Science.gov

Sample records for biological drug products

  1. 37 CFR 1.775 - Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. 1.775 Section 1.775 Patents... Review § 1.775 Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. (a) If a determination is made pursuant to § 1.750 that a patent for a human drug,...

  2. 37 CFR 1.775 - Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. 1.775 Section 1.775 Patents... Review § 1.775 Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. (a) If a determination is made pursuant to § 1.750 that a patent for a human drug,...

  3. 37 CFR 1.775 - Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. 1.775 Section 1.775 Patents... Review § 1.775 Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. (a) If a determination is made pursuant to § 1.750 that a patent for a human drug,...

  4. 37 CFR 1.775 - Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. 1.775 Section 1.775 Patents... Review § 1.775 Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. (a) If a determination is made pursuant to § 1.750 that a patent for a human drug,...

  5. 37 CFR 1.775 - Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. 1.775 Section 1.775 Patents... Review § 1.775 Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. (a) If a determination is made pursuant to § 1.750 that a patent for a human drug,...

  6. 78 FR 58311 - Complex Issues in Developing Drug and Biological Products for Rare Diseases; Public Workshop...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Complex Issues in Developing Drug and Biological Products... announcing the following public workshop entitled ``Complex Issues in Developing Drug and Biological Products for Rare Diseases.'' The purpose of the public workshop is twofold: To discuss complex issues...

  7. Considerations of the chemical biology of microbial natural products provide an effective drug discovery strategy.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyukjae; Oh, Dong-Chan

    2015-09-01

    Conventional approaches to natural product drug discovery rely mainly on random searches for bioactive compounds using bioassays. These traditional approaches do not incorporate a chemical biology perspective. Searching for bioactive molecules using a chemical and biological rationale constitutes a powerful search paradigm. Here, the authors review recent examples of the discovery of bioactive natural products based on chemical and biological interactions between hosts and symbionts, and propose this method provides a more effective means of exploring natural chemical diversity and eventually of discovering new drugs.

  8. 78 FR 67985 - Supplemental Applications Proposing Labeling Changes for Approved Drugs and Biological Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-13

    ...,'' 30 FR 993, January 30, 1965). Over the years, FDA has clarified the types of labeling changes that...''; final rule, 50 FR 7452 at 7470, February 22, 1985). In 2006, FDA amended its regulations governing the... Human Prescription Drug and Biological Products''; final rule, 71 FR 3922, January 24, 2006)....

  9. Postmarketing safety reports for human drug and biological products; electronic submission requirements. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-06-10

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is amending its postmarketing safety reporting regulations for human drug and biological products to require that persons subject to mandatory reporting requirements submit safety reports in an electronic format that FDA can process, review, and archive. FDA is taking this action to improve the Agency's systems for collecting and analyzing postmarketing safety reports. The change will help the Agency to more rapidly review postmarketing safety reports, identify emerging safety problems, and disseminate safety information in support of FDA's public health mission. In addition, the amendments will be a key element in harmonizing FDA's postmarketing safety reporting regulations with international standards for the electronic submission of safety information.

  10. Content and format of labeling for human prescription drug and biological products; requirements for pregnancy and lactation labeling. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-12-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending its regulations governing the content and format of the "Pregnancy," "Labor and delivery," and "Nursing mothers" subsections of the "Use in Specific Populations" section of the labeling for human prescription drug and biological products. The final rule requires the removal of the pregnancy categories A, B, C, D, and X from all human prescription drug and biological product labeling. For human prescription drug and biological products subject to the Agency's 2006 Physician Labeling Rule, the final rule requires that the labeling include a summary of the risks of using a drug during pregnancy and lactation, a discussion of the data supporting that summary, and relevant information to help health care providers make prescribing decisions and counsel women about the use of drugs during pregnancy and lactation. The final rule eliminates the "Labor and delivery" subsection because information about labor and delivery is included in the "Pregnancy" subsection. The final rule requires that the labeling include relevant information about pregnancy testing, contraception, and infertility for health care providers prescribing for females and males of reproductive potential. The final rule creates a consistent format for providing information about the risks and benefits of prescription drug and/or biological product use during pregnancy and lactation and by females and males of reproductive potential. These revisions will facilitate prescriber counseling for these populations.

  11. 75 FR 33312 - Indexing Structured Product Labeling for Human Prescription Drug and Biological Products; Request...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ... categories of information in product labeling for use as terms to search repositories of approved... clinical decision support tools and electronic prescribing systems to rapidly search and sort product... consistently to enable comprehensive searches to find all relevant information, including appropriate...

  12. Propolis: A Complex Natural Product with a Plethora of Biological Activities That Can Be Explored for Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Carvalho, Ricardo; Baltazar, Fátima; Almeida-Aguiar, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The health industry has always used natural products as a rich, promising, and alternative source of drugs that are used in the health system. Propolis, a natural resinous product known for centuries, is a complex product obtained by honey bees from substances collected from parts of different plants, buds, and exudates in different geographic areas. Propolis has been attracting scientific attention since it has many biological and pharmacological properties, which are related to its chemical composition. Several in vitro and in vivo studies have been performed to characterize and understand the diverse bioactivities of propolis and its isolated compounds, as well as to evaluate and validate its potential. Yet, there is a lack of information concerning clinical effectiveness. The goal of this review is to discuss the potential of propolis for the development of new drugs by presenting published data concerning the chemical composition and the biological properties of this natural compound from different geographic origins. PMID:26106433

  13. 77 FR 47397 - Request for Nominations of Specific Drug/Biologic Product(s) That Could Be Brought Before the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-08

    ... nominations. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Office of Hematology and Oncology Products... pediatric oncology product development. DATES: Nominations must be received by September 4, 2012, to receive....gov , and please include the subject line ``Suggested Product for 2012 Pediatric Oncology...

  14. Lessons from the past and charting the future of marine natural products drug discovery and chemical biology

    PubMed Central

    Gerwick, William H.; Moore, Bradley S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Marine life forms are an important source of structurally-diverse and biologically-active secondary metabolites, several of which have inspired the development of new classes of therapeutic agents. These success stories have had to overcome difficulties inherent to natural products-derived drugs, such as adequate sourcing of the agent and issues related to structural complexity. Nevertheless, several marine-derived agents are now approved, most as `first-in-class' drugs, with 5 of 7 appearing in the past few years. Additionally, there is a rich pipeline of clinical and pre-clinical marine compounds to suggest their continued application in human medicine. Understanding of how these agents are biosynthetically assembled has accelerated in recent years, especially through interdisciplinary approaches, and innovative manipulations and re-engineering of some of these gene clusters are yielding novel agents of enhanced pharmaceutical properties compared with the natural product. PMID:22284357

  15. 42 CFR 410.29 - Limitations on drugs and biologicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... drug product's medical need. (21 CFR 310.6 contains an explanation of the efficacy review program.) (c) Any drug product that is identical, related, or similar, as defined in 21 CFR 310.6, to a drug product... factors, and except for EPO, any drug or biological that can be self-administered. (b) Any drug...

  16. 78 FR 65904 - Permanent Discontinuance or Interruption in Manufacturing of Certain Drug or Biological Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ...), modifying the regulation at Sec. 314.81 related to drug shortages (76 FR 78530). As a result of the... implementing the pre-FDASIA section 506C (72 FR 58993 at 58994 (October 18, 2007)), and in medical device... pre-FDASIA section 506C (65 FR 66665 at 66666 (November 7, 2000)). When defining these terms, we...

  17. Identification of transformation products of antiviral drugs formed during biological wastewater treatment and their occurrence in the urban water cycle.

    PubMed

    Funke, Jan; Prasse, Carsten; Ternes, Thomas A

    2016-07-01

    The fate of five antiviral drugs (abacavir, emtricitabine, ganciclovir, lamivudine and zidovudine) was investigated in biological wastewater treatment. Investigations of degradation kinetics were accompanied by the elucidation of formed transformation products (TPs) using activated sludge lab experiments and subsequent LC-HRMS analysis. Degradation rate constants ranged between 0.46 L d(-1) gSS(-1) (zidovudine) and 55.8 L d(-1) gSS(-1) (abacavir). Despite these differences of the degradation kinetics, the same main biotransformation reaction was observed for all five compounds: oxidation of the terminal hydroxyl-moiety to the corresponding carboxylic acid (formation of carboxy-TPs). In addition, the oxidation of thioether moieties to sulfoxides was observed for emtricitabine and lamivudine. Antiviral drugs were detected in influents of municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) with concentrations up to 980 ng L(-1) (emtricitabine), while in WWTP effluents mainly the TPs were found with concentration levels up to 1320 ng L(-1) (carboxy-abacavir). Except of zidovudine none of the original antiviral drugs were detected in German rivers and streams, whereas the concentrations of the TPs ranged from 16 ng L(-1) for carboxy-lamivudine up to 750 ng L(-1) for carboxy-acyclovir. These concentrations indicate an appreciable portion from WWTP effluents present in rivers and streams, as well as the high environmental persistence of the carboxy-TPs. As a result three of the carboxylic TPs were detected in finished drinking water.

  18. The year's new drugs and biologics--2006.

    PubMed

    Graul, A I; Sorbera, L A; Bozzo, J; Serradell, N; Revel, L; Prous, J R

    2007-01-01

    This annual series presents new drugs and biologics that were launched or approved for the first time during the previous year. In 2006, 41 new medicines--this figure includes both drugs and biologics for therapeutic use as well as new diagnostic agents and, for the first time this year, an important new herbal medicine--reached their first markets. Drug repositioning continues to have a significant impact, with line extensions (new indications, new formulations and new combinations of previously marketed products) accounting for more than 20 of the new medicines launched in 2006. This year's edition of the article also includes several new features: a deeper insight into the five first-in-class drugs launched for the first time last year, providing a better understanding of their novel mechanisms of action; an analysis of the discovery and development periods for the year's new products; a comprehensive overview of drug repositioning as a strategy for extending the life spans of medicines; and an analysis of the market for these new medicines. New generic drug approvals are also reviewed, as well as a brief glimpse at selected drugs and biologics which could reach their first markets in the foreseeable future. PMID:17332898

  19. The year's new drugs and biologics--2006.

    PubMed

    Graul, A I; Sorbera, L A; Bozzo, J; Serradell, N; Revel, L; Prous, J R

    2007-01-01

    This annual series presents new drugs and biologics that were launched or approved for the first time during the previous year. In 2006, 41 new medicines--this figure includes both drugs and biologics for therapeutic use as well as new diagnostic agents and, for the first time this year, an important new herbal medicine--reached their first markets. Drug repositioning continues to have a significant impact, with line extensions (new indications, new formulations and new combinations of previously marketed products) accounting for more than 20 of the new medicines launched in 2006. This year's edition of the article also includes several new features: a deeper insight into the five first-in-class drugs launched for the first time last year, providing a better understanding of their novel mechanisms of action; an analysis of the discovery and development periods for the year's new products; a comprehensive overview of drug repositioning as a strategy for extending the life spans of medicines; and an analysis of the market for these new medicines. New generic drug approvals are also reviewed, as well as a brief glimpse at selected drugs and biologics which could reach their first markets in the foreseeable future.

  20. How to compare biologic drugs.

    PubMed

    Calvet, Xavier; Esplugues, Juan Vicente

    2014-01-01

    This consensus document reviews the evidence on the evaluation of biological drugs. The main conclusions of the group are: a) the current evidence on biological comparisons is based on indirect comparisons and is generally unreliable and with important methodological limitations. Therefore, b) it is considered necessary to amend the regulatory directives in the sense of strongly favoring randomized non-inferiority studies comparing face to face the new biological treatment with current standards, avoiding trials versus placebo, c) A key element in this process will be determined by consensus among regulatory agencies, scientific societies, the pharmaceutical industry and health authorities regarding the clinical differences that should be considered relevant in each of the conditions tested. PMID:25043229

  1. Synthetic biology for pharmaceutical drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Trosset, Jean-Yves; Carbonell, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology (SB) is an emerging discipline, which is slowly reorienting the field of drug discovery. For thousands of years, living organisms such as plants were the major source of human medicines. The difficulty in resynthesizing natural products, however, often turned pharmaceutical industries away from this rich source for human medicine. More recently, progress on transformation through genetic manipulation of biosynthetic units in microorganisms has opened the possibility of in-depth exploration of the large chemical space of natural products derivatives. Success of SB in drug synthesis culminated with the bioproduction of artemisinin by microorganisms, a tour de force in protein and metabolic engineering. Today, synthetic cells are not only used as biofactories but also used as cell-based screening platforms for both target-based and phenotypic-based approaches. Engineered genetic circuits in synthetic cells are also used to decipher disease mechanisms or drug mechanism of actions and to study cell-cell communication within bacteria consortia. This review presents latest developments of SB in the field of drug discovery, including some challenging issues such as drug resistance and drug toxicity. PMID:26673570

  2. Synthetic biology for pharmaceutical drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Trosset, Jean-Yves; Carbonell, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology (SB) is an emerging discipline, which is slowly reorienting the field of drug discovery. For thousands of years, living organisms such as plants were the major source of human medicines. The difficulty in resynthesizing natural products, however, often turned pharmaceutical industries away from this rich source for human medicine. More recently, progress on transformation through genetic manipulation of biosynthetic units in microorganisms has opened the possibility of in-depth exploration of the large chemical space of natural products derivatives. Success of SB in drug synthesis culminated with the bioproduction of artemisinin by microorganisms, a tour de force in protein and metabolic engineering. Today, synthetic cells are not only used as biofactories but also used as cell-based screening platforms for both target-based and phenotypic-based approaches. Engineered genetic circuits in synthetic cells are also used to decipher disease mechanisms or drug mechanism of actions and to study cell–cell communication within bacteria consortia. This review presents latest developments of SB in the field of drug discovery, including some challenging issues such as drug resistance and drug toxicity. PMID:26673570

  3. Environmental assessment requirements for live biological drugs.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Ann

    2008-02-01

    Marketing approval of biological products by the US Food and Drug Administration must comply with requirements of Code of Federal Regulations title 21 part 25, "Environmental Impact Considerations." An environmental impact statement is usually not required. Environmental assessment is required unless excluded. As naturally occurring substances, biological products qualify for categorical exclusion if manufacture and use do not significantly alter their concentration or distribution in the human environment. The manufacturing process and establishment descriptions in the license application should include enough detail to ensure that waste is controlled and inactivated. During clinical development of a live biotherapeutic product, data should be collected regarding the shedding of live organisms from treated patients. The ability of the live organism to persist in the environment should be assessed, and instructions for safe handling by health care providers and consumers should be incorporated into the package insert.

  4. Environmental assessment requirements for live biological drugs.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Ann

    2008-02-01

    Marketing approval of biological products by the US Food and Drug Administration must comply with requirements of Code of Federal Regulations title 21 part 25, "Environmental Impact Considerations." An environmental impact statement is usually not required. Environmental assessment is required unless excluded. As naturally occurring substances, biological products qualify for categorical exclusion if manufacture and use do not significantly alter their concentration or distribution in the human environment. The manufacturing process and establishment descriptions in the license application should include enough detail to ensure that waste is controlled and inactivated. During clinical development of a live biotherapeutic product, data should be collected regarding the shedding of live organisms from treated patients. The ability of the live organism to persist in the environment should be assessed, and instructions for safe handling by health care providers and consumers should be incorporated into the package insert. PMID:18181713

  5. Overview of drug product development.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Padma

    2011-12-01

    The process for developing drug delivery systems has evolved over the past two decades with more scientific rigor, involving a collaboration of various fields, i.e., biology, chemistry, engineering, and pharmaceutics. Drug products, also commonly known in the pharmaceutical industry as formulations or "dosage forms," are used for administering the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) for purposes of assessing safety in preclinical models, early- to late-phase human clinical trials, and for routine clinical/commercial use. This overview discusses approaches for creating small-molecule API dosage forms, from preformulation to commercial manufacturing.

  6. Biological hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Benemann, J.R.

    1995-11-01

    Biological hydrogen production can be accomplished by either thermochemical (gasification) conversion of woody biomass and agricultural residues or by microbiological processes that yield hydrogen gas from organic wastes or water. Biomass gasification is a well established technology; however, the synthesis gas produced, a mixture of CO and H{sub 2}, requires a shift reaction to convert the CO to H{sub 2}. Microbiological processes can carry out this reaction more efficiently than conventional catalysts, and may be more appropriate for the relatively small-scale of biomass gasification processes. Development of a microbial shift reaction may be a near-term practical application of microbial hydrogen production.

  7. 21 CFR 601.50 - Confidentiality of data and information in an investigational new drug notice for a biological...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... investigational new drug notice for a biological product. 601.50 Section 601.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... biological product. (a) The existence of an IND notice for a biological product will not be disclosed by the... availability for public disclosure of all data and information in an IND file for a biological product shall...

  8. 42 CFR 419.64 - Transitional pass-through payments: Drugs and biologicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... radiopharmaceutical drug or biological product used in diagnostic, monitoring, and therapeutic nuclear medicine... the average cost of a new drug or biological to be not insignificant if it meets the...

  9. 21 CFR 201.56 - Requirements on content and format of labeling for human prescription drug and biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... summary of the essential scientific information needed for the safe and effective use of the drug. (2) The... information becomes available that causes the labeling to become inaccurate, false, or misleading. (3) The... information required under § 201.57(a), (b), and (c) under the following headings and subheadings and in...

  10. FDA 101: Regulating Biological Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... animal, and microorganism—and may be produced by biotechnology methods. Gene-based and cellular biologics, at the ... other categories of biological products mostly produced by biotechnology methods, including: monoclonal antibodies designed as targeted therapies ...

  11. 42 CFR 419.64 - Transitional pass-through payments: Drugs and biologicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... drugs. A drug or biological that is used for a rare disease or condition and has been designated as an... radiopharmaceutical drug or biological product used in diagnostic, monitoring, and therapeutic nuclear medicine... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Transitional pass-through payments: Drugs...

  12. The year's new drugs & biologics 2015: Part I.

    PubMed

    Graul, A I; Cruces, E; Stringer, M

    2016-01-01

    Nearly 100 new drugs and biologics, including important new line extensions, were approved or launched for the first time globally in 2015. These products are covered in depth in part I of our annual review of the pharma and biotech industry.

  13. 21 CFR 310.4 - Biologics; products subject to license control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Biologics; products subject to license control. 310.4 Section 310.4 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE NEW DRUGS General Provisions § 310.4 Biologics; products...

  14. The year's new drugs & biologics, 2014: Part I.

    PubMed

    Graul, A I; Cruces, E; Stringer, M

    2015-01-01

    A year-end wrap-up of new drug approvals and launches reveals that activity in the pharmaceutical industry continues at a high level, with 55 new drugs and biologics introduced on their first markets in 2014 (as of December 23, 2014). Additionally, 29 important new line extensions (new formulations, new combinations or new indications for previously marketed products) also reached their first markets during the year. The most active therapeutic group in terms of new launches was anti-infective therapies, with 11 new drugs and biologics launched, most for the treatment of multidrug-resistant bacterial infections or hepatitis C. The most active market for new launches was again the U.S., site of more than half of all new launches in 2014. However new launch activity increased considerably last year in Japan, which actually pulled ahead of the E.U. for the first time in many years. In another important new development, 15 of the new drugs and biologics launched last year had orphan drug status, 5 had breakthrough therapy designation and 3 had Qualified Infectious Disease Product (QIDP) status. Another 19 products were approved for the first time during the year but not yet launched by close of this article; most are slated for launch in the first months of the new year.

  15. A snapshot of biologic drug development: Challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Andrews, L; Ralston, S; Blomme, E; Barnhart, K

    2015-12-01

    Since the approval of insulin as the first recombinant therapeutic protein, the prominence of biologic therapies in drug development has grown significantly. Many modalities beyond traditional biologics are now being developed or explored for various indications with significant unmet medical needs. From early traditional replacement proteins to more recent, highly engineered antibodies, oligonucleotides, fusion proteins, and gene constructs, biologic agents have delivered life-changing therapies, despite often having scientifically and technically challenging development programs. This brief review outlines some of the major biotherapeutic classes and identifies the advantages and challenges with the development of these products. PMID:26614816

  16. 21 CFR 25.31 - Human drugs and biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Human drugs and biologics. 25.31 Section 25.31 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT CONSIDERATIONS Categorical Exclusions § 25.31 Human drugs and biologics. The classes...

  17. 21 CFR 25.31 - Human drugs and biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Human drugs and biologics. 25.31 Section 25.31 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT CONSIDERATIONS Categorical Exclusions § 25.31 Human drugs and biologics. The classes...

  18. 21 CFR 25.31 - Human drugs and biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Human drugs and biologics. 25.31 Section 25.31 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT CONSIDERATIONS Categorical Exclusions § 25.31 Human drugs and biologics. The classes...

  19. 21 CFR 25.31 - Human drugs and biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Human drugs and biologics. 25.31 Section 25.31 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT CONSIDERATIONS Categorical Exclusions § 25.31 Human drugs and biologics. The classes...

  20. 21 CFR 25.31 - Human drugs and biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Human drugs and biologics. 25.31 Section 25.31 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT CONSIDERATIONS Categorical Exclusions § 25.31 Human drugs and biologics. The classes...

  1. Canadian Drug Products Containing ASA

    PubMed Central

    Parker, William A.; Shearer, Cameron A.; Kirkpatrick, Susan L.

    1977-01-01

    A list of nearly 200 Canadian ASA-containing drug products is presented. Information was supplied by the major pharmaceutical companies and data were also obtained from various Canadian reference sources. This information should aid the physician and other health-related personnel in identifying ASA-containing products and counselling the salicylate-endangered patient. PMID:21304856

  2. 42 CFR 409.13 - Drugs and biologicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Drugs and biologicals. 409.13 Section 409.13 Public... § 409.13 Drugs and biologicals. (a) Except as specified in paragraph (b) of this section, Medicare pays for drugs and biologicals as inpatient hospital or inpatient CAH services only if— (1) They...

  3. 42 CFR 409.13 - Drugs and biologicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Drugs and biologicals. 409.13 Section 409.13 Public... § 409.13 Drugs and biologicals. (a) Except as specified in paragraph (b) of this section, Medicare pays for drugs and biologicals as inpatient hospital or inpatient CAH services only if— (1) They...

  4. 42 CFR 409.13 - Drugs and biologicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Drugs and biologicals. 409.13 Section 409.13 Public... § 409.13 Drugs and biologicals. (a) Except as specified in paragraph (b) of this section, Medicare pays for drugs and biologicals as inpatient hospital or inpatient CAH services only if— (1) They...

  5. 42 CFR 409.13 - Drugs and biologicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Drugs and biologicals. 409.13 Section 409.13 Public... § 409.13 Drugs and biologicals. (a) Except as specified in paragraph (b) of this section, Medicare pays for drugs and biologicals as inpatient hospital or inpatient CAH services only if— (1) They...

  6. 42 CFR 409.13 - Drugs and biologicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Drugs and biologicals. 409.13 Section 409.13 Public... § 409.13 Drugs and biologicals. (a) Except as specified in paragraph (b) of this section, Medicare pays for drugs and biologicals as inpatient hospital or inpatient CAH services only if— (1) They...

  7. 21 CFR 510.4 - Biologics; products subject to license control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Biologics; products subject to license control. 510.4 Section 510.4 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Biologics; products subject to license control. An animal drug produced and distributed in full...

  8. 21 CFR 510.4 - Biologics; products subject to license control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Biologics; products subject to license control. 510.4 Section 510.4 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Biologics; products subject to license control. An animal drug produced and distributed in full...

  9. 21 CFR 510.4 - Biologics; products subject to license control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Biologics; products subject to license control. 510.4 Section 510.4 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Biologics; products subject to license control. An animal drug produced and distributed in full...

  10. Co-opting biology to deliver drugs

    PubMed Central

    Yousefpour, Parisa; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2014-01-01

    The goal of drug delivery is to improve the safety and therapeutic efficacy of drugs. This review focuses on delivery platforms that are either derived from endogenous pathways, long-circulating biomolecules and cells or that piggyback onto long-circulating biomolecules and cells. The first class of such platforms is protein-based delivery systems—albumin, transferrin, and fusion to the Fc domain of antibodies—that have a long-circulation half-life and are designed to transport different molecules. The second class is lipid-based delivery systems—lipoproteins and exosomes—that are naturally occurring circulating lipid particles. The third class is cell-based delivery systems—erythrocytes, macrophages, and platelets—that have evolved, for reasons central to their function, to exhibit a long life-time in the body. The last class is small molecule-based delivery systems that include folic acid. This paper reviews the biology of these systems, their application in drug delivery, and the promises and limitations of these endogenous systems for drug delivery. PMID:24916780

  11. Synthetic Biology Guides Biofuel Production

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Michael R.; Atsumi, Shota

    2010-01-01

    The advancement of microbial processes for the production of renewable liquid fuels has increased with concerns about the current fuel economy. The development of advanced biofuels in particular has risen to address some of the shortcomings of ethanol. These advanced fuels have chemical properties similar to petroleum-based liquid fuels, thus removing the need for engine modification or infrastructure redesign. While the productivity and titers of each of these processes remains to be improved, progress in synthetic biology has provided tools to guide the engineering of these processes through present and future challenges. PMID:20827393

  12. New Biologic Drug Tackles Hard-To-Control Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160833.html New Biologic Drug Tackles Hard-to-Control Asthma Benralizumab ... 2016 WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new injectable drug reduces flare-ups in patients with ...

  13. Biology of Addiction: Drugs and Alcohol Can Hijack Your Brain

    MedlinePlus

    ... External link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Biology of Addiction Drugs and Alcohol Can Hijack Your ... scientists are working to learn more about the biology of addiction. They’ve shown that addiction is ...

  14. 21 CFR 601.50 - Confidentiality of data and information in an investigational new drug notice for a biological...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Confidentiality of data and information in an investigational new drug notice for a biological product. 601.50 Section 601.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Information § 601.50 Confidentiality of data and information in an investigational new drug notice for...

  15. 21 CFR 601.50 - Confidentiality of data and information in an investigational new drug notice for a biological...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Confidentiality of data and information in an investigational new drug notice for a biological product. 601.50 Section 601.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Food and Drug Administration unless it has previously been publicly disclosed or acknowledged. (b)...

  16. 21 CFR 601.50 - Confidentiality of data and information in an investigational new drug notice for a biological...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Confidentiality of data and information in an investigational new drug notice for a biological product. 601.50 Section 601.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Food and Drug Administration unless it has previously been publicly disclosed or acknowledged. (b)...

  17. 21 CFR 601.50 - Confidentiality of data and information in an investigational new drug notice for a biological...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Confidentiality of data and information in an investigational new drug notice for a biological product. 601.50 Section 601.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Food and Drug Administration unless it has previously been publicly disclosed or acknowledged. (b)...

  18. Capturing Biological Activity in Natural Product Fragments by Chemical Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Erika A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Natural products have had an immense influence on science and have directly led to the introduction of many drugs. Organic chemistry, and its unique ability to tailor natural products through synthesis, provides an extraordinary approach to unlock the full potential of natural products. In this Review, an approach based on natural product derived fragments is presented that can successfully address some of the current challenges in drug discovery. These fragments often display significantly reduced molecular weights, reduced structural complexity, a reduced number of synthetic steps, while retaining or even improving key biological parameters such as potency or selectivity. Examples from various stages of the drug development process up to the clinic are presented. In addition, this process can be leveraged by recent developments such as genome mining, antibody–drug conjugates, and computational approaches. All these concepts have the potential to identify the next generation of drug candidates inspired by natural products. PMID:26833854

  19. Capturing Biological Activity in Natural Product Fragments by Chemical Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Crane, Erika A; Gademann, Karl

    2016-03-14

    Natural products have had an immense influence on science and have directly led to the introduction of many drugs. Organic chemistry, and its unique ability to tailor natural products through synthesis, provides an extraordinary approach to unlock the full potential of natural products. In this Review, an approach based on natural product derived fragments is presented that can successfully address some of the current challenges in drug discovery. These fragments often display significantly reduced molecular weights, reduced structural complexity, a reduced number of synthetic steps, while retaining or even improving key biological parameters such as potency or selectivity. Examples from various stages of the drug development process up to the clinic are presented. In addition, this process can be leveraged by recent developments such as genome mining, antibody-drug conjugates, and computational approaches. All these concepts have the potential to identify the next generation of drug candidates inspired by natural products.

  20. Initial steps in the regulation of generic biological drugs: a comparison of U.S. and Canadian regimes.

    PubMed

    Szeto, Kenneth J; Wolanski, Marian

    2012-01-01

    Biological drug products are poised to overtake traditional pharmaceuticals as the best selling products in the pharmaceutical industry. Accordingly, both innovator and generic drug companies have a vested interest in the rules and regulations governing the approval and market entry of follow-on ("generic") biologic drug products as well as relevant procedures for litigating disputes involving biologic drug products. The U.S. and Canada both regulate the development and sale of traditional generic drugs through complex legal and regulatory schemes that seek to maintain a balance of interests between the innovator and generic sectors of the pharmaceutical industry. With the continued emergence of biological drugs, both countries have recently set forth legal and regulatory schemes to address the unique issues presented by generic biologic drug products. These issues include the requirements needed to submit an application for a generic biologic; biosimilarity vs. interchangeability designations; market and data exclusivity; and procedures for litigating disputes involving biologic drugs. Like the respective rules governing traditional pharmaceuticals, the recent U.S. and Canadian regulations addressing biological drugs contain both similarities and differences. As such, an understanding of both countries regulatory schemes will help both innovators and generics in decision making and legal strategy related to biological drugs. This article provides a comparative overview of the two systems to assist in such an understanding.

  1. Genetic and biological markers in drug abuse and alcoholism

    SciTech Connect

    Braude, M.C.; Chao, H.M.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 11 selections. Some of the titles are: Polymorphic Gene Marker Studies; Pharmacogenetic Approaches to the Prediction of Drug Response; Genetic Markers of Drug Abuse in Mouse Models; Genetics as a Tool for Identifying Biological Markers of Drug Abuse; and Studies of an Animal Model of Alcoholism.

  2. Biologically responsive polymeric nanoparticles for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Colson, Yolonda L; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2012-07-24

    Responsive nanoparticles that release their drug cargo in accordance with a change in pH or oxidative stress are of significant clinical interest as this approach offers the opportunity to link drug delivery to a specific location or disease state. This research news article reviews the current state of this field by examining a series of published articles that highlight the novelty and benefits of using responsive polymeric particles to achieve functionally-targeted drug delivery. PMID:22988558

  3. Requirements for Foreign and Domestic Establishment Registration and Listing for Human Drugs, Including Drugs That Are Regulated Under a Biologics License Application, and Animal Drugs. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-08-31

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending its regulations governing drug establishment registration and drug listing. These amendments reorganize, modify, and clarify current regulations concerning who must register establishments and list human drugs, human drugs that are also biological products, and animal drugs. The final rule requires electronic submission, unless waived in certain circumstances, of registration and listing information. This rulemaking pertains to finished drug products and to active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) alone or together with one or more other ingredients. The final rule describes how and when owners or operators of establishments at which drugs are manufactured or processed must register their establishments with FDA and list the drugs they manufacture or process. In addition, the rule makes certain changes to the National Drug Code (NDC) system. We are taking this action to improve management of drug establishment registration and drug listing requirements and make these processes more efficient and effective for industry and for us. This action also supports implementation of the electronic prescribing provisions of the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 (MMA) and the availability of current drug labeling information through DailyMed, a computerized repository of drug information maintained by the National Library of Medicine. PMID:27580511

  4. Requirements for Foreign and Domestic Establishment Registration and Listing for Human Drugs, Including Drugs That Are Regulated Under a Biologics License Application, and Animal Drugs. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-08-31

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending its regulations governing drug establishment registration and drug listing. These amendments reorganize, modify, and clarify current regulations concerning who must register establishments and list human drugs, human drugs that are also biological products, and animal drugs. The final rule requires electronic submission, unless waived in certain circumstances, of registration and listing information. This rulemaking pertains to finished drug products and to active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) alone or together with one or more other ingredients. The final rule describes how and when owners or operators of establishments at which drugs are manufactured or processed must register their establishments with FDA and list the drugs they manufacture or process. In addition, the rule makes certain changes to the National Drug Code (NDC) system. We are taking this action to improve management of drug establishment registration and drug listing requirements and make these processes more efficient and effective for industry and for us. This action also supports implementation of the electronic prescribing provisions of the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 (MMA) and the availability of current drug labeling information through DailyMed, a computerized repository of drug information maintained by the National Library of Medicine.

  5. 42 CFR 410.29 - Limitations on drugs and biologicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Except as provided in § 410.28(a) for outpatient diagnostic services and § 410.63(b) for blood clotting... drug product's medical need. (21 CFR 310.6 contains an explanation of the efficacy review program.) (c) Any drug product that is identical, related, or similar, as defined in 21 CFR 310.6, to a drug...

  6. 42 CFR 410.29 - Limitations on drugs and biologicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Except as provided in § 410.28(a) for outpatient diagnostic services and § 410.63(b) for blood clotting... drug product's medical need. (21 CFR 310.6 contains an explanation of the efficacy review program.) (c) Any drug product that is identical, related, or similar, as defined in 21 CFR 310.6, to a drug...

  7. 42 CFR 410.29 - Limitations on drugs and biologicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Except as provided in § 410.28(a) for outpatient diagnostic services and § 410.63(b) for blood clotting... drug product's medical need. (21 CFR 310.6 contains an explanation of the efficacy review program.) (c) Any drug product that is identical, related, or similar, as defined in 21 CFR 310.6, to a drug...

  8. 42 CFR 410.29 - Limitations on drugs and biologicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Except as provided in § 410.28(a) for outpatient diagnostic services and § 410.63(b) for blood clotting... drug product's medical need. (21 CFR 310.6 contains an explanation of the efficacy review program.) (c) Any drug product that is identical, related, or similar, as defined in 21 CFR 310.6, to a drug...

  9. Reinvigorating natural product combinatorial biosynthesis with synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunji; Moore, Bradley S; Yoon, Yeo Joon

    2015-09-01

    Natural products continue to play a pivotal role in drug-discovery efforts and in the understanding if human health. The ability to extend nature's chemistry through combinatorial biosynthesis--altering functional groups, regiochemistry and scaffold backbones through the manipulation of biosynthetic enzymes--offers unique opportunities to create natural product analogs. Incorporating emerging synthetic biology techniques has the potential to further accelerate the refinement of combinatorial biosynthesis as a robust platform for the diversification of natural chemical drug leads. Two decades after the field originated, we discuss the current limitations, the realities and the state of the art of combinatorial biosynthesis, including the engineering of substrate specificity of biosynthetic enzymes and the development of heterologous expression systems for biosynthetic pathways. We also propose a new perspective for the combinatorial biosynthesis of natural products that could reinvigorate drug discovery by using synthetic biology in combination with synthetic chemistry.

  10. Reinvigorating natural product combinatorial biosynthesis with synthetic biology

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunji; Moore, Bradley S.; Yoon, Yeo Joon

    2016-01-01

    Natural products continue to play a pivotal role in drug discovery efforts and in understanding human health. The ability to extend nature’s chemistry through combinatorial biosynthesis – altering functional groups, regiochemistry, and scaffold backbones through manipulation of biosynthetic enzymes – offers unique opportunities to create natural product analogues. Incorporating emerging synthetic biology techniques has the potential to further accelerate the refinement of combinatorial biosynthesis as a robust platform for the diversification of natural chemical drug leads. Two decades after the field originated, we discuss the current limitations, realities, and the state of the art of combinatorial biosynthesis, including the engineering of substrate specificity of biosynthetic enzymes and the development heterologous expression systems for biosynthetic pathways. We also propose a new perspective for the combinatorial biosynthesis of natural products that could reinvigorate drug discovery by using synthetic biology in combination with synthetic chemistry. PMID:26284672

  11. Natural products with health benefits from marine biological resources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ocean is the cradle of lives, which provides a diverse array of intriguing natural products that has captured scientists’ attention in the past few decades due to their significant and extremely potent biological activities. In addition to being rich sources for pharmaceutical drugs, marine nat...

  12. Raman Barcode for Counterfeit Drug Product Detection.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Latevi S; Rodriguez, Jason D

    2016-05-01

    Potential infiltration of counterfeit drug products-containing the wrong or no active pharmaceutical ingredient (API)-into the bona fide drug supply poses a significant threat to consumers worldwide. Raman spectroscopy offers a rapid, nondestructive avenue to screen a high throughput of samples. Traditional qualitative Raman identification is typically done with spectral correlation methods that compare the spectrum of a reference sample to an unknown. This is often effective for pure materials but is quite challenging when dealing with drug products that contain different formulations of active and inactive ingredients. Typically, reliable identification of drug products using common spectral correlation algorithms can only be made if the specific product under study is present in the library of reference spectra, thereby limiting the scope of products that can be screened. In this paper, we introduce the concept of the Raman barcode for identification of drug products by comparing the known peaks in the API reference spectrum to the peaks present in the finished drug product under study. This method requires the transformation of the Raman spectra of both API and finished drug products into a barcode representation by assigning zero intensity to every spectral frequency except the frequencies that correspond to Raman peaks. By comparing the percentage of nonzero overlap between the expected API barcode and finished drug product barcode, the identity of API present can be confirmed. In this study, 18 approved finished drug products and nine simulated counterfeits were successfully identified with 100% accuracy utilizing this method. PMID:27043140

  13. The similarity question for biologicals and non-biological complex drugs.

    PubMed

    Crommelin, Daan J A; Shah, Vinod P; Klebovich, Imre; McNeil, Scott E; Weinstein, Vera; Flühmann, Beat; Mühlebach, Stefan; de Vlieger, Jon S B

    2015-08-30

    For small - low molecular weight - molecule medicines a robust regulatory system has evolved over the years. This system guarantees high and constant quality of our (generic) medicines. Pharmaceutical equivalence and bioequivalence assessment are the pillars under that system. But there are complex medicines where the question of equivalence is more challenging to answer. For biologicals the paradigm of similarity rather than equality (the emergence of 'biosimilars') was developed in the past decade. This has been a program where an evolutionary, science based approach has been chosen by the frontrunner regulatory body, the EMA, with a 'learn and confirm' character. In addition, there is another group of complex drugs, the non-biological complex drugs, NBCDs, where the generic paradigm can be challenged as well. The NBCDs are defined as: 1. consisting of a complex multitude of closely related structures; 2. the entire multitude is the active pharmaceutical ingredient; 3. the properties cannot be fully characterized by physicochemical analysis and 4. the consistent, tightly controlled manufacturing process is fundamental to reproduce the product. NBCDs encompass product families such as the glatiramoids, liposomes, iron-carbohydrate colloids and many candidates of the group of the upcoming nanoparticulate systems. Following the main principles of regulatory pathways for biologicals (with appropriate product-by-product adjustments), instead of that for small molecules, would be the more logical strategy for these NBCDs. The status and outstanding regulatory issues for biosimilars and NBCD-similars/follow on versions were discussed at a conference in Budapest, Hungary (October 2014) and this commentary touches upon the issues brought up in the presentations, deliberations and conclusions.

  14. Chemical and biological production of cyclotides

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yilong; Bi, Tao; Camarero, Julio A.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclotides are fascinating naturally occurring micro-proteins (≈30 residues long) present in several plant families, and display various biological properties such as protease inhibitory, anti-microbial, insecticidal, cytotoxic, anti-HIV and hormone-like activities. Cyclotides share a unique head-to-tail circular knotted topology of three disulfide bridges, with one disulfide penetrating through a macrocycle formed by the two other disulfides and interconnecting peptide backbones, forming what is called a cystine knot topology. This cyclic cystine knot (CCK) framework gives the cyclotides exceptional rigidity, resistance to thermal and chemical denaturation, and enzymatic stability against degradation. Interestingly, cyclotides have been shown to be orally bioavailable, and other cyclotides have been shown to cross the cell membranes. Moreover, recent reports have also shown that engineered cyclotides can be efficiently used to target extracellular and intracellular protein-protein interactions, therefore making cyclotides ideal tools for drug development to selectively target protein-protein interactions. In this work we will review all the available methods for production of these interesting proteins using chemical or biological methods. PMID:27064329

  15. Pharmacogenomic Biomarkers: an FDA Perspective on Utilization in Biological Product Labeling.

    PubMed

    Schuck, Robert N; Grillo, Joseph A

    2016-05-01

    Precision medicine promises to improve both the efficacy and safety of therapeutic products by better informing why some patients respond well to a drug, and some experience adverse reactions, while others do not. Pharmacogenomics is a key component of precision medicine and can be utilized to select optimal doses for patients, more precisely identify individuals who will respond to a treatment and avoid serious drug-related toxicities. Since pharmacogenomic biomarker information can help inform drug dosing, efficacy, and safety, pharmacogenomic data are critically reviewed by FDA staff to ensure effective use of pharmacogenomic strategies in drug development and appropriate incorporation into product labels. Pharmacogenomic information may be provided in drug or biological product labeling to inform health care providers about the impact of genotype on response to a drug through description of relevant genomic markers, functional effects of genomic variants, dosing recommendations based on genotype, and other applicable genomic information. The format and content of labeling for biologic drugs will generally follow that of small molecule drugs; however, there are notable differences in pharmacogenomic information that might be considered useful for biologic drugs in comparison to small molecule drugs. Furthermore, the rapid entry of biologic drugs for treatment of rare genetic diseases and molecularly defined subsets of common diseases will likely lead to increased use of pharmacogenomic information in biologic drug labels in the near future. In this review, we outline the general principles of therapeutic product labeling and discuss the utilization of pharmacogenomic information in biologic drug labels. PMID:26912182

  16. Pharmacogenomic Biomarkers: an FDA Perspective on Utilization in Biological Product Labeling.

    PubMed

    Schuck, Robert N; Grillo, Joseph A

    2016-05-01

    Precision medicine promises to improve both the efficacy and safety of therapeutic products by better informing why some patients respond well to a drug, and some experience adverse reactions, while others do not. Pharmacogenomics is a key component of precision medicine and can be utilized to select optimal doses for patients, more precisely identify individuals who will respond to a treatment and avoid serious drug-related toxicities. Since pharmacogenomic biomarker information can help inform drug dosing, efficacy, and safety, pharmacogenomic data are critically reviewed by FDA staff to ensure effective use of pharmacogenomic strategies in drug development and appropriate incorporation into product labels. Pharmacogenomic information may be provided in drug or biological product labeling to inform health care providers about the impact of genotype on response to a drug through description of relevant genomic markers, functional effects of genomic variants, dosing recommendations based on genotype, and other applicable genomic information. The format and content of labeling for biologic drugs will generally follow that of small molecule drugs; however, there are notable differences in pharmacogenomic information that might be considered useful for biologic drugs in comparison to small molecule drugs. Furthermore, the rapid entry of biologic drugs for treatment of rare genetic diseases and molecularly defined subsets of common diseases will likely lead to increased use of pharmacogenomic information in biologic drug labels in the near future. In this review, we outline the general principles of therapeutic product labeling and discuss the utilization of pharmacogenomic information in biologic drug labels.

  17. Drug-device combination products: regulatory landscape and market growth.

    PubMed

    Bayarri, L

    2015-08-01

    Combination products are therapeutic and diagnostic products that combine drugs, devices and/or biological products, leading to safer and more effective treatments thanks to careful and precise drug targeting, local administration and individualized therapy. These technologies can especially benefit patients suffering from serious diseases and conditions such as cancer, heart disease, multiple sclerosis and diabetes, among others. On the other hand, drug-device combination products have also introduced a new dynamic in medical product development, regulatory approval and corporate interaction. Due to the increasing integration of drugs and devices observed in the latest generation of combination products, regulatory agencies have developed specific competences and regulations over the last decade. Manufacturers are required to fully understand the specific requirements in each country in order to ensure timely and accurate market access of new combination products, and the development of combination products involves a very specific pattern of interactions between manufacturers and regulatory agencies. The increased sophistication of the products brought to market over the last couple of decades has accentuated the need to develop drugs and devices collaboratively using resources from both industries, fostering the need of business partnering and technology licensing. This review will provide a global overview of the market trends, as well as (in the last section) an analysis of the drug-device combination products approved by the FDA during the latest 5 years.

  18. Drug-device combination products: regulatory landscape and market growth.

    PubMed

    Bayarri, L

    2015-08-01

    Combination products are therapeutic and diagnostic products that combine drugs, devices and/or biological products, leading to safer and more effective treatments thanks to careful and precise drug targeting, local administration and individualized therapy. These technologies can especially benefit patients suffering from serious diseases and conditions such as cancer, heart disease, multiple sclerosis and diabetes, among others. On the other hand, drug-device combination products have also introduced a new dynamic in medical product development, regulatory approval and corporate interaction. Due to the increasing integration of drugs and devices observed in the latest generation of combination products, regulatory agencies have developed specific competences and regulations over the last decade. Manufacturers are required to fully understand the specific requirements in each country in order to ensure timely and accurate market access of new combination products, and the development of combination products involves a very specific pattern of interactions between manufacturers and regulatory agencies. The increased sophistication of the products brought to market over the last couple of decades has accentuated the need to develop drugs and devices collaboratively using resources from both industries, fostering the need of business partnering and technology licensing. This review will provide a global overview of the market trends, as well as (in the last section) an analysis of the drug-device combination products approved by the FDA during the latest 5 years. PMID:26380388

  19. Application of chemical biology in target identification and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yue; Xiao, Ting; Lei, Saifei; Zhou, Fulai; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2015-09-01

    Drug discovery and development is vital to the well-being of mankind and sustainability of the pharmaceutical industry. Using chemical biology approaches to discover drug leads has become a widely accepted path partially because of the completion of the Human Genome Project. Chemical biology mainly solves biological problems through searching previously unknown targets for pharmacologically active small molecules or finding ligands for well-defined drug targets. It is a powerful tool to study how these small molecules interact with their respective targets, as well as their roles in signal transduction, molecular recognition and cell functions. There have been an increasing number of new therapeutic targets being identified and subsequently validated as a result of advances in functional genomics, which in turn led to the discovery of numerous active small molecules via a variety of high-throughput screening initiatives. In this review, we highlight some applications of chemical biology in the context of drug discovery.

  20. Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis: Are Biologic Drugs Right for You?

    MedlinePlus

    Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis: Are Biologic Drugs Right for You? What is rheumatoid arthritis (RA)? Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a serious condition. The body’s immune system attacks the lining of ...

  1. 9 CFR 114.4 - Identification of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Identification of biological products... REQUIREMENTS FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.4 Identification of biological products. Suitable tags or labels of... biological products, all component parts to be combined to form a biological product, all biological...

  2. 9 CFR 114.4 - Identification of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Identification of biological products... REQUIREMENTS FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.4 Identification of biological products. Suitable tags or labels of... biological products, all component parts to be combined to form a biological product, all biological...

  3. 9 CFR 114.4 - Identification of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Identification of biological products... REQUIREMENTS FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.4 Identification of biological products. Suitable tags or labels of... biological products, all component parts to be combined to form a biological product, all biological...

  4. Results of a survey of biological drug and device industries inspected by FDA under the Team Biologics Program.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Steve; Gangi, Victor J; Johnson, Anne; Little, Jacqueline; Mendivil, Steven; Trott, Carolyn; Webber, Keith; Weinstein, Mark

    2007-01-01

    The Product Quality Research Institute, in conjunction with the Food and Drug Administration, conducted an anonymous, electronic survey of the biological products manufacturing industry inspected by Team Biologics, with emphasis in obtaining industry input on inspection and compliance aspects of program operations. Representatives from all of the product-specific manufacturing industries inspected under the Team Biologics Program responded to this survey (vaccines; fractionated plasma proteins and recombinant analogs; allergenics; therapeutics and in-vivo diagnostics; and in-vitro diagnostics, including blood grouping reagents). Data and written feedback was obtained regarding each firm's interactions and experiences of Team Biologics inspections at its facilities over the past three years. The three areas most impacted by Team Biologic inspections were "Production and Process Controls", "Failure Investigations" and "Facility / Equipment Controls". Overall assessment of the program was generally positive with 68% identifying a positive impact on the sites operations and 88% assessed the inspections as being conducted fairly. The findings and conclusions of this report will be utilized by the FDA to evaluate and further assess the impact of the Team Biologics Program and to implement any necessary changes. This report provides useful information to companies currently manufacturing licensed biologic products subject to Team Biologics inspections and also to those companies anticipating these inspections for future product manufacturing.

  5. Marine Natural Products: A Way to New Drugs

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The investigation of marine natural products (low molecular weight bioregulators) is a rapidly developing scientific field at the intersection of biology and chemistry. Investigations aimed at detecting, identifying, and understanding the structure of marine natural products have led to the discovery of 20,000 new substances, including those characterized by an extremely high physiological activity. Some results and prospects of works aimed at creating new drugs on the basis of marine natural products are discussed herein. PMID:22649599

  6. Novel opportunities for computational biology and sociology in drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Lixia

    2009-01-01

    Drug discovery today is impossible without sophisticated modeling and computation. In this review we touch on previous advances in computational biology and by tracing the steps involved in pharmaceutical development, we explore a range of novel, high value opportunities for computational innovation in modeling the biological process of disease and the social process of drug discovery. These opportunities include text mining for new drug leads, modeling molecular pathways and predicting the efficacy of drug cocktails, analyzing genetic overlap between diseases and predicting alternative drug use. Computation can also be used to model research teams and innovative regions and to estimate the value of academy-industry ties for scientific and human benefit. Attention to these opportunities could promise punctuated advance, and will complement the well-established computational work on which drug discovery currently relies. PMID:19674801

  7. Novel opportunities for computational biology and sociology in drug discovery☆

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Lixia; Evans, James A.; Rzhetsky, Andrey

    2013-01-01

    Current drug discovery is impossible without sophisticated modeling and computation. In this review we outline previous advances in computational biology and, by tracing the steps involved in pharmaceutical development, explore a range of novel, high-value opportunities for computational innovation in modeling the biological process of disease and the social process of drug discovery. These opportunities include text mining for new drug leads, modeling molecular pathways and predicting the efficacy of drug cocktails, analyzing genetic overlap between diseases and predicting alternative drug use. Computation can also be used to model research teams and innovative regions and to estimate the value of academy–industry links for scientific and human benefit. Attention to these opportunities could promise punctuated advance and will complement the well-established computational work on which drug discovery currently relies. PMID:20349528

  8. Biological production of products from waste gases

    DOEpatents

    Gaddy, James L.

    2002-01-22

    A method and apparatus are designed for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, and carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various products, such as organic acids, alcohols, hydrogen, single cell protein, and salts of organic acids by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified.

  9. 77 FR 3780 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... portion of the meeting will be closed to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological..., Parasitic and Allergenic Products, Office of Vaccines Research and Review, Center for Biologics...

  10. 76 FR 13646 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... portion of the meeting will be closed to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological... Products, Office of Vaccines Research and Review, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, FDA. In...

  11. Systems Biology Approaches to a Rational Drug Discovery Paradigm.

    PubMed

    Prathipati, Philip; Mizuguchi, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Ligand- and structure-based drug design approaches complement phenotypic and target screens, respectively, and are the two major frameworks for guiding early-stage drug discovery efforts. Since the beginning of this century, the advent of the genomic era has presented researchers with a myriad of high throughput biological data (parts lists and their interaction networks) to address efficacy and toxicity, augmenting the traditional ligand- and structure-based approaches. This data rich era has also presented us with challenges related to integrating and analyzing these multi-platform and multi-dimensional datasets and translating them into viable hypotheses. Hence in the present paper, we review these existing approaches to drug discovery research and argue the case for a new systems biology based approach. We present the basic principles and the foundational arguments/underlying assumptions of the systems biology based approaches to drug design. Also discussed are systems biology data types (key entities, their attributes and their relationships with each other, and data models/representations), software and tools used for both retrospective and prospective analysis, and the hypotheses that can be inferred. In addition, we summarize some of the existing resources for a systems biology based drug discovery paradigm (open TG-GATEs, DrugMatrix, CMap and LINCs) in terms of their strengths and limitations. PMID:26306988

  12. Systems Biology Approaches to a Rational Drug Discovery Paradigm.

    PubMed

    Prathipati, Philip; Mizuguchi, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Ligand- and structure-based drug design approaches complement phenotypic and target screens, respectively, and are the two major frameworks for guiding early-stage drug discovery efforts. Since the beginning of this century, the advent of the genomic era has presented researchers with a myriad of high throughput biological data (parts lists and their interaction networks) to address efficacy and toxicity, augmenting the traditional ligand- and structure-based approaches. This data rich era has also presented us with challenges related to integrating and analyzing these multi-platform and multi-dimensional datasets and translating them into viable hypotheses. Hence in the present paper, we review these existing approaches to drug discovery research and argue the case for a new systems biology based approach. We present the basic principles and the foundational arguments/underlying assumptions of the systems biology based approaches to drug design. Also discussed are systems biology data types (key entities, their attributes and their relationships with each other, and data models/representations), software and tools used for both retrospective and prospective analysis, and the hypotheses that can be inferred. In addition, we summarize some of the existing resources for a systems biology based drug discovery paradigm (open TG-GATEs, DrugMatrix, CMap and LINCs) in terms of their strengths and limitations.

  13. Synthetic biology advances for pharmaceutical production

    PubMed Central

    Breitling, Rainer; Takano, Eriko

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology enables a new generation of microbial engineering for the biotechnological production of pharmaceuticals and other high-value chemicals. This review presents an overview of recent advances in the field, describing new computational and experimental tools for the discovery, optimization and production of bioactive molecules, and outlining progress towards the application of these tools to pharmaceutical production systems. PMID:25744872

  14. Patent landscape for biological hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Levin, David B; Lubieniechi, Simona

    2013-12-01

    Research and development of biological hydrogen production have expanded significantly in the past decade. Production of renewable hydrogen from agricultural, forestry, or other organic waste streams offers the possibility to contribute to hydrogen production capacity with no net, or at least with lower, greenhouse gas emissions. Significant improvements in the volumetric or molar yields of hydrogen production have been accomplished through genetic engineering of hydrogen synthesizing microorganisms. Although no commercial scale renewable biohydrogen production facilities are currently in operation, a few pilot scale systems have been demonstrated successfully, and while industrial scale production of biohydrogen still faces a number of technical and economic barriers, understanding the patent landscape is an important step in developing a viable commercialization strategy. In this paper, we review patents filed on biological hydrogen production. Patents on biohydrogen production from both the Canadian and American Patents databases were classified into three main groups: (1) patents for biological hydrogen by direct photolysis; (2) patents for biological hydrogen by dark fermentation; and (3) patents for process engineering for biological hydrogen production.

  15. Translating Stem Cell Biology Into Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Singeç, Ilyas; Simeonov, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cell research has made extraordinary progress over the last decade. The robustness of nuclear reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has created entirely novel opportunities for drug discovery and personalized regenerative medicine. Patient- and disease-specific iPSCs can be expanded indefinitely and differentiated into relevant cell types of different organ systems. As the utilization of iPSCs is becoming a key enabling technology across various scientific disciplines, there are still important challenges that need to be addressed. Here we review the current state and reflect on the issues that the stem cell and translational communities are facing in bringing iPSCs closer to clinical application.

  16. Biological production of organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Jianping; Paddock, Troy; Carrieri, Damian; Maness, Pin-Ching; Seibert, Michael

    2016-04-12

    Strains of cyanobacteria that produce high levels of alpha ketoglutarate (AKG) and pyruvate are disclosed herein. Methods of culturing these cyanobacteria to produce AKG or pyruvate and recover AKG or pyruvate from the culture are also described herein. Nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides that function as ethylene-forming enzymes and their use in the production of ethylene are further disclosed herein. These nucleic acids may be expressed in hosts such as cyanobacteria, which in turn may be cultured to produce ethylene.

  17. Natural production of biological optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seung Ho; Kim, Young L.

    2015-03-01

    Synthesis and production in nature often provide ideas to design and fabricate advanced biomimetic photonic materials and structures, leading to excellent physical properties and enhanced performance. In addition, the recognition and utilization of natural or biological substances have been typical routes to develop biocompatible and biodegradable materials for medical applications. In this respect, biological lasers utilizing such biomaterials and biostructures have been received considerable attention, given a variety of implications and potentials for bioimaging, biosensing, implantation, and therapy. However, without relying on industrial facilities, eco-friendly massive production of such optical components or systems has not yet been investigated. We show examples of bioproduction of biological lasers using agriculture and fisheries. We anticipate that such approaches will open new possibilities for scalable eco-friendly `green' production of biological photonics components and systems.

  18. Bone effects of biologic drugs in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Corrado, Addolorata; Neve, Anna; Maruotti, Nicola; Cantatore, Francesco Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Biologic agents used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are able to reduce both disease activity and radiographic progression of joint disease. These drugs are directed against several proinflammatory cytokines (TNF α , IL-6, and IL-1) which are involved both in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation and progression of joint structural damage and in systemic and local bone loss typically observed in RA. However, the role of biologic drugs in preventing bone loss in clinical practice has not yet clearly assessed. Many clinical studies showed a trend to a positive effect of biologic agents in preventing systemic bone loss observed in RA. Although the suppression of inflammation is the main goal in the treatment of RA and the anti-inflammatory effects of biologic drugs exert a positive effect on bone metabolism, the exact relationship between the prevention of bone loss and control of inflammation has not been clearly established, and if the available biologic drugs against TNF α , IL-1, and IL-6 can exert their effect on systemic and local bone loss also through a direct mechanism on bone cell metabolism is still to be clearly defined.

  19. Natural product synthesis at the interface of chemistry and biology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Nature has evolved to produce unique and diverse natural products that possess high target affinity and specificity. Natural products have been the richest sources for novel modulators of biomolecular function. Since the chemical synthesis of urea by Wöhler, organic chemists have been intrigued by natural products, leading to the evolution of the field of natural product synthesis over the past two centuries. Natural product synthesis has enabled natural products to play an essential role in drug discovery and chemical biology. With the introduction of novel, innovative concepts and strategies for synthetic efficiency, natural product synthesis in the 21st century is well poised to address the challenges and complexities faced by natural product chemistry and will remain essential to progress in biomedical sciences. PMID:25043880

  20. Natural product synthesis at the interface of chemistry and biology.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jiyong

    2014-08-11

    Nature has evolved to produce unique and diverse natural products that possess high target affinity and specificity. Natural products have been the richest sources for novel modulators of biomolecular function. Since the chemical synthesis of urea by Wöhler, organic chemists have been intrigued by natural products, leading to the evolution of the field of natural product synthesis over the past two centuries. Natural product synthesis has enabled natural products to play an essential role in drug discovery and chemical biology. With the introduction of novel, innovative concepts and strategies for synthetic efficiency, natural product synthesis in the 21st century is well poised to address the challenges and complexities faced by natural product chemistry and will remain essential to progress in biomedical sciences.

  1. 21 CFR 600.14 - Reporting of biological product deviations by licensed manufacturers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Reporting of biological product deviations by licensed manufacturers. 600.14 Section 600.14 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... addresses in § 600.2), or an electronic filing through CBER's Web site at...

  2. 21 CFR 600.14 - Reporting of biological product deviations by licensed manufacturers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reporting of biological product deviations by licensed manufacturers. 600.14 Section 600.14 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... addresses in § 600.2), or an electronic filing through CBER's Web site at...

  3. 21 CFR 600.14 - Reporting of biological product deviations by licensed manufacturers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Reporting of biological product deviations by licensed manufacturers. 600.14 Section 600.14 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... addresses in § 600.2), or an electronic filing through CBER's Web site at...

  4. [Design and construction of artificial biological systems for complex natural products biosynthesis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianfeng; Meng, Hailin; Xiong, Zhiqiang; Wang, Yong

    2013-08-01

    Natural products (NPs) are important drug pools for human disease prevention and treatment. The great advances in synthetic biology have greatly revolutionized the strategies of NPs development and production. This review entitled with design and construction of artificial biological systems for complex NPs biosynthesis, mainly introduced the progresses in artificial design of synthetic biological parts, naturally mining novel synthetic parts of NPs, the assembly & adaption of the artificial biological modules & systems.

  5. 9 CFR 114.6 - Mixing biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mixing biological products. 114.6 Section 114.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.6 Mixing biological products. Each biological product, when in liquid form,...

  6. 9 CFR 114.6 - Mixing biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mixing biological products. 114.6 Section 114.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.6 Mixing biological products. Each biological product, when in liquid form,...

  7. Biology-driven cancer drug development: back to the future

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Most of the significant recent advances in cancer treatment have been based on the great strides that have been made in our understanding of the underlying biology of the disease. Nevertheless, the exploitation of biological insight in the oncology clinic has been haphazard and we believe that this needs to be enhanced and optimized if patients are to receive maximum benefit. Here, we discuss how research has driven cancer drug development in the past and describe how recent advances in biology, technology, our conceptual understanding of cell networks and removal of some roadblocks may facilitate therapeutic advances in the (hopefully) near future. PMID:20385032

  8. 21 CFR 211.134 - Drug product inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drug product inspection. 211.134 Section 211.134 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS... § 211.134 Drug product inspection. (a) Packaged and labeled products shall be examined during...

  9. 21 CFR 211.134 - Drug product inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Drug product inspection. 211.134 Section 211.134 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS... § 211.134 Drug product inspection. (a) Packaged and labeled products shall be examined during...

  10. 75 FR 47605 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... portion of the meeting will be closed to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological..., Office of Vaccines Research and Review, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, FDA. FDA intends...

  11. Pharmacist Substitution of Biological Products: Issues and Considerations.

    PubMed

    Li, Edward; Ramanan, Sundar; Green, Larry

    2015-07-01

    Biosimilars are biological products that are highly similar to their biological reference products, notwithstanding minor differences in clinically inactive components. However, unlike generics of small-molecule drugs, biosimilars are not identical to their reference products, since each manufacturer uses unique cell lines and processes, and these lead to slight structural differences between products. Because these structural variations can lead to differences in clinical response, clinical studies demonstrating biosimilarity are required before and robust pharmacovigilance after approval. Although the FDA has not yet issued formal guidance on interchangeable biosimilars, higher standards of similarity will be required in order to achieve an interchangeable designation. In this commentary, we review the differences between generics and biosimilars, describe their respective regulatory approval pathways, discuss interchangeability and substitution, and review substitution of interchangeable biosimilars, focusing on key professional considerations for pharmacists.

  12. Pharmacist Substitution of Biological Products: Issues and Considerations.

    PubMed

    Li, Edward; Ramanan, Sundar; Green, Larry

    2015-07-01

    Biosimilars are biological products that are highly similar to their biological reference products, notwithstanding minor differences in clinically inactive components. However, unlike generics of small-molecule drugs, biosimilars are not identical to their reference products, since each manufacturer uses unique cell lines and processes, and these lead to slight structural differences between products. Because these structural variations can lead to differences in clinical response, clinical studies demonstrating biosimilarity are required before and robust pharmacovigilance after approval. Although the FDA has not yet issued formal guidance on interchangeable biosimilars, higher standards of similarity will be required in order to achieve an interchangeable designation. In this commentary, we review the differences between generics and biosimilars, describe their respective regulatory approval pathways, discuss interchangeability and substitution, and review substitution of interchangeable biosimilars, focusing on key professional considerations for pharmacists. PMID:26108377

  13. 76 FR 47211 - Report on the Performance of Drug and Biologics Firms in Conducting Postmarketing Requirements...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ... studies and clinical trials that applicants have agreed to, or are required to, conduct. FOR FURTHER..., including clinical trials, for human drug and biological products (section 506B of the FD&C Act (21 U.S.C... a postmarketing study or clinical trial that an applicant has been required to, or has agreed...

  14. 77 FR 13339 - Report on the Performance of Drug and Biologics Firms in Conducting Postmarketing Requirements...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-06

    ... studies and clinical trials that applicants have agreed to, or are required to, conduct. FOR FURTHER... postmarketing studies, including clinical trials, for human drug and biological products (section 506B of the FD... monitor the progress of a postmarketing study or clinical trial that an applicant has been required to,...

  15. 75 FR 68802 - Report on the Performance of Drug and Biologics Firms in Conducting Postmarketing Requirements...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-09

    ... studies and clinical trials that applicants have agreed to or are required to conduct. FOR FURTHER..., including clinical trials, for human drug and biological products (section 506B of the FD&C Act (21 U.S.C... a postmarketing study or clinical trial that an applicant has been required to or has agreed...

  16. Synthetic biology of fungal natural products

    PubMed Central

    Mattern, Derek J.; Valiante, Vito; Unkles, Shiela E.; Brakhage, Axel A.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology is an ever-expanding field in science, also encompassing the research area of fungal natural product (NP) discovery and production. Until now, different aspects of synthetic biology have been covered in fungal NP studies from the manipulation of different regulatory elements and heterologous expression of biosynthetic pathways to the engineering of different multidomain biosynthetic enzymes such as polyketide synthases or non-ribosomal peptide synthetases. The following review will cover some of the exemplary studies of synthetic biology in filamentous fungi showing the capacity of these eukaryotes to be used as model organisms in the field. From the vast array of different NPs produced to the ease for genetic manipulation, filamentous fungi have proven to be an invaluable source for the further development of synthetic biology tools. PMID:26284053

  17. Counting on natural products for drug design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Tiago; Reker, Daniel; Schneider, Petra; Schneider, Gisbert

    2016-06-01

    Natural products and their molecular frameworks have a long tradition as valuable starting points for medicinal chemistry and drug discovery. Recently, there has been a revitalization of interest in the inclusion of these chemotypes in compound collections for screening and achieving selective target modulation. Here we discuss natural-product-inspired drug discovery with a focus on recent advances in the design of synthetically tractable small molecules that mimic nature's chemistry. We highlight the potential of innovative computational tools in processing structurally complex natural products to predict their macromolecular targets and attempt to forecast the role that natural-product-derived fragments and fragment-like natural products will play in next-generation drug discovery.

  18. Standardization for natural product synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huimin; Medema, Marnix H

    2016-08-27

    Standardization is one of the foundational features of modern-day engineering, and the use of standardized parts and processes is a key element that distinguishes bona fide synthetic biology from traditional genetic engineering. Here, we discuss the role of standardization in natural product synthetic biology, focusing on standardization of data on biosynthetic pathways and gene clusters, as well as the role of standardization in the process of biosynthetic gene cluster engineering. PMID:27313083

  19. 21 CFR 352.52 - Labeling of sunscreen drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Labeling of sunscreen drug products. 352.52... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE SUNSCREEN DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 352.52 Labeling of sunscreen drug products. (a) Statement of identity. The labeling of the product contains...

  20. 21 CFR 352.52 - Labeling of sunscreen drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Labeling of sunscreen drug products. 352.52... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE SUNSCREEN DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 352.52 Labeling of sunscreen drug products. (a) Statement of identity. The labeling of the product contains...

  1. 21 CFR 352.52 - Labeling of sunscreen drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Labeling of sunscreen drug products. 352.52... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE SUNSCREEN DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 352.52 Labeling of sunscreen drug products. (a) Statement of identity. The labeling of the product contains...

  2. 21 CFR 352.52 - Labeling of sunscreen drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Labeling of sunscreen drug products. 352.52... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE SUNSCREEN DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 352.52 Labeling of sunscreen drug products. (a) Statement of identity. The labeling of the product contains...

  3. 21 CFR 352.52 - Labeling of sunscreen drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling of sunscreen drug products. 352.52... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE SUNSCREEN DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 352.52 Labeling of sunscreen drug products. (a) Statement of identity. The labeling of the product contains...

  4. Yeast Synthetic Biology Platform Generates Novel Chemical Structures as Scaffolds for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic biology has been heralded as a new bioengineering platform for the production of bulk and specialty chemicals, drugs, and fuels. Here, we report for the first time a series of 74 novel compounds produced using a combinatorial genetics approach in baker’s yeast. Based on the concept of “coevolution” with target proteins in an intracellular primary survival assay, the identified, mostly scaffold-sized (200–350 MW) compounds, which displayed excellent biological activity, can be considered as prevalidated hits. Of the molecules found, >75% have not been described previously; 20% of the compounds exhibit novel scaffolds. Their structural and physicochemical properties comply with established rules of drug- and fragment-likeness and exhibit increased structural complexities compared to synthetically produced fragments. In summary, the synthetic biology approach described here represents a completely new, complementary strategy for hit and early lead identification that can be easily integrated into the existing drug discovery process. PMID:24742115

  5. 76 FR 44016 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... portion of the meeting will be closed to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological..., Division of Bacterial, Parasitic and Allergenic Products, Office of Vaccines Research and Review,...

  6. 78 FR 20663 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... portion of the meeting will be closed to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological... DNA Viruses, Division of Viral Products, Office of Vaccines Research and Review, Center for...

  7. 78 FR 60884 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... portion of the meeting will be closed to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological... of Retroviruses and Laboratory of Immunoregulation, Division of Viral Products, Office of...

  8. 75 FR 17929 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... circovirus type 1 (PCV 1) in Rotarix, a U.S. licensed vaccine manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline and...

  9. 77 FR 42319 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... lines derived from human tumors for vaccine manufacture. FDA intends to make background...

  10. 75 FR 2876 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... selection of strains to be included in the influenza virus vaccine for the 2010 - 2011 influenza season....

  11. 76 FR 55397 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... portion of the meeting will be closed to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological... the Laboratory of Method Development, Division of Viral Products, Office of Vaccines Research...

  12. 76 FR 52668 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Amendment of Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ... Administration (FDA) is announcing an amendment to the notice of meeting of the Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee. This meeting was announced in the Federal Register of July 22, 2011 (76 FR... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory...

  13. 77 FR 63839 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... immunogenicity of an Influenza A (H5N1) Virus Monovalent Vaccine manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline. On November...

  14. 78 FR 5465 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... strains to be included in the influenza virus vaccine for the 2013- 2014 influenza season. FDA intends...

  15. Solid-Phase Biological Assays for Drug Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsberg, Erica M.; Sicard, Clémence; Brennan, John D.

    2014-06-01

    In the past 30 years, there has been a significant growth in the use of solid-phase assays in the area of drug discovery, with a range of new assays being used for both soluble and membrane-bound targets. In this review, we provide some basic background to typical drug targets and immobilization protocols used in solid-phase biological assays (SPBAs) for drug discovery, with emphasis on particularly labile biomolecular targets such as kinases and membrane-bound receptors, and highlight some of the more recent approaches for producing protein microarrays, bioaffinity columns, and other devices that are central to small molecule screening by SPBA. We then discuss key applications of such assays to identify drug leads, with an emphasis on the screening of mixtures. We conclude by highlighting specific advantages and potential disadvantages of SPBAs, particularly as they relate to particular assay formats.

  16. 21 CFR 610.68 - Exceptions or alternatives to labeling requirements for biological products held by the Strategic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Exceptions or alternatives to labeling requirements for biological products held by the Strategic National Stockpile. 610.68 Section 610.68 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS...

  17. Microbial Production of Isoprenoids Enabled by Synthetic Biology

    PubMed Central

    Immethun, Cheryl M.; Hoynes-O’Connor, Allison G.; Balassy, Andrea; Moon, Tae Seok

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms transform inexpensive carbon sources into highly functionalized compounds without toxic by-product generation or significant energy consumption. By redesigning the natural biosynthetic pathways in an industrially suited host, microbial cell factories can produce complex compounds for a variety of industries. Isoprenoids include many medically important compounds such as antioxidants and anticancer and antimalarial drugs, all of which have been produced microbially. While a biosynthetic pathway could be simply transferred to the production host, the titers would become economically feasible when it is rationally designed, built, and optimized through synthetic biology tools. These tools have been implemented by a number of research groups, with new tools pledging further improvements in yields and expansion to new medically relevant compounds. This review focuses on the microbial production of isoprenoids for the health industry and the advancements though synthetic biology. PMID:23577007

  18. Marine natural products: a new wave of drugs?

    PubMed Central

    Montaser, Rana; Luesch, Hendrik

    2011-01-01

    The largely unexplored marine world that presumably harbors the most biodiversity may be the vastest resource to discover novel ‘validated’ structures with novel modes of action that cover biologically relevant chemical space. Several challenges, including the supply problem and target identification, need to be met for successful drug development of these often complex molecules; however, approaches are available to overcome the hurdles. Advances in technologies such as sampling strategies, nanoscale NMR for structure determination, total chemical synthesis, fermentation and biotechnology are all crucial to the success of marine natural products as drug leads. We illustrate the high degree of innovation in the field of marine natural products, which in our view will lead to a new wave of drugs that flow into the market and pharmacies in the future. PMID:21882941

  19. 21 CFR 341.72 - Labeling of antihistamine drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling of antihistamine drug products. 341.72 Section 341.72 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE COLD, COUGH, ALLERGY, BRONCHODILATOR, AND ANTIASTHMATIC DRUG PRODUCTS...

  20. 21 CFR 341.76 - Labeling of bronchodilator drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling of bronchodilator drug products. 341.76 Section 341.76 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE COLD, COUGH, ALLERGY, BRONCHODILATOR, AND ANTIASTHMATIC DRUG PRODUCTS...

  1. 9 CFR 114.4 - Identification of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Identification of biological products... OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS PRODUCTION REQUIREMENTS FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.4 Identification of biological products. Suitable tags or labels...

  2. [Off-label indications of biological drugs in dermatology].

    PubMed

    Cortés, Begonia; Laffitte, Emmanuel

    2016-03-30

    Last years, the development of biological drugs substantially improved the outcome of many inflammatory diseases. In dermatology, this kind of therapy is essentially prescribed for the treatment of psoriasis, and include the anti-TNF, anti-IL-12/IL-23 and anti-IL-17. Despite these treatments have not yet been approved, they seemed to be efficient for the treatment of many other inflammatory dermatosis, like granulomatous diseases, neutrophilic diseases, hydradenitis suppurativa or pityriasis rubra pilaris. PMID:27172693

  3. [Comparative analysis of seven marine biological source of mineral drugs].

    PubMed

    Si, Wei; A, Ru-na; Li, Shang-rong; Zhang, Jing-Xian; Wu, Wan-ying; Cui, Ya-jun

    2014-09-01

    The marine biological source of mineral drugs recorded in Chinese Pharmacopoeia (2010 version) mainly including pearl, nacre, clam shell, common oyster shell, ark shell, cuttle bone, and sea-ear shell are widely used in clinical. Calcium carbonate and a small amount of protein are the main components in this type of drugs. In this paper, a systematical and comparable study were carried out by determination of calcium carbonate by EDTA titration method, the crystal of calcium carbonate by X-Ray powder diffraction and the total amino acids (TAAs) of the hydrolyzed samples by ultraviolet spectrophotometry method. As a result, the crystal structure is calcite for common oyster shell, mixture of calcite and aragonite for nacre and sea-ear shell, aragonite for the other drugs. The content of calcium carbonate ranged from 86% to 96%. Cuttle bone has the highest amount of TAAs among the seven drugs which reached 1.7% while clam shell has the lowest content of 0.16% on average. In conclusion, an effective method was developed for the quality control of marine mineral drugs by comprehensive analysis of calcium carbonate and TAAs in the seven marine mineral drugs.

  4. Drug-loaded nanocarriers: passive targeting and crossing of biological barriers.

    PubMed

    Rabanel, J M; Aoun, V; Elkin, I; Mokhtar, M; Hildgen, P

    2012-01-01

    Poor bioavailability and poor pharmacokinetic characteristics are some of the leading causes of drug development failure. Therefore, poorly-soluble drugs, fragile proteins or nucleic acid products may benefit from their encapsulation in nanosized vehicles, providing enhanced solubilization, protection against degradation, and increased access to pathological compartments. A key element for the success of drug-loaded nanocarriers is their ability to either cross biological barriers themselves, or allow loaded drugs to traverse them to achieve optimal pharmacological action at pathological sites. Depending on the mode of administration, nanocarriers may have to cross different physiological barriers in their journey towards their target. In this review, the crossing of biological barriers by passive targeting strategies will be presented for intravenous delivery (vascular endothelial lining, particularly for tumor vasculature and blood brain barrier targeting), oral administration (gastrointestinal lining), and upper airway administration (pulmonary epithelium). For each specific barrier, background information will be provided on the structure and biology of the tissues involved as well as available pathways for nano-objects or loaded drugs (diffusion and convection through fenestration, transcytosis, tight junction crossing, etc.). The determinants of passive targeting - size, shape, surface chemistry, surface patterning of nanovectors - will be discussed in light of current results. Perspectives on each mode of administration will be presented. The focus will be on polymeric nanoparticles and dendrimers, although advances in liposome technology will be also reported as they represent the largest body in the drug delivery literature.

  5. Biologically erodable microspheres as potential oral drug delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathiowitz, Edith; Jacob, Jules S.; Jong, Yong S.; Carino, Gerardo P.; Chickering, Donald E.; Chaturvedi, Pravin; Santos, Camilla A.; Vijayaraghavan, Kavita; Montgomery, Sean; Bassett, Michael; Morrell, Craig

    1997-03-01

    Biologically adhesive delivery systems offer important advantages1-5 over conventional drug delivery systems6. Here we show that engineered polymer microspheres made of biologically erodable polymers, which display strong adhesive interactions with gastrointestinal mucus and cellular linings, can traverse both the mucosal absorptive epithelium and the follicle-associated epithelium covering the lymphoid tissue of Peyer's patches. The polymers maintain contact with intestinal epithelium for extended periods of time and actually penetrate it, through and between cells. Thus, once loaded with compounds of pharmacological interest, the microspheres could be developed as delivery systems to transfer biologically active molecules to the circulation. We show that these microspheres increase the absorption of three model substances of widely different molecular size: dicumarol, insulin and plasmid DNA.

  6. 9 CFR 114.18 - Reprocessing of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reprocessing of biological products. 114.18 Section 114.18 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... REQUIREMENTS FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.18 Reprocessing of biological products. The Administrator...

  7. 9 CFR 114.17 - Rebottling of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Rebottling of biological products. 114.17 Section 114.17 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... REQUIREMENTS FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.17 Rebottling of biological products. The Administrator...

  8. 9 CFR 114.18 - Reprocessing of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reprocessing of biological products. 114.18 Section 114.18 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... REQUIREMENTS FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.18 Reprocessing of biological products. The Administrator...

  9. 9 CFR 106.1 - Biological products; exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS EXEMPTION FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS USED IN DEPARTMENT PROGRAMS OR UNDER DEPARTMENT CONTROL OR SUPERVISION § 106.1 Biological products... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Biological products; exemption....

  10. Defining Patient Centric Pharmaceutical Drug Product Design.

    PubMed

    Stegemann, Sven; Ternik, Robert L; Onder, Graziano; Khan, Mansoor A; van Riet-Nales, Diana A

    2016-09-01

    The term "patient centered," "patient centric," or "patient centricity" is increasingly used in the scientific literature in a wide variety of contexts. Generally, patient centric medicines are recognized as an essential contributor to healthy aging and the overall patient's quality of life and life expectancy. Besides the selection of the appropriate type of drug substance and strength for a particular indication in a particular patient, due attention must be paid that the pharmaceutical drug product design is also adequately addressing the particular patient's needs, i.e., assuring adequate patient adherence and the anticipate drug safety and effectiveness. Relevant pharmaceutical design aspects may e.g., involve the selection of the route of administration, the tablet size and shape, the ease of opening the package, the ability to read the user instruction, or the ability to follow the recommended (in-use) storage conditions. Currently, a harmonized definition on patient centric drug development/design has not yet been established. To stimulate scientific research and discussions and the consistent interpretation of test results, it is essential that such a definition is established. We have developed a first draft definition through various rounds of discussions within an interdisciplinary AAPS focus group of experts. This publication summarizes the outcomes and is intended to stimulate further discussions with all stakeholders towards a common definition of patient centric pharmaceutical drug product design that is useable across all disciplines involved.

  11. Strategies for improving biological hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Hallenbeck, Patrick C; Abo-Hashesh, Mona; Ghosh, Dipankar

    2012-04-01

    Biological hydrogen production presents a possible avenue for the large scale sustainable generation of hydrogen needed to fuel a future hydrogen economy. Amongst the possible approaches that are under active investigation and that will be briefly discussed; biophotolysis, photofermentation, microbial electrolysis, and dark fermentation, dark fermentation has the additional advantages of largely relying on already developed bioprocess technology and of potentially using various waste streams as feedstock. However, the major roadblock to developing a practical process has been the low yields, typically around 25%, well below those achievable for the production of other biofuels from the same feedstocks. Moreover, low yields also lead to the generation of side products whose large scale production would generate a waste disposal problem. Here recent attempts to overcome these barriers are reviewed and recent progress in efforts to increase hydrogen yields through physiological manipulation, metabolic engineering and the use of two-stage systems are described.

  12. The challenging definition of naïve patient for biological drug use.

    PubMed

    Biggioggero, Martina; Danova, Marco; Genovese, Umberto; Locatelli, Francesco; Meroni, Pier Luigi; Pane, Fabrizio; Scaglione, Francesco

    2015-06-01

    Biosimilar is defined by The European Medical Agency as a biological medicinal product, which is similar but not identical to the biological drug already authorized. The biosimilar and its reference product are expected to display the same safety and efficacy profile and are generally used to treat the same conditions. The Italian Medicines Agency considers biosimilars as a valid therapeutic option with an economic advantage, especially in primary naïve patients with no previous exposure to the originator or with a sufficiently long wash-out period ("secondary naïve"). The identification of "secondary naïve" is not well defined and can be subjected to different variables, mainly the drug biologic effect and its immunogenicity. The first one depends on the type of biologics and on their mechanism of action. The second one is related to the fact that biologicals may be immunogenic and can trigger an anti-drug antibody response (ADA). ADA may behave as neutralizing antibodies blocking the active site of the biological but can also recognize other epitopes favoring the formation of immune-complexes that eventually affect the pharmacodynamics. Moreover, the concomitant immune-suppressive treatment can affect the immunogenicity, even if the exact mechanism remains unknown. In conclusion, the development and use of biosimilars represent a tool for increasing health system sustainability. However it is of paramount importance to distinguish between the pharmacodynamics of a given drug and its immunogenicity being the two aspects unrelated. Thus a detailed definition of "secondary naïve" patients is challenging, and may be related to both the two parameters.

  13. Genetics of rheumatoid arthritis contributes to biology and drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Yukinori; Wu, Di; Trynka, Gosia; Raj, Towfique; Terao, Chikashi; Ikari, Katsunori; Kochi, Yuta; Ohmura, Koichiro; Suzuki, Akari; Yoshida, Shinji; Graham, Robert R.; Manoharan, Arun; Ortmann, Ward; Bhangale, Tushar; Denny, Joshua C.; Carroll, Robert J.; Eyler, Anne E.; Greenberg, Jeffrey D.; Kremer, Joel M.; Pappas, Dimitrios A.; Jiang, Lei; Yin, Jian; Ye, Lingying; Su, Ding-Feng; Yang, Jian; Xie, Gang; Keystone, Ed; Westra, Harm-Jan; Esko, Tõnu; Metspalu, Andres; Zhou, Xuezhong; Gupta, Namrata; Mirel, Daniel; Stahl, Eli A.; Diogo, Dorothée; Cui, Jing; Liao, Katherine; Guo, Michael H.; Myouzen, Keiko; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Coenen, Marieke J.H.; van Riel, Piet L.C.M.; van de Laar, Mart A.F.J.; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan; Huizinga, Tom W.J.; Dieudé, Philippe; Mariette, Xavier; Bridges, S. Louis; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Toes, Rene E.M.; Tak, Paul P.; Miceli-Richard, Corinne; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Martin, Javier; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Ärlestig, Lisbeth; Choi, Hyon K.; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Galan, Pilar; Lathrop, Mark; Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Barton, Anne; de Vries, Niek; Moreland, Larry W.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Taniguchi, Atsuo; Yamada, Ryo; Kubo, Michiaki; Liu, Jun S.; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Worthington, Jane; Padyukov, Leonid; Klareskog, Lars; Gregersen, Peter K.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Stranger, Barbara E.; De Jager, Philip L.; Franke, Lude; Visscher, Peter M.; Brown, Matthew A.; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Takahashi, Atsushi; Xu, Huji; Behrens, Timothy W.; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Momohara, Shigeki; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Plenge, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge in human genetics is to devise a systematic strategy to integrate disease-associated variants with diverse genomic and biological datasets to provide insight into disease pathogenesis and guide drug discovery for complex traits such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA)1. Here, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analysis in a total of >100,000 subjects of European and Asian ancestries (29,880 RA cases and 73,758 controls), by evaluating ~10 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We discovered 42 novel RA risk loci at a genome-wide level of significance, bringing the total to 1012–4. We devised an in-silico pipeline using established bioinformatics methods based on functional annotation5, cis-acting expression quantitative trait loci (cis-eQTL)6, and pathway analyses7–9 – as well as novel methods based on genetic overlap with human primary immunodeficiency (PID), hematological cancer somatic mutations and knock-out mouse phenotypes – to identify 98 biological candidate genes at these 101 risk loci. We demonstrate that these genes are the targets of approved therapies for RA, and further suggest that drugs approved for other indications may be repurposed for the treatment of RA. Together, this comprehensive genetic study sheds light on fundamental genes, pathways and cell types that contribute to RA pathogenesis, and provides empirical evidence that the genetics of RA can provide important information for drug discovery. PMID:24390342

  14. Genetics of rheumatoid arthritis contributes to biology and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yukinori; Wu, Di; Trynka, Gosia; Raj, Towfique; Terao, Chikashi; Ikari, Katsunori; Kochi, Yuta; Ohmura, Koichiro; Suzuki, Akari; Yoshida, Shinji; Graham, Robert R; Manoharan, Arun; Ortmann, Ward; Bhangale, Tushar; Denny, Joshua C; Carroll, Robert J; Eyler, Anne E; Greenberg, Jeffrey D; Kremer, Joel M; Pappas, Dimitrios A; Jiang, Lei; Yin, Jian; Ye, Lingying; Su, Ding-Feng; Yang, Jian; Xie, Gang; Keystone, Ed; Westra, Harm-Jan; Esko, Tõnu; Metspalu, Andres; Zhou, Xuezhong; Gupta, Namrata; Mirel, Daniel; Stahl, Eli A; Diogo, Dorothée; Cui, Jing; Liao, Katherine; Guo, Michael H; Myouzen, Keiko; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Coenen, Marieke J H; van Riel, Piet L C M; van de Laar, Mart A F J; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan; Huizinga, Tom W J; Dieudé, Philippe; Mariette, Xavier; Bridges, S Louis; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Toes, Rene E M; Tak, Paul P; Miceli-Richard, Corinne; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Martin, Javier; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Arlestig, Lisbeth; Choi, Hyon K; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Galan, Pilar; Lathrop, Mark; Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Barton, Anne; de Vries, Niek; Moreland, Larry W; Criswell, Lindsey A; Karlson, Elizabeth W; Taniguchi, Atsuo; Yamada, Ryo; Kubo, Michiaki; Liu, Jun S; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Worthington, Jane; Padyukov, Leonid; Klareskog, Lars; Gregersen, Peter K; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Stranger, Barbara E; De Jager, Philip L; Franke, Lude; Visscher, Peter M; Brown, Matthew A; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Takahashi, Atsushi; Xu, Huji; Behrens, Timothy W; Siminovitch, Katherine A; Momohara, Shigeki; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Plenge, Robert M

    2014-02-20

    A major challenge in human genetics is to devise a systematic strategy to integrate disease-associated variants with diverse genomic and biological data sets to provide insight into disease pathogenesis and guide drug discovery for complex traits such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here we performed a genome-wide association study meta-analysis in a total of >100,000 subjects of European and Asian ancestries (29,880 RA cases and 73,758 controls), by evaluating ∼10 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms. We discovered 42 novel RA risk loci at a genome-wide level of significance, bringing the total to 101 (refs 2 - 4). We devised an in silico pipeline using established bioinformatics methods based on functional annotation, cis-acting expression quantitative trait loci and pathway analyses--as well as novel methods based on genetic overlap with human primary immunodeficiency, haematological cancer somatic mutations and knockout mouse phenotypes--to identify 98 biological candidate genes at these 101 risk loci. We demonstrate that these genes are the targets of approved therapies for RA, and further suggest that drugs approved for other indications may be repurposed for the treatment of RA. Together, this comprehensive genetic study sheds light on fundamental genes, pathways and cell types that contribute to RA pathogenesis, and provides empirical evidence that the genetics of RA can provide important information for drug discovery. PMID:24390342

  15. 42 CFR 419.64 - Transitional pass-through payments: Drugs and biologicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... outpatient hospital service: (1) Orphan drugs. A drug or biological that is used for a rare disease or..., monitoring, and therapeutic nuclear medicine services if payment for the drug or biological as an outpatient... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Transitional pass-through payments: Drugs...

  16. 42 CFR 419.64 - Transitional pass-through payments: Drugs and biologicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... outpatient hospital service: (1) Orphan drugs. A drug or biological that is used for a rare disease or..., monitoring, and therapeutic nuclear medicine services if payment for the drug or biological as an outpatient... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Transitional pass-through payments: Drugs...

  17. Evaluating the administration costs of biologic drugs: development of a cost algorithm.

    PubMed

    Tetteh, Ebenezer K; Morris, Stephen

    2014-12-01

    Biologic drugs, as with all other medical technologies, are subject to a number of regulatory, marketing, reimbursement (financing) and other demand-restricting hurdles applied by healthcare payers. One example is the routine use of cost-effectiveness analyses or health technology assessments to determine which medical technologies offer value-for-money. The manner in which these assessments are conducted suggests that, holding all else equal, the economic value of biologic drugs may be determined by how much is spent on administering these drugs or trade-offs between drug acquisition and administration costs. Yet, on the supply-side, it seems very little attention is given to how manufacturing and formulation choices affect healthcare delivery costs. This paper evaluates variations in the administration costs of biologic drugs, taking care to ensure consistent inclusion of all relevant cost resources. From this, it develops a regression-based algorithm with which manufacturers could possibly predict, during process development, how their manufacturing and formulation choices may impact on the healthcare delivery costs of their products. PMID:26208926

  18. 75 FR 59729 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... portion of the meeting will be closed to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological... for protective antigen-based anthrax vaccines for a post-exposure prophylaxis indication using...

  19. 9 CFR 112.6 - Packaging biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Packaging biological products. 112.6... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS PACKAGING AND LABELING § 112.6 Packaging biological products. (a) Each multiple-dose final container of a biological...

  20. 9 CFR 113.50 - Ingredients of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ingredients of biological products... REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.50 Ingredients of biological products. All ingredients used in a licensed biological product shall meet accepted standards of purity and quality; shall be...

  1. 9 CFR 113.50 - Ingredients of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ingredients of biological products... REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.50 Ingredients of biological products. All ingredients used in a licensed biological product shall meet accepted standards of purity and quality; shall be...

  2. 9 CFR 113.50 - Ingredients of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ingredients of biological products... REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.50 Ingredients of biological products. All ingredients used in a licensed biological product shall meet accepted standards of purity and quality; shall be...

  3. 9 CFR 113.50 - Ingredients of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ingredients of biological products... REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.50 Ingredients of biological products. All ingredients used in a licensed biological product shall meet accepted standards of purity and quality; shall be...

  4. 9 CFR 113.50 - Ingredients of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ingredients of biological products... REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.50 Ingredients of biological products. All ingredients used in a licensed biological product shall meet accepted standards of purity and quality; shall be...

  5. 78 FR 38053 - Determination That OPANA ER (Oxymorphone Hydrochloride) Drug Products Covered by New Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-25

    ... Products Covered by New Drug Application 21-610 Were Not Withdrawn From Sale for Reasons of Safety or... products approved under new drug application (NDA) 21-610 were not withdrawn from sale for reasons of... of abbreviated new drug applications (ANDAs) that refer to these drug products, and it will allow...

  6. Genetics of Psoriasis and Pharmacogenetics of Biological Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Prieto-Pérez, Rocío; Cabaleiro, Teresa; Daudén, Esteban; Ochoa, Dolores; Roman, Manuel; Abad-Santos, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the skin. The causes of psoriasis are unknown, although family and twin studies have shown genetic factors to play a key role in its development. The many genes associated with psoriasis and the immune response include TNFα, IL23, and IL12. Advances in knowledge of the pathogenesis of psoriasis have enabled the development of new drugs that target cytokines (e.g., etanercept, adalimumab, and infliximab, which target TNFα, and ustekinumab, which targets the p40 subunit of IL23 and IL12). These drugs have improved the safety and efficacy of treatment in comparison with previous therapies. However, not all patients respond equally to treatment, possibly owing to interindividual genetic variability. In this review, we describe the genes associated with psoriasis and the immune response, the biological drugs used to treat chronic severe plaque psoriasis, new drugs in phase II and III trials, and current knowledge on the implications of pharmacogenomics in predicting response to these treatments. PMID:24069534

  7. What does systems biology mean for drug development?

    PubMed

    Schrattenholz, André; Soskić, Vukić

    2008-01-01

    The complexity and flexibility of cellular architectures is increasingly recognized by impressive progress on the side of molecular analytics, i.e. proteomics, genomics and metabolomics. One of the messages from systems biology is that the number of molecular species in cellular networks is orders of magnitude bigger than anticipated by genomic analysis, in particular by fast posttranslational modifications of proteins. The requirements to manage external signals, integrate spatiotemporal signal transduction inside an organism and at the same time optimizing networks of biochemical and chemical reactions result in chemically extremely fine tuned molecular entities. Chemical side reactions of enzymatic activity, like e.g. random oxidative damage of proteins by free radicals during aging constantly introduce epigenetic alterations of protein targets. These events gradually and on an individual stochastic scale, keep modifying activities of these targets, and their affinities and selectivities towards biological and pharmacological ligands. One further message is that many of the key reactions in living systems are essentially based on interactions of low affinities and even low selectivities. This principle is responsible for the enormous flexibility and redundancy of cellular circuitries. So, in complex disorders like cancer or neurodegenerative diseases, which are rooted in relatively subtle and multimodal dysfunction of important physiologic pathways, drug discovery programs based on the concept of high affinity/high specificity compounds ("one-target, one-disease"), which still dominate the pharmaceutical industry increasingly turn out to be unsuccessful. Despite improvements in rational drug design and high throughput screening methods, the number of novel, single-target drugs fell much behind expectations during the past decade and the treatment of "complex diseases" remains a most pressing medical need. Currently a change of paradigm can be observed with

  8. 9 CFR 114.17 - Rebottling of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Rebottling of biological products. 114.17 Section 114.17 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS PRODUCTION REQUIREMENTS FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS §...

  9. The impact of natural products upon modern drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, A

    2008-06-01

    In the period 1970-2006, a total of 24 unique natural products were discovered that led to an approved drug. We analyze these successful leads in terms of drug-like properties, and show that they can be divided into two equal subsets. The first falls in the 'Lipinski universe' and complies with the Rule of Five. The second is a 'parallel universe' that violates the rules. Nevertheless, the latter compounds remain largely compliant in terms of logP and H-bond donors, highlighting the importance of these two metrics in predicting bioavailability. Natural products are often cited as an exception to Lipinski's rules. We believe this is because nature has learned to maintain low hydrophobicity and intermolecular H-bond donating potential when it needs to make biologically active compounds with high molecular weight and large numbers of rotatable bonds. In addition, natural products are more likely than purely synthetic compounds to resemble biosynthetic intermediates or endogenous metabolites, and hence take advantage of active transport mechanisms. Interestingly, the natural product leads in the Lipinski and parallel universe had an identical success rate (50%) in delivering an oral drug.

  10. Synthetic Biological Approaches to Natural Product Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Jaclyn M; Tang, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Small molecules produced in Nature continue to be an inspiration for the development of new therapeutic agents. These natural products possess exquisite chemical diversity, which gives rise to their wide range of biological activities. In their host organism, natural products are assembled and modified by dedicated biosynthetic pathways that Nature has meticulously developed. Often times, the complex structures or chemical modifications instated by these pathways are difficult to replicate using traditional synthetic methods. An alternative approach for creating or enhancing the structural variation of natural products is through combinatorial biosynthesis. By rationally reprogramming and manipulating the biosynthetic machinery responsible for their production, unnatural metabolites that were otherwise inaccessible can be obtained. Additionally, new chemical structures can be synthesized or derivatized by developing the enzymes that carry out these complicated chemical reactions into biocatalysts. In this review, we will discuss a variety of combinatorial biosynthetic strategies, their technical challenges, and highlight some recent (since 2007) examples of rationally designed unnatural metabolites, as well as platforms that have been established for the production and modification of clinically important pharmaceutical compounds. PMID:22221832

  11. Biological hydrogen production: prospects and challenges.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyung-Sool; Vermaas, Wim F J; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2010-05-01

    Hydrogen gas provides exceptional value as an energy carrier and industrial feedstock, but currently is produced entirely by reforming fossil fuels. Biological hydrogen production (BioH(2)), which offers the possibility of being renewable and carbon neutral, can be achieved by photosynthesis, fermentation, and microbial electrolysis cells. This review introduces the principles, advantages and challenges of each approach to BioH(2). Photosynthetic BioH(2) is the ultimate renewable source, since it directly uses inexhaustible resources: sunlight energy and electrons from H(2)O. However, it presents major technical challenges, particularly due to oxygen sensitivity. Fermentative BioH(2) offers a high production rate, but poor conversion efficiency from the organic substrate to H(2). The microbial electrolysis cell can achieve high conversion efficiency, but is an emerging technology.

  12. 21 CFR 601.25 - Review procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective, and not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Review procedures to determine that licensed... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS LICENSING Biologics Licensing § 601.25 Review procedures to... category of products. (a) Advisory review panels. The Commissioner of Food and Drugs shall appoint...

  13. 21 CFR 601.25 - Review procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective, and not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Review procedures to determine that licensed... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS LICENSING Biologics Licensing § 601.25 Review procedures to... category of products. (a) Advisory review panels. The Commissioner of Food and Drugs shall appoint...

  14. 21 CFR 601.25 - Review procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective, and not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Review procedures to determine that licensed... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS LICENSING Biologics Licensing § 601.25 Review procedures to... category of products. (a) Advisory review panels. The Commissioner of Food and Drugs shall appoint...

  15. 21 CFR 335.50 - Labeling of antidiarrheal drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Labeling of antidiarrheal drug products. 335.50 Section 335.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... section 502 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act) relating to misbranding and...

  16. 21 CFR 335.50 - Labeling of antidiarrheal drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Labeling of antidiarrheal drug products. 335.50 Section 335.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... section 502 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act) relating to misbranding and...

  17. 21 CFR 335.50 - Labeling of antidiarrheal drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Labeling of antidiarrheal drug products. 335.50 Section 335.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... section 502 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act) relating to misbranding and...

  18. 21 CFR 335.50 - Labeling of antidiarrheal drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Labeling of antidiarrheal drug products. 335.50 Section 335.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... section 502 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act) relating to misbranding and...

  19. 21 CFR 211.208 - Drug product salvaging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Drug product salvaging. 211.208 Section 211.208 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Returned and Salvaged...

  20. 21 CFR 211.208 - Drug product salvaging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drug product salvaging. 211.208 Section 211.208 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Returned and Salvaged...

  1. 21 CFR 211.204 - Returned drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Returned drug products. 211.204 Section 211.204 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Returned and Salvaged...

  2. 21 CFR 211.204 - Returned drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Returned drug products. 211.204 Section 211.204 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Returned and Salvaged...

  3. 21 CFR 211.134 - Drug product inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drug product inspection. 211.134 Section 211.134 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Packaging and Labeling...

  4. 21 CFR 211.134 - Drug product inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Drug product inspection. 211.134 Section 211.134 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Packaging and Labeling...

  5. 21 CFR 211.208 - Drug product salvaging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Drug product salvaging. 211.208 Section 211.208 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Returned and Salvaged...

  6. 21 CFR 211.208 - Drug product salvaging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drug product salvaging. 211.208 Section 211.208 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Returned and Salvaged...

  7. 21 CFR 211.94 - Drug product containers and closures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drug product containers and closures. 211.94 Section 211.94 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Control...

  8. 21 CFR 211.208 - Drug product salvaging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Drug product salvaging. 211.208 Section 211.208 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Returned and Salvaged...

  9. 21 CFR 211.204 - Returned drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Returned drug products. 211.204 Section 211.204 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Returned and Salvaged...

  10. 21 CFR 211.204 - Returned drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Returned drug products. 211.204 Section 211.204 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Returned and Salvaged...

  11. 21 CFR 211.94 - Drug product containers and closures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Drug product containers and closures. 211.94 Section 211.94 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Control...

  12. 21 CFR 211.94 - Drug product containers and closures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Drug product containers and closures. 211.94 Section 211.94 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Control...

  13. 21 CFR 211.204 - Returned drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Returned drug products. 211.204 Section 211.204 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Returned and Salvaged...

  14. 21 CFR 211.94 - Drug product containers and closures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Drug product containers and closures. 211.94 Section 211.94 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Control...

  15. 21 CFR 211.94 - Drug product containers and closures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drug product containers and closures. 211.94 Section 211.94 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Control...

  16. 21 CFR 211.134 - Drug product inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Drug product inspection. 211.134 Section 211.134 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Packaging and Labeling...

  17. 21 CFR 341.78 - Labeling of expectorant drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Labeling of expectorant drug products. 341.78 Section 341.78 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... product for persistent or chronic cough such as occurs with smoking, asthma, chronic bronchitis,...

  18. 21 CFR 341.78 - Labeling of expectorant drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Labeling of expectorant drug products. 341.78 Section 341.78 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... product for persistent or chronic cough such as occurs with smoking, asthma, chronic bronchitis,...

  19. Parasite neuropeptide biology: Seeding rational drug target selection?

    PubMed Central

    McVeigh, Paul; Atkinson, Louise; Marks, Nikki J.; Mousley, Angela; Dalzell, Johnathan J.; Sluder, Ann; Hammerland, Lance; Maule, Aaron G.

    2011-01-01

    The rationale for identifying drug targets within helminth neuromuscular signalling systems is based on the premise that adequate nerve and muscle function is essential for many of the key behavioural determinants of helminth parasitism, including sensory perception/host location, invasion, locomotion/orientation, attachment, feeding and reproduction. This premise is validated by the tendency of current anthelmintics to act on classical neurotransmitter-gated ion channels present on helminth nerve and/or muscle, yielding therapeutic endpoints associated with paralysis and/or death. Supplementary to classical neurotransmitters, helminth nervous systems are peptide-rich and encompass associated biosynthetic and signal transduction components – putative drug targets that remain to be exploited by anthelmintic chemotherapy. At this time, no neuropeptide system-targeting lead compounds have been reported, and given that our basic knowledge of neuropeptide biology in parasitic helminths remains inadequate, the short-term prospects for such drugs remain poor. Here, we review current knowledge of neuropeptide signalling in Nematoda and Platyhelminthes, and highlight a suite of 19 protein families that yield deleterious phenotypes in helminth reverse genetics screens. We suggest that orthologues of some of these peptidergic signalling components represent appealing therapeutic targets in parasitic helminths. PMID:24533265

  20. Drug diffusion and biological responses of arteries using a drug-eluting stent with nonuniform coating

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Noboru; Mori, Yuhei; Uchiyama, Sayaka

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a nonuniform coating, abluminal-gradient coating (AGC), which leaves the abluminal surface of the curves and links parts of the stent free from the drug coating, on the diffusion direction of the drug and the biological responses of the artery to drug-eluting stent (DES) by comparing the AGC-sirolimus stent and the conventional full-surface coating (CFC) sirolimus stent. The study aimed to verify whether the AGC approach was appropriate for the development of a safer DES, minimizing the risks of stent thrombosis due to delayed endothelialization by the drug and distal embolization due to cracking of the coating layer on the hinge parts of the DES on stent expansion. In the in vitro local drug diffusion study, we used rhodamine B as a model drug, and rhodamine B released from the AGC stent diffused predominantly into the abluminal side of the alginate artery model. Conversely, rhodamine B released from the CFC stent quickly spread to the luminal side of the artery model, where endothelial cell regeneration is required. In the biological responses study, the luminal surface of the iliac artery implanted with the AGC-sirolimus stent in a rabbit iliac artery for 2 weeks was completely covered with endothelial-like cells. On the other hand, the luminal surface of the iliac artery implanted with the CFC-sirolimus stent for 2 weeks only showed partial coverage with endothelial-like cells. While thrombosis was observed in two of the three CFC-sirolimus stents, it was observed in only one of the three AGC-sirolimus stents. Taken together, these findings indicate that the designed nonuniform coating (AGC) is an appropriate approach to ensure a safer DES. However, the number of studies is limited and a larger study should be conducted to reach a statistically significant conclusion. PMID:27051322

  1. [Dangerous drugs: products containing synthetic chemicals].

    PubMed

    Kamijo, Yoshito

    2016-02-01

    When the patients poisoned with "dangerous drugs", that is, products containing synthetic chemicals such as synthetic cannabinoids and cathinones, are transferred to the emergency facilities, the chemicals really consumed cannot be determined there. So, supportive care may be the most important strategy for treating them. For example, those with serious consciousness disturbance should be supported with ventilator after intubation. Those with remarkable excitatory CNS or sympathetic symptoms, benzodiazepines such as diazepam and midazolam, should be administered. Those with hallucination or delusion, antipsychotics such as haloperidol or risperidone should be administered. Those with rhabdomyolysis, hypermyoglobinemia and acute kidney injury, intravenous fluids and hemodialysis should be introduced. PMID:26915246

  2. Alcohol and Drug Prevention Curriculum Resource Guide Grades 10-12: Science--Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Alcohol and Drug Defense Program.

    This curriculum resource guide on alcohol and drug prevention provides suggested activities for teachers of grades 10 through 12. Three integrated learning activities for science/biology and healthful living are presented. The science/biology goal is understanding the biology of humans. Healthful living goals include analyzing drug and alcohol use…

  3. The year's new drugs & biologics, 2013: Part II.

    PubMed

    Graul, A I; Navarro, D; Dulsat, C; Cruces, E; Tracy, M

    2014-02-01

    The demise of the pharmaceutical industry, so pessimistically predicted by many in recent years, has not come to pass and in fact the patient is alive and well. New programs enacted by drug regulators have been enthusiastically taken up by the industry, including the FDA's breakthrough therapy and qualified infectious disease product (QIDP) designations, as well as the now-consolidated orphan drug programs in many countries. Pharma companies pragmatically wean nonperformers from the pipeline in an efficient manner, resulting in somewhat leaner but higher-quality pipelines. Mergers and acquisitions also continue to drive consolidation and efficiency in the industry, a trend that continued during 2013. This article provides an updated review of these and other trends in the pharmaceutical industry in the year just passed.

  4. Systems Biology of Microbial Exopolysaccharides Production

    PubMed Central

    Ates, Ozlem

    2015-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides (EPSs) produced by diverse group of microbial systems are rapidly emerging as new and industrially important biomaterials. Due to their unique and complex chemical structures and many interesting physicochemical and rheological properties with novel functionality, the microbial EPSs find wide range of commercial applications in various fields of the economy such as food, feed, packaging, chemical, textile, cosmetics and pharmaceutical industry, agriculture, and medicine. EPSs are mainly associated with high-value applications, and they have received considerable research attention over recent decades with their biocompatibility, biodegradability, and both environmental and human compatibility. However, only a few microbial EPSs have achieved to be used commercially due to their high production costs. The emerging need to overcome economic hurdles and the increasing significance of microbial EPSs in industrial and medical biotechnology call for the elucidation of the interrelations between metabolic pathways and EPS biosynthesis mechanism in order to control and hence enhance its microbial productivity. Moreover, a better understanding of biosynthesis mechanism is a significant issue for improvement of product quality and properties and also for the design of novel strains. Therefore, a systems-based approach constitutes an important step toward understanding the interplay between metabolism and EPS biosynthesis and further enhances its metabolic performance for industrial application. In this review, primarily the microbial EPSs, their biosynthesis mechanism, and important factors for their production will be discussed. After this brief introduction, recent literature on the application of omics technologies and systems biology tools for the improvement of production yields will be critically evaluated. Special focus will be given to EPSs with high market value such as xanthan, levan, pullulan, and dextran. PMID:26734603

  5. Systems Biology of Microbial Exopolysaccharides Production.

    PubMed

    Ates, Ozlem

    2015-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides (EPSs) produced by diverse group of microbial systems are rapidly emerging as new and industrially important biomaterials. Due to their unique and complex chemical structures and many interesting physicochemical and rheological properties with novel functionality, the microbial EPSs find wide range of commercial applications in various fields of the economy such as food, feed, packaging, chemical, textile, cosmetics and pharmaceutical industry, agriculture, and medicine. EPSs are mainly associated with high-value applications, and they have received considerable research attention over recent decades with their biocompatibility, biodegradability, and both environmental and human compatibility. However, only a few microbial EPSs have achieved to be used commercially due to their high production costs. The emerging need to overcome economic hurdles and the increasing significance of microbial EPSs in industrial and medical biotechnology call for the elucidation of the interrelations between metabolic pathways and EPS biosynthesis mechanism in order to control and hence enhance its microbial productivity. Moreover, a better understanding of biosynthesis mechanism is a significant issue for improvement of product quality and properties and also for the design of novel strains. Therefore, a systems-based approach constitutes an important step toward understanding the interplay between metabolism and EPS biosynthesis and further enhances its metabolic performance for industrial application. In this review, primarily the microbial EPSs, their biosynthesis mechanism, and important factors for their production will be discussed. After this brief introduction, recent literature on the application of omics technologies and systems biology tools for the improvement of production yields will be critically evaluated. Special focus will be given to EPSs with high market value such as xanthan, levan, pullulan, and dextran. PMID:26734603

  6. Synthetic biology approaches in drug discovery and pharmaceutical biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Synthetic biology is the attempt to apply the concepts of engineering to biological systems with the aim to create organisms with new emergent properties. These organisms might have desirable novel biosynthetic capabilities, act as biosensors or help us to understand the intricacies of living systems. This approach has the potential to assist the discovery and production of pharmaceutical compounds at various stages. New sources of bioactive compounds can be created in the form of genetically encoded small molecule libraries. The recombination of individual parts has been employed to design proteins that act as biosensors, which could be used to identify and quantify molecules of interest. New biosynthetic pathways may be designed by stitching together enzymes with desired activities, and genetic code expansion can be used to introduce new functionalities into peptides and proteins to increase their chemical scope and biological stability. This review aims to give an insight into recently developed individual components and modules that might serve as parts in a synthetic biology approach to pharmaceutical biotechnology. PMID:20396881

  7. Biological production of ethanol from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    Due to the abundant supply of coal in the United States, significant research efforts have occurred over the past 15 years concerning the conversion of coal to liquid fuels. Researchers at the University of Arkansas have concentrated on a biological approach to coal liquefaction, starting with coal-derived synthesis gas as the raw material. Synthesis gas, a mixture of CO, H[sub 2], CO[sub 2], CH[sub 4] and sulfur gases, is first produced using traditional gasification techniques. The CO, CO[sub 2] and H[sub 2] are then converted to ethanol using a bacterial culture of Clostridium 1jungdahlii. Ethanol is the desired product if the resultant product stream is to be used as a liquid fuel. However, under normal operating conditions, the wild strain'' produces acetate in favor of ethanol in conjunction with growth in a 20:1 molar ratio. Research was performed to determine the conditions necessary to maximize not only the ratio of ethanol to acetate, but also to maximize the concentration of ethanol resulting in the product stream.

  8. Discovery of novel drug targets and their functions using phenotypic screening of natural products.

    PubMed

    Chang, Junghwa; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2016-03-01

    Natural products are valuable resources that provide a variety of bioactive compounds and natural pharmacophores in modern drug discovery. Discovery of biologically active natural products and unraveling their target proteins to understand their mode of action have always been critical hurdles for their development into clinical drugs. For effective discovery and development of bioactive natural products into novel therapeutic drugs, comprehensive screening and identification of target proteins are indispensable. In this review, a systematic approach to understanding the mode of action of natural products isolated using phenotypic screening involving chemical proteomics-based target identification is introduced. This review highlights three natural products recently discovered via phenotypic screening, namely glucopiericidin A, ecumicin, and terpestacin, as representative case studies to revisit the pivotal role of natural products as powerful tools in discovering the novel functions and druggability of targets in biological systems and pathological diseases of interest.

  9. 9 CFR 103.3 - Shipment of experimental biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shipment of experimental biological..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS EXPERIMENTAL PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION, AND EVALUATION OF BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS PRIOR TO LICENSING § 103.3 Shipment...

  10. 9 CFR 103.1 - Preparation of experimental biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Preparation of experimental biological..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS EXPERIMENTAL PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION, AND EVALUATION OF BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS PRIOR TO LICENSING § 103.1 Preparation...

  11. Learning from Biology: Synthetic Lipoproteins for Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Huang; Cruz, William; Chen, Juan; Zheng, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic lipoproteins represent a relevant tool for targeted delivery of biological/chemical agents (chemotherapeutics, siRNAs, photosensitizers and imaging contrast agents) into various cell types. These nanoparticles offer a number of advantages on drugs delivery over their native counterparts while retaining their natural characteristics and biological functions. Their ultra-small size (<30nm), high biocompatibility, favorable circulation half-life and natural ability to bind specific lipoprotein receptors i.e. low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and Scavenger receptor class B member 1 (SRB1) that are found in a number of pathological conditions (e.g. cancer, atherosclerosis), make them superior delivery strategies when compared to other nanoparticle systems. We review the various approaches that have been developed for the generation of synthetic lipoproteins and their respective applications in vitro and in vivo. More specifically, we summarize the way to address the limitation on use of reconstituted lipoproteins by means of natural or recombinant apolipoproteins, as well as apolipoprotein mimetic molecules. Finally, we provide an overview of the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches and discuss future perspectives for clinical translation of these nanoparticles. PMID:25346461

  12. Neurotrophic Natural Products: Chemistry and Biology

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Lacoske, Michelle H.

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases and spinal cord injury affect approximately 50 million people worldwide, bringing the total healthcare cost to over 600 billion dollars per year. Nervous system growth factors, that is, neurotrophins, are a potential solution to these disorders, since they could promote nerve regeneration. An average of 500 publications per year attests to the significance of neurotrophins in biomedical sciences and underlines their potential for therapeutic applications. Nonetheless, the poor pharmacokinetic profile of neurotrophins severely restricts their clinical use. On the other hand, small molecules that modulate neurotrophic activity offer a promising therapeutic approach against neurological disorders. Nature has provided an impressive array of natural products that have potent neurotrophic activities. This Review highlights the current synthetic strategies toward these compounds and summarizes their ability to induce neuronal growth and rehabilitation. It is anticipated that neurotrophic natural products could be used not only as starting points in drug design but also as tools to study the next frontier in biomedical sciences: the brain activity map project. PMID:24353244

  13. Pharmacogenomics and cardiovascular drugs: need for integrated biological system with phenotypes and proteomic markers.

    PubMed

    Siest, Gérard; Marteau, Jean-Brice; Maumus, Sandy; Berrahmoune, Hind; Jeannesson, Elise; Samara, Anastasia; Batt, Anne-Marie; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie

    2005-12-19

    Personalized medicine is based on a better knowledge of biological variability, considering the important part due to genetics. When trying to identify involved genes and their products in differential cardiovascular drug responses, a five-step strategy is to be followed: 1) Pharmacokinetic-related genes and phenotypes (2) Pharmacodynamic targets, genes and products (3) Cardiovascular diseases and risks depending on specific or large metabolic cycles (4) Physiological variations of previously identified genes and proteins (5) Environment influences on them. After summarizing the most well-known genes involved in drug metabolism, we will take as example of drugs, the statins, considered as very important drugs from a Public-Health standpoint, but also for economical reasons. These drugs respond differently in human depending on multiple polymorphisms. We will give examples with common ApoE polymorphisms influencing the hypolipemic effects of statins. These drugs also have pleiotropic effects and decrease inflammatory markers. This illustrates the need to separate clinical diseases phenotypes in specific metabolic pathways, which could propose other classifications, of diseases and related genes. Hypertension is also a good example of clinical phenotype which should be followed after various therapeutic approaches by genes polymorphisms and proteins markers. Gene products are under clear environmental expression variations such as age, body mass index and obesity, alcohol, tobacco and dietary interventions which are the first therapeutical actions taken in cardiovascular diseases. But at each of the five steps, within a pharmacoproteomic strategy, we also need to use available information from peptides, proteins and metabolites, which usually are the gene products. A profiling approach, i.e., dealing with genomics, but now also with proteomics, is to be used. In conclusion, the profiling, as well as the large amount of data, will more than before render necessary an

  14. Monascus secondary metabolites: production and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Patakova, Petra

    2013-02-01

    The genus Monascus, comprising nine species, can reproduce either vegetatively with filaments and conidia or sexually by the formation of ascospores. The most well-known species of genus Monascus, namely, M. purpureus, M. ruber and M. pilosus, are often used for rice fermentation to produce red yeast rice, a special product used either for food coloring or as a food supplement with positive effects on human health. The colored appearance (red, orange or yellow) of Monascus-fermented substrates is produced by a mixture of oligoketide pigments that are synthesized by a combination of polyketide and fatty acid synthases. The major pigments consist of pairs of yellow (ankaflavin and monascin), orange (rubropunctatin and monascorubrin) and red (rubropunctamine and monascorubramine) compounds; however, more than 20 other colored products have recently been isolated from fermented rice or culture media. In addition to pigments, a group of monacolin substances and the mycotoxin citrinin can be produced by Monascus. Various non-specific biological activities (antimicrobial, antitumor, immunomodulative and others) of these pigmented compounds are, at least partly, ascribed to their reaction with amino group-containing compounds, i.e. amino acids, proteins or nucleic acids. Monacolins, in the form of β-hydroxy acids, inhibit hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, a key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis in animals and humans.

  15. 21 CFR 357.150 - Labeling of anthelmintic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Section 357.150 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE MISCELLANEOUS INTERNAL DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE... be taken alone or with milk or fruit juice. Use of a laxative is not necessary prior to, during,...

  16. 21 CFR 357.150 - Labeling of anthelmintic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Section 357.150 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE MISCELLANEOUS INTERNAL DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE... be taken alone or with milk or fruit juice. Use of a laxative is not necessary prior to, during,...

  17. 21 CFR 357.150 - Labeling of anthelmintic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Section 357.150 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE MISCELLANEOUS INTERNAL DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE... be taken alone or with milk or fruit juice. Use of a laxative is not necessary prior to, during,...

  18. Dynamic enhancement of drug product labels to support drug safety, efficacy, and effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Out-of-date or incomplete drug product labeling information may increase the risk of otherwise preventable adverse drug events. In recognition of these concerns, the United States Federal Drug Administration (FDA) requires drug product labels to include specific information. Unfortunately, several studies have found that drug product labeling fails to keep current with the scientific literature. We present a novel approach to addressing this issue. The primary goal of this novel approach is to better meet the information needs of persons who consult the drug product label for information on a drug’s efficacy, effectiveness, and safety. Using FDA product label regulations as a guide, the approach links drug claims present in drug information sources available on the Semantic Web with specific product label sections. Here we report on pilot work that establishes the baseline performance characteristics of a proof-of-concept system implementing the novel approach. Claims from three drug information sources were linked to the Clinical Studies, Drug Interactions, and Clinical Pharmacology sections of the labels for drug products that contain one of 29 psychotropic drugs. The resulting Linked Data set maps 409 efficacy/effectiveness study results, 784 drug-drug interactions, and 112 metabolic pathway assertions derived from three clinically-oriented drug information sources (ClinicalTrials.gov, the National Drug File – Reference Terminology, and the Drug Interaction Knowledge Base) to the sections of 1,102 product labels. Proof-of-concept web pages were created for all 1,102 drug product labels that demonstrate one possible approach to presenting information that dynamically enhances drug product labeling. We found that approximately one in five efficacy/effectiveness claims were relevant to the Clinical Studies section of a psychotropic drug product, with most relevant claims providing new information. We also identified several cases where all of the drug-drug

  19. 75 FR 73108 - Guidance for Industry on Abbreviated New Drug Applications: Impurities in Drug Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry on Abbreviated New Drug Applications...) guidance for industry ``Q3B(R) Impurities in New Drug Products,'' which was announced in August 2006. DATES... and Research, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New ] Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 51, rm. 2201,...

  20. Systems biology approaches for identifying adverse drug reactions and elucidating their underlying biological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Boland, Mary Regina; Jacunski, Alexandra; Lorberbaum, Tal; Romano, Joseph D; Moskovitch, Robert; Tatonetti, Nicholas P

    2016-01-01

    Small molecules are indispensable to modern medical therapy. However, their use may lead to unintended, negative medical outcomes commonly referred to as adverse drug reactions (ADRs). These effects vary widely in mechanism, severity, and populations affected, making ADR prediction and identification important public health concerns. Current methods rely on clinical trials and postmarket surveillance programs to find novel ADRs; however, clinical trials are limited by small sample size, whereas postmarket surveillance methods may be biased and inherently leave patients at risk until sufficient clinical evidence has been gathered. Systems pharmacology, an emerging interdisciplinary field combining network and chemical biology, provides important tools to uncover and understand ADRs and may mitigate the drawbacks of traditional methods. In particular, network analysis allows researchers to integrate heterogeneous data sources and quantify the interactions between biological and chemical entities. Recent work in this area has combined chemical, biological, and large-scale observational health data to predict ADRs in both individual patients and global populations. In this review, we explore the rapid expansion of systems pharmacology in the study of ADRs. We enumerate the existing methods and strategies and illustrate progress in the field with a model framework that incorporates crucial data elements, such as diet and comorbidities, known to modulate ADR risk. Using this framework, we highlight avenues of research that may currently be underexplored, representing opportunities for future work.

  1. Tribbles pseudokinases: novel targets for chemical biology and drug discovery?

    PubMed

    Foulkes, Daniel M; Byrne, Dominic P; Bailey, Fiona P; Eyers, Patrick A

    2015-10-01

    Tribbles (TRIB) proteins are pseudokinase mediators of eukaryotic signalling that have evolved important roles in lipoprotein metabolism, immune function and cellular differentiation and proliferation. In addition, an evolutionary-conserved modulation of PI3K/AKT signalling pathways highlights them as novel and rather unusual pharmaceutical targets. The three human TRIB family members are uniquely defined by an acidic pseudokinase domain containing a 'broken' α C-helix and a MEK (MAPK/ERK)-binding site at the end of the putative C-lobe and a distinct C-terminal peptide motif that interacts directly with a small subset of cellular E3 ubiquitin ligases. This latter interaction drives proteasomal-dependent degradation of networks of transcription factors, whose rate of turnover determines the biological attributes of individual TRIB family members. Defining the function of individual Tribs has been made possible through evaluation of individual TRIB knockout mice, siRNA/overexpression approaches and genetic screening in flies, where the single TRIB gene was originally described 15 years ago. The rapidly maturing TRIB field is primed to exploit chemical biology approaches to evaluate endogenous TRIB signalling events in intact cells. This will help define how TRIB-driven protein-protein interactions and the atypical TRIB ATP-binding site, fit into cellular signalling modules in experimental scenarios where TRIB-signalling complexes remain unperturbed. In this mini-review, we discuss how small molecules can reveal rate-limiting signalling outputs and functions of Tribs in cells and intact organisms, perhaps serving as guides for the development of new drugs. We predict that appropriate small molecule TRIB ligands will further accelerate the transition of TRIB pseudokinase analysis into the mainstream of cell signalling. PMID:26517930

  2. 21 CFR 1310.11 - Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 1310.11 Section 1310.11 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT... Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. (a)...

  3. 21 CFR 1310.11 - Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 1310.11 Section 1310.11 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT... Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. (a)...

  4. Marinopyrroles: Unique Drug Discoveries Based on Marine Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Li, Rongshi

    2016-01-01

    Natural products provide a successful supply of new chemical entities (NCEs) for drug discovery to treat human diseases. Approximately half of the NCEs are based on natural products and their derivatives. Notably, marine natural products, a largely untapped resource, have contributed to drug discovery and development with eight drugs or cosmeceuticals approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency, and ten candidates undergoing clinical trials. Collaborative efforts from drug developers, biologists, organic, medicinal, and natural product chemists have elevated drug discoveries to new levels. These efforts are expected to continue to improve the efficiency of natural product-based drugs. Marinopyrroles are examined here as a case study for potential anticancer and antibiotic agents.

  5. Biological hydrogen production using a membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sang-Eun; Iyer, Prabha; Bruns, Mary Ann; Logan, Bruce E

    2004-07-01

    A cross-flow membrane was coupled to a chemostat to create an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (MBR) for biological hydrogen production. The reactor was fed glucose (10,000 mg/L) and inoculated with a soil inoculum heat-treated to kill non-spore-forming methanogens. Hydrogen gas was consistently produced at a concentration of 57-60% in the headspace under all conditions. When operated in chemostat mode (no flow through the membrane) at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 3.3 h, 90% of the glucose was removed, producing 2200 mg/L of cells and 500 mL/h of biogas. When operated in MBR mode, the solids retention time (SRT) was increased to SRT = 12 h producing a solids concentration in the reactor of 5800 mg/L. This SRT increased the overall glucose utilization (98%), the biogas production rate (640 mL/h), and the conversion efficiency of glucose-to-hydrogen from 22% (no MBR) to 25% (based on a maximum of 4 mol-H(2)/mol-glucose). When the SRT was increased from 5 h to 48 h, glucose utilization (99%) and biomass concentrations (8,800 +/- 600 mg/L) both increased. However, the biogas production decreased (310 +/- 40 mL/h) and the glucose-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency decreased from 37 +/- 4% to 18 +/- 3%. Sustained permeate flows through the membrane were in the range of 57 to 60 L/m(2) h for three different membrane pore sizes (0.3, 0.5, and 0.8 microm). Most (93.7% to 99.3%) of the membrane resistance was due to internal fouling and the reversible cake resistance, and not the membrane itself. Regular backpulsing was essential for maintaining permeate flux through the membrane. Analysis of DNA sequences using ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis indicated bacteria were most closely related to members of Clostridiaceae and Flexibacteraceae, including Clostridium acidisoli CAC237756 (97%), Linmingia china AF481148 (97%), and Cytophaga sp. MDA2507 AF238333 (99%). No PCR amplification of 16s rRNA genes was obtained when archaea-specific primers were used.

  6. [Application of systems biology and synthetic biology in strain improvement for biofuel production].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinqing; Bai, Fengwu; Li, Yin

    2010-07-01

    Biofuels are renewable and environmentally friendly, but high production cost makes them economically not competitive, and the development of robust strains is thus one of the prerequisites. In this article, strain improvement studies based on the information from systems biology studies are reviewed, with a focus on their applications on stress tolerance improvement. Furthermore, the contribution of systems biology, synthetic biology and metabolic engineering in strain development for biofuel production is discussed, with an expectation for developing more robust strains for biofuel production.

  7. Drug discovery and natural products: end of an era or an endless frontier?

    PubMed

    Li, Jesse W-H; Vederas, John C

    2009-07-10

    Historically, the majority of new drugs have been generated from natural products (secondary metabolites) and from compounds derived from natural products. During the past 15 years, pharmaceutical industry research into natural products has declined, in part because of an emphasis on high-throughput screening of synthetic libraries. Currently there is substantial decline in new drug approvals and impending loss of patent protection for important medicines. However, untapped biological resources, "smart screening" methods, robotic separation with structural analysis, metabolic engineering, and synthetic biology offer exciting technologies for new natural product drug discovery. Advances in rapid genetic sequencing, coupled with manipulation of biosynthetic pathways, may provide a vast resource for the future discovery of pharmaceutical agents. PMID:19589993

  8. 75 FR 61497 - Approval Pathway for Biosimilar and Interchangeable Biological Products; Public Hearing; Request...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... drug, thereby saving time and resources and avoiding unnecessary duplication of human or animal testing... avoid duplicative animal and human testing, sponsors may wish, to the extent permissible, to rely on.... Most biological products are produced in a living system such as a microorganism, or plant or...

  9. 9 CFR 114.6 - Mixing biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mixing biological products. 114.6 Section 114.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS PRODUCTION REQUIREMENTS...

  10. The Chemical Biology of New Drugs in Development for Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Clifton E.; Blanchard, John S.

    2010-01-01

    With the worldwide emergence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) and extensively-drug-resistant (XDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), there are serious concerns about the continued ability to contain this disease. We discuss the most promising new drugs in late stage development that might be useful in treating MDR and XDR forms of the disease. These agents have novel mechanisms of action that are not targeted by the standard drugs used presently to treat susceptible strains. PMID:20452813

  11. 21 CFR 332.30 - Labeling of antiflatulent drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Labeling of antiflatulent drug products. (a) Statement of identity. The labeling of the product contains... accidental overdose, seek professional assistance or contact a poison control center immediately.”...

  12. "Pruning of biomolecules and natural products (PBNP)": an innovative paradigm in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Bathula, Surendar Reddy; Akondi, Srirama Murthy; Mainkar, Prathama S; Chandrasekhar, Srivari

    2015-06-21

    The source or inspiration of many marketed drugs can be traced back to natural product research. However, the chemical structure of natural products covers a wide spectrum from very simple to complex. With more complex structures it is often desirable to simplify the molecule whilst retaining the desired biological activity. This approach seeks to identify the structural unit or pharmacophore responsible for the desired activity. Such pharmacophores have been the start point for a wide range of lead generation and optimisation programmes using techniques such as Biology Oriented Synthesis, Diversity Oriented Synthesis, Diverted Total Synthesis, and Fragment Based Drug Discovery. This review discusses the literature precedence of simplification strategies in four areas of natural product research: proteins, polysaccharides, nucleic acids, and compounds isolated from natural product extracts, and their impact on identifying therapeutic products. PMID:25966676

  13. Systematic synergy modeling: understanding drug synergy from a systems biology perspective.

    PubMed

    Chen, Di; Liu, Xi; Yang, Yiping; Yang, Hongjun; Lu, Peng

    2015-09-16

    Owing to drug synergy effects, drug combinations have become a new trend in combating complex diseases like cancer, HIV and cardiovascular diseases. However, conventional synergy quantification methods often depend on experimental dose-response data which are quite resource-demanding. In addition, these methods are unable to interpret the explicit synergy mechanism. In this review, we give representative examples of how systems biology modeling offers strategies toward better understanding of drug synergy, including the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network-based methods, pathway dynamic simulations, synergy network motif recognitions, integrative drug feature calculations, and "omic"-supported analyses. Although partially successful in drug synergy exploration and interpretation, more efforts should be put on a holistic understanding of drug-disease interactions, considering integrative pharmacology and toxicology factors. With a comprehensive and deep insight into the mechanism of drug synergy, systems biology opens a novel avenue for rational design of effective drug combinations.

  14. Drug resistance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis: from the traditional Chinese view to modern systems biology.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuhui; Zhang, Zongde; Sun, Zhaogang

    2015-01-01

    The pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) is a well-evolved, organized pathogen that has developed drug resistance, specifically multidrug resistance (MDR) and extensive drug resistance (XDR). This review primarily summarizes the mechanisms of drug resistance by M. tuberculosis according to the traditional Chinese view. The traditional Chinese view of drug resistance includes: the physical barrier of the cell wall; mutations relating to current anti-TB agents; drug efflux pumps; and drug stress, including the SOS response systems, the mismatch repair systems and the toxin-antitoxin systems. In addition, this review addresses the integrated systems biology of genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics and interactomics. Development of the various levels of systems biology has enabled determination of the anatomy of bacteria. Finally, the current review proposes that further investigation regarding the population of individuals with a high drug metabolic speed is vital to further understand drug resistance in M. tuberculosis.

  15. 9 CFR 112.6 - Packaging biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Packaging biological products. 112.6 Section 112.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS PACKAGING AND...

  16. 9 CFR 106.1 - Biological products; exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Biological products; exemption. 106.1 Section 106.1 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS EXEMPTION FOR...

  17. 9 CFR 114.4 - Identification of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Identification of biological products. 114.4 Section 114.4 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS...

  18. 9 CFR 103.1 - Preparation of experimental biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Preparation of experimental biological products. 103.1 Section 103.1 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS...

  19. 9 CFR 103.3 - Shipment of experimental biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Shipment of experimental biological products. 103.3 Section 103.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS...

  20. 9 CFR 112.6 - Packaging biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Packaging biological products. 112.6 Section 112.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS PACKAGING AND...

  1. 9 CFR 106.1 - Biological products; exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Biological products; exemption. 106.1 Section 106.1 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS EXEMPTION FOR...

  2. 9 CFR 103.1 - Preparation of experimental biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Preparation of experimental biological products. 103.1 Section 103.1 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS...

  3. 9 CFR 103.1 - Preparation of experimental biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Preparation of experimental biological products. 103.1 Section 103.1 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS...

  4. 9 CFR 103.3 - Shipment of experimental biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Shipment of experimental biological products. 103.3 Section 103.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS...

  5. 9 CFR 103.3 - Shipment of experimental biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Shipment of experimental biological products. 103.3 Section 103.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS...

  6. 9 CFR 106.1 - Biological products; exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Biological products; exemption. 106.1 Section 106.1 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS EXEMPTION FOR...

  7. 9 CFR 103.1 - Preparation of experimental biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Preparation of experimental biological products. 103.1 Section 103.1 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS...

  8. [New drugs for horses and production animals in 2012].

    PubMed

    Emmerich, I U

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, two newly developed active pharmaceutical ingredients for horses and food producing animals were released on the German market for veterinary drug products. Those are the parenterally applicable first generation cephalosporin Cefalonium (Cepravin®) and the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug Suxibuzone (Danilon®). Furthermore, one established veterinary active pharmaceutical ingredient is applicable to additional species: The anticoccidial Amprolium (Eimeryl®) has again been authorized for chicken and turkeys. Additionally, two veterinary drugs with a new formulation as well as three products with a new strength and one product with a new indication have recently been released to the veterinary drugs market for horses and food producing animals.

  9. Protein Complex Production from the Drug Discovery Standpoint.

    PubMed

    Moarefi, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Small molecule drug discovery critically depends on the availability of meaningful in vitro assays to guide medicinal chemistry programs that are aimed at optimizing drug potency and selectivity. As it becomes increasingly evident, most disease relevant drug targets do not act as a single protein. In the body, they are instead generally found in complex with protein cofactors that are highly relevant for their correct function and regulation. This review highlights selected examples of the increasing trend to use biologically relevant protein complexes for rational drug discovery to reduce costly late phase attritions due to lack of efficacy or toxicity.

  10. Pathology and drug action in schizophrenia: insights from molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Strange, P G

    1998-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe disorder of personality which has a genetic basis. Schizophrenia arises from a change in brain development. There is no strong evidence that disturbances in neurotransmitter systems are a primary cause. Anti-psychotic drugs act primarily through D2 and D3 dopamine receptors. The atypical drug clozapine may act through a number of different receptors, including D2, D3 and D4 dopamine receptors. Anti-psychotic drugs are inverse agonists at D2 dopamine receptors.

  11. Harnessing Polypharmacology with Computer-Aided Drug Design and Systems Biology.

    PubMed

    Wathieu, Henri; Issa, Naiem T; Byers, Stephen W; Dakshanamurthy, Sivanesan

    2016-01-01

    The ascent of polypharmacology in drug development has many implications for disease therapy, most notably in the efforts of drug discovery, drug repositioning, precision medicine and combination therapy. The single- target approach to drug development has encountered difficulties in predicting drugs that are both clinically efficacious and avoid toxicity. By contrast, polypharmacology offers the possibility of a controlled distribution of effects on a biological system. This review addresses possibilities and bottlenecks in the efficient computational application of polypharmacology. The two major areas we address are the discovery and prediction of multiple protein targets using the tools of computer-aided drug design, and the use of these protein targets in predicting therapeutic potential in the context of biological networks. The successful application of polypharmacology to systems biology and pharmacology has the potential to markedly accelerate the pace of development of novel therapies for multiple diseases, and has implications for the intellectual property landscape, likely requiring targeted changes in patent law. PMID:26907947

  12. Harnessing Polypharmacology with Computer-Aided Drug Design and Systems Biology.

    PubMed

    Wathieu, Henri; Issa, Naiem T; Byers, Stephen W; Dakshanamurthy, Sivanesan

    2016-01-01

    The ascent of polypharmacology in drug development has many implications for disease therapy, most notably in the efforts of drug discovery, drug repositioning, precision medicine and combination therapy. The single- target approach to drug development has encountered difficulties in predicting drugs that are both clinically efficacious and avoid toxicity. By contrast, polypharmacology offers the possibility of a controlled distribution of effects on a biological system. This review addresses possibilities and bottlenecks in the efficient computational application of polypharmacology. The two major areas we address are the discovery and prediction of multiple protein targets using the tools of computer-aided drug design, and the use of these protein targets in predicting therapeutic potential in the context of biological networks. The successful application of polypharmacology to systems biology and pharmacology has the potential to markedly accelerate the pace of development of novel therapies for multiple diseases, and has implications for the intellectual property landscape, likely requiring targeted changes in patent law.

  13. Synthetic Biology in the FDA Realm: Toward Productive Oversight Assessment.

    PubMed

    Fatehi, Leili; Hall, Ralph F

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology (SB) is expected to create tremendous opportunities in a wide range of areas, including in foods, therapeutics, and diagnostics subject to regulatory oversight by the United States Food and Drug Administration. At the same time, there is substantial basis for concern about the uncertainties of accurately assessing the human health and environmental risks of such SB products. As such, SB is the latest in a string of emerging technologies that is the subject of calls for new approaches to regulation and oversight that involve "thinking ahead" to anticipate governance challenges upstream of technological development and adopting oversight mechanisms that are both adaptive to new information about risks and reflexive to performance data and feedback on policy outcomes over time. These new approaches constitute a marked departure from the status quo, and their development and implementation will require considerable time, resources, and reallocation of responsibilities. Furthermore, in order to develop an appropriate oversight response, adaptive or otherwise, there is first a need to identify the specific types and natures of applications, uncertainties, and regulatory issues that are likely to pose oversight challenges. This article presents our vision for a Productive Oversight Assessment (POA) approach in which the abilities and deficits of an oversight system are evaluated with the aim of enabling productive decisions (i.e., timely, feasible, effective for achieving desired policy outcomes) about oversight while also building capacity to facilitate broader governance efforts. The value ofPOA is two-fold. First, it will advance the development of a generalizable approach for making productive planning and decision-making about the oversight of any given new technology that presents challenges and uncertainties for any given oversight system whose policy goals are implicated by that technology. Second, this effort can enhance the very processes

  14. 77 FR 71803 - Guidance on Food and Drug Administration Oversight of Positron Emission Tomography Drug Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-04

    ... guidance of the same title was announced in the Federal Register on February 27, 2012 (77 FR 11553), and... availability of a guidance entitled ``FDA Oversight of PET Drug Products--Questions and Answers.'' This... Oversight of PET Drug Products--Questions and Answers.'' In 1997, Congress passed the Food and...

  15. Biologically based pest controls: Markets, industries, and products. Special report

    SciTech Connect

    Ridgway, R.L.; Inscoe, M.N.; Thorpe, K.W.

    1994-05-20

    Numbers and amounts of conventional pesticides to combat insect pests, weeds and plant diseases are likely to decline. Although biologically based pest control products have been touted as possible replacements, such products now comprise less than 2% of the market in the United States. Twelve large multinational companies market 80% of the world`s pesticides, valued at about $200 billion, and are responsible for about 20% of the activities to develop and/or produce biological products. In the U.S. about 65 small companies are responsible for 80% of the activities on biological products, which are valued at about $165 million. Without major changes in the research, development, and delivery system, biological products are not likely to be practical replacements for significant amounts of conventional pesticides in the foreseeable future.

  16. 9 CFR 102.5 - U.S. Veterinary Biological Product License.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false U.S. Veterinary Biological Product... BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 102.5 U.S. Veterinary Biological Product License. (a) Authorization to produce each biological product shall be specified on a U.S. Veterinary Biological Product License, issued by...

  17. Quantifying biological activity in chemical terms: a pharmacology primer to describe drug effect.

    PubMed

    Kenakin, Terry

    2009-04-17

    Drugs can initiate, inhibit, modulate, or potentiate basal activity in cells to produce physiological effects. The interplay between the fundamental affinity and efficacy of drugs with the functional texture imposed on the receptor by the cell (e.g., variation in basal set points or cytosolic signal proteins) generates behaviors for drugs in different tissues that can cause apparently capricious variation between tissues under various physiological conditions. This poses a problem for pharmacologists studying drugs in test systems to predict effects in therapeutic ones. De-emphasis of tissue-specific drug behaviors by reducing drug effects to chemical terms can, to a large extent, reduce the effects of variances in biological systems (changing basal set points, genetic and biochemical variability, etc.). This Perspective discusses the application of four major pharmacodynamic parameters (affinity, efficacy, orthosteric vs allosteric binding, and rate of dissociation of drug from the biological target) to the quantification of biological activity to furnish chemical structure-activity relationships (SARs). These four parameters can be used to quantify effects in test systems and predict subsequent activity in a therapeutic setting. Because at least three different SARs are involved in the drug discovery process (primary therapeutic activity, pharmacokinetics, and safety), with more possible if target selectivity is required, some simple statistical approaches to multivariate structure-activity studies (i.e., primary activity plus selectivity data) also are considered. In total, these data can provide system-independent data to characterize biological activity of molecules in chemical terms that can greatly reduce biologically induced variability.

  18. Natural Products as a Foundation for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Beutler, John A.

    2009-01-01

    Natural products have contributed to the development of many drugs for diverse indications. While most U.S. pharmaceutical companies have reduced or eliminated their in-house natural product groups, new paradigms and new enterprises have evolved to carry on a role for natural products in the pharmaceutical industry. Many of the reasons for the decline in popularity of natural products are being addressed by the development of new techniques for screening and production. This overview aims to inform pharmacologists of current strategies and techniques that make natural products a viable strategic choice for inclusion in drug discovery programs. PMID:20161632

  19. 9 CFR 101.3 - Biological products and related terms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... used to rehydrate a desiccated product or a liquid used to dilute another substance. (h) Serial. The... by a serial number: Provided, That, when all or part of a serial of liquid biological product is packaged as diluent for all or part of a serial of desiccated product, the resulting combination...

  20. Biological production of ethanol from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    A batch kinetic study involving Clostridium lungdahlii in a mineral medium was carried out in order to provide baseline data for the effects of nutrients on product ratio and kinetics. The use of this minimal medium containing vitamins, minerals, select amino acids and salts showed both a lower maximum specific growth rate and a lower maximum specific uptake rate than found when using a complex medium supplemented with 0.01% yeast extract. At the same time, the product ratio was improved slightly in favor of ethanol over acetate. Future experiments will measure the effects of ammonia and phosphate limitation on product ratio and process kinetics.

  1. Generic Biologic Drugs Seem as Effective as Originals

    MedlinePlus

    ... the healthcare system significant amounts of money, the Johns Hopkins University researchers noted. "The billion-dollar question has ... of Public Health, and co-director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Drug Safety and Effectiveness in Baltimore. ...

  2. Biological production of ethanol from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Previously studies have shown the importance of both medium composition and concentration and medium pH on ethanol production of Clostridium ljungdahlii in fermenting CO, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} in synthesis gas. Four additional batch experiments involving medium composition and concentration were carried out in modified basal medium without yeast extract at pH 4.0. These experiments indicate that basal medium with only small amounts of B-vitamins can yield significant cell growth while yielding ethanol as the major product. Product ratios as high as 11.0 g ethanol per g acetate were obtained with half strength B-vitamins. Further experiments indicates that Ca-pantothenate may be necessary for the growth of C. ljungdahlii and that growth and ethanol production can occur simultaneously.

  3. 9 CFR 115.2 - Inspections of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... United States veterinary license number or a United States veterinary permit number or other mark...) When notified to stop distribution and sale of a serial or subserial of a veterinary biological product by the Secretary, veterinary biologics licensees or permittees shall: (1) Stop the...

  4. Biological Activity of Recently Discovered Halogenated Marine Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Gribble, Gordon W.

    2015-01-01

    This review presents the biological activity—antibacterial, antifungal, anti-parasitic, antiviral, antitumor, antiinflammatory, antioxidant, and enzymatic activity—of halogenated marine natural products discovered in the past five years. Newly discovered examples that do not report biological activity are not included. PMID:26133553

  5. Biological production of ethanol fom coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    Research is continuing in an attempt to increase both the ethanol concentration and product ratio using C. ljungdahlii. The purpose of this report is to present data (acetate to ethanol) utilizing a medium prepared especially for C. ljungdahlii. Medium development studies are presented, as well as reactor studies with the new medium in batch reactors. Continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) with cell recycle. The use of this new medium has resulted in significant improvements in cell concentration, ethanol concentration and product ratio.

  6. Biological production of ethanol from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Research is continuing in an attempt to increase both the ethanol concentration and product ratio using C. ljungdahlii. The purpose of this report is to present data utilizing a medium prepared especially for C. ljungdahlii. Medium development studies are presented, as well as reactor studies with the new medium in batch reactors. CSTRs and CSTRs with cell recycle. The use of this new medium has resulted in significant improvements in cell concentration, ethanol concentration and product ratio.

  7. Total synthesis and biological activity of natural product Urukthapelstatin A.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Chieh; Tantisantisom, Worawan; McAlpine, Shelli R

    2013-07-19

    Herein we report the first total synthesis of the natural product Urkuthaplestatin A (Ustat A) utilizing a convergent synthetic strategy. The characterization and biological activity match those of the previously published natural product. Interestingly, several intermediates, including the linear and serine cyclized precursors, show a 100-fold decrease in cytotoxicity, with IC50's in the low micromolar range. These data indicate that the rigidity and the consecutive aromatic heterocyclic system are responsible for the biological activity. PMID:23819711

  8. Biological production of ethanol from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    Two batch and one continuous reactor study involving Clostridium ljungdahlii were carried out. First, the effects of H{sub 2} partial pressure on growth, CO and H{sub 2} uptake and product formation by C. ljungdahlii were investigated in batch culture. Over the concentration range studied, it was observed that CO was preferentially utilized in favor of H{sub 2}. It was also seen that increasing H{sub 2} partial pressures increased the ratio of ethanol to acetate. Finally, a two-stage CSTR system was successfully operated with C. ljungdahlii in which growth occurred in the first stage and ethanol production occurred in the second stage.

  9. United States Food and Drug Administration Product Label Changes.

    PubMed

    Kircik, Leon; Sung, Julie C; Stein-Gold, Linda; Goldenberg, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Once a drug has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration and is on the market, the Food and Drug Administration communicates new safety information through product label changes. Most of these label changes occur after a spontaneous report to either the drug manufacturing companies or the Food and Drug Administration MedWatch program. As a result, 400 to 500 label changes occur every year. Actinic keratosis treatments exemplify the commonality of label changes throughout the postmarket course of a drug. Diclofenac gel, 5-fluorouracil cream, imiquimod, and ingenol mebutate are examples of actinic keratosis treatments that have all undergone at least one label revision. With the current system of spontaneous reports leading to numerous label changes, each occurrence does not necessarily signify a radical change in the safety of a drug. PMID:26962391

  10. United States Food and Drug Administration Product Label Changes

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Julie C.; Stein-Gold, Linda; Goldenberg, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Once a drug has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration and is on the market, the Food and Drug Administration communicates new safety information through product label changes. Most of these label changes occur after a spontaneous report to either the drug manufacturing companies or the Food and Drug Administration MedWatch program. As a result, 400 to 500 label changes occur every year. Actinic keratosis treatments exemplify the commonality of label changes throughout the postmarket course of a drug. Diclofenac gel, 5-fluorouracil cream, imiquimod, and ingenol mebutate are examples of actinic keratosis treatments that have all undergone at least one label revision. With the current system of spontaneous reports leading to numerous label changes, each occurrence does not necessarily signify a radical change in the safety of a drug. PMID:26962391

  11. Systems biology-embedded target validation: improving efficacy in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Vandamme, Drieke; Minke, Benedikt A; Fitzmaurice, William; Kholodenko, Boris N; Kolch, Walter

    2014-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry is faced with a range of challenges with the ever-escalating costs of drug development and a drying out of drug pipelines. By harnessing advances in -omics technologies and moving away from the standard, reductionist model of drug discovery, there is significant potential to reduce costs and improve efficacy. Embedding systems biology approaches in drug discovery, which seek to investigate underlying molecular mechanisms of potential drug targets in a network context, will reduce attrition rates by earlier target validation and the introduction of novel targets into the currently stagnant market. Systems biology approaches also have the potential to assist in the design of multidrug treatments and repositioning of existing drugs, while stratifying patients to give a greater personalization of medical treatment.

  12. Predicting Drug Use at Electronic Music Dance Events: Self-Reports and Biological Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mark B.; Voas, Robert A.; Miller, Brenda A.; Holder, Harold D.

    2009-01-01

    Most information on the prevalence of drug use comes from self-report surveys. The sensitivity of such information is cause for concern about the accuracy of self-report measures. In this study, self-reported drug use in the last 48 hr is compared to results from biological assays of saliva samples from 371 young adults entering clubs. The…

  13. 41 CFR 101-42.1102-5 - Drugs, biologicals, and reagents other than controlled substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... regulated noncontrolled drugs, 40 CFR part 260 et seq., are sufficiently stringent to ensure that these... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Drugs, biologicals, and... 42.11-Special Types of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.1102-5...

  14. 41 CFR 101-42.1102-5 - Drugs, biologicals, and reagents other than controlled substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... regulated noncontrolled drugs, 40 CFR part 260 et seq., are sufficiently stringent to ensure that these... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2011-07-01 2007-07-01 true Drugs, biologicals, and... 42.11-Special Types of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.1102-5...

  15. Network-based drug discovery by integrating systems biology and computational technologies.

    PubMed

    Leung, Elaine L; Cao, Zhi-Wei; Jiang, Zhi-Hong; Zhou, Hua; Liu, Liang

    2013-07-01

    Network-based intervention has been a trend of curing systemic diseases, but it relies on regimen optimization and valid multi-target actions of the drugs. The complex multi-component nature of medicinal herbs may serve as valuable resources for network-based multi-target drug discovery due to its potential treatment effects by synergy. Recently, robustness of multiple systems biology platforms shows powerful to uncover molecular mechanisms and connections between the drugs and their targeting dynamic network. However, optimization methods of drug combination are insufficient, owning to lacking of tighter integration across multiple '-omics' databases. The newly developed algorithm- or network-based computational models can tightly integrate '-omics' databases and optimize combinational regimens of drug development, which encourage using medicinal herbs to develop into new wave of network-based multi-target drugs. However, challenges on further integration across the databases of medicinal herbs with multiple system biology platforms for multi-target drug optimization remain to the uncertain reliability of individual data sets, width and depth and degree of standardization of herbal medicine. Standardization of the methodology and terminology of multiple system biology and herbal database would facilitate the integration. Enhance public accessible databases and the number of research using system biology platform on herbal medicine would be helpful. Further integration across various '-omics' platforms and computational tools would accelerate development of network-based drug discovery and network medicine.

  16. Network-based drug discovery by integrating systems biology and computational technologies

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Elaine L.; Cao, Zhi-Wei; Jiang, Zhi-Hong; Zhou, Hua

    2013-01-01

    Network-based intervention has been a trend of curing systemic diseases, but it relies on regimen optimization and valid multi-target actions of the drugs. The complex multi-component nature of medicinal herbs may serve as valuable resources for network-based multi-target drug discovery due to its potential treatment effects by synergy. Recently, robustness of multiple systems biology platforms shows powerful to uncover molecular mechanisms and connections between the drugs and their targeting dynamic network. However, optimization methods of drug combination are insufficient, owning to lacking of tighter integration across multiple ‘-omics’ databases. The newly developed algorithm- or network-based computational models can tightly integrate ‘-omics’ databases and optimize combinational regimens of drug development, which encourage using medicinal herbs to develop into new wave of network-based multi-target drugs. However, challenges on further integration across the databases of medicinal herbs with multiple system biology platforms for multi-target drug optimization remain to the uncertain reliability of individual data sets, width and depth and degree of standardization of herbal medicine. Standardization of the methodology and terminology of multiple system biology and herbal database would facilitate the integration. Enhance public accessible databases and the number of research using system biology platform on herbal medicine would be helpful. Further integration across various ‘-omics’ platforms and computational tools would accelerate development of network-based drug discovery and network medicine. PMID:22877768

  17. Extending the “Web of Drug Identity” with Knowledge Extracted from United States Product Labels

    PubMed Central

    Hassanzadeh, Oktie; Zhu, Qian; Freimuth, Robert; Boyce, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Structured Product Labels (SPLs) contain information about drugs that can be valuable to clinical and translational research, especially if it can be linked to other sources that provide data about drug targets, chemical properties, interactions, and biological pathways. Unfortunately, SPLs currently provide coarsely-structured drug information and lack the detailed annotation that is required to support computational use cases. To help address this issue we created LinkedSPLs, a Linked Data resource that extends the “web of drug identity” using information extracted from SPLs. In this paper we describe the mapping that LinkedSPLs provides between SPL active ingredients and DrugBank chemical entities. These mappings were created using three approaches: InChI chemical structure descriptors comparison, exact string matching based on the chemical name, and automatic (unsupervised) linkage identification. Comparison of the approaches found that, while these three approaches are complementary, the automatic approach performs well in terms of precision and recall. PMID:24303301

  18. Packaging biological cargoes in mesoporous materials: opportunities for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Siefker, Justin; Karande, Pankaj; Coppens, Marc-Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Confinement of biomolecules in structured nanoporous materials offers several desirable features ranging from chemical and thermal stability, to resistance to degradation from the external environment. A new generation of mesoporous materials presents exciting new possibilities for the formulation and controlled release of biological agents. Such materials address niche applications in enteral and parenteral delivery of biologics, such as peptides, polypeptides, enzymes and proteins for use as therapeutics, imaging agents, biosensors, and adjuvants. Areas covered: Mesoporous silica Santa Barbara Amorphous-15 (SBA-15), with its unique, tunable pore diameter, and easily functionalized surface, provides a representative example of this new generation of materials. Here, we review recent advances in the design and synthesis of nanostructured mesoporous materials, focusing on SBA-15, and highlight opportunities for the delivery of biological agents to various organ and tissue compartments. Expert opinion: The SBA-15 platform provides a delivery carrier that is inherently separated from the active biologic due to distinct intra and extra-particle environments. This permits the SBA-15 platform to not require direct modification of the active biological therapeutic. Additionally, this makes the platform universal and allows for its application independent of the desired methods of discovery and development. The SBA-15 platform also directly addresses issues of targeted delivery and controlled release, although future challenges in the implementation of this platform reside in particle design, biocompatibility, and the tunability of the internal and external material properties. Examples illustrating the flexibility in the application of the SBA-15 platform are also discussed. PMID:25016923

  19. 21 CFR 349.50 - Labeling of ophthalmic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., discard.” (3) For ophthalmic drug products containing mercury compounds used as a preservative. “This product contains (name and quantity of mercury-containing ingredient) as a preservative. Do not use this product if you are sensitive to” (select one of the following: “mercury” or “(insert name of...

  20. 21 CFR 349.50 - Labeling of ophthalmic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., discard.” (3) For ophthalmic drug products containing mercury compounds used as a preservative. “This product contains (name and quantity of mercury-containing ingredient) as a preservative. Do not use this product if you are sensitive to” (select one of the following: “mercury” or “(insert name of...

  1. 21 CFR 349.50 - Labeling of ophthalmic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., discard.” (3) For ophthalmic drug products containing mercury compounds used as a preservative. “This product contains (name and quantity of mercury-containing ingredient) as a preservative. Do not use this product if you are sensitive to” (select one of the following: “mercury” or “(insert name of...

  2. 21 CFR 349.50 - Labeling of ophthalmic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., discard.” (3) For ophthalmic drug products containing mercury compounds used as a preservative. “This product contains (name and quantity of mercury-containing ingredient) as a preservative. Do not use this product if you are sensitive to” (select one of the following: “mercury” or “(insert name of...

  3. 21 CFR 341.78 - Labeling of expectorant drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE COLD, COUGH, ALLERGY, BRONCHODILATOR, AND ANTIASTHMATIC DRUG PRODUCTS FOR...,” and “make coughs more productive”). Other truthful and nonmisleading statements, describing only the... persistent cough may be a sign of a serious condition. If cough persists for more than 1 week, tends to...

  4. 21 CFR 314.108 - New drug product exclusivity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... coordination bonds), or other noncovalent derivative (such as a complex, chelate, or clathrate) of the molecule... Administration. New chemical entity means a drug that contains no active moiety that has been approved by FDA in...) application. (1) (2) If a drug product that contains a new chemical entity was approved after September...

  5. 21 CFR 314.108 - New drug product exclusivity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... coordination bonds), or other noncovalent derivative (such as a complex, chelate, or clathrate) of the molecule... Administration. New chemical entity means a drug that contains no active moiety that has been approved by FDA in...) application. (1) (2) If a drug product that contains a new chemical entity was approved after September...

  6. 21 CFR 314.108 - New drug product exclusivity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... coordination bonds), or other noncovalent derivative (such as a complex, chelate, or clathrate) of the molecule... Administration. New chemical entity means a drug that contains no active moiety that has been approved by FDA in...) application. (1) (2) If a drug product that contains a new chemical entity was approved after September...

  7. 21 CFR 314.108 - New drug product exclusivity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... coordination bonds), or other noncovalent derivative (such as a complex, chelate, or clathrate) of the molecule... Administration. New chemical entity means a drug that contains no active moiety that has been approved by FDA in...) application. (1) (2) If a drug product that contains a new chemical entity was approved after September...

  8. 21 CFR 314.108 - New drug product exclusivity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... coordination bonds), or other noncovalent derivative (such as a complex, chelate, or clathrate) of the molecule... Administration. New chemical entity means a drug that contains no active moiety that has been approved by FDA in...) application. (1) (2) If a drug product that contains a new chemical entity was approved after September...

  9. De Novo Fragment Design for Drug Discovery and Chemical Biology.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Tiago; Reker, Daniel; Welin, Martin; Caldera, Michael; Brunner, Cyrill; Gabernet, Gisela; Schneider, Petra; Walse, Björn; Schneider, Gisbert

    2015-12-01

    Automated molecular de novo design led to the discovery of an innovative inhibitor of death-associated protein kinase 3 (DAPK3). An unprecedented crystal structure of the inactive DAPK3 homodimer shows the fragment-like hit bound to the ATP pocket. Target prediction software based on machine learning models correctly identified additional macromolecular targets of the computationally designed compound and the structurally related marketed drug azosemide. The study validates computational de novo design as a prime method for generating chemical probes and starting points for drug discovery.

  10. Characterizing biological products and assessing comparability following manufacturing changes.

    PubMed

    Chirino, Arthur J; Mire-Sluis, Anthony

    2004-11-01

    Changes in production methods of a biological product may necessitate an assessment of comparability to ensure that these manufacturing changes have not affected the safety, identity, purity, or efficacy of the product. Depending on the nature of the protein or the change, this assessment consists of a hierarchy of sequential tests in analytical testing, preclinical animal studies and clinical studies. Differences in analytical test results between pre- and post-change products may require functional testing to establish the biological or clinical significance of the observed difference. An underlying principle of comparability is that under certain conditions, protein products may be considered comparable on the basis of analytical testing results alone. However, the ability to compare biological materials is solely dependent on the tests used, since no single analytical method is able to compare every aspect of protein structure or function. The advantages and disadvantages of any given method depends on the protein property being characterized. PMID:15529163

  11. Biological production of liquid fuels from biomass

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    A scheme for the production of liquid fuels from renewable resources such as poplar wood and lignocellulosic wastes from a refuse hydropulper was investigated. The particular scheme being studied involves the conversion of a cellulosic residue, resulting from a solvent delignified lignocellulosic feed, into either high concentration sugar syrups or into ethyl and/or butyl alcohol. The construction of a pilot apparatus for solvent delignifying 150 g samples of lignocellulosic feeds was completed. Also, an analysis method for characterizing the delignified product has been selected and tested. This is a method recommended in the Forage Fiber Handbook. Delignified samples are now being prepared and tested for their extent of delignification and susceptibility to enzyme hydrolysis. Work is continuing on characterizing the cellulase and cellobiase enzyme systems derived from the YX strain of Thermomonospora.

  12. Evaluation of Anti-Inflammatory Drug-Conjugated Silicon Quantum Dots: Their Cytotoxicity and Biological Effect

    PubMed Central

    Hanada, Sanshiro; Fujioka, Kouki; Futamura, Yasuhiro; Manabe, Noriyoshi; Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Silicon quantum dots (Si-QDs) have great potential for biomedical applications, including their use as biological fluorescent markers and carriers for drug delivery systems. Biologically inert Si-QDs are less toxic than conventional cadmium-based QDs, and can modify the surface of the Si-QD with covalent bond. We synthesized water-soluble alminoprofen-conjugated Si-QDs (Ap-Si). Alminoprofen is a non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used as an analgesic for rheumatism. Our results showed that the “silicon drug” is less toxic than the control Si-QD and the original drug. These phenomena indicate that the condensed surface integration of ligand/receptor-type drugs might reduce the adverse interaction between the cells and drug molecules. In addition, the medicinal effect of the Si-QDs (i.e., the inhibition of COX-2 enzyme) was maintained compared to that of the original drug. The same drug effect is related to the integration ratio of original drugs, which might control the binding interaction between COX-2 and the silicon drug. We conclude that drug conjugation with biocompatible Si-QDs is a potential method for functional pharmaceutical drug development. PMID:23306154

  13. Modern Methods for Analysis of Antiepileptic Drugs in the Biological Fluids for Pharmacokinetics, Bioequivalence and Therapeutic Drug Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yoo-Sin; Kim, Shin-Hee; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Jun, Min-Young

    2011-01-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic disease occurring in approximately 1.0% of the world's population. About 30% of the epileptic patients treated with availably antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) continue to have seizures and are considered therapy-resistant or refractory patients. The ultimate goal for the use of AEDs is complete cessation of seizures without side effects. Because of a narrow therapeutic index of AEDs, a complete understanding of its clinical pharmacokinetics is essential for understanding of the pharmacodynamics of these drugs. These drug concentrations in biological fluids serve as surrogate markers and can be used to guide or target drug dosing. Because early studies demonstrated clinical and/or electroencephalographic correlations with serum concentrations of several AEDs, It has been almost 50 years since clinicians started using plasma concentrations of AEDs to optimize pharmacotherapy in patients with epilepsy. Therefore, validated analytical method for concentrations of AEDs in biological fluids is a necessity in order to explore pharmacokinetics, bioequivalence and TDM in various clinical situations. There are hundreds of published articles on the analysis of specific AEDs by a wide variety of analytical methods in biological samples have appears over the past decade. This review intends to provide an updated, concise overview on the modern method development for monitoring AEDs for pharmacokinetic studies, bioequivalence and therapeutic drug monitoring. PMID:21660146

  14. Biological production of ethanol from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    Research is continuing in attempting to increase both the ethanol concentration and product ratio (acetate to ethanol) from the C. ljungdahlii fermentation. Both batch and continuous reactors are being used for this purpose. The purpose of this report is four-fold. First, the data presented in PETC Report No. 2-4-91 (June--September, 1991) are analyzed and interpreted using normalized specific growth and production rates. This technique eliminates experimental variation due to differences in inoculum history. Secondly, the effects of the sulfur gases H{sub 2}S and COS on the performance of C. ljungdahlii are presented and discussed. Although these are preliminary results, they illustrate the tolerance of the bacterium to low levels of sulfur gases. Thirdly, the results of continuous stirred tank reactor studies are presented, where cell and product concentrations are shown as a function of agitation rate and gas flow rate. Finally, additional data are presented showing the performance of C. ljungdahlii in a CSTR with cell recycle.

  15. Biological production of ethanol from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Research is continuing in attempting to increase both the ethanol concentration and product ratio from the C. ljungdahlii fermentation. Both batch and continuous reactors are being used for this purpose. The purpose of this report is four-fold. First, the data presented in PETC Report No. 2-4-91 (June--September 1991) are analyzed and interpreted using normalized specific growth and production rates. This technique eliminates experimental variation due to the differences in inoculum history. Secondly, the effects of the sulfur gases H{sub 2}S and COS on the performance of C. ljungdahlii are presented and discussed. Although these are preliminary results, they illustrate the tolerance of the bacterium to low levels of sulfur gases. Thirdly, the results of continuous stirred tank reactor studies are presented, where cell and product concentrations are shown as a function of agitation rate and gas flow rate. Finally, additional data are presented showing the performance of C. ljungdahlii in a CSTR with cell recycle.

  16. Development and validation of cell-based assays for the detection of neutralizing antibodies to drug products: a practical approach.

    PubMed

    Jolicoeur, Pierre; Tacey, Richard L

    2012-12-01

    Neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) that bind to drug products and may diminish or eliminate the associated biological activity are an unintended and undesirable outcome of some drug products. Standard immunoassays can detect drug-specific antibodies but cannot distinguish NAbs, so cell-based assays are often preferred because they closely mimic the mechanism by which NAbs and drug products interact in vivo. Each cell-based NAb assay is unique and based on several factors, such as the drug product, study population and phase of development (preclinical or clinical). The type of NAb assay (direct or indirect) depends on the drug's mechanism of action. Key steps in assay development are: selecting a suitable cell line, choosing the proper cellular response (end point method), selection of proper controls and optimization of assay parameters. Once developed, the assay must be rigorously tested (validated) to ensure that it meets several important criteria and is fit for its intended purpose. PMID:23244285

  17. 21 CFR 341.76 - Labeling of bronchodilator drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., psychiatric, or emotional conditions, or Parkinson's disease), or for 2 weeks after stopping the MAOI drug. If....” (2) “Do not use this product if you have heart disease, high blood pressure, thyroid...

  18. Interfacing materials science and biology for drug carrier design.

    PubMed

    Such, Georgina K; Yan, Yan; Johnston, Angus P R; Gunawan, Sylvia T; Caruso, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Over the last ten years, there has been considerable research interest in the development of polymeric carriers for biomedicine. Such delivery systems have the potential to significantly reduce side effects and increase the bioavailability of poorly soluble therapeutics. The design of carriers has relied on harnessing specific variations in biological conditions, such as pH or redox potential, and more recently, by incorporating specific peptide cleavage sites for enzymatic hydrolysis. Although much progress has been made in this field, the specificity of polymeric carriers is still limited when compared with their biological counterparts. To synthesize the next generation of carriers, it is important to consider the biological rationale for materials design. This requires a detailed understanding of the cellular microenvironments and how these can be harnessed for specific applications. In this review, several important physiological cues in the cellular microenvironments are outlined, with a focus on changes in pH, redox potential, and the types of enzymes present in specific regions. Furthermore, recent studies that use such biologically inspired triggers to design polymeric carriers are highlighted, focusing on applications in the field of therapeutic delivery.

  19. 21 CFR 216.24 - Drug products withdrawn or removed from the market for reasons of safety or effectiveness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... Bromfenac sodium: All drug products containing bromfenac sodium. Butamben: All parenteral drug products containing butamben. Camphorated oil: All drug products containing camphorated oil. Carbetapentane citrate: All oral gel drug products containing carbetapentane citrate. Casein, iodinated: All drug...

  20. 9 CFR 113.3 - Sampling of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... samples of each serial or subserial of a biological product manufactured in the United States or imported... filling operation. (iv) Representative samples of each serial or subserial in each shipment of imported... such samples from each serial and the minimum quantity of product to be provided in each sample...

  1. 9 CFR 106.1 - Biological products; exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... control of the Department in the prevention, control or eradication of animal diseases in connection with (a) an official USDA program; or (b) an emergency animal disease situation, or (c) a USDA... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Biological products; exemption....

  2. Downscaling drug nanosuspension production: processing aspects and physicochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Van Eerdenbrugh, Bernard; Stuyven, Bernard; Froyen, Ludo; Van Humbeeck, Jan; Martens, Johan A; Augustijns, Patrick; Van den Mooter, Guy

    2009-01-01

    In this study, scaling down nanosuspension production to 10 mg of drug compound and evaluation of the nanosuspensions to 1 mg of drug compound per test were investigated. Media milling of seven model drug compounds (cinnarizine-indomethacin-itraconazole-loviride-mebendazole-naproxen-phenytoin) was evaluated in a 96-well plate setup (10, 20, and 30 mg) and a glass-vial-based system in a planetary mill (10, 100, and 1,000 mg). Physicochemical properties evaluated on 1 mg of drug compound were drug content (high-performance liquid chromatography), size [dynamic light scattering (DLS)], morphology (scanning electron microscopy), thermal characteristics (differential scanning calorimetry), and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). Scaling down nanosuspension production to 10 mg of drug compound was feasible for the seven model compounds using both designs, the planetary mill design being more robust. Similar results were obtained for both designs upon milling 10 mg of drug compound. Drug content determination was precise and accurate. DLS was the method of choice for size measurements. Morphology evaluation and thermal analysis were feasible, although sample preparation had a big influence on the results. XRPD in capillary mode was successfully performed, both in the suspended state and after freeze-drying in the capillary. Results obtained for the latter were superior. Both the production and the physicochemical evaluation of nanosuspensions can be successfully downscaled, enabling nanosuspension screening applications in preclinical development settings.

  3. 21 CFR 200.51 - Aqueous-based drug products for oral inhalation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aqueous-based drug products for oral inhalation. 200.51 Section 200.51 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...-based drug products for oral inhalation. (a) All aqueous-based drug products for oral inhalation must...

  4. 21 CFR 200.51 - Aqueous-based drug products for oral inhalation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aqueous-based drug products for oral inhalation. 200.51 Section 200.51 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...-based drug products for oral inhalation. (a) All aqueous-based drug products for oral inhalation must...

  5. 21 CFR 200.51 - Aqueous-based drug products for oral inhalation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aqueous-based drug products for oral inhalation. 200.51 Section 200.51 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...-based drug products for oral inhalation. (a) All aqueous-based drug products for oral inhalation must...

  6. 21 CFR 200.51 - Aqueous-based drug products for oral inhalation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aqueous-based drug products for oral inhalation. 200.51 Section 200.51 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...-based drug products for oral inhalation. (a) All aqueous-based drug products for oral inhalation must...

  7. 21 CFR 201.312 - Magnesium sulfate heptahydrate; label declaration on drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate heptahydrate; label declaration on drug products. 201.312 Section 201.312 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Drug Products § 201.312 Magnesium sulfate heptahydrate; label declaration on drug products....

  8. 21 CFR 201.312 - Magnesium sulfate heptahydrate; label declaration on drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate heptahydrate; label declaration on drug products. 201.312 Section 201.312 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Drug Products § 201.312 Magnesium sulfate heptahydrate; label declaration on drug products....

  9. 21 CFR 201.312 - Magnesium sulfate heptahydrate; label declaration on drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate heptahydrate; label declaration on drug products. 201.312 Section 201.312 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Drug Products § 201.312 Magnesium sulfate heptahydrate; label declaration on drug products....

  10. 21 CFR 201.312 - Magnesium sulfate heptahydrate; label declaration on drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate heptahydrate; label declaration on drug products. 201.312 Section 201.312 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Drug Products § 201.312 Magnesium sulfate heptahydrate; label declaration on drug products....

  11. 21 CFR 201.312 - Magnesium sulfate heptahydrate; label declaration on drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate heptahydrate; label declaration on drug products. 201.312 Section 201.312 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Drug Products § 201.312 Magnesium sulfate heptahydrate; label declaration on drug products....

  12. Anti-infectious drug repurposing using an integrated chemical genomics and structural systems biology approach.

    PubMed

    Ng, Clara; Hauptman, Ruth; Zhang, Yinliang; Bourne, Philip E; Xie, Lei

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of multi-drug and extensive drug resistance of microbes to antibiotics poses a great threat to human health. Although drug repurposing is a promising solution for accelerating the drug development process, its application to anti-infectious drug discovery is limited by the scope of existing phenotype-, ligand-, or target-based methods. In this paper we introduce a new computational strategy to determine the genome-wide molecular targets of bioactive compounds in both human and bacterial genomes. Our method is based on the use of a novel algorithm, ligand Enrichment of Network Topological Similarity (ligENTS), to map the chemical universe to its global pharmacological space. ligENTS outperforms the state-of-the-art algorithms in identifying novel drug-target relationships. Furthermore, we integrate ligENTS with our structural systems biology platform to identify drug repurposing opportunities via target similarity profiling. Using this integrated strategy, we have identified novel P. falciparum targets of drug-like active compounds from the Malaria Box, and suggest that a number of approved drugs may be active against malaria. This study demonstrates the potential of an integrative chemical genomics and structural systems biology approach to drug repurposing.

  13. Using Nonexperts for Annotating Pharmacokinetic Drug-Drug Interaction Mentions in Product Labeling: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Yifan; Hernandez, Andres; Horn, John R; Jacobson, Rebecca; Boyce, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Background Because vital details of potential pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions are often described in free-text structured product labels, manual curation is a necessary but expensive step in the development of electronic drug-drug interaction information resources. The use of nonexperts to annotate potential drug-drug interaction (PDDI) mentions in drug product label annotation may be a means of lessening the burden of manual curation. Objective Our goal was to explore the practicality of using nonexpert participants to annotate drug-drug interaction descriptions from structured product labels. By presenting annotation tasks to both pharmacy experts and relatively naïve participants, we hoped to demonstrate the feasibility of using nonexpert annotators for drug-drug information annotation. We were also interested in exploring whether and to what extent natural language processing (NLP) preannotation helped improve task completion time, accuracy, and subjective satisfaction. Methods Two experts and 4 nonexperts were asked to annotate 208 structured product label sections under 4 conditions completed sequentially: (1) no NLP assistance, (2) preannotation of drug mentions, (3) preannotation of drug mentions and PDDIs, and (4) a repeat of the no-annotation condition. Results were evaluated within the 2 groups and relative to an existing gold standard. Participants were asked to provide reports on the time required to complete tasks and their perceptions of task difficulty. Results One of the experts and 3 of the nonexperts completed all tasks. Annotation results from the nonexpert group were relatively strong in every scenario and better than the performance of the NLP pipeline. The expert and 2 of the nonexperts were able to complete most tasks in less than 3 hours. Usability perceptions were generally positive (3.67 for expert, mean of 3.33 for nonexperts). Conclusions The results suggest that nonexpert annotation might be a feasible option for comprehensive

  14. Natural products from cyanobacteria: Exploiting a new source for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Sielaff, Heike; Christiansen, Guntram; Schwecke, Torsten

    2006-02-01

    In the 1990s, the pharmaceutical industry shifted its focus to a combinatorial chemistry approach to fill drug-discovery pipelines; however, more recently there has been renewed interest in natural products as sources of lead compounds. Cyanobacteria are prolific producers of natural products displaying enormous chemical diversity, yet, until recently, exploitation of the genera was hampered by a number of issues related to their handling. With most of these problems now resolved, cyanobacteria have the potential to expand the variety of natural products obtained from microorganisms. The relative disregard in the past of cyanobacteria compared with other microbial sources of natural products, as well as the huge chemical diversity and biological activities of their products, recommend them as an attractive source of novel drugs for use in diverse therapeutic areas.

  15. Exosomes as therapeutic drug carriers and delivery vehicles across biological membranes: current perspectives and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Ha, Dinh; Yang, Ningning; Nadithe, Venkatareddy

    2016-07-01

    Exosomes are small intracellular membrane-based vesicles with different compositions that are involved in several biological and pathological processes. The exploitation of exosomes as drug delivery vehicles offers important advantages compared to other nanoparticulate drug delivery systems such as liposomes and polymeric nanoparticles; exosomes are non-immunogenic in nature due to similar composition as body׳s own cells. In this article, the origin and structure of exosomes as well as their biological functions are outlined. We will then focus on specific applications of exosomes as drug delivery systems in pharmaceutical drug development. An overview of the advantages and challenges faced when using exosomes as a pharmaceutical drug delivery vehicles will also be discussed.

  16. Exosomes as therapeutic drug carriers and delivery vehicles across biological membranes: current perspectives and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Ha, Dinh; Yang, Ningning; Nadithe, Venkatareddy

    2016-07-01

    Exosomes are small intracellular membrane-based vesicles with different compositions that are involved in several biological and pathological processes. The exploitation of exosomes as drug delivery vehicles offers important advantages compared to other nanoparticulate drug delivery systems such as liposomes and polymeric nanoparticles; exosomes are non-immunogenic in nature due to similar composition as body׳s own cells. In this article, the origin and structure of exosomes as well as their biological functions are outlined. We will then focus on specific applications of exosomes as drug delivery systems in pharmaceutical drug development. An overview of the advantages and challenges faced when using exosomes as a pharmaceutical drug delivery vehicles will also be discussed. PMID:27471669

  17. Nano-sized crystalline drug production by milling technology.

    PubMed

    Moribe, Kunikazu; Ueda, Keisuke; Limwikrant, Waree; Higashi, Kenjirou; Yamamoto, Keiji

    2013-01-01

    Nano-formulation of poorly water-soluble drugs has been developed to enhance drug dissolution. In this review, we introduce nano-milling technology described in recently published papers. Factors affecting the size of drug crystals are compared based on the preparation methods and drug and excipient types. A top-down approach using the comminution process is a method conventionally used to prepare crystalline drug nanoparticles. Wet milling using media is well studied and several wet-milled drug formulations are now on the market. Several trials on drug nanosuspension preparation using different apparatuses, materials, and conditions have been reported. Wet milling using a high-pressure homogenizer is another alternative to preparing production-scale drug nanosuspensions. Dry milling is a simple method of preparing a solid-state drug nano-formulation. The effect of size on the dissolution of a drug from nanoparticles is an area of fundamental research, but it is sometimes incorrectly evaluated. Here, we discuss evaluation procedures and the associated problems. Lastly, the importance of quality control, process optimization, and physicochemical characterization are briefly discussed.

  18. Stability profiles of drug products extended beyond labeled expiration dates.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Robbe C; Taylor, Jeb S; Porter, Donna A; Prasanna, Hullahalli R; Hussain, Ajaz S

    2006-07-01

    The American Medical Association has questioned whether expiration dating markedly underestimates the actual shelf life of drug products. Results from the shelf life extension program (SLEP) have been evaluated to provide extensive data to address this issue. The SLEP has been administered by the Food and Drug Administration for the United States Department of Defense (DOD) for 20 years. This program probably contains the most extensive source of pharmaceutical stability data extant. This report summarizes extended stability profiles for 122 different drug products (3,005 different lots). The drug products were categorized into five groups based on incidence of initial extension failures and termination failures (extended lot eventually failed upon re-testing). Based on testing and stability assessment, 88% of the lots were extended at least 1 year beyond their original expiration date for an average extension of 66 months, but the additional stability period was highly variable. The SLEP data supports the assertion that many drug products, if properly stored, can be extended past the expiration date. Due to the lot-to-lot variability, the stability and quality of extended drug products can only be assured by periodic testing and systematic evaluation of each lot. PMID:16721796

  19. The Interstellar Production of Biologically Important Organics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Bernstein, Max P.; Dworkin, Jason; Allamandola, Louis J.

    2000-01-01

    One of the primary tasks of the Astrochemistry Laboratory at Ames Research Center is to use laboratory simulations to study the chemical processes that occur in dense interstellar clouds. Since new stars are formed in these clouds, their materials may be responsible for the delivery of organics to new habitable planets and may play important roles in the origin of life. These clouds are extremely cold (less than 50 kelvin), and most of the volatiles in these clouds are condensed onto dust grains as thin ice mantles. These ices are exposed to cosmic rays and ultraviolet (UV) photons that break chemical bonds and result in the production of complex molecules when the ices are warmed (as they would be when incorporated into a star-forming region). Using cryovacuum systems and UV lamps, this study simulates the conditions of these clouds and studies the resulting chemistry. Some of the areas of progress made in 1999 are described below. It shows some of the types of molecules that may be formed in the interstellar medium. Laboratory simulations have already confirmed that many of these compounds are made under these conditions.

  20. Lessons from innovation in drug-device combination products.

    PubMed

    Couto, Daniela S; Perez-Breva, Luis; Saraiva, Pedro; Cooney, Charles L

    2012-01-01

    Drug-device combination products introduced a new dynamic on medical product development, regulatory approval, and corporate interaction that provide valuable lessons for the development of new generations of combination products. This paper examines the case studies of drug-eluting stents and transdermal patches to facilitate a detailed understanding of the challenges and opportunities introduced by combination products when compared to previous generations of traditional medical or drug delivery devices. Our analysis indicates that the largest barrier to introduce a new kind of combination products is the determination of the regulatory center that is to oversee its approval. The first product of a new class of combination products offers a learning opportunity for the regulator and the sponsor. Once that first product is approved, the leading regulatory center is determined, and the uncertainty about the entire class of combination products is drastically reduced. The sponsor pioneering a new class of combination products assumes a central role in reducing this uncertainty by advising the decision on the primary function of the combination product. Our analysis also suggests that this decision influences the nature (pharmaceutical, biotechnology, or medical devices) of the companies that will lead the introduction of these products into the market, and guide the structure of corporate interaction thereon.

  1. Lessons from innovation in drug-device combination products.

    PubMed

    Couto, Daniela S; Perez-Breva, Luis; Saraiva, Pedro; Cooney, Charles L

    2012-01-01

    Drug-device combination products introduced a new dynamic on medical product development, regulatory approval, and corporate interaction that provide valuable lessons for the development of new generations of combination products. This paper examines the case studies of drug-eluting stents and transdermal patches to facilitate a detailed understanding of the challenges and opportunities introduced by combination products when compared to previous generations of traditional medical or drug delivery devices. Our analysis indicates that the largest barrier to introduce a new kind of combination products is the determination of the regulatory center that is to oversee its approval. The first product of a new class of combination products offers a learning opportunity for the regulator and the sponsor. Once that first product is approved, the leading regulatory center is determined, and the uncertainty about the entire class of combination products is drastically reduced. The sponsor pioneering a new class of combination products assumes a central role in reducing this uncertainty by advising the decision on the primary function of the combination product. Our analysis also suggests that this decision influences the nature (pharmaceutical, biotechnology, or medical devices) of the companies that will lead the introduction of these products into the market, and guide the structure of corporate interaction thereon. PMID:22200650

  2. 21 CFR 310.509 - Parenteral drug products in plastic containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Parenteral drug products in plastic containers... Parenteral drug products in plastic containers. (a) Any parenteral drug product packaged in a plastic... parenteral drug product for intravenous use in humans that is packaged in a plastic immediate container on...

  3. 21 CFR 310.509 - Parenteral drug products in plastic containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Parenteral drug products in plastic containers... Parenteral drug products in plastic containers. (a) Any parenteral drug product packaged in a plastic... parenteral drug product for intravenous use in humans that is packaged in a plastic immediate container on...

  4. 21 CFR 310.509 - Parenteral drug products in plastic containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Parenteral drug products in plastic containers... Parenteral drug products in plastic containers. (a) Any parenteral drug product packaged in a plastic... parenteral drug product for intravenous use in humans that is packaged in a plastic immediate container on...

  5. 21 CFR 310.509 - Parenteral drug products in plastic containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Parenteral drug products in plastic containers... Parenteral drug products in plastic containers. (a) Any parenteral drug product packaged in a plastic... parenteral drug product for intravenous use in humans that is packaged in a plastic immediate container on...

  6. Chemical biology 2012: from drug targets to biological systems and back.

    PubMed

    Socher, Elke; Grossmann, Tom N

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sites sharing a common target: This year's EMBO conference on chemical biology encouraged over 340 researchers to come to Heidelberg, Germany, and discuss the use of diverse chemical strategies and tools to investigate biological questions and better understand cellular processes.

  7. A Historical Overview of Natural Products in Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Daniel A.; Urban, Sylvia; Roessner, Ute

    2012-01-01

    Historically, natural products have been used since ancient times and in folklore for the treatment of many diseases and illnesses. Classical natural product chemistry methodologies enabled a vast array of bioactive secondary metabolites from terrestrial and marine sources to be discovered. Many of these natural products have gone on to become current drug candidates. This brief review aims to highlight historically significant bioactive marine and terrestrial natural products, their use in folklore and dereplication techniques to rapidly facilitate their discovery. Furthermore a discussion of how natural product chemistry has resulted in the identification of many drug candidates; the application of advanced hyphenated spectroscopic techniques to aid in their discovery, the future of natural product chemistry and finally adopting metabolomic profiling and dereplication approaches for the comprehensive study of natural product extracts will be discussed. PMID:24957513

  8. Overpromotion of drugs in international product package inserts.

    PubMed

    Osifo, N G

    1983-01-01

    A study of the drug-labelling information contained in international product package inserts (PPIs) available in Nigeria in comparison with similar information in the United States Physicians' Desk Reference (PDR) was undertaken, against a background of recently-improved drug control regulations in Nigeria. The findings indicate that most multinational pharmaceutical firms, especially through their affiliates and subsidiaries, overpromote their drugs for extra indications and with mention of fewer hazards in the PPIs, than in the PDR. For some drugs with known, medically-stringent indications or low therapeutic indices, a few drug companies appeared to exert discretional restraint on overpromotion by providing the same content of information in the PPIs as in the PDR. The present study suggests that merely intending a better drug control with more sophisticated regulations which are not enforced may not cure the exploitative attitude of multinational drug companies and their subsidiaries or affiliates, in overpromoting pharmaceutical products through PPIs destined for countries with a literally free drug market.

  9. NATURAL PRODUCTS: A CONTINUING SOURCE OF NOVEL DRUG LEADS

    PubMed Central

    Cragg, Gordon M.; Newman, David J.

    2013-01-01

    1. Background Nature has been a source of medicinal products for millennia, with many useful drugs developed from plant sources. Following discovery of the penicillins, drug discovery from microbial sources occurred and diving techniques in the 1970s opened the seas. Combinatorial chemistry (late 1980s), shifted the focus of drug discovery efforts from Nature to the laboratory bench. 2. Scope of Review This review traces natural products drug discovery, outlining important drugs from natural sources that revolutionized treatment of serious diseases. It is clear Nature will continue to be a major source of new structural leads, and effective drug development depends on multidisciplinary collaborations. 3. Major Conclusions The explosion of genetic information led not only to novel screens, but the genetic techniques permitted the implementation of combinatorial biosynthetic technology and genome mining. The knowledge gained has allowed unknown molecules to be identified. These novel bioactive structures can be optimized by using combinatorial chemistry generating new drug candidates for many diseases. 4 General Significance: The advent of genetic techniques that permitted the isolation / expression of biosynthetic cassettes from microbes may well be the new frontier for natural products lead discovery. It is now apparent that biodiversity may be much greater in those organisms. The numbers of potential species involved in the microbial world are many orders of magnitude greater than those of plants and multi-celled animals. Coupling these numbers to the number of currently unexpressed biosynthetic clusters now identified (>10 per species) the potential of microbial diversity remains essentially untapped. PMID:23428572

  10. 21 CFR 1310.11 - Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 1310.11 Section 1310.11 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE RECORDS AND REPORTS OF LISTED CHEMICALS AND CERTAIN MACHINES §...

  11. 21 CFR 1310.11 - Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 1310.11 Section 1310.11 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE RECORDS AND REPORTS OF LISTED CHEMICALS AND CERTAIN MACHINES §...

  12. 21 CFR 1310.11 - Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 1310.11 Section 1310.11 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE RECORDS AND REPORTS OF LISTED CHEMICALS AND CERTAIN MACHINES §...

  13. 75 FR 65565 - Animal Drugs, Feeds, and Related Products; Withdrawal of Approval of New Animal Drug Applications...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 520, 556, and 558 Animal Drugs, Feeds, and Related Products; Withdrawal of Approval of New Animal Drug Applications; Aklomide; Levamisole...: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the animal drug regulations by removing...

  14. New natural products as new leads for antibacterial drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Brown, Dean G; Lister, Troy; May-Dracka, Tricia L

    2014-01-15

    Natural products have been a rich source of antibacterial drugs for many decades, but investments in this area have declined over the past two decades. The purpose of this review article is to provide a recent survey of new natural product classes and the mechanisms by which they work. PMID:24388805

  15. The Impact of Conventional and Biological Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs on Bone Biology. Rheumatoid Arthritis as a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Barreira, Sofia Carvalho; Fonseca, João Eurico

    2016-08-01

    The bone and the immune system have a very tight interaction. Systemic immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), induce bone loss, leading to a twofold increase in osteoporosis and an increase of fragility fracture risk of 1.35-2.13 times. This review focuses on the effects of conventional and biological disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) on bone biology, in the context of systemic inflammation, with a focus on RA. Published evidence supports a decrease in osteoclastic activity induced by DMARDs, which leads to positive effects on bone mineral density (BMD). It is unknown if this effect could be translated into fracture risk reduction. The combination with antiosteoclastic drugs can have an additional benefit.

  16. Milk kefir: composition, microbial cultures, biological activities, and related products.

    PubMed

    Prado, Maria R; Blandón, Lina Marcela; Vandenberghe, Luciana P S; Rodrigues, Cristine; Castro, Guillermo R; Thomaz-Soccol, Vanete; Soccol, Carlos R

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a strong focus on beneficial foods with probiotic microorganisms and functional organic substances. In this context, there is an increasing interest in the commercial use of kefir, since it can be marketed as a natural beverage that has health promoting bacteria. There are numerous commercially available kefir based-products. Kefir may act as a matrix in the effective delivery of probiotic microorganisms in different types of products. Also, the presence of kefir's exopolysaccharides, known as kefiran, which has biological activity, certainly adds value to products. Kefiran can also be used separately in other food products and as a coating film for various food and pharmaceutical products. This article aims to update the information about kefir and its microbiological composition, biological activity of the kefir's microflora and the importance of kefiran as a beneficial health substance.

  17. Assessment of biological Hydrogen production processes: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafpour, G. D.; Shahavi, M. H.; Neshat, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    Energy crisis created a special attention on renewable energy sources. Among these sources; hydrogen through biological processes is well-known as the most suitable and renewable energy sources. In terms of process yield, hydrogen production from various sources was evaluated. A summary of microorganisms as potential hydrogen producers discussed along with advantages and disadvantages of several bioprocesses. The pathway of photo-synthetic and dark fermentative organisms was discussed. In fact, the active enzymes involved in performance of biological processes for hydrogen generation were identified and their special functionalities were discussed. The influential factors affecting on hydrogen production were known as enzymes assisting liberation specific enzymes such as nitrogenase, hydrogenase and uptake hydrogenase. These enzymes were quite effective in reduction of proton and form active molecular hydrogen. Several types of photosynthetic systems were evaluated with intension of maximum hydrogen productivities. In addition dark fermentative and light intensities on hydrogen productions were evaluated. The hydrogen productivities of efficient hydrogen producing strains were evaluated.

  18. Milk kefir: composition, microbial cultures, biological activities, and related products

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Maria R.; Blandón, Lina Marcela; Vandenberghe, Luciana P. S.; Rodrigues, Cristine; Castro, Guillermo R.; Thomaz-Soccol, Vanete; Soccol, Carlos R.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a strong focus on beneficial foods with probiotic microorganisms and functional organic substances. In this context, there is an increasing interest in the commercial use of kefir, since it can be marketed as a natural beverage that has health promoting bacteria. There are numerous commercially available kefir based-products. Kefir may act as a matrix in the effective delivery of probiotic microorganisms in different types of products. Also, the presence of kefir’s exopolysaccharides, known as kefiran, which has biological activity, certainly adds value to products. Kefiran can also be used separately in other food products and as a coating film for various food and pharmaceutical products. This article aims to update the information about kefir and its microbiological composition, biological activity of the kefir’s microflora and the importance of kefiran as a beneficial health substance. PMID:26579086

  19. Using Molecular Biology to Develop Drugs for Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cowey, C. Lance; Rathmell, W. Kimryn

    2010-01-01

    Background Renal cell carcinoma is a disease marked by a unique biology which has governed it’s long history of poor response to conventional cancer treatments. The discovery of the signaling pathway activated as a result of inappropriate constitutive activation of the hypoxia inducible factors (HIF), transcription factors physiologically and transiently stabilized in response to low oxygen, has provided a primary opportunity to devise treatment strategies to target this oncogenic pathway. Objective A review of the molecular pathogenesis of renal cell cancer as well as molecularly targeted therapies, both those currently available and those in development, will be provided. In addition, trials involving combination or sequential targeted therapy are discussed. Methods A detailed review of the literature describing the molecular biology of renal cell cancer and novel therapies was performed and summarized. Results/Conclusion Therapeutics targeting angiogenesis have provided the first class of agents which provide clinical benefit in a large majority of patients and heralded renal cell carcinoma as a solid tumor paradigm for the development of novel therapeutics. Multiple strategies targeting this pathway and now other identified pathways in renal cell carcinoma provide numerous potential opportunities to make major improvements in treating this historically devastating cancer. PMID:20648240

  20. A look at emerging delivery systems for topical drug products.

    PubMed

    Fireman, Sharon; Toledano, Ofer; Neimann, Karine; Loboda, Natalia; Dayan, Nava

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of new topical drugs based on new chemical entities has become a rare event. Instead, pharmaceutical companies have been focused on reformulating existing drugs resulting in an ever-growing number of topical drug products for every approved drug substance. In light of this trend, soon reformulations may not be as rewarding to their sponsors as they are today unless they offer a substantial improvement over other formulations of the same drug substance and the same indication, namely improved efficacy over existing drugs, reduced side effects, unique drug combinations, or applicability for new indications. This article reviews and compares topical drug delivery systems currently under active research that are designed to offer such advantages in the coming years. The reviewed delivery systems are: liposomes, niosomes, transferosomes, ethosomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers, cyclodextrin, and sol-gel microcapsules. Among all the topical drug delivery systems currently undergoing active research, only the sol-gel microencapsulation is at clinical stages. PMID:22353154

  1. Systems pharmacology to predict drug toxicity: integration across levels of biological organization.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jane P F; Abernethy, Darrell R

    2013-01-01

    To achieve sensitive and specific mechanism-based prediction of drug toxicity, the tools of systems pharmacology will be integrated using structured ontological approaches, analytics, mathematics, and statistics. Success of this effort is based on the assumption that a systems network that consists of drug-induced perturbations of physiological functions can be characterized. This network spans the hierarchy of biological organization, from gene to mRNA to protein to intracellular organelle to cell to organ to organism. It is populated with data from each of these levels of biological organization. These data, from disparate sources, include the published literature, drug development archives of all approved drugs and drug candidates that did not complete development, and various toxicity databases and adverse event reporting systems. The network contains interrelated genomics, transcriptomics, and metabolomics data, as well as organ and physiological functional data that are derived from the universe of information that describes and analyzes drug toxicity. Here we describe advances in bioinformatics, computer sciences, next-generation sequencing, and systems biology that create the opportunity for integrated systems pharmacology-based prediction of drug safety.

  2. 21 CFR 216.24 - Drug products withdrawn or removed from the market for reasons of safety or effectiveness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... fenfluramine hydrochloride. Flosequinan: All drug products containing flosequinan. Gelatin: All intravenous drug products containing gelatin. Glycerol, iodinated: All drug products containing iodinated...

  3. 21 CFR 216.24 - Drug products withdrawn or removed from the market for reasons of safety or effectiveness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... fenfluramine hydrochloride. Flosequinan: All drug products containing flosequinan. Gelatin: All intravenous drug products containing gelatin. Glycerol, iodinated: All drug products containing iodinated...

  4. The effect of globalization of drug manufacturing, production, and sourcing and challenges for American drug safety.

    PubMed

    Woo, J; Wolfgang, S; Batista, H

    2008-03-01

    Americans benefit from one of the safest drug supplies and one of the highest standards of consumer protection in the world. Over the past decade, though, a general trend toward globalization of the supply chains for finished pharmaceutical products and active pharmaceutical ingredients has created new challenges for the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in ensuring the safety and quality of the drug supply. Explosive growth in pharmaceutical manufacturing for the US market is particularly evident in the developing regions of Asia. Manufacturing sites in China and India now comprise approximately 40% of all FDA-registered foreign sites, having increased from 30% in 2002. (In 2001, when legislation first went into effect requiring registration of all foreign drug manufacturing sites, 140 registered sites in China listed 797 drug items for potential importation; as of 1 October 2007, that number had grown to 815 registered sites and well over 3,000 listed items.) In total in 2006, the United States received >145,000 line entries of imported drug products from >160 countries, up from only 1,300 line entries in 2000. FDA regulatory oversight resources (e.g., those allocated to inspection and testing of imports) are being challenged to keep up with the explosive growth of imported drugs. (In 2006, the FDA performed inspections at 212 foreign drug firms. This number has remained relatively consistent over the past 6 years, starting at 249 in 2001 and ranging from 190 to 260 on an annual basis.)

  5. Cell culture media impact on drug product solution stability.

    PubMed

    Purdie, Jennifer L; Kowle, Ronald L; Langland, Amie L; Patel, Chetan N; Ouyang, Anli; Olson, Donald J

    2016-07-01

    To enable subcutaneous administration of monoclonal antibodies, drug product solutions are often needed at high concentrations. A significant risk associated with high drug product concentrations is an increase in aggregate level over the shelf-life dating period. While much work has been done to understand the impact of drug product formulation on aggregation, there is limited understanding of the link between cell culture process conditions and soluble aggregate growth in drug product. During cell culture process development, soluble aggregates are often measured at harvest using cell-free material purified by Protein A chromatography. In the work reported here, cell culture media components were evaluated with respect to their impact on aggregate levels in high concentration solution drug product during accelerated stability studies. Two components, cysteine and ferric ammonium citrate, were found to impact aggregate growth rates in our current media (version 1) leading to the development of new chemically defined media and concentrated feed formulations. The new version of media and associated concentrated feeds (version 2) were evaluated across four cell lines producing recombinant IgG4 monoclonal antibodies and a bispecific antibody. In all four cell lines, the version 2 media reduced aggregate growth over the course of a 12 week accelerated stability study compared with the version 1 media, although the degree to which aggregate growth decreased was cell line dependent. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:998-1008, 2016.

  6. Cancer in silico drug discovery: a systems biology tool for identifying candidate drugs to target specific molecular tumor subtypes.

    PubMed

    San Lucas, F Anthony; Fowler, Jerry; Chang, Kyle; Kopetz, Scott; Vilar, Eduardo; Scheet, Paul

    2014-12-01

    Large-scale cancer datasets such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) allow researchers to profile tumors based on a wide range of clinical and molecular characteristics. Subsequently, TCGA-derived gene expression profiles can be analyzed with the Connectivity Map (CMap) to find candidate drugs to target tumors with specific clinical phenotypes or molecular characteristics. This represents a powerful computational approach for candidate drug identification, but due to the complexity of TCGA and technology differences between CMap and TCGA experiments, such analyses are challenging to conduct and reproduce. We present Cancer in silico Drug Discovery (CiDD; scheet.org/software), a computational drug discovery platform that addresses these challenges. CiDD integrates data from TCGA, CMap, and Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE) to perform computational drug discovery experiments, generating hypotheses for the following three general problems: (i) determining whether specific clinical phenotypes or molecular characteristics are associated with unique gene expression signatures; (ii) finding candidate drugs to repress these expression signatures; and (iii) identifying cell lines that resemble the tumors being studied for subsequent in vitro experiments. The primary input to CiDD is a clinical or molecular characteristic. The output is a biologically annotated list of candidate drugs and a list of cell lines for in vitro experimentation. We applied CiDD to identify candidate drugs to treat colorectal cancers harboring mutations in BRAF. CiDD identified EGFR and proteasome inhibitors, while proposing five cell lines for in vitro testing. CiDD facilitates phenotype-driven, systematic drug discovery based on clinical and molecular data from TCGA.

  7. Effects on bone metabolism of new therapeutic strategies with standard chemotherapy and biologic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Ciolli, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    Summary Recent biological advances have provided the framework for novel therapeutic strategies in oncology. Many new treatments are now based on standard cytotoxic drugs plus biologic agents. In Multiple Myeloma, a plasma cell neoplasm characterized by a severe bone disease, biologic drugs such as proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory agents, above their antineoplastic efficacy have a beneficial effects on bone disease. Bortezomib, a clinically available proteasome inhibitor active against myeloma, induces the differentiation of mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells into osteoblasts, resulting in new bone formation. Immunomodulatory drugs (e.g., thalidomide and lenalidomide), which are active against myeloma, also block the activity of bone-resorbing osteoclasts. These data reflect the utility of targeting endogenous mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells for the purpose of tissue repair and suggest that combining different classes of agents that are antineoplastic and also inhibit bone destruction and increase bone formation should be very beneficial for myeloma patients suffering from severe bone disease. PMID:24554928

  8. 21 CFR 333.150 - Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products... First Aid Antibiotic Drug Products § 333.150 Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products. (a... identifies the product as a “first aid antibiotic.” (b) Indications. The labeling of the product...

  9. 21 CFR 333.150 - Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products... First Aid Antibiotic Drug Products § 333.150 Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products. (a... identifies the product as a “first aid antibiotic.” (b) Indications. The labeling of the product...

  10. 21 CFR 333.150 - Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products... First Aid Antibiotic Drug Products § 333.150 Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products. (a... identifies the product as a “first aid antibiotic.” (b) Indications. The labeling of the product...

  11. 21 CFR 333.150 - Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products... First Aid Antibiotic Drug Products § 333.150 Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products. (a... identifies the product as a “first aid antibiotic.” (b) Indications. The labeling of the product...

  12. 21 CFR 333.150 - Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products... First Aid Antibiotic Drug Products § 333.150 Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products. (a... identifies the product as a “first aid antibiotic.” (b) Indications. The labeling of the product...

  13. 21 CFR 333.250 - Labeling of antifungal drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE TOPICAL ANTIMICROBIAL DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Topical... labeled for the treatment of athlete's foot, jock itch, and ringworm. (i) (Select one of the following: “Treats,” “For the treatment of,” “For effective treatment of,” “Cures,” “For the cure of,” “Clears...

  14. Overcome Cancer Cell Drug Resistance Using Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pu; Yang, Hua Li; Yang, Ying Juan; Wang, Lan; Lee, Shao Chin

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the major treatment methods for cancer. However, failure in chemotherapy is not uncommon, mainly due to dose-limiting toxicity associated with drug resistance. Management of drug resistance is important towards successful chemotherapy. There are many reports in the Chinese literature that natural products can overcome cancer cell drug resistance, which deserve sharing with scientific and industrial communities. We summarized the reports into four categories: (1) in vitro studies using cell line models; (2) serum pharmacology; (3) in vivo studies using animal models; and (4) clinical studies. Fourteen single compounds were reported to have antidrug resistance activity for the first time. In vitro, compounds were able to overcome drug resistance at nontoxic or subtoxic concentrations, in a dose-dependent manner, by inhibiting drug transporters, cell detoxification capacity, or cell apoptosis sensitivity. Studies in vivo showed that single compounds, herbal extract, and formulas had potent antidrug resistance activities. Importantly, many single compounds, herbal extracts, and formulas have been used clinically to treat various diseases including cancer. The review provides comprehensive data on use of natural compounds to overcome cancer cell drug resistance in China, which may facilitate the therapeutic development of natural products for clinical management of cancer drug resistance. PMID:26421052

  15. Next-generation antimicrobials: from chemical biology to first-in-class drugs.

    PubMed

    Ang, Michelle Lay Teng; Murima, Paul; Pethe, Kevin

    2015-09-01

    The global emergence of multi-drug resistant bacteria invokes an urgent and imperative necessity for the identification of novel antimicrobials. The general lack of success in progressing novel chemical entities from target-based drug screens have prompted calls for radical and innovative approaches for drug discovery. Recent developments in chemical biology and target deconvolution strategies have revived interests in the utilization of whole-cell phenotypic screens and resulted in several success stories for the discovery and development novel drug candidates and target pathways. In this review, we present and discuss recent chemical biology approaches focusing on the discovery of novel targets and new lead molecules for the treatment of human bacterial and protozoan infections.

  16. Principles of nanoparticle design for overcoming biological barriers to drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Elvin; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Biological barriers to drug transport prevent successful accumulation of nanotherapeutics specifically at diseased sites, limiting efficacious responses in disease processes ranging from cancer to inflammation. Although substantial research efforts have aimed to incorporate multiple functionalities and moieties within the overall nanoparticle design, many of these strategies fail to adequately address these barriers. Obstacles, such as nonspecific distribution and inadequate accumulation of therapeutics, remain formidable challenges to drug developers. A reimagining of conventional nanoparticles is needed to successfully negotiate these impediments to drug delivery. Site-specific delivery of therapeutics will remain a distant reality unless nanocarrier design takes into account the majority, if not all, of the biological barriers that a particle encounters upon intravenous administration. By successively addressing each of these barriers, innovative design features can be rationally incorporated that will create a new generation of nanotherapeutics, realizing a paradigmatic shift in nanoparticle-based drug delivery. PMID:26348965

  17. [Research advances in gene polymorphisms in biological pathways of drugs for asthma].

    PubMed

    Guo, Dan-Dan; Zheng, Xiang-Rong

    2016-06-01

    The studies on gene polymorphisms in biological pathways of the drugs for the treatment of asthma refer to the studies in which pharmacogenetic methods, such as genome-wide association studies, candidate gene studies, genome sequencing, admixture mapping analysis, and linkage disequilibrium, are used to identify, determine, and repeatedly validate the effect of one or more single nucleotide polymorphisms on the efficacy of drugs. This can provide therapeutic strategies with optimal benefits, least side effects, and lowest costs to patients with asthma, and thus realize individualized medicine. The common drugs for asthma are β2 receptor agonists, glucocorticoids, and leukotriene modifiers. This article reviews the research achievements in polymorphisms in biological pathways of the common drugs for asthma, hoping to provide guidance for pharmacogenetic studies on asthma in future and realize individualized medicine for patients with asthma soon.

  18. 21 CFR 212.110 - How must I maintain records of my production of PET drugs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... PET drugs? 212.110 Section 212.110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY DRUGS Records § 212.110 How must I maintain records of my production of PET drugs? (a) Record availability. Records must be maintained at the PET drug production facility or another...

  19. 21 CFR 212.110 - How must I maintain records of my production of PET drugs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... PET drugs? 212.110 Section 212.110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... of PET drugs? (a) Record availability. Records must be maintained at the PET drug production facility... from the date of final release, including conditional final release, of a PET drug product....

  20. 21 CFR 355.70 - Testing procedures for fluoride dentifrice drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Testing procedures for fluoride dentifrice drug products. 355.70 Section 355.70 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE ANTICARIES DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE...

  1. 21 CFR 355.70 - Testing procedures for fluoride dentifrice drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Testing procedures for fluoride dentifrice drug products. 355.70 Section 355.70 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE ANTICARIES DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE...

  2. 21 CFR 350.60 - Guidelines for effectiveness testing of antiperspirant drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Guidelines for effectiveness testing of antiperspirant drug products. 350.60 Section 350.60 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE ANTIPERSPIRANT DRUG PRODUCTS FOR...

  3. 21 CFR 350.60 - Guidelines for effectiveness testing of antiperspirant drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Guidelines for effectiveness testing of antiperspirant drug products. 350.60 Section 350.60 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE ANTIPERSPIRANT DRUG PRODUCTS FOR...

  4. The Structural Biology of Enzymes Involved in Natural Product Glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shanteri; Phillips, George N.

    2012-01-01

    The glycosylation of microbial natural products often dramatically influences the biological and/or pharmacological activities of the parental metabolite. Over the past decade, crystal structures of several enzymes involved in the biosynthesis and attachment of novel sugars found appended to natural products have emerged. In many cases, these studies have paved the way to a better understanding of the corresponding enzyme mechanism of action and have served as a starting point for engineering variant enzymes to facilitate to production of differentially-glycosylated natural products. This review specifically summarizes the structural studies of bacterial enzymes involved in biosynthesis of novel sugar nucleotides. PMID:22688446

  5. Importance of systems biology in engineering microbes for biofuel production

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Redding, Alyssa M.; Rutherford, Becky J.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-12-02

    Microorganisms have been rich sources for natural products, some of which have found use as fuels, commodity chemicals, specialty chemicals, polymers, and drugs, to name a few. The recent interest in production of transportation fuels from renewable resources has catalyzed numerous research endeavors that focus on developing microbial systems for production of such natural products. Eliminating bottlenecks in microbial metabolic pathways and alleviating the stresses due to production of these chemicals are crucial in the generation of robust and efficient production hosts. The use of systems-level studies makes it possible to comprehensively understand the impact of pathway engineering within the context of the entire host metabolism, to diagnose stresses due to product synthesis, and provides the rationale to cost-effectively engineer optimal industrial microorganisms.

  6. [Biological assay of anthelmintic drugs. Determination of DE 50].

    PubMed

    Luffau, G; Carrat, C; Borgaonkar, P W

    1982-01-01

    Experiments on ivermectine, thiabendazole and levamisole were performed by using the Nippostrongylus brasiliensis rat model. The aim of the experiments was to study the 50% as well as 99.5% doses of the above anthelmintics. Besides this a relative evaluation of drugs was also carried out and different dose efficiencies were compared by keeping one anthelmintic as a standard. The results were obtained on the following experimental conditions: homogeneity of the group of rats (age, weight and sex), uniform infestation in all the animals (3000 larvae at day zero), administration of anthelmintics was done on day 6 and autopsy was performed on the 9th day of infection. The effectivity of anthelmintic is essentially based on the mortality of the adult worms. The mathematical expression is obtained on the basis of logarithmic values of the doses and probit percentage analysis. The graph obtained between dose vs efficiency is a straight line, so the value of DE 50 can be calculated using this straight line. The normal distribution of worms exposed to a dose was verified which justifies the statistical interpretation. PMID:6985244

  7. 21 CFR 338.50 - Labeling of nighttime sleep-aid drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Labeling of nighttime sleep-aid drug products. 338... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE NIGHTTIME SLEEP-AID DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 338.50 Labeling of nighttime sleep-aid drug products. (a) Statement of identity. The labeling...

  8. 21 CFR 338.50 - Labeling of nighttime sleep-aid drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling of nighttime sleep-aid drug products. 338... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE NIGHTTIME SLEEP-AID DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 338.50 Labeling of nighttime sleep-aid drug products. (a) Statement of identity. The labeling...

  9. 21 CFR 338.50 - Labeling of nighttime sleep-aid drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Labeling of nighttime sleep-aid drug products. 338... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE NIGHTTIME SLEEP-AID DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 338.50 Labeling of nighttime sleep-aid drug products. (a) Statement of identity. The labeling...

  10. 21 CFR 338.50 - Labeling of nighttime sleep-aid drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Labeling of nighttime sleep-aid drug products. 338... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE NIGHTTIME SLEEP-AID DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 338.50 Labeling of nighttime sleep-aid drug products. (a) Statement of identity. The labeling...

  11. 21 CFR 338.50 - Labeling of nighttime sleep-aid drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Labeling of nighttime sleep-aid drug products. 338... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE NIGHTTIME SLEEP-AID DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 338.50 Labeling of nighttime sleep-aid drug products. (a) Statement of identity. The labeling...

  12. Continuous downstream processing for high value biological products: A Review.

    PubMed

    Zydney, Andrew L

    2016-03-01

    There is growing interest in the possibility of developing truly continuous processes for the large-scale production of high value biological products. Continuous processing has the potential to provide significant reductions in cost and facility size while improving product quality and facilitating the design of flexible multi-product manufacturing facilities. This paper reviews the current state-of-the-art in separations technology suitable for continuous downstream bioprocessing, focusing on unit operations that would be most appropriate for the production of secreted proteins like monoclonal antibodies. This includes cell separation/recycle from the perfusion bioreactor, initial product recovery (capture), product purification (polishing), and formulation. Of particular importance are the available options, and alternatives, for continuous chromatographic separations. Although there are still significant challenges in developing integrated continuous bioprocesses, recent technological advances have provided process developers with a number of attractive options for development of truly continuous bioprocessing operations. PMID:26153056

  13. [Trade-offs in oral drug product development].

    PubMed

    Kondo, Hiromu; Sako, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Drug products are developed to meet multiple targets, thereby increasing their value. Pharmaceutical scientists encounter several trade-offs during the development of novel oral formulations. These trade-offs are generated by their desire to supply the highest possible quality products under the prevailing conditions of limited time and cost, and feasible options. When there are two incompatible factors, it is sometimes difficult to dismiss one element. This is because a quality target product profile (QTPP) is critical for each product being developed, and all elements should basically be satisfied with the criteria. Therefore, technological innovation becomes important to overcome the trade-offs. This article introduces examples of such innovations which have been successful in doing this, as well as some encountered in the oral formulation development and in the selection of proper dosage forms. Based on these examples, points to be considered in order to produce the drug product are thoroughly discussed. PMID:25747218

  14. 78 FR 38349 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Expedited Programs for Serious Conditions-Drugs and Biologics...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Expedited Programs for Serious Conditions--Drugs and Biologics; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a...

  15. PRODUCTION AND BIOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF METHYLATED TRIVALENT ARSENICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    PRODUCTION AND BIOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF METHYLATED TRIVALENT ARSENICALS

    Miroslav Styblo1,2,*, Zuzana Drobna1, Felecia S. Walton1, Ilona Jaspers1,2, Shan Lin3,
    Stephen B. Waters3, David J. Thomas4

    1Department of Pediatrics, 2Center for Environmental Medicine an...

  16. New directions in cancer research 2003: technological advances in biology, drug resistance, and molecular pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Franks, Michael E; Macpherson, Gordon R; Lepper, Erin R; Figg, William D; Sparreboom, Alex

    2003-12-01

    The 94th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) was held from July 11 to 14, 2003 in Washington, DC, and provided an overview of the latest developments in the field of cancer. This report provides highlights of presentations on array-based and RNA-interference technologies to study cancer biology and molecular pharmacology of anticancer drugs, mechanisms and modulation of drug resistance patterns, recent developments in the treatment of prostate cancer, and the medicinal chemistry of established and novel anticancer drugs.

  17. Recreational drug discovery: natural products as lead structures for the synthesis of smart drugs.

    PubMed

    Appendino, Giovanni; Minassi, Alberto; Taglialatela-Scafati, Orazio

    2014-07-01

    Covering: up to December 2013. Over the past decade, there has been a growing transition in recreational drugs from natural materials (marijuana, hashish, opium), natural products (morphine, cocaine), or their simple derivatives (heroin), to synthetic agents more potent than their natural prototypes, which are sometimes less harmful in the short term, or that combine properties from different classes of recreational prototypes. These agents have been named smart drugs, and have become popular both for personal consumption and for collective intoxication at rave parties. The reasons for this transition are varied, but are mainly regulatory and commercial. New analogues of known illegal intoxicants are invisible to most forensic detection techniques, while the alleged natural status and the lack of avert acute toxicity make them appealing to a wide range of users. On the other hand, the advent of the internet has made possible the quick dispersal of information among users and the on-line purchase of these agents and/or the precursors for their synthesis. Unlike their natural products chemotypes (ephedrine, mescaline, cathinone, psilocybin, THC), most new drugs of abuse are largely unfamiliar to the organic chemistry community as well as to health care providers. To raise awareness of the growing plague of smart drugs we have surveyed, in a medicinal chemistry fashion, their development from natural products leads, their current methods of production, and the role that clandestine home laboratories and underground chemists have played in the surge of popularity of these drugs. PMID:24823967

  18. Recreational drug discovery: natural products as lead structures for the synthesis of smart drugs.

    PubMed

    Appendino, Giovanni; Minassi, Alberto; Taglialatela-Scafati, Orazio

    2014-07-01

    Covering: up to December 2013. Over the past decade, there has been a growing transition in recreational drugs from natural materials (marijuana, hashish, opium), natural products (morphine, cocaine), or their simple derivatives (heroin), to synthetic agents more potent than their natural prototypes, which are sometimes less harmful in the short term, or that combine properties from different classes of recreational prototypes. These agents have been named smart drugs, and have become popular both for personal consumption and for collective intoxication at rave parties. The reasons for this transition are varied, but are mainly regulatory and commercial. New analogues of known illegal intoxicants are invisible to most forensic detection techniques, while the alleged natural status and the lack of avert acute toxicity make them appealing to a wide range of users. On the other hand, the advent of the internet has made possible the quick dispersal of information among users and the on-line purchase of these agents and/or the precursors for their synthesis. Unlike their natural products chemotypes (ephedrine, mescaline, cathinone, psilocybin, THC), most new drugs of abuse are largely unfamiliar to the organic chemistry community as well as to health care providers. To raise awareness of the growing plague of smart drugs we have surveyed, in a medicinal chemistry fashion, their development from natural products leads, their current methods of production, and the role that clandestine home laboratories and underground chemists have played in the surge of popularity of these drugs.

  19. The potential of plants as a system for the development and production of human biologics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Davis, Keith R

    2016-01-01

    The growing promise of plant-made biologics is highlighted by the success story of ZMapp™ as a potentially life-saving drug during the Ebola outbreak of 2014-2016. Current plant expression platforms offer features beyond the traditional advantages of low cost, high scalability, increased safety, and eukaryotic protein modification. Novel transient expression vectors have been developed that allow the production of vaccines and therapeutics at unprecedented speed to control potential pandemics or bioterrorism attacks. Plant-host engineering provides a method for producing proteins with unique and uniform mammalian post-translational modifications, providing opportunities to develop biologics with increased efficacy relative to their mammalian cell-produced counterparts. Recent demonstrations that plant-made proteins can function as biocontrol agents of foodborne pathogens further exemplify the potential utility of plant-based protein production. However, resolving the technical and regulatory challenges of commercial-scale production, garnering acceptance from large pharmaceutical companies, and obtaining U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for several major classes of biologics are essential steps to fulfilling the untapped potential of this technology.

  20. The potential of plants as a system for the development and production of human biologics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Davis, Keith R

    2016-01-01

    The growing promise of plant-made biologics is highlighted by the success story of ZMapp™ as a potentially life-saving drug during the Ebola outbreak of 2014-2016. Current plant expression platforms offer features beyond the traditional advantages of low cost, high scalability, increased safety, and eukaryotic protein modification. Novel transient expression vectors have been developed that allow the production of vaccines and therapeutics at unprecedented speed to control potential pandemics or bioterrorism attacks. Plant-host engineering provides a method for producing proteins with unique and uniform mammalian post-translational modifications, providing opportunities to develop biologics with increased efficacy relative to their mammalian cell-produced counterparts. Recent demonstrations that plant-made proteins can function as biocontrol agents of foodborne pathogens further exemplify the potential utility of plant-based protein production. However, resolving the technical and regulatory challenges of commercial-scale production, garnering acceptance from large pharmaceutical companies, and obtaining U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for several major classes of biologics are essential steps to fulfilling the untapped potential of this technology. PMID:27274814

  1. The potential of plants as a system for the development and production of human biologics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiang; Davis, Keith R.

    2016-01-01

    The growing promise of plant-made biologics is highlighted by the success story of ZMapp™ as a potentially life-saving drug during the Ebola outbreak of 2014-2016. Current plant expression platforms offer features beyond the traditional advantages of low cost, high scalability, increased safety, and eukaryotic protein modification. Novel transient expression vectors have been developed that allow the production of vaccines and therapeutics at unprecedented speed to control potential pandemics or bioterrorism attacks. Plant-host engineering provides a method for producing proteins with unique and uniform mammalian post-translational modifications, providing opportunities to develop biologics with increased efficacy relative to their mammalian cell-produced counterparts. Recent demonstrations that plant-made proteins can function as biocontrol agents of foodborne pathogens further exemplify the potential utility of plant-based protein production. However, resolving the technical and regulatory challenges of commercial-scale production, garnering acceptance from large pharmaceutical companies, and obtaining U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for several major classes of biologics are essential steps to fulfilling the untapped potential of this technology. PMID:27274814

  2. Biodegradation of phytosanitary products in biological wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Massot, A; Estève, K; Noilet, P; Méoule, C; Poupot, C; Mietton-Peuchot, M

    2012-04-15

    Agricultural activity generates two types of waste: firstly, biodegradable organic effluents generally treated by biological processes and, secondly, phytosanitary effluents which contain residues of plant protection products. The latter are collected and treated. Current technological solutions are essentially based on concentration or physical-chemical processes. However, recent improvements in the biodegradability of pesticides open the way to the consideration of alternative, biological, treatment using mixed liquor from wastewater plant activated sludge. The feasibility of the biological treatment of viticultural effluents has been evaluated by the application of pesticides to activated sludge. The necessity for selection of a pesticide-resistant biomass has been highlighted. The elimination of the phytosanitary products shows the potential of a resistant biomass in the treatment of pesticides. The aerated biological storage ponds at three wineries, followed by a sand or reed-bed filter, were used for the treatment of the total annual volume of the viticulture effluents and validate the laboratory experiments. The results show that the biological purification of pesticides by activated sludge is possible by allowing approximately 8 days for biomass adaptation. Stability of purification occurs between 20 and 30 days. PMID:22284913

  3. A Practical Guide for Exploring Opportunities of Repurposing Drugs for CNS Diseases in Systems Biology.

    PubMed

    Mei, Hongkang; Feng, Gang; Zhu, Jason; Lin, Simon; Qiu, Yang; Wang, Yue; Xia, Tian

    2016-01-01

    Systems biology has shown its potential in facilitating pathway-focused therapy development for central nervous system (CNS) diseases. An integrated network can be utilized to explore the multiple disease mechanisms and to discover repositioning opportunities. This review covers current therapeutic gaps for CNS diseases and the role of systems biology in pharmaceutical industry. We conclude with a Multiple Level Network Modeling (MLNM) example to illustrate the great potential of systems biology for CNS diseases. The system focuses on the benefit and practical applications in pathway centric therapy and drug repositioning.

  4. 21 CFR 344.52 - Labeling of ear drying aid drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Labeling of ear drying aid drug products. 344.52... Labeling of ear drying aid drug products. (a) Statement of identity. The labeling of the product contains the established name of the drug, if any, and identifies the product as an “ear drying aid.”...

  5. 21 CFR 344.52 - Labeling of ear drying aid drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling of ear drying aid drug products. 344.52... Labeling of ear drying aid drug products. (a) Statement of identity. The labeling of the product contains the established name of the drug, if any, and identifies the product as an “ear drying aid.”...

  6. 21 CFR 357.810 - Active ingredients for deodorant drug products for internal use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Active ingredients for deodorant drug products for... HUMAN USE Deodorant Drug Products for Internal Use § 357.810 Active ingredients for deodorant drug products for internal use. The active ingredient of the product consists of either of the following...

  7. 21 CFR 357.810 - Active ingredients for deodorant drug products for internal use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Active ingredients for deodorant drug products for... HUMAN USE Deodorant Drug Products for Internal Use § 357.810 Active ingredients for deodorant drug products for internal use. The active ingredient of the product consists of either of the following...

  8. 21 CFR 357.810 - Active ingredients for deodorant drug products for internal use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Active ingredients for deodorant drug products for... HUMAN USE Deodorant Drug Products for Internal Use § 357.810 Active ingredients for deodorant drug products for internal use. The active ingredient of the product consists of either of the following...

  9. [Current situation and issues for analyzing illegal drug products].

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Takashi; Takahashi, Kazunaga; Saijo, Masaaki; Fukiwake, Tomohide; Motoki, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    Thirty-two psychotropic substances (31 compounds and one plant) have been controlled as designated substances (Shitei-yakubutsu) in Japan by the Pharmaceutical Affairs Law since April 2007. Although the trafficking of these drugs has decreased because of this regulation, new designer drugs (synthetic cannabinoids and cathinones) have appeared, one after the other. As of October 2011, 40 compounds had been newly added to this category. Analytical methods have become more complicated due to this increase in the number of designated substances. Moreover, many reference substances for such designated substances and other new designer drugs are not commercially available. For the reasons stated above, a lot of time and effort is required to analyze the illegal drug products available on the market. PMID:23292013

  10. 21 CFR 216.24 - Drug products withdrawn or removed from the market for reasons of safety or effectiveness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... containing metabromsalan. Methamphetamine hydrochloride: All parenteral drug products containing methamphetamine hydrochloride. Methapyrilene: All drug products containing methapyrilene. Methopholine: All...

  11. 21 CFR 216.24 - Drug products withdrawn or removed from the market for reasons of safety or effectiveness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... containing metabromsalan. Methamphetamine hydrochloride: All parenteral drug products containing methamphetamine hydrochloride. Methapyrilene: All drug products containing methapyrilene. Methopholine: All...

  12. 42 CFR 409.25 - Drugs, biologicals, supplies, appliances, and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Posthospital SNF Care § 409.25... in paragraph (b) of this section, Medicare pays for drugs and biologicals as posthospital SNF care... paragraph (d) of this section, Medicare pays for supplies, appliances, and equipment as posthospital...

  13. 42 CFR 409.25 - Drugs, biologicals, supplies, appliances, and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Posthospital SNF Care § 409.25... in paragraph (b) of this section, Medicare pays for drugs and biologicals as posthospital SNF care... paragraph (d) of this section, Medicare pays for supplies, appliances, and equipment as posthospital...

  14. 42 CFR 409.25 - Drugs, biologicals, supplies, appliances, and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Posthospital SNF Care § 409.25... in paragraph (b) of this section, Medicare pays for drugs and biologicals as posthospital SNF care... paragraph (d) of this section, Medicare pays for supplies, appliances, and equipment as posthospital...

  15. 42 CFR 409.25 - Drugs, biologicals, supplies, appliances, and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Posthospital SNF Care § 409.25... in paragraph (b) of this section, Medicare pays for drugs and biologicals as posthospital SNF care... paragraph (d) of this section, Medicare pays for supplies, appliances, and equipment as posthospital...

  16. 42 CFR 409.25 - Drugs, biologicals, supplies, appliances, and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Posthospital SNF Care § 409.25... in paragraph (b) of this section, Medicare pays for drugs and biologicals as posthospital SNF care... paragraph (d) of this section, Medicare pays for supplies, appliances, and equipment as posthospital...

  17. 41 CFR 101-42.1102-5 - Drugs, biologicals, and reagents other than controlled substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... shall be coordinated with local air and water pollution control authorities. (3) Destruction of surplus....2 through 101-42.4, drugs, biologicals, and reagents which are fit for human use shall be reported... unfit for human use. The holding agency shall destroy, as provided in paragraph (d) of this...

  18. 41 CFR 101-42.1102-5 - Drugs, biologicals, and reagents other than controlled substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... shall be coordinated with local air and water pollution control authorities. (3) Destruction of surplus....2 through 101-42.4, drugs, biologicals, and reagents which are fit for human use shall be reported... unfit for human use. The holding agency shall destroy, as provided in paragraph (d) of this...

  19. 41 CFR 101-42.1102-5 - Drugs, biologicals, and reagents other than controlled substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... shall be coordinated with local air and water pollution control authorities. (3) Destruction of surplus....2 through 101-42.4, drugs, biologicals, and reagents which are fit for human use shall be reported... unfit for human use. The holding agency shall destroy, as provided in paragraph (d) of this...

  20. Viral hepatitis screening guideline before biological drug use in rheumatic patients

    PubMed Central

    Karadağ, Ömer; Kaşifoğlu, Timuçin; Özer, Birol; Kaymakoğlu, Sabahattin; Kuş, Yeşim; İnanç, Murat; Keser, Gökhan; Kiraz, Sedat

    2016-01-01

    Biological drugs (tumor necrosis factor inhibitors, rituximab, tocilizumab, abatacept, and tofacitinib) are important treatment alternatives in rheumatology, particularly for resistant patients. However, they may cause hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) reactivation; for instance, HBV reactivation may occur in a patient who is an inactive hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) carrier or who has resolved HBV infection. Therefore, the screening of patients before biological treatment and the application of a prophylactic treatment, particularly with respect to latent HBV infections, are recommended when necessary. This guideline covers pre-treatment screening and follow-up recommendations, if required, with respect to viral hepatitides in rheumatology patients who are planned to be given biological drugs. Although this guideline is prepared for biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), it is recommended to be used also for target-oriented DMARDS and medium–high dose corticosteroids (>7.5 mg prednisolone/day equivalent). It should be considered that the reactivation risk is higher when more than one immunosuppressive drug is used.

  1. Hydrocortisone and dexamethasone in very deformable drug carriers have increased biological potency, prolonged effect, and reduced therapeutic dosage.

    PubMed

    Cevc, Gregor; Blume, Gabriele

    2004-05-27

    We characterised biological properties of novel formulations of two low-potency glucocorticosteroids, dexamethasone and hydrocortisone, which have an equivalent dose ratio of 1:50 in vasoconstriction tests. The rate of such carrier-mediated, mainly non-diffusive glucocorticosteroids transport with very deformable lipid vesicles (Transfersomes) through the skin, and the corresponding cutaneous drug biodistribution data, were complemented with the drug bio-efficacy studies. The minimum effective drug dose that reduces arachidonic acid-induced murine ear oedema by 50% was used as one bioactivity indicator. The minimum drug amount ensuring such an effect in mouse skin decreases appreciably when a corticosteroid is applied epicutaneously with very deformable vesicles rather than a lotion or a crème. Specifically, the minimum effective dose for hydrocortisone in very deformable carriers is 2-3 microg cm(-2) whereas for the crème- or lotion-like preparations at least 10 microg cm(-2) is required. Such three- to fivefold relative increase of hydrocortisone potency is accompanied by at least 13%, and more often >20%, absolute drug potency enhancement. The delivery of hydrocortisone with very deformable carriers moreover prolongs the suppression of the drug-induced oedema nearly 2-fold (to approximately 24 h per application). The effective dose of dexamethasone delivered with very deformable vesicles into murine skin is reduced >10 times compared with the crème- or lotion-based products. Specifically, less than 0.1 microg cm(-2) dexamethasone in very deformable vesicles suppresses the arachidonic acid-induced murine ear oedema >50%, on the average. Dexamethasone use on the skin in such vesicles extends the duration of drug action fourfold, compared with a commercial crème, i.e. to >48 h per application. Epicutaneous use of glucocorticosteroids in very deformable vesicles also diminishes such drug's abrasion sensitivity and may increase the general robustness of drug

  2. Synthetic biology and microbioreactor platforms for programmable production of biologics at the point-of-care.

    PubMed

    Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Han, Ningren; Cleto, Sara; Cao, Jicong; Purcell, Oliver; Shah, Kartik A; Lee, Kevin; Ram, Rajeev; Lu, Timothy K

    2016-01-01

    Current biopharmaceutical manufacturing systems are not compatible with portable or distributed production of biologics, as they typically require the development of single biologic-producing cell lines followed by their cultivation at very large scales. Therefore, it remains challenging to treat patients in short time frames, especially in remote locations with limited infrastructure. To overcome these barriers, we developed a platform using genetically engineered Pichia pastoris strains designed to secrete multiple proteins on programmable cues in an integrated, benchtop, millilitre-scale microfluidic device. We use this platform for rapid and switchable production of two biologics from a single yeast strain as specified by the operator. Our results demonstrate selectable and near-single-dose production of these biologics in <24 h with limited infrastructure requirements. We envision that combining this system with analytical, purification and polishing technologies could lead to a small-scale, portable and fully integrated personal biomanufacturing platform that could advance disease treatment at point-of-care. PMID:27470089

  3. Synthetic biology and microbioreactor platforms for programmable production of biologics at the point-of-care

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Han, Ningren; Cleto, Sara; Cao, Jicong; Purcell, Oliver; Shah, Kartik A.; Lee, Kevin; Ram, Rajeev; Lu, Timothy K.

    2016-01-01

    Current biopharmaceutical manufacturing systems are not compatible with portable or distributed production of biologics, as they typically require the development of single biologic-producing cell lines followed by their cultivation at very large scales. Therefore, it remains challenging to treat patients in short time frames, especially in remote locations with limited infrastructure. To overcome these barriers, we developed a platform using genetically engineered Pichia pastoris strains designed to secrete multiple proteins on programmable cues in an integrated, benchtop, millilitre-scale microfluidic device. We use this platform for rapid and switchable production of two biologics from a single yeast strain as specified by the operator. Our results demonstrate selectable and near-single-dose production of these biologics in <24 h with limited infrastructure requirements. We envision that combining this system with analytical, purification and polishing technologies could lead to a small-scale, portable and fully integrated personal biomanufacturing platform that could advance disease treatment at point-of-care. PMID:27470089

  4. 76 FR 16533 - Animal Drugs, Feeds, and Related Products; Withdrawal of Approval of New Animal Drug Applications...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 558 Animal Drugs, Feeds, and Related Products..., 2010 (75 FR 65565) amending the animal drug regulations. The October 26, 2010, final rule amended the... medicated feed. This correction is being made to improve the accuracy of the animal drug regulations....

  5. 21 CFR 341.76 - Labeling of bronchodilator drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... pharmacist before use if you are” : (i) “ taking prescription drugs for asthma, obesity, weight control...) “ do not take more than directed” (ii) “ adults and children 12 years of age and over: oral dose is 12...) “ children under 12 years of age: ask a doctor”. (2) For products containing epinephrine,...

  6. 21 CFR 341.76 - Labeling of bronchodilator drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... pharmacist before use if you are” : (i) “ taking prescription drugs for asthma, obesity, weight control...) “ do not take more than directed” (ii) “ adults and children 12 years of age and over: oral dose is 12...) “ children under 12 years of age: ask a doctor”. (2) For products containing epinephrine,...

  7. 21 CFR 341.76 - Labeling of bronchodilator drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... pharmacist before use if you are” : (i) “ taking prescription drugs for asthma, obesity, weight control...) “ do not take more than directed” (ii) “ adults and children 12 years of age and over: oral dose is 12...) “ children under 12 years of age: ask a doctor”. (2) For products containing epinephrine,...

  8. 21 CFR 357.150 - Labeling of anthelmintic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... taking this drug. If any of these conditions persist consult a doctor.” (2) “If you are pregnant or have liver disease, do not take this product unless directed by a doctor.” (d) Directions. The labeling of... Do not use unless directed by a doctor. 25 to 37 pounds 125 milligrams. 38 to 62 pounds...

  9. 21 CFR 357.150 - Labeling of anthelmintic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... taking this drug. If any of these conditions persist consult a doctor.” (2) “If you are pregnant or have liver disease, do not take this product unless directed by a doctor.” (d) Directions. The labeling of... Do not use unless directed by a doctor. 25 to 37 pounds 125 milligrams. 38 to 62 pounds...

  10. Systems Biology of Recombinant Protein Production in Bacillus megaterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biedendieck, Rebekka; Bunk, Boyke; Fürch, Tobias; Franco-Lara, Ezequiel; Jahn, Martina; Jahn, Dieter

    Over the last two decades the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus megaterium was systematically developed to a useful alternative protein production host. Multiple vector systems for high yield intra- and extracellular protein production were constructed. Strong inducible promoters were combined with DNA sequences for optimised ribosome binding sites, various leader peptides for protein export and N- as well as C-terminal affinity tags for affinity chromatographic purification of the desired protein. High cell density cultivation and recombinant protein production were successfully tested. For further system biology based control and optimisation of the production process the genomes of two B. megaterium strains were completely elucidated, DNA arrays designed, proteome, fluxome and metabolome analyses performed and all data integrated using the bioinformatics platform MEGABAC. Now, solid theoretical and experimental bases for primary modeling attempts of the production process are available.

  11. Modeling Drug- and Chemical-Induced Hepatotoxicity with Systems Biology Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Sudin; Shoda, Lisl K.M.; Zhang, Qiang; Woods, Courtney G.; Howell, Brett A.; Siler, Scott Q.; Woodhead, Jeffrey L.; Yang, Yuching; McMullen, Patrick; Watkins, Paul B.; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2012-01-01

    We provide an overview of computational systems biology approaches as applied to the study of chemical- and drug-induced toxicity. The concept of “toxicity pathways” is described in the context of the 2007 US National Academies of Science report, “Toxicity testing in the 21st Century: A Vision and A Strategy.” Pathway mapping and modeling based on network biology concepts are a key component of the vision laid out in this report for a more biologically based analysis of dose-response behavior and the safety of chemicals and drugs. We focus on toxicity of the liver (hepatotoxicity) – a complex phenotypic response with contributions from a number of different cell types and biological processes. We describe three case studies of complementary multi-scale computational modeling approaches to understand perturbation of toxicity pathways in the human liver as a result of exposure to environmental contaminants and specific drugs. One approach involves development of a spatial, multicellular “virtual tissue” model of the liver lobule that combines molecular circuits in individual hepatocytes with cell–cell interactions and blood-mediated transport of toxicants through hepatic sinusoids, to enable quantitative, mechanistic prediction of hepatic dose-response for activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor toxicity pathway. Simultaneously, methods are being developing to extract quantitative maps of intracellular signaling and transcriptional regulatory networks perturbed by environmental contaminants, using a combination of gene expression and genome-wide protein-DNA interaction data. A predictive physiological model (DILIsym™) to understand drug-induced liver injury (DILI), the most common adverse event leading to termination of clinical development programs and regulatory actions on drugs, is also described. The model initially focuses on reactive metabolite-induced DILI in response to administration of acetaminophen, and spans multiple biological

  12. 77 FR 22327 - Draft Guidance for Industry on New Animal Drugs and New Animal Drug Combination Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-13

    ... Animal Drug Combination Products Administered in or on Medicated Feed or Drinking Water of Food-Producing... Drinking Water of Food- Producing Animals: Recommendations for Drug Sponsors for Voluntarily Aligning... and New Animal Drug Combination Products Administered in or on Medicated Feed or Drinking Water...

  13. First-principles modeling of biological systems and structure-based drug-design.

    PubMed

    Sgrignani, Jacopo; Magistrato, Alessandra

    2013-03-01

    Molecular modeling techniques play a relevant role in drug design providing detailed information at atomistic level on the structural, dynamical, mechanistic and electronic properties of biological systems involved in diseases' onset, integrating and supporting commonly used experimental approaches. These information are often not accessible to the experimental techniques taken singularly, but are of crucial importance for drug design. Due to the enormous increase of the computer power in the last decades, quantum mechanical (QM) or first-principles-based methods have become often used to address biological issues of pharmaceutical relevance, providing relevant information for drug design. Due to their complexity and their size, biological systems are often investigated by means of a mixed quantum-classical (QM/MM) approach, which treats at an accurate QM level a limited chemically relevant portion of the system and at the molecular mechanics (MM) level the remaining of the biomolecule and its environment. This method provides a good compromise between computational cost and accuracy, allowing to characterize the properties of the biological system and the (free) energy landscape of the process in study with the accuracy of a QM description. In this review, after a brief introduction of QM and QM/MM methods, we will discuss few representative examples, taken from our work, of the application of these methods in the study of metallo-enzymes of pharmaceutical interest, of metal-containing anticancer drugs targeting the DNA as well as of neurodegenerative diseases. The information obtained from these studies may provide the basis for a rationale structure-based drug design of new and more efficient inhibitors or drugs.

  14. COMPUTER-AIDED DRUG DISCOVERY AND DEVELOPMENT (CADDD): in silico-chemico-biological approach

    PubMed Central

    Kapetanovic, I.M.

    2008-01-01

    It is generally recognized that drug discovery and development are very time and resources consuming processes. There is an ever growing effort to apply computational power to the combined chemical and biological space in order to streamline drug discovery, design, development and optimization. In biomedical arena, computer-aided or in silico design is being utilized to expedite and facilitate hit identification, hit-to-lead selection, optimize the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity profile and avoid safety issues. Commonly used computational approaches include ligand-based drug design (pharmacophore, a 3-D spatial arrangement of chemical features essential for biological activity), structure-based drug design (drug-target docking), and quantitative structure-activity and quantitative structure-property relationships. Regulatory agencies as well as pharmaceutical industry are actively involved in development of computational tools that will improve effectiveness and efficiency of drug discovery and development process, decrease use of animals, and increase predictability. It is expected that the power of CADDD will grow as the technology continues to evolve. PMID:17229415

  15. Solid Phase Microextraction and Related Techniques for Drugs in Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Moein, Mohammad Mahdi; Said, Rana; Bassyouni, Fatma

    2014-01-01

    In drug discovery and development, the quantification of drugs in biological samples is an important task for the determination of the physiological performance of the investigated drugs. After sampling, the next step in the analytical process is sample preparation. Because of the low concentration levels of drug in plasma and the variety of the metabolites, the selected extraction technique should be virtually exhaustive. Recent developments of sample handling techniques are directed, from one side, toward automatization and online coupling of sample preparation units. The primary objective of this review is to present the recent developments in microextraction sample preparation methods for analysis of drugs in biological fluids. Microextraction techniques allow for less consumption of solvent, reagents, and packing materials, and small sample volumes can be used. In this review the use of solid phase microextraction (SPME), microextraction in packed sorbent (MEPS), and stir-bar sorbtive extraction (SBSE) in drug analysis will be discussed. In addition, the use of new sorbents such as monoliths and molecularly imprinted polymers will be presented. PMID:24688797

  16. 9 CFR 102.5 - U.S. Veterinary Biological Product License.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false U.S. Veterinary Biological Product..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS LICENSES FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 102.5 U.S. Veterinary Biological Product License. (a) Authorization to produce...

  17. 21 CFR 355.70 - Testing procedures for fluoride dentifrice drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Testing procedures for fluoride dentifrice drug... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE ANTICARIES DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Testing Procedures § 355.70 Testing procedures for fluoride dentifrice drug products. (a) A fluoride dentifrice...

  18. 21 CFR 355.55 - Principal display panel of all fluoride rinse drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Principal display panel of all fluoride rinse drug products. 355.55 Section 355.55 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 355.55 Principal display panel of all fluoride rinse drug products. In addition to the statement...

  19. 21 CFR 355.55 - Principal display panel of all fluoride rinse drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Principal display panel of all fluoride rinse drug products. 355.55 Section 355.55 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 355.55 Principal display panel of all fluoride rinse drug products. In addition to the statement...

  20. 21 CFR 352.50 - Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE SUNSCREEN DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 352.50 Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug products. In addition to the statement...

  1. 21 CFR 352.50 - Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE SUNSCREEN DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 352.50 Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug products. In addition to the statement...

  2. 21 CFR 352.50 - Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE SUNSCREEN DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 352.50 Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug products. In addition to the statement...

  3. 21 CFR 352.50 - Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE SUNSCREEN DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 352.50 Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug products. In addition to the statement...

  4. 21 CFR 352.50 - Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE SUNSCREEN DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 352.50 Principal display panel of all sunscreen drug products. In addition to the statement...

  5. 21 CFR 357.810 - Active ingredients for deodorant drug products for internal use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Active ingredients for deodorant drug products for internal use. 357.810 Section 357.810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... HUMAN USE Deodorant Drug Products for Internal Use § 357.810 Active ingredients for deodorant...

  6. 21 CFR 357.810 - Active ingredients for deodorant drug products for internal use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Active ingredients for deodorant drug products for internal use. 357.810 Section 357.810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... HUMAN USE Deodorant Drug Products for Internal Use § 357.810 Active ingredients for deodorant...

  7. 21 CFR 355.55 - Principal display panel of all fluoride rinse drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Principal display panel of all fluoride rinse drug products. 355.55 Section 355.55 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 355.55 Principal display panel of all fluoride rinse drug products. In addition to the statement...

  8. 21 CFR 355.55 - Principal display panel of all fluoride rinse drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Principal display panel of all fluoride rinse drug products. 355.55 Section 355.55 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 355.55 Principal display panel of all fluoride rinse drug products. In addition to the statement...

  9. 21 CFR 211.82 - Receipt and storage of untested components, drug product containers, and closures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Receipt and storage of untested components, drug product containers, and closures. 211.82 Section 211.82 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... and storage of untested components, drug product containers, and closures. (a) Upon receipt and...

  10. Systems Biology Approaches to Understand Natural Products Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Licona-Cassani, Cuauhtemoc; Cruz-Morales, Pablo; Manteca, Angel; Barona-Gomez, Francisco; Nielsen, Lars K.; Marcellin, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    Actinomycetes populate soils and aquatic sediments that impose biotic and abiotic challenges for their survival. As a result, actinomycetes metabolism and genomes have evolved to produce an overwhelming diversity of specialized molecules. Polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, post-translationally modified peptides, lactams, and terpenes are well-known bioactive natural products with enormous industrial potential. Accessing such biological diversity has proven difficult due to the complex regulation of cellular metabolism in actinomycetes and to the sparse knowledge of their physiology. The past decade, however, has seen the development of omics technologies that have significantly contributed to our better understanding of their biology. Key observations have contributed toward a shift in the exploitation of actinomycete’s biology, such as using their full genomic potential, activating entire pathways through key metabolic elicitors and pathway engineering to improve biosynthesis. Here, we review recent efforts devoted to achieving enhanced discovery, activation, and manipulation of natural product biosynthetic pathways in model actinomycetes using genome-scale biological datasets. PMID:26697425

  11. Systems Biology Approaches to Understand Natural Products Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Licona-Cassani, Cuauhtemoc; Cruz-Morales, Pablo; Manteca, Angel; Barona-Gomez, Francisco; Nielsen, Lars K; Marcellin, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    Actinomycetes populate soils and aquatic sediments that impose biotic and abiotic challenges for their survival. As a result, actinomycetes metabolism and genomes have evolved to produce an overwhelming diversity of specialized molecules. Polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, post-translationally modified peptides, lactams, and terpenes are well-known bioactive natural products with enormous industrial potential. Accessing such biological diversity has proven difficult due to the complex regulation of cellular metabolism in actinomycetes and to the sparse knowledge of their physiology. The past decade, however, has seen the development of omics technologies that have significantly contributed to our better understanding of their biology. Key observations have contributed toward a shift in the exploitation of actinomycete's biology, such as using their full genomic potential, activating entire pathways through key metabolic elicitors and pathway engineering to improve biosynthesis. Here, we review recent efforts devoted to achieving enhanced discovery, activation, and manipulation of natural product biosynthetic pathways in model actinomycetes using genome-scale biological datasets. PMID:26697425

  12. 21 CFR 330.3 - Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products. 330.3 Section 330.3 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE OVER-THE-COUNTER (OTC) HUMAN DRUGS WHICH ARE GENERALLY...

  13. 21 CFR 200.51 - Aqueous-based drug products for oral inhalation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aqueous-based drug products for oral inhalation. 200.51 Section 200.51 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL GENERAL Requirements for Specific Classes of Drugs § 200.51 Aqueous-based drug products for oral inhalation. (a)...

  14. Construction of a microbial natural product library for chemical biology studies.

    PubMed

    Kato, Naoki; Takahashi, Shunji; Nogawa, Toshihiko; Saito, Tamio; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2012-04-01

    The RIKEN Natural Products Depository (NPDepo) is a public depository of small molecules. Currently, the NPDepo chemical library contains 39,200 pure compounds, half of which are natural products and their derivatives. In order to reinforce the uniqueness of our chemical library, we have improved our strategies for the collection of microbial natural products. Firstly, a microbial metabolite fraction library coupled with an MP (microbial products) plot database provides a powerful resource for the efficient isolation of microbial metabolites. Secondly, biosynthetic studies of microbial metabolites have enabled us to not only access ingenious biosynthetic machineries, but also obtain a variety of biosynthetic intermediates. Our chemical library contributes to the discovery of molecular probes for increasing our understanding of complex biological processes and for eventually developing new drug leads.

  15. MALDI-MS drug analysis in biological samples: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Steuer, Andrea E; Poetzsch, Michael; Kraemer, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Drug analysis represents a large field in different disciplines. Plasma is commonly considered to be the biosample of choice for that purpose. However, concentrations often do not represent the levels present within deeper compartments and therefore cannot sufficiently explain efficacy or toxicology of drugs. MALDI-MS in drug analysis is of great interest for high-throughput quantification and particularly spatially resolved tissue imaging. The current perspective article will deal with challenges and opportunities of MALDI-MS drug analysis in different biological samples. A particular focus will be on hair samples. Recent applications were included, reviewed for their instrumental setup and sample preparation and pros and cons as well as future perspectives are critically discussed. PMID:27524467

  16. Random laser in biological tissues impregnated with a fluorescent anticancer drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahoz, F.; Martín, I. R.; Urgellés, M.; Marrero-Alonso, J.; Marín, R.; Saavedra, C. J.; Boto, A.; Díaz, M.

    2015-04-01

    We have demonstrated that chemically modified anticancer drugs can provide random laser (RL) when infiltrated in a biological tissue. A fluorescent biomarker has been covalently bound to tamoxifen, which is one of the most frequently used drugs for breast cancer therapy. The light emitted by the drug-dye composite is scattered in tissue, which acts as a gain medium. Both non-coherent and coherent RL regimes have been observed. Moreover, the analysis of power Fourier transforms of coherent RL spectra indicates that the tissues show a dominant random laser cavity length of about 18 µm, similar to the average size of single cells. These results show that RL could be obtained from other drugs, if properly marked with a fluorescent tag, which could be appealing for new forms of combined opto-chemical therapies.

  17. PET and SPECT Imaging of Tumor Biology: New Approaches towards Oncology Drug Discovery and Development

    PubMed Central

    Van Dort, Marcian E.; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Ross, Brian D.

    2009-01-01

    Spiraling drug developmental costs and lengthy time-to-market introduction are two critical challenges facing the pharmaceutical industry. The clinical trials success rate for oncology drugs is reported to be 5% as compared to other therapeutic categories (11%) with most failures often encountered late in the clinical development process. PET and SPECT nuclear imaging technologies could play an important role in facilitating the drug development process improving the speed, efficiency and cost of drug development. This review will focus on recent studies of PET and SPECT radioligands in oncology and their application in the investigation of tumor biology. The use of clinically-validated radioligands as imaging-based biomarkers in oncology could significantly impact new cancer therapeutic development. PMID:19809593

  18. Astringent drug products that produce aluminum acetate; skin protectant drug products for over-the-counter human use; technical amendment. Final rule; technical amendment.

    PubMed

    2009-03-01

    We (Food and Drug Administration (FDA)) are amending the final monograph (FM) for over-the-counter (OTC) skin protectant astringent drug products. This amendment clarifies that aluminum acetate solutions, produced by dissolving aluminum sulfate tetradecahydrate and calcium acetate monohydrate in powder or tablet form in water, are generally recognized as safe and effective (GRASE) and not misbranded as astringent drug products. The amendment also describes how manufacturers should relabel these products to comply with the FM. We are issuing this amendment in response to a citizen petition (CP) that we received from a manufacturer of OTC astringent drug products. This final rule is part of our ongoing review of OTC drug products.

  19. Large scale animal cell cultivation for production of cellular biologicals.

    PubMed

    van Wezel, A L; van der Velden-de Groot, C A; de Haan, H H; van den Heuvel, N; Schasfoort, R

    1985-01-01

    Through the developments in molecular biology the interest for large scale animal cell cultivation has sharply increased during the last 5 years. At our laboratory, four different cultivation systems were studied, all of which are homogeneous culture systems, as they lend themselves best for scaling up and for the control of culture conditions. The four different systems which were compared are: batch culture, continuous chemostat, continuous recycling and continuous perfusion culture system, both for cells growing in suspension and for anchorage dependent cells in microcarrier culture. Our results indicate that for the production of virus vaccines and cells the batch and recycling culture system are most suitable. Disadvantages of the continued chemostat culture system are: the system is only applicable for cells growing in suspension; relatively low concentrations of cells and cellular products are obtained. The continuous perfusion system appears to be very suitable for the production of cellular components and also for the production of viruses which do not give cell lysis.

  20. Formate Formation and Formate Conversion in Biological Fuels Production

    PubMed Central

    Crable, Bryan R.; Plugge, Caroline M.; McInerney, Michael J.; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Biomethanation is a mature technology for fuel production. Fourth generation biofuels research will focus on sequestering CO2 and providing carbon-neutral or carbon-negative strategies to cope with dwindling fossil fuel supplies and environmental impact. Formate is an important intermediate in the methanogenic breakdown of complex organic material and serves as an important precursor for biological fuels production in the form of methane, hydrogen, and potentially methanol. Formate is produced by either CoA-dependent cleavage of pyruvate or enzymatic reduction of CO2 in an NADH- or ferredoxin-dependent manner. Formate is consumed through oxidation to CO2 and H2 or can be further reduced via the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway for carbon fixation or industrially for the production of methanol. Here, we review the enzymes involved in the interconversion of formate and discuss potential applications for biofuels production. PMID:21687599

  1. Diversity-oriented synthetic strategies applied to cancer chemical biology and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Collins, Ian; Jones, Alan M

    2014-01-01

    How can diversity-oriented strategies for chemical synthesis provide chemical tools to help shape our understanding of complex cancer pathways and progress anti-cancer drug discovery efforts? This review (surveying the literature from 2003 to the present) considers the applications of diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS), biology-oriented synthesis (BIOS) and associated strategies to cancer biology and drug discovery, summarising the syntheses of novel and often highly complex scaffolds from pluripotent or synthetically versatile building blocks. We highlight the role of diversity-oriented synthetic strategies in producing new chemical tools to interrogate cancer biology pathways through the assembly of relevant libraries and their application to phenotypic and biochemical screens. The use of diversity-oriented strategies to explore structure-activity relationships in more advanced drug discovery projects is discussed. We show how considering appropriate and variable focus in library design has provided a spectrum of DOS approaches relevant at all stages in anti-cancer drug discovery. PMID:25350364

  2. Money as tool, money as drug: the biological psychology of a strong incentive.

    PubMed

    Lea, Stephen E G; Webley, Paul

    2006-04-01

    Why are people interested in money? Specifically, what could be the biological basis for the extraordinary incentive and reinforcing power of money, which seems to be unique to the human species? We identify two ways in which a commodity which is of no biological significance in itself can become a strong motivator. The first is if it is used as a tool, and by a metaphorical extension this is often applied to money: it is used instrumentally, in order to obtain biologically relevant incentives. Second, substances can be strong motivators because they imitate the action of natural incentives but do not produce the fitness gains for which those incentives are instinctively sought. The classic examples of this process are psychoactive drugs, but we argue that the drug concept can also be extended metaphorically to provide an account of money motivation. From a review of theoretical and empirical literature about money, we conclude that (i) there are a number of phenomena that cannot be accounted for by a pure Tool Theory of money motivation; (ii) supplementing Tool Theory with a Drug Theory enables the anomalous phenomena to be explained; and (iii) the human instincts that, according to a Drug Theory, money parasitizes include trading (derived from reciprocal altruism) and object play. PMID:16606498

  3. 21 CFR 310.518 - Drug products containing iron or iron salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drug products containing iron or iron salts. 310... Drug products containing iron or iron salts. Drug products containing elemental iron or iron salts as...) that contains iron or iron salts for use as an iron source shall bear the following statement:...

  4. 21 CFR 310.518 - Drug products containing iron or iron salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drug products containing iron or iron salts. 310... Drug products containing iron or iron salts. Drug products containing elemental iron or iron salts as...) that contains iron or iron salts for use as an iron source shall bear the following statement:...

  5. 21 CFR 310.519 - Drug products marketed as over-the-counter (OTC) daytime sedatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drug products marketed as over-the-counter (OTC... or Devices § 310.519 Drug products marketed as over-the-counter (OTC) daytime sedatives. (a... ingredients in over-the-counter (OTC) drug products for use as daytime sedatives. The following claims...

  6. 21 CFR 310.518 - Drug products containing iron or iron salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Drug products containing iron or iron salts. 310... Drug products containing iron or iron salts. Drug products containing elemental iron or iron salts as...) that contains iron or iron salts for use as an iron source shall bear the following statement:...

  7. 21 CFR 310.518 - Drug products containing iron or iron salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Drug products containing iron or iron salts. 310... Drug products containing iron or iron salts. Drug products containing elemental iron or iron salts as...) that contains iron or iron salts for use as an iron source shall bear the following statement:...

  8. Systems chemical biology and the Semantic Web: what they mean for the future of drug discovery research.

    PubMed

    Wild, David J; Ding, Ying; Sheth, Amit P; Harland, Lee; Gifford, Eric M; Lajiness, Michael S

    2012-05-01

    Systems chemical biology, the integration of chemistry, biology and computation to generate understanding about the way small molecules affect biological systems as a whole, as well as related fields such as chemogenomics, are central to emerging new paradigms of drug discovery such as drug repurposing and personalized medicine. Recent Semantic Web technologies such as RDF and SPARQL are technical enablers of systems chemical biology, facilitating the deployment of advanced algorithms for searching and mining large integrated datasets. In this paper, we aim to demonstrate how these technologies together can change the way that drug discovery is accomplished.

  9. Community-Reviewed Biological Network Models for Toxicology and Drug Discovery Applications.

    PubMed

    Namasivayam, Aishwarya Alex; Morales, Alejandro Ferreiro; Lacave, Ángela María Fajardo; Tallam, Aravind; Simovic, Borislav; Alfaro, David Garrido; Bobbili, Dheeraj Reddy; Martin, Florian; Androsova, Ganna; Shvydchenko, Irina; Park, Jennifer; Calvo, Jorge Val; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C; Racero, Manuel González Vélez; Biryukov, Maria; Talikka, Marja; Pérez, Modesto Berraquero; Rohatgi, Neha; Díaz-Díaz, Noberto; Mandarapu, Rajesh; Ruiz, Rubén Amián; Davidyan, Sergey; Narayanasamy, Shaman; Boué, Stéphanie; Guryanova, Svetlana; Arbas, Susana Martínez; Menon, Swapna; Xiang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Biological network models offer a framework for understanding disease by describing the relationships between the mechanisms involved in the regulation of biological processes. Crowdsourcing can efficiently gather feedback from a wide audience with varying expertise. In the Network Verification Challenge, scientists verified and enhanced a set of 46 biological networks relevant to lung and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The networks were built using Biological Expression Language and contain detailed information for each node and edge, including supporting evidence from the literature. Network scoring of public transcriptomics data inferred perturbation of a subset of mechanisms and networks that matched the measured outcomes. These results, based on a computable network approach, can be used to identify novel mechanisms activated in disease, quantitatively compare different treatments and time points, and allow for assessment of data with low signal. These networks are periodically verified by the crowd to maintain an up-to-date suite of networks for toxicology and drug discovery applications. PMID:27429547

  10. Community-Reviewed Biological Network Models for Toxicology and Drug Discovery Applications

    PubMed Central

    Namasivayam, Aishwarya Alex; Morales, Alejandro Ferreiro; Lacave, Ángela María Fajardo; Tallam, Aravind; Simovic, Borislav; Alfaro, David Garrido; Bobbili, Dheeraj Reddy; Martin, Florian; Androsova, Ganna; Shvydchenko, Irina; Park, Jennifer; Calvo, Jorge Val; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C.; Racero, Manuel González Vélez; Biryukov, Maria; Talikka, Marja; Pérez, Modesto Berraquero; Rohatgi, Neha; Díaz-Díaz, Noberto; Mandarapu, Rajesh; Ruiz, Rubén Amián; Davidyan, Sergey; Narayanasamy, Shaman; Boué, Stéphanie; Guryanova, Svetlana; Arbas, Susana Martínez; Menon, Swapna; Xiang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Biological network models offer a framework for understanding disease by describing the relationships between the mechanisms involved in the regulation of biological processes. Crowdsourcing can efficiently gather feedback from a wide audience with varying expertise. In the Network Verification Challenge, scientists verified and enhanced a set of 46 biological networks relevant to lung and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The networks were built using Biological Expression Language and contain detailed information for each node and edge, including supporting evidence from the literature. Network scoring of public transcriptomics data inferred perturbation of a subset of mechanisms and networks that matched the measured outcomes. These results, based on a computable network approach, can be used to identify novel mechanisms activated in disease, quantitatively compare different treatments and time points, and allow for assessment of data with low signal. These networks are periodically verified by the crowd to maintain an up-to-date suite of networks for toxicology and drug discovery applications. PMID:27429547

  11. Photochemical versus biological production of methyl iodide during Meteor 55

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, U.; Wallace, D.

    2003-04-01

    The flux of methyl iodide from sea to air represents the largest flux of iodine from the ocean to the atmosphere. Surface water concentrations and hence fluxes are particularly high in tropical regions. This flux may be responsible for the enrichment of iodine in the marine aerosol and may contribute to important processes in the marine boundary layer, including particle formation. Methyl iodide is commonly referred to as a biogenic gas, with both macroalgae and phytoplankton identified as important sources. On the other hand experimental and field data have shown the importance of photochemical production that is not necessarily associated directly with biological activity. During the Meteor cruise 55 along 11°N in the tropical Atlantic Ocean, a series of experiments were conducted to examine the biological vs. photochemical production of methyl iodide. A total of eight separate experiments were conducted. Production of CH3I in quartz glass flasks during 24 hour incubations (dark and natural sunlight) was measured under three experimental treatments: untreated seawater, filtered seawater (0.1 um pore size filter to exclude most phytoplankton and bacteria), and seawater that was poisoned with mercuric chloride. There were two clear findings from these experiments: (1) methyl iodide production was significantly higher in all the incubations that were exposed to the light than in the dark incubations; (2) there was no significant difference between CH3I production under the three experimental treatments. These results argue very strongly for the primary importance of photochemical production of CH3I as opposed to biogenic production at least for the tropical open ocean surface waters. Further experiments are required to investigate the reactants involved, their sources, the wavelength and depth dependence of production, etc. as well as (possibly related) sink processes.

  12. Tunable and reversible drug control of protein production via a self-excising degron

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hokyung K.; Jacobs, Conor L.; Huo, Yunwen; Yang, Jin; Krumm, Stefanie A.; Plemper, Richard K.; Tsien, Roger Y.; Lin, Michael Z.

    2015-01-01

    An effective method for direct chemical control over the production of specific proteins would be widely useful. We describe Small Molecule-Assisted Shutoff (SMASh), a technique in which proteins are fused to a degron that removes itself in the absence of drug, leaving untagged protein. Clinically tested HCV protease inhibitors can then block degron removal, inducing rapid degradation of subsequently synthesized protein copies. SMASh allows reversible and dose-dependent shutoff of various proteins in multiple mammalian cell types and in yeast. We also used SMASh to confer drug responsiveness onto a RNA virus for which no licensed inhibitors exist. As SMASh does not require permanent fusion of a large domain, it should be useful when control over protein production with minimal structural modification is desired. Furthermore, as SMASh only involves a single genetic modification and does not rely on modulating protein-protein interactions, it should be easy to generalize to multiple biological contexts. PMID:26214256

  13. Developments on drug discovery and on new therapeutics: highly diluted tinctures act as biological response modifiers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In the search for new therapies novel drugs and medications are being discovered, developed and tested in laboratories. Highly diluted substances are intended to enhance immune system responses resulting in reduced frequency of various diseases, and often present no risk of serious side-effects due to its low toxicity. Over the past years our research group has been investigating the action of highly diluted substances and tinctures on cells from the immune system. Methods We have developed and tested several highly diluted tinctures and here we describe the biological activity of M1, M2, and M8 both in vitro in immune cells from mice and human, and in vivo in mice. Cytotoxicity, cytokines released and NF-κB activation were determined after in vitro treatment. Cell viability, oxidative response, lipid peroxidation, bone marrow and lymph node cells immunophenotyping were accessed after mice in vivo treatment. Results None of the highly diluted tinctures tested were cytotoxic to macrophages or K562. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages treated with all highly diluted tinctures decreased tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) release and M1, and M8 decreased IFN-γ production. M1 has decreased NF-κB activity on TNF-α stimulated reporter cell line. In vivo treatment lead to a decrease in reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO) production was increased by M1, and M8, and lipid peroxidation was induced by M1, and M2. All compounds enhanced the innate immunity, but M1 also augmented acquired immunity and M2 diminished B lymphocytes, responsible to acquired immunity. Conclusions Based on the results presented here, these highly diluted tinctures were shown to modulate immune responses. Even though further investigation is needed there is an indication that these highly diluted tinctures could be used as therapeutic interventions in disorders where the immune system is compromised. PMID:22029602

  14. Current perspectives in drug discovery against tuberculosis from natural products.

    PubMed

    Nguta, Joseph Mwanzia; Appiah-Opong, Regina; Nyarko, Alexander K; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Addo, Phyllis G A

    2015-09-01

    Currently, one third of the world's population is latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), while 8.9-9.9 million new and relapse cases of tuberculosis (TB) are reported yearly. The renewed research interests in natural products in the hope of discovering new and novel antitubercular leads have been driven partly by the increased incidence of multidrug-resistant strains of MTB and the adverse effects associated with the first- and second-line antitubercular drugs. Natural products have been, and will continue to be a rich source of new drugs against many diseases. The depth and breadth of therapeutic agents that have their origins in the secondary metabolites produced by living organisms cannot be compared with any other source of therapeutic agents. Discovery of new chemical molecules against active and latent TB from natural products requires an interdisciplinary approach, which is a major challenge facing scientists in this field. In order to overcome this challenge, cutting edge techniques in mycobacteriology and innovative natural product chemistry tools need to be developed and used in tandem. The present review provides a cross-linkage to the most recent literature in both fields and their potential to impact the early phase of drug discovery against TB if seamlessly combined. PMID:27649863

  15. The pharmaceutical biochemistry group: where pharmaceutical chemistry meets biology and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Kalia, Yogeshvar N; Perozzo, Remo; Scapozza, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    Successful drug discovery and development of new therapeutics is a long, expensive multidisciplinary process needing innovation and the integration of smart cutting edge science and technology to overcome the challenges in taking a drug from the bench to the bedside. The research activities of the Pharmaceutical Biochemistry group span the drug discovery and development process, providing an interface that brings together pharmaceutical chemistry, biochemistry, structural biology, computational chemistry and biopharmaceutics. Formulation and drug delivery are brought into play at an earlier stage when facing the perennial challenge of transforming a potent molecule in vitro into a therapeutic agent in vivo. Concomitantly, drug delivery results can be understood at a molecular level. This broad range of interdisciplinary research activities and competences enables us to address key challenges in modern drug discovery and development, provides a powerful collaborative platform for other universities and the pharmaceutical industry and an excellent training platform for pharmacists and pharmaceutical scientists who will later be involved in drug discovery and development.

  16. 78 FR 68854 - Over-the-Counter Ophthalmic Drug Products-Emergency Use Eyewash Products; Rescheduling of Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Over-the-Counter Ophthalmic Drug Products--Emergency Use Eyewash Products; Rescheduling of Public Hearing AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice; rescheduling of public hearing. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is rescheduling a December...

  17. Standard Preparations, Limits of Potency, and Dating Period Limitations for Biological Products. Direct final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or Agency or we) is amending the general biological products standards relating to dating periods and also removing certain standards relating to standard preparations and limits of potency. FDA is taking this action to update outdated requirements, and accommodate new and evolving technology and testing capabilities, without diminishing public health protections. This action is part of FDA's retrospective review of its regulations in response to an Executive order. FDA is issuing these amendments directly as a final rule because the Agency believes they are noncontroversial and FDA anticipates no significant adverse comments. PMID:27192727

  18. Postmarket safety in Canada: are significant therapeutic advances and biologics less safe than other drugs? A cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Lexchin, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Examine the probability of new active substances (NASs) approved in Canada between 1 January 1997 and 31 March 2012 acquiring a serious postmarket safety warning. Design Cohort study. Data sources Annual reports of the Therapeutic Products Directorate and the Biologic and Genetic Therapies Directorate; evaluations of therapeutic innovation from the Patented Medicine Prices Review Board and Prescrire International; MedEffect Canada website. Interventions Postmarket regulatory safety warning or withdrawal from market due to safety reasons. Primary and secondary outcome measures Compare the probability of acquiring a postmarket safety warning in Canada in four different groups of drugs: (1) traditional medications versus biologics; (2) medications that offer significant new therapeutic benefits versus those that do not. Determine how well the type of review that an NAS received from Health Canada predicted the product's postmarket therapeutic value. Results The probability of a traditional NAS acquiring a serious safety warning and/or being withdrawn was 29.9% (95% CI 21.8% to 40.2%) vs 27.3% (95% CI 18.2% to 39.7%) for an NAS of biological origin (p=0.47, log-rank test). For medications that were significant therapeutic advances the probability was 40.2% (95% CI 24.5% to 60.9%) vs 33.9% (95% CI 26.4% to 42.7%) for those that were not (p=0.18, log-rank test). Health Canada was 77.4% accurate in predicting the therapeutic importance of an NAS. Conclusions There was no difference in postmarket regulatory safety action between traditional medications and biologics and no difference between drugs with significant therapeutic benefits and those without. Although these results draw on Canadian data, they are likely to be relevant internationally. Further research should assess whether the current level of premarket safety evaluation is acceptable. PMID:24549164

  19. Indicators of Club Management Practices and Biological Measurements of Patrons’ Drug and Alcohol Use

    PubMed Central

    Byrnes, Hilary F.; Miller, Brenda A.; Johnson, Mark B.; Voas, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Electronic Music Dance Events in nightclubs attract patrons with heavy alcohol/drug use. Public health concerns are raised from risks related to these behaviors. Practices associated with increased risk in these club settings need to be identified. Objectives The relationship between club management practices and biological measures of patrons’ alcohol/drug use is examined. Methods Observational data from 25 events across 6 urban clubs were integrated with survey data (N=738 patrons, 42.8% female) from patrons exiting these events, 2010–2012. Five indicators of club management practices were examined using mixed model regressions: club security, bar crowding, safety signs, serving intoxicated patrons, and isolation. Results Analyses revealed that serving intoxicated patrons and safety signs were related to less substance use. Specifically, serving intoxicated patrons was related to heavy alcohol and drug use at exit, while safety signs were marginally related to less exit drug use. Conclusions/Importance Findings indicate observable measures in nightclubs provide important indicators for alcohol/drug use, suggesting practices to target. Study strengths include the use of biological measures of substance use on a relatively large scale. Limitations and future directions are discussed. PMID:24832721

  20. Searching for disease-modifying drugs in AD: can we combine neuropsychological tools with biological markers?

    PubMed

    Caraci, Filippo; Castellano, Sabrina; Salomone, Salvatore; Drago, Filippo; Bosco, Paolo; Di Nuovo, Santo

    2014-02-01

    Drug discovery efforts in Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been directed in the last ten years to develop "disease-modifying drugs" able to exert neuroprotective effects in an early phase of AD pathogenesis. Unfortunately several candidate disease-modifying drugs have failed in Phase III clinical trials conducted in mild to moderate AD for different methodological difficulties, such as the time course of treatment in relation to development of disease as well as the appropriate use of validated biological and neuropsychological markers. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) has been considered a precursor of AD. Much effort is now directed to identify the most appropriate and sensitive markers which can predict the progression from MCI to AD, such as neuroimaging markers (e.g. hippocampal atrophy and amyloid positron emission tomography imaging), cerebrospinal fluid markers (i.e. association of elevated tau with low levels of amyloid β -peptide(1-42) and neuropsychological markers (i.e. episodic memory deficits and executive dysfunction). Recent studies demonstrate that the combination of these different biomarkers significantly increases the chance to predict the conversion into AD within 24 months. These biomarkers will be essential in the future to analyze clinical efficacy of disease-modifying drugs in MCI patients at high risk to develop AD. In the present review we analyze recent evidence on the combination of neuropsychological and biological markers in AD as a new tool to track disease progression in early AD as well as the response to disease-modifying drugs. PMID:24040795

  1. Liposomal Drug Products: A Quality by Design Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaoming

    Quality by Design (QbD) principles has been applied to the development of two liposomal formulations, containing a hydrophilic small molecule therapeutic (Tenofovir) and a protein therapeutic (superoxide dismutase). The goal of the research is to provide critical information on 1) how to reduce the preparation variability in liposome formulations, and 2) how to increase drug encapsulation inside liposomes to reduce manufacturing cost. Most notably, an improved liposome preparation method was developed which increased the encapsulation efficiency of hydrophilic molecules. In particular, this method allows for very high encapsulation efficiency. For example, encapsulation efficiencies of up to 50% have been achieved, whereas previously only 20% or less have been reported. Another significant outcome from this research is a first principle mathematical model to predict the encapsulation efficiency of hydrophilic drugs in unilamellar liposomes. This mathematical model will be useful in: formulation development to rapidly achieve optimized formulations; comparison of drug encapsulation efficiencies of liposomes prepared using different methods; and assisting in the development of suitable process analytical technologies to achieve real-time monitoring and control of drug encapsulation during manufacturing. A novel two-stage reverse dialysis in vitro release testing method has also been developed for passively targeted liposomes, which uses the first stage to mimic the circulation of liposomes in the body and the second stage to imitate the drug release process at the target. The developed in vitro release testing method can be used to distinguish formulations with varied compositions for quality control testing purposes. This developed method may pave the way to the development of more biorelevant quality control testing methods for liposomal drug products in the future. The QbD case studies performed in this research are examples of how this approach can be used to

  2. [Special considerations for the regulation of biological medicinal products in individualised medicine. More than stratified medicine].

    PubMed

    Müller-Berghaus, J; Volkers, P; Scherer, J; Cichutek, K

    2013-11-01

    The term individualised medicine, also called personalised medicine, is commonly used as an equivalent to stratified medicine. However, this is erroneous since quite often it is forgotten that especially biological medicinal products have other aspects of individualization that go beyond mere stratification. The principles of stratified medicine have been applied for biological medicinal products for many years. A historical example is diphtheria antitoxin made from horse serum, while current examples are transfusion of red blood cells and the administration of factor VIII in haemophilia A. The stratifying aspects of these medicinal products are given by the following considerations: diphtheria antitoxin is only administered after a diagnosis of diphtheria and not in other forms of tonsillitis, red blood cells should only be transfused once blood group compatibility as been established and factor VIII replacement is only administered in haemophilia A as opposed to other acquired or hereditary disease of the coagulation system. The peculiarities of biological medicinal products, in particular the inherent variability of the drug, are especially important for autologous cellular medicinal products. In addition to the expected variability of the biological source material there is interindividual variability of patients as cell donors, which make definition of specifications and determination of criteria for pharmaceutical quality and potency tests difficult. Therapy with modified autologous cells, a common and important application of advanced therapy medicinal products, is exemplary for the special considerations that must be made when evaluating pharmaceutical quality, mode of action and toxicological properties of the biological medicine. The clinical investigation of advanced therapy medicinal products with the intent of demonstrating safety and efficacy is particularly challenging because of the complexity of therapy, which often involves invasive interventions

  3. [Special considerations for the regulation of biological medicinal products in individualised medicine. More than stratified medicine].

    PubMed

    Müller-Berghaus, J; Volkers, P; Scherer, J; Cichutek, K

    2013-11-01

    The term individualised medicine, also called personalised medicine, is commonly used as an equivalent to stratified medicine. However, this is erroneous since quite often it is forgotten that especially biological medicinal products have other aspects of individualization that go beyond mere stratification. The principles of stratified medicine have been applied for biological medicinal products for many years. A historical example is diphtheria antitoxin made from horse serum, while current examples are transfusion of red blood cells and the administration of factor VIII in haemophilia A. The stratifying aspects of these medicinal products are given by the following considerations: diphtheria antitoxin is only administered after a diagnosis of diphtheria and not in other forms of tonsillitis, red blood cells should only be transfused once blood group compatibility as been established and factor VIII replacement is only administered in haemophilia A as opposed to other acquired or hereditary disease of the coagulation system. The peculiarities of biological medicinal products, in particular the inherent variability of the drug, are especially important for autologous cellular medicinal products. In addition to the expected variability of the biological source material there is interindividual variability of patients as cell donors, which make definition of specifications and determination of criteria for pharmaceutical quality and potency tests difficult. Therapy with modified autologous cells, a common and important application of advanced therapy medicinal products, is exemplary for the special considerations that must be made when evaluating pharmaceutical quality, mode of action and toxicological properties of the biological medicine. The clinical investigation of advanced therapy medicinal products with the intent of demonstrating safety and efficacy is particularly challenging because of the complexity of therapy, which often involves invasive interventions

  4. Removal of headspace CO2 increases biological hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Park, Wooshin; Hyun, Seung H; Oh, Sang-Eun; Logan, Bruce E; Kim, In S

    2005-06-15

    For biological hydrogen production by fermentation to be a useful method of hydrogen generation, molar yields of hydrogen must be increased. While heat treatment of a soil inoculum increases hydrogen yields by preventing loss of hydrogen to methanogenesis, hydrogen is still lost to acetic acid generation from hydrogen and CO2. To reduce hydrogen losses via acetogenesis, CO2 concentrations in the headspace were substantially reduced during hydrogen production using a chemical scavenger (KOH). CO2 in the headspace was decreased from 24.5% (control) to a maximum of 5.2% during the highest gas production phase, resulting in a hydrogen partial pressure of 87.4%. This reduction in CO2 increased the hydrogen yield by 43% (from 1.4 to 2.0 mol of H2/mol of glucose). The soluble byproducts in all tests consisted primarily of acetate and ethanol. Higher concentrations of ethanol (10.9 mM) remained in solution from bottles with CO2 removal than in the control (1.2 mM), likely as a result of hydrogen inhibition of biological ethanol conversion to acetic acid. These results show that hydrogen production can be increased by removing CO2 in the reactor vessel, likely as a result of suppression of acetogenesis.

  5. Intensification of tropical Pacific biological productivity due to volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikamoto, Megumi O.; Timmermann, Axel; Yoshimori, Masakazu; Lehner, Flavio; Laurian, Audine; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Mouchet, Anne; Joos, Fortunat; Raible, Christoph C.; Cobb, Kim M.

    2016-02-01

    Major volcanic eruptions generate widespread ocean cooling, which reduces upper ocean stratification. This effect has the potential to increase nutrient delivery into the euphotic zone and boost biological productivity. Using externally forced last millennium simulations of three climate/Earth System models (Model for Interdisciplinary Research On Climate (MIROC), Community Earth System Model (CESM), and LOch-Vecode-Ecbilt-CLio-agIsm Model (LOVECLIM)), we test the hypothesis that large volcanic eruptions intensify nutrient-driven export production. It is found that strong volcanic radiative forcing enhances the likelihood of eastern Pacific El Niño-like warming in CESM and LOVECLIM. This leads to an initial reduction of nutrients and export production in the eastern equatorial Pacific. However, this initial response reverses after about 3 years in association with La Niña cooling. The resulting delayed enhancement of biological production resembles the multiyear response in MIROC. The model simulations show that volcanic impacts on tropical Pacific dynamics and biogeochemistry persist for several years, thus providing a new source for potential multiyear ecosystem predictability.

  6. Computational systems biology in drug discovery and development: methods and applications.

    PubMed

    Materi, Wayne; Wishart, David S

    2007-04-01

    Computational systems biology is an emerging field in biological simulation that attempts to model or simulate intra- and intercellular events using data gathered from genomic, proteomic or metabolomic experiments. The need to model complex temporal and spatiotemporal processes at many different scales has led to the emergence of numerous techniques, including systems of differential equations, Petri nets, cellular automata simulators, agent-based models and pi calculus. This review provides a brief summary and an assessment of most of these approaches. It also provides examples of how these methods are being used to facilitate drug discovery and development.

  7. Ecological Momentary Assessment of Illicit Drug Use Compared to Biological and Self-Reported Methods

    PubMed Central

    Genz, Andrew; Westergaard, Ryan P; Chang, Larry W; Bollinger, Robert C; Latkin, Carl; Kirk, Gregory D

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of mHealth methods for capturing illicit drug use and associated behaviors have become more widely used in research settings, yet there is little research as to how valid these methods are compared to known measures of capturing and quantifying drug use. Objective We examined the concordance of ecological momentary assessment (EMA) of drug use to previously validated biological and audio-computer assisted self-interview (ACASI) methods. Methods The Exposure Assessment in Current Time (EXACT) study utilized EMA methods to assess drug use in real-time in participants’ natural environments. Utilizing mobile devices, participants self-reported each time they used heroin or cocaine over a 4-week period. Each week, PharmChek sweat patch samples were collected for measurement of heroin and cocaine and participants answered an ACASI-based questionnaire to report behaviors and drug using events during the prior week. Reports of cocaine and heroin use captured through EMA were compared to weekly biological or self-report measures through percent agreement and concordance correlation coefficients to account for repeated measures. Correlates of discordance were obtained from logistic regression models. Results A total of 109 participants were a median of 48.5 years old, 90% African American, and 52% male. During 436 person-weeks of observation, we recorded 212 (49%) cocaine and 103 (24%) heroin sweat patches, 192 (44%) cocaine and 161 (37%) heroin ACASI surveys, and 163 (37%) cocaine and 145 (33%) heroin EMA reports. The percent agreement between EMA and sweat patch methods was 70% for cocaine use and 72% for heroin use, while the percent agreement between EMA and ACASI methods was 77% for cocaine use and 79% for heroin use. Misreporting of drug use by EMA compared to sweat patch and ACASI methods were different by illicit drug type. Conclusions Our work demonstrates moderate to good agreement of EMA to biological and standard self-report methods in

  8. Microbial biotransformation as a tool for drug development based on natural products from mevalonic acid pathway: A review

    PubMed Central

    Hegazy, Mohamed-Elamir F.; Mohamed, Tarik A.; ElShamy, Abdelsamed I.; Mohamed, Abou-El-Hamd H.; Mahalel, Usama A.; Reda, Eman H.; Shaheen, Alaa M.; Tawfik, Wafaa A.; Shahat, Abdelaaty A.; Shams, Khalid A.; Abdel-Azim, Nahla S.; Hammouda, Fayza M.

    2014-01-01

    Natural products are structurally and biologically interesting metabolites, but they have been isolated in minute amounts. The syntheses of such natural products help in obtaining them in bulk amounts. The recognition of microbial biotransformation as important manufacturing tool has increased in chemical and pharmaceutical industries. In recent years, microbial transformation is increasing significantly from limited interest into highly active area in green chemistry including preparation of pharmaceutical products. This is the first review published on the usage of microbial biocatalysts for some natural product classes and natural product drugs. PMID:25685541

  9. Molecular biology in studies of oceanic primary production

    SciTech Connect

    LaRoche, J.; Falkowski, P.G. ); Geider, R. . Coll. of Marine Studies)

    1992-01-01

    Remote sensing and the use of moored in situ instrumentation has greatly improved our ability to measure phytoplankton chlorophyll and photosynthesis on global scales with high temporal resolution. However, the interpretation of these measurements and their significance with respect to the biogeochemical cycling of carbon relies on their relationship with physiological and biochemical processes in phytoplankton. For example, the use of satellite images of surface chlorophyll to estimate primary production is often based on the functional relationship between photosynthesis and irradiance. A variety of environmental factors such as light, temperature, nutrient availability affect the photosynthesis/irradiance (P vs I) relationship in phytoplankton. We present three examples showing how molecular biology can be used to provide basic insight into the factors controlling primary productivity at three different levels of complexity: 1. Studies of light intensity regulation in unicellular alga show how molecular biology can help understand the processing of environmental cues leading to the regulation of photosynthetic gene expression. 2. Probing of the photosynthetic apparatus using molecular techniques can be used to test existing mechanistic models derived from the interpretation of physiological and biophysical measurements. 3. Exploratory work on the expression of specific proteins during nutrient-limited growth of phytoplankton may lead to the identification and production of molecular probes for field studies.

  10. Molecular biology in studies of oceanic primary production

    SciTech Connect

    LaRoche, J.; Falkowski, P.G.; Geider, R.

    1992-07-01

    Remote sensing and the use of moored in situ instrumentation has greatly improved our ability to measure phytoplankton chlorophyll and photosynthesis on global scales with high temporal resolution. However, the interpretation of these measurements and their significance with respect to the biogeochemical cycling of carbon relies on their relationship with physiological and biochemical processes in phytoplankton. For example, the use of satellite images of surface chlorophyll to estimate primary production is often based on the functional relationship between photosynthesis and irradiance. A variety of environmental factors such as light, temperature, nutrient availability affect the photosynthesis/irradiance (P vs I) relationship in phytoplankton. We present three examples showing how molecular biology can be used to provide basic insight into the factors controlling primary productivity at three different levels of complexity: 1. Studies of light intensity regulation in unicellular alga show how molecular biology can help understand the processing of environmental cues leading to the regulation of photosynthetic gene expression. 2. Probing of the photosynthetic apparatus using molecular techniques can be used to test existing mechanistic models derived from the interpretation of physiological and biophysical measurements. 3. Exploratory work on the expression of specific proteins during nutrient-limited growth of phytoplankton may lead to the identification and production of molecular probes for field studies.

  11. Drug delivery trends in clinical trials and translational medicine: growth in biologic molecule development and impact on rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease, and colitis.

    PubMed

    Ho, Rodney J Y; Chien, Jenny Y

    2012-08-01

    There are 94,709 clinical trials across 179 countries. Approximately half (47,467) are related to the three categories within the scope of the free online resource "Drug Delivery Trends in Clinical Trials and Translational Medicine," which are (1) drug delivery technology and systems, (2) biological molecule platforms, and (3) pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions. In this commentary, trends in biological molecule platforms and their impacts are discussed. The sales of top 15 biologic drugs have reached over $63 billion in 2010. In the past 10 years, major pharmaceutical companies have acquired biological molecule platforms and have become integrated biopharmaceutical companies, highlighting the role of biotechnology in driving new therapeutic product development. The top three products--Remicade, Enbrel, and Humira--indicated for arthritis and colitis and targeted to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), each generated over $6 billion in annual sales. In addition to TNF-α, biologic candidates targeted to other inflammatory molecules are in clinical development, partly driven by commercial interests and medical need. Although clinical experience indicates that all the anti-TNF-α molecular platforms are effective for rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease, and colitis, whether the new agents can provide additional relief or cures remains to be seen.

  12. Current good manufacturing practice in plant automation of biological production processes.

    PubMed

    Dorresteijn, R C; Wieten, G; van Santen, P T; Philippi, M C; de Gooijer, C D; Tramper, J; Beuvery, E C

    1997-01-01

    The production of biologicals is subject to strict governmental regulations. These are drawn up in current good manufacturing practices (cGMP), a.o. by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. To implement cGMP in a production facility, plant automation becomes an essential tool. For this purpose Manufacturing Execution Systems (MES) have been developed that control all operations inside a production facility. The introduction of these recipe-driven control systems that follow ISA S88 standards for batch processes has made it possible to implement cGMP regulations in the control strategy of biological production processes. Next to this, an MES offers additional features such as stock management, planning and routing tools, process-dependent control, implementation of software sensors and predictive models, application of historical data and on-line statistical techniques for trend analysis and detection of instrumentation failures. This paper focuses on the development of new production strategies in which cGMP guidelines are an essential part.

  13. The Role of Carrier Geometry in Overcoming Biological Barriers to Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Carolyn; Shuvaev, Vladimir V; Bailey, Mark; Muzykantov, Vladimir R; Dziubla, Thomas D

    2016-01-01

    For a variety of diseases, effective therapy is severely limited or rendered impossible due to an inability to deliver medications to the intended sites of action. Multiple barriers exist through the body, which have evolved over time to limit the migration of foreign compounds from entering the tissues. Turning toward biology as inspiration, it has been the general goal of drug delivery to create carrier strategies that mimic, in part, features of bacteria/ viruses that allow them overcome these barriers. By packaging drugs into nano and micron scale vehicles, it should be possible to completely change the biodistribution and residence times of pharmaceutically active compounds. Recently, due to advances in formulation technologies, it has become possible to control not just the material selection, surface chemistry, and/or size, but also the overall geometry and plasticity of the drug carriers. These approaches aid in the formulation of nonspherical particles such as, discs, rods, and even unique structures such as cubes and nanodiamonds. The adjustment of size and shape can be used for the aid or prevention in cellular uptake and also to overcome the vascular and mucosal barrier. In this review, we present a summary of some approaches used to control carrier shape and the impact these geometries have upon drug transport across biological barriers.

  14. The Role of Carrier Geometry in Overcoming Biological Barriers to Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Carolyn; Shuvaev, Vladimir V; Bailey, Mark; Muzykantov, Vladimir R; Dziubla, Thomas D

    2016-01-01

    For a variety of diseases, effective therapy is severely limited or rendered impossible due to an inability to deliver medications to the intended sites of action. Multiple barriers exist through the body, which have evolved over time to limit the migration of foreign compounds from entering the tissues. Turning toward biology as inspiration, it has been the general goal of drug delivery to create carrier strategies that mimic, in part, features of bacteria/ viruses that allow them overcome these barriers. By packaging drugs into nano and micron scale vehicles, it should be possible to completely change the biodistribution and residence times of pharmaceutically active compounds. Recently, due to advances in formulation technologies, it has become possible to control not just the material selection, surface chemistry, and/or size, but also the overall geometry and plasticity of the drug carriers. These approaches aid in the formulation of nonspherical particles such as, discs, rods, and even unique structures such as cubes and nanodiamonds. The adjustment of size and shape can be used for the aid or prevention in cellular uptake and also to overcome the vascular and mucosal barrier. In this review, we present a summary of some approaches used to control carrier shape and the impact these geometries have upon drug transport across biological barriers. PMID:26675218

  15. 78 FR 75570 - Guidance for Industry on New Animal Drugs and New Animal Drug Combination Products Administered...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-12

    ... Drug Combination Products Administered in or on Medicated Feed or Drinking Water of Food-Producing... or Drinking Water of Food-Producing Animals: Recommendations for Drug Sponsors for Voluntarily... Medicated Feed or Drinking Water of Food- Producing Animals: Recommendations for Drug Sponsors...

  16. Evolutionary game based control for biological systems with applications in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaobo; Lenaghan, Scott C; Zhang, Mingjun

    2013-06-01

    Control engineering and analysis of biological systems have become increasingly important for systems and synthetic biology. Unfortunately, no widely accepted control framework is currently available for these systems, especially at the cell and molecular levels. This is partially due to the lack of appropriate mathematical models to describe the unique dynamics of biological systems, and the lack of implementation techniques, such as ultra-fast and ultra-small devices and corresponding control algorithms. This paper proposes a control framework for biological systems subject to dynamics that exhibit adaptive behavior under evolutionary pressures. The control framework was formulated based on evolutionary game based modeling, which integrates both the internal dynamics and the population dynamics. In the proposed control framework, the adaptive behavior was characterized as an internal dynamic, and the external environment was regarded as an external control input. The proposed open-interface control framework can be integrated with additional control algorithms for control of biological systems. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed framework, an optimal control strategy was developed and validated for drug delivery using the pathogen Giardia lamblia as a test case. In principle, the proposed control framework can be applied to any biological system exhibiting adaptive behavior under evolutionary pressures.

  17. Finding novel pharmaceuticals in the systems biology era using multiple effective drug targets, phenotypic screening and knowledge of transporters: where drug discovery went wrong and how to fix it.

    PubMed

    Kell, Douglas B

    2013-12-01

    Despite the sequencing of the human genome, the rate of innovative and successful drug discovery in the pharmaceutical industry has continued to decrease. Leaving aside regulatory matters, the fundamental and interlinked intellectual issues proposed to be largely responsible for this are: (a) the move from 'function-first' to 'target-first' methods of screening and drug discovery; (b) the belief that successful drugs should and do interact solely with single, individual targets, despite natural evolution's selection for biochemical networks that are robust to individual parameter changes; (c) an over-reliance on the rule-of-5 to constrain biophysical and chemical properties of drug libraries; (d) the general abandoning of natural products that do not obey the rule-of-5; (e) an incorrect belief that drugs diffuse passively into (and presumably out of) cells across the bilayers portions of membranes, according to their lipophilicity; (f) a widespread failure to recognize the overwhelmingly important role of proteinaceous transporters, as well as their expression profiles, in determining drug distribution in and between different tissues and individual patients; and (g) the general failure to use engineering principles to model biology in parallel with performing 'wet' experiments, such that 'what if?' experiments can be performed in silico to assess the likely success of any strategy. These facts/ideas are illustrated with a reasonably extensive literature review. Success in turning round drug discovery consequently requires: (a) decent systems biology models of human biochemical networks; (b) the use of these (iteratively with experiments) to model how drugs need to interact with multiple targets to have substantive effects on the phenotype; (c) the adoption of polypharmacology and/or cocktails of drugs as a desirable goal in itself; (d) the incorporation of drug transporters into systems biology models, en route to full and multiscale systems biology models that

  18. Biological matrices for the evaluation of in utero exposure to drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Jaime; García-Algar, Oscar; Vall, Oriol; de la Torre, Rafael; Scaravelli, Giulia; Pichini, Simona

    2007-12-01

    In recent years, the evaluation of in utero exposure to drugs of abuse has been achieved by testing biological matrices coming from the fetus or newborn (eg, meconium, fetal hair, cord blood, neonatal urine), the pregnant or nursing mother (eg, hair, blood, oral fluid, sweat, urine, breast milk), or from both the fetus and the mother (placenta, amniotic fluid). Overall, these matrices have the advantage of noninvasive collection (with the exception of amniotic fluid) and early detection of exposure from different gestational periods. Matrices such as amniotic fluid, meconium, fetal hair, and maternal hair provide a long historical record of prenatal exposure to certain drugs and can account for different periods of gestation: amniotic fluid from the early pregnancy, meconium for the second and third trimester of gestation, fetal hair for the third, and finally maternal hair (when long enough) for the whole pregnancy. Placenta may reveal the passage of a substance from the mother to the fetus. Cord blood and neonatal urine are useful for determining acute exposure to drugs of abuse in the period immediately previous to delivery. Drug detection in maternal blood, oral fluid, and sweat accounts only for acute consumption that occurred in the hours previous to collection and gives poor information concerning fetal exposure. Different immunoassays were used as screening methods for drug testing in the above-reported matrices or as unique analytical investigation tools when chromatographic techniques coupled to mass spectrometry were not commonly available. However, in the last decade, both liquid and gas chromatography-mass spectrometric methodologies have been routinely applied after appropriate extraction of drugs and their metabolites from these biological matrices.

  19. Systems biology approaches to enhance our understanding of drug hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Perkins, J R; Barrionuevo, E; Ranea, J A; Blanca, M; Cornejo-Garcia, J A

    2014-12-01

    Hypersensitivity drug reactions (HDRs) encompass a wide spectrum of unpredictable clinical entities. They represent an important health problem, affecting people of all ages, and lead to a large strain on the public health system. Here, we summarize experiments that use high-throughput genomics technologies to investigate HDRs. We also introduce the field of systems biology as a relatively recent discipline concerned with the integration and analysis of high-throughput data sets such as DNA microarrays and next-generation sequencing data. We describe previous studies that have applied systems biology techniques to related fields such as allergy and asthma. Finally, we present a number of potential applications of systems biology to the study of HDRs, in order to make the reader aware of the types of analyses that can be performed and the insights that can be gained through their application.

  20. Biological therapies for cardiac arrhythmias: can genes and cells replace drugs and devices?

    PubMed

    Cho, Hee Cheol; Marbán, Eduardo

    2010-03-01

    Cardiac rhythm disorders reflect failures of impulse generation and/or conduction. With the exception of ablation methods that yield selective endocardial destruction, present therapies are nonspecific and/or palliative. Progress in understanding the underlying biology opens up prospects for new alternatives. This article reviews the present state of the art in gene- and cell-based therapies to correct cardiac rhythm disturbances. We begin with the rationale for such approaches, briefly discuss efforts to address aspects of tachyarrhythmia, and review advances in creating a biological pacemaker to cure bradyarrhythmia. Insights gained bring the field closer to a paradigm shift away from devices and drugs, and toward biologics, in the treatment of rhythm disorders. PMID:20203316

  1. 21 CFR 341.80 - Labeling of nasal decongestant drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling of nasal decongestant drug products. 341.80 Section 341.80 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE COLD, COUGH, ALLERGY, BRONCHODILATOR, AND ANTIASTHMATIC...

  2. 21 CFR 310.518 - Drug products containing iron or iron salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) that contains iron or iron salts for use as an iron source shall bear the following statement: WARNING... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Drug products containing iron or iron salts. 310... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE NEW DRUGS Requirements for Specific New Drugs or Devices §...

  3. 21 CFR 211.89 - Rejected components, drug product containers, and closures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rejected components, drug product containers, and closures. 211.89 Section 211.89 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED...

  4. 21 CFR 211.89 - Rejected components, drug product containers, and closures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rejected components, drug product containers, and closures. 211.89 Section 211.89 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED...

  5. 21 CFR 211.89 - Rejected components, drug product containers, and closures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rejected components, drug product containers, and closures. 211.89 Section 211.89 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED...

  6. 21 CFR 211.89 - Rejected components, drug product containers, and closures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rejected components, drug product containers, and closures. 211.89 Section 211.89 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED...

  7. 21 CFR 211.89 - Rejected components, drug product containers, and closures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rejected components, drug product containers, and closures. 211.89 Section 211.89 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED...

  8. Computer-Aided Drug Design of Bioactive Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Prachayasittikul, Veda; Worachartcheewan, Apilak; Shoombuatong, Watshara; Songtawee, Napat; Simeon, Saw; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Nantasenamat, Chanin

    2015-01-01

    Natural products have been an integral part of sustaining civilizations because of their medicinal properties. Past discoveries of bioactive natural products have relied on serendipity, and these compounds serve as inspiration for the generation of analogs with desired physicochemical properties. Bioactive natural products with therapeutic potential are abundantly available in nature and some of them are beyond exploration by conventional methods. The effectiveness of computational approaches as versatile tools for facilitating drug discovery and development has been recognized for decades, without exception, in the case of natural products. In the post-genomic era, scientists are bombarded with data produced by advanced technologies. Thus, rendering these data into knowledge that is interpretable and meaningful becomes an essential issue. In this regard, computational approaches utilize the existing data to generate knowledge that provides valuable understanding for addressing current problems and guiding the further research and development of new natural-derived drugs. Furthermore, several medicinal plants have been continuously used in many traditional medicine systems since antiquity throughout the world, and their mechanisms have not yet been elucidated. Therefore, the utilization of computational approaches and advanced synthetic techniques would yield great benefit to improving the world's health population and well-being. PMID:25961523

  9. Computer-Aided Drug Design of Bioactive Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Prachayasittikul, Veda; Worachartcheewan, Apilak; Shoombuatong, Watshara; Songtawee, Napat; Simeon, Saw; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Nantasenamat, Chanin

    2015-01-01

    Natural products have been an integral part of sustaining civilizations because of their medicinal properties. Past discoveries of bioactive natural products have relied on serendipity, and these compounds serve as inspiration for the generation of analogs with desired physicochemical properties. Bioactive natural products with therapeutic potential are abundantly available in nature and some of them are beyond exploration by conventional methods. The effectiveness of computational approaches as versatile tools for facilitating drug discovery and development has been recognized for decades, without exception, in the case of natural products. In the post-genomic era, scientists are bombarded with data produced by advanced technologies. Thus, rendering these data into knowledge that is interpretable and meaningful becomes an essential issue. In this regard, computational approaches utilize the existing data to generate knowledge that provides valuable understanding for addressing current problems and guiding the further research and development of new natural-derived drugs. Furthermore, several medicinal plants have been continuously used in many traditional medicine systems since antiquity throughout the world, and their mechanisms have not yet been elucidated. Therefore, the utilization of computational approaches and advanced synthetic techniques would yield great benefit to improving the world's health population and well-being.

  10. 21 CFR 357.152 - Package inserts for anthelmintic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the pinworm. (c) A commentary on the life cycle of the pinworm. (d) A commentary on the ways in which... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Package inserts for anthelmintic drug products... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE MISCELLANEOUS INTERNAL DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER...

  11. Optimization of the Bacterial Cytochrome P450 BM3 System for the Production of Human Drug Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Di Nardo, Giovanna; Gilardi, Gianfranco

    2012-01-01

    Drug metabolism in human liver is a process involving many different enzymes. Among them, a number of cytochromes P450 isoforms catalyze the oxidation of most of the drugs commercially available. Each P450 isoform acts on more than one drug, and one drug may be oxidized by more than one enzyme. As a result, multiple products may be obtained from the same drug, and as the metabolites can be biologically active and may cause adverse drug reactions (ADRs), the metabolic profile of a new drug has to be known before this can be commercialized. Therefore, the metabolites of a certain drug must be identified, synthesized and tested for toxicity. Their synthesis must be in sufficient quantities to be used for metabolic tests. This review focuses on the progresses done in the field of the optimization of a bacterial self-sufficient and efficient cytochrome P450, P450 BM3 from Bacillus megaterium, used for the production of metabolites of human enzymes. The progress made in the improvement of its catalytic performance towards drugs, the substitution of the costly NADPH cofactor and its immobilization and scale-up of the process for industrial application are reported. PMID:23443101

  12. Natural products as a resource for biologically active compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Hanke, F.J.

    1986-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate various sources of biologically active natural products in an effort to identify the active pesticidal compounds involved. The study is divided into several parts. Chapter 1 contains a discussion of several new compounds from plant and animal sources. Chapter 2 introduces a new NMR technique. In section 2.1 a new technique for better utilizing the lanthanide relaxation agent Gd(fod)/sub 3/ is presented which allows the predictable removal of resonances without line broadening. Section 2.2 discusses a variation of this technique for use in an aqueous solvent by applying this technique towards identifying the binding sites of metals of biological interest. Section 2.3 presents an unambiguous /sup 13/C NMR assignment of melibiose. Chapter 3 deals with work relating to the molting hormone of most arthropods, 20-hydroxyecdysone. Section 3.1 discusses the use of two-dimensional NMR (2D NMR) to assign the /sup 1/H NMR spectrum of this biologically important compound. Section 3.2 presents a new application for Droplet countercurrent chromatography (DCCC). Chapter 4 presents a basic improvement to the commercial DCCC instrument that is currently being applied to future commercial instruments. Chapter 5 discusses a curious observation of the effects that two previously known compounds, nagilactone C and (-)-epicatechin, have on lettuce and rice and suggest a possible new role for the ubiquitous flavanol (-)-epicatechin in plants.

  13. Current studies on physiological functions and biological production of lactosucrose.

    PubMed

    Mu, Wanmeng; Chen, Qiuming; Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Tao; Jiang, Bo

    2013-08-01

    Lactosucrose (O-β-D-galactopyranosyl-(1,4)-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl-(1,2)-β-D-fructofuranoside) is a trisaccharide formed from lactose and sucrose by enzymatic transglycosylation. This rare trisaccharide is a kind of indigestible carbohydrate, has good prebiotic effect, and promotes intestinal mineral absorption. It has been used as a functional ingredient in a range of food products which are approved as foods for specified health uses in Japan. Using lactose and sucrose as substrates, lactosucrose can be produced through transfructosylation by β-fructofuranosidase from Arthrobacter sp. K-1 or a range of levansucrases, or through transgalactosylation by β-galactosidase from Bacillus circulans. This article presented a review of recent studies on the physiological functions of lactosucrose and the biological production from lactose and sucrose by different enzymes. PMID:23828605

  14. Current studies on physiological functions and biological production of lactosucrose.

    PubMed

    Mu, Wanmeng; Chen, Qiuming; Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Tao; Jiang, Bo

    2013-08-01

    Lactosucrose (O-β-D-galactopyranosyl-(1,4)-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl-(1,2)-β-D-fructofuranoside) is a trisaccharide formed from lactose and sucrose by enzymatic transglycosylation. This rare trisaccharide is a kind of indigestible carbohydrate, has good prebiotic effect, and promotes intestinal mineral absorption. It has been used as a functional ingredient in a range of food products which are approved as foods for specified health uses in Japan. Using lactose and sucrose as substrates, lactosucrose can be produced through transfructosylation by β-fructofuranosidase from Arthrobacter sp. K-1 or a range of levansucrases, or through transgalactosylation by β-galactosidase from Bacillus circulans. This article presented a review of recent studies on the physiological functions of lactosucrose and the biological production from lactose and sucrose by different enzymes.

  15. Systems biological approaches towards understanding cellulase production by Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Kubicek, Christian P

    2013-01-20

    Recent progress and improvement in "-omics" technologies has made it possible to study the physiology of organisms by integrated and genome-wide approaches. This bears the advantage that the global response, rather than isolated pathways and circuits within an organism, can be investigated ("systems biology"). The sequencing of the genome of Trichoderma reesei (teleomorph Hypocrea jecorina), a fungus that serves as a major producer of biomass-degrading enzymes for the use of renewable lignocellulosic material towards production of biofuels and biorefineries, has offered the possibility to study this organism and its enzyme production on a genome wide scale. In this review, I will highlight the use of genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics towards an improved and novel understanding of the biochemical processes that involve in the massive overproduction of secreted proteins.

  16. Scientific workflows as productivity tools for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Shon, John; Ohkawa, Hitomi; Hammer, Juergen

    2008-05-01

    Large pharmaceutical companies annually invest tens to hundreds of millions of US dollars in research informatics to support their early drug discovery processes. Traditionally, most of these investments are designed to increase the efficiency of drug discovery. The introduction of do-it-yourself scientific workflow platforms has enabled research informatics organizations to shift their efforts toward scientific innovation, ultimately resulting in a possible increase in return on their investments. Unlike the handling of most scientific data and application integration approaches, researchers apply scientific workflows to in silico experimentation and exploration, leading to scientific discoveries that lie beyond automation and integration. This review highlights some key requirements for scientific workflow environments in the pharmaceutical industry that are necessary for increasing research productivity. Examples of the application of scientific workflows in research and a summary of recent platform advances are also provided.

  17. An overview of biological production of L-theanine.

    PubMed

    Mu, Wanmeng; Zhang, Tao; Jiang, Bo

    2015-01-01

    L-Theanine (γ-glutamylethylamide) is a unique non-protein amino acid that is naturally found in tea plants. It contributes to the umami taste and unique flavor to green tea infusion, and thus its content in tea leaves highly impacts the tea quality and price. In addition to the graceful taste, it has been proved to have many beneficial physiological effects, especially promoting relaxation and improving concentration and learning ability. Based on these promising advantages, L-theanine has been commercially developed as a valuable ingredient for use in food and beverages to improve and/or maintain human health. L-Theanine can be obtained by chemical synthesis or isolation from tea, while chemical synthesis of L-theanine is hard to be accepted by consumers and is not allowed to use in food industry, and isolation of L-theanine in high purity generally involves time-consuming, cost-ineffective, and complicated operational processes. Accordingly, the biological production of L-theanine has recently attracted much attention. Four kinds of bacterial enzymes, including L-glutamine synthetase, γ-glutamylmethylamide synthetase, γ-glutamyltranspeptidase, and L-glutaminase, have been characterized to have L-theanine-producing ability. Herein, an overview of recent studies on the biological production of L-theanine was presented.

  18. Biological drugs for the treatment of psoriasis in a public health system

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Luciane Cruz; Silveira, Miriam Sanches do Nascimento; de Camargo, Iara Alves; Barberato, Silvio; Del Fiol, Fernando de Sá; Osorio-de-Castro, Claudia Garcia Serpa

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the access and utilization profile of biological medications for psoriasis provided by the judicial system in Brazil. METHODS This is a cross-sectional study. We interviewed a total of 203 patients with psoriasis who were on biological medications obtained by the judicial system of the State of Sao Paulo, from 2004 to 2010. Sociodemographics, medical, and political-administrative characteristics were complemented with data obtained from dispensation orders that included biological medications to treat psoriasis and the legal actions involved. The data was analyzed using an electronic data base and shown as simple variable frequencies. The prescriptions contained in the lawsuits were analyzed according to legal provisions. RESULTS A total of 190 lawsuits requesting several biological drugs (adalimumab, efalizumab, etanercept, and infliximab) were analyzed. Patients obtained these medications as a result of injunctions (59.5%) or without having ever demanded biological medication from any health institution (86.2%), i.e., public or private health services. They used the prerogative of free legal aid (72.6%), even though they were represented by private lawyers (91.1%) and treated in private facilities (69.5%). Most of the patients used a biological medication for more than 13 months (66.0%), and some patients were undergoing treatment with this medication when interviewed (44.9%). Approximately one third of the patients discontinued treatment due to worsening of their illness (26.6%), adverse drug reactions (20.5%), lack of efficacy, or because the doctor discontinued this medication (13.8%). None of the analyzed medical prescriptions matched the legal prescribing requirements. Clinical monitoring results showed that 70.3% of the patients had not undergone laboratory examinations (blood work, liver and kidney function tests) for treatment control purposes. CONCLUSIONS The plaintiffs resorted to legal action to get access to biological medications

  19. 37 CFR 1.779 - Calculation of patent term extension for a veterinary biological product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... extension for a veterinary biological product. 1.779 Section 1.779 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights... Calculation of patent term extension for a veterinary biological product. (a) If a determination is made pursuant to § 1.750 that a patent for a veterinary biological product is eligible for extension, the...

  20. 37 CFR 1.779 - Calculation of patent term extension for a veterinary biological product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... extension for a veterinary biological product. 1.779 Section 1.779 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights... Calculation of patent term extension for a veterinary biological product. (a) If a determination is made pursuant to § 1.750 that a patent for a veterinary biological product is eligible for extension, the...