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Sample records for biological damage induced

  1. Effects of carotenoids on damage of biological lipids induced by gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Takeshi; Fujii, Noriko

    2014-05-01

    Carotenoids are considered to be involved in the radioresistant mechanisms of radioresistant bacteria. In these bacterial cells, carotenoids are present in biological lipids, and therefore may be related to the radiation-induced damage of lipids. However, only limited data are available for the role of carotenoids in such damage. In this study, we irradiated an α-linolenic acid-benzene solution with gamma rays and analyzed the resulting oxidative degradation and peroxidation damage in the presence or absence of two typical carotenoids: β-carotene and astaxanthin. The analyses revealed that oxidative degradation and peroxidation of α-linolenic acid, as evaluated by the amount of malondialdehyde and conjugated diene formed, respectively, increased in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, 8.5×10-3 M β-carotene inhibited gamma radiation-induced oxidative degradation of α-linolenic acid, whereas 5.0×10-5 and 5.0×10-6 M β-carotene, and 5.0×10-7 and 5.0×10-8 M astaxanthin promoted degradation. In contrast, neither β-carotene nor astaxanthin affected peroxidation of α-linolenic acid. These results suggest that an optimum concentration of carotenoids in radioresistant bacteria protects biological lipid structures from radiation-induced damage.

  2. Unusual copper-induced sensitization of the biological damage due to superoxide radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Amram, S.; Mordechai, C.; Czapski, G.

    1981-12-01

    The role of superoxide radicals in biological damage in the presence of copper(II) ions has been investigated. Solutions of purified penicillinase in phosphate buffer, saturated with either air N/sub 2/, N/sub 2/O, or N/sub 2/O/O/sub 2/, were..gamma..-irradiated in the presence and in the absence of formate. The residual activity of the enzyme in catalyzing the cleavage of the..beta..-lactam ring of benzylpenicillin, was then monitored. The results indicate that in metal-free systems only the primary water-derived radicals, H,e/sub aq/, and OH, contribute toward enzyme inactivation, while the secondary species O/sub 2/ and CO/sub 2/ do not. The effect of copper(II) ions on the radiation-induced damage depended on which of the active species was predominant. With OH radicals, no effect of copper was detected. The damage originating from e/sub aq/ and H radicals decreased with the addition of copper, presumably due to their trapping by the copper(II) ions. In contrast, with O/sub 2/ radicals predominant in the system, copper dramatically enhanced the damage. This copper-induced sensitization was further increased in the presence of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and the dose modifying factor of copper exceeded 100, i.e. enchancement of the damage by two orders of magnitude, as compared with an oxygen enhancement ratio of 2-3 generally found for molecular oxygen. This copper effect could be completely eliminated by EDTA. The present results suggest that the presence of both transition metal ions and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and the binding of the metal ions to the target bimolecules are required for the manifestation.

  3. Unusual copper-induced sensitization of the biological damage due to superoxide radicals. [Gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Samuni, A.; Chevion, M.; Czapski, G.

    1981-12-25

    The role of superoxide radicals in biological damage in the presence of copper(II) ions has been investigated. Solutions of purified penicillinase in phosphate buffer, saturated with either air N/sub 2/, N/sub 2/O, or N/sub 2/O/O/sub 3/, were ..gamma..-irradiated in the presence and in the absence of formate. The residual activity of the enzyme in catalyzing the cleavage of the ..beta..-lactam ring of benzylpenicillin, was the monitored. The results indicate that in metal-free systems only the primary water-derived radicals, H, e/sub aq//sup -/, and OH, contribute toward enzyme inactivation, while the secondary species O/sub 2//sup -/ and CO/sub 2//sup -/ do not. The effect of copper(II) ions on the radiation-induced damage depended on which of the active species was predominant. With OH radicals, no effect of copper was detected. The damage originating from e/sub aq//sup -/ and H radicals decreased with the addition of copper, presumably due to their trapping by the copper(II) ions. In contrast, with O/sub 2//sup -/ radicals predominant in the system, copper dramatically enhanced the damage. This copper-induced sensitization was further increased in the presence of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and the dose modifying factor of copper exceeded 100. This copper effect could be completely eliminated by EDTA. The present results suggest that the presence of both transition metal ions and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and the binding of the metal ions to the target bimolecules are required for the manifestation of the deleterious role of O/sub 2//sup -/. According to this model, the enhancement of the damage by copper results from the attack, of reducing radical species on copper(II) ions bound to the bimolecule. These protein-Cu(II) complexes can be reduced by O/sub 2//sup -/ radicals yielding protein-Cu(I) species, which in turn react with H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ to locally form secondary hydroxyl radicals that react, on that site, with the protein impairing its biological function.

  4. Shock wave induces biological renal damage by activating excessive inflammatory responses in rat model.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Long, Qingzhi; Cheng, Xinfa; He, Dalin

    2014-08-01

    The study was aimed to investigate the potential mechanism of inflammatory renal damage induced by shock wave. A total of 48 rats, with the right kidney cut, are randomly assigned into control group, ESWL group and ESWL + PDTC group. Rats were treated with shock wave at the left kidney. At post-shock wave 3 and 105 days, all the animals were sacrificed for detecting the expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1. The inflammatory responses were evaluated by detecting the level of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and ED-1. The histological renal injury was also examined. Before the animals were sacrificed, the urine samples were collected for measuring the values of malondialdehyde (MDA), β2-microglobulin, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-18. At post-shock wave 3 days, the higher expression of ICAM-1 and TNF-α were observed in shock wave-treated kidneys. The level of urine TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-18 were also increased significantly. Using PDTC obviously decreased the expression of ICAM-1 and TNF-α. It also effectively inhibited the degree of oxidative stress and neutrophil infiltration. At post-shock wave 105 days, the expression of MCP-1 and the level of urine β2-microglobulin and IL-18 were increased significantly. The histological analysis also indicated more ED-1-positive cells and serious fibrosis in shock wave-treated kidneys. PDTC significantly suppressed MCP-1 and IL-18 expression, decreased monocyte infiltration, and alleviate the degree of interstitium fibrosis. Shock wave triggered excessive inflammatory responses and aggravated renal biological damage. Several inflammatory factors including ICAM-1, MCP-1, and TNF-α were considered to play important role in this type of renal damage.

  5. Role of cellular communication in the pathways of radiation-induced biological damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarini, Francesca; Facoetti, Angelica; Mariotti, Luca; Nano, Rosanna; Ottolenghi, Andrea

    During the last decade, a large number of experimental studies on the so-called "non-targeted effects", in particular bystander effects, outlined that cellular communication plays a signifi- cant role in the pathways leading to radiation-induced biological damage. This might imply a paradigm shift in (low-dose) radiobiology, according to which one has to consider the response of groups of cells behaving like a population rather than single cells behaving as individuals. Furthermore, bystander effects, which are observed both for lethal endpoints (e.g. clonogenic inactivation and apoptosis) and for non-lethal ones (e.g. mutations and neoplastic transformation), tend to show non-linear dose responses characterized by a sharp increase followed by a plateau. This might have significant consequences in terms of low-dose risk, which is generally calculated on the basis of the "Linear No Threshold" hypothesis. Although it is known that two types of cellular communication (i.e. via gap junctions and/or molecular messengers diffusing in the extra-cellular environment, such as cytokines) play a major role, it is of utmost importance to better understand the underlying mechanisms, and how such mechanisms can be modulated by ionizing radiation. Though the "final" goal is to elucidate the in vivo scenario, in the meanwhile also in vitro studies can provide useful insights. In the present paper we will discuss key issues on the mechanisms underlying non-targeted effects and, more generally, cell communication, with focus on candidate molecular signals. Theoretical models and simulation codes can be of help in elucidating such mechanisms. In this framework, we will present a model and Monte Carlo code, under development at the University of Pavia, simulating the release, diffusion and internalization of candidate signals (typically cytokines) travelling in the extra-cellular environment, both by unirradiated (i.e., control) cells and by irradiated cells. The focus will be on the

  6. Protective Effect of Selected Medicinal Plants against Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Oxidative Damage on Biological Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Pai Kotebagilu, Namratha; Reddy Palvai, Vanitha

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is developed due to susceptibility of biological substrates to oxidation by generation of free radicals. In degenerative diseases, oxidative stress level can be reduced by antioxidants which neutralize free radicals. Primary objective of this work was to screen four medicinal plants, namely, Andrographis paniculata, Costus speciosus, Canthium parviflorum, and Abrus precatorius, for their antioxidant property using two biological substrates—RBC and microsomes. The antioxidative ability of three solvent extracts, methanol (100% and 80%) and aqueous leaf extracts, was studied at different concentrations by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances method using Fenton's reagent to induce oxidation in the substrates. The polyphenol and flavonoid content were analyzed to relate with the observed antioxidant effect of the extracts. The phytochemical screening indicated the presence of flavonoids, polyphenols, tannins, and β-carotene in the samples. In microsomes, 80% methanol extract of Canthium and Costus and, in RBC, 80% methanol extract of Costus showed highest inhibition of oxidation and correlated well with the polyphenol and flavonoid content. From the results it can be concluded that antioxidants from medicinal plants are capable of inhibiting oxidation in biological systems, suggesting scope for their use as nutraceuticals. PMID:25436152

  7. Radiation-induced DNA damage and the relative biological effectiveness of 18F-FDG in wild-type mice

    DOE PAGES

    Taylor, Kristina; Lemon, Jennifer A.; Boreham, Douglas R.

    2014-05-28

    Clinically, the most commonly used positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer is the glucose analog 2-[18F] fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (18F-FDG), however little research has been conducted on the biological effects of 18F-FDG injections. The induction and repair of DNA damage and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of radiation from 18F-FDG relative to 662 keV γ-rays were investigated. The study also assessed whether low-dose radiation exposure from 18F-FDG was capable of inducing an adaptive response. DNA damage to the bone marrow erythroblast population was measured using micronucleus formation and lymphocyte γH2A.X levels. To test the RBE of 18F-FDG, mice were injected with a rangemore » of activities of 18F-FDG (0–14.80 MBq) or irradiated with Cs-137 γ-rays (0–100 mGy). The adaptive response was investigated 24 h after the 18F-FDG injection by 1 Gy in vivo challenge doses for micronucleated reticulocyte (MN-RET) formation or 1, 2 and 4 Gy in vitro challenges doses for γH2A.X formation. A significant increase in MN-RET formation above controls occurred following injection activities of 3.70, 7.40 or 14.80 MBq (P < 0.001) which correspond to bone marrow doses of ~35, 75 and 150 mGy, respectively. Per unit dose, the Cs-137 radiation exposure induced significantly more damage than the 18F-FDG injections (RBE = 0.79 ± 0.04). A 20% reduction in γH2A.X fluorescence was observed in mice injected with a prior adapting low dose of 14.80 MBq 18F-FDG relative to controls (P < 0.019). A 0.74 MBq 18F-FDG injection, which gives mice a dose approximately equal to a typical human PET scan, did not cause a significant increase in DNA damage nor did it generate an adaptive response. Typical 18F-FDG injection activities used in small animal imaging (14.80 MBq) resulted in a decrease in DNA damage, as measured by γH2A.X formation, below spontaneous levels observed in control mice. Lastly, the 18F-FDG RBE was <1.0, indicating that the mixed radiation quality

  8. Laser-induced damage in biological tissue: Role of complex and dynamic optical properties of the medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Elharith M.

    Since its invention in the early 1960's, the laser has been used as a tool for surgical, therapeutic, and diagnostic purposes. To achieve maximum effectiveness with the greatest margin of safety it is important to understand the mechanisms of light propagation through tissue and how that light affects living cells. Lasers with novel output characteristics for medical and military applications are too often implemented prior to proper evaluation with respect to tissue optical properties and human safety. Therefore, advances in computational models that describe light propagation and the cellular responses to laser exposure, without the use of animal models, are of considerable interest. Here, a physics-based laser-tissue interaction model was developed to predict the spatial and temporal temperature and pressure rise during laser exposure to biological tissues. Our new model also takes into account the dynamic nature of tissue optical properties and their impact on the induced temperature and pressure profiles. The laser-induced retinal damage is attributed to the formation of microbubbles formed around melanosomes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and the damage mechanism is assumed to be photo-thermal. Selective absorption by melanin creates these bubbles that expand and collapse around melanosomes, destroying cell membranes and killing cells. The Finite Element (FE) approach taken provides suitable ground for modeling localized pigment absorption which leads to a non-uniform temperature distribution within pigmented cells following laser pulse exposure. These hot-spots are sources for localized thermo-elastic stresses which lead to rapid localized expansions that manifest themselves as microbubbles and lead to microcavitations. Model predictions for the interaction of lasers at wavelengths of 193, 694, 532, 590, 1314, 1540, 2000, and 2940 nm with biological tissues were generated and comparisons were made with available experimental data for the retina

  9. [Alleviative effects of nitric oxide on the biological damage of spirulina platensis induced by enhanced ultraviolet-B].

    PubMed

    Xue, Lin-gui; Li, Shi-weng; Xu, Shi-jian; An, Li-zhe; Wang, Xun-ling

    2006-08-01

    Continuing depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer by atmospheric pollutants, in particular chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), has resulted in an increasing incidence of solar UV-B (280-320 nm) at the Earth's surface. Enhanced UV-B radiation has been considered as important global environmental problem and results in important effects to mankind and the entire global ecosystem. Nitric oxide (NO) is not only a toxic molecule, one of reactive nitrogen species (RNS), but also an important redox-active signaling molecule. NO is really a double-edged sword, it can be either beneficial and activate defense responses in plants and animals or toxic, together with ROS. Besides those, NO can also act as a signal molecule and play very important roles in life of organisms. To study the effects of NO on the biological specific property of enhanced UV-B stressed Spirulina platensis, the chlorophyll-a, protein contents and biomass were investigated under enhanced UV-B radiation and its combination with different chemical treatment. The changes of chlorophyll-a, protein contents and biomass confirmed that 0.5 mmol/L sodium nitroprusside (SNP), a donor of nitric oxide (NO), could markedly alleviate the biological damage of cyanobacteria-Spirulina platensis 794 caused by enhanced ultraviolet-B. Further results proved that NO significantly increase the content of protein and proline. Meanwhile, the accumulation of reduced glutathione (GSH) in S. platensis cells were raised under normal growth condition. But exogenous NO could decrease the increasing of reduced glutathione (GSH) in enhanced UV-B stressed S. platensis cells. These results suggest that NO has protective effect and can strongly alleviate biological damage caused by UV-B stress in S. platensis 794 cells. For the first time, reported the effect of NO on the regulating ability of biological damage of S. platensis induced by enhanced UV-B. Therefore, further investigations will be necessary to inquire into the interaction and

  10. Radiation-induced DNA damage and the relative biological effectiveness of 18F-FDG in wild-type mice

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Kristina; Lemon, Jennifer A.; Boreham, Douglas R.

    2014-05-28

    Clinically, the most commonly used positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer is the glucose analog 2-[18F] fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (18F-FDG), however little research has been conducted on the biological effects of 18F-FDG injections. The induction and repair of DNA damage and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of radiation from 18F-FDG relative to 662 keV γ-rays were investigated. The study also assessed whether low-dose radiation exposure from 18F-FDG was capable of inducing an adaptive response. DNA damage to the bone marrow erythroblast population was measured using micronucleus formation and lymphocyte γH2A.X levels. To test the RBE of 18F-FDG, mice were injected with a range of activities of 18F-FDG (0–14.80 MBq) or irradiated with Cs-137 γ-rays (0–100 mGy). The adaptive response was investigated 24 h after the 18F-FDG injection by 1 Gy in vivo challenge doses for micronucleated reticulocyte (MN-RET) formation or 1, 2 and 4 Gy in vitro challenges doses for γH2A.X formation. A significant increase in MN-RET formation above controls occurred following injection activities of 3.70, 7.40 or 14.80 MBq (P < 0.001) which correspond to bone marrow doses of ~35, 75 and 150 mGy, respectively. Per unit dose, the Cs-137 radiation exposure induced significantly more damage than the 18F-FDG injections (RBE = 0.79 ± 0.04). A 20% reduction in γH2A.X fluorescence was observed in mice injected with a prior adapting low dose of 14.80 MBq 18F-FDG relative to controls (P < 0.019). A 0.74 MBq 18F-FDG injection, which gives mice a dose approximately equal to a typical human PET scan, did not cause a significant increase in DNA damage nor did it generate an adaptive response. Typical 18F-FDG injection activities used in small animal imaging (14.80 MBq) resulted in a decrease in DNA damage, as measured by γH2A.X formation

  11. Drug-induced corneal damage.

    PubMed

    2014-04-01

    Corneal damage can have a variety of causes, including infections, chemical splashes, environmental factors (radiation, trauma, contact lenses, etc.), and systemic diseases (genetic, autoimmune, inflammatory, metabolic, etc.). A wide range of drugs can also damage the cornea. The severity of drug-induced corneal changes can range from simple asymptomatic deposits to irreversible, sight-threatening damage. Several factors can influence the onset of corneal lesions. Some factors, such as the dose, are treatment-related, while others such as contact lenses, are patient-related. A variety of mechanisms may be involved, including corneal dryness, changes in the corneal epithelium, impaired wound healing and deposits. Many drugs can damage the cornea through direct contact, after intraocular injection or instillation, including VEGF inhibitors, anti-inflammatory drugs, local anaesthetics, glaucoma drugs, fluoroquinolones, and preservatives. Some systemically administered drugs can also damage the cornea, notably cancer drugs, amiodarone and isotretinoin. Vulnerable patients should be informed of this risk if they are prescribed a drug with the potential to damage the cornea so that they can identify problems in a timely manner. It may be necessary to discontinue the suspect drug when signs and symptoms of corneal damage occur.

  12. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel chiral oxazino-indoles as potential and selective neuroprotective agents against Aβ25-35-induced neuronal damage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Tao, Ling-Xue; Xiao, Wei; Ji, Sha-Sha; Wang, Jian-Rong; Li, Xu-Wen; Zhang, Hai-Yan; Guo, Yue-Wei

    2016-08-01

    A series of chiral oxazino-indoles have been synthesized via a key intermolecular oxa-Pictet-Spengler reaction. These compounds exhibited significant and selective neuroprotective effects against Aβ25-35-induced neuronal damage. This is the first report of evaluating the influence of chiral diversity of oxazino-indoles on their neuroprotective activities, with the structure-activity relationship been analyzed. The highly active compounds 3f, 3g, 4g, 4h, and 6b all performed over 90% cell protection, providing a new direction for the development of neuroprotective agents against Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27301369

  13. Prevention of chemotherapy-induced ovarian damage.

    PubMed

    Roness, Hadassa; Kashi, Oren; Meirow, Dror

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the impact of cytotoxic drugs on the ovary have opened up new directions for the protection of the ovary from chemotherapy-induced damage. These advances have spurred the investigation of pharmacological agents to prevent ovarian damage at the time of treatment. Prevention of ovarian damage and follicle loss would provide significant advantages over existing fertility preservation techniques. This manuscript reviews new methods for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced ovarian damage, including agents that act on the PI3K/PTEN/Akt follicle activation pathway, apoptotic pathways, the vascular system, and other potential methods of reducing chemotherapy-induced ovotoxicity.

  14. The loss of ATP2C1 impairs the DNA damage response and induces altered skin homeostasis: Consequences for epidermal biology in Hailey-Hailey disease.

    PubMed

    Cialfi, Samantha; Le Pera, Loredana; De Blasio, Carlo; Mariano, Germano; Palermo, Rocco; Zonfrilli, Azzurra; Uccelletti, Daniela; Palleschi, Claudio; Biolcati, Gianfranco; Barbieri, Luca; Screpanti, Isabella; Talora, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Mutation of the Golgi Ca(2+)-ATPase ATP2C1 is associated with deregulated calcium homeostasis and altered skin function. ATP2C1 mutations have been identified as having a causative role in Hailey-Hailey disease, an autosomal-dominant skin disorder. Here, we identified ATP2C1 as a crucial regulator of epidermal homeostasis through the regulation of oxidative stress. Upon ATP2C1 inactivation, oxidative stress and Notch1 activation were increased in cultured human keratinocytes. Using RNA-seq experiments, we found that the DNA damage response (DDR) was consistently down-regulated in keratinocytes derived from the lesions of patients with Hailey-Hailey disease. Although oxidative stress activates the DDR, ATP2C1 inactivation down-regulates DDR gene expression. We showed that the DDR response was a major target of oxidative stress-induced Notch1 activation. Here, we show that this activation is functionally important because early Notch1 activation in keratinocytes induces keratinocyte differentiation and represses the DDR. These results indicate that an ATP2C1/NOTCH1 axis might be critical for keratinocyte function and cutaneous homeostasis, suggesting a plausible model for the pathological features of Hailey-Hailey disease. PMID:27528123

  15. The loss of ATP2C1 impairs the DNA damage response and induces altered skin homeostasis: Consequences for epidermal biology in Hailey-Hailey disease

    PubMed Central

    Cialfi, Samantha; Le Pera, Loredana; De Blasio, Carlo; Mariano, Germano; Palermo, Rocco; Zonfrilli, Azzurra; Uccelletti, Daniela; Palleschi, Claudio; Biolcati, Gianfranco; Barbieri, Luca; Screpanti, Isabella; Talora, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Mutation of the Golgi Ca2+-ATPase ATP2C1 is associated with deregulated calcium homeostasis and altered skin function. ATP2C1 mutations have been identified as having a causative role in Hailey-Hailey disease, an autosomal-dominant skin disorder. Here, we identified ATP2C1 as a crucial regulator of epidermal homeostasis through the regulation of oxidative stress. Upon ATP2C1 inactivation, oxidative stress and Notch1 activation were increased in cultured human keratinocytes. Using RNA-seq experiments, we found that the DNA damage response (DDR) was consistently down-regulated in keratinocytes derived from the lesions of patients with Hailey-Hailey disease. Although oxidative stress activates the DDR, ATP2C1 inactivation down-regulates DDR gene expression. We showed that the DDR response was a major target of oxidative stress-induced Notch1 activation. Here, we show that this activation is functionally important because early Notch1 activation in keratinocytes induces keratinocyte differentiation and represses the DDR. These results indicate that an ATP2C1/NOTCH1 axis might be critical for keratinocyte function and cutaneous homeostasis, suggesting a plausible model for the pathological features of Hailey-Hailey disease. PMID:27528123

  16. Muscle damage induced by electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Nosaka, Kazunori; Aldayel, Abdulaziz; Jubeau, Marc; Chen, Trevor C

    2011-10-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES) induces muscle damage that is characterised by histological alterations of muscle fibres and connective tissue, increases in circulating creatine kinase (CK) activity, decreases in muscle strength and development of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Muscle damage is induced not only by eccentric contractions with ES but also by isometric contractions evoked by ES. Muscle damage profile following 40 isometric contractions of the knee extensors is similar between pulsed current (75 Hz, 400 μs) and alternating current (2.5 kHz delivered at 75 Hz, 400 μs) ES for similar force output. When comparing maximal voluntary and ES-evoked (75 Hz, 200 μs) 50 isometric contractions of the elbow flexors, ES results in greater decreases in maximal voluntary contraction strength, increases in plasma CK activity and DOMS. It appears that the magnitude of muscle damage induced by ES-evoked isometric contractions is comparable to that induced by maximal voluntary eccentric contractions, although the volume of affected muscles in ES is not as large as that of eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage. It seems likely that the muscle damage in ES is associated with high mechanical stress on the activated muscle fibres due to the specificity of motor unit recruitment (i.e., non-selective, synchronous and spatially fixed manner). The magnitude of muscle damage induced by ES is significantly reduced when the second ES bout is performed 2-4 weeks later. It is possible to attenuate the magnitude of muscle damage by "pre-conditioning" muscles, so that muscle damage should not limit the use of ES in training and rehabilitation. PMID:21811767

  17. Autophagy in light-induced retinal damage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Perusek, Lindsay; Maeda, Akiko

    2016-03-01

    Vision is reliant upon converting photon signals to electrical information which is interpreted by the brain and therefore allowing us to receive information about our surroundings. However, when exposed to excessive light, photoreceptors and other types of cells in the retina can undergo light-induced cell death, termed light-induced retinal damage. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge regarding molecular events in the retina after excessive light exposure and mechanisms of light-induced retinal damage. We also introduce works which investigate potential roles of autophagy, an essential cellular mechanism required for maintaining homeostasis under stress conditions, in the illuminated retina and animal models of light-induced retinal damage.

  18. BRAIN DAMAGE IN CHILDREN, THE BIOLOGICAL AND SOCIAL ASPECTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BIRCH, HERBERT G., ED.

    PAPERS AND DISCUSSION SUMMARIES ARE PRESENTED FROM A CONFERENCE ON THE BIOLOGICAL AND SOCIAL PROBLEMS OF CHILDHOOD BRAIN DAMAGE, HELD AT THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL OF PHILADELPHIA IN NOVEMBER 1962. A VARIETY OF DISCIPLINES IS REPRESENTED, AND THE FOLLOWING TOPICS ARE CONSIDERED--(1) "THE PROBLEM OF 'BRAIN DAMAGE' IN CHILDREN" BY HERBERT G. BIRCH, (2)…

  19. Calcium signaling in UV-induced damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Dan; Zhang, Su-juan; Li, Yuan-yuan; Qu, Ying; Ren, Zhao-Yu

    2007-05-01

    Hepa1-6 cells were irradiated with UV and incubated for varying periods of time. [Ca 2+] i (intracellular calcium concentration) of UV-irradiated cell was measured by ratio fluorescence imaging system. The comet assay was used to determine DNA damage. During the UVB-irradiation, [Ca 2+] i had an ascending tendency from 0.88 J/m2 to 92.4J/m2. Comet assay instant test indicated that when the irradiation dosage was above 0.88J/m2, DNA damage was observed. Even after approximate 2 h of incubation, DNA damage was still not detected by 0.88J/m2 of UVB irradiation. During UVA-irradiation, the elevation of [Ca 2+] i was not dose-dependent in a range of 1200 J/m2-6000J/m2 and DNA damage was not observed by comet assay. These results suggested that several intracellular UV receptors might induce [Ca 2+] i rising by absorption of the UV energy. Just [Ca 2+] i rising can't induce DNA damage certainly, it is very likely that the breakdown of calcium steady state induces DNA damage.u

  20. Parvovirus infection-induced DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yong; Qiu, Jianming

    2014-01-01

    Parvoviruses are a group of small DNA viruses with ssDNA genomes flanked by two inverted terminal structures. Due to a limited genetic resource they require host cellular factors and sometimes a helper virus for efficient viral replication. Recent studies have shown that parvoviruses interact with the DNA damage machinery, which has a significant impact on the life cycle of the virus as well as the fate of infected cells. In addition, due to special DNA structures of the viral genomes, parvoviruses are useful tools for the study of the molecular mechanisms underlying viral infection-induced DNA damage response (DDR). This review aims to summarize recent advances in parvovirus-induced DDR, with a focus on the diverse DDR pathways triggered by different parvoviruses and the consequences of DDR on the viral life cycle as well as the fate of infected cells. PMID:25429305

  1. Persistent damage induces mitochondrial DNA degradation.

    PubMed

    Shokolenko, Inna N; Wilson, Glenn L; Alexeyev, Mikhail F

    2013-07-01

    Considerable progress has been made recently toward understanding the processes of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and repair. However, a paucity of information still exists regarding the physiological effects of persistent mtDNA damage. This is due, in part, to experimental difficulties associated with targeting mtDNA for damage, while sparing nuclear DNA. Here, we characterize two systems designed for targeted mtDNA damage based on the inducible (Tet-ON) mitochondrial expression of the bacterial enzyme, exonuclease III, and the human enzyme, uracil-N-glyosylase containing the Y147A mutation. In both systems, damage was accompanied by degradation of mtDNA, which was detectable by 6h after induction of mutant uracil-N-glycosylase and by 12h after induction of exoIII. Unexpectedly, increases in the steady-state levels of single-strand lesions, which led to degradation, were small in absolute terms indicating that both abasic sites and single-strand gaps may be poorly tolerated in mtDNA. mtDNA degradation was accompanied by the loss of expression of mtDNA-encoded COX2. After withdrawal of the inducer, recovery from mtDNA depletion occurred faster in the system expressing exonuclease III, but in both systems reduced mtDNA levels persisted longer than 144h after doxycycline withdrawal. mtDNA degradation was followed by reduction and loss of respiration, decreased membrane potential, reduced cell viability, reduced intrinsic reactive oxygen species production, slowed proliferation, and changes in mitochondrial morphology (fragmentation of the mitochondrial network, rounding and "foaming" of the mitochondria). The mutagenic effects of abasic sites in mtDNA were low, which indicates that damaged mtDNA molecules may be degraded if not rapidly repaired. This study establishes, for the first time, that mtDNA degradation can be a direct and immediate consequence of persistent mtDNA damage and that increased ROS production is not an invariant consequence of mtDNA damage.

  2. Chemical genoprotection: reducing biological damage to as low as reasonably achievable levels

    PubMed Central

    Alcaraz, M; Armero, D; Martínez-Beneyto, Y; Castillo, J; Benavente-García, O; Fernandez, H; Alcaraz-Saura, M; Canteras, M

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant substances present in the human diet with an antimutagenic protective capacity against genotoxic damage induced by exposure to X-rays in an attempt to reduce biological damage to as low a level as reasonably possible. Methods Ten compounds were assessed using the lymphocyte cytokinesis-block micronucleus (MN) cytome test. The compounds studied were added to human blood at 25 μM 5 min before exposure to irradiation by 2 Gy of X-rays. Results The protective capacity of the antioxidant substances assessed was from highest to lowest according to the frequency of the MN generated by X-ray exposure: rosmarinic acid = carnosic acid = δ-tocopherol = l-acid ascorbic = apigenin = amifostine (P < 0.001) > green tea extract = diosmine = rutin = dimetylsulfoxide (P < 0.05) > irradiated control. The reduction in genotoxic damage with the radiation doses administered reached 58%, which represents a significant reduction in X-ray-induced chromosomal damage (P < 0.001). This degree of protection is greater than that obtained with amifostine, a radioprotective compound used in radiotherapy and which is characterised by its high toxicity. Conclusion Several antioxidant substances, common components of the human diet and lacking toxicity, offer protection from the biological harm induced by ionizing radiation. Administering these protective substances to patients before radiological exploration should be considered, even in the case of small radiation doses and regardless of the biological damage expected. PMID:21697157

  3. The DNA Damage Response Induces Interferon

    PubMed Central

    Brzostek-Racine, Sabrina; Gordon, Chris; Van Scoy, Sarah; Reich, Nancy C.

    2011-01-01

    This study reveals a new complexity in the cellular response to DNA damage: activation of interferon (IFN) signaling. The DNA damage response involves the rapid recruitment of repair enzymes, and the activation of signal transducers that regulate cell cycle checkpoints and cell survival. To understand the link between DNA damage and innate cellular defense that occurs in response to many viral infections, we evaluated the effects of agents such as etoposide that promote double-stranded DNA breaks. Treatment of human cells with etoposide led to the induction of IFN-stimulated genes, and the IFN-α and IFN-λ genes. The nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), known to be activated in response to DNA damage, was shown to be a key regulator of this IFN gene induction. Expression of an NF-κB subunit, p65/RelA was sufficient for induction of the human IFN-λ1 gene. In addition, NF-κB was required for the induction of the IFN regulatory factors-1 and -7 that are able to stimulate expression of the IFN-α and IFN-λ genes. Cells that lack the NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO), lack the ability to induce the IFN genes following DNA damage. Breaks in DNA are generated during normal physiological processes of replication, transcription, and recombination, as well as by external genotoxic agents or infectious agents. The significant finding of IFN production as a stress response to DNA damage provides a new perspective on the role of IFN signaling. PMID:22013119

  4. The DNA-damage response in human biology and disease

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Stephen P.; Bartek, Jiri

    2010-01-01

    The prime objective for every life-form is to deliver its genetic material, intact and unchanged, to the next generation. This must be achieved despite constant assaults by endogenous and environmental agents on the DNA. To counter this threat, life has evolved several systems to detect DNA damage, signal its presence and mediate its repair. Such responses, which impact a wide range of cellular events, are biologically significant because they prevent diverse human diseases. Our improving understanding of DNA-damage responses is providing new avenues for disease management. PMID:19847258

  5. Both Complexity and Location of DNA Damage Contribute to Cellular Senescence Induced by Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xurui; Ye, Caiyong; Sun, Fang; Wei, Wenjun; Hu, Burong; Wang, Jufang

    2016-01-01

    Persistent DNA damage is considered as a main cause of cellular senescence induced by ionizing radiation. However, the molecular bases of the DNA damage and their contribution to cellular senescence are not completely clear. In this study, we found that both heavy ions and X-rays induced senescence in human uveal melanoma 92–1 cells. By measuring senescence associated-β-galactosidase and cell proliferation, we identified that heavy ions were more effective at inducing senescence than X-rays. We observed less efficient repair when DNA damage was induced by heavy ions compared with X-rays and most of the irreparable damage was complex of single strand breaks and double strand breaks, while DNA damage induced by X-rays was mostly repaired in 24 hours and the remained damage was preferentially associated with telomeric DNA. Our results suggest that DNA damage induced by heavy ion is often complex and difficult to repair, thus presents as persistent DNA damage and pushes the cell into senescence. In contrast, persistent DNA damage induced by X-rays is preferentially associated with telomeric DNA and the telomere-favored persistent DNA damage contributes to X-rays induced cellular senescence. These findings provide new insight into the understanding of high relative biological effectiveness of heavy ions relevant to cancer therapy and space radiation research. PMID:27187621

  6. LET analyses of biological damage during solar particle events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Shinn, Judy L.; Katz, Robert

    1991-01-01

    The effects of nuclear reactions on integral low-linear-energy-transfer (LET) protons spectra are studied, behind typical levels of spacecraft and body shielding, for the historically largest flares using the high-energy transport code BRYNTRN in conjunction with several biological damage models. The cellular track model of Katz provides an accurate description of cellular damage from heavy ion exposure. The track model is applied with BRYNTRN to provide a LET decomposition of survival and transformation rates for solar proton events. In addition, a fluence-based risk coefficient formalism is used to estimate Harderian gland-tumor induction in rodents and cataractogenesis in rabbits from solar flares, and a LET analysis is used to assess the relative contribution from target fragments on these biological endpoints.

  7. Selenomethionine protects against adverse biological effects induced by space radiation.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Ann R; Ware, Jeffrey H; Guan, Jun; Donahue, Jeremiah J; Biaglow, John E; Zhou, Zhaozong; Stewart, Jelena; Vazquez, Marcelo; Wan, X Steven

    2004-01-15

    Ionizing radiation-induced adverse biological effects impose serious challenges to astronauts during extended space travel. Of particular concern is the radiation from highly energetic, heavy, charged particles known as HZE particles. The objective of the present study was to characterize HZE particle radiation-induced adverse biological effects and evaluate the effect of D-selenomethionine (SeM) on the HZE particle radiation-induced adverse biological effects. The results showed that HZE particle radiation can increase oxidative stress, cytotoxicity, and cell transformation in vitro, and decrease the total antioxidant status in irradiated Sprague-Dawley rats. These adverse biological effects were all preventable by treatment with SeM, suggesting that SeM is potentially useful as a countermeasure against space radiation-induced adverse effects. Treatment with SeM was shown to enhance ATR and CHK2 gene expression in cultured human thyroid epithelial cells. As ionizing radiation is known to result in DNA damage and both ATR and CHK2 gene products are involved in DNA damage, it is possible that SeM may prevent HZE particle radiation-induced adverse biological effects by enhancing the DNA repair machinery in irradiated cells.

  8. Selenomethionine protects against adverse biological effects induced by space radiation.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Ann R; Ware, Jeffrey H; Guan, Jun; Donahue, Jeremiah J; Biaglow, John E; Zhou, Zhaozong; Stewart, Jelena; Vazquez, Marcelo; Wan, X Steven

    2004-01-15

    Ionizing radiation-induced adverse biological effects impose serious challenges to astronauts during extended space travel. Of particular concern is the radiation from highly energetic, heavy, charged particles known as HZE particles. The objective of the present study was to characterize HZE particle radiation-induced adverse biological effects and evaluate the effect of D-selenomethionine (SeM) on the HZE particle radiation-induced adverse biological effects. The results showed that HZE particle radiation can increase oxidative stress, cytotoxicity, and cell transformation in vitro, and decrease the total antioxidant status in irradiated Sprague-Dawley rats. These adverse biological effects were all preventable by treatment with SeM, suggesting that SeM is potentially useful as a countermeasure against space radiation-induced adverse effects. Treatment with SeM was shown to enhance ATR and CHK2 gene expression in cultured human thyroid epithelial cells. As ionizing radiation is known to result in DNA damage and both ATR and CHK2 gene products are involved in DNA damage, it is possible that SeM may prevent HZE particle radiation-induced adverse biological effects by enhancing the DNA repair machinery in irradiated cells. PMID:14744637

  9. Correlation of polishing-induced shallow subsurface damages with laser-induced gray haze damages in fused silica optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiang; Zhao, Heng; Wang, Gang; Zhou, Peifan; Ma, Ping

    2016-08-01

    Laser-induced damage in fused silica optics greatly restricts the performances of laser facilities. Gray haze damage, which is always initiated on ceria polished optics, is one of the most important damage morphologies in fused silica optics. In this paper, the laser-induced gray haze damages of four fused silica samples polished with CeO2, Al2O3, ZrO2, and colloidal silica slurries are investigated. Four samples all present gray haze damages with much different damage densities. Then, the polishing-induced contaminant and subsurface damages in four samples are analyzed. The results reveal that the gray haze damages could be initiated on the samples without Ce contaminant and are inclined to show a tight correlation with the shallow subsurface damages.

  10. Initial Biological Damage from Space Radiation: Implications for Development of Biological Countermeasures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Paloski, William H. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Astronauts are exposed to high-energy nuclear particles originating from the galactic cosmic rays, high-energy protons trapped in the Earth's magnetic field or solar particle events, and secondary radiation produced by nuclear reactions. Important differences between conventional radiation including X-rays or gamma-rays, and high-energy nuclei occur at the level of initial damage to DNA and other potential biological target molecules, and to tissues. Such differences include a large fraction of the initial damage from high charge and energy (HZE) nuclear particles manifested as irreparable lesions including small- and large-scale DNA deletions. Also, low dose-rate exposures in space result in a heterogeneous population of damaged cells distinct from energetic photon irradiation of tissue. We present an overview of the initial biological damage and dose and dose-rate effects produced by ionizing radiation using track structure and nuclear reaction models. Implications of the differences in cellular and tissue damage between conventional radiation and space radiation for the development of biological countermeasures are discussed.

  11. Opportunities for nutritional amelioration of radiation-induced cellular damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Nancy D.; Braby, Leslie A.; Ford, John; Lupton, Joanne R.

    2002-01-01

    The closed environment and limited evasive capabilities inherent in space flight cause astronauts to be exposed to many potential harmful agents (chemical contaminants in the environment and cosmic radiation exposure). Current power systems used to achieve space flight are prohibitively expensive for supporting the weight requirements to fully shield astronauts from cosmic radiation. Therefore, radiation poses a major, currently unresolvable risk for astronauts, especially for long-duration space flights. The major detrimental radiation effects that are of primary concern for long-duration space flights are damage to the lens of the eye, damage to the immune system, damage to the central nervous system, and cancer. In addition to the direct damage to biological molecules in cells, radiation exposure induces oxidative damage. Many natural antioxidants, whether consumed before or after radiation exposure, are able to confer some level of radioprotection. In addition to achieving beneficial effects from long-known antioxidants such as vitamins E and C and folic acid, some protection is conferred by several recently discovered antioxidant molecules, such as flavonoids, epigallocatechin, and other polyphenols. Somewhat counterintuitive is the protection provided by diets containing elevated levels of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, considering they are thought to be prone to peroxidation. Even with the information we have at our disposal, it will be difficult to predict the types of dietary modifications that can best reduce the risk of radiation exposure to astronauts, those living on Earth, or those enduring diagnostic or therapeutic radiation exposure. Much more work must be done in humans, whether on Earth or, preferably, in space, before we are able to make concrete recommendations.

  12. Opportunities for nutritional amelioration of radiation-induced cellular damage.

    PubMed

    Turner, Nancy D; Braby, Leslie A; Ford, John; Lupton, Joanne R

    2002-10-01

    The closed environment and limited evasive capabilities inherent in space flight cause astronauts to be exposed to many potential harmful agents (chemical contaminants in the environment and cosmic radiation exposure). Current power systems used to achieve space flight are prohibitively expensive for supporting the weight requirements to fully shield astronauts from cosmic radiation. Therefore, radiation poses a major, currently unresolvable risk for astronauts, especially for long-duration space flights. The major detrimental radiation effects that are of primary concern for long-duration space flights are damage to the lens of the eye, damage to the immune system, damage to the central nervous system, and cancer. In addition to the direct damage to biological molecules in cells, radiation exposure induces oxidative damage. Many natural antioxidants, whether consumed before or after radiation exposure, are able to confer some level of radioprotection. In addition to achieving beneficial effects from long-known antioxidants such as vitamins E and C and folic acid, some protection is conferred by several recently discovered antioxidant molecules, such as flavonoids, epigallocatechin, and other polyphenols. Somewhat counterintuitive is the protection provided by diets containing elevated levels of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, considering they are thought to be prone to peroxidation. Even with the information we have at our disposal, it will be difficult to predict the types of dietary modifications that can best reduce the risk of radiation exposure to astronauts, those living on Earth, or those enduring diagnostic or therapeutic radiation exposure. Much more work must be done in humans, whether on Earth or, preferably, in space, before we are able to make concrete recommendations. PMID:12361786

  13. [Galactic heavy charged particles damaging effect on biological structures].

    PubMed

    Grigor'ev, A I; Krasavin, E A; Ostrovskiĭ, M A

    2013-03-01

    A concept of the radiation risk of the manned interplanetary flights is proposed and substantiated. Heavy charged particles that are a component of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) have a high damaging effect on the biological structures as great amount of energy is deposited in heavy particle tracks. The high biological effectiveness of heavy ions is observed in their action on cell genetic structures and the whole organism, including the brain structures. The hippocampus is the part of the central nervous system that is the most sensitive to radiation--first of all, to heavy charged particles. Irradiation of animals with accelerated iron ions at doses corresponding to the real fluxes of GCR heavy nuclei, to which Mars mission crews can be exposed, leads to marked behavioral function disorders in the post-irradiation period. To evaluate the radiation risk for the interplanetary flight crews, the concept of successful mission accomplishment is introduced. In these conditions, the central nervous system structures can be the critical target of GCR heavy nuclei. Their damage can modify the higher integrative functions of the brain and cause disorders in the crew members' operator performances.

  14. [Galactic heavy charged particles damaging effect on biological structures].

    PubMed

    Grigor'ev, A I; Krasavin, E A; Ostrovskiĭ, M A

    2013-03-01

    A concept of the radiation risk of the manned interplanetary flights is proposed and substantiated. Heavy charged particles that are a component of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) have a high damaging effect on the biological structures as great amount of energy is deposited in heavy particle tracks. The high biological effectiveness of heavy ions is observed in their action on cell genetic structures and the whole organism, including the brain structures. The hippocampus is the part of the central nervous system that is the most sensitive to radiation--first of all, to heavy charged particles. Irradiation of animals with accelerated iron ions at doses corresponding to the real fluxes of GCR heavy nuclei, to which Mars mission crews can be exposed, leads to marked behavioral function disorders in the post-irradiation period. To evaluate the radiation risk for the interplanetary flight crews, the concept of successful mission accomplishment is introduced. In these conditions, the central nervous system structures can be the critical target of GCR heavy nuclei. Their damage can modify the higher integrative functions of the brain and cause disorders in the crew members' operator performances. PMID:23789432

  15. Lycopene-induced hydroxyl radical causes oxidative DNA damage in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonyoung; Lee, Dong Gun

    2014-09-01

    Lycopene, which is a well-known red carotenoid pigment, has been drawing scientific interest because of its potential biological functions. The current study reports that lycopene acts as a bactericidal agent by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated DNA damage in Escherichia coli. Lycopene treatment elevated the level of ROS-in particular, hydroxyl radicals ((•)OH) -which can damage DNA in E. coli. Lycopene-induced DNA damage in bacteria was confirmed and we also observed cell filamentation caused by cell division arrest, an indirect marker of the DNA damage repair system, in lycopene-treated E. coli. Increased RecA expression was observed, indicating activation of the DNA repair system (SOS response). To summarize, lycopene exerts its antibacterial effects by inducing (•)OH -mediated DNA damage that cannot be ameliorated by the SOS response. Lycopene may be a clinically useful adjuvant for current antimicrobial therapies.

  16. Detection of DNA damage induced by heavy ion irradiation in the individual cells with comet assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, S.; Natsuhori, M.; Ito, N.; Funayama, T.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2003-05-01

    Investigating the biological effects of high-LET heavy ion irradiation at low fluence is important to evaluate the risk of charged particles. Especially it is important to detect radiation damage induced by the precise number of heavy ions in the individual cells. Thus we studied the relationship between the number of ions traversing the cell and DNA damage produced by the ion irradiation. We applied comet assay to measure the DNA damage in the individual cells. Cells attached on the ion track detector CR-39 were irradiated with ion beams at TIARA, JAERI-Takasaki. After irradiation, the cells were stained with ethidium bromide and the opposite side of the CR-39 was etched. We observed that the heavy ions with higher LET values induced the heavier DNA damage. The result indicated that the amount of DNA damage induced by one particle increased with the LET values of the heavy ions.

  17. Copper deficiency potentiates ethanol induced liver damage

    SciTech Connect

    Zidenberg-Cherr, S.; Han, B.; Graham, T.W.; Keen, C.L. )

    1992-02-26

    Copper sufficient (+Cu) and deficient ({minus}Cu) rats were fed liquid diets with EtOH or dextrose at 36% of kcals for 2 mo. Consumption of either the {minus}Cu diet or EtOH resulted in lower liver CuZn superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities were lowest in EtOH/{minus}Cu rats; being 20% and 50% of control values, respectively. Ethanol resulted in higher MnSOD activity in +Cu and {minus}Cu rats. Low Cu intake as well as EtOH resulted in lower mitochondrial (Mit) TBARS relative to controls. TBARS were lowest in Mit from EtOH/{minus}Cu rats. Microsomal (Micro) TBARS were lower in {minus}Cu and EtOH-fed rats than in controls. The peroxidizability index (PI) was calculated as an index of substrate availability for lipid peroxidation. Ethanol feeding resulted in lower PI's in Mit and Micro than measured in non-EtOH rats. There was a positive correlation between Micro PI's and TBARS. These results show that despite reductions in components of antioxidant defense, compensatory mechanism arise resulting in reduction in peroxidation targets and/or an increase in alternate free radical quenching factors. Histological examination demonstrated increased portal and intralobular connective tissue and cell necrosis in EtOH/{minus}Cu rats, suggesting that Cu may be a critical modulator of EtOH induced tissue damage.

  18. Track Structure and the Biological Effectiveness of Accelerated Particles for the Induction of Chromosome Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, K.; Hada, M.; Chappell, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    Track structure models predict that at a fixed value of LET, particles with lower charge number, Z will have a higher biological effectiveness compared to particles with a higher Z. In this report we investigated how track structure effects induction of chromosomal aberration in human cells. Human lymphocytes were irradiated in vitro with various energies of accelerated iron, silicon, neon, or titanium ions and chromosome damage was assessed in using three color FISH chromosome painting in chemically induced PCC samples collected a first cell division post irradiation. The LET values for these ions ranged from 30 to195 keV/micron. Of the particles studied, Neon ions have the highest biological effectiveness for induction of total chromosome damage, which is consistent with track structure model predictions. For complex-type exchanges 64 MeV/ u Neon and 450 MeV/u Iron were equally effective and induced the most complex damage. In addition we present data on chromosomes exchanges induced by six different energies of protons (5 MeV/u to 2.5 GeV/u). The linear dose response term was similar for all energies of protons suggesting that the effect of the higher LET at low proton energies is balanced by the production of nuclear secondaries from the high energy protons.

  19. Radiation-induced chromosome damage in astronauts' lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Testard, I; Ricoul, M; Hoffschir, F; Flury-Herard, A; Dutrillaux, B; Fedorenko, B; Gerasimenko, V; Sabatier, L

    1996-10-01

    The increased number of manned space missions has made it important to estimate the biological risks encountered by astronauts. As they are exposed to cosmic rays, especially ions with high linear energy transfer (LET), it is necessary to estimate the doses they receive. The most sensitive biological dosimetry used is based on the quantification of radiation-induced chromosome damage to human lymphocytes. After the space missions ANTARES (1992) and ALTAIR (1993), we performed cytogenetic analysis of blood samples from seven astronauts who had spent from 2 weeks to 6 months in space. After 2 or 3 weeks, the X-ray equivalent dose was found to be below the cytogenetic detection level of 20 mGy. After 6 months, the biological dose greatly varied among the astronauts, from 95 to 455 mGy equivalent dose. These doses are in the same range as those estimated by physical dosimetry (90 mGy absorbed dose and 180 mSv equivalent dose). Some blood cells exhibited the same cytogenetic pattern as the 'rogue cells' occasionally observed in controls, but with a higher frequency. We suggest that rogue cells might result from irradiation with high-LET particles of cosmic origin. However, the responsibility of such cells for the long-term effects of cosmic irradiation remains unknown and must be investigated. PMID:8862451

  20. A continuum damage model of fatigue-induced damage in laminated composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E.; Allen, David H.

    1988-01-01

    A model is presented which predicts the stress-strain behavior of continuous fiber reinforced laminated composites in the presence of microstructural damage. The model is based on the concept of continuum damage mechanics and uses internal state variables to characterize the various damage modes. The associated internal state variable growth laws are mathematical models of the loading history induced development of microstructural damage. The model is demonstrated by using it to predict the response of damaged AS-4/3502 graphite/epoxy laminate panels.

  1. GUI to Facilitate Research on Biological Damage from Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Frances A.; Ponomarev, Artem Lvovich

    2010-01-01

    A graphical-user-interface (GUI) computer program has been developed to facilitate research on the damage caused by highly energetic particles and photons impinging on living organisms. The program brings together, into one computational workspace, computer codes that have been developed over the years, plus codes that will be developed during the foreseeable future, to address diverse aspects of radiation damage. These include codes that implement radiation-track models, codes for biophysical models of breakage of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) by radiation, pattern-recognition programs for extracting quantitative information from biological assays, and image-processing programs that aid visualization of DNA breaks. The radiation-track models are based on transport models of interactions of radiation with matter and solution of the Boltzmann transport equation by use of both theoretical and numerical models. The biophysical models of breakage of DNA by radiation include biopolymer coarse-grained and atomistic models of DNA, stochastic- process models of deposition of energy, and Markov-based probabilistic models of placement of double-strand breaks in DNA. The program is designed for use in the NT, 95, 98, 2000, ME, and XP variants of the Windows operating system.

  2. Kinetic Modeling of the X-ray-induced Damage to a Metalloprotein

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Katherine M.; Kosheleva, Irina; Henning, Robert W.; Seidler, Gerald T.; Pushkar, Yulia

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that biological samples undergo x-ray-induced degradation. One of the fastest occurring x-ray-induced processes involves redox modifications (reduction or oxidation) of redox-active cofactors in proteins. Here we analyze room temperature data on the photoreduction of Mn ions in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II, one of the most radiation damage sensitive proteins and a key constituent of natural photosynthesis in plants, green algae and cyanobacteria. Time-resolved x-ray emission spectroscopy with wavelength-dispersive detection was used to collect data on the progression of x-ray-induced damage. A kinetic model was developed to fit experimental results, and the rate constant for the reduction of OEC MnIII/IV ions by solvated electrons was determined. From this model, the possible kinetics of x-ray-induced damage at variety of experimental conditions, such as different rates of dose deposition as well as different excitation wavelengths, can be inferred. We observed a trend of increasing dosage threshold prior to the onset of x-ray-induced damage with increasing rates of damage deposition. This trend suggests that experimentation with higher rates of dose deposition is beneficial for measurements of biological samples sensitive to radiation damage, particularly at pink beam and x-ray FEL sources. PMID:23815809

  3. Spaceflight environment induces mitochondrial oxidative damage in ocular tissue.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiao W; Pecaut, Michael J; Stodieck, Louis S; Ferguson, Virginia L; Bateman, Ted A; Bouxsein, Mary; Jones, Tamako A; Moldovan, Maria; Cunningham, Christopher E; Chieu, Jenny; Gridley, Daila S

    2013-10-01

    A recent report shows that more than 30% of the astronauts returning from Space Shuttle missions or the International Space Station (ISS) were diagnosed with eye problems that can cause reduced visual acuity. We investigate here whether spaceflight environment-associated retinal damage might be related to oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial apoptosis. Female C57BL/6 mice were flown in the space shuttle Atlantis (STS-135), and within 3-5 h of landing, the spaceflight and ground-control mice, similarly housed in animal enclosure modules (AEMs) were euthanized and their eyes were removed for analysis. Changes in expression of genes involved in oxidative stress, mitochondrial and endothelial cell biology were examined. Apoptosis in the retina was analyzed by caspase-3 immunocytochemical analysis and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Levels of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) protein, an oxidative specific marker for lipid peroxidation were also measured. Evaluation of spaceflight mice and AEM ground-control mice showed that expression of several genes playing central roles in regulating the mitochondria-associated apoptotic pathway were significantly altered in mouse ocular tissue after spaceflight compared to AEM ground-control mice. In addition, the mRNA levels of several genes, which are responsible for regulating the production of reactive oxygen species were also significantly up-regulated in spaceflight samples compared to AEM ground-control mice. Further more, the level of HNE protein was significantly elevated in the retina after spaceflight compared to controls. Our results also revealed that spaceflight conditions induced significant apoptosis in the retina especially inner nuclear layer (INL) and ganglion cell layer (GCL) compared to AEM ground controls. The data provided the first evidence that spaceflight conditions induce oxidative damage that results in mitochondrial apoptosis in the retina. This data suggest

  4. DNA damage response induced by HZE particles in human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, David; Aroumougame, Asaithamby

    Convincing evidences indicate that high-linear energy transfer (LET) ionizing radiation (IR) induced complex DNA lesions are more difficult to repair than isolated DNA lesions induced by low-LET IR; this has been associated with the increased RBE for cell killing, chromosomal aberrations, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis in high energy charged-particle irradiated human cells. We have employed an in situ method to directly monitor induction and repair of clustered DNA lesions at the single-cell level. We showed, consistent with biophysical modeling, that the kinetics of loss of clustered DNA lesions was substantially compromised in human fibroblasts. The unique spatial distribution of different types of DNA lesions within the clustered damages determined the cellular ability to repair these damages. Importantly, examination of metaphase cells derived from HZE particle irradiated cells revealed that the extent of chromosome aberrations directly correlated with the levels of unrepaired clustered DNA lesions. In addition, we used a novel organotypic human lung three-dimensional (3D) model to investigate the biological significance of unrepaired DNA lesions in differentiated lung epithelial cells. We found that complex DNA lesions induced by HZE particles were even more difficult to be repaired in organotypic 3D culture, resulting enhanced cell killing and chromosome aberrations. Our data suggest that DNA repair capability in differentiated cells renders them vulnerable to DSBs, promoting genome instability that may lead to carcinogenesis. As the organotypic 3D model mimics human lung, it opens up new experimental approaches to explore the effect of radiation in vivo and will have important implications for evaluating radiation risk in human tissues.

  5. Clustered DNA damage induced by heavy ion particles.

    PubMed

    Terato, Hiroaki; Ide, Hiroshi

    2004-12-01

    Clustered DNA damage (locally multiply damaged site) is thought to be a critical lesion caused by ionizing radiation, and high LET radiation such as heavy ion particles is believed to produce high yields of such damage. Since heavy ion particles are major components of ionizing radiation in a space environment, it is important to clarify the chemical nature and biological consequences of clustered DNA damage and its relationship to the health effects of exposure to high LET particles in humans. The concept of clustered DNA damage emerged around 1980, but only recently has become the subject of experimental studies. In this article, we review methods used to detect clustered DNA damage, and the current status of our understanding of the chemical nature and repair of clustered DNA damage. PMID:15858387

  6. Mechanisms of Diabetes-Induced Liver Damage

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Jamaludin; Nazratun Nafizah, A. H.; Zariyantey, A. H.; Budin, S. B.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a non-communicable disease that occurs in both developed and developing countries. This metabolic disease affects all systems in the body, including the liver. Hyperglycaemia, mainly caused by insulin resistance, affects the metabolism of lipids, carbohydrates and proteins and can lead to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which can further progress to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, cirrhosis and, finally, hepatocellular carcinomas. The underlying mechanism of diabetes that contributes to liver damage is the combination of increased oxidative stress and an aberrant inflammatory response; this activates the transcription of pro-apoptotic genes and damages hepatocytes. Significant involvement of pro-inflammatory cytokines—including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α—exacerbates the accumulation of oxidative damage products in the liver, such as malondialdehyde, fluorescent pigments and conjugated dienes. This review summarises the biochemical, histological and macromolecular changes that contribute to oxidative liver damage among diabetic individuals. PMID:27226903

  7. Relationship of gonadal activity and chemotherapy-induced gonadal damage

    SciTech Connect

    Rivkees, S.A.; Crawford, J.D.

    1988-04-08

    The authors tested the hypothesis that chemotherapy-induced gonadal damage is proportional to the degree of gonadal activity during treatment. Thirty studies that evaluated gonadal function after cyclophosphamide therapy for renal disease or combination chemotherapy for Hodgkin's disease or acute lymphocytic leukemia provided data for analysis. Data were stratified according to sex, illness, chemotherapeutic regimen and dose, and pubertal stage at the time of treatment. Chemotherapy-induced damage was more likely to occur in patients who were treated when sexually mature compared with those who were treated when prepubertal. Males were significantly more frequently affected than females when treated for renal disease of Hodgkin's disease. Chemotherapy-induced damage was also more likely to occur when patients were treated with large doses of alkylating agents. These data suggest that chemotherapy-induced damage is proportional to gonadal activity. Further efforts are needed to test whether induced gonadal quiescence during chemotherapy will reduce the strikingly high incidence of gonadal failure following chemotherapy.

  8. DNA damage induces a meiotic arrest in mouse oocytes mediated by the spindle assembly checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Josie K.; Lane, Simon I. R.; Merriman, Julie A.; Jones, Keith T.

    2015-01-01

    Extensive damage to maternal DNA during meiosis causes infertility, birth defects and abortions. However, it is unknown if fully grown oocytes have a mechanism to prevent the creation of DNA-damaged embryos. Here we show that DNA damage activates a pathway involving the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) in response to chemically induced double strand breaks, UVB and ionizing radiation. DNA damage can occur either before or after nuclear envelope breakdown, and provides an effective block to anaphase-promoting complex activity, and consequently the formation of mature eggs. This contrasts with somatic cells, where DNA damage fails to affect mitotic progression. However, it uncovers a second function for the meiotic SAC, which in the context of detecting microtubule–kinetochore errors has hitherto been labelled as weak or ineffectual in mammalian oocytes. We propose that its essential role in the detection of DNA damage sheds new light on its biological purpose in mammalian female meiosis. PMID:26522232

  9. Chemically induced intestinal damage models in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Oehlers, Stefan H; Flores, Maria Vega; Hall, Christopher J; Okuda, Kazuhide S; Sison, John Oliver; Crosier, Kathryn E; Crosier, Philip S

    2013-06-01

    Several intestinal damage models have been developed using zebrafish, with the aim of recapitulating aspects of human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). These experimentally induced inflammation models have utilized immersion exposure to an array of colitogenic agents (including live bacteria, bacterial products, and chemicals) to induce varying severity of inflammation. This technical report describes methods used to generate two chemically induced intestinal damage models using either dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) or trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). Methods to monitor intestinal damage and inflammatory processes, and chemical-genetic methods to manipulate the host response to injury are also described.

  10. DNA damage profiles induced by sunlight at different latitudes.

    PubMed

    Schuch, André Passaglia; Yagura, Teiti; Makita, Kazuo; Yamamoto, Hiromasa; Schuch, Nelson Jorge; Agnez-Lima, Lucymara Fassarella; MacMahon, Ricardo Monreal; Menck, Carlos Frederico Martins

    2012-04-01

    Despite growing knowledge on the biological effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation on human health and ecosystems, it is still difficult to predict the negative impacts of the increasing incidence of solar UV radiation in a scenario of global warming and climate changes. Hence, the development and application of DNA-based biological sensors to monitor the solar UV radiation under different environmental conditions is of increasing importance. With a mind to rendering a molecular view-point of the genotoxic impact of sunlight, field experiments were undertaken with a DNA-dosimeter system in parallel with physical photometry of solar UVB/UVA radiation, at various latitudes in South America. On applying biochemical and immunological approaches based on specific DNA-repair enzymes and antibodies, for evaluating sunlight-induced DNA damage profiles, it became clear that the genotoxic potential of sunlight does indeed vary according to latitude. Notwithstanding, while induction of oxidized DNA bases is directly dependent on an increase in latitude, the generation of 6-4PPs is inversely so, whereby the latter can be regarded as a biomolecular marker of UVB incidence. This molecular DNA lesion-pattern largely reflects the relative incidence of UVA and UVB energy at any specific latitude. Hereby is demonstrated the applicability of this DNA-based biosensor for additional, continuous field experiments, as a means of registering variations in the genotoxic impact of solar UV radiation.

  11. Preventing Ultraviolet Light-Induced Damage: The Benefits of Antioxidants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yip, Cheng-Wai

    2007-01-01

    Extracts of fruit peels contain antioxidants that protect the bacterium "Escherichia coli" against damage induced by ultraviolet light. Antioxidants neutralise free radicals, thus preventing oxidative damage to cells and deoxyribonucleic acid. A high survival rate of UV-exposed cells was observed when grapefruit or grape peel extract was added,…

  12. Single-cell analysis challenges the connection between autophagy and senescence induced by DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Filippi-Chiela, Eduardo Cremonese; Bueno e Silva, Mardja Manssur; Thomé, Marcos Paulo; Lenz, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy and senescence have been described as central features of cell biology, but the interplay between these mechanisms remains obscure. Using a therapeutically relevant model of DNA damage-induced senescence in human glioma cells, we demonstrated that acute treatment with temozolomide induces DNA damage, a transitory activation of PRKAA/AMPK-ULK1 and MAPK14/p38 and the sustained inhibition of AKT-MTOR. This produced a transient induction of autophagy, which was followed by senescence. However, at the single cell level, this coordinated transition was not observed, and autophagy and senescence were triggered in a very heterogeneous manner. Indeed, at a population level, autophagy was highly negatively correlated with senescence markers, while in single cells this correlation did not exist. The inhibition of autophagy triggered apoptosis and decreased senescence, while its activation increased temozolomide-induced senescence, showing that DNA damage-induced autophagy acts by suppressing apoptosis.

  13. New insights in photoaging, UVA induced damage and skin types.

    PubMed

    Battie, Claire; Jitsukawa, Setsuko; Bernerd, Françoise; Del Bino, Sandra; Marionnet, Claire; Verschoore, Michèle

    2014-10-01

    UVA radiation is the most prevalent component of solar UV radiation; it deeply penetrates into the skin and induces profound alterations of the dermal connective tissue. In recent years, the detrimental effects of UVA radiation were more precisely demonstrated at cellular and molecular levels, using adequate methods to identify biological targets of UVA radiation and the resulting cascade impairment of cell functions and tissue degradation. In particular gene expression studies recently revealed that UVA radiation induces modulation of several genes confirming the high sensitivity of dermal fibroblasts to UVA radiation. The major visible damaging effects of UVA radiation only appear after years of exposure: it has been clearly evidenced that they are responsible for more or less early signs of photoageing and photocarcinogenesis. UVA radiation appears to play a key role in pigmented changes occurring with age, the major sign of skin photoaging in Asians. Skin susceptibility to photoaging alterations also depends on constitutive pigmentation. The skin sensitivity to UV light has been demonstrated to be linked to skin color type. PMID:25234829

  14. Quercitrin protects skin from UVB-induced oxidative damage

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Yuanqin; Li, Wenqi; Son, Young-Ok; Sun, Lijuan; Lu, Jian; Kim, Donghern; Wang, Xin; Yao, Hua; Wang, Lei; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Hitron, Andrew J.; Luo, Jia; Gao, Ning; Shi, Xianglin; Zhang, Zhuo

    2013-06-01

    Exposure of the skin to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation causes oxidative damage to skin, resulting in sunburn, photoaging, and skin cancer. It is generally believed that the skin damage induced by UV irradiation is a consequence of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recently, there is an increased interest in the use of natural products as chemopreventive agents for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) due to their antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties. Quercitrin, glycosylated form of quercetin, is the most common flavonoid in nature with antioxidant properties. The present study investigated the possible beneficial effects of quercitrin to inhibit UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that quercitrin decreased ROS generation induced by UVB irradiation in JB6 cells. Quercitrin restored catalase expression and GSH/GSSG ratio reduced by UVB exposure, two major antioxidant enzymes, leading to reductions of oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis and protection of the skin from inflammation caused by UVB exposure. The present study demonstrated that quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage to skin. - Highlights: • Oxidative stress plays a key role in UV-induced cell and tissue injuries. • Quercitrin decreases ROS generation and restores antioxidants irradiated by UVB. • Quercitrin reduces UVB-irradiated oxidative DNA damage, apoptosis, and inflammation. • Quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB-induced skin injuries.

  15. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    DOE PAGES

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesismore » that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.« less

  16. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.

  17. Effects of Ionizing Radiation on Biological Molecules—Mechanisms of Damage and Emerging Methods of Detection

    PubMed Central

    Reisz, Julie A.; Bansal, Nidhi; Qian, Jiang; Zhao, Weiling

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The detrimental effects of ionizing radiation (IR) involve a highly orchestrated series of events that are amplified by endogenous signaling and culminating in oxidative damage to DNA, lipids, proteins, and many metabolites. Despite the global impact of IR, the molecular mechanisms underlying tissue damage reveal that many biomolecules are chemoselectively modified by IR. Recent Advances: The development of high-throughput “omics” technologies for mapping DNA and protein modifications have revolutionized the study of IR effects on biological systems. Studies in cells, tissues, and biological fluids are used to identify molecular features or biomarkers of IR exposure and response and the molecular mechanisms that regulate their expression or synthesis. Critical Issues: In this review, chemical mechanisms are described for IR-induced modifications of biomolecules along with methods for their detection. Included with the detection methods are crucial experimental considerations and caveats for their use. Additional factors critical to the cellular response to radiation, including alterations in protein expression, metabolomics, and epigenetic factors, are also discussed. Future Directions: Throughout the review, the synergy of combined “omics” technologies such as genomics and epigenomics, proteomics, and metabolomics is highlighted. These are anticipated to lead to new hypotheses to understand IR effects on biological systems and improve IR-based therapies. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21: 260–292. PMID:24382094

  18. WILD PIGS: BIOLOGY, DAMAGE, CONTROL TECHINQUES AND MANAGEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, John; Brisbin, I. Lehr

    2009-12-31

    about anything; and, they can live just about anywhere. On top of that, wild pigs are both very difficult to control and, with the possible exception of island ecosystems, almost impossible to eradicate (Dickson et al. 2001, Sweeney et al. 2003). The solution to the wild pig problem has not been readily apparent. The ultimate answer as to how to control these animals has not been found to date. In many ways, wild pigs are America's most successful large invasive species. All of which means that wild pigs are a veritable nightmare for land and resource managers trying to keep the numbers of these animals and the damage that they do under control. Since the more that one knows about an invasive species, the easier it is to deal with and hopefully control. For wild pigs then, it is better to 'know thy enemy' than to not, especially if one expects to be able to successfully control them. In an effort to better 'know thy enemy,' a two-day symposium was held in Augusta, Georgia, on April 21-22, 2004. This symposium was organized and sponsored by U.S.D.A. Forest Service-Savannah River (USFS-SR), U. S. Department of Energy-Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SR), the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), the South Carolina Chapter of the Soil & Water Conservation Society, and the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL). The goal of this symposium was to assemble researchers and land managers to first address various aspects of the biology and damage of wild pigs, and then review the control techniques and management of this invasive species. The result would then be a collected synopsis of what is known about wild pigs in the United States. Although the focus of the symposium was primarily directed toward federal agencies, presenters also included professionals from academic institutions, and private-sector control contractors and land managers. Most of the organizations associated with implementing this symposium were affiliated with the Savannah River Site (SRS), a

  19. New Treatment Strategies for Alcohol-Induced Heart Damage

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Solà, Joaquim; Planavila Porta, Ana

    2016-01-01

    High-dose alcohol misuse induces multiple noxious cardiac effects, including myocyte hypertrophy and necrosis, interstitial fibrosis, decreased ventricular contraction and ventricle enlargement. These effects produce diastolic and systolic ventricular dysfunction leading to congestive heart failure, arrhythmias and an increased death rate. There are multiple, dose-dependent, synchronic and synergistic mechanisms of alcohol-induced cardiac damage. Ethanol alters membrane permeability and composition, interferes with receptors and intracellular transients, induces oxidative, metabolic and energy damage, decreases protein synthesis, excitation-contraction coupling and increases cell apoptosis. In addition, ethanol decreases myocyte protective and repair mechanisms and their regeneration. Although there are diverse different strategies to directly target alcohol-induced heart damage, they are partially effective, and can only be used as support medication in a multidisciplinary approach. Alcohol abstinence is the preferred goal, but control drinking is useful in alcohol-addicted subjects not able to abstain. Correction of nutrition, ionic and vitamin deficiencies and control of alcohol-related systemic organ damage are compulsory. Recently, several growth factors (myostatin, IGF-1, leptin, ghrelin, miRNA, and ROCK inhibitors) and new cardiomyokines such as FGF21 have been described to regulate cardiac plasticity and decrease cardiac damage, improving cardiac repair mechanisms, and they are promising agents in this field. New potential therapeutic targets aim to control oxidative damage, myocyte hypertrophy, interstitial fibrosis and persistent apoptosis In addition, stem-cell therapy may improve myocyte regeneration. However, these strategies are not yet approved for clinical use. PMID:27690014

  20. Physics associated with cavitation induced material damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, F. B.

    1974-01-01

    The role of cavitation in mechanical failure is discussed. Some of the most common types of material damage associated with the presence of cavitation are surface material removal, delamination and structural vibration. This occurs in external flows such as on propellers, hydrofoils, and high speed non-lifting surfaces. In internal flows, pipe bends, inlets, constructions, pumps and turbines are typical. Nominally nonflowing liquids are also susceptible in, for example, strong acoustic fields and high energy particle detectors. For flowing systems, Bernoulli's equation shows how a local pressure is reduced as the fluid's velocity is increased. At sufficiently high velocities, a tension can actually develop and this has, in fact, been demonstrated experimentally. Once the pressure is reduced below the fluid vapor pressure a vapor cavity can be nucleated. Various aspects of this process are simply shown by considering the flow over a lifting surface.

  1. Inflammation, gene mutation and photoimmunosuppression in response to UVR-induced oxidative damage contributes to photocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Halliday, Gary M

    2005-04-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation causes inflammation, gene mutation and immunosuppression in the skin. These biological changes are responsible for photocarcinogenesis. UV radiation in sunlight is divided into two wavebands, UVB and UVA, both of which contribute to these biological changes, and therefore probably to skin cancer in humans and animal models. Oxidative damage caused by UV contributes to inflammation, gene mutation and immunosuppression. This article reviews evidence for the hypothesis that UV oxidative damage to these processes contributes to photocarcinogenesis. UVA makes a larger impact on oxidative stress in the skin than UVB by inducing reactive oxygen and nitrogen species which damage DNA, protein and lipids and which also lead to NAD+ depletion, and therefore energy loss from the cell. Lipid peroxidation induces prostaglandin production that in association with UV-induced nitric oxide production causes inflammation. Inflammation drives benign human solar keratosis (SK) to undergo malignant conversion into squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) probably because the inflammatory cells produce reactive oxygen species, thus increasing oxidative damage to DNA and the immune system. Reactive oxygen or nitrogen appears to cause the increase in mutational burden as SK progress into SCC in humans. UVA is particularly important in causing immunosuppression in both humans and mice, and UV lipid peroxidation induced prostaglandin production and UV activation of nitric oxide synthase is important mediators of this event. Other immunosuppressive events are likely to be initiated by UV oxidative stress. Antioxidants have also been shown to reduce photocarcinogenesis. While most of this evidence comes from studies in mice, there is supporting evidence in humans that UV-induced oxidative damage contributes to inflammation, gene mutation and immunosuppression. Available evidence implicates oxidative damage as an important contributor to sunlight-induced carcinogenesis in humans.

  2. Glimepiride protects neurons against amyloid-β-induced synapse damage.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Craig; West, Ewan; Nolan, William; McHale-Owen, Harriet; Williams, Alun; Bate, Clive

    2016-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease is associated with the accumulation within the brain of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides that damage synapses and affect memory acquisition. This process can be modelled by observing the effects of Aβ on synapses in cultured neurons. The addition of picomolar concentrations of soluble Aβ derived from brain extracts triggered the loss of synaptic proteins including synaptophysin, synapsin-1 and cysteine string protein from cultured neurons. Glimepiride, a sulphonylurea used for the treatment of diabetes, protected neurons against synapse damage induced by Aβ. The protective effects of glimepiride were multi-faceted. Glimepiride treatment was associated with altered synaptic membranes including the loss of specific glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins including the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) that acts as a receptor for Aβ42, increased synaptic gangliosides and altered cell signalling. More specifically, glimepiride reduced the Aβ-induced increase in cholesterol and the Aβ-induced activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) in synapses that occurred within cholesterol-dense membrane rafts. Aβ42 binding to glimepiride-treated neurons was not targeted to membrane rafts and less Aβ42 accumulated within synapses. These studies indicate that glimepiride modified the membrane micro-environments in which Aβ-induced signalling leads to synapse damage. In addition, soluble PrP(C), released from neurons by glimepiride, neutralised Aβ-induced synapse damage. Such observations raise the possibility that glimepiride may reduce synapse damage and hence delay the progression of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26432105

  3. Glimepiride protects neurons against amyloid-β-induced synapse damage.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Craig; West, Ewan; Nolan, William; McHale-Owen, Harriet; Williams, Alun; Bate, Clive

    2016-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease is associated with the accumulation within the brain of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides that damage synapses and affect memory acquisition. This process can be modelled by observing the effects of Aβ on synapses in cultured neurons. The addition of picomolar concentrations of soluble Aβ derived from brain extracts triggered the loss of synaptic proteins including synaptophysin, synapsin-1 and cysteine string protein from cultured neurons. Glimepiride, a sulphonylurea used for the treatment of diabetes, protected neurons against synapse damage induced by Aβ. The protective effects of glimepiride were multi-faceted. Glimepiride treatment was associated with altered synaptic membranes including the loss of specific glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins including the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) that acts as a receptor for Aβ42, increased synaptic gangliosides and altered cell signalling. More specifically, glimepiride reduced the Aβ-induced increase in cholesterol and the Aβ-induced activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) in synapses that occurred within cholesterol-dense membrane rafts. Aβ42 binding to glimepiride-treated neurons was not targeted to membrane rafts and less Aβ42 accumulated within synapses. These studies indicate that glimepiride modified the membrane micro-environments in which Aβ-induced signalling leads to synapse damage. In addition, soluble PrP(C), released from neurons by glimepiride, neutralised Aβ-induced synapse damage. Such observations raise the possibility that glimepiride may reduce synapse damage and hence delay the progression of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Pathology and biology of radiation-induced cardiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Tapio, Soile

    2016-01-01

    Heart disease is the leading global cause of death. The risk for this disease is significantly increased in populations exposed to ionizing radiation, but the mechanisms are not fully elucidated yet. This review aims to gather and discuss the latest data about pathological and biological consequences in the radiation-exposed heart in a comprehensive manner. A better understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying radiation-induced damage in heart tissue and cardiac vasculature will provide novel targets for therapeutic interventions. These may be valuable for individuals clinically or occupationally exposed to varying doses of ionizing radiation. PMID:27422929

  5. Laser induced damage in optical materials: 7th ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1976-06-01

    The Seventh ERDA-ASTM-ONR-NBS Symposium on Laser Induced Damage in Optical Materials was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, on 29-31 July 1975. These Symposia are held as part of the activities in ASTM Subcommittee II on Lasers and Laser Materials, which is charged with the responsibilities of formulating standards and test procedures for laser materials, components, and devices. The Chairman of Subcommittee II is Haynes Lee, of Owens-Illinois, Inc. Co-chairmen for the Damage Symposia are Arthur Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory and Alexander J. Glass of Law-rence Livermore Laboratory. Over 150 attendees at the Symposium heard forty-five papers on topics relating fabrication procedures to laser induced damage in optical materials; on metal mirrors; in ir window materials; the multipulse, wavelength, and pulse length dependence of damage thresholds; damage in dielectric films and at exposed surfaces; as well as theoretical discussions on avalanche ionization and multiphoton processes of importance at shorter wavelengths. Of particular importance were the scaling relations developed from several parametric studies relating fundamental properties (refractive index, surface roughness etc.) to the damage threshold. This year many of the extrinsic influences tending to reduce a materials damage resistance were isolated such that measures of their egregious nature could be quantified. Much still needs to be accomplished to improve processing and fabrication procedures to allow a measurable approach to a materials intrinsic strength to be demonstrated.

  6. Effects of vitamins on chromium(VI)-induced damage

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, Masayasu )

    1991-05-01

    The effects of vitamin E and vitamin B{sub 2} on DNA damage and cellular reduction of chromium (VI) were investigated using Chinese hamster V-79 cells. pretreatment with {alpha}-tocopherol succinate (vitamin E) resulted in a decrease of DNA single-strand breaks produced by Na{sub 2}CrO{sub 4}, while similar treatment with riboflavin (vitamin B{sub 2}) enhanced levels of DNA breaks. Electron spin resonance (ESR) studies showed that incubation of cells with Na{sub 2}CrO{sub 4} resulted in the formation of both chromium (V) and chromium (III) complexes, and cellular pretreatment with vitamin E reduced the level of the chromium (V) complex, whereas pretreatment with vitamin B{sub 2} enhanced the level of this intermediate. ESR studies demonstrated that a chromium (V) species was formed by the reaction of Na{sub 2}CrO{sub 4} with vitamin B{sub 2} and that vitamin B{sub 2} enhanced the formation of hydroxyl radicals during the reaction of Na{sub 2}CrO{sub 4} and hydrogen peroxide. These results indicate that vitamin E and vitamin B{sub 2} are capable of altering the biological effects of carcinogenic chromium (VI) compounds, possibly through their abilities to modify levels of chromium (V) in cells. The results also suggest that chromate-induced cytotoxicity may not be directly correlated with the genotoxic effects of this metal. The importance of the role of vitamins in chromate-induced toxicity is discussed.

  7. Pneumococcal Pneumolysin Induces DNA Damage and Cell Cycle Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Prashant; He, Fang; Kwang, Jimmy; Engelward, Bevin P.; Chow, Vincent T.K.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae produces pneumolysin toxin as a key virulence factor against host cells. Pneumolysin is a cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC) toxin that forms lytic pores in host membranes and mediates pneumococcal disease pathogenesis by modulating inflammatory responses. Here, we show that pneumolysin, which is released during bacterial lysis, induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), as indicated by ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-mediated H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX). Pneumolysin-induced γH2AX foci recruit mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1) and p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1), to sites of DSBs. Importantly, results show that toxin-induced DNA damage precedes cell cycle arrest and causes apoptosis when DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK)-mediated non-homologous end joining is inhibited. Further, we observe that cells that were undergoing DNA replication harbored DSBs in greater frequency during pneumolysin treatment. This observation raises the possibility that DSBs might be arising as a result of replication fork breakdown. Additionally, neutralizing the oligomerization domain of pneumolysin with monoclonal antibody suppresses DNA damage and also cell cycle arrest, indicating that pneumolysin oligomerization is important for causing DNA damage. Taken together, this study reveals a previously unidentified ability of pneumolysin to induce cytotoxicity via DNA damage, with implications in the pathophysiology of S. pneumoniae infection. PMID:27026501

  8. Pneumococcal Pneumolysin Induces DNA Damage and Cell Cycle Arrest.

    PubMed

    Rai, Prashant; He, Fang; Kwang, Jimmy; Engelward, Bevin P; Chow, Vincent T K

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae produces pneumolysin toxin as a key virulence factor against host cells. Pneumolysin is a cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC) toxin that forms lytic pores in host membranes and mediates pneumococcal disease pathogenesis by modulating inflammatory responses. Here, we show that pneumolysin, which is released during bacterial lysis, induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), as indicated by ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-mediated H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX). Pneumolysin-induced γH2AX foci recruit mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1) and p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1), to sites of DSBs. Importantly, results show that toxin-induced DNA damage precedes cell cycle arrest and causes apoptosis when DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK)-mediated non-homologous end joining is inhibited. Further, we observe that cells that were undergoing DNA replication harbored DSBs in greater frequency during pneumolysin treatment. This observation raises the possibility that DSBs might be arising as a result of replication fork breakdown. Additionally, neutralizing the oligomerization domain of pneumolysin with monoclonal antibody suppresses DNA damage and also cell cycle arrest, indicating that pneumolysin oligomerization is important for causing DNA damage. Taken together, this study reveals a previously unidentified ability of pneumolysin to induce cytotoxicity via DNA damage, with implications in the pathophysiology of S. pneumoniae infection. PMID:27026501

  9. Quercitrin protects skin from UVB-induced oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yuanqin; Li, Wenqi; Son, Young-Ok; Sun, Lijuan; Lu, Jian; Kim, Donghern; Wang, Xin; Yao, Hua; Wang, Lei; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Hitron, Andrew J; Luo, Jia; Gao, Ning; Shi, Xianglin; Zhang, Zhuo

    2013-06-01

    Exposure of the skin to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation causes oxidative damage to skin, resulting in sunburn, photoaging, and skin cancer. It is generally believed that the skin damage induced by UV irradiation is a consequence of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recently, there is an increased interest in the use of natural products as chemopreventive agents for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) due to their antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties. Quercitrin, glycosylated form of quercetin, is the most common flavonoid in nature with antioxidant properties. The present study investigated the possible beneficial effects of quercitrin to inhibit UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that quercitrin decreased ROS generation induced by UVB irradiation in JB6 cells. Quercitrin restored catalase expression and GSH/GSSG ratio reduced by UVB exposure, two major antioxidant enzymes, leading to reductions of oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis and protection of the skin from inflammation caused by UVB exposure. The present study demonstrated that quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage to skin.

  10. DETECTION OF LOW DOSE RADIATION-AND CHEMICALLY-INDUCED DNA DAMAGE USING TEMPERATURE DIFFERENTIAL FLUORESCENCE ASSAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rapid, sensitive and simple assays for radiation- and chemically-induced DNA damage can be of significant benefit to a number of fields including radiation biology, clinical research, and environmental monitoring. Although temperature-induced DNA strand separation has been use...

  11. Modeling of Laser Induced Damage in NIF UV Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Feit, M D; Rubenchik, A M

    2001-02-21

    Controlling damage to nominally transparent optical elements such as lenses, windows and frequency conversion crystals on high power lasers is a continuing technical problem. Scientific understanding of the underlying mechanisms of laser energy absorption, material heating and vaporization and resultant mechanical damage is especially important for UV lasers with large apertures such as NIF. This LDRD project was a single year effort, in coordination with associated experimental projects, to initiate theoretical descriptions of several of the relevant processes. In understanding laser damage, we distinguish between damage initiation and the growth of existent damage upon subsequent laser irradiation. In general, the effect of damage could be ameliorated by either preventing its initiation or by mitigating its growth. The distinction comes about because initiation is generally due to extrinsic factors such as contaminants, which provide a means of local laser energy absorption. Thus, initiation tends to be local and stochastic in nature. On the other hand, the initial damaging event appears to modify the surrounding material in such a way that multiple pulse damage grows more or less regularly. More exactly, three ingredients are necessary for visible laser induced damage. These are adequate laser energy, a mechanism of laser energy absorption and mechanical weakness. For damage growth, the material surrounding a damage site is already mechanically weakened by cracks and probably chemically modified as well. The mechanical damage can also lead to electric field intensification due to interference effects, thus increasing the available laser energy density. In this project, we successfully accounted for the pulselength dependence of damage threshold in bulk DKDP crystals with the hypothesis of small absorbers with a distribution of sizes. We theoretically investigated expected scaling of damage initiation craters both to baseline detailed numerical simulations

  12. Neuronal growth cones respond to laser-induced axonal damage

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tao; Mohanty, Samarendra; Gomez-Godinez, Veronica; Shi, Linda Z.; Liaw, Lih-Huei; Miotke, Jill; Meyer, Ronald L.; Berns, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    Although it is well known that damage to neurons results in release of substances that inhibit axonal growth, release of chemical signals from damaged axons that attract axon growth cones has not been observed. In this study, a 532 nm 12 ns laser was focused to a diffraction-limited spot to produce site-specific damage to single goldfish axons in vitro. The axons underwent a localized decrease in thickness (‘thinning’) within seconds. Analysis by fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy indicated that there was no gross rupture of the cell membrane. Mitochondrial transport along the axonal cytoskeleton immediately stopped at the damage site, but recovered over several minutes. Within seconds of damage nearby growth cones extended filopodia towards the injury and were often observed to contact the damaged site. Turning of the growth cone towards the injured axon also was observed. Repair of the laser-induced damage was evidenced by recovery of the axon thickness as well as restoration of mitochondrial movement. We describe a new process of growth cone response to damaged axons. This has been possible through the interface of optics (laser subcellular surgery), fluorescence and electron microscopy, and a goldfish retinal ganglion cell culture model. PMID:21831892

  13. Clustered DNA damages induced in isolated DNA and in human cells by low doses of ionizing radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, B. M.; Bennett, P. V.; Sidorkina, O.; Laval, J.; Lowenstein, D. I. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Clustered DNA damages-two or more closely spaced damages (strand breaks, abasic sites, or oxidized bases) on opposing strands-are suspects as critical lesions producing lethal and mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation. However, as a result of the lack of methods for measuring damage clusters induced by ionizing radiation in genomic DNA, neither the frequencies of their production by physiological doses of radiation, nor their repairability, nor their biological effects are known. On the basis of methods that we developed for quantitating damages in large DNAs, we have devised and validated a way of measuring ionizing radiation-induced clustered lesions in genomic DNA, including DNA from human cells. DNA is treated with an endonuclease that induces a single-strand cleavage at an oxidized base or abasic site. If there are two closely spaced damages on opposing strands, such cleavage will reduce the size of the DNA on a nondenaturing gel. We show that ionizing radiation does induce clustered DNA damages containing abasic sites, oxidized purines, or oxidized pyrimidines. Further, the frequency of each of these cluster classes is comparable to that of frank double-strand breaks; among all complex damages induced by ionizing radiation, double-strand breaks are only about 20%, with other clustered damage constituting some 80%. We also show that even low doses (0.1-1 Gy) of high linear energy transfer ionizing radiation induce clustered damages in human cells.

  14. [The role of the biological damaging factor in the explosive injury].

    PubMed

    Popov, V L; Kadochnikov, D S; Minaeva, P V

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the specific features of the action of the biological damaging factors on the human organism associated with the explosive injury. Both the direct action of the damaging agents contained in the biological weapons and their secondary effects in the form of systemic and local infectious complications of the inflicted wounds are considered. The criteria for the evaluation of the degree of harm to the health of the victims of explosion attributable to the action of the biological damaging factor are proposed.

  15. [The role of the biological damaging factor in the explosive injury].

    PubMed

    Popov, V L; Kadochnikov, D S; Minaeva, P V

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the specific features of the action of the biological damaging factors on the human organism associated with the explosive injury. Both the direct action of the damaging agents contained in the biological weapons and their secondary effects in the form of systemic and local infectious complications of the inflicted wounds are considered. The criteria for the evaluation of the degree of harm to the health of the victims of explosion attributable to the action of the biological damaging factor are proposed. PMID:26856054

  16. Blasting-induced damage in coal

    SciTech Connect

    Kabongo, K.K.

    1995-12-31

    The paper is drawn from a project intended to explore a technique of prediction, control and optimization of fracture in coal induced by blasting. It evaluates the fines generated in coal submitted to dynamic loading stresses in an impact stamp mortar. The aim is to analyze a complex phenomenon of coal response to blast-generated stresses from a series of discrete simulations of shock and gas actions in controllable processes. It is learned that despite the nucleation of primary crushing and fractures to originate from the point of impact energy in coal, a secondary crushing appears to depart from within the burden progressing towards the free boundaries. The extension of the secondary crushing zone appears to be influenced by the magnitude of the breaking stresses generated and the coal burden distance. A strong dependence of fines on the coal`s innate discontinuities (strength) and the energy input is highlighted.

  17. Biological effectiveness of accelerated particles for the induction of chromosome damage: track structure effects.

    PubMed

    George, Kerry A; Hada, Megumi; Chappell, Lori; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2013-07-01

    We have investigated how radiation quality affects the induction of chromosomal aberrations in human cells. Human lymphocytes were irradiated in vitro with various energies of accelerated high charge and energy (HZE) particles including oxygen, neon, silicon, titanium and iron. Chromosome damage was assessed using three-color FISH chromosome painting in chemically induced premature chromosome condensation samples collected at first cell division after irradiation. The LET values for these particles ranged from 30 to 195 keV/μm, and their energies ranged from about 55 MeV/u to more than 1,000 MeV/u. The 89 and 142 MeV/u neon particles produced the most simple-type reciprocal exchanges per unit dose. For complex-type exchanges, 64 MeV/u neon and 450 MeV/u iron were equally effective and induced the greatest amount of complex damage. Track structure models predict that at a fixed value of LET, particles with lower charge number (Z) will have a higher biological effectiveness compared to particles with a higher Z, and that a saturation cross section will be observed for different radiation qualities. Our results are consistent with model expectations within the limitation of experimental error, and provide the most extensive data that have been reported on the radiation quality dependences of chromosomal aberrations. PMID:23692480

  18. Exercise-induced oxidatively damaged DNA in humans: evaluation in plasma or urine?

    PubMed

    Karpouzi, Christina; Nikolaidis, Stefanos; Kabasakalis, Athanasios; Tsalis, George; Mougios, Vassilis

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise can induce oxidative damage in humans. 8-Hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) is a widely known biomarker of DNA oxidation, which can be determined in blood and urine. The aim of the present study was to compare these two biological fluids in terms of which is more suitable for the estimation of the oxidative damage of DNA by measuring the concentration of 8-OHdG one hour after maximal exercise by enzyme immunoassay. The concentration of 8-OHdG increased with exercise only in plasma (p < 0.001), and values differed between exercise tests in both plasma and urine (p < 0.05). In conclusion, plasma appears to be more sensitive to exercise-induced 8-OHdG changes than urine and, hence, a more appropriate medium for assessing oxidative damage of DNA, although the poor repeatability of the measurement needs to be addressed in future studies. PMID:26849281

  19. Laser Induced Damage in Optical Materials: 6th ASTM Symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1975-03-01

    The Sixth ASTM-ONR-NBS Symposium on Laser Induced Damage in Optical Materials was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado on 22-23 May 1974. Over 150 attendees at the Symposium heard thirty-one papers on topics relating to laser induced damage in crystalline and nonlinear optical materials, at dielectric surfaces, and in thin film coatings as well as discussions of damage problems in the ir region due both to cw and pulsed irradiation. In addition, several reports on the theoretical analysis of laser-materials interaction relative to the damage progress were given, along with tabulations of fundamental materials properties of importance in evaluation of optical material response to high-power laser radiation. Attention was given to high-power laser system design considerations that relate to improved system performance and reliability when various damage mechanisms are operable in such systems. A workshop on the machining of optics was held, and nine papers on various facets of the topic were presented dealing with machining procedures, surface characterization of machined elements, coating of machined components, and the polishing and damage resistance of polished, coated, and bare metal reflectors. PMID:20134954

  20. Genetic damage induced by organic extract of coke oven emissions on human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Qingfeng; Duan, Huawei; Wang, Yadong; Huang, Chuanfeng; Niu, Yong; Dai, Yufei; Bin, Ping; Liu, Qingjun; Chen, Wen; Ma, Junxiang; Zheng, Yuxin

    2012-08-01

    Coke oven emissions are known as human carcinogen, which is a complex mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon. In this study, we aimed to clarify the mechanism of action of coke oven emissions induced carcinogenesis and to identify biomarkers of early biological effects in a human bronchial epithelial cell line with CYP1A1 activity (HBE-CYP1A1). Particulate matter was collected in the oven area on glass filter, extracted and analyzed by GC/MS. DNA breaks and oxidative damage were evaluated by alkaline and endonucleases (FPG, hOGG1 and ENDO III)-modified comet assays. Cytotoxicity and chromosomal damage were assessed by the cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome (CBMN-Cyt) assay. The cells were treated with organic extract of coke oven emissions (OE-COE) representing 5, 10, 20, 40μg/mL extract for 24h. We found that there was a dose-effect relationship between the OE-COE and the direct DNA damage presented by tail length, tail intensity and Olive tail moment in the comet assay. The presence of lesion-specific endonucleases in the assays increased DNA migration after OE-COE treatment when compared to those without enzymes, which indicated that OE-COE produced oxidative damage at the level of pyrimidine and purine bases. The dose-dependent increase of micronuclei, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds in exposed cells was significant, indicating chromosomal and genomic damage induced by OE-COE. Based on the cytotoxic biomarkers in CBMN-Cyt assay, OE-COE may inhibit nuclear division, interfere with apoptosis, or induce cell necrosis. This study indicates that OE-COE exposure can induce DNA breaks/oxidative damage and genomic instability in HBE-CYP1A1 cells. The FPG-comet assay appears more specific for detecting oxidative DNA damage induced by complex mixtures of genotoxic substances.

  1. Hardening measures for bipolar transistors against microwave-induced damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Chang-Chun; Ma, Zhen-Yang; Ren, Xing-Rong; Yang, Yin-Tang; Zhao, Ying-Bo; Yu, Xin-Hai

    2013-06-01

    In the present paper we study the influences of the bias voltage and the external components on the damage progress of a bipolar transistor induced by high-power microwaves. The mechanism is presented by analyzing the variation in the internal distribution of the temperature in the device. The findings show that the device becomes less vulnerable to damage with an increase in bias voltage. Both the series diode at the base and the relatively low series resistance at the emitter, Re, can obviously prolong the burnout time of the device. However, Re will aid damage to the device when the value is sufficiently high due to the fact that the highest hot spot shifts from the base-emitter junction to the base region. Moreover, the series resistance at the base Rb will weaken the capability of the device to withstand microwave damage.

  2. DNA damage-induced replication arrest in Xenopus egg extracts

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Matthew P.; Michael, W. Matthew

    2003-01-01

    Chromosomal replication is sensitive to the presence of DNA-damaging alkylating agents, such as methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). MMS is known to inhibit replication though activation of the DNA damage checkpoint and through checkpoint-independent slowing of replication fork progression. Using Xenopus egg extracts, we now report an additional pathway that is stimulated by MMS-induced damage. We show that, upon incubation in egg extracts, MMS-treated DNA activates a diffusible inhibitor that blocks, in trans, chromosomal replication. The downstream effect of the inhibitor is a failure to recruit proliferating cell nuclear antigen, but not DNA polymerase α, to the nascent replication fork. Thus, alkylation damage activates an inhibitor that intercepts the replication pathway at a point between the polymerase α and proliferating cell nuclear antigen execution steps. We also show that activation of the inhibitor does not require the DNA damage checkpoint; rather, stimulation of the pathway described here results in checkpoint activation. These data describe a novel replication arrest pathway, and they also provide an example of how subpathways within the DNA damage response network are integrated to promote efficient cell cycle arrest in response to damaged DNA. PMID:14581453

  3. Heavy ion induced damage to plasmid DNA: plateau region vs. spread out Bragg-peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, H. M.; van Goethem, M. J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; Brandenburg, S.; Hoekstra, R.; Schlathölter, T.

    2011-08-01

    We have investigated the damage of synthetic plasmid pBR322 DNA in dilute aqueous solutions induced by fast carbon ions. The relative contribution of indirect damage and direct damage to the DNA itself is expected to vary with linear energy transfer along the ion track, with the direct damage contribution increasing towards the Bragg peak. Therefore, 12C ions at the spread-out Bragg peak (dose averaged LET∞ = 189 ± 15 keV/ μm) and in the plateau region of the Bragg curve (LET = 40 keV/ μm) were employed and the radical scavenger concentration in the plasmid solution was varied to quantify the indirect effect. In order to minimize the influence of 12C break-up fragments, a relatively low initial energy of 90 MeV/nucleon was employed for the carbon ions. DNA damage has been quantified by subsequent electrophoresis on agarose gels. We find that strand breaks due to both indirect and direct effects are systematically higher in the plateau region as compared to the Bragg peak region with the difference being smallest at high scavenging capacities. In view of the fact that the relative biological effectiveness for many biological endpoints is maximum at the Bragg peak our findings imply that DNA damage at the Bragg peak is qualitatively most severe.

  4. Plasmid DNA damage induced by helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Cantrell, William A.; Escobar, Erika E.; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2014-03-01

    A helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is applied to induce damage to aqueous plasmid DNA. The resulting fractions of the DNA conformers, which indicate intact molecules or DNA with single- or double-strand breaks, are determined using agarose gel electrophoresis. The DNA strand breaks increase with a decrease in the distance between the APPJ and DNA samples under two working conditions of the plasma source with different parameters of applied electric pulses. The damage level induced in the plasmid DNA is also enhanced with increased plasma irradiation time. The reactive species generated in the APPJ are characterized by optical emission spectra, and their roles in possible DNA damage processes occurring in an aqueous environment are also discussed.

  5. Heat Induced Damage Detection by Terahertz (THz) Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahani, Ehsan Kabiri; Kundu, Tribikram; Wu, Ziran; Xin, Hao

    2011-06-01

    Terahertz (THz) and sub-terahertz imaging and spectroscopy are becoming increasingly popular nondestructive evaluation techniques for damage detection and characterization of materials. THz radiation is being used for inspecting ceramic foam tiles used in TPS (Thermal Protection System), thick polymer composites and polymer tiles that are not good conductors of ultrasonic waves. Capability of THz electromagnetic waves in detecting heat induced damage in porous materials is investigated in this paper. Porous pumice stone blocks are subjected to long time heat exposures to produce heat induced damage in the block. The dielectric properties extracted from THz TDS (Time Domain Spectroscopy) measurements are compared for different levels of heat exposure. Experimental results show noticeable and consistent change in dielectric properties with increasing levels of heat exposure, well before its melting point.

  6. Potential role of punicalagin against oxidative stress induced testicular damage

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Faiza; Tian, Hui; Li, Wenqing; Hung, Helong; Sun, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Punicalagin is isolated from pomegranate and widely used for the treatment of different diseases in Chinese traditional medicine. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Punicalagin (purity ≥98%) on oxidative stress induced testicular damage and its effect on fertility. We detected the antioxidant potential of punicalagin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced oxidative stress damage in testes, also tried to uncover the boosting fertility effect of Punicalagin (PU) against oxidative stress-induced infertility. Results demonstrated that 9 mg kg−1 for 7 days treatment significantly decreases LPS induced oxidative damage in testes and nitric oxide production. The administration of oxidative stress resulted in a significant reduction in testes antioxidants GSH, T-SOD, and CAT raised LPO, but treatment with punicalagin for 7 days increased antioxidant defense GSH, T-SOD, and CAT by the end of the experiment and reduced LPO level as well. PU also significantly activates Nrf2, which is involved in regulation of antioxidant defense systems. Hence, the present research categorically elucidates the protective effect of punicalagin against LPS induced oxidative stress induced perturbation in the process of spermatogenesis and significantly increased sperm health and number. Moreover, fertility success significantly decreased in LPS-injected mice compared to controls. Mice injected with LPS had fertility indices of 12.5%, while others treated with a combination of PU + LPS exhibited 75% indices. By promoting fertility and eliminating oxidative stress and inflammation, PU may be a useful nutrient for the treatment of infertility. PMID:26763544

  7. Curculigo orchioides protects cisplatin-induced cell damage.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tong Ho; Hong, Bin Na; Jung, Su-Young; Lee, Jeong-Han; So, Hong-Seob; Park, Raekil; You, Yong-Ouk

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin is commonly used as a chemotherapeutic agent against many human cancers. However, it generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) and has serious dose-limiting side effects, including ototoxicity. The roots of Curculigo orchioides (C. orchioides) have been used to treat auditory diseases such as tinnitus and hearing loss in Chinese traditional medicine. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of an ethanol extract obtained from C. orchioides rhizome (COR) on cisplatin-induced cell damage in auditory cells (HEI-OC1). COR (2.5-25 μg/ml) inhibited cisplatin-induced HEI-OC1 cell damage in a dose-dependent manner. To investigate the protective mechanism of COR on cisplatin cytotoxicity in HEI-OC1 cells, we measured the effects of COR on ROS generation and lipid peroxidation in cisplatin-treated cells as well as its scavenging activities against superoxide radicals, hydroxyl radicals, hydrogen peroxide, and DPPH radicals. COR (1-25 μg/ml) had scavenging activities against superoxide radicals, hydroxyl radicals, hydrogen peroxide, and DPPH radicals, as well as reduced lipid peroxidation. In in vivo experiments, COR was shown to reduce cochlear and peripheral auditory function impairments through cisplatin-induced auditory damage in mice. These results indicate that COR protects from cisplatin-induced auditory damage by inhibiting lipid peroxidation and scavenging activities against free radicals.

  8. Multiscale physics of ion-induced radiation damage.

    PubMed

    Surdutovich, Eugene; Solov'yov, A V

    2014-01-01

    This is a review of a multiscale approach to the physics of ion-beam cancer therapy, an approach suggested in order to understand the interplay of a large number of phenomena involved in the radiation damage scenario occurring on a range of temporal, spatial, and energy scales. We describe different effects that take place on different scales and play major roles in the scenario of interaction of ions with tissue. The understanding of these effects allows an assessment of relative biological effectiveness that relates the physical quantities, such as dose, to the biological values, such as the probability of cell survival.

  9. Cold-induced thermoregulation and biological aging.

    PubMed

    Florez-Duquet, M; McDonald, R B

    1998-04-01

    Aging is associated with diminished cold-induced thermoregulation (CIT). The mechanisms accounting for this phenomenon have yet to be clearly elucidated but most likely reflect a combination of increased heat loss and decreased metabolic heat production. The inability of the aged subject to reduce heat loss during cold exposure is associated with diminished reactive tone of the cutaneous vasculature and, to a lesser degree, alterations in the insulative properties of body fat. Cold-induced metabolic heat production via skeletal muscle shivering thermogenesis and brown adipose tissue nonshivering thermogenesis appears to decline with age. Few investigations have directly linked diminished skeletal muscle shivering thermogenesis with the age-related reduction in cold-induced thermoregulatory capacity. Rather, age-related declines in skeletal muscle mass and metabolic activity are cited as evidence for decreased heat production via shivering. Reduced mass, GDP binding to brown fat mitochondria, and uncoupling protein (UCP) levels are cited as evidence for attenuated brown adipose tissue cold-induced nonshivering thermogenic capacity during aging. The age-related reduction in brown fat nonshivering thermogenic capacity most likely reflects altered cellular signal transduction rather than changes in neural and hormonal signaling. The discussion in this review focuses on how alterations in CIT during the life span may offer insight into possible mechanisms of biological aging. Although the preponderance of evidence presented here demonstrates that CIT declines with chronological time, the mechanism reflecting this attenuated function remains to be elucidated. The inability to draw definitive conclusions regarding biological aging and CIT reflects the lack of a clear definition of aging. It is unlikely that the mechanisms accounting for the decline in cold-induced thermoregulation during aging will be determined until biological aging is more precisely defined. PMID

  10. Cold-induced thermoregulation and biological aging.

    PubMed

    Florez-Duquet, M; McDonald, R B

    1998-04-01

    Aging is associated with diminished cold-induced thermoregulation (CIT). The mechanisms accounting for this phenomenon have yet to be clearly elucidated but most likely reflect a combination of increased heat loss and decreased metabolic heat production. The inability of the aged subject to reduce heat loss during cold exposure is associated with diminished reactive tone of the cutaneous vasculature and, to a lesser degree, alterations in the insulative properties of body fat. Cold-induced metabolic heat production via skeletal muscle shivering thermogenesis and brown adipose tissue nonshivering thermogenesis appears to decline with age. Few investigations have directly linked diminished skeletal muscle shivering thermogenesis with the age-related reduction in cold-induced thermoregulatory capacity. Rather, age-related declines in skeletal muscle mass and metabolic activity are cited as evidence for decreased heat production via shivering. Reduced mass, GDP binding to brown fat mitochondria, and uncoupling protein (UCP) levels are cited as evidence for attenuated brown adipose tissue cold-induced nonshivering thermogenic capacity during aging. The age-related reduction in brown fat nonshivering thermogenic capacity most likely reflects altered cellular signal transduction rather than changes in neural and hormonal signaling. The discussion in this review focuses on how alterations in CIT during the life span may offer insight into possible mechanisms of biological aging. Although the preponderance of evidence presented here demonstrates that CIT declines with chronological time, the mechanism reflecting this attenuated function remains to be elucidated. The inability to draw definitive conclusions regarding biological aging and CIT reflects the lack of a clear definition of aging. It is unlikely that the mechanisms accounting for the decline in cold-induced thermoregulation during aging will be determined until biological aging is more precisely defined.

  11. The basic chemistry of exercise-induced DNA oxidation: oxidative damage, redox signaling, and their interplay

    PubMed Central

    Cobley, James N.; Margaritelis, Nikos V.; Morton, James P.; Close, Graeme L.; Nikolaidis, Michalis G.; Malone, John K.

    2015-01-01

    Acute exercise increases reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation. This phenomenon is associated with two major outcomes: (1) redox signaling and (2) macromolecule damage. Mechanistic knowledge of how exercise-induced redox signaling and macromolecule damage are interlinked is limited. This review focuses on the interplay between exercise-induced redox signaling and DNA damage, using hydroxyl radical (·OH) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as exemplars. It is postulated that the biological fate of H2O2 links the two processes and thus represents a bifurcation point between redox signaling and damage. Indeed, H2O2 can participate in two electron signaling reactions but its diffusion and chemical properties permit DNA oxidation following reaction with transition metals and ·OH generation. It is also considered that the sensing of DNA oxidation by repair proteins constitutes a non-canonical redox signaling mechanism. Further layers of interaction are provided by the redox regulation of DNA repair proteins and their capacity to modulate intracellular H2O2 levels. Overall, exercise-induced redox signaling and DNA damage may be interlinked to a greater extent than was previously thought but this requires further investigation. PMID:26136689

  12. Analysis of alcohol-induced DNA damage in Escherichia coli by visualizing single genomic DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yujin; Lee, Jinyong; Kim, Jisoo; Oh, Yeeun; Kim, Dogeun; Lee, Jungyun; Lim, Sangyong; Jo, Kyubong

    2016-07-21

    Consumption of alcohol injures DNA, and such damage is considered to be a primary cause for the development of cancer and many other diseases essentially due to reactive oxygen species generated from alcohol. To sensitively detect alcohol-induced DNA lesions in a biological system, we introduced a novel analytical platform for visualization of single genomic DNA molecules using E. coli. By fluorescently labelling the DNA lesions, our approach demonstrated, with the highest sensitivity, that we could count the number of DNA lesions induced by alcohol metabolism in a single bacterial cell. Moreover, our results showed a linear relationship between ethanol concentration and the number of DNA lesions: 0.88 lesions per 1% ethanol. Using this approach, we quantitatively analysed the DNA damage induced by exposure to alcoholic beverages such as beer (5% ethanol), rice wine (13%), soju (20%), and whisky (40%). PMID:27186604

  13. Avermectin induced inflammation damage in king pigeon brain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Jie; Sun, Bao-Hong; Qu, Jian Ping; Xu, Shiwen; Li, Shu

    2013-11-01

    To determine the effect of Avermectin (AVM) on inflammation damage in king pigeon brain, eighty two-month-old American king pigeons were randomly divided into four groups, and were fed with either commercial diet or AVM-supplemented diet containing 20 mg kg(-1)diet, 40 mg kg(-1)diet, and 60 mg kg(-1)diet AVM for 30, 60 and 90 d, respectively. Then, the expression level of inflammatory factors (iNOS, PTGEs, NF-κB), histological damage, and ultra-structural damage were examined. It showed that AVM caused higher expressions (P<0.05) of iNOS, PTGEs, NF-κB with disorganized histological and ultra-structural structures in cerebrum, cerebellum, and optic lobe. Meanwhile, inflammatory and histopathological damage were induced by AVM in king pigeon brains. In addition, the main targeted organelle in nervous system was mitochondria, which indicated that mitochondria may be relevant to the process of inflammation induced by AVM. To our best knowledge, this is the first report to study the toxic effect of AVM on inflammatory damage in king pigeon. Thus, the information presented in this study is believed to be helpful in supplementing data for further AVM toxicity study.

  14. UV-induced DNA damage and repair: a review.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajeshwar P; Häder, Donat P

    2002-04-01

    Increases in ultraviolet radiation at the Earth's surface due to the depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer have recently fuelled interest in the mechanisms of various effects it might have on organisms. DNA is certainly one of the key targets for UV-induced damage in a variety of organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. UV radiation induces two of the most abundant mutagenic and cytotoxic DNA lesions such as cyclobutane-pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and 6-4 photoproducts (6-4PPs) and their Dewar valence Isomers. However, cells have developed a number of repair or tolerance mechanism to counteract the DNA damage caused by UV or any other stressors. Photoreactivation with the help of the enzyme photolyase is one of the most important and frequently occurring repair mechanisms in a variety of organisms. Excision repair, which can be distinguished into base excision repair (BER) and nucleotide excision repair (NER), also plays an important role in DNA repair in several organisms with the help of a number of glycosylases and polymerases, respectively. In addition, mechanisms such as mutagenic repair or dimer bypass, recombinational repair, cell-cycle checkpoints, apoptosis and certain alternative repair pathways are also operative in various organisms. This review deals with UV-induced DNA damage and the associated repair mechanisms as well as methods of detecting DNA damage and its future perspectives.

  15. Zebrafish fin regeneration after cryoinjury-induced tissue damage

    PubMed Central

    Chassot, Bérénice; Pury, David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although fin regeneration following an amputation procedure has been well characterized, little is known about the impact of prolonged tissue damage on the execution of the regenerative programme in the zebrafish appendages. To induce histolytic processes in the caudal fin, we developed a new cryolesion model that combines the detrimental effects of freezing/thawing and ischemia. In contrast to the common transection model, the damaged part of the fin was spontaneously shed within two days after cryoinjury. The remaining stump contained a distorted margin with a mixture of dead material and healthy cells that concomitantly induced two opposing processes of tissue debris degradation and cellular proliferation, respectively. Between two and seven days after cryoinjury, this reparative/proliferative phase was morphologically featured by displaced fragments of broken bones. A blastemal marker msxB was induced in the intact mesenchyme below the damaged stump margin. Live imaging of epithelial and osteoblastic transgenic reporter lines revealed that the tissue-specific regenerative programmes were initiated after the clearance of damaged material. Despite histolytic perturbation during the first week after cryoinjury, the fin regeneration resumed and was completed without further alteration in comparison to the simple amputation model. This model reveals the powerful ability of the zebrafish to restore the original appendage architecture after the extended histolysis of the stump. PMID:27215324

  16. The stochastic nature of growth of laser-induced damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, C. W.; Cross, David A.; Liao, Zhi M.; Norton, Mary A.; Negres, Raluca A.

    2015-07-01

    Laser fluence and operational tempo of ICF systems operating in the UV are typically limited by the growth of laser- induced damage on their final optics (primarily silica optics). In the early 2000 time frame, studies of laser damage growth with relevant large area beams revealed that for some laser conditions damage sites located on the exit surface of a fused silica optic grew following an exponential growth rule: D(n) = D0 exp (n α(φ)), where D is final site diameter, D0 is the initial diameter of the site, φ is the laser fluence, α(φ) is the growth coefficient, and n is the number of exposures. In general α is a linear function of φ, with a threshold of φTH. In recent years, it has been found that that growth behavior is actually considerably more complex. For example, it was found that α is not a constant for a given fluence but follows a probability distribution with a mean equal to α(φ). This is complicated by observations that these distributions are actually functions of the pulse shape, damage site size, and initial morphology of damage initiation. In addition, there is not a fixed fluence threshold for damage sites growth, which is better described by a probability of growth which depends on site size, morphology and laser fluence. Here will review these findings and discuss implications for the operation of large laser systems.

  17. Influenza infection induces host DNA damage and dynamic DNA damage responses during tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Na; Parrish, Marcus; Chan, Tze Khee; Yin, Lu; Rai, Prashant; Yoshiyuki, Yamada; Abolhassani, Nona; Tan, Kong Bing; Kiraly, Orsolya; Chow, Vincent TK; Engelward, Bevin P.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza viruses account for significant morbidity worldwide. Inflammatory responses, including excessive generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS), mediate lung injury in severe Influenza infections. However, the molecular basis of inflammation-induced lung damage is not fully understood. Here, we studied influenza H1N1 infected cells in vitro, as well as H1N1 infected mice, and we monitored molecular and cellular responses over the course of two weeks in vivo. We show that influenza induces DNA damage both when cells are directly exposed to virus in vitro (measured using the comet assay) and also when cells are exposed to virus in vivo (estimated via γH2AX foci). We show that DNA damage, as well as responses to DNA damage, persist in vivo until long after virus has been cleared, at times when there are inflammation associated RONS (measured by xanthine oxidase activity and oxidative products). The frequency of lung epithelial and immune cells with increased γH2AX foci is elevated in vivo, especially for dividing cells (Ki-67 positive) exposed to oxidative stress during tissue regeneration. Additionally, we observed a significant increase in apoptotic cells as well as increased levels of DSB repair proteins Ku70, Ku86 and Rad51 during the regenerative phase. In conclusion, results show that influenza induces DNA both in vitro and in vivo, and that DNA damage responses are activated, raising the possibility that DNA repair capacity may be a determining factor for tissue recovery and disease outcome. PMID:25809161

  18. Stress-induced DNA damage biomarkers: applications and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Nikitaki, Zacharenia; Hellweg, Christine E.; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    A variety of environmental stresses like chemicals, UV and ionizing radiation and organism's endogenous processes such as replication stress and metabolism can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) that can attack cellular vital components like DNA, proteins and lipid membranes. Among them, much attention has been focused on DNA since DNA damage plays a role in several biological disorders and aging processes. Thus, DNA damage can be used as a biomarker in a reliable and accurate way to quantify for example radiation exposure and can indicate its possible long term effects and cancer risk. Based on the type of DNA lesions detected one can hypothesize on the most probable mechanisms involved in the formation of these lesions for example in the case of UV and ionizing radiation (e.g., X- or α-, γ-rays, energetic ions, neutrons). In this review we describe the most accepted chemical pathways for DNA damage induction and the different types of DNA lesions, i.e., single, complex DNA lesions etc. that can be used as DNA damage biomarkers. We critically compare DNA damage detection methods and their limitations. In addition, we suggest the use of DNA repair gene products as biomarkes for identification of different types of stresses i.e., radiation, oxidative, or replication stress, based on bioinformatic approaches and meta-analysis of literature data. PMID:26082923

  19. Stress-induced DNA Damage biomarkers: Applications and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitaki, Zacharenia; Hellweg, Christine; Georgakilas, Alexandros; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2015-06-01

    A variety of environmental stresses like chemicals, UV and ionizing radiation and organism’s endogenous processes like replication stress and metabolism can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) that can attack cellular vital components like DNA, proteins and lipid membranes. Among them, much attention has been focused on DNA since DNA damages play a role in several biological disorders and aging processes. Thus, DNA damage can be used as a biomarker in a reliable and accurate way to quantify for example radiation exposure and can indicate its possible long term effects and cancer risk. Based on the type of DNA lesions detected one can hypothesize on the most probable mechanisms involved in the formation of these lesions for example in the case of UV and ionizing radiation (e.g. X- or α-, γ-rays, energetic ions, neutrons). In this review we describe the most accepted chemical pathways for DNA damage induction and the different types of DNA lesions, i.e. single, complex DNA lesions etc. that can be used as biomarkers. We critically compare DNA damage detection methods and their limitations. In addition to such DNA damage products, we suggest possible gene inductions that can be used to characterize responses to different types of stresses i.e. radiation, oxidative and replication stress, based on bioinformatic approaches and stringent meta-analysis of literature data.

  20. Stress-induced DNA damage biomarkers: applications and limitations.

    PubMed

    Nikitaki, Zacharenia; Hellweg, Christine E; Georgakilas, Alexandros G; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    A variety of environmental stresses like chemicals, UV and ionizing radiation and organism's endogenous processes such as replication stress and metabolism can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) that can attack cellular vital components like DNA, proteins and lipid membranes. Among them, much attention has been focused on DNA since DNA damage plays a role in several biological disorders and aging processes. Thus, DNA damage can be used as a biomarker in a reliable and accurate way to quantify for example radiation exposure and can indicate its possible long term effects and cancer risk. Based on the type of DNA lesions detected one can hypothesize on the most probable mechanisms involved in the formation of these lesions for example in the case of UV and ionizing radiation (e.g., X- or α-, γ-rays, energetic ions, neutrons). In this review we describe the most accepted chemical pathways for DNA damage induction and the different types of DNA lesions, i.e., single, complex DNA lesions etc. that can be used as DNA damage biomarkers. We critically compare DNA damage detection methods and their limitations. In addition, we suggest the use of DNA repair gene products as biomarkes for identification of different types of stresses i.e., radiation, oxidative, or replication stress, based on bioinformatic approaches and meta-analysis of literature data. PMID:26082923

  1. Changes of color coordinates of biological tissue with superficial skin damage due to mechanical trauma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pteruk, Vail; Mokanyuk, Olexander; Kvaternuk, Olena; Yakenina, Lesya; Kotyra, Andrzej; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Dussembayeva, Shynar

    2015-12-01

    Change of color coordinates of normal and pathological biological tissues is based on calculated spectral diffuse reflection. The proposed color coordinates of normal and pathological biological tissues of skin provided using standard light sources, allowing accurately diagnose skin damage due to mechanical trauma with a blunt object for forensic problems.

  2. Radiation induced crystallinity damage in poly( L-lactic acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantoǧlu, Ömer; Güven, Olgun

    2002-12-01

    The radiation-induced crystallinity damage in poly( L-lactic acid) (PLLA) in the presence of air and in vacuum, is studied. From the heat of fusion enthalpy values of gamma irradiated samples, some changes on the thermal properties were determined. To identify these changes, first the glass transition temperature ( Tg) of L-lactic acid polymers irradiated to various doses in air and vacuum have been investigated and it is found that it is independent of irradiation atmosphere and dose. The fraction of damaged units of PLLA per unit of absorbed energy has been measured. For this purpose, SAXS and differential scanning calorimetry methods were used, and the radiation yield of number of damaged units ( G(- u)) is found to be 0.74 and 0.58 for PLLA samples irradiated in vacuum and air, respectively.

  3. Radiation-induced DNA damage and chromatin structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rydberg, B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation in cells are clustered and not randomly distributed. For low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation this clustering occurs mainly on the small scales of DNA molecules and nucleosomes. For example, experimental evidence suggests that both strands of DNA on the nucleosomal surface can be damaged in single events and that this damage occurs with a 10-bp modulation because of protection by histones. For high LET radiation, clustering also occurs on a larger scale and depends on chromatin organization. A particularly significant clustering occurs when an ionizing particle traverses the 30 nm chromatin fiber with generation of heavily damaged DNA regions with an average size of about 2 kbp. On an even larger scale, high LET radiation can produce several DNA double-strand breaks in closer proximity than expected from randomness. It is suggested that this increases the probability of misrejoining of DNA ends and generation of lethal chromosome aberrations.

  4. Pattern Learning, Damage and Repair within Biological Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siu, Theodore; Fitzgerald O'Neill, Kate; Shinbrot, Troy

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes damage to neural networks, potentially leading to disability or even death. Nearly one in ten of these patients die, and most of the remainder suffer from symptoms ranging from headaches and nausea to convulsions and paralysis. In vitro studies to develop treatments for TBI have limited in vivo applicability, and in vitro therapies have even proven to worsen the outcome of TBI patients. We propose that this disconnect between in vitro and in vivo outcomes may be associated with the fact that in vitro tests assess indirect measures of neuronal health, but do not investigate the actual function of neuronal networks. Therefore in this talk, we examine both in vitro and in silico neuronal networks that actually perform a function: pattern identification. We allow the networks to execute genetic, Hebbian, learning, and additionally, we examine the effects of damage and subsequent repair within our networks. We show that the length of repaired connections affects the overall pattern learning performance of the network and we propose therapies that may improve function following TBI in clinical settings.

  5. Mechanisms for microvascular damage induced by ultrasound-activated microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hong; Brayman, Andrew A.; Evan, Andrew P.; Matula, Thomas J.

    2012-10-01

    To provide insight into the mechanisms of microvascular damage induced by ultrasound-activated microbubbles, experimental studies were performed to correlate microvascular damage to the dynamics of bubble-vessel interactions. High-speed photomicrography was used to record single microbubbles interacting with microvessels in ex vivo tissue, under the exposure of short ultrasound pulses with a center frequency of 1 MHz and peak negative pressures (PNP) ranging from 0.8-4 MPa. Vascular damage associated with observed bubble-vessel interactions was either indicated directly by microbubble extravasation or examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses. As observed previously, the high-speed images revealed that ultrasound-activated microbubbles could cause distention and invagination of adjacent vessel walls, and could form liquid jets in microvessels. Vessel distention, invagination, and liquid jets were associated with the damage of microvessels whose diameters were smaller than those of maximally expanded microbubbles. However, vessel invagination appeared to be the dominant mechanism for the damage of relative large microvessels.

  6. Mechanisms for microvascular damage induced by ultrasound-activated microbubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Hong; Brayman, Andrew A.; Evan, Andrew P.; Matula, Thomas J.

    2012-10-03

    To provide insight into the mechanisms of microvascular damage induced by ultrasound-activated microbubbles, experimental studies were performed to correlate microvascular damage to the dynamics of bubble-vessel interactions. High-speed photomicrography was used to record single microbubbles interacting with microvessels in ex vivo tissue, under the exposure of short ultrasound pulses with a center frequency of 1 MHz and peak negative pressures (PNP) ranging from 0.8-4 MPa. Vascular damage associated with observed bubble-vessel interactions was either indicated directly by microbubble extravasation or examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses. As observed previously, the high-speed images revealed that ultrasound-activated microbubbles could cause distention and invagination of adjacent vessel walls, and could form liquid jets in microvessels. Vessel distention, invagination, and liquid jets were associated with the damage of microvessels whose diameters were smaller than those of maximally expanded microbubbles. However, vessel invagination appeared to be the dominant mechanism for the damage of relative large microvessels.

  7. Repair of radiation induced genetic damage under microgravity.

    PubMed

    Pross, H D; Kost, M; Kiefer, J

    1994-10-01

    The influence of microgravity on the repair of radiation induced genetic damage in a temperature-conditional repair mutant of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (rad 54-3) was investigated onboard the IML-1 mission (January 22nd-30th 1992, STS-42). Cells were irradiated before the flight, incubated under microgravity at the permissive (22 degrees C) and restrictive (36 degrees C) temperature and afterwards tested for survival. The results suggest that repair may be reduced under microgravity.

  8. A stochastic model of radiation-induced bone marrow damage

    SciTech Connect

    Cotlet, G.; Blue, T.E.

    2000-03-01

    A stochastic model, based on consensus principles from radiation biology, is used to estimate bone-marrow stem cell pool survival (CFU-S and stroma cells) after irradiation. The dose response model consists of three coupled first order linear differential equations which quantitatively describe time dependent cellular damage, repair, and killing of red bone marrow cells. This system of differential equations is solved analytically through the use of a matrix approach for continuous and fractionated irradiations. The analytic solutions are confirmed through the dynamical solution of the model equations using SIMULINK. Rate coefficients describing the cellular processes of radiation damage and repair, extrapolated to humans from animal data sets and adjusted for neutron-gamma mixed fields, are employed in a SIMULINK analysis of criticality accidents. The results show that, for the time structures which may occur in criticality accidents, cell survival is established mainly by the average dose and dose rate.

  9. Enhancement of ultrasonically induced cell damage by phthalocyanines in vitro.

    PubMed

    Milowska, Katarzyna; Gabryelak, Teresa

    2008-12-01

    In this work, erythrocytes from carp were used as a nucleated cell model to test the hypothesis that the phthalocyanines (zinc--ZnPc and chloroaluminium -AlClPc) enhance ultrasonically induced damage in vitro. In order to confirm and complete our earlier investigation, the influence of ultrasound (US) and phthalocyanines (Pcs) on unresearched cellular components, was studied. Red blood cells were exposed to 1 MHz continuous ultrasound wave (0.61 and/or 2.44 W/cm(2)) in the presence or absence of phthalocyanines (3 microM). To identify target cell damage, we studied hemolysis, membrane fluidity and morphology of erythrocytes. To demonstrate the changes in the fluidity of plasma membrane we used the spectrofluorimetric methods using two fluorescence probes: 1-[4-(trimethylamino)phenyl]-6-phenyl-1,3,5,-hexatriene (TMA-DPH) and 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH). The effect of US and Pcs on nucleated erythrocytes morphology was estimated on the basis of microscopic observation. The enhancement of ultrasonically induced membrane damage by both phthalocyanines was observed in case of hemolysis, and membrane surface fluidity, in comparison to ultrasound. The authors also observed changes in the morphology of erythrocytes. The obtained results support the hypothesis that the Pcs enhance ultrasonically induced cell damage in vitro. Furthermore, the influence of ultrasound on phthalocyanines (Pcs) in medium and in cells was tested. The authors observed changes in the phthalocyanines absorption spectra in the medium and the increase in the intensity of phthalocyanines fluorescence in the cells. These data can suggest changes in the structure of phthalocyanines after ultrasound action.

  10. Effect of Picroliv on cadmium induced testicular damage in rat.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Neelam; Khandelwal, Shashi

    2008-02-01

    Ameliorative potential of Picroliv, a standardized extract of Picrorhiza kurroa on Cd induced early and advanced testicular damage was investigated in male rats. In the former experiment, the rats were administered Cd as CdCl(2) (0.5mg/kg, s.c.) 5days/week for 18 weeks and Picroliv at two doses (6 and 12 mg/kg, p.o.) was given for the last 4 weeks i.e. from week 15 to 18, to the Cd administered group. In the latter experiment, the Cd administration continued for 24 weeks and Picroliv was given from week 21 to 24. At 18 weeks, Cd caused alterations in oxidative stress indices like increased lipid peroxidation (MDA) and reduced levels of non protein sulphydryls (NPSH). They were found close to the control values by Picroliv treatment, suggesting its antioxidant potential. The increased levels of Zn and Ca were reduced by Picroliv, the Cd levels remained unaltered. The Cd induced testicular damage was also mitigated by Picroliv. The higher dose (12 mg/kg) being more effective than the lower dose. However, at 24 weeks of Cd exposure, the oxidative stress indicators in testis were more pronounced along with the morphological alterations. These parameters remained unaffected by Picroliv treatment. On comparative evaluation of the two studies, 18 weeks Cd exposure caused moderate testicular damage, which could be reversed significantly by Picroliv administration and correlated well with oxidative stress markers. Our results clearly demonstrate the ameliorative potential of Picroliv in Cd induced early testicular damage. PMID:17928123

  11. Bacterial Genotoxins: Merging the DNA Damage Response into Infection Biology

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Francesca; Frisan, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial genotoxins are unique among bacterial toxins as their molecular target is DNA. The consequence of intoxication or infection is induction of DNA breaks that, if not properly repaired, results in irreversible cell cycle arrest (senescence) or death of the target cells. At present, only three bacterial genotoxins have been identified. Two are protein toxins: the cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) family produced by a number of Gram-negative bacteria and the typhoid toxin produced by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi. The third member, colibactin, is a peptide-polyketide genotoxin, produced by strains belonging to the phylogenetic group B2 of Escherichia coli. This review will present the cellular effects of acute and chronic intoxication or infection with the genotoxins-producing bacteria. The carcinogenic properties and the role of these effectors in the context of the host-microbe interaction will be discussed. We will further highlight the open questions that remain to be solved regarding the biology of this unusual family of bacterial toxins. PMID:26270677

  12. Proton-induced radiation damage in germanium detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bruckner, J.; Korfer, M.; Wanke, H. , Mainz ); Schroeder, A.N.F. ); Figes, D.; Dragovitsch, P. ); Englert, P.A.J. ); Starr, R.; Trombka, J.I. . Goddard Space Flight Center); Taylor, I. ); Drake, D.M.; Shunk, E.R. )

    1991-04-01

    High-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors will be used in future space missions for gamma-ray measurements and will be subject to interactions with energetic particles. To simulate this process several large-volume n-type HPGe detectors were incrementally exposed to a particle fluence of up to 10{sub 8} protons cm{sup {minus}2} (proton energy: 1.5 GeV) at different operating temperatures (90 to 120 K) to induce radiation damage. Basic scientific as well as engineering data on detector performance were collected. During the incremental irradiation, the peak shape produced by the detectors showed a significant change from a Gaussian shape to a broad complex structure. After the irradiation all detectors were thoroughly characterized by measuring many parameters. To remove the accumulated radiation damage the detectors were stepwise annealed at temperatures T {le} 110{degrees}C while staying specially designed cryostats. This paper shows that n-type HPGe detectors can be used in charged particles environments as high-energy resolution devices until a certain level of radiation damage is accumulated and that the damage can be removed at moderate annealing temperatures and the detector returned to operating condition.

  13. Oxidative DNA damage induced by aminoacetone, an amino acid metabolite.

    PubMed

    Hiraku, Y; Sugimoto, J; Yamaguchi, T; Kawanishi, S

    1999-05-01

    We investigated DNA damage induced by aminoacetone, a metabolite of threonine and glycine. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed that aminoacetone caused cellular DNA cleavage. Aminoacetone increased the amount of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) in human cultured cells in a dose-dependent manner. The formation of 8-oxodG in calf thymus DNA increased due to aminoacetone only in the presence of Cu(II). DNA ladder formation was observed at higher concentrations of aminoacetone than those causing DNA cleavage. Flow cytometry showed that aminoacetone enhanced the generation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in cultured cells. Aminoacetone caused damage to 32P-5'-end-labeled DNA fragments, obtained from the human c-Ha-ras-1 and p53 genes, at cytosine and thymine residues in the presence of Cu(II). Catalase and bathocuproine inhibited DNA damage, suggesting that H2O2 and Cu(I) were involved. Analysis of the products generated from aminoacetone revealed that aminoacetone underwent Cu(II)-mediated autoxidation in two different pathways: the major pathway in which methylglyoxal and NH+4 are generated and the minor pathway in which 2,5-dimethylpyrazine is formed through condensation of two molecules of aminoacetone. These findings suggest that H2O2 generated by the autoxidation of aminoacetone reacts with Cu(I) to form reactive species capable of causing oxidative DNA damage.

  14. Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage and Running Economy in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Assumpção, Cláudio de Oliveira; Lima, Leonardo Coelho Rabello; Oliveira, Felipe Bruno Dias; Greco, Camila Coelho; Denadai, Benedito Sérgio

    2013-01-01

    Running economy (RE), defined as the energy demand for a given velocity of submaximal running, has been identified as a critical factor of overall distance running performance. Plyometric and resistance trainings, performed during a relatively short period of time (~15–30 days), have been successfully used to improve RE in trained athletes. However, these exercise types, particularly when they are unaccustomed activities for the individuals, may cause delayed onset muscle soreness, swelling, and reduced muscle strength. Some studies have demonstrated that exercise-induced muscle damage has a negative impact on endurance running performance. Specifically, the muscular damage induced by an acute bout of downhill running has been shown to reduce RE during subsequent moderate and high-intensity exercise (>65% VO2max). However, strength exercise (i.e., jumps, isoinertial and isokinetic eccentric exercises) seems to impair RE only for subsequent high-intensity exercise (~90% VO2max). Finally, a single session of resistance exercise or downhill running (i.e., repeated bout effect) attenuates changes in indirect markers of muscle damage and blunts changes in RE. PMID:23431253

  15. Ion-induced electron production in tissue-like media and DNA damage mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surdutovich, E.; Obolensky, O. I.; Scifoni, E.; Pshenichnov, I.; Mishustin, I.; Solov'yov, A. V.; Greiner, W.

    2009-01-01

    This work is the first stage in the development of an inclusive approach to calculation of the DNA damage caused by irradiation of biological tissue by ion/proton beams. The project starts with an analysis of ionization caused by the projectiles and the characteristics of secondary electrons produced in tissue-like media. We consider interactions with the medium on a microscopic level and this allows us to obtain the energy spectrum and abundance of secondary electrons as functions of the projectile’s kinetic energy. The physical information obtained in this analysis is related to biological processes responsible for the DNA damage induced by the projectile. In particular, we consider double strand breaks of DNA caused by secondary electrons and free radicals, and local heating in the ion’s track. The heating may enhance the biological effectiveness of electron/free radical nteractions with the DNA and may even be considered as an independent mechanism of DNA damage. Numerical estimates are performed for the case of carbon-ion beams. The obtained dose-depth curves are compared with results of the MCHIT model based on the GEANT4 toolkit.

  16. Revision of laser-induced damage threshold evaluation from damage probability data

    SciTech Connect

    Bataviciute, Gintare; Grigas, Povilas; Smalakys, Linas; Melninkaitis, Andrius

    2013-04-15

    In this study, the applicability of commonly used Damage Frequency Method (DFM) is addressed in the context of Laser-Induced Damage Threshold (LIDT) testing with pulsed lasers. A simplified computer model representing the statistical interaction between laser irradiation and randomly distributed damage precursors is applied for Monte Carlo experiments. The reproducibility of LIDT predicted from DFM is examined under both idealized and realistic laser irradiation conditions by performing numerical 1-on-1 tests. A widely accepted linear fitting resulted in systematic errors when estimating LIDT and its error bars. For the same purpose, a Bayesian approach was proposed. A novel concept of parametric regression based on varying kernel and maximum likelihood fitting technique is introduced and studied. Such approach exhibited clear advantages over conventional linear fitting and led to more reproducible LIDT evaluation. Furthermore, LIDT error bars are obtained as a natural outcome of parametric fitting which exhibit realistic values. The proposed technique has been validated on two conventionally polished fused silica samples (355 nm, 5.7 ns).

  17. Fullerene derivatives protect endothelial cells against NO-induced damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, Fang; Li, Wei; Han, Dong; Qu, Ying; Liu, Ying; Zhao, Yuliang; Chen, Chunying

    2009-06-01

    Functional fullerene derivatives have been demonstrated with potent antioxidation properties. Nitric oxide (NO) is a free radical that plays a part in leading to brain damage when it is accumulated to a high concentration. The possible scavenging activity of NO by the hydroxylated fullerene derivative C60(OH)22 and malonic acid derivative C60(C(COOH)2)2 was investigated using primary rat brain cerebral microvessel endothelial cells (CMECs). Results demonstrate that sodium nitroprusside (SNP), used as an NO donor, caused a marked decrease in cell viability and an increase in apoptosis. However, fullerene derivatives can remarkably protect against the apoptosis induced by NO assault. In addition, fullerene derivatives can also prevent NO-induced depolymerization of cytoskeleton and damage of the nucleus and accelerate endothelial cell repair. Further investigation shows that the sudden increase of the intercellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by NO was significantly attenuated by post-treatment with fullerene derivatives. Our results suggest that functional fullerene derivatives are potential applications for NO-related disorders.

  18. Trophic Complexity and the Adaptive Value of Damage-Induced Plant Volatiles

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Indirect plant defenses are those facilitating the action of carnivores in ridding plants of their herbivorous consumers, as opposed to directly poisoning or repelling them. Of the numerous and diverse indirect defensive strategies employed by plants, inducible volatile production has garnered the most fascination among plant-insect ecologists. These volatile chemicals are emitted in response to feeding by herbivorous arthropods and serve to guide predators and parasitic wasps to their prey. Implicit in virtually all discussions of plant volatile-carnivore interactions is the premise that plants “call for help” to bodyguards that serve to boost plant fitness by limiting herbivore damage. This, by necessity, assumes a three-trophic level food chain where carnivores benefit plants, a theoretical framework that is conceptually tractable and convenient, but poorly depicts the complexity of food-web dynamics occurring in real communities. Recent work suggests that hyperparasitoids, top consumers acting from the fourth trophic level, exploit the same plant volatile cues used by third trophic level carnivores. Further, hyperparasitoids shift their foraging preferences, specifically cueing in to the odor profile of a plant being damaged by a parasitized herbivore that contains their host compared with damage from an unparasitized herbivore. If this outcome is broadly representative of plant-insect food webs at large, it suggests that damage-induced volatiles may not always be beneficial to plants with major implications for the evolution of anti-herbivore defense and manipulating plant traits to improve biological control in agricultural crops. PMID:23209381

  19. Trophic complexity and the adaptive value of damage-induced plant volatiles.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Indirect plant defenses are those facilitating the action of carnivores in ridding plants of their herbivorous consumers, as opposed to directly poisoning or repelling them. Of the numerous and diverse indirect defensive strategies employed by plants, inducible volatile production has garnered the most fascination among plant-insect ecologists. These volatile chemicals are emitted in response to feeding by herbivorous arthropods and serve to guide predators and parasitic wasps to their prey. Implicit in virtually all discussions of plant volatile-carnivore interactions is the premise that plants "call for help" to bodyguards that serve to boost plant fitness by limiting herbivore damage. This, by necessity, assumes a three-trophic level food chain where carnivores benefit plants, a theoretical framework that is conceptually tractable and convenient, but poorly depicts the complexity of food-web dynamics occurring in real communities. Recent work suggests that hyperparasitoids, top consumers acting from the fourth trophic level, exploit the same plant volatile cues used by third trophic level carnivores. Further, hyperparasitoids shift their foraging preferences, specifically cueing in to the odor profile of a plant being damaged by a parasitized herbivore that contains their host compared with damage from an unparasitized herbivore. If this outcome is broadly representative of plant-insect food webs at large, it suggests that damage-induced volatiles may not always be beneficial to plants with major implications for the evolution of anti-herbivore defense and manipulating plant traits to improve biological control in agricultural crops.

  20. Oxidative damage and neurodegeneration in manganese-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Milatovic, Dejan; Yu, Yingchun

    2009-10-15

    Exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) levels results in neurotoxicity to the extrapyramidal system and the development of Parkinson's disease (PD)-like movement disorder, referred to as manganism. Although the mechanisms by which Mn induces neuronal damage are not well defined, its neurotoxicity appears to be regulated by a number of factors, including oxidative injury, mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation. To investigate the mechanisms underlying Mn neurotoxicity, we studied the effects of Mn on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, changes in high-energy phosphates (HEP), neuroinflammation mediators and associated neuronal dysfunctions both in vitro and in vivo. Primary cortical neuronal cultures showed concentration-dependent alterations in biomarkers of oxidative damage, F{sub 2}-isoprostanes (F{sub 2}-IsoPs) and mitochondrial dysfunction (ATP), as early as 2 h following Mn exposure. Treatment of neurons with 500 {mu}M Mn also resulted in time-dependent increases in the levels of the inflammatory biomarker, prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}). In vivo analyses corroborated these findings, establishing that either a single or three (100 mg/kg, s.c.) Mn injections (days 1, 4 and 7) induced significant increases in F{sub 2}-IsoPs and PGE{sub 2} in adult mouse brain 24 h following the last injection. Quantitative morphometric analyses of Golgi-impregnated striatal sections from mice exposed to single or three Mn injections revealed progressive spine degeneration and dendritic damage of medium spiny neurons (MSNs). These findings suggest that oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation are underlying mechanisms in Mn-induced neurodegeneration.

  1. Oxidative damage and neurodegeneration in manganese-induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Milatovic, Dejan; Zaja-Milatovic, Snjezana; Gupta, Ramesh C.; Yu, Yingchun; Aschner, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) levels results in neurotoxicity to the extrapyramidal system and the development of Parkinson’s disease (PD)-like movement disorder, referred to as manganism. Although the mechanisms by which Mn induces neuronal damage are not well defined, its neurotoxicity appears to be regulated by a number of factors, including oxidative injury, mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation. To investigate the mechanisms underlying Mn neurotoxicity, we studied the effects of Mn on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, changes in high-energy phosphates (HEP), neuroinflammation mediators and associated neuronal dysfunctions both in vitro and in vivo. Primary cortical neuronal cultures showed concentration-dependent alterations in biomarkers of oxidative damage, F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs) and mitochondrial dysfunction (ATP), as early as 2 hours following Mn exposure. Treatment of neurons with 500 µM Mn also resulted in time-dependent increases in the levels of the inflammatory biomarker, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). In vivo analyses corroborated these findings, establishing that either a single or three (100 mg/kg, s.c.) Mn injections (days 1, 4 and 7) induced significant increases in F2-IsoPs and PGE2 in adult mouse brain 24 hours following the last injection. Quantitative morphometric analyses of Golgi-impregnated striatal sections from mice exposed to single or three Mn injections revealed progressive spine degeneration and dendritic damage of medium spiny neurons (MSNs). These findings suggest that oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation are underlying mechanisms in Mn-induced neurodegeneration. PMID:19607852

  2. Induction and repair of HZE induced cytogenetic damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, A. L.; Bao, S.; Rithidech, K.; Chrisler, W. B.; Couch, L. A.; Braby, L. A.

    2001-01-01

    Wistar rats were exposed to high-mass, high energy (HZE) 56Fe particles (1000 GeV/AMU) using the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). The animals were sacrificed at 1-5 hours or after a 30-day recovery period. The frequency of micronuclei in the tracheal and the deep lung epithelial cells were evaluated. The relative effectiveness of 56Fe, for the induction of initial chromosome damage in the form of micronuclei, was compared to damage produced in the same biological system exposed to other types of high and low-LET radiation. It was demonstrated that for animals sacrificed at short times after exposure, the tracheal and lung epithelial cells, the 56Fe particles were 3.3 and 1.3 times as effective as 60Co in production of micronuclei, respectively. The effectiveness was also compared to that for exposure to inhaled radon. With this comparison, the 56Fe exposure of the tracheal epithelial cells and the lung epithelial cells were only 0.18 and 0.20 times as effective as radon in the production of the initial cytogenetic damage. It was suggested that the low relative effectiveness was related to potential for 'wasted energy' from the core of the 56Fe particles. When the animals were sacrificed after 30 days, the slopes of the dose-response relationships, which reflect the remaining level of damage, decreased by a factor of 10 for both the tracheal and lung epithelial cells. In both cases, the slope of the dose-response lines were no longer significantly different from zero, and the r2 values were very high. Lung epithelial cells, isolated from the animals sacrificed hours after exposure, were maintained in culture, and the micronuclei frequency evaluated after 4 and 6 subcultures. These cells were harvested at 24 and 36 days after the exposure. There was no dose-response detected in these cultures and no signs of genomic instability at either sample time.

  3. Gender differences in alcohol-induced neurotoxicity and brain damage.

    PubMed

    Alfonso-Loeches, Silvia; Pascual, María; Guerri, Consuelo

    2013-09-01

    Considerable evidence has demonstrated that women are more vulnerable than men to the toxic effects of alcohol, although the results as to whether gender differences exist in ethanol-induced brain damage are contradictory. We have reported that ethanol, by activating the neuroimmune system and Toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4), can cause neuroinflammation and brain injury. However, whether there are gender differences in alcohol-induced neuroinflammation and brain injury are currently controversial. Using the brains of TLR4(+/+) and TLR4(-/-) (TLR4-KO) mice, we report that chronic ethanol treatment induces inflammatory mediators (iNOS and COX-2), cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α), gliosis processes, caspase-3 activation and neuronal loss in the cerebral cortex of both female and male mice. Conversely, the levels of these parameters tend to be higher in female than in male mice. Using an in vivo imaging technique, our results further evidence that ethanol treatment triggers higher GFAP levels and lower MAP-2 levels in female than in male mice, suggesting a greater effect of ethanol-induced astrogliosis and less MAP-2(+) neurons in female than in male mice. Our results further confirm the pivotal role of TLR4 in alcohol-induced neuroinflammation and brain damage since the elimination of TLR4 protects the brain of males and females against the deleterious effects of ethanol. In short, the present findings demonstrate that, during the same period of ethanol treatment, females are more vulnerable than males to the neurotoxic/neuroinflammatory effects of ethanol, thus supporting the view that women are more susceptible than men to the medical consequences of alcohol abuse.

  4. Proton induced radiation damage in fast crystal scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Zhang, Liyuan; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Kapustinsky, Jon; Nelson, Ron; Wang, Zhehui

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports proton induced radiation damage in fast crystal scintillators. A 20 cm long LYSO crystal, a 15 cm long CeF3 crystal and four liquid scintillator based sealed quartz capillaries were irradiated by 800 MeV protons at Los Alamos up to 3.3 ×1014 p /cm2. Four 1.5 mm thick LYSO plates were irradiated by 24 GeV protons at CERN up to 6.9 ×1015 p /cm2. The results show an excellent radiation hardness of LYSO crystals against charged hadrons.

  5. Protective Effect of Acacia nilotica (L.) against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatocellular Damage in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Narayanan; Sakthivel, Kunnathur Murugesan; Guruvayoorappan, Chandrasekaran

    2013-01-01

    The potential biological functions of A. nilotica have long been described in traditional system of medicine. However, the protective effect of A. nilotica on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity is still unknown. The present study attempted to investigate the protective effect of A. nilotica against acetaminophen-induced hepatic damage in Wistar rats. The biochemical liver functional tests Alanine transaminase (ALT), Aspartate transaminase (AST), Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), total bilirubin, total protein, oxidative stress test (Lipid peroxidation), antioxidant parameter glutathione (GSH), and histopathological changes were examined. Our results show that the pretreatment with A. nilotica (250 mg/kg·bw) orally revealed attenuation of serum activities of ALT, AST, ALP, liver weight, and total bilirubin levels that were enhanced by administration of acetaminophen. Further, pretreatment with extract elevated the total protein and GSH level and decreased the level of LPO. Histopathological analysis confirmed the alleviation of liver damage and reduced lesions caused by acetaminophen. The present study undoubtedly provides a proof that hepatoprotective action of A. nilotica extract may rely on its effect on reducing the oxidative stress in acetaminophen-induced hepatic damage in rat model. PMID:23864853

  6. Dietary nickel chloride induces oxidative intestinal damage in broilers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bangyuan; Cui, Hengmin; Peng, Xi; Fang, Jing; Zuo, Zhicai; Deng, Junliang; Huang, Jianying

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the oxidative damage induced by dietary nickel chloride (NiCl2) in the intestinal mucosa of different parts of the intestine of broilers, including duodenum, jejunum and ileum. A total of 240 one-day-old broilers were divided into four groups and fed on a corn-soybean basal diet as control diet or the same basal diet supplemented with 300, 600 or 900 mg/kg NiCl2 during a 42-day experimental period. The results showed that the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and the ability to inhibit hydroxy radical and glutathione (GSH) content were significantly (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01) decreased in the 300, 600 and 900 mg/kg groups in comparison with those of the control group. In contrast, malondialdehyde (MDA) content was significantly (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01) higher in the 300, 600 and 900 mg/kg groups than that in the control group. It was concluded that dietary NiCl2 in excess of 300 mg/kg could cause oxidative damage in the intestinal mucosa in broilers, which finally impaired the intestinal functions including absorptive function and mucosal immune function. The oxidative damage might be a main mechanism on the effects of NiCl2 on the intestinal health of broilers. PMID:23702803

  7. Radiation induced oxidative damage modification by cholesterol in liposomal membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, B. N.; Mishra, K. P.

    1999-05-01

    Ionizing radiation induced structural and chemical alterations in egg lecithin liposomal membrane have been studied by measurements of lipid peroxides, conjugated diene and fluorescence polarization. Predominantly unilamellar phospholipid vesicles prepared by sonication procedure were subjected to radiation doses of γ-rays from Co-60 in aerated, buffered aqueous suspensions. The oxidative damage in irradiated lipid molecules of liposomes has been determined spectrophotometrically by diene conjugate formation and thiobarbituric acid reactive (TBAR) method as a function of radiation dose. A correlation was found between the radiation dose applied (0.1-1 kGy) and the consequent lipid oxidation. The damage produced in irradiated liposomal membrane was measured by 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) fluorescence decay and polarization. The observed decrease in DPH fluorescence and increase in polarization was found dependent on the radiation dose suggesting alterations in rigidity or organizational order in phospholipid bilayer after irradiation. Furthermore, irradiated liposome vesicles composed of cholesterol showed marked reduction in observed radiation mediated peroxide formation and significantly affected the DPH fluorescence parameters. The magnitude of these modifying effects were found dependent on the mole fraction of cholesterol. It is concluded that modulation of structural order in unilamellar vesicle membrane by variations in basic molecular components controlled the magnitude of lipid peroxidation and diene conjugate formation. These observations contribute to our understanding of mechanism of radical reaction mediated damage caused by ionizing radiation in phospholipid membrane.

  8. Photodynamic therapy induced vascular damage: an overview of experimental PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Moriyama, L. T.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2013-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been developed as one of the most important therapeutic options in the treatment of cancer and other diseases. By resorting to the photosensitizer and light, which convert oxygen into cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS), PDT will induce vascular damage and direct tumor cell killing. Another consequence of PDT is the microvascular stasis, which results in hypoxia and further produces tumor regression. To improve the treatment with PDT, three promising strategies are currently attracting much interest: (1) the combination of PDT and anti-angiogenesis agents, which more effectively prevent the proliferation of endothelial cells and the formation of new blood vessels; (2) the nanoparticle-assisted delivery of photosensitizer, which makes the photosensitizer more localized in tumor sites and thus renders minimal damage to the normal tissues; (3) the application of intravascular PDT, which can avoid the loss of energy during the transmission and expose the target area directly. Here we aim to review the important findings on vascular damage by PDT on mice. The combination of PDT with other approaches as well as its effect on cancer photomedicine are also reviewed.

  9. Differential genomic damage in different tumor lines induced by prodigiosin.

    PubMed

    Lins, Jeanne Cristina Lapenda; DE Melo, Maria Eliane Bezerra; DO Nascimento, Silene Carneiro; Adam, Monica Lucia

    2015-06-01

    Prodigiosin is a secondary metabolite produced by Serratia marcercens. As this pigment is suggested to be a cancer drug, genotoxicity studies are necessary. The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the genotoxic effects of prodigiosin on tumoral and normal cell lines, NCIH-292, MCF-7 and HL-60. A normal line BGMK was used as control. Genomic damage induced by prodigiosin was observed in all tumor lines as well as the control line. The pigment induced the formation of micronuclei in tumor cells. The present data confirm the antitumor potential of prodigiosin. However, these findings also raise concerns regarding its target-specific action, as genotoxic effects on normal cells also occurred.

  10. Damage-free vibrational spectroscopy of biological materials in the electron microscope

    PubMed Central

    Rez, Peter; Aoki, Toshihiro; March, Katia; Gur, Dvir; Krivanek, Ondrej L.; Dellby, Niklas; Lovejoy, Tracy C.; Wolf, Sharon G.; Cohen, Hagai

    2016-01-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy in the electron microscope would be transformative in the study of biological samples, provided that radiation damage could be prevented. However, electron beams typically create high-energy excitations that severely accelerate sample degradation. Here this major difficulty is overcome using an ‘aloof' electron beam, positioned tens of nanometres away from the sample: high-energy excitations are suppressed, while vibrational modes of energies <1 eV can be ‘safely' investigated. To demonstrate the potential of aloof spectroscopy, we record electron energy loss spectra from biogenic guanine crystals in their native state, resolving their characteristic C–H, N–H and C=O vibrational signatures with no observable radiation damage. The technique opens up the possibility of non-damaging compositional analyses of organic functional groups, including non-crystalline biological materials, at a spatial resolution of ∼10 nm, simultaneously combined with imaging in the electron microscope. PMID:26961578

  11. Anchor-induced chondral damage in the hip

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Dean K.; Bharam, Srino; White, Brian J.; Matsuda, Nicole A.; Safran, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the outcomes from anchor-induced chondral damage of the hip, both with and without frank chondral penetration. A multicenter retrospective case series was performed of patients with chondral deformation or penetration during initial hip arthroscopic surgery. Intra-operative findings, post-surgical clinical courses, hip outcome scores and descriptions of arthroscopic treatment in cases requiring revision surgery and anchor removal are reported. Five patients (three females) of mean age 32 years (range, 16–41 years) had documented anchor-induced chondral damage with mean 3.5 years (range, 1.5–6.0 years) follow-up. The 1 o'clock position (four cases) and anterior and mid-anterior portals (two cases each) were most commonly implicated. Two cases of anchor-induced acetabular chondral deformation without frank penetration had successful clinical and radiographic outcomes, while one case progressed from deformation to chondral penetration with clinical worsening. Of the cases that underwent revision hip arthroscopy, all three had confirmed exposed hard anchors which were removed. Two patients have had clinical improvement and one patient underwent early total hip arthroplasty. Anchor-induced chondral deformation without frank chondral penetration may be treated with close clinical and radiographic monitoring with a low threshold for revision surgery and anchor removal. Chondral penetration should be treated with immediate removal of offending hard anchor implants. Preventative measures include distal-based portals, small diameter and short anchors, removable hard anchors, soft suture-based anchors, curved drill and anchor insertion instrumentation and attention to safe trajectories while visualizing the acetabular articular surface. PMID:27011815

  12. Anchor-induced chondral damage in the hip.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Dean K; Bharam, Srino; White, Brian J; Matsuda, Nicole A; Safran, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the outcomes from anchor-induced chondral damage of the hip, both with and without frank chondral penetration. A multicenter retrospective case series was performed of patients with chondral deformation or penetration during initial hip arthroscopic surgery. Intra-operative findings, post-surgical clinical courses, hip outcome scores and descriptions of arthroscopic treatment in cases requiring revision surgery and anchor removal are reported. Five patients (three females) of mean age 32 years (range, 16-41 years) had documented anchor-induced chondral damage with mean 3.5 years (range, 1.5-6.0 years) follow-up. The 1 o'clock position (four cases) and anterior and mid-anterior portals (two cases each) were most commonly implicated. Two cases of anchor-induced acetabular chondral deformation without frank penetration had successful clinical and radiographic outcomes, while one case progressed from deformation to chondral penetration with clinical worsening. Of the cases that underwent revision hip arthroscopy, all three had confirmed exposed hard anchors which were removed. Two patients have had clinical improvement and one patient underwent early total hip arthroplasty. Anchor-induced chondral deformation without frank chondral penetration may be treated with close clinical and radiographic monitoring with a low threshold for revision surgery and anchor removal. Chondral penetration should be treated with immediate removal of offending hard anchor implants. Preventative measures include distal-based portals, small diameter and short anchors, removable hard anchors, soft suture-based anchors, curved drill and anchor insertion instrumentation and attention to safe trajectories while visualizing the acetabular articular surface.

  13. Laser induced damage in optical materials: tenth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1979-07-01

    The tenth annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 12-14 September 1978. The symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Department of Energy, and the Office of Naval Research. About 175 scientists attended, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Japan, West Germany, and the Soviet Union. The symposium was divided into sessions concerning the measurement of absorption characteristics, bulk material properties, mirrors and surfaces, thin film damage, coating materials and design, and breakdown phenomena. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for use from 10.6 microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength was also discussed. In commemoration of the tenth symposium in this series, a number of comprehensive review papers were presented to assess the state of the art in various facets of laser induced damage in optical materials. Alexander J. Glass of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory were co-chairpersons. The eleventh annual symposium is scheduled for 30-31 October 1979 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado.

  14. Biological effects of pyrroloquinoline quinone on liver damage in Bmi-1 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, YUANQING; CHEN, NING; MIAO, DENGSHUN

    2015-01-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) has been demonstrated to function as an antioxidant by scavenging free radicals and subsequently protecting the mitochondria from oxidative stress-induced damage. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether PQQ is able to rescue premature senescence in the liver, induced by the deletion of B cell-specific Moloney MLV insertion site-1 (Bmi-1), by inhibiting oxidative stress. In vivo, the mice were allocated into three groups that underwent the following treatment protocols. WT mice received a normal diet, while BKO mice also received a normal diet. An additional group of BKO mice were fed a PQQ-supplemented diet (BKO + PQQ; 4 mg PQQ/kg in the normal diet). The results indicated that PQQ partially rescued the liver damage induced by the deletion of Bmi-1. PQQ was demonstrated to exhibit these therapeutic effects on liver damage through multiple aspects, including the promotion of proliferation, antiapoptotic effects, the inhibition of senescence, the upregulation of antioxidant ability, the downregulation of cell cycle protein expression, the scavenging of reactive oxygen species and the reduction of DNA damage. The results of these experiments indicated that treatment of BKO mice with a moderate dose of PQQ significantly protected the liver from deleterious effects by inhibiting oxidative stress and participating in DNA damage repair. Therefore, PQQ has great potential as a therapeutic agent against oxidative stress during liver damage. PMID:26622336

  15. Oxidative stress and DNA damage in broad bean (Vicia faba L.) seedlings induced by thallium.

    PubMed

    Radić, Sandra; Cvjetko, Petra; Glavas, Katarina; Roje, Vibor; Pevalek-Kozlina, Branka; Pavlica, Mirjana

    2009-01-01

    Thallium (Tl) is a metal of great toxicological concern because it is highly toxic to all living organisms through mechanisms that are yet poorly understood. Since Tl is accumulated by important crops, the present study aimed to analyze the biological effects induced by bioaccumulation of Tl in broad bean (Vicia faba L.) as well as the plant's antioxidative defense mechanisms usually activated by heavy metals. Thallium toxicity was related to production of reactive oxygen species in leaves and roots of broad bean seedlings following short-term (72 h) exposure to thallium (I) acetate (0, 0.5, 1, 5, and 10 mg/L) by evaluating DNA damage and oxidative stress parameters as well as antioxidative response. The possible antagonistic effect of potassium (K) was tested by combined treatment with 5 mg/L of Tl (Tl+) and 10 mg/L of potassium (K+) acetate. Accumulation of Tl+ in roots was 50 to 250 times higher than in broad bean shoots and was accompanied by increase in dry weight and proline. Despite responsive antioxidative defense (increased activities of superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, and pyrogallol peroxidase), Tl+ caused oxidative damage to lipids and proteins as evaluated by malondialdehyde and carbonyl group levels, and induced DNA strand breaks. Combined treatment caused no oxidative alternations to lipids and proteins though it induced DNA damage. The difference in Tl-induced genotoxicity following both acellular and cellular exposure implies indirect DNA damage. Results obtained indicate that oxidative stress is involved in the mechanism of Tl toxicity and that the tolerance of broad bean to Tl is achieved, at least in part, through the increased activity of antioxidant enzymes.

  16. Cellular track model of biological damage to mammalian cell cultures from galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Katz, Robert; Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Nealy, John E.; Shinn, Judy L.

    1991-01-01

    The assessment of biological damage from the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) is a current interest for exploratory class space missions where the highly ionizing, high-energy, high-charge ions (HZE) particles are the major concern. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values determined by ground-based experiments with HZE particles are well described by a parametric track theory of cell inactivation. Using the track model and a deterministic GCR transport code, the biological damage to mammalian cell cultures is considered for 1 year in free space at solar minimum for typical spacecraft shielding. Included are the effects of projectile and target fragmentation. The RBE values for the GCR spectrum which are fluence-dependent in the track model are found to be more severe than the quality factors identified by the International Commission on Radiological Protection publication 26 and seem to obey a simple scaling law with the duration period in free space.

  17. Alpha particle induced DNA damage and repair in normal cultured thyrocytes of different proliferation status.

    PubMed

    Lyckesvärd, Madeleine Nordén; Delle, Ulla; Kahu, Helena; Lindegren, Sture; Jensen, Holger; Bäck, Tom; Swanpalmer, John; Elmroth, Kecke

    2014-07-01

    Childhood exposure to ionizing radiation increases the risk of developing thyroid cancer later in life and this is suggested to be due to higher proliferation of the young thyroid. The interest of using high-LET alpha particles from Astatine-211 ((211)At), concentrated in the thyroid by the same mechanism as (131)I [1], in cancer treatment has increased during recent years because of its high efficiency in inducing biological damage and beneficial dose distribution when compared to low-LET radiation. Most knowledge of the DNA damage response in thyroid is from studies using low-LET irradiation and much less is known of high-LET irradiation. In this paper we investigated the DNA damage response and biological consequences to photons from Cobolt-60 ((60)Co) and alpha particles from (211)At in normal primary thyrocytes of different cell cycle status. For both radiation qualities the intensity levels of γH2AX decreased during the first 24h in both cycling and stationary cultures and complete repair was seen in all cultures but cycling cells exposed to (211)At. Compared to stationary cells alpha particles were more harmful for cycling cultures, an effect also seen at the pChk2 levels. Increasing ratios of micronuclei per cell nuclei were seen up to 1Gy (211)At. We found that primary thyrocytes were much more sensitive to alpha particle exposure compared with low-LET photons. Calculations of the relative biological effectiveness yielded higher RBE for cycling cells compared with stationary cultures at a modest level of damage, clearly demonstrating that cell cycle status influences the relative effectiveness of alpha particles. PMID:24769180

  18. Alpha particle induced DNA damage and repair in normal cultured thyrocytes of different proliferation status.

    PubMed

    Lyckesvärd, Madeleine Nordén; Delle, Ulla; Kahu, Helena; Lindegren, Sture; Jensen, Holger; Bäck, Tom; Swanpalmer, John; Elmroth, Kecke

    2014-07-01

    Childhood exposure to ionizing radiation increases the risk of developing thyroid cancer later in life and this is suggested to be due to higher proliferation of the young thyroid. The interest of using high-LET alpha particles from Astatine-211 ((211)At), concentrated in the thyroid by the same mechanism as (131)I [1], in cancer treatment has increased during recent years because of its high efficiency in inducing biological damage and beneficial dose distribution when compared to low-LET radiation. Most knowledge of the DNA damage response in thyroid is from studies using low-LET irradiation and much less is known of high-LET irradiation. In this paper we investigated the DNA damage response and biological consequences to photons from Cobolt-60 ((60)Co) and alpha particles from (211)At in normal primary thyrocytes of different cell cycle status. For both radiation qualities the intensity levels of γH2AX decreased during the first 24h in both cycling and stationary cultures and complete repair was seen in all cultures but cycling cells exposed to (211)At. Compared to stationary cells alpha particles were more harmful for cycling cultures, an effect also seen at the pChk2 levels. Increasing ratios of micronuclei per cell nuclei were seen up to 1Gy (211)At. We found that primary thyrocytes were much more sensitive to alpha particle exposure compared with low-LET photons. Calculations of the relative biological effectiveness yielded higher RBE for cycling cells compared with stationary cultures at a modest level of damage, clearly demonstrating that cell cycle status influences the relative effectiveness of alpha particles.

  19. Integration of Principles of Systems Biology and Radiation Biology: Toward Development of in silico Models to Optimize IUdR-Mediated Radiosensitization of DNA Mismatch Repair Deficient (Damage Tolerant) Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kinsella, Timothy J.; Gurkan-Cavusoglu, Evren; Du, Weinan; Loparo, Kenneth A.

    2011-01-01

    Over the last 7 years, we have focused our experimental and computational research efforts on improving our understanding of the biochemical, molecular, and cellular processing of iododeoxyuridine (IUdR) and ionizing radiation (IR) induced DNA base damage by DNA mismatch repair (MMR). These coordinated research efforts, sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Integrative Cancer Biology Program (ICBP), brought together system scientists with expertise in engineering, mathematics, and complex systems theory and translational cancer researchers with expertise in radiation biology. Our overall goal was to begin to develop computational models of IUdR- and/or IR-induced base damage processing by MMR that may provide new clinical strategies to optimize IUdR-mediated radiosensitization in MMR deficient (MMR−) “damage tolerant” human cancers. Using multiple scales of experimental testing, ranging from purified protein systems to in vitro (cellular) and to in vivo (human tumor xenografts in athymic mice) models, we have begun to integrate and interpolate these experimental data with hybrid stochastic biochemical models of MMR damage processing and probabilistic cell cycle regulation models through a systems biology approach. In this article, we highlight the results and current status of our integration of radiation biology approaches and computational modeling to enhance IUdR-mediated radiosensitization in MMR− damage tolerant cancers. PMID:22649757

  20. Quantitative Analysis of Clustered DNA Damages Induced by Silicon Beams of Different Kinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Keszenman D. J.; Keszenman, D.J.; Bennett, P.V.; Sutherland, B.M.; Wilson, P.F.

    2013-05-14

    Humans may b exposed to highly energetic charged particle radiation as a result of medical treatments, occupational activitie or accidental events. In recent years, our increasing presence and burgeoning interest in space exploration beyond low Earth orbit has led to a large increase in the research of the biological effects ofcharged particle radiation typical of that encountered in the space radiation environment. The study of the effects of these types of radiation qualities in terms ofDNA damage induction and repair is fundamental to understand mechanisms both underlying their greater biological effectiveness as we)) as the short and long term risks of health effects such as carcinogenesis, degen rative diseases and premature aging. Charged particle radiation induces a variety of DNA alterations, notably bistranded clustered damages, defined as two or more closely-opposed strand break , oxidized bases or abasic sites within a few helical turns. The induction of such highly complex DNA damage enhances the probability of incorrect or incomplete repair and thus constitutes greater potential for genomic instability, cell death and transformation.

  1. Damages of Biological Components in Bacteria and Bacteriophages Exposed to Atmospheric Non-thermal Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Akira; Yasuda, Hachiro

    Mechanism of inactivation of bio-particles exposed to dielectric barrier discharge, DBD, has been studied using E. coli and bacteriophages. States of different biological components were monitored during the course of inactivation. Analysis of green fluorescent protein, GFP, introduced into E.coli cells proved that Non-thermal Plasma, NTP causes a prominent protein damages without cutting peptide bonds. We have developed a biological assay which evaluates in vitro DNA damage of the bacteriophages. Bacteriophage λ having double stranded DNA was exposed to DBD, then DNA was purified and subjected to in vitro DNA packaging reactions. The re-packaged phages consist of the DNA from discharged phages and brand-new coat proteins. Survival curves of the re-packaged phages showed extremely large D value (D = 25 s) compared to the previous D value (D = 3 s) from the discharged phages. The results indicate that DNA damage hardly contributed to the inactivation, and the damage in coat proteins is responsible for inactivation of the phages. M13 phages having single stranded DNA were also examined with the same manner. In this case, damage to DNA was as severe as that of the coat proteins.

  2. DNA damage-induced translocation of S100A11 into the nucleus regulates cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Proteins are able to react in response to distinct stress stimuli by alteration of their subcellular distribution. The stress-responsive protein S100A11 belongs to the family of multifunctional S100 proteins which have been implicated in several key biological processes. Previously, we have shown that S100A11 is directly involved in DNA repair processes at damaged chromatin in the nucleus. To gain further insight into the underlying mechanism subcellular trafficking of S100A11 in response to DNA damage was analyzed. Results We show that DNA damage induces a nucleolin-mediated translocation of S100A11 from the cytoplasm into the nucleus. This translocation is impeded by inhibition of the phosphorylation activity of PKCα. Translocation of S100A11 into the nucleus correlates with an increased cellular p21 protein level. Depletion of nucleolin by siRNA severely impairs translocation of S100A11 into the nucleus resulting in a decreased p21 protein level. Additionally, cells lacking nucleolin showed a reduced colony forming capacity. Conclusions These observations suggest that regulation of the subcellular distribution of S100A11 plays an important role in the DNA damage response and p21-mediated cell cycle control. PMID:21167017

  3. Relative biological damage and electron fluence in and out of a 6 MV photon field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syme, A.; Kirkby, C.; Mirzayans, R.; Mac Kenzie, M.; Field, C.; Fallone, B. G.

    2009-11-01

    Scattered radiation in the penumbra of a megavoltage radiation therapy beam can deposit a non-negligible dose in the healthy tissue around a target volume. The lower energy of the radiation in this region suggests that its biological effectiveness might not be the same as that of the open beam. In this work, we determined the relative biological damage in normal human fibroblasts after megavoltage irradiation in two geometries. The first was an open-beam irradiation and the second was a blocked configuration in which only scattered radiation could reach the target cells. The biological damage was evaluated by the γ-H2AX immunofluorescence assay, which is capable of detecting DNA double-strand breaks in individual cells. We report that the scattered radiation is more effective at producing biological damage than the open beam radiation. We found a 27% enhancement in the net mean nuclear γ-H2AX fluorescence intensity at 2 Gy and a 48% enhancement at 4 Gy. These findings are of interest due to the increased doses of penumbral radiation close to target volumes both in dose escalation studies and in IMRT treatment deliveries where high dose gradients exist for the purpose of conformal avoidance of healthy tissues.

  4. Nicotine induces DNA damage in human salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Ginzkey, Christian; Kampfinger, Katja; Friehs, Gudrun; Köhler, Christian; Hagen, Rudolf; Richter, Elmar; Kleinsasser, Norbert H

    2009-01-10

    The tobacco alkaloid nicotine is responsible for addiction to tobacco and supposed to contribute to tobacco carcinogensis, too. Recently, genotoxic effects of nicotine have been reported in human cells from blood and upper aerodigestive tract. Because of nicotine accumulation in saliva, the study of possible in vitro genotoxic effects of nicotine have been extended to human salivary gland cells. Specimens of parotid glands of 10 tumor patients were obtained from tumor-free tissue. Single cells were prepared by enzymatic digestion immediately after surgery and exposed for 1h to 0.125-4.0mM of nicotine. Possible genotoxic effects were determined by the Comet assay using the % DNA in tail (DT) as a reliable indicator of DNA damage. Nicotine induced a significant dose-dependent increase of DNA migration in parotid gland single-cells. The mean DT was 1.12-fold (0.125mM) to 2.24-fold (4.0mM) higher compared to control. The lowest concentration eliciting significant DNA damage within 1h, 0.25mM nicotine, is only 10-fold higher than maximal concentrations of nicotine reported in saliva after unrestricted smoking. Although conclusive evidence for a carcinogenic potential of nicotine is still lacking, the safety of long-term nicotine replacement therapy should be carefully monitored. PMID:18852035

  5. Ebselen attenuates cadmium-induced testicular damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Ardais, Ana P; Santos, Francielli W; Nogueira, Cristina W

    2008-04-01

    This study was designed to examine if ebselen, an organoselenium compound with antioxidant and glutathione peroxidase-mimetic properties, attenuates testicular injury caused by intraperitoneal administration of CdCl(2). A number of toxicological parameters were evaluated in the testes of mice, such as delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (delta-ALA-D) activity, lipid peroxidation, ascorbic acid levels and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities. Ebselen attenuated lipid peroxidation levels altered by CdCl(2). delta-ALA-D activity inhibited by the highest dose of CdCl(2) was attenuated by ebselen. A significant negative correlation between lipid peroxidation levels and delta-ALA-D activity was observed. Ebselen restored ascorbic acid levels reduced by CdCl(2). A significant negative correlation between ascorbic acid levels and delta-ALA-D activity reinforces the idea that ebselen attenuated the damage induced by CdCl(2) via its antioxidant property. The significant correlation between ALT and delta-ALA-D activity supports the assumption that ebselen prevented damage caused by CdCl(2). The results show that ebselen attenuated oxidative stress, a process important for CdCl(2) toxicity. PMID:17624921

  6. Liposomal Antioxidants for Protection against Oxidant-Induced Damage

    PubMed Central

    Suntres, Zacharias E.

    2011-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), including superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radical, can be formed as normal products of aerobic metabolism and can be produced at elevated rates under pathophysiological conditions. Overproduction and/or insufficient removal of ROS result in significant damage to cell structure and functions. In vitro studies showed that antioxidants, when applied directly and at relatively high concentrations to cellular systems, are effective in conferring protection against the damaging actions of ROS, but results from animal and human studies showed that several antioxidants provide only modest benefit and even possible harm. Antioxidants have yet to be rendered into reliable and safe therapies because of their poor solubility, inability to cross membrane barriers, extensive first-pass metabolism, and rapid clearance from cells. There is considerable interest towards the development of drug-delivery systems that would result in the selective delivery of antioxidants to tissues in sufficient concentrations to ameliorate oxidant-induced tissue injuries. Liposomes are biocompatible, biodegradable, and nontoxic artificial phospholipid vesicles that offer the possibility of carrying hydrophilic, hydrophobic, and amphiphilic molecules. This paper focus on the use of liposomes for the delivery of antioxidants in the prevention or treatment of pathological conditions related to oxidative stress. PMID:21876690

  7. Investigation of plasma etch induced damage in compound semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Shul, R.J.; Lovejoy, M.L.; Hetherington, D.L.; Rieger, D.J.; Vawter, G.A.; Klem, J.F.; Melloch, M.R.

    1993-11-01

    We have investigated the electrical performance of mesa-isolated GaAs pn-junction diodes to determine the plasma-induced damage effects from reactive ion and reactive ion beam etching. A variety of plasma chemistries (SiCl{sub 4}, BCl{sub 3}, BCl{sub 3}/Cl{sub 2}, and Cl{sub 2}) and ion energies ranging from 100 to 400 eV were studied. We have observed that many of the RIE BCl{sub 3}/Cl{sub 2} plasmas and RIBE Cl{sub 2} plasmas yield diodes with low reverse-bias currents that are comparable to the electrical characteristics of wet-chemical-etched devices. The reverse-bias leakage currents are independent of surface morphology and sidewall profiles.

  8. Laser-induced damage thresholds of starched PMMA waveplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melninkaitis, A.; Mikšys, D.; Maciulevičius, M.; Sirutkaitis, V.; Šlekys, G.; Samoylov, A. V.

    2007-01-01

    Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) is a versatile polymeric material that is well suited for fabrication of many commercial optical components: lenses, fibers, windows, phase waveplates and others. Our focus is achromatic zero-order waveplates made of anisotropic PMMA which can be used to modify the state of polarization of electromagnetic radiation. Such waveplates have a broad range of application in devices where polarized radiation is used. For example, when tunable lasers are used or when spectropolarimetric measurements are performed, one needs an achromatic waveplate providing a specific retardation in a wide wavelength range. Herewith anisotropic properties of PMMA subjected to one-axis stretching are analyzed and the technology for manufacturing such achromatic and super-achromatic, one-axis-stretched PMMA waveplates is described. This technology excludes any mechanical processing of waveplate component surfaces. Technical characteristics of achromatic and super-achromatic waveplates manufactured of PMMA including results of laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) measurements are discussed below.

  9. Recovery of absolute threshold with UVA-induced retinal damage

    SciTech Connect

    Henton, W.W.; Sykes, S.M.

    1984-06-01

    A within-trial psychophysical procedure tracked the initial loss and subsequent recovery of visual thresholds in albino rats exposed to ultraviolet light at 350 nanometers and 0.4 milliwatts per square centimeter. Absolute thresholds increased up to 5 log units immediately following the 15 hour ultraviolet exposure, with a daily recovery of 1-2 log to asymptotic thresholds over a 7-day post-exposure period. The corresponding retinal damage on Day 1 included extensive vesiculation of the photoreceptor outer segments, vacuolation of the inner segments, and pyknosis of cell nuclei. The total number of photoreceptor nuclei and outer segments was unchanged relative to control eyes through post-exposure Day 3. Both nuclei and outer segment counts then consistently decreased 15-20 percent between Days 3-7. The two-stage loss of photoreceptors but daily recovery of absolute thresholds again suggests a significant dissociation of retinal structure and psychophysical function in light-induced ocular pathology.

  10. Role of Oxidative Damage in Radiation-Induced Bone Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Alwood, Joshua S.; Limoli, Charles L.; Globus, Ruth K.

    2014-01-01

    used an array of countermeasures (Antioxidant diets and injections) to prevent the radiation-induced bone loss, although these did not prevent bone loss, analysis is ongoing to determine if these countermeasure protected radiation-induced damage to other tissues.

  11. Oxidant conditioning protects cartilage from mechanically induced damage.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Prem; Hecht, Benjamin A; Pedersen, Douglas R; Lavery, Matthew R; Maynard, Jerry; Buckwalter, Joseph A; Martin, James A

    2010-07-01

    Articular cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritis has been linked to abnormal mechanical stresses that are known to cause chondrocyte apoptosis and metabolic derangement in in vitro models. Evidence implicating oxidative damage as the immediate cause of these harmful effects suggests that the antioxidant defenses of chondrocytes might influence their tolerance for mechanical injury. Based on evidence that antioxidant defenses in many cell types are stimulated by moderate oxidant exposure, we hypothesized that oxidant preconditioning would reduce acute chondrocyte death and proteoglycan depletion in cartilage explants after exposure to abnormal mechanical stresses. Porcine cartilage explants were treated every 48 h with tert-butyl hydrogen peroxide (tBHP) at nonlethal concentrations (25, 100, 250, and 500 microM) for a varying number of times (one, two, or four) prior to a bout of unconfined axial compression (5 MPa, 1 Hz, 1800 cycles). When compared with untreated controls, tBHP had significant positive effects on post-compression viability, lactate production, and proteoglycan losses. Overall, the most effective regime was 100 microM tBHP applied four times. RNA analysis revealed significant effects of 100 microM tBHP on gene expression. Catalase, hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha), and glyceraldehyde 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) were significantly increased relative to untreated controls in explants treated four times with 100 microM tBHP, a regime that also resulted in a significant decrease in matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) expression. These findings demonstrate that repeated exposure of cartilage to sublethal concentrations of peroxide can moderate the acute effects of mechanical stress, a conclusion supported by evidence of peroxide-induced changes in gene expression that could render chondrocytes more resistant to oxidative damage. PMID:20058262

  12. Differential effects of NF-kappaB on apoptosis induced by DNA-damaging agents: the type of DNA damage determines the final outcome.

    PubMed

    Strozyk, E; Pöppelmann, B; Schwarz, T; Kulms, D

    2006-10-12

    The transcription factor nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-kappaB) is generally regarded as an antiapoptotic factor. Accordingly, NF-kappaB activation inhibits death ligand-induced apoptosis. In contrast, ultraviolet light B (UVB)-induced apoptosis is not inhibited but even enhanced upon NF-kappaB activation by interleukin-1 (IL-1). This study was performed to identify the molecular mechanisms underlying this switch of NF-kappaB. Enhancement of UVB-induced apoptosis was always associated with increased release of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), which was dependent on NF-kappaB activation. The same was observed when UVA and cisplatin were used, which like UVB induce base modifications. In contrast, apoptosis caused by DNA strand breaks was not enhanced by IL-1, indicating that the type of DNA damage is critical for switching the effect of NF-kappaB on apoptosis. Surprisingly, activated NF-kappaB induced TNF-alpha mRNA expression in the presence of all DNA damage-inducing agents. However, in the presence of DNA strand breaks, there was no release of the TNF-alpha protein, which is so crucial for enhancing apoptosis. Together, this indicates that induction of DNA damage may have a significant impact on biological effects but it is the type of DNA damage that determines the final outcome. This may have implications for the role of NF-kappaB in carcinogenesis and for the application of NF-kappaB inhibitors in anticancer therapy.

  13. Depth position recognition-related laser-induced damage test method based on initial transient damage features.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bin; Lu, Menglei; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Li; Jiao, Hongfei; Cheng, Xinbin; Wang, Zhanshan

    2016-08-01

    Even absorptive defects or inner cracks hiding several micrometers to a few dozen micrometers beneath the top surface can induce damage to transmission elements in the ultraviolet band. The extremely small size and disordered state of such defects or cracks hinder their detection using conventional methods. Therefore, the diagnosis of factors that limit damage resistance performance is a key technique for improving the fabrication technology of optical elements. With a focus on laser damage to third-harmonic transmission elements, this study establishes a micron space-resolved and nanosecond time-resolved imaging system on the basis of the pump-probe detection technique. The changes in the properties of defect-induced laser damage in the time domain are clarified. A diagnostic method for original damage depth in micron precision is proposed according to damage behaviors. This method can retrieve initial information on damage inducement and depth position. The recognition and diagnostic capabilities of such a technique are calibrated with artificial samples and then used to analyze real samples. PMID:27505738

  14. Shortwave UV-induced damage as part of the solar damage spectrum is not a major contributor to mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Gebhard, Daniel; Matt, Katja; Burger, Katharina; Bergemann, Jörg

    2014-06-01

    Because of the absence of a nucleotide excision repair in mitochondria, ultraviolet (UV)-induced bulky mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lesions persist for several days before they would eventually be removed by mitophagy. Long persistence of this damage might disturb mitochondrial functions, thereby contributing to skin ageing. In this study, we examined the influence of shortwave UV-induced damage on mitochondrial parameters in normal human skin fibroblasts. We irradiated cells with either sun-simulating light (SSL) or with ultraviolet C to generate bulky DNA lesions. At equivalent antiproliferative doses, both irradiation regimes induced gene expression of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and matrix metallopeptidase 1 (MMP-1). Only irradiation with SSL, however, caused significant changes in mtDNA copy number and a decrease in mitochondrial respiration. Our results indicate that shortwave UV-induced damage as part of the solar spectrum is not a major contributor to mitochondrial dysfunction.

  15. Nitrous acid induced damage in T7 DNA and phage

    SciTech Connect

    Scearce, L.M.; Masker, W.E.

    1986-05-01

    The response of bacteriophage T7 to nitrous acid damage was investigated. The T7 system allows in vitro mimicry of most aspects of in vivo DNA metabolism. Nitrous acid is of special interest since it has been previously shown to induce deletions and point mutations as well as novel adducts in DNA. T7 phage was exposed to 56 mM nitrous acid at pH 4.6 in vivo, causing a time dependent 98% decrease in survival for each 10 min duration of exposure to nitrous acid. These studies were extended to include examination of pure T7 DNA exposed in vitro to nitrous acid conditions identical to those used in the in vivo survival studies. The treated DNA was dialyzed to remove the nitrous acid and the DNA was encapsulated into empty phage heads. These in vitro packaged phage showed a survival curve analogous to the in vivo system. There was no change in survival when either in vitro or in vivo exposed phage were grown on wild type E. coli or on E. coli strains deficient in DNA repair due to mutations in DNA polymerase I, exonuclease III or a uvrA mutation. Survival was not increased when nitrous acid treated T7 were grown on E. coli induced for SOS repair. In vitro replication of nitrous acid treated DNA showed a time dependent decrease in the total amount of DNA synthesized.

  16. Exposure to 50Hz-sinusoidal electromagnetic field induces DNA damage-independent autophagy.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yunyun; Xia, Ruohong; Jiang, Hengjun; Chen, Yanfeng; Hong, Ling; Yu, Yunxian; Xu, Zhengping; Zeng, Qunli

    2016-08-01

    As electromagnetic field (EMF) is commonly encountered within our daily lives, the biological effects of EMF are of great concern. Autophagy is a key process for maintaining cellular homeostasis, and it can also reveal cellular responses to environmental stimuli. In this study, we aim to investigate the biological effects of a 50Hz-sinusoidal electromagnetic field on autophagy and we identified its mechanism of action in Chinese Hamster Lung (CHL) cells. CHL cells were exposed to a 50Hz sinusoidal EMF at 0.4mT for 30min or 24h. In this study, we found that a 0.4mT EMF resulted in: (i) an increase in LC3-II expression and increased autophagosome formation; (ii) no significant difference in the incidence of γH2AX foci between the sham and exposure groups; (iii) reorganized actin filaments and increased pseudopodial extensions without promoting cell migration; and (iv) enhanced cell apoptosis when autophagy was blocked by Bafilomycin A1. These results implied that DNA damage was not directly involved in the autophagy induced by a 0.4mT 50Hz EMF. In addition, an EMF induced autophagy balanced the cellular homeostasis to protect the cells from severe adverse biological consequences.

  17. Exposure to 50Hz-sinusoidal electromagnetic field induces DNA damage-independent autophagy.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yunyun; Xia, Ruohong; Jiang, Hengjun; Chen, Yanfeng; Hong, Ling; Yu, Yunxian; Xu, Zhengping; Zeng, Qunli

    2016-08-01

    As electromagnetic field (EMF) is commonly encountered within our daily lives, the biological effects of EMF are of great concern. Autophagy is a key process for maintaining cellular homeostasis, and it can also reveal cellular responses to environmental stimuli. In this study, we aim to investigate the biological effects of a 50Hz-sinusoidal electromagnetic field on autophagy and we identified its mechanism of action in Chinese Hamster Lung (CHL) cells. CHL cells were exposed to a 50Hz sinusoidal EMF at 0.4mT for 30min or 24h. In this study, we found that a 0.4mT EMF resulted in: (i) an increase in LC3-II expression and increased autophagosome formation; (ii) no significant difference in the incidence of γH2AX foci between the sham and exposure groups; (iii) reorganized actin filaments and increased pseudopodial extensions without promoting cell migration; and (iv) enhanced cell apoptosis when autophagy was blocked by Bafilomycin A1. These results implied that DNA damage was not directly involved in the autophagy induced by a 0.4mT 50Hz EMF. In addition, an EMF induced autophagy balanced the cellular homeostasis to protect the cells from severe adverse biological consequences. PMID:27177844

  18. Comparison of Model Calculations of Biological Damage from Exposure to Heavy Ions with Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    The space environment consists of a varying field of radiation particles including high-energy ions, with spacecraft shielding material providing the major protection to astronauts from harmful exposure. Unlike low-LET gamma or X rays, the presence of shielding does not always reduce the radiation risks for energetic charged-particle exposure. Dose delivered by the charged particle increases sharply at the Bragg peak. However, the Bragg curve does not necessarily represent the biological damage along the particle path since biological effects are influenced by the track structures of both primary and secondary particles. Therefore, the ''biological Bragg curve'' is dependent on the energy and the type of the primary particle and may vary for different biological end points. Measurements of the induction of micronuclei (MN) have made across the Bragg curve in human fibroblasts exposed to energetic silicon and iron ions in vitro at two different energies, 300 MeV/nucleon and 1 GeV/nucleon. Although the data did not reveal an increased yield of MN at the location of the Bragg peak, the increased inhibition of cell progression, which is related to cell death, was found at the Bragg peak location. These results are compared to the calculations of biological damage using a stochastic Monte-Carlo track structure model, Galactic Cosmic Ray Event-based Risk Model (GERM) code (Cucinotta, et al., 2011). The GERM code estimates the basic physical properties along the passage of heavy ions in tissue and shielding materials, by which the experimental set-up can be interpreted. The code can also be used to describe the biophysical events of interest in radiobiology, cancer therapy, and space exploration. The calculation has shown that the severely damaged cells at the Bragg peak are more likely to go through reproductive death, the so called "overkill".

  19. Repair and misrepair of heavy-ion-induced chromosomal damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, E.; Blakely, E.; Ivery, G.; Tobias, C.

    The premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique was used to investigate chromosomal damage, repair, and misrepair in the G1 phase of a human/hamster hybrid cell line that contains a single human chromosome. Plateau-phase cell cultures were exposed to either x-rays or a 425 MeV/u beam of neon ions near the Bragg peak where the LET is 183 keV/μm. An in situ hybridization technique coupled to fluorescent staining of PCC spreads confirmed the linearity of the dose response for initial chromatin breakage in the human chromosome to high doses (1600 cGy x-ray or 1062 cGy Ne). On Giemsa-stained slides, initial chromatin breakage in the total genome and the rejoining kinetics of these breaks were determined. As a measure of chromosomal misrepair, ring PCC aberrations were also scored. Ne ions were about 1.5 x more effective per unit dose compared to x-rays at producing the initially measured chromatin breakage. 90% of the x-ray-induced breaks rejoined in cells incubated at 37°C after exposure. In contrast, only 50% of Ne-ion-induced breaks rejoined. In the irradiated G1 cells, ring PCC aberrations increased with time apparently by first order kinetics after either x-ray or Ne exposures. However, far fewer rings formed in Ne-irradiated cells after a dose giving a comparable initial number of chromatin breaks. Following x-ray exposures, the yield of rings formed after long repair times (6 to 9 hrs) fit a quadratic dose-response curve. These results indicate quantitative and qualitative differences in the chromosomal lesions induced by low- and high-LET radiations.

  20. Zinc protects HepG2 cells against the oxidative damage and DNA damage induced by ochratoxin A

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Juanjuan; Zhang, Yu; Xu, Wentao; Luo, YunBo; Hao, Junran; Shen, Xiao Li; Yang, Xuan; Li, Xiaohong; Huang, Kunlun

    2013-04-15

    Oxidative stress and DNA damage are the most studied mechanisms by which ochratoxin A (OTA) induces its toxic effects, which include nephrotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, immunotoxicity and genotoxicity. Zinc, which is an essential trace element, is considered a potential antioxidant. The aim of this paper was to investigate whether zinc supplement could inhibit OTA-induced oxidative damage and DNA damage in HepG2 cells and the mechanism of inhibition. The results indicated that that exposure of OTA decreased the intracellular zinc concentration; zinc supplement significantly reduced the OTA-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity but did not affect the OTA-induced decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ{sub m}). Meanwhile, the addition of the zinc chelator N,N,N′,N′-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN) strongly aggravated the OTA-induced oxidative damage. This study also demonstrated that zinc helped to maintain the integrity of DNA through the reduction of OTA-induced DNA strand breaks, 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) formation and DNA hypomethylation. OTA increased the mRNA expression of metallothionein1-A (MT1A), metallothionein2-A (MT2A) and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1). Zinc supplement further enhanced the mRNA expression of MT1A and MT2A, but it had no effect on the mRNA expression of SOD1 and catalase (CAT). Zinc was for the first time proven to reduce the cytotoxicity of OTA through inhibiting the oxidative damage and DNA damage, and regulating the expression of zinc-associated genes. Thus, the addition of zinc can potentially be used to reduce the OTA toxicity of contaminated feeds. - Highlights: ► OTA decreased the intracellular zinc concentration. ► OTA induced the formation of 8-OHdG in HepG2 cells. ► It was testified for the first time that OTA induced DNA hypomethylation. ► Zinc protects against the oxidative damage and DNA damage induced by

  1. Low Dose Iron Treatments Induce a DNA Damage Response in Human Endothelial Cells within Minutes

    PubMed Central

    Mollet, Inês G.; Giess, Adam; Paschalaki, Koralia; Periyasamy, Manikandan; Lidington, Elaine C.; Mason, Justin C.; Jones, Michael D.; Game, Laurence; Ali, Simak; Shovlin, Claire L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Spontaneous reports from patients able to report vascular sequelae in real time, and recognition that serum non transferrin bound iron may reach or exceed 10μmol/L in the blood stream after iron tablets or infusions, led us to hypothesize that conventional iron treatments may provoke acute vascular injury. This prompted us to examine whether a phenotype could be observed in normal human endothelial cells treated with low dose iron. Methodology Confluent primary human endothelial cells (EC) were treated with filter-sterilized iron (II) citrate or fresh media for RNA sequencing and validation studies. RNA transcript profiles were evaluated using directional RNA sequencing with no pre-specification of target sequences. Alignments were counted for exons and junctions of the gene strand only, blinded to treatment types. Principal Findings Rapid changes in RNA transcript profiles were observed in endothelial cells treated with 10μmol/L iron (II) citrate, compared to media-treated cells. Clustering for Gene Ontology (GO) performed on all differentially expressed genes revealed significant differences in biological process terms between iron and media-treated EC, whereas 10 sets of an equivalent number of randomly selected genes from the respective EC gene datasets showed no significant differences in any GO terms. After 1 hour, differentially expressed genes clustered to vesicle mediated transport, protein catabolism, and cell cycle (Benjamini p = 0.0016, 0.0024 and 0.0032 respectively), and by 6 hours, to cellular response to DNA damage stimulus most significantly through DNA repair genes FANCG, BLM, and H2AFX. Comet assays demonstrated that 10μM iron treatment elicited DNA damage within 1 hour. This was accompanied by a brisk DNA damage response pulse, as ascertained by the development of DNA damage response (DDR) foci, and p53 stabilization. Significance These data suggest that low dose iron treatments are sufficient to modify the vascular endothelium

  2. Ecabet sodium alleviates neomycin-induced hair cell damage.

    PubMed

    Rah, Yoon Chan; Choi, June; Yoo, Myung Hoon; Yum, Gunhwee; Park, Saemi; Oh, Kyoung Ho; Lee, Seung Hoon; Kwon, Soon Young; Cho, Seung Hyun; Kim, Suhyun; Park, Hae-Chul

    2015-12-01

    Ecabet sodium (ES) is currently applied to some clinical gastrointestinal disease primarily by the inhibition of the ROS production. In this study, the protective role of ES was evaluated against the neomycin-induced hair cell loss using zebrafish experimental animal model. Zebrafish larvae (5-7 dpf), were treated with each of the following concentrations of ES: 5, 10, 20, 40, and 80 μg/mL for 1 h, followed by 125 μM neomycin for 1h. The positive control group was established by 125 μM neomycin-only treatment (1h) and the negative control group with no additional chemicals was also established. Hair cells inside four neuromasts ( SO1, SO2, O1, OC1) were assessed using fluorescence microscopy (n = 10). Hair cell survival was calculated as the mean number of viable hair cells for each group. Apoptosis and mitochondrial damage were investigated using special staining (TUNEL and DASPEI assay, respectively), and compared among groups. Ultrastructural changes were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. Pre-treatment group with ES increased the mean number of viable hair cells as a dose-dependent manner achieving almost same number of viable hair cells with 40 μM/ml ES treatment (12.98 ± 2.59 cells) comparing to that of the negative control group (14.15 ± 1.39 cells, p = 0.72) and significantly more number of viable hair cells than that of the positive control group (7.45 ± 0.91 cells, p < 0.01). The production of reactive oxygen species significantly increased by 183% with 125 μM neomycin treatment than the negative control group and significantly decreased down to 105% with the pre-treatment with 40 μM/ml ES (n = 40, p = 0.04). A significantly less number of TUNEL-positive cells (reflecting apoptosis, p < 0.01) and a significantly increased DASPEI reactivity (reflecting viable mitochondria, p < 0.01) were observed in 40 μM/ml ES pre-treatment group. Our data suggest that ES could protect against neomycin-induced hair cell loss possibly by reducing

  3. Molecular and sensory mechanisms to mitigate sunlight-induced DNA damage in treefrog tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Schuch, André P; Lipinski, Victor M; Santos, Mauricio B; Santos, Caroline P; Jardim, Sinara S; Cechin, Sonia Z; Loreto, Elgion L S

    2015-10-01

    The increased incidence of solar ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation has been proposed as an environmental stressor, which may help to explain the enigmatic decline of amphibian populations worldwide. Despite growing knowledge regarding the UV-induced biological effects in several amphibian models, little is known about the efficacy of DNA repair pathways. In addition, little attention has been given to the interplay between these molecular mechanisms with other physiological strategies that avoid the damage induced by sunlight. Here, DNA lesions induced by environmental doses of solar UVB and UVA radiation were detected in genomic DNA samples of treefrog tadpoles (Hypsiboas pulchellus) and their DNA repair activity was evaluated. These data were complemented by monitoring the induction of apoptosis in blood cells and tadpole survival. Furthermore, the tadpoles' ability to perceive and escape from UV wavelengths was evaluated as an additional strategy of photoprotection. The results show that tadpoles are very sensitive to UVB light, which could be explained by the slow DNA repair rates for both cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and pyrimidine (6,4) pyrimidone photoproducts (6,4PPs). However, they were resistant to UVA, probably as a result of the activation of photolyases during UVA irradiation. Surprisingly, a sensory mechanism that triggers their escape from UVB and UVA light avoids the generation of DNA damage and helps to maintain the genomic integrity. This work demonstrates the genotoxic impact of both UVB and UVA radiation on tadpoles and emphasizes the importance of the interplay between molecular and sensory mechanisms to minimize the damage caused by sunlight.

  4. Nonthermal atmospheric plasma rapidly disinfects multidrug-resistant microbes by inducing cell surface damage.

    PubMed

    Kvam, Erik; Davis, Brian; Mondello, Frank; Garner, Allen L

    2012-04-01

    Plasma, a unique state of matter with properties similar to those of ionized gas, is an effective biological disinfectant. However, the mechanism through which nonthermal or "cold" plasma inactivates microbes on surfaces is poorly understood, due in part to challenges associated with processing and analyzing live cells on surfaces rather than in aqueous solution. Here, we employ membrane adsorption techniques to visualize the cellular effects of plasma on representative clinical isolates of drug-resistant microbes. Through direct fluorescent imaging, we demonstrate that plasma rapidly inactivates planktonic cultures, with >5 log(10) kill in 30 s by damaging the cell surface in a time-dependent manner, resulting in a loss of membrane integrity, leakage of intracellular components (nucleic acid, protein, ATP), and ultimately focal dissolution of the cell surface with longer exposure time. This occurred with similar kinetic rates among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans. We observed no correlative evidence that plasma induced widespread genomic damage or oxidative protein modification prior to the onset of membrane damage. Consistent with the notion that plasma is superficial, plasma-mediated sterilization was dramatically reduced when microbial cells were enveloped in aqueous buffer prior to treatment. These results support the use of nonthermal plasmas for disinfecting multidrug-resistant microbes in environmental settings and substantiate ongoing clinical applications for plasma devices.

  5. Nonthermal Atmospheric Plasma Rapidly Disinfects Multidrug-Resistant Microbes by Inducing Cell Surface Damage

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Brian; Mondello, Frank; Garner, Allen L.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma, a unique state of matter with properties similar to those of ionized gas, is an effective biological disinfectant. However, the mechanism through which nonthermal or “cold” plasma inactivates microbes on surfaces is poorly understood, due in part to challenges associated with processing and analyzing live cells on surfaces rather than in aqueous solution. Here, we employ membrane adsorption techniques to visualize the cellular effects of plasma on representative clinical isolates of drug-resistant microbes. Through direct fluorescent imaging, we demonstrate that plasma rapidly inactivates planktonic cultures, with >5 log10 kill in 30 s by damaging the cell surface in a time-dependent manner, resulting in a loss of membrane integrity, leakage of intracellular components (nucleic acid, protein, ATP), and ultimately focal dissolution of the cell surface with longer exposure time. This occurred with similar kinetic rates among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans. We observed no correlative evidence that plasma induced widespread genomic damage or oxidative protein modification prior to the onset of membrane damage. Consistent with the notion that plasma is superficial, plasma-mediated sterilization was dramatically reduced when microbial cells were enveloped in aqueous buffer prior to treatment. These results support the use of nonthermal plasmas for disinfecting multidrug-resistant microbes in environmental settings and substantiate ongoing clinical applications for plasma devices. PMID:22232292

  6. Mediators of inflammation-induced bone damage in arthritis and their control by herbal products.

    PubMed

    Nanjundaiah, Siddaraju M; Astry, Brian; Moudgil, Kamal D

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation of the synovial joints leading to bone and cartilage damage. Untreated inflammatory arthritis can result in severe deformities and disability. The use of anti-inflammatory agents and biologics has been the mainstay of treatment of RA. However, the prolonged use of such agents may lead to severe adverse reactions. In addition, many of these drugs are quite expensive. These limitations have necessitated the search for newer therapeutic agents for RA. Natural plant products offer a promising resource for potential antiarthritic agents. We describe here the cellular and soluble mediators of inflammation-induced bone damage (osteoimmunology) in arthritis. We also elaborate upon various herbal products that possess antiarthritic activity, particularly mentioning the specific target molecules. As the use of natural product supplements by RA patients is increasing, this paper presents timely and useful information about the mechanism of action of promising herbal products that can inhibit the progression of inflammation and bone damage in the course of arthritis. PMID:23476694

  7. Male-killing symbiont damages host's dosage-compensated sex chromosome to induce embryonic apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Harumoto, Toshiyuki; Anbutsu, Hisashi; Lemaitre, Bruno; Fukatsu, Takema

    2016-01-01

    Some symbiotic bacteria are capable of interfering with host reproduction in selfish ways. How such bacteria can manipulate host's sex-related mechanisms is of fundamental interest encompassing cell, developmental and evolutionary biology. Here, we uncover the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying Spiroplasma-induced embryonic male lethality in Drosophila melanogaster. Transcriptomic analysis reveals that many genes related to DNA damage and apoptosis are up-regulated specifically in infected male embryos. Detailed genetic and cytological analyses demonstrate that male-killing Spiroplasma causes DNA damage on the male X chromosome interacting with the male-specific lethal (MSL) complex. The damaged male X chromosome exhibits a chromatin bridge during mitosis, and bridge breakage triggers sex-specific abnormal apoptosis via p53-dependent pathways. Notably, the MSL complex is not only necessary but also sufficient for this cytotoxic process. These results highlight symbiont's sophisticated strategy to target host's sex chromosome and recruit host's molecular cascades toward massive apoptosis in a sex-specific manner. PMID:27650264

  8. Male-killing symbiont damages host's dosage-compensated sex chromosome to induce embryonic apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Harumoto, Toshiyuki; Anbutsu, Hisashi; Lemaitre, Bruno; Fukatsu, Takema

    2016-01-01

    Some symbiotic bacteria are capable of interfering with host reproduction in selfish ways. How such bacteria can manipulate host's sex-related mechanisms is of fundamental interest encompassing cell, developmental and evolutionary biology. Here, we uncover the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying Spiroplasma-induced embryonic male lethality in Drosophila melanogaster. Transcriptomic analysis reveals that many genes related to DNA damage and apoptosis are up-regulated specifically in infected male embryos. Detailed genetic and cytological analyses demonstrate that male-killing Spiroplasma causes DNA damage on the male X chromosome interacting with the male-specific lethal (MSL) complex. The damaged male X chromosome exhibits a chromatin bridge during mitosis, and bridge breakage triggers sex-specific abnormal apoptosis via p53-dependent pathways. Notably, the MSL complex is not only necessary but also sufficient for this cytotoxic process. These results highlight symbiont's sophisticated strategy to target host's sex chromosome and recruit host's molecular cascades toward massive apoptosis in a sex-specific manner. PMID:27650264

  9. Mediators of Inflammation-Induced Bone Damage in Arthritis and Their Control by Herbal Products

    PubMed Central

    Nanjundaiah, Siddaraju M.; Astry, Brian; Moudgil, Kamal D.

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation of the synovial joints leading to bone and cartilage damage. Untreated inflammatory arthritis can result in severe deformities and disability. The use of anti-inflammatory agents and biologics has been the mainstay of treatment of RA. However, the prolonged use of such agents may lead to severe adverse reactions. In addition, many of these drugs are quite expensive. These limitations have necessitated the search for newer therapeutic agents for RA. Natural plant products offer a promising resource for potential antiarthritic agents. We describe here the cellular and soluble mediators of inflammation-induced bone damage (osteoimmunology) in arthritis. We also elaborate upon various herbal products that possess antiarthritic activity, particularly mentioning the specific target molecules. As the use of natural product supplements by RA patients is increasing, this paper presents timely and useful information about the mechanism of action of promising herbal products that can inhibit the progression of inflammation and bone damage in the course of arthritis. PMID:23476694

  10. Methylphenidate and Amphetamine Do Not Induce Cytogenetic Damage in Lymphocytes of Children with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witt, Kristine L.; Shelby, Michael D.; Itchon-Ramos, Nilda; Faircloth, Melissa; Kissling, Grace E.; Chrisman, Allan K.; Ravi, Hima; Murli, Hemalatha; Mattison, Donald R.; Kollins, Scott H.

    2008-01-01

    The inducement of chromosomal damage in lymphocytes among children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder receiving treatment with methylphenidate- or amphetamine-based drugs is investigated. Findings did not reveal significant increases in cytogenetic damage related to the treatment. The risk for cytogenetic damage posed by such products…

  11. Verapamil limits shockwave-induced renal tubular damage in vivo.

    PubMed

    Strohmaier, W L; Abelius, A; Billes, I; Grossmann, T; Wilbert, D M; Bichler, K H

    1994-08-01

    Previous investigations on Madin Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells demonstrated the protective effect of verapamil against shockwave-induced tubular dysfunction. In the present study, we investigated whether verapamil is also protective against shockwave-induced damage in vivo. Male rates were randomly assigned to three groups: verapamil (N = 18) (Group I), control (N = 18) (Group II), or sham treatment (N = 4) (Group III). Groups I and II were treated with 500 shockwaves to each kidney with the Dornier MFL 5000 at 18 kV. Animals assigned to Group III received only anesthesics. Verapamil was given to the animals in Group I for 5 days starting 1 day before shockwave exposure. Urine was collected for 8 hours the day before and immediately, 1.7, and 28 days after shockwave exposure (SWE) for measurement of volume, osmolality, hemoglobin, protein, N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase (NAG), beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2M), sodium, and creatinine. Kidneys were perfused and removed for histologic study 1, 7, and 28 days after SWE in six animals of Groups I and II. Blood was taken in these rats (Day 1 after SWE) for the determination of creatinine and sodium and the calculation of the creatinine clearance (CCr) and the fractional excretion of sodium (FENa). After SWE, there was strong diuresis and significantly increased excretion of NAG and beta 2M in the controls, while urine osmolality decreased. These changes were significantly less pronounced in the verapamil-treated rats. The CCr was higher and FENa lower than in the latter group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Role of creatine supplementation in exercise-induced muscle damage: A mini review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jooyoung; Lee, Joohyung; Kim, Seungho; Yoon, Daeyoung; Kim, Jieun; Sung, Dong Jun

    2015-10-01

    Muscle damage is induced by both high-intensity resistance and endurance exercise. Creatine is a widely used dietary supplement to improve exercise performance by reducing exercise-induced muscle damage. Many researchers have suggested that taking creatine reduces muscle damage by decreasing the inflammatory response and oxidative stress, regulating calcium homeostasis, and activating satellite cells. However, the underlying mechanisms of creatine and muscle damage have not been clarified. Therefore, this review discusses the regulatory effects of creatine on muscle damage by compiling the information collected from basic science and sports science research. PMID:26535213

  13. Chemical modification of normal tissue damage induced by photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Sigdestad, C. P.; Fingar, V. H.; Wieman, T. J.; Lindberg, R. D.

    1996-01-01

    One of the limitations of successful use of photodynamic therapy (PDT) employing porphyrins is the acute and long-term cutaneous photosensitivity. This paper describes results of experiments designed to test the effects of two radiation protective agents (WR-2721, 500 mg kg-1 or WR-3689, 700 mg kg-1) on murine skin damage induced by PDT. C3H mice were shaved and depilated three days prior to injection with the photosensitiser, Photofrin (5 or 10 mg kg-1). Twenty-four hours later, the mice were injected intraperitoneally with a protector 30 min prior to Argon dye laser (630 nm) exposure. The skin response was followed for two weeks post irradiation using an arbitrary response scale. A light dose response as well as a drug dose response was obtained. The results indicate that both protectors reduced the skin response to PDT, however WR-2721 was demonstrated to be the most effective. The effect of the protectors on vascular stasis after PDT was determined using a fluorescein dye exclusion assay. In mice treated with Photofrin (5 mg kg-1), and 630 nm light (180 J cm-2) pretreatment with either WR-2721 or WR-3689 resulted in significant protection of the vascular effects of PDT. These studies document the ability of the phosphorothioate class of radiation protective agents to reduce the effects of light on photosensitized skin. They do so in a drug dose-dependent fashion with maximum protection at the highest drug doses. PMID:8763855

  14. SHI induced damage in electrical properties of silicon NPN BJTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M. Vinay; Kumar, Santhosh; Yashoda, T.; Krishnaveni, S.

    2016-05-01

    The investigation of radiation damage in Si microelectronic circuitry and devices are being carried out by various research groups globally. In particular the Si Bipolar junction transistors are very sensitive to high energetic radiation. In the present study, radiation response of NPN Bipolar junction transistor (2N3773) has been examined for 60 MeV B4+ ion. Key electrical properties like Gummel, dc current gain and capacitance - voltage (C-V) characteristics of 60 MeV B4+ ion irradiated transistor were studied before and after irradiation. Ion irradiation and subsequent electrical characterizations were performed at room temperature. Current voltage (I-V) measurements showed the increase in collector current for VBE ≤ 0.4 V as a function of fluence, which is due to B4+ ion induced surface leakage currents. Base current is observed to be more sensitive than collector current and gain appears to be degraded with ion fluence. Also, C-V measurements shows that both built in potential and doping concentration increased significantly after irradiation.

  15. Damage-free vibrational spectroscopy of biological materials in the electron microscope

    DOE PAGES

    Rez, Peter; Aoki, Toshihiro; March, Katia; Gur, Dvir; Krivanek, Ondrej L.; Dellby, Niklas; Lovejoy, Tracy C.; Wolf, Sharon G.; Cohen, Hagai

    2016-03-10

    Vibrational spectroscopy in the electron microscope would be transformative in the study of biological samples, provided that radiation damage could be prevented. However, electron beams typically create high-energy excitations that severely accelerate sample degradation. Here this major difficulty is overcome using an ‘aloof’ electron beam, positioned tens of nanometres away from the sample: high-energy excitations are suppressed, while vibrational modes of energies o1 eV can be ‘safely’ investigated. To demonstrate the potential of aloof spectroscopy, we record electron energy loss spectra from biogenic guanine crystals in their native state, resolving their characteristic C–H, N–H and C=O vibrational signatures with nomore » observable radiation damage. Furthermore, the technique opens up the possibility of non-damaging compositional analyses of organic functional groups, including non-crystalline biological materials, at a spatial resolution of ~10nm, simultaneously combined with imaging in the electron microscope.« less

  16. Relative biological damage in and out of field of 6, 10 and 18 MV clinical photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezzati, A. O.

    2016-08-01

    The lower energy of scattered radiation in and out of a megavoltage (MV) photon beam suggests that relative biological damage (RBD) may change from in- to out-of-field regions for unit absorbed dose. Because of high linear energy transfer (LET) and potential of causing severe damage to the DNA, low-energy (10 eV-1 keV) slowing down electrons should be included in radiation biological damage calculations. In this study RBD was calculated in and out of field of 6, 10 and 18 MV clinical photon beams including low-energy slowing down electrons in the track length estimated method. Electron spectra at energies higher than 2 keV were collected in a water phantom at different depths and off-axis points by using the MCNP code. A new extrapolation method was used to estimate the electron spectra at energies lower than 2 keV. The obtained spectra at energies lower than 2 keV merged with spectra at energies higher than 2 keV by using continuity of the spectra. These spectra were used as an input to a validated microdosimetric Monte Carlo (MC) code, MC damage simulation (MCDS), to calculate the RBD of induced DSB in DNA at points in and out of the primary radiation field under fully aerobic (100% O2 and anoxic (0% O2 conditions. There was an observable difference in the energy spectra for electrons for points in the primary radiation field and those points out of field. RBD had maximum variation, 11% in 6 MV photons at field size of 20×20 cm2. This variation was less than 11% for 10 and 18 MV photons and field sizes smaller than 20×20 cm2. Our simulations also showed that under the anoxic condition, RBD increases up to 6% for 6 and 10 MV photons and the 20×20 cm2 field size. This work supports the hypothesis that in megavoltage treatments out-of-field radiation quality can vary enough to have an impact on RBD per unit dose and that this may play a role as the radiation therapy community explores biological optimization as a tool to assist treatment planning.

  17. Calcitriol-induced DNA damage: toward a molecular mechanism of selective cell death.

    PubMed

    Hasan, S Saif; Rizvi, Asim; Naseem, Imrana

    2013-09-01

    Calcitriol, the biologically active form of vitamin D, is known to function as an important anticancer agent. The exact mechanism by which calcitriol exerts its effects remains unknown. Recent evidence suggests a link between calcitriol-induced, free-radical-mediated DNA damage and cell death, in the presence of elevated levels of copper, such as those observed in malignant cells. As calcitriol is a lipid-soluble molecule, its interaction with DNA and copper would require a "chaperone"-like molecule, which binds the relatively hydrophobic calcitriol and polar DNA. A candidate protein is the vitamin D receptor (VDR), which binds both molecules. Using the recently elucidated full-length structure of the VDR molecule, we present and discuss three possible mechanisms to explain the interaction between calcitriol and DNA, as mediated by VDR.

  18. Advances and New Concepts in Alcohol-Induced Organelle Stress, Unfolded Protein Responses and Organ Damage.

    PubMed

    Ji, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol is a simple and consumable biomolecule yet its excessive consumption disturbs numerous biological pathways damaging nearly all organs of the human body. One of the essential biological processes affected by the harmful effects of alcohol is proteostasis, which regulates the balance between biogenesis and turnover of proteins within and outside the cell. A significant amount of published evidence indicates that alcohol and its metabolites directly or indirectly interfere with protein homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causing an accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins, which triggers the unfolded protein response (UPR) leading to either restoration of homeostasis or cell death, inflammation and other pathologies under severe and chronic alcohol conditions. The UPR senses the abnormal protein accumulation and activates transcription factors that regulate nuclear transcription of genes related to ER function. Similarly, this kind of protein stress response can occur in other cellular organelles, which is an evolving field of interest. Here, I review recent advances in the alcohol-induced ER stress response as well as discuss new concepts on alcohol-induced mitochondrial, Golgi and lysosomal stress responses and injuries. PMID:26047032

  19. Advances and New Concepts in Alcohol-Induced Organelle Stress, Unfolded Protein Responses and Organ Damage

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol is a simple and consumable biomolecule yet its excessive consumption disturbs numerous biological pathways damaging nearly all organs of the human body. One of the essential biological processes affected by the harmful effects of alcohol is proteostasis, which regulates the balance between biogenesis and turnover of proteins within and outside the cell. A significant amount of published evidence indicates that alcohol and its metabolites directly or indirectly interfere with protein homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causing an accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins, which triggers the unfolded protein response (UPR) leading to either restoration of homeostasis or cell death, inflammation and other pathologies under severe and chronic alcohol conditions. The UPR senses the abnormal protein accumulation and activates transcription factors that regulate nuclear transcription of genes related to ER function. Similarly, this kind of protein stress response can occur in other cellular organelles, which is an evolving field of interest. Here, I review recent advances in the alcohol-induced ER stress response as well as discuss new concepts on alcohol-induced mitochondrial, Golgi and lysosomal stress responses and injuries. PMID:26047032

  20. Advances and New Concepts in Alcohol-Induced Organelle Stress, Unfolded Protein Responses and Organ Damage.

    PubMed

    Ji, Cheng

    2015-06-03

    Alcohol is a simple and consumable biomolecule yet its excessive consumption disturbs numerous biological pathways damaging nearly all organs of the human body. One of the essential biological processes affected by the harmful effects of alcohol is proteostasis, which regulates the balance between biogenesis and turnover of proteins within and outside the cell. A significant amount of published evidence indicates that alcohol and its metabolites directly or indirectly interfere with protein homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causing an accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins, which triggers the unfolded protein response (UPR) leading to either restoration of homeostasis or cell death, inflammation and other pathologies under severe and chronic alcohol conditions. The UPR senses the abnormal protein accumulation and activates transcription factors that regulate nuclear transcription of genes related to ER function. Similarly, this kind of protein stress response can occur in other cellular organelles, which is an evolving field of interest. Here, I review recent advances in the alcohol-induced ER stress response as well as discuss new concepts on alcohol-induced mitochondrial, Golgi and lysosomal stress responses and injuries.

  1. Damage proneness induced by genomic DNA demethylation in mammalian cells cultivated in vitro.

    PubMed

    Perticone, P; Gensabella, G; Cozzi, R

    1997-07-01

    Variations in the genomic DNA methylation level have been shown to be an epigenetic inheritable modification affecting, among other targets, the sister chromatid exchange (SCE) rate in mammalian cells in vitro. The inheritable increase in SCE rate in affected cell populations appears as a puzzling phenomenon in view of the well established relation between SCE and both mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. In the present work we demonstrate that, in a treated cell population, demethylation could be responsible for the inheritable induction of damage proneness affecting both damage induction and repair. Normal and ethionine or azacytidine treated Chinese hamster ovary cells, subclone K1 (CHO-K1), were challenged with UV light (UV) or mitomycin-C (MMC) at different times from the demethylating treatment. The SCE rate was measured with two main objects in view: (i) the induction of synergism or additivity in combined treatments, where mutagen (UV or MMC) pulse is supplied from 0 to 48 h after the end of the demethylating treatment; and (ii) the pattern of damage extinction, for the duration of up to six cell cycles after the end of the combined (demethylating agent + mutagen) treatment. Results indicate both a synergism in SCE induction by mutagens in demethylated cells even if supplied up to four cell cycles after the end of the demethylation treatment and a delay in recovery of induced damage, compared with normally methylated cells. These data are discussed in the light of the supposed mechanism of SCE increase and of the possible biological significance in terms of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis.

  2. Damage proneness induced by genomic DNA demethylation in mammalian cells cultivated in vitro.

    PubMed

    Perticone, P; Gensabella, G; Cozzi, R

    1997-07-01

    Variations in the genomic DNA methylation level have been shown to be an epigenetic inheritable modification affecting, among other targets, the sister chromatid exchange (SCE) rate in mammalian cells in vitro. The inheritable increase in SCE rate in affected cell populations appears as a puzzling phenomenon in view of the well established relation between SCE and both mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. In the present work we demonstrate that, in a treated cell population, demethylation could be responsible for the inheritable induction of damage proneness affecting both damage induction and repair. Normal and ethionine or azacytidine treated Chinese hamster ovary cells, subclone K1 (CHO-K1), were challenged with UV light (UV) or mitomycin-C (MMC) at different times from the demethylating treatment. The SCE rate was measured with two main objects in view: (i) the induction of synergism or additivity in combined treatments, where mutagen (UV or MMC) pulse is supplied from 0 to 48 h after the end of the demethylating treatment; and (ii) the pattern of damage extinction, for the duration of up to six cell cycles after the end of the combined (demethylating agent + mutagen) treatment. Results indicate both a synergism in SCE induction by mutagens in demethylated cells even if supplied up to four cell cycles after the end of the demethylation treatment and a delay in recovery of induced damage, compared with normally methylated cells. These data are discussed in the light of the supposed mechanism of SCE increase and of the possible biological significance in terms of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. PMID:9237771

  3. High and Low LET Radiation Differentially Induce Normal Tissue Damage Signals

    SciTech Connect

    Niemantsverdriet, Maarten; Goethem, Marc-Jan van; Bron, Reinier; Hogewerf, Wytse; Brandenburg, Sytze; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Luijk, Peter van; Coppes, Robert P.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy using high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation is aimed at efficiently killing tumor cells while minimizing dose (biological effective) to normal tissues to prevent toxicity. It is well established that high LET radiation results in lower cell survival per absorbed dose than low LET radiation. However, whether various mechanisms involved in the development of normal tissue damage may be regulated differentially is not known. Therefore the aim of this study was to investigate whether two actions related to normal tissue toxicity, p53-induced apoptosis and expression of the profibrotic gene PAI-1 (plasminogen activator inhibitor 1), are differentially induced by high and low LET radiation. Methods and Materials: Cells were irradiated with high LET carbon ions or low LET photons. Cell survival assays were performed, profibrotic PAI-1 expression was monitored by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and apoptosis was assayed by annexin V staining. Activation of p53 by phosphorylation at serine 315 and serine 37 was monitored by Western blotting. Transfections of plasmids expressing p53 mutated at serines 315 and 37 were used to test the requirement of these residues for apoptosis and expression of PAI-1. Results: As expected, cell survival was lower and induction of apoptosis was higher in high -LET irradiated cells. Interestingly, induction of the profibrotic PAI-1 gene was similar with high and low LET radiation. In agreement with this finding, phosphorylation of p53 at serine 315 involved in PAI-1 expression was similar with high and low LET radiation, whereas phosphorylation of p53 at serine 37, involved in apoptosis induction, was much higher after high LET irradiation. Conclusions: Our results indicate that diverse mechanisms involved in the development of normal tissue damage may be differentially affected by high and low LET radiation. This may have consequences for the development and manifestation of normal tissue damage.

  4. Eucalyptus globulus extract protects upon acetaminophen-induced kidney damages in male rat

    PubMed Central

    Dhibi, Sabah; Mbarki, Sakhria; Elfeki, Abdelfettah; Hfaiedh, Najla

    2014-01-01

    Plants have historically been used in treating many diseases. Eucalyptus globules, a rich source of bioactive compounds, and have been shown to possess antioxidative properties. The purpose of this study, carried out on male Wistar rats, was to evaluate the beneficial effects of Eucalyptus globulus extract upon acetaminophen-induced damages in kidney. Our study is realized in the Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences of Sfax (Tunisia). 32 Wistar male rats; were divided into 4 batches: a control group (n=8), a group of rats treated with acetaminophen (goomg/kg) by intraperitoneal injection during 4 days (n=8), a group receiving Eucalyptus globulus extract (130 mg of dry leaves/kg/day) in drinking water during 42 days after 2 hours of acetaminophen administration (during 4 days) (n=8) and group received only Eucalyptus (n=8) during 42 days. After 6 weeks, animals from each group were rapidly sacrificed by decapitation. Blood serum was obtained by centrifugation. Under our experimental conditions, acetaminophen poisoning resulted in an oxidative stress evidenced by statistically significant losses in the activities of catalase (CAT), superoxide-dismutase (SOD), glutathione-peroxidase (GPX) activities and an increase in lipids peroxidation level in renal tissue of acetaminophen-treated group compared with the control group. Acetaminophen also caused kidney damage as evident by statistically significant (p<0.05) increase in levels of creatinine and urea and decreased levels of uric acid and proteins in blood. Histological analysis demonstrated alteration of proximal tubules, atrophy of the glomerule and dilatation of urinary space. Previous administration of plant extract is found to alleviate this acetaminophen-induced damage. PMID:24856382

  5. Can biologic treatment induce cutaneous focal mucinosis?

    PubMed Central

    Włodarczyk, Marcin; Sobolewska, Aleksandra; Sieniawska, Joanna; Rogowski-Tylman, Michał; Sysa-Jedrzejowska, Anna; Olejniczak-Staruch, Irmina; Narbutt, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Skin mucinosis is a rare skin disease which clinically manifests as firm papules and waxy nodules. We report a case of a 66-year-old female psoriatic patient who developed skin mucinosis during biological therapy. Because of a previous lack of response to the local and conventional systemic treatment of psoriasis, the patient received biological therapy (infliximab from June 2008 to May 2009 – initial clinical improvement and loss of treatment effectiveness in the 36th week of the therapy; adalimumab from June 2009 to January 2010 – lack effectiveness; ustekinumab from March 2012 to the present). Throughout 2 months we observed a manifestation of the skin mucinosis as well-demarcated, yellow and brown, papulo-nodular lesions of 5–10 mm in diameter, localized on the back. Histopathological examination with alcian blue staining demonstrated mucin deposits in the dermis. On the basis of clinical and histopathological findings, the diagnosis of cutaneous focal mucinosis was established. We present the case because of the extremely rare occurrence of the disease. Scarce literature and data suggest that there is an association between focal mucinosis and thyroid dysfunction, as well as possible adverse effects of biological therapy with TNF-α antagonists. PMID:25610359

  6. DNA damage induced by red food dyes orally administered to pregnant and male mice.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, S; Murakami, M; Matsusaka, N; Kano, K; Taniguchi, K; Sasaki, Y F

    2001-05-01

    We determined the genotoxicity of synthetic red tar dyes currently used as food color additives in many countries, including JAPAN: For the preliminary assessment, we treated groups of 4 pregnant mice (gestational day 11) once orally at the limit dose (2000 mg/kg) of amaranth (food red No. 2), allura red (food red No. 40), or acid red (food red No. 106), and we sampled brain, lung, liver, kidney, glandular stomach, colon, urinary bladder, and embryo 3, 6, and 24 h after treatment. We used the comet (alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis) assay to measure DNA damage. The assay was positive in the colon 3 h after the administration of amaranth and allura red and weakly positive in the lung 6 h after the administration of amaranth. Acid red did not induce DNA damage in any sample at any sampling time. None of the dyes damaged DNA in other organs or the embryo. We then tested male mice with amaranth, allura red, and a related color additive, new coccine (food red No. 18). The 3 dyes induced DNA damage in the colon starting at 10 mg/kg. Twenty ml/kg of soaking liquid from commercial red ginger pickles, which contained 6.5 mg/10 ml of new coccine, induced DNA damage in colon, glandular stomach, and bladder. The potencies were compared to those of other rodent carcinogens. The rodent hepatocarcinogen p-dimethylaminoazobenzene induced colon DNA damage at 1 mg/kg, whereas it damaged liver DNA only at 500 mg/kg. Although 1 mg/kg of N-nitrosodimethylamine induced DNA damage in liver and bladder, it did not induce colon DNA damage. N-nitrosodiethylamine at 14 mg/kg did not induce DNA damage in any organs examined. Because the 3 azo additives we examined induced colon DNA damage at a very low dose, more extensive assessment of azo additives is warranted.

  7. Comparison of Model Calculations of Biological Damage from Exposure to Heavy Ions with Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Wu, Honglu; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis

    The space environment consists of a varying field of radiation particles including high-energy ions, with spacecraft shielding material providing the major protection to astronauts from harmful exposure. Unlike low-LET g or X rays, the presence of shielding does not always reduce the radiation risks for energetic charged-particle exposure. Dose delivered by the charged particle increases sharply at the Bragg peak. However, the Bragg curve does not necessarily represent the biological damage along the particle path since biological effects are influenced by the track structures of both primary and secondary particles. Therefore, the ‘‘biological Bragg curve’’ is dependent on the energy and the type of the primary particle and may vary for different biological end points. Measurements of the induction of micronuclei (MN) have made across the Bragg curve in human fibroblasts exposed to energetic silicon and iron ions in vitro at two different energies, 300 MeV/nucleon and 1 GeV/nucleon. Although the data did not reveal an increased yield of MN at the location of the Bragg peak, the increased inhibition of cell progression, which is related to cell death, was found at the Bragg peak location. These results are compared to the calculations of biological damage using a stochastic Monte-Carlo track structure model, Galactic Cosmic Ray Event-based Risk Model (GERM) code (Cucinotta et al., 2011). The GERM code estimates the basic physical properties along the passage of heavy ions in tissue and shielding materials, by which the experimental set-up can be interpreted. The code can also be used to describe the biophysical events of interest in radiobiology, cancer therapy, and space exploration. The calculation has shown that the severely damaged cells at the Bragg peak are more likely to go through reproductive death, the so called “overkill”. F. A. Cucinotta, I. Plante, A. L. Ponomarev, and M. Y. Kim, Nuclear Interactions in Heavy Ion Transport and Event

  8. The effect of multiple wavelengths on Laser-induced damage in DKDP crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, C W; Auerbach, J M

    2005-07-11

    Laser-induced damage is a key factor that constrains how optical materials are used in high-power laser systems. In this work the size and density of bulk laser-induced damage sites formed during frequency tripling in a DKDP crystal are studied. The characteristics of the damage sites formed during tripling, where 1053-nm, 526-nm, and 351-nm light is simultaneously present, are compared to damage sites formed by 351-nm light alone. The fluence of each wavelength is calculated as a function of depth with a full 4D(x,y,z,t) frequency conversion code and compared to measured damage density and size distributions. The density of damage is found be predominantly governed by 351-nm light with some lesser, though non-negligible contribution from 526-nm light. The morphology of the damage sites, however, is seen to be relatively insensitive to wavelength and depend only on total fluence of all wavelengths present.

  9. [Tanning lamp radiation-induced photochemical retinal damage].

    PubMed

    Volkov, V V; Kharitonova, N N; Mal'tsev, D S

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of original clinical research a rare case of bilateral retinal damage due to tanning lamp radiation exposure is presented. Along with significant decrease of visual acuity and light sensitivity of central visual field as well as color vision impairment, bilateral macular dystrophy was found during an ophthalmoscopy and confirmed by optical coherent tomography and fluorescent angiography. Intensive retinoprotective, vascular, and antioxidant therapy was effective and led to functional improvement and stabilization of the pathologic process associated with photochemical retinal damage. A brief review of literature compares mechanisms of retinal damage by either short or long-wave near visible radiation.

  10. Helium vs. Proton Induced Displacement Damage in Electronic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringo, Sawnese; Barghouty, A. F.

    2010-01-01

    In this project, the specific effects of displacement damage due to the passage of protons and helium nuclei on some typical electronic materials will be evaluated and contrasted. As the electronic material absorbs the energetic proton and helium momentum, degradation of performance occurs, eventually leading to overall failure. Helium nuclei traveling at the same speed as protons are expected to impart more to the material displacement damage; due to the larger mass, and thus momentum, of helium nuclei compared to protons. Damage due to displacement of atoms in their crystalline structure can change the physical properties and hence performance of the electronic materials.

  11. Harvesting the potential of induced biological diversity.

    PubMed

    Waugh, Robbie; Leader, David J; McCallum, Nicola; Caldwell, David

    2006-02-01

    For most of the past century, chemical and physical mutagens have been used in plant genetic research to introduce novel genetic variation. In crop improvement, more than 2000 plant varieties that contain induced mutations have been released for cultivation having faced none of the regulatory restrictions imposed on genetically modified material. In plant science, mutational approaches have found extensive use in forward genetics and for enhancer and suppressor screens - particularly in model organisms where positional cloning is easily achieved. However, new approaches that combine mutagenesis with novel and sensitive methods to detect induced DNA sequence variation are establishing a new niche for mutagenesis in the expanding area of (crop) plant functional genomics and providing a bridge that links discovery in models to application in crops.

  12. Short and longer-term effects of creatine supplementation on exercise induced muscle damage

    PubMed Central

    Rosene, John; Matthews, Tracey; Ryan, Christine; Belmore, Keith; Bergsten, Alisa; Blaisdell, Jill; Gaylord, James; Love, Rebecca; Marrone, Michael; Ward, Kristine; Wilson, Eric

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if creatine supplementation assisted with reducing the amount of exercise induced muscle damage and if creatine supplementation aided in recovery from exercise induced muscle damage. Two groups of subjects (group 1 = creatine; group 2 = placebo) participated in an eccentric exercise protocol following 7 and 30 days of creatine or placebo supplementation (20 g.d-1 for 7 d followed by 6g.d-1 for 23 d = 30 d). Prior to the supplementation period, measurements were obtained for maximal dynamic strength, maximal isometric force, knee range of motion, muscle soreness, and serum levels of creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Following 7 days of creatine supplementation, on day 8, subjects began consuming 6 g.d-1 of creatine for 23 days. Additionally on days 8 and 31, subjects performed an eccentric exercise protocol using the knee extensors to induce muscle damage. Indirect markers of muscle damage, including maximal isometric force, knee range of motion, muscle soreness, and serum levels of CK and LDH, were collected at 12, 24, and 48 hours following each exercise bout. The results indicated that acute bouts of creatine have no effect on indirect markers of muscle damage for the acute (7 days) bout. However, maximal isometric force was greater for the creatine group versus placebo for the chronic (30 days) bout. This suggests that the ergogenic effect of creatine following 30 days of supplementation may have a positive impact on exercise induced muscle damage. Key points Eccentric muscle actions highly associated with exercise induced muscle damage. Creatine supplementation has ergogenic effect to increase protein synthesis. Creatine supplementation does not attenuate exercise induced muscle damage with short term supplementation (7 days). Increased maximal isometric force seen with creatine supplementation after 30 days following exercise induced muscle damage. Ergogenic effect of creatine

  13. Effects of pH on nicotine-induced DNA damage and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui-Ju; Chi, Chin-Wen; Liu, Tsung-Yun

    2005-09-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that chewing betel quid and smoking have synergistic potential in the development of oral squamous-cell carcinoma in Taiwan. Chewing betel quid produces alkalization of saliva. This study investigated the response of human oral cancer OEC-M1 cells to nicotine in different pH environments (6.5 and 8) by examining its effects on DNA damage as evidenced by single-cell gel electrophoresis. Nicotine (1 and 10 muM) significantly induced DNA strand breakage when cultured at pH 8 for 6 h but did not induce DNA damage at pH 6.5. Nicotine-induced DNA damage was also time dependent. When cells were pretreated with catalase or N-acetylcysteine, a significant reduction in nicotine-induced DNA damage was observed. Flow cytometric analyses showed that the production of 8-oxoguanine was significantly increased following nicotine (10 muM) treatment. Posttreatment of nicotine-damaged DNA by endonuclease III and formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase, recognizing oxidized DNA bases, increased the extent of DNA damage. These results suggest that nicotine-induced DNA strand breakage is pH dependent, and oxidative stress might be involved in nicotine-induced DNA damage. Finally, cigarette smoke condensate (equivalent to 8 muM nicotine) induced significant DNA strand breaks in OEC-M1 cells at pH 8 and correlated with the generation of oxidative DNA damage. Thus, alkaline saliva generated by chewing betel quid plays an important role in cigarette-related nicotine-induced DNA damage, and reactive oxygen species may be involved in generating this DNA damage. PMID:16076763

  14. Accumulation of DNA damage-induced chromatin alterations in tissue-specific stem cells: the driving force of aging?

    PubMed

    Schuler, Nadine; Rübe, Claudia E

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of DNA damage leading to stem cell exhaustion has been proposed to be a principal mechanism of aging. Using 53BP1-foci as a marker for DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) in mouse epidermis were analyzed for age-related DNA damage response (DDR). We observed increasing amounts of 53BP1-foci during the natural aging process independent of telomere shortening and after protracted low-dose radiation, suggesting substantial accumulation of DSBs in HFSCs. Electron microscopy combined with immunogold-labeling showed multiple small 53BP1 clusters diffusely distributed throughout the highly compacted heterochromatin of aged HFSCs, but single large 53BP1 clusters in irradiated HFSCs. These remaining 53BP1 clusters did not colocalize with core components of non-homologous end-joining, but with heterochromatic histone modifications. Based on these results we hypothesize that these lesions were not persistently unrepaired DSBs, but may reflect chromatin rearrangements caused by the repair or misrepair of DSBs. Flow cytometry showed increased activation of repair proteins and damage-induced chromatin modifications, triggering apoptosis and cellular senescence in irradiated, but not in aged HFSCs. These results suggest that accumulation of DNA damage-induced chromatin alterations, whose structural dimensions reflect the complexity of the initial genotoxic insult, may lead to different DDR events, ultimately determining the biological outcome of HFSCs. Collectively, our findings support the hypothesis that aging might be largely the remit of structural changes to chromatin potentially leading to epigenetically induced transcriptional deregulation.

  15. Shock induced multi-mode damage in depleted uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Koller, Darcie D; Cerreta, Ellen K; Gray, Ill, George T

    2009-01-01

    Recent dynamic damage studies on depleted uranium samples have revealed mixed mode failure mechanisms leading to incipient cracking as well as ductile failure processes. Results show that delamination of inclusions upon compression may provide nucleation sites for damage initiation in the form of crack tip production. However, under tension the material propagates cracks in a mixed shear localization and mode-I ductile tearing and cracking. Cracks tips appear to link up through regions of severe, shear dominated plastic flow. Shock recovery experiments were conducted on a 50 mm single stage light gas gun. Serial metallographic sectioning was conducted on the recovered samples to characterize the bulk response of the sample. Experiments show delaminated inclusions due to uniaxial compression without damage propagation. Further results show the propagation of the damage through tensile loading to the incipient state, illustrating ductile processes coupled with mixed mode-I tensile ductile tearing, shear localization, and mode-I cracking in depleted uranium.

  16. Influence of Subsurface Cracks on Laser Induced Surface Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Feit, M D; Rubenchik, A M

    2003-11-07

    Cracks can affect laser damage susceptibility in three ways. These are field intensification due to interference, enhanced absorption due to trapped material in the cracks, and increased mechanical weakness. Enhanced absorption is the most important effect.

  17. Electron-Induced Displacement Damage Effects in CCDs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Heidi N.; Elliott, Tom; Alexander, James W.

    2006-01-01

    We compare differences in parametric degradation for CCDs irradiated to the same displacement damage dose with 10-MeV and 50-MeV electrons. Charge transfer efficiency degradation was observed to not scale with NIEL for small signals.

  18. Investigation of Friction-induced Damage to the Pig Cornea.

    PubMed

    Barros, Raquel C; Van Kooten, Theo G; Veeregowda, Deepak Halenahally

    2015-10-01

    Mechanical friction causes damage to the cornea. A friction measurement device with minimal intervention with the pig cornea tear film revealed a low friction coefficient of 0.011 in glycerine solution. Glycerine molecules presumably bind to water, mucins, and epithelial cells and therewith improve both squeeze film and boundary lubrication. Using confocal microscopy, we determined that glycerine solution reduced damage to epithelial cells by 50% compared with the phosphate buffer saline.

  19. Femtosecond laser threshold: retinal damage versus induced breakdown mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, Clarence P.; Toth, Cynthia A.; Stein, Cindy D.; Noojin, Gary D.; Stolarski, David J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Boppart, Stephen A.; Roach, William P.

    1994-08-01

    Threshold measurements at 90 femtoseconds (fs) and 600 fs have been made for minimum visible lesions (MVLs) using Dutch Belted rabbit and Rhesus monkey eyes. Laser induced breakdown (LIB) thresholds on biological materials including vitreous, normal saline, tap water, and ultrapure water are reported along with irradiance calculations utilizing nonlinear transmission properties including self-focusing. At both pulsewidths the ED50 dose required for the Rhesus monkey eye was less than half the value determined for the Dutch Belted rabbit eye, all thresholds being 1 microjoule ((mu) J) or less. Measurements on the Rhesus eye at 600 fs found the ED50 dose (0.26 (mu) J) to be much lower than the ED50 dose at 90 fs (0.43 (mu) J). But for these two pulsewidths, almost the same energy level was determined for the Dutch Belted rabbit eye (0.94 (mu) J vs. 1.0 (mu) J). LIB threshold measurements at 100 fs and 300 fs using a simulated eye with isolated vitreous found the ED50 dosages to be 3.5 and 6.0 (mu) J respectively. We found in all cases that the ED50 dosages required to produce MVLs in 24 hours for rabbit and monkey eyes were less than the ED50 values measured for LIB in vitreous or saline or any other breakdown values reported. Also observed was the fact that many of the threshold lesions did not appear in the 1-hour postexposure check but clearly showed up at the 24-hour reading which provided for a much lower threshold dose after 24 hours. We discuss the energy levels and peak powers at which nonlinear effects can begin to occur.

  20. Is Allelopathic Activity of Ipomoea murucoides Induced by Xylophage Damage?

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Palacios, Alejandro; Corona-López, Angélica María; Rios, María Yolanda; Aguilar-Guadarrama, Berenice; Toledo-Hernández, Víctor Hugo; Rodríguez-López, Verónica; Valencia-Díaz, Susana

    2015-01-01

    Herbivory activates the synthesis of allelochemicals that can mediate plant-plant interactions. There is an inverse relationship between the activity of xylophages and the abundance of epiphytes on Ipomoea murucoides. Xylophagy may modify the branch chemical constitution, which also affects the liberation of allelochemicals with defense and allelopathic properties. We evaluated the bark chemical content and the effect of extracts from branches subjected to treatments of exclusion, mechanical damage and the presence/absence of epiphytes, on the seed germination of the epiphyte Tillandsia recurvata. Principal component analysis showed that branches without any treatment separate from branches subjected to treatments; damaged and excluded branches had similar chemical content but we found no evidence to relate intentional damage with allelopathy; however 1-hexadecanol, a defense volatile compound correlated positively with principal component (PC) 1. The chemical constitution of branches subject to exclusion plus damage or plus epiphytes was similar among them. PC2 indicated that palmitic acid (allelopathic compound) and squalene, a triterpene that attracts herbivore enemies, correlated positively with the inhibition of seed germination of T. recurvata. Inhibition of seed germination of T. recurvata was mainly correlated with the increment of palmitic acid and this compound reached higher concentrations in excluded branches treatments. Then, it is likely that the allelopathic response of I. murucoides would increase to the damage (shade, load) that may be caused by a high load of epiphytes than to damage caused by the xylophages. PMID:26625350

  1. Modelling biofilm-induced formation damage and biocide treatment in subsurface geosystems

    PubMed Central

    Ezeuko, C C; Sen, A; Gates, I D

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm growth in subsurface porous media, and its treatment with biocides (antimicrobial agents), involves a complex interaction of biogeochemical processes which provide non-trivial mathematical modelling challenges. Although there are literature reports of mathematical models to evaluate biofilm tolerance to biocides, none of these models have investigated biocide treatment of biofilms growing in interconnected porous media with flow. In this paper, we present a numerical investigation using a pore network model of biofilm growth, formation damage and biocide treatment. The model includes three phases (aqueous, adsorbed biofilm, and solid matrix), a single growth-limiting nutrient and a single biocide dissolved in the water. Biofilm is assumed to contain a single species of microbe, in which each cell can be a viable persister, a viable non-persister, or non-viable (dead). Persisters describe small subpopulation of cells which are tolerant to biocide treatment. Biofilm tolerance to biocide treatment is regulated by persister cells and includes ‘innate’ and ‘biocide-induced’ factors. Simulations demonstrate that biofilm tolerance to biocides can increase with biofilm maturity, and that biocide treatment alone does not reverse biofilm-induced formation damage. Also, a successful application of biological permeability conformance treatment involving geologic layers with flow communication is more complicated than simply engineering the attachment of biofilm-forming cells at desired sites. PMID:23164434

  2. Temporal Effects of Mechanical Loading on Deformation-Induced Damage in Skeletal Muscle Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Stekelenburg, A.; Strijkers, G. J.; Rijpkema, J. J. M.; Baaijens, F. P. T.; Bader, D. L.; Nicolay, K.; Oomens, C. W. J.

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical loading of soft tissues covering bony prominences can cause skeletal muscle damage, ultimately resulting in a severe pressure ulcer termed deep tissue injury. Recently, by means of an experimental-numerical approach, it was shown that local tissue deformations cause tissue damage once a deformation threshold is exceeded. In the present study, the effects of load exposure time and intermittent load relief on the development of deformation-induced muscle damage were investigated. The data showed that a 2 h loading period caused more damage than 10 min loading. Intermittent load reliefs of 2 min during a 2 h loading period had minimal effect on the evolution of skeletal muscle damage. In addition, a local deformation threshold for damage was found, which was similar for each of the loading regimes applied in this study. For short loading periods, these results imply that local tissue deformations determine whether muscle damage will develop and the exposure time influences the amount of tissue damage. Temporary load reliefs were inefficient in reducing deformation-induced damage, but may still influence the development of ischemia-induced damage during longer loading periods. PMID:20232152

  3. Neurotoxin-induced DNA damage is persistentin SH-SY5Y cells and LC neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Musich, Phillip R.; Cui, Kui; Zou, Yue; Zhu, Meng-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Degeneration of the noradrenergic neurons has been reported in the brain of patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases. However, their pathologic characteristics during the neurodegenerative course and underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we used the neurotoxincamptothecin (CPT)to induce the DNA damage response in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, normal fibroblast cells, and primarily cultured LC and raphe neurons to examine cellular responses and repair capabilities after neurotoxin exposure. To our knowledge, the present study is the first to show that noradrenergic SH-SY5Y cells are more sensitive to CPT-induced DNA damage and deficientin DNA repair, as compared to fibroblast cells. Furthermore, similar to SH-SY5Y cells, primarily cultured LC neurons are more sensitive to CPT-induced DNA damage and show a deficiency in repairing this damage. Moreover, while N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP4) exposure also results in DNA damage in cultured LC neurons, neither CPT nor DSP4 induce DNA damage in neuronal cultures from the raphe nuclei. Taken together, noradrenergic SH-SY5Y cells and LC neurons are sensitive to CPT-induced DNA damage and exhibit a repair deficiency, providing a mechanistic explanation for the pathologic characteristics of LC degeneration when facing endogenous and environmental DNA-damaging insultsin vivo. PMID:25724887

  4. The Biological Effectiveness of Accelerated Particles for the Induction of Chromosome Damage: Track Structure Effects and Cytogenetic Signatures of High-LET Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, K.; Hada, M.; Chappell, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2012-01-01

    Track structure models predict that at a fixed value of LET, particles with lower charge number, Z will have a higher biological effectiveness compared to particles with a higher Z. In this report we investigated how track structure effects induction of chromosomal aberration in human cells. Human lymphocytes were irradiated in vitro with various energies of accelerated iron, silicon, neon, or titanium ions and chromosome damage was assessed in using three color FISH chromosome painting in chemically induced PCC samples collected a first cell division post irradiation. The LET values for these ions ranged from 30 to 195 keV/micrometers. Of the particles studied, Neon ions have the highest biological effectiveness for induction of total chromosome damage, which is consistent with track structure model predictions. For complex-type exchanges 64 MeV/ u Neon and 450 MeV/u Iron were equally effective and induced the most complex damage. In addition we present data on chromosomes exchanges induced by six different energies of protons (5 MeV/u to 2.5 GeV/u). The linear dose response term was similar for all energies of protons suggesting that the effect of the higher LET at low proton energies is balanced by the production of nuclear secondaries from the high energy protons. All energies of protons have a much higher percentage of complex-type chromosome exchanges than gamma rays, signifying a cytogenetic signature for proton exposures.

  5. Lightning Strike Induced Damage Mechanisms of Carbon Fiber Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Hirohide

    Composite materials have a wide application in aerospace, automotive, and other transportation industries, because of the superior structural and weight performances. Since carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites possess a much lower electrical conductivity as compared to traditional metallic materials utilized for aircraft structures, serious concern about damage resistance/tolerance against lightning has been rising. Main task of this study is to clarify the lightning damage mechanism of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy polymer composites to help further development of lightning strike protection. The research on lightning damage to carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites is quite challenging, and there has been little study available until now. In order to tackle this issue, building block approach was employed. The research was started with the development of supporting technologies such as a current impulse generator to simulate a lightning strike in a laboratory. Then, fundamental electrical properties and fracture behavior of CFRPs exposed to high and low level current impulse were investigated using simple coupon specimens, followed by extensive parametric investigations in terms of different prepreg materials frequently used in aerospace industry, various stacking sequences, different lightning intensity, and lightning current waveforms. It revealed that the thermal resistance capability of polymer matrix was one of the most influential parameters on lightning damage resistance of CFRPs. Based on the experimental findings, the semi-empirical analysis model for predicting the extent of lightning damage was established. The model was fitted through experimental data to determine empirical parameters and, then, showed a good capability to provide reliable predictions for other test conditions and materials. Finally, structural element level lightning tests were performed to explore more practical situations. Specifically, filled-hole CFRP plates and patch

  6. The DNA replication and damage checkpoint pathways induce transcription by inhibition of the Crt1 repressor.

    PubMed

    Huang, M; Zhou, Z; Elledge, S J

    1998-09-01

    We have identified the yeast CRT1 gene as an effector of the DNA damage and replication checkpoint pathway. CRT1 encodes a DNA-binding protein that recruits the general repressors Ssn6 and Tup1 to the promoters of damage-inducible genes. Derepression of the Crt1 regulon suppresses the lethality of mec1 and rad53 null alleles and is essential for cell viability during replicative stress. In response to DNA damage and replication blocks, Crt1 becomes hyperphosphorylated and no longer binds DNA, resulting in transcriptional induction. CRT1 is autoregulated and is itself induced by DNA damage, indicating the existence of a negative feedback pathway that facilitates return to the repressed state after elimination of damage. The inhibition of an autoregulatory repressor in response to DNA damage is a strategy conserved throughout prokaryotic and eukaryotic evolution.

  7. The processes controlling damage zone propagation induced by wellbore fluid injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalev, Eyal; Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

    2013-04-01

    Induced seismicity by wellbore fluid injection is an important tool for enhancing permeability in hydrocarbon and geothermal reservoirs. We model nucleation and propagation of damage zones and seismicity patterns for two-dimensional plane strain configuration at a depth of 5 km using novel numerical software developed in the course of this study. Simulations include the coupling of poro-elastic deformation and groundwater flow with damage evolution (weakening and healing) and its effect on the elastic and hydrologic parameters. Results show that the process occurring during fluid injection can be divided into four stages. The duration of each stage depends on the hydrological and mechanical parameters. Initially, fluid flows into the rock with no seismic events (5 to 20 hr). At this stage, damage increases from 0 to 1 creating two sets of conjugate zones (four narrow damage zones). Thereafter, the occurrence of seismic events and faulting begins and accelerates for the next 20 to 70 hr. At the initial part of this stage, two of the damage zones create stress shadows on the other two damage zones that stop progressing. The velocity of the advancing damage is limited only by the rock parameters controlling damage evolution. At the third stage, which lasts for the following 20-30 hr, damage acceleration decreases because fluid transport becomes a limiting factor as the damage zones are too long to efficiently transfer the pressure from the well to the tip of the damage zones. Finally, the damage decelerates and even stops in some cases. The propagation of damage is controlled and limited by fluid transport from the injection well to the tip of the damage zones because fluid transport does not keep up with the dilatancy of the damage zones. The time and distance of propagation depend on the damage-permeability coupling and the remote shear stress. Higher remote shear stress causes shorter initial periods of no seismicity; strong damage-permeability coupling causes

  8. Modelling blast induced damage from a fully coupled explosive charge

    PubMed Central

    Onederra, Italo A.; Furtney, Jason K.; Sellers, Ewan; Iverson, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents one of the latest developments in the blasting engineering modelling field—the Hybrid Stress Blasting Model (HSBM). HSBM includes a rock breakage engine to model detonation, wave propagation, rock fragmentation, and muck pile formation. Results from two controlled blasting experiments were used to evaluate the code’s ability to predict the extent of damage. Results indicate that the code is capable of adequately predicting both the extent and shape of the damage zone associated with the influence of point-of-initiation and free-face boundary conditions. Radial fractures extending towards a free face are apparent in the modelling output and matched those mapped after the experiment. In the stage 2 validation experiment, the maximum extent of visible damage was of the order of 1.45 m for the fully coupled 38-mm emulsion charge. Peak radial velocities were predicted within a relative difference of only 1.59% at the nearest history point at 0.3 m from the explosive charge. Discrepancies were larger further away from the charge, with relative differences of −22.4% and −42.9% at distances of 0.46 m and 0.61 m, respectively, meaning that the model overestimated particle velocities at these distances. This attenuation deficiency in the modelling produced an overestimation of the damage zone at the corner of the block due to excessive stress reflections. The extent of visible damage in the immediate vicinity of the blasthole adequately matched the measurements. PMID:26412978

  9. Subsurface damage induced in dental resurfacing of a feldspar porcelain with coarse diamond burs.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiao-Fei; Yin, Ling

    2009-02-01

    The primary cause for early failure of ceramic restorations is surface and subsurface damage induced in adjustment and resurfacing using dental handpieces/burs. This paper reports finite element analysis (FEA) modelling of dental resurfacing to predict the degrees of subsurface damage, in combination with experimental measurement using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The FEA predictions of subsurface damage induced in a feldspar porcelain with coarse diamond burs were in agreement with the SEM experimental measurement. These findings provide dental clinicians a quantitative description of the response of dental resurfacing-induced subsurface damage. The implication of the results for non-destructive evaluation of subsurface damage by FEA modelling will be practically meaningful to clinical dental restorations for high-quality ceramic restorations. PMID:19144338

  10. Carnosine and neocuproine as neutralizing agents for copper overload-induced damages in cultured human cells.

    PubMed

    Arnal, Nathalie; de Alaniz, María J T; Marra, Carlos A

    2011-07-15

    Copper is dangerous when it is present in excess, mainly because it can participate in the Fenton reaction, which produces radical species. As a consequence of copper pollution, people are involuntarily exposed to a copper overload under sub-clinical and sub-symptomatological conditions, which may be very difficult to detect. Thus, we investigated (i) the possible use of the chelator molecules carnosine and neocuproine to prevent the Cu overload-induced damage on cellular lipids and proteins, as tested in human cell culture systems, and (ii) the differential response of these two chelating agents in relation to their protective action, and the type of copper ion involved in the process, by using two types of human cultured cells (HepG2 and A-549). Cu treatment clearly enhanced (p<0.01) the formation of protein carbonyls, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and the concentration of nitrate plus nitrites, with a concomitant decrease in cell survival, as estimated by the trypan dye exclusion test and lactate dehydrogenase leakage. Simultaneous treatment with Cu and carnosine or neocuproine indicated that carnosine is more efficient than neocuproine in protecting both types of cells from the effect of cupric ions on both the cell-associated damages and the decrease in the cellular viability. This observation was supported by the fact that carnosine is not only a complexing agent for Cu(II), but also an effective antioxidant that can dismutate superoxide radicals, scavenge hydroxyl radicals and neutralize TBARS formation. Carnosine should be investigated in more detail in order to establish its putative utility as an agent to prevent copper-associated damages in biological systems.

  11. Description of particle induced damage on protected silver coatings.

    PubMed

    Schwinde, Stefan; Schürmann, Mark; Jobst, Paul Johannes; Kaiser, Norbert; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    In the visible to infrared spectral range, highly-reflective silver mirrors are applied in the manufacture of optical instruments such as telescopes. However, it is still difficult to combine high reflectivity and long-term stability of the protected silver coating. We show that the deposition of impervious protective layers is necessary but often not sufficient for long-term environmental stability. Hygroscopic air borne particles absorbed by the protections surface attract water molecules and form a solution. This solution first damages the protection, subsequently permeates the protection and finally damages the silver whereby the reflectivity is reduced. We demonstrate this particular damage mechanism with different experiments and describe this mechanism in detail. PMID:26192652

  12. Cryptococcus neoformans-induced macrophage lysosome damage crucially contributes to fungal virulence1

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Michael J.; Eastman, Alison J.; Qiu, Yafeng; Gregorka, Brian; Kozel, Thomas R.; Osterholzer, John J.; Curtis, Jeffrey L.; Swanson, Joel A.; Olszewski, Michal A.

    2015-01-01

    Upon ingestion by macrophages, Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn) can survive and replicate intracellularly unless the macrophages become classically activated. The mechanism enabling intracellular replication is not fully understood; neither are the mechanisms which allow classical activation to counteract replication. Cn-induced lysosome damage was observed in infected murine bone marrow-derived macrophages, increased with time and required yeast viability. To demonstrate lysosome damage in the infected host, we developed a novel flow-cytometric method for measuring lysosome damage. Increased lysosome damage was found in Cn-containing lung cells compared to Cn–free cells. Among Cn-containing myeloid cells, recently recruited cells displayed lower damage than resident cells, consistent with the protective role of recruited macrophages. The magnitude of lysosome damage correlated with increased Cn replication. Experimental induction of lysosome damage increased Cn replication. Activation of macrophages with IFN-γ abolished macrophage lysosome damage and enabled increased killing of Cn. We conclude that induction of lysosome damage is an important Cn survival strategy and that classical activation of host macrophages counters replication by preventing damage. Thus, therapeutic strategies which decrease lysosomal damage, or increase resistance to such damage, could be valuable in treating cryptococcal infections. PMID:25637026

  13. Statistical study of single and multiple pulse laser-induced damage in glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallais, L.; Natoli, J. Y.; Amra, C.

    2002-12-01

    Single and multiple pulse laser damage studies are performed in Suprasil silica and BK-7 borosilicate glasses. Experiments are made in the bulk of materials at 1.064µm with nanosecond pulses, using an accurate and reliable measurement system. By means of a statistical study on laser damage probabilities, we demonstrate that the same nano-precursors could be involved in the multiple shot and single shot damage process. A damage mechanism with two stages is then proposed to explain the results. Firstly, a pre-damage process, corresponding to material changes at a microscopic level, leads the precursor to a state that can induce a one-pulse damage. And secondly a final damage occurs, with a mechanism identical to the single shot case. For each material, a law is found to predict the precursor life-time. We can then deduce the long term life of optical elements in high-power laser systems submitted to multipulse irradiation.

  14. Properties of defect-induced multiple pulse laser damage of transmission components.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bin; Zhang, Li; Lu, Menglei; Wang, Ke; Jiao, Hongfei; Zhang, Jinlong; Cheng, Xinbin; Yang, Liming; Wang, Zhanshan

    2016-09-01

    When the number of laser pulses increases, the laser-induced damage threshold of the optical components gradually declines. The magnitude and tendency of this reduced threshold are associated with various factors. Furthermore, this reduced threshold is conclusively determined by the limiting factors or defect characteristics that trigger damage to optical components. Then, fully understanding the damage properties of different kinds of defects will contribute to the optimization of the performance and lifetime of the optical components. In this study, the statistical and deterministic characterizations of the fatigue effect are used to evaluate the properties of the multiple pulse laser damage of transmission components. First, the influence of spot sizes and polishing materials on the properties of the multiple pulse laser damage of optical components is discussed. Then, the structural, absorptive, and mixed artificial defects are fabricated, and the damage characteristics are evaluated and analyzed. Finally, the damage mechanism of different factors has been clarified. PMID:27607284

  15. Authigenic minerals: Biologically influenced and induced organomineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupraz, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Organominerals are minerals precipitated by interactions with organic matter without enzymatic control. Organomineralization of authigenic carbonate minerals depends on two key components: (1) the "carbonate alkalinity engine" impacting the calcium carbonate saturation index and (2) the organic matrix comprised of extracellular organic matter (EOM), which provides a template for carbonate nucleation. The alkalinity engine can be "intrinsic" when microbial metabolisms increase supersaturation or lower the kinetic barrier of precipitation, or "extrinsic" when the physicochemical environment creates the conditions for mineral formation. The organic matrix produced by various communities within the microbial mats is known to influence nucleation, morphology and mineralogy of minerals through binding of cations. By playing with these two key components, three types of authigenic minerals can be formed: (1) a purely physicochemical precipitation on an abiotic substrate, (2) a precipitation "influenced" by the presence of an organic matrix but resulting from a physicochemical forcing (environmentally driven), or (3) a "microbially-induced" precipitation, in which both supersaturation and organic matrix are resulting from microbial activity. In this keynote, we will review important processes involved in the precipitation of authigenic carbonate minerals in modern microbial mats and open the discussion on the potential use of authigenic carbonate minerals as biosignatures in the fossil record.

  16. Explosive-induced shock damage in copper and recompression of the damaged region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turley, W. D.; Stevens, G. D.; Hixson, R. S.; Cerreta, E. K.; Daykin, E. P.; Graeve, O. A.; La Lone, B. M.; Novitskaya, E.; Perez, C.; Rigg, P. A.; Veeser, L. R.

    2016-08-01

    We have studied the dynamic spall process for copper samples in contact with detonating low-performance explosives. When a triangular shaped shock wave from detonation moves through a sample and reflects from the free surface, tension develops immediately, one or more damaged layers can form, and a spall scab can separate from the sample and move ahead of the remaining target material. For dynamic experiments, we used time-resolved velocimetry and x-ray radiography. Soft-recovered samples were analyzed using optical imaging and microscopy. Computer simulations were used to guide experiment design. We observe that for some target thicknesses the spall scab continues to run ahead of the rest of the sample, but for thinner samples, the detonation product gases accelerate the sample enough for it to impact the spall scab several microseconds or more after the initial damage formation. Our data also show signatures in the form of a late-time reshock in the time-resolved data, which support this computational prediction. A primary goal of this research was to study the wave interactions and damage processes for explosives-loaded copper and to look for evidence of this postulated recompression event. We found both experimentally and computationally that we could tailor the magnitude of the initial and recompression shocks by varying the explosive drive and the copper sample thickness; thin samples had a large recompression after spall, whereas thick samples did not recompress at all. Samples that did not recompress had spall scabs that completely separated from the sample, whereas samples with recompression remained intact. This suggests that the hypothesized recompression process closes voids in the damage layer or otherwise halts the spall formation process. This is a somewhat surprising and, in some ways controversial, result, and the one that warrants further research in the shock compression community.

  17. The Effects of Creatine Supplementation on Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawson, Eric S.; Gunn, Bridget; Clarkson, Priscilla M.

    2001-01-01

    Investigated the effects of oral creatine (Cr) supplementation on markers of exercise-induced muscle damage following high-force eccentric exercise in men randomly administered Cr or placebo. Results indicated that 5 days of Cr supplementation did not reduce indirect makers of muscle damage or enhance recovery from high-force eccentric exercise.…

  18. Catastrophic nanosecond laser induced damage in the bulk of potassium titanyl phosphate crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Frank R. Natoli, Jean-Yves; Akhouayri, Hassan; Commandré, Mireille; Duchateau, Guillaume

    2014-06-28

    Due to its high effective nonlinearity and the possibility to produce periodically poled crystals, potassium titanyl phosphate (KTiOPO{sub 4}, KTP) is still one of the economically important nonlinear optical materials. In this overview article, we present a large study on catastrophic nanosecond laser induced damage in this material and the very similar RbTiOPO{sub 4} (RTP). Several different systematic studies are included: multiple pulse laser damage, multi-wavelength laser damage in KTP, damage resistance anisotropy, and variations of the laser damage thresholds for RTP crystals of different qualities. All measurements were carried out in comparable experimental conditions using a 1064 nm Q-switched laser and some were repeated at 532 nm. After summarizing the experimental results, we detail the proposed model for laser damage in this material and discuss the experimental results in this context. According to the model, nanosecond laser damage is caused by light-induced generation of transient laser-damage precursors which subsequently provide free electrons that are heated by the same nanosecond pulse. We also present a stimulated Raman scattering measurement and confront slightly different models to the experimental data. Finally, the physical nature of the transient damage precursors is discussed and similarities and differences to laser damage in other crystals are pointed out.

  19. Autophosphorylation and Pin1 binding coordinate DNA damage-induced HIPK2 activation and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Bitomsky, Nadja; Conrad, Elisa; Moritz, Christian; Polonio-Vallon, Tilman; Sombroek, Dirk; Schultheiss, Kathrin; Glas, Carolina; Greiner, Vera; Herbel, Christoph; Mantovani, Fiamma; del Sal, Giannino; Peri, Francesca; Hofmann, Thomas G.

    2013-01-01

    Excessive genome damage activates the apoptosis response. Protein kinase HIPK2 is a key regulator of DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Here, we deciphered the molecular mechanism of HIPK2 activation and show its relevance for DNA damage-induced apoptosis in cellulo and in vivo. HIPK2 autointeracts and site-specifically autophosphorylates upon DNA damage at Thr880/Ser882. Autophosphorylation regulates HIPK2 activity and mutation of the phosphorylation-acceptor sites deregulates p53 Ser46 phosphorylation and apoptosis in cellulo. Moreover, HIPK2 autophosphorylation is conserved between human and zebrafish and is important for DNA damage-induced apoptosis in vivo. Mechanistically, autophosphorylation creates a binding signal for the phospho-specific isomerase Pin1. Pin1 links HIPK2 activation to its stabilization by inhibiting HIPK2 polyubiquitination and modulating Siah-1–HIPK2 interaction. Concordantly, Pin1 is required for DNA damage-induced HIPK2 stabilization and p53 Ser46 phosphorylation and is essential for induction of apotosis both in cellulo and in zebrafish. Our results identify an evolutionary conserved mechanism regulating DNA damage-induced apoptosis. PMID:24145406

  20. Organophosphate-induced brain damage: mechanisms, neuropsychiatric and neurological consequences, and potential therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun

    2012-06-01

    Organophosphate (OP)-induced brain damage is defined as progressive damage to the brain, resulting from the cholinergic neuronal excitotoxicity and dysfunction induced by OP-induced irreversible AChE inhibition. This delayed secondary neuronal damage that occurs mainly in the cholinergic regions of the brain that contain dense accumulations of cholinergic neurons and the majority of cholinergic projection, might be largely responsible for persistent profound neuropsychiatric and neurological impairments (memory, cognitive, mental, emotional, motor and sensory deficits) in the victims of OP poisoning. Neuroprotective strategies for attenuating OP-induced brain damage should target different development stages of OP-induced brain damage, and may include but not limited to: (1) Antidote therapies with atropine and related efficient anticholinergic drugs; (2) Anti-excitotoxic therapies targeting attenuation of cerebral edema and inflammatory reaction, blockage of calcium influx, inhibition of apoptosis program, and the control of seizures; (3) Neuroprotective strategies using cytokines, antioxidants and NMDAR antagonists (a single drug or a combination of drugs) to slow down the process of secondary neuronal damage; and (4) Therapies targeting individual symptoms or clusters of chronic neuropsychiatric and neurological symptoms. These neuroprotective strategies may help limit or prevent secondary neuronal damage at the early stage of OP poisoning and attenuate the subsequent neuropsychiatric and neurological impairments, thus reducing the long-term disability caused by exposure to OPs. PMID:22498093

  1. Electron flow through biological molecules: Does hole hopping protect proteins from oxidative damage?

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Jay R.; Gray, Harry B.

    2016-01-01

    Biological electron transfers often occur between metal-containing cofactors that are separated by very large molecular distances. Employing photosensitizer-modified iron and copper proteins, we have shown that single-step electron tunneling can occur on nanosecond to microsecond timescales at distances between 15 and 20 angstroms. We also have shown that charge transport can occur over even longer distances by hole hopping (multistep tunneling) through intervening tyrosines and tryptophans. In this Perspective, we advance the hypothesis that such hole hopping through Tyr/Trp chains could protect oxygenase, dioxygenase, and peroxidase enzymes from oxidative damage. In support of this view, by examining the structures of P450 (CYP102A) and 2OG-Fe (TauD) enzymes, we have identified candidate Tyr/Trp chains that could transfer holes from uncoupled high-potential intermediates to reductants in contact with protein surface sites. PMID:26537399

  2. Relationship between recurrent liquefaction-induced damage and subsurface conditions in Midorigaoka, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Wakamatsu, Kazue; Yoshida, Nozomu

    2008-07-08

    Midorigaoka, Kushiro City, northeast Japan, suffered liquefaction-induced ground failures during four successive earthquakes in the past thirty years. This paper presents the ground failures and their effects to structures observed in Midorigaoka during the earthquakes, and examines the relationships between recurrent liquefaction-induced damage and subsurface conditions. As a result, thick liquefiable fill, slope of the ground surface, and subsurface water conditions, which resulted primarily from filling a marshy valley, are found to be responsible on the damage.

  3. Study of filamentary damage in synthesized silica induced by chirped femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Onda, Satoshi; Watanabe, Wataru; Yamada, Kazuhiro; Itoh, Kazuyoshi; Nishii, Junji

    2005-11-01

    Different filamentary tracks in synthesized silica were induced by varying both the pulse duration and the incident energy of chirped laser pulses under slow-focusing conditions. Short-duration pulses induced filamentary refractive-index change, whereas longer pulses produced scattering damage in filamentary tracks. We report a systematic study on the morphology and birefringence of filamentary refractive-index change and scattering damage.

  4. Chronic hypertension aggravates heat stress-induced brain damage: possible neuroprotection by cerebrolysin.

    PubMed

    Muresanu, Dafin Fior; Zimmermann-Meinzingen, Sibilla; Sharma, Hari Shanker

    2010-01-01

    Whole body hyperthermia (WBH) aggravates brain edema formation and cell damage in chronic hypertensive rats compared with normotensive animals. In this investigation, we examined the influence of cerebrolysin on WBH-induced edema formation and brain pathology in hypertensive and normotensive rats. Rats subjected to 4 h WBH at 38 degrees C in a biological oxygen demand (BOD) incubator showed breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), reduced cerebral blood flow (CBF), edema formation and cell injuries in several parts of the brain. These effects were further aggravated in chronic hypertensive rats (two-kidney one clip model (2K1C), for 4 weeks) subjected to WBH. Pretreatment with cerebrolysin (5 mL/kg, 24 h and 30 min before heat stress) markedly attenuated the BBB dysfunction and brain pathology in normal animals. However, in hypertensive animals, a high dose of cerebrolysin (10 mL/kg, 24 h and 30 min before heat stress) was needed to attenuate WBH-induced BBB dysfunction and brain pathology. These observations indicate that heat stress could affect differently in normal and hypertensive conditions. Furthermore, our results suggest that patients suffering from various chronic cardiovascular diseases may respond differently to hyperthermia and to neuroprotective drugs, e.g., cerebrolysin not reported earlier.

  5. RNA damage in biological conflicts and the diversity of responding RNA repair systems

    PubMed Central

    Burroughs, A. Maxwell; Aravind, L.

    2016-01-01

    RNA is targeted in biological conflicts by enzymatic toxins or effectors. A vast diversity of systems which repair or ‘heal’ this damage has only recently become apparent. Here, we summarize the known effectors, their modes of action, and RNA targets before surveying the diverse systems which counter this damage from a comparative genomics viewpoint. RNA-repair systems show a modular organization with extensive shuffling and displacement of the constituent domains; however, a general ‘syntax’ is strongly maintained whereby systems typically contain: a RNA ligase (either ATP-grasp or RtcB superfamilies), nucleotidyltransferases, enzymes modifying RNA-termini for ligation (phosphatases and kinases) or protection (methylases), and scaffold or cofactor proteins. We highlight poorly-understood or previously-uncharacterized repair systems and components, e.g. potential scaffolding cofactors (Rot/TROVE and SPFH/Band-7 modules) with their respective cognate non-coding RNAs (YRNAs and a novel tRNA-like molecule) and a novel nucleotidyltransferase associating with diverse ligases. These systems have been extensively disseminated by lateral transfer between distant prokaryotic and microbial eukaryotic lineages consistent with intense inter-organismal conflict. Components have also often been ‘institutionalized’ for non-conflict roles, e.g. in RNA-splicing and in RNAi systems (e.g. in kinetoplastids) which combine a distinct family of RNA-acting prim-pol domains with DICER-like proteins. PMID:27536007

  6. Variation of the enhanced biologically damaging solar UV due to clouds.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Alfio V; Downs, Nathan

    2004-07-01

    The variation of the biologically damaging solar UV (UVBE) enhanced by clouds above that of clear sky UVBE has been investigated. This was undertaken for summer through to winter for SZA of 5 to 60 degrees employing an integrated automatic cloud and spectral UV measurement system that recorded the solar UV spectra and the sky images at five minute intervals. The UVBE calculated with action spectra with higher relative effectiveness in the UVA produced the lower percentage of cloud enhanced cases. The DNA UVBE provided the highest percentage of cloud enhanced cases compared to the total number of UV scans with 2.2% cloud enhanced cases. As a comparison, the plant and fish melanoma UVBE provided the lowest percentage of cloud enhanced cases with 0.6 to 0.8% cloud enhanced cases. For the cases of cloud enhanced UVBE, the average ratio of the measured UVBE to calculated cloud free UVBE for the photokeratitis, cataracts, plant, generalized plant damage and fish melanoma action spectra was 1.21 to 1.25. In comparison, the highest value of 1.4 was for the DNA action spectrum.

  7. Variation of the enhanced biologically damaging solar UV due to clouds.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Alfio V; Downs, Nathan

    2004-07-01

    The variation of the biologically damaging solar UV (UVBE) enhanced by clouds above that of clear sky UVBE has been investigated. This was undertaken for summer through to winter for SZA of 5 to 60 degrees employing an integrated automatic cloud and spectral UV measurement system that recorded the solar UV spectra and the sky images at five minute intervals. The UVBE calculated with action spectra with higher relative effectiveness in the UVA produced the lower percentage of cloud enhanced cases. The DNA UVBE provided the highest percentage of cloud enhanced cases compared to the total number of UV scans with 2.2% cloud enhanced cases. As a comparison, the plant and fish melanoma UVBE provided the lowest percentage of cloud enhanced cases with 0.6 to 0.8% cloud enhanced cases. For the cases of cloud enhanced UVBE, the average ratio of the measured UVBE to calculated cloud free UVBE for the photokeratitis, cataracts, plant, generalized plant damage and fish melanoma action spectra was 1.21 to 1.25. In comparison, the highest value of 1.4 was for the DNA action spectrum. PMID:15238998

  8. X-ray induced damage observations in ZERODUR mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Takacs, P.Z.; Furenlid, K.; Furenlid, L.

    1997-07-01

    Catastrophic damage has been observed in some ZERODUR mirrors used as first mirrors in two beam lines at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). Despite the high reflectivity of the coatings used on these mirrors, a significant flux of high energy photons penetrates below the coating and is absorbed in the substrate. Although model calculations indicate that the local temperature does not increase significantly, the authors suspect that over long time periods the absorbed flux produces structural changes in the material, leading to a build-up of surface stress, gross figure changes, and growth of fractures. These changes are probably related to the nature of the two-phase glass-ceramic composition of the ZERODUR material. Metal mirrors and single-phase materials do not exhibit such catastrophic damage under similar exposure conditions.

  9. Damage of vascular endothelial barrier induced by explosive blast and its clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Min; Chen, Jing

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, injuries induced by explosive blast have got more and more attention owing to weapon development and frequent terrorist activities. Tear, bleeding and edema of tissues and organs are the main manifestations of blast shock wave damage. Vascular endothelial barrier is the main defense of tissues and organs' integrity. This article aims to discuss possible mechanisms of endothelial barrier damage induced by explosive blast and main manifestations of blood brain barrier, bloodeair barrier, and intestinal vascular barrier impairments. In addition, the main regulatory factors of vascular permeability are also summarized so as to provide theoretical basis for prevention and cure of vascular endothelial barrier damage resulting from explosive blast. PMID:27321288

  10. Damage of vascular endothelial barrier induced by explosive blast and its clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Min; Chen, Jing

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, injuries induced by explosive blast have got more and more attention owing to weapon development and frequent terrorist activities. Tear, bleeding and edema of tissues and organs are the main manifestations of blast shock wave damage. Vascular endothelial barrier is the main defense of tissues and organs' integrity. This article aims to discuss possible mechanisms of endothelial barrier damage induced by explosive blast and main manifestations of blood brain barrier, bloodeair barrier, and intestinal vascular barrier impairments. In addition, the main regulatory factors of vascular permeability are also summarized so as to provide theoretical basis for prevention and cure of vascular endothelial barrier damage resulting from explosive blast.

  11. Radiation-Induced Liver Damage: Correlation of Histopathology with Hepatobiliary Magnetic Resonance Imaging, a Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Seidensticker, Max; Burak, Miroslaw; Kalinski, Thomas; Garlipp, Benjamin; Koelble, Konrad; Wust, Peter; Antweiler, Kai; Seidensticker, Ricarda; Mohnike, Konrad; Pech, Maciej; Ricke, Jens

    2015-02-15

    PurposeRadiotherapy of liver malignancies shows promising results (radioembolization, stereotactic irradiation, interstitial brachytherapy). Regardless of the route of application, a certain amount of nontumorous liver parenchyma will be collaterally damaged by radiation. The functional reserve may be significantly reduced with an impact on further treatment planning. Monitoring of radiation-induced liver damage by imaging is neither established nor validated. We performed an analysis to correlate the histopathological presence of radiation-induced liver damage with functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) utilizing hepatobiliary contrast media (Gd-BOPTA).MethodsPatients undergoing local high-dose-rate brachytherapy for whom a follow-up hepatobiliary MRI within 120 days after radiotherapy as well as an evaluable liver biopsy from radiation-exposed liver tissue within 7 days before MRI were retrospectively identified. Planning computed tomography (CT)/dosimetry was merged to the CT-documentation of the liver biopsy and to the MRI. Presence/absence of radiation-induced liver damage (histopathology) and Gd-BOPTA uptake (MRI) as well as the dose applied during brachytherapy at the site of tissue sampling was determined.ResultsFourteen biopsies from eight patients were evaluated. In all cases with histopathological evidence of radiation-induced liver damage (n = 11), no uptake of Gd-BOPTA was seen. In the remaining three, cases no radiation-induced liver damage but Gd-BOPTA uptake was seen. Presence of radiation-induced liver damage and absence of Gd-BOPTA uptake was correlated with a former high-dose exposition.ConclusionsAbsence of hepatobiliary MRI contrast media uptake in radiation-exposed liver parenchyma may indicate radiation-induced liver damage. Confirmatory studies are warranted.

  12. Ultraviolet induced DNA damage and hereditary skin cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, J.D.; Carrier, W.L.; Francis, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    Clearly, cells from normal individuals possess the ability to repair a variety of damage to DNA. Numerous studies indicate that defects in DNA repair may increase an individual's susceptibility to cancer. It is hoped that continued studies of the exact structural changes produced in the DNA by environmental insults, and the correlation of specific DNA changes with particulr cellular events, such as DNA repair, will lead to a better understanding of cell-killing, mutagenesis and carbinogenesis. 1 figure, 2 tables.

  13. 2-Aminopurine hairpin probes for the detection of ultraviolet-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    El-Yazbi, Amira F; Loppnow, Glen R

    2012-05-13

    Nucleic acid exposure to radiation and chemical insults leads to damage and disease. Thus, detection and understanding DNA damage is important for elucidating molecular mechanisms of disease. However, current methods of DNA damage detection are either time-consuming, destroy the sample, or are too specific to be used for generic detection of damage. In this paper, we develop a fluorescence sensor of 2-aminopurine (2AP), a fluorescent analogue of adenine, incorporated in the loop of a hairpin probe for the quantification of ultraviolet (UV) C-induced nucleic acid damage. Our results show that the selectivity of the 2AP hairpin probe to UV-induced nucleic acid damage is comparable to molecular beacon (MB) probes of DNA damage. The calibration curve for the 2AP hairpin probe shows good linearity (R(2)=0.98) with a limit of detection of 17.2 nM. This probe is a simple, fast and economic fluorescence sensor for the quantification of UV-induced damage in DNA.

  14. Laser damage to optical components induced by surface chromium particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmier, Stephanie S. P.; Tovena, Isabelle; Courchinoux, Roger; Josse, Michel A.; Rullier, Jean Luc; Bertussi, Bertrand; Natoli, Jean Yves; Servant, Laurent; Talaga, David

    2005-02-01

    To obtain better understanding of particulate contamination, chromium dots (50 x 50 &mum2) were deposited on a silica substrate by photolithography. The aim in using this sample is to observe the mechanism of damage initiation that can be attributed to surface contamination of micro-metric size. A Nd:YAG laser irradiated the sample at 1064 nm for different fluences and also different numbers of shots. Several methods were used to characterise the laser effects on the chromium dots and the silica substrate: "Nomarski", "atomic force" and photothermal microscope observations. The laser fluence is found to be the most important parameter for the behaviour of the chromium dots. At low fluence (<1 J/cm2), they become cracked (fractured). At medium fluence (around 1 J/cm2) chromium fusion is reached and chromium oxide appears. Finally at higher fluence (3 J/cm2), although chromium dots are blown off the substrate and small damage to silica occurs on the first shot, the subsequent shots do not lead to a dramatic increase in the damage.

  15. Laser induced damage in optical materials: 8th ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1977-05-01

    The Eighth Annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was hosted by the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, from 13 to 15 July 1976. The Symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Energy Research and Development Administration, and the Office of Naval Research. About 160 scientists attended the Symposium, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, and Brazil. The Symposium was divided into five half-day sessions concerning Bulk Material Properties and Thermal Behavior, Mirrors and Surfaces, Thin Film Properties, Thin Film Damage, and Scaling Laws and Fundamental Mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the Symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to new materials for use at 10.6 microm in mirror substrates, windo s, and coatings. New techniques in film deposition and advances in diamond-turning of optics were described. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength were discussed. Alexander J. Glass of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory were co-chairpersons of the Symposium. The Ninth Annual Symposium is scheduled for 4-6 October 1977 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado.

  16. Clustered DNA damages induced in human hematopoietic cells by low doses of ionizing radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, Betsy M.; Bennett, Paula V.; Cintron-Torres, Nela; Hada, Megumi; Trunk, John; Monteleone, Denise; Sutherland, John C.; Laval, Jacques; Stanislaus, Marisha; Gewirtz, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces clusters of DNA damages--oxidized bases, abasic sites and strand breaks--on opposing strands within a few helical turns. Such damages have been postulated to be difficult to repair, as are double strand breaks (one type of cluster). We have shown that low doses of low and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation induce such damage clusters in human cells. In human cells, DSB are about 30% of the total of complex damages, and the levels of DSBs and oxidized pyrimidine clusters are similar. The dose responses for cluster induction in cells can be described by a linear relationship, implying that even low doses of ionizing radiation can produce clustered damages. Studies are in progress to determine whether clusters can be produced by mechanisms other than ionizing radiation, as well as the levels of various cluster types formed by low and high LET radiation.

  17. Molecular beacon probes for the detection of cisplatin-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Shire, Zahra J; Loppnow, Glen R

    2012-04-01

    Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II)) causes crosslinking of DNA at AG and GG sites in cellular DNA, inhibiting replication, and making it a useful anti-cancer drug. Several techniques have been used previously to detect nucleic acid damage but most of these tools are labour-intensive, time-consuming, and/or expensive. Here, we describe a sensitive, robust, and quantitative tool for detecting cisplatin-induced DNA damage by using fluorescent molecular beacon probes (MB). Our results show a decrease of fluorescence in the presence of cisplatin-induced DNA damage, confirmed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The decrease in fluorescence upon damage scales with the number of AG and GG sites, indicating the ability of MB to quantitatively detect DNA damage by cisplatin.

  18. AFM CHARACTERIZATION OF RAMAN LASER INDUCED DAMAGE ON CDZNTECRYSTAL SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    Teague, L.; Duff, M.

    2008-10-07

    High quality CdZnTe (or CZT) crystals have the potential for use in room temperature gamma-ray and X-ray spectrometers. Over the last decade, the methods for growing high quality CZT have improved the quality of the produced crystals however there are material features that can influence the performance of these materials as radiation detectors. The presence of structural heterogeneities within the crystals, such as twinning, pipes, grain boundaries (polycrystallinity), and secondary phases (SPs) can have an impact on the detector performance. There is considerable need for reliable and reproducible characterization methods for the measurement of crystal quality. With improvements in material characterization and synthesis, these crystals may become suitable for widespread use in gamma radiation detection. Characterization techniques currently utilized to test for quality and/or to predict performance of the crystal as a gamma-ray detector include infrared (IR) transmission imaging, synchrotron X-ray topography, photoluminescence spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy. In some cases, damage caused by characterization methods can have deleterious effects on the crystal performance. The availability of non-destructive analysis techniques is essential to validate a crystal's quality and its ability to be used for either qualitative or quantitative gamma-ray or X-ray detection. The work presented herein discusses the damage that occurs during characterization of the CZT surface by a laser during Raman spectroscopy, even at minimal laser powers. Previous Raman studies have shown that the localized annealing from tightly focused, low powered lasers results in areas of higher Te concentration on the CZT surface. This type of laser damage on the surface resulted in decreased detector performance which was most likely due to increased leakage current caused by areas of higher Te concentration. In this study

  19. Relationship between the repair of radiation-induced DNA damage and recovery from potentially lethal damage in 9L rat brain tumor cells. [Gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    vanAnkeren, S.C.; Wheeler, K.T.

    1984-03-01

    The kinetics of repair of radiation-induced DNA damage and recovery from radiation-induced potentially lethal damage (PLD) for fed plateau-phase 9L/Ro rat brain tumor cells were compared after single doses of gamma-radiation and after combined treatment with 3 micrograms of 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU)/ml given 16 hr prior to irradiation. DNA damage and repair were assayed using alkaline filter elution, while cell survival was assayed by colony formation. Repair of radiation-induced DNA damage and recovery from radiation-induced PLD followed statistically identical biphasic kinetics; the fast-phase half-times were 4.1 +/- 0.3 (S.D.) min and 4.0 +/- 0.8 min, while the slow-phase half-times were 59.7 +/- 11.2 min and 78.7 +/- 34.1 min, respectively. Treatment with BCNU prior to irradiation resulted in both additional DNA damage and increased cell kill. When DNA damage and cell survival after the combined treatment were corrected for the contribution from BCNU given alone, no inhibition of either repair of radiation-induced DNA damage or of recovery from radiation-induced PLD was observed. However, postirradiation hypertonic treatment inhibited both DNA repair and recovery from radiation-induced PLD. These correlations between the kinetics of the molecular and cellular repair processes support a role for repair of radiation-induced DNA damage in recovery from radiation-induced PLD. The lack of inhibition by BCNU of both repair of radiation-induced DNA damage and of recovery from radiation-induced PLD also demonstrates that these are not the mechanisms by which BCNU enhances radiation-induced cytotoxicity in 9L cells.

  20. The effect of phytosterol protects rats against 4-nitrophenol-induced liver damage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiaqin; Song, Meiyan; Li, Yansen; Zhang, Yonghui; Taya, Kazuyoshi; Li, ChunMei

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effect of phytosterol (PS) in regard to liver damage induced by 4-nitrophenol (PNP). Twenty rats were randomly divided into four groups (Control, PS, PNP, and PNP+PS). The PS and PNP+PS groups were pretreated with PS for one week. The PNP and PNP+PS groups were injected subcutaneously with PNP for 28 days. The control group received a basal diet and was injected with vehicle alone. Treatment with PS prevented the elevation of the total bilirubin levels, as well as an increase in serum alkaline transaminase and aspartate transaminase, which are typically caused by PNP-induced liver damage. Histopathologically showed that liver damage was significantly mitigated by PS treatment. However, there was no significant change in antioxidant enzyme activities, and the Nrf2-antioxidant system was not activated after treatment with PS. These results suggest that PS could mitigate liver damage induced by PNP, but does not enhance antioxidant capacity. PMID:26748050

  1. Fracture Induced Sub-Band Absorption as a Precursor to Optical Damage on Fused Silica Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P E; Bude, J D; Suratwala, T I; Shen, N; Laurence, T A; Steele, W A; Menapace, J; Feit, M D; Wong, L L

    2010-03-05

    The optical damage threshold of indentation induced flaws on fused silica surfaces was explored. Mechanical flaws were characterized by laser damaged testing, SEM, optical, and photoluminescence microscopy. Localized polishing, chemical etching, and the control of indentation morphology were used to isolate the structural features which limit optical damage. A thin defect layer on fracture surfaces, including those smaller than the wavelength of visible light, was found to be the dominant source of laser damage initiation during illumination with 355nm, 3ns laser pulses. Little evidence was found that either displaced or densified material or fluence intensification plays a significant role in optical damage at fluences >35J/cm{sup 2}. Elimination of the defect layer was shown to increase the overall damage performance of fused silica optics.

  2. Thermally induced osteocyte damage initiates pro-osteoclastogenic gene expression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Eimear B; Tallon, David; Cheung, Wing-Yee; Schaffler, Mitchell B; Kennedy, Oran D; McNamara, Laoise M

    2016-06-01

    Bone is often subject to harsh temperatures during orthopaedic procedures resulting in thermally induced bone damage, which may affect the healing response. Postsurgical healing of bone is essential to the success of surgery, therefore, an understanding of the thermally induced responses of bone cells to clinically relevant temperatures in vivo is required. Osteocytes have been shown to be integrally involved in the bone remodelling cascade, via apoptosis, in micro-damage systems. However, it is unknown whether this relationship is similar following thermal damage. Sprague-Dawley rat tibia were exposed to clinically relevant temperatures (47°C or 60°C) to investigate the role of osteocytes in modulating remodelling related factors. Immunohistochemistry was used to quantify osteocyte thermal damage (activated caspase-3). Thermally induced pro-osteoclastogenic genes (Rankl, Opg and M-csf), in addition to genes known to mediate osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation via prostaglandin production (Cox2), vascularization (Vegf) and inflammatory (Il1a) responses, were investigated using gene expression analysis. The results demonstrate that heat-treatment induced significant bone tissue and cellular damage. Pro-osteoclastogenic genes were upregulated depending on the amount of temperature elevation compared with the control. Taken together, the results of this study demonstrate the in vivo effect of thermally induced osteocyte damage on the gene expression profile.

  3. Thermally induced osteocyte damage initiates pro-osteoclastogenic gene expression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Eimear B; Tallon, David; Cheung, Wing-Yee; Schaffler, Mitchell B; Kennedy, Oran D; McNamara, Laoise M

    2016-06-01

    Bone is often subject to harsh temperatures during orthopaedic procedures resulting in thermally induced bone damage, which may affect the healing response. Postsurgical healing of bone is essential to the success of surgery, therefore, an understanding of the thermally induced responses of bone cells to clinically relevant temperatures in vivo is required. Osteocytes have been shown to be integrally involved in the bone remodelling cascade, via apoptosis, in micro-damage systems. However, it is unknown whether this relationship is similar following thermal damage. Sprague-Dawley rat tibia were exposed to clinically relevant temperatures (47°C or 60°C) to investigate the role of osteocytes in modulating remodelling related factors. Immunohistochemistry was used to quantify osteocyte thermal damage (activated caspase-3). Thermally induced pro-osteoclastogenic genes (Rankl, Opg and M-csf), in addition to genes known to mediate osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation via prostaglandin production (Cox2), vascularization (Vegf) and inflammatory (Il1a) responses, were investigated using gene expression analysis. The results demonstrate that heat-treatment induced significant bone tissue and cellular damage. Pro-osteoclastogenic genes were upregulated depending on the amount of temperature elevation compared with the control. Taken together, the results of this study demonstrate the in vivo effect of thermally induced osteocyte damage on the gene expression profile. PMID:27335224

  4. Laser-induced fluorescence-cued, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy biological-agent detection

    SciTech Connect

    Hybl, John D.; Tysk, Shane M.; Berry, Shaun R.; Jordan, Michael P

    2006-12-01

    Methods for accurately characterizing aerosols are required for detecting biological warfare agents. Currently, fluorescence-based biological agent sensors provide adequate detection sensitivity but suffer from high false-alarm rates. Combining single-particle fluorescence analysis with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) provides additional discrimination and potentially reduces false-alarm rates. A transportable UV laser-induced fluorescence-cued LIBS test bed has been developed and used to evaluate the utility of LIBS for biological-agent detection. Analysis of these data indicates that LIBS adds discrimination capability to fluorescence-based biological-agent detectors.However, the data also show that LIBS signatures of biological agent simulants are affected by washing. This may limit the specificity of LIBS and narrow the scope of its applicability in biological-agent detection.

  5. Laser-induced fluorescence-cued, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy biological-agent detection.

    PubMed

    Hybl, John D; Tysk, Shane M; Berry, Shaun R; Jordan, Michael P

    2006-12-01

    Methods for accurately characterizing aerosols are required for detecting biological warfare agents. Currently, fluorescence-based biological agent sensors provide adequate detection sensitivity but suffer from high false-alarm rates. Combining single-particle fluorescence analysis with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) provides additional discrimination and potentially reduces false-alarm rates. A transportable UV laser-induced fluorescence-cued LIBS test bed has been developed and used to evaluate the utility of LIBS for biological-agent detection. Analysis of these data indicates that LIBS adds discrimination capability to fluorescence-based biological-agent detectors. However, the data also show that LIBS signatures of biological agent simulants are affected by washing. This may limit the specificity of LIBS and narrow the scope of its applicability in biological-agent detection.

  6. Polymyxin E Induces Rapid Paenibacillus polymyxa Death by Damaging Cell Membrane while Ca2+ Can Protect Cells from Damage

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yuanning; Qin, Wangrong; Lin, Jianxun

    2015-01-01

    Polymyxin E, produced by Paenibacillus polymyxa, is an important antibiotic normally against Gram-negative pathogens. In this study, we found that polymyxin E can kill its producer P. polymyxa, a Gram-positive bacterium, by disrupting its cell membrane. Membrane damage was clearly revealed by detecting the leakage of intracellular molecules. The observation using scanning electron microscopy also supported that polymyxin E can destroy the cell membrane and cause an extensive cell surface alteration. On the other hand, divalent cations can give protection against polymyxin E. Compared with Mg2+, Ca2+ can more effectively alleviate polymyxin E-induced damage to the cell membrane, thus remarkably increasing the P. polymyxa survival. Our findings would shed light on a not yet described bactericidal mechanism of polymyxin E against Gram-positive bacteria and more importantly the nature of limited fermentation output of polymyxin E from P. polymyxa. PMID:26252512

  7. Modelling biological and chemically induced precipitation of calcium phosphate in enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems.

    PubMed

    Barat, R; Montoya, T; Seco, A; Ferrer, J

    2011-06-01

    The biologically induced precipitation processes can be important in wastewater treatment, in particular treating raw wastewater with high calcium concentration combined with Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal. Currently, there is little information and experience in modelling jointly biological and chemical processes. This paper presents a calcium phosphate precipitation model and its inclusion in the Activated Sludge Model No 2d (ASM2d). The proposed precipitation model considers that aqueous phase reactions quickly achieve the chemical equilibrium and that aqueous-solid change is kinetically governed. The model was calibrated using data from four experiments in a Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR) operated for EBPR and finally validated with two experiments. The precipitation model proposed was able to reproduce the dynamics of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) formation and later crystallization to hydroxyapatite (HAP) under different scenarios. The model successfully characterised the EBPR performance of the SBR, including the biological, physical and chemical processes.

  8. Laser induced damage in optical materials: eleventh ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Bennett, H E; Glass, A J; Guenther, A H; Newnam, B

    1980-07-15

    The eleventh Symposium on Optical Materials for High-Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 30-31 October 1979. The symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Department of Energy, and the Office of Naval Research. About 150 scientists attended the symposium, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Japan, West Germany, and Denmark. The symposium was divided into sessions concerning transparent optical materials and the measurement of their properties, mirrors and surfaces, thin film characteristics, thin film damage, considerations for high-power systems, and finally theory and breakdown. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for high-power apparatus. The wavelength range of prime interest was from 10.6 microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength was discussed in detail. Harold E. Bennett of the Naval Weapons Center, Alexander J. Glass of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory, and Brian E. Newnam of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory were cochairpersons. The twelfth annual symposium is scheduled for 30 September-1 October 1980 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado.

  9. p38γ regulates UV-induced checkpoint signaling and repair of UV-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chia-Cheng; Wu, Xiaohua; Han, Jiahuai; Sun, Peiqing

    2010-06-01

    In eukaryotic cells, DNA damage triggers activation of checkpoint signaling pathways that coordinate cell cycle arrest and repair of damaged DNA. These DNA damage responses serve to maintain genome stability and prevent accumulation of genetic mutations and development of cancer. The p38 MAPK was previously implicated in cellular responses to several types of DNA damage. However, the role of each of the four p38 isoforms and the mechanism for their involvement in DNA damage responses remained poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrate that p38γ, but not the other p38 isoforms, contributes to the survival of UV-treated cells. Deletion of p38γ sensitizes cells to UV exposure, accompanied by prolonged S phase cell cycle arrest and increased rate of apoptosis. Further investigation reveal that p38γ is essential for the optimal activation of the checkpoint signaling caused by UV, and for the efficient repair of UV-induced DNA damage. These findings have established a novel role of p38γ in UV-induced DNA damage responses, and suggested that p38γ contributes to the ability of cells to cope with UV exposure by regulating the checkpoint signaling pathways and the repair of damaged DNA.

  10. Characteristics and mechanism of laser-induced surface damage initiated by metal contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Shuang; Sun, Mingying; Shi, Shuaixu; Li, Zhaoyan; Zhang, Ya-nan; Liu, Zhigang

    2015-08-01

    In high power laser facility, contaminants on optics surfaces reduce damage resistance of optical elements and then decrease their lifetime. By damage test experiments, laser damage induced by typical metal particles such as stainless steel 304 is studied. Optics samples with metal particles of different sizes on surfaces are prepared artificially based on the file and sieve. Damage test is implemented in air using a 1-on-1 mode. Results show that damage morphology and mechanism caused by particulate contamination on the incident and exit surfaces are quite different. Contaminants on the incident surface absorb laser energy and generate high temperature plasma during laser irradiation which can ablate optical surface. Metal particles melt and then the molten nano-particles redeposit around the initial particles. Central region of the damaged area bears the same outline as the initial particle because of the shielding effect. However, particles on the exit surface absorb a mass of energy, generate plasma and splash lots of smaller particles, only a few of them redeposit at the particle coverage area on the exit surface. Most of the laser energy is deposited at the interface of the metal particle and the sample surface, and thus damage size on the exit surface is larger than that on the incident surface. The areas covered by the metal particle are strongly damaged. And the damage sites are more serious than that on the incident surface. Besides damage phenomenon also depends on coating and substrate materials.

  11. Damage-induced deflection approach for damage localization and quantification of shear buildings: validation on a full-scale shear building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, S. H.; Koo, K. Y.; Jung, H. Y.; Jung, H. J.

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents the full-scale experimental validation of the damage-induced deflection approach recently developed for damage detection and quantification of shear buildings. In the approach, an additional deflection induced by damage is used to estimate its location and severity because the deflection contains essential information about the damage. In this study, damage location and severity of a five-story full-scale shear building was estimated, not measured directly, by modal flexibility matrices obtained from acceleration responses of the structure during the shaker excitation at the fourth floor. Two damage cases have been considered by reducing the spring stiffness of the connecting brace at the first floor. In numerical simulations, it was found that the approach successfully identified the damage location and also estimated the damage ratios accurately by using only the lowest two natural frequencies and mode shapes. In the experimental study, a series of tests have been carried out and it was demonstrated that the damaged floor was successfully localized and the damage ratios estimated by the damage-induced deflection approach agreed well with those calculated from numerical simulations.

  12. Dissecting the molecular mechanism of ionizing radiation-induced tissue damage in the feather follicle.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Liao, Chunyan; Chu, Qiqi; Zhou, Guixuan; Lin, Xiang; Li, Xiaobo; Lu, Haijie; Xu, Benhua; Yue, Zhicao

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a common therapeutic agent in cancer therapy. It damages normal tissue and causes side effects including dermatitis and mucositis. Here we use the feather follicle as a model to investigate the mechanism of IR-induced tissue damage, because any perturbation of feather growth will be clearly recorded in its regular yet complex morphology. We find that IR induces defects in feather formation in a dose-dependent manner. No abnormality was observed at 5 Gy. A transient, reversible perturbation of feather growth was induced at 10 Gy, leading to defects in the feather structure. This perturbation became irreversible at 20 Gy. Molecular and cellular analysis revealed P53 activation, DNA damage and repair, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in the pathobiology. IR also induces patterning defects in feather formation, with disrupted branching morphogenesis. This perturbation is mediated by cytokine production and Stat1 activation, as manipulation of cytokine levels or ectopic Stat1 over-expression also led to irregular feather branching. Furthermore, AG-490, a chemical inhibitor of Stat1 signaling, can partially rescue IR-induced tissue damage. Our results suggest that the feather follicle could serve as a useful model to address the in vivo impact of the many mechanisms of IR-induced tissue damage.

  13. Photo-induced cell damage analysis for multi-focus CARS microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamikawa, Takeo; Murakami, Yoshinori; Matsumura, Naokazu; Niioka, Hirohiko; Fukushima, Shuichiro; Araki, Tsutomu; Hashimoto, Mamoru

    2011-03-01

    We investigated photo-induced cell damage for multi-focus CARS (coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering) microscopy. In general, using a near-infrared pulse light source, photo-induced damage is dominantly caused via multi-photon induced phenomena, and the peak power of the excitation light is limited for the non-invasive imaging. We obtained cell viability images during single- or multi-focus (7 foci) exposure of which wavelength and pulse duration were 709 nm and 5 ps. The laser power of one focal spot was respectively set to 27.8 mW and 14.5 mW for single- and multi-focus excitation because those excitation beams induce the comparable signals for third-order nonlinear phenomena. The cell viability was observed using DAPI fluorophore that mainly stains DNA of dead cells. As a result, we found that the single-focus excitation with 27.8 mW/spot caused cell damage within 6 min. In contrast, photo-induced damage was not detected until 20 min for the multi-focus excitation with 14.5 mW/spot and 7 foci. The results suggest that the photo-induced damage is a serious problem on the single-focus excitation, and the multi-focus excitation method is preferable for CARS imaging.

  14. DETECTION OF LOW DOSE RADIATION INDUCED DNA DAMAGE USING TEMPERATURE DIFFERENNTIAL FLUORESENCE ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for radiation-induced DNA damage is reported. Changes in temperature-induced strand separation in both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from Escherichia coli) were measured after exposure to low doses of radiation. Exposures...

  15. DETECTION OF LOW DOSE RADIATION INDUCED DNA DAMAGE USING TEMPERATURE DIFFERENTIAL FLUORESCENCE ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for radiation-induced DNA damage is reported. Changes in temperature-induced strand separation in both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from Escherichia coli) were measured after exposure to low doses of radiation. Exposur...

  16. Influence of naringin on cadmium-induced genomic damage in human lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Dilek; Aydemir, Nilufer Cinkilic; Vatan, Ozgür; Tüzün, Ece; Bilaloglu, Rahmi

    2012-03-01

    Cadmium is an important toxic environmental heavy metal. Generally, occupational and environmental exposures to cadmium result from heavy metal mining, metallurgy and industrial use and the manufacturing of nickel-cadmium batteries, pigments and plastic stabilizers. Cadmium induces oxidative stress and alters the antioxidant system, resulting in oxidative DNA damage and lipid peroxidation. The effect of naringin, a grapefruit flavonone, on cadmium-induced genomic damage was studied by using an in vitro system to test for chromosomal aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges. Cadmium significantly increased the total chromosomal aberrations in human lymphocytes at concentrations of 20 and 40 μM, and although naringin alone did not induce any chromosomal aberrations, it decreased those induced by cadmium. The mitotic index was not affected by either cadmium or naringin. Cadmium also induced a significant number of sister chromatid exchanges, but naringin alone did not induce sister chromatid exchanges and was unable to decrease the frequency of sister chromatid exchanges induced by cadmium. Replicative index analysis revealed that naringin and cadmium did not significantly alter replicative index frequencies. In this study, we show that plant-based flavonoids, such as naringin, may reduce the genomic damage induced by cadmium and may protect the cellular environments from free radical damage by its possible antioxidative potential. PMID:21636685

  17. Laser induced damage in optical materials: ninth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1978-08-01

    The Ninth Annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 4-6 October 1977. The symposium was under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Department of Energy (formerly ERDA), and the Office of Naval Research. About 185 scientists attended, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Australia, Union of South Africa, and the Soviet Union. The Symposium was divided into sessions concerning Laser Windows and Materials, Mirrors and Surfaces, Thin Films, Laser Glass and Glass Lasers, and Fundamental Mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for use from 10.6 microm to the uv region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength were also discussed. Alexander J. Glass of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory were co-chairpersons. The Tenth Annual Symposium is scheduled for 12-14 September 1978 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado.

  18. Experimental determination of the relationship between permeability and microfracture-induced damage in bedded salt

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeifle, T.W.

    1998-03-01

    The development of deep underground structures (e.g., shafts, mines, storage and disposal caverns) significantly alters the stress state in the rock near the structure or opening. The effect of such an opening is to concentrate the far-field stress near the free surface. For soft rock such as salt, the concentrating effect of the opening induces deviatoric stresses in the salt that may be large enough to initiate microcracks which then propagate with time. The volume of rock susceptible to damage by microfracturing is often referred to as the disturbed rock zone and, by its nature, is expected to exhibit high permeability relative to that of the native, far-field rock. This paper presents laboratory data that characterize microfracture-induced damage and the effect this damage has on permeability for bedded salt from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant located in southeastern New Mexico. Damage is induced in the salt through a series of tertiary creep experiments and quantified in terms of dilatant volumetric strain. The permeability of damaged specimens is then measured using nitrogen gas as the permeant. The range in damage investigated included dilatant volumetric strains from less than 0.03 percent to nearly 4.0 percent. Permeability values corresponding to these damage levels ranged from 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}18} m{sup 2} to 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} m{sup 2}. Two simple models were fitted to the data for use in predicting permeability from dilatant volumetric strain.

  19. UV-induced DNA damage in Cyclops abyssorum tatricus populations from clear and turbid alpine lakes

    PubMed Central

    Tartarotti, Barbara; Saul, Nadine; Chakrabarti, Shumon; Trattner, Florian; Steinberg, Christian E. W.; Sommaruga, Ruben

    2014-01-01

    Zooplankton from clear alpine lakes thrive under high levels of solar UV radiation (UVR), but in glacially turbid ones they are more protected from this damaging radiation. Here, we present results from experiments done with Cyclops abyssorum tatricus to assess UV-induced DNA damage and repair processes using the comet assay. Copepods were collected from three alpine lakes of differing UV transparency ranging from clear to glacially turbid, and exposed to artificial UVR. In addition, photoprotection levels [mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) and lipophilic antioxidant capacity] were estimated in the test populations. Similar UV-induced DNA damage levels were observed among the copepods from all lakes, but background DNA damage (time zero and dark controls) was lowest in the copepods from the glacially turbid lake, resulting in a higher relative DNA damage accumulation. Most DNA strand breaks were repaired after recovery in the dark. Low MAA concentrations were found in the copepods from the glacially turbid lake, while the highest levels were observed in the population from the most UV transparent lake. However, the highest lipophilic antioxidant capacities were measured in the copepods from the lake with intermediate UV transparency. Photoprotection and the ability to repair DNA damage, and consequently reducing UV-induced damage, are part of the response mechanisms in zooplankton to changes in water transparency caused by glacier retreat. PMID:24616551

  20. Protective Effect of Pyruvate Against Radiation-Induced Damage in Collagenized Tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griko, Y. V.; Yan, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation produces both acute and late effects on the collagenized tissues and have profound effects on wound healing. Because of the crucial practical importance for new radioprotective agents, our study has been focused on evaluation of the efficacy of non-toxic naturally occurring compounds to protect tissue integrity against high-dose gamma radiation. Here, we demonstrate that molecular integrity of collagen may serve as a sensitive biological marker for quantitative evaluation of molecular damage to collagenized tissue and efficacy of radioprotective agents. Increasing doses of gamma radiation (0-50kGy) result in progressive destruction of the native collagen fibrils, which provide a structural framework, strength, and proper milieu for the regenerating tissue. The strategy used in this study involved the thermodynamic specification of all structural changes in collagenized matrix of skin, aortic heart valve, and bone tissue induced by different doses and conditions of g-irradiation. This study describes a simple biophysical approach utilizing the Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) to characterize the structural resistance of the aortic valve matrix exposed to different doses of g-irradiation. It allows us to identify the specific response of each constituent as well as to determine the influence of the different treatments on the characteristic parameters of protein structure. We found that pyruvate, a substance that naturally occurs in the body, provide significant protection (up to 80%) from biochemical and biomechanical damage to the collagenized tissue through the effective targeting of reactive oxygen species. The recently discovered role of pyruvate in the cell antioxidant defense to O2 oxidation, and its essential constituency in the daily human diet, indicate that the administration of pyruvate-based radioprotective formulations may provide safe and effective protection from deleterious effects of ionizing

  1. MTERF2 contributes to MPP(+)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and cell damage.

    PubMed

    Han, Yanyan; Gao, Peiye; Qiu, Shi; Zhang, Linbing; Yang, Ling; Zuo, Ji; Zhong, Chunjiu; Zhu, Shun; Liu, Wen

    2016-02-26

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder whose pathogenesis is under intense investigation. Substantial evidence indicates that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in the pathophysiology of PD. Several mitochondrial internal regulating factors act to maintain the mitochondrial function. However, how these internal regulating factors contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction in PD remains elusive. One of these factors, mitochondrial transcription termination factor 2 (MTERF2), has been implicated in the regulation of oxidative phosphorylation by modulating mitochondrial DNA transcription. Here, we discovered a new role of MTERF2 in regulating mitochondrial dysfunction and cell damage induced by MPP(+) in SH-SY5Y cells. We found that MPP(+) treatment elevated MTERF2 expression, induced mitochondrial dysfunction and cell damage, which was alleviated by MTERF2 knockdown. These findings demonstrate that MTERF2 contributes to MPP(+)-induced mitochondrial disruption and cell damage. This study indicates that MTERF2 is a potential therapeutic target for environmentally induced Parkinson's disease. PMID:26826381

  2. Reduction of arsenite-enhanced ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage by supplemental zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Karen L.; King, Brenee S.; Sandoval, Monica M.; Liu, Ke Jian; Hudson, Laurie G.

    2013-06-01

    Arsenic is a recognized human carcinogen and there is evidence that arsenic augments the carcinogenicity of DNA damaging agents such as ultraviolet radiation (UVR) thereby acting as a co-carcinogen. Inhibition of DNA repair is one proposed mechanism to account for the co-carcinogenic actions of arsenic. We and others find that arsenite interferes with the function of certain zinc finger DNA repair proteins. Furthermore, we reported that zinc reverses the effects of arsenite in cultured cells and a DNA repair target protein, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1. In order to determine whether zinc ameliorates the effects of arsenite on UVR-induced DNA damage in human keratinocytes and in an in vivo model, normal human epidermal keratinocytes and SKH-1 hairless mice were exposed to arsenite, zinc or both before solar-simulated (ss) UVR exposure. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activity, DNA damage and mutation frequencies at the Hprt locus were measured in each treatment group in normal human keratinocytes. DNA damage was assessed in vivo by immunohistochemical staining of skin sections isolated from SKH-1 hairless mice. Cell-based findings demonstrate that ssUVR-induced DNA damage and mutagenesis are enhanced by arsenite, and supplemental zinc partially reverses the arsenite effect. In vivo studies confirm that zinc supplementation decreases arsenite-enhanced DNA damage in response to ssUVR exposure. From these data we can conclude that zinc offsets the impact of arsenic on ssUVR-stimulated DNA damage in cells and in vivo suggesting that zinc supplementation may provide a strategy to improve DNA repair capacity in arsenic exposed human populations. - Highlights: • Low levels of arsenite enhance UV-induced DNA damage in human keratinocytes. • UV-initiated HPRT mutation frequency is enhanced by arsenite. • Zinc supplementation offsets DNA damage and mutation frequency enhanced by arsenite. • Zinc-dependent reduction of arsenite enhanced DNA damage is confirmed in vivo.

  3. Terbium fluorescence as a sensitive, inexpensive probe for UV-induced damage in nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    El-Yazbi, Amira F; Loppnow, Glen R

    2013-07-01

    Much effort has been focused on developing methods for detecting damaged nucleic acids. However, almost all of the proposed methods consist of multi-step procedures, are limited, require expensive instruments, or suffer from a high level of interferences. In this paper, we present a novel simple, inexpensive, mix-and-read assay that is generally applicable to nucleic acid damage and uses the enhanced luminescence due to energy transfer from nucleic acids to terbium(III) (Tb(3+)). Single-stranded oligonucleotides greatly enhance the Tb(3+) emission, but duplex DNA does not. With the use of a DNA hairpin probe complementary to the oligonucleotide of interest, the Tb(3+)/hairpin probe is applied to detect ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damage. The hairpin probe hybridizes only with the undamaged DNA. However, the damaged DNA remains single-stranded and enhances the intrinsic fluorescence of Tb(3+), producing a detectable signal directly proportional to the amount of DNA damage. This allows the Tb(3+)/hairpin probe to be used for sensitive quantification of UV-induced DNA damage. The Tb(3+)/hairpin probe showed superior selectivity to DNA damage compared to conventional molecular beacons probes (MBs) and its sensitivity is more than 2.5 times higher than MBs with a limit of detection of 4.36±1.2 nM. In addition, this probe is easier to synthesize and more than eight times cheaper than MBs, which makes its use recommended for high-throughput, quantitative analysis of DNA damage.

  4. BPC-15 reduces trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colonic damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Veljaca, M; Lesch, C A; Pllana, R; Sanchez, B; Chan, K; Guglietta, A

    1995-01-01

    The effect of BPC-15 (Booly Protection Compound-15) was evaluated in a rat model of colonic injury. A single intracolonic administration of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) dissolved in ethanol induces severe colonic damage, which is characterized by areas of necrosis surrounded by areas of acute inflammation. The damage is associated with high myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, mainly as a reflection of neutrophilic infiltration into the damaged tissue. In this study, 1 hr before a single intracolonic administration of 50 mg/kg of TNBS in 50% ethanol, the animals were treated with one of the following doses of BPC-15: 0.0001, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1 or 10 nmol/kg administered i.p. or with a dose of 10 nmol/kg administered intracolonically. The animals were sacrificed 3 days later and the extent of colonic necrosis and hyperemia was measured with an image analyzer. The i.p. administration of BPC-15 significantly reduced the extent of TNBS-induced colonic damage in a dose-dependent manner. This was associated with a statistically significant and dose-dependent reduction in colonic tissue MPO activity. At the dose tested (10 nmol/kg), intracolonic administration of BPC-15 did not significantly reduce either the extent of the colonic damage or the increase in MPO activity induced by TNBS. In conclusion, this study showed that i.p. administration of BPC-15 reduced TNBS-induced colonic damage in rats. PMID:7815358

  5. High-Density Plasma-Induced Etch Damage of GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, A.G.; Han, J.; Lester, L.F.; Pearton, S.J.; Ren, F.; Shul, R.J.; Willison, C.G.; Zhang, L.; Zolper, J.C.

    1999-04-29

    Anisotropic, smooth etching of the group-III nitrides has been reported at relatively high rates in high-density plasma etch systems. However, such etch results are often obtained under high de-bias andlor high plasma flux conditions where plasma induced damage can be significant. Despite the fact that the group-III nitrides have higher bonding energies than more conventional III-V compounds, plasma-induced etch damage is still a concern. Attempts to minimize such damage by reducing the ion energy or increasing the chemical activity in the plasma often result in a loss of etch rate or anisotropy which significantly limits critical dimensions and reduces the utility of the process for device applications requiring vertical etch profiles. It is therefore necessary to develop plasma etch processes which couple anisotropy for critical dimension and sidewall profile control and high etch rates with low-damage for optimum device performance. In this study we report changes in sheet resistance and contact resistance for n- and p-type GaN samples exposed to an Ar inductively coupled plasma (ICP). In general, plasma-induced damage was more sensitive to ion bombardment energies as compared to plasma flux. In addition, p-GaN was typically more sensitive to plasma-induced damage as compared to n-GaN.

  6. Oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis induced by metabolites of butylated hydroxytoluene.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, S; Nishino, K; Oikawa, S; Inoue, S; Mizutani, T; Kawanishi, S

    1998-08-01

    DNA damage by metabolites of a food additive, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), was investigated as a potential mechanism of carcinogenicity. The mechanism of DNA damage by 2,6-di-tert-butyl-p-benzoquinone (BHT-quinone), 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroperoxyl-4-methyl-2,5-cyclohexadienone (BHT-OOH), and 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (BHT-CHO) in the presence of metal ions was investigated by using 32P-labeled DNA fragments obtained from the c-Ha-ras-1 proto-oncogene and the p53 tumor suppressor gene. BHT-OOH caused DNA damage in the presence of Cu(II), whereas BHT-quinone and BHT-CHO did not. However, BHT-quinone did induce DNA damage in the presence of NADH and Cu(II). Bathocuproine inhibited Cu(II)-mediated DNA damage, indicating the participation of Cu(I) in the process. Catalase also inhibited DNA damage induced by BHT-quinone, but not that induced by BHT-OOH. The DNA cleavage pattern observed with BHT-quinone plus NADH was different from that seen with BHT-OOH. With BHT-quinone plus NADH, piperidine-labile sites could be generated at nucleotides other than adenine residue. BHT-OOH caused cleavage specifically at guanine residues. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis showed that BHT-OOH and BHT-quinone induced DNA strand breaks in cultured cells, whereas BHT-CHO did not. Both BHT-quinone and BHT-OOH induced internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, which is the characteristic of apoptosis. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis revealed an increase of peroxides in cultured cells treated with BHT-OOH or BHT-quinone. These results suggest that BHT-OOH participates in oxidative DNA damage directly, whereas BHT-quinone causes DNA damage through H2O2 generation, which leads to internucleosomal DNA fragmentation. PMID:9744574

  7. Oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis induced by metabolites of butylated hydroxytoluene.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, S; Nishino, K; Oikawa, S; Inoue, S; Mizutani, T; Kawanishi, S

    1998-08-01

    DNA damage by metabolites of a food additive, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), was investigated as a potential mechanism of carcinogenicity. The mechanism of DNA damage by 2,6-di-tert-butyl-p-benzoquinone (BHT-quinone), 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroperoxyl-4-methyl-2,5-cyclohexadienone (BHT-OOH), and 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (BHT-CHO) in the presence of metal ions was investigated by using 32P-labeled DNA fragments obtained from the c-Ha-ras-1 proto-oncogene and the p53 tumor suppressor gene. BHT-OOH caused DNA damage in the presence of Cu(II), whereas BHT-quinone and BHT-CHO did not. However, BHT-quinone did induce DNA damage in the presence of NADH and Cu(II). Bathocuproine inhibited Cu(II)-mediated DNA damage, indicating the participation of Cu(I) in the process. Catalase also inhibited DNA damage induced by BHT-quinone, but not that induced by BHT-OOH. The DNA cleavage pattern observed with BHT-quinone plus NADH was different from that seen with BHT-OOH. With BHT-quinone plus NADH, piperidine-labile sites could be generated at nucleotides other than adenine residue. BHT-OOH caused cleavage specifically at guanine residues. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis showed that BHT-OOH and BHT-quinone induced DNA strand breaks in cultured cells, whereas BHT-CHO did not. Both BHT-quinone and BHT-OOH induced internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, which is the characteristic of apoptosis. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis revealed an increase of peroxides in cultured cells treated with BHT-OOH or BHT-quinone. These results suggest that BHT-OOH participates in oxidative DNA damage directly, whereas BHT-quinone causes DNA damage through H2O2 generation, which leads to internucleosomal DNA fragmentation.

  8. The Influence of Shielding on the Biological Effectiveness of Accelerated Particles for the Induction of Chromosome Damages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, K.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2006-01-01

    Chromosome damage was assessed in human peripheral blood lymphocytes after in vitro exposure to the either Si-28 (490 or 600 MeV/n), Ti-48 (1000 MeV/n), or Fe-56 (600, 1000, or 5000 MeV/n). LET values for these ions ranged from approximately 50 to 174 keV/micrometers and doses ranged from 10 to 200 cGy. The effect of either aluminum or polyethylene shielding on the induction of chromosome aberrations was investigated for each ion. Chromosome exchanges were measured using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole chromosome probes in cells collected 48-56 hours after irradiation using a chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. The yield of chromosomal aberrations increased linearly with dose and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for the primary beams, estimated from the initial slope of the dose response curve for total chromosomal exchanges with respect to gamma-rays, ranged from 14 to 35. The RBE values increased with LET, reaching a maximum for the 1 GeV/n Fe ions with LET of 150 keV/micrometers, and decreased with further increases in LET. When LET of the primary beam was in the region of increasing RBE (i.e. below approximately 100 keV/micrometers), the addition of shielding material increased the effectiveness per unit dose. Whereas shielding decreased the effectiveness per unit dose when the LET of the primary particle beam was higher than 150 keV/micrometers.

  9. Biological Effectiveness of Accelerated Particles for the Induction of Chromosome Damage Measured in Metaphase and Interphase Human Lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Kerry; Durante, Marco; Willingham, Veronica; Wu, Honglu; Yang, Tracy C.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2003-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations were investigated in human lymphocytes after in vitro exposure to 1H-, 3He-, 12C-, 40Ar-, 28Si-, 56Fe-, or 197Au-ion beams, with LET ranging from approximately 0.4-1393 keV/microm in the dose range of 0.075-3 Gy. Dose-response curves for chromosome exchanges, measured at the first mitosis postirradiation using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole-chromosome probes, were fitted with linear or linear-quadratic functions. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) was estimated from the initial slope of the dose-response curve for chromosomal damage with respect to low- or high-dose-rate gamma rays. Estimates of RBEmax values for mitotic spreads, which ranged from near 0.7 to 11.1 for total exchanges, increased with LET, reaching a maximum at about 150 keV/microm, and decreased with further increase in LET. RBEs for complex aberrations are undefined due to the lack of an initial slope for gamma rays. Additionally, the effect of mitotic delay on RBE values was investigated by measuring chromosome aberrations in interphase after chemically induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC), and values were up to threefold higher than for metaphase analysis.

  10. A viscoelastic model of shear-induced blood damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arwatz, Gilad; Smits, Alexander

    2012-11-01

    The mechanisms responsible for blood damage (hemolysis) have been studied since the mid-1960s, and it is now widely accepted that the level of shear stress and exposure time play important roles. Several models for hemolysis have been previously proposed. However, these models are purely empirical and limited to a narrow range of shear stress and exposure time and mostly, they lack any physical basis. In this study, we propose a new non-dimensional model that captures the mechanics of the red blood cells breakdown by taking into account the viscoelastic nature of their membrane. We validate our model against experimental measurements of hemolysis caused by laminar shear stress ranging from 50Pa to 500 Pa and exposure times extending from 60 s to 300 s. Funding provided by Princeton University's Project X.

  11. Molecular Hydrogen Therapy Ameliorates Organ Damage Induced by Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yijun; Zhu, Duming

    2016-01-01

    Since it was proposed in 2007, molecular hydrogen therapy has been widely concerned and researched. Many animal experiments were carried out in a variety of disease fields, such as cerebral infarction, ischemia reperfusion injury, Parkinson syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, chronic kidney disease, radiation injury, chronic hepatitis, rheumatoid arthritis, stress ulcer, acute sports injuries, mitochondrial and inflammatory disease, and acute erythema skin disease and other pathological processes or diseases. Molecular hydrogen therapy is pointed out as there is protective effect for sepsis patients, too. The impact of molecular hydrogen therapy against sepsis is shown from the aspects of basic vital signs, organ functions (brain, lung, liver, kidney, small intestine, etc.), survival rate, and so forth. Molecular hydrogen therapy is able to significantly reduce the release of inflammatory factors and oxidative stress injury. Thereby it can reduce damage of various organ functions from sepsis and improve survival rate. Molecular hydrogen therapy is a prospective method against sepsis. PMID:27413421

  12. Laser induced damage in optical materials: twelfth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Bennett, H E; Glass, A J; Guenther, A H; Newnam, B

    1981-09-01

    The twelfth annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 30 Sept.-l Oct., 1980. The symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-l, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Department of Energy, the Office of Naval Research, and the Air Force Office of Scientific research. Over 150 scientists attended the symposium, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Japan, and West Germany. The symposium was divided into sessions concerning materials and measurements, mirrors and surfaces, thin films, and finally fundamental mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for high power systems. The wavelength range of prime interest was from 10.6 microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength was discussed in detail. Harold E. Bennett of the Naval Weapons Center, Alexander J. Glass of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory, and Brian E. Newnam of the Los Alamos National Laboratory were cochairmen of the symposium. The thirteenth annual symposium is scheduled for 17-18 Nov. 1981 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado.

  13. Feasibility of OCT to detect radiation-induced esophageal damage in small animal models (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelvehgaran, Pouya; Alderliesten, Tanja; Salguero, Javier; Borst, Gerben; Song, Ji-Ying; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; de Boer, Johannes F.; de Bruin, Daniel M.; van Herk, Marcel B.

    2016-03-01

    Lung cancer survival is poor and radiotherapy patients often suffer serious treatment side effects. The esophagus is particularly sensitive leading to reduced food intake or even fistula formation. Only few direct techniques exist to measure radiation-induced esophageal damage, for which knowledge is needed to improve the balance between risk of tumor recurrence and complications. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a minimally-invasive imaging technique that obtains cross-sectional, high-resolution (1-10µm) images and is capable of scanning the esophageal wall up to 2-3mm depth. In this study we investigated the feasibility of OCT to detect esophageal radiation damage in mice. In total 30 mice were included in 4 study groups (1 main and 3 control groups). Mice underwent cone-beam CT imaging for initial setup assessment and dose planning followed by single-fraction dose delivery of 4, 10, 16, and 20Gy on 5mm spots, spaced 10mm apart. Mice were repeatedly imaged using OCT: pre-irradiation and up to 3 months post-irradiation. The control groups received either OCT only, irradiation only, or were sham-operated. We used histopathology as gold standard for radiation-induced damage diagnosis. The study showed edema in both the main and OCT-only groups. Furthermore, radiation-induced damage was primarily found in the highest dose region (distal esophagus). Based on the histopathology reports we were able to identify the radiation-induced damage in the OCT images as a change in tissue scattering related to the type of induced damage. This finding indicates the feasibility and thereby the potentially promising role of OCT in radiation-induced esophageal damage assessment.

  14. Gastroprotective effect of 2-mercaptoethane sulfonate against acute gastric mucosal damage induced by ethanol.

    PubMed

    Amirshahrokhi, Keyvan; Khalili, Ali-Reza

    2016-05-01

    Gastric mucosal damage induced by ethanol is a serious medical problem. Recent evidences suggest that reactive oxygen species and inflammatory mediators play a key role in the destruction of gastric mucosa. The present study was aimed to evaluate the potential beneficial effect of MESNA (2-mercaptoethane sulfonate) against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage in mice. The animals were orally pretreated with vehicle or MESNA and then treated with acidified ethanol to induce gastric mucosal damage. One hour after ethanol ingestion mice were euthanized and stomach samples were collected for biochemical analysis. Macroscopic and histopathological evaluation of gastric mucosa showed that pretreatment with MESNA attenuated gastric lesions induced by ethanol. Administration of MESNA significantly increased glutathione content and superoxide dismutase and catalase activity in the gastric tissues. In addition, MESNA markedly reduced ethanol-induced lipid peroxidation, myeloperoxidase activity, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 levels. These findings suggest that the thiol-containing compound MESNA is able to decrease alcohol-induced oxidative stress and inflammation in the gastric tissue. It seems that MESNA may have a protective effect against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage. PMID:26967742

  15. Myoglobin A79G polymorphism association with exercise-induced skeletal muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Cui, T; Jiang, M S

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the role of A79G, a polymorphism of the myoglobin gene (MB), in susceptibility to exercise-induced skeletal muscle damage. Between January 2012 and December 2014, a total of 166 cases with exercise-induced skeletal muscle damage and 166 controls were recruited into our study. Genotyping of MB A79G was carried out using polymerase chain reaction coupled with restriction fragment length polymorphism. Using unconditional logistic regression analysis, we found that the GG genotype of MB A79G was associated with higher risk of exercise-induced muscle damage compared with the wild-type genotype, and the OR (95%CI) was 2.91 (1.20-7.59). Compared with the AA genotype, the AG+GG genotype was associated with a significantly increased risk of exercise-induced muscle damage for those with blood lactic acid ≥1.80 mM (OR = 2.05; 95%CI = 1.09-3.88). In conclusion, we found that the A79G polymorphism of the MB gene plays an important role in influencing the development of exercise-induced skeletal muscle damage. PMID:27323063

  16. Involvement of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in methamphetamine-induced neural damage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xufeng; Xing, Jingjing; Jiang, Lei; Qian, Wenyi; Wang, Yixin; Sun, Hao; Wang, Yu; Xiao, Hang; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Jinsong

    2016-11-01

    Methamphetamine (METH), an illicit drug, is widely abused in many parts of the world. Mounting evidence shows that METH exposure contributes to neurotoxicity, particularly for the monoaminergic neurons. However, to date, only a few studies have tried to unravel the mechanisms involved in METH-induced non-monoaminergic neural damage. Therefore, in the present study, we tried to explore the mechanisms for METH-induced neural damage in cortical neurons. Our results showed that METH significantly increased intracellular [Ca(2) (+) ]i in Ca(2) (+) -containing solution rather than Ca(2) (+) -free solution. Moreover, METH also upregulated calmodulin (CaM) expression and activated CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). Significantly, METH-induced neural damage can be partially retarded by CaM antagonist W7 as well as CaMKII blocker KN93. In addition, L-type Ca(2) (+) channel was also proved to be involved in METH-induced cell damage, as nifedipine, the L-type Ca(2) (+) channel-specific inhibitor, markedly attenuated METH-induced neural damage. Collectively, our results suggest that Ca(2) (+) -CaM-CaMKII is involved in METH-mediated neurotoxicity, and it might suggest a potential target for the development of therapeutic strategies for METH abuse. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Modulation of DNA-induced damage and repair capacity in humans after dietary intervention with lutein-enriched fermented milk.

    PubMed

    Herrero-Barbudo, Carmen; Soldevilla, Beatriz; Pérez-Sacristán, Belén; Blanco-Navarro, Inmaculada; Herrera, Mercedes; Granado-Lorencio, Fernando; Domínguez, Gemma

    2013-01-01

    Dietary factors provide protection against several forms of DNA damage. Additionally, consumer demand for natural products favours the development of bioactive food ingredients with health benefits. Lutein is a promising biologically active component in the food industry. The EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies considers that protection from oxidative damage may be a beneficial physiological effect but that a cause and effect relationship has not been established. Thus, our aim was to evaluate the safety and potential functional effect of a lutein-enriched milk product using the Comet Assay in order to analyze the baseline, the induced DNA-damage and the repair capacity in the lymphocytes of 10 healthy donors before and after the intake of the mentioned product. Our data suggest that the regular consumption of lutein-enriched fermented milk results in a significant increase in serum lutein levels and this change is associated with an improvement in the resistance of DNA to damage and the capacity of DNA repair in lymphocytes. Our results also support the lack of a genotoxic effect at the doses supplied as well as the absence of interactions and side effects on other nutritional and biochemicals markers. PMID:24040187

  18. Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles Induced Toxicity in Human Lung Cells: Role of ROS Mediated DNA Damage and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Alok K.

    2014-01-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs) have promising industrial and biomedical applications. In spite of their applications, the toxicity of these NPs in biological/physiological environment is a major concern. Present study aimed to understand the molecular mechanism underlying the toxicity of CeO2 NPs on lung adenocarcinoma (A549) cells. After internalization, CeO2 NPs caused significant cytotoxicity and morphological changes in A549 cells. Further, the cell death was found to be apoptotic as shown by loss in mitochondrial membrane potential and increase in annexin-V positive cells and confirmed by immunoblot analysis of BAX, BCl-2, Cyt C, AIF, caspase-3, and caspase-9. A significant increase in oxidative DNA damage was found which was confirmed by phosphorylation of p53 gene and presence of cleaved poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP). This damage could be attributed to increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with concomitant decrease in antioxidant “glutathione (GSH)” level. DNA damage and cell death were attenuated by the application of ROS and apoptosis inhibitors N-acetyl-L- cysteine (NAC) and Z-DEVD-fmk, respectively. Our study concludes that ROS mediated DNA damage and cell cycle arrest play a major role in CeO2 NPs induced apoptotic cell death in A549 cells. Apart from beneficial applications, these NPs also impart potential harmful effects which should be properly evaluated prior to their use. PMID:24987704

  19. Gruneisen-stress induced ablation of biological tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Dingus, R.S.; Scammon, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of biomedical applications of lasers is frequently to remove tissue in a controlled manner. However, for ablation induced by thermal- or photo-decomposition, damage to surrounding tissue may be excessive in some instances. Tissue can also be ablated by a hydrodynamic process referred to as front surface spallation, in which a thin layer next to a free surface is heated to levels, below vaporization but, so rapidly that it cannot undergo thermal expansion during laser heating. This generates a stress pulse, which propagates away from the heated region, with an initial amplitude that can be calculated using the Grueneisen coefficient. As the pulse reflects from the free surface, a tensile tail can develop of sufficient amplitude, exceeding the material strength, that a layer will be spalled off, taking much of the laser-deposited energy with it. Because tissue is generally a low strength material, this process has the potential of producing controlled ablation with reduced damage to the remaining tissue. However, to achieve these conditions, the laser pulse length, absorption depth and fluence must be properly tailored. This paper presents hydrodynamic calculations and analytical modeling relating to both stress- and thermal-induced ablation as a function of laser and tissue properties to illustrate the potential benefits of stress induced ablation. Also, guidance is given for tailoring the exposure parameters to enhance front surface spallation. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Caryocar brasiliense camb protects against genomic and oxidative damage in urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, N.B.R.; Rangel, M.P.; Martins, V.; Hage, M.; Gelain, D.P.; Barbeiro, D.F.; Grisolia, C.K.; Parra, E.R.; Capelozzi, V.L.

    2015-01-01

    The antioxidant effects of Caryocar brasiliense Camb, commonly known as the pequi fruit, have not been evaluated to determine their protective effects against oxidative damage in lung carcinogenesis. In the present study, we evaluated the role of pequi fruit against urethane-induced DNA damage and oxidative stress in forty 8-12 week old male BALB/C mice. An in vivo comet assay was performed to assess DNA damage in lung tissues and changes in lipid peroxidation and redox cycle antioxidants were monitored for oxidative stress. Prior supplementation with pequi oil or its extract (15 µL, 60 days) significantly reduced urethane-induced oxidative stress. A protective effect against DNA damage was associated with the modulation of lipid peroxidation and low protein and gene expression of nitric oxide synthase. These findings suggest that the intake of pequi fruit might protect against in vivo genotoxicity and oxidative stress. PMID:26200231

  1. A FLUORESCENCE BASED ASSAY FOR DNA DAMAGE INDUCED BY TOXIC INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous natural and man-made agents are continuously released into the environment due to human activity. Many of these agents cause irreversible damage to the normal biological functions leading to morbidity and mortality in the exposed organisms. The possibility of deliberat...

  2. (WASHINGTON, DC) A FLUORESCENCE BASED ASSAY FOR DNA DAMAGE INDUCED BY TOXIC INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous natural and man-made agents are continuously released into the environment due to human activity. Many of these agents cause irreversible damage to the normal biological functions leading to morbidity and mortality in the exposed organisms. The possibility of deliberat...

  3. Biological effects of laser-induced stress waves

    SciTech Connect

    Doukas, A.; Lee, S.; McAuliffe, D.

    1995-12-31

    Laser-induced stress waves can be generated by one of the following mechanisms: Optical breakdown, ablation or rapid heating of an absorbing medium. These three modes of laser interaction with matter allow the investigation of cellular and tissue responses to stress waves with different characteristics and under different conditions. The most widely studied phenomena are those of the collateral damage seen in photodisruption in the eye and in 193 run ablation of cornea and skin. On the other hand, the therapeutic application of laser-induced stress waves has been limited to the disruption of noncellular material such as renal stones, atheromatous plaque and vitreous strands. The effects of stress waves to cells and tissues can be quite disparate. Stress waves can fracture tissue, damage cells, and increase the permeability of the plasma membrane. The viability of cell cultures exposed to stress waves increases with the peak stress and the number of pulses applied. The rise time of the stress wave also influences the degree of cell injury. In fact, cell viability, as measured by thymidine incorporation, correlates better with the stress gradient than peak stress. Recent studies have also established that stress waves induce a transient increase of the permeability of the plasma membrane in vitro. In addition, if the stress gradient is below the damage threshhold, the cells remain viable. Thus, stress waves can be useful as a means of drug delivery, increasing the intracellular drug concentration and allowing the use of drugs which are impermeable to the cell membrane. The present studies show that it is important to create controllable stress waves. The wavelength tunability and the micropulse structure of the free electron laser is ideal for generating stress waves with independently adjustable parameters, such as rise time, duration and peak stress.

  4. Laser-induced damage of multilayer dielectric gratings with picosecond laser pulses under vacuum and air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Fanyu; Jin, Yunxia; Huang, Haopeng; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Shijie; He, Hongbo

    2015-10-01

    In this study, laser damage tests of multilayer dielectric gratings (MDGs) are performed in vacuum (5×10-4 Pa) and in air at a wavelength of 1053 nm with pulse widths of 0.56 ps ~9.7 ps. The laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) of MDGs in vacuum/air ranges from 2.1/2.2 J/cm2 to 4.4/4.8 J/cm2 for laser beams of normal incidence. The LIDT of MDGs follows a τ0.26 scaling in the pulse width regime considered. The typical damage morphologies in the two environments caused by the near threshold pulse were observed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM); the results indicate that the damage features of MDGs in vacuum are the same as those in air. The testing results reveal that a clean vacuum environment neither changes the laser damage mechanism nor lowers the LIDT of MDGs.

  5. Laser-induced damage to spray pyrolysis deposited transparent conducting films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, P.; Sathianandan, K.; Subhash, N.

    1986-02-01

    Laser-induced damage study of transparent conducting coatings of tin oxide prepared by spray pyrolysis has been made using a dye Q-switched Nd:glass laser emitting 25-ns (FWHM) pulses at 1062 nm. For comparison tin oxide films prepared by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method and indium tin oxide (ITO) prepared by the reactive RF sputtering method have also been damage tested. The study reveals that the spray pyrolysis method yields good electrical and optical quality films with a damage threshold value of 5.2 + or - 0.3 J/sq cm. Though CVD technique provides the highest damage threshold coatings (14.2 + or - 0.6 J/sq cm), their electrical characteristics and uniformity are inferior to RF-sputtered ITO films which have the best electrical properties and the lowest damage threshold values (1.3 + or - 0.1 J/sq cm).

  6. New method for measuring the laser-induced damage threshold of optical thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jun-hong; Wang, Hong; Xi, Ying-xue

    2012-10-01

    The laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) of thin film means that the thin film can withstand a maximum intensity of laser radiation. The film will be damaged when the irradiation under high laser intensity is greater than the value of LIDT. In this paper, an experimental platform with measurement operator interfaces and control procedures in the VB circumstance is built according to ISO11254-1. In order to obtain more accurate results than that with manual measurement, in the software system, a hardware device can be controlled by control widget on the operator interfaces. According to the sample characteristic, critical parameters of the LIDT measurement system such as spot diameter, damage threshold region, and critical damage pixel number are set up on the man-machine conversation interface, which could realize intelligent measurements of the LIDT. According to experimental data, the LIDT is obtained by fitting damage curve automatically.

  7. Polymerase η suppresses telomere defects induced by DNA damaging agents

    PubMed Central

    Pope-Varsalona, Hannah; Liu, Fu-Jun; Guzik, Lynda; Opresko, Patricia L.

    2014-01-01

    Telomeres at chromosome ends are normally masked from proteins that signal and repair DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). Bulky DNA lesions can cause DSBs if they block DNA replication, unless they are bypassed by translesion (TLS) DNA polymerases. Here, we investigated roles for TLS polymerase η, (polη) in preserving telomeres following acute physical UVC exposure and chronic chemical Cr(VI) exposure, which both induce blocking lesions. We report that polη protects against cytotoxicity and replication stress caused by Cr(VI), similar to results with ultraviolet C light (UVC). Both exposures induce ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) kinase and polη accumulation into nuclear foci and localization to individual telomeres, consistent with replication fork stalling at DNA lesions. Polη-deficient cells exhibited greater numbers of telomeres that co-localized with DSB response proteins after exposures. Furthermore, the genotoxic exposures induced telomere aberrations associated with failures in telomere replication that were suppressed by polη. We propose that polη's ability to bypass bulky DNA lesions at telomeres is critical for proper telomere replication following genotoxic exposures. PMID:25355508

  8. Analyzing electrostatic induced damage risk to reticles with an in situ e-reticle system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Richard; Sebald, Thomas

    2009-12-01

    E-Reticle system is an electrostatic field test device, which has the form factor of a conventional six inch quartz production reticle. The E-Reticle was used to assess the ESD damage risks in a mask cleaning tool. Test results indicate that a reticle may see higher than ITRS recommended electrostatic potential specifications when mechanical operations and cold DIW rinse start and in progress, hence seeing increased probability of electrostatic induced damages.

  9. Shear Loads Induce Cellular Damage in Tendon Fascicles

    PubMed Central

    Kondratko-Mittnacht, Jaclyn; Lakes, Roderic; Vanderby, Ray

    2016-01-01

    Tendon is vital to musculoskeletal function, transferring loads from muscle to bone for joint motion and stability. It is an anisotropic, highly organized, fibrous structure containing primarily type I collagen in addition to tenocytes and other extracellular matrix components contributing to maintenance and function. Tendon is generally loaded via normal stress in a longitudinal direction. However, certain situations, including fiber breakage, enzymatic remodeling, or tendon pathology may introduce various degrees of other loading modalities, such as shear-lag at the fiber level, potentially affecting cellular response and subsequent function. Fascicles from rat tail tendon were dissected and placed in one of three paired groups: intact, single laceration, or double laceration. Each pair had a mechanically tested and control specimen. Single laceration fascicles contained one transverse laceration to mimic a partial tear. Double laceration fascicles had overlapping, longitudinally separated lacerations on opposite sides to cause intra-fascicular shear transfer to be the primary mechanism of loading. Elastic properties of the fascicle, e.g. peak load, steady state load, and stiffness, decreased from intact to single laceration to double laceration groups. Surprisingly, 45% of the intact strength was maintained when shear was the primary internal load transfer mechanism. Cellular viability decreased after mechanical testing in both laceration groups; cell death appeared primarily in a longitudinal plane where high shear load transfer occurred. This cell death extended far from the injury site and may further compromise an already damaged tendon via enzymatic factors and subsequent remodeling associated with cell necrosis. PMID:26162546

  10. Protection against radiation induced damage to spermatogenesis by Podophyllum hexandrum.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Namita; Goel, H C

    2002-07-01

    Aqueous extract of rhizome of Podophyllum hexandrum (RP-1) has been found to render protection against lethal whole body irradiation (10 Gy), damage to haemopoietic and gastrointestinal tissue etc. in mice. In order to assess its suitability from clinical point of view its effects were investigated on male germinal tissue in mice. Swiss albino strain 'A' male mice (10-12 weeks) were exposed to varied radiation doses (0.5, 2.0, 5.0 and 10 Gy) with and without 200 mg/kg b.w. of RP-1 and sacrificed at different time periods (10, 35 and 70 days) to collect the tissue. Administration of RP-1, 2 h before irradiation rendered a significant increase in the testis weight, repopulating tubules, resting primary spermatocytes, stem cell survival index, sperm counts and reduction in abnormalities of sperm morphology, at all the time periods studied here. RP-1 treatment alone did not generate any adverse effects. These results reveal that RP-1, if put to clinical application, will not be harmful to the testicular system.

  11. Shear loads induce cellular damage in tendon fascicles.

    PubMed

    Kondratko-Mittnacht, Jaclyn; Lakes, Roderic; Vanderby, Ray

    2015-09-18

    Tendon is vital to musculoskeletal function, transferring loads from muscle to bone for joint motion and stability. It is an anisotropic, highly organized, fibrous structure containing primarily type I collagen in addition to tenocytes and other extracellular matrix components contributing to maintenance and function. Tendon is generally loaded via normal stress in a longitudinal direction. However, certain situations, including fiber breakage, enzymatic remodeling, or tendon pathology may introduce various degrees of other loading modalities, such as shear-lag at the fiber level, potentially affecting cellular response and subsequent function. Fascicles from rat tail tendon were dissected and placed in one of three paired groups: intact, single laceration, or double laceration. Each pair had a mechanically tested and control specimen. Single laceration fascicles contained one transverse laceration to mimic a partial tear. Double laceration fascicles had overlapping, longitudinally separated lacerations on opposite sides to cause intra-fascicular shear transfer to be the primary mechanism of loading. Elastic properties of the fascicle, e.g. peak load, steady state load, and stiffness, decreased from intact to single laceration to double laceration groups. Surprisingly, 45% of the intact strength was maintained when shear was the primary internal load transfer mechanism. Cellular viability decreased after mechanical testing in both laceration groups; cell death appeared primarily in a longitudinal plane where high shear load transfer occurred. This cell death extended far from the injury site and may further compromise an already damaged tendon via enzymatic factors and subsequent remodeling associated with cell necrosis. PMID:26162546

  12. Dimethylformamide-induced liver damage among synthetic leather workers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.D.; Lai, M.Y.; Chen, J.S.; Lin, J.M.; Chiang, J.R.; Shiau, S.J.; Chang, W.S. )

    1991-05-01

    Prevalence of liver injury associated with dimethylformamide (DMF) exposure was determined. Medical examinations, liver function tests, and creatine phosphokinase (CPK) determinations were performed on 183 of 204 (76%) employees of a synthetic leather factory. Air concentrations of solvents were measured with personal samplers and gas chromatography. The concentration of DMF in air to which each worker was exposed was categorized. High exposure concentrations of DMF (i.e., 25-60 ppm) were significantly associated with elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels (ALT greater than or equal to 35 IU/l), a result that did not change even after stratification by hepatitis B carrier status. Modeling by logistic regression demonstrated that exposure to high concentrations of DMF was associated with an elevated ALT (p = .01), whereas hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was slightly but independently associated with an elevated ALT (p = .07). In those workers who had normal ALT values, there occurred still significantly higher mean ALT and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities, especially among those who were not HBsAg carriers. A significant association existed between elevated CPK levels and exposure to DMF. However, an analysis of the CPK isoenzyme among 143 workers did not reveal any specific damage to muscles. This outbreak of liver injury among synthetic leather workers is ascribed to DMF. It is recommended that the occupational standard for DMF and its toxicity among HBsAg carriers be evaluated further.

  13. Laser-induced damage in optical materials: sixteenth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Bennett, H E; Guenther, A H; Milam, D; Newnam, B E

    1987-03-01

    The Sixteenth Annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, CO, 15-17 Oct. 1984. The Symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Department of Energy, the Office of Naval Research, and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. Approximately 180 scientists attended the Symposium, including representatives from England, France, The Netherlands, Scotland, and West Germany. The Symposium was divided into sessions concerning Materials and Measurements, Mirrors and Surfaces, Thin Films, and Fundamental Mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the Symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for high-power apparatus. The wavelength range of prime interest was from 10.6,microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin-film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. Harold E. Bennett of the U.S. Naval Weapons Center, Arthur H. Guenther of the U.S. Air Force Weapons Laboratory, David Milam of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Brian E. Newnam of the Los Alamos National Laboratory were cochairmen of the Symposium.

  14. Ion-beam-induced damage formation in CdTe

    SciTech Connect

    Rischau, C. W.; Schnohr, C. S.; Wendler, E.; Wesch, W.

    2011-06-01

    Damage formation in <111>- and <112>-oriented CdTe single crystals irradiated at room temperature and 15 K with 270 keV Ar or 730 keV Sb ions was investigated in situ using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) in channeling configuration. Defect profiles were calculated from the RBS spectra using the computer code DICADA and additional energy-dependent RBS measurements were performed to identify the type of defects. At both temperatures no formation of a buried amorphous layer was detected even after prolonged irradiation with several 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. The fact that CdTe is not rendered amorphous even at 15 K suggests that the high resistance to amorphization is caused by the high ionicity of CdTe rather than thermal effects. The calculated defect profiles show the formation of a broad defect distribution that extends much deeper into the crystal than the projected range of the implanted ions at both temperatures. The post-range defects in CdTe thus do not seem to be of thermal origin either, but are instead believed to result from migration driven by the electronic energy loss.

  15. Modification of radiation-induced oxidative damage in liposomal and microsomal membrane by eugenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, B. N.; Lathika, K. M.; Mishra, K. P.

    2006-03-01

    Radiation-induced membrane oxidative damage, and their modification by eugenol, a natural antioxidant, was investigated in liposomes and microsomes. Liposomes prepared with DPH showed decrease in fluorescence after γ-irradiation, which was prevented significantly by eugenol and correlated with magnitude of oxidation of phospholipids. Presence of eugenol resulted in substantial inhibition in MDA formation in irradiated liposomes/microsomes, which was less effective when added after irradiation. Similarly, the increase in phospholipase C activity observed after irradiation in microsomes was inhibited in samples pre-treated with eugenol. Results suggest association of radio- oxidative membrane damage with alterations in signaling molecules, and eugenol significantly prevented these membrane damaging events.

  16. Modeling of laser-induced damage and optic usage at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zhi M.; Nostrand, Mike; Carr, Wren; Bude, Jeff; Suratwala, Tayyab I.

    2016-07-01

    Modeling of laser-induced optics damage has been introduced to benchmark existing optic usage at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) which includes the number of optics exchanged for damage repair. NIF has pioneered an optics recycle strategy to allow it to run the laser at capacity since fully commissioned in 2009 while keeping the cost of optics usage manageable. We will show how the damage model is being used to evaluate strategies to streamline our optics loop efficiency, as we strive to increase the laser shot rate without increasing operating costs.

  17. Initiation, Growth and Mitigation of UV Laser Induced Damage in Fused Silica

    SciTech Connect

    Rubenchik, A M; Feit, M D

    2003-06-10

    Laser damage of large fused silica optics initiates at imperfections. Possible initiation mechanisms are considered. We demonstrate that a model based on nanoparticle explosions is consistent with the observed initiation craters. Possible mechanisms for growth upon subsequent laser irradiation, including material modification and laser intensification, are discussed. Large aperture experiments indicate an exponential increase in damage size with number of laser shots. Physical processes associated with this growth and a qualitative explanation of self-accelerated growth is presented. Rapid growth necessitates damage growth mitigation techniques. Several possible mitigation techniques are mentioned, with special emphasis on CO{sub 2} processing. Analysis of material evaporation, crack healing, and thermally induced stress are presented.

  18. Shear-driven damage of ductile metals induced by indentation load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chunyu; Xiao, Wenkang

    2015-08-01

    Although indentation does not induce apparent cracking in ductile materials, degradation of elastic stiffness of ductile metals has been found in micro-/macro- indentation tests. After comparing the predicted degradation by extended damaged-plasticity models with that measured by experimental testing, it is found that the softening caused by distortion of existing voids is inadequate to cause the notable degradation of elasticity. It is suggested that an independent damage-nucleation mechanism arising from shear deformation may exist. Although attractive in practical applications for its non-destructive nature, the damage-based indentation technique for estimating the fracture properties of ductile materials needs further investigation.

  19. Initiation, Growth and Mitigation of UV Laser Induced Damage in Fused Silica

    SciTech Connect

    Rubenchik, A M; Feit, M D

    2001-12-21

    Laser damage of large fused silica optics initiates at imperfections. Possible initiation mechanisms are considered. We demonstrate that a model based on nanoparticle explosions is consistent with the observed initiation craters. Possible mechanisms for growth upon subsequent laser irradiation, including material modification and laser intensification, are discussed. Large aperture experiments indicate an exponential increase in damage size with number of laser shots. Physical processes associated with this growth and a qualitative explanation of self-accelerated growth is presented. Rapid growth necessitates damage growth mitigation techniques. Several possible mitigation techniques are mentioned, with special emphasis on CO{sub 2} processing. Analysis of material evaporation, crack healing, and thermally induced stress are presented.

  20. Laser-induced damage in dielectrics with nanosecond to subpicosecond pulses. I. Experimental. Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, B.C.; Herman, S.; Perry, M.D.

    1994-12-01

    The authors report extensive laser-induced damage threshold measurements on pure and multilayer dielectrics at 1053 and 526 mm for pulse durations, {tau}, ranging from 140 fs to 1 ns. Qualitative differences in the morphology of damage and a departure from the diffusion-dominated {tau}{sup 1/2} scaling indicate that damage results from plasma formation and ablation for {tau}{le}10 ps and from conventional melting and boiling for {tau}>50 ps. A theoretical model based on electron production via multiphoton ionization, Joule heating, and collisional (avalanche) ionization is in good agreement with both the pulsewidth and wavelength scaling of experimental results.

  1. Preliminary Results of Earthquake-Induced Building Damage Detection with Object-Based Image Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabuncu, A.; Uca Avci, Z. D.; Sunar, F.

    2016-06-01

    Earthquakes are the most destructive natural disasters, which result in massive loss of life, infrastructure damages and financial losses. Earthquake-induced building damage detection is a very important step after earthquakes since earthquake-induced building damage is one of the most critical threats to cities and countries in terms of the area of damage, rate of collapsed buildings, the damage grade near the epicenters and also building damage types for all constructions. Van-Ercis (Turkey) earthquake (Mw= 7.1) was occurred on October 23th, 2011; at 10:41 UTC (13:41 local time) centered at 38.75 N 43.36 E that places the epicenter about 30 kilometers northern part of the city of Van. It is recorded that, 604 people died and approximately 4000 buildings collapsed or seriously damaged by the earthquake. In this study, high-resolution satellite images of Van-Ercis, acquired by Quickbird-2 (Digital Globe Inc.) after the earthquake, were used to detect the debris areas using an object-based image classification. Two different land surfaces, having homogeneous and heterogeneous land covers, were selected as case study areas. As a first step of the object-based image processing, segmentation was applied with a convenient scale parameter and homogeneity criterion parameters. As a next step, condition based classification was used. In the final step of this preliminary study, outputs were compared with streetview/ortophotos for the verification and evaluation of the classification accuracy.

  2. DNA damage-induced phosphorylation of the human telomere-associated protein TRF2

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hiromi; Mendonca, Marc S.; Bradshaw, Paul S.; Hoelz, Derek J.; Malkas, Linda H.; Meyn, M. Stephen; Gilley, David

    2005-01-01

    Several protein kinases from diverse eukaryotes known to perform important roles in DNA repair have also been shown to play critical roles in telomere maintenance. Here, we report that the human telomere-associated protein TRF2 is rapidly phosphorylated in response to DNA damage. We find that the phosphorylated form of TRF2 is not bound to telomeric DNA, as is the ground form of TRF2, and is rapidly localized to damage sites. Our results suggest that the ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) protein kinase signal-transduction pathway is primarily responsible for the DNA damage-induced phosphorylation of TRF2. Unlike DNA damage-induced phosphorylation of other ATM targets, the phosphorylated form of TRF2 is transient, being detected rapidly at DNA damage sites postirradiation, but largely dissipated by 2 hours. In addition, we report that the phosphorylated form of TRF2 is present at telomeres in cell types undergoing telomere-based crisis and a recombination-driven, telomerase-independent, alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway, likely as a consequence of a telomere-based DNA damage response. Our results link the induction of TRF2 phosphorylation to the DNA damage-response system, providing an example of direct cross-talk via a signaling pathway between these two major cellular processes essential for genomic stability, telomere maintenance, and DNA repair. PMID:16223874

  3. DNA damage induced by m-phenylenediamine and its derivative in the presence of copper ion.

    PubMed

    Chen, F; Murata, M; Hiraku, Y; Yamashita, N; Oikawa, S; Kawanishi, S

    1998-09-01

    To clarify the mechanism of carcinogenesis by hair dyes, we compared the extent of DNA damage induced by mutagenic m-phenylenediamine and 4-methoxy-m-phenylenediamine, using 32P-5'-end-labeled DNA fragments obtained from the human c-Ha-ras-1 protooncogene and the p53 tumor suppressor gene. Carcinogenic 4-methoxy-m-phenylenediamine caused DNA damage at thymine and cytosine residues in the presence of Cu(II). Catalase and bathocuproine, a Cu(I)-specific chelator, inhibited 4-methoxy-m-phenylenediamine-induced DNA damage, suggesting the involvement of H2O2 and Cu(I). Superoxide dismutase (SOD) enhanced the DNA damage. Formation of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG) was induced by 4-methoxy-m-phenylenediamine in the presence of Cu(II). UV-visible spectroscopic studies have shown that Cu(II) mediated autoxidation of 4-methoxy-m-phenylenediamine and SOD accelerated the autoxidation. On the other hand, non-carcinogenic m-phenylenediamine did not cause clear DNA damage and significant autoxidation even in the presence of Cu(II). These results suggest that carcinogenicity of m-phenylenediamines is associated with ability to cause oxidative DNA damage rather than bacterial mutagenicity. PMID:9802551

  4. Derinat Protects Skin against Ultraviolet-B (UVB)-Induced Cellular Damage.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wen-Li; Lu, Jian-He; Noda, Mami; Wu, Ching-Ying; Liu, Jia-Dai; Sakakibara, Manabu; Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Yu, Hsin-Su; Lin, Ming-Wei; Huang, Yaw-Bin; Yan, Shian-Jang; Yoshioka, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B (UVB) is one of the most cytotoxic and mutagenic stresses that contribute to skin damage and aging through increasing intracellular Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Derinat (sodium deoxyribonucleate) has been utilized as an immunomodulator for the treatment of ROS-associated diseases in clinics. However, the molecular mechanism by which Derinat protects skin cells from UVB-induced damage is poorly understood. Here, we show that Derinat significantly attenuated UVB-induced intracellular ROS production and decreased DNA damage in primary skin cells. Furthermore, Derinat reduced intracellular ROS, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression and DNA damage in the skin of the BALB/c-nu mice exposed to UVB for seven days in vivo. Importantly, Derinat blocked the transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels (TRPCs), as demonstrated by calcium imaging. Together, our results indicate that Derinat acts as a TRPCs blocker to reduce intracellular ROS production and DNA damage upon UVB irradiation. This mechanism provides a potential new application of Derinat for the protection against UVB-induced skin damage and aging. PMID:26569211

  5. Impact of caffeic acid phenethyl ester treatment on vancomycin-induced pancreatic damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Koyu, Ahmet; Gokalp, Osman; Gumral, Nurhan; Oktem, Faruk; Karahan, Nermin; Yilmaz, Nigar; Saygin, Mustafa

    2016-02-01

    This study investigates the preventive effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on pancreatic damage induced by vancomycin (VCM) in rats. Rats were equally divided into three groups: group I (control), group II (only VCM-treated group) and group III (VCM + CAPE-treated groups). VCM was intraperitoneally administered at a dose of 200 mg kg(-1)twice daily for 7 days. CAPE was administered orally at 10 µM mL(-1) kg(-1) dose once daily for 7 days. The first dose of CAPE administration was performed 24 h prior to VCM injection. Blood and pancreas tissue samples were removed and collected after the study. Serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP), amylase, γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) and lipase activities were determined. Pancreas tissue samples were evaluated with the light microscope. Group II significantly increased serum ALP, amylase, GGT and lipase activities when compared with the control group. Group III significantly decreased serum ALP, amylase, GGT and lipase activities when compared with group II. In histopathological examination, it has been observed that there was a significant pancreatic damage in group II. CAPE exerted prominent structural protection against VCM-induced pancreatic damage and this effect was statistically significant. CAPE caused a marked reduction in the extent of pancreatic damage. We have concluded that it may play an important role in the VCM-induced pancreatic damage and reduce the pancreatic damage both at the biochemical and histopathological aspects.

  6. Polyphenols in Exercise Performance and Prevention of Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage

    PubMed Central

    Hrelia, Silvana

    2013-01-01

    Although moderate physical exercise is considered an essential component of a healthy lifestyle that leads the organism to adapt itself to different stresses, exercise, especially when exhaustive, is also known to induce oxidative stress, inflammation, and muscle damage. Many efforts have been carried out to identify dietary strategies or micronutrients able to prevent or at least attenuate the exercise-induced muscle damage and stress. Unfortunately most studies have failed to show protection, and at the present time data supporting the protective effect of micronutrients, as antioxidant vitamins, are weak and trivial. This review focuses on those polyphenols, present in the plant kingdom, that have been recently suggested to exert some positive effects on exercise-induced muscle damage and oxidative stress. In the last decade flavonoids as quercetin, catechins, and other polyphenols as resveratrol have caught the scientists attention. However, at the present time drawing a clear and definitive conclusion seems to be untimely. PMID:23983900

  7. Regolith modeling and its relation to earthquake induced building damage: A remote sensing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafique, Muhammad; van der Meijde, Mark; Ullah, Saleem

    2011-07-01

    Regolith thickness is known as a major factor in influencing the intensity of earthquake induced ground shaking and consequently building damages. It is, however, often simplified or ignored due to its variable and complex nature. To evaluate the role of regolith thickness on earthquake induced building damage, a remote sensing based methodology is developed to model the spatial variation of regolith thickness, based on DEM derived topographic attributes and geology. Regolith thickness samples were evenly collected in geological formations at representative sites of topographic attributes. Topographic attributes (elevation, slope, TWI, distance from stream) computed from the ASTER derived DEM and a geology map were used to explore their role in spatial variation of regolith thickness. Stepwise regression was used to model the spatial variation of regolith thickness in erosional landscape of the study area. Topographic attributes and geology, explain 60% of regolith thickness variation in the study area. To test, if the modeled regolith can be used for prediction of seismic induced building damages, it is compared with the 2005 Kashmir earthquake induced building damages derived from high resolution remote sensing images and field data. The comparison shows that the structural damages increase with increasing regolith thickness. The predicted regolith thickness can be used for demarcating site prone to amplified seismic response.

  8. Positive feedback regulation of p53 transactivity by DNA damage-induced ISG15 modification

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Ho; Yang, Seung Wook; Park, Jung Mi; Ka, Seung Hyeun; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Kong, Young-Yun; Jeon, Young Joo; Seol, Jae Hong; Chung, Chin Ha

    2016-01-01

    p53 plays a pivotal role in tumour suppression under stresses, such as DNA damage. ISG15 has been implicated in the control of tumorigenesis. Intriguingly, the expression of ISG15, UBE1L and UBCH8 is induced by DNA-damaging agents, such as ultraviolet and doxorubicin, which are known to induce p53. Here, we show that the genes encoding ISG15, UBE1L, UBCH8 and EFP, have the p53-responsive elements and their expression is induced in a p53-dependent fashion under DNA damage conditions. Furthermore, DNA damage induces ISG15 conjugation to p53 and this modification markedly enhances the binding of p53 to the promoters of its target genes (for example, CDKN1 and BAX) as well as of its own gene by promoting phosphorylation and acetylation, leading to suppression of cell growth and tumorigenesis. These findings establish a novel feedback circuit between p53 and ISG15-conjugating system for positive regulation of the tumour suppressive function of p53 under DNA damage conditions. PMID:27545325

  9. Nucleolar damage correlates with neurotoxicity induced by different platinum drugs

    PubMed Central

    McKeage, M J; Hsu, T; Screnci, D; Haddad, G; Baguley, B C

    2001-01-01

    Platinum-based drugs are very useful in cancer therapy but are associated with neurotoxicity in the clinic. To investigate the mechanism of neurotoxicity, dorsal root ganglia of rats treated with various platinum drugs were studied. Cell body, nuclear and nucleolar dimensions of dorsal root ganglia sensory nerve cells were measured to determine morphological toxicity. Sensory nerve conduction velocity was measured to determine functional toxicity. After a single dose of oxaliplatin (10 mg kg−1), no significant change in nuclear and cell body diameter was seen but decreased nucleolar size was apparent within a few hours of treatment. Changes in nucleolar size were maximal at 24 hours, recovered very slowly and showed a non-linear dependence on oxaliplatin dose (r2= 0.99). Functional toxicity was delayed in onset until 14 days after a single dose of oxaliplatin but eventually recovered 3 months after treatment. Multiple doses of cisplatin, carboplatin, oxaliplatin, R, R -ormaplatin and S, S -ormaplatin were also associated with time-dependent reduction in nucleolar size. A linear correlation was obtained between the rate of change in nucleolar size during multiple dose treatment with the series of platinum drugs and the time taken for the development of altered sensory nerve conduction velocity (r2= 0.86;P< 0.024). Damage to the nucleolus of ganglionic sensory neurons is therefore linked to the neurotoxicity of platinum-based drugs, possibly through mechanisms resulting in the inhibition of rRNA synthesis. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign  http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11710838

  10. Glycine reduces cadmium-induced teratogenic damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Paniagua-Castro, Norma; Escalona-Cardoso, Gerardo; Chamorro-Cevallos, Germán

    2007-01-01

    The effect of glycine in preventing cadmium (Cd) teratogenicity in mice was studied. Cadmium chloride (CdCl2) was administered subcutaneously at 1, 2 or 4 mg/kg doses on gestation days (GD) 7, 8 and 9. Glycine was given ad libitum (in the drinking water) from GD0 through GD18 (the day when animals were killed), as a 1% and 2% drinking water solution. Cd and nucleic acid concentrations in embryos were determined. The most common finding seen after CdCl2 4 mg/kg exposure was exencephaly. The incidence of this malformation was significantly reduced in mice receiving 2% glycine while fetal Cd significantly decreased as compared to cadmium-treated positive control animals. Increased nucleic acid levels were seen in the same embryos. In glycine non-supplemented mice given CdCl2 4 mg/kg, embryonic lipid peroxidation proved to be increased. In conclusion, lipid peroxidation was associated with cadmium-induced teratogenicity, and glycine inhibited the cadmium-induced effect by inhibiting placental transport of cadmium. However, further detailed studies are needed to establish the mechanism(s) of action.

  11. The role of insulin against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative damages in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Mahesh; Kim, Sung-Jin

    2014-06-01

    Exogenous hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) can easily penetrate into biological membranes and enhance the formation of other reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the present study, we have investigated the neuroprotective effects of insulin on H2O2-induced toxicity of retinoic acid (RA)-differentiated SH-SY5Y cells. To measure the changes in the cell viability of SH-SY5Y cells at different concentrations of H2O2 for 24 h, a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT)-based assay was used and a 100 µM H2O2 was selected to establish a model of H2O2-induced oxidative stress. Further assays showed that 24 h of 100 µM H2O2-induced significant changes in the levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), nitric oxide (NO), ROS, and calcium ion (Ca2+) in neuronal cells, but insulin can effectively diminish the H2O2-induced oxidative damages to these cells. Moreover, cells treated with insulin increased H2O2-induced suppression of glutathione levels and exerted an apparent suppressive effect on oxidative products. The results of insulin treatment with SH-SY5Y cells increased the Bcl-2 levels and decreased the Akt levels. The treatment of insulin had played a protective effect on H2O2-induced oxidative stress related to the Akt/Bcl-2 pathways.

  12. Metastasis suppressor NM23-H1 promotes repair of UV-induced DNA damage and suppresses UV-induced melanomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, Stuart G; Novak, Marian; Dabernat, Sandrine; Daniel, Jean-Yves; Mellon, Isabel; Zhang, Qingbei; Harris, Nathan; Ciesielski, Michael J; Fenstermaker, Robert A; Kovacic, Diane; Slominski, Andrzej; Kaetzel, David M

    2012-01-01

    Reduced expression of the metastasis suppressor NM23-H1 is associated with aggressive forms of multiple cancers. Here, we establish that NM23-H1 (termed H1 isoform in human, M1 in mouse) and two of its attendant enzymatic activities, the 3'-5' exonuclease and nucleoside diphosphate kinase, are novel participants in the cellular response to UV radiation (UVR)-induced DNA damage. NM23-H1 deficiency compromised the kinetics of repair for total DNA polymerase-blocking lesions and nucleotide excision repair of (6-4) photoproducts in vitro. Kinase activity of NM23-H1 was critical for rapid repair of both polychromatic UVB/UVA-induced (290-400 nm) and UVC-induced (254 nm) DNA damage, whereas its 3'-5' exonuclease activity was dominant in the suppression of UVR-induced mutagenesis. Consistent with its role in DNA repair, NM23-H1 rapidly translocated to sites of UVR-induced (6-4) photoproduct DNA damage in the nucleus. In addition, transgenic mice hemizygous-null for nm23-m1 and nm23-m2 exhibited UVR-induced melanoma and follicular infundibular cyst formation, and tumor-associated melanocytes displayed invasion into adjacent dermis, consistent with loss of invasion-suppressing activity of NM23 in vivo. Taken together, our data show a critical role for NM23 isoforms in limiting mutagenesis and suppressing UVR-induced melanomagenesis.

  13. Thermal analysis of induced damage to the healthy cell during RFA of breast tumor.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sundeep; Bhowmik, Arka; Repaka, Ramjee

    2016-05-01

    Effective pre-clinical computational modeling strategies have been demonstrated in this article to enable risk free clinical application of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of breast tumor. The present study (a) determines various optimal regulating parameters required for RFA of tumor and (b) introduces an essential clinical monitoring scheme to minimize the extent of damage to the healthy cell during RFA of tumor. The therapeutic capabilities offered by RFA of breast tumor, viz., the rise in local temperature and induced thermal damage have been predicted by integrating the bioheat transfer model, the electric field distribution model and the thermal damage model. The mathematical model has been validated with the experimental results available in the literature. The results revealed that, the effective damage of tumor volume sparing healthy tissue essentially depends on the voltage, the exposure time, the local heat distribution, the tumor stage and the electrode geometric configuration. It has been confirmed that, the assessment of damage front can accurately determine the extent of damage as compared to the thermal front. The study further evaluates the damaged healthy and tumor volumes due to RFA of different stages of breast cancer. The assessment of cell survival and damage fractions discloses the propensity of reappearance/healing of tumor cells after treatment. PMID:27157337

  14. Hyperprolinemia induces DNA, protein and lipid damage in blood of rats: antioxidant protection.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Andréa G K; Scherer, Emilene B; da Cunha, Aline A; Manfredini, Vanusa; Biancini, Giovana Brondani; Vanzin, Camila Simioni; Vargas, Carmen R; Wyse, Angela T S

    2014-09-01

    The present study investigated the effects of hyperprolinemia on oxidative damage to biomolecules (protein, lipids and DNA) and the antioxidant status in blood of rats. The influence of the antioxidants on the effects elicited by proline was also examined. Wistar rats received two daily injections of proline and/or vitamin E plus C (6th-28th day of life) and were killed 12h after the last injection. Results showed that hyperprolinemia induced a significant oxidative damage to proteins, lipids and DNA demonstrated by increased carbonyl content, malondialdehyde levels and a greater damage index in comet assay, respectively. The concomitant antioxidants administration to proline treatment completely prevented oxidative damage to proteins, but partially prevented lipids and DNA damage. We also observed that the non-enzymatic antioxidant potential was decreased by proline treatment and partially prevented by antioxidant supplementation. The plasma levels of vitamins E and C significantly increased in rats treated exogenously with these vitamins but, interestingly, when proline was administered concomitantly with vitamin E plus C, the levels of these vitamins were similar to those found in plasma of control and proline rats. Our findings suggest that hyperprolinemia promotes oxidative damage to the three major classes of macromolecules in blood of rats. These effects were accomplished by decrease in non-enzymatic antioxidant potential and decrease in vitamins administered exogenously, which significantly decreased oxidative damage to biomolecules studied. These data suggest that antioxidants may be an effective adjuvant therapeutic to limit oxidative damage caused by proline.

  15. Hyperprolinemia induces DNA, protein and lipid damage in blood of rats: antioxidant protection.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Andréa G K; Scherer, Emilene B; da Cunha, Aline A; Manfredini, Vanusa; Biancini, Giovana Brondani; Vanzin, Camila Simioni; Vargas, Carmen R; Wyse, Angela T S

    2014-09-01

    The present study investigated the effects of hyperprolinemia on oxidative damage to biomolecules (protein, lipids and DNA) and the antioxidant status in blood of rats. The influence of the antioxidants on the effects elicited by proline was also examined. Wistar rats received two daily injections of proline and/or vitamin E plus C (6th-28th day of life) and were killed 12h after the last injection. Results showed that hyperprolinemia induced a significant oxidative damage to proteins, lipids and DNA demonstrated by increased carbonyl content, malondialdehyde levels and a greater damage index in comet assay, respectively. The concomitant antioxidants administration to proline treatment completely prevented oxidative damage to proteins, but partially prevented lipids and DNA damage. We also observed that the non-enzymatic antioxidant potential was decreased by proline treatment and partially prevented by antioxidant supplementation. The plasma levels of vitamins E and C significantly increased in rats treated exogenously with these vitamins but, interestingly, when proline was administered concomitantly with vitamin E plus C, the levels of these vitamins were similar to those found in plasma of control and proline rats. Our findings suggest that hyperprolinemia promotes oxidative damage to the three major classes of macromolecules in blood of rats. These effects were accomplished by decrease in non-enzymatic antioxidant potential and decrease in vitamins administered exogenously, which significantly decreased oxidative damage to biomolecules studied. These data suggest that antioxidants may be an effective adjuvant therapeutic to limit oxidative damage caused by proline. PMID:24980685

  16. Reactive ion-etching-induced damage in silicon using SF/sub 6/ gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, B.M.; Pinto, R.; Sachidananda Babu, R.

    1987-07-01

    Damage introduced in silicon during reactive-ion etching (RIE) in SI/sub 6/ gas containing 10 Vol % of H/sub 2/, He, N/sub 2/, O/sub 2/, or Ar has been investigated using Schottky barrier measurements and Rutherford backscattering. RIE was performed at 0.1 Watt cm/sup -2/ power density with the radio frequancy (rf) cathode covered with a quartz plate. The annealing effect on damage was studied at various temperatures up to 800 /sup 0/C in dry N/sub 2/. The results indicate that the damage has two components namely, a shallow near-surface region with lattice damage and a deep layer containing discrete defect centers which act as donors. The extent of the deep damage layer is the net balance between two competing processes: (a) the etch rate, and (b) the rate of damage migration into silicon. However, the damage has been found to reach a saturation level after RIE for 1 min in all the gas mixtures studied. The results also suggest that RIE in SF/sub 6/+10% H/sub 2/ gas mixture causes a deep damage layer which could, however, be annealed at 150 /sup 0/C aided significantly by the passivation of defect centers by hydrogen permeated during RIE. On the other hand, the damage induced in SF/sub 6/+10% Ar-etched samples has been found to anneal at 800 /sup 0/C indicating there by a higher level of lattice damage or amorphization of the near-surface layer of silicon. Therefore, the mass of the bombarding ion significantly affects the nature of the damage layers.

  17. Molecular responses to photogenotoxic stress induced by the antibiotic lomefloxacin in human skin cells: from DNA damage to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Marrot, Laurent; Belaïdi, Jean Phillipe; Jones, Christophe; Perez, Phillipe; Riou, Lydia; Sarasin, Alain; Meunier, Jean Roch

    2003-09-01

    Photo-unstable chemicals sometimes behave as phototoxins in skin, inducing untoward clinical side-effects when exposed to sunlight. Some drugs, such as psoralens or fluoroquinolones, can damage genomic DNA, thus increasing the risk of photocarcinogenesis. Here, lomefloxacin, an antibiotic from the fluoroquinolone family known to be involved in skin tumor development in photoexposed mice, was studied using normal human skin cells in culture: fibroblasts, keratinocytes, and Caucasian melanocytes. When treated cells were exposed to simulated solar ultraviolet A (320-400 nm), lomefloxacin induced damage such as strand breaks and pyrimidine dimers in genomic DNA. Lomefloxacin also triggered various stress responses: heme-oxygenase-1 expression in fibroblasts, changes in p53 status as shown by the accumulation of p53 and p21 proteins or the induction of MDM2 and GADD45 genes, and stimulation of melanogenesis by increasing the tyrosinase activity in melanocytes. Lomefloxacin could also lead to apoptosis in keratinocytes exposed to ultraviolet A: caspase-3 was activated and FAS-L gene was induced. Moreover, keratinocytes were shown to be the most sensitive cell type to lomefloxacin phototoxic effects, in spite of the well-established effectiveness of their antioxidant equipment. These data show that the phototoxicity of a given drug can be driven by different mechanisms and that its biologic impact varies according to cell type.

  18. Sulforaphane protects against cytokine- and streptozotocin-induced {beta}-cell damage by suppressing the NF-{kappa}B pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Mi-Young; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Woo-Sung; Park, Jin-Woo; Kim, Hyung-Jin; So, Hong-Seob; Park, Raekil; Kwon, Kang-Beom Park, Byung-Hyun

    2009-02-15

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is an indirect antioxidant that protects animal tissues from chemical or biological insults by stimulating the expression of several NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2)-regulated phase 2 enzymes. Treatment of RINm5F insulinoma cells with SFN increases Nrf2 nuclear translocation and expression of phase 2 enzymes. In this study, we investigated whether the activation of Nrf2 by SFN treatment or ectopic overexpression of Nrf2 inhibited cytokine-induced {beta}-cell damage. Treatment of RIN cells with IL-1{beta} and IFN-{gamma} induced {beta}-cell damage through a NF-{kappa}B-dependent signaling pathway. Activation of Nrf2 by treatment with SFN and induction of Nrf2 overexpression by transfection with Nrf2 prevented cytokine toxicity. The mechanism by which Nrf2 activation inhibited NF-{kappa}B-dependent cell death signals appeared to involve the reduction of oxidative stress, as demonstrated by the inhibition of cytokine-induced H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production. The protective effect of SFN was further demonstrated by the restoration of normal insulin secreting responses to glucose in cytokine-treated rat pancreatic islets. Furthermore, pretreatment with SFN blocked the development of type 1 diabetes in streptozotocin-treated mice.

  19. Ultrasound-induced DNA damage and signal transductions indicated by gammaH2AX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusawa, Yukihiro; Fujiwara, Yoshisada; Zhao, Qing-Li; Hassan, Mariame Ali; Ogawa, Ryohei; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Takasaki, Ichiro; Takahashi, Akihisa; Ohnishi, Takeo; Kondo, Takashi

    2011-09-01

    Ultrasound (US) has been shown to induce cancer cell death via different forms including apoptosis. Here, we report the potential of low-intensity pulsed US (LIPUS) to induce genomic DNA damage and subsequent DNA damage response. Using the ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) as the positive control, we were able to observe the induction of DSBs (as neutral comet tails) and the subsequent formation of gammaH2AX-positive foci (by immunofluorescence detection) in human leukemia cells following exposure to LIPUS. The LIPUS-induced DNA damage arose most likely from the mechanical, but not sonochemical, effect of cavitation, based on our observation that the suppression of inertial cavitation abrogated the gammH2AX foci formation, whereas scavenging of free radical formation (e.g., hydroxyl radical) had no protective effect on it. Treatment with the specific kinase inhibitor of ATM or DNA-PKcs, which can phosphorylate H2AX Ser139, revealed that US-induced gammaH2AX was inhibited more effectively by the DNA-PK inhibitor than ATM kinase inhibitor. Notably, these inhibitor effects were opposite to those with radiation-induced gammH2AX. In conclusion, we report, for the first time that US can induce DNA damage and the DNA damage response as indicated by gammaH2AX was triggered by the cavitational mechanical effects. Thus, it is expected that the data shown here may provide a better understanding of the cellular responses to US.

  20. Cerium oxide nanoparticles, combining antioxidant and UV shielding properties, prevent UV-induced cell damage and mutagenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputo, Fanny; de Nicola, Milena; Sienkiewicz, Andrzej; Giovanetti, Anna; Bejarano, Ignacio; Licoccia, Silvia; Traversa, Enrico; Ghibelli, Lina

    2015-09-01

    Efficient inorganic UV shields, mostly based on refracting TiO2 particles, have dramatically changed the sun exposure habits. Unfortunately, health concerns have emerged from the pro-oxidant photocatalytic effect of UV-irradiated TiO2, which mediates toxic effects on cells. Therefore, improvements in cosmetic solar shield technology are a strong priority. CeO2 nanoparticles are not only UV refractors but also potent biological antioxidants due to the surface 3+/4+ valency switch, which confers anti-inflammatory, anti-ageing and therapeutic properties. Herein, UV irradiation protocols were set up, allowing selective study of the extra-shielding effects of CeO2vs. TiO2 nanoparticles on reporter cells. TiO2 irradiated with UV (especially UVA) exerted strong photocatalytic effects, superimposing their pro-oxidant, cell-damaging and mutagenic action when induced by UV, thereby worsening the UV toxicity. On the contrary, irradiated CeO2 nanoparticles, via their Ce3+/Ce4+ redox couple, exerted impressive protection on UV-treated cells, by buffering oxidation, preserving viability and proliferation, reducing DNA damage and accelerating repair; strikingly, they almost eliminated mutagenesis, thus acting as an important tool to prevent skin cancer. Interestingly, CeO2 nanoparticles also protect cells from the damage induced by irradiated TiO2, suggesting that these two particles may also complement their effects in solar lotions. CeO2 nanoparticles, which intrinsically couple UV shielding with biological and genetic protection, appear to be ideal candidates for next-generation sun shields.

  1. Coagulin-L ameliorates TLR4 induced oxidative damage and immune response by regulating mitochondria and NOX-derived ROS.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Sukka Santosh; Chauhan, Parul; Maurya, Preeti; Saini, Deepika; Yadav, Prem Prakash; Barthwal, Manoj Kumar

    2016-10-15

    Withanolides possess diverse biological and pharmacological activity but their immunomodulatory function is less realized. Hence, coagulin-L, a withanolide isolated from Withania coagulans Dunal has been studied for such an effect in human and murine cells, and mice model. Coagulin-L (1, 3, 10μM) exhibited immunomodulatory effect by suppressing TLR4 induced immune mediators such as cytokines (GMCSF, IFNα, IFNγ, IL-1α, IL-1Rα, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-2R, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-10, IL-12 (p40/p70), IL-13, IL-15, IL-17), chemokines (IL-8/CXCL8, MIG/CXCL9, IP-10/CXCL10, KC, MCP-1/CCL2, MIP-1α/CCL3, MIP-1β/CCL4, RANTES/CCL5, eotaxin/CCL11), growth factors (FGF-basic, VEGF), nitric oxide and intracellular superoxide. Mechanistically, coagulin-L abrogated LPS induced total and mitochondrial ROS generation, NOX2, NOX4 mRNA expression, IRAK and MAPK (p38, JNK, ERK) activation. Coagulin-L also attenuated IκBα degradation, which prevented NFκB downstream iNOS expression and pro-inflammatory cytokine release. Furthermore, coagulin-L (10, 25, 50mg/kg, p.o.), undermined the LPS (10mg/kg, i.p.) induced endotoxemia response in mice as evinced from diminished cytokine release, nitric oxide, aortic p38 MAPK activation and endothelial tissue impairment besides suppressing NOX2 and NOX4 expression in liver and aorta. Moreover, coagulin-L also alleviated the ROS mediated oxidative damage which was assessed through protein carbonyl, lipid hydroperoxide, 8-isoprostane and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine quantification. To extend, coagulin-L also suppressed carrageenan-induced paw edema and thioglycollate-induced peritonitis in mice. Therefore, coagulin-L can be of therapeutic importance in pathological conditions induced by oxidative damage. PMID:27568862

  2. Coagulin-L ameliorates TLR4 induced oxidative damage and immune response by regulating mitochondria and NOX-derived ROS.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Sukka Santosh; Chauhan, Parul; Maurya, Preeti; Saini, Deepika; Yadav, Prem Prakash; Barthwal, Manoj Kumar

    2016-10-15

    Withanolides possess diverse biological and pharmacological activity but their immunomodulatory function is less realized. Hence, coagulin-L, a withanolide isolated from Withania coagulans Dunal has been studied for such an effect in human and murine cells, and mice model. Coagulin-L (1, 3, 10μM) exhibited immunomodulatory effect by suppressing TLR4 induced immune mediators such as cytokines (GMCSF, IFNα, IFNγ, IL-1α, IL-1Rα, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-2R, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-10, IL-12 (p40/p70), IL-13, IL-15, IL-17), chemokines (IL-8/CXCL8, MIG/CXCL9, IP-10/CXCL10, KC, MCP-1/CCL2, MIP-1α/CCL3, MIP-1β/CCL4, RANTES/CCL5, eotaxin/CCL11), growth factors (FGF-basic, VEGF), nitric oxide and intracellular superoxide. Mechanistically, coagulin-L abrogated LPS induced total and mitochondrial ROS generation, NOX2, NOX4 mRNA expression, IRAK and MAPK (p38, JNK, ERK) activation. Coagulin-L also attenuated IκBα degradation, which prevented NFκB downstream iNOS expression and pro-inflammatory cytokine release. Furthermore, coagulin-L (10, 25, 50mg/kg, p.o.), undermined the LPS (10mg/kg, i.p.) induced endotoxemia response in mice as evinced from diminished cytokine release, nitric oxide, aortic p38 MAPK activation and endothelial tissue impairment besides suppressing NOX2 and NOX4 expression in liver and aorta. Moreover, coagulin-L also alleviated the ROS mediated oxidative damage which was assessed through protein carbonyl, lipid hydroperoxide, 8-isoprostane and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine quantification. To extend, coagulin-L also suppressed carrageenan-induced paw edema and thioglycollate-induced peritonitis in mice. Therefore, coagulin-L can be of therapeutic importance in pathological conditions induced by oxidative damage.

  3. Identification of pathways controlling DNA damage induced mutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lis, Ewa T; O'Neill, Bryan M; Gil-Lamaignere, Cristina; Chin, Jodie K; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2008-05-01

    Mutation in response to most types of DNA damage is thought to be mediated by the error-prone sub-branch of post-replication repair and the associated translesion synthesis polymerases. To further understand the mutagenic response to DNA damage, we screened a collection of 4848 haploid gene deletion strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for decreased damage-induced mutation of the CAN1 gene. Through extensive quantitative validation of the strains identified by the screen, we identified ten genes, which included error-prone post-replication repair genes known to be involved in induced mutation, as well as two additional genes, FYV6 and RNR4. We demonstrate that FYV6 and RNR4 are epistatic with respect to induced mutation, and that they function, at least partially, independently of post-replication repair. This pathway of induced mutation appears to be mediated by an increase in dNTP levels that facilitates lesion bypass by the replicative polymerase Pol delta, and it is as important as error-prone post-replication repair in the case of UV- and MMS-induced mutation, but solely responsible for EMS-induced mutation. We show that Rnr4/Pol delta-induced mutation is efficiently inhibited by hydroxyurea, a small molecule inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase, suggesting that if similar pathways exist in human cells, intervention in some forms of mutation may be possible.

  4. The Biological Effectiveness of Different Radiation Qualities for the Induction of Chromosome Damage in Human Lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2010-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations were measured in human peripheral blood lymphocytes after in vitro exposure to 28Si- ions with energies ranging from 90 to 600 MeV/u, or to 56Fe-ions with energies ranging from 200 to 5,000 MeV/u. The LET of the various Fe beams in this study ranged from 145 to 440 keV/micron and the LET of the Si ions ranged from 48 to 158 keV/ m. Doses delivered were in the 10- to 200-cGy range. Dose-response curves for chromosome exchanges in cells at first division after exposure, measured using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole-chromosome probes, were fitted with linear or linear-quadratic functions. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) was estimated from the initial slope of the dose-response curve for chromosome damage with respect to -rays. The estimates of RBE(sub max) values for total chromosome exchanges ranged from 4.4+/-0.4 to 31.5+/-2.6 for Fe ions, and 11.8+/-1.0 to 42.2+/-3.3 for Si ions. The highest RBE(sub max) value for Fe ions was obtained with the 600-Mev/u beam, and the highest RBE(sub max) value for Si ions was obtained with the 170 MeV/u beam. For both ions the RBEmax values increased with LET, reaching a maximum at about 180 keV/micron for Fe and about 100 keV/ m for Si, and decreasing with further increase in LET. Additional studies for low doses 28Si-ions down to 0.02 Gy will be discussed.

  5. Impact of storage induced outgassing organic contamination on laser induced damage of silica optics at 351 nm.

    PubMed

    Bien-Aimé, K; Belin, C; Gallais, L; Grua, P; Fargin, E; Néauport, J; Tovena-Pecault, I

    2009-10-12

    The impact of storage conditions on laser induced damage density at 351 nm on bare fused polished silica samples has been studied. Intentionally outgassing of polypropylene pieces on silica samples was done. We evidenced an important increase of laser induced damage density on contaminated samples demonstrating that storage could limit optics lifetime performances. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Gas Chromatography -Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) have been used to identify the potential causes of this effect. It shows that a small quantity of organic contamination deposited on silica surface is responsible for this degradation. Various hypotheses are proposed to explain the damage mechanism. The more likely hypothesis is a coupling between surface defects of optics and organic contaminants.

  6. A DNA-damage-induced cell cycle checkpoint in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Preuss, S B; Britt, A B

    2003-01-01

    Although it is well established that plant seeds treated with high doses of gamma radiation arrest development as seedlings, the cause of this arrest is unknown. The uvh1 mutant of Arabidopsis is defective in a homolog of the human repair endonuclease XPF, and uvh1 mutants are sensitive to both the toxic effects of UV and the cytostatic effects of gamma radiation. Here we find that gamma irradiation of uvh1 plants specifically triggers a G(2)-phase cell cycle arrest. Mutants, termed suppressor of gamma (sog), that suppress this radiation-induced arrest and proceed through the cell cycle unimpeded were recovered in the uvh1 background; the resulting irradiated plants are genetically unstable. The sog mutations fall into two complementation groups. They are second-site suppressors of the uvh1 mutant's sensitivity to gamma radiation but do not affect the susceptibility of the plant to UV radiation. In addition to rendering the plants resistant to the growth inhibitory effects of gamma radiation, the sog1 mutation affects the proper development of the pollen tetrad, suggesting that SOG1 might also play a role in the regulation of cell cycle progression during meiosis. PMID:12750343

  7. Urea-induced oxidative damage in Elodea densa leaves.

    PubMed

    Maleva, Maria; Borisova, Galina; Chukina, Nadezda; Prasad, M N V

    2015-09-01

    Urea being a fertilizer is expected to be less toxic to plants. However, it was found that urea at 100 mg L(-1) caused the oxidative stress in Elodea leaves due to the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxidation that are known to stimulate antioxidant pathway. Urea at a concentration of 500 and 1000 mg L(-1) decreased low-molecular-weight antioxidants. In this case, the antioxidant status of plants was supported by the activity of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase and guaiacol peroxidase. A significant increase in the soluble proteins and -SH groups was observed with high concentrations of urea (30-60 % of control). Thus, the increased activity of antioxidant enzymes, low-molecular-weight antioxidants, and induced soluble protein thiols are implicated in plant resistance to oxidative stress imposed by urea. We found that guaiacol peroxidase plays an important role in the removal of the peroxide in Elodea leaves exposed to 1000 mg L(-1)of urea.

  8. Perinatal radiation-induced renal damage in the beagle

    SciTech Connect

    Jaenke, R.S.; Angleton, G.M. )

    1990-04-01

    The developing perinatal kidney is particularly sensitive to radiation. The pathogenesis of the radiation-induced lesion is related to the destruction of outer cortical developing nephrons and direct radiation injury with secondary hemodynamic alterations in remnant nephrons. In this study, which is part of a life span investigation of the effects of whole-body gamma radiation during prenatal and early postnatal life, dogs were given 0, 0.16, 0.83, or 1.25 Gy irradiation at either 55 days postcoitus or 2 days postpartum and were examined morphometrically and histopathologically at 70 days of age. Although irradiated dogs showed no reduction in the total number of nephrons per kidney, there was a significant increase in the total number and relative percentage of immature, dysplastic glomeruli. In addition, deeper cortical glomeruli of irradiated kidneys exhibited mesangial sclerosis similar to that associated with progressive renal failure in our previous studies. These findings are in accord with those reported at doses of 2.24 to 3.57 Gy and demonstrate that the perinatal kidney is affected by radiation doses much lower than previously demonstrated.

  9. Induced DNA damage by dental resin monomers in somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Arossi, Guilherme Anziliero; Lehmann, Mauricio; Dihl, Rafael Rodrigues; Reguly, Maria Luiza; de Andrade, Heloisa Helena Rodrigues

    2010-02-01

    The present in vivo study investigated the genotoxicity of four dental resin monomers: triethyleneglycoldimethacrylate (TEGDMA), hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA), urethanedimethacrylate (UDMA) and bisphenol A-glycidylmethacrylate (BisGMA). The Somatic Mutation and Recombination Test (SMART) in Drosophila melanogaster was applied to analyse their genotoxicity expressed as homologous mitotic recombination, point and chromosomal mutation. SMART detects the loss of heterozygosity of marker genes expressed phenotypically on the fly's wings. This fruit fly has an extensive genetic homology to mammalians, which makes it a suitable model organism for genotoxic investigations. The present findings provide evidence that the mechanistic basis underlying the genotoxicity of UDMA and TEGDMA is related to homologous recombination and gene/chromosomal mutation. A genotoxic pattern can correspondingly be discerned for both UDMA and TEGDMA: their genotoxicity is attributed respectively to 49% and 44% of mitotic recombination, as well as 51% and 56% of mutational events, including point and chromosomal alterations. The monomer UDMA is 1.6 times more active than TEGDMA to induce mutant clones per treatment unit. BisGMA and HEMA had no statistically significant effect on total spot frequencies - suggesting no genotoxic action in the SMART assay. The clinical significance of these observations has to be interpreted for data obtained in other bioassays.

  10. A DNA damage-induced, SOS-independent checkpoint regulates cell division in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Modell, Joshua W; Kambara, Tracy K; Perchuk, Barrett S; Laub, Michael T

    2014-10-01

    Cells must coordinate DNA replication with cell division, especially during episodes of DNA damage. The paradigm for cell division control following DNA damage in bacteria involves the SOS response where cleavage of the transcriptional repressor LexA induces a division inhibitor. However, in Caulobacter crescentus, cells lacking the primary SOS-regulated inhibitor, sidA, can often still delay division post-damage. Here we identify didA, a second cell division inhibitor that is induced by DNA damage, but in an SOS-independent manner. Together, DidA and SidA inhibit division, such that cells lacking both inhibitors divide prematurely following DNA damage, with lethal consequences. We show that DidA does not disrupt assembly of the division machinery and instead binds the essential division protein FtsN to block cytokinesis. Intriguingly, mutations in FtsW and FtsI, which drive the synthesis of septal cell wall material, can suppress the activity of both SidA and DidA, likely by causing the FtsW/I/N complex to hyperactively initiate cell division. Finally, we identify a transcription factor, DriD, that drives the SOS-independent transcription of didA following DNA damage.

  11. MicroRNA-mediated gene silencing modulates the UV-induced DNA-damage response

    PubMed Central

    Pothof, Joris; Verkaik, Nicole S; van IJcken, Wilfred; Wiemer, Erik A C; Ta, Van T B; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T J; Jaspers, Nicolaas G J; van Gent, Dik C; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Persengiev, Stephan P

    2009-01-01

    DNA damage provokes DNA repair, cell-cycle regulation and apoptosis. This DNA-damage response encompasses gene-expression regulation at the transcriptional and post-translational levels. We show that cellular responses to UV-induced DNA damage are also regulated at the post-transcriptional level by microRNAs. Survival and checkpoint response after UV damage was severely reduced on microRNA-mediated gene-silencing inhibition by knocking down essential components of the microRNA-processing pathway (Dicer and Ago2). UV damage triggered a cell-cycle-dependent relocalization of Ago2 into stress granules and various microRNA-expression changes. Ago2 relocalization required CDK activity, but was independent of ATM/ATR checkpoint signalling, whereas UV-responsive microRNA expression was only partially ATM/ATR independent. Both microRNA-expression changes and stress-granule formation were most pronounced within the first hours after genotoxic stress, suggesting that microRNA-mediated gene regulation operates earlier than most transcriptional responses. The functionality of the microRNA response is illustrated by the UV-inducible miR-16 that downregulates checkpoint-gene CDC25a and regulates cell proliferation. We conclude that microRNA-mediated gene regulation adds a new dimension to the DNA-damage response. PMID:19536137

  12. A DNA Damage-Induced, SOS-Independent Checkpoint Regulates Cell Division in Caulobacter crescentus

    PubMed Central

    Modell, Joshua W.; Kambara, Tracy K.; Perchuk, Barrett S.; Laub, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Cells must coordinate DNA replication with cell division, especially during episodes of DNA damage. The paradigm for cell division control following DNA damage in bacteria involves the SOS response where cleavage of the transcriptional repressor LexA induces a division inhibitor. However, in Caulobacter crescentus, cells lacking the primary SOS-regulated inhibitor, sidA, can often still delay division post-damage. Here we identify didA, a second cell division inhibitor that is induced by DNA damage, but in an SOS-independent manner. Together, DidA and SidA inhibit division, such that cells lacking both inhibitors divide prematurely following DNA damage, with lethal consequences. We show that DidA does not disrupt assembly of the division machinery and instead binds the essential division protein FtsN to block cytokinesis. Intriguingly, mutations in FtsW and FtsI, which drive the synthesis of septal cell wall material, can suppress the activity of both SidA and DidA, likely by causing the FtsW/I/N complex to hyperactively initiate cell division. Finally, we identify a transcription factor, DriD, that drives the SOS-independent transcription of didA following DNA damage. PMID:25350732

  13. Aag DNA Glycosylase Promotes Alkylation-Induced Tissue Damage Mediated by Parp1

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, Jennifer A.; Moroski-Erkul, Catherine A.; Lake, Annabelle; Eichinger, Lindsey W.; Shah, Dharini; Jhun, Iny; Limsirichai, Prajit; Bronson, Roderick T.; Christiani, David C.; Meira, Lisiane B.; Samson, Leona D.

    2013-01-01

    Alkylating agents comprise a major class of front-line cancer chemotherapeutic compounds, and while these agents effectively kill tumor cells, they also damage healthy tissues. Although base excision repair (BER) is essential in repairing DNA alkylation damage, under certain conditions, initiation of BER can be detrimental. Here we illustrate that the alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) mediates alkylation-induced tissue damage and whole-animal lethality following exposure to alkylating agents. Aag-dependent tissue damage, as observed in cerebellar granule cells, splenocytes, thymocytes, bone marrow cells, pancreatic β-cells, and retinal photoreceptor cells, was detected in wild-type mice, exacerbated in Aag transgenic mice, and completely suppressed in Aag−/− mice. Additional genetic experiments dissected the effects of modulating both BER and Parp1 on alkylation sensitivity in mice and determined that Aag acts upstream of Parp1 in alkylation-induced tissue damage; in fact, cytotoxicity in WT and Aag transgenic mice was abrogated in the absence of Parp1. These results provide in vivo evidence that Aag-initiated BER may play a critical role in determining the side-effects of alkylating agent chemotherapies and that Parp1 plays a crucial role in Aag-mediated tissue damage. PMID:23593019

  14. Oxidative damage induced by copper in mouse primary hepatocytes by single-cell analysis.

    PubMed

    Jing, Mingyang; Liu, Yang; Song, Wei; Yan, Yunxing; Yan, Wenbao; Liu, Rutao

    2016-01-01

    Copper can disturb the intracellular redox balance, induce oxidative stress, and subsequently cause irreversible damage, leading to a variety of diseases. In the present study, mouse primary hepatocytes were chosen to elucidate the in vitro oxidative damage of short-term copper exposure (10-200 μM) by single-cell analysis. We evaluated the toxicity of copper by reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione (GSH), and oxidative DNA damage at the single-cell level. Oxidative damage induced by copper was verified by the morphological changes, persistent elevations of excessive ROS and malondialdehyde (MDA), a decrease in GSH level, and the oxidative DNA damage. Furthermore, the average ROS generation, GSH consumption, and the indicators in DNA damage did not significantly change at relatively low concentrations (10 or 50 μM), but we can find the alterations of parameters in some single cells clearly. Emphasis on the analysis of single cells is conducive to gain a better understanding on the toxicity of copper. This study will also complement studies on the environmental risk assessment of copper pollution.

  15. DNA Damage-induced Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Stress Response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Lori A.; Degtyareva, Natalya; Doetsch, Paul W.

    2008-01-01

    Cells are exposed to both endogenous and exogenous sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS). At high levels, ROS can lead to impaired physiological function through cellular damage of DNA, proteins, lipids, and other macromolecules, which can lead to certain human pathologies including cancers, neurodegenerative disorders, and cardiovascular disease, as well as aging. We have employed Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system to examine the levels and types of ROS that are produced in response to DNA damage in isogenic strains with different DNA repair capacities. We find that when DNA damage is introduced into cells from exogenous or endogenous sources there is an increase in the amount of intracellular ROS which is not directly related to cell death. We have examined the spectrum of ROS in order to elucidate its role in the cellular response to DNA damage. As an independent verification of the DNA damage-induced ROS response, we show that a major activator of the oxidative stress response, Yap1, relocalizes to the nucleus following exposure to the DNA alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate. Our results indicate that the DNA damage-induced increase in intracellular ROS levels is a generalized stress response that is likely to function in various signaling pathways. PMID:18708137

  16. Ochratoxin A induces oxidative DNA damage in liver and kidney after oral dosing to rats.

    PubMed

    Kamp, Hennicke G; Eisenbrand, Gerhard; Janzowski, Christine; Kiossev, Jetchko; Latendresse, John R; Schlatter, Josef; Turesky, Robert J

    2005-12-01

    The nephrotoxic/carcinogenic mycotoxin ochratoxin A (OTA) occurs as a contaminant in food and feed and may be linked to human endemic Balkan nephropathy. The mechanism of OTA-derived carcinogenicity is still under debate, since reactive metabolites of OTA and DNA adducts have not been unambiguously identified. Oxidative DNA damage, however, has been observed in vitro after incubation of mammalian cells with OTA. In this study, we investigated whether OTA induces oxidative DNA damage in vivo as well. Male F344 rats were dosed with 0, 0.03, 0.1, 0.3 mg/kg bw per day OTA for 4 wk (gavage, 7 days/wk, five animals per dose group). Subsequently, oxidative DNA damage was determined in liver and kidney by the comet assay (single cell gel electrophoresis) with/without use of the repair enzyme formamido-pyrimidine-DNA-glycosylase (FPG). The administration of OTA had no effect on basic DNA damage (determined without FPG); however, OTA-mediated oxidative damage was detected with FPG treatment in kidney and liver DNA of all dose groups. Since the doses were in a range that had caused kidney tumors in a 2-year carcinogenicity study with rats, the oxidative DNA damage induced by OTA may help to explain its mechanism of carcinogenicity. For the selective induction of tumors in the kidney, increased oxidative stress in connection with severe cytotoxicity and increased cell proliferation might represent driving factors.

  17. HTLV-1 Tax protein sensitizes cells to apoptotic cell death induced by DNA damaging agents.

    PubMed

    Kao, S Y; Lemoine, F J; Mariott, S J

    2000-04-27

    Transient HTLV-1 Tax expression suppresses cellular nucleotide excision repair, and this effect correlates with Tax transactivation of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen promoter. The inability to repair DNA damage typically induces apoptotic cell death. Therefore, we investigated the effect of Tax-mediated suppression of DNA repair on apoptosis in stable Tax-expressing cells. Constitutive Tax expression reduced cellular nucleotide excision repair activity compared with parental and control cells. Tax-expressing cells were also more sensitive to apoptosis induced by DNA damaging agents than control cells. Even though Tax-expressing cells displayed reduced DNA repair, they showed increased DNA replication following UV damage. These results suggest that Tax suppresses the cell's ability to repair DNA damage and stimulates DNA replication even in the presence of damage. The inability to repair DNA damage is likely to stimulate apoptotic cell death in the majority of Tax-expressing cells while the ability to promote DNA replication may also allow the survival of a small population of cells. We propose that together these effects contribute to the monoclonal nature and low efficiency of HTLV-1 transformation.

  18. DNA damage-induced centrosome amplification occurs via excessive formation of centriolar satellites.

    PubMed

    Löffler, H; Fechter, A; Liu, F Y; Poppelreuther, S; Krämer, A

    2013-06-13

    Centrosome amplification is a frequent phenomenon in malignancies and may facilitate tumorigenesis by promoting chromosomal instability. On the other hand, a centrosome inactivation checkpoint comprising centrosome amplification leading to elimination of cells by mitotic catastrophe has been described in response to DNA damage by ionizing radiation or cytostatic drugs. So far, the exact nature of DNA damage-induced centrosome amplification, which might be overduplication or fragmentation of existing centrosomes, has been controversial. To solve this controversy, we have established a method to distinguish between these two possibilities using A549 cells expressing photoconvertible CETN2-Dendra2. In response to various DNA-damaging treatments, centrosome amplification but not fragmentation was observed. Moreover, centrosome amplification was preceded by excessive formation of centrin-containing centriolar satellites, which were identified as de novo-generated atypical centrin dots staining positive for centriolar satellite markers but negative or only weakly positive for other established centrosomal markers, and which could be verified as centriolar satellites using immunogold electron microscopy. In line with this notion, disruption of dynein-mediated recruitment of centrosomal proteins via centriolar satellites suppressed centrosome amplification after DNA damage, and excessive formation of centriolar satellites could be inhibited by interference with Chk1, a known mediator of centrosome amplification in response to DNA damage. In conclusion, we provide a model in which a Chk1-mediated DNA damage checkpoint induces excessive formation of centriolar satellites constituting assembly platforms for centrosomal proteins, which subsequently leads to centrosome amplification. PMID:22824794

  19. Docosahexaenoic Acid Induces Oxidative DNA Damage and Apoptosis, and Enhances the Chemosensitivity of Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Eun Ah; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2016-01-01

    The human diet contains low amounts of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and high amounts of ω-6 PUFAs, which has been reported to contribute to the incidence of cancer. Epidemiological studies have shown that a high consumption of fish oil or ω-3 PUFAs reduced the risk of colon, pancreatic, and endometrial cancers. The ω-3 PUFA, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), shows anticancer activity by inducing apoptosis of some human cancer cells without toxicity against normal cells. DHA induces oxidative stress and oxidative DNA adduct formation by depleting intracellular glutathione (GSH) and decreasing the mitochondrial function of cancer cells. Oxidative DNA damage and DNA strand breaks activate DNA damage responses to repair the damaged DNA. However, excessive DNA damage beyond the capacity of the DNA repair processes may initiate apoptotic signaling pathways and cell cycle arrest in cancer cells. DHA shows a variable inhibitory effect on cancer cell growth depending on the cells' molecular properties and degree of malignancy. It has been shown to affect DNA repair processes including DNA-dependent protein kinases and mismatch repair in cancer cells. Moreover, DHA enhanced the efficacy of anticancer drugs by increasing drug uptake and suppressing survival pathways in cancer cells. In this review, DHA-induced oxidative DNA damage, apoptotic signaling, and enhancement of chemosensitivity in cancer cells will be discussed based on recent studies. PMID:27527148

  20. Evaluation of service-induced damage and restoration of cast turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, C.; Persson, P.-O.

    1993-08-01

    Conventionally cast turbine blades of Inconel 713C, from a military gas turbine aircraft engine, have been investigated with regard to service-induced microstructural damage and residual creep life time. For cast turbine blades, service life is defined by statistical values. The statistical methods can prove to be uneconomical, because safe limits must be stated with regard to the statistical probability that some blades will have higher damage than normal. An alternative approach is to determine the service-induced microstructural damage on each blade, or a representative number of blades, to better optimize blade us-age. Ways to use service-induced γ rafting and void formation as quantified microstructural damage pa-rameters in a service lifetime prediction model are suggested. The damage parameters were quantified, in blades with different service exposure levels, and correlated to remaining creep life evaluated from creep test specimens taken from different positions of serviced blades. Results from tests with different rejuvenation treatments, including hot isostatic pressing andJor heat treatment, are discussed briefly.

  1. Mcl-1 protects prostate cancer cells from cell death mediated by chemotherapy-induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Reiner, Teresita; de las Pozas, Alicia; Parrondo, Ricardo; Palenzuela, Deanna; Cayuso, William; Rai, Priyamvada; Perez-Stable, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1 is highly expressed in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), resulting in resistance to apoptosis and association with poor prognosis. Although predominantly localized in the cytoplasm, there is evidence that Mcl-1 exhibits nuclear localization where it is thought to protect against DNA damage-induced cell death. The role of Mcl-1 in mediating resistance to chemotherapy-induced DNA damage in prostate cancer (PCa) is not known. We show in human PCa cell lines and in TRAMP, a transgenic mouse model of PCa, that the combination of the antimitotic agent ENMD-1198 (analog of 2-methoxyestradiol) with betulinic acid (BA, increases proteotoxic stress) targets Mcl-1 by increasing its proteasomal degradation, resulting in increased γH2AX (DNA damage) and apoptotic/necrotic cell death. Knockdown of Mcl-1 in CRPC cells leads to elevated γH2AX, DNA strand breaks, and cell death after treatment with 1198 + BA- or doxorubicin. Additional knockdowns in PC3 cells suggests that cytoplasmic Mcl-1 protects against DNA damage by blocking the mitochondrial release of apoptosis-inducing factor and thereby preventing its nuclear translocation and subsequent interaction with the cyclophilin A endonuclease. Overall, our results suggest that chemotherapeutic agents that target Mcl-1 will promote cell death in response to DNA damage, particularly in CRPC. PMID:26425662

  2. Characterization of damage-induced magnetization for 304 austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongmei; Chen, Zhenmao; Li, Yong

    2011-12-01

    Experimental and analytical studies are carried out on features of damages-induced magnetization (natural magnetization) of the 304 austenitic stainless steel. Various tensile plastic deformations are introduced into test pieces with different initial discontinuities. The surface strain distributions and natural magnetic fields are measured during and after the tensile testings. The magnetization distributions inside the material are reconstructed from the measured natural magnetic field signals through inverse analysis. From the experimental and numerical results, it is clarified that at first, the magnetization direction of the material depends on the load direction and damage distribution and the distribution pattern of magnetization reflects the existence of concentrative damages. Second, the relationship between the intensity of damage-induced magnetization and the maximum plastic strain follows a simple formula proposed in this paper. Third, the magnetization intensity is correlated with the volume fraction of the martensitic phase. Finally, the theory of minimum energy is applicable to qualitatively explain the mechanism of the damage-induced magnetization for the 304 austenitic stainless steel.

  3. Docosahexaenoic Acid Induces Oxidative DNA Damage and Apoptosis, and Enhances the Chemosensitivity of Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Eun Ah; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2016-01-01

    The human diet contains low amounts of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and high amounts of ω-6 PUFAs, which has been reported to contribute to the incidence of cancer. Epidemiological studies have shown that a high consumption of fish oil or ω-3 PUFAs reduced the risk of colon, pancreatic, and endometrial cancers. The ω-3 PUFA, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), shows anticancer activity by inducing apoptosis of some human cancer cells without toxicity against normal cells. DHA induces oxidative stress and oxidative DNA adduct formation by depleting intracellular glutathione (GSH) and decreasing the mitochondrial function of cancer cells. Oxidative DNA damage and DNA strand breaks activate DNA damage responses to repair the damaged DNA. However, excessive DNA damage beyond the capacity of the DNA repair processes may initiate apoptotic signaling pathways and cell cycle arrest in cancer cells. DHA shows a variable inhibitory effect on cancer cell growth depending on the cells’ molecular properties and degree of malignancy. It has been shown to affect DNA repair processes including DNA-dependent protein kinases and mismatch repair in cancer cells. Moreover, DHA enhanced the efficacy of anticancer drugs by increasing drug uptake and suppressing survival pathways in cancer cells. In this review, DHA-induced oxidative DNA damage, apoptotic signaling, and enhancement of chemosensitivity in cancer cells will be discussed based on recent studies. PMID:27527148

  4. Attenuation of eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage conferred by maximal isometric contractions: a mini review

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Leonardo C. R.; Denadai, Benedito S.

    2015-01-01

    Although, beneficial in determined contexts, eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) might be unwanted during training regimens, competitions and daily activities. There are a vast number of studies investigating strategies to attenuate EIMD response after damaging exercise bouts. Many of them consist of performing exercises that induce EIMD, consuming supplements or using equipment that are not accessible for most people. It appears that performing maximal isometric contractions (ISOs) 2–4 days prior to damaging bouts promotes significant attenuation of EIMD symptoms that are not related to muscle function. It has been shown that the volume of ISOs, muscle length in which they are performed, and interval between them and the damaging bout influence the magnitude of this protection. In addition, it appears that this protection is not long-lived, lasting no longer than 4 days. Although no particular mechanisms for these adaptations were identified, professionals should consider applying this non-damaging stimulus before submitting their patients to unaccustomed exercised. However, it seems not to be the best option for athletes or relatively trained individuals. Future, studies should focus on establishing if ISOs protect other populations (i.e., trained individuals) or muscle groups (i.e., knee extensors) against EIMD, as well as investigate different mechanisms for ISO-induced protection. PMID:26578972

  5. Displacement damage induce degradation of COTS array CCDs irradiated by neutron beams from a nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zujun; Chen, Wei; Xiao, Zhigang; Liu, Minbo; Huang, Shaoyan; He, Baoping; Luo, Tongding

    2015-01-01

    The experiments of displacement damage effects on COTS array charge coupled devices (CCDs) induced by neutron irradiation from a nuclear reactor are presented. The charge transfer inefficiency (CTI), saturation output signal voltage (VS), dynamic range (DR), dark signal, and camera imaging quality versus neutron fluence are investigated. The degradation mechanisms of the CCDs irradiated by reactor neutron beams are also analyzed. The CTI increase due to neutron displacement damage appears to be proportional to displacement damage dose. The experiments show that VS degradation induced by neutron irradiation is much less than that induced by gamma irradiation. The dark images from the CCDs irradiated by neutrons are given to investigate dark signal degradation. The degradation forms and mechanisms of the camera imaging quality are very different between the reactor neutron displacement damage and the gamma total ionization dose damage. The three samples were exposed by 1 MeV neutron-equivalent fluences of 1×1011, 5×1011, and 1×1012 n/cm2, respectively. A sample was exposed by 1 MeV neutron-equivalent fluences up to 2×1013 n/cm2, and the CCD is a functional failure after irradiation.

  6. Fibrinogen-induced perivascular microglial clustering is required for the development of axonal damage in neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Davalos, Dimitrios; Kyu Ryu, Jae; Merlini, Mario; Baeten, Kim M.; Le Moan, Natacha; Petersen, Mark A.; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Smirnoff, Dimitri S.; Bedard, Catherine; Hakozaki, Hiroyuki; Gonias Murray, Sara; Ling, Jennie B.; Lassmann, Hans; Degen, Jay L.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Akassoglou, Katerina

    2012-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier disruption, microglial activation and neurodegeneration are hallmarks of multiple sclerosis. However, the initial triggers that activate innate immune responses and their role in axonal damage remain unknown. Here we show that the blood protein fibrinogen induces rapid microglial responses toward the vasculature and is required for axonal damage in neuroinflammation. Using in vivo two-photon microscopy, we demonstrate that microglia form perivascular clusters before myelin loss or paralysis onset and that, of the plasma proteins, fibrinogen specifically induces rapid and sustained microglial responses in vivo. Fibrinogen leakage correlates with areas of axonal damage and induces reactive oxygen species release in microglia. Blocking fibrin formation with anticoagulant treatment or genetically eliminating the fibrinogen binding motif recognized by the microglial integrin receptor CD11b/CD18 inhibits perivascular microglial clustering and axonal damage. Thus, early and progressive perivascular microglial clustering triggered by fibrinogen leakage upon blood-brain barrier disruption contributes to axonal damage in neuroinflammatory disease. PMID:23187627

  7. The neuroprotective effect of hyperbaric oxygen treatment on laser-induced retinal damage in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnevskia-Dai, Victoria; Belokopytov, Mark; Dubinsky, Galina; Nachum, Gal; Avni, Isaac; Belkin, Michael; Rosner, Mordechai

    2005-04-01

    Retinal damage induced by mechanical trauma, ischemia or laser photocoagulation increases considerably by secondary degeneration processes. The spread of damage may be ameliorated by neuroprotection that is aimed at reducing the extent of the secondary degeneration and promote healing processes. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment consists of inspiration of oxygen at higher than one absolute atmospheric pressure. Improved neural function was observed in patients with acute brain trauma or ischemia treated with HBO. This study was designed to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) on laser induced retinal damage in a rat model. Standard argon laser lesions were created in 25 pigmented rats divided into three groups: Ten rats were treated immediately after the irradiation with HBO three times during the first 24 hr followed by 12 consecutive daily treatments. Five rats received a shorter treatment regimen of 10 consecutive HBO treatments. The control group (10 rats) underwent the laser damage with no additional treatment. The retinal lesions were evaluated 20 days after the injury. All outcome measures were improved by the longer HBO treatment (P<0.01). The shorter HBO treatment was less effective, showing an increase only in nuclei density at the central area of lesion (P< 0.01). Hyperbaric oxygen seems to exert a neuroprotective effect on laser-induced retinal damage in a rat model. In the range of HBO exposures studied, longer exposure provides more neuroprotection. These results encourage further evaluation of the potential therapeutic use of hyperbaric oxygen in diseases and injuries of the retina.

  8. Annexin-1 regulated by HAUSP is essential for UV-induced damage response

    PubMed Central

    Park, J-J; Lim, K-H; Baek, K-H

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage can occur through diverse stimulations such as toxins, drugs, and environmental factors. To respond to DNA damage, mammalian cells induce DNA damage response (DDR). DDR signal activates a rapid signal transduction pathway, regulating the cell fate based on the damaged cell condition. Moreover, serious damaged cells have to be eliminated by the macrophage to maintain homeostasis. Because the DDR induces genomic instability followed by tumor formation, targeting the DDR signaling can be applied for the cancer therapy. Herpes virus-associated ubiquitin-specific protease (HAUSP/USP7) is one of the well-known deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) owing to its relevance with Mdm2-p53 complex. The involvement of HAUSP in DDR through p53 led us to investigate novel substrates for HAUSP, which is related to DDR or apoptosis. As a result, we identified annexin-1 (ANXA1) as one of the putative substrates for HAUSP. ANXA1 has numerous roles in cellular systems including anti-inflammation, damage response, and apoptosis. Several studies have demonstrated that ANXA1 can be modified in a post-translational manner by processes such as phosphorylation, SUMOylation, and ubiquitination. In addition, DNA damage gives various functions to ANXA1 such as stress response or cleavage-mediated apoptotic cell clearance. In the current study, our proteomic analysis using two-dimensional electrophoresis, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and nano LC-MS/MS, and immunoprecipitation revealed that ANXA1 binds to HAUSP through its HAUSP-binding motif (P/AXXS), and the cleavage and damage-responsive functions of ANXA1 upon UV-induced DNA damage may be followed by HAUSP-mediated deubiquitination of ANXA1. Intriguingly, the UV-induced damage responses via HAUSP-ANXA1 interaction in HeLa cells were different from the responses shown in the Jurkat cells, suggesting that their change of roles may depend on the cell types. PMID:25695607

  9. Eugenol attenuates pulmonary damage induced by diesel exhaust particles.

    PubMed

    Zin, Walter A; Silva, Ana G L S; Magalhães, Clarissa B; Carvalho, Giovanna M C; Riva, Douglas R; Lima, Crystianne C; Leal-Cardoso, Jose H; Takiya, Christina M; Valença, Samuel S; Saldiva, Paulo H N; Faffe, Débora S

    2012-03-01

    Environmentally relevant doses of inhaled diesel particles elicit pulmonary inflammation and impair lung mechanics. Eugenol, a methoxyphenol component of clove oil, presents in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Our aim was to examine a possible protective role of eugenol against lung injuries induced by diesel particles. Male BALB/c mice were divided into four groups. Mice received saline (10 μl in; CTRL group) or 15 μg of diesel particles DEP (15 μg in; DIE and DEUG groups). After 1 h, mice received saline (10 μl; CTRL and DIE groups) or eugenol (164 mg/kg; EUG and DEUG group) by gavage. Twenty-four hours after gavage, pulmonary resistive (ΔP1), viscoelastic (ΔP2) and total (ΔPtot) pressures, static elastance (Est), and viscoelastic component of elastance (ΔE) were measured. We also determined the fraction areas of normal and collapsed alveoli, amounts of polymorpho- (PMN) and mononuclear cells in lung parenchyma, apoptosis, and oxidative stress. Est, ΔP2, ΔPtot, and ΔE were significantly higher in the DIE than in the other groups. DIE also showed significantly more PMN, airspace collapse, and apoptosis than the other groups. However, no beneficial effect on lipid peroxidation was observed in DEUG group. In conclusion, eugenol avoided changes in lung mechanics, pulmonary inflammation, and alveolar collapse elicited by diesel particles. It attenuated the activation signal of caspase-3 by DEP, but apoptosis evaluated by TUNEL was avoided. Finally, it could not avoid oxidative stress as indicated by malondialdehyde.

  10. Eugenol attenuates pulmonary damage induced by diesel exhaust particles.

    PubMed

    Zin, Walter A; Silva, Ana G L S; Magalhães, Clarissa B; Carvalho, Giovanna M C; Riva, Douglas R; Lima, Crystianne C; Leal-Cardoso, Jose H; Takiya, Christina M; Valença, Samuel S; Saldiva, Paulo H N; Faffe, Débora S

    2012-03-01

    Environmentally relevant doses of inhaled diesel particles elicit pulmonary inflammation and impair lung mechanics. Eugenol, a methoxyphenol component of clove oil, presents in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Our aim was to examine a possible protective role of eugenol against lung injuries induced by diesel particles. Male BALB/c mice were divided into four groups. Mice received saline (10 μl in; CTRL group) or 15 μg of diesel particles DEP (15 μg in; DIE and DEUG groups). After 1 h, mice received saline (10 μl; CTRL and DIE groups) or eugenol (164 mg/kg; EUG and DEUG group) by gavage. Twenty-four hours after gavage, pulmonary resistive (ΔP1), viscoelastic (ΔP2) and total (ΔPtot) pressures, static elastance (Est), and viscoelastic component of elastance (ΔE) were measured. We also determined the fraction areas of normal and collapsed alveoli, amounts of polymorpho- (PMN) and mononuclear cells in lung parenchyma, apoptosis, and oxidative stress. Est, ΔP2, ΔPtot, and ΔE were significantly higher in the DIE than in the other groups. DIE also showed significantly more PMN, airspace collapse, and apoptosis than the other groups. However, no beneficial effect on lipid peroxidation was observed in DEUG group. In conclusion, eugenol avoided changes in lung mechanics, pulmonary inflammation, and alveolar collapse elicited by diesel particles. It attenuated the activation signal of caspase-3 by DEP, but apoptosis evaluated by TUNEL was avoided. Finally, it could not avoid oxidative stress as indicated by malondialdehyde. PMID:22194320

  11. Fluoride induces oxidative damage and SIRT1/autophagy through ROS-mediated JNK signaling.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Maiko; Bandoski, Cheryl; Bartlett, John D

    2015-12-01

    Fluoride is an effective caries prophylactic, but at high doses can also be an environmental health hazard. Acute or chronic exposure to high fluoride doses can result in dental enamel and skeletal and soft tissue fluorosis. Dental fluorosis is manifested as mottled, discolored, porous enamel that is susceptible to dental caries. Fluoride induces cell stress, including endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress, which leads to impairment of ameloblasts responsible for dental enamel formation. Recently we reported that fluoride activates SIRT1 and autophagy as an adaptive response to protect cells from stress. However, it still remains unclear how SIRT1/autophagy is regulated in dental fluorosis. In this study, we demonstrate that fluoride exposure generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the resulting oxidative damage is counteracted by SIRT1/autophagy induction through c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling in ameloblasts. In the mouse-ameloblast-derived cell line LS8, fluoride induced ROS, mitochondrial damage including cytochrome-c release, up-regulation of UCP2, attenuation of ATP synthesis, and H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX), which is a marker of DNA damage. We evaluated the effects of the ROS inhibitor N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and the JNK inhibitor SP600125 on fluoride-induced SIRT1/autophagy activation. NAC decreased fluoride-induced ROS generation and attenuated JNK and c-Jun phosphorylation. NAC decreased SIRT1 phosphorylation and formation of the autophagy marker LC3II, which resulted in an increase in the apoptosis mediators γH2AX and cleaved/activated caspase-3. SP600125 attenuated fluoride-induced SIRT1 phosphorylation, indicating that fluoride activates SIRT1/autophagy via the ROS-mediated JNK pathway. In enamel organs from rats or mice treated with 50, 100, or 125 ppm fluoride for 6 weeks, cytochrome-c release and the DNA damage markers 8-oxoguanine, p-ATM, and γH2AX were increased compared to those in controls (0 ppm fluoride). These

  12. From radiation-induced chromosome damage to cell death: modelling basic mechanisms and applications to boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Ballarini, F; Bortolussi, S; Clerici, A M; Ferrari, C; Protti, N; Altieri, S

    2011-02-01

    Cell death is a crucial endpoint in radiation-induced biological damage: on one side, cell death is a reference endpoint to characterise the action of radiation in biological targets; on the other side, any cancer therapy aims to kill tumour cells. Starting from Lea's target theory, many models have been proposed to interpret radiation-induced cell killing; after briefly discussing some of these models, in this paper, a mechanistic approach based on an experimentally observed link between chromosome aberrations and cell death was presented. More specifically, a model and a Monte Carlo code originally developed for chromosome aberrations were extended to simulate radiation-induced cell death applying an experimentally observed one-to-one relationship between the average number of 'lethal aberrations' (dicentrics, rings and deletions) per cell and -ln S, S being the fraction of surviving cells. Although such observation was related to X rays, in the present work, the approach was also applied to protons and alpha particles. A good agreement between simulation outcomes and literature data provided a model validation for different radiation types. The same approach was then successfully applied to simulate the survival of cells enriched with boron and irradiated with thermal neutrons at the Triga Mark II reactor in Pavia, to mimic a typical treatment for boron neutron capture therapy. PMID:21159746

  13. Correlation between helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) variables and plasma induced DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Ek R.; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2016-09-01

    A helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) source with a dielectric capillary and two tubular electrodes was used to induce damage in aqueous plasmid DNA. The fraction of different types of DNA damage (i.e., intact or undamaged, double strand breaks (DSBs), and single strand breaks (SSBs)) that occurred as the result of plasma irradiation was quantified through analysis of agarose gel electrophoresis images. The total DNA damage increased with an increase in both flow rate and duration of irradiation, but decreased with an increase in distance between the APPJ and sample. The average power of the plasma was calculated and the length of APPJ was measured for various flow rates and voltages applied. The possible effects of plasma power and reactive species on DNA damage are discussed.

  14. Correlation between helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) variables and plasma induced DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Ek R.; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2016-09-01

    A helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) source with a dielectric capillary and two tubular electrodes was used to induce damage in aqueous plasmid DNA. The fraction of different types of DNA damage (i.e., intact or undamaged, double strand breaks (DSBs), and single strand breaks (SSBs)) that occurred as the result of plasma irradiation was quantified through analysis of agarose gel electrophoresis images. The total DNA damage increased with an increase in both flow rate and duration of irradiation, but decreased with an increase in distance between the APPJ and sample. The average power of the plasma was calculated and the length of APPJ was measured for various flow rates and voltages applied. The possible effects of plasma power and reactive species on DNA damage are discussed. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Low-Energy Interactions related to Atmospheric and Extreme Conditions", edited by S. Ptasinska, M. Smialek-Telega, A. Milosavljevic, B. Sivaraman.

  15. A photoluminescence study of plasma reactive ion etching-induced damage in GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouffak, Z.; Bensaoula, A.; Trombetta, L.

    2014-11-01

    GaN films with reactive ion etching (RIE) induced damage were analyzed using photoluminescence (PL). We observed band-edge as well as donor-acceptor peaks with associated phonon replicas, all in agreement with previous studies. While both the control and damaged samples have their band-edge peak location change with temperature following the Varshni formula, its intensity however decreases with damage while the D—A peak increases considerably. Nitrogen post-etch plasma was shown to improve the band edge peak and decrease the D—A peak. This suggests that the N2 plasma has helped reduce the number of trapped carriers that were participating in the D—A transition and made the D°X transition more active, which reaffirms the N2 post-etch plasma treatment as a good technique to heal the GaN surface, most likely by filling the nitrogen vacancies previously created by etch damage.

  16. Effects of wet etch processing on laser-induced damage of fused silica surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Battersby, C.L.; Kozlowski, M.R.; Sheehan, L.M.

    1998-12-22

    Laser-induced damage of transparent fused silica optical components by 355 nm illumination occurs primarily at surface defects produced during the grinding and polishing processes. These defects can either be surface defects or sub-surface damage.Wet etch processing in a buffered hydrogen fluoride (HF) solution has been examined as a tool for characterizing such defects. A study was conducted to understand the effects of etch depth on the damage threshold of fused silica substrates. The study used a 355 nm, 7.5 ns, 10 Hz Nd:YAG laser to damage test fused silica optics through various wet etch processing steps. Inspection of the surface quality was performed with Nomarski microscopy and Total Internal Reflection Microscopy. The damage test data and inspection results were correlated with polishing process specifics. The results show that a wet etch exposes subsurface damage while maintaining or improving the laser damage performance. The benefits of a wet etch must be evaluated for each polishing process.

  17. Filamentation and damage in fused silica induced by tightly focused femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Couairon, A.; Sudrie, L.; Franco, M.; Prade, B.; Mysyrowicz, A.

    2005-03-15

    We investigate experimentally and numerically the damage tracks induced by tightly focused (NA=0.5) infrared femtosecond laser pulses in the bulk of a fused silica sample. Two types of irreversible damage are observed. The first damage corresponds to a permanent change of refractive index without structural modifications (type I). It appears for input pulse energies beyond 0.1 {mu}J. It takes the form of a narrow track extending over more than 100 {mu}m at higher input powers. It is attributed to a change of the polarizability of the medium, following a filamentary propagation which generates an electron-hole plasma through optical field ionization. A second type of damage occurs for input pulse energies beyond 0.3 {mu}J (type II). It takes the form of a pear-shaped structural damage associated with an electron-ion plasma triggered by avalanche. The temporal evolution of plasma absorption is studied by pump-probe experiments. For type I damage, a fast electron-hole recombination is observed. Type II damage is linked with a longer absorption.

  18. Statistical evaluation of characteristic SDDLV-induced stress resultants to discriminate between undamaged and damaged elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, L. M.; Johansen, R. J.; Ulriksen, M. D.; Tcherniak, D.; Damkilde, L.

    2015-07-01

    The stochastic dynamic damage location vector (SDDLV) method utilizes the vectors from the kernel of a damaged-induced transfer function matrix change to localize damages in a structure. The kernel vectors associated with the lowest singular values are converted into static pseudo-loads and applied alternately to an undamaged reference model with known stiffness matrix, hereby, theoretically, yielding characteristic stress resultants approaching zero in the damaged elements. At present, the discrimination between potentially damaged elements and undamaged ones is typically conducted on the basis of modified characteristic stress resultants, which are compared to a pre-defined tolerance value, without any thorough statistical evaluation. In the present paper, it is tested whether three widely-used statistical pattern-recognition-based damage-detection methods can provide an effective statistical evaluation of the characteristic stress resultants, hence facilitating general discrimination between damaged and undamaged elements. The three detection methods in question enable outlier analysis on the basis of, respectively, Euclidian distance, Hotelling's T2 statistics, and Mahalanobis distance. The study of the applicability of these methods is based on experimentally obtained accelerations of a cantilevered residential-sized wind turbine blade subjected to an unmeasured multi-impulse load. The characteristic stress resultants are derived by applying the static pseudo-loads to a representative finite element (FE) model of the actual blade.

  19. Podophyllum hexandrum prevents radiation-induced neuronal damage in postnatal rats exposed in utero.

    PubMed

    Sajikumar, S; Goel, H C

    2003-08-01

    Podophyllum hexandrum has been shown to mitigate radiation injuries and especially the haemopoietic syndrome in adult mice. To monitor the radiation-induced changes in the nervous system, the neurons of postnatal young mice and their modification by P. hexandrum, were studied histologically for differences in the apical and basal dendritic branching and intersections in the CA1 neurons of the hippocampal region of rats which were delivered a 2 Gy gamma dose while in utero (day 17 of gestation). Irradiation significantly reduced the dendritic branching and intersections but pre-irradiation administration of the extract of P. hexandrum (i.p. 200 mg/kg/b.w., 2 h) reduced the damage in postnatal young mice. These studies indicate that P. hexandrum provides protection to neurons against radiation-induced damage and the mechanism of neuronal damage and its repair need to be investigated further.

  20. Zinc modulates drought-induced biochemical damages in tea [Camellia sinensis (L) O Kuntze].

    PubMed

    Upadhyaya, Hrishikesh; Dutta, Biman Kumar; Panda, Sanjib Kumar

    2013-07-10

    Zinc (Zn) is an essential micronutrient that affects the growth and productivity of tea plant. Drought stress causes various biochemical and physiological damages in plants. The present study aims at understanding the role of Zn in modulating drought stress induced growth and biochemical damages in tea plant. The results of the present investigation demonstrated that drought-induced decrease in relative water content (RWC), dry mass of leaf, and antioxidants such as ascorbate and glutathione in the tested tea clones (TV-1, TV-17, and TV-29) was minimized by zinc sulfate (ZnSO4) treatment before water withholding for 7 days. Increase in phenolic content with decrease in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and lipid peroxidation and differential activities of enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POX), polyphenol peroxidase (PPO), glutathione reductase (GR), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) with concomitant increased Zn uptake in leaf suggested Zn modulates drought-mediated biochemical damages in tea plant.

  1. Radiation-damage-induced phasing: a case study using UV irradiation with light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    de Sanctis, Daniele; Zubieta, Chloe; Felisaz, Franck; Caserotto, Hugo; Nanao, Max H

    2016-03-01

    Exposure to X-rays, high-intensity visible light or ultraviolet radiation results in alterations to protein structure such as the breakage of disulfide bonds, the loss of electron density at electron-rich centres and the movement of side chains. These specific changes can be exploited in order to obtain phase information. Here, a case study using insulin to illustrate each step of the radiation-damage-induced phasing (RIP) method is presented. Unlike a traditional X-ray-induced damage step, specific damage is introduced via ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs). In contrast to UV lasers, UV-LEDs have the advantages of small size, low cost and relative ease of use.

  2. Antioxidant Protective Effect of Honey in Cigarette Smoke-Induced Testicular Damage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Mahaneem; Sulaiman, Siti Amrah; Jaafar, Hasnan; Sirajudeen, Kuttulebbai Nainamohamed Salam

    2011-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) can cause testicular damage and we investigated the possible protective effect of honey against CS-induced testicular damage and oxidative stress in rats. CS exposure (8 min, 3 times daily) and honey supplementation (1.2 g/kg daily) were given for 13 weeks. Rats exposed to CS significantly had smaller seminiferous tubules diameter and epithelial height, lower Leydig cell count and increased percentage of tubules with germ cell loss. CS also produced increased lipid peroxidation (TBARS) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, as well as reduced total antioxidant status (TAS) and activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT). However, supplementation of honey significantly reduced histological changes and TBARS level, increased TAS level, as well as significantly restored activities of GPx, SOD and CAT in rat testis. These findings may suggest that honey has a protective effect against damage and oxidative stress induced by CS in rat testis. PMID:22016605

  3. Oxidative damage and cell-programmed death induced in Zea mays L. by allelochemical stress.

    PubMed

    Ciniglia, Claudia; Mastrobuoni, Francesco; Scortichini, Marco; Petriccione, Milena

    2015-05-01

    The allelochemical stress on Zea mays was analyzed by using walnut husk washing waters (WHWW), a by-product of Juglans regia post-harvest process, which possesses strong allelopathic potential and phytotoxic effects. Oxidative damage and cell-programmed death were induced by WHWW in roots of maize seedlings. Treatment induced ROS burst, with excess of H2O2 content. Enzymatic activities of catalase were strongly increased during the first hours of exposure. The excess in malonildialdehyde following exposure to WHWW confirmed that oxidative stress severely damaged maize roots. Membrane alteration caused a decrease in NADPH oxidase activity along with DNA damage as confirmed by DNA laddering. The DNA instability was also assessed through sequence-related amplified polymorphism assay, thus suggesting the danger of walnut processing by-product and focusing the attention on the necessity of an efficient treatment of WHWW.

  4. Radiation-damage-induced phasing: a case study using UV irradiation with light-emitting diodes

    PubMed Central

    de Sanctis, Daniele; Zubieta, Chloe; Felisaz, Franck; Caserotto, Hugo; Nanao, Max H.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to X-rays, high-intensity visible light or ultraviolet radiation results in alterations to protein structure such as the breakage of disulfide bonds, the loss of electron density at electron-rich centres and the movement of side chains. These specific changes can be exploited in order to obtain phase information. Here, a case study using insulin to illustrate each step of the radiation-damage-induced phasing (RIP) method is presented. Unlike a traditional X-ray-induced damage step, specific damage is introduced via ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs). In contrast to UV lasers, UV-LEDs have the advantages of small size, low cost and relative ease of use. PMID:26960126

  5. Laser induced damage in multilayer dielectric gratings due to ultrashort laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, B.W.; Stuart, B.C.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Perry, M.D.

    1995-05-26

    Chirped pulse amplification is increasingly used to produce intense ultrashort laser pulses. When high-efficiency gratings are the dispersive element, as in the LLNL Petawatt laser, their susceptibility to laser induced damage constitutes a limitation on the peak intensities that can be reached. To obtain robust gratings, it is necessary to understand the causes of short-pulse damage, and to recognize the range of design options for high efficiency gratings. Metal gratings owe their high efficiency to their high conductivity. To avoid the inevitable light absorption that accompanies conductivity, we have developed designs for high efficiency reflection gratings that use only transparent dielectric materials. These combine the reflectivity of a multilayer dielectric stack with a diffraction grating. We report here our present understanding of short-pulse laser induced damage, as it applies to dielectric gratings.

  6. Lipids and Oxidative Stress Associated with Ethanol-Induced Neurological Damage

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The excessive intake of alcohol is a serious public health problem, especially given the severe damage provoked by chronic or prenatal exposure to alcohol that affects many physiological processes, such as memory, motor function, and cognitive abilities. This damage is related to the ethanol oxidation in the brain. The metabolism of ethanol to acetaldehyde and then to acetate is associated with the production of reactive oxygen species that accentuate the oxidative state of cells. This metabolism of ethanol can induce the oxidation of the fatty acids in phospholipids, and the bioactive aldehydes produced are known to be associated with neurotoxicity and neurodegeneration. As such, here we will review the role of lipids in the neuronal damage induced by ethanol-related oxidative stress and the role that lipids play in the related compensatory or defense mechanisms. PMID:26949445

  7. [Incidence of biological intravascular coagulation in legal induced abortions].

    PubMed

    Boudaoud, S; Eurin, B; Drouet, L; Alhomme, P; Dreyfus, R; Serfaty, D

    1986-01-01

    A prospective study was designed to evaluate coagulation abnormalities induced by early abortion (before ten weeks of pregnancy). Fifty-two women underwent suction abortion, under diazepam-fentanyl anaesthesia with spontaneous ventilation; they were screened for coagulation parameters before and after surgery. Eight tests were carried out: prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), thrombin time platelet count, fibrinogen levels, fibrin split products, fibrin soluble complexes and euglobulin lysis time. Results were consistent with activation. Consequences were limited and one general test (APTT) was not significantly modified. Suction abortion, even performed in early pregnancy, exposed to biological disseminated intravascular coagulation with a general risk of venous thrombosis.

  8. Tomography Study of Shock-Induced Damage Beneath Craters by Normal and Oblique Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, H.; Ahrens, T.

    2004-12-01

    Comparisons of laboratory impact craters produced in rock and planetary-scale impact structures, indicate that the observed reductions in elastic wave velocities by shock-induced damage of rock beneath impact craters can be used to constrain the impact history. A series of small-scale normal and oblique impact experiments were conducted on 20x20x15 cm samples of San Marcos granite by a 1.2 km/s, 2 kJ impactor. The resulting largely circular (8 cm in diameter) crater dimensions agrees closely with previous data. By conducting a multiple source-receiver ultrasonic survey of the shocked rock beneath laboratory craters (sampled by 290 ray paths beneath the crater) we have tomographically mapped the in-situ P-wave velocity beneath craters and find measurable damage, as defined by > 0.1 km/s velocity reduction, are induced to depths of 7 cm beneath the crater for normal impacts. However, oblique impacts produce shallower damage zone ( ˜ 3 cm deep) that are asymmetric along the plane containing the impact trajectory. The downrange shows more damage than the uprange. Since the extent of the shock-damage region depends on impact velocity and impact energy, the extent of damage in our laboratory impact structures , and we presume also planetary scale impact structures, carries both impact velocity and direction of impact information not previously recognized or sought. Hence damage zone dimensions are expected to constrain planetary impacts parameters. Oblique impacts, where the tracjectory is ≥ 15° relative to the impacted surface, yields approximately circular craters, can in principle, provide information on impactor trajectory. For planetary impacts, the damage profile, as measured by seismic velocity deficit, beneath craters allow some statistical constraint on impacts produced by low-inclination orbit objects (asteroids and Jupiter-family comets), versus, high-inclination orbit objects (long-period and new comets).

  9. p53-dependent SIRT6 expression protects Aβ42-induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Eun Sun; Choi, Hyunjung; Song, Hyundong; Hwang, Yu Jin; Kim, Ahbin; Ryu, Hoon; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia and age-related neurodegenerative disease. Elucidating the cellular changes that occur during ageing is an important step towards understanding the pathogenesis and progression of neurodegenerative disorders. SIRT6 is a member of the mammalian sirtuin family of anti-aging genes. However, the relationship between SIRT6 and AD has not yet been elucidated. Here, we report that SIRT6 protein expression levels are reduced in the brains of both the 5XFAD AD mouse model and AD patients. Aβ42, a major component of senile plaques, decreases SIRT6 expression, and Aβ42-induced DNA damage is prevented by the overexpression of SIRT6 in HT22 mouse hippocampal neurons. Also, there is a strong negative correlation between Aβ42-induced DNA damage and p53 levels, a protein involved in DNA repair and apoptosis. In addition, upregulation of p53 protein by Nutlin-3 prevents SIRT6 reduction and DNA damage induced by Aβ42. Taken together, this study reveals that p53-dependent SIRT6 expression protects cells from Aβ42-induced DNA damage, making SIRT6 a promising new therapeutic target for the treatment of AD. PMID:27156849

  10. Laser-Induced Damage Threshold and Certification Procedures for Optical Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This document provides instructions for performing laser-induced-damage-threshold tests and pass-fail certification tests on optical materials used in pulsed-laser systems. The optical materials to which these procedures apply include coated and uncoated optical substrates, laser crystals, Q-switches, polarizers, and other optical components employed in pulsed-laser systems.

  11. Mitochondria regulate DNA damage and genomic instability induced by high LET radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Davidson, Mercy M.; Hei, Tom K.

    2014-04-01

    High linear energy transfer (LET) radiation including α particles and heavy ions is the major type of radiation found in space and is considered a potential health risk for astronauts. Even though the chance that these high LET particles traversing through the cytoplasm of cells is higher than that through the nuclei, the contribution of targeted cytoplasmic irradiation to the induction of genomic instability and other chromosomal damages induced by high LET radiation is not known. In the present study, we investigated whether mitochondria are the potential cytoplasmic target of high LET radiation in mediating cellular damage using a mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depleted (ρ0) human small airway epithelial (SAE) cell model and a precision charged particle microbeam with a beam width of merely one micron. Targeted cytoplasmic irradiation by high LET α particles induced DNA oxidative damage and double strand breaks in wild type ρ+ SAE cells. Furthermore, there was a significant increase in autophagy and micronuclei, which is an indication of genomic instability, together with the activation of nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) and mitochondrial inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) signaling pathways in ρ+ SAE cells. In contrast, ρ0 SAE cells exhibited a significantly lower response to these same endpoints examined after cytoplasmic irradiation with high LET α particles. The results indicate that mitochondria are essential in mediating cytoplasmic radiation induced genotoxic damage in mammalian cells. Furthermore, the findings may shed some light in the design of countermeasures for space radiation.

  12. Mitochondrial decay is involved in BaP-induced cervical damage.

    PubMed

    Gao, Meili; Long, Jiangang; Li, Yongfei; Shah, Walayat; Fu, Ling; Liu, Jiankang; Wang, Yili

    2010-12-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and a potent inducer of carcinogenesis. Many studies have reported that the carcinogenic effects of BaP might be due to its intermediate metabolites and to reactive oxygen species (ROS) that cause oxidative damage to the cells. However, the mechanisms of BaP-induced oxidative damage in cervical tissue are still not clear. We studied these mechanisms in female ICR mice treated with BaP either orally or intraperitoneally by measuring (1) several general biomarkers of oxidative stress in serum, (2) mitochondrial function in the cervix, and (3) the morphology of mitochondria in cervical tissue. BaP treatment (1) significantly lowered levels of vitamins A, C, and E and of glutathione; (2) reduced activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione S-transferases; and (3) significantly increased lipid peroxidation levels. In addition, significant increases in the levels of superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radical were observed. These results were confirmed by morphological changes in mitochondria and by decreases in membrane potential levels and in succinate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase activities. The changes in these biomarkers and mitochondrial damage were BaP-dose-dependent and eventually induced both cell apoptosis and necrosis in cervical tissue. As mitochondria are the major sites of ROS generation, these findings show that mitochondrial decay greatly contributes to BaP-induced cervical damage.

  13. ORGANIC AND INORGANIC ARSENICALS SENSITIZE HUMAN BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS TO HYDROGEN PEROXIDE-INDUCED DNA DAMAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The lungs are a target organ for arsenic carcinogenesis, however, its mechanism of action remains unclear. Furthermore, it has been suggested that inorganic arsenic (iAs) can potentiate DNA damage induced by other agents. Once inside the human body iAs generally undergoes two ...

  14. Maternal separation increases methamphetamine-induced damage in the striatum in male, but not female rats.

    PubMed

    Hensleigh, Emily; Pritchard, Laurel M

    2015-12-15

    Methamphetamine abuse impacts the global economy through costs associated with drug enforcement, emergency room visits, and treatment. Previous research has demonstrated early life stress, such as childhood abuse, increases the likelihood of developing a substance abuse disorder. However, the effects of early life stress on neuronal damage induced by binge methamphetamine administration are unknown. We aimed to elucidate the effects of early life stress on methamphetamine induced dopamine damage in the striatum. Pups were separated from dams for 3h per day during the first two weeks of development or 15 min for control. In adulthood, rats received either subcutaneous 0.9% saline or 5.0mg/kg METH injections every 2h for a total of four injections. Rectal temperatures were taken before the first injection and 1h after each subsequent injection. Seven days after treatment, rats were euthanized and striatum was collected for quantification of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine transporters (DAT) content by Western blot. Methamphetamine significantly elevated core body temperature in males and decreased striatal DAT and TH content, and this effect was potentiated by early life stress. Females did not exhibit elevated core body temperatures or changes in DAT or TH in either condition. Results indicate maternal separation increases methamphetamine induced damage, and females are less susceptible to methamphetamine induced damage.

  15. Repair of ultraviolet B and singlet oxygen-induced DNA damage in xeroderma pigmentosum cells.

    PubMed

    Rünger, T M; Epe, B; Möller, K

    1995-01-01

    Ultraviolet B (UVB) (290-320 nm) is capable of damaging the DNA molecule directly by generating predominantly pyrimidine dimers. UVA (320-400 nm) does not alter the DNA molecule directly. However, when it is absorbed by cellular photosensitizers, it can damage the DNA molecule indirectly, e.g., by mediation of singlet oxygen, generating predominantly 8-hydroxyguanine. These indirect effects have been implicated in the mutagenic, genotoxic, and carcinogenic effects of UVA. To study the processing of directly and indirectly UV-induced DNA damage in intact, DNA-repair-proficient and -deficient human cells, we used the replicating plasmid pRSVcat, either irradiated with up to 10 kJ/m2 UVB or treated with the photosensitizer methylene blue plus visible light (which generates singlet oxygen). These treated plasmids were introduced into lymphoblast lines from normal donors or from patients with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation groups A, C, D, E, and variant. DNA repair was assessed by measuring activity of reactivated chloramphenicol-acetyl-transferase enzyme, encoded by the plasmid's cat gene, in cell extracts after 3 d. As expected, the repair of UVB-induced DNA damage was reduced in all XP cell lines, and the degree varied with the complementation group. XP-A, -D, -E, and -variant cells were normally efficient in the repair of singlet oxygen-induced DNA damage. Only three of four XP-C cell lines showed a markedly reduced repair of these lesions. This indicates differential DNA-repair pathways for directly and indirectly UV-induced DNA damage in human cells and suggests that both may be affected in XP-C. PMID:7798643

  16. Effects of helium on inflammatory and oxidative stress-induced endothelial cell damage.

    PubMed

    Smit, Kirsten F; Kerindongo, Raphaela P; Böing, Anita; Nieuwland, Rienk; Hollmann, Markus W; Preckel, Benedikt; Weber, Nina C

    2015-09-10

    Helium induces preconditioning in human endothelium protecting against postischemic endothelial dysfunction. Circulating endothelial microparticles are markers of endothelial dysfunction derived in response to injury. Another noble gas, xenon, protected human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) against inflammatory stress in vitro. We hypothesised that helium protects the endothelium in vitro against inflammatory and oxidative stress. HUVEC were isolated from fresh umbilical cords and grown upon confluence. Cells were subjected to starving medium for 12h before the experiment and treated for either 3 × 5 min or 1 × 30 min with helium (5% CO2, 25% O2, 70% He) or control gas (5% CO2, 25% O2, 70% N2) in a specialised gas chamber. Subsequently, cells were stimulated with TNF-α (40 ng/ml for 24h or 10 ng/ml for 2h) or H2O2 (500 μM for 2h) or left untreated. Adhesion molecule expression was analysed using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Caspase-3 expression and viability of the cells was measured by flowcytometry. Microparticles were investigated by nanoparticle tracking analysis. Helium had no effect on adhesion molecule expression after TNF-α stimulation but in combination with oxidative stress decreased cell viability (68.9 ± 1.3% and 58 ± 1.9%) compared to control. Helium further increased TNF-α induced release of caspase-3 containing particles compared to TNF-α alone (6.4 × 10(6) ± 1.1 × 10(6) and 2.9 × 10(6) ± 0.7 × 10(6), respectively). Prolonged exposure of helium increased microparticle formation (2.4 × 10(9) ± 0.5 × 10(9)) compared to control (1.7 × 10(9) ± 0.2 × 10(9)). Summarized, helium increases inflammatory and oxidative stress-induced endothelial damage and is thus not biologically inert. A possible noxious effects on the cellular level causing alterations in microparticle formation both in number and content should be acknowledged.

  17. Effects of helium on inflammatory and oxidative stress-induced endothelial cell damage.

    PubMed

    Smit, Kirsten F; Kerindongo, Raphaela P; Böing, Anita; Nieuwland, Rienk; Hollmann, Markus W; Preckel, Benedikt; Weber, Nina C

    2015-09-10

    Helium induces preconditioning in human endothelium protecting against postischemic endothelial dysfunction. Circulating endothelial microparticles are markers of endothelial dysfunction derived in response to injury. Another noble gas, xenon, protected human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) against inflammatory stress in vitro. We hypothesised that helium protects the endothelium in vitro against inflammatory and oxidative stress. HUVEC were isolated from fresh umbilical cords and grown upon confluence. Cells were subjected to starving medium for 12h before the experiment and treated for either 3 × 5 min or 1 × 30 min with helium (5% CO2, 25% O2, 70% He) or control gas (5% CO2, 25% O2, 70% N2) in a specialised gas chamber. Subsequently, cells were stimulated with TNF-α (40 ng/ml for 24h or 10 ng/ml for 2h) or H2O2 (500 μM for 2h) or left untreated. Adhesion molecule expression was analysed using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Caspase-3 expression and viability of the cells was measured by flowcytometry. Microparticles were investigated by nanoparticle tracking analysis. Helium had no effect on adhesion molecule expression after TNF-α stimulation but in combination with oxidative stress decreased cell viability (68.9 ± 1.3% and 58 ± 1.9%) compared to control. Helium further increased TNF-α induced release of caspase-3 containing particles compared to TNF-α alone (6.4 × 10(6) ± 1.1 × 10(6) and 2.9 × 10(6) ± 0.7 × 10(6), respectively). Prolonged exposure of helium increased microparticle formation (2.4 × 10(9) ± 0.5 × 10(9)) compared to control (1.7 × 10(9) ± 0.2 × 10(9)). Summarized, helium increases inflammatory and oxidative stress-induced endothelial damage and is thus not biologically inert. A possible noxious effects on the cellular level causing alterations in microparticle formation both in number and content should be acknowledged. PMID:26096659

  18. Yields of biologically significant damage produced in mammalian DNA by irradiation associated with radon decay. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, J.F.

    1994-03-01

    The objective of this project was to characterize the difference between damage to DNA caused by alpha particles and by low LET radiation. Estimation of the risk posed by exposure to high LET radiation (such as that from radon) relies at present on epidemiological data, and is therefore largely empirical. This empiricism is evident from the concepts of quality factor or RBE that find use for describing the biological effects of high LET radiation. The author argues that some effort should be made to address the mechanisms of DNA damage by high and low LET forms of radiation, and how these mechanisms might relate to the biological endpoints. This report summarizes the results of the author`s investigations and the current understanding of these mechanisms.

  19. Nano-ranged low-energy ion-beam-induced DNA transfer in biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L. D.; Wongkham, W.; Prakrajang, K.; Sangwijit, K.; Inthanon, K.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Wanichapichart, P.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2013-06-01

    Low-energy ion beams at a few tens of keV were demonstrated to be able to induce exogenous macromolecules to transfer into plant and bacterial cells. In the process, the ion beam with well controlled energy and fluence bombarded living cells to cause certain degree damage in the cell envelope in nanoscales to facilitate the macromolecules such as DNA to pass through the cell envelope and enter the cell. Consequently, the technique was applied for manipulating positive improvements in the biological species. This physical DNA transfer method was highly efficient and had less risk of side-effects compared with chemical and biological methods. For better understanding of mechanisms involved in the process, a systematic study on the mechanisms was carried out. Applications of the technique were also expanded from DNA transfer in plant and bacterial cells to DNA transfection in human cancer cells potentially for the stem cell therapy purpose. Low-energy nitrogen and argon ion beams that were applied in our experiments had ranges of 100 nm or less in the cell envelope membrane which was majorly composed of polymeric cellulose. The ion beam bombardment caused chain-scission dominant damage in the polymer and electrical property changes such as increase in the impedance in the envelope membrane. These nano-modifications of the cell envelope eventually enhanced the permeability of the envelope membrane to favor the DNA transfer. The paper reports details of our research in this direction.

  20. Chromosome-wide histone deacetylation by sirtuins prevents hyperactivation of DNA damage-induced signaling upon replicative stress

    PubMed Central

    Simoneau, Antoine; Ricard, Étienne; Weber, Sandra; Hammond-Martel, Ian; Wong, Lai Hong; Sellam, Adnane; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Raymond, Martine; Wurtele, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome encodes five sirtuins (Sir2 and Hst1–4), which constitute a conserved family of NAD-dependent histone deacetylases. Cells lacking any individual sirtuin display mild growth and gene silencing defects. However, hst3Δ hst4Δ double mutants are exquisitely sensitive to genotoxins, and hst3Δ hst4Δ sir2Δ mutants are inviable. Our published data also indicate that pharmacological inhibition of sirtuins prevents growth of several fungal pathogens, although the biological basis is unclear. Here, we present genome-wide fitness assays conducted with nicotinamide (NAM), a pan-sirtuin inhibitor. Our data indicate that NAM treatment causes yeast to solicit specific DNA damage response pathways for survival, and that NAM-induced growth defects are mainly attributable to inhibition of Hst3 and Hst4 and consequent elevation of histone H3 lysine 56 acetylation (H3K56ac). Our results further reveal that in the presence of constitutive H3K56ac, the Slx4 scaffolding protein and PP4 phosphatase complex play essential roles in preventing hyperactivation of the DNA damage-response kinase Rad53 in response to spontaneous DNA damage caused by reactive oxygen species. Overall, our data support the concept that chromosome-wide histone deacetylation by sirtuins is critical to mitigate growth defects caused by endogenous genotoxins. PMID:26748095

  1. Methacryloxylethyl Cetyl Ammonium Chloride Induces DNA Damage and Apoptosis in Human Dental Pulp Cells via Generation of Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yang; Ma, Sai; Wang, Yirong; Li, Jing; Shan, Lequn; Sun, Jinlong; Chen, Jihua

    2016-01-01

    The polymerizable antibacterial monomer methacryloxylethyl cetyl ammonium chloride (DMAE-CB) has provided an effective strategy to combat dental caries. However, the application of such material raises the question about the biological safety and the question remains open. The mechanism of this toxic action, however, is not yet clearly understood. The present study aims at providing novel insight into the possible causal link between cellular oxidative stress and DNA damage, as well as apoptosis in human dental pulp cells exposed to DMAE-CB. The enhanced formation of reactive oxygen species and depletion of glutathione, as well as differential changes in activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase in DMAE-CB-treated cells indicated oxidative stress. By using substances that can alter GSH synthesis, we found that GSH was the key component in the regulation of cell response towards oxidative stress induced by DMAE-CB. The increase in oxidative stress-sensitive 8-Oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) content, formation of γ-H2AX and cell cycle G1 phase arrest indicated that DNA damage occurred as a result of the interaction between DNA base and ROS beyond the capacities of antioxidant mechanisms in cells exposed to DMAE-CB. Such oxidative DNA damage thus triggers the activation of ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) signaling, the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, and destruction of mitochondrial morphology and function. PMID:27143955

  2. Chromosome-wide histone deacetylation by sirtuins prevents hyperactivation of DNA damage-induced signaling upon replicative stress.

    PubMed

    Simoneau, Antoine; Ricard, Étienne; Weber, Sandra; Hammond-Martel, Ian; Wong, Lai Hong; Sellam, Adnane; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Raymond, Martine; Wurtele, Hugo

    2016-04-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome encodes five sirtuins (Sir2 and Hst1-4), which constitute a conserved family of NAD-dependent histone deacetylases. Cells lacking any individual sirtuin display mild growth and gene silencing defects. However, hst3Δ hst4Δ double mutants are exquisitely sensitive to genotoxins, and hst3Δ hst4Δ sir2Δmutants are inviable. Our published data also indicate that pharmacological inhibition of sirtuins prevents growth of several fungal pathogens, although the biological basis is unclear. Here, we present genome-wide fitness assays conducted with nicotinamide (NAM), a pan-sirtuin inhibitor. Our data indicate that NAM treatment causes yeast to solicit specific DNA damage response pathways for survival, and that NAM-induced growth defects are mainly attributable to inhibition of Hst3 and Hst4 and consequent elevation of histone H3 lysine 56 acetylation (H3K56ac). Our results further reveal that in the presence of constitutive H3K56ac, the Slx4 scaffolding protein and PP4 phosphatase complex play essential roles in preventing hyperactivation of the DNA damage-response kinase Rad53 in response to spontaneous DNA damage caused by reactive oxygen species. Overall, our data support the concept that chromosome-wide histone deacetylation by sirtuins is critical to mitigate growth defects caused by endogenous genotoxins. PMID:26748095

  3. Methacryloxylethyl Cetyl Ammonium Chloride Induces DNA Damage and Apoptosis in Human Dental Pulp Cells via Generation of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yang; Ma, Sai; Wang, Yirong; Li, Jing; Shan, Lequn; Sun, Jinlong; Chen, Jihua

    2016-01-01

    The polymerizable antibacterial monomer methacryloxylethyl cetyl ammonium chloride (DMAE-CB) has provided an effective strategy to combat dental caries. However, the application of such material raises the question about the biological safety and the question remains open. The mechanism of this toxic action, however, is not yet clearly understood. The present study aims at providing novel insight into the possible causal link between cellular oxidative stress and DNA damage, as well as apoptosis in human dental pulp cells exposed to DMAE-CB. The enhanced formation of reactive oxygen species and depletion of glutathione, as well as differential changes in activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase in DMAE-CB-treated cells indicated oxidative stress. By using substances that can alter GSH synthesis, we found that GSH was the key component in the regulation of cell response towards oxidative stress induced by DMAE-CB. The increase in oxidative stress-sensitive 8-Oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) content, formation of γ-H2AX and cell cycle G1 phase arrest indicated that DNA damage occurred as a result of the interaction between DNA base and ROS beyond the capacities of antioxidant mechanisms in cells exposed to DMAE-CB. Such oxidative DNA damage thus triggers the activation of ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) signaling, the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, and destruction of mitochondrial morphology and function. PMID:27143955

  4. Mfd is required for rapid recovery of transcription following UV-induced DNA damage but not oxidative DNA damage in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Schalow, Brandy J; Courcelle, Charmain T; Courcelle, Justin

    2012-05-01

    Transcription-coupled repair (TCR) is a cellular process by which some forms of DNA damage are repaired more rapidly from transcribed strands of active genes than from nontranscribed strands or the overall genome. In humans, the TCR coupling factor, CSB, plays a critical role in restoring transcription following both UV-induced and oxidative DNA damage. It also contributes indirectly to the global repair of some forms of oxidative DNA damage. The Escherichia coli homolog, Mfd, is similarly required for TCR of UV-induced lesions. However, its contribution to the restoration of transcription and to global repair of oxidative damage has not been examined. Here, we report the first direct study of transcriptional recovery following UV-induced and oxidative DNA damage in E. coli. We observed that mutations in mfd or uvrA reduced the rate that transcription recovered following UV-induced damage. In contrast, no difference was detected in the rate of transcription recovery in mfd, uvrA, fpg, nth, or polB dinB umuDC mutants relative to wild-type cells following oxidative damage. mfd mutants were also fully resistant to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and removed oxidative lesions from the genome at rates comparable to wild-type cells. The results demonstrate that Mfd promotes the rapid recovery of gene expression following UV-induced damage in E. coli. In addition, these findings imply that Mfd may be functionally distinct from its human CSB homolog in that it does not detectably contribute to the recovery of gene expression or global repair following oxidative damage.

  5. Modeling marrow damage from response data: Evolution from radiation biology to benzene toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T.D.; Morris, M.D.; Hasan, J.S.

    1996-12-01

    Consensus principles from radiation biology were used to describe a generic set of nonlinear, first-order differential equations for modeling toxicity-induced compensatory cell kinetics in terms of sublethal injury, repair, direct killing, killing of cells with unrepaired sublethal injury, and repopulation. This cellular model was linked to a probit model of hematopoietic mortality that describes death from infection and/or hemorrhage between 5 and 30 days. Mortality data from 27 experiments with 851 dose-response groups, in which doses were protracted by rate and/or fractionation, were used to simultaneously estimate all rate constants by maximum-likelihood methods. Data used represented 18,940 test animals: 12,827 mice, 2925 rats, 1676 sheep, 829 swine, 479 dogs, and 204 burros. Although a long-term, repopulating hematopoietic stem cell is ancestral to all lineages needed to restore normal homeostasis, the dose-response data from the protracted irradiations indicate clearly that the particular lineage that is critical to hematopoietic recovery does not resemble stemlike cells with regard to radiosensitivity and repopulation rates. Instead, the weakest link in the chain of hematopoiesis was found to have an intrinsic radioresistance equal to or greater than stromal cells and to repopulate at the same rates. Model validation has been achieved by predicting the LD50 and/or fractional group mortality in 38 protracted-dose experiments (rats and mice) that were not used in the fitting of model coefficients. 29 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Modeling marrow damage from response data: evolution from radiation biology to benzene toxicity.

    PubMed

    Jones, D T; Morris, M D; Hasan, J S

    1996-12-01

    Consensus principles from radiation biology were used to describe a generic set of nonlinear, first-order differential equations for modeling toxicity-induced compensatory cell kinetics in terms of sublethal injury, repair, direct killing, killing of cells with unrepaired sublethal injury, and repopulation. This cellular model was linked to a probit model of hematopoietic mortality that describes death from infection and/or hemorrhage between 5 and 30 days. Mortality data from 27 experiments with 851 dose-response groups, in which doses were protracted by rate and/or fractionation, were used to simultaneously estimate all rate constants by maximum-likelihood methods. Data used represented 18,940 test animals: 12,827 mice, 2925 rats, 1676 sheep, 829 swine, 479 dogs, and 204 burros. Although a long-term, repopulating hematopoietic stem cell is ancestral to all lineages needed to restore normal homeostasis, the dose-response data from the protracted irradiations indicate clearly that the particular lineage that is critical to hematopoietic recovery does not resemble stemlike cells with regard to radiosensitivity and repopulation rates. Instead, the weakest link in the chain of hematopoiesis was found to have an intrinsic radioresistance equal to or greater than stromal cells and to repopulate at the same rates. Model validation has been achieved by predicting the LD50 and/or fractional group mortality in 38 protracted-dose experiments (rats and mice) that were not used in fitting of model coefficients.

  7. Modeling marrow damage from response data: Morphallaxis from radiation biology to benzene toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T.D.; Morris, M.D.; Hasan, J.S.

    1995-12-01

    Consensus principles from radiation biology were used to describe a generic set of nonlinear, first-order differential equations for modeling of toxicity-induced compensatory cell kinetics in terms of sublethal injury, repair, direct killing, killing of cells with unrepaired sublethal injury, and repopulation. This cellular model was linked to a probit model of hematopoietic mortality that describes death from infection and/or hemorrhage between {approximately} 5 and 30 days. Mortality data from 27 experiments with 851 doseresponse groups, in which doses were protracted by rate and/or fractionation, were used to simultaneously estimate all rate constants by maximum-likelihood methods. Data used represented 18,940 test animals distributed according to: (mice, 12,827); (rats, 2,925); (sheep, 1,676); (swine, 829); (dogs, 479); and (burros, 204). Although a long-term, repopulating hematopoietic stem cell is ancestral to all lineages needed to restore normal homeostasis, the dose-response data from the protracted irradiations indicate clearly that the particular lineage that is ``critical`` to hematopoietic recovery does not resemble stem-like cells with regard to radiosensitivity and repopulation rates. Instead, the weakest link in the chain of hematopoiesis was found to have an intrinsic radioresistance equal to or greater than stromal cells and to repopulate at the same rates. Model validation has been achieved by predicting the LD{sub 50} and/or fractional group mortality in 38 protracted-dose experiments (rats and mice) that were not used in the fitting of model coefficients.

  8. Cell to Cell Variability of Radiation-Induced Foci: Relation between Observed Damage and Energy Deposition.

    PubMed

    Gruel, Gaëtan; Villagrasa, Carmen; Voisin, Pascale; Clairand, Isabelle; Benderitter, Marc; Bottollier-Depois, Jean-François; Barquinero, Joan Francesc

    2016-01-01

    Most studies that aim to understand the interactions between different types of photon radiation and cellular DNA assume homogeneous cell irradiation, with all cells receiving the same amount of energy. The level of DNA damage is therefore generally determined by averaging it over the entire population of exposed cells. However, evaluating the molecular consequences of a stochastic phenomenon such as energy deposition of ionizing radiation by measuring only an average effect may not be sufficient for understanding some aspects of the cellular response to this radiation. The variance among the cells associated with this average effect may also be important for the behaviour of irradiated tissue. In this study, we accurately estimated the distribution of the number of radiation-induced γH2AX foci (RIF) per cell nucleus in a large population of endothelial cells exposed to 3 macroscopic doses of gamma rays from 60Co. The number of RIF varied significantly and reproducibly from cell to cell, with its relative standard deviation ranging from 36% to 18% depending on the macroscopic dose delivered. Interestingly, this relative cell-to-cell variability increased as the dose decreased, contrary to the mean RIF count per cell. This result shows that the dose effect, in terms of the number of DNA lesions indicated by RIF is not as simple as a purely proportional relation in which relative SD is constant with dose. To analyse the origins of this observed variability, we calculated the spread of the specific energy distribution for the different target volumes and subvolumes in which RIF can be generated. Variances, standard deviations and relative standard deviations all changed similarly from dose to dose for biological and calculated microdosimetric values. This similarity is an important argument that supports the hypothesis of the conservation of the association between the number of RIF per nucleus and the specific energy per DNA molecule. This comparison allowed us to

  9. Genetic damage induced by benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide and risk of lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Q.; Cheng, L.; Li, D.

    1997-10-01

    Lung cancer is the paradigm of carcinogen-induced disease. A chemical carcinogen, benzo[a]pyrene, commonly found in tobacco, is both mutagenic and carcinogenic. It is hypothesized that individuals have varying responses to exposure to environmental carcinogens. In this study, we used benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE) as the test mutagen to investigate three in-vitro susceptibility markers in lymphocytes from 51 patients with lung cancer and 172 cancer-free controls. These markers were: BPDE-induced chromosomal aberrations, BPDE-induced DNA adducts, and DNA repair capacity using host cell reactivation assay with BPDE-damaged plasmid. Using the medians of the controls as the cutoff values, increased risk of lung cancer was associated with increased frequency of chromosomal aberrations (OR=6.53; 95% confidence interval (C.I.), 3.74-11.4), increased BPDE-DNA adduct level (odds ratio (OR)=4.7; 95% C.I., 1.2-18.5), and reduced DNA repair capacity (OR=5.7; 95% C.I., 2.1-15.7). In correlation analyses, cellular ability to repair BPDE-induced DNA damage was found to be inversely correlated with the levels of BPDE-induced DNA adducts (n=34; r=0.34; p=0.048) and the levels of BPDE-DNA adducts correlated significantly with the frequency of chromosomal aberrations (n=62; r=0.42; p=0.001). However, cellular ability to repair BPDE-induced DNA damage was not correlated significantly with the frequency of chromosomal aberrations (n=47; r=0.06; p=0.677). These biomarkers have differing sensitivities in measuring repair of damage induced by chemical carcinogens; therefore, the complementary use of these assays should increase the probability of identifying individuals with susceptibility to smoking-related cancers.

  10. Assessment of nicotine-induced DNA damage in a genotoxicological test battery.

    PubMed

    Ginzkey, Christian; Friehs, Gudrun; Koehler, Christian; Hackenberg, Stephan; Hagen, Rudolf; Kleinsasser, Norbert H

    2013-02-18

    The role of the tobacco-alkaloid nicotine in tumour biology is widely discussed in the literature. Due to a strong capacity to induce angiogenesis, a pro-mutagenic potential in non-tumour and cancer cells, and a pro- and anti-apoptotic influence, nicotine seems to promote the growth of established tumours. However, results indicating DNA damage and genetic instability associated with nicotine have been contradictory thus far. A variety of markers and endpoints of genotoxicity are required to characterize the genotoxic potential of nicotine. Induction of DNA single- and double-strand breaks, the formation of micronuclei, and the induction of sister chromatid exchange and chromosome aberrations represent possible genotoxicological endpoints at different cellular levels. Human lymphocytes were exposed to nicotine concentrations between 1μM and 1mM for 24h in vitro. The comet assay, the cytokinesis-block micronucleus test, the chromosome aberration (CA) test, and the sister chromatid exchange (SCE) test were then applied. Viability and apoptosis were measured by flow cytometry in combination with the annexin V-propidium iodide staining test. In this test setting, no enhanced DNA migration was measured by the comet assay. An increase in the micronucleus frequency was detected at a concentration of 100μM nicotine without affecting the frequency of apoptotic cells. A distinct genotoxic effect was determined by the CA test and the SCE test, with a significant increase in CA and SCE at a concentration of 1μM. In the annexin V test, nicotine did not influence the proportion of apoptotic or necrotic cells. The current data indicating the induction of CA by nicotine underscore the necessity of ongoing investigations on the potential of nicotine to initiate mutagenesis and tumour promotion. Taking into account the physiological nicotine plasma levels in smokers or in nicotine-replacement therapy, particularly the long-term use of nicotine should be critically discussed. PMID

  11. 'Nothing of chemistry disappears in biology': the Top 30 damage-prone endogenous metabolites.

    PubMed

    Lerma-Ortiz, Claudia; Jeffryes, James G; Cooper, Arthur J L; Niehaus, Thomas D; Thamm, Antje M K; Frelin, Océane; Aunins, Thomas; Fiehn, Oliver; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Henry, Christopher S; Hanson, Andrew D

    2016-06-15

    Many common metabolites are intrinsically unstable and reactive, and hence prone to chemical (i.e. non-enzymatic) damage in vivo Although this fact is widely recognized, the purely chemical side-reactions of metabolic intermediates can be surprisingly hard to track down in the literature and are often treated in an unprioritized case-by-case way. Moreover, spontaneous chemical side-reactions tend to be overshadowed today by side-reactions mediated by promiscuous ('sloppy') enzymes even though chemical damage to metabolites may be even more prevalent than damage from enzyme sloppiness, has similar outcomes, and is held in check by similar biochemical repair or pre-emption mechanisms. To address these limitations and imbalances, here we draw together and systematically integrate information from the (bio)chemical literature, from cheminformatics, and from genome-scale metabolic models to objectively define a 'Top 30' list of damage-prone metabolites. A foundational part of this process was to derive general reaction rules for the damage chemistries involved. The criteria for a 'Top 30' metabolite included predicted chemical reactivity, essentiality, and occurrence in diverse organisms. We also explain how the damage chemistry reaction rules ('operators') are implemented in the Chemical-Damage-MINE (CD-MINE) database (minedatabase.mcs.anl.gov/#/top30) to provide a predictive tool for many additional potential metabolite damage products. Lastly, we illustrate how defining a 'Top 30' list can drive genomics-enabled discovery of the enzymes of previously unrecognized damage-control systems, and how applying chemical damage reaction rules can help identify previously unknown peaks in metabolomics profiles. PMID:27284066

  12. Laser-induced damage of fused silica on high-power laser: beam intensity modulation, optics defect, contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dongfeng; Sun, Mingyin; Wu, Rong; Lu, Xinqiang; Lin, Zunqi; Zhu, Jianqiang

    2015-11-01

    The wedged focus lens of fused silica, one of the final optics assembly's optics, focuses the 351 nm beam onto target and separates the residual 1053 and 527 nm light with 351 nm light. After the experiment with beam energies at 3ω range from 3 to 5KJ, and pulse shapes about 3ns, the wedged focus lens has laser-induced damage at particular area. Analysis the damage result, there are three reasons to induce these damages. These reasons are beam intensity modulation, optics defect and contamination that cause different damage morphologies. The 3ω beam intensity modulation, one of three factors, is the mostly import factor to induce damage. Here, the n2 nonlinear coefficient of fused silica material can lead to small-scale self-focusing filament because of optics thickness and beam intensity. And some damage-filaments' tails are bulk damage spots because there are subsurface scratches or metal contaminations.

  13. The Biological Effectiveness of Different Radiation Qualities for the Induction of Chromosome Damage in Human Lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; George, Kerry; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations were measured in human peripheral blood lymphocytes after in vitro exposure to Si-28-ions with energies ranging from 90 to 600 MeV/u, Ti-48-ions with energies ranging from 240 to 1000 MeV/u, or to Fe-56-ions with energies ranging from 200 to 5,000 MeV/u. The LET of the various Si beams in this study ranged from 48 to 158 keV/ m, the LET of the Ti ions ranged from 107 to 240 keV/micron, and the LET of the Fe-ions ranged from 145 to 440 keV/ m. Doses delivered were in the 10- to 200-cGy range. Dose-response curves for chromosome exchanges in cells at first division after exposure, measured using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole-chromosome probes, were fitted with linear or linear-quadratic functions. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) was estimated from the initial slope of the dose-response curve for chromosome damage with respect to gamma-rays. The estimates of RBEmax values for total chromosome exchanges ranged from 4.4+/-0.4 to 31.5+/-2.6 for Fe ions, 21.4+/-1.7 to 28.3+/-2.4 for Ti ions, and 11.8+/-1.0 to 42.2+/-3.3 for Si ions. The highest RBEmax value for Fe ions was obtained with the 600 MeV/u beam, the highest RBEmax value for Ti ions was obtained 1000 MeV/u beam, and the highest RBEmax value for Si ions was obtained with the 170 MeV/u beam. For Si and Fe ions the RBEmax values increased with LET, reaching a maximum at about 180 keV/micron for Fe and about 100 keV/micron for Si, and decreasing with further increase in LET. Additional studies for low doses Si-28-ions down to 0.02 Gy will be discussed.

  14. Ampelopsin protects endothelial cells from hyperglycemia-induced oxidative damage by inducing autophagy via the AMPK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xinyu; Zhang, Ting; Shi, Linying; Kang, Chao; Wan, Jing; Zhou, Yong; Zhu, Jundong; Mi, Mantian

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic angiopathy is a major diabetes-specific complication that often begins with endothelial dysfunction induced by hyperglycemia; however, the pathological mechanisms of this progression remain unclear. Ampelopsin is a natural flavonol that has strong antioxidant activity, but little information is available regarding its antidiabetic effect. This study focused on the effect of ampelopsin on hyperglycemia-induced oxidative damage and the underlying mechanism of this effect in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). We found that hyperglycemia impaired autophagy in HUVECs through the inhibition of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which directly led to endothelial cell damage. Ampelopsin significantly attenuated the detrimental effect of hyperglycemia-induced cell dysfunction in a concentration-dependent manner in HUVECs. Ampelopsin significantly upregulated LC3-II, Beclin1, and Atg5 protein levels but downregulated p62 protein levels in HUVECs. Transmission electron microscopy and confocal microscopy indicated that ampelopsin notably induced autophagosomes and LC3-II dots, respectively. Additionally, the autophagy-specific inhibitor 3-MA, as well as Atg5 and Beclin1 siRNA pretreatment, markedly attenuated ampelopsin-induced autophagy, which subsequently abolished the protective effect of ampelopsin against hyperglycemia in HUVECs. Moreover, ampelopsin also increased AMPK activity and inhibited mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) complex activation. Ampelopsin-induced autophagy was attenuated by the AMPK antagonist compound C but strengthened by the AMPK agonist AICAR (5-minoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide). Furthermore, AMPK siRNA transfection eliminated ampelopsin's alleviation of cell injury induced by hyperglycemia. The protective effect of ampelopsin against hyperglycemia-induced cell damage, which functions by targeting autophagy via AMPK activation, makes it a promising pharmacological treatment for type-2 diabetes.

  15. Countermeasures for space radiation induced adverse biologic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, A. R.; Wan, X. S.

    2011-11-01

    Radiation exposure in space is expected to increase the risk of cancer and other adverse biological effects in astronauts. The types of space radiation of particular concern for astronaut health are protons and heavy ions known as high atomic number and high energy (HZE) particles. Recent studies have indicated that carcinogenesis induced by protons and HZE particles may be modifiable. We have been evaluating the effects of proton and HZE particle radiation in cultured human cells and animals for nearly a decade. Our results indicate that exposure to proton and HZE particle radiation increases oxidative stress, cytotoxicity, cataract development and malignant transformation in in vivo and/or in vitro experimental systems. We have also shown that these adverse biological effects can be prevented, at least partially, by treatment with antioxidants and some dietary supplements that are readily available and have favorable safety profiles. Some of the antioxidants and dietary supplements are effective in preventing radiation induced malignant transformation in vitro even when applied several days after the radiation exposure. Our recent progress is reviewed and discussed in the context of the relevant literature.

  16. Autophagy Plays a Cytoprotective Role During Cadmium-Induced Oxidative Damage in Primary Neuronal Cultures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Qiwen; Song, Ruilong; Zhang, Yajing; Zhang, Kangbao; Yuan, Yan; Bian, Jianchun; Liu, Xuezhong; Gu, Jianhong; Liu, Zongping

    2015-12-01

    Cadmium (Cd) induces significant oxidative damage in cells. Recently, it was reported that autophagy could be induced by Cd in neurons. However, little is known about the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during Cd-induced autophagy. In our study, we examined the cross-talk between ROS and autophagy by using N-acetyl cysteine (NAC, an antioxidant) and chloroquine (CQ, a pharmacological inhibitor of autophagy) in a primary rat neuronal cell cultures. We observed accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles and the increased expression of endogenous protein light chain 3 (LC3) in Cd-treated neurons, revealing that Cd induced a high level of autophagy. Moreover, increased levels of ROS were observed in neurons treated with Cd, showing that ROS accumulation was closely associated with neuron's exposure to Cd. Furthermore, we found that autophagy was inhibited by using CQ and/or NAC with further aggravation of mitochondrial damage, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage and hypoploid apoptotic cell number in Cd-treated neurons. These results proved that autophagy has a cytoprotective role during Cd-induced toxicity in neurons, and it can prevent the oxidative damage. These findings may enable the development of novel therapeutic strategies for neurological diseases.

  17. Photoprotection by honeybush extracts, hesperidin and mangiferin against UVB-induced skin damage in SKH-1 mice.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Antoinette; Davids, Lester M; Rautenbach, Fanie; Marnewick, Jeanine L

    2011-05-01

    The possible mechanism of photoprotection by polyphenolic extracts of honeybush and the two most abundant polyphenols found in honeybush, hesperidin and mangiferin were determined using a mouse model. Ethanol: acetone soluble extracts and pure honeybush compounds were applied topically to the skin of SKH-1 mice before daily exposures to ultraviolet B (UVB) (180 mJ/cm²) for 10 days. The honeybush extracts reduced signs of sunburn, such as erythema, peeling and hardening of the skin and also significantly (P < 0.05) reduced edema, epidermal hyperplasia and the induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), GADD45 and OGG1/2 expression. The fermented honeybush extract significantly (P < 0.05) reduced lipid peroxidation and depletion of the antioxidant enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase. Hesperidin and mangiferin were less effective. These results show that extracts of honeybush and to some extent, hesperidin and mangiferin, renders protection against UVB-induced skin damage. The mechanisms investigated suggest that honeybush extracts protected the skin via modulation of induced-oxidative damage, inflammation and cell proliferation. Other specific biological properties such as modulation of signaling pathways could also be involved. PMID:21435898

  18. Neuroprotective Effects of Inhibiting Fyn S-Nitrosylation on Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Damage to CA1 Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Lingyun; Wei, Xuewen; Guo, Peng; Zhang, Guangyi; Qi, Suhua

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) can regulate signaling pathways via S-nitrosylation. Fyn can be post-translationally modified in many biological processes. In the present study, using a rat four-vessel-occlusion ischemic model, we aimed to assess whether Fyn could be S-nitrosylated and to evaluate the effects of Fyn S-nitrosylation on brain damage. In vitro, Fyn could be S-nitrosylated by S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO, an exogenous NO donor), and in vivo, endogenous NO synthesized by NO synthases (NOS) could enhance Fyn S-nitrosylation. Application of GSNO, 7-nitroindazole (7-NI, an inhibitor of neuronal NOS) and hydrogen maleate (MK-801, the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist) could decrease the S-nitrosylation and phosphorylation of Fyn induced by cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Cresyl violet staining validated that these compounds exerted neuroprotective effects against the cerebral I/R-induced damage to hippocampal CA1 neurons. Taken together, in this study, we demonstrated that Fyn can be S-nitrosylated both in vitro and in vivo and that inhibiting S-nitrosylation can exert neuroprotective effects against cerebral I/R injury, potentially via NMDAR-mediated mechanisms. These findings may lead to a new field of inquiry to investigate the underlying pathogenesis of stroke and the development of novel treatment strategies. PMID:27420046

  19. Amifostine, a radioprotectant agent, protects rat brain tissue lipids against ionizing radiation induced damage: An FTIR microspectroscopic imaging study

    SciTech Connect

    Cakmak G.; Miller L.; Zorlu, F.; Severcan, F.

    2012-03-03

    Amifostine is the only approved radioprotective agent by FDA for reducing the damaging effects of radiation on healthy tissues. In this study, the protective effect of amifostine against the damaging effects of ionizing radiation on the white matter (WM) and grey matter (GM) regions of the rat brain were investigated at molecular level. Sprague-Dawley rats, which were administered amifostine or not, were whole-body irradiated at a single dose of 800 cGy, decapitated after 24 h and the brain tissues of these rats were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM). The results revealed that the total lipid content and CH{sub 2} groups of lipids decreased significantly and the carbonyl esters, olefinic=CH and CH{sub 3} groups of lipids increased significantly in the WM and GM after exposure to ionizing radiation, which could be interpreted as a result of lipid peroxidation. These changes were more prominent in the WM of the brain. The administration of amifostine before ionizing radiation inhibited the radiation-induced lipid peroxidation in the brain. In addition, this study indicated that FTIRM provides a novel approach for monitoring ionizing radiation induced-lipid peroxidation and obtaining different molecular ratio images can be used as biomarkers to detect lipid peroxidation in biological systems.

  20. Neuroprotective Effects of Inhibiting Fyn S-Nitrosylation on Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Damage to CA1 Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Hao, Lingyun; Wei, Xuewen; Guo, Peng; Zhang, Guangyi; Qi, Suhua

    2016-07-12

    Nitric oxide (NO) can regulate signaling pathways via S-nitrosylation. Fyn can be post-translationally modified in many biological processes. In the present study, using a rat four-vessel-occlusion ischemic model, we aimed to assess whether Fyn could be S-nitrosylated and to evaluate the effects of Fyn S-nitrosylation on brain damage. In vitro, Fyn could be S-nitrosylated by S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO, an exogenous NO donor), and in vivo, endogenous NO synthesized by NO synthases (NOS) could enhance Fyn S-nitrosylation. Application of GSNO, 7-nitroindazole (7-NI, an inhibitor of neuronal NOS) and hydrogen maleate (MK-801, the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist) could decrease the S-nitrosylation and phosphorylation of Fyn induced by cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Cresyl violet staining validated that these compounds exerted neuroprotective effects against the cerebral I/R-induced damage to hippocampal CA1 neurons. Taken together, in this study, we demonstrated that Fyn can be S-nitrosylated both in vitro and in vivo and that inhibiting S-nitrosylation can exert neuroprotective effects against cerebral I/R injury, potentially via NMDAR-mediated mechanisms. These findings may lead to a new field of inquiry to investigate the underlying pathogenesis of stroke and the development of novel treatment strategies.

  1. Ginkgo biloba leaf extract induces DNA damage by inhibiting topoisomerase II activity in human hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuhong; Chen, Si; Mei, Hu; Xuan, Jiekun; Guo, Xiaoqing; Couch, Letha; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N; Guo, Lei; Mei, Nan

    2015-09-30

    Ginkgo biloba leaf extract has been shown to increase the incidence in liver tumors in mice in a 2-year bioassay conducted by the National Toxicology Program. In this study, the DNA damaging effects of Ginkgo biloba leaf extract and many of its constituents were evaluated in human hepatic HepG2 cells and the underlying mechanism was determined. A molecular docking study revealed that quercetin, a flavonoid constituent of Ginkgo biloba, showed a higher potential to interact with topoisomerase II (Topo II) than did the other Ginkgo biloba constituents; this in silico prediction was confirmed by using a biochemical assay to study Topo II enzyme inhibition. Moreover, as measured by the Comet assay and the induction of γ-H2A.X, quercetin, followed by keampferol and isorhamnetin, appeared to be the most potent DNA damage inducer in HepG2 cells. In Topo II knockdown cells, DNA damage triggered by Ginkgo biloba leaf extract or quercetin was dramatically decreased, indicating that DNA damage is directly associated with Topo II. DNA damage was also observed when cells were treated with commercially available Ginkgo biloba extract product. Our findings suggest that Ginkgo biloba leaf extract- and quercetin-induced in vitro genotoxicity may be the result of Topo II inhibition.

  2. Re-assessment of chronic radio-induced tissue damage in a rat hindlimb model

    PubMed Central

    PHULPIN, BÉRENGÈRE; DOLIVET, GILLES; MARIE, PIERRE-YVES; POUSSIER, SYLVAIN; GALLET, PATRICE; LEROUX, AGNÈS; GRAFF, PIERRE; GROUBACH, FREDERIQUE; BRAVETTI, PIERRE; MERLIN, JEAN-LOUIS; TRAN, NGUYEN

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy is successfully used to treat neoplastic lesions, but may adversely affect normal tissues within the irradiated volume. However, additional clinical and para-clinical data are required for a comprehensive understanding of the pathogenesis of this damage. We assessed a rat model using clinical records and medical imaging to gain a better understanding of irradiation-induced tissue damage. The hindlimbs of the rats in this model were irradiated with a single dose of 30 or 50 Gy. Sequential analysis was based on observation records of stage and planar scintigraphy. Additional radiography, radiohistology and histology studies were performed to detect histological alterations. All animals developed acute and late effects, with an increased severity after a dose of 50 Gy. The bone uptake of 99mTc-HDP was significantly decreased in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Histologically, significant tissue damage was observed. After the 50 Gy irradiation, the animals developed lesions characteristic of osteoradionecrosis (ORN). Radiographic and histological studies provided evidence of lytic bone lesions. Our rat model developed tissue damage characteristic of radiation injury after a single 30 Gy irradiation and tissue degeneration similar to that which occurs during human ORN after a 50 Gy irradiation. The development of this animal model is an essential step in exploring the pathogenesis of irradiation-induced tissue damage, and may be used to test the efficacy of new treatments. PMID:22993575

  3. Ginkgo biloba leaf extract induces DNA damage by inhibiting topoisomerase II activity in human hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuhong; Chen, Si; Mei, Hu; Xuan, Jiekun; Guo, Xiaoqing; Couch, Letha; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N; Guo, Lei; Mei, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Ginkgo biloba leaf extract has been shown to increase the incidence in liver tumors in mice in a 2-year bioassay conducted by the National Toxicology Program. In this study, the DNA damaging effects of Ginkgo biloba leaf extract and many of its constituents were evaluated in human hepatic HepG2 cells and the underlying mechanism was determined. A molecular docking study revealed that quercetin, a flavonoid constituent of Ginkgo biloba, showed a higher potential to interact with topoisomerase II (Topo II) than did the other Ginkgo biloba constituents; this in silico prediction was confirmed by using a biochemical assay to study Topo II enzyme inhibition. Moreover, as measured by the Comet assay and the induction of γ-H2A.X, quercetin, followed by keampferol and isorhamnetin, appeared to be the most potent DNA damage inducer in HepG2 cells. In Topo II knockdown cells, DNA damage triggered by Ginkgo biloba leaf extract or quercetin was dramatically decreased, indicating that DNA damage is directly associated with Topo II. DNA damage was also observed when cells were treated with commercially available Ginkgo biloba extract product. Our findings suggest that Ginkgo biloba leaf extract- and quercetin-induced in vitro genotoxicity may be the result of Topo II inhibition. PMID:26419945

  4. Ginkgo biloba leaf extract induces DNA damage by inhibiting topoisomerase II activity in human hepatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhuhong; Chen, Si; Mei, Hu; Xuan, Jiekun; Guo, Xiaoqing; Couch, Letha; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N.; Guo, Lei; Mei, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Ginkgo biloba leaf extract has been shown to increase the incidence in liver tumors in mice in a 2-year bioassay conducted by the National Toxicology Program. In this study, the DNA damaging effects of Ginkgo biloba leaf extract and many of its constituents were evaluated in human hepatic HepG2 cells and the underlying mechanism was determined. A molecular docking study revealed that quercetin, a flavonoid constituent of Ginkgo biloba, showed a higher potential to interact with topoisomerase II (Topo II) than did the other Ginkgo biloba constituents; this in silico prediction was confirmed by using a biochemical assay to study Topo II enzyme inhibition. Moreover, as measured by the Comet assay and the induction of γ-H2A.X, quercetin, followed by keampferol and isorhamnetin, appeared to be the most potent DNA damage inducer in HepG2 cells. In Topo II knockdown cells, DNA damage triggered by Ginkgo biloba leaf extract or quercetin was dramatically decreased, indicating that DNA damage is directly associated with Topo II. DNA damage was also observed when cells were treated with commercially available Ginkgo biloba extract product. Our findings suggest that Ginkgo biloba leaf extract- and quercetin-induced in vitro genotoxicity may be the result of Topo II inhibition. PMID:26419945

  5. Impact of Gas Adsorption Induced Coal Matrix Damage on the Evolution of Coal Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W. C.; Wei, C. H.; Liu, J.; Xu, T.; Elsworth, D.

    2013-11-01

    It has been widely reported that coal permeability can change from reduction to enhancement due to gas adsorption even under the constant effective stress condition, which is apparently inconsistent with the classic theoretical solutions. This study addresses this inconsistency through explicit simulations of the dynamic interactions between coal matrix swelling/shrinking induced damage and fracture aperture alteration, and translations of these interactions to permeability evolution under the constant effective stress condition. We develop a coupled coal-gas interaction model that incorporates the material heterogeneity and damage evolution of coal, which allows us to couple the progressive development of damage zone with gas adsorption processes within the coal matrix. For the case of constant effective stress, coal permeability changes from reduction to enhancement while the damage zone within the coal matrix develops from the fracture wall to further inside the matrix. As the peak Langmuir strain is approached, the decrease of permeability halts and permeability increases with pressure. The transition of permeability reduction to permeability enhancement during gas adsorption, which may be closely related to the damage zone development in coal matrix, is controlled by coal heterogeneity, external boundary condition, and adsorption-induced swelling.

  6. Influence of surface cracks on laser-induced damage resistance of brittle KH₂PO₄ crystal.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jian; Chen, Mingjun; Liao, Wei; Wang, Haijun; Wang, Jinghe; Xiao, Yong; Li, Mingquan

    2014-11-17

    Single point diamond turning (SPDT) currently is the leading finishing method for achieving ultra-smooth surface on brittle KH(2)PO(4) crystal. In this work, the light intensification modulated by surface cracks introduced by SPDT cutting is numerically simulated using finite-difference time-domain algorithm. The results indicate that the light intensification caused by surface cracks is wavelength, crack geometry and position dependent. Under the irradiation of 355 nm laser, lateral cracks on front surfaces and conical cracks on both front and rear surfaces can produce light intensification as high as hundreds of times, which is sufficient to trigger avalanche ionization and finally lower the laser damage resistance of crystal components. Furthermore, we experimentally tested the laser-induced damage thresholds (LIDTs) on both crack-free and flawed crystal surfaces. The results imply that brittle fracture with a series of surface cracks is the dominant source of laser damage initiation in crystal components. Due to the negative effect of surface cracks, the LIDT on KDP crystal surface could be sharply reduced from 7.85J/cm(2) to 2.33J/cm(2) (355 nm, 6.4 ns). In addition, the experiment of laser-induced damage growth is performed and the damage growth behavior agrees well with the simulation results of light intensification caused by surface cracks with increasing crack depths.

  7. Repair of DNA Damage Induced by the Cytidine Analog Zebularine Requires ATR and ATM in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chun-Hsin; Finke, Andreas; Díaz, Mariana; Rozhon, Wilfried; Poppenberger, Brigitte; Baubec, Tuncay; Pecinka, Ales

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage repair is an essential cellular mechanism that maintains genome stability. Here, we show that the nonmethylable cytidine analog zebularine induces a DNA damage response in Arabidopsis thaliana, independent of changes in DNA methylation. In contrast to genotoxic agents that induce damage in a cell cycle stage-independent manner, zebularine induces damage specifically during strand synthesis in DNA replication. The signaling of this damage is mediated by additive activity of ATAXIA TELANGIECTASIA MUTATED AND RAD3-RELATED and ATAXIA TELANGIECTASIA MUTATED kinases, which cause postreplicative cell cycle arrest and increased endoreplication. The repair requires a functional STRUCTURAL MAINTENANCE OF CHROMOSOMES5 (SMC5)-SMC6 complex and is accomplished predominantly by synthesis-dependent strand-annealing homologous recombination. Here, we provide insight into the response mechanism for coping with the genotoxic effects of zebularine and identify several components of the zebularine-induced DNA damage repair pathway. PMID:26023162

  8. Effectiveness of Disaster-prevention Technologies against Quake-induced Damage of MR Scanners during the Great East Japan Earthquake.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi-Sekino, Sachiko; Machida, Yoshio; Tsuchihashi, Toshio; Isoda, Haruo; Noguchi, Takashi; Nakai, Toshiharu

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we have performed a statistical analysis to investigate damages in magnetic resonance (MR) scanners caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake (GEJE, magnitude 9.0) and evaluated whether these disaster-prevention technologies contributed to the reduction of damages in the GEJE or not. It was confirmed that the extent of damage was significantly different between seismic scale (SS) 5 and SS over 6. Our survey study demonstrated that anchoring of MR facilities reduced damages due to quakes and demonstrated that anchoring is an efficient method for quake-induced damage prevention. The odds ratio revealed that base isolation was very useful to prevent damages in MR scanners.

  9. Cellular Response to Bleomycin-Induced DNA Damage in Human Fibroblast Cells in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Outside the protection of the geomagnetic field, astronauts and other living organisms are constantly exposed to space radiation that consists of energetic protons and other heavier charged particles. Whether spaceflight factors, microgravity in particular, have effects on cellular responses to DNA damage induced by exposure to radiation or cytotoxic chemicals is still unknown, as is their impact on the radiation risks for astronauts and on the mutation rate in microorganisms. Although possible synergistic effects of space radiation and other spaceflight factors have been investigated since the early days of the human space program, the published results were mostly conflicting and inconsistent. To investigate effects of spaceflight on cellular responses to DNA damages, human fibroblast cells flown to the International Space Station (ISS) were treated with bleomycin for three hours in the true microgravity environment, which induced DNA damages including double-strand breaks (DSB) similar to the ionizing radiation. Damages in the DNA were measured by the phosphorylation of a histone protein H2AX (g-H2AX), which showed slightly more foci in the cells on ISS than in the ground control. The expression of genes involved in DNA damage response was also analyzed using the PCR array. Although a number of the genes, including CDKN1A and PCNA, were significantly altered in the cells after bleomycin treatment, no significant difference in the expression profile of DNA damage response genes was found between the flight and ground samples. At the time of the bleomycin treatment, the cells on the ISS were found to be proliferating faster than the ground control as measured by the percentage of cells containing positive Ki-67 signals. Our results suggested that the difference in g-H2AX focus counts between flight and ground was due to the faster growth rate of the cells in space, but spaceflight did not affect initial transcriptional responses of the DNA damage response genes to

  10. Cellular Response to Bleomycin-Induced DNA Damage in Human Fibroblast Cells in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Living organisms are constantly exposed to space radiation that consists of energetic protons and other heavier charged particles. Whether spaceflight factors, microgravity in particular, affects on the cellular response to DNA damage induced by exposures to radiation or other toxic chemicals will have an impact on the radiation risks for the astronauts, as well as on the mutation rate in microorganisms, is still an open question. Although the possible synergistic effects of space radiation and other spaceflight factors have been investigated since the early days of the human space program, the published results were mostly conflicting and inconsistent. To investigate the effects of spaceflight on the cellular response to DNA damages, human fibroblast cells flown to the International Space Station (ISS) were treated with bleomycin for three hours in the true microgravity environment, which induces DNA damages including the double strand breaks (DSB) similar to the ionizing radiation. Damage in the DNA was measured by the phosphorylation of a histone protein H2AX (-H2AX), which showed slightly more foci in the cells on ISS than in the ground control. The expression of genes involved in the DNA damage response was also analyzed using the PCR array. Although a number of the genes, including CDKN1A and PCNA, were significantly altered in the cells after bleomycin treatment, no significant difference in the expression profile of DNA damage response genes was found between the flight and ground samples. At the time of the bleomycin treatment, the cells on the ISS were found to be proliferating faster than the ground control as measured by the percentage of cells containing positive Ti-67 signals. Our results suggested that the difference in -H2AX between flight and ground was due to the faster growth rate of the cells in space, but spaceflight did not affect the response of the DNA damage response genes to bleomycin treatment.

  11. Effects of allopurinol on exercise-induced muscle damage: new therapeutic approaches?

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Gomar, F; Pareja-Galeano, H; Perez-Quilis, C; Santos-Lozano, A; Fiuza-Luces, C; Garatachea, N; Lippi, G; Lucia, A

    2015-01-01

    Intensive muscular activity can trigger oxidative stress, and free radicals may hence be generated by working skeletal muscle. The role of the enzyme xanthine oxidase as a generating source of free radicals is well documented and therefore is involved in the skeletal muscle damage as well as in the potential transient cardiovascular damage induced by high-intensity physical exercise. Allopurinol is a purine hypoxanthine-based structural analog and a well-known inhibitor of xanthine oxidase. The administration of the xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol may hence be regarded as promising, safe, and an economic strategy to decrease transient skeletal muscle damage (as well as heart damage, when occurring) in top-level athletes when administered before a competition or a particularly high-intensity training session. Although continuous administration of allopurinol in high-level athletes is not recommended due to its possible role in hampering training-induced adaptations, the drug might be useful in non-athletes. Exertional rhabdomyolysis is the most common form of rhabdomyolysis and affects individuals participating in a type of intense exercise to which they are not accustomed. This condition can cause exercise-related myoglobinuria, thus increasing the risk of acute renal failure and is also associated with sickle cell trait. In this manuscript, we have reviewed the recent evidence about the effects of allopurinol on exercise-induced muscle damage. More research is needed to determine whether allopurinol may be useful for preventing not only exertional rhabdomyolysis and acute renal damage but also skeletal muscle wasting in critical illness as well as in immobilized, bedridden, sarcopenic or cachectic patients.

  12. Protection from radiation-induced mitochondrial and genomic DNA damage by an extract of Hippophae rhamnoides.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Sandeep Kumar; Chaudhary, Pankaj; Kumar, Indracanti Prem; Samanta, Namita; Afrin, Farhat; Gupta, Manju Lata; Sharma, Upendra Kumar; Sinha, Arun Kumar; Sharma, Yogendra Kumar; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2006-12-01

    Hippophae rhamnoides or seabuckthorn is used extensively in Indian and Tibetan traditional medicine for the treatment of circulatory disorders, ischemic heart disease, hepatic injury, and neoplasia. In the present study, we have evaluated the radioprotective potential of REC-1001, a fraction isolated from the berries of H. rhamnoides. Chemical analysis of the extract indicated that REC-1001 was approximately 68% by weight polyphenols, and contained kaempferol, isorhamnetin, and quercetin. The effect of REC-1001 on modulating radiation-induced DNA damage was determined in murine thymocytes by measuring nonspecific nuclear DNA damage at the whole genome level using the alkaline halo assay and by measuring sequence/gene-specific DNA damage both in nuclear DNA (beta-globin gene) and in mitochondrial DNA using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Treatment with 10 Gy resulted in a significant amount of DNA damage in the halo assay and reductions in the amplification of both the beta-globin gene and mitochondrial DNA. REC-1001 dose-dependently reduced the amount of damage detected in each assay, with the maximum protective effects observed at the highest REC-1001 dose evaluated (250 micro g/ml). Studies measuring the nicking of naked plasmid DNA further established the radioprotective effect of REC-1001. To elucidate possible mechanisms of action, the antioxidant properties and the free-radical scavenging activities of REC-1001 were evaluated. REC-1001 dose-dependently scavenged radiation-induced hydroxyl radicals, chemically-generated superoxide anions, stabilized DPPH radicals, and reduced Fe(3+) to Fe(2+). The results of the study indicate that the REC-1001 extract of H. rhamnoides protects mitochondrial and genomic DNA from radiation-induced damage. The polyphenols/flavonoids present in the extract might be responsible for the free radical scavenging and DNA protection afforded by REC-1001. PMID:16948057

  13. Epigallocatechin gallate eye drops protect against ultraviolet B–induced corneal oxidative damage in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mu-Hsin; Tsai, Chia-Fang; Lu, Fung-Jou

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation from sunlight is a known risk factor for human corneal injury. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effects of green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) on UVB radiation–induced corneal oxidative damage in male imprinting control region (ICR) mice. Methods Corneal oxidative damage was induced by exposure to UVB radiation at 560 μW/cm2. The animals received 0%, 0.1%, and 0.01% EGCG eye drops at a 5 mg/ml dose, twice daily for 8 days. Corneal surface damage was graded according to smoothness and the extent of lissamine green staining. Corneal glutathione (GSH), thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), and protein carbonyl levels, as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and glutathione reductase (GSH-Rd) activity in the cornea, were measured to monitor corneal injury. Results UVB radiation caused significant damage to the corneas, including apparent corneal ulceration and severe epithelial exfoliation, leading to a decrease in SOD, catalase, GSH-Px, GSH-Rd, and GSH activity in the cornea. However, the corneal TBARS and protein carbonyls increased compared with the control group. Treatment with EGCG eye drops significantly (p<0.05) ameliorated corneal damage, increased SOD, catalase, GSH-Px, GSH-Rd, and GSH activity, and decreased the TBARS and protein carbonyls in the corneas compared with the UVB-treated group. Conclusions EGCG eye drops exhibit potent protective effects on UVB radiation–induced corneal oxidative damage in mice, likely due to the increase in antioxidant defense system activity and the inhibition of lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation. PMID:24520184

  14. Involvement of DNA polymerase beta in repairing oxidative damages induced by antitumor drug adriamycin

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Shukun; Wu Mei; Zhang Zunzhen

    2010-08-01

    Adriamycin (ADM) is a widely used antineoplastic drug. However, the increasing cellular resistance has become a serious limitation to ADM clinical application. The most important mechanism related to ADM-induced cell death is oxidative DNA damage mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Base excision repair (BER) is a major pathway in the repair of DNA single strand break (SSB) and oxidized base. In this study, we firstly applied the murine embryo fibroblasts wild-type (pol {beta} +/+) and homozygous pol {beta} null cell (pol {beta} -/-) as a model to investigate ADM DNA-damaging effects and the molecular basis underlying these effects. Here, cellular sensitivity to ADM was examined using colorimetric assay and colony forming assay. ADM-induced cellular ROS level and the alteration of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were measured by commercial kits. Further, DNA strand break, chromosomal damage and gene mutation were assessed by comet assay, micronucleus test and hprt gene mutation assay, respectively. The results showed that pol {beta} -/- cells were more sensitive to ADM compared with pol {beta} +/+ cells and more severe SSB and chromosomal damage as well as higher hprt gene mutation frequency were observed in pol {beta} -/- cells. ROS level in pol {beta} -/- cells increased along with decreased activity of SOD. These results demonstrated that pol {beta} deficiency could enable ROS accumulation with SOD activity decrease, further elevate oxidative DNA damage, and subsequently result in SSB, chromosome cleavage as well as gene mutation, which may be partly responsible for the cytotoxicity of ADM and the hypersensitivity of pol {beta} -/- cells to ADM. These findings suggested that pol {beta} is vital for repairing oxidative damage induced by ADM.

  15. Cadmium Chloride Induces DNA Damage and Apoptosis of Human Liver Carcinoma Cells via Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Skipper, Anthony; Sims, Jennifer N.; Yedjou, Clement G.; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium is a heavy metal that has been shown to cause its toxicity in humans and animals. Many documented studies have shown that cadmium produces various genotoxic effects such as DNA damage and chromosomal aberrations. Ailments such as bone disease, renal damage, and several forms of cancer are attributed to overexposure to cadmium.  Although there have been numerous studies examining the effects of cadmium in animal models and a few case studies involving communities where cadmium contamination has occurred, its molecular mechanisms of action are not fully elucidated. In this research, we hypothesized that oxidative stress plays a key role in cadmium chloride-induced toxicity, DNA damage, and apoptosis of human liver carcinoma (HepG2) cells. To test our hypothesis, cell viability was determined by MTT assay. Lipid hydroperoxide content stress was estimated by lipid peroxidation assay. Genotoxic damage was tested by the means of alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay. Cell apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry assessment (Annexin-V/PI assay). The result of MTT assay indicated that cadmium chloride induces toxicity to HepG2 cells in a concentration-dependent manner, showing a 48 hr-LD50 of 3.6 µg/mL. Data generated from lipid peroxidation assay resulted in a significant (p < 0.05) increase of hydroperoxide production, specifically at the highest concentration tested. Data obtained from the Comet assay indicated that cadmium chloride causes DNA damage in HepG2 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. A strong concentration-response relationship (p < 0.05) was recorded between annexin V positive cells and cadmium chloride exposure. In summary, these in vitro studies provide clear evidence that cadmium chloride induces oxidative stress, DNA damage, and programmed cell death in human liver carcinoma (HepG2) cells. PMID:26729151

  16. IKKα and IKKβ Regulation of DNA Damage-Induced Cleavage of Huntingtin

    PubMed Central

    Khoshnan, Ali; Ko, Jan; Tescu, Simona; Brundin, Patrick; Patterson, Paul H.

    2009-01-01

    Background Proteolysis of huntingtin (Htt) plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease (HD). However, the environmental cues and signaling pathways that regulate Htt proteolysis are poorly understood. One stimulus may be the DNA damage that accumulates in neurons over time, and the subsequent activation of signaling pathways such as those regulated by IκB kinase (IKK), which can influence neurodegeneration in HD. Methodology/Principal Findings We asked whether DNA damage induces the proteolysis of Htt and if activation of IKK plays a role. We report that treatment of neurons with the DNA damaging agent etoposide or γ-irradiation promotes cleavage of wild type (WT) and mutant Htt, generating N-terminal fragments of 80–90 kDa. This event requires IKKβ and is suppressed by IKKα. Elevated levels of IKKα, or inhibition of IKKβ expression by a specific small hairpin RNA (shRNA) or its activity by sodium salicylate, prevents Htt proteolysis and increases neuronal resistance to DNA damage. Moreover, IKKβ phosphorylates the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL, a modification known to reduce Bcl-xL levels, and activates caspases that can cleave Htt. When IKKβ expression is blocked, etoposide treatment does not decrease Bcl-xL and activation of caspases is diminished. Similar to silencing of IKKβ, increasing the level of Bcl-xL in neurons prevents etoposide-induced caspase activation and Htt proteolysis. Conclusions/Significance These results indicate that DNA damage triggers cleavage of Htt and identify IKKβ as a prominent regulator. Moreover, IKKβ-dependent reduction of Bcl-xL is important in this process. Thus, inhibition of IKKβ may promote neuronal survival in HD as well as other DNA damage-induced neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:19488402

  17. The Molecular Crosstalk between the MET Receptor Tyrosine Kinase and the DNA Damage Response — Biological and Clinical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Medová, Michaela; Aebersold, Daniel M.; Zimmer, Yitzhak

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy remains an imperative treatment modality for numerous malignancies. Enduring significant technical achievements both on the levels of treatment planning and radiation delivery have led to improvements in local control of tumor growth and reduction in healthy tissue toxicity. Nevertheless, resistance mechanisms, which presumably also involve activation of DNA damage response signaling pathways that eventually may account for loco-regional relapse and consequent tumor progression, still remain a critical problem. Accumulating data suggest that signaling via growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases, which are aberrantly expressed in many tumors, may interfere with the cytotoxic impact of ionizing radiation via the direct activation of the DNA damage response, leading eventually to so-called tumor radioresistance. The aim of this review is to overview the current known data that support a molecular crosstalk between the hepatocyte growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase MET and the DNA damage response. Apart of extending well established concepts over MET biology beyond its function as a growth factor receptor, these observations directly relate to the role of its aberrant activity in resistance to DNA damaging agents, such as ionizing radiation, which are routinely used in cancer therapy and advocate tumor sensitization towards DNA damaging agents in combination with MET targeting. PMID:24378750

  18. Utilization of biologically generated acid for drilling fluid damage removal and uniform acid placement across long formation intervals

    SciTech Connect

    Almond, S.W.; Harris, R.E.; Penny, G.S.

    1995-12-31

    A method of drilling damage removal is presented which uses biologically generated acid (BGA) as the stimulation fluid. The BGA solution is not reactive during the actual pumping stage which allows its displacement into the reservoir to be controlled by the relatively low permeability of the near wellbore damage. Catalytic generation of acid occurs at a controlled rate once the BGA has been injected into the formation and results in uniform damage removal around the near wellbore region. The ability of BGA to be generated under a variety of temperature and pressure conditions and the compatibility evaluation of BGA with a variety of commonly used oil and water based drilling muds is first presented to establish some of the operational guidelines for BGA use. Drilling damage removal studies utilizing the modified API linear conductivity flow cell and carbonate material with BGA is presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of this stimulation fluid. Dual core flow test data is then presented which shows BGA`s ability and HCL`s inability to remove drilling damage over long horizontal intervals in carbonate formations.

  19. Induction of the Wnt Antagonist Dickkopf-1 Is Involved in Stress-Induced Hippocampal Damage

    PubMed Central

    Bucci, Domenico; Orlando, Rosamaria; Caruso, Alessandra; Molinaro, Gemma; Cappuccio, Irene; Riozzi, Barbara; Gradini, Roberto; Motolese, Marta; Caraci, Filippo; Copani, Agata; Scaccianoce, Sergio; Melchiorri, Daniela; Bruno, Valeria; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Nicoletti, Ferdinando

    2011-01-01

    The identification of mechanisms that mediate stress-induced hippocampal damage may shed new light into the pathophysiology of depressive disorders and provide new targets for therapeutic intervention. We focused on the secreted glycoprotein Dickkopf-1 (Dkk-1), an inhibitor of the canonical Wnt pathway, involved in neurodegeneration. Mice exposed to mild restraint stress showed increased hippocampal levels of Dkk-1 and reduced expression of β-catenin, an intracellular protein positively regulated by the canonical Wnt signalling pathway. In adrenalectomized mice, Dkk-1 was induced by corticosterone injection, but not by exposure to stress. Corticosterone also induced Dkk-1 in mouse organotypic hippocampal cultures and primary cultures of hippocampal neurons and, at least in the latter model, the action of corticosterone was reversed by the type-2 glucocorticoid receptor antagonist mifepristone. To examine whether induction of Dkk-1 was causally related to stress-induced hippocampal damage, we used doubleridge mice, which are characterized by a defective induction of Dkk-1. As compared to control mice, doubleridge mice showed a paradoxical increase in basal hippocampal Dkk-1 levels, but no Dkk-1 induction in response to stress. In contrast, stress reduced Dkk-1 levels in doubleridge mice. In control mice, chronic stress induced a reduction in hippocampal volume associated with neuronal loss and dendritic atrophy in the CA1 region, and a reduced neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus. Doubleridge mice were resistant to the detrimental effect of chronic stress and, instead, responded to stress with increases in dendritic arborisation and neurogenesis. Thus, the outcome of chronic stress was tightly related to changes in Dkk-1 expression in the hippocampus. These data indicate that induction of Dkk-1 is causally related to stress-induced hippocampal damage and provide the first evidence that Dkk-1 expression is regulated by corticosteroids in the central nervous system

  20. Acetyl-L-carnitine protects neuronal function from alcohol-induced oxidative damage in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Rump, Travis J.; Muneer, P.M. Abdul; Szlachetka, Adam M.; Lamb, Allyson; Haorei, Catherine; Alikunju, Saleena; Xiong, Huangui; Keblesh, James; Liu, Jianuo; Zimmerman, Matthew C.; Jones, Jocelyn; Donohue, Terrence M.; Persidsky, Yuri; Haorah, James

    2011-01-01

    The studies presented here demonstrate the protective effect of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) against alcohol-induced oxidative neuroinflammation, neuronal degeneration, and impaired neurotransmission. Our findings reveal the cellular and biochemical mechanisms of alcohol-induced oxidative damage in various types of brain cells. Chronic ethanol administration to mice caused an increase in inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and 3-nitrotyrosine adduct formation in frontal cortical neurons but not in astrocytes from brains of these animals. Interestingly, alcohol administration caused a rather selective activation of NADPH oxidase (NOX), which, in turn, enhanced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and 4-hydroxynonenal, but these were predominantly localized in astrocytes and microglia. Oxidative damage in glial cells was accompanied by their pronounced activation (astrogliosis) and coincident neuronal loss, suggesting that inflammation in glial cells caused neuronal degeneration. Immunohistochemistry studies indicated that alcohol consumption induced different oxidative mediators in different brain cell types. Thus, nitric oxide was mostly detected in iNOS-expressing neurons, whereas ROS were predominantly generated in NOX-expressing glial cells after alcohol ingestion. Assessment of neuronal activity in ex vivo frontal cortical brain tissue slices from ethanol-fed mice showed a reduction in long-term potentiation synaptic transmission compared with slices from controls. Coadministration of ALC with alcohol showed a significant reduction in oxidative damage and neuronal loss and a restoration of synaptic neurotransmission in this brain region, suggesting that ALC protects brain cells from ethanol-induced oxidative injury. These findings suggest the potential clinical utility of ALC as a neuroprotective agent that prevents alcohol-induced brain damage and development of neurological disorders. PMID:20708681

  1. Beneficial protective effect of pramipexole on light-induced retinal damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Shibagaki, Keiichi; Okamoto, Kazuyoshi; Katsuta, Osamu; Nakamura, Masatsugu

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the effects of pramipexole, a potent dopamine receptor D2/D3 agonist, on light-induced retinal damage in mice, H2O2-induced retinal pigment epithelium ARPE-19 cell injury in humans, and hydroxyl radical scavenging activity in a cell-free system. Pramipexole (0.1 and 1 mg/kg body weight) was orally administered to mice 1 h before light exposure (5000 lux, 2 h). Electrophysiological and morphologic studies were performed to evaluate the effects of the pramipexole on light-induced retinal damage in mice. Pramipexole significantly prevented the reduction of the a- and b-wave electroretinogram (ERG) amplitudes caused by light exposure in a dose-dependent manner. In parallel, damage to the inner and outer segments (IS/OS) of the photoreceptors, loss of photoreceptor nuclei, and the number of Tdt-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells in the outer nuclear layer (ONL) caused by light exposure were notably ameliorated by pramipexole. Additionally, pramipexole suppressed H2O2-induced ARPE-19 cell death in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner. The effect of pramipexole was significant at concentrations of 10(-6) M or higher. Pramipexole also significantly prevented H2O2-induced activation of caspases-3/7 and the intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a concentration-dependent manner ranging from 10(-5) to 10(-3) M. Furthermore, pramipexole increased the scavenging activity toward a hydroxyl radical generated from H2O2 in a Fenton reaction. Our results suggest that pramipexole protects against light-induced retinal damage as an antioxidant and that it may be a novel and effective therapy for retinal degenerative disorders, such as dry age-related macular degeneration.

  2. Micromechanical Modeling of Anisotropic Damage-Induced Permeability Variation in Crystalline Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yifeng; Hu, Shaohua; Zhou, Chuangbing; Jing, Lanru

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a study on the initiation and progress of anisotropic damage and its impact on the permeability variation of crystalline rocks of low porosity. This work was based on an existing micromechanical model considering the frictional sliding and dilatancy behaviors of microcracks and the recovery of degraded stiffness when the microcracks are closed. By virtue of an analytical ellipsoidal inclusion solution, lower bound estimates were formulated through a rigorous homogenization procedure for the damage-induced effective permeability of the microcracks-matrix system, and their predictive limitations were discussed with superconducting penny-shaped microcracks, in which the greatest lower bounds were obtained for each homogenization scheme. On this basis, an empirical upper bound estimation model was suggested to account for the influences of anisotropic damage growth, connectivity, frictional sliding, dilatancy, and normal stiffness recovery of closed microcracks, as well as tensile stress-induced microcrack opening on the permeability variation, with a small number of material parameters. The developed model was calibrated and validated by a series of existing laboratory triaxial compression tests with permeability measurements on crystalline rocks, and applied for characterizing the excavation-induced damage zone and permeability variation in the surrounding granitic rock of the TSX tunnel at the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL) Underground Research Laboratory (URL) in Canada, with an acceptable agreement between the predicted and measured data.

  3. Hepatoprotective Activity of Elephantopus scaber on Alcohol-Induced Liver Damage in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Wan Yong; Yeap, Swee Keong; Ho, Chai Ling; Abdul Rahim, Raha; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu

    2012-01-01

    Elephantopus scaber has been traditionally used as liver tonic. However, the protective effect of E. scaber on ethanol-induced liver damage is still unclear. In this study, we have compared the in vivo hepatoprotective effect of E. scaber with Phyllanthus niruri on the ethanol-induced liver damage in mice. The total phenolic and total flavanoid content of E. scaber ethanol extract were determined in this study. Accelerating serum biochemical profiles (including AST, ALT, ALP, triglyceride, and total bilirubin) associated with fat drop and necrotic body in the liver section were observed in the mice treated with ethanol. Low concentration of E. scaber was able to reduce serum biochemical profiles and the fat accumulation in the liver. Furthermore, high concentration of E. scaber and positive control P. niruri were able to revert the liver damage, which is comparable to the normal control. Added to this, E. scaber did not possess any oral acute toxicity on mice. These results suggest the potential effect of this extract as a hepatoprotective agent towards-ethanol induced liver damage without any oral acute toxicity effect. These activities might be contributed, or at least in part, by its high total phenolic and flavonoid contents. PMID:22973401

  4. DNA damage and oxidative stress induced by acetylsalicylic acid in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Oliván, Leobardo Manuel; Galar-Martínez, Marcela; Islas-Flores, Hariz; García-Medina, Sandra; SanJuan-Reyes, Nely

    2014-08-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory widely used due to its low cost and high effectiveness. This compound has been found in water bodies worldwide and is toxic to aquatic organisms; nevertheless its capacity to induce oxidative stress in bioindicators like Daphnia magna remains unknown. This study aimed to evaluate toxicity in D. magna induced by acetylsalicylic acid in water, using oxidative stress and DNA damage biomarkers. An acute toxicity test was conducted in order to determine the median lethal concentration (48-h LC50) and the concentrations to be used in the subsequent subacute toxicity test in which the following biomarkers were evaluated: lipid peroxidation, oxidized protein content, activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, and level of DNA damage. Lipid peroxidation level and oxidized protein content were significantly increased (p<0.05), and antioxidant enzymes significantly altered with respect to controls; while the DNA damage were significantly increased (p<0.05) too. In conclusion, acetylsalicylic acid induces oxidative stress and DNA damage in D. magna.

  5. Identification of Earthquake Induced Damage Areas Using Fourier Transform and SPOT HRVIR Pan Images.

    PubMed

    Sertel, Elif

    2009-01-01

    A devastating earthquake with a magnitude of Mw 7.4 occurred on the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) of Turkey on August 17, 1999 at 00:01:39 UTC (3:01 a.m. local time). The aim of this study is to propose a new approach to automatically identify earthquake induced damage areas which can provide valuable information to support emergency response and recovery assessment procedures. This research was conducted in the Adapazari inner city, covering a 3 × 3 km area, where 11,373 buildings collapsed as a result of the earthquake. SPOT high resolution visible infrared (HRVIR) Pan images obtained before (25 June 1999) and after (4 October 1999) the earthquake were used in the study. Five steps were employed to conduct the research and these are: (i) geometric and radiometric correction of satellite images, (ii) Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) of pre- and post-earthquake images and filtering the images in frequency domain, (iii) generating difference image using Inverse Fast Fourier Transform (IFFT) pre- and post- earthquake images, (iv) application of level slicing to difference image to identify the earthquake-induced damages, (v) accuracy assessment of the method using ground truth obtained from a 1/5,000 scale damage map. The total accuracy obtained in the research is 80.19 %, illustrating that the proposed method can be successfully used to automatically identify earthquake-induced damage areas.

  6. Plasma-induced-damage of GaAs during etching of refractory metal contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Shul, R.J.; Lovejoy, M.L.; Baca, A.G.; Zolper, J.C.; Rieger, D.J.; Hafich, M.J.; Corless, R.F.; Vartuli, C.R.

    1994-10-01

    The effect of plasma-induced-damage on the majority carrier transport properties of GaAs has been studied by monitoring changes in sheet resistance (R{sub s}) of thin conducting layers under various plasma conditions including etch conditions for refractory metal contacts. R{sub s} determined from transmission line measurements are used to evaluate plasma-induced-damage for electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) and reactive ion etch (RIE) conditions by varying the thickness of doped epitaxial layers. The authors speculate that plasma-induced-damage in the near surface region plays a major role in explaining the damage mechanism observed in this study. Very consistent trends have been observed where R{sub s} increases with increasing ECR and RIE dc-bias, increasing microwave power, and decreasing pressure, thus showing R{sub s} increases as either the ion energy or ion flux increases. The authors have also observed that R{sub s} is lower for samples exposed to the RIE than the ECR, possibly due to higher ion and electron densities generated in the ECR and higher pressures in the RIE. It has also been observed R{sub s} dependence on ECR plasma chemistry where, R{sub s} is lower in SF{sub 6}/Ar plasmas than Ar and N{sub 2} plasmas possibly related to interactions of F or S atoms with the GaAs surface. Moderate anneal temperatures (200 to 500{degrees}C) have shown significant R{sub s} recovery.

  7. Edaravone protect against retinal damage in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Dongqing; Xu, Yidan; Hang, Hui; Liu, Xiaoyi; Chen, Xi; Xie, Ping; Yuan, Songtao; Zhang, Weiwei; Lin, Xiaojun; Liu, Qinghuai

    2014-01-01

    Edaravone (3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one), a free radical scavenger, is used for the clinical treatment of retinal injury. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of edaravone against diabetic retinal damage in the mouse. Diabetic retinopathy in the mouse was induced by injection of streptozotocin. Edaravone was given once-daily and was intraperitoneally (i.p.) treated at a dose of 3 mg/kg from streptozotocin injection to 4 weeks after onset of diabetes. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) damage was evaluated by recording the pattern electroretinogram (ERG). RGCs damage was also detected by Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining, and the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were determined fluorometrically. The expressions of phosporylated-ERK1/2, BDNF, and caspase-3 were determined by Western blot analysis. Retinal levels of ROS, phosphorylated ERK1/2, and cleaved caspase-3 were significantly increased, whereas the expression of BDNF was significantly decreased in the retinas of diabetic mice, compared to nondiabetic mice. Administration of edaravone significantly attenuated diabetes induced RGCs death, upregulation of ROS, ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and cleaved caspase-3 and downregulation of BDNF. These findings suggest that oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in diabetic retinal damage and that systemic administration of edaravone may slow the progression of retinal neuropathy induced by diabetes.

  8. Identification of Earthquake Induced Damage Areas Using Fourier Transform and SPOT HRVIR Pan Images

    PubMed Central

    Sertel, Elif

    2009-01-01

    A devastating earthquake with a magnitude of Mw 7.4 occurred on the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) of Turkey on August 17, 1999 at 00:01:39 UTC (3:01 a.m. local time). The aim of this study is to propose a new approach to automatically identify earthquake induced damage areas which can provide valuable information to support emergency response and recovery assessment procedures. This research was conducted in the Adapazari inner city, covering a 3 × 3 km area, where 11,373 buildings collapsed as a result of the earthquake. SPOT high resolution visible infrared (HRVIR) Pan images obtained before (25 June 1999) and after (4 October 1999) the earthquake were used in the study. Five steps were employed to conduct the research and these are: (i) geometric and radiometric correction of satellite images, (ii) Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) of pre- and post-earthquake images and filtering the images in frequency domain, (iii) generating difference image using Inverse Fast Fourier Transform (IFFT) pre- and post- earthquake images, (iv) application of level slicing to difference image to identify the earthquake-induced damages, (v) accuracy assessment of the method using ground truth obtained from a 1/5,000 scale damage map. The total accuracy obtained in the research is 80.19 %, illustrating that the proposed method can be successfully used to automatically identify earthquake-induced damage areas. PMID:22573966

  9. Detection of DNA damage induced by space radiation in Mir and space shuttle.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Takeo; Ohnishi, Ken; Takahashi, Akihisa; Taniguchi, Yoshitaka; Sato, Masaru; Nakano, Tamotsu; Nagaoka, Shunji

    2002-12-01

    Although physical monitoring of space radiation has been accomplished, we aim to measure exact DNA damage as caused by space radiation. If DNA damage is caused by space radiation, we can detect DNA damage dependent on the length of the space flight periods by using post-labeling methods. To detect DNA damage caused by space radiation, we placed fixed human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells in the Russian Mir space station for 40 days and in an American space shuttle for 9 days. After landing, we labeled space-radiation-induced DNA strand breaks by enzymatic incorporation of [3H]-dATP with terminal deoxyribo-nucleotidyl transferase (TdT). We detected DNA damage as many grains on fixed silver emulsion resulting from beta-rays emitted from 3H-atoms in the nuclei of the cells placed in the Mir-station (J/Mir mission, STS-89), but detected hardly any in the ground control sample. In the space shuttle samples (S/MM-8), the number of cells having many grains was lower than that in the J/Mir mission samples. These results suggest that DNA damage is caused by space radiation and that it is dependent on the length of the space flight.

  10. Induced superficial chondrocyte death reduces catabolic cartilage damage in murine posttraumatic osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minjie; Mani, Sriniwasan B; He, Yao; Hall, Amber M; Xu, Lin; Li, Yefu; Zurakowski, David; Jay, Gregory D; Warman, Matthew L

    2016-08-01

    Joints that have degenerated as a result of aging or injury contain dead chondrocytes and damaged cartilage. Some studies have suggested that chondrocyte death precedes cartilage damage, but how the loss of chondrocytes affects cartilage integrity is not clear. In this study, we examined whether chondrocyte death undermines cartilage integrity in aging and injury using a rapid 3D confocal cartilage imaging technique coupled with standard histology. We induced autonomous expression of diphtheria toxin to kill articular surface chondrocytes in mice and determined that chondrocyte death did not lead to cartilage damage. Moreover, cartilage damage after surgical destabilization of the medial meniscus of the knee was increased in mice with intact chondrocytes compared with animals whose chondrocytes had been killed, suggesting that chondrocyte death does not drive cartilage damage in response to injury. These data imply that chondrocyte catabolism, not death, contributes to articular cartilage damage following injury. Therefore, therapies targeted at reducing the catabolic phenotype may protect against degenerative joint disease. PMID:27427985

  11. A sport-physiological perspective on bird migration: evidence for flight-induced muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Guglielmo, C G; Piersma, T; Williams, T D

    2001-08-01

    Exercise-induced muscle damage is a well-described consequence of strenuous exercise, but its potential importance in the evolution of animal activity patterns is unknown. We used plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity as an indicator of muscle damage to investigate whether the high intensity, long-duration flights of two migratory shorebird species cause muscle damage that must be repaired during stopover. In two years of study, plasma CK activity was significantly higher in migrating western sandpipers (a non-synchronous, short-hop migrant), than in non-migrants. Similarly, in the bar-tailed godwit (a synchronous, long-jump migrant), plasma CK activity was highest immediately after arrival from a 4000-5000km flight from West Africa to The Netherlands, and declined before departure for the arctic breeding areas. Late-arriving godwits had higher plasma CK activity than birds that had been at the stopover site longer. Juvenile western sandpipers making their first southward migration had higher plasma CK activity than adults. These results indicate that muscle damage occurs during migration, and that it is exacerbated in young, relatively untrained birds. However, the magnitude of the increases in plasma CK activity associated with migratory flight were relatively small, suggesting that the level of muscle damage is moderate. Migrants may avoid damage behaviourally, or have efficient biochemical and physiological defences against muscle injury. PMID:11533118

  12. Laser induced fluorescence imaging of thermal damage in polymer matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, W.G.; Meyer, K.E.; Wachter, E.A.; Perl, D.R.; Kulowitch, P.J.

    1997-06-01

    A simple, fluorescence based imaging system has been developed that is capable of identifying regions of thermal damage in polymer matrix composites (PMCs). These materials are playing an increasingly important role in the production of high performance vehicles and aircraft, where their low weight and high mechanical strength, combined with advancements in manufacturing technology, ensure increased use for a variety of applications. Of particular concern in the aerospace industry is the tendency of some PMC materials to become irreversibly damaged when exposed to elevated temperatures. Traditional nondestructive testing (NDT) techniques are capable of detecting physical anomalies such as cracks and delaminations but cannot detect initial heat damage, which occurs on a molecular scale. Spectroscopic techniques such as laser induced fluorescence provide an attractive means for detecting this type of damage and are amenable to imaging large, irregularly shaped surfaces. In this report the authors describe instrumentation capable of rapidly detecting thermal damage in graphite epoxy components and suggest improvements which will enable this technology to make quantitative judgments concerning the mechanical strength properties of heat damaged specimens.

  13. DNA damage-induced activation of CUL4B targets HUWE1 for proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Yi, Juan; Lu, Guang; Li, Li; Wang, Xiaozhen; Cao, Li; Lin, Ming; Zhang, Sha; Shao, Genze

    2015-05-19

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase HUWE1/Mule/ARF-BP1 plays an important role in integrating/coordinating diverse cellular processes such as DNA damage repair and apoptosis. A previous study has shown that HUWE1 is required for the early step of DNA damage-induced apoptosis, by targeting MCL-1 for proteasomal degradation. However, HUWE1 is subsequently inactivated, promoting cell survival and the subsequent DNA damage repair process. The mechanism underlying its regulation during this process remains largely undefined. Here, we show that the Cullin4B-RING E3 ligase (CRL4B) is required for proteasomal degradation of HUWE1 in response to DNA damage. CUL4B is activated in a NEDD8-dependent manner, and ubiquitinates HUWE1 in vitro and in vivo. The depletion of CUL4B stabilizes HUWE1, which in turn accelerates the degradation of MCL-1, leading to increased induction of apoptosis. Accordingly, cells deficient in CUL4B showed increased sensitivity to DNA damage reagents. More importantly, upon CUL4B depletion, these phenotypes can be rescued through simultaneous depletion of HUWE1, consistent with the role of CUL4B in regulating HUWE1. Collectively, these results identify CRL4B as an essential E3 ligase in targeting the proteasomal degradation of HUWE1 in response to DNA damage, and provide a potential strategy for cancer therapy by targeting HUWE1 and the CUL4B E3 ligase.

  14. Investigation of surface damage precursor evolutions and laser-induced damage threshold improvement mechanism during Ion beam etching of fused silica.

    PubMed

    Shi, Feng; Zhong, Yaoyu; Dai, Yifan; Peng, Xiaoqiang; Xu, Mingjin; Sui, Tingting

    2016-09-01

    Surface damage precursor evolution has great influence on laser-induced damage threshold improvement of fused silica surface during Ion beam etching. In this work, a series of ion sputtering experiment are carried out to obtain the evolutions of damage precursors (dot-form microstructures, Polishing-Induced Contamination, Hertz scratches, and roughness). Based on ion sputtering theory, surface damage precursor evolutions are analyzed. The results show that the dot-form microstructures will appear during ion beam etching. But as the ion beam etching depth goes up, the dot-form microstructures can be mitigated. And ion-beam etching can broaden and passivate the Hertz scratches without increasing roughness value. A super-smooth surface (0.238nm RMS) can be obtained finally. The relative content of Fe and Ce impurities both significantly reduce after ion beam etching. The laser-induced damage threshold of fused silica is improved by 34% after ion beam etching for 800nm. Research results can be a reference on using ion beam etching process technology to improve laser-induced damage threshold of fused silica optics. PMID:27607688

  15. Deformation-induced damage and recovery in model hydrogels - A molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zidek, Jan; Milchev, Andrey; Jancar, Josef; Vilgis, Thomas A.

    2016-09-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulation of a model hybrid cross-link hydrogel, we investigate the network damage evolution and the related structure transformations. We model the hydrogel structure as a network-connected assembly of crosslinked clusters whereby deformation-induced damage is considered along with network recovery. The two principal mechanisms involved in hydrogel recovery from deformation include segment hops of the building structure units (segments) between clusters and cluster shape modification. These mechanisms act either instantaneously, or with a certain time delay after the onset of deformation. By elucidating the conditions under which one of the mechanisms prevails, one may design hydrogel materials with a desired response to deformation.

  16. DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction in cell apoptosis induced by nonthermal air plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, G. J.; Lee, J. K.; Kim, W.; Kim, K. T.

    2010-01-11

    Nonthermal plasma is known to induce animal cell death but the mechanism is not yet clear. Here, cellular and biochemical regulation of cell apoptosis is demonstrated for plasma treated cells. Surface type nonthermal air plasma triggered apoptosis of B16F10 mouse melanoma cancer cells causing DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction. Plasma treatment activated caspase-3, apoptosis executioner. The plasma treated cells also accumulated gamma-H2A.X, marker for DNA double strand breaks, and p53 tumor suppressor gene as a response to DNA damage. Interestingly, cytochrome C was released from mitochondria and its membrane potential was changed significantly.

  17. DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction in cell apoptosis induced by nonthermal air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, G. J.; Kim, W.; Kim, K. T.; Lee, J. K.

    2010-01-01

    Nonthermal plasma is known to induce animal cell death but the mechanism is not yet clear. Here, cellular and biochemical regulation of cell apoptosis is demonstrated for plasma treated cells. Surface type nonthermal air plasma triggered apoptosis of B16F10 mouse melanoma cancer cells causing DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction. Plasma treatment activated caspase-3, apoptosis executioner. The plasma treated cells also accumulated gamma-H2A.X, marker for DNA double strand breaks, and p53 tumor suppressor gene as a response to DNA damage. Interestingly, cytochrome C was released from mitochondria and its membrane potential was changed significantly.

  18. A study of ps-laser-induced-damage-threshold in hybrid metal-dielectric mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škoda, Václav; Vanda, Jan

    2014-10-01

    Laser-induced-damage-threshold of two types of metal-dielectric mirrors was tested using a laser apparatus working at 800 nm wavelength with 1 ps pulse length at 1 kHz repetition rate and in 106-on-1 test mode. Four sets of mirror samples with different layer system designs using a multilayer Ta2O5/SiO2 coating on silver or gold metal layer were manufactured. Both BK7 and fused silica substrate materials were used for manufacturing of samples. The measured damage thresholds at 45 deg incidence and P-polarization were compared with computed properties of layer system and used materials.

  19. The calcium-sensing receptor participates in testicular damage in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Wei-Yuan; Tong, Li-Quan; Zhang, Hai-Jun; Cao, Yong-Gang; Wang, Gong-Chen; Zhu, Jin-Zhi; Zhang, Feng; Sun, Xue-Ying; Zhang, Tie-Hui; Zhang, Lin-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Male infertility caused by testicular damage is one of the complications of diabetes mellitus. The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is expressed in testicular tissues and plays a pivotal role in calcium homeostasis by activating cellular signaling pathways, but its role in testicular damage induced by diabetes remains unclear. A diabetic model was established by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 40 mg kg−1) in Wistar rats. Animals then received GdCl3 (an agonist of CaSR, 8.67 mg kg−1), NPS-2390 (an antagonist of CaSR, 0.20 g kg−1), or a combination of both 2 months after STZ injection. Diabetic rats had significantly lower testes weights and serum levels of testosterone compared to healthy rats, indicating testicular damage and dysfunction in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Compared with healthy controls, the testicular tissues of diabetic rats overexpressed the CaSR protein and had higher levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), lower superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity, and higher numbers of apoptotic germ cells. The testicular tissues from diabetic rats also expressed lower levels of Bcl-2 and higher levels of Bax and cleaved caspase-3 in addition to higher phosphorylation rates of c-Jun NH2-terminal protein kinase (JNK), p38, and extracellular signaling-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2. The above parameters could be further increased or aggravated by the administration of GdCl3, but could be attenuated by injection of NPS-2390. In conclusion, the present results indicate that CaSR activation participates in diabetes-induced testicular damage, implying CaSR may be a potential target for protective strategies against diabetes-induced testicular damage and could help to prevent infertility in diabetic men. PMID:26387585

  20. Glucagon-like peptide-1 inhibits angiotensin II-induced mesangial cell damage via protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yuji; Matsui, Takanori; Ojima, Ayako; Nishino, Yuri; Nakashima, Sae; Maeda, Sayaka; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi

    2012-11-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that renin-angiotensin system plays a role in diabetic nephropathy. Recently, we have found that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), one of the incretins, a gut hormone secreted from L cells in the intestine in response to food intake, inhibits advanced glycation end product-induced monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 gene expression in mesangial cells thorugh the interaction with the receptor of GLP-1. However, effects of GLP-1 on angiotensin II-exposed mesangial cells are unknown. This study investigated whether and how GLP-1 blocked the angiotensin II-induced mesangial cell damage in vitro. GLP-1 completely blocked the angiotensin II-induced superoxide generation, NF-κB activation, up-regulation of mRNA levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in mesangial cells, all of which were prevented by the treatments with H-89, an inhibitor of protein kinase A. The present results demonstrated for the first time that GLP-1 blocked the angiotensin II-induced mesangial cell injury by inhibiting superoxide-mediated NF-κB activation via protein kinase C pathway. Our present study suggests that strategies to enhance the biological actions of GLP-1 may be a promising strategy for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  1. Assessing Nezara viridula (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) feeding damage in macadamia nuts by using a biological stain.

    PubMed

    Golden, Mary; Follett, Peter A; Wright, Mark G

    2006-06-01

    Damage caused by southern green stink bug, Nezara viridula (L.), to macadamia nuts, Macadamia integrifolia Maiden & Betche, is normally determined after nuts are harvested and processed, which may be many months after damage occurred in the field. We developed a method using ruthenium red dye to stain stink bug feeding probes and indirectly assess feeding activity in macadamia nuts. By using the staining method, feeding probes were easily detected on the husk, shell, and kernel. Husk probing was highly correlated (0.80-0.90) with feeding and damage to the kernel. Failure rate to detect kernel damage from stained husk probes was generally <6%. The staining method was equally effective for immature and mature nuts; therefore, N. viridula feeding activity can be monitored throughout the season to evaluate pest management tactics and forecast outbreak populations.

  2. DNA-damaging agents in cancer chemotherapy: serendipity and chemical biology.

    PubMed

    Cheung-Ong, Kahlin; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey

    2013-05-23

    DNA-damaging agents have a long history of use in cancer chemotherapy. The full extent of their cellular mechanisms, which is essential to balance efficacy and toxicity, is often unclear. In addition, the use of many anticancer drugs is limited by dose-limiting toxicities as well as the development of drug resistance. Novel anticancer compounds are continually being developed in the hopes of addressing these limitations; however, it is essential to be able to evaluate these compounds for their mechanisms of action. This review covers the current DNA-damaging agents used in the clinic, discusses their limitations, and describes the use of chemical genomics to uncover new information about the DNA damage response network and to evaluate novel DNA-damaging compounds. PMID:23706631

  3. Assessing Nezara viridula (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) feeding damage in macadamia nuts by using a biological stain.

    PubMed

    Golden, Mary; Follett, Peter A; Wright, Mark G

    2006-06-01

    Damage caused by southern green stink bug, Nezara viridula (L.), to macadamia nuts, Macadamia integrifolia Maiden & Betche, is normally determined after nuts are harvested and processed, which may be many months after damage occurred in the field. We developed a method using ruthenium red dye to stain stink bug feeding probes and indirectly assess feeding activity in macadamia nuts. By using the staining method, feeding probes were easily detected on the husk, shell, and kernel. Husk probing was highly correlated (0.80-0.90) with feeding and damage to the kernel. Failure rate to detect kernel damage from stained husk probes was generally <6%. The staining method was equally effective for immature and mature nuts; therefore, N. viridula feeding activity can be monitored throughout the season to evaluate pest management tactics and forecast outbreak populations. PMID:16813317

  4. Molecular dynamics study of accelerated ion-induced shock waves in biological media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vera, Pablo; Mason, Nigel J.; Currell, Fred J.; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2016-09-01

    We present a molecular dynamics study of the effects of carbon- and iron-ion induced shock waves in DNA duplexes in liquid water. We use the CHARMM force field implemented within the MBN Explorer simulation package to optimize and equilibrate DNA duplexes in liquid water boxes of different sizes and shapes. The translational and vibrational degrees of freedom of water molecules are excited according to the energy deposited by the ions and the subsequent shock waves in liquid water are simulated. The pressure waves generated are studied and compared with an analytical hydrodynamics model which serves as a benchmark for evaluating the suitability of the simulation boxes. The energy deposition in the DNA backbone bonds is also monitored as an estimation of biological damage, something which is not possible with the analytical model. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic Cluster Collisions (7th International Symposium)", edited by Gerardo Delgado Barrio, Andrey V. Solov'yov, Pablo Villarreal, Rita Prosmiti.

  5. Molecular dynamics study of accelerated ion-induced shock waves in biological media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vera, Pablo; Mason, Nigel J.; Currell, Fred J.; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2016-09-01

    We present a molecular dynamics study of the effects of carbon- and iron-ion induced shock waves in DNA duplexes in liquid water. We use the CHARMM force field implemented within the MBN Explorer simulation package to optimize and equilibrate DNA duplexes in liquid water boxes of different sizes and shapes. The translational and vibrational degrees of freedom of water molecules are excited according to the energy deposited by the ions and the subsequent shock waves in liquid water are simulated. The pressure waves generated are studied and compared with an analytical hydrodynamics model which serves as a benchmark for evaluating the suitability of the simulation boxes. The energy deposition in the DNA backbone bonds is also monitored as an estimation of biological damage, something which is not possible with the analytical model.

  6. Chronic administration of troxerutin protects mouse kidney against D-galactose-induced oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chan-Min; Ma, Jie-Qiong; Lou, Yao

    2010-10-01

    Troxerutin, a natural bioflavonoid, has been reported to have many benefits and medicinal properties. In this study, we evaluated the protective effect of troxerutin against D-gal-induced oxidative DNA damage in mouse kidney, and explored the potential mechanism of its action. Our data showed that troxerutin significantly decreased levels of urea, uric acid and creatinine in serum and the renal histological injury in D-gal-treated mice. Troxerutin markedly restored Cu/Zn-SOD, CAT and GPx activities in the kidney of D-gal-treated mouse. Furthermore, the increase of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (a marker of oxidative DNA damage) induced by d-gal was effectively suppressed by troxerutin. Internucleosomal DNA ladder fragmentation and the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP) nick-end-labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells in D-gal-treated mice were inhibited by troxerutin, which might be attributed to its antioxidant property by decreasing activities of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NADPH oxidase) and levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In conclusion, these results suggested that troxerutin could protect the mouse kidney against D-gal-induced injury by improving renal function, attenuating histopathologic changes, reducing ROS production, renewing the activities of antioxidant enzymes and decreasing DNA oxidative damage. This study provided novel insights into the protective mechanisms of troxerutin in D-gal-induced kidney injury.

  7. Effects of Traumeel (Tr14) on Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage Response in Healthy Subjects: A Double-Blind RCT

    PubMed Central

    Deuster, Vanessa; Frech, Torsten; Pons-Kühnemann, Jörn; Mooren, Frank-Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The present double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial intended to test whether ingestion of a natural combination medicine (Tr14 tablets) affects serum muscle damage and inflammatory immune response after downhill running. 96 male subjects received Tr14 tablets, which consist of 14 diluted biological and mineral components, or a placebo for 72 h after the exercise test, respectively. Changes in postexercise levels of various serum muscle damage and immunological markers were investigated. The area under the curve with respect to the increase (AUCi) of perceived pain score and creatine kinase (CK) were defined as primary outcome measures. While for CK the p value of the difference between the two groups is borderline, the pain score and muscle strength were not statistically significant. However, a trend towards lower levels of muscle damage (CK, p = 0.05; LDH, p = 0.06) in the Tr14 group was shown. Less pronounced lymphopenia (p = 0.02), a trend towards a lower expression of CD69 count (p = 0.07), and antigen-stimulated ICAM-1 (p = 0.01) were found in the verum group. The Tr14 group showed a tendentially lower increase of neutrophils (p = 0.10), BDNF (p = 0.03), stem cell factor (p = 0.09), and GM-CSF (p = 0.09) to higher levels. The results of the current study indicate that Tr14 seems to limit exercise-induced muscle damage most likely via attenuation of both innate and adaptive immune responses. This study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01912469). PMID:27478305

  8. Organophosphates induce distal axonal damage, but not brain oedema, by inactivating neuropathy target esterase

    SciTech Connect

    Read, David J.; Li Yong; Chao, Moses V.; Cavanagh, John B.; Glynn, Paul

    2010-05-15

    Single doses of organophosphorus compounds (OP) which covalently inhibit neuropathy target esterase (NTE) can induce lower-limb paralysis and distal damage in long nerve axons. Clinical signs of neuropathy are evident 3 weeks post-OP dose in humans, cats and chickens. By contrast, clinical neuropathy in mice following acute dosing with OPs or any other toxic compound has never been reported. Moreover, dosing mice with ethyloctylphosphonofluoridate (EOPF) - an extremely potent NTE inhibitor - causes a different (subacute) neurotoxicity with brain oedema. These observations have raised the possibility that mice are intrinsically resistant to neuropathies induced by acute toxic insult, but may incur brain oedema, rather than distal axonal damage, when NTE is inactivated. Here we provide the first report that hind-limb dysfunction and extensive axonal damage can occur in mice 3 weeks after acute dosing with a toxic compound, bromophenylacetylurea. Three weeks after acutely dosing mice with neuropathic OPs no clinical signs were observed, but distal lesions were present in the longest spinal sensory axons. Similar lesions were evident in undosed nestin-cre:NTEfl/fl mice in which NTE had been genetically-deleted from neural tissue. The extent of OP-induced axonal damage in mice was related to the duration of NTE inactivation and, as reported in chickens, was promoted by post-dosing with phenylmethanesulfonylfluoride. However, phenyldipentylphosphinate, another promoting compound in chickens, itself induced in mice lesions different from the neuropathic OP type. Finally, EOPF induced subacute neurotoxicity with brain oedema in both wild-type and nestin-cre:NTEfl/fl mice indicating that the molecular target for this effect is not neural NTE.

  9. Impact of TLR4 on behavioral and cognitive dysfunctions associated with alcohol-induced neuroinflammatory damage.

    PubMed

    Pascual, María; Baliño, Pablo; Alfonso-Loeches, Silvia; Aragón, Carlos M G; Guerri, Consuelo

    2011-06-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an important role in the innate immune response, and emerging evidence indicates their role in brain injury and neurodegeneration. Our recent results have demonstrated that ethanol is capable of activating glial TLR4 receptors and that the elimination of these receptors in mice protects against ethanol-induced glial activation, induction of inflammatory mediators and apoptosis. This study was designed to assess whether ethanol-induced inflammatory damage causes behavioral and cognitive consequences, and if behavioral alterations are dependent of TLR4 functions. Here we show in mice drinking alcohol for 5months, followed by a 15-day withdrawal period, that activation of the astroglial and microglial cells in frontal cortex and striatum is maintained and that these events are associated with cognitive and anxiety-related behavioral impairments in wild-type (WT) mice, as demonstrated by testing the animals with object memory recognition, conditioned taste aversion and dark and light box anxiety tasks. Mice lacking TLR4 receptors are protected against ethanol-induced inflammatory damage, and behavioral associated effects. We further assess the possibility of the epigenetic modifications participating in short- or long-term behavioral effects associated with neuroinflammatory damage. We show that chronic alcohol treatment decreases H4 histone acetylation and histone acetyltransferases activity in frontal cortex, striatum and hippocampus of WT mice. Alterations in chromatin structure were not observed in TLR4(-/-) mice. These results provide the first evidence of the role that TLR4 functions play in the behavioral consequences of alcohol-induced inflammatory damage and suggest that the epigenetic modifications mediated by TLR4 could contribute to short- or long-term alcohol-induced behavioral or cognitive dysfunctions.

  10. WE-G-BRE-04: Gold Nanoparticle Induced Vasculature Damage for Proton Therapy: Monte Carlo Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y; Paganetti, H; Schuemann, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to investigate the gold nanoparticle (GNP) induced vasculature damage in a proton beam. We compared the results using a clinical proton beam, 6MV photon beam and two kilovoltage photon beams. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were carried out using TOPAS (TOol for PArticle Simulation) to obtain the spatial dose distribution in close proximity to GNPs up to 20μm distance. The spatial dose distribution was used as an input to calculate the additional dose deposited to the blood vessels. For this study, GNP induced vasculature damage is evaluated for three particle sources (proton beam, MV photon beam and kV photon beam), various treatment depths for each particle source, various GNP uptakes and three different vessel diameters (8μm, 14μm and 20μm). Results: The result shows that for kV photon, GNPs induce more dose in the vessel wall for 150kVp photon source than 250kVp. For proton therapy, GNPs cause more dose in the vessel wall at shallower treatment depths. For 6MV photons, GNPs induce more dose in the vessel wall at deeper treatment depths. For the same GNP concentration and prescribed dose, the additional dose at the inner vessel wall is 30% more than the prescribed dose for the kVp photon source, 15% more for the proton source and only 2% more for the 6MV photon source. In addition, the dose from GNPs deceases sharper for proton therapy than kVp photon therapy as the distance from the vessel inner wall increases. Conclusion: We show in this study that GNPs can potentially be used to enhance radiation therapy by causing vasculature damage using clinical proton beams. The GNP induced damage for proton therapy is less than for the kVp photon source but significantly larger than for the clinical MV photon source.

  11. Protection against UVA-induced photooxidative damage in mammalian cell lines expressing increased levels of metallothionein

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, E.J. Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL . Dept. of Biology); Peak, J.G.; Peak, M.J. ); Roth, R.M. . Dept. of Biology)

    1990-01-01

    Metallothionein (MT) is an endogenous low molecular weight protein that is inducible in a variety of eukaryotic cells and has the ability to selectivity bind heavy metal ions such as zinc and the cadmium. Although the exact physiological role of MT is still not understood, there is strong evidence that MT is involved in providing cellular resistance against the damaging effects of heavy metals and in the regulation of intracellular zinc and copper. Recently, it has been demonstrated that MT can scavenge radiation-induced reactive oxygen intermediates in vitro, specifically hydroxyl and superoxide radicals, and because of these observations it has been suggested that MT may provide protection against radiation-induced oxidative stress in vivo. Cell lines expressing increased levels of MT have demonstrated resistance to ionizing radiation, to ultraviolet radiation, and also to various DNA damaging agents including melphalan and cis-diaminedichloroplatinum. It is therefore important to gain some insight into the relationship between cellular MT content and cellular resistance to radiation and other DNA damaging agents. In this study we investigated the role of MT in providing protection against monochromatic 365-nm UVA radiation, which is known to generate intracellular reactive oxygen species that are involved in both DNA damage and cell killing. For this purpose, we used zinc acetate, a potent inducer of MT, to elevate MT levels in V79 Chinese hamster fibroblasts prior to UVA exposure and determined cell survival for uninduced and induced cultures. In order to eliminate any zinc effects other than MT induction, we also isolated and characterized cadmium chloride-resistant clones of V79 cells that have increased steady-state levels of both MT mRNA and protein, and we examined their survival characteristics against 365-nm radiation in the absence of zinc acetate. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  12. DNA damage and estrogenic activity induced by the environmental pollutant 2-nitrotoluene and its metabolite

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Chigusa; Egami, Takashi; Midorikawa, Kaoru; Hiraku, Yusuke; Oikawa, Shinji; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The environmental pollutant 2-nitrotoluene (2-NO2-T) is carcinogenic and reproductively toxic in animals. In this study, we elucidated the mechanisms of its carcinogenicity and reproductive toxicity. Methods We examined DNA damage induced by 2-NO2-T and its metabolite, 2-nitrosotoluene (2-NO-T), using 32P-5′-end-labeled DNA. We measured 8-oxo-7, 8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), an indicator of oxidative DNA damage, in calf thymus DNA and cellular DNA in cultured human leukemia (HL-60) cells treated with 2-NO2-T and 2-NO-T. 8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) gene expression in HL-60 cells was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We examined estrogenic activity using an E-screen assay and a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor. Results In experiments with isolated DNA fragments, 2-NO-T induced oxidative DNA damage in the presence of Cu (II) and β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide disodium salt (reduced form) (NADH), while 2-NO2-T did not. 2-NO-T significantly increased levels of 8-oxodG in HL-60 cells. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis revealed upregulation of OGG1 gene expression induced by 2-NO-T. An E-screen assay using the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 revealed that 2-NO2-T induced estrogen-dependent cell proliferation. In contrast, 2-NO-T decreased the cell number and suppressed 17β-estradiol-induced cell proliferation. The data obtained with the SPR sensor using estrogen receptor α and the estrogen response element supported the results of the E-screen assay. Conclusions Oxidative DNA damage caused by 2-NO-T and estrogen-disrupting effects caused by 2-NO2-T and 2-NO-T may play a role in the reproductive toxicity and carcinogenicity of these entities. PMID:21432561

  13. Sodium Selenite Acts as an Otoprotectant against Neomycin-Induced Hair Cell Damage in a Zebrafish Model

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jiwon; Choi, June; Rah, Yoon Chan; Yoo, Myung Hoon; Oh, Kyoung Ho; Im, Gi Jung; Lee, Seung Hoon; Kwon, Soon Young; Park, Hae-Chul; Chae, Sung Won; Jung, Hak Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Sodium selenite is a trace element essential for many physiological functions in the body. It is involved in various biological processes; it acts as a cofactor for antioxidant enzymes that protect against free radicals and is reported to limit metal-mediated oxidative DNA damage. In the present study, we investigated the effect of sodium selenite on neomycin ototoxicity in wild-type and transgenic zebrafish (Brn3C: EGFP). Five or six days post-fertilization, zebrafish larvae were co-exposed to 125 μM neomycin and various concentrations (10 μM, 100 μM, 250 μM, and 500 μM) of sodium selenite for 1 h. Hair cells within neuromasts of the supraorbital (SO1 and SO2), otic (O1), and occipital (OC1) lateral lines were analyzed by fluorescence microscopy (n = 10 fish per treatment). Hair cell survival was estimated as the ratio of the hair cell numbers in each group compared to those of the control group that were not exposed to neomycin. Apoptosis and hair cell damage of neuromasts were evaluated using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay and 2-[4-(dimethylamino) styryl]-N-ethylpyridinium iodide (DASPEI) assay, respectively. Ultrastructural changes were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Neuromast hair cells were preserved in zebrafish exposed to 125 μM neomycin and 500 μM sodium selenite for 1 h. Sodium selenite protected against neomycin-induced hair cell loss of neuromasts, reduced apoptosis, and prevented zebrafish ultrastructural changes. We propose that sodium selenite protects against neomycin-induced hair cell damage by inhibiting apoptosis, decreasing the disarray of stereocilia, and preventing ultrastructural changes in the neuromast hair cells of the zebrafish. PMID:26974429

  14. Targeting neddylation induces DNA damage and checkpoint activation and sensitizes chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells to alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Paiva, C; Godbersen, J C; Berger, A; Brown, J R; Danilov, A V

    2015-01-01

    Microenvironment-mediated upregulation of the B-cell receptor (BCR) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling in CLL cells resident in the lymph node and bone marrow promotes apoptosis evasion and clonal expansion. We recently reported that MLN4924 (pevonedistat), an investigational agent that inhibits the NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE), abrogates stromal-mediated NF-κB pathway activity and CLL cell survival. However, the NAE pathway also assists degradation of multiple other substrates. MLN4924 has been shown to induce DNA damage and cell cycle arrest, but the importance of this mechanism in primary neoplastic B cells has not been studied. Here we mimicked the lymph node microenvironment using CD40 ligand (CD40L)-expressing stroma and interleukin-21 (IL-21) to find that inducing proliferation of the primary CLL cells conferred enhanced sensitivity to NAE inhibition. Treatment of the CD40-stimulated CLL cells with MLN4924 resulted in deregulation of Cdt1, a DNA replication licensing factor, and cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p27. This led to DNA damage, checkpoint activation and G2 arrest. Alkylating agents bendamustine and chlorambucil enhanced MLN4924-mediated DNA damage and apoptosis. These events were more prominent in cells stimulated with IL-21 compared with CD40L alone, indicating that, following NAE inhibition, the culture conditions were able to direct CLL cell fate from an NF-κB inhibition to a Cdt1 induction program. Our data provide insight into the biological consequences of targeting NAE in CLL and serves as further rationale for studying the clinical activity of MLN4924 in CLL, particularly in combination with alkylating agents. PMID:26158513

  15. Sodium Selenite Acts as an Otoprotectant against Neomycin-Induced Hair Cell Damage in a Zebrafish Model.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jiwon; Choi, June; Rah, Yoon Chan; Yoo, Myung Hoon; Oh, Kyoung Ho; Im, Gi Jung; Lee, Seung Hoon; Kwon, Soon Young; Park, Hae-Chul; Chae, Sung Won; Jung, Hak Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Sodium selenite is a trace element essential for many physiological functions in the body. It is involved in various biological processes; it acts as a cofactor for antioxidant enzymes that protect against free radicals and is reported to limit metal-mediated oxidative DNA damage. In the present study, we investigated the effect of sodium selenite on neomycin ototoxicity in wild-type and transgenic zebrafish (Brn3C: EGFP). Five or six days post-fertilization, zebrafish larvae were co-exposed to 125 μM neomycin and various concentrations (10 μM, 100 μM, 250 μM, and 500 μM) of sodium selenite for 1 h. Hair cells within neuromasts of the supraorbital (SO1 and SO2), otic (O1), and occipital (OC1) lateral lines were analyzed by fluorescence microscopy (n = 10 fish per treatment). Hair cell survival was estimated as the ratio of the hair cell numbers in each group compared to those of the control group that were not exposed to neomycin. Apoptosis and hair cell damage of neuromasts were evaluated using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay and 2-[4-(dimethylamino) styryl]-N-ethylpyridinium iodide (DASPEI) assay, respectively. Ultrastructural changes were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Neuromast hair cells were preserved in zebrafish exposed to 125 μM neomycin and 500 μM sodium selenite for 1 h. Sodium selenite protected against neomycin-induced hair cell loss of neuromasts, reduced apoptosis, and prevented zebrafish ultrastructural changes. We propose that sodium selenite protects against neomycin-induced hair cell damage by inhibiting apoptosis, decreasing the disarray of stereocilia, and preventing ultrastructural changes in the neuromast hair cells of the zebrafish.

  16. Targeting neddylation induces DNA damage and checkpoint activation and sensitizes chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells to alkylating agents

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, C; Godbersen, J C; Berger, A; Brown, J R; Danilov, A V

    2015-01-01

    Microenvironment-mediated upregulation of the B-cell receptor (BCR) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling in CLL cells resident in the lymph node and bone marrow promotes apoptosis evasion and clonal expansion. We recently reported that MLN4924 (pevonedistat), an investigational agent that inhibits the NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE), abrogates stromal-mediated NF-κB pathway activity and CLL cell survival. However, the NAE pathway also assists degradation of multiple other substrates. MLN4924 has been shown to induce DNA damage and cell cycle arrest, but the importance of this mechanism in primary neoplastic B cells has not been studied. Here we mimicked the lymph node microenvironment using CD40 ligand (CD40L)-expressing stroma and interleukin-21 (IL-21) to find that inducing proliferation of the primary CLL cells conferred enhanced sensitivity to NAE inhibition. Treatment of the CD40-stimulated CLL cells with MLN4924 resulted in deregulation of Cdt1, a DNA replication licensing factor, and cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p27. This led to DNA damage, checkpoint activation and G2 arrest. Alkylating agents bendamustine and chlorambucil enhanced MLN4924-mediated DNA damage and apoptosis. These events were more prominent in cells stimulated with IL-21 compared with CD40L alone, indicating that, following NAE inhibition, the culture conditions were able to direct CLL cell fate from an NF-κB inhibition to a Cdt1 induction program. Our data provide insight into the biological consequences of targeting NAE in CLL and serves as further rationale for studying the clinical activity of MLN4924 in CLL, particularly in combination with alkylating agents. PMID:26158513

  17. Dietary spices protect against hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage and inhibit nicotine-induced cancer cell migration.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, R; Kanthimathi, M S

    2012-10-01

    Spices are rich sources of antioxidants due to the presence of phenols and flavonoids. In this study, the DNA protecting activity and inhibition of nicotine-induced cancer cell migration of 9 spices were analysed. Murine fibroblasts (3T3-L1) and human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells were pre-treated with spice extracts and then exposed to H₂O₂ and nicotine. The comet assay was used to analyse the DNA damage. Among the 9 spices, ginger, at 50 μg/ml protected against 68% of DNA damage in 3T3-L1 cells. Caraway, cumin and fennel showed statistically significant (p<0.05) DNA protecting activity. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with nicotine induced cell migration, whereas pre-treatment with spices reduced this migration. Pepper, long pepper and ginger exhibited a high rate of inhibition of cell migration. The results of this study prove that spices protect DNA and inhibit cancer cell migration. PMID:25005983

  18. A Robust Damage-Reporting Strategy for Polymeric Materials Enabled by Aggregation-Induced Emission

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Microscopic damage inevitably leads to failure in polymers and composite materials, but it is difficult to detect without the aid of specialized equipment. The ability to enhance the detection of small-scale damage prior to catastrophic material failure is important for improving the safety and reliability of critical engineering components, while simultaneously reducing life cycle costs associated with regular maintenance and inspection. Here, we demonstrate a simple, robust, and sensitive fluorescence-based approach for autonomous detection of damage in polymeric materials and composites enabled by aggregation-induced emission (AIE). This simple, yet powerful system relies on a single active component, and the general mechanism delivers outstanding performance in a wide variety of materials with diverse chemical and mechanical properties. PMID:27725956

  19. Facilitation of DNA damage-induced apoptosis by endoplasmic reticulum protein mitsugumin23

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, Tetsuo; Sasaki, Nozomi; Nishi, Miyuki; Takeshima, Hiroshi

    2010-02-05

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) emanates context-dependent signals, thereby mediating cellular response to a variety of stresses. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms have been enigmatic. To better understand the signaling capacity of the ER, we focused on roles played by mitsugumin23 (MG23), a protein residing predominantly in this organelle. Overexpression of MG23 in human embryonic kidney 293T cells specifically enhanced apoptosis triggered by etoposide, a DNA-damaging anti-cancer drug. Conversely, genetic deletion of MG23 reduced susceptibility of thymocytes to DNA damage-induced apoptosis, which was demonstrated by whole-body irradiation experiments. In this setting, induction of the tumor-suppressor gene p53 was attenuated in MG23-knockout thymocytes as compared with their wild-type counterparts, consistent with the elevated radioresistance. It is therefore suggested that MG23 is an essential component of ER-generated lethal signals provoked upon DNA damage, specifying cell fate under pathophysiological conditions.

  20. Plant Nuclei Move to Escape Ultraviolet-Induced DNA Damage and Cell Death1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hidema, Jun; Tamura, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    A striking feature of plant nuclei is their light-dependent movement. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf mesophyll cells, the nuclei move to the side walls of cells within 1 to 3 h after blue-light reception, although the reason is unknown. Here, we show that the nuclear movement is a rapid and effective strategy to avoid ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced damages. Mesophyll nuclei were positioned on the cell bottom in the dark, but sudden exposure of these cells to UVB caused severe DNA damage and cell death. The damage was remarkably reduced in both blue-light-treated leaves and mutant leaves defective in the actin cytoskeleton. Intriguingly, in plants grown under high-light conditions, the mesophyll nuclei remained on the side walls even in the dark. These results suggest that plants have two strategies for reducing UVB exposure: rapid nuclear movement against acute exposure and nuclear anchoring against chronic exposure. PMID:26681797

  1. Modulation of ischemia-induced NMDAR1 activation by environmental enrichment decreases oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Briones, Teresita L; Rogozinska, Magdalena; Woods, Julie

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we examined whether enriched environment (EE) housing has direct neuroprotective effects on oxidative damage following transient global cerebral ischemia. Fifty-two adult male Wistar rats were included in the study and received either ischemia or sham surgery. Once fully awake, rats in each group were randomly assigned to either: EE housing or socially paired housing (CON). Animals remained in their assigned environment for 7 days, and then were killed. Our data showed that glutamate receptor expression was significantly higher in the hippocampus of the ischemia CON group than in the ischemia EE group. Furthermore, the oxidative DNA damage, protein oxidation, and neurodegeneration in the hippocampus of the ischemia CON group were significantly increased compared to the ischemia EE group. These results suggest that EE housing possibly modulated the ischemia-induced glutamate excitotoxicity, which then attenuated the oxidative damage and neurodegeneration in the ischemia EE rats.

  2. Correlation of Laser-Induced Damage to Phase Objects in Bulk Fused Silica

    SciTech Connect

    Nostrand, M C; Cerjan, C J; Johnson, M A; Suratwala, T I; Weiland, T L; Sell, W D; Vickers, J L; Luthi, R L; Stanley, J R; Parham, T G; Thorsness, C B

    2004-11-10

    The Optical Sciences Laser (OSL) Upgrade facility, described in last year's proceedings, is a kJ-class, large aperture (100cm{sup 2}) laser system that can accommodate prototype optical components for large-scale inertial confinement fusion lasers. High-energy operation of such lasers is often limited by damage to the optical components. Recent experiments on the OSL Upgrade facility using fused silica components at 4 J/cm{sup 2} (351-nm, 3-ns) have created output surface and bulk damage sites that have been correlated to phase objects in the bulk of the material. Optical Path Difference (OPD) measurements of the phase defects indicate the probability of laser-induced damage is strongly dependent on OPD.

  3. Damage to amino acid–nucleotide pairs induced by 1 eV electrons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zejun; Mason, Nigel J.; Sanche, Leon

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the role of two selected amino acids, glycine and arginine, on damage induced to a short chain of single stranded DNA, the tetramer GCAT, during 1 eV electron exposure. At this energy, DNA has a high cross section for DNA damage via exclusively dissociative electron attachment. Surprisingly, at low ratios of glycine : GCAT, an increase in the total fragmentation yield is observed, whilst at higher ratios, glycine and arginine appear to protect DNA from the direct action of electrons. In addition, binding energies were calculated by molecular modelling of the interactions between these amino acids and either nucleobases or nucleotides. These binding energies appear to be related to the ability of amino acids to protect DNA against low energy electron damage. PMID:20563347

  4. Plant Nuclei Move to Escape Ultraviolet-Induced DNA Damage and Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Iwabuchi, Kosei; Hidema, Jun; Tamura, Kentaro; Takagi, Shingo; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2016-02-01

    A striking feature of plant nuclei is their light-dependent movement. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf mesophyll cells, the nuclei move to the side walls of cells within 1 to 3 h after blue-light reception, although the reason is unknown. Here, we show that the nuclear movement is a rapid and effective strategy to avoid ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced damages. Mesophyll nuclei were positioned on the cell bottom in the dark, but sudden exposure of these cells to UVB caused severe DNA damage and cell death. The damage was remarkably reduced in both blue-light-treated leaves and mutant leaves defective in the actin cytoskeleton. Intriguingly, in plants grown under high-light conditions, the mesophyll nuclei remained on the side walls even in the dark. These results suggest that plants have two strategies for reducing UVB exposure: rapid nuclear movement against acute exposure and nuclear anchoring against chronic exposure.

  5. Investigation of laser induced damage threshold measurement with single-shot on thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhichao; Zheng, Yi; Pan, Feng; Lin, Qi; Ma, Ping; Wang, Jian

    2016-09-01

    A method for rapid determination of laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) of optical coatings is proposed and investigated in this paper. By use of this method, the LIDT of thin film can be rapidly obtained by only one shot. The modulation of laser beam profile, which is considered as a negative factor in conventional LIDT test, is utilized in this method. Basing on image processing technique, the damage information could be extracted from the comparison between the damage pattern and beam intensity distribution in the test region. The applicability and repeatability of this testing method has been verified on three type reflectors, HfO2/SiO2, HfO2/Al2O3 and Ta2O5/SiO2. In addition, the experimental results showed that appropriate beam size, laser energy and image compression ratio are the key factors to ensure a high accuracy of LIDT.

  6. Process-induced damage evolution and management in resin transfer molding of composite panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuan, Yean-Der

    2000-10-01

    Woven fiber composites made by resin transfer molding process are currently used as the primary and secondary load bearing structures in automotive and aircraft industries. A variety of defects could be evolved during the injection stage and the curing stage of the process. Improper injection conditions or unsound tool design would result in process induced damage in the form of dry spots, incomplete filling, or displacement of the fiber. In the curing stage, the process parameters of heating and cooling rates, and the temperature level at each element of the curing cycle have direct effects on the development of internal residual stresses, and shape distortion due to warpage. The work in this dissertation aims at developing numerical models to predict, characterize, and minimize process-induced damage during both the injection stage and curing stage in RTM process for woven-fiber composites. A control volume technique based on the finite difference method is used to characterize the flow behavior in resin transfer molding (RTM) of composite structures. Resin flow through fiber mats is modeled as a two-phase flow through porous media. Experimental results on flow behavior of EPON 826 epoxy resin into irregular mold cavity with fiberglass mats agree well with the present numerical simulation. Parametric analysis of several case studies using developed model illustrates the effectiveness of the flow model in investigating the flow pattern, mold filling time, dry spots formulation, and pressure distribution inside the mold. A numerical model describing the evolution of process-induced damage during curing in molded composite panels was developed. The effects of thermo-mechanical and thermo-chemical responses of the material on the evolution of damage during resin transfer molding of the panels are quantified. The developed numerical model in conjunction with an optimization module based on Simulated Annealing (SA) scheme form a useful tool for conducting a parametric

  7. Gravity-induced rock mass damage related to large en masse rockslides: Evidence from Vajont

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paronuzzi, Paolo; Bolla, Alberto

    2015-04-01

    The Vajont landslide is a well-known, reservoir-induced slope failure that occurred on 9 October 1963 and was characterized by an 'en masse' sliding motion that triggered various large waves, determining catastrophic consequences for the nearby territory and adjacent villages. During the Vajont dam construction, and especially after the disaster, some researchers identified widespread field evidence of heavy rock mass damage involving the presumed prehistoric rockslide and/or the 1963 failed mass. This paper describes evidence of heavy gravitational damage, including (i) folding, (ii) fracturing, (iii) faulting, and (iv) intact rock disintegration. The gravity-induced rock mass damage (GRMD) characterizes the remnants of the basal shear zone, still resting on the large detachment surface, and the 1963 failed rock mass. The comprehensive geological study of the 1963 Vajont landslide, based on the recently performed geomechanical survey (2006-present) and on the critical analysis of the past photographic documentation (1959-1964), allows us to recognize that most GRMD evidence is related to the prehistoric multistage Mt. Toc rockslide. The 1963 catastrophic en masse remobilization induced an increase to the prehistoric damage, reworking preexisting structures and creating additional gravity-driven features (folds, fractures, faults, and rock fragmentation). The gravity-induced damage was formed during the slope instability phases that preceded the collapse (static or quasi-static GRMD) and also as a consequence of the sliding motion and of the devastating impact between the failed blocks (dynamic GRMD). Gravitational damage originated various types of small drag folds such as flexures, concentric folds, chevron, and kink-box folds, all having a radius of 1-5 m. Large buckle folds (radius of 10-50 m) are related to the dynamic damage and were formed during the en masse motion as a consequence of deceleration and impact processes that involved the sliding mass. Prior

  8. Protective effects of carvacrol and pomegranate against methotrexate-induced intestinal damage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Türkcü, Gül; Alabalık, Ulaş; Keleş, Ayşe Nur; Bozkurt, Mehtap; İbiloğlu, İbrahim; Fırat, Uğur; Büyükbayram, Hüseyin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this experimental study was to evaluate the efficacy of carvacrol (CVR) and pomegranate (PMG) against methotrexate (MTX)-induced intestinal damage using histopathological and immunohistochemical techniques. Methods: Thirty-two male Sprague-Dawley rats, weighing 195-250 g, were divided into four groups: control, MTX treatment alone, MTX plus CVR and MTX plus PMG. A single dose of CVR (73 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally to group III on the first day of the experiment, PMG (225 mg/kg/day) was administered orogastrically (with a gavage needle) once daily for 7 days and a single dose of MTX (20 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally on the second day of the experiment. Intestinal tissues were obtained on 8th day, and examined for villus damage, crypt damage, and inflammation. Ki-67 and Caspase 3 staining was used for immunohistochemical evaluation. Results: MTX treatment induced villus shortening and fusion, epithelial atrophy, crypt loss, inflammatory infiltrate in the lamina propria, and goblet cell depletion. The CVR and PMG decreased the severity of intestinal damage caused by MTX treatment. In the MTX-received group, significant inflammatory cell infiltration was observed in the lamina propria. Compared to the MTX-received group, the PMG and CVR groups showed less villus and crypt damage and less inflammation in the lamina propria. Fewer Ki-67 positive cells were observed in the crypts of the MTX-received groups compared to the control group. There were more Ki-67 positive cells in the CVR and PMG groups compared to MTX group. The MTX-received group exhibited more caspase-3 positive cells than the control group, and the number of caspase-3 positive cells were decreased in the CVR and PMG treated groups. Conclusion: This study is the first to show that PMG and CVR decrease MTX-related damage and apoptotic activity in intestinal tissue. PMID:26629037

  9. Ultrasonic Assessment of Impact-Induced Damage and Microcracking in Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liaw, Benjamin; Zeichner, Glenn; Liu, Yanxiong; Bowles, Kenneth J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The main objective of this NASA FAR project is to conduct ultrasonic assessment of impact-induced damage and microcracking in polymer matrix composites at various temperatures. It is believed that the proposed study of impact damage assessment on polymer matrix composites will benefit several NASA's missions and current interests, such as ballistic impact testing of composite fan containment and high strain rate deformation modeling of polymer matrix composites. Currently, impact-induced delamination and fracture in 6061-T6 aluminum/cast acrylic sandwich plates adhered by epoxy were generated in an instrumented drop-weight impact machine. Although only a small dent was produced on the aluminum side when a hemispherical penetrator tup was dropped onto it from a couple of inches, a large ring of delamination at the interface was observed. The delamination damage was often accompanied by severe shattering in the acrylic substratum. Damage patterns in the acrylic layer include radial and ring cracks and, together with delamination at the interface, may cause peeling-off of acrylic material from the sandwich plate. Theory of stress-wave propagation can be used to explain these damage patterns. The impact tests were conducted at various temperatures. The results also show clearly that temperature effect is very important in impact damage. For pure cast acrylic nil-ductile transition (NDT) occurs between 185-195 F Excessive impact energy was dissipated into fracture energy when tested at temperature below this range or through plastic deformation when tested at temperature above the NDT temperature. Results from this study will be used as baseline data for studying fiber-metal laminates, such as GLARE and ARALL for advanced aeronautical and astronautical applications.

  10. DNA damage-induced metaphase I arrest is mediated by the spindle assembly checkpoint and maternal age

    PubMed Central

    Marangos, Petros; Stevense, Michelle; Niaka, Konstantina; Lagoudaki, Michaela; Nabti, Ibtissem; Jessberger, Rolf; Carroll, John

    2015-01-01

    In mammalian oocytes DNA damage can cause chromosomal abnormalities that potentially lead to infertility and developmental disorders. However, there is little known about the response of oocytes to DNA damage. Here we find that oocytes with DNA damage arrest at metaphase of the first meiosis (MI). The MI arrest is induced by the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) because inhibiting the SAC overrides the DNA damage-induced MI arrest. Furthermore, this MI checkpoint is compromised in oocytes from aged mice. These data lead us to propose that the SAC is a major gatekeeper preventing the progression of oocytes harbouring DNA damage. The SAC therefore acts to integrate protection against both aneuploidy and DNA damage by preventing production of abnormal mature oocytes and subsequent embryos. Finally, we suggest escaping this DNA damage checkpoint in maternal ageing may be one of the causes of increased chromosome anomalies in oocytes and embryos from older mothers. PMID:26522734

  11. DNA damage-induced metaphase I arrest is mediated by the spindle assembly checkpoint and maternal age.

    PubMed

    Marangos, Petros; Stevense, Michelle; Niaka, Konstantina; Lagoudaki, Michaela; Nabti, Ibtissem; Jessberger, Rolf; Carroll, John

    2015-01-01

    In mammalian oocytes DNA damage can cause chromosomal abnormalities that potentially lead to infertility and developmental disorders. However, there is little known about the response of oocytes to DNA damage. Here we find that oocytes with DNA damage arrest at metaphase of the first meiosis (MI). The MI arrest is induced by the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) because inhibiting the SAC overrides the DNA damage-induced MI arrest. Furthermore, this MI checkpoint is compromised in oocytes from aged mice. These data lead us to propose that the SAC is a major gatekeeper preventing the progression of oocytes harbouring DNA damage. The SAC therefore acts to integrate protection against both aneuploidy and DNA damage by preventing production of abnormal mature oocytes and subsequent embryos. Finally, we suggest escaping this DNA damage checkpoint in maternal ageing may be one of the causes of increased chromosome anomalies in oocytes and embryos from older mothers. PMID:26522734

  12. Chromatin Modifications during Repair of Environmental Exposure-Induced DNA Damage: A Potential Mechanism for Stable Epigenetic Alterations

    PubMed Central

    O’Hagan, Heather M.

    2014-01-01

    Exposures to environmental toxicants and toxins cause epigenetic changes that likely play a role in the development of diseases associated with exposure. The mechanism behind these exposure-induced epigenetic changes is currently unknown. One commonality between most environmental exposures is that they cause DNA damage either directly or through causing an increase in reactive oxygen species, which can damage DNA. Like transcription, DNA damage repair must occur in the context of chromatin requiring both histone modifications and ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling. These chromatin changes aid in DNA damage accessibility and signaling. Several proteins and complexes involved in epigenetic silencing during both development and cancer have been found to be localized to sites of DNA damage. The chromatin-based response to DNA damage is considered a transient event, with chromatin being restored to normal as DNA damage repair is completed. However, in individuals chronically exposed to environmental toxicants or with chronic inflammatory disease, repeated DNA damage-induced chromatin rearrangement may ultimately lead to permanent epigenetic alterations. Understanding the mechanism behind exposure-induced epigenetic changes will allow us to develop strategies to prevent or reverse these changes. This review focuses on epigenetic changes and DNA damage induced by environmental exposures, the chromatin changes that occur around sites of DNA damage, and how these transient chromatin changes may lead to heritable epigenetic alterations at sites of chronic exposure. PMID:24259318

  13. Paclitaxel-induced epithelial damage and ectopic MMP-13 expression promotes neurotoxicity in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Lisse, Thomas S; Middleton, Leah J; Pellegrini, Adriana D; Martin, Paige B; Spaulding, Emily L; Lopes, Olivia; Brochu, Elizabeth A; Carter, Erin V; Waldron, Ashley; Rieger, Sandra

    2016-04-12

    Paclitaxel is a microtubule-stabilizing chemotherapeutic agent that is widely used in cancer treatment and in a number of curative and palliative regimens. Despite its beneficial effects on cancer, paclitaxel also damages healthy tissues, most prominently the peripheral sensory nervous system. The mechanisms leading to paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy remain elusive, and therapies that prevent or alleviate this condition are not available. We established a zebrafish in vivo model to study the underlying mechanisms and to identify pharmacological agents that may be developed into therapeutics. Both adult and larval zebrafish displayed signs of paclitaxel neurotoxicity, including sensory axon degeneration and the loss of touch response in the distal caudal fin. Intriguingly, studies in zebrafish larvae showed that paclitaxel rapidly promotes epithelial damage and decreased mechanical stress resistance of the skin before induction of axon degeneration. Moreover, injured paclitaxel-treated zebrafish skin and scratch-wounded human keratinocytes (HEK001) display reduced healing capacity. Epithelial damage correlated with rapid accumulation of fluorescein-conjugated paclitaxel in epidermal basal keratinocytes, but not axons, and up-regulation of matrix-metalloproteinase 13 (MMP-13, collagenase 3) in the skin. Pharmacological inhibition of MMP-13, in contrast, largely rescued paclitaxel-induced epithelial damage and neurotoxicity, whereas MMP-13 overexpression in zebrafish embryos rendered the skin vulnerable to injury under mechanical stress conditions. Thus, our studies provide evidence that the epidermis plays a critical role in this condition, and we provide a previously unidentified candidate for therapeutic interventions. PMID:27035978

  14. Spatiotemporal kinetics of γ-H2AX protein on charged particles induced DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, H.; Chang, H. C.; Cho, I. C.; Chen, C. H.; Liu, C. S.; Chou, W. T.

    2014-08-01

    In several researches, it has been demonstrated that charged particles can induce more complex DNA damages. These complex damages have higher ability to cause the cell death or cell carcinogenesis. For this reason, clarifying the DNA repair mechanism after charged particle irradiation plays an important role in the development of charged particle therapy and space exploration. Unfortunately, the detail spatiotemporal kinetic of DNA damage repair is still unclear. In this study, we used γ-H2AX protein to investigate the spatiotemporal kinetics of DNA double strand breaks in alpha-particle irradiated HeLa cells. The result shows that the intensity of γ-H2AX foci increased gradually, and reached to its maximum at 30 min after irradiation. A good linear relationship can be observed between foci intensity and radiation dose. After 30 min, the γ-H2AX foci intensity was decreased with time passed, but remained a large portion (∼50%) at 48 h passed. The data show that the dissolution rate of γ-H2AX foci agreed with two components DNA repairing model. These results suggest that charged particles can induce more complex DNA damages and causing the retardation of DNA repair.

  15. Benefits of dietary phytochemical supplementation on eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage: Is including antioxidants enough?

    PubMed

    Pereira Panza, Vilma Simões; Diefenthaeler, Fernando; da Silva, Edson Luiz

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this review was to critically discuss studies that investigated the effects of supplementation with dietary antioxidant phytochemicals on recovery from