numerous gas-phase anthropogenic and biogenic compounds are emitted into the atmosphere. These gases undergo oxidation to form other gas-phase species and particulate matter. Whether directly or indirectly, primary pollutants, secondary gas-phase products, and particulate matter all pose health and environmental risks. In this work, ambient measurements conducted using chemical ionization mass spectrometry are used as a tool for investigating regional air quality. Ambient measurements of peroxynitric acid (HO2NO2) were conducted in Mexico City. A method of inferring the rate of ozone production, PO3, is developed based on observations of HO2NO 2, NO, and NO2. Comparison of this observationally based PO3 to a highly constrained photochemical box model indicates that regulations aimed at reducing ozone levels in Mexico City by reducing NOx concentrations may be effective at higher NO x levels than predicted using accepted photochemistry. Measurements of SO2 and particulate sulfate were conducted over the Los Angeles basin in 2008 and are compared to measurements made in 2002. A large decrease in SO2 concentration and a change in spatial distribution are observed. Nevertheless, only a modest reduction in sulfate concentration is observed at ground sites within the basin. Possible explanations for these trends are investigated. Two techniques, single and triple quadrupole chemical ionization mass spectrometry, were used to quantify ambient concentrations of biogenic oxidation products, hydroxyacetone and glycolaldehyde. The use of these techniques demonstrates the advantage of triple quadrupole mass spectrometry for separation of mass analogues, provided the collision-induced daughter ions are sufficiently distinct. Enhancement ratios of hydroxyacetone and glycolaldehyde in Californian biomass burning plumes are presented as are concentrations of these compounds at a rural ground site downwind of Sacramento.

  4. An intercomparison of biogenic emissions estimates from BEIS2 and BIOME: Reconciling the differences

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkinson, J.G.; Emigh, R.A.; Pierce, T.E.

    1996-12-31

    Biogenic emissions play a critical role in urban and regional air quality. For instance, biogenic emissions contribute upwards of 76% of the daily hydrocarbon emissions in the Atlanta, Georgia airshed. The Biogenic Emissions Inventory System-Version 2.0 (BEIS2) and the Biogenic Model for Emissions (BIOME) are two models that compute biogenic emissions estimates. BEIS2 is a FORTRAN-based system, and BIOME is an ARC/INFO{reg_sign} - and SAS{reg_sign}-based system. Although the technical formulations of the models are similar, the models produce different biogenic emissions estimates for what appear to be essentially the same inputs. The goals of our study are the following: (1) Determine why BIOME and BEIS2 produce different emissions estimates; (2) Attempt to understand the impacts that the differences have on the emissions estimates; (3) Reconcile the differences where possible; and (4) Present a framework for the use of BEIS2 and BIOME. In this study, we used the Coastal Oxidant Assessment for Southeast Texas (COAST) biogenics data which were supplied to us courtesy of the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC), and we extracted the BEIS2 data for the same domain. We compared the emissions estimates of the two models using their respective data sets BIOME Using TNRCC data and BEIS2 using BEIS2 data.

  5. Occurrence of biogenic amines in Miso, Japanese traditional fermented soybean paste.

    PubMed

    Byun, Bo Young; Mah, Jae-Hyung

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze overall contents of biogenic amines in Miso and thereby evaluate the safety of the food. Through HPLC analysis of 22 different Miso products, it was found that most samples had low biogenic amine contents. However, some samples contained both histamine and tyramine close to hazardous levels of the amines, which indicate that the amounts of biogenic amines in Miso are not completely within the safe level for human health. Meanwhile, the biogenic amine contents showed no clear relationship with physicochemical parameters, whereas they revealed a good relationship with the ratio of soybean to other grains used in raw material. Thus, it turned out that biogenic amine contents in Miso are primarily affected by the ratio of raw ingredients, especially soybeans. The aerobic plate counts of Miso samples ranged from 3 to 8 Log CFU/g, and all the strains isolated from Miso samples were found to produce biogenic amines. Most strains were identified to be Bacillus subtilis, often regarded as the predominant contaminant bacteria in Miso, and highly capable of producing tyramine and spermine. Taken together, therefore, this study suggests that variability of biogenic amine contents in Miso are primarily attributed to the ratio of raw ingredients in the food that affects the relative contribution level of bacterial contaminants to the contents. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  6. Iron-Refractory Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz Keskin, Ebru; Yenicesu, İdil

    2015-01-01

    Iron is essential for life because it is indispensable for several biological reactions, such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. Over the past few years, our understanding of iron metabolism and its regulation has changed dramatically. New disorders of iron metabolism have emerged, and the role of iron as a cofactor in other disorders has begun to be recognized. The study of genetic conditions such as hemochromatosis and iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) has provided crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis. In the future, these advances may be exploited to improve treatment of both genetic and acquired iron disorders. IRIDA is caused by mutations in TMPRSS6, the gene encoding matriptase-2, which downregulates hepcidin expression under conditions of iron deficiency. The typical features of this disorder are hypochromic, microcytic anemia with a very low mean corpuscular volume of erythrocytes, low transferrin saturation, no (or inadequate) response to oral iron, and only a partial response to parenteral iron. In contrast to classic iron deficiency anemia, serum ferritin levels are usually low-normal, and serum or urinary hepcidin levels are inappropriately high for the degree of anemia. Although the number of cases reported thus far in the literature does not exceed 100, this disorder is considered the most common of the “atypical” microcytic anemias. The aim of this review is to share the current knowledge on IRIDA and increase awareness in this field. PMID:25805669

  7. Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz Keskin, Ebru; Yenicesu, İdil

    2015-03-05

    Iron is essential for life because it is indispensable for several biological reactions, such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. Over the past few years, our understanding of iron metabolism and its regulation has changed dramatically. New disorders of iron metabolism have emerged, and the role of iron as a cofactor in other disorders has begun to be recognized. The study of genetic conditions such as hemochromatosis and iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) has provided crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis. In the future, these advances may be exploited to improve treatment of both genetic and acquired iron disorders. IRIDA is caused by mutations in TMPRSS6, the gene encoding matriptase-2, which downregulates hepcidin expression under conditions of iron deficiency. The typical features of this disorder are hypochromic, microcytic anemia with a very low mean corpuscular volume of erythrocytes, low transferrin saturation, no (or inadequate) response to oral iron, and only a partial response to parenteral iron. In contrast to classic iron deficiency anemia, serum ferritin levels are usually low-normal, and serum or urinary hepcidin levels are inappropriately high for the degree of anemia. Although the number of cases reported thus far in the literature does not exceed 100, this disorder is considered the most common of the "atypical" microcytic anemias. The aim of this review is to share the current knowledge on IRIDA and increase awareness in this field.

  8. Impacts of biogenic emissions of VOC and NOx on tropospheric ozone during summertime in eastern China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin'geng; Han, Zhiwei; Wang, Tijian; Zhang, Renjian

    2008-05-20

    This study is intended to understand and quantify the impacts of biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) and nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) on the formation of tropospheric ozone during summertime in eastern China. The model system consists of the non-hydrostatic mesoscale meteorological model (MM5) and a tropospheric chemical and transport model (TCTM) with the updated carbon-bond chemical reaction mechanism (CBM-IV). The spatial resolution of the system domain is 30 km x 30 km. The impacts of biogenic emissions are investigated by performing simulations (36 h) with and without biogenic emissions, while anthropogenic emissions are constant. The results indicate that biogenic emissions have remarkable impacts on surface ozone in eastern China. In big cities and their surrounding areas, surface ozone formation tends to be VOC-limited. The increase in ozone concentration by biogenic VOC is generally 5 ppbv or less, but could be more than 10 ppbv or even 30 ppbv in some local places. The impacts of biogenic NO(x) are different or even contrary in different regions, depending on the relative availability of NO(x) and VOC. The surface ozone concentrations reduced or increased by the biogenic NO(x) could be as much as 10 ppbv or 20 ppbv, respectively. The impacts of biogenic emissions on ozone aloft are generally restricted to the boundary layer and generally more obvious during the daytime than during the nighttime. This study is useful for understanding the role of biogenic emissions and for planning strategies for surface ozone abatement in eastern China. Due to limitations of the emission inventories used and the highly non-linear nature of zone formation, however, some uncertainties remain in the results.

  9. Prevention of iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, L

    1994-12-01

    This chapter discusses different methods to prevent iron deficiency--to reduce iron losses (e.g. reducing menstrual iron losses by using a contraceptive pill or combating of hookworm infestation) or to increase iron absorption. Iron absorption can be increased (1) by modifying the composition of meals--increasing the content of dietary factors enhancing iron absorption (e.g. meat and ascorbic acid) or reducing the content of factors inhibiting iron absorption such as phytate and iron-binding phenolic compounds, (2) by increasing the iron content of the diet by fortification with iron, or by (3) supplementation with iron tablets. Several factors to consider in the choice of strategy are discussed such as the importance of the bioavailability of the diet for the efficacy of iron fortification, the choice of vehicle for iron fortification that is compatible with the iron compound used, the feasibility to increase the bioavailability of the dietary iron by modification of the composition of the diet and the short time available in pregnancy to ensure a sufficient supply of the extra iron needed limiting the effective measures available to supplementation with iron tablets.

  10. What, Where, When, Who and How: Accounting for Biogenic CO2 Emissions Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohrel, S. B.

    2013-12-01

    The world is facing a future with a changing climate as well as increasing energy needs. Many countries, including the United States, are therefore considering an increased role of biomass in domestic energy portfolios. Accounting for emissions related to biomass production and use for energy is a complex issue: determining the extent to which biomass utilization can contribute to meeting energy needs while not contributing additional GHG emissions to the atmosphere necessitates further research. Such analysis becomes more challenging when evaluating biogenic feedstocks with long rotations (i.e., woody biomass). Detailed analysis and new accounting methods are needed in order to better assess and understand the potential implications of increased bioenergy utilization in the United States energy portfolio. In response to the EPA's 2011 Draft Accounting Framework for Biogenic CO2 Emissions from Stationary Sources, the Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel (BCE Panel) appointed by the Science Advisory Board (2013) found that 'Carbon neutrality cannot be assumed for all biomass energy a priori. There are circumstances in which biomass is grown, harvested and combusted in a carbon neutral fashion but carbon neutrality is not an appropriate a priori assumption; it is a conclusion that should be reached only after considering a particular feedstock's production and consumption cycle. There is considerable heterogeneity in feedstock types, sources and production methods and thus net biogenic carbon emissions will vary considerably.' In that light, this study discusses the current policy discussion on biogenic feedstock use for energy in the United States. It then evaluates the question: how can we account for stationary source biogenic CO2 emissions while considering the biological cycling of carbon on the biogenic feedstock production landscape? The analysis discusses current biogenic feedstock usage in the U.S. and potential future impacts of increased biogenic feedstock

  11. Recent progresses in layer-by-layer assembled biogenic capsules and their applications.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Mingjun; Zhao, Jie; Shao, Jingxin; Du, Cuiling; Cui, Wei; Duan, Li; Qi, Wei; Li, Junbai

    2017-02-01

    In this review, we summarize the recent progress made in the fabrication of pure natural materials such as biogenic capsules. Unlike polyelectrolyte capsules, biogenic capsules are primarily prepared with pure natural components using layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly on sacrificial templates. These capsules have been developed as smart materials for guest molecule encapsulation and delivery in the last two decades. With the extreme demands on biodegradability and biocompatibility, biogenic capsules exhibit unique properties that can be integrated with special ligands or conjugated functional groups for the design of intelligent platforms, significantly enriching their functions and applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A new test procedure for biogenic sulfuric acid corrosion of concrete

    PubMed

    Vincke; Verstichel; Monteny; Verstraete

    1999-01-01

    A new test method is described for biogenic sulfuric acid corrosion of concrete, more specifically in sewer conditions. The aim of the new test method is the development of an accelerated and reproducible procedure for monitoring the resistance of different types of concrete with regard to biogenic sulfuric acid corrosion. This experimental procedure reflects worst case conditions by providing besides H2S, also an enrichment of thiobacilli and biologically produced sulfur. By simulating the cyclic processes occurring in sewer pipes, significant differences between concrete mixtures could be detected after 51 days. Concrete modified by a styrene-acrylic ester polymer demonstrated a higher resistance against biogenic sulfuric acid attack.

  13. Biogenic nanoparticles: copper, copper oxides, copper sulphides, complex copper nanostructures and their applications.

    PubMed

    Rubilar, Olga; Rai, Mahendra; Tortella, Gonzalo; Diez, Maria Cristina; Seabra, Amedea B; Durán, Nelson

    2013-09-01

    Copper nanoparticles have been the focus of intensive study due to their potential applications in diverse fields including biomedicine, electronics, and optics. Copper-based nanostructured materials have been used in conductive films, lubrification, nanofluids, catalysis, and also as potent antimicrobial agent. The biogenic synthesis of metallic nanostructured nanoparticles is considered to be a green and eco-friendly technology since neither harmful chemicals nor high temperatures are involved in the process. The present review discusses the synthesis of copper nanostructured nanoparticles by bacteria, fungi, and plant extracts, showing that biogenic synthesis is an economically feasible, simple and non-polluting process. Applications for biogenic copper nanoparticles are also discussed.

  14. Influence of iron sulfides on abiotic oxidation of UO2 by nitrite and dissolved oxygen in natural sediments.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Julian; Bi, Yuqiang; Hayes, Kim F

    2015-01-20

    Iron sulfide precipitates formed under sulfate reducing conditions may buffer U(IV) insoluble solid phases from reoxidation after oxidants re-enter the reducing zone. In this study, sediment column experiments were performed to quantify the effect of biogenic mackinawite on U(IV) stability in the presence of nitrite or dissolved oxygen (DO). Two columns, packed with sediment from an abandoned U contaminated mill tailings site near Rifle, CO, were biostimulated for 62 days with an electron donor (3 mM acetate) in the presence (BRS+) and absence (BRS−) of 7 mM sulfate. The bioreduced sediment was supplemented with synthetic uraninite (UO2(s)), sterilized by gamma-irradiation, and then subjected to a sequential oxidation by nitrite and DO. Biogenic iron sulfides produced in the BRS+ column, mostly as mackinawite, inhibited U(IV) reoxidation and mobilization by both nitrite and oxygen. Most of the influent nitrite (0.53 mM) exited the columns without oxidizing UO2, while a small amount of nitrite was consumed by iron sulfides precipitates. An additional 10-day supply of 0.25 mM DO influent resulted in the release of about 10% and 49% of total U in BRS+ and BRS– columns, respectively. Influent DO was effectively consumed by biogenic iron sulfides in the BRS+ column, while DO and a large U spike were detected after only a brief period in the effluent in the BRS– column.

  15. Iron and Your Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... vegetarian diet might also need added iron. What's Iron Deficiency? Iron deficiency is when a person's body doesn't have ... fact, many teenage girls are at risk for iron deficiency — even if they have normal periods — if their ...

  16. Iron stress in plants.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Erin L; Guerinot, Mary

    2002-07-30

    Although iron is an essential nutrient for plants, its accumulation within cells can be toxic. Plants, therefore, respond to both iron deficiency and iron excess by inducing expression of different gene sets. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of iron homeostasis in plants gained through functional genomic approaches

  17. Distribution of dissolved iron during the natural iron-fertilization experiment KEOPS (Kerguelen Plateau, Southern Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, Stéphane; Sarthou, Géraldine; Laan, Patrick

    2008-03-01

    The Southern Ocean is the largest high-nutrient low-chlorophyll (HNLC) region of the world ocean. It is now well recognized that the low biological productivity in this region is mainly due to the limitation of phytoplankton growth by iron. However, in the core of the Southern Ocean, a massive bloom occurs annually above the Kerguelen Plateau. In the context of KEOPS (Kerguelen Plateau and Ocean compared Study) we investigated the three-dimensional distribution of dissolved iron (DFe) concentrations southeast of the island. We show that in surface waters, DFe was low and not significantly different above and outside the plateau (0.090±0.034 and 0.073±0.014 nM, respectively). By contrast, below 150 m major differences in vertical profiles of DFe were observed. The deep waters above the plateau were clearly enriched, with DFe concentrations up to 0.6 nM near the seafloor. The regeneration from sinking biogenic material and the input from the sediments are very likely the major processes delivering DFe to the deep water. The deep iron-rich reservoir existing above the plateau was responsible for the natural iron fertilization of the surface water by two different mechanisms: (i) winter mixing provided 5 times more DFe to the surface waters above the plateau than outside and (ii) enhanced vertical gradients of DFe and elevated vertical diffusivity resulted in an 8-fold higher diapycnal diffusive flux. The natural iron fertilization presented major differences from artificial iron-fertilization experiments carried out in the Southern Ocean. The amount of DFe required to stimulate the biological activity is much less and the mode of addition is clearly different. The quantification of the excess of DFe supplied in the naturally fertilized area leads to the conclusion that the natural iron fertilization is 10-150 times more efficient to export carbon below 200 m than in artificial fertilization experiments. The bloom above the Kerguelen Plateau was contingent to iron

  18. Parenteral iron dextran therapy.

    PubMed

    Kumpf, V J; Holland, E G

    1990-02-01

    Parenteral iron therapy is indicated in patients with iron-deficiency anemia associated with conditions that interfere with the ingestion or absorption of oral iron. Replacement doses of iron required to replenish iron stores are based on body weight and the observed hemoglobin value. Methods of administering iron dextran are reviewed, including intramuscular and intravenous injections of the undiluted drug, intravenous infusion of a diluted preparation, and as an addition to parenteral nutrition solutions. The overall incidence of adverse reactions associated with the parenteral administration of iron is low, but the potential for an anaphylactic reaction requires that an initial test dose be given followed by careful patient observation.

  19. Iron Deficiency Anemia.

    PubMed

    DeLoughery, Thomas G

    2017-03-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the most common causes of anemia. The 2 main etiologies of iron deficiency are blood loss due to menstrual periods and blood loss due to gastrointestinal bleeding. Beyond anemia, lack of iron has protean manifestations, including fatigue, hair loss, and restless legs. The most efficient test for the diagnosis of iron deficiency is the serum ferritin. Iron replacement can be done orally, or in patients in whom oral iron is not effective or contraindicated, with intravenous iron. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Iron status of vegetarians.

    PubMed

    Craig, W J

    1994-05-01

    An appropriately planned well-balanced vegetarian diet is compatible with an adequate iron status. Although the iron stores of vegetarians may be reduced, the incidence of iron-deficiency anemia in vegetarians is not significantly different from that in omnivores. Restrictive vegetarian diets (eg, macrobiotic) are associated with more widespread iron-deficiency anemia. Western vegetarians who consume a variety of foods have a better iron status than do those in developing countries who consume a limited diet based on unleavened, unrefined cereals. Whereas phytates, polyphenolics, and other plant constituents found in vegetarian diets inhibit nonheme-iron absorption, vitamin C, citric acid, and other organic acids facilitate nonheme-iron absorption.

  1. Parenteral iron supplementation.

    PubMed

    Kumpf, V J

    1996-08-01

    Indications for the use of parenteral iron are limited to conditions in which the oral supplementation of iron is not possible or fails. An overview of iron balance and iron requirements is presented to describe situations in which iron supplementation may be required. When parenteral iron supplementation is required, careful attention to proper dosing and administration is necessary to optimize efficacy and safety. The purpose of this article is to review the literature regarding the clinical use of parenteral iron therapy and provide guidelines on dosing and administration. Methods of iron dextran administration, including the IV and intramuscular injection of undiluted drug and total dose infusion, are compared. Complications associated with the use of parenteral iron are also be reviewed. Finally, the use of iron supplementation in patients receiving parenteral nutrition care explored.

  2. Airborne flux measurements of biogenic isoprene over California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misztal, P. K.; Karl, T.; Weber, R.; Jonsson, H. H.; Guenther, A. B.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2014-10-01

    Biogenic isoprene fluxes were measured onboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft as part of the California Airborne Biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) Emission Research in Natural Ecosystem Transects (CABERNET) campaign during June 2011. The airborne virtual disjunct eddy covariance (AvDEC) approach used measurements from a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) and a wind radome probe to directly determine fluxes of isoprene over 7400 km of flight paths focusing on areas of California predicted to have the largest emissions. The fast Fourier transform (FFT) approach was used to calculate fluxes of isoprene over long transects of more than 15 km, most commonly between 50 and 150 km. The continuous wavelet transformation (CWT) approach was used over the same transects to also calculate instantaneous isoprene fluxes with localization of both frequency and time independent of non-stationarities. Fluxes were generally measured by flying consistently at 400 m ± 50 m (a.g.l.) altitude, and extrapolated to the surface according to the determined flux divergence determined in the racetrack-stacked profiles. The wavelet-derived surface fluxes of isoprene averaged to 2 km spatial resolution showed good correspondence to basal emission factor (BEF) land-cover data sets used to drive BVOC emission models. The surface flux of isoprene was close to zero over Central Valley crops and desert shrublands, but was very high (up to 15 mg m-2 h-1) above oak woodlands, with clear dependence of emissions on temperature and oak density. Isoprene concentrations of up to 8 ppb were observed at aircraft height on the hottest days and over the dominant source regions. Even though the isoprene emissions from agricultural crop regions, shrublands, and coniferous forests were extremely low, observations at the Walnut Grove tower south of Sacramento demonstrate that isoprene oxidation products from the high emitting regions in the surrounding oak woodlands accumulate at night in

  3. 77 FR 21772 - Notification of Two Public Teleconferences of the Science Advisory Board Biogenic Carbon...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ... Biogenic CO2 Emissions from Stationary Sources (September 2011), please contact Dr. Jennifer Jenkins, Climate Change Division, at jenkins.jennifer@epa.gov or 202-343-9361 or Sara Ohrel at ohrel.sara@epa.gov...

  4. BIOGENIC CONTRIBUTION TO PM-2.5 AMBIENT AEROSOL FROM RADIOCARBON MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Knowledge of the relative contributions of biogenic versus anthropogenic sources to ambient aerosol is of great interest in the formulation of strategies to achieve nationally mandated air quality standards. Radiocarbon (Carbon-14) measurements provide a means to quantify the ...

  5. Biogenic amines formation in Streptococcus thermophilus isolated from home-made natural yogurt.

    PubMed

    Gezginc, Yekta; Akyol, Ismail; Kuley, Esmeray; Özogul, Fatih

    2013-05-01

    Twelve different biogenic amines formation in 58 isolates of Streptococcus thermophilus from home-made natural yogurt were investigated in histidine (HDB) and lysine decarboxylase broth (LDB). All S. thermophilus isolates had an ability to produce twelve different biogenic amines in HDB and LDB. Most of the S. thermophilus isolates formed low amounts of histamine (1-50 mg/L) from histidine. Apart from one isolate, S. thermophilus produced tyramine at low (47 isolates) and medium (10 isolates) levels. The amount of each specific biogenic amine produced by S. thermophilus was generally lower than 100 mg L(-1). Also, the presence of hdcA gene was investigated using PCR technique and relation between gene and histamine production was conducted in S. thermophilus isolates. This study showed that most of the S. thermophilus isolates have the ability to form biogenic amines, especially histamine, and tyramine, which is an important consideration when selecting strains as starter cultures.

  6. Rn-222 tracing and stable isotope measurements of biogenic gas fluxes from methane saturated sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martens, Christopher S.; Green, C. D.; Blair, Neal; Chanton, J. P.

    1985-01-01

    Transport of reduced biogenic gases from anoxic sediments and soils to the atmosphere can be quantitatively studied through measurement of radon-222/radium-226 disequilibrium. In previous work, seasonal variations in biogenic gas transport mechanisms, net fluxes and overall composition were documented. Now presented are direct field measurements of radon-222 activity in gases exiting organic rich sediments which show their usefulness for tracing of the stripping of dissolved biogenic gases from within the sediment column and transport via bubble ebullition. Methane is depleted in deuterium during the summer as compared with winter months and is in general lighter than in most marine sediments signaling the probable importance of acetate as an important precursor molecule. The significant seasonal isotopic variations observed illustrate the importance of understanding mechanisms and rates of biogenic gas production in order to interpret observed tropospheric isotopic data.

  7. Rn-222 tracing and stable isotope measurements of biogenic gas fluxes from methane saturated sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martens, Christopher S.; Green, C. D.; Blair, Neal; Chanton, J. P.

    1985-01-01

    Transport of reduced biogenic gases from anoxic sediments and soils to the atmosphere can be quantitatively studied through measurement of radon-222/radium-226 disequilibrium. In previous work, seasonal variations in biogenic gas transport mechanisms, net fluxes and overall composition were documented. Now presented are direct field measurements of radon-222 activity in gases exiting organic rich sediments which show their usefulness for tracing of the stripping of dissolved biogenic gases from within the sediment column and transport via bubble ebullition. Methane is depleted in deuterium during the summer as compared with winter months and is in general lighter than in most marine sediments signaling the probable importance of acetate as an important precursor molecule. The significant seasonal isotopic variations observed illustrate the importance of understanding mechanisms and rates of biogenic gas production in order to interpret observed tropospheric isotopic data.

  8. A32A-0126: A BIOGENIC ROLE IN EXPOSURE TO TWO TOXIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biogenic sources play an important role in ozone and particulate concentrations through emissions of volatile organic compounds. The same emissions also contribute to chronic toxic exposures from formaldehyde and acetaldehyde because each compound arises through primary and sec...

  9. Effect of intense magnetic fields on the convection of biogenic guanine crystals in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaka, M.; Mizukawa, Y.

    2015-05-01

    In this study, the basic magneto-optic properties of biogenic microcrystals in aqueous media were investigated. Microcrystals, mica plates, silica, and microcrystals from a diatom cell and biogenic guanine crystals from goldfish showed light scattering inhibition when the crystals were observed in water under a 5 T magnetic field and dark-field illumination. In particular, in 50% ethanol/water medium, convection of the biogenic guanine particle aggregates was reversibly inhibited when the microcrystal suspension was exposed to a 5 T magnetic field. Microscopic observation comparing the biogenic guanine crystals in water with 95% ethanol or 99% acetone revealed that light flickering on the surface of the crystals was affected by the surface interaction of the crystal with the surrounding medium. By considering both the magnetic orientation of the microcrystals and the possible interactions of crystals with the surrounding medium, a magnetically controllable fluidic tracer was suggested.

  10. EVALUATION OF SOLID ADSORBENTS FOR THE COLLECTION AND ANALYSES OF AMBIENT BIOGENIC VOLATILE ORGANICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Micrometeorological flux measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) usually require that large volumes of air be collected (whole air samples) or focused during the sampling process (cryogenic trapping or gas-solid partitioning on adsorbents) in order to achiev...

  11. BIOGENIC CONTRIBUTION TO PM-2.5 AMBIENT AEROSOL FROM RADIOCARBON MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Knowledge of the relative contributions of biogenic versus anthropogenic sources to ambient aerosol is of great interest in the formulation of strategies to achieve nationally mandated air quality standards. Radiocarbon (Carbon-14) measurements provide a means to quantify the ...

  12. A32A-0126: A BIOGENIC ROLE IN EXPOSURE TO TWO TOXIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biogenic sources play an important role in ozone and particulate concentrations through emissions of volatile organic compounds. The same emissions also contribute to chronic toxic exposures from formaldehyde and acetaldehyde because each compound arises through primary and sec...

  13. Enhanced biogenic emissions of nitric oxide and nitrous oxide following surface biomass burning

    Treesearch

    Iris C. Anderson; Joel S. Levine; Mark A. Poth; Philip J. Riggan

    1988-01-01

    Recent measurements indicate significantly enhanced biogenic soil emissions of both nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) following surface burning. These enhanced fluxes persisted for at least 6 months following the burn. Simultaneous measurements indicate enhanced levels of...

  14. Biogenic FeS accelerates reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32.

    PubMed

    Huo, Ying-Chao; Li, Wen-Wei; Chen, Chang-Bin; Li, Chen-Xuan; Zeng, Raymond; Lau, Tai-Chu; Huang, Tian-Yin

    2016-12-01

    Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) widely exist in the subsurface environment and are involved in various contaminant degradation and element geochemical cycling processes. Recent studies suggest that DMRB can biosynthesize metal nanoparticles during metal reduction, but it is unclear yet how such biogenic nanomaterials would affect their decontamination behaviors. In this study, we found that the dechlorination rates of carbon tetrachloride (CT) by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 was significantly increased by 8 times with the formation of biogenic ferrous sulfide (FeS) nanoparticles. The pasteurized biogenic FeS enabled 5 times faster dechlorination than abiotic FeS that had larger sizes and irregular structure, confirming a significant contribution of the biogenic FeS to CT bioreduction resulting from its good dispersion and relatively high dechlorination activity. This study highlights a potentially important role of biosynthesized nanoparticles in environmental bioremediation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Determination of biogenic amines in fish tissues by ion-exchange chromatography with conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Cinquina, A L; Calì, A; Longo, F; De Santis, L; Severoni, A; Abballe, F

    2004-04-02

    Some biogenic amines, such as putrescine, cadaverine, spermidine and histamine, have been found to be useful as quality indices for the decomposition of fish, so research on the simultaneous analysis of various biogenic amines in food is of interest and importance. The intake of histamine may cause an allergic intoxication known as "scombroid poisoning" while secondary biogenic amines can potentiate the toxicity of histamine and in addition can react with nitrite to form carcinogenic nitrosamines. A new method for the simultaneous determination of underivatized biogenic amines based on ion-exchange chromatography with conductivity detector has been developed. The proposed method offers a number of advantages over previous pulsed amperometric detection and integrated pulsed amperometric detection methods such as simpler extraction procedure and sharp peaks. Separations were performed on a new low hydrophobic weak cation-exchange analytical column. This technique is simple, rapid and useful for routine checks in repetitive analyses.

  16. Identification and Validation of Biogenic Preservation: Defining Constraints Within Martian Mineralogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perl, S. M.; Vaishampayan, P. A.; Corsetti, F. A.; Piazza, O.; Ahmed, M.; Willis, P.; Creamer, J. S.; Williford, K. W.; Flannery, D. T.; Tuite, M. L.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Bhartia, R.; Baxter, B. K.; Butler, J.; Hodyss, R.; Berelson, W. M.; Nealson, K. H.

    2016-05-01

    This investigation seeks to confine the limits of preservation potential within evaporate minerals by performing analyses to determine the extent of biological retention, in-situ validation of biogenic matter, and volumetric examination of clays.

  17. EVALUATION OF SOLID ADSORBENTS FOR THE COLLECTION AND ANALYSES OF AMBIENT BIOGENIC VOLATILE ORGANICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Micrometeorological flux measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) usually require that large volumes of air be collected (whole air samples) or focused during the sampling process (cryogenic trapping or gas-solid partitioning on adsorbents) in order to achiev...

  18. Sludge conditioning using biogenic flocculant produced by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans for enhancement in dewaterability.

    PubMed

    Kurade, Mayur B; Murugesan, Kumarasamy; Selvam, Ammaiyappan; Yu, Shuk-Man; Wong, Jonathan W C

    2016-10-01

    Biogenic flocculant produced by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was used for sludge conditioning to improve the dewaterability of anaerobically-digested sludge, and its efficiency was compared with commercial cationic polyacrylamide (PAM). Biogenic flocculant rapidly reduced the pH and increased the oxidation-reduction potential of sludge. Capillary suction time (CST) and specific resistant to filtration (SRF) of sludge was decreased by 74% and 89%, respectively, compared with control; and the reductions were 58% CST and 67% SRF higher when compared with commercial polymer. Biogenic treatment improved the sludge calorific value by 13%, and also reduced the unpleasant odor. The small-scale mechanical filter press study showed that the biogenic flocculant can reduce the moisture content of sludge to 70%, and improve the clarity of the filtrate in terms of removal of total suspended solids and total dissolved solids when compared with synthetic polymer treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Identifying and Quantifying Chemical Forms of Sediment-Bound Ferrous Iron.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, M.; Kent, D. B.; Bekins, B. A.; Cozzarelli, I.; Ng, G. H. C.

    2015-12-01

    Aqueous Fe(II) produced by dissimilatory iron reduction comprises only a small fraction of total biogenic Fe(II) within an aquifer. Most biogenic Fe(II) is bound to sediments on ion exchange sites; as surface complexes and, possibly, surface precipitates; or incorporated into solid phases (e.g., siderite, magnetite). Different chemical forms of sediment-bound Fe(II) have different reactivities (e.g., with dissolved oxygen) and their formation or destruction by sorption/desorption and precipitation/dissolution is coupled to different solutes (e.g., major cations, H+, carbonate). We are quantifying chemical forms of sediment-bound Fe(II) using previously published extractions, novel extractions, and experimental studies (e.g., Fe isotopic exchange). Sediments are from Bemidji, Minnesota, where biodegradation of hydrocarbons from a burst oil pipeline has driven extensive dissimilatory Fe(III) reduction, and sites potentially impacted by unconventional oil and gas development. Generally, minimal Fe(II) was mobilized from ion exchange sites (batch desorption with MgCl2 and repeated desorption with NH4Cl). A < 2mm sediment fraction from the iron-reducing zone at Bemidji had 1.8umol/g Fe(II) as surface complexes or carbonate phases (sodium acetate at pH 5) of which ca. 13% was present as surface complexes (FerroZine extractions). Total bioavailable Fe(III) and biogenic Fe(II) (HCl extractions) was 40-50 umole/g on both background and iron-reducing zone sediments . Approximately half of the HCl-extractable Fe from Fe-reducing zone sediments was Fe(II) whereas 12 - 15% of Fe extracted from background sediments was present as Fe(II). One-third to one-half of the total biogenic Fe(II) extracted from sediments collected from a Montana prairie pothole located downgradient from a produced-water disposal pit was present as surface-complexed Fe(II).

  20. Validation of an HPLC Analytical Method for Determination of Biogenic Amines in Agricultural Products and Monitoring of Biogenic Amines in Korean Fermented Agricultural Products

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Hyeock; Park, Jung Hyuck; Choi, Ari; Hwang, Han-Joon

    2015-01-01

    An HPLC analytical method was validated for the quantitative determination of biogenic amines in agricultural products. Four agricultural foods, including apple juice, Juk, corn oil and peanut butter, were selected as food matrices based on their water and fat contents (i.e., non-fatty liquid, non-fatty solid, fatty liquid and fatty solid, respectively). The precision, accuracy, recovery, limit of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were determined to test the validity of an HPLC procedure for the determination of biogenic amines, including tryptamine, β-phenylethylamine, putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, tyramine, spermidine and spermine, in each matrix. The LODs and LOQs for the biogenic amines were within the range of 0.01~0.10 mg/kg and 0.02~0.31 mg/kg, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of intraday for biogenic amine concentrations ranged from 1.86 to 5.95%, whereas the RSD of interday ranged from 2.08 to 5.96%. Of the matrices spiked with biogenic amines, corn oil with tyramine and Juk with putrescine exhibited the least accuracy of 84.85% and recovery rate of 89.63%, respectively, at the lowest concentration (10 mg/kg). Therefore, the validation results fulfilled AOAC criteria and recommendations. Subsequently, the method was applied to the analysis of biogenic amines in fermented agricultural products for a total dietary survey in Korea. Although the results revealed that Korean traditional soy sauce and Doenjang contained relatively high levels of histamine, the amounts are of no concern if these fermented agricultural products serve as condiments. PMID:26483889

  1. Applications of Satellite Remote Sensing Data for Biogenic Emission Estimates in Southeastern Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, M. S.; Howard, T.; Mullins, G.; McDonald-Buller, E.; Allen, D. T.

    2007-12-01

    Biogenic hydrocarbons, including isoprene, monoterpenes, and oxygenated compounds, are emitted in substantial quantities by vegetation and dominate the overall volatile organic compound emission inventory in Southeastern Texas. Spatial distributions of biogenic emissions in Texas are heterogeneous, and biogenic emission processes are affected by the characterization of land cover, leaf area index, drought stress, and surface temperatures. On a regional scale, biogenic emissions, particularly isoprene, in the presence of high levels of nitrogen oxides (NOx), will produce elevated ground-level ozone concentrations. The sensitivity of biogenic emission estimates and air quality model predictions to the characterization of land use/land cover (LULC) in southeastern Texas is examined. A LULC database has been developed for the region based on source imagery collected by the Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper-Plus sensor between 1999 and 2003, and data from field studies used for species identification and quantification of biomass densities. This database and the LULC database currently used in regulatory air quality models by the State of Texas are compared. Effects of the LULC data on biogenic emission estimates and modeled ozone concentrations are examined using the Global Biosphere Emissions and Interactions System and the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with extensions during an August 22-September 6, 2000 episode developed for the Houston/Galveston area. These results are also compared to biogenic emission estimates from the recently created Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN), which includes a global vegetation map compiled from recent satellite data and ecosystem inventories. Biogenic emissions estimated from the new LULC dataset showed good general spatial agreement with those from the currently used LULC dataset but significantly lower emissions (~40% less hourly emissions across the modeling domain), primarily due to differences in

  2. Magnetic properties of iron minerals produced by natural iron- and manganese-reducing groundwater bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrajevitch, Alexandra; Kondratyeva, Lubov M.; Golubeva, Evgeniya M.; Kodama, Kazuto; Hori, Rie S.

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the contribution of biogenic magnetic particles into sedimentary assemblages is a current challenge in palaeomagnetism. It has been demonstrated recently that magnetic particles produced through biologically controlled mineralization processes, such as magnetosomes from magnetotactic bacteria, contribute to the recording of natural remanent magnetization in marine and lacustrian sediments. Contributions from other, biologically induced, mineralization types, which are known from multiple laboratory experiments to include magnetic minerals, remain largely unknown. Here, we report magnetic properties of iron minerals formed by a community of iron- and manganese-reducing bacteria isolated from a natural groundwater deposit during a 2 yr long incubation experiment. The main iron phases of the biomineralized mass are lepidocrocite, goethite and magnetite, each of which has environmental significance. Unlike the majority of the previous studies that reported superparamagnetic grain size, and thus no remanence carrying capacity of biologically induced magnetite, hysteresis and first-order reversal curves measurements in our study have not detected significant superparamagnetic contribution. The biomineralized mass, instead, contains a mixture of single-domain to pseudo-single-domain and multidomain magnetite particles that are capable of carrying a stable chemical remanent magnetization. Isothermal remanent magnetization acquisition parameters and first-order reversal curves signatures of the biomineralized samples deviate from previously proposed criteria for the distinction of extracellular (biologically induced) magnetic particles in mixtures. Given its potential significance as a carrier of natural remanent magnetization, environmental requirements, distribution in nature and the efficiency in the geomagnetic field recording by biologically induced mineralization need comprehensive investigation.

  3. Anthropogenic impact on biogenic Si pools in temperate soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clymans, W.; Struyf, E.; Govers, G.; Vandevenne, F.; Conley, D. J.

    2011-05-01

    Human land use changes directly affect silica (Si) mobilisation and Si storage in terrestrial ecosystems and influence Si export from the continents, although the magnitudes of the impact are unknown. Yet biogenic silica (BSi) in soils is an understudied aspect. We have quantified and compared total biogenic (PSia) and easily soluble (PSie) Si pools at four sites along a gradient of disturbance in southern Sweden. An estimate of the magnitude of change in temperate continental BSi pools due to human disturbance is provided. Land use clearly affects BSi pools and their distribution. Total PSia and PSie for a continuous forested site at Siggaboda Nature Reserve (66 900 ± 22 800 kg SiO2 ha-1 and 952 ± 16 kg SiO2 ha-1) are significantly higher than disturbed land use types from the Råshult Culture Reserve including arable land (28 800 ± 7200 kg SiO2 ha-1 and 239 ± 91 kg SiO2 ha-1), pasture sites (27 300 ± 5980 kg SiO2 ha-1 and 370 ± 129 kg SiO2 ha-1) and grazed forest (23 600 ± 6370 kg SiO2 ha-1 and 346 ± 123 kg SiO2 ha-1). Vertical PSia and PSie profiles show significant (p<0.05) variation among the sites. These differences in size and distribution are interpreted as the long-term effect of reduced BSi replenishment and increased mobilisation of the PSia in disturbed soils. In temperate regions, total PSia showed a 10 % decline since agricultural development (3000BCE). Recent agricultural expansion (after 1700CE) has resulted in an average export of 1.1 ± 0.8 Tmol Si yr-1, leading to an annual contribution of ca. 20 % to the global land-ocean Si flux carried by rivers. Human activities clearly exert a long-term influence on Si cycling in soils and contribute significantly to the land-ocean Si flux.

  4. Airborne flux measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds over California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misztal, P. K.; Karl, T.; Weber, R.; Jonsson, H. H.; Guenther, A. B.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2014-03-01

    Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) fluxes were measured onboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft as part of the California Airborne BVOC Emission Research in Natural Ecosystem Transects (CABERNET) campaign during June 2011. The airborne virtual disjunct eddy covariance (AvDEC) approach used measurements from a PTR-MS and a wind radome probe to directly determine fluxes of isoprene, MVK + MAC, methanol, monoterpenes, and MBO over ∼10 000 km of flight paths focusing on areas of California predicted to have the largest emissions of isoprene. The Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) approach was used to calculate fluxes over long transects of more than 15 km, most commonly between 50 and 150 km. The Continuous Wavelet Transformation (CWT) approach was used over the same transects to also calculate "instantaneous" fluxes with localization of both frequency and time independent of non-stationarities. Vertical flux divergence of isoprene is expected due to its relatively short lifetime and was measured directly using "racetrack" profiles at multiple altitudes. It was found to be linear and in the range 5% to 30% depending on the ratio of aircraft altitude to PBL height (z / zi). Fluxes were generally measured by flying consistently at 400 ± 50 m (a.g.l.) altitude, and extrapolated to the surface according to the determined flux divergence. The wavelet-derived surface fluxes of isoprene averaged to 2 km spatial resolution showed good correspondence to Basal Emission Factor (BEF) landcover datasets used to drive biogenic VOC (BVOC) emission models. The surface flux of isoprene was close to zero over Central Valley crops and desert shrublands, but was very high (up to 15 mg m-2 h-1) above oak woodlands, with clear dependence of emissions on temperature and oak density. Isoprene concentrations of up to 8 ppb were observed at aircraft height on the hottest days and over the dominant source regions. While isoprene emissions from agricultural crop regions, shrublands, and

  5. Sub-Antarctic marine aerosol: significant contributions from biogenic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmale, J.; Schneider, J.; Nemitz, E.; Tang, Y. S.; Dragosits, U.; Blackall, T. D.; Trathan, P. N.; Phillips, G. J.; Sutton, M.; Braban, C. F.

    2013-03-01

    Biogenic influences on the composition and characteristics of aerosol were investigated on Bird Island (54°00' S, 38°03' W) in the South Atlantic during November and December 2010. This remote marine environment is characterised by large seabird and seal colonies. The chemical composition of the submicron particles, measured by an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), was 21% non-sea salt sulfate 2% nitrate, 7% ammonium, 22% organics and 47% sea salt including sea salt sulfate. A new method to isolate the sea salt signature from the high-resolution AMS data was applied. Generally, the aerosol was found to be less acidic than in other marine environments due to the high availability of ammonia, from local fauna emissions. By positive matrix factorisation five different organic aerosol (OA) profiles could be isolated: an amino acids/amine factor (AA-OA, 18% of OA mass), a methanesulfonic acid OA factor (MSA-OA, 25%), a marine oxygenated OA factor (M-OOA, 40%), a sea salt OA fraction (SS-OA, 7%) and locally produced hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA, 9%). The AA-OA was dominant during the first two weeks of November and found to be related with the hatching of penguins in a nearby colony. This factor, rich in nitrogen (C : N ratio = 0.13), has implications for the biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen in the area as particulate matter is often transported over longer distances than gaseous N-rich compounds. The MSA-OA was mainly transported from more southerly latitudes where phytoplankton bloomed. The bloom was identified as one of three sources for particulate sulfate on Bird Island, next to sea salt sulfate and sulfate transported from South America. M-OOA was the dominant organic factor and found to be similar to marine OA observed at Mace Head, Ireland. An additional OA factor highly correlated with sea salt aerosol was identified (SS-OA). However, based on the available data the type of mixture, internal or external, could not be determined. Potassium was not associated to sea

  6. Sub-Antarctic marine aerosol: dominant contributions from biogenic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmale, J.; Schneider, J.; Nemitz, E.; Tang, Y. S.; Dragosits, U.; Blackall, T. D.; Trathan, P. N.; Phillips, G. J.; Sutton, M.; Braban, C. F.

    2013-09-01

    Biogenic influences on the composition and characteristics of aerosol were investigated on Bird Island (54°00' S, 38°03' W) in the South Atlantic during November and December 2010. This remote marine environment is characterised by large seabird and seal colonies. The chemical composition of the submicron particles, measured by an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), was 21% non-sea-salt sulfate, 2% nitrate, 8% ammonium, 22% organics and 47% sea salt including sea salt sulfate. A new method to isolate the sea spray signature from the high-resolution AMS data was applied. Generally, the aerosol was found to be less acidic than in other marine environments due to the high availability of ammonia, from local fauna emissions. By positive matrix factorisation five different organic aerosol (OA) profiles could be isolated: an amino acid/amine factor (AA-OA, 18% of OA mass), a methanesulfonic acid OA factor (MSA-OA, 25%), a marine oxygenated OA factor (M-OOA, 41%), a sea spray OA fraction (SS-OA, 7%) and locally produced hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA, 9%). The AA-OA was dominant during the first two weeks of November and found to be related with the hatching of penguins in a nearby colony. This factor, rich in nitrogen (N : C ratio = 0.13), has implications for the biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen in the area as particulate matter is often transported over longer distances than gaseous N-rich compounds. The MSA-OA was mainly transported from more southerly latitudes where phytoplankton bloomed. The bloom was identified as one of three sources for particulate sulfate on Bird Island, next to sea salt sulfate and sulfate transported from South America. M-OOA was the dominant organic factor and found to be similar to marine OA observed at Mace Head, Ireland. An additional OA factor highly correlated with sea spray aerosol was identified (SS-OA). However, based on the available data the type of mixture, internal or external, could not be determined. Potassium was not associated

  7. Characteristics of aerosolized ice forming marine biogenic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpert, Peter A.

    atomus and Emiliania huxleyi, cells and cell fragments efficiently nucleate ice in the deposition mode, however, only T. pseudonana and N. atomus form ice in the immersion mode, presumably due to different cell wall compositions. This further corroborates the role of phytoplanktonic species for aerosolization of marine biogenic cloud active particles. Experimental data are used to parameterize marine biogenic particle fluxes and heterogeneous ice nucleation as a function of biological activity. The atmospheric implications of the results and their implementation into cloud and climate models are discussed.

  8. Biogenic hardparts: Difficult archives of the geological past (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Immenhauser, A.; Schone, B. R.; Hoffmann, R.; Niedermayr, A.

    2013-12-01

    Biomineralized exo- or endoskeletons of fossil marine invertebrates are widespread and diverse components of the Phanerozoic rock record of Earth's past and present oceans. Exoskeletons serve as protection against environmental pressure or predators, whilst endoskeletons can act as support or serve as an attachment for muscles and ligaments and hence as a mechanism for transmitting muscular forces. Biogenic hard parts represent sophisticated products resulting from the hierarchical interaction of inorganic minerals (95%) and macromolecular organic matrices, forming commonly less than 5%. The significance of many biogenic carbonate archives lies in the time-resolved growth patterns and their ability to record ambient environmental conditions in the form of multiple geochemical properties (multi-proxy archives) that have been widely used to assess past oceanic seawater properties. Here, we compile and review published work dealing with crystallization pathways of skeletal hard parts secreted by mollusks (i.e., bivalves and cephalopods) as well as brachiopods as widely used archives of ancient neritic epeiric settings. Bivalves and cephalopods (e.g., extinct ammonoids and belemnites and extant Sepia, Nautilus and Spirula) all form accretionary calcitic, aragonitic or vateritic skeletal hard parts. Despite the fact that mollusks and brachiopods form part of very different branches of the animal phylogenetic tree, their biomineralization strategies are surprisingly similar. Our main focus lies in a critical assessment of the complex pathways of ions and aquo-complexes from their source (seawater) to the final product (biomineral). We do this as an attempt to critically test the commonly held hypothesis that many fossil hard parts precipitated (under favorable conditions and pending subsequent diagenetic alteration) in equilibrium with seawater. Two main observations stand out: (1) the present knowledge on pathways and mechanisms (e.g., ion channel trans-membrane or

  9. Antioxidants, Enzyme Inhibitors, and Biogenic Compounds in Grain Extracts of Barleys.

    PubMed

    Maliar, Tibor; Slaba, Gabriela; Nemeček, Peter; Maliarová, Mária; Benková, Michaela; Havrlentová, Michaela; Ondrejovič, Miroslav; Kraic, Ján

    2015-11-01

    The content of biogenic compounds and the biological activities of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.)-grain extracts was evaluated. The sufficiently large and heterogeneous set of barley genotypes (100 accessions) enabled the selection of special genotypes interesting for potential industrial, pharmaceutical, and medicinal applications. Barley genotypes with the highest contents of phenols, phenolic acids, flavonoids, biogenic thiols, and amines, radical-scavenging activity, as well as inhibitory activities of trypsin, thrombin, collagenase, urokinase, and cyclooxygenase were identified.

  10. Biogenic caliches in Texas: The role of organisms and effect of climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jie; Chafetz, Henry S.

    2009-12-01

    Biogenic constituents are ubiquitous and abundant in the caliches of Texas. Investigation of 51 caliche profiles on various host strata (alluvium, limestone, igneous rocks, etc.) across approximately 900 km of Texas from subhumid east to arid west has shown that 43 of these profiles exhibit prominent biogenic constituents. These profiles exhibit significant differences in thickness (varying from centimeters to meters) and maturity (varying from I to VI). All of the different caliche facies are composed of low-Mg calcite. Biogenic features generally occur in the upper part of the profiles, including the uppermost portion of massive caliche horizons, platy horizons, laminar crusts, and pisoids. The main biogenic caliche facies include rhizoliths (calcified root structures), stromatolite-like laminar crusts, and coated grains. Compared to the abiogenic massive micritic to microsparitic calcite groundmass, biogenic constituents are morphologically distinct. These biogenic constituents are composed of several microscopic mineral components, including calcified filaments, needle fiber calcite (e.g., single crystalline needles and needle pairs, triangular crystals, and polycrystalline chains of rhombohedrons), spherulites, micro-rods, and nano-spheres. A large number of calcified root cellular structures and micro-organisms, e.g., fungal filaments, actinomycetes, and rod-like bacteria, are also present. Plant roots as well as soil biota produce distinctive structures and also enhance lithification by inducing calcite precipitation in the caliches, i.e., biologically controlled or influenced processes. Host strata did not significantly influence the abundance nor type of biogenic features in the caliches. In contrast, climate had an evident effect on the development of biogenic constituents in these caliches in terms of the amount as well as type. The thickness of laminar crusts and grain coatings and the abundance of biotic constituents within those facies decrease as the

  11. Variation of Atmospheric Biogenic Emissions in a coupled Radiative-Photochemical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauer, H.; Grenfell, J. L.; Stracke, B.; von Paris, P.; Gebauer, S.; Godolt, M.

    2008-09-01

    Abstract We investigate the effect of varying biogenic surface emissions in our atmospheric column model upon atmospheric biomarkers such as ozone and nitrous oxide as well as related compounds such as water. Ozone in particular features a complex photochemistry which can interact with biogenic emissions in a non-linear fashion. Our aim is to estimate the possible range of biomarker signals which can arise from earthlike exoplanets.

  12. Isoprene and monoterpenes biogenic emissions in France: modeling and impact during a regional pollution episode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solmon, Fabien; Sarrat, Claire; Serça, Dominique; Tulet, Pierre; Rosset, Robert

    Biogenic emission of isoprene and monoterpenes are modeled in order to study their impact on regional atmospheric chemistry and pollution in France. First, an emission potential inventory is developed using a fine scale landuse database, forest composition statistics, biometric data and species emission factors. Considering the main emission patterns, the results show consistency with previously published European and global inventories. When downscaling to sub-region of France, this database is likely to provide refined sources distribution, an important issue for regional atmospheric chemistry studies. The temporal evolution of biogenic fluxes with meteorological conditions is calculated on line in the MesoNH-C meso-scale atmospheric chemistry model. Leaf-level algorithms are integrated at the ecosystem scale using sub-grid prognostic surface temperature and canopy shading effects. Finally, ecosystem to landscape integration is performed by aggregating biogenic fluxes at the model grid cell scale. Uncertainties associated with these estimations are discussed with respect to different spatial scales. In the second part of the paper, these developments are used to study biogenic emission impacts on regional ozone formation. We focus on a summer pollution event over Paris and northern France, documented during the ESQUIF experiment. The introduction of biogenic fluxes led to an increase in simulated surface ozone concentrations, reaching 18-30% in the Paris plume and about 20-30% in some rural areas. This impact was mainly due to large biogenic fluxes as well as to the chemical conditions prevailing in the anthropogenic plumes reaching biogenic sources. In this situation, some comparisons with air quality measurements pointed out an improvement of simulated ozone concentrations when accounting for biogenic fluxes, both in urban plumes and over rural areas.

  13. Global comparison reveals biogenic weathering as driven by nutrient limitation at ecosystem scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boy, Jens; Godoy, Roberto; Dechene, Annika; Shibistova, Olga; Amir, Hamid; Iskandar, Issi; Fogliano, Bruno; Boy, Diana; McCulloch, Robert; Andrino, Alberto; Gschwendtner, Silvia; Marin, Cesar; Sauheitl, Leopold; Dultz, Stefan; Mikutta, Robert; Guggenberger, Georg

    2017-04-01

    A substantial contribution of biogenic weathering in ecosystem nutrition, especially by symbiotic microorganisms, has often been proposed, but large-scale in vivo studies are still missing. Here we compare a set of ecosystems spanning from the Antarctic to tropical forests for their potential biogenic weathering and its drivers. To address biogenic weathering rates, we installed mineral mesocosms only accessible for bacteria and fungi for up to 4 years, which contained freshly broken and defined nutrient-baring minerals in soil A horizons of ecosystems along a gradient of soil development differing in climate and plant species communities. Alterations of the buried minerals were analyzed by grid-intersection, confocal lascer scanning microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy on the surface and on thin sections. On selected sites, carbon fluxes were tracked by 13C labeling, and microbial community was identified by DNA sequencing. In young ecosystems (protosoils) biogenic weathering is almost absent and starts after first carbon accumulation by aeolian (later litter) inputs and is mainly performed by bacteria. With ongoing soil development and appearance of symbiotic (mycorrhized) plants, nutrient availability in soil increasingly drove biogenic weathering, and fungi became the far more important players than bacteria. We found a close relation between fungal biogenic weathering and available potassium across all 16 forested sites in the study, regardless of the dominant mycorrhiza type (AM or EM), climate, and plant-species composition. We conclude that nutrient limitations at ecosystem scale are generally counteracted by adapted fungal biogenic weathering. The close relation between fungal weathering and plant-available nutrients over a large range of severely contrasting ecosystems points towards a direct energetic support of these weathering processes by the photoautotrophic community, making biogenic weathering a

  14. Perspectives on iron absorption.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, Leif; Hulthén, Lena

    2002-01-01

    Newly established relationships between dietary iron absorption and serum ferritin and between serum ferritin and iron stores permit calculation of amounts of stored iron under different conditions at steady states when absorption equals losses. The rate of growth of stores can also be calculated. All calculations are based on observations and require no model assumptions. Present analyses demonstrated an effective control of iron absorption preventing development of iron overload in otherwise healthy subjects even if the diet is fortified with iron and even if meat intake is high. There are strong relationships between iron requirements, bioavailability of dietary iron, and amounts of stored iron. Our observations that a reduction in iron stores and a calculated decrease of hemoglobin iron had the same increasing effect on iron absorption suggest that the control of iron absorption is mediated from a common cell, which may register both size of iron stores and hemoglobin iron deficit. We suggest that the hepatocyte is that cell. Nutritional iron deficiency is especially critical in menstruating women, in the latter third of pregnancy, during adolescence for both girls and boys, and in the weaning period from 4 to 6 months to 2 years of age. The body possesses remarkable, potential control systems of probable very ancient origin capable of preventing both iron deficiency and iron overload. Present problems with iron deficiency being the most frequent deficiency disorder are related to nonbiological changes in our societies over the most recent 10,000 years. This perspective on iron homeostasis or iron balance is mainly based on studies in humans of clinical and epidemiological observations, trying to understand why iron deficiency is the most frequent deficiency disorder in the world in spite of the ingenious mechanisms in the body that should prevent it. Withdrawal of iron fortification of flour in Sweden in 1994 led to a significant increase in iron deficiency

  15. [Development of biogenic VOC emissions inventory with high temporal and spatial resolution].

    PubMed

    Hu, Y; Zhang, Y; Xie, S; Zeng, L

    2001-11-01

    A new method was developed to estimate biogenic VOC emissions with high temporal and spatial resolution by use of Mesoscale Meteorology Modeling System Version5 (MM5). In this method, the isoprene and monoterpene standard emission factors for some types of tree in China were given and the standard VOC emission factors and seasonally average densities of leaf biomass for all types of vegetation were determined. A biogenic VOC emissions inventory in South China was established which could meet the requirement of regional air quality modeling. Total biogenic VOC emissions in a typical summer day were estimated to be 1.12 x 10(4) metric tons in an area of 729 km x 729 km of South China. The results showed the temporal and spatial distributions of biogenic VOC emission rates in this area. The results also showed that the geographical distribution of biogenic VOC emission rates depended on vegetation types and their distributions and the diurnal variation mainly depended on the solar radiation and temperature. The uncertainties of estimating biogenic VOC emissions were also discussed.

  16. Effect of Mn(II) on the structure and reactivity of biogenic uraninite.

    PubMed

    Veeramani, Harish; Schofield, Eleanor J; Sharp, Jonathan O; Suvorova, Elena I; Ulrich, Kai-Uwe; Mehta, Apurva; Giammar, Daniel E; Bargar, John R; Bernier-Latmanit, Rizlan

    2009-09-01

    The efficacy of a site remediation strategy involving the stimulaton of microbial U(VI) reduction hinges in part upon the long-term stability of the product, biogenic uraninite, toward environmental oxidants. Geological sedimentary uraninites (nominal formula UO2) reportedly contain abundant cation impurities that enhance their resistance to oxidation. By analogy, incorporation of common groundwater solutes into biogenic uraninite could also impart stability-enhancing properties. Mn(II) is a common groundwater cation, which has a favorable ionic radiusfor substitution reactions. The structure and reactivity of Mn(II)-reacted biogenic uraninite are investigated in this study. Up to 4.4 weight percent Mn(II) was found to be structurally bound in biogenic uraninite. This Mn(II) incorporation was associated with decreasing uraninite particle size and structural order. Importantly, the equilibrium solubility of Mn-reacted uraninite was halved relative to unreacted uraninite, demonstrating changes in thermodynamic properties, while the dissolution rate was up to 38-fold lower than that of unreacted biogenic uraninite. We conclude that structuralincorporation of Mn(II) into uraninite has an important stabilizing effect leading to the prediction that other groundwater solutes may similarly stabilize biogenic uraninite.

  17. Dissolution of biogenic and synthetic UO2 under varied reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Kai-Uwe; Singh, Abhas; Schofield, Eleanor J; Bargar, John R; Veeramani, Harish; Sharp, Jonathan O; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; Giammar, Daniel E

    2008-08-01

    The chemical stability of biogenic UO2, a nanoparticulate product of environmental bioremediation, may be impacted by the particles' surface free energy, structural defects, and compositional variability in analogy to abiotic UO(2+x) (0 < or = x < or = 0.25). This study quantifies and compares intrinsic solubility and dissolution rate constants of biogenic nano-UO2 and synthetic bulk UO2.00, taking molecular-scale structure into account. Rates were determined under anoxic conditions as a function of pH and dissolved inorganic carbon in continuous-flow experiments. The dissolution rates of biogenic and synthetic UO2 solids were lowest at near neutral pH and increased with decreasing pH. Similar surface area-normalized rates of biogenic and synthetic UO2 suggest comparable reactive surface site densities. This finding is consistent with the identified structural homology of biogenic UO2 and stoichiometric UO2.00 Compared to carbonate-free anoxic conditions, dissolved inorganic carbon accelerated the dissolution rate of biogenic UO2 by 3 orders of magnitude. This phenomenon suggests continuous surface oxidation of U(IV) to U(VI), with detachment of U(VI) as the rate-determining step in dissolution. Although reducing conditions were maintained throughout the experiments, the UO2 surface can be oxidized by water and radiogenic oxidants. Even in anoxic aquifers, UO2 dissolution may be controlled by surface U(VI) rather than U(IV) phases.

  18. Effect of autochthonous starter cultures on the biogenic amine content of ewe's milk cheese throughout ripening.

    PubMed

    Renes, E; Diezhandino, I; Fernández, D; Ferrazza, R E; Tornadijo, M E; Fresno, J M

    2014-12-01

    Cheese is among the most commonly implicated foods associated with biogenic amines poisoning. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the type of autochthonous starter culture and ripening time on the concentration of biogenic amines (histamine, tyramine, putrescine, cadaverine, tryptamine, β-phenylethylamine, spermine and spermidine) in cheeses made from pasteurized ewe's milk. 4 cheese batches were made, in duplicate, and ripened for 7 months. The biogenic amines of 40 cheeses were analysed by high performance liquid chromatography. The predominant biogenic amines determined at the end of the ripening time were phenylethylamine, spermine and tryptamine. Together, these accounted for 81% of the total of biogenic amines studied. The type of starter culture used to make the ewe's cheese had a significant effect (p < 0.001) on the content of biogenic amines throughout ripening time. It was lower in the batches made with an autochthonous starter culture made up entirely of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris or of the same in combination with Lactobacillus plantarum.

  19. Study on biogenic amines in various dry salted fish consumed in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yanyan; Chen, Yufeng; Li, Laihao; Yang, Xianqing; Yang, Shaoling; Lin, Wanling; Zhao, Yongqiang; Deng, Jianchao

    2016-08-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the biogenic amines (BAs), physicochemical property and microorganisms in dry salted fish, a traditional aquatic food consumed in China. Forty three samples of dry salted fish were gathered from retail and wholesale markets and manufacturers, which had been produced in various regions in China. Cadaverine (CAD) and putrescine (PUT) were quantitatively the most common biogenic amines. About 14% of the samples exceeded the histamine content standards established by the FDA and/or EU. The highest histamine content was found in Silver pomfret ( Pampus argenteus) (347.79 mg kg-1). Five of forty three samples exceeded the acceptable content of TYR (100 mg kg-1), and 23.26% of dried-salted fish contained high contents of biogenic amines (above 600 mg kg-1). In addition, species, regions, pickling processes and drying methods made the physicochemical property, microorganisms and biogenic amines in dry salted fish to be different to some extents. The total plate count (TPC) was much higher than that of total halophilic bacteria in all samples. The biogenic amines, physicochemical property and microbiological counts exhibited large variations among samples. Furthermore, no significant correlation between biogenic amines and physicochemical property and TPC was observed. This study indicated that dry salted fish may still present healthy risk for BAs, depending on the processing methods, storage conditions among others.

  20. Operation of marine diesel engines on biogenic fuels: modification of emissions and resulting climate effects.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Andreas; Lauer, Peter; Fritsche, Uwe; Hasselbach, Jan; Lichtenstern, Michael; Schlager, Hans; Fleischer, Fritz

    2011-12-15

    The modification of emissions of climate-sensitive exhaust compounds such as CO(2), NO(x), hydrocarbons, and particulate matter from medium-speed marine diesel engines was studied for a set of fossil and biogenic fuels. Applied fossil fuels were the reference heavy fuel oil (HFO) and the low-sulfur marine gas oil (MGO); biogenic fuels were palm oil, soybean oil, sunflower oil, and animal fat. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions related to the production of biogenic fuels were treated by means of a fuel life cycle analysis which included land use changes associated with the growth of energy plants. Emissions of CO(2) and NO(x) per kWh were found to be similar for fossil fuels and biogenic fuels. PM mass emission was reduced to 10-15% of HFO emissions for all low-sulfur fuels including MGO as a fossil fuel. Black carbon emissions were reduced significantly to 13-30% of HFO. Changes in emissions were predominantly related to particulate sulfate, while differences between low-sulfur fossil fuels and low-sulfur biogenic fuels were of minor significance. GHG emissions from the biogenic fuel life cycle (FLC) depend crucially on energy plant production conditions and have the potential of shifting the overall GHG budget from positive to negative compared to fossil fuels.

  1. Biogenic Sulphate, Sulphur Dioxide and Methanesulphonic Acid Ratios over the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seguin, A.; Norman, A.; Wadleigh, M.; Siauw, A.; Eaton, S.

    2006-12-01

    Methanesulphonic acid (MSA) and sulphate are the end products of two different oxidation pathways of atmospheric dimethylsulphide (DMS). Sulphate aerosols can act as cloud condensation nuclei that affect incoming solar radiation and thus climate. The branching ratio cannot be measured using sulphate concentrations alone due to anthropogenic sulphate contributions. Stable isotope techniques, however, can be used to define continental and biogenic emissions, determine the origin of sulphate in aerosol samples and provide insight into DMS oxidation. Size segregated aerosol filters, sulphur dioxide and atmospheric DMS were collected during the summer 2003 Canadian Surface Ocean Lower Atmospheric Study (C-SOLAS) over the North Atlantic. Isotope values along with sulphate, MSA and cation concentrations were analysed. Non-sea salt (NSS) sulphate concentrations where as high as 11000 ng/m3. Biogenic sulphate concentrations ranged between 100 and 800 ng/m3 while biogenic sulphur dioxide concentrations ranged between 20 and 4000 ng/m3. Polluted air masses see an increase in biogenic sulphur dioxide indicating an influence of human activity on the oxidation pathways of DMS. MSA and biogenic sulphur dioxide concentrations are compared to the biogenic sulphate to explore the branching ratio.

  2. Land use change affects biogenic silica pool distribution in a subtropical soil toposequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unzué-Belmonte, Dácil; Ameijeiras-Mariño, Yolanda; Opfergelt, Sophie; Cornelis, Jean-Thomas; Barão, Lúcia; Minella, Jean; Meire, Patrick; Struyf, Eric

    2017-07-01

    Land use change (deforestation) has several negative consequences for the soil system. It is known to increase erosion rates, which affect the distribution of elements in soils. In this context, the crucial nutrient Si has received little attention, especially in a tropical context. Therefore, we studied the effect of land conversion and erosion intensity on the biogenic silica pools in a subtropical soil in the south of Brazil. Biogenic silica (BSi) was determined using a novel alkaline continuous extraction where Si / Al ratios of the fractions extracted are used to distinguish BSi and other soluble fractions: Si / Al > 5 for the biogenic AlkExSi (alkaline-extractable Si) and Si / Al < 5 for the non-biogenic AlkExSi. Our study shows that deforestation can rapidly (< 50 years) deplete the biogenic AlkExSi pool in soils depending on the slope of the study site (10-53 %), with faster depletion in steeper sites. We show that higher erosion in steeper sites implies increased accumulation of biogenic Si in deposition zones near the bottom of the slope, where rapid burial can cause removal of BSi from biologically active zones. Our study highlights the interaction of erosion strength and land use for BSi redistribution and depletion in a soil toposequence, with implications for basin-scale Si cycling.

  3. The impact of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions on surface ozone concentrations in Istanbul.

    PubMed

    Im, Ulas; Poupkou, Anastasia; Incecik, Selahattin; Markakis, Konstantinos; Kindap, Tayfun; Unal, Alper; Melas, Dimitros; Yenigun, Orhan; Topcu, Sema; Odman, M Talat; Tayanc, Mete; Guler, Meltem

    2011-03-01

    Surface ozone concentrations at Istanbul during a summer episode in June 2008 were simulated using a high resolution and urban scale modeling system coupling MM5 and CMAQ models with a recently developed anthropogenic emission inventory for the region. Two sets of base runs were performed in order to investigate for the first time the impact of biogenic emissions on ozone concentrations in the Greater Istanbul Area (GIA). The first simulation was performed using only the anthropogenic emissions whereas the second simulation was performed using both anthropogenic and biogenic emissions. Biogenic NMVOC emissions were comparable with anthropogenic NMVOC emissions in terms of magnitude. The inclusion of biogenic emissions significantly improved the performance of the model, particularly in reproducing the low night time values as well as the temporal variation of ozone concentrations. Terpene emissions contributed significantly to the destruction of the ozone during nighttime. Biogenic NMVOCs emissions enhanced ozone concentrations in the downwind regions of GIA up to 25ppb. The VOC/NO(x) ratio almost doubled due to the addition of biogenic NMVOCs. Anthropogenic NO(x) and NMVOCs were perturbed by ±30% in another set of simulations to quantify the sensitivity of ozone concentrations to the precursor emissions in the region. The sensitivity runs, as along with the model-calculated ozone-to-reactive nitrogen ratios, pointed NO(x)-sensitive chemistry, particularly in the downwind areas. On the other hand, urban parts of the city responded more to changes in NO(x) due to very high anthropogenic emissions.

  4. Observational constraints on biogenic VOC emission model estimates (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, A. B.

    2013-12-01

    Chemistry and transport models require accurate estimates of biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions in order to simulate the atmospheric constituents controlling air quality and climate, such as ozone and particles, and so the uncertainties associated with BVOC estimates may be limiting the development of effective air quality and climate management strategies. BVOC emission models include driving variables and algorithms that span scales from the leaf level to entire landscapes. While considerable effort has been made to improve BVOC emission models in the past decades, there have been relatively few attempts to quantify the uncertainties associated with these estimates or to rigorously assess emission modeling approaches. This presentation will summarize the availability of observations that can be used to constrain BVOC emission models including flux measurements (leaf enclosure, above canopy tower, and aircraft platforms) and ambient concentrations of BVOC and their products. Results from studies targeting specific BVOC emission processes (e.g., the response of isoprene emission to drought and the response of monoterpene emissions to bark beetle attack) will be shown and the application of these observations for BVOC model evaluation will be discussed. In addition, the results from multi-scale BVOC emission studies (leaf enclosure, whole canopy flux tower, regional aircraft eddy covariance) will be presented and a approach for incorporating these observations into a community model testbed will be described and used to evaluate regional BVOC emission models.

  5. Evidence for marine biogenic influence on summertime Arctic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Megan D.; Köllner, Franziska; Burkart, Julia; Bozem, Heiko; Thomas, Jennie L.; Schneider, Johannes; Aliabadi, Amir A.; Hoor, Peter M.; Schulz, Hannes; Herber, Andreas B.; Leaitch, W. Richard; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.

    2017-06-01

    We present vertically resolved observations of aerosol composition during pristine summertime Arctic background conditions. The methansulfonic acid (MSA)-to-sulfate ratio peaked near the surface (mean 0.10), indicating a contribution from ocean-derived biogenic sulfur. Similarly, the organic aerosol (OA)-to-sulfate ratio increased toward the surface (mean 2.0). Both MSA-to-sulfate and OA-to-sulfate ratios were significantly correlated with FLEXPART-WRF-predicted air mass residence time over open water, indicating marine-influenced OA. External mixing of sea salt aerosol from a larger number fraction of organic, sulfate, and amine-containing particles, together with low wind speeds (median 4.7 m s-1), suggests a role for secondary organic aerosol formation. Cloud condensation nuclei concentrations were nearly constant (˜120 cm-3) when the OA fraction was <60% and increased to 350 cm-3 when the organic fraction was larger and residence times over open water were longer. Our observations illustrate the importance of marine-influenced OA under Arctic background conditions, which are likely to change as the Arctic transitions to larger areas of open water.

  6. Technological Factors Affecting Biogenic Amine Content in Foods: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Gardini, Fausto; Özogul, Yesim; Suzzi, Giovanna; Tabanelli, Giulia; Özogul, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    Biogenic amines (BAs) are molecules, which can be present in foods and, due to their toxicity, can cause adverse effects on the consumers. BAs are generally produced by microbial decarboxylation of amino acids in food products. The most significant BAs occurring in foods are histamine, tyramine, putrescine, cadaverine, tryptamine, 2-phenylethylamine, spermine, spermidine, and agmatine. The importance of preventing the excessive accumulation of BAs in foods is related to their impact on human health and food quality. Quality criteria in connection with the presence of BAs in food and food products are necessary from a toxicological point of view. This is particularly important in fermented foods in which the massive microbial proliferation required for obtaining specific products is often relater with BAs accumulation. In this review, up-to-date information and recent discoveries about technological factors affecting BA content in foods are reviewed. Specifically, BA forming-microorganism and decarboxylation activity, genetic and metabolic organization of decarboxylases, risk associated to BAs (histamine, tyramine toxicity, and other BAs), environmental factors influencing BA formation (temperature, salt concentration, and pH). In addition, the technological factors for controlling BA production (use of starter culture, technological additives, effects of packaging, other non-thermal treatments, metabolizing BA by microorganisms, effects of pressure treatments on BA formation and antimicrobial substances) are addressed. PMID:27570519

  7. Lossless compression of stromatolite images: a biogenicity index?

    PubMed

    Corsetti, Frank A; Storrie-Lombardi, Michael C

    2003-01-01

    It has been underappreciated that inorganic processes can produce stromatolites (laminated macroscopic constructions commonly attreibuted to microbiological activity), thus calling into question the long-standing use of stromatolites as de facto evidence for ancient life. Using lossless compression on unmagnified reflectance red-green-blue (RGB) images of matched stromatolite-sediment matrix pairs as a complexity metric, the compressibility index (delta(c), the log ratio of the ratio of the compressibility of the matrix versus the target) of a putative abiotic test stromatolite is significantly less than the delta(c) of a putative biotic test stromatolite. There is a clear separation in delta(c) between the different stromatolites discernible at the outcrop scale. In terms of absolute compressibility, the sediment matrix between the stromatolite columns was low in both cases, the putative abiotic stromatolite was similar to the intracolumnar sediment, and the putative biotic stromatolite was much greater (again discernible at the outcrop scale). We propose tht this metric would be useful for evaluating the biogenicity of images obtained by the camera systems available on every Mars surface probe launched to date including Viking, Pathfinder, Beagle, and the two Mars Exploration Rovers.

  8. Boreal tree pollen sensed by polarization lidar: Depolarizing biogenic chaff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassen, Kenneth

    2008-09-01

    Polarization (0.694 μm) lidar measurements show that tree pollen can generate strong laser depolarization in the backscatter from the lower atmosphere. Examples are given illustrating that linear depolarization ratios up to 0.3 are measured in plumes of paper birch pollen at the onset of boreal forest green-out. These pollen are ~25 μm in diameter and near-spherical in shape, but with lobes protruding from a surface membrane, which appears to produce the depolarization. Similar lidar findings are frequently observed during the summer at Fairbanks, Alaska, indicating that various types of seasonal pollen releases may be identified by polarization lidar. This scattering behavior is likely a general attribute of pollen and other suspended biogenic debris, which has implications for benefiting human health. This source of laser depolarization should not be confused with the presence of airborne dust or certain pollution particles, but is a natural background aerosol component caused by plant reproduction, as should be recognized in current global polarization lidar aerosol research using the CALIPSO satellite.

  9. Advances in Biochemical Screening for Phaeochromocytoma using Biogenic Amines

    PubMed Central

    Whiting, Malcolm J.; Doogue, Matthew P.

    2009-01-01

    Biochemical testing for phaeochromocytoma is performed in diagnostic laboratories using a variety of tests with plasma, serum or 24-hour urine collections. These tests include catecholamines and their methylated metabolites - the metanephrines, either individually or in combination with their sulfated metabolites. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) continues to be the dominant analytical method for biogenic amine quantitation. Chromatographic techniques are changing, with improvements in sample preparation procedures, column technology and more specific analyte detection using tandem mass spectrometry. Enrolments in quality assurance programs indicate that there are still many more laboratories in Australasia analysing urinary catecholamines than metanephrines. Nevertheless, clinical evidence and expert opinion favour metanephrines as the analytes with highest sensitivity for the detection of phaeochromocytoma. Practical issues such as better chemical stability and easier specimen collection also favour metanephrines over catecholamines. For these reasons, it is likely that laboratories increasingly will replace urine catecholamine testing with either plasma or urine metanephrines. However in interpreting positive results, the need remains to consider issues such as pre-test probability and use of potentially interfering medications. PMID:19224007

  10. Biogenic volatile organic compound emissions from vegetation fires.

    PubMed

    Ciccioli, Paolo; Centritto, Mauro; Loreto, Francesco

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this paper was to provide an overview of the current state of the art on research into the emission of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) from vegetation fires. Significant amounts of VOCs are emitted from vegetation fires, including several reactive compounds, the majority belonging to the isoprenoid family, which rapidly disappear in the plume to yield pollutants such as secondary organic aerosol and ozone. This makes determination of fire-induced BVOC emission difficult, particularly in areas where the ratio between VOCs and anthropogenic NOx is favourable to the production of ozone, such as Mediterranean areas and highly anthropic temperate (and fire-prone) regions of the Earth. Fire emissions affecting relatively pristine areas, such as the Amazon and the African savannah, are representative of emissions of undisturbed plant communities. We also examined expected BVOC emissions at different stages of fire development and combustion, from drying to flaming, and from heatwaves coming into contact with unburned vegetation at the edge of fires. We conclude that forest fires may dramatically change emission factors and the profile of emitted BVOCs, thereby influencing the chemistry and physics of the atmosphere, the physiology of plants and the evolution of plant communities within the ecosystem. © 2014 The Authors. Plant, Cell & Environment published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Emissions of biogenic sulfur gases from Alaskan tundra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Mark E.; Morrison, Michael C.

    1992-01-01

    Results of sulfur emission measurements made in freshwater and marine wetlands in Alaskan tundra during the Arctic Boundary Layer Expedition 2A (ABLE 3A) in July 1988 are presented. The data indicate that this type of tundra emits very small amounts of gaseous sulfur and, when extrapolated globally, accounts for a very small percentage of the global flux of biogenic sulfur to the atmosphere. Sulfur emissions from marine sites are up to 20-fold greater than fluxes from freshwater habitats and are dominated by dimethyl sulfide (DMS). Highest emissions, with a mean of 6.0 nmol/sq m/h, occurred in water-saturated wet meadow areas. In drier upland tundra sites, highest fluxes occurred in areas inhabited by mixed vegetation and labrador tea at 3.0 nmol/sq m/h and lowest fluxes were from lichen-dominated areas at 0.9 nmol/sq m/h. DMS was the dominant gas emitted from all these sites. Emissions of DMS were highest from intertidal soils inhabited by Carex subspathacea.

  12. A marine biogenic source of atmospheric ice-nucleating particles.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Theodore W; Ladino, Luis A; Alpert, Peter A; Breckels, Mark N; Brooks, Ian M; Browse, Jo; Burrows, Susannah M; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Huffman, J Alex; Judd, Christopher; Kilthau, Wendy P; Mason, Ryan H; McFiggans, Gordon; Miller, Lisa A; Nájera, Juan J; Polishchuk, Elena; Rae, Stuart; Schiller, Corinne L; Si, Meng; Temprado, Jesús Vergara; Whale, Thomas F; Wong, Jenny P S; Wurl, Oliver; Yakobi-Hancock, Jacqueline D; Abbatt, Jonathan P D; Aller, Josephine Y; Bertram, Allan K; Knopf, Daniel A; Murray, Benjamin J

    2015-09-10

    The amount of ice present in clouds can affect cloud lifetime, precipitation and radiative properties. The formation of ice in clouds is facilitated by the presence of airborne ice-nucleating particles. Sea spray is one of the major global sources of atmospheric particles, but it is unclear to what extent these particles are capable of nucleating ice. Sea-spray aerosol contains large amounts of organic material that is ejected into the atmosphere during bubble bursting at the organically enriched sea-air interface or sea surface microlayer. Here we show that organic material in the sea surface microlayer nucleates ice under conditions relevant for mixed-phase cloud and high-altitude ice cloud formation. The ice-nucleating material is probably biogenic and less than approximately 0.2 micrometres in size. We find that exudates separated from cells of the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana nucleate ice, and propose that organic material associated with phytoplankton cell exudates is a likely candidate for the observed ice-nucleating ability of the microlayer samples. Global model simulations of marine organic aerosol, in combination with our measurements, suggest that marine organic material may be an important source of ice-nucleating particles in remote marine environments such as the Southern Ocean, North Pacific Ocean and North Atlantic Ocean.

  13. Lossless Compression of Stromatolite Images: A Biogenicity Index?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsetti, Frank A.; Storrie-Lombardi, Michael C.

    2003-12-01

    It has been underappreciated that inorganic processes can produce stromatolites (laminated macroscopic constructions commonly attributed to microbiological activity), thus calling into question the long-standing use of stromatolites as de facto evidence for ancient life. Using lossless compression on unmagnified reflectance red-green-blue (RGB) images of matched stromatolite-sediment matrix pairs as a complexity metric, the compressibility index (δc, the log of the ratio of the compressibility of the matrix versus the target) of a putative abiotic test stromatolite is significantly less than the δc of a putative biotic test stromatolite. There is a clear separation in δc between the different stromatolites discernible at the outcrop scale. In terms of absolute compressibility, the sediment matrix between the stromatolite columns was low in both cases, the putative abiotic stromatolite was similar to the intracolumnar sediment, and the putative biotic stromatolite was much greater (again discernible at the outcrop scale). We propose that this metric would be useful for evaluating the biogenicity of images obtained by the camera systems available on every Mars surface probe launched to date including Viking, Pathfinder, Beagle, and the two Mars Exploration Rovers.

  14. Pharmacological potential of biogenic amine–polyamine interactions beyond neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Jiménez, F; Ruiz-Pérez, M V; Urdiales, J L; Medina, M A

    2013-01-01

    Histamine, serotonin and dopamine are biogenic amines involved in intercellular communication with multiple effects on human pathophysiology. They are products of two highly homologous enzymes, histidine decarboxylase and l-aromatic amino acid decarboxylase, and transmit their signals through different receptors and signal transduction mechanisms. Polyamines derived from ornithine (putrescine, spermidine and spermine) are mainly involved in intracellular effects related to cell proliferation and death mechanisms. This review summarizes structural and functional evidence for interactions between components of all these amine metabolic and signalling networks (decarboxylases, transporters, oxidases, receptors etc.) at cellular and tissue levels, distinct from nervous and neuroendocrine systems, where the crosstalk among these amine-related components can also have important pathophysiological consequences. The discussion highlights aspects that could help to predict and discuss the effects of intervention strategies. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Histamine Pharmacology Update. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.170.issue-1 PMID:23347064

  15. Biogenic volatile organic compound emissions from vegetation fires

    PubMed Central

    CICCIOLI, PAOLO; CENTRITTO, MAURO; LORETO, FRANCESCO

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to provide an overview of the current state of the art on research into the emission of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) from vegetation fires. Significant amounts of VOCs are emitted from vegetation fires, including several reactive compounds, the majority belonging to the isoprenoid family, which rapidly disappear in the plume to yield pollutants such as secondary organic aerosol and ozone. This makes determination of fire-induced BVOC emission difficult, particularly in areas where the ratio between VOCs and anthropogenic NOx is favourable to the production of ozone, such as Mediterranean areas and highly anthropic temperate (and fire-prone) regions of the Earth. Fire emissions affecting relatively pristine areas, such as the Amazon and the African savannah, are representative of emissions of undisturbed plant communities. We also examined expected BVOC emissions at different stages of fire development and combustion, from drying to flaming, and from heatwaves coming into contact with unburned vegetation at the edge of fires. We conclude that forest fires may dramatically change emission factors and the profile of emitted BVOCs, thereby influencing the chemistry and physics of the atmosphere, the physiology of plants and the evolution of plant communities within the ecosystem. PMID:24689733

  16. Quality assessment and analysis of Biogen Idec compound library.

    PubMed

    Bowes, Scott; Sun, Dongyu; Kaffashan, Azita; Zeng, Chenhui; Chuaqui, Claudio; Hronowski, Xiaoping; Buko, Alex; Zhang, Xin; Josiah, Serene

    2006-10-01

    A subset of the compound repository for lead identification at Biogen Idec was characterized for its chemical stability over a 3-year period. Compounds were stored at 4 degrees C as 10 mM DMSO stocks, and a small subset of compounds was stored as lyophilized dry films. Compound integrity of 470 discrete compounds (Compound Set I) and 1917 combinatorial chemistry-derived compounds (Compound Set II) was evaluated by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry from the time of acquisition into the library collection and after 3 years of storage. Loss of compound integrity over the 3 years of storage was observed across the 2 subsets tested. Of Compound Set I, 63% of samples retained > 80% purity, whereas 57% of samples from Compound Set II had purity greater than 60%. The stability of the lyophilized samples was superior to the samples stored as DMSO solution. Although storage at 4 degrees C as DMSO solution was adequate for the majority of compounds, the authors observed and quantified the level of degradation within the compound collection. Their study provides general insight into compound storage and selection of library subsets for future lead identification activities.

  17. Photochemistry of biogenic emissions over the Amazon forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, Daniel J.; Wofsy, Steven C.

    1988-01-01

    The boundary layer chemistry over the Amazon forest during the dry season is simulated with a photochemical model. Results are in good agreement with measurements of isoprene, NO, ozone, and organic acids. Photochemical reactions of biogenic isoprene and NOx can supply most of the ozone observed in the boundary layer. Production of ozone is very sensitive to the availability of NOx, but is insensitive to the isoprene source strength. High concentrations of total odd nitrogen (NOy) are predicted for the planetary boundary layer, about 1 ppb in the mixed layer and 0.75 ppb in the convective cloud layer. Most of the odd nitrogen is present as PAN-type species, which are removed by dry deposition to the forest. The observed daytime variations of isoprene are explained by a strong dependence of the isoprene emission flux on sun angle. Nighttime losses of isoprene exceed rates of reaction with NO3 and O3 and appear to reflect dry-deposition processes. The 24-hour averaged isoprene emission flux is calculated to be 38 mg/sq m per day. Photooxidation of isoprene could account for a large fraction of the CO enrichment observed in the boundary layer under unpolluted conditions and could constitute an important atmospheric source of formic acid, methacrylic acid, and pyruvic acid.

  18. Addressing biogenic greenhouse gas emissions from hydropower in LCA.

    PubMed

    Hertwich, Edgar G

    2013-09-03

    The ability of hydropower to contribute to climate change mitigation is sometimes questioned, citing emissions of methane and carbon dioxide resulting from the degradation of biogenic carbon in hydropower reservoirs. These emissions are, however, not always addressed in life cycle assessment, leading to a bias in technology comparisons, and often misunderstood. The objective of this paper is to review and analyze the generation of greenhouse gas emissions from reservoirs for the purpose of technology assessment, relating established emission measurements to power generation. A literature review, data collection, and statistical analysis of methane and CO2 emissions are conducted. In a sample of 82 measurements, methane emissions per kWh hydropower generated are log-normally distributed, ranging from micrograms to 10s of kg. A multivariate regression analysis shows that the reservoir area per kWh electricity is the most important explanatory variable. Methane emissions flux per reservoir area are correlated with the natural net primary production of the area, the age of the power plant, and the inclusion of bubbling emissions in the measurement. Even together, these factors fail to explain most of the variation in the methane flux. The global average emissions from hydropower are estimated to be 85 gCO2/kWh and 3 gCH4/kWh, with a multiplicative uncertainty factor of 2. GHG emissions from hydropower can be largely avoided by ceasing to build hydropower plants with high land use per unit of electricity generated.

  19. Ion-induced nucleation of pure biogenic particles.

    PubMed

    Kirkby, Jasper; Duplissy, Jonathan; Sengupta, Kamalika; Frege, Carla; Gordon, Hamish; Williamson, Christina; Heinritzi, Martin; Simon, Mario; Yan, Chao; Almeida, João; Tröstl, Jasmin; Nieminen, Tuomo; Ortega, Ismael K; Wagner, Robert; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Brilke, Sophia; Chen, Xuemeng; Craven, Jill; Dias, Antonio; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Fuchs, Claudia; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hoyle, Christopher R; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Krapf, Manuel; Kürten, Andreas; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Molteni, Ugo; Onnela, Antti; Peräkylä, Otso; Piel, Felix; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P; Pringle, Kirsty; Rap, Alexandru; Richards, Nigel A D; Riipinen, Ilona; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Scott, Catherine E; Seinfeld, John H; Sipilä, Mikko; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, Antonio; Virtanen, Annele; Vogel, Alexander L; Wagner, Andrea C; Wagner, Paul E; Weingartner, Ernest; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Ye, Penglin; Zhang, Xuan; Hansel, Armin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Worsnop, Douglas R; Baltensperger, Urs; Kulmala, Markku; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-05-26

    Atmospheric aerosols and their effect on clouds are thought to be important for anthropogenic radiative forcing of the climate, yet remain poorly understood. Globally, around half of cloud condensation nuclei originate from nucleation of atmospheric vapours. It is thought that sulfuric acid is essential to initiate most particle formation in the atmosphere, and that ions have a relatively minor role. Some laboratory studies, however, have reported organic particle formation without the intentional addition of sulfuric acid, although contamination could not be excluded. Here we present evidence for the formation of aerosol particles from highly oxidized biogenic vapours in the absence of sulfuric acid in a large chamber under atmospheric conditions. The highly oxygenated molecules (HOMs) are produced by ozonolysis of α-pinene. We find that ions from Galactic cosmic rays increase the nucleation rate by one to two orders of magnitude compared with neutral nucleation. Our experimental findings are supported by quantum chemical calculations of the cluster binding energies of representative HOMs. Ion-induced nucleation of pure organic particles constitutes a potentially widespread source of aerosol particles in terrestrial environments with low sulfuric acid pollution.

  20. Ion-induced nucleation of pure biogenic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkby, Jasper; Duplissy, Jonathan; Sengupta, Kamalika; Frege, Carla; Gordon, Hamish; Williamson, Christina; Heinritzi, Martin; Simon, Mario; Yan, Chao; Almeida, João; Tröstl, Jasmin; Nieminen, Tuomo; Ortega, Ismael K.; Wagner, Robert; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Brilke, Sophia; Chen, Xuemeng; Craven, Jill; Dias, Antonio; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C.; Franchin, Alessandro; Fuchs, Claudia; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hoyle, Christopher R.; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Krapf, Manuel; Kürten, Andreas; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Molteni, Ugo; Onnela, Antti; Peräkylä, Otso; Piel, Felix; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Pringle, Kirsty; Rap, Alexandru; Richards, Nigel A. D.; Riipinen, Ilona; Rissanen, Matti P.; Rondo, Linda; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Scott, Catherine E.; Seinfeld, John H.; Sipilä, Mikko; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, Antonio; Virtanen, Annele; Vogel, Alexander L.; Wagner, Andrea C.; Wagner, Paul E.; Weingartner, Ernest; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M.; Ye, Penglin; Zhang, Xuan; Hansel, Armin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Baltensperger, Urs; Kulmala, Markku; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric aerosols and their effect on clouds are thought to be important for anthropogenic radiative forcing of the climate, yet remain poorly understood. Globally, around half of cloud condensation nuclei originate from nucleation of atmospheric vapours. It is thought that sulfuric acid is essential to initiate most particle formation in the atmosphere, and that ions have a relatively minor role. Some laboratory studies, however, have reported organic particle formation without the intentional addition of sulfuric acid, although contamination could not be excluded. Here we present evidence for the formation of aerosol particles from highly oxidized biogenic vapours in the absence of sulfuric acid in a large chamber under atmospheric conditions. The highly oxygenated molecules (HOMs) are produced by ozonolysis of α-pinene. We find that ions from Galactic cosmic rays increase the nucleation rate by one to two orders of magnitude compared with neutral nucleation. Our experimental findings are supported by quantum chemical calculations of the cluster binding energies of representative HOMs. Ion-induced nucleation of pure organic particles constitutes a potentially widespread source of aerosol particles in terrestrial environments with low sulfuric acid pollution.

  1. Oxygen-isotope fractionation between marine biogenic silica and seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Matheney, R.K.; Knauth, L.P. )

    1989-12-01

    A stepwise fluorination technique has been used to selectively react away the water component of hydrous silica in order to better investigate the oxygen-isotope fractionation between biogenic opal and seawater, and to determine whether all taxa produce opal which is suitable for oxygen isotope paleothermometry. {delta}{sup 18}O of the tetrahedrally coordinated silicate oxygen of siliceous sponge spicules grown at a wide variety of temperatures varies independently of temperature. {delta}{sup 18}O from an Eocene radiolarian ooze sample is much more enriched than would be expected from any reasonable isotopic temperature curve, given the probable growing temperature of the sample. {delta}{sup 18}O of diatom samples seems to vary systematically with temperature and to conform approximately to the isotopic temperature curve for diatom frustules obtained by Labeyrie and coworkers using an entirely different analytical technique. Sponges appear to precipitate silica in isotopic disequilibrium with seawater oxygen, and old radiolarian silica may exchange readily with could oceanic bottom water. Neither will apparently be useful for paleoclimate reconstructions. Diatoms maybe useful in deducing ancient surface-water temperatures, but the systematic variation of {alpha} with temperature for diatoms may not be related to the quartz-H{sub 2}O equilibrium isotope fractionation.

  2. A marine biogenic source of atmospheric ice-nucleating particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Theodore W.; Ladino, Luis A.; Alpert, Peter A.; Breckels, Mark N.; Brooks, Ian M.; Browse, Jo; Burrows, Susannah M.; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Huffman, J. Alex; Judd, Christopher; Kilthau, Wendy P.; Mason, Ryan H.; McFiggans, Gordon; Miller, Lisa A.; Nájera, Juan J.; Polishchuk, Elena; Rae, Stuart; Schiller, Corinne L.; Si, Meng; Temprado, Jesús Vergara; Whale, Thomas F.; Wong, Jenny P. S.; Wurl, Oliver; Yakobi-Hancock, Jacqueline D.; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Aller, Josephine Y.; Bertram, Allan K.; Knopf, Daniel A.; Murray, Benjamin J.

    2015-09-01

    The amount of ice present in clouds can affect cloud lifetime, precipitation and radiative properties. The formation of ice in clouds is facilitated by the presence of airborne ice-nucleating particles. Sea spray is one of the major global sources of atmospheric particles, but it is unclear to what extent these particles are capable of nucleating ice. Sea-spray aerosol contains large amounts of organic material that is ejected into the atmosphere during bubble bursting at the organically enriched sea-air interface or sea surface microlayer. Here we show that organic material in the sea surface microlayer nucleates ice under conditions relevant for mixed-phase cloud and high-altitude ice cloud formation. The ice-nucleating material is probably biogenic and less than approximately 0.2 micrometres in size. We find that exudates separated from cells of the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana nucleate ice, and propose that organic material associated with phytoplankton cell exudates is a likely candidate for the observed ice-nucleating ability of the microlayer samples. Global model simulations of marine organic aerosol, in combination with our measurements, suggest that marine organic material may be an important source of ice-nucleating particles in remote marine environments such as the Southern Ocean, North Pacific Ocean and North Atlantic Ocean.

  3. Favourable Locations of Possible Periodic Biogen Activity On Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kereszturi, A.

    In aur approach the basic assumptions were the following. 1. If once liquid water- loving organisms developed on ancient Mars, 2. during the later global cooling they tried to follow the location of the liquid water. 3. If there were no continuous exis- tence of liquid water on Mars, 4. but there were warm periods because of the climate changes, 6. locally liquid water appeared at some places like in lakes, subsurface reser- voires, water outbreaks. 6. The living organisms on the ancient probably wet Mars may have interrupted their biogen activity during the frozen periods. 7. The best chance for their reactivation during the next warm period is at that regions where the wet periods was the most frequent and longest. We looked for these possible places and analyzed from this point of view the possibility of repeated watery periods and astrobiological consequences at the equatorial regions (because of high temperature during thicker atmosphere) at volcanic centers (long lasted hot spot activity), in subsurface water basins, and at regions of frequent basal melting of the cryosphere.

  4. Emissions of biogenic sulfur gases from Alaskan tundra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Mark E.; Morrison, Michael C.

    1992-01-01

    Results of sulfur emission measurements made in freshwater and marine wetlands in Alaskan tundra during the Arctic Boundary Layer Expedition 2A (ABLE 3A) in July 1988 are presented. The data indicate that this type of tundra emits very small amounts of gaseous sulfur and, when extrapolated globally, accounts for a very small percentage of the global flux of biogenic sulfur to the atmosphere. Sulfur emissions from marine sites are up to 20-fold greater than fluxes from freshwater habitats and are dominated by dimethyl sulfide (DMS). Highest emissions, with a mean of 6.0 nmol/sq m/h, occurred in water-saturated wet meadow areas. In drier upland tundra sites, highest fluxes occurred in areas inhabited by mixed vegetation and labrador tea at 3.0 nmol/sq m/h and lowest fluxes were from lichen-dominated areas at 0.9 nmol/sq m/h. DMS was the dominant gas emitted from all these sites. Emissions of DMS were highest from intertidal soils inhabited by Carex subspathacea.

  5. Comparing turbulent mixing of biogenic VOC across model scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Barth, M. C.; Steiner, A. L.

    2016-12-01

    Vertical mixing of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) is very important in simulating the formation of ozone, secondary organic aerosols (SOA), and climate feedbacks. To assess the representation of vertical mixing in the atmosphere for the Baltimore-Washington DISCOVER-AQ 2011 campaign, we use two models of different scale and turbulence representation: (1) the National Center for Atmospheric Research's Large Eddy Simulation (LES), and (2) the Weather Research and Forecasting-Chemistry (WRF-Chem) model to simulate regional meteorology and chemistry. For WRF-Chem, we evaluate the boundary layer schemes in the model at convection-permitting scales (4km). WRF-Chem simulated vertical profiles are compared with the results from turbulence-resolving LES model under similar meteorological and chemical environment. The influence of clouds on gas and aqueous species and the impact of cloud processing at both scales are evaluated. Temporal evolutions of a surface-to-cloud concentration ratio are calculated to determine the capability of BVOC vertical mixing in WRF-Chem.

  6. HOx Radical Behavior in Urban, Biogenic and Mixed Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantrell, C. A.; Mauldin, L.; Schardt, N.; Mukherjee, A. D.

    2014-12-01

    The importance of HOx radicals in tropospheric chemistry is well-recognized. These roles include control of the lifetimes of a wide variety of trace gases, and control of photochemical ozone formation. The continued advance in understanding comes from laboratory investigations and field observations especially as part of comprehensive measurement campaigns. We participated in two recent observational campaigns aboard the NSF/NCAR C-130 aircraft platform: NOMADSS (Nitrogen, Oxidants, Mercury and Aerosol Distributions, Sources and Sinks) and FRAPPE (Front Range Atmospheric Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment). During these studies, a wide varieties of air masses were sampled ranging from fresh urban to rural both without and without biogenic influence to marine, and including the impacts of emissions from oil and gas extraction and animal production. Among the wide variety of parameters and species related to tropospheric chemistry that were measured, our group made observations of HOx and related species: OH, HO2, HO2+RO2, H2SO4, and stabilized Criegee intermediates (sCIs) using selected ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry. The paper discusses the functional dependence of these species on other measures of the chemical environment (e.g. NO, VOCs, j-values) as well as comparison of model estimates with the observations.

  7. Interactions of Nitrate Aerosols With Biogenic and Anthropogenic Organic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezell, M. J.; Yu, Y.; D'Anna, B.; McIntire, T. M.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2005-12-01

    While a variety of recent studies have highlighted the interactions of gas phase organic compounds with sulfuric acid seed particles, there is far less known about their interactions with nitrate-containing particles. In the studies reported here, a variety of techniques have been used to examine the impact of organics on the chemistry, photochemistry and light-scattering properties of deliquesced nitrate aerosol particles. Alpha-pinene and naphthalene were chosen as representative of important biogenic and anthropogenic organics found in urban air. Nephelometer measurements combined with Mie scattering calculations have been used to examine the effects of these organics on the light-scattering properties of the aerosols in the dark as well as after irradiation. In addition, the morphology of the particles was examined using atomic force microscopy and the chemical composition of the particles analyzed using GC-MS. Mechanisms of interaction of the parent organics with the nitrate particles, including the potential for reactions at interfaces, and the atmospheric implications will be presented.

  8. Ambient Gas-Particle Partitioning of Tracers for Biogenic Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacman-VanWertz, Gabriel; Yee, Lindsay D.; Kreisberg, Nathan M.; Wernis, Rebecca; Moss, Joshua A.; Hering, Susanne V.; de Sa, Suzanne; Martin, Scot T.; Alexander, Mikaela L.; Palm, Brett B.; Hu, Weiwei; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Day, Douglas; Jimenez, Jose L.; Riva, Matthieu; Surratt, Jason D.; Viegas, Juarez; Manzi, Antonio; Edgerton, Eric S.; Baumann, K.; Souza, Rodrigo A.; Artaxo, Paulo; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2016-08-23

    Exchange of atmospheric organic compounds between gas and particle phases is important in the production and chemistry of particle-phase mass but is poorly understood due to a lack of simultaneous measurements in both phases of individual compounds. Measurements of particle- and gas phase organic compounds are reported here for the southeastern United States and central Amazonia. Polyols formed from isoprene oxidation contribute 8% and 15% on average to particle-phase organic mass at these sites but are also observed to have substantial gas-phase concentrations contrary to many models that treat these compounds as nonvolatile. The results of the present study show that the gas-particle partitioning of approximately 100 known and newly observed oxidation products is not well explained by environmental factors (e.g., temperature). Compounds having high vapor pressures have higher particle fractions than expected from absorptive equilibrium partitioning models. These observations support the conclusion that many commonly measured biogenic oxidation products may be bound in low-volatility mass (e.g., accretion products, inorganic organic adducts) that decomposes to individual compounds on analysis. However, the nature and extent of any such bonding remains uncertain. Similar conclusions are reach for both study locations, and average particle fractions for a given compound are consistent within similar to 25% across measurement sites.

  9. A marine biogenic source of atmospheric ice-nucleating particles

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, T. W.; Ladino, L. A.; Alpert, Peter A.; Breckels, M. N.; Brooks, I. M.; Browse, J.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Carslaw, K. S.; Huffman, J. A.; Judd, C.; Kilthau, W. P.; Mason, R. H.; McFiggans, Gordon; Miller, L. A.; Najera, J.; Polishchuk, E. A.; Rae, S.; Schiller, C. L.; Si, M.; Vergara Temprado, J.; Whale, Thomas; Wong, J P S; Wurl, O.; Yakobi-Hancock, J. D.; Abbatt, JPD; Aller, Josephine Y.; Bertram, Allan K.; Knopf, Daniel A.; Murray, Benjamin J.

    2015-09-09

    The formation of ice in clouds is facilitated by the presence of airborne ice nucleating particles1,2. Sea spray is one of the major global sources of atmospheric particles, but it is unclear to what extent these particles are capable of nucleating ice3–11. Here we show that material in the sea surface microlayer, which is enriched in surface active organic material representative of that found in sub-micron sea- spray aerosol12–21, nucleates ice under conditions that occur in mixed-phase clouds and high-altitude ice clouds. The ice active material is likely biogenic and is less than ~0.2 ?m in size. We also show that organic material (exudate) released by a common marine diatom nucleates ice when separated from cells and propose that organic material associated with phytoplankton cell exudates are a candidate for the observed ice nucleating ability of the microlayer samples. By combining our measurements with global model simulations of marine organic aerosol, we show that ice nucleating particles of marine origin are dominant in remote marine environments, such as the Southern Ocean, the North Pacific and the North Atlantic.

  10. Fungal spores overwhelm biogenic organic aerosols in a midlatitudinal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chunmao; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Fukuda, Yasuro; Mochida, Michihiro; Iwamoto, Yoko

    2016-06-01

    Both primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs) and oxidation products of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) contribute significantly to organic aerosols (OAs) in forested regions. However, little is known about their relative importance in diurnal timescales. Here, we report biomarkers of PBAP and secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) for their diurnal variability in a temperate coniferous forest in Wakayama, Japan. Tracers of fungal spores, trehalose, arabitol and mannitol, showed significantly higher levels in nighttime than daytime (p < 0.05), resulting from the nocturnal sporulation under near-saturated relative humidity. On the contrary, BVOC oxidation products showed higher levels in daytime than nighttime, indicating substantial photochemical SOA formation. Using tracer-based methods, we estimated that fungal spores account for 45 % of organic carbon (OC) in nighttime and 22 % in daytime, whereas BVOC oxidation products account for 15 and 19 %, respectively. To our knowledge, we present for the first time highly time-resolved results that fungal spores overwhelmed BVOC oxidation products in contributing to OA especially in nighttime. This study emphasizes the importance of both PBAPs and SOAs in forming forest organic aerosols.

  11. A mesoscale phytoplankton bloom in the polar Southern Ocean stimulated by iron fertilization.

    PubMed

    Boyd, P W; Watson, A J; Law, C S; Abraham, E R; Trull, T; Murdoch, R; Bakker, D C; Bowie, A R; Buesseler, K O; Chang, H; Charette, M; Croot, P; Downing, K; Frew, R; Gall, M; Hadfield, M; Hall, J; Harvey, M; Jameson, G; LaRoche, J; Liddicoat, M; Ling, R; Maldonado, M T; McKay, R M; Nodder, S; Pickmere, S; Pridmore, R; Rintoul, S; Safi, K; Sutton, P; Strzepek, R; Tanneberger, K; Turner, S; Waite, A; Zeldis, J

    2000-10-12

    Changes in iron supply to oceanic plankton are thought to have a significant effect on concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide by altering rates of carbon sequestration, a theory known as the 'iron hypothesis'. For this reason, it is important to understand the response of pelagic biota to increased iron supply. Here we report the results of a mesoscale iron fertilization experiment in the polar Southern Ocean, where the potential to sequester iron-elevated algal carbon is probably greatest. Increased iron supply led to elevated phytoplankton biomass and rates of photosynthesis in surface waters, causing a large drawdown of carbon dioxide and macronutrients, and elevated dimethyl sulphide levels after 13 days. This drawdown was mostly due to the proliferation of diatom stocks. But downward export of biogenic carbon was not increased. Moreover, satellite observations of this massive bloom 30 days later, suggest that a sufficient proportion of the added iron was retained in surface waters. Our findings demonstrate that iron supply controls phytoplankton growth and community composition during summer in these polar Southern Ocean waters, but the fate of algal carbon remains unknown and depends on the interplay between the processes controlling export, remineralisation and timescales of water mass subduction.

  12. Export fluxes in a naturally fertilized area of the Southern Ocean, the Kerguelen Plateau: ecological vectors of carbon and biogenic silica to depth (Part 2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rembauville, M.; Blain, S.; Armand, L.; Quéguiner, B.; Salter, I.

    2014-12-01

    The chemical (particulate organic carbon and nitrogen, biogenic silica) and biological (diatoms and faecal pellets) composition of the material exported to a moored sediment trap located under the winter mixed layer of the naturally-fertilized Kerguelen Plateau in the Southern Ocean was studied over an annual cycle. Despite iron availability in spring, the annual particulate organic carbon (POC) export (98.2 mmol m-2) at 289 m was low but annual biogenic silica export was significant (114 mmol m-2). This feature was related to the abundance of empty diatom frustules and the ratio of full : empty cell exerted a first order control in BSi : POC export stoichiometry of biological pump. Chaetoceros Hyalochaete spp. and Thalassiosira antarctica resting spores were found to be responsible for more than 60% of the annual POC that occurred during two very short export events (<14 days in spring-summer) representing the majority of captured export. Low diatom fluxes were observed over the remainder of the year. Faecal pellet contribution to annual carbon flux was low (34%) and reached it's seasonal maximum in autumn and winter (>80%). The seasonal progression of faecal pellet types revealed a clear transition from small spherical shapes (small copepods) in spring, larger cylindrical and ellipsoid shapes in summer (euphausiids and large copepods) and finally large tabular shapes (salps) in autumn and winter. We propose that in this High Biomass, Low Export (HBLE) environment, small, highly silicified, fast-sinking resting spores are able to bypass the high grazing pressure and efficient carbon transfer to higher trophic levels that are responsible for the low fluxes observed the during the remainder of the year. Our study also provides a statistical framework linking the ecological succession of diatom and zooplankton communities to the seasonality of carbon and silicon export within an iron-fertilized bloom region in the Southern Ocean.

  13. [Effects of Canalization on the Iron Deposition in Sanjiang Plain].

    PubMed

    Su, Wen-hui; Yu, Xiao-fei; Wang, Guo-ping; Luan, Jin-hua; Zou, Yuan-chun

    2015-04-01

    Canalization is the representative process and landscape of wetland reclamation. A typical ditch system of four levels near the Honghe National Nature Reserve in Sanjiang Plain was selected. Deposition plates were set on the sediments along the ditch level and the remained natural wetland nearby was quantitatively sampled for two years as the control. The deposition fluxes, total iron concentration, iron oxides and their components, as well as biogenic elements in the sediments collected by deposition plates were measured. The results showed that the litter, mud/sand and total deposition fluxes showed no significant differences between different ditch levels, with the means of (57.00 ± 16.90) g x (m2 x a)(-1), (3 997.57 ± 798.98) g x (m2 x a)(-1) and (4054.57 ± 792.91) g x (m2 x a)(-1), respectively. The litter flux decreased with the increase of ditch level, and the flux in the natural wetland [ (120.26 ± 19.42) g x (m2 x a)(-1) ] was significantly greater than that of the ditches. The mud/sand [ (35.41 ± 11.15 ) g x (m2 x a)(-1)] and total deposition fluxes [ (155.67 ± 20.75) g x ( m2 x a](-1) ] were significantly smaller than those of the ditches. There were no significant differences in the total iron between different ditches and natural wetland, while the free iron oxide content in the ditch sediments was significantly lower than that of natural wetland sediment. Except for the main ditch, the amorphous and complex iron oxides in the other ditch and natural wetland sediments showed no significant differences. The free degree of the iron oxide in ditch sediments was 60.2% of that in the natural wetland, while the differences in the complex degree and the activated degree were insignificant. The differences in the total organic carbon, total nitrogen and total phosphorus were insignificant, and all were smaller than those of the natural wetland, with the percentages of 14.6%, 31.6% and 41.0%, respectively. It could be concluded that the effects of

  14. Iron deficiency in Europe.

    PubMed

    Hercberg, S; Preziosi, P; Galan, P

    2001-04-01

    In Europe, iron deficiency is considered to be one of the main nutritional deficiency disorders affecting large fractions of the population, particularly such physiological groups as children, menstruating women and pregnant women. Some factors such as type of contraception in women, blood donation or minor pathological blood loss (haemorrhoids, gynaecological bleeding...) considerably increase the difficulty of covering iron needs. Moreover, women, especially adolescents consuming low-energy diets, vegetarians and vegans are at high risk of iron deficiency. Although there is no evidence that an absence of iron stores has any adverse consequences, it does indicate that iron nutrition is borderline, since any further reduction in body iron is associated with a decrease in the level of functional compounds such as haemoglobin. The prevalence of iron-deficient anaemia has slightly decreased in infants and menstruating women. Some positive factors may have contributed to reducing the prevalence of iron-deficiency anaemia in some groups of population: the use of iron-fortified formulas and iron-fortified cereals; the use of oral contraceptives and increased enrichment of iron in several countries; and the use of iron supplements during pregnancy in some European countries. It is possible to prevent and control iron deficiency by counseling individuals and families about sound iron nutrition during infancy and beyond, and about iron supplementation during pregnancy, by screening persons on the basis of their risk for iron deficiency, and by treating and following up persons with presumptive iron deficiency. This may help to reduce manifestations of iron deficiency and thus improve public health. Evidence linking iron status with risk of cardiovascular disease or cancer is unconvincing and does not justify changes in food fortification or medical practice, particularly because the benefits of assuring adequate iron intake during growth and development are well established

  15. Assessing the utility of trace and rare earth elements as biosignatures in microbial iron oxyhydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heim, Christine; Simon, Klaus; Ionescu, Danny; Reimer, Andreas; De Beer, Dirk; Quéric, Nadia-Valérie; Reitner, Joachim; Thiel, Volker

    2015-02-01

    Microbial iron oxyhydroxides are common deposits in natural waters, recent sediments and mine drainage systems and often contain significant accumulations of trace and rare earth elements (TREE). TREE patterns are widely used to characterize minerals and rocks, and to elucidate their evolution and origin. Whether and which characteristic TREE signatures distinguish between a biological and an abiological origin of iron minerals is still not well understood. Long-term flow reactor studies were performed in the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory to investigate the development of microbial mats dominated by iron-oxidizing bacteria, namely Mariprofundus sp. and Gallionella sp. The experiments investigated the accumulation and fractionation of TREE under controlled conditions and enabled us to assess potential biosignatures evolving within the microbial iron oxyhydroxides. Concentrations of Be, Y, Zn, Zr, Hf, W, Th, Pb, and U in the microbial mats were 1e3- to 1e5-fold higher than in the feeder fluids whereas the rare earth elements and Y (REE+Y) contents were 1e4 and 1e6 fold enriched. Except for a hydrothermally induced Eu anomaly, the normalized REE+Y patterns of the microbial iron oxyhydroxides were very similar to published REE+Y distributions of Archaean Banded Iron Formations. The microbial iron oxyhydroxides from the flow reactors were compared to iron oxyhydroxides that were artificially precipitated from the same feeder fluid. These abiotic and inorganic iron oxyhydroxides show the same REE+Y distribution patterns. Our results indicate that the REE+Y mirror quite exactly the water chemistry, but they do not allow to distinguish microbially mediated from inorganic iron precipitates. All TREE studied showed an overall similar fractionation behavior in biogenic, abiotic and inorganic iron oxyhydroxides. Exceptions are Ni and Tl, which were only accumulated in the microbial iron oxyhydroxides and may point to a potential usage of these elements as microbial biosignatures.

  16. Magnetic vesicles as MRI-trackable biogenic nanovectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriola Silva, Amanda K.; Luciani, Nathalie; Gazeau, Florence; Wilhelm, Claire

    2012-03-01

    Magnetic labeling renders cells MRI-detectable which provides attractive solutions for tracking the fate of a transplanted cell population. Understanding the interplay of magnetic nanoparticles and cells is then an important point that should not be neglected. Here we show that in the condition of food starvation, macrophage cells emit vesicles containing nanoparticles. First, we inferred the intracellular iron oxide load from the magnetophoretic velocity of cells at a calibrated magnetic field gradient. After magnetic labeling and culture in stress conditions, the intracellular iron oxide load was once more determined and a detectable difference was observed before and after stress. Moreover, we identified in the stress conditioned medium membrane vesicle structures carrying magnetic particles. Besides pointing out the role of cell-derived vesicles in the sequestration of the intracellular magnetic label, experiments also demonstrated that vesicles were able to chaperone the magnetic cargo into naïve cells.

  17. Assessing the Role of Iron Sulfides in the Long Term Sequestration of U by Sulfate Reducing Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Rittman, Bruce; Zhou, Chen; Vannela, Raveender

    2013-12-31

    This four-year project’s overarching aim was to identify the role of biogenic and synthetic iron-sulfide minerals in the long-term sequestration of reduced U(IV) formed under sulfate-reducing conditions when subjected to re-oxidizing conditions. As stated in this final report, significant progress was achieved through the collaborative research effort conducted at Arizona State University (ASU) and the University of Michigan (UM).

  18. Evaluating the influence of National Research Council levels of copper, iron, manganese, and zinc using organic (Bioplex) minerals on resulting tissue mineral concentrations, metallothionein, and liver antioxidant enzymes in grower-finisher swine diets.

    PubMed

    Gowanlock, D W; Mahan, D C; Jolliff, J S; Hill, G M

    2015-03-01

    Graded levels of a trace mineral premix containing an organic (Bioplex) source of Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn was evaluated with additional treatments containing organic Zn or Fe. Grower-finisher pigs were fed from 25 to 115 kg BW. The number of pigs in the experiment, the breeding/genetics of the pigs, the management, and the average age of the pigs were previously reported. The experiment was conducted as a randomized complete block design in 7 replicates. Treatments were 1) basal diet without supplemental Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn; 2) basal diet + 2.5 mg/kg Cu, 50 mg/kg Fe, 1.5 mg/kg Mn, and 40 mg/kg Zn (50% NRC); 3) basal diet + 5 mg/kg Cu, 100 mg/kg Fe, 3 mg/kg Mn, and 80 mg/kg Zn (100% NRC); 4) basal diet + 25 mg Zn/kg; 5) basal diet + 50 mg Zn/kg; and 6) basal diet + 50 mg Fe/kg. Selenium and I were added to all diets at 0.3 and 0.14 mg/kg, respectively. Diets were composed of corn-soybean meal, dicalcium phosphate, and limestone with phytase added to enhance mineral availability. Three pigs per pen were bled at 55, 80, and 115 kg BW and plasma was analyzed for microminerals. When the average replicate BW was 115 kg, 3 pigs per pen of an equal gender ratio were killed. The liver, kidney, and heart were removed and analyzed for microminerals. Liver, duodenum, and jejunal metallothionein and the antioxidant enzymes in the liver containing these microminerals were determined. The results demonstrated that plasma minerals were unaffected at the 3 BW intervals. Liver and duodenum metallothionein protein were greater ( < 0.05) as dietary micromineral levels increased but jejunum metallothionein did not change as microminerals increased. The activity of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) was not affected as the levels of the micromineral increased, whereas the activity of Mn SOD increased slightly ( < 0.05) to the 50% NRC treatment level. Liver Zn (relative and total) increased ( < 0.05) as dietary micromineral levels increased and also when Zn was added singly to the diet. Liver

  19. Physicochemical and biological characteristics of the nanostructured polysaccharide-iron hydrogel produced by microorganism Klebsiella oxytoca.

    PubMed

    Kianpour, Sedigheh; Ebrahiminezhad, Alireza; Mohkam, Milad; Tamaddon, Ali Mohammad; Dehshahri, Ali; Heidari, Reza; Ghasemi, Younes

    2017-02-01

    There is an increasing interest in the nanostructured polysaccharide-iron hydrogel produced by Klebsiella oxytoca. Critical physicochemical and biological characteristics of these nanostructures should be revealed for biomedical applications. Accordingly, an iron reducing strain K. oxytoca, which synthesizes biogenic polysaccharide-iron hydrogel nanoparticles, known as Fe (III)-exopolysaccharide (Fe-EPS) was isolated from a mineral spring. For microbiological identification purpose 16S rRNA sequence analysis and different morphological, physiological, and biochemical characteristics of the isolate were studied. Critical physicochemical and biological characteristics of the produced Fe-EPS were evaluated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). In addition, for the first time, Fe-EPS which synthesized by K. oxytoca was evaluated by dynamic light scattering (DLS), thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), and cytotoxicity assay. TEM micrographs showed that the biogenic Fe-EPS is composed of ultra-small (about 1.8 nm) iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) which are trapped in a polysaccharide matrix. The matrix was about 17% (w/w) of Fe-EPS total weight and provided a large negative charge of -71 mV. Interestingly, Fe-EPS showed a growth promotion effect on hepatocarcinoma cell line (Hep-G2) and 36% increase in the percentage of viability was observed by 24 h exposure to 500 μg ml(-1) Fe-EPS.

  20. An approach for verifying biogenic greenhouse gas emissions inventories with atmospheric CO2 concentration data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogle, Stephen M.; Davis, Kenneth; Lauvaux, Thomas; Schuh, Andrew; Cooley, Dan; West, Tristram O.; Heath, Linda S.; Miles, Natasha L.; Richardson, Scott; Breidt, F. Jay; Smith, James E.; McCarty, Jessica L.; Gurney, Kevin R.; Tans, Pieter; Denning, A. Scott

    2015-03-01

    Verifying national greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions inventories is a critical step to ensure that reported emissions data to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) are accurate and representative of a country’s contribution to GHG concentrations in the atmosphere. Furthermore, verifying biogenic fluxes provides a check on estimated emissions associated with managing lands for carbon sequestration and other activities, which often have large uncertainties. We report here on the challenges and results associated with a case study using atmospheric measurements of CO2 concentrations and inverse modeling to verify nationally-reported biogenic CO2 emissions. The biogenic CO2 emissions inventory was compiled for the Mid-Continent region of United States based on methods and data used by the US government for reporting to the UNFCCC, along with additional sources and sinks to produce a full carbon balance. The biogenic emissions inventory produced an estimated flux of -408 ± 136 Tg CO2 for the entire study region, which was not statistically different from the biogenic flux of -478 ± 146 Tg CO2 that was estimated using the atmospheric CO2 concentration data. At sub-regional scales, the spatial density of atmospheric observations did not appear sufficient to verify emissions in general. However, a difference between the inventory and inversion results was found in one isolated area of West-central Wisconsin. This part of the region is dominated by forestlands, suggesting that further investigation may be warranted into the forest C stock or harvested wood product data from this portion of the study area. The results suggest that observations of atmospheric CO2 concentration data and inverse modeling could be used to verify biogenic emissions, and provide more confidence in biogenic GHG emissions reporting to the UNFCCC.

  1. Biogenic silica deposition at the Antarctic continental rise estimated from non-destructive core logging measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruetzner, J.; Hillenbrand, C.-D.; Rebesco, M. A.; Wefer, G.

    2003-04-01

    Knowledge about the spatial and temporal distribution of biogenic silica preserved in the sea floor is crucial to reconstruct paleo-productivity. Several techniques (e.g. XRD, microfossil counting, density separation, wet chemical leaching) have been employed to determine biogenic opal in marine sediments. These methods are time consuming and destructive. In the last decade, numerous core logging devices have been developed for measuring physical and chemical sediment properties quasi-continuously, rapidly, and non-destructively. We compare empirical relationships between biogenic opal content (leaching method on discrete samples), spectral reflectance (400 to 700 nm wavelength at 10-nm intervals), bulk density, magnetic susceptibility, and XRF-scans (Fe, Ti) derived for ODP Sites 1095 (Antarctic Peninsula) and 1165 (Prydz Bay, East Antarctica). Both raw as well as transformed (squaring and first-order derivation) core logging data from the position of the samples measured for biogenic silica content were used as input for a multiple linear regression. The derived equations are statistically significant (p<<0.001) and account for 86% (Site 1165) and 78% (Site1095) of the observed percent opal variance with a root mean square error < 3.1% and thus provide high-resolution, non-invasive alternatives to direct measurement of opal. Using chronologies derived from magnetostratigraphy as well as from orbital tuning of selected intervals the derived opal percentages were converted into accumulation rates of biogenic silica. A regression describing the relationship between opal preservation and sedimentation rate was used to extract the signal of primary opal deposition. During the late Miocene/early Pliocene biogenic silica deposition was very similar in magnitude and trend at both investigated sites. Pronounced lows in productivity during the Messinian were followed by a dramatic increase (>100 %) at 5.2 Ma. Short term changes in biogenic opal deposition show fluctuations

  2. Stable silicon isotope signatures of marine pore waters - Biogenic opal dissolution versus authigenic clay mineral formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlert, Claudia; Doering, Kristin; Wallmann, Klaus; Scholz, Florian; Sommer, Stefan; Grasse, Patricia; Geilert, Sonja; Frank, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Dissolved silicon isotope compositions have been analysed for the first time in pore waters (δ30SiPW) of three short sediment cores from the Peruvian margin upwelling region with distinctly different biogenic opal content in order to investigate silicon isotope fractionation behaviour during early diagenetic turnover of biogenic opal in marine sediments. The δ30SiPW varies between +1.1‰ and +1.9‰ with the highest values occurring in the uppermost part close to the sediment-water interface. These values are of the same order or higher than the δ30Si of the biogenic opal extracted from the same sediments (+0.3‰ to +1.2‰) and of the overlying bottom waters (+1.1‰ to +1.5‰). Together with dissolved silicic acid concentrations well below biogenic opal saturation, our collective observations are consistent with the formation of authigenic alumino-silicates from the dissolving biogenic opal. Using a numerical transport-reaction model we find that approximately 24% of the dissolving biogenic opal is re-precipitated in the sediments in the form of these authigenic phases at a relatively low precipitation rate of 56 μmol Si cm-2 yr-1. The fractionation factor between the precipitates and the pore waters is estimated at -2.0‰. Dissolved and solid cation concentrations further indicate that off Peru, where biogenic opal concentrations in the sediments are high, the availability of reactive terrigenous material is the limiting factor for the formation of authigenic alumino-silicate phases.

  3. Distinguishing and understanding thermogenic and biogenic sources of methane using multiply substituted isotopologues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolper, D. A.; Martini, A. M.; Clog, M.; Douglas, P. M.; Shusta, S. S.; Valentine, D. L.; Sessions, A. L.; Eiler, J. M.

    2015-07-01

    Sources of methane to sedimentary environments are commonly identified and quantified using the stable isotopic compositions of methane. The methane "clumped-isotope geothermometer", based on the measurement of multiply substituted methane isotopologues (13CH3D and 12CH2D2), shows promise in adding new constraints to the sources and formational environments of both biogenic and thermogenic methane. However, questions remain about how this geothermometer behaves in systems with mixtures of biogenic and thermogenic gases and different biogenic environments. We have applied the methane clumped-isotope thermometer to a mixed biogenic-thermogenic system (Antrim Shale, USA) and to biogenic gas from gas seeps (Santa Barbara and Santa Monica Basin, USA), a pond on the Caltech campus, and methanogens grown in pure culture. We demonstrate that clumped-isotope based temperatures add new quantitative constraints to the relative amounts of biogenic vs. thermogenic gases in the Antrim Shale indicating a larger proportion (∼50%) of thermogenic gas in the system than previously thought. Additionally, we find that the clumped-isotope temperature of biogenic methane appears related to the environmental settings in which the gas forms. In systems where methane generation rates appear to be slow (e.g., the Antrim Shale and gas seeps), microbial methane forms in or near both internal isotopic equilibrium and hydrogen-isotope equilibrium with environmental waters. In systems where methane forms rapidly, microbial methane is neither in internal isotopic equilibrium nor hydrogen-isotope equilibrium with environmental waters. A quantitative model of microbial methanogenesis that incorporates isotopes is proposed to explain these results.

  4. Late Quaternary fluctuations of biogenic component fluxes on the continental slope of the Ross Sea, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccaroni, L.; Frank, M.; Frignani, M.; Langone, L.; Ravaioli, M.; Mangini, A.

    1998-11-01

    A sediment core, collected from the western part of the continental slope of the Ross Sea at 2380 m water depth, records events of the last two climatic cycles (250 kyr). A 230Th ex-based chronology was obtained and boundaries of the isotope stages were set assuming that biological productivity was enhanced during periods of less ice cover. Then, 230Th ex0, organic carbon, biogenic silica and biogenic Ba distributions were compared to the glacial-interglacial stage boundaries and corresponding ages of the δ 18O record of Martinson et al. [Martinson, D.G., Pisias, N.G., Hays, J.D., Imbrie, J., Moore, T.C., Jr., Shackleton, N.J, 1987. Age dating and the orbital theory of the ice ages: development of a high-resolution 0 to 300,000-year chronostratigraphy. Quaternary Research, 27: 1-29]. Sediment accumulation rates ranged between 1.2 cm kyr -1 in the isotope stage 6 and 3.8 cm kyr -1 during the Holocene. Variations in the concentrations and fluxes of organic carbon, biogenic Ba, biogenic silica and Mn gave information on palaeoclimate changes. Processes of sediment redistribution in the Ross Sea margin were enlightened from a comparison of the measured and expected fluxes of 230Th ex. Calculation of the focusing-corrected accumulation rates of biogenic Ba enabled us to evaluate the export palaeoproductivity. Corrected accumulation rates of biogenic components and calculated palaeoproductivities were low, compared to the Antarctic Polar Front in the Atlantic sector, throughout the last two climatic cycles. Glacial-interglacial changes of sea ice cover and ventilation of the Ross Sea were probably major causes of variations in biogenic particle flux and distribution of redox-sensitive elements within the sediment column.

  5. Source apportionment of biogenic contributions to ozone formation over the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Cohan, Alexander; Pour Biazar, Arastoo; Cohan, Daniel S.

    2017-09-01

    Vegetation is the leading emitter of volatile organic compounds (VOC), a key ingredient for ozone formation. The contribution of biogenic VOC (BVOC) emissions to regional ozone formation needs better quantification so that air quality regulators can effectively design emission control strategies. One of the key uncertainties for modeling BVOC emissions comes from the estimation of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) reaching canopy. Satellite insolation retrieval data provide an alternative to prognostic meteorological models for representing the spatial and temporal variations of PAR. In this study, biogenic emission estimates generated with the MEGAN and BEIS biogenic emissions models using satellite or prognostic PAR are used to examine the contribution of BVOC to ozone in the United States. The Comprehensive Air Quality Model with Extensions (CAMx) is applied with Ozone Source Apportionment Technology (OSAT) and brute force zero-out sensitivity runs to quantify the biogenic contributions to ozone formation during May through September 2011. The satellite PAR retrievals are on average lower than modeled PAR and exhibit better agreement with SCAN and SURFRAD network measurements. Using satellite retrievals instead of modeled PAR reduces BEIS and MEGAN estimates of isoprene by an average of 3%-4% and 9%-12%, respectively. The simulations still overestimate observed ground-level isoprene concentrations by a factor of 1.1 for BEIS and 2.6 for MEGAN. The spatial pattern of biogenic ozone contribution diagnosed from OSAT differs from the brute force zero-out sensitivity results, with the former more smoothly distributed and the latter exhibiting peak impacts near metropolitan regions with intense anthropogenic NOx emissions. OSAT tends to apportion less ozone to biogenics as BVOC emissions increase, since that shifts marginal ozone formation toward more NOx-limited conditions. By contrast, zero-out source apportionment of ozone to biogenics increases with BVOC

  6. Iron Therapy for Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Raghavendra; Georgieff, Michael K.

    2009-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Preterm infants are at risk for both iron deficiency and iron overload. The role of iron in multiple organ functions suggests that iron supplementation is essential for the preterm infant. Conversely, the potential for iron overload and the poorly developed anti-oxidant measures in the preterm infant argues against indiscriminate iron supplementation in this population. The purpose of this article is to review the predisposing factors and consequences of iron deficiency and iron overload in the preterm infant, the current recommendation for iron supplementation and its appropriateness, and describe potential management strategies that strike a balance between iron deficiency and iron toxicity. PMID:19161863

  7. Influence of Biogeochemical Conditions on the Stability and Remobilization of Biogenic U(IV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, L.; Liu, C.; Szecsody, J. E.; Zachara, J. M.

    2004-05-01

    Uranium (U) is a common contaminant at the US Department of Energy (DOE) sites resulting from its central role in nuclear fuel cycle, and at U mine tailing sites associated with its production. U is present in the environment primarily as the hexavalent U(VI) and tetravalent U(IV). U(IV) is typically contained in insoluble precipitates, such as uraninite [UO2(s)], whereas U(VI) exists as uranyl ion, UO22+, and its complexes with various ligands. The mobility of U(VI) is a major concern in the subsurface environments. Under anoxic conditions, U(VI) can be reduced into U(IV) by some metal reducing bacteria, thus immobilizing U from groundwater. The reductive immobilization of U has been proposed as a remediation technology and under active studies at many US DOE sites. A key to the success of such immobilization technology is the maintenance of long term stability of the immobilized U when remediation completes and subsurface environments return to oxic conditions. This study investigated the influence of biogeochemical conditions on the stability and remobilization of biogenic U(IV). The experiments were conducted in a batch system using sediments collected from the US DOE Field Research Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Both sediments and U(VI) were first reduced by a dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium, Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN32, and then mixed in a solution containing 0.1 mM bicarbonate and 0.1 M NaNO3 in contact with atmospheric O2. Aqueous U(VI) in the suspensions were monitored as a function of time to determine the rates of U remobilization. The influence of biogeochemical conditions in the initial suspensions including Fe(II) concentration, pH, and the aging of bio-reduced U was evaluated. The results demonstrated that the Fe(II) concentration and pH had significant effects on the rate of U remobilization, while aging had only minor influence. The immobilized U was the most stable under neutral pH condition and its stability increased

  8. Airborne flux measurements of Biogenic Isoprene over California

    SciTech Connect

    Misztal, P.; Karl, Thomas G.; Weber, Robin; Jonsson, H. H.; Guenther, Alex B.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2014-10-10

    Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) fluxes were measured onboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft as part of the California Airborne BVOC Emission Research in Natural Ecosystem Transects (CABERNET) campaign during June 2011. The airborne virtual disjunct eddy covariance (AvDEC) approach used measurements from a PTR-MS and a wind radome probe to directly determine fluxes of isoprene, MVK+MAC, methanol, monoterpenes, and MBO over ~10,000-km of flight paths focusing on areas of California predicted to have the largest emissions of isoprene. The Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) approach was used to calculate fluxes over long transects of more than 15 km, most commonly between 50 and 150 km. The Continuous Wavelet Transformation (CWT) approach was used over the same transects to also calculate "instantaneous" fluxes with localization of both frequency and time independent of non-stationarities. Vertical flux divergence of isoprene is expected due to its relatively short lifetime and was measured directly using "racetrack" profiles at multiple altitudes. It was found to be linear and in the range 5% to 30% depending on the ratio of aircraft altitude to PBL height (z/zi). Fluxes were generally measured by flying consistently 1 at 400 m ±50 m (a.g.l.) altitude, and extrapolated to the surface according to the determined flux divergence. The wavelet-derived surface fluxes of isoprene averaged to 2 km spatial resolution showed good correspondence to Basal Emission Factor (BEF) landcover datasets used to drive biogenic VOC (BVOC) emission models. The surface flux of isoprene was close to zero over Central Valley crops and desert shrublands, but was very high (up to 15 mg m-2 h-1) above oak woodlands, with clear dependence of emissions on temperature and oak density. Isoprene concentrations of up to 8 ppb were observed at aircraft height on the hottest days and over the dominant source regions. While isoprene emissions from agricultural crop regions, shrublands, and

  9. Iron losses in sweat

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, M.; Magnusson, B.; Persson, H.; Hallberg, L.

    1986-03-01

    The losses of iron in whole body cell-free sweat were determined in eleven healthy men. A new experimental design was used with a very careful cleaning procedure of the skin and repeated consecutive sampling periods of sweat in a sauna. The purpose was to achieve a steady state of sweat iron losses with minimal influence from iron originating from desquamated cells and iron contaminating the skin. A steady state was reached in the third sauna period (second sweat sampling period). Iron loss was directly related to the volume of sweat lost and amounted to 22.5 micrograms iron/l sweat. The findings indicate that iron is a physiological constituent of sweat and derived not only from contamination. Present results imply that variations in the amount of sweat lost will have only a marginal effect on the variation in total body iron losses.

  10. Ferrous Sulfate (Iron)

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells. It is used to treat or prevent iron-deficiency anemia, a condition that occurs when the body ... than prescribed by your doctor.Although symptoms of iron deficiency usually improve within a few days, you may ...

  11. Iron in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... a long period of time can lead to iron deficiency anemia. Symptoms include lack of energy, shortness of ... irritability, dizziness , or weight loss. Physical signs of iron deficiency are a pale tongue and spoon-shaped nails. ...

  12. Iron supplements (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The mineral iron is an essential nutrient for humans because it is part of blood cells, which carry oxygen to all body cells. There is no conclusive evidence that iron supplements contribute to heart attacks.

  13. Constraints on Biogenic Emplacement of Crystalline Calcium Carbonate and Dolomite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colas, B.; Clark, S. M.; Jacob, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is a biogenic precursor of calcium carbonates forming shells and skeletons of marine organisms, which are key components of the whole marine environment. Understanding carbonate formation is an essential prerequisite to quantify the effect climate change and pollution have on marine population. Water is a critical component of the structure of ACC and the key component controlling the stability of the amorphous state. Addition of small amounts of magnesium (1-5% of the calcium content) is known to promote the stability of ACC presumably through stabilization of the hydrogen bonding network. Understanding the hydrogen bonding network in ACC is fundamental to understand the stability of ACC. Our approach is to use Monte-Carlo simulations constrained by X-ray and neutron scattering data to determine hydrogen bonding networks in ACC as a function of magnesium doping. We have already successfully developed a synthesis protocol to make ACC, and have collected X-ray data, which is suitable for determining Ca, Mg and O correlations, and have collected neutron data, which gives information on the hydrogen/deuterium (as the interaction of X-rays with hydrogen is too low for us to be able to constrain hydrogen atom positions with only X-rays). The X-ray and neutron data are used to constrain reverse Monte-Carlo modelling of the ACC structure using the Empirical Potential Structure Refinement program, in order to yield a complete structural model for ACC including water molecule positions. We will present details of our sample synthesis and characterization methods, X-ray and neutron scattering data, and reverse Monte-Carlo simulations results, together with a discussion of the role of hydrogen bonding in ACC stability.

  14. Biogenic amine systems in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Monastirioti, M

    1999-04-15

    Biogenic amines are important neuroactive molecules of the central nervous system (CNS) of several insect species. Serotonin (5HT), dopamine (DA), histamine (HA), and octopamine (OA) are the amines which have been extensively studied in Drosophila melanogaster. Each one of the four aminergic neuronal systems exhibits a stereotypic pattern of a small number of neurons that are widely distributed in the fly CNS. In this review, histochemical and immunocytochemical data on the distribution of the amine neurons in the larval and adult nervous system, are summarized. The majority of DA and 5HT neurons are interneurons, most of which are found in bilateral clusters. 5HT innervation is found in the feeding apparatus as well as in the endocrine organ of the larva, the ring gland. The octopaminergic neuronal population consists of both interneurons and efferent neurons. In the larval CNS all OA immunoreactive somata are localized in the midline of the ventral ganglion while in the adult CNS both unpaired neurons and bilateral clusters of immunoreactive cells are observed. One target of OA innervation is the abdominal muscles of the larval body wall where OA immunoreactivity is associated with the type II boutons in the axonal terminals. Histamine is mainly found in all photoreceptor cells where it is considered to be the major neurotransmitter molecule, and in specific mechanosensory neurons of the peripheral nervous system. Similarities between specific aminergic neurons and innervation sites in Drosophila and in other insect species are discussed. In addition, studies on the development and differentiation of 5HT and DA neurons are reviewed and data on the localization of 5HT, DA, and OA receptors are included as well. Finally, an overview on the isolation of the genes and the mutations in the amine biosynthetic pathways is presented and the implications of the molecular genetic approach in Drosophila are discussed.

  15. Atmospheric DMS and Biogenic Sulfur aerosol measurements in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghahremaninezhadgharelar, R.; Norman, A. L.; Wentworth, G.; Burkart, J.; Leaitch, W. R.; Abbatt, J.; Sharma, S.; Desiree, T. S.

    2014-12-01

    Dimethyl Sulfide (DMS) and its oxidation products were measured on the board of the Canadian Coast Guard Ship (CCGS) Amundsen and above melt ponds in the Arctic during July 2014 in the context of the NETCARE study which seeks to understand the effect of DMS and its oxidation products with respect to aerosol nucleation, as well as its effect on cloud and precipitation properties. The objective of this study is to quantify the role of DMS in aerosol growth and activation in the Arctic atmosphere. Atmospheric DMS samples were collected from different altitudes, from 200 to 9500 feet, aboard the POLAR6 aircraft expedition to determine variations in the DMS concentration and a comparison was made to shipboard DMS measurements and its effects on aerosol size fractions. The chemical and isotopic composition of sulfate aerosol size fractions was studied. Sulfur isotope ratios (34S/32S) offer a way to determine the oceanic DMS contribution to aerosol growth. The results are expected to address the contribution of anthropogenic as well as biogenic sources of aerosols to the growth of the different aerosol size fractions. In addition, aerosol sulfate concentrations were measured at the same time within precipitation and fogs to compare with the characteristics of aerosols in each size fraction with the characteristics of the sulfate in each medium. This measurement is expected to explain the contribution of DMS oxidation in aerosol activation in the Arctic summer. Preliminary results from the measurement campaign for DMS and its oxidation products in air, fog and precipitation will be presented.

  16. Biogenic silver nanoparticles: efficient and effective antifungal agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netala, Vasudeva Reddy; Kotakadi, Venkata Subbaiah; Domdi, Latha; Gaddam, Susmila Aparna; Bobbu, Pushpalatha; Venkata, Sucharitha K.; Ghosh, Sukhendu Bikash; Tartte, Vijaya

    2016-04-01

    Biogenic synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) by exploiting various plant materials is an emerging field and considered green nanotechnology as it involves simple, cost effective and ecofriendly procedure. In the present study AgNPs were successfully synthesized using aqueous callus extract of Gymnema sylvestre. The aqueous callus extract treated with 1nM silver nitrate solution resulted in the formation of AgNPs and the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the formed AgNPs showed a peak at 437 nm in the UV Visible spectrum. The synthesized AgNPs were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD). FTIR spectra showed the peaks at 3333, 2928, 2361, 1600, 1357 and 1028 cm-1 which revealed the role of different functional groups possibly involved in the synthesis and stabilization of AgNPs. TEM micrograph clearly revealed the size of the AgNPs to be in the range of 3-30 nm with spherical shape and poly-dispersed nature; it is further confirmed by Particle size analysis that the stability of AgNPs is due its high negative Zeta potential (-36.1 mV). XRD pattern revealed the crystal nature of the AgNPs by showing the braggs peaks corresponding to (111), (200), (220) and (311) planes of face-centered cubic crystal phase of silver. Selected area electron diffraction pattern showed diffraction rings and confirmed the crystalline nature of synthesized AgNPs. The synthesized AgNPs exhibited effective antifungal activity against Candida albicans, Candida nonalbicans and Candida tropicalis.

  17. Reversible and irreversible processing of biogenic olefins on acidic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liggio, J.; Li, S.-M.

    2008-04-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that heterogeneous chemistry of oxygenated hydrocarbons, primarily carbonyls, plays a role in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA); however, evidence is emerging that direct uptake of alkenes on acidic aerosols does occur and can contribute to SOA formation. In the present study, significant uptake of monoterpenes, oxygenated monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes to acidic sulfate aerosols is found under various conditions in a reaction chamber. Proton transfer mass spectrometry is used to quantify the organic gases, while an aerosol mass spectrometer is used to quantify the organic mass uptake and obtain structural information for heterogeneous products. Aerosol mass spectra are consistent with several mechanisms including acid catalyzed olefin hydration, cationic polymerization and organic ether formation, while measurable decreases in the sulfate mass on a per particle basis suggest that the formation of organosulfate compounds is also likely. A portion of the heterogeneous reactions appears to be reversible, consistent with reversible olefin hydration reactions. A slow increase in the organic mass after a fast initial uptake is attributed to irreversible reactions, consistent with polymerization and organosulfate formation. Uptake coefficients (γ) were estimated for a fast initial uptake governed by the mass accommodation coefficient (α) and ranged from 1×10-6-2.5×10-2. Uptake coefficients for a subsequent slower reactive uptake ranged from 1×10-7-1×10-4. These processes may potentially lead to a considerable amount of SOA from the various biogenic hydrocarbons under acidic conditions, which can be highly significant for freshly nucleated aerosols, particularly given the large array of atmospheric olefins.

  18. Reversible and irreversible processing of biogenic olefins on acidic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liggio, J.; Li, S.-M.

    2007-08-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that heterogeneous chemistry of oxygenated hydrocarbons, primarily carbonyls, plays a role in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA); however, evidence is emerging that direct uptake of alkenes on acidic aerosols does occur and can contribute to SOA formation. In the present study, significant uptake of monoterpenes, oxygenated monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes to acidic sulfate aerosols is found under various conditions in a reaction chamber. Proton transfer mass spectrometry is used to quantify the organic gases, while an aerosol mass spectrometer is used to quantify the organic mass uptake and obtain structural information for heterogeneous products. Aerosol mass spectra are consistent with several mechanisms including acid catalyzed olefin hydration, cationic polymerization and organic ester formation, while measurable decreases in the sulfate mass on a per particle basis suggest that the formation of organosulfate compounds is also likely. A portion of the heterogeneous reactions appears to be reversible, consistent with reversible olefin hydration reactions. A slow increase in the organic mass after a fast initial uptake is attributed to irreversible reactions, consistent with polymerization and organosulfate formation. Uptake coefficients (γ) were estimated for a fast initial uptake governed by the mass accommodation coefficient (α) and ranged from 1×10-6-2.5×10-2. Uptake coefficients for a subsequent slower reactive uptake ranged from 1×10-7-1×10-4. These processes are estimated to potentially produce greater than 2.5 μg m-3 of SOA from the various biogenic hydrocarbons under atmospheric conditions, which can be highly significant given the large array of atmospheric olefins.

  19. Characterization and reactivity of biogenic manganese oxides for ciprofloxacin oxidation.

    PubMed

    Tu, Jinjun; Yang, Zhendong; Hu, Chun; Qu, Jiuhui

    2014-05-01

    Biogenic manganese oxides (BioMnOx) were synthesized by the oxidation of Mn(II) with Mn-oxidizing bacteria Pseudomonas sp. G7 under different initial pH values and Mn(II) dosages, and were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. The crystal structure and Mn oxidation states of BioMnOx depended on the initial pH and Mn(II) dosages of the medium. The superoxide radical (O(·-)2) was observed in Mn-containing (III/IV) BioMnOx suspensions by electron spin resonance measurements. BioMnOx(0.4)-7, with mixed valence of Mn(II/III/IV) and the strongest O(·-)2 signals, was prepared in the initial pH 7 and Mn(II) dosage of 0.4 mmol/L condition, and exhibited the highest activity for ciprofloxacin degradation and no Mn(II) release. During the degradation of ciprofloxacin, the oxidation of the Mn(II) formed came from biotic and abiotic reactions in BioMnOx suspensions on the basis of the Mn(II) release and O(·-)2 formation from different BioMnOx. The degradation process of ciprofloxacin was shown to involve the cleavage of the hexatomic ring having a secondary amine and carbon-carbon double bond connected to a carboxyl group, producing several compounds containing amine groups as well as small organic acids. Copyright © 2014 The Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. La biogenèse des mélanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Delevoye, Cédric; Giordano, Francesca; van Niel, Guillaume; Raposo, Graça

    2012-01-01

    Les mélanocytes situés à la base de l’épiderme produisent des mélanosomes qui sont transférés aux kératinocytes pour assurer la pigmentation de l’épiderme et sa photoprotection contre les rayons ultraviolets. Les mélanosomes, organites apparentés aux lysosomes, sont le lieu de synthèse et de stockage d’un pigment, la mélanine. Leur formation dépend de protéines mélanosomales qui transitent par les voies de biosynthèse et d’endocytose et exploitent les mécanismes moléculaires du trafic intracellulaire. Les acteurs moléculaires impliqués dans le transport des protéines mélanosomales et la biogenèse des mélanosomes sont la cible de mutations dans des maladies génétiques accompagnées d’hypopigmentation comme l’albinisme et les maladies lysosomales. Les études menées sur les mélanocytes issus de souris modèles de ces maladies permettent de comprendre certaines des étapes-clés de la mélanogenèse ainsi que les dysfonctionnements associés à ces pathologies. De plus, décrypter la mélanogenèse facilite également la compréhension d’autres processus physiologiques, comme l’illustrent les similitudes inattendues avec l’amyloïdogenèse dans les maladies neurodégénératives. PMID:21382323

  1. Particle size dependence of biogenic secondary organic aerosol molecular composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Peijun; Johnston, Murray V.

    2017-06-01

    Formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is initiated by the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the gas phase whose products subsequently partition to the particle phase. Non-volatile molecules have a negligible evaporation rate and grow particles at their condensation rate. Semi-volatile molecules have a significant evaporation rate and grow particles at a much slower rate than their condensation rate. Particle phase chemistry may enhance particle growth if it transforms partitioned semi-volatile molecules into non-volatile products. In principle, changes in molecular composition as a function of particle size allow non-volatile molecules that have condensed from the gas phase (a surface-limited process) to be distinguished from those produced by particle phase reaction (a volume-limited process). In this work, SOA was produced by β-pinene ozonolysis in a flow tube reactor. Aerosol exiting the reactor was size-selected with a differential mobility analyzer, and individual particle sizes between 35 and 110 nm in diameter were characterized by on- and offline mass spectrometry. Both the average oxygen-to-carbon (O / C) ratio and carbon oxidation state (OSc) were found to decrease with increasing particle size, while the relative signal intensity of oligomers increased with increasing particle size. These results are consistent with oligomer formation primarily in the particle phase (accretion reactions, which become more favored as the volume-to-surface-area ratio of the particle increases). Analysis of a series of polydisperse SOA samples showed similar dependencies: as the mass loading increased (and average volume-to-surface-area ratio increased), the average O / C ratio and OSc decreased, while the relative intensity of oligomer ions increased. The results illustrate the potential impact that particle phase chemistry can have on biogenic SOA formation and the particle size range where this chemistry becomes important.

  2. Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds & their photochemical transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhujun; Hohaus, Thorsten; Tillmann, Ralf; Andres, Stefanie; Kuhn, Uwe; Rohrer, Franz; Wahner, Andreas; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid

    2015-04-01

    Natural and anthropogenic activities emit volatile organic compounds (VOC) into the atmosphere. While it is known that land vegetation accounts for 90% of the global VOC emissions, only a few molecules' emission factors are understood. Through VOCs atmospheric oxidation intermediate products are formed. The detailed chemical mechanisms involved are insufficiently known to date and need to be understood for air quality management and climate change predictions. In an experiment using a PTR-ToF-MS with the new-built plant chamber SAPHIR-PLUS in Forschungszentrum Juelich, biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds (BVOC) from Quercus ilex trees were measured. The BVOC emissions were dominated by monoterpenes, minor emissions of isoprene and methanol were also observed with the overall emission pattern typical for Quercus ilex trees in the growing season. Monoterpenes and isoprene emissions showed to be triggered by light. Additionally, their emissions showed clear exponential temperature dependence under constant light condition as reported in literature. As a tracer for leaf growth, methanol emission showed an abrupt increase at the beginning of light exposure. This is explained as instantaneous release of methanol produced during the night once stomata of leaves open upon light exposure. Emission of methanol showed a near linear increase with temperature in the range of 10 to 35 °C. BVOC were transferred from the plant chamber PLUS to the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR, where their oxidation products from O3 oxidation were measured with PTR-ToF-MS. Gas phase oxidation products such as acetone and acetaldehyde were detected. A quantitative analysis of the data will be presented, including comparison of observations to the Master Chemical Mechanism model.

  3. Hyperspectral observation of anthropogenic and biogenic pollution in coastal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrova, Olga; Loupian, Evgeny; Mityagina, Marina; Uvarov, Ivan

    The work presents results of anthropogenic and biogenic pollution detection in coastal zones of the Black and Caspian Seas based on satellite hyperspetral data provided by the Hyperion and HICO instruments. Techniques developed on the basis of the analysis of spectral characteristics calculated in special points were employed to address the following problems: (a) assessment of the blooming intensity of cyanobacteria and their distribution in bays of western Crimea and discrimination between anthropogenic pollutant discharge events and algae bloom; (b) detection of anthropogenic pollution in Crimean lakes utilized as industrial liquid discharge reservoirs; (c) detection of oil pollution in areas of shelf oil production in the Caspian Sea. Information values of different spectral bands and their composites were estimated in connection with the retrieval of the main sea water components: phytoplankton, suspended matter and colored organic matter, and also various anthropogenic pollutants, including oil. Software tools for thematic hyperspectral data processing in application to the investigation of sea coastal zones and internal water bodies were developed on the basis of the See the Sea geoportal created by the Space Research Institute RAS. The geoportal is focused on the study of processes in the world ocean with the emphasis on the advantages of satellite systems of observation. The tools that were introduced into the portal allow joint analysis of quasi-simultaneous satellite data, in particular data from the Hyperion, HICO, OLI Landsat-8, ETM Landsat-7 and TM Landsat-5 instruments. Results of analysis attempts combining data from different sensors are discussed. Their strong and weak points are highlighted. The study was completed with partial financial support from The Russian Foundation for Basic Research grants # 14-05-00520-a and 13-07-12017.

  4. Biogenic carbon fluxes from global agricultural production and consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Julie; West, Tristram O.; Le Page, Yannick; Kyle, G. Page; Zhang, Xuesong; Collatz, G. James; Imhoff, Marc L.

    2015-10-01

    Quantification of biogenic carbon fluxes from agricultural lands is needed to generate comprehensive bottom-up estimates of net carbon exchange for global and regional carbon monitoring. We estimated global agricultural carbon fluxes associated with annual crop net primary production (NPP), harvested biomass, and consumption of biomass by humans and livestock. These estimates were combined for a single estimate of net carbon exchange and spatially distributed to 0.05° resolution using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer satellite land cover data. Global crop NPP in 2011 was estimated at 5.25 ± 0.46 Pg C yr-1, of which 2.05 ± 0.05 Pg C yr-1 was harvested and 0.54 Pg C yr-1 was collected from crop residues for livestock fodder. Total livestock feed intake in 2011 was 2.42 ± 0.21 Pg C yr-1, of which 2.31 ± 0.21 Pg C yr-1 was emitted as CO2, 0.07 ± 0.01 Pg C yr-1 was emitted as CH4, and 0.04 Pg C yr-1 was contained within milk and egg production. Livestock grazed an estimated 1.27 Pg C yr-1 in 2011, which constituted 52.4% of total feed intake. Global human food intake was 0.57 ± 0.03 Pg C yr-1 in 2011, the majority of which was respired as CO2. Completed global cropland carbon budgets accounted for the ultimate use of approximately 80% of harvested biomass. The spatial distribution of these fluxes may be used for global carbon monitoring, estimation of regional uncertainty, and for use as input to Earth system models.

  5. A marine biogenic source of atmospherically relevant ice nucleating particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Theodore W.; Ladino, Luis A.; Alpert, Peter A.; Chance, Rosie; Whale, Thomas F.; Vergara Temprado, Jesús; Burrows, Susannah M.; Breckels, Mark N.; Kilthau, Wendy P.; Browse, Jo; Bertram, Allan K.; Miller, Lisa A.; Carpenter, Lucy J.; Hamilton, Jacqui F.; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Brooks, Ian M.; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Aller, Josephine Y.; Knopf, Daniel A.; Murray, Benjamin J.

    2016-04-01

    There are limited observations describing marine sources of ice nucleating particles (INPs), despite sea spray aerosol being one of the dominant sources of atmospheric particles globally. Evidence indicates that some marine aerosol particles act as INPs, but the source of these particles is unclear. The sea surface microlayer is enriched in surface active organic material representative of that found in sub-micron sea-spray aerosol. We show that the sea surface microlayer is enriched in INPs that nucleate ice under conditions pertinent to both high-altitude ice clouds and low to mid-altitude mixed-phase clouds. The INPs pass through 0.2 μm pore filters, are heat sensitive and spectroscopic analysis indicates the presence of material consistent with phytoplankton exudates. Mass spectrometric analysis of solid phase extracted dissolved organic material from microlayer and sub-surface water samples showed that the relative abundance of certain ions correlated with microlayer ice nucleation activity. However, these ions were not themselves directly responsible for ice nucleation. We propose that material associated with phytoplankton exudates is a candidate for the observed activity of the microlayer samples. We show that laboratory produced exudate from a ubiquitous marine diatom contains INPs despite its separation from diatom cells. Finally we use a parameterisation of our field data to estimate the atmospheric INP contribution from primary marine organic emissions using a global model and test the model against existing INP measurements in the remote oceans. We find that biogenic marine INPs can be dominant in remote marine environments, such as the Southern Ocean.

  6. Biogenic Carbon on Mars: A Subsurface Chauvinistic Viewpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onstott, T. C.; Lau, C. Y. M.; Magnabosco, C.; Harris, R.; Chen, Y.; Slater, G.; Sherwood Lollar, B.; Kieft, T. L.; van Heerden, E.; Borgonie, G.; Dong, H.

    2015-12-01

    A review of 150 publications on the subsurface microbiology of the continental subsurface provides ~1,400 measurements of cellular abundances down to 4,800 meter depth. These data suggest that the continental subsurface biomass is comprised of ~1016-17 grams of carbon, which is higher than the most recent estimates of ~1015 grams of carbon (1 Gt) for the marine deep biosphere. If life developed early in Martian history and Mars sustained an active hydrological cycle during its first 500 million years, then is it possible that Mars could have developed a subsurface biomass of comparable size to that of Earth? Such a biomass would comprise a much larger fraction of the total known Martian carbon budget than does the subsurface biomass on Earth. More importantly could a remnant of this subsurface biosphere survive to the present day? To determine how sustainable subsurface life could be in isolation from the surface we have been studying subsurface fracture fluids from the Precambrian Shields in South Africa and Canada. In these environments the energetically efficient and deeply rooted acetyl-CoA pathway for carbon fixation plays a central role for chemolithoautotrophic primary producers that form the base of the biomass pyramid. These primary producers appear to be sustained indefinitely by H2 generated through serpentinization and radiolytic reactions. Carbon isotope data suggest that in some subsurface locations a much larger population of secondary consumers are sustained by the primary production of biogenic CH4 from a much smaller population of methanogens. These inverted biomass and energy pyramids sustained by the cycling of CH4 could have been and could still be active on Mars. The C and H isotopic signatures of Martian CH4 remain key tools in identifying potential signatures of an extant Martian biosphere. Based upon our results to date cavity ring-down spectroscopic technologies provide an option for making these measurements on future rover missions.

  7. Mesoproterozoic biogenic thrombolites from the North China platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Dongjie; Shi, Xiaoying; Jiang, Ganqing

    2013-03-01

    Thrombolites are abundant in the subtidal dolostones of the Mesoproterozoic Wumishan Formation (ca 1.50-1.45 Ga) in the North China platform. Three major components are identified within the thrombolites: irregular mesoclots, micritic matrix and spar-filled voids. The mesoclot generally comprises a relatively organic-rich micritic core and a microsparitic outer layer that consists of fibrous aragonite (pseudocrystals) with less organic matter. In the core of mesoclots, abundant fossilized organic remnants, such as putative coccoidal and filamentous bacteria and mucus- to film-like extracellular polymeric substance (EPS), are closely associated with organominerals including nanoglobules and submicron-scale polyhedrons. In exceptionally well-preserved mesoclots, their outer layers commonly contain micropores displaying as bacterial molds and filamentous bacteria fossils. The matrix of mesoclots consists mainly of micropeloids (20-30 μm in diameter) and minor terrigenous detritus. Some mesoclots have denticulate edges and their matrix shows growth laminations that envelope the outlines of mesoclots. These features indicate that the mesoclots are primary and they were mineralized earlier than the surrounding matrix. The mineralization of mesoclots may have proceeded in two stages: (1) organomineralization of the cores through replacement of organic matter by minute organominerals resulting from anaerobic degradation of bacteria and EPS and (2) inorganic precipitation of the outer layers fostered by an increase in carbonate alkalinity in micro-environment due to organic matter decomposition. The thrombolites from the Mesoproterozoic Wumishan Formation may have formed through complex interactions between microbes and environments and represent the earliest known Precambrian biogenic thrombolites.

  8. Oxygen Isotope Signatures of Biogenic Manganese(III/IV) Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, K. M.; Hansel, C. M.; Wankel, S. D.

    2015-12-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxide minerals are pervasive throughout a number of surface earth environments as rock varnishes, ferromanganese nodules, crusts around deep-sea vents, and cave deposits among many other marine, freshwater, and terrestrial deposits. Mn(III,IV) oxides are also among the strongest sorbents and oxidants in surface earth environments and are crucial to understanding the fate of organic matter in sedimentary environments. The precipitation of Mn oxide minerals proceeds via both abiotic and biotic oxidation pathways, the latter due to the indirect or direct activity of Mn(II)- oxidizing microorganisms, including bacteria and fungi. Although the precipitation of Mn oxides is believed to be primarily controlled by Mn(II)-oxidizing organisms in most surface earth environments, confirmation of this generally held notion has remained illusive and limits our understanding of their formation on Earth and beyond (e.g., Mars). Previous work provided evidence that O atom incorporation by specific Mn oxidation pathways may exhibit unique and predictable isotopic fractionation. In this study, we expand upon this evidence by measuring the oxygen isotope signature of several biogenic and abiogenic Mn oxide minerals synthesized under a range of oxygen-18 labeled water. These results allow us to determine the relative amount oxygen atoms derived from water and molecular oxygen that are incorporated in the oxide and shed light on corresponding isotope fractionation factors. Additionally, we show that, once precipitated, Mn oxide isotope signatures are robust with respect to aqueous oxygen isotope exchange. The study provides a foundation on which to study and interpret Mn oxides in natural environments and determine which environmental controls may govern Mn(II) oxidation.

  9. Ice Formation Potential of Field-Collected Marine Biogenic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrion-Matta, A.; Alpert, P. A.; Radway, J.; Kilthau, W.; Bothe, D.; Knopf, D. A.; Aller, J. Y.

    2013-12-01

    Marine biogenic particles composed mainly of sea salt and organic material aerosolized from a mesocosm in laboratory experiments have recently been found to act as ice nuclei. How these particles relate to those collected from sea spray under ambient conditions in the field is unknown. This study reports on the heterogeneous ice nucleation potential of particles collected during the marine aerosol characterization experiment (MACE) on the south shore of Long Island, New York. Ambient aerosol size distributions were measured and particles were collected on hydrophobically coated substrates and subsequently used for ice nucleation experiments using an ice nucleation cell coupled to an optical microscope. This technique allows detection of ice formation for temperatures between 200 and 273 K and for relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice) from 100% up to water saturation. Individual ice nucleating particles were identified for subsequent chemical and physical characterization using both X-ray and electron micro-spectroscopic techniques. Concentrations of bacteria, viruses, and transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) in the bulk seawater, sea-surface microlayer (SML), and in sea spray were determined using established methods and related to airborne sea spray particles and their ice nucleation potential. Onshore aerosol size distribution measurements taken at 5 m height and 10 m away from the breaking waves, revealed a peak maximum at 100 nm and Ntot = 6.8 x 10^2 cm^-3. Bacterial, viral, and TEP were found to be enriched in the SML. Ambient particles collected during MACE were found to nucleate ice efficiently, e. g. at 215 K, ice nucleation occurred on average at 125% RHice. Results of aerosol size distributions and ice nucleation efficiencies are compared to laboratory bubble bursting experiments in which natural seawater was used. The goal of this study is to understand the connection between sea spray aerosolization and atmospheric ice cloud formation and to

  10. Airborne observations of vegetation and implications for biogenic emission characterization.

    PubMed

    Hawes, Amy K; Solomon, Susan; Portmann, Robert W; Daniel, John S; Langford, Andrew O; Miller, H LeRoy; Eubank, Charles S; Goldan, Paul; Wiedinmyer, Christine; Atlas, Elliot; Hansel, Armin; Wisthaler, Armin

    2003-12-01

    Measuring hydrocarbons from aircraft represents one way to infer biogenic emissions at the surface. The focus of this paper is to show that complementary remote sensing information can be provided by optical measurements of a vegetation index, which is readily measured with high temporal coverage using reflectance data. We examine the similarities between the vegetation index and in situ measurements of the chemicals isoprene, methacrolein, and alpha-pinene to estimate whether the temporal behavior of the in situ measurements of these chemicals could be better understood by the addition of the vegetation index. Data were compared for flights conducted around Houston in August and September 2000. The three independent sets of chemical measurements examined correspond reasonably well with the vegetation index curves for the majority of flight days. While low values of the vegetation index always correspond to low values of the in situ chemical measurements, high values of the index correspond to both high and low values of the chemical measurements. In this sense it represents an upper limit when compared with in situ data (assuming the calibration constant is adequately chosen). This result suggests that while the vegetation index cannot represent a purely predictive quantity for the in situ measurements, it represents a complementary measurement that can be useful in understanding comparisons of various in situ observations, particularly when these observations occur with relatively low temporal frequency. In situ isoprene measurements and the vegetation index were also compared to an isoprene emission inventory to provide additional insight on broad issues relating to the use of vegetation indices in emission database development.

  11. Historical anthropogenic radiative forcing of changes in biogenic secondary aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta Navarro, Juan; D'Andrea, Stephen; Pierce, Jeffrey; Ekman, Annica; Struthers, Hamish; Zorita, Eduardo; Guenther, Alex; Arneth, Almut; Smolander, Sampo; Kaplan, Jed; Farina, Salvatore; Scott, Catherine; Rap, Alexandru; Farmer, Delphine; Spracklen, Domink; Riipinen, Ilona

    2016-04-01

    Human activities have lead to changes in the energy balance of the Earth and the global climate. Changes in atmospheric aerosols are the second largest contributor to climate change after greenhouse gases since 1750 A.D. Land-use practices and other environmental drivers have caused changes in the emission of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) well before 1750 A.D, possibly causing climate effects through aerosol-radiation and aerosol-cloud interactions. Two numerical emission models LPJ-GUESS and MEGAN were used to quantify the changes in aerosol forming BVOC emissions in the past millennium. A chemical transport model of the atmosphere (GEOS-Chem-TOMAS) was driven with those BVOC emissions to quantify the effects on radiation caused by millennial changes in SOA. We found that global isoprene emissions decreased after 1800 A.D. by about 12% - 15%. This decrease was dominated by losses of natural vegetation, whereas monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions increased by about 2% - 10%, driven mostly by rising surface air temperatures. From 1000 A.D. to 1800 A.D, isoprene, monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions decline by 3% - 8% driven by both, natural vegetation losses, and the moderate global cooling between the medieval climate anomaly and the little ice age. The millennial reduction in BVOC emissions lead to a 0.5% to 2% reduction in climatically relevant aerosol particles (> 80 nm) and cause a direct radiative forcing between +0.02 W/m² and +0.07 W/m², and an indirect radiative forcing between -0.02 W/m² and +0.02 W/m².